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Sample records for acute respiratory tract

  1. Pathogenic significance of Klebsiella oxytoca in acute respiratory tract infection.

    Power, J T; Calder, M A

    1983-01-01

    A retrospective study of all Klebsiella isolations from patients admitted to hospital with acute respiratory tract infections over a 27-month period was carried out. Ten of the Klebsiella isolations from sputum and one from a blood culture were identified as Klebsiella oxytoca. The clinical and radiological features of six patients are described. Four of these patients had lobar pneumonia, one bronchopneumonia, and one acute respiratory tract infection superimposed on cryptogenic fibrosing al...

  2. Novel Human Bocavirus in Children with Acute Respiratory Tract Infection

    Song, Jing-Rong; Jin, Yu; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Gao, Han-chun; Xiao, Ni-Guang; Chen, Wei-Xia; Xu, Zi-qian; Yan, Kun-long; Zhao, Yang; Hou, Yun-De; Duan, Zhao-jun

    2010-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) and HBoV2, two human bocavirus species, were found in 18 and 10 of 235 nasopharyngeal aspirates, respectively, from children hospitalized with acute respiratory tract infection. Our results suggest that, like HBoV, HBoV2 is distributed worldwide and may be associated with respiratory and enteric diseases.

  3. Human Bocavirus: Passenger or Pathogen in Acute Respiratory Tract Infections?

    Schildgen, Oliver; Müller, Andreas; Allander, Tobias; Mackay, Ian M.; Völz, Sebastian; Kupfer, Bernd; Simon, Arne

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a newly identified virus tentatively assigned to the family Parvoviridae, subfamily Parvovirinae, genus Bocavirus. HBoV was first described in 2005 and has since been detected in respiratory tract secretions worldwide. Herein we review the literature on HBoV and discuss the biology and potential clinical impact of this virus. Most studies have been PCR based and performed on patients with acute respiratory symptoms, from whom HBoV was detected in 2 to 19% of...

  4. Treatment of acute upper respiratory tract infections in children

    Rončević-Babin Nevenka P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Acute respiratory tract infections are the most common diseases of childhood. A preschool child suffers up to 5-7 infections of upper airways during a year. Upper airway infections make 80 - 90% of all respiratory infections. Etiology and treatment In 75% of all cases respiratory infections are of viral etiology, 15% of bacterial and 10% are caused by mycoplasma, rickettsiae, fungi, parasites. The treatment of respiratory infections includes antimicrobial therapy (causal, relief of symptoms (symptomatic and application of general principles of child treatment. The choice of antimicrobial drug is based on the evidence of agents and their sensitivity to antimicrobial drugs, age, patient's condition, previous treatment and possible allergic reactions to the drug. In cases where adequate specimen cannot be obtained for microbiologic tests, when these tests do not reveal the agent, or therapy must start before evidence of the agent is available, we must decide about the therapy, taking in consideration the most frequent agents, and those that would cause the most devastating clinical picture. This therapy can be modified later, according to the isolated agent and its sensitivity to the drug. Considering the incidence and importance of respiratory infections in morbidity and mortality of children, the aim of this article was to present guidelines in treatment of respiratory infections. The main point remains that the treatment should take into consideration the individual patient before all.

  5. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana

    Kwofie Theophilus B

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Method Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Results Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2% were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3% patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%, Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3 in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8% and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3. Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36 of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. Conclusion The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection.

  6. Treatment of acute lower respiratory tract infections in children

    Rončević-Babin Nevenka P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Acute respiratory tract infections are the most common childhood diseases. A preschool child suffers up to 5-7 infections of upper airways during a year. Lower airway infections make 5-20% of all respiratory infections. Etiologic factors In developed countries, 75% of pneumonias in childhood are of viral etiology, in 15% of bacterial, and in 10% of some other causative agent (mycoplasma, rickettsiae, fungi, parasites. In developing countries, bacterial pneumonias are present in much higher percentages. Treatment Treatment of respiratory infections includes antimicrobial therapy (causal, relief of symptoms (symptomatic and conduction of general principles in child treatment. The choice of antimicrobial drug is based on evidence of agents and their sensitivity to antimicrobial drugs, age, patient's condition, previous treatment and possible allergic reactions to the drug. In cases where we cannot provide adequate specimen for microbiologic testing, when these tests do not reveal the agent, or when therapy must be started before the agent is available, we must decide about the therapy, taking in consideration the most frequent agents, and those that would cause the most devastating clinical picture. This therapy can later be modified according to the isolated agent and its sensitivity to the drug. Conclusion Having in mind the incidence and importance of respiratory infections in morbidity and mortality of children the aim of this article was to show guidelines in treatment of respiratory infections in children. The main point remains that we should take in consideration the individual patient before all.

  7. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Larsen, Hans Henrik; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p < 0.001). Overall symptoms and clinical findings were similar among hMPV and RSV positive episodes, but more RSV-infected children required respiratory support. hMPV is present in young...

  8. Coxsackievirus A21, Enterovirus 68, and Acute Respiratory Tract Infection, China

    Xiang, Zichun; Gonzalez, Richard; Wang, Zhong; Ren, Lili; Xiao, Yan; Li, Jianguo; Li, Yongjun; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    During August 2006–April 2010, in Beijing, China, 2 rare human enterovirus serotypes, coxsackievirus A21 and enterovirus 68, were detected most frequently in human enterovirus–positive adults with acute respiratory tract infections. Thus, during some years, these 2 viruses cause a substantial proportion of enterovirus-associated adult acute respiratory tract infections.

  9. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Henrik Larsen, Hans; Koch, Anders; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Nordmann Winther, Thilde; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Westh, Henrik Torkil; Lundgren, Bettina; Melbye, Mads; Høgh, Birthe

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection.......6%) ARTI episodes by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using primers targeting the hMPV N gene and the RSV L gene. Two children were co-infected with hMPV and RSV. They were excluded from statistical analysis. Hospitalization for ARTI caused by hMPV was restricted to very young...

  10. Guidelines to rational use of antibiotics in acute upper respiratory tract infections in Chinese children

    2001-01-01

    @@Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) is the most common disease afflicting Chinese children and ranks first in numbers of outpatients, hospitalization and fatality rate. ARTI is also the most frequent reason that antibiotics are prescribed.

  11. STATE OF MICROBIAL LANDSCAPE OF UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE STENOSING LARYNGOTRACHEITIS

    2015-01-01

    The increase in the number of acute respiratory infections in children, accompanied by airway obstruction, often leads to the development of stenotic laryngotracheitis. The primary factors are respiratory viruses, and bacterial flora often joining together, changing the type of the disease which is determined by its outcome. Exposure to infectious agents in the body contribute to the development of chronic infectious diseases of the respiratory tract in children, resulting in damages to the c...

  12. Assessment of a new algorithm in the management of acute respiratory tract infections in children

    Seyed Ahmad Tabatabaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the practicability of a new algorithm in decreasing the rate of incorrect diagnoses and inappropriate antibiotic usage in pediatric Acute Respiratory Tract Infection (ARTI. Materials and Methods: Children between 1 month to15 years brought to outpatient clinics of a children′s hospital with acute respiratory symptoms were managed according to the steps recommended in the algorithm. Results: Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Lower Respiratory Tract Infection, and undifferentiated ARTI accounted for 82%, 14.5%, and 3.5% of 1 209 cases, respectively. Antibiotics were prescribed in 33%; for: Common cold, 4.1%; Sinusitis, 85.7%; Otitis media, 96.9%; Pharyngotonsillitis, 63.3%; Croup, 6.5%; Bronchitis, 15.6%; Pertussis-like syndrome, 82.1%; Bronchiolitis, 4.1%; and Pneumonia, 50%. Conclusion: Implementation of the ARTIs algorithm is practicable and can help to reduce diagnostic errors and rate of antibiotic prescription in children with ARTIs.

  13. Detection of viral acute lower respiratory tract infection in hospitalized infants using real-time PCR

    Bassant Meligy

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: RV was the most commonly detected virus in children under 3 years admitted with acute lower respiratory tract infections. Coinfection was present in the majority of our patients; however it was not related significantly to parameters of disease severity.

  14. ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT OF 42 CASES OF ACUTE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTION

    ManWei; WangJinglan

    2000-01-01

    We made clinical observations on the therapeutic effect of acupuncture on acute upper respiratory tract infection and compared with the effect of paracetamol and Antondine, The result showed that acupuncture therapy could allay fever more rapidly than drugs, so long as the differentiation of syndromes is correct and the acupoint is selected properly.

  15. Acute bacterial infections of the lower respiratory tract in children from low-income countries

    Fleer, A; Wolf, B.H.M.

    2000-01-01

    Acute bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children and is responsible for 4 million childhood deaths each year. Most of these deaths are caused by pneumonia and occur in the youngest children in the poorest parts of the world. Severe pneu

  16. Human bocavirus in children suffering from acute lower respiratory tract infection in Beijing Children's Hospital

    ZHANG Li-li; XU Wen-bo; SHEN Kun-ling; TANG Liu-ying; XIE Zheng-de; TAN Xiao-juan; LI Chong-shan; CUI Ai-li; JI Yi-xin; XU Song-tao; MAO Nai-ying

    2008-01-01

    Background Human bocavirus(HBoV)is a parvovirus recently found to possibly cause respiratory tract disease in children and adults.This studV investigated HBoV infection and its clinical characte rist:ics in children younger than five years of age suffering from acute Iower respiratory tract infection in Beijing Children's Hospital.Methods Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children suffering from acute Iower respiratory tract infection during the winters of 2004 to 2006 (from November through the following February).HBoV was detected by polymerase chain reaction amplification and virus isolation and the amplification products were sequenced for identification.Results HBoV jnfection was detected in 16 of 333 study subjects.Coinfections with respiratory syncytial virus were detected in 3 of 16 HBoV positive patients with acute lower respiratory tract infection.The median age for HBoV positive children was 8 months(mean age,17 months;range,3 to 57 months).Among the HBoV positive children,14 were younger than 3 years old.9 were younger than 1 year old and 7 were younger than 6 months.These 16 positive HBoV children exhibited coughing and abnormal chest radiography findings and more than 60%of these children had wheezing and fever.Ten children were clinically diagnosed with pneumonia,2 bronchiolitis,2 acute bronchitis and 2 asthma.One child died.Conclusions HBoV was detected in about 5%of children with acute Iower respiratory infection seen in Beijing Children's Hospital.Fudher investigations regarding clinical and epidemiologic charactedstics of HBoV infection are needed.

  17. [Mucolytics in acute and chronic respiratory tract disorders. I. Pathophysiology and mechanisms of action].

    Kupczyk, Maciej; Kuna, Piotr

    2002-03-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is a cardinal sign of both acute and chronic pulmonary diseases. Normally, mucus protects respiratory tract, but its overproduction leads to airway obstruction and promotes bacterial colonization. In the first part of our review we outlined the possible factors responsible for mucus hypersecretion and clinical consequences of this process. Mucolytic agents such as Ambroxol and N-acetylcysteine are able to alter the secretion of mucus and its physical properties which results in improvement of mucociliary clearance. Mechanisms of action and indications for use of mucolytics are presented. Mucolytics have been shown to have a role in improving lung functions and patients' quality of life. Undoubtedly they are useful as an adjunctive therapy of respiratory tract disorders. PMID:12053600

  18. STATE OF MICROBIAL LANDSCAPE OF UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE STENOSING LARYNGOTRACHEITIS

    Gulnoza Utkurovna Samieva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the number of acute respiratory infections in children, accompanied by airway obstruction, often leads to the development of stenotic laryngotracheitis. The primary factors are respiratory viruses, and bacterial flora often joining together, changing the type of the disease which is determined by its outcome. Exposure to infectious agents in the body contribute to the development of chronic infectious diseases of the respiratory tract in children, resulting in damages to the ciliary epithelium and weakening of its connection with the basal cells and the basement membrane. This, in turn, facilitates the penetration of allergens and other inflammation stimulants into submucosal tissue.We have studied the state of the microbial landscape of the mucous membranes in the upper respiratory tract in 275 patients with stenosing laryngotracheitis; they are children aged 6 months to 5 years. All patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 included 122 children with primary stenosing laryngotracheitis (PSLT; group 2 were 153 patients with recurrent stenosing laryngotracheitis (RSLT.  We noted that the most common mucosal lesion of germs in all age groups falls on Staphylococcus aureus. It has been established that the nasopharynx microbial defeat is found twice as often at RSLT than at PSLT. In older children with RSLT, oropharynx was frequently a complex association of pathogens.

  19. Primary pneumocystis infection in infants hospitalized with acute respiratory tract infection

    Larsen, Hans Henrik; von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Lundgren, Bettina; Høgh, Birthe; Westh, Henrik; Lundgren, Jens D

    2007-01-01

    Acquisition of Pneumocystis jirovecii infection early in life has been confirmed by serologic studies. However, no evidence of clinical illness correlated with the primary infection has been found in immunocompetent children. We analyzed 458 nasopharyngeal aspirates from 422 patients hospitalized...... with 431 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection (RTI) by using a real-time PCR assay. In 68 episodes in 67 infants, P. jirovecii was identified. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of a positive signal compared with the first quartile of age (7-49 days) was 47.4 (11.0-203), 8.7 (1...

  20. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of severe respiratory syncytial virus-associated acute lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized infants

    Xiao-Bo Zhang; Li-Juan Liu; Li-Ling Qian; Gao-Li Jiang; Chuan-Kai Wang; Pin Jia; Peng Shi; Jin Xu; Li-Bo Wang

    2014-01-01

    Background: To investigate the clinical characteristics and analyze risk factors for severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in hospitalized infants with acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRIs). Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of infants with RSV-associated ALRIs between March 1st, 2011 and February 29th, 2012 was conducted. Subjects were followed up over the phone or by outpatient visit six and twelve months after discharge. Results: Among 913 RSV-associated ALRIs infants, 288 (31.5%) had severe infections, which accounted for 4.2% of hospitalized children. The hospital RSV mortality rate was 1.0%. The proportions of cases with tachypnea, apnea, cyanosis, and fine rales were significantly higher in the severe ALRIs group (all P Conclusions: Younger age, low birth weight and underlying disease are associated with severe RSVassociated ALRIs. Furthermore, severe RSV infections may be associated with a higher frequency of subsequent bronchitis, pneumonia and re-hospitalization in the following year.

  1. Acute viral infections with combined involvement of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts in children. Therapy with interferon.

    Dondurei, E A; Osidak, L V; Golovacheva, E G; Golovanova, A K; Amosova, I V; Gladchenko, L N

    2009-08-01

    We evaluated the percent of acute respiratory viral infections with gastrointestinal syndrome in the structure of morbidity in babies aging 6 months and elder. Therapeutic efficiency and safety of anaferon (pediatric formuation) as a component of complex therapy of acute respiratory viral infections with involvement of the gastrointestinal tract were proven; more rapid disappearance of all symptoms and improvement of the immune status parameters were demonstrated. PMID:20027348

  2. [Mucolytics in acute and chronic respiratory tract disorders. II. Uses for treatment and antioxidant properties].

    Kupczyk, Maciej; Kuna, Piotr

    2002-03-01

    In the first part of our editorial we reviewed the possible factors responsible for mucus hypersecretion in acute and chronic pulmonary diseases. The present paper presents the results of studies proving, that mucolytics are useful in adjunctive therapy of respiratory tract disorders. Mucolytic agents such as Ambroxol and N-acetylcysteine are able to alter the secretion of mucus and its physical properties which results in improvement of mucociliary clearance. Current evidence indicate, that these drugs are effective, especially in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and acute bronchitis. They produce a modest improvement in symptom control and lung function. It has been demonstrated that there is a synergism between mucolytics and antibiotics in the treatment of exacerbation of chronic bronchitis. Moreover, they act as scavengers of reactive oxygen species. Ambroxol is able to inhibit mediator release involved in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. As mucolytics are cheap and well-tolerated they are beneficial in the therapy of patients suffering from respiratory tract disorders. PMID:12053601

  3. CLINICAL PROFILE OF ACUTE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN BETWEEN 2MONTHS TO 5 YEARS

    Amitoj Singh Chhina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Acute respiratory infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in under - five children in developing countries. Hence, the present study was undertaken to study the various risk factors, clinical profile and outcome of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI in children aged 2 month to 5 years. OBJECTIVE : clinical features, laborato ry assessment and morbidity and mortality pattern associated with acute lower respiratory tract infections in children aged 2 months to 5 years. METHODS: 100 ALRI cases fulfilling WHO criteria for pneumonia, in the age group of 2 month to 5 years were evaluated for clinical profile as per a predesigned proforma in a rural medical college. RESULTS : Of cases 61% were infants and remaining 39%12 - 60 months age group, males outnumbered females with sex ratio of 1.3;1. Elevated total leukocyte counts for age were observed in only 22% of cases, of these 3% were having pneumonia, 9% severe pneumonia and 10% very severe pneumonia. Significant association was found between leukocytosis and ALRI severity (p= 0.0001 Positive blood culture was obtained in 8% of cases and was significantly associated with ALRI severity (p=. 0.027. Among the ALRI cases, 84% required oxygen supplementation at any time during the hospital stay and 8% required mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate was 1%; with 99% of cases recovering and getting discharged uneventfully. CONCLUSION : Among the clinical variables, the signs and symptoms of ALRI as per the WHO ARI Control Programme were found in almost all cases. Regarding the laboratory profile, leukocytosis and blood culture positivity w ere observed in a small percentage, but significant association with ALRI severity was observed for both. Thus, clinical signs, and not invasive blood tests are a better diagnostic tools, though the latter may provide additional therapeutic and prognostic information in severe disease

  4. Pteropine orthoreovirus infection among out-patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection in Malaysia.

    Voon, Kenny; Tan, Yeh Fong; Leong, Pooi Pooi; Teng, Cheong Lieng; Gunnasekaran, Rajasekaran; Ujang, Kamsiah; Chua, Kaw Bing; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to assess the incidence rate of Pteropine orthreovirus (PRV) infection in patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in a suburban setting in Malaysia, where bats are known to be present in the neighborhood. Using molecular detection of PRVs directly from oropharyngeal swabs, our study demonstrates that PRV is among one of the common causative agents of acute URTI with cough and sore throat as the commonest presenting clinical features. Phylogenetic analysis on partial major outer and inner capsid proteins shows that these PRV strains are closely related to Melaka and Kampar viruses previously isolated in Malaysia. Further study is required to determine the public health significance of PRV infection in Southeast Asia, especially in cases where co-infection with other pathogens may potentially lead to different clinical outcomes. PMID:26106066

  5. Primary pneumocystis infection in infants hospitalized with acute respiratory tract infection

    Larsen, Hans Henrik; von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Lundgren, Bettina; Høgh, Birthe; Westh, Henrik; Lundgren, Jens D

    2007-01-01

    .9-39.7), and 0.6 (0.1-6.7) for infants in the second (50-112 days), third (113-265 days), and fourth (268-4,430 days) age quartiles, respectively. Infants with an episode of upper RTI (URTI) were 2.0 (1.05-3.82) times more likely to harbor P. jirovecii than infants with a lower RTI. P. jirovecii may manifest...... with 431 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection (RTI) by using a real-time PCR assay. In 68 episodes in 67 infants, P. jirovecii was identified. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of a positive signal compared with the first quartile of age (7-49 days) was 47.4 (11.0-203), 8.7 (1...... itself as a self-limiting URTI in infants, predominantly those 1.5-4 months of age....

  6. Prescriber and Patient Responsibilities in Treatment of Acute Respiratory Tract Infections — Essential for Conservation of Antibiotics

    Antonio C Pignatari; Aurelio Sessa; Roman Kozlov; Attila Altiner; Oxford, John S.; John Bell; Duerden, Martin G; Alike van der Velden; Sabiha Y. Essack

    2013-01-01

    Inappropriate antibiotic use in normally self-limiting acute respiratory tract infections (RTIs), such as sore throat and the common cold, is a global problem and an important factor for increasing levels of antibiotic resistance. A new group of international experts—the Global Respiratory Infection Partnership (GRIP)—is committed to addressing this issue, with the interface between primary care practitioners and their patients as their core focus. To combat the overuse of antibiotics in the ...

  7. Systematic Review of Clinical Trials Assessing the Effectiveness of Ivy Leaf (Hedera Helix) for Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    Holzinger, Felix; Chenot, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Among nonantibiotic cough remedies, herbal preparations containing extracts from leaves of ivy (Hedera helix) enjoy great popularity. Objective. A systematic review to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of ivy for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Methods. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nonrandomized controlled clinical trials and observational studies evaluating the efficacy of ivy preparations for acute URTIs. Study quality was asse...

  8. Systematic Review of Clinical Trials Assessing the Effectiveness of Ivy Leaf (Hedera Helix) for Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    Holzinger, Felix; Chenot, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Among nonantibiotic cough remedies, herbal preparations containing extracts from leaves of ivy (Hedera helix) enjoy great popularity. Objective. A systematic review to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of ivy for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Methods. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nonrandomized controlled clinical trials and observational studies evaluating the efficacy of ivy preparations for acute URTIs. Study quality was asse...

  9. Acute lower respiratory tract infection due to respiratory syncytial virus in a group of Egyptian children under 5 years of age

    El-kholy Amany A; El-anany Mervat G; Mansi Yasmeen A; Fattouh Aya M; El-karaksy Hanaa M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and aim Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most important causes of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTI) in infants and young children. This study was conducted to describe the epidemiology of ALRTI associated with RSV among children ≤ 5 years old in Egypt. Patients and Methods We enrolled 427 children ≤ 5 years old diagnosed with ALRTI attending the outpatient clinic or Emergency Department (ED) of Children Hospital, Cairo University during a one-...

  10. Clinical characteristics of acute lower respiratory tract infections due to 13 respiratory viruses detected by multiplex PCR in children

    Jeong-Sook Lim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : This study was performed to investigate the epidemiologic and clinical features of 13 respiratory viruses in children with acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRIs. Methods : Nasopharyngeal aspirates were prospectively obtained from 325 children aged 15 years or less from May 2008 to April 2009 and were tested for the presence of 13 respiratory viruses by multiplex real-time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results : Viruses were identified in 270 children (83.1%. Co-infections with ?#242; viruses were observed in 71 patients (26.3 %. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV was the most common virus detected (33.2%, followed by human rhinovirus (hRV (19.1%, influenza virus (Flu A (16.9%, human metapneumovirus (hMPV (15.4%, parainfluenza viruses (PIVs (8.3%, human bocavirus (hBoV (8.0%, adenovirus (ADV (5.8%, and human coronavirus (hCoV (2.2%. Clinical diagnoses of viral ALRIs were bronchiolitis (37.5%, pneumonia (34.5%, asthma exacerbation (20.9%, and croup (7.1%. Clinical diagnoses of viral bronchiolitis and pneumonia were frequently demonstrated in patients who tested positive for RSV, hRV, hMPV, or Flu A. Flu A and hRV were most commonly identified in children older than 3 years and were the 2 leading causes of asthma exacerbation. hRV C was detected in 14 (4.3% children, who were significantly older than those infected with hRV A (mean±SD, 4.1±3.5 years vs. 1.7±2.3 years; P=0.009. hBoV was usually detected in young children (2.3±3.4 years with bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Conclusion : This study described the features of ALRI associated with 13 respiratory viruses in Korean children. Additional investigations are required to define the roles of newly identified viruses in children with ALRIs.

  11. The development and validation of a multidimensional sum-scaling questionnaire to measure patient-reported outcomes in acute respiratory tract infections in primary care: the Acute Respiratory Tract Infection Questionnaire: ARTIQ

    Aabenhus, R.; Thorsen, H.; Siersma, V.;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patient-reported outcomes are seldom validated measures in clinical trials of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) in primary care. We developed and validated a patient-reported outcome sum-scaling measure to assess the severity and functional impacts of ARTIs. METHODS: Qualitative...... interviews and field testing among adults with an ARTI were conducted to ascertain a high degree of face and content validity of the questionnaire. Subsequently, a draft version of the Acute Respiratory Tract Infection Questionnaire (ARTIQ) was statistically validated by using the partial credit Rasch model...... to test dimensionality, objectivity, and reliability of items. Test of known groups' validity was conducted by comparing participants with and without an ARTI. RESULTS: The final version of the ARTIQ consisted of 38 items covering five dimensions (Physical-upper, Physical-lower, Psychological, Sleep...

  12. Maternal agency influences the prevalence of diarrhea and acute respiratory tract infections among young Indonesian children.

    Agustina, Rina; Shankar, Anita V; Ayuningtyas, Azalea; Achadi, Endang L; Shankar, Anuraj H

    2015-05-01

    To examine the relationship between measures of mother's caretaking, practice and individual agency on acute diarrhea and respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) of Indonesian children. Using population-based household data from the Indonesian Demographic Health Surveys for 2002-2003 (n = 9,151 children) and 2007 (n = 9,714 children), we selected 28 indicators related to mother' caretaking, and applied principal component analysis to derive indices for access to care, practice and experience, and agency. The association between index quartiles (level 1-4) and the prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in the youngest child family size, child's age and sex, immunization status and received vitamin A supplementation. Moderate levels (level 3) of practice and experience were associated with decreased diarrheal risk (adjusted OR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.75-0.98), but not for ARTIs. Children of mothers with higher levels (level 4) of agency were protected against both diarrhea (adjusted OR 0.68, 95 % CI 0.60-0.77) and ARTIs (adjusted OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.66-0.91). Stratified analyses with child's age and mother's education, and tests of interaction, showed that agency had a stronger effect on diarrhea and ARTIs prevalence in children child health. PMID:25108503

  13. Infection biomarkers in primary care patients with acute respiratory tract infections–comparison of Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein

    Meili, Marc; Kutz, Alexander; Briel, Matthias; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Bucher, Heiner C.; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a lack of studies comparing the utility of C-reactive protein (CRP) with Procalcitonin (PCT) for the management of patients with acute respiratory tract infections (ARI) in primary care. Our aim was to study the correlation between these markers and to compare their predictive accuracy in regard to clinical outcome prediction. Methods This is a secondary analysis using clinical and biomarker data of 458 primary care patients with pneumonic and non-pneumonic ARI. We used co...

  14. ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT OF 42 CASES OF ACUTE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTION

    满伟; 王敬兰

    2000-01-01

    We made clinical observations on the therapeutic effect of acupuncture on acute upperr espiratory tract infection and compared with the effect of paracetamol and Antondine, The result showed that acupuncture therapy could allay fever more rapidly than drugs, so long as the differentiation of syndromes is correct and the acupoint is selected properly.

  15. Viral etiology of acute lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized young children in a children's referral hospital in Iran.

    Pourakbari, Babak; Mahmoudi, Shima; Movahedi, Zahra; Halimi, Shahnaz; Momeni, Shervin; Hosseinpour-Sadeghi, Reihaneh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are considered major causes of acute respiratory tract infections among children under 5 years old. In this study we investigated the prevalence of three respiratory viruses--respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza virus (INF) and adenovirus (ADV)--among hospitalized children with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children under five who had been hospitalized for LRTIs. The clinical data, including demographic data (age and sex), vital symptoms and signs at admission, duration of fever, duration of hospitalization, chest X-ray findings and outcome were considered. All inpatient specimens were tested by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for RSV and the INF-A, INF-B and parainfluenza viruses and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ADV. Out of those from 232 patients, 58 (25%) specimens were positive for either RSV, INF or ADV. The most predominant pathogens were RSV (40 cases, 17.2%), followed by INF (10 cases, 4%; including 8 type A and 2 type B) and ADV (8 cases, 3.4%). A total of 32 (55.1%) viral cases were identified in the spring, followed by 19 (32.7%) in the autumn and 7 (12%) in the winter. There was no significant correlation between clinical symptoms and the individual virus detected. In our study, RSV and INF were the two most common causes of LRTIs. These data are helpful for guiding the development of further vaccines as well as the use of antiviral drugs. Further studies will be needed to investigate other respiratory viruses such as parainfluenza, human metapneumovirus and rhinovirus. PMID:25818953

  16. Respiratory tract and mediastinum

    Respiratory tract problems originating in attempts to diagnose and treat illness are commonplace. They range from pharyngeal trauma during intubation to radiation-induced thyroid carcinoma. Occasionally, as with pulmonary hypervolemia accompanying drug-induced renal failure, they originate at a distance. Their actual number far exceeds those brought to clinical attention. Familiarity with the procedures which give rise to these complications is helpful in detecting and remedying them. It is important, therefore, to discuss their pathogenesis as well as their clinical and radiological findings

  17. Detection of human bocavirus from children and adults with acute respiratory tract illness in Guangzhou, southern China

    Liu Wen-Kuan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human bocavirus (HBoV is a newly discovered parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI and gastrointestinal illness. Our study is the first to analyze the characteristics of HBoV-positive samples from ARTI patients with a wide age distribution from Guangzhou, southern China. Methods Throat swabs (n=2811 were collected and analyzed from children and adults with ARTI over a 13-month period. The HBoV complete genome from a 60 year-old female patient isolate was also determined. Results HBoV DNA was detected in 65/2811 (2.3% samples, of which 61/1797 were from children (Mycoplasma pneumoniae had the highest frequency of 16.9% (11/65. Upper and lower respiratory tract illness were common symptoms, with 19/65 (29.2% patients diagnosed with pneumonia by chest radiography. All four adult patients had systemic influenza-like symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome revealed a close relationship with other HBoVs, and a more distant relationship with HBoV2 and HBoV3. Conclusions HBoV was detected from children and adults with ARTI from Guangzhou, southern China. Elderly people were also susceptive to HBoV. A single lineage of HBoV was detected among a wide age distribution of patients with ARTI.

  18. Prescriber and Patient Responsibilities in Treatment of Acute Respiratory Tract Infections — Essential for Conservation of Antibiotics

    Antonio C. Pignatari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate antibiotic use in normally self-limiting acute respiratory tract infections (RTIs, such as sore throat and the common cold, is a global problem and an important factor for increasing levels of antibiotic resistance. A new group of international experts—the Global Respiratory Infection Partnership (GRIP—is committed to addressing this issue, with the interface between primary care practitioners and their patients as their core focus. To combat the overuse of antibiotics in the community, and facilitate a change from prescribing empiric antibiotic treatment towards cautious deferment combined with symptomatic relief, there is a need to introduce and enhance evidence-based dialogue between primary care practitioners and their patients. Communication with patients should focus on the de-medicalisation of self-limiting viral infections, which can be achieved via a coherent globally endorsed framework outlining the rationale for appropriate antibiotic use in acute RTIs in the context of antibiotic stewardship and conservancy. The planned framework is intended to be adaptable at a country level to reflect local behaviours, cultures and healthcare systems, and has the potential to serve as a model for change in other therapeutic areas.

  19. Characterization of Human Coronavirus Etiology in Chinese Adults with Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infection by Real-Time RT-PCR Assays

    Lu, Roujian; Yu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Wen; Duan, Xijie; Zhang, Linglin; Zhou, Weimin; Xu, Jin; Xu, Lingjie; Hu, Qin; Lu, Jianxin; Ruan, Li; Wang, Zhong; Tan, Wenjie

    2012-01-01

    Background In addition to SARS associated coronaviruses, 4 non-SARS related human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are recognized as common respiratory pathogens. The etiology and clinical impact of HCoVs in Chinese adults with acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) needs to be characterized systematically by molecular detection with excellent sensitivity. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we detected 4 non-SARS related HCoV species by real-time RT-PCR in 981 nasopharyngeal swabs col...

  20. Systematic review of clinical trials assessing the effectiveness of ivy leaf (hedera helix) for acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    Holzinger, Felix; Chenot, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Among nonantibiotic cough remedies, herbal preparations containing extracts from leaves of ivy (Hedera helix) enjoy great popularity. Objective. A systematic review to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of ivy for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Methods. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nonrandomized controlled clinical trials and observational studies evaluating the efficacy of ivy preparations for acute URTIs. Study quality was assessed by the Jadad score or the EPHPP tool. Results. 10 eligible studies were identified reporting on 17463 subjects. Studies were heterogeneous in design and conduct; 2 were RCTs. Three studies evaluated a combination of ivy and thyme, 7 studies investigated monopreparations of ivy. Only one RCT (n = 360) investigating an ivy/thyme combination used a placebo control and showed statistically significant superiority in reducing the frequency and duration of cough. All other studies lack a placebo control and show serious methodological flaws. They all conclude that ivy extracts are effective for reducing symptoms of URTI. Conclusion. Although all studies report that ivy extracts are effective to reduce symptoms of URTI, there is no convincing evidence due to serious methodological flaws and lack of placebo controls. The combination of ivy and thyme might be more effective but needs confirmation. PMID:20976077

  1. Systematic Review of Clinical Trials Assessing the Effectiveness of Ivy Leaf (Hedera Helix for Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    Felix Holzinger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Among nonantibiotic cough remedies, herbal preparations containing extracts from leaves of ivy (Hedera helix enjoy great popularity. Objective. A systematic review to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of ivy for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs. Methods. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs, nonrandomized controlled clinical trials and observational studies evaluating the efficacy of ivy preparations for acute URTIs. Study quality was assessed by the Jadad score or the EPHPP tool. Results. 10 eligible studies were identified reporting on 17463 subjects. Studies were heterogeneous in design and conduct; 2 were RCTs. Three studies evaluated a combination of ivy and thyme, 7 studies investigated monopreparations of ivy. Only one RCT (=360 investigating an ivy/thyme combination used a placebo control and showed statistically significant superiority in reducing the frequency and duration of cough. All other studies lack a placebo control and show serious methodological flaws. They all conclude that ivy extracts are effective for reducing symptoms of URTI. Conclusion. Although all studies report that ivy extracts are effective to reduce symptoms of URTI, there is no convincing evidence due to serious methodological flaws and lack of placebo controls. The combination of ivy and thyme might be more effective but needs confirmation.

  2. Acute lower respiratory tract infection due to respiratory syncytial virus in a group of Egyptian children under 5 years of age

    El-kholy Amany A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aim Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is one of the most important causes of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTI in infants and young children. This study was conducted to describe the epidemiology of ALRTI associated with RSV among children ≤ 5 years old in Egypt. Patients and Methods We enrolled 427 children ≤ 5 years old diagnosed with ALRTI attending the outpatient clinic or Emergency Department (ED of Children Hospital, Cairo University during a one- year period. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained from the patients, kept on ice and processed within 2 hours of collection. Immunoflourescent assay (IFA for RSV was performed. Results 91 cases (21.3% had viral etiology with RSV antigens detected in 70 cases (16.4%. The RSV positive cases were significantly younger than other non-RSV cases (mean age 8.2 months versus 14.2 months, p Conclusion RSV is the most common viral etiology of ALRTI in children below 5 years of age, especially in young infants below 6 months of age. It is more prevalent in winter and tends to cause severe infection.

  3. Respiratory tract infection during Hajj

    Alzeer Abdulaziz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infection during Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca is a common illness, and it is responsible for most of the hospital admissions. Influenza virus is the leading cause of upper respiratory tract infection during Hajj, and pneumonia can be serious. Taking into account the close contacts among the pilgrims, as well as the crowding, the potential for transmission of M. tuberculosis is expected to be high. These pilgrims can be a source for spreading infection on their return home. Although vaccination program for influenza is implemented, its efficacy is uncertain in this religious season. Future studies should concentrate on prevention and mitigation of these infections.

  4. [Update on current care guidelines. Current care guideline: Acute lower respiratory tract infection in adults].

    Honkanen, Pekka; Broas, Markku; Hedman, Jouni; Jartti, Airi; Järvinen, Asko; Koskela, Markku; Meinander, Tuula; Puolijoki, Hannu; Rautakorpi, Ulla; Syrjälä, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is recognised in patients suffering from acute cough or deteriorated general condition. Patients with acute cough without pneumonia-related symptoms or clinical findings do not benefit from antimicrobial treatment. Those with suspected or confirmed pneumonia are treated with antibiotics, amoxicillin being the first choice. Most patients with pneumonia can be treated at home. Those with severe symptoms are referred to hospital. Patients are always encouraged to contact his/her physician if the symptoms worsen or do not ameliorate within 2-3 days. Patients aged 50 years or older and smokers are controlled by thoracic radiography in 6-8 weeks. PMID:26237912

  5. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  6. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Respiratory Failure Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  7. Homeopathic medicine for acute cough in upper respiratory tract infections and acute bronchitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Zanasi, Alessandro; Mazzolini, Massimiliano; Tursi, Francesco; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Paccapelo, Alexandro; Lecchi, Marzia

    2014-02-01

    Cough is a frequent symptom associated to upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) and, although being self-limiting, it might deeply affect the quality of life. Homeopathic products are often employed by patients to treat cough, but the evidence on their efficacy is scarce. Thus, we tested the efficacy of a homeopathic syrup in treating cough arising from URTIs with a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial. Patients were treated with either the homeopathic syrup or a placebo for a week, and recorded cough severity in a diary by means of a verbal category-descriptive score for two weeks. Sputum viscosity was assessed with a viscosimeter before and after 4 days of treatment; patients were also asked to provide a subjective evaluation of viscosity. Eighty patients were randomized to receive placebo (n = 40) or the homeopathic syrup (n = 40). All patients completed the study. In each group cough scores decreased over time, however, after 4 and 7 days of treatment, cough severity was significantly lower in the homeopathic group than in the placebo one (p syrup employed in the study was able to effectively reduce cough severity and sputum viscosity, thereby representing a valid remedy for the management of acute cough induced by URTIs. PMID:23714686

  8. The Microbiome and the Respiratory Tract.

    Dickson, Robert P; Erb-Downward, John R; Martinez, Fernando J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2016-01-01

    Although the notion that "the normal lung is free from bacteria" remains common in textbooks, it is virtually always stated without citation or argument. The lungs are constantly exposed to diverse communities of microbes from the oropharynx and other sources, and over the past decade, novel culture-independent techniques of microbial identification have revealed that the lungs, previously considered sterile in health, harbor diverse communities of microbes. In this review, we describe the topography and population dynamics of the respiratory tract, both in health and as altered by acute and chronic lung disease. We provide a survey of current techniques of sampling, sequencing, and analysis of respiratory microbiota and review technical challenges and controversies in the field. We review and synthesize what is known about lung microbiota in various diseases and identify key lessons learned across disease states. PMID:26527186

  9. [Cycloferon efficacy in the treatment of acute respiratory tract viral infection and influenza during the morbidity outbreak in 2009-2010].

    Romantsov, M G; Golofeevskiĭ, S V

    2010-01-01

    Clinical signs of acute respiratory tract viral infection and influenza in 150 patients under the standard symptomatic therapy with cycloferon, an early interferon 1 and 2 inductor are described. The patients were randomized by the body temperature on the day of the medical advise seeking. The clinical process of the respiratory tract infection was characterized by the second increase of the body temperature stated in 31.8% of the patients. By the clinical signs the infection was mixed (virus-virus) that explained the second increase of the body temperature. Normalization of the temperature was stated on the 4th or 5th day of the observation. The catarrhal and intoxication syndromes were observed for no more than 5 days. When the treatment was started in time (on the day of the medical advise seeking), cycloferon provided minimization of the intoxication and catarrhal syndromes and normalization of the body temperature on the 4th day of the therapy without the use of antibacterial agents. PMID:20583555

  10. [Phytotherapy of respiratory tract diseases].

    Bylka, Wiesława; Witkowska-Banaszczak, Ewa; Studzińska-Sroka, Elzbieta; Matławska, Irena

    2012-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been used in cough due to their antitussive and expectorant activity. Antitussives act either centrally on the cough center of the brain or peripherally on the cough receptors in the respiratory passages. The antitussive effect of many herbs results from the content of mucilage, which exerts protective and demulcent activity. The activity of expectorant herbs results primarily from their influence on the gastric mucose (saponins and ipec alkaloids). This proves reflex stimulation which leads to an increase in the secretion of bronchial glands. Volatile-oil type expectorant herbs exert a direct stimulatory effect on the bronchial glands by means of local irritation with antibacterial activity. In colds and flu, herbs containing volatile oil can be used; also, volatile oils are ingredients of syrups and liquids as well as external phytomedicines in the form of liniments, ointments, and inhalations. The paper shows the herbs and phytomedicines present on the Polish market used for the treatment of respiratory tract diseases. PMID:23289257

  11. Clinical and epidemiological aspects related to the detection of adenovirus or respiratory syncytial virus in infants hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection

    Eduardo A. Ferone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize and compare clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory aspects ofinfants with acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI associated with the detection of adenovirus(ADV or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. METHODS: A preliminary respiratory infection surveillance study collected samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA for viral research, linked to the completion of a standard protocol, from children younger than two years admitted to a university hospital with ALRI, between March of 2008 and August of 2011. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used for eight viruses: ADV, RSV, metapneumovirus, Parainfluenza 1, 2, and 3, and Influenza A and B. Cases with NPA collectedduring the first 24 hours of admission, negative results of blood culture, and exclusive detection of ADV (Gadv group or RSV (Grsv group were selected for comparisons. RESULTS: The preliminary study included collection of 1,121 samples of NPA, 813 collected in thefirst 24 hours of admission, of which 50.3% were positive for at least one virus; RSV was identifiedin 27.3% of cases surveyed, and ADV was identified in 15.8%. Among the aspects analyzed inthe Gadv (n = 58 and Grsv (n = 134 groups, the following are noteworthy: the higher meanage, more frequent prescription of antibiotics, and the highest median of total white blood cellcount and C-reactive protein values in Gadv. CONCLUSIONS: PCR can detect persistent/latent forms of ADV, an aspect to be considered wheninterpreting results. Additional studies with quantitative diagnostic techniques could elucidatethe importance of the high frequency observed.

  12. Concurrent acute illness and comorbid conditions poorly predict antibiotic use in upper respiratory tract infections: a cross-sectional analysis

    Perencevich Eli N

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inappropriate antibiotic use promotes resistance. Antibiotics are generally not indicated for upper respiratory infections (URIs. Our objectives were to describe patterns of URI treatment and to identify patient and provider factors associated with antibiotic use for URIs. Methods This study was a cross-sectional analysis of medical and pharmacy claims data from the Pennsylvania Medicaid fee-for-service program database. We identified Pennsylvania Medicaid recipients with a URI office visit over a one-year period. Our outcome variable was antibiotic use within seven days after the URI visit. Study variables included URI type and presence of concurrent acute illnesses and chronic conditions. We considered the associations of each study variable with antibiotic use in a logistic regression model, stratifying by age group and adjusting for confounders. Results Among 69,936 recipients with URI, 35,786 (51.2% received an antibiotic. In all age groups, acute sinusitis, chronic sinusitis, otitis, URI type and season were associated with antibiotic use. Except for the oldest group, physician specialty and streptococcal pharyngitis were associated with antibiotic use. History of chronic conditions was not associated with antibiotic use in any age group. In all age groups, concurrent acute illnesses and history of chronic conditions had only had fair to poor ability to distinguish patients who received an antibiotic from patients who did not. Conclusion Antibiotic prevalence for URIs was high, indicating that potentially inappropriate antibiotic utilization is occurring. Our data suggest that demographic and clinical factors are associated with antibiotic use, but additional reasons remain unexplained. Insight regarding reasons for antibiotic prescribing is needed to develop interventions to address the growing problem of antibiotic resistance.

  13. Acute Urinary Tract Obstruction

    Aleksic Djordje

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The kidneys are paired organs with the primary function of helping to remove toxins from the body and regulate water balance. They are vital to survival. After urine is produced in the kidneys, it must pass into the bladder, where it can be stored before being eliminated from the body through the urethra. Urinary tract obstruction is a common problem encountered by urologists, primary care physicians, and emergency medicine physicians. Urine can become obstructed at any point in this pathway. There are three groups of urinary tract obstructions: 1 obstruction of the urinary tract lumen; 2 obstruction of the urinary tract wall; and 3 extrinsic obstruction, which can press on the urinary tract lumen. An obstruction can be present from birth or develop later in life. The most common causes of obstruction include stones, strictures, tumours, and bladder dysfunction. These obstructions may result in the hydronephrosis of one or both kidneys, which, if left untreated, may lead to the deterioration of renal function. The goal of an initial treatment of urinary tract obstruction is to remove the obstruction. Later, we treat the cause that led to the obstruction. The bottom line is that all efforts should be made to preserve kidney function to avoid the need for dialysis or renal transplantation.

  14. Diseases of the respiratory tract of chelonians.

    Origgi, F C; Jacobson, E R

    2000-05-01

    Diseases of the respiratory tract commonly occur in captive chelonians, and several diseases also have occurred in wild chelonians. Infectious causes include viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Herpesviruses have surfaced as important pathogens of the oral cavity and respiratory tract in Hermann's tortoise (Testudo hermanii), spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca), and other tortoises in Europe and the United States. Herpesvirus-associated respiratory diseases also have been reported in the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, in mariculture in the Cayman Islands. Of diseases caused by bacteria, an upper respiratory tract disease caused by Mycoplasma sp has been reported in free-hanging and captive gopher tortoises in the southeastern United States and in desert tortoises in the Mojave Desert of the southwestern United States. Mycotic pulmonary disease is commonly reported in captive chelonians, especially in those maintained at suboptimal temperatures. An intranuclear coccidia has been seen in several species of captive tortoises in the United States, and, in one case, a severe proliferative pneumonia was associated with organisms in the lung. The most common noninfectious cause of respiratory disease in chelonians results from trauma to the carapace. Although pulmonary fibromas commonly occur in green turtles with fibropapillomatosis, for the most part, tumors of the respiratory tract are uncommon in chelonians. PMID:11228895

  15. Diagnosis of influenza from lower respiratory tract sampling after negative upper respiratory tract sampling.

    Bogoch, Isaac I; Andrews, Jason R; Zachary, Kimon C; Hohmann, Elizabeth L

    2013-01-01

    In this retrospective cohort study, we demonstrate that PCR-confirmed diagnoses of influenza were made solely by lower respiratory sampling in 6.9% of cases, as traditional upper respiratory tract tests were negative, indeterminate or not performed. Clinical features of these cases are presented. Clinicians should consider lower respiratory tract sampling in select cases of influenza-like illness for diagnosis. PMID:23135351

  16. Diagnosis of influenza from lower respiratory tract sampling after negative upper respiratory tract sampling

    Bogoch, Isaac I.; Andrews, Jason R.; Zachary, Kimon C.; Hohmann, Elizabeth L.

    2013-01-01

    In this retrospective cohort study, we demonstrate that PCR-confirmed diagnoses of influenza were made solely by lower respiratory sampling in 6.9% of cases, as traditional upper respiratory tract tests were negative, indeterminate or not performed. Clinical features of these cases are presented. Clinicians should consider lower respiratory tract sampling in select cases of influenza-like illness for diagnosis. PMID:23135351

  17. Characterization of human coronavirus etiology in Chinese adults with acute upper respiratory tract infection by real-time RT-PCR assays.

    Roujian Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In addition to SARS associated coronaviruses, 4 non-SARS related human coronaviruses (HCoVs are recognized as common respiratory pathogens. The etiology and clinical impact of HCoVs in Chinese adults with acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI needs to be characterized systematically by molecular detection with excellent sensitivity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we detected 4 non-SARS related HCoV species by real-time RT-PCR in 981 nasopharyngeal swabs collected from March 2009 to February 2011. All specimens were also tested for the presence of other common respiratory viruses and newly identified viruses, human metapneumovirus (hMPV and human bocavirus (HBoV. 157 of the 981 (16.0% nasopharyngeal swabs were positive for HCoVs. The species detected were 229E (96 cases, 9.8%, OC43 (42 cases, 4.3%, HKU1 (16 cases, 1.6% and NL63 (11 cases, 1.1%. HCoV-229E was circulated in 21 of the 24 months of surveillance. The detection rates for both OC43 and NL63 were showed significantly year-to-year variation between 2009/10 and 2010/11, respectively (P<0.001 and P = 0.003, and there was a higher detection frequency of HKU1 in patients aged over 60 years (P = 0.03. 48 of 157(30.57% HCoV positive patients were co-infected. Undifferentiated human rhinoviruses and influenza (Flu A were the most common viruses detected (more than 35% in HCoV co-infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, human parainfluenza virus (PIV and HBoV were detected in very low rate (less than 1% among adult patients with URTI. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: All 4 non-SARS-associated HCoVs were more frequently detected by real-time RT-PCR assay in adults with URTI in Beijing and HCoV-229E led to the most prevalent infection. Our study also suggested that all non-SARS-associated HCoVs contribute significantly to URTI in adult patients in China.

  18. Effectiveness, safety and tolerability of a complex homeopathic medicinal product in the prevention of recurrent acute upper respiratory tract infections in children: a multicenter, open, comparative, randomized, controlled clinical trial

    Jong, Miek C.; Buskin, Stephen L.; Ilyenko, Lydia; Kholodova, Irina; Burkart, Julia; Weber, Stephan; Keller, Thomas; Klement, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Background The present study was initiated to investigate the effectiveness, safety and tolerability of complex homeopathic CalSuli-4-02 tablets on prevention of recurrent acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) in children, in comparison to another complex homeopathic product. Methods The study was designed as a prospective, multicenter, randomized, open, clinical trial with two parallel treatment groups at four outpatient pediatric clinics in Russia. Children aged ≤ 6 years with su...

  19. Possible Prevalence and Transmission of Acute Respiratory Tract Infections Caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae among the Internally Displaced Persons in Tsunami Disaster Evacuation Camps of Sri Lanka

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Batuwanthudawe, Ranjith; Thevanesam, Vasanthi; Kaji, Chiharu; Qin, Liang; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Saito, Wakana; Saito, Mariko; Watanabe, Kiwao; Oishi, Kazunori; Abeysinghe, Nihal; Kunii, Osamu

    2007-01-01

    Objective The objective of this prospective study was to investigate the status of acute respiratory tract infections caused by Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae in tsunami disaster evacuation camps. Methods Nasopharyngeal swabs (NP) of 324 internally displaced persons (IDP) in 3 different tsunami disaster evacuation camps of Sri Lanka were collected between March 18th and 20th, 2005, and analyzed for MIC, β-lactamase production, serotypes, PCR and pulsed-field gel electroph...

  20. Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    Anita Chakravarti; Bineeta Kashyap

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Acute lower respiratory infections lead to high morbidity and mortality rates in children from developing countries. The aim of this study was to look into the extent of respiratory syncytial virus infections in children with special reference to the role of specific immunoglobulins in protection against infection as well as the association with bacterial pathogens. Material & Methods: Nasopharyngeal aspirates were tested for respiratory syncytial virus antigen by enzyme immunoassa...

  1. RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION AMONG YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION

    Milani, M

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants,and also an important factor for hospitalization during the winter months. To determine the prevalence and importance of RSV as a cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection, we carried out a prospective study during 5 months period from November to March 1998 in 6 pediatric hospitals. A nasopharyngeal aspirate was obtained for detection of RSV in all cases. Sociodemographic data, clinic...

  2. Effects of inhaled acids on respiratory tract defense mechanisms.

    Schlesinger, R B

    1985-01-01

    The respiratory tract is endowed with an interlocking array of nonspecific and specific defense mechanisms which protect it from the effects of inhaled microbes and toxicants, and reduce the risk of absorption of materials into the bloodstream, with subsequent systemic translocation. Ambient acids may compromise these defenses, perhaps providing a link between exposure and development of chronic and acute pulmonary disease. This paper reviews the effects of inhaled acids upon the nonspecific ...

  3. Primary care management of respiratory tract infections in Dutch preschool children

    Jansen, Angelique G S C; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Schilder, Anne G M; Hoes, Arno W; de Jong, Vanya F G M; Hak, Eelko

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine age-specific antibiotic prescription and referral rates in preschool children diagnosed with acute respiratory tract infection (RTI) in primary care. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Research database of the Netherlands University Medical Center Utrecht Primary Ca

  4. Mechanisms of infection in the respiratory tract.

    Baskerville, A

    1981-12-01

    Related to its potential vulnerability the respiratory tract has a very complex and effective defence apparatus. The interaction between these defence mechanisms and certain characteristics of aetiological agents results in a pattern in which initial infections by these agents tend to occur at specific sites in the tract. Infections in which the primary portal of entry is in the upper respiratory tract include Bordetella bronchiseptica and Haemophilus spp in pigs; Pasteurella spp in cattle, sheep, pigs; Mycoplasma spp in cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry; equine herpesvirus 1 in horses; infectious bovine rhinotracheitis in cattle; parainfluenza 3 in cattle and sheep; infectious laryngo-tracheitis and infectious bronchitis in poultry; feline viral rhinotracheitis and calicivirus in cats; Aujeszky's disease virus and swine influenza in pigs; and equine influenza in horses. Infections in which the primary portal of entry is in the lower respiratory tract include Aspergillus fumigatus in poultry and mammals, respiratory syncytial virus in cattle, distemper virus in dogs and adenovirus in cattle and dogs. A fuller understanding of the interactions between an agent and the host at the point of entry would make it much easier to develop effective vaccines and therapeutic agents. PMID:16030806

  5. Diversity and Evolutionary Histories of Human Coronaviruses NL63 and 229E Associated with Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Symptoms in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Al-Khannaq, Maryam Nabiel; Ng, Kim Tien; Oong, Xiang Yong; Pang, Yong Kek; Takebe, Yutaka; Chook, Jack Bee; Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2016-05-01

    The human alphacoronaviruses HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E are commonly associated with upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). Information on their molecular epidemiology and evolutionary dynamics in the tropical region of southeast Asia however is limited. Here, we analyzed the phylogenetic, temporal distribution, population history, and clinical manifestations among patients infected with HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 2,060 consenting adults presented with acute URTI symptoms in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between 2012 and 2013. The presence of HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E was detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The spike glycoprotein, nucleocapsid, and 1a genes were sequenced for phylogenetic reconstruction and Bayesian coalescent inference. A total of 68/2,060 (3.3%) subjects were positive for human alphacoronavirus; HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E were detected in 45 (2.2%) and 23 (1.1%) patients, respectively. A peak in the number of HCoV-NL63 infections was recorded between June and October 2012. Phylogenetic inference revealed that 62.8% of HCoV-NL63 infections belonged to genotype B, 37.2% was genotype C, while all HCoV-229E sequences were clustered within group 4. Molecular dating analysis indicated that the origin of HCoV-NL63 was dated to 1921, before it diverged into genotype A (1975), genotype B (1996), and genotype C (2003). The root of the HCoV-229E tree was dated to 1955, before it diverged into groups 1-4 between the 1970s and 1990s. The study described the seasonality, molecular diversity, and evolutionary dynamics of human alphacoronavirus infections in a tropical region. PMID:26928836

  6. C-reactive protein point-of-care testing and antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in rural primary health centres of North Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Yebyo, Henock; Medhanyie, Araya Abrha; Spigt, Mark; Hopstaken, Rogier

    2016-01-01

    Unjustified antibiotic prescribing for acute upper respiratory infections (URTIs) is probably more common in poor-resource settings where physicians are scarce. Introducing C-reactive protein (CRP) point-of-care testing in such settings could reduce the misuse of antibiotics, which could avert antibiotic resistance. However, information useful for the applicability of CRP test in resource-limited settings is lacking. This study aimed to elicit the frequency of antibiotic prescribing and distribution of CRP levels in remote, rural settings in Ethiopia. We included 414 patients with acute URTIs from four health centres. Health professionals recorded the clinical features of the patients, but the laboratory professionals measured the CRP levels of all patients at the point of care. The most prominent respiratory causes for consultation were acute URTIs combined (44.4%), and lower respiratory tract infections-pneumonia (29.71%) and acute bronchitis (25.84%). The CRP distribution was acute URTIs in the rural areas of Ethiopia is unduly high, with high proportions of mild, self-limiting illness, mostly URTIs. Implementation of CRP point-of-care testing in such resource-constrained settings, with low- or middle-grade healthcare professionals, could help reconcile the inappropriate use of antibiotics by withholding from patients who do not benefit from antibiotic treatment. PMID:26769226

  7. Risk factors for lower respiratory tract infections in children

    Objectives: Acute respiratory tract infections are divided into two groups as upper and lower respiratory tract infections. These are very common diseases in childhood. In this study, we aimed to determine risk factors for lower respiratory tract in this region. Methodology: Hospital were included in our study. Their examinations, backgrounds, family histories and information about environmental factors were recorded in questionnaire forms. Results: Lack of vaccination, duration of breast feeding, onset age of cow's milk, family history for asthma and food allergy, number of hospitalized people in the same room, number of people who live in same house and smoking around the children were evaluated for the presence of LRTI, and LRTI risks of these factors were respectively observed as 1.69, 1.71, 1.61, 1.69, 1.20, 1.47, 1.56 and 2.63 fold increased. Conclusion: Standardization of clinical diagnosis, accurate and realistic use of antibiotics, correction of nutrition, improvement of socio-economic situation and the elimination of Respiratory Infections. (author)

  8. Management of respiratory tract infections in children

    PAUL, Siba Prosad

    2014-01-01

    Siba Prosad Paul,1 Rachel Wilkinson,2 Christine Routley3 1Southmead Hospital, Bristol, 2St Richard's Hospital, Chichester, 3Paediatric Services, Yeovil District Hospital, Yeovil, UK Abstract: Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in children are one of the most common reasons for parents consulting health professionals. Most RTIs are self-limiting viral illnesses that will resolve with time and supportive management. However, it is important for the health professional to identify any ...

  9. Management of respiratory tract infections in children

    Paul SP; Wilkinson R; Routley C

    2014-01-01

    Siba Prosad Paul,1 Rachel Wilkinson,2 Christine Routley3 1Southmead Hospital, Bristol, 2St Richard's Hospital, Chichester, 3Paediatric Services, Yeovil District Hospital, Yeovil, UK Abstract: Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in children are one of the most common reasons for parents consulting health professionals. Most RTIs are self-limiting viral illnesses that will resolve with time and supportive management. However, it is important for the health professional to identify any RTI ...

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Yadam, Suman; Bihler, Eric; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious inflammatory disorder with high mortality. Its main pathologic mechanism seems to result from increased alveolar permeability. Its definition has also changed since first being described according to the Berlin definition, which now classifies ARDS on a severity scale based on PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen, arterial)/FIO2 (fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio. The cornerstone of therapy was found to be a low tidal volume strategy featuring volumes of 6 to 8 mL per kg of ideal body weight that has been shown to have decreased mortality as proven by the ARDSnet trials. There are other areas of treatment right now that include extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, as well for severe refractory hypoxemia. Other methods that include prone positioning for ventilation have also shown improvements in oxygenation. Positive end-expiratory pressure with lung recruitment maneuvers has also been found to be helpful. Other therapies that include vasodilators and neuromuscular agents are still being explored and need further studies to define their role in ARDS. PMID:26919679

  11. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Modrykamien, Ariel M.; Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss t...

  12. A touchdown nucleic acid amplification protocol as an alternative to culture backup for immunofluorescence in the routine diagnosis of acute viral respiratory tract infections

    Feeney Susan A; Mitchell Suzanne J; Mitchell Frederick; De Ornellas Dennis; McCaughey Conall; O'Neill Hugh J; Ong Grace M; Coyle Peter V; Wyatt Dorothy E; Forde Marian; Stockton Joanne

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Immunofluorescence and virus culture are the main methods used to diagnose acute respiratory virus infections. Diagnosing these infections using nucleic acid amplification presents technical challenges, one of which is facilitating the different optimal annealing temperatures needed for each virus. To overcome this problem we developed a diagnostic molecular strip which combined a generic nested touchdown protocol with in-house primer master-mixes that could recognise 12 c...

  13. IRON AND IRON-RELATED PROTEINS IN THE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT OF ARDS PATIENTS

    OBJECTIVE: An increased oxidative stress in the lower respiratory tract of individuals with acute respiratory distress syndrome is considered to be one mechanism of lung injury in these patients. Cell and tissue damage resulting from an oxidative stress can ultimately be the cons...

  14. ASSOCIATION OF MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE WITH RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Osama Mohammed Saed Abdul-Wahab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of four most common species of organisms that are responsible for most clinically significant infections in humans. It is a frequent cause of acute respiratory infections in both children and adults. The organism can cause pharyngitis, otitis, tracheobronchitis, or community-acquired pneumonia, but patients may also remain totally asymptomatic. Aim of this prospective study for children, was to investigate the association of M. pneumoniae with respiratory tract infections in a Saudi population. This study was designed as a case-control study in which 90 patients (Mean age of the patients in case group was 5.94±2.73 and in control group was 6.51±2.26 of either sexes were included. These patients were classified into two groups: first group (case group, included 45 patients who had been admitted in hospital with diagnosis of respiratory tract infections and the second group (control group, included 45 healthy patients who had no history of respiratory tract infections. Both the groups were age and sex matched. Presence of IgM antibodies to Mycoplasma pneumoniae was assessed by ELISA technique in both groups. In the case group, 4 (9% cases out of 45 children were positive for anti-mycoplasma antibody whereas in the control group, all children were negative. All positive case group patients had symptoms of acute pneumonia. 18 (40% of the patients were diagnosed with bronchial asthma (40% inclusive of all the four cases diagnosed with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. The relative risk for the occurrence of mycoplasma infection was estimated to be 9 (95%C.I = 0.49-162.43. However, on comparing the case and control groups, the result was not found to be statistically significant. (Fischer Exact Test p = 0.0583. Children in Saudi Arabia are at a relatively higher risk of developing Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection especially those predisposed with underlying chronic respiratory illnesses such as asthma. This is a first

  15. BACTERIAL LOAD IN THE HUMAN UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    M. Lika (Cekani); Kulla, A.; Nelaj, E; O. Mece

    2011-01-01

    Most of the surfaces of the upper respiratory tract (including nasal and oral passages, nasopharynx, oropharynx, and trachea) are colonized by normal flora. These organisms are usually regular inhabitants of these surfaces and rarely cause disease. Once a respiratory tract pathogen is in the respiratory tract it colonizes the surfaces causing creating so the conditions to cause a disease. Certain microorganisms considered as etiological agent of disease can cause the disease if they are pres...

  16. Microbial flora variations in the respiratory tract of mice

    Cangemi de Gutierrez Rosa; Miguel de Nader Olga; Ruiz Holgado Aida Pesce de; Nader-Macias María Elena

    1999-01-01

    A stable microbial system in the respiratory tract acts as an important defense mechanism against pathogenic microorganisms. Perturbations in this system may allow pathogens to establish. In an ecological environment such as the respiratory tract, there are many diverse factors that play a role in the establishment of the indigenous flora. In the present work we studied the normal microbial flora of different areas of the respiratory tract of mice and their evolution from the time the mice we...

  17. Upper respiratory tract illnesses and accidents.

    Smith, A P; Harvey, I; Richmond, P; Peters, T J; Thomas, M; Brockman, P

    1994-07-01

    Anecdotal accounts suggest that colds and influenza may increase human error. This view is supported by laboratory studies of the effects of upper respiratory tract illnesses (URTIs) on performance efficiency, which have shown that both experimentally induced and naturally occurring URTIs reduce aspects of performance efficiency. The present research examined the relationship between accidents and URTIs by studying 923 patients attending an Accident and Emergency department at a time of year when upper respiratory tract viruses were circulating. The results revealed no significant associations between URTIs and workplace accidents, and, similarly, no significant associations emerged when all accidents were compared with other attenders. The only effect which was close to statistical significance was a protective effect of influenza against workplace accidents, which could be explained in terms of a person with influenza or who has recently had influenza being less likely to work and therefore less likely to be at risk of experiencing a workplace accident. Further research must examine this topic with different methodologies, such as selecting controls from fellow workers of the index case, and these studies will provide us with a clearer view as to whether or not there is an association between URTIs and workplace accidents. PMID:7919298

  18. Defence System of Respiratory Tract and Clearence of Inhalation Agents

    Nesrin Ocal

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that inhaled urban air contains many particles and gases. On the other hand, the anesthetic agents used in respiratory diseases comprise pharmaceutical particles. Deposition and cleaning processes of both the inhaled foreign particles and gases from room air, and inhalation agents from respiratory tract are very important clinically. These processes are carried out by the defense mechanisms of the respiratory system. In this review, the defence system of respiratory tract and...

  19. Management of respiratory tract infections in children

    Paul SP

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Siba Prosad Paul,1 Rachel Wilkinson,2 Christine Routley3 1Southmead Hospital, Bristol, 2St Richard's Hospital, Chichester, 3Paediatric Services, Yeovil District Hospital, Yeovil, UK Abstract: Respiratory tract infections (RTIs in children are one of the most common reasons for parents consulting health professionals. Most RTIs are self-limiting viral illnesses that will resolve with time and supportive management. However, it is important for the health professional to identify any RTI that may have more serious implications for the child and require medical intervention. Diagnosis can usually be made from the history and presenting symptoms such as cough, wheeze, tachypnea, fever, or stridor. Exclusion of "red flag" symptoms will enable health professionals to appropriately reassure parents and advise symptomatic management with antipyretics and adequate fluid administration. With the expanding role of nurses in ambulatory settings, many children are now being seen by health professionals other than doctors, (eg, advanced nurse practitioners, some of whom are trained in pediatrics while others have limited knowledge of nursing sick children. It is therefore vital that these professionals remain aware of any risk factors and that they can recognize "red flags" in a sick child rapidly and escalate further management appropriately. Some children will require admission to hospital for respiratory support and other therapies, such as intravenous antibiotics and fluids. With advancement of the "non-medical prescriber" within the nursing profession, awareness of when to give or not give antibiotic therapy needs careful consideration, especially in light of the problems that may arise from overuse of antibiotic treatment. Nurses have a vital role, not only in administering medications and supporting other medical interventions, but also in supporting the child and family over the period of illness. The education of the parents and the child, in some

  20. Acute effects of low-level sulphur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide exposures on the respiratory tract of susceptible subjects in cold environments

    Salonen, R.O.; Randell, J.T.; Haelinen, A.I.; Pennanen, A.S. [National Public Health Inst., Kuopio (Finland). Div. of Environmental Health; Kosma, V.M. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Pathology; Pekkarinen, H. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physiology; Ruuskanen, J. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Tukiainen, H. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Pulmonary Diseases

    1995-12-31

    Several recent epidemiological studies from Finland have suggested that sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) cause adverse health effects in susceptible population groups, such as children and asthmatic patients, at much smaller concentrations than the present guideline values of the World Health Organization. One possible explanation of these findings is that the relatively long winter-time increases the sensitivity of the respiratory tract to irritant pollutants. This hypothesis is supported by experimental human and animal studies, which have shown obstruction and inflammatory changes in the conducting airways after ventilation of cold and dry air. Asthmatic patients are much more sensitive than healthy subjects to the irritating effects of cold and dry air and of air pollutants. The airways of many non-asthmatic a topic subjects are also sensitive to cold air, but these subjects are poorly defined as a potential susceptible population group to air pollutants. The aims of this project are: (1) to construct experimental human and animal facilities and protocols for short-term studies on SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} exposures at subfreezing temperatures, (2) to apply advanced lung function methodologies and symptom assessment for characterisation of short-term respiratory responses of asthmatic and a topic subjects to these exposures, (3) to apply well-established pulmonary physiological, cytological and morphological methods for characterisation of short-term responses to and mechanisms of these exposures in the guinea-pig lower airways. (author)

  1. Patient-reported outcomes to assess the efficacy of extended-release guaifenesin for the treatment of acute respiratory tract infection symptoms

    Albrecht Helmut

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guaifenesin is a component of medicines used to improve symptoms associated with upper respiratory tract infections. Patient-reported outcome instruments are valuable for evaluating symptom improvements; however, a validated tool to assess efficacy of mucoactive drugs does not exist. We compared the efficacy of extended-release guaifenesin with placebo for treatment of symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection using subjective efficacy assessments in a pilot study and confirmed precision of assessments in a validation study. Methods The pilot study was a randomized, double-blind study where patients were dosed with either 1200 mg extended-release guaifenesin (n = 188 or placebo (n = 190, every 12 hours for 7 days. Efficacy was assessed using subjective measures including the Daily Cough and Phlegm Diary, the Spontaneous Symptom Severity Assessment and the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey. End-of-study assessments were completed by patients and investigator. The validation study consisted of two phases. In Phase I, subjects completed interviews to gather evidence to support the content validity of the Daily Cough and Phlegm Diary, the Spontaneous Symptom Severity Assessment and Patient’s End-of-Treatment Assessment. Phase II examined the psychometric properties of assessments evaluated in Phase I of the validation study using data from the pilot study. Results Subjective measures of efficacy at Day 4 showed the most prominent difference between treatment groups, in favor of guaifenesin. The 8-symptom related questions (SUM8 in the Daily Cough and Phlegm Diary, analyzed as a composite score appeared to be the strongest candidate endpoint for further evaluation. Results from the interviews in Phase I supported the content of the assessments which were validated during Phase II. Treatments were well tolerated. Conclusions Results from the clinical pilot and validation studies showed that the SUM8 diary

  2. Updating the ICRP human respiratory tract model

    The ICRP Task Group on Internal Dosimetry is developing new Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides (OIR) documents. Application of the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) requires a review of the lung-to-blood absorption characteristics of inhaled compounds of importance in radiological protection. Where appropriate, material-specific absorption parameter values will be given, and for other compounds, assignments to default Types will be made on current information. Publication of the OIR provides an opportunity for updating the HRTM in the light of experience and new information. The main possibilities under consideration relate to the two main clearance pathways. Recent studies provide important new data on rates of particle transport from the nasal passages, bronchial tree (slow phase) and alveolar region. The review of absorption rates provides a database of parameter values from which consideration can be given to deriving typical values for default Types F, M and S materials, and element-specific rapid dissolution rates. (authors)

  3. Updating the ICRP human respiratory tract model

    Bailey, M.R. [Radiation Protection Division, Health Protection Agency, Chilton, Oxon OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Ansoborlo, E. [CEA/DEN/DRCP/CETAMA, VRH-Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Guilmette, R.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS G761 RP-2 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Paquet, F. [IRSN/DPHD/SDOS/LEAR, BP166, F-26702 Pierrelatte, Cedex (France)

    2007-07-01

    The ICRP Task Group on Internal Dosimetry is developing new Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides (OIR) documents. Application of the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) requires a review of the lung-to-blood absorption characteristics of inhaled compounds of importance in radiological protection. Where appropriate, material-specific absorption parameter values will be given, and for other compounds, assignments to default Types will be made on current information. Publication of the OIR provides an opportunity for updating the HRTM in the light of experience and new information. The main possibilities under consideration relate to the two main clearance pathways. Recent studies provide important new data on rates of particle transport from the nasal passages, bronchial tree (slow phase) and alveolar region. The review of absorption rates provides a database of parameter values from which consideration can be given to deriving typical values for default Types F, M and S materials, and element-specific rapid dissolution rates. (authors)

  4. Microdistribution and Long-Term Retention of 239Pu (NO3)4 in the Respiratory Tracts of an Acutely Exposed Plutonium Worker and Experimental Beagle Dogs

    Nielsen, Christopher E.; Wilson, Dulaney A.; Brooks, Antone L.; McCord, Stacey; Dagle, Gerald E.; James, Anthony C.; Tolmachev, Sergei Y.; Thrall, Brian D.; Morgan, William F.

    2012-11-01

    The long-term retention of inhaled soluble forms of plutonium raises concerns as to the potential health effects in persons working in nuclear energy or the nuclear weapons program. The distributions of long-term retained inhaled plutonium-nitrate [239Pu (NO3)4] deposited in the lungs of an accidentally exposed nuclear worker (Human Case 0269) and in the lungs of experimentally exposed beagle dogs with varying initial lung depositions were determined via autoradiographs of selected histological lung, lymph node, trachea, and nasal turbinate tissue sections. These studies showed that both the human and dogs had a non-uniform distribution of plutonium throughout the lung tissue. Fibrotic scar tissue effectively encapsulated a portion of the plutonium and prevented its clearance from the body or translocation to other tissues and diminished dose to organ parenchyma. Alpha radiation activity from deposited plutonium in Human Case 0269 was observed primarily along the sub-pleural regions while no alpha activity was seen in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of this individual. However, relatively high activity levels in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of the beagles indicated the lymphatic system was effective in clearing deposited plutonium from the lung tissues. In both the human case and beagle dogs, the appearance of retained plutonium within the respiratory tract was inconsistent with current biokinetic models of clearance for soluble forms of plutonium. Bound plutonium can have a marked effect on the dose to the lungs and subsequent radiation exposure has the potential increase in cancer risk.

  5. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Objectives:To know the relationship between hypothermia, etiology, respiratory failure and prognosis of submersion in environmental emergency medicine.Methods:FromDecember1, 2002 toSeptember30,2007, there were52 hospitalized near- drowning cases in a medical center at northernTaiwan.Retrospective study of52 submersion patients who were hospitalized during the duration was analyzed.Results:The hypothermic groups are more commonly seen in acute respiratory failure after submersion,36%vs.21%,P<0.05.The hypothermic submersion patients who are older in age than normothermic submersion patients(44vs.27 years old,P<0.05).The suicidal submersion patients are older, hypothermic and longer length of stay than accidental submersion patients.Conclusions:Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department(ED) are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  6. Fluorescence diagnosis of upper respiratory tract infections

    Blanco, Kate C.; Inada, Natalia M.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    The pharyngitis and laryngitis are respiratory tract infections highly common. Pharyngitis can be accompanied by fever, especially if caused by a systemic infection. Laryngitis is an inflammation of your voice box (larynx) from irritation or infection. The conventional treatment is the antibiotics administration, which may be responsible by an increase of identification of bacterial strains resistant to drug. This fact associated to high incidence of these infections become important to develop new technologies for diagnosis. This study aims to evaluate the use of widefield fluorescence imaging for the characterization of oropharynx infections, in order to diagnose the bacteria colonization. The imaging system for wide field fluorescence visualization is Evince® (MMOptics, São Carlos, SP, Brazil) coupled to an Apple iPhone® cell phone device. The system consists of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) operating in the violet blue region centered at green-red spectrum 450 nm and optical filters that allow viewing of fluorescence. A tongue depressor was adapted to Evince® for mouth opening. The same images were captured with white light and fluorescence with an optical system. The red fluorescence may be a bacterial marker for physiological monitoring of oropharynx infection processes. The bacterial biofilm on tissue were assigned to the presence of protoporphyrin IX. This work indicates that the autofluorescence of the tissue may be used as a non-invasive technique to aid in the oropharynx infection diagnostic.

  7. Frequent respiratory tract infections in children. The role of environmental and genetic factors.

    Ruskamp, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTI), presenting as common cold, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, acute otitis media, bronchitis or pneumonia are a major health problem in children. In this thesis common environmental and host factors, as well as plausible genetic factors were evaluated in a large birth coho

  8. Early adaptive immune responses in the respiratory tract of foot and mouth disease-infected cattle

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease which affects both domestic and wildlife biungulate species. This acute disease, caused by the FMD virus (FMDV), usually includes an active replication phase in the respiratory tract up to 72 h post-infection followed by hematogenous ...

  9. Main features of the proposed NCRP respiratory tract model

    The proposed NCRP respiratory tract dosimetry model regions include the naso-oro-pharyngo-laryngeal (NOPL), the tracheobronchial (TB), the pulmonary (P), and the lymph nodes (LN). Input aerosol concentrations are derived from a consideration of particle-size-dependent inspirability. Particle deposition in the respiratory tract is modelled using the mechanisms of inertial impaction, sedimentation and diffusion. The rates of absorption of particles, and transport to the blood, have been derived from clearance data from people and laboratory animals. The effect of body growth on particle deposition is considered. Particle clearance rates are assumed to be independent of age. The proposed respiratory tract model differs significantly from the 1966 Task Group Model in that (1) inspirability is considered; (2) new sub-regions of the respiratory tract are considered; (3) absorption of materials by the blood is treated in a more sophisticated fashion; and (4) body size (and thus age) is taken into account. (author)

  10. Enabling factors for antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections

    Jaruseviciene, Lina; Radzeviciene Jurgute, Ruta; Bjerrum, Lars;

    2013-01-01

    necessity for political leadership to encourage clinically grounded antibiotic use; over-the-counter sale of antibiotics; designation of antibiotics as reimbursable medications; supervision by external oversight institutions; lack of guidelines for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections; and...

  11. Surveillance for outbreaks of respiratory tract infections in nursing homes

    Loeb, M; McGeer, A; McArthur, M; Peeling, R. W.; Petric, M; Simor, A E

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of respiratory tract infections are common in long-term care facilities for older people. The objective of our study was to determine both the frequency of such outbreaks and their clinical and epidemiological features. METHODS: Prospective surveillance for outbreaks of respiratory tract infections and a retrospective audit of surveillance records were conducted in 5 nursing homes in metropolitan Toronto over 3 years. The clinical manifestations of infected residents wer...

  12. RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION AMONG YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION

    M. Milani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants,and also an important factor for hospitalization during the winter months. To determine the prevalence and importance of RSV as a cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection, we carried out a prospective study during 5 months period from November to March 1998 in 6 pediatric hospitals. A nasopharyngeal aspirate was obtained for detection of RSV in all cases. Sociodemographic data, clinical signs, diagnosis and hospital admissions were documented. During this study period, 365 young infants (51.5% male, 48.5% female with respiratory tract infection were visited in 6 hospitals. The median age of patients was 24 months (range: 1 month to 5 years.RSV infection was found in 70 out of 365 patients (19.18%.Among the 70 children with RSV infection, 29 patients (41.42% were under 12 months of age.The main clinical manifestations of RSV infection were cough (88.57% and coryza (78.57%. There were no significant differences between patients who were tested positive for RSV and those who were tested negative with regard to demographic variables and clinical diagnoses. This study indicates that RSV is an important cause of respiratory tract infection in infants and young children .Distinguishing RSV from other respiratory infection is difficult because of the similarity in clinical presentation among children.

  13. Antiviral effects of bovine interferons on bovine respiratory tract viruses.

    Fulton, R W; Downing, M M; Cummins, J M

    1984-01-01

    The antiviral effects of bovine interferons on the replication of bovine respiratory tract viruses were studied. Bovine turbinate monolayer cultures were treated with bovine interferons and challenged with several bovine herpesvirus 1 strains, bovine viral diarrhea virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, goat respiratory syncytial virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine adenovirus type 7, or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with bovine interferons reduced viral yield for each of the...

  14. Risk factors for acute respiratory syncytial virus infection of lower respiratory tract in hospitalized infants%婴儿急性下呼吸道呼吸道合胞病毒感染的危险因素研究

    张晓波; 刘丽娟; 施鹏; 蒋高立; 贾品; 王传凯; 王立波; 钱莉玲

    2014-01-01

    染的风险大为增加.%Objective To investigate the clinical epidemiologic characteristics and analyze risk factors for acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in hospitalized infants with acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI).Method ALRI infants admitted to Children's Hospital of Fudan University from March 1 st,2011 to February 29th,2012,were enrolled in this study.Patient information included demographic characteristics,feeding history,family status,clinical presentation,accessory examination,treatment and prognosis.According to the etiology of ALRI infants,we compared the seasonal distribution,demographic characteristics,household characteristics and underlying diseases between RSV-positive patients and RSV-negative patients.Univariate and multiple Logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors that were associated with risk of RSV infection.Result Among 1 726 ALRI infants,there were 913 RSV-positive infants (52.9%).The occurrence of RSV infection had a seasonal variation,with a peak in winter (59.1%).The median (P25,P75) age of RSV infants was 64 (21-155) days.The gestational age (GA) and body weight (BW) was (37.5 ± 2.4) weeks and (3.07 ±0.66) kg,respectively.The male/female ratio among these was 1.9:1.RSV infection was more popular among infants in the families with smoking members,crowded living conditions,history of atopic mother.Differences of the proportion of patients with underlying disease between RSV-positive and negative groups were statistically significant (59.4% vs.54.2%,P < 0.05).Univariate logistic regression demonstrated that factors increasing the risk of RSV infection were:GA < 37weeks (OR =1.346,95% CI:1.037-1.748),birth weight < 2 500 g (OR =1.447,95 % CI:1.103-1.898),underlying diseases (OR =1.232,95 % CI:1.018-1.492),underlying CHD (OR =1.391,95% CI:1.120-1.728),environmental tobacco smoke exposure (OR =1.254,95% CI:1.035-1.519),mother with atopic diseases (OR =1.827,95% CI:1.296-2.573),crowded house with four or

  15. Complete Genomes of Three Human Bocavirus Strains from Children with Gastroenteritis and Respiratory Tract Illnesses in Jiangsu, China

    Wang, Xiaochun; Zhang, Xiaodan; Tian, Hua; Ling, Feng; Yu, Min; Sun, Guangming; Yang, Shixing; Shen, Quan; Wang, Yan; Shao, Shihe; Zhang, Wen

    2012-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a newly discovered parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI) and gastrointestinal illness. No previous reports indicated the presence of HBoV infection in Jiangsu Province, China. Here we report three complete genomic sequences of HBoV strains from children with gastroenteritis and respiratory tract illnesses in Jiangsu, China. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the three HBoV strains in the present study belong to the HBoV1 lineage, where j...

  16. Infecções agudas das vias aéreas superiores: diagnóstico e tratamento ambulatorial Acute upper respiratory tract infections: outpatient diagnosis and treatment

    Paulo M.C. Pitrez

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: apresentar uma revisão atualizada sobre as infecções das vias aéreas superiores (IVAS mais comuns na prática diária de consultório do pediatra, visando a uma adequada orientação de condutas diagnósticas e terapêuticas. FONTES DOS DADOS: foram revisadas referências obtidas na base de dados Medline. Foram selecionados os artigos mais relevantes sobre o tema. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: rinofaringite aguda, sinusite aguda, faringoamigdalite aguda estreptocócica e laringite viral aguda são apresentadas de forma crítica e sucinta. As dificuldades observadas na prática clínica, em relação ao diagnóstico diferencial de determinadas IVAS, limitações na busca do agente etiológico e o uso, muitas vezes abusivo, de antimicrobianos são analisados e discutidos. CONCLUSÕES: as IVAS são um dos motivos mais comuns de visita ao consultório do pediatra. Por isso, conceitos e informações atualizados são essenciais para que o manejo dessa doença seja otimizado, reduzindo a indicação de exames diagnósticos dispensáveis, ou a implementação de tratamentos desnecessários ou prejudiciais ao paciente.OBJECTIVE: to present an updated review of the most common upper respiratory infections (URI in children seen by the pediatrician in outpatient clinics, for better diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. SOURCES OF DATA: references from Medline database were reviewed. The most relevant articles were selected. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: acute rhinopharyngitis, sinusitis, streptococcal tonsillitis and viral croup are presented in a concise and critical view. Differential and etiological diagnosis limitations and the abusive use of antimicrobials in these illnesses are also discussed. CONCLUSIONS: URI are the most common cause of visits to pediatrician clinics. Therefore, update and critical concepts, as well as references are essential for a proper management of these illnesses, decreasing the indication of unnecessary diagnostic tests and

  17. Ineffective airway clearance in children with acute respiratory infection

    Lívia Zulmyra Cintra Andrade

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study was performed with 151 children inpatients of a pediatric hospital in Northeastern Brazil, with the objective to analyze the accuracy of the defining characteristics of the diagnoses ineffective airway clearance in children with acute respiratory infection. A thorough respiratory evaluation was performed and the diagnostic inference was developed by specialists. The most frequent defining characteristics were adventitious breath sounds, ineffective cough, dyspnea, and changes in respiratory rate. Ineffective airway clearance was present in 37.7% of the sample. Agitation was the characteristic with the highest sensitivity. Dyspnea, adventitious breath sounds, orthopnea, changes in respiratory rate and agitation presented higher specificity for the diagnosis. In conclusion, the defining characteristics showed different performances to correctly classify children with infective airway clearance. Studies like this can contribute for a correct nursing diagnostic inference and for the implementation of more effective interventions, thus improving the quality of health care. Descriptors: Respiratory Tract Infections; Nursing Diagnosis; Child.

  18. BACTERIAL LOAD IN THE HUMAN UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    M. Lika (Cekani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the surfaces of the upper respiratory tract (including nasal and oral passages, nasopharynx, oropharynx, and trachea are colonized by normal flora. These organisms are usually regular inhabitants of these surfaces and rarely cause disease. Once a respiratory tract pathogen is in the respiratory tract it colonizes the surfaces causing creating so the conditions to cause a disease. Certain microorganisms considered as etiological agent of disease can cause the disease if they are present in a sufficient number on the respiratory tract and they possess virulent factors that are expressed in any host. The most common bacteria in chronic upper respiratory tract, head and neck infections are anaerobic ones. The distribution of the organism according to the seasons has resulted to have a significant connection. From 700 cases, 502 were negative and 198 cases presented bacterial load. The number of cases resulted to be 41 in spring season, 91 in Summer, 36 in the Autumn and 30 in the Winter season. Most microorganisms predominate in summer rather than S.pneumococcus which dominates in the autumn. Source sampling have not resulted organism independent. We noticed that three different sources of different bacteria predominate.

  19. Pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    ZHANG Ding-mei; LU Jia-hai; ZHONG Nan-shan

    2008-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) first emerged in Guangdong province,China in November2002.During the following 3 months,it spread rapidly across the world,resulting in approximately 800 deaths.In 2004,subsequent sporadic cases emerged in Singapore and China.A novel coronavims,SARS-CoV,was identified as the etiological agent of SARS.1,2 This virus belongs to a family of large,positive,single-stranded RNA viruses.Nevertheless,genomic characterization shows that the SARS-CoV is only moderately related to other known coronaviruses.3 In contrast with previously described coronaviruses,SARS-CoV infection typically causes severe symptoms related to the lower respiratory tract.The SARS-CoV genome includes 14 putative open reading frames encoding 28 potential proteins,and the functions of many of these proteins are not known.4 A number of complete and partial autopsies of SARS patients have been reported since the first outbreak in 2003.The predominant pathological finding in these cases was diffuse alveolar damage (DAD).This severe pulmonary injury of SARS patients is caused both by direct viral effects and immunopathogenetic factors.5 Many important aspects of the pathogenesis of SARS have not yet been fully clarified.In this article,we summarize the most important mechanisms involved in the complex pathogenesis of SARS,including clinical characters,host and receptors,immune system response and genetic factors.

  20. Respiratory Complications from Acute Corrosive Poisonings in Adults

    Chibishev, Andon; Simonovska, Natasa; Bozinovska, Cvetanka; Pereska, Zanina; Smokovski, Ivica; Glasnovic, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute corrosive poisonings are caused by ingestion of corrosive chemicals which are most commonly used as household agents. Intoxications with these kind of agents produce numerous and severe post-corrosive complications of the upper gastrointestinal tract. On the other hand, our experience showed that corrosive agents may also cause injuries of the respiratory system, which makes the treatment very hard and additionally complicates the severe clinical condition of the patient. ...

  1. Respiratory tract retention of inhaled particles in experimental animals

    A variety of inhalation studies have been reviewed to develop a model for describing the retention of particles in the respiratory tracts of several species of experimental animals. Presently, the respiratory tract clearance model receives the greatest use in the radiation protection field. This model has several disadvantages in its basic construction and in its application to radionuclide exposures of people to heterogeneous aerosolized substances. These are discussed and an alternative model is described. The alternative model uses time-varying solubility functions to described absorption of material from the lung and upper respiratory tract. The solubility functions can be determined from studies in experimental animals or can be approximated from in vitro chemical systems. Application of this model to data from several experimental studies is included

  2. Reverse Genetics for Fusogenic Bat-Borne Orthoreovirus Associated with Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Humans: Role of Outer Capsid Protein σC in Viral Replication and Pathogenesis.

    Kawagishi, Takahiro; Kanai, Yuta; Tani, Hideki; Shimojima, Masayuki; Saijo, Masayuki; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Nelson Bay orthoreoviruses (NBVs) are members of the fusogenic orthoreoviruses and possess 10-segmented double-stranded RNA genomes. NBV was first isolated from a fruit bat in Australia more than 40 years ago, but it was not associated with any disease. However, several NBV strains have been recently identified as causative agents for respiratory tract infections in humans. Isolation of these pathogenic bat reoviruses from patients suggests that NBVs have evolved to propagate in humans in the form of zoonosis. To date, no strategy has been developed to rescue infectious viruses from cloned cDNA for any member of the fusogenic orthoreoviruses. In this study, we report the development of a plasmid-based reverse genetics system free of helper viruses and independent of any selection for NBV isolated from humans with acute respiratory infection. cDNAs corresponding to each of the 10 full-length RNA gene segments of NBV were cotransfected into culture cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase, and viable NBV was isolated using a plaque assay. The growth kinetics and cell-to-cell fusion activity of recombinant strains, rescued using the reverse genetics system, were indistinguishable from those of native strains. We used the reverse genetics system to generate viruses deficient in the cell attachment protein σC to define the biological function of this protein in the viral life cycle. Our results with σC-deficient viruses demonstrated that σC is dispensable for cell attachment in several cell lines, including murine fibroblast L929 cells but not in human lung epithelial A549 cells, and plays a critical role in viral pathogenesis. We also used the system to rescue a virus that expresses a yellow fluorescent protein. The reverse genetics system developed in this study can be applied to study the propagation and pathogenesis of pathogenic NBVs and in the generation of recombinant NBVs for future vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26901882

  3. Respiratory tract mortality in cement workers: a proportionate mortality study

    Rachiotis George; Drivas Spyros; Kostikas Konstantinos; Makropoulos Vasilios; Hadjichristodoulou Christos

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The evidence regarding the association between lung cancer and occupational exposure to cement is controversial. This study investigated causes of deaths from cancer of respiratory tract among cement workers. Methods The deaths of the Greek Cement Workers Compensation Scheme were analyzed covering the period 1969-1998. All respiratory, lung, laryngeal and urinary bladder cancer proportionate mortality were calculated for cement production, maintenance, and office workers i...

  4. Successful Topical Respiratory Tract Immunization of Primates against Ebola Virus▿

    Bukreyev, Alexander; Rollin, Pierre E.; Tate, Mallory K; Yang, Lijuan; Zaki, Sherif R.; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Murphy, Brian R.; Collins, Peter L.; Sanchez, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Ebola virus causes outbreaks of severe viral hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans. The virus is highly contagious and can be transmitted by contact and by the aerosol route. These features make Ebola virus a potential weapon for bioterrorism and biological warfare. Therefore, a vaccine that induces both systemic and local immune responses in the respiratory tract would be highly beneficial. We evaluated a common pediatric respiratory pathogen, human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV...

  5. Factors affecting on the particle deposition in the respiratory tract

    The deposition pattern of inhaled particles in the respiratory tracts is affected by anatomical structure of the respiratory tracts and respiratory pattern of animals, which are modified by many factors as animal species, physiological and psychological conditions, age, sex, smoking drug, lung diseases, etc. In human, studies have been focused on the initial lung deposition of particles and have made it clear that the respiratory pattern, gender, and diseases may have influence on the deposition pattern. On the other hand, there was little knowledge on the initial lung deposition of particles in laboratory animals. Recently, Raabe et al. have reported the initial lung deposition of 169Yb-aluminosilicate particles in mice, rats, hamsters, guinea pigs and rabbits. The authors have also investigated the lung deposition of latex particles with different sizes and 198Au-colloid in rats whose respiratory volumes during the inhalation were monitored by body plethysmography. These experiments indicated that the deposition of inhaled particles in distal lung e.g. small bronchiolar and alveolar region, was much lower in laboratory animals than that of human. This species difference may be due to smaller diameter of respiratory tract and/or shallower breathing and higher respiratory rate of laboratory animals. The experimental animals in which respiratory diseases were induced artificially have been used to investigate the modification factors on the deposition pattern of inhaled particles. As respiratory diseases, emphysema was induced in rats, hamsters, beagle dogs in some laboratories and pulmonary delayed type hypersensitivity reaction in rats was in our laboratory. The initial lung deposition of particles in these animals was consistently decreased in comparison with normals, regardless of the animal species and the type of disease. (author)

  6. Microbial flora variations in the respiratory tract of mice

    Rosa Cangemi de Gutierrez

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available A stable microbial system in the respiratory tract acts as an important defense mechanism against pathogenic microorganisms. Perturbations in this system may allow pathogens to establish. In an ecological environment such as the respiratory tract, there are many diverse factors that play a role in the establishment of the indigenous flora. In the present work we studied the normal microbial flora of different areas of the respiratory tract of mice and their evolution from the time the mice were born. Our interest was to know which were the dominant groups of microorganisms in each area, which were the first capable of colonizing and which dominated over time to be used as probiotic microorganisms. Our results show that Gram negative facultatively anaerobic bacilli and strict anaerobic microorganisms were the last ones to appear in the bronchia, while aerobic and Gram positive cocci were present in all the areas of the respiratory tract. The number of facultative aerobes and strict anaerobes were similar in the nasal passage, pharynx instilled and trachea, but lower in bronchia. The dominant species were Streptococcus viridans and Staphylococcus saprophyticcus, followed by S. epidermidis, Lactobacilli and S. cohnii I which were present on every studied days but at different proportions. This paper is the first part of a research topic investigating the protective effect of the indigenous flora against pathogens using the mice as an experimental model.

  7. CFD heat transfer simulation of the human upper respiratory tract for oronasal breathing condition

    Kambiz Farahmand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries due to inhalation of hot gas are commonly encountered when dealing with fire and combustible material, which is harmful and threatens human life. In the literature, various studies have been conducted to investigate heat and mass transfer characteristics in the human respiratory tract (HRT. This study focuses on assessing the injury taking place in the upper human respiratory tract and identifying acute tissue damage, based on level of exposure. A three-dimensional heat transfer simulation is performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software to study the temperature profile through the upper HRT consisting of the nasal cavity, oral cavity, trachea, and the first two generations of bronchi. The model developed is for the simultaneous oronasal breathing during the inspiration phase with a high volumetric flow rate of 90 liters/minute and the inspired air temperature of 100 degrees Celsius. The geometric model depicting the upper HRT is generated based on the data available and literature cited. The results of the simulation give the temperature distribution along the center and the surface tissue of the respiratory tract. This temperature distribution will help to assess the level of damage induced in the upper respiratory tract and appropriate treatment for the damage. A comparison of nasal breathing, oral breathing, and oronasal breathing is performed. Temperature distribution can be utilized in the design of the respirator systems where inlet temperature is regulated favoring the human body conditions.

  8. Pneumococci in nasopharyngeal samples from Filipino children with acute respiratory infections.

    Lankinen, K. S.; Leinonen, M; Tupasi, T E; Haikala, R; Ruutu, P.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in the upper respiratory tract was studied in 318 Filipino children less than 5 years old with an acute lower respiratory tract infection. Nasopharyngeal samples were obtained from 292 children. With both quantitative bacterial culture and detection of capsular polysaccharide antigens by coagglutination, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, and latex agglutination, pneumococci were found in 160 (70%) of the 227 samples eligible for analysis. Culture was posit...

  9. Intravenous naloxone in acute respiratory failure.

    Ayres, J.; J Rees; Lee, T.; Cochrane, G M

    1982-01-01

    A 58-year-old man presented with acute on chronic respiratory failure. In the acute stage of his illness an infusion of the opiate antagonist naloxone caused an improvement in oxygen saturation as measured by ear oximetry from 74% to 85%, while a saline infusion resulted in a return of oxygen saturation to the original value. When he had recovered from the acute episode the same dose of naloxone had no effect on oxygen saturation. These findings suggest that in acute respiratory failure there...

  10. [Serum procalcitonin and respiratory tract infections].

    Zarka, V; Valat, C; Lemarié, E; Boissinot, E; Carré, P; Besnard, J C; Diot, P

    1999-12-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the prognostic value of serum procalcitonine (PCT) assay in adult respiratory infections. Forty-nine patients admitted with pleurisy, community-acquired pneumonia, tuberculosis, infection were included in this prospective study. PCT was assayed on admission and discharge. Biological and clinical parameters of gravity were also evaluated. Twenty patients had elevated PCT of more than 0.50 ng/ml. In 29 patients, PCT was undetectable. The serum PCT level was normal in the patients with tuberculosis, infection, pneumocytosis. PCT did not correlate with the biological and clinical markers of the disease severity but the evolution of PCT correlated with the evolution of C-reactive-protein (r = 0.58, p < 0.05). PCT seems to be an early marker of the evolution of respiratory infections, but it does not help to establish prognosis. Further studies are necessary to assess the potential value of PCT in more severe respiratory infections requiring assisted ventilation. PMID:10685471

  11. Epidemiological features of acute lower respiratory tract viral infections in children%儿童急性下呼吸道病毒感染的临床流行特征

    张冰; 王晓; 张微; 陈旭央

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the epidemiological features of acute lower respiratory tract viral infections in chil-dren.MethodsA retrospective epidemiological investigation was conducted to analyze the prevalence rate, seasonality andsusceptible population of seven common respiratory viruses among 4355 hospitalized pediatric patients (<15 y) with acute respiratory tract infection during 2006 to 2010. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were screened for virus by direct immunofluorescent (DIF) assay.ResultsVirus was identified in 1093 out of 4355 patients (25.1%); RSV accounted for 17.6%, followed by PIV-3 (2.7%),ADV( 2%), IV-A( 1.3%), PIV-1 (0.7%), PIV-2(0.3%), IV-B(0.2% )and mixed( 0.3%). The median ages of infected pediatric patients were 4 months for RSV, 9 months for PIV-3, 13 months for ADV, 11 months for PIV-1 and 13.5 months for IV, respectively ( X2= 46.186, P<0.01 ).The infants and younger children were more susceptible for developing RSV and PIV-3 related disease, and RSV often occurred in winter and spring. The prevalence of viral infection in children with bronchiolitis,bronchitis,pneumonia and asthma were 64.5%, 15.6%, 17.6% and 31.7%, respectively.ConclusionThe respiratory viruses are still a main cause oflower respiratory tract infections in children, especially in infants and younger children. RSV remains the main pathogen of bronchiolitis.%目的 了解小儿急性病毒性下呼吸道感染的流行特征.方法 回顾性分析2006 至2010 年住院的急性下呼吸道感染儿童鼻咽吸取物4种7型常见呼吸道病毒的检出情况以及季节和年龄分布特点.直接免疫荧光法检测病毒.结果 4 355例患儿中有1 093例病毒检测阳性,总阳性率25.1%,其中呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)阳性率17.6%,副流感病毒(PIV)-3 为2.7%,腺病毒(ADV)为2.0%,流感病毒(IV)-A1.3%,PIV-1 为0.7%,PIV-2 为0.3%,IV-B 为0.2%,混合感染0.3%.病毒感染患儿年龄中位数RSV 为4个月,PIV-3 为9个月,ADV 为13 个月,PIV-1 为11 个月,IV 为13.5 个

  12. Viral and bacterial interactions in the upper respiratory tract.

    Astrid A T M Bosch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory infectious diseases are mainly caused by viruses or bacteria that often interact with one another. Although their presence is a prerequisite for subsequent infections, viruses and bacteria may be present in the nasopharynx without causing any respiratory symptoms. The upper respiratory tract hosts a vast range of commensals and potential pathogenic bacteria, which form a complex microbial community. This community is assumed to be constantly subject to synergistic and competitive interspecies interactions. Disturbances in the equilibrium, for instance due to the acquisition of new bacteria or viruses, may lead to overgrowth and invasion. A better understanding of the dynamics between commensals and pathogens in the upper respiratory tract may provide better insight into the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases. Here we review the current knowledge regarding specific bacterial-bacterial and viral-bacterial interactions that occur in the upper respiratory niche, and discuss mechanisms by which these interactions might be mediated. Finally, we propose a theoretical model to summarize and illustrate these mechanisms.

  13. 利复星序贯疗法治疗急性下呼吸道细菌感染的研讨%Study on the sequential therapy of levofloxacin in treatment of acute lower respiratory tract bacterial infections

    韩钢

    2001-01-01

    目的:评价利复星序贯疗法治疗急性下呼吸道细菌性感染的疗效和安全性。方法:对102例急性下呼吸道细菌感染患者,采用利复星400mg/d,5~7d静脉滴注,继之以利复星400mg/d,4~7d口服。结果:痊愈30例(29.4%),显效64例(62.7%),有效率92.1%,细菌清除率88.9%,总疗程9~14d(平均11.8d),药物副作用发生较少(发生率3.92%)。结论:利复星序贯疗法治疗急性下呼吸道常见细菌性感染有效、安全、疗程短。%Objective:To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Levofloxacin in treatment of acute lower respiratory tract bacterial infection (ALRTBI) by sequential therapy. Methods: One hundred and two patients with ALRTBI were treated with Levofloxacin iv drip in a regimen of 400mg/ d for 5~7d then with oral Levofloxacin in dose of 400mg/ d for 4~7d in sequence.Results: An effective rate of 92.1% and a bacterial eradication rate of 88.9% were obtained with a tolerable side effect of 3.92%. Conclusion: Levofloxacin in sequential therapy is an effective and safe agent for treatment of ALRTBI.

  14. Study on the viral etiology of acute respiratory tract infections in Shanghai area during 2009-2010%2009~2010年上海地区急性呼吸道感染病毒病原谱分析

    何静; 周志统; 胡芸文; 龚燕; 张万菊; 徐磊; 刘祎; 钱方兴; 揭志军; 俞慧菊; 李杨

    2011-01-01

    调查2009~2010年上海地区人群急性呼吸道感染(ARTI)的病毒性病原,探讨2009甲型H1N1流感暴发背景下呼吸道感染病毒病原谱的构成.采用套式多重反转录-聚合酶链反应(RT- PCR)和实时荧光定量RT-PCR方法,对来自2 044例患者的2 044份标本(包括2 005份鼻咽拭子和39份肺泡灌洗液),同时检测腺病毒(ADV)、副流感病毒(PIV)、甲型流感病毒(FluA)、乙型流感病毒(FluB)、微小核糖核酸病毒、呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)、人偏肺病毒(hMPV)、冠状病毒(CoV)和人博卡病毒(HBoV).其中,656 (32.09%)份标本经呼吸道病毒检测为阳性,52份标本为双重感染.FluA检出率最高(13.36%),其后依次为微小核糖核酸病毒(10.23%)、FluB(4.84%)、ADV(1.96%)、PIV(1.76%)、RSV(1.32%)、CoV(0.59%)、hMPV(0.39%)和HBoV(0.20%).但各月病毒检出率分布不均,2009和2010年呼吸道病毒检出率高峰出现在当年11月(53.07%和65.59%),低谷都出现在当年5月,且2009年5~9月的病毒检出率高于2010年同期(32.02% vs 15.38%,P0.05).呼吸道病毒检出率还与年龄相关,0~4岁组和5~14岁组病毒检出率高于其他年龄组.在0~4岁及≥65岁组中,微小核糖核酸病毒检出率最高,FluA次之;其余年龄组中FluA检出率最高.混合感染中15岁以下儿童占50%(26/52),微小核糖核酸病毒与其他病毒混合感染占84.62%(44/52).本研究表明,上海地区2009~2010年FluA是最常见的急性呼吸道感染病原,2009甲型H1N1流感病毒成为2009年FluA的优势亚型.微小核糖核酸病毒是混合感染中最常见的病原.结果提示,应长期监测主要呼吸道病毒的活动水平,并加强对微小核糖核酸病毒流行病学和致病性的研究.%The present paper aims to understand the viral etiology in patients with acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) in Shanghai area during 2009-2010 and to explore the respiratory viral spectrum under the background of 2009 A(H1N1) influenza outbreak

  15. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department (ED are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  16. Do pollution and climate influence respiratory tract infections in children?

    Saulo Duarte Passos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To review if pollution and climate changes can influence respiratory tract infections in children. Data source: articles published on the subject in PubMed, SciELO, Bireme, EBSCO and UpTodate were reviewed. The following inclusion criteria were considered: scientific papers between 2002 and 2012, study design, the pediatric population, reference documents such as the CETESB and World Health Organization Summary of the data: We analyzed research that correlated respiratory viruses and climate and/or pollution changes. Respiratory syncytial virus has been the virus related most to changes in climate and humidity. Other "old and new" respiratory viruses such as Human Bocavirus, Metapneumovirus, Parechovirus and Parainfuenza would need to be investigated owing to their clinical importance. Although much has been studied with regard to the relationship between climate change and public health, specific studies about its influence on children's health remain scarce.

  17. Pathobiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Sapru, Anil; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael W; Dahmer, Mary K

    2015-06-01

    The unique characteristics of pulmonary circulation and alveolar-epithelial capillary-endothelial barrier allow for maintenance of the air-filled, fluid-free status of the alveoli essential for facilitating gas exchange, maintaining alveolar stability, and defending the lung against inhaled pathogens. The hallmark of pathophysiology in acute respiratory distress syndrome is the loss of the alveolar capillary permeability barrier and the presence of protein-rich edema fluid in the alveoli. This alteration in permeability and accumulation of fluid in the alveoli accompanies damage to the lung epithelium and vascular endothelium along with dysregulated inflammation and inappropriate activity of leukocytes and platelets. In addition, there is uncontrolled activation of coagulation along with suppression of fibrinolysis and loss of surfactant. These pathophysiological changes result in the clinical manifestations of acute respiratory distress syndrome, which include hypoxemia, radiographic opacities, decreased functional residual capacity, increased physiologic deadspace, and decreased lung compliance. Resolution of acute respiratory distress syndrome involves the migration of cells to the site of injury and re-establishment of the epithelium and endothelium with or without the development of fibrosis. Most of the data related to acute respiratory distress syndrome, however, originate from studies in adults or in mature animals with very few studies performed in children or juvenile animals. The lack of studies in children is particularly problematic because the lungs and immune system are still developing during childhood and consequently the pathophysiology of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome may differ in significant ways from that seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. This article describes what is known of the pathophysiologic processes of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as we know it today while also presenting the much

  18. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Pryhuber, Gloria S.; Chess, Patricia R.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Paul R. Knight; Notter, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by rapid-onset respiratory failure following a variety of direct and indirect insults to the parenchyma or vasculature of the lungs. Mortality from ALI/ARDS is substantial, and current therapy primarily emphasizes mechanical ventilation and judicial fluid management plus standard treatment of the initiating insult and any known underlying disease. Current pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS is not optimal, a...

  19. Metal toxicity and the respiratory tract.

    Nemery, B

    1990-02-01

    The type of lung disease caused by metal compounds depends on the nature of the offending agent, its physicochemical form, the dose, exposure conditions and host factors. The fumes or gaseous forms of several metals, e.g. cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), nickel carbonyl (Nl(CO)4, zinc chloride (ZnCl2), vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), may lead to acute chemical pneumonitis and pulmonary oedema or to acute tracheobronchitis. Metal fume fever, which may follow the inhalation of metal fumes e.g. zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and many others, is a poorly understood influenza-like reaction, accompanied by an acute self-limiting neutrophil alveolitis. Chronic obstructive lung disease may result from occupational exposure to mineral dusts, including probably some metallic dusts, or from jobs involving the working of metal compounds, such as welding. Exposure to cadmium may lead to emphysema. Bronchial asthma may be caused by complex platinum salts, nickel, chromium or cobalt, presumably on the basis of allergic sensitization. The cause of asthma in aluminium workers is unknown. It is remarkable that asthma induced by nickel (Ni) or chromium (Cr) is apparently infrequent, considering their potency and frequent involvement as dermal sensitizers. Metallic dusts deposited in the lung may give rise to pulmonary fibrosis and functional impairment, depending on the fibrogenic potential of the agent and on poorly understood host factors. Inhalation of iron compounds causes siderosis, a pneumoconiosis with little or no fibrosis. Hard metal lung disease is a fibrosis characterized by desquamative and giant cell interstitial pneumonitis and is probably caused by cobalt, since a similar disease has been observed in workers exposed to cobalt in the absence of tungsten carbide. Chronic beryllium disease is a fibrosis with sarcoid-like epitheloid granulomas and is presumably due to a cell-mediated immune response to beryllium. Such a mechanism may be responsible for the pulmonary fibrosis

  20. Antibiotic prescribing by pediatricians for respiratory tract infection in children.

    Arnold, S R; Allen, U D; Al-Zahrani, M; Tan, D H; Wang, E E

    1999-08-01

    To examine antimicrobial prescribing rates for viral respiratory tract infections by primary care pediatricians in the greater Toronto area, charts were reviewed for the week of 17-21 February 1997 at 61 pediatricians' offices. Antibiotics were considered appropriate if the diagnosis was compatible with bacterial infection. A total of 3,585 patient visits were reviewed. The common cold was the most common respiratory tract syndrome leading to an office visit (1,317 visits). The overall rate of appropriate antibiotic prescribing was 89.5%. There was no significant difference in prescribing when physicians were compared by year of graduation from medical school, sex, or location of training. Diagnostic codes (ICD-9 [International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition] codes) did not match the chart diagnosis in 41% of cases. Toronto primary care pediatricians appear to have a lower rate of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing than do primary care physicians in other regions of Canada and the United States. PMID:10476734

  1. Determinants of prescribing of second-choice antibiotics for upper and lower respiratory tract in Dutch general practice.

    Duijn, H.J. van; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.; Schellevis, F.; Verheij, T.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the association between general practitioners' (GPs') characteristics and the volume of second-choice antibiotics for acute respiratory tract (RT) episodes by GPs. Methods: Morbidity and antibiotic prescription data originated from the Second Dutch Nat

  2. Metagenomic analysis of viral genetic diversity in respiratory samples from children with severe acute respiratory infection in China.

    Wang, Y; Zhu, N; Li, Y; Lu, R; Wang, H; Liu, G; Zou, X; Xie, Z; Tan, W

    2016-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) in children is thought to be mainly caused by infection with various viruses, some of which have been well characterized; however, analyses of respiratory tract viromes among children with SARI versus those without are limited. In this study, nasopharyngeal swabs from children with and without SARI (135 versus 15) were collected in China between 2008 and 2010 and subjected to multiplex metagenomic analyses using a next-generation sequencing platform. The results show that members of the Paramyxoviridae, Coronaviridae, Parvoviridae, Orthomyxoviridae, Picornaviridae, Anelloviridae and Adenoviridae families represented the most abundant species identified (>50% genome coverage) in the respiratory tracts of children with SARI. The viral population found in the respiratory tracts of children without SARI was less diverse and mainly dominated by the Anelloviridae family with only a small proportion of common epidemic respiratory viruses. Several almost complete viral genomes were assembled, and the genetic diversity was determined among several samples based on next-generation sequencing. This research provides comprehensive mapping of the viromes of children with SARI and indicates high heterogeneity of known viruses present in the childhood respiratory tract, which may benefit the detection and prevention of respiratory disease. PMID:26802214

  3. DNA repair capacity in the rat respiratory tract

    A product of alkylating agents and DNA, O6-methylguanine, can mispair with thymine, resulting in initiation of a carcinogenic tissue response. O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) is an acceptor protein responsible for repairing O6-methylguanine. The purpose of our experiments was to characterize AGT activity in vitro in tissue and cell extracts of the respiratory tract, a target tissue for inhaled alkylating agents. Removal of [3H]Methyl from O6-methylguanine was measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography after incubation of tissue and cell extracts with the [3H]DNA. With the exception of tracheal and bronchial extracts, all tissues and cells analyzed contained AGT activity, which increased in proportion to the amount of protein added to reaction flasks. AGT activity in tracheal and bronchial extracts was only detected at the highest protein concentration used (1.5 mg protein/mL) and ranged from 10-15 fmole/mg protein. AGT activity in the respiratory tract was highest in the lung and a region of the nasal tissue (i.e., ethmoturbinates) and ranged from 45-75 fmole/mg protein. These data suggest that methylated DNA in specific regions of the rat respiratory tract should be readily repaired, albeit to different extents. (author)

  4. Software for the draft NCRP respiratory tract dosimetry model

    A task group of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement (NCRP) is developing a new respiratory tract dosimetry model to update an earlier model developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Task Group on Lung Dynamics. To facilitate the use of the new model and model calculations, a menu-driven computer simulation package has been developed. The implementation and main features of the package are presented, including: (1) calculations of regional fractional deposition and clearance in the nasal, oral, tracheobronchial airways (16 generations), and pulmonary region; (2) scaling of respiratory tract airway size and breathing parameters for people of all sizes; and (3) incorporation of dissolution and mechanical clearance as two competing mechanisms. At present, the software package can be used to compute fractions of total inhaled radioactive material initially deposited and later retained in the respiratory tract regions. In the near future, the software will also make dosimetry calculations. This paper discusses mathematical formulations, computer languages, examples and future development associated with this package. (author)

  5. Compliance with Recommendations on Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing for Respiratory Tract Infections

    Malo, Sara; Bjerrum, Lars; Feja, Cristina;

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate antibiotic use in primary care, such as in Respiratory Tract Infections (RTIs), is an important cause of bacterial resistance. This study aimed at describing the current pattern of outpatient antibiotic use in acute RTIs in Spain and evaluating adherence to national recommendations......, and adherence to recommendations for antibiotic prescribing was assessed. One third of patients with a RTI were prescribed an antibiotic, with young adults (aged 15-64 years) being the most treated. High prescribing rates were observed in patients with acute otitis, sinusitis and acute tonsillitis (about 70......%), whereas low rates were found in acute bronchitis (50%) and non-specific upper RTIs (24%) episodes. A high prescription of broad-spectrum agents and antibiotics not recommended as first choice was observed. In accordance with Spanish guidelines, there exists a potential over-prescribing of antibiotics...

  6. Emergency thyroidectomy: Due to acute respiratory failure

    Zulfu Bayhan; Sezgin Zeren; Bercis Imge Ucar; Isa Ozbay; Yalcin Sonmez; Metin Mestan; Onur Balaban; Nilufer Araz Bayhan; Mehmet Fatih Ekici

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Giant cervical and mediastinal goiter may lead to acute respiratory failure caused by laryngotracheal compression and airway obstruction. Here, we present a case admitted to the emergency service with a giant goiter along with respiratory failure and poor general health status, which required urgent surgical intervention. PRESENTATION OF CASE: A 71-year-old female admitted to the emergency room with shortness of breath and poor general health status resulting from a giant cer...

  7. The pressure gradient in the human respiratory tract

    Chovancová, Michaela; Elcner, Jakub

    2014-03-01

    Respiratory airways cause resistance to air flow during inhalation and exhalation. The pressure gradient is necessary to transport the air from the mount (or nose) to pulmonary alveoli. The knowledge of pressure gradient (i.e. respiratory airways resistance) is also needed to solve the question of aerosol deposition in the human respiratory tract. The obtained data will be used as boundary conditions for CFD simulations of aerosol transport. Understanding of aerosol transport in the human lungs can help us to determine the health hazard of harmful particles. On the other hand it can be used to set the conditions for transport of medication to the desirable place. This article deals with the description of the mathematical equations defining the pressure gradient and resistance in the bronchial three and describes the geometry used in the calculation.

  8. Patterns Of Antimicrobial Use For Respiratory Tract Infections In Elderly Patients

    Background: Elderly patients are prone to respiratory tract infections (RTIs) both; acute bronchitis and pneumonia. A large proportion of the antibiotics prescribed are unlikely to provide clinical benefit to patients. There is an increased need to decrease excess antibiotic use in elderly to minimize antibiotic resistance. Objective: To describe patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) among elderly Patients and methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on one hundred elderly patients, aged > 60 years, both males and females to describe patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) among elderly patients. RTIs, categorized as acute bronchitis, and pneumonia, were studied for appropriateness of antimicrobial use, type of antibiotics used, and factors associated with their use. We rated antibiotic use as appropriate (when an effective drug was used), inappropriate (when a more effective drug was indicated), or unjustified (when use of any antimicrobial was not indicated). Results: Of 100 patients with RTI, overall treatment was appropriate in 79% of episodes, inappropriate in 9%, and unjustified in 12%. For acute bronchitis, treatment was appropriate in 85% and unjustified in 15% of cases. For pneumonia, treatment was appropriate in 55% of episodes. Among the most commonly used antimicrobials, B.Lactam + macrolides their use were unjustified in 41% of cases. There were statistical significant differences in the patterns of antibiotic use when stratified by age, gender, and co- morbid conditions including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Conclusion: Antimicrobials are unjustifiably used for 12% of RTIs and 15% of cases of acute bronchitis, thus suggesting a need for programs to improve antibiotic prescribing at hospitals.

  9. Procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment of respiratory tract infections in a primary care setting

    Aabenhus, Rune; Jensen, Jens Ulrik Stæhr

    2011-01-01

    , could greatly improve patient care and limit excessive antibiotic prescriptions. Procalcitonin is a new marker of suspected bacterial infection that has shown promise in guiding antibiotic therapy in acute respiratory tract infections in hospitals without compromising patient safety. Procalcitonin......-of-care test for procalcitonin with acceptable precision, severely hampering its application in primary care. This article reviews the physiology of procalcitonin, describes the assays available for its measurement, evaluates the present evidence from primary care on its use to identify correctly patients who......Clinical signs of infection do not allow for correct identification of bacterial and viral aetiology in acute respiratory infections. A valid tool to assist the clinician in identifying patients who will benefit from antibiotic therapy, as well as patients with a potentially serious infection...

  10. Diagnosis of Upper and Lower Respiratory Tract Bacterial Infections with the Use of Multiplex PCR Assays

    Jenny Kourea-Kremastinou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of respiratory infections by molecular techniques provides important information about the epidemiology of respiratory disease, especially during the post-vaccination era. The objective of the present study was the detection of bacterial pathogens directly in clinical samples from patients with upper and lower respiratory tract infections using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays developed in our laboratory. Clinical samples taken over a three-year period (2007–2009 and obtained from 349 patients (adults (n = 66; children (n = 283 with signs and symptoms of certain upper or lower respiratory tract infections, consisted of: bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL, n = 83, pleural fluids (n = 29, and middle-ear aspirates (n = 237. Overall, 212 samples (61% were confirmed by culture and/or PCR. Among the positive samples, Streptococcus pneumoniae (mainly serotype 3 was predominant (104/212; 49.0%, followed by non-typable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi 59/212; 27.8% and Streptococcus pyogenes (47/212; 22%. Haemophilus influenzae type b was detected in only three samples. The underlying microbiology of respiratory infections is gradually changing in response to various selective pressures, such as vaccine use and antibiotic consumption. The application of multiplex PCR (mPCR assays is particularly useful since it successfully identified the microorganisms implicated in acute otitis media or lower respiratory tract infections in nearly 75% of patients with a positive result compared to conventional cultures. Non-culture identification of the implicated pneumococcal serotypes is also an important issue for monitoring pneumococcal infections in the era of conjugate pneumococcal vaccines.

  11. Procalcitonin-guided antibiotic use versus a standard approach for acute respiratory tract infections in primary care: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial and baseline characteristics of participating general practitioners [ISRCTN73182671

    Bucher Heiner C

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI are among the most frequent reasons for consultations in primary care. Although predominantly viral in origin, ARTI often lead to the prescription of antibiotics for ambulatory patients, mainly because it is difficult to distinguish between viral and bacterial infections. Unnecessary antibiotic use, however, is associated with increased drug expenditure, side effects and antibiotic resistance. A novel approach is to guide antibiotic therapy by procalcitonin (ProCT, since serum levels of ProCT are elevated in bacterial infections but remain lower in viral infections and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this trial is to compare a ProCT-guided antibiotic therapy with a standard approach based on evidence-based guidelines for patients with ARTI in primary care. Methods/Design This is a randomised controlled trial in primary care with an open intervention. Adult patients judged by their general practitioner (GP to need antibiotics for ARTI are randomised in equal numbers either to standard antibiotic therapy or to ProCT-guided antibiotic therapy. Patients are followed-up after 1 week by their GP and after 2 and 4 weeks by phone interviews carried out by medical students blinded to the goal of the trial. Exclusion criteria for patients are antibiotic use in the previous 28 days, psychiatric disorders or inability to give written informed consent, not being fluent in German, severe immunosuppression, intravenous drug use, cystic fibrosis, active tuberculosis, or need for immediate hospitalisation. The primary endpoint is days with restrictions from ARTI within 14 days after randomisation. Secondary outcomes are antibiotic use in terms of antibiotic prescription rate and duration of antibiotic treatment in days, days off work and days with side-effects from medication within 14 days, and relapse rate from the infection within 28 days after randomisation. Discussion We aim to include 600

  12. Antibiotic knowledge and self-care for acute respiratory tract infections in Mexico Conocimiento y automedicación de antibióticos para infecciones respiratorias en México

    Ralph Gonzales

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine knowledge of and self-treatment with antibiotics among medically-insured adults in Mexico. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional, interviewer-administered survey among 101 adult patients seeking care for acute respiratory tract infections in a family medicine clinic in Mexico. Knowledge scores were calculated as a composite of correct, incorrect and don't know responses. Factors associated with antibiotic knowledge and antibiotic self-treatment were explored with bivariate analyses. RESULTS: 47% of participants were taking antibiotics prior to the visit, 20% were self-treating. Antibiotic knowledge was highly variable. Many participants believed common non-antibiotic treatments for colds and coughs were antibiotics, such as ambroxol (45%, Desenfriol (45% and paracetamol (44%. Older participants (>40 years had better knowledge scores. DISCUSSION: Self-treatment with and misperceptions about antibiotics are common among medically insured adults seeking medical attention in Mexico.OBJETIVO: Examinar el conocimiento y automedicación de antibióticos en adultos asegurados en México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Llevamos a cabo un estudio transversal mediante la administración de un cuestionario a 101 pacientes adultos que solicitaban atención médica por infección respiratoria aguda en una clínica de medicina familiar en México. La puntuación de conocimiento estuvo compuesta por respuestas correctas, incorrectas y "no sé", los factores asociados con conocimiento y automedicación de antibióticos fueron explorados mediante análisis bivariado. RESULTADOS: 47% de los participantes tomaron antibióticos previamente y 20% fueron automedicados. La puntuación de conocimiento fue muy variable. Muchos de los participantes creyeron que tratamientos comunes para resfriado y tos eran antibióticos, como ambroxol (45%, Desenfriol (45% y paracetamol (44%. Los participantes con mayor edad (>40 años obtuvieron mejores

  13. Clinical efficacy of ciprofloxacin in lower respiratory tract infections.

    Pedersen, S S

    1989-01-01

    The sputum pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of ciprofloxacin in lower respiratory tract infections is reviewed. Following intravenous administration, ciprofloxacin penetrates rapidly into bronchial tissue; the elimination half life is between 3 and 4 h and a dose dependency is seen. Following oral intake, the time to reach maximal concentrations is approximately two hours and after a dose of 750 mg the concentration may reach 1.7 mg/l in patients without cystic fibrosis and range from 0.5 to 3.4 mg/l in cystic fibrosis patients. Coadministration of ciprofloxacin increases serum levels and decreases total body clearance of theophylline. In controlled comparative clinical trials, ciprofloxacin has been found to have similar clinical efficacy as amoxycillin, ampicillin, cefalexin, doxycycline, co-trimoxazole, imipenem-cilastatin and ceftazidime for the treatment of a range of lower respiratory tract infections. Ciprofloxacin has been found to be superior in clinical efficacy to cefaclor. Experimental animal models suggest a role for ciprofloxacin in infections caused by Legionella pneumophila and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The clinical and bacteriological efficacy of ciprofloxacin is less pronounced in lung infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but is comparable to the combination of beta-lactams and aminoglycosides. Development of resistance is frequently observed during ciprofloxacin treatment of Ps. aeruginosa. Because of the availability of other oral and effective agents, ciprofloxacin is not recommended for empirical treatment of community acquired lower respiratory infections, but should be reserved for infections caused by multiply resistant organisms. PMID:2667111

  14. Procalcitonin guided antibiotic therapy and hospitalization in patients with lower respiratory tract infections: a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial

    Henzen Christoph

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Lower respiratory tract infections like acute bronchitis, exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and community-acquired pneumonia are often unnecessarily treated with antibiotics, mainly because of physicians' difficulties to distinguish viral from bacterial cause and to estimate disease-severity. The goal of this trial is to compare medical outcomes, use of antibiotics and hospital resources in a strategy based on enforced evidence-based guidelines versus procalcitonin guided antibiotic therapy in patients with lower respiratory tract infections. Methods and design: We describe a prospective randomized controlled non-inferiority trial with an open intervention. We aim to randomize over a fixed recruitment period of 18 months a minimal number of 1002 patients from 6 hospitals in Switzerland. Patients must be >18 years of age with a lower respiratory tract infections Discussion: Use of and prolonged exposure to antibiotics in lower respiratory tract infections is high. The proposed trial investigates whether procalcitonin-guidance may safely reduce antibiotic consumption along with reductions in hospitalization costs and antibiotic resistance. It will additionally generate insights for improved prognostic assessment of patients with lower respiratory tract infections. Trial registration: ISRCTN95122877

  15. Airway CD8(+) T Cells Are Associated with Lung Injury during Infant Viral Respiratory Tract Infection.

    Connors, Thomas J; Ravindranath, Thyyar M; Bickham, Kara L; Gordon, Claire L; Zhang, Feifan; Levin, Bruce; Baird, John S; Farber, Donna L

    2016-06-01

    Infants and young children are disproportionately susceptible to severe complications from respiratory viruses, although the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Recent studies show that the T cell response in the lung is important for protective responses to respiratory infections, although details on the infant/pediatric respiratory immune response remain sparse. The objectives of the present study were to characterize the local versus systemic immune response in infants and young children with respiratory failure from viral respiratory tract infections and its association to disease severity. Daily airway secretions were sampled from infants and children 4 years of age and younger receiving mechanical ventilation owing to respiratory failure from viral infection or noninfectious causes. Samples were examined for immune cell composition and markers of T cell activation. These parameters were then correlated with clinical disease severity. Innate immune cells and total CD3(+) T cells were present in similar proportions in airway aspirates derived from infected and uninfected groups; however, the CD8:CD4 T cell ratio was markedly increased in the airways of patients with viral infection compared with uninfected patients, and specifically in infected infants with acute lung injury. T cells in the airways were phenotypically and functionally distinct from those in blood with activated/memory phenotypes and increased cytotoxic capacity. We identified a significant increase in airway cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells in infants with lung injury from viral respiratory tract infection that was distinct from the T cell profile in circulation and associated with increasing disease severity. Airway sampling could therefore be diagnostically informative for assessing immune responses and lung damage. PMID:26618559

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus infection of the lower respiratory tract: radiological findings in 108 children

    For years the typical appearance of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced infection of the lower respiratory tract has been discussed. All available studies have led to different results. The aim of this study was to control these results, with 108 children. The age range was 1 day to 10 years (median 7 months). Within 72 h of admission, all children developed an RSV infection of the lower respiratory tract. Chest X-rays (pa-view) of 55 children under, and 53 children over, the age of 6 months (10/53>24 months) were evaluated. The diagnosis of RSV and the chest X-ray were mostly done on the same day. The major radiological findings of the two age-groups were compared by Wilcoxon's unpaired rank sum test. Major radiological findings were: normal chest X-ray (30%), central pneumonia (32%) or peribronchitis (26%). There was no statistical significance between the age-groups. Other findings were emphysema (11%), pleural effusion (6%), lobar- or broncho-pneumonia (each 6%), atelectasis (5%) or pneumothorax in one case. Therefore, the most common radiological findings in RSV-induced infection of the lower respiratory tract, supported by our results (RSV infection without bacterial superinfection) are central pneumonia, peribronchitis or normal chest X-ray. Thus an age-group separation into under or over 6 months is no longer necessary. (orig.)

  17. Anesthetic management of parturient with thoracic kyphoscoliosis, malaria and acute respiratory distress syndrome for urgent cesarean section

    Pandey, Ravindra Kr; Batra, Meenu M; Darlong, Vanlal; Garg, Rakesh; Punj, Jyotsna; Kumar, Sri

    2015-01-01

    The management of cesarean section in kyphoscoliotic patient is challenging. The respiratory changes and increased metabolic demands due to pregnancy may compromise the limited respiratory reserves in such patients. Presence of other comorbidities like malaria and respiratory tract infection will further compromise the effective oxygenation. We report a case of kyphoscoliosis along with malaria and acute respiratory distress syndrome for urgent cesarean section. PMID:26702219

  18. Respiratory failure in acute pancreatitis.

    Banerjee, A K; Haggie, S J; Jones, R B; Basran, G. S.

    1995-01-01

    There are a number of important pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis which make a significant contribution to the morbidity and mortality of the condition. The pathophysiology and management guidelines are given for each and approaches towards better treatment in the future are discussed.

  19. Incense use and respiratory tract carcinomas: a prospective cohort study

    Yuan, J.M.; Wang, R.; Koh, W.P.; Lee, H.P.; Yu, M.C.; Friborg, Jeppe Tang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Incense use is an integral part of daily life in large parts of Asia. The burning of incense is a powerful producer of particulate matter and the smoke contains a multitude of well-characterized carcinogens. However, to the authors' knowledge, no convincing association has been reported...... overall effect was observed on lung cancer. The duration and intensity of incense use were associated with an increased risk of squamous cell carcinomas in the entire respiratory tract (P for trend = .004), whereas there was no significant association noted between incense use and nonsquamous cell...

  20. SMART phones and the acute respiratory patient.

    Gleeson, L

    2012-05-01

    Definition of Respiratory Failure using PaO2 alone is confounded when patients are commenced on oxygen therapy prior to arterial blood gas (ABG) measurement. Furthermore, classification of Respiratory Failure as Type 1 or Type 2 using PaCO2 alone can give an inaccurate account of events as both types can co-exist. 100 consecutive presentations of acute respiratory distress were assessed initially using PaO2, and subsequently PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio, to diagnose Respiratory Failure. Respiratory Failure cases were classified as Type 1 or Type 2 initially using PaCO2, and subsequently alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient. Any resultant change in management was documented. Of 100 presentations, an additional 16 cases were diagnosed as Respiratory Failure using PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio in place of PaO2 alone (p = 0.0338). Of 57 cases of Respiratory Failure, 22 cases classified as Type 2 using PaCO2 alone were reclassified as Type 1 using A-a gradient (p < 0.001). Of these 22 cases, management changed in 18.

  1. Low to medium WU-virus titers in young children with lower respiratory tract infections.

    Kleines, Michael; Scheithauer, Simone; Hengst, Meike; Honnef, Dagmar; Ritter, Klaus; Mühler, Eberhard; Häusler, Martin; Rostamzadeh, Ayda

    2008-01-01

    The WU-virus (WUV), a novel polyomavirus, has recently been recovered from respiratory tract samples. Within a study collective of children with severe lower respiratory tract disease, 3% of the patients tested WUV positive. Viral loads ranged from 5 x 10(2) copies/ml to 1 x 10(4) copies/ml. The WUV genome-positive patients did not display specific clinical or radiological characteristics to be distinguished from other respiratory tract infections. PMID:19321930

  2. Nebulizer delivery of tobramycin to the lower respiratory tract.

    Weber, A; Smith, A; Williams-Warren, J; Ramsey, B; Covert, D S

    1994-05-01

    We characterized a tobramycin aerosol generated by five nebulizers: Micron One, Pulmosonic, Pulmo-Aide, DeVilbiss Model 65, and UltraNeb 100 by particle size and drug concentration. The Micron One nebulizer did not produce a recoverable aerosol, while the Pulmosonic had a minimal output; therefore three machines were examined for their ability to deliver tobramycin to the lower respiratory tract of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The DeVilbiss 65 had the greatest output: with air as the carrier gas it produced an aerosol with > 60% of the particles having a mean mass aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of > 5.5 microns. Using helox shifted the MMAD so that > 65% of the particles were 9.2 microns, without a change in the particles 60% particles, amount of aerosol with a < 3.3 microns MMAD to 98%. Tobramycin delivery to the lower respiratory tract with the Pulmo-Aide and UltraNeb 100 was compared using air or helox by measuring sputum drug concentration. Pulmo-Aide failed to produce detectable tobramycin in sputum in 2 out of 9 patients with CF. With the UltraNeb 100, all patients had measurable sputum tobramycin immediately after administration (range, 16.2-3385 micrograms/g), but no statistically significant difference was found when using either compressed air, helox, or ambient air.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8058428

  3. Proposed updating of the ICRP human respiratory tract model

    The ICRP Task Group on Internal Dosimetry is developing new Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides documents, which will include revised dose coefficients for inhalation of radionuclides by workers. Application of the ICRP Human Respiratory Tract Model requires a review of the lung-to-blood absorption characteristics of inhaled materials of importance in radiological protection. It is planned that, where appropriate, material-specific absorption parameter values will be given, and for other materials, assignments to default absorption Types will be made on the basis of current information. Publication of the Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides documents provides an opportunity for updating the Human Respiratory Tract Model in the light of experience and new information. The main possibilities under consideration relate to the two main clearance pathways: absorption to blood and particle transport. The review of absorption rates is providing a database of parameter values from which consideration can be given to deriving typical values for default Types F, M and S materials, and element-specific rapid dissolution rates. Important new data on rates of particle transport from the nasal passages, bronchial tree (slow phase) and alveolar-interstitial region have come from recent human studies, some of which were conducted to address uncertainties identified by development of the model. These new results, and others, are being reviewed alongside those available in 1993 when the model was finalised, to propose revisions based on the best currently-available information. This paper reports on the current status of this work. (author)

  4. Surveillance of acute respiratory infections among outpatients: A pilot study in Isfahan city

    Abbasali Javadi; Peyman Adibi; Behrooz Ataei; Zary Nokhodian; Majid Yaran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering that there was not any regional survey in Isfahan, Iran regarding the epidemiology of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI) in different age groups of general population, the aim of this study was to determine the epidemiologic feature of ARTIs in Isfahan using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, patients aged

  5. [Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis following adenovirus and respiratory syncytial virus infection].

    de Suremain, A; Somrani, R; Bourdat-Michel, G; Pinel, N; Morel-Baccard, C; Payen, V

    2015-05-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is responsible for nearly 10% of acute renal failure (ARF) cases in children. It is mostly drug-induced, but in a few cases viruses are involved, probably by an indirect mechanism. An immune-competent 13-month-old boy was admitted to the intensive care unit for severe ARF with anuria in a context of fever, cough, and rhinorrhea lasting 1 week. The kidney biopsy performed early brought out tubulointerstitial damage with mild infiltrate of lymphocytes, without any signs of necrosis. There were no virus inclusion bodies, no interstitial hemorrhage, and no glomerular or vascular damage. Other causes of TIN were excluded: there was no biological argument for an immunological, immune, or drug-induced cause. Adenovirus (ADV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) were positive in respiratory multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in nasal aspirate but not in blood, urine, and renal tissue. The patient underwent dialysis for 10 days but the response to corticosteroid therapy was quickly observed within 48 h. The mechanism of TIN associated with virus infection is unknown. However, it may be immune-mediated to be able to link severe renal dysfunction and ADV and/or RSV invasion of the respiratory tract. PMID:25842199

  6. Cefditoren in upper and lower community-acquired respiratory tract infections

    Francisco Soriano

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Soriano1, María-José Giménez1,2, Lorenzo Aguilar1,21PRISM-AG, Madrid, Spain; 2Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid, SpainAbstract: This article reviews and updates published data on cefditoren in the evolving scenario of resistance among the most prevalent isolates from respiratory tract infections in the community (Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. By relating the in vitro activity of cefditoren (in national and multinational surveillance and against isolates with emerging resistant genotypes/phenotypes to its pharmacokinetics, the cefditoren pharmacodynamic activity predicting efficacy (in humans, animal models, and in vitro simulations is analyzed prior to reviewing clinical studies (tonsillopharyngitis, sinusitis, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, and community-acquired pneumonia and the relationship between bacterial eradication and clinical efficacy. The high in vitro activity of cefditoren against the most prevalent respiratory isolates in the community, together with its pharmacokinetics (enabling a twice daily regimen leading to adequate pharmacodynamic indexes covering all S. pyogenes, H. influenzae, and at least 95% S. pneumoniae isolates, makes cefditoren an antibiotic that will play a significant role in the treatment of respiratory tract infections in the community. In the clinical setting, studies carried out with cefditoren showed that treatments with the 400 mg twice daily regimen were associated with high rates of bacteriological response, even against penicillin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae, with good correlation between bacteriological efficacy/response and clinical outcome.Keywords: cefditoren, Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, community-acquired respiratory tract infections

  7. Surfactant treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Lopez-Herce, J.; de Lucas, N; Carrillo, A.; Bustinza, A.; Moral, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine prospectively the efficacy of surfactant in acute respiratory distress syndrome.
STUDY DESIGN—Twenty patients, 1 month to 16 years of age, diagnosed with an acute pulmonary disease with severe hypoxaemia (PaO2/FiO2 < 100) (13 with systemic or pulmonary disease and seven with cardiac disease) were treated with one to six doses of 50-200 mg/kg of porcine surfactant administered directly into the trachea. The surfactant was considered to be effectiv...

  8. Atypical presentation of human bocavirus: Severe respiratory tract infection complicated with encephalopathy.

    Akturk, Hacer; Sık, Guntulu; Salman, Nuran; Sutcu, Murat; Tatli, Burak; Ciblak, Meral Akcay; Erol, Oguz Bulent; Torun, Selda Hancerli; Citak, Agop; Somer, Ayper

    2015-11-01

    Human bocavirus (HBOV) has been reported as a worldwide distributed respiratory pathogen. It has also been associated with encephalitis recently by detection of the virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients presented with encephalitis. This retrospective study aimed to present clinical features of HBOV infections in children with respiratory symptoms and describe unexplained encephalopathy in a subgroup of these patients. Results of 1,143 pediatric nasal samples from mid-December 2013 to July 2014 were reviewed for detection of HBOV. A multiplex real time polymerase chain reaction assay was used for viral detection. Medical records of the patients were retrospectively analyzed. HBOV was detected in 30 patients (2.6%). Median age was 14 months (5-80). Clinical diagnoses were upper respiratory tract infection (n = 10), bronchopneumonia (n = 9), acute bronchiolitis (n = 5), pneumonia (n = 4), acute bronchitis (n = 1), and asthma execarbation (n = 1). Hospitalization was required in 16 (53.3%) patients and 10 (62.5%) of them admitted to pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Noninvasive mechanical ventilation modalities was applied to four patients and mechanical ventilation to four patients. Intractable seizures developed in four patients while mechanically ventilated on the 2nd-3rd days of PICU admission. No specific reason for encephalopathy was found after a thorough investigation. No mortality was observed, but two patients were discharged with neurological sequela. HBOV may lead to respiratory infections in a wide spectrum of severity. This report indicates its potential to cause severe respiratory infections requiring PICU admission and highlights possible clinical association of HBOV and encephalopathy, which developed during severe respiratory infection. PMID:25966820

  9. Acute Respiratory Distress Due to Methane Inhalation

    Jo, Jun Yeon; Kwon, Yong Sik; Lee, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Seok; Rho, Byung Hak; Choi, Won-Il

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation of toxic gases can lead to pneumonitis. It has been known that methane gas intoxication causes loss of consciousness or asphyxia. There is, however, a paucity of information about acute pulmonary toxicity from methane gas inhalation. A 21-year-old man was presented with respiratory distress after an accidental exposure to methane gas for one minute. He came in with a drowsy mentality and hypoxemia. Mechanical ventilation was applied immediately. The patient's symptoms and chest rad...

  10. Predictors of antibiotic prescription in respiratory tract infections by ambulatory care practitioners Predictores de la prescripción de antibióticos en infecciones del tracto respiratorio por médicos de atención ambulatoria

    Mireya Aznar; Raúl Mejía; Robert Wigton; Roberto Fayanas

    2005-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in viral respiratory infections (common cold, acute rhinosinusitis and acute bronchitis) promotes the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria. Studies have found that antibiotics are prescribed for 50-70% of respiratory tract infections, despite the fact that most of them have a viral etiology. The objective of the study was to determine predictors of antibiotic use in acute respiratory infections. It was conducted as a cross-sectional study on physicians' practices ...

  11. Respiratory Failure in Acute Organophosphorus Pesticide Self-Poisoning

    Eddleston, Michael; Mohamed, Fahim; Davies, James OJ; Eyer, Peter; Worek, Franz; Sheriff, Mh Rezvi; Buckley, Nick A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Acute organophosphorus (OP) pesticide poisoning is a major clinical problem in the developing world. Textbooks ascribe most deaths to respiratory failure occurring in one of two distinct clinical syndromes - acute cholinergic respiratory failure or the intermediate syndrome. The delayed failure appears to be due to respiratory muscle weakness, but its pathophysiology is not yet clear.

  12. Relationship Between Upper Respiratory Tract Influenza Test Result and Clinical Outcomes Among Critically Ill Influenza Patients

    Reddy, Krishna P.; Bajwa, Ednan K.; Parker, Robert A.; Andrew B Onderdonk; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2016-01-01

    Among critically ill patients with lower respiratory tract (LRT)-confirmed influenza, we retrospectively observed worse 28-day clinical outcomes in upper respiratory tract (URT)-negative versus URT-positive subjects. This finding may reflect disease progression and highlights the need for influenza testing of both URT and LRT specimens to improve diagnostic yield and possibly inform prognosis.

  13. Lower Respiratory Tract Infections Due To Mycoplasma Pneumoniae: Report of Four Cases

    Çetinkaya, Feyzullah; Göçmen, Ayhan; Ustaçelebi, Şemsettin

    1993-01-01

    Mycoplasma pnemoniae is one of the most important causes of lower respiratory tract infections in childhood In this study four cases diagnosed by complement fixation method are reported and the rilevant literature is reviewed Key words: Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Lower Respiratory Tract

  14. Velocity profiles in idealized model of human respiratory tract

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with numerical simulation focused on velocity profiles in idealized model of human upper airways during steady inspiration. Three r gimes of breathing were investigated: Resting condition, Deep breathing and Light activity which correspond to most common regimes used for experiments and simulations. Calculation was validated with experimental data given by Phase Doppler Anemometry performed on the model with same geometry. This comparison was made in multiple points which form one cross-section in trachea near first bifurcation of bronchial tree. Development of velocity profile in trachea during steady inspiration was discussed with respect for common phenomenon formed in trachea and for future research of transport of aerosol particles in human respiratory tract.

  15. Deposition of cigarette smoke particles in the rat respiratory tract

    Male and female rats were exposed to mainstream cigarette smoke to determine the fractional deposition. Deposition studies were conducted by placing the rats in plethysmography tubes for respiratory minute volume measurements and exposing them to 14C-dotriacontane-labeled cigarette smoke at mass concentrations of 202 or 624 mg/m3 for 25 min. Immediately after the exposure, the rats were sacrificed and the 14C contents in various tissues and organs were analyzed. Results showed that the GI tract contained 16-31% of the total activity, indicating significant clearance from the large airways and nose to the GI tract during the exposure and during the 10-15 min between cessation of the exposure and the removal of the organs. Total deposition of the inhaled activity was 20.1 ± 1.6% for both exposure concentrations. The intrapulmonary deposition fractions (lung lobes plus airways below the lobar bronchi) were 12.4 ± 0.9% and 15.9 ± 1.4% for high and low concentrations, respectively, suggesting a slight enhancement in upper airway deposition for animals exposed to the higher smoke concentration. (author)

  16. Impact of Host Proteases on Reovirus Infection in the Respiratory Tract

    Nygaard, Rachel M.; Golden, Joseph W.; Schiff, Leslie A.

    2012-01-01

    Virion uncoating is an essential early event in reovirus infection. In natural enteric infections, rapid proteolytic uncoating of virions is mediated by pancreatic serine proteases. The proteases that promote reovirus disassembly and cell entry in the respiratory tract remain unknown. In this report, we show that endogenous respiratory and inflammatory proteases can promote reovirus infection in vitro and that preexisting inflammation augments in vivo infection in the murine respiratory tract.

  17. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript. PMID:27524204

  18. Deposition of inhaled particles in the respiratory tract as a function of age at exposure

    A respiratory tract deposition model was developed that would accommodate age 1 month to adulthood as an initial step in calculating radiation dose following inhalation during environmental exposures. The approach to changing respiratory tract and physiological parameters to be applicable to children was to derive an analytical function describing the ratio of the child value to the value for a reference adult with the desired characteristics. A computer program was written to carry out the tracing of airflow through the respiratory tract and deposition in each of the sections for monodispersed particles of known density and diameter. 7 references

  19. LUDEP 1.0, a personal computer program to implement the new ICRP respiratory tract model

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection has recently approved a new model of the human respiratory tract. This model has been designed to represent realistically the deposition and biokinetic behaviour of inhaled radionuclides, and to calculate doses to the respiratory tract. In order to examine the practical application and radiological implications of the new model, a Personal Computer program has been developed. LUDEP 1.0 is a user-friendly program for the IBM-compatible PC which enables the user to calculate doses to the respiratory tract and to other organs. (author)

  20. Acute respiratory failure following ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Antonello Nicolini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is a serious and potentially life-threatening physiological complication that may be encountered in patients who undergo controlled ovarian hyperstimulation cycles. The syndrome is typically associated with regimes of exogenous gonadotropins, but it can be seen, albeit rarely, when clomiphene is administered during the induction phase. Although this syndrome is widely described in scientific literature and is well known by obstetricians, the knowledge of this pathological and potentially life-threatening condition is generally less than satisfactory among physicians. The dramatic increase in therapeutic strategies to treat infertility has pushed this condition into the realm of acute care therapy. The potential complications of this syndrome, including pulmonary involvement, should be considered and identified so as to allow a more appropriate diagnosis and management. We describe a case of a woman with an extremely severe (Stage 6 ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome who presented ascites, bilateral pleural effusion and severe respiratory failure treated with non-invasive ventilation. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit because of severe respiratory failure, ascites, and bilateral pleural effusion due to ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Treatment included non-invasive ventilation and three thoracentesis procedures, plus the administration of albumin, colloid solutions and high-dose furosemid. Severe form of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is observed in 0.5-5% of the women treated, and intensive care may be required for management of thromboembolic complications, renal failure and severe respiratory failure. Pulmonary intensive care may involve thoracentesis, oxygen supplementation and, in more severe cases, assisted ventilation. To our knowledge, there have been only two studies in English language medical literature that describe severe respiratory failure treated with non

  1. Dysbiosis of upper respiratory tract microbiota in elderly pneumonia patients.

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Huijskens, Elisabeth G W; Wyllie, Anne L; Biesbroek, Giske; van den Bergh, Menno R; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Wang, Xinhui; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Bonten, Marc J; Rossen, John W A; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. We hypothesize that dysbiosis between regular residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiome, that is balance between commensals and potential pathogens, is involved in pathogen overgrowth and consequently disease. We compared oropharyngeal microbiota of elderly pneumonia patients (n=100) with healthy elderly (n=91) by 16S-rRNA-based sequencing and verified our findings in young adult pneumonia patients (n=27) and young healthy adults (n=187). Microbiota profiles differed significantly between elderly pneumonia patients and healthy elderly (PERMANOVA, Pbacterial community members in URT microbiota showed high specificity of 95% and sensitivity of 84% (89% and 73%, respectively, after cross-validation) for differentiating pneumonia patients from healthy individuals. These results suggest that pneumonia in elderly and young adults is associated with dysbiosis of the URT microbiome with bacterial overgrowth of single species and absence of distinct anaerobic bacteria. Whether the observed microbiome changes are a cause or a consequence of the development of pneumonia or merely coincide with disease status remains a question for future research. PMID:26151645

  2. Systematic Review of Factors Associated with Antibiotic Prescribing for Respiratory Tract Infections.

    McKay, Rachel; Mah, Allison; Law, Michael R; McGrail, Kimberlyn; Patrick, David M

    2016-07-01

    Antibiotic use is a modifiable driver of antibiotic resistance. In many circumstances, antibiotic use is overly broad or unnecessary. We systematically assessed factors associated with antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTI). Studies were included if they used actual (not self-reported or intended) prescribing data, assessed factors associated with antibiotic prescribing for RTIs, and performed multivariable analysis of associations. We searched Medline, Embase, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts using keyword and MeSH (medical subject headings) search terms. Two authors reviewed each abstract and independently appraised all included texts. Data on factors affecting antibiotic prescribing were extracted. Our searches retrieved a total of 2,848 abstracts, with 97 included in full-text review and 28 meeting full inclusion criteria. Compared to other factors, diagnosis of acute bronchitis was associated with increased antibiotic prescribing (range of adjusted odds ratios [aOR], 1.56 to 15.9). Features on physical exam, such as fever, purulent sputum, abnormal respiratory exam, and tonsillar exudate, were also associated with higher odds of antibiotic prescribing. Patient desire for an antibiotic was not associated or was modestly associated with prescription (range of aORs, 0.61 to 9.87), in contrast to physician perception of patient desire for antibiotics, which showed a stronger association (range of aORs, 2.11 to 23.3). Physician's perception of patient desire for antibiotics was strongly associated with antibiotic prescribing. Antimicrobial stewardship programs should continue to expand in the outpatient setting and should emphasize clear and direct communication between patients and physicians, as well as signs and symptoms that do and do not predict bacterial etiology of upper respiratory tract infections. PMID:27139474

  3. Clustering of acute respiratory infection hospitalizations in childcare facilities

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Benn, Christine Stabell; Simonsen, Jacob; Thrane, Nana; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2010-01-01

    To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics.......To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics....

  4. Regional distribution of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and DNA adducts in the respiratory tract - relationship to respiratory epithelial populations

    Specific regions from one-half of the nasal, tracheal, bronchial, and pulmonary airways of dogs were excised and analyzed for the presence of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. Substrates for different isozymes of cytochrome P-450, including benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), nitropyrene (NP), ethoxycoumarin, and ethoxyresorufin as well as selected Phase II enzymes were measured. Experiments were also conducted in which rats were exposed nose-only to dilute diesel exhaust (10 mg particles/m3) for up to 12 weeks. DNA adducts were measured in various regions of the respiratory tract after the 12-week exposure, using the highly sensitive 32P-postlabeling assay. The data indicate that there are significant differences in the metabolic capability and DNA adduct distribution along the respiratory tract. Quantitative differences that were noted along the respiratory tract are probably due to both differences in the capability of a given region to metabolize the organic chemicals associated with diesel exhaust and differences in the deposition patterns of the diesel exhaust. Differences in the metabolic capability, and therefore DNA adduct distribution, along the respiratory tracts of different species could explain, in part, why certain portions of the respiratory tract are more susceptible to tumor formation than are other portions

  5. Progress and perspectives in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Rotta, Alexandre Tellechea; Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Andreolio, Cinara; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of acute onset characterized by hypoxemia and infiltrates on chest radiographs that affects both adults and children of all ages. It is an important cause of respiratory failure in pediatric intensive care units and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, until recently, the definitions and diagnostic criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome have focused on the adult population. In this article, we review the evolution of the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome over nearly five decades, with a special focus on the new pediatric definition. We also discuss recommendations for the implementation of mechanical ventilation strategies in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and the use of adjuvant therapies. PMID:26331971

  6. Surfactant therapy for acute respiratory distress in infants

    Corrado Moretti; Barbàra, Caterina S; Rosanna Grossi; Stefano Luciani; Fabio Midulla; Paola Papoff

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains the primary indication for admission to paediatric intensive care units and accounts for significant mortality, morbidity and resource utilization. Respiratory infections, in particular pneumonia and severe bronchiolitis, are the most common causes of respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation in infants and children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and the management of paediatric patients with acute lung injury. Dat...

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: Pulmonary and extrapulmonary not so similar

    Inderpaul Singh Sehgal; Sahajal Dhooria; Digambar Behera; Ritesh Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by acute onset respiratory failure with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and hypoxemia. Current evidence suggests different respiratory mechanics in pulmonary ARDS (ARDSp) and extrapulmonary ARDS (ARDSexp) with disproportionate decrease in lung compliance in the former and chest wall compliance in the latter. Herein, we report two patients of ARDS, one each with ARDSp and ARDSexp that were managed using real-time esophageal pressure m...

  8. A new sampler for simulating aerosol deposition in the respiratory tract

    LI Dehong; ZHUO Weihai; YI Yanling; CHEN Bo; LIU Haikuan

    2008-01-01

    Abstract For estimation of the deposition fractions of radon progeny in different regions of the respiratory tract, a new sampler consisting of three different configurations of sampling heads was developed. The deposition fractions of aerosols on the wire screens inside the sampling heads were calculated with the fan model of filtration theory. The deposition fractions of aerosols in different regions of the respiratory tract were calculated with the lung dose evaluation program (LUDEP (C)) developed by National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) as References. In general indoor and mine environments, the deviation between the deposition fractions of attached aerosol on the wire screens designed in this study and its reference values in the respiratory tract is less than 5%. It is possible to accurately estimate the deposition fractions of radon progeny in different regions of the respiratory tract through mimic measurements of radon progeny collected with the new sampler.

  9. Treatment of adults with community-acquired respiratory tract infections: results of a multicentric clinical trial with gatifloxacin

    Medeiros Eduardo Alexandrino Servolo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infections have an important clinical and economic impact and they are the most common indication for antibiotic use in outpatient practice. This prospective, multicenter non-controlled trial assessed the efficacy and safety of gatifloxacin in the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Patients were treated with a daily oral dose of gatifloxacin 400 mg for 7-14 days. The diagnosis of respiratory infection was made based on the clinical condition and/or radiologic findings. A total of 5,044 adult patients with community-acquired respiratory infections was treated with gatifloxacin in different centers in Brazil between March 1, 2001, and October 31, 2001. Among the 5,044 patients treated, 1,501 patients (29.76% had community-acquired pneumonia, 756 (14.99% had acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis and 2,787 (55.25% had acute sinusitis. Of the total of patients treated, 3,607 (71.51% were considered cured, 1,261 (25% progressed with some clinical improvement, 28 (0.56% presented a relapse, 56 (1.11% failed to treatment and 92 (1.82% were unable to be evaluated. Adverse events were described in 634 (12.57% patients. The most common adverse events were: nausea (2.24%; dyspepsia (1.86%; diarrhea (0.79%; change in taste (0.46%; insomnia and irritability (0.22%; dizziness (0.77%; headache (0.42%; allergic reaction (0.18%; Central Nervous System alterations - insomnia, agitation, anxiety - (0.46%. This study showed that the treatment of respiratory tract infections with gatifloxacin was safe and efficient and had a low incidence of adverse events.

  10. Acute respiratory infections in young Ethiopian children

    Harris RA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca Arden HarrisDepartment of Family and Social Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USAThe identification of risk factors for acute respiratory infections (ARI is crucial for designing interventions to both minimize transmission and augment the immune response, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa where poverty-related ARI is still a major cause of preventable death in young children.1 I therefore read with interest Geberetsadik et al’s recent study of the factors associated with ARI in Ethiopian children.2 Their study uses nationally representative data on households and individuals to build a model of the social, demographic, and anthropometric determinants of ARI. A precise understanding of their model, however, requires clarification of several items in their paper.View original paper by Geberetsadik et al.

  11. Human Pharyngeal Microbiome May Play A Protective Role in Respiratory Tract Infections

    Gao, Zhancheng; Kang, Yu; Yu, Jun; Ren, Lufeng

    2014-01-01

    The human pharyngeal microbiome, which resides at the juncture of digestive and respiratory tracts, may have an active role in the prevention of respiratory tract infections, similar to the actions of the intestinal microbiome against enteric infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that the pharyngeal microbiome comprises an abundance of bacterial species that interacts with the local epithelial and immune cells, and together, they form a unique micro-ecological system. Most of the micro...

  12. Molecular Detection of Pneumocystis Jirovecii in Patients with Respiratory Tract Infections

    Oyebode Armstrong Terry Alli; David Olusoga Ogbolu; Olufunmi Ademola; Musiliu Adewale Oyenike

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pneumocystis jirovecii, formerly known as P. carinii, is an opportunistic fungus causing Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia especially in immunocompromised patients. Aim: The aim of this study was to detect P. jirovecii in sputum samples from patients suspected of having respiratory tract infections. Materials and Methods: In this study, 230 acid fast bacilli negative sputum samples from 230 patients presenting with respiratory tract infections submitted to three teaching hospitals′ m...

  13. [Respiratory tract infections in children treated on an outpatient basis for a year].

    Karkowski, M K

    1993-09-01

    On the basis of doctor's work record an analysis was done of respiratory tract diseases in children treated in the Paediatric Division of the Regional outpatient Clinic of the Railway Health Service in Elblag in 1991. Respiratory tract infections accounted for 24.17% attendance (255.42% in July and 53.62% in March). Despite periodicity, high morbidity persisted over the whole year. PMID:7975596

  14. Role of pneumococcal virulence genes in the etiology of respiratory tract infection and biofilm formation

    Kurola, P. (Paula)

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Streptococcus pneumoniae, pneumococcus, is a common cause of respiratory tract infections and also a common inhabitant of the upper respiratory tract of healthy people. At present, 93 different polysaccharide types have been identified and in addition to them, unencapsulated pneumococci are found especially in healthy carriers. Pneumococci are usually identified by using a bacterial culture combined with biochemical or immunochemical tests. Recently, new DNA-based methods, such a...

  15. Procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment of respiratory tract infections in a primary care setting: are we there yet?

    Aabenhus, R.; Jensen, J.U.

    2011-01-01

    , could greatly improve patient care and limit excessive antibiotic prescriptions. Procalcitonin is a new marker of suspected bacterial infection that has shown promise in guiding antibiotic therapy in acute respiratory tract infections in hospitals without compromising patient safety. Procalcitonin......-of-care test for procalcitonin with acceptable precision, severely hampering its application in primary care. This article reviews the physiology of procalcitonin, describes the assays available for its measurement, evaluates the present evidence from primary care on its use to identify correctly patients who......Clinical signs of infection do not allow for correct identification of bacterial and viral aetiology in acute respiratory infections. A valid tool to assist the clinician in identifying patients who will benefit from antibiotic therapy, as well as patients with a potentially serious infection...

  16. Analysis of antibiotic consumption for treating respiratory tract infections in children and compliance with the national clinical guidelines

    Lakić Dragana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Respiratory infections are the most common infections in children. The aims of the study were to analyze the use of antibiotics for respiratory infections in the period 2008 - 2010 in children’s population in region of Niš and to estimate the rational use of antibiotics in relation to the recommendations of the National Guidelines for physicians in primary care. Material and methods. Data source was a Pharmacy Niš database. Antibiotics prescriptions were selected for the following diagnoses: H65-H75 (acute otitis media, mastoiditis, J01 (acute sinusitis, J02-J03 (tonsillopharyngitis, J12-J18 (community acquired pneumonia, J20 (acute bronchitis, J32 (chronic sinusitis, J42 (chronic bronchitis. Antibiotic consumption was expressed in defined daily dose/1000 inhabitants/day. Results. The most widely prescribed antibiotic for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections in children during the three years was amoxicillin (34.63; 32.50 and 31.00 defined daily dose/1000 inhabitants/day in 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. In the treatment of infections of the middle ear and mastoid, the combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid, was the most prescribed antibiotics (60% of total consumption of antibiotics for this indication. Azithromycin was the most widely prescribed antibiotic for the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections in children during the observed period (6.92; 8.20 and 7.18 defined daily dose/1000 inhabitans/day in 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. Conclusion. Recommendations of national guidelines are not complied with the treatment of upper and lower respiratory infections in the children population in region of Niš. This could be a sign of potentially irrational use of antibiotics that need to be further examined. Education of physicians can influence irrational use of antibiotics.

  17. Acute respiratory distress in a silversmith

    Jignesh Mukeshkumar Parikh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old young male patient presented in casualty department with severe respiratory distress on the fourth day from onset of symptoms. The patient was nonsmoker and had no antecedent medical or drug history. Prior to admission, patient had dry cough and bilateral pleuritic chest pain for the last three days. He was in severe respiratory distress with use of accessory muscles of respiration. On examination, he had heart rate of 120 beats/min, blood pressure (BP of 150/80, respiratory rate of 48-52/min and central cyanosis present. On systemic examination, reduced intensity of breath sounds with extensive rhonchi and crepitation was found in both lung fields, with other examination being within normal limits. On pulse oximetry, oxygen saturation was 28% on room air, which increased up to 36% with the help of 4 L oxygen via nasal prongs. PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio was 100. Chest X-ray analysis was suggestive of non-cardiac pulmonary edema in view of bilateral fluffy opacity without cardiomegaly. In view of 2/3 positive criteria, his provisional diagnosis was Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. He required mechanical ventilatory support and was gradually weaned over a period of 10 days. The patient was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics and other supportive measures. On re-evaluation of history, we found that he was a goldsmith by occupation, smelting silver and gold for the past 8-10 years. On the day of onset of symptoms, while smelting silver he was exposed to golden yellow fumes for around 15 minutes, with the quantum of exposure more than any other day earlier. From previous experience and analysis of similar silver metals, he was able to tell us that the silver was adulterated with large amount of cadmium on that day than before. Serum level of cadmium was 2.9 μg/L 6 days after initial exposure. At the time of discharge, he had residual opacities in the chest radiograph and resting oxygen saturation was 94% on room air.

  18. Human respiratory tract model for radiological protection: A revision of the ICRP Dosimetric Model for the Respiratory System

    In 1984, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) appointed a task group of Committee 2 to review and revise, as necessary, the ICRP Dosimetric Model for the Respiratory System. The model was originally published in 1966, modified slightly in Publication No. 19, and again in Publication No. 30 (in 1979). The task group concluded that research during the past 20 y suggested certain deficiencies in the ICRP Dosimetric Model for the Respiratory System. Research has also provided sufficient information for a revision of the model. The task group's approach has been to review, in depth, morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract; deposition of inhaled particles in the respiratory tract; clearance of deposited materials; and the nature and specific sites of damage to the respiratory tract caused by inhaled radioactive substances. This review has led to a redefinition of the regions of the respiratory tract for dosimetric purposes. The redefinition has a morphologic and physiological basis and is consistent with observed deposition and clearance of particles and with resultant pathology. Regions, as revised, are the extrathoracic (E-T) region, comprising the nasal and oral regions, the pharynx, larynx, and upper part of the trachea; the fast-clearing thoracic region (T[f]), comprising the remainder of the trachea and bronchi; and the slow-clearing thoracic region (T[s]), comprising the bronchioles, alveoli, and thoracic lymph nodes. A task group report will include models for calculating radiation doses to these regions of the respiratory tract following inhalation of representative alpha-, beta-, and gamma-emitting particulate and gaseous radionuclides. The models may be implemented as a package of computer codes available to a wide range of users

  19. Clinical features of probable severe acute respiratory syndrome in Beijing

    Hai-Ying Lu; Xiao-Yuan Xu; Yu Lei; Yang-Feng Wu; Bo-Wen Chen; Feng Xiao; Gao-Qiang Xie; De-Min Han

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To summarize clinical features of probable severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Beijing.METHODS: Retrospective cases involving 801 patients admitted to hospitals in Beijing between March and June 2003, with a diagnosis of probable SARS, moderate type.The series of clinical manifestation, laboratory and radiograph data obtained from 801 cases were analyzed. RESULTS: One to three days after the onset of SARS, the major clinical symptoms were fever (in 88.14% of patients), fatigue, headache, myalgia, arthralgia (25-36%), etc. The counts of WBC (in 22.56% of patients) lymphocyte (70.25%)and CD3, CD4, CD8 positive T cells (70%) decreased. From 4-7 d, the unspecific symptoms became weak; however, the rates of low respiratory tract symptoms, such as cough (24.18%), sputum production (14.26%), chest distress (21.04%) and shortness of breath (9.23%) increased, so did the abnormal rates on chest radiograph or CT. The low counts of WBC, lymphocyte and CD3, CD4, CD8 positiveT cells touched bottom. From 8 to 16 d, the patients presented progressive cough (29.96%), sputum production (13.09%), chest distress (29.96%) and shortness of breath (35.34%). All patients had infiltrates on chest radiograph or CT, some even with multi-infiltrates. Two weeks later, patients' respiratory symptoms started to alleviate, the infiltrates on the lung began to absorb gradually, the counts of WBC, lymphocyte and CD3, CD4, CD8 positive T cells were restored to normality.CONCLUSION: The data reported here provide evidence that the course of SARS could be divided into four stages, namely the initial stage, progressive stage, fastigium and convalescent stage.

  20. X-ray orbiscope physiological examination of the upper respiratory tract in newborn and infants using

    Physiological changes in the laryngotracheal axis were examined during the respiratory cycle by image inten fication with high image frequency (6 images/sec). This examination of movements appeared to be very useful in functional disturbances of the trachea for analyzing the symptoms of obstructive disturbances in the upper respiratory tract. (orig.)

  1. Viral and Bacterial Interactions in the Upper Respiratory Tract

    Bosch, Astrid A. T. M.; Biesbroek, Giske; Trzcinski, Krzysztof; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Bogaert, Debby

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory infectious diseases are mainly caused by viruses or bacteria that often interact with one another. Although their presence is a prerequisite for subsequent infections, viruses and bacteria may be present in the nasopharynx without causing any respiratory symptoms. The upper respiratory t

  2. Antimicrobial treatment of lower respiratory tract infections in the hospital setting.

    Grossman, Ronald F; Rotschafer, John C; Tan, James S

    2005-07-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) that may require hospitalization include acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (AECB), community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), which includes ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) is treated similar to HAP and may be considered with HAP. For CAP requiring hospitalization, the current guidelines for the treatments of RTIs generally recommend either a beta-lactam and macrolide combination or a fluoroquinolone. The respiratory fluoroquinolones (levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gemifloxacin) are excellent antibiotics due to high levels of susceptibility among gram-negative, gram-positive, and atypical pathogens. The fluoroquinolones are active against > 98% of Streptococcus pneumoniae, including penicillin-resistant strains. Fluoroquinolones are also recommended for AECB requiring hospitalization. Evidence from clinical trials suggests that levofloxacin monotherapy is as efficacious as combination ceftriaxone-erythromycin therapy in the treatment of patients hospitalized with CAP. For early-onset HAP, VAP, and HCAP without the risk of multidrug resistance, ceftriaxone, ampicillin-sulbactam, ertapenem, or one of the fluoroquinolones is recommended. High-dose, short-course therapy regimens may offer improved treatment due to higher drug concentrations, more rapid killing, increased adherence, and the potential to reduce development of resistance. Recent studies have shown that short-course therapy with levofloxacin, azithromycin, or telithromycin in patients with CAP was effective, safe, and tolerable and may control the rate of resistance. PMID:15993675

  3. Cryptosporidial Infection of Lower Respiratory Tract in a Budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulates

    Gharagozlou, M.J.,

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporial and bacterial co-infection is reported in a budgerigar with clinical manifestations of septicemia and respiratory tract infection. Microscopically large number of round to oval 2-5μm cryptosporidial organisms were found to be lodged on the parabronchial epithelial cells of the respiratory tract. The bacterial colonies were seen around the parabronchial spaces of the lung tissue. It is suggested that the C. baileyi is the most likely cryptosporidium species which caused respiratory cryptosporidiosis in the budgerigar.

  4. A preliminary approach to age-dependent deposition modeling for human respiratory tract

    Since the respiratory tract model, presented by the ICRP Task Group on Lung Dynamics, is limited to adult workers for determining internal radiation exposure from inhaled radionuclides, the development of the model for estimating radiation doses in the general public, including all age groups, from environmental radioactive materials is required. This paper provides background information in developing the age-dependent respiratory tract model. A way of obtaining deposition probability through major mechanisms, such as impaction, sedimentation, and diffusion, in the respiratory airways is given. A computer program for estimating the percent deposition of inhaled monodisperse particles is described. (Namekawa, K.)

  5. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: epidemiology and management approaches

    Walkey AJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Allan J Walkey,1 Ross Summer,1 Vu Ho,1 Philip Alkana21The Pulmonary Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 2Asthma Research Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Acute lung injury and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome represent a spectrum of lung disease characterized by the sudden onset of inflammatory pulmonary edema secondary to myriad local or systemic insults. The present article provides a review of current evidence in the epidemiology and treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, with a focus on significant knowledge gaps that may be addressed through epidemiologic methods.Keywords: acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, review, epidemiology

  6. ENTEROVIRUSES ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS DURING SEVEN YEARS IN RIO DE JANEIRO (1985-1991

    PORTES Silvana A.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Enteroviruses were investigated in respiratory secretions collected from patients with acute respiratory infections (ARI over a seven year period (1985-1991, as part of a longitudinal study of ARI aetiology. All the viruses that are most commonly associated with ARI were found in this study. Among the virus isolates, enteroviruses were only less frequent than respiratory syncytial viruses, adenoviruses and influenzaviruses. Forty five enterovirus samples were isolated from patients with either upper respiratory tract infections (URTI or lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI. From these enterovirus isolates, thirty one samples were identified as poliovirus (n=18 and non polio enterovirus (n=13 by serum neutralization. Poliovirus were identified as type 1 and 2 and all of them were vaccinal strains. From thirteen non polio enterovirus, twelve were identified as echovirus serotypes 1, 2, 7, 11, 19 and 31. The remainder was identified as coxsackievirus B4.

  7. The role of imaging in adult acute urinary tract infection

    Webb, J.A.W. [Diagnostic Radiology Department, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, West Smithfield, London EC1A 7BE (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    Imaging is required in only a minority of patients with urinary tract infection. Some patients who present with severe loin pain are imaged because ureteric colic is suspected. If urinary tract infection does not respond normally to antibiotics, imaging is undertaken to check for evidence of renal obstuction or sepsis. Finally, after the acute infection has been treated, imaging is required in some patients to check for factors pre-disposing to renal damage or to relapsing or recurrent infection. This review discusses the appropriate choice of imaging technique to use in each clinical situation and summarises the expected findings. (orig.). With 15 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The role of imaging in adult acute urinary tract infection

    Imaging is required in only a minority of patients with urinary tract infection. Some patients who present with severe loin pain are imaged because ureteric colic is suspected. If urinary tract infection does not respond normally to antibiotics, imaging is undertaken to check for evidence of renal obstuction or sepsis. Finally, after the acute infection has been treated, imaging is required in some patients to check for factors pre-disposing to renal damage or to relapsing or recurrent infection. This review discusses the appropriate choice of imaging technique to use in each clinical situation and summarises the expected findings. (orig.). With 15 figs., 1 tab

  9. Drug Utilization Study on Antibiotics Use in Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

    Harish Govind Naik

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Antibiotics are commonly prescribed for the lower respiratory tract infection. But if antibiotics are not used rationally then there will be increase chances of resistance of bacteria as well as increase in the total cost of treatment. This study was conducted to see the antibiotics utilization pattern. Aim: This drug utilization study was conducted to evaluate the pattern of antibiotics use in Medicine Department of a Krishna Hospital, Karad, Maharashtra, India. 96 case records were examined, of which 46.87% were LRTI (nonspecific LRTI and acute bronchitis and 51% were pneumonia. Female accounted for 53.12% and male for 46.87 % of total cases. The World Health Organization (WHO indicators (utilization in defined daily doses (DDD; DDD/1000inhibitant/day were used and the ATC/DDD method was implemented. The most frequently prescribed antibiotic was ceftriaxone, followed by Azithromycin. The DDD/1000inhibitant/day of Azithromycin was the highest (5.74. Average treatment period was found to be 5.42 and 6.52 for LRTI (nonspecific LRTI and Acute Bronchitis and pneumonia respectively. A total of 96 cases studied; in which 33 cases had mono-antibiotic therapy (33.37% and rest contained poly-antibiotics therapy (66.63%. Prescribing by generic names has to be encouraged. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(4.000: 324-327

  10. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  11. Postoperative Acute Respiratory Failure In Patients Treated Surgically For Goiters

    Buła Grzegorz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to present a clinical picture, treatment and prognosis regarding patients who developed acute respiratory failure (ARF while treated surgically for a goiter.

  12. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASE AS THE DEBUT OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    A. Yu. Ischenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus — a chronic autoimmune disease that is often associated with infectious processes. The paper presents two clinical cases of systemic lupus erythematosus , debuted with acute respiratory infection.

  13. BACTERIAL PROFILE, ANTIBIOTIC SENSITIVITY AND RESISTANCE OF LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN UPPER EGYPT

    Gamal Agmy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI account for a considerable proportion of morbidity and antibiotic use. We aimed to identify the causative bacteria, antibiotic sensitivity and resistance of hospitalized adult patients due to LRTI in Upper Egypt. METHODS: A multicentre prospective study was performed at 3 University Hospitals for 3 years. Samples included sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL for staining and culture, and serum for serology. Samples were cultured on 3 bacteriological media (Nutrient, Chocolate ,MacConkey's agars.Colonies were identified via MicroScan WalkAway-96. Pneumoslide IgM kit was used for detection of atypical pathogens via indirect immunofluorescent assay. RESULTS: The predominant isolates in 360 patients with CAP were S.pneumoniae (36%, C. pneumoniae (18%, and M. pneumoniae (12%. A higher sensitivity was recorded for moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, macrolides, and cefepime. A higher of resistance was recorded for doxycycline, cephalosporins, and β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitors. The predominant isolates in 318 patients with HAP were, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; MRSA (23%, K. pneumoniae (14%, and polymicrobial in 12%. A higher sensitivity was recorded for vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, and moxifloxacin. Very high resistance was recorded for β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitors and cephalosporins. The predominant organisms in 376 patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (AECOPD were H. influnzae (30%, S. pneumoniae (25%, and M. catarrhalis(18%. A higher sensitivity was recorded for moxifloxacin, macrolides and cefepime. A higher rate of resistance was recorded for aminoglycosides and cephalosporins CONCLUSIONS: The most predominant bacteria for CAP in Upper Egypt are S. pneumoniae and atypical organisms, while that for HAP are MRSA and Gram negative bacteria. For acute exacerbation of COPD,H.influnzae was the commonest organism. Respiratory quinolones

  14. Non-invasive versus invasive mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Loretta YC Yam; Alfred YF Chan; Thomas MT Cheung; Eva LH Tsui; Jane CK Chan; Vivian CW Wong

    2005-01-01

    Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome is frequently complicated by respiratory failure requiring ventilatory support. We aimed to compare the efficacy of non-invasive ventilation against invasive mechanical ventilation treating respiratory failure in this disease. Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted on all respiratory failure patients identified from the Hong Kong Hospital Authority Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Database. Intubation rate, mortality and secondary outcome of a hospital utilizing non-invasive ventilation under standard infection control conditions (NIV Hospital) were compared against 13 hospitals using solely invasive ventilation (IMV Hospitals). Multiple logistic regression analyses with adjustments for confounding variables were performed to test for association between outcomes and hospital groups. Results Both hospital groups had comparable demographics and clinical profiles, but NIV Hospital (42 patients) had higher lactate dehydrogenase ratio and worse radiographic score on admission and ribavirin-corticosteroid commencement. Compared to IMV Hospitals (451 patients), NIV Hospital had lower adjusted odds ratios for intubation (0.36, 95% CI 0.164-0.791, P=0.011) and death (0.235, 95% CI 0.077-0.716, P=0.011), and improved earlier after pulsed steroid rescue. There were no instances of transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome among health care workers due to the use of non-invasive ventilation.Conclusion Compared to invasive mechanical ventilation, non-invasive ventilation as initial ventilatory support for acute respiratory failure in the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome appeared to be associated with reduced intubation need and mortality.

  15. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far.......Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  16. Non-invasive mechanic ventilation in treating acute respiratory failure

    Federico Lari; Novella Scandellari; Ferdinando De Maria; Virna Zecchi; Gianpaolo Bragagni; Fabrizio Giostra; Nicola DiBattista

    2009-01-01

    Non invasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory failure (ARF) improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, decrease mortality and endo tracheal intubation (ETI) rate also outside the intensive care units (ICUs). Objective of this study is to verify applicability of NIV in a general non respiratory medical ward. We enrolled 68 consecutive patients (Pts) with Hypoxemic or Hyper capnic ARF: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ...

  17. Revision of the ICRP dosimetric model for the human respiratory tract

    Bair, W.J.

    1990-12-01

    Although the dosimetric model of the respiratory tract used in ICRP Publication 30 had not been shown to be seriously deficient for the purpose of calculating Annual Limits on Intake (ALIs) for workers, the availability of new information led the ICRP in 1984 to create a special Task Group to review the dosimetric model of the respiratory tract and, if justified, propose revisions or a new model. The Task Group directed its efforts toward improving the model used in Publication 30 rather than developing a completely new model. The objective was a model that would facilitate calculation of biologically meaningful doses; be consistent with morphological, physiological, and radiobiological characteristics of the respiratory tract; incorporate current knowledge; meet all radiation protection needs; be user friendly by not being unnecessarily sophisticated; be adaptable to development of computer software for calculation of relevant radiation doses from knowledge of a few readily measured exposure parameters; be equally useful for assessment purposes as for calculating ALIs; be applicable to all members of the world population; and consider the influence of smoking, air pollutants, and diseases of the inhalation, deposition, and clearance of radioactive particles from the respiratory tract. The model provides for calculation of a committed dose equivalent for each region, adjusted for the relative cancer sensitivity of that region, and for the summing of these to yield a committed dose equivalent for the entire respiratory tract. 3 figs.

  18. Acute effects of winter air pollution on respiratory health

    Zee, van der S.

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis, acute respiratory health effects of exposure to winter air pollution are investigated in panels of children (7-11 yr) and adults (50-70 yr) with and without chronic respiratory symptoms, living in urban and non-urban areas in the Netherlands. The study was performed during three cons

  19. The upper respiratory tract microbiome and its potential role in bovine respiratory disease and otitis media

    Lima, Svetlana F.; Teixeira, Andre Gustavo V.; Higgins, Catherine H.; Lima, Fabio S.; Bicalho, Rodrigo C.

    2016-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract (URT) hosts a complex microbial community of commensal microorganisms and potential pathogens. Analyzing the composition and nature of the healthy URT microbiota and how it changes over time will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of pneumonia and otitis. A longitudinal study was conducted including 174 Holstein calves that were divided in four groups: healthy calves, calves diagnosed with pneumonia, otitis or both diseases. Deep pharyngeal swabs were collected on days 3, 14, 28, and 35 of life, and next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene as well as quantitative PCR was performed. The URT of Holstein dairy calves aged 3 to 35 days revealed to host a highly diverse bacterial community. The relative abundances of the bacterial genera Mannheimia, Moraxella, and Mycoplasma were significantly higher in diseased versus healthy animals, and the total bacterial load of newborn calves at day 3 was higher for animals that developed pneumonia than for healthy animals. Our results corroborate the existing knowledge that species of Mannheimia and Mycoplasma are important pathogens in pneumonia and otitis. Furthermore, they suggest that species of Moraxella can potentially cause the same disorders (pneumonia and otitis), and that high neonatal bacterial load is a key contributor to the development of pneumonia. PMID:27363739

  20. [Exposure to tobacco smoke and type of acute respiratory infections in children].

    Bielska, Dorota; Trofimiuk, Emil; Ołdak, Elzbieta; Cylwik, Bogdan; Chlabicz, Sławomir

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are the most common cause of the child and family practice physicians are one of the main reasons for referral to a specialist clinic and hospital pediatric wards. The severity of respiratory disease in adolescence influenced by various factors, endo- and exogenous. Some of them, especially environmental factors can be eliminated or reduced and thus reduce the risk of developing this disease. The most common source of pollutants in dwellings is tobacco smoke. The aim of this study was to assess exposure to tobacco smoke in three years old children of attending local kindergartens in Białystok and its influence on the type of recovery from acute respiratory infections by the respondents. The study included 313 children from among the 1,200 who attend the local 51-kindergartens in Bialystok. Information on the structure of tobacco use in three-years-old-children's families and respiratory illnesses among random children were obtained, based on anonymous questionnaires completed by their carers. Exposure to tobacco smoke was based on questionnaires and serum cotinine in relation to creatinine in the urine of patients (K/K). In the 150 families surveyed children found 210 smoking people. Every day smoked 37.3% of fathers and 23.6% of mothers. Of the children surveyed--34% of the houses which where there was a prohibition on tobacco use, 35% of the houses which were smoked in enclosed areas, in 31% of homes have not been established no-smoking rules. Children who during the six-month period to attend kindergarten gone lower respiratory tract infection had mean K/K (59.57 ng/mg) higher than the ones that were healthy and underwent upper respiratory tract infection. Used by the parents of the children tested in part to reduce the exposure to tobacco smoke in the home environment was ineffective and did not influence the decrease in the incidence of lower respiratory tract. PMID:21360910

  1. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients: A Respiratory Therapist Perspective

    Hidalgo, V.; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C; Pérez, R.; Cerpa, F; Budini, H; Cáceres, D.; Gutiérrez, T.; Molina, J; Keymer, J; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapist in Chile and Respiratory Therapist worldwide are the professionals who are experts in respiratory care, in mechanical ventilation (MV), pathophysiology and connection and disconnection criteria. They should be experts in every aspect of the acute respiratory failure and its management, they and are the ones who in medical units are able to resolve doubts about ventilation and the setting of the ventilator. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation should be the first-line of treatmen...

  2. Application of sequence-independent amplification to screen for potentially viral pathogens from clinical respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory tract infection of unknown etiology%应用序列非依赖扩增技术检测儿童呼吸道标本中潜在病毒病原体

    郭英; 钱渊; 段招军

    2012-01-01

    目的 应用序列非依赖扩增技术(sequence-independent amplification,SIA)检测常见病毒筛查阴性的5岁以下急性呼吸道感染患儿的呼吸道标本中可能存在的潜在病毒病原体,了解SIA扩增文库中各种背景核酸的组成.方法 随机选择45份常见病毒筛查阴性的5岁以下急性呼吸道感染患儿的鼻咽吸出物,0.45μm过滤和DNase/RNase处理去除病毒颗粒外的各种外源性核酸,再通过序列非依赖扩增技术对处理后的标本提取的核酸进行扩增,继而对扩增产物进行克隆、测序和BLAST比对.结果 测序403个克隆,获得有效序列368个,检出16个(16/368,4.3%)真核病毒同源序列,分别与Torque teno mini virus,Torque teno midi virus和Human bocavirus同源.此外,还检出1个真菌病毒( sclerotinia sclerotiorum hypovirulence associated DNA virus 1)同源序列和5个细菌病毒(噬菌体)同源序列.其余检出序列包含206个( 206/368,56.0%)与人基因组DNA同源的序列,11个(11/368,3.0%) rRNA同源序列,72个(72/368,19.6%)细菌同源序列,4个(4/368,1.1%)真菌同源序列,5个(5/368,1.4%)寄生虫同源序列,6个(6/368,1.6%)食源性序列,以及36个(36/368,9.8%)未能确定分类的序列.结论 核酸消化结合SIA方法可以检出常规检测方法所无法检出的潜在病毒病原体,本研究为后续系统性的查找和监测未知病毒提供了基础.%Objective Application of sequence-independent amplification (SIA) to identify the potentially viral pathogens in the clinical respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory tract infection of unknown etiology and characterize the composition of various non-viral sequences in the library of SIA amplicons.Method 45 randomly selected pediatric nasopharyngeal aspirate(NPA) samples for which no causal agent could be identified by common viruses screening were subjected to filtration & DNase/RNase treatments to remove the non-viral nucleic acid and then followed by

  3. EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACT WITH MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a common human respiratory pathogen, has been studied experimentally for years using intranasal inoculation of the golden Sytrian hamster. Because of recent evidence outlining the role in pulmonary immune development of particle size and depth of mycoplasma...

  4. Human Bocavirus in Patients with Respiratory Tract Infection

    Kim, Jang Su; Lim, Chae Seung; Kim, Young Kee; Lee, Kap No; Lee, Chang Kyu

    2011-01-01

    Background Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a newly identified viral pathogen, and its clinical epidemiology and significance in respiratory infections have not yet been completely elucidated. We investigated the prevalence of HBoV infection and the association between viral (HBoV) load and clinical features of the infection in patients of all age-groups. Methods Nasopharyngeal aspirates from patients with symptoms of respiratory infection were tested for presence of HBoV by using real-time polymera...

  5. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in an alpaca cria

    Simpson, Katharine M.; Streeter, Robert N.; Genova, Suzanne G.

    2011-01-01

    A 7-hour-old alpaca was presented for lethargy and depression. The cria responded favorably to initial treatment but developed acute-onset dyspnea 48 hours later. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was diagnosed by thoracic imaging and blood gas analysis. The cria was successfully treated with corticosteroids and discharged from the hospital.

  6. In vivo Measurement of Unattached Radon Progeny Deposited in the Human Respiratory Tract

    Seven nose breathing and seven mouth breathing volunteers were exposed to atmospheres enriched with unattached radon progeny (218Po, 214Pb and 214Bi). The activity of these radionuclides deposited in the respiratory track was measured in vivo after the exposures. The results of these measurements are in agreement with predictions calculated with the ICRP Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract Model. Temporal analysis of the activity deposited in the heads of the volunteers leads to the conclusion that a significant amount of the deposited activity associated with particle diameters of about 1 nm is not subject to a fast transport to the gastrointestinal tract as generally reported for larger aerosol particles. (author)

  7. Radiologic findings of childhood lower respiratory tract infection by influenza virus

    After the RS (respiratory syncytial) virus, the influenza virus is the most common cause of childhood lower respiratory tract infection. We assessed the radiologic findings of childhood lower respiratory tract infection by the influenza virus. A total of 105 pediatric patients (76 males and 29 females; mean age, 2.4 years) with symptoms of respiratory tract infection were examined between March 1997 and April 2000. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained and influenza virus infection was confirmed by direct or indirect immunofluorescent assays. Peribronchial infiltration, hyperinflation, atelectasis, pulmonary consolidation, and hilar lymphadenopathy were evaluated retrospectively at simple chest radiography. Bilateral perihiler peribronchial infiltration was noted in 78.1% of patients (n=82), hyperinflation in 63.8% (n=67), atelectasis in 3.8% (n=4, segmental 50%, lobar 50%), and pulmonary consolidation in 16.2% [n=17; segmental 70.6% (n=12), lobar 29.4% (n=5)]. Hilar lymphadenopathy was noted in one patient in whom there was no pleural effusion, and subglottic airway narrowing in 12 of 14 in whom the croup symptom complex was present. The major radiologic findings of influenza virus infection were bilateral perihilar peribronchial infiltration and hyperinflation. In some patients, upper respiratory tract infection was combined with subgolttic airway narrowing. Atelectasis or pleural effusion was rare

  8. Radiologic findings of childhood lower respiratory tract infection by influenza virus

    Song, Ho Taek; Park, Choong Ki; Shin, Hee Jung; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Hahm, Chang Kok; Hern, Ahn You [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-01

    After the RS (respiratory syncytial) virus, the influenza virus is the most common cause of childhood lower respiratory tract infection. We assessed the radiologic findings of childhood lower respiratory tract infection by the influenza virus. A total of 105 pediatric patients (76 males and 29 females; mean age, 2.4 years) with symptoms of respiratory tract infection were examined between March 1997 and April 2000. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained and influenza virus infection was confirmed by direct or indirect immunofluorescent assays. Peribronchial infiltration, hyperinflation, atelectasis, pulmonary consolidation, and hilar lymphadenopathy were evaluated retrospectively at simple chest radiography. Bilateral perihiler peribronchial infiltration was noted in 78.1% of patients (n=82), hyperinflation in 63.8% (n=67), atelectasis in 3.8% (n=4, segmental 50%, lobar 50%), and pulmonary consolidation in 16.2% [n=17; segmental 70.6% (n=12), lobar 29.4% (n=5)]. Hilar lymphadenopathy was noted in one patient in whom there was no pleural effusion, and subglottic airway narrowing in 12 of 14 in whom the croup symptom complex was present. The major radiologic findings of influenza virus infection were bilateral perihilar peribronchial infiltration and hyperinflation. In some patients, upper respiratory tract infection was combined with subgolttic airway narrowing. Atelectasis or pleural effusion was rare.

  9. Absorbed fraction of electrons in human respiratory tract

    Absorbed fractions of electrons, defined as part of electron energy deposited in the target, were calculated for various combinations of source and targets in HRTM. In that propose source code for PENELOPE was developed while respirator tract was modeled according to ICRP66. Absorbed fractions were fitted with the function presented in the paper

  10. Age related aspects of physiology in respiratory tract modelling

    Dosimetric assessments for inhaled radionuclides require the use of age-related physiological parameters. The dimensions and masses of respiratory organs in children, aged 3 months, 1,5,10 and 25 years, and standard values for respiratory volumes such as functional residual capacity (FRC) have been reviewed. Airway dimensions were scaled to body sizes and masses to body weights. Daily inspired air volumes were calculated for each age for different physical activities and breathing rates. The same retention functions for deposited material have to be applied to adults and children because the available data provide no firm support for age specific values. (author)

  11. Respiratory tract dose calculation considering physiological parameters from samples of Brazilian population

    The Human Respiratory Tract Model proposed by the ICRP Publication 66 accounts for the morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract. The ICRP 66 presents deposition fraction in the respiratory tract regions considering reference values from Caucasian man. However, in order to obtain a more accurate assessment of intake and dose the ICRP recommends the use of specific information when they are available. The application of parameters from Brazilian population in the deposition and in the clearance model shows significant variations in the deposition fractions and in the fraction of inhaled activity transferred to blood. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the influence in dose calculation to each region of the respiratory tract when physiological parameters from Brazilian population are applied in the model. The purpose of the dosimetric model is to evaluate dose to each tissues of respiratory tract that are potentially risk from inhaled radioactive materials. The committed equivalent dose, H.T., is calculated by the product of the total number of transformations of the radionuclide in tissue source S over a period of fifty years after incorporation and of the energy absorbed per unit mass in the target tissue T, for each radiation emitted per transformation in tissue source S. The dosimetric model of Human Respirator y Tract was implemented in the software Excel for Windows (version 2000) and H.T. was determined in two stages. First it was calculated the number of total transformations, US, considering the fractional deposition of activity in each source tissue and then it was calculated the total energy absorbed per unit mass S.E.E., in the target tissue. It was assumed that the radionuclide emits an alpha particle with average energy of 5.15 MeV. The variation in the fractional deposition in the compartments of the respiratory tract in changing the physiological parameters from Caucasian to Brazilian adult man causes variation in the number of

  12. Aspergillus thyroiditis: a complication of respiratory tract infection in an immunocompromised patient.

    Alvi, Madiha M; Meyer, David S; Hardin, Nicholas J; Dekay, James G; Marney, Annis M; Gilbert, Matthew P

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year-old male with past medical history significant for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma status after chemotherapy presented with acute onset of neck pain, odynophagia, and dysphagia associated with subjective fever, chills, and dyspnea. Physical findings included a temperature of 38.4°C, hypertension, and tachycardia. Patient was found to have anterior neck tenderness. Laboratory evaluation revealed neutropenia. The patient was started on empiric antibacterial and antiviral therapy and continued on home prophylactic antifungal treatment. Thyroid function tests revealed overt hyperthyroidism. A thyroid ultrasound showed heterogeneous echotexture without discrete nodules. Subacute thyroiditis was treated with methylprednisolone, metoprolol, and opiate analgesics. Patient's antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral treatments were broadened. A fine needle aspiration was not conducted. The patient's condition deteriorated rapidly over his brief hospital course and he expired. Autopsy showed fungal thyroiditis secondary to disseminated invasive Aspergillus. This report describes the presentation of fungal thyroiditis secondary to disseminated invasive Aspergillus originating from the respiratory tract. The authors review the diagnostic challenges, pathophysiology, and treatment of this condition. PMID:24455333

  13. Experimental Study of H120 Vaccination Efficacy on Respiratory Tract in Broiler Chickens

    Yousef Doustar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious bronchitis is an acute viral disease with high contagious and mortality among chicks. Apparent symptoms of Infectious bronchitis in chicks are tracheal respiration and nasal discharges. The objective of this study was to assessment H120 vaccination efficacy on respiratory tract in Broiler Chickens. In this study, 60 Ross 308 commercial strain one-day old chicks free of mycoplasma galisepticum and mycoplasma synoviae were divided into two, control and treatment, groups and three sub groups of 10 chicks. The treatment sub groups were vaccinated against bronchitis on the first day. All of chicks were placed in the hatchery and 20 mL of 10% formalin. H120 lyophilized vaccine of massachoset strain prepared in Razi institute was used for vaccination. The results of the present study show that spraying form of vaccination has a high reaction. So it is recommended that this kind of vaccination is used carefully. In the present study the aftermath of H120 vaccine spray was observed and recorded during Histopathological studies.

  14. Clinical relevance of prevention of respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infection in preterm infants born between 33 and 35 weeks gestational age

    Carbonell-Estrany, X.; Bont, L.; Doering, G.; Gouyon, J-B; Lanari, M.

    2008-01-01

    Premature infants are vulnerable to severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) resulting in hospitalisation and the potential for longer-term respiratory morbidity. Whilst the severity and consequence of RSV LRTI are generally accepted and recognised in infants

  15. An epidemiological survey to assess the clinical use of cephalosporins in community-acquired respiratory tract infections

    Vikram Sobti

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: In-clinic use of cefpodoxime as monotherapy is preferred in upper respiratory tract infections. However, clinicians recommend a combination therapy of cefpodoxime and levofloxacin in lower respiratory tract infections. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(3.000: 547-550

  16. Infection Feature and Drug Resistance of Bacteria of Inferior Respiratory Tract in Patients with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Guiyang of China%贵阳地区慢性阻塞性肺疾病急性加重期下呼吸道细菌感染特征和耐药性分析

    周忠; 王燕; 蔡翠; 龙海; 张娟; 查小芳

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the infective bacteria of inferior respiratory tract by analyzing sputum and secretion from inferior respiratory tract in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( AECOPD ) in Guiyang of China, and to provide evidence for clinical therapy. Methods Sputum and secretion of inferior respiratory tract of 254 patients with AECOPD admitted in our hospital from 1 April 2009 to 30 April 2010 in Guiyang were cultured and drug sensitivity tests were conducted, with one or more strains of bacteria being cultured. Results Positive sputum and secretion of inferior respiratory tract culture were found in 215 ( 84. 65% ) patients with AECOPD, and 516 strains of pathogenic bacteria were cultured. Among these bacteria, the six main pathogenic bacteria were 305 (59. 11% ) strains of moraxella catarrhalis, 108 ( 20. 93% ) strains of streptococus viridans, 22 ( 4. 26% ) strains escherichia coli, 14 ( 2. 71% ) strains of enteroaerogen, 14 ( 2. 71% ) strains of klebsie pneumoniae and 11 ( 2. 13% ) strains of hafnia alvei. There were single infective bacteria in 154 patients with AECOPD and mixing infective bacteria in 61 patients with AECOPD. Single infective bacteria were the mainly influence factors for the severity of AECOPD. Single infective bacteria and mixing infective bacteria both showed linear regression correlation with the severity of AECOPD. The same bacterial isolates were founded many times in sputum cultures, but the drug resistances of these outcomes were not the same in 60 patients with AECOPD. Six main types of pathogenic bacteria had more drug resistance ( moraxella catarrhalis et al ) to penicillin, ampicillin, erythromycin, ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Most of the gram-negative bacillus had low drug resistance to cephalosporins. The positive sputum germiculture was positively correlated with the severity of heart function of corpulmonale. Conclusion The moraxella catarrhalis and treptococus

  17. The effect of using an interactive booklet on childhood respiratory tract infections in consultations: Study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial in primary care

    Nuttall Jacqueline

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory tract infections in children result in more primary care consultations than any other acute condition, and are the most common reason for prescribing antibiotics (which are largely unnecessary. About a fifth of children consult again for the same illness episode. Providing parents with written information on respiratory tract infections may result in a reduction in re-consultation rates and antibiotic prescribing for these illnesses. Asking clinicians to provide and discuss the information during the consultation may enhance effectiveness. This paper outlines the protocol for a study designed to evaluate the use of a booklet on respiratory tract infections in children within primary care consultations. Methods/Design This will be a cluster randomised controlled trial. General practices will be randomised to provide parents consulting because their child has an acute respiratory tract infection with either an interactive booklet, or usual care. The booklet provides information on the expected duration of their child's illness, the likely benefits of various treatment options, signs and symptoms that should prompt re-consultation, and symptomatic treatment advice. It has been designed for use within the consultation and aims to enhance communication through the use of specific prompts. Clinicians randomised to using the interactive booklet will receive online training in its use. Outcomes will be assessed via a telephone interview with the parent two weeks after first consulting. The primary outcome will be the proportion of children who re-consult for the same illness episode. Secondary outcomes include: antibiotic use, parental satisfaction and enablement, and illness costs. Consultation rates for respiratory tract infections for the subsequent year will be assessed by a review of practice notes. Discussion Previous studies in adults and children have shown that educational interventions can result in reductions

  18. Mycoplasmas isolated from the respiratory tract of cattle and goats in Tanzania

    Kusiluka, L.J.M.; Ojeniyi, B.; Friis, N.F.; Kazwala, R.R.; Kokotovic, Branko

    2000-01-01

    A microbiological study of the mycoplasma flora in the respiratory tracts of cattle and goats in selected regions of Tanzania is described. In the examination of cattle, mycoplasmas were isolated from 60 (17.8%) of the 338 examined lung samples, 8 (47.1%) of the 17 lymph nodes, 4 (13.3%) of the 3...

  19. Selective media for recovery of Haemophilus influenzae from specimens contaminated with upper respiratory tract microbial flora.

    Chapin, K. C.; Doern, G V

    1983-01-01

    Isolation of Haemophilus influenzae from specimens contaminated with upper respiratory tract microbial flora was attempted with three different media: enriched chocolate agar, chocolate agar plus vancomycin, and chocolate agar plus vancomycin, bacitracin, and clindamycin. Recovery rates of H. influenzae from 852 pediatric pharyngeal swab specimens were 6.0, 28.5, and 59.9%, respectively.

  20. Effectiveness of adenoidectomy in children with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections

    van den Aardweg, M.T.A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the effects of adenoidectomy in children with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs).Despite being one of the most frequent operations performed in children, evidence for the effectiveness of adenoidectomy is scarce and guidance in particular for children with re

  1. Epidemiology of respiratory tract infections in Dutch general practice: a historical analysis.

    Schellevis, F.G.; Donker, G.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To describe time trends in the incidence of respiratory tract infections in general practice in the Netherlands and its relation to sex and age. Design and Methods: Data will be presented from several morbidity surveys conducted in general practices in the Netherlands: the Intermittent Morbidi

  2. Prognosis of primary care patients aged 80 years and older with lower respiratory tract infection

    van de Nadort, Christiana; Smeets, Hugo M; Bont, Jettie; Zuithoff, N Peter A; Hak, Eelko; Verheij, Theo J M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Predictors for a complicated course of a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) episode among patients aged > or =80 years are unknown. AIM: To determine prognostic factors for hospital admission or death within 30 days after first onset of LRTI among primary care patients aged > or =8

  3. COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF MAMMALIAN RESPIRATORY TRACTS: THE NASOPHARYNGEAL REGION AND THE TRACHEOBRONCHIAL REGION

    Silicone rubber casts of the respiratory tract are used in morphological studies of the human, baboon, rhesus monkey, dog, rabbit, guinea pig, rat, hamster, and mouse. n these studies, the trachea of the specimen was opened by tracheotomy, and silicone rubber (734 RTV) was introd...

  4. The acute respiratory distress syndrome: from mechanism to translation

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a form of severe hypoxemic respiratory failure characterized by inflammatory injury to the alveolar capillary barrier with extravasation of protein-rich edema fluid into the airspace. Although many modalities have been investigated to treat ARDS for the past several decades, supportive therapies still remain the mainstay of treatment. Here, we briefly review the definition, epidemiology and pathophysiology of ARDS. Next, we present emerging as...

  5. An Unusual Cause of Acute Hypercapneic Respiratory Failure

    Janice Wang; Astha Chichra; Seth Koenig

    2011-01-01

    We present a rare cause of hypercapneic respiratory failure through this case report of a 72-year-old man presenting with progressive dyspnea and dysphagia over two years. Hypercapneic respiratory failure was acute on chronic in nature without an obvious etiology. Extensive workup for intrinsic pulmonary disease and neurologic causes were negative. Laryngoscopy and diagnostic imaging confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, also known as DISH, as the cause of upper...

  6. Respiratory virus infections and aeroallergens in acute bronchial asthma.

    Carlsen, K H; Orstavik, I; Leegaard, J; Høeg, H

    1984-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty six attacks of acute bronchial asthma occurring in 169 children aged over 2 years were studied during a two year period. More attacks occurred during spring and autumn than at other times of the year. In 73 patients (29%) a respiratory virus infection was diagnosed, with the same seasonal variation as the asthmatic attacks. Most of the virus infections were caused by rhinovirus (45%) and respiratory syncytial virus (19%). There was no significant correlation between asth...

  7. An unusual cause of epistaxis, anemia and upper respiratory tract obstruction, Leeches: Report of three cases

    Engin Şengül

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The leech is an endoparasite for man and may cause lethal complications. In this article, we report two cases of 4 and 6-year-old who presented epistaxis due to leech infestasyon in nasopharynx and other case of 65-year-old adult with alzheimer who presented obstruction of upper respiratory tracks and anemia due to leech infestation in larynx. Especially in rural areas, it should always be borne in mind that leech might cause high mortality and morbidity due to serious complications such as anemia and obstruction of upper respiratory tracts and should be considered in evaluating the differential diagnosis of upper airway obstruction. J Clin Exp Invest 2012; 3 (3: 401-403Key words: Leech, epistaxis, anemia, obstruction of upper respiratory tract.

  8. Safety and tolerability of moxifloxacin in the treatment of respiratory tract infections: a post-marketing surveillance conducted in Indonesia

    Arini Setiawati

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Moxifloxacin 400 mg tablet has been marketed in Indonesia for several indications, i.e. acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (AECB, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, and acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS. To assess the safety and tolerability of moxifloxacin, a post-marketing surveillance study was conducted in the year 2001 involving 589 physicians. Clinical efficacy was also evaluated, both by physicians and patients, using a 6-symptom total score, which was scaled 0-12. A total of 1715 patients with acute sinusitis, CAP, AECB, and other infections were treated with oral moxifloxacin 400 mg once daily. There were 151 (8.8% patients with adverse events (AEs and 5 (0.29% patients with serious adverse events (SAEs that were considered related to moxifloxacin treatment. The most common adverse reactions were nausea (4.96%, dizziness (1.52%, vomiting (0.64%, headache (0.47%, and weakness (0.47%. Twenty three (1.34% patients discontinued treatment due to adverse events. Tolerance to treatment was rated very good and good by 647 (37.7% and 919 (53.6% of patients, respectively. Based on physicians’ clinical assessment, 57.7% of patients were cured and 39.9% were improved at the end of treatment. Mean total symptom score, as assessed by the patients, decreased from 6.43 on day-1 to 2.76 on day-3. Totally, 95.3% of patients felt better after receiving moxifloxacin and 97.6% of patients had good impression on moxifloxacin treatment. In conclusion, treatment of respiratory tract infections, mainly AECB, CAP and ABS, with moxifloxacin 400 mg once daily in this post-marketing surveillance was shown to be safe and well tolerated. Moxifloxacin was also shown to be highly effective in the treatment of these infections with rapid improvement of symptoms. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 11-19Keywords : post-marketing survtillance, PMS, moxifloxacin, respiratory tract infections

  9. Is there still room for novel viral pathogens in pediatric respiratory tract infections?

    Blanca Taboada

    Full Text Available Viruses are the most frequent cause of respiratory disease in children. However, despite the advanced diagnostic methods currently in use, in 20 to 50% of respiratory samples a specific pathogen cannot be detected. In this work, we used a metagenomic approach and deep sequencing to examine respiratory samples from children with lower and upper respiratory tract infections that had been previously found negative for 6 bacteria and 15 respiratory viruses by PCR. Nasal washings from 25 children (out of 250 hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia and nasopharyngeal swabs from 46 outpatient children (out of 526 were studied. DNA reads for at least one virus commonly associated to respiratory infections was found in 20 of 25 hospitalized patients, while reads for pathogenic respiratory bacteria were detected in the remaining 5 children. For outpatients, all the samples were pooled into 25 DNA libraries for sequencing. In this case, in 22 of the 25 sequenced libraries at least one respiratory virus was identified, while in all other, but one, pathogenic bacteria were detected. In both patient groups reads for respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus-OC43, and rhinovirus were identified. In addition, viruses less frequently associated to respiratory infections were also found. Saffold virus was detected in outpatient but not in hospitalized children. Anellovirus, rotavirus, and astrovirus, as well as several animal and plant viruses were detected in both groups. No novel viruses were identified. Adding up the deep sequencing results to the PCR data, 79.2% of 250 hospitalized and 76.6% of 526 ambulatory patients were positive for viruses, and all other children, but one, had pathogenic respiratory bacteria identified. These results suggest that at least in the type of populations studied and with the sampling methods used the odds of finding novel, clinically relevant viruses, in pediatric respiratory infections are low.

  10. Unravelling the transcriptome profile of the Swine respiratory tract mycoplasmas.

    Franciele Maboni Siqueira

    Full Text Available The swine respiratory ciliary epithelium is mainly colonized by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma flocculare and Mycoplasma hyorhinis. While colonization by M. flocculare is virtually asymptomatic, M. hyopneumoniae and M. hyorhinis infections may cause respiratory disease. Information regarding transcript structure and gene abundance provides valuable insight into gene function and regulation, which has not yet been analyzed on a genome-wide scale in these Mycoplasma species. In this study, we report the construction of transcriptome maps for M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis, which represent data for conducting comparative studies on the transcriptional repertory. For each species, three cDNA libraries were generated, yielding averages of 415,265, 695,313 and 93,578 reads for M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis, respectively, with an average read length of 274 bp. The reads mapping showed that 92%, 98% and 96% of the predicted genes were transcribed in the M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis genomes, respectively. Moreover, we showed that the majority of the genes are co-expressed, confirming the previously predicted transcription units. Finally, our data defined the RNA populations in detail, with the map transcript boundaries and transcription unit structures on a genome-wide scale.

  11. Acute pancreatitis and acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating dengue haemorrhagic fever

    Agrawal, Avinash; Jain, Nirdesh; Gutch, Manish; Shankar, Amit

    2011-01-01

    Dengue infection is now known to present with wide spectrum of complications. Isolated cases of acute pancreatitis complicating dengue haemorrhagic fever have been reported in literature. Here the authors report a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever that develops acute pancreatitis and presented with acute onset of breathlessness, which then progressed to full-blown acute respiratory distress syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of dengue haemorrhagic fever complicated wi...

  12. Low Request of Antibiotics from Patients with Respiratory Tract Infections in Six Countries: Results from the Happy Audit Study

    Carl Llor

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A total of 59,535 patients with respiratory tract infections were registered in the Happy Audit project, an audit-based, before-and-after study conducted in primary care centres of six countries (Argentina, Denmark, Lithuania, Russia, Spain, and Sweden in 2008 and 2009. An antibiotic was explicitly requested by the patient in 1,255 cases (2.1%, with a great variation across countries ranging from 0.4%–4.9%. Antibiotics were significantly more often prescribed to patients requesting them compared to those who did not (64% vs. 28%; p < 0.001. Patients with acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were most likely to request antibiotics while those with common colds were least likely (3.9% vs. 1.2%, respectively. The presence of tonsillar exudates and dyspnoea were more commonly associated with a demand for antibiotics. Even though physicians very often perceive that patients demand an antibiotic, the results of this study clearly show that patients only request antibiotics in a low percentage of cases. Patients were most likely to request antibiotics when they had symptoms of lower respiratory tract infections and when they came with more severe symptoms. Furthermore, there were considerable differences between countries, suggesting that the different backgrounds and traditions largely explain this variability in patients’ requests for antibiotics.

  13. Acute respiratory viral infections in pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Eliana C.A. Benites

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to estimate the prevalence of infection by respiratory viruses in pediatric patients with cancer and acute respiratory infection (ARI and/or fever. METHODS: cross-sectional study, from January 2011 to December 2012. The secretions of nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed in children younger than 21 years with acute respiratory infections. Patients were treated at the Grupo em Defesa da Criança Com Câncer (Grendacc and University Hospital (HU, Jundiaí, SP. The rapid test was used for detection of influenza virus (Kit Biotrin, Inc. Ireland, and real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (FTD, Respiratory pathogens, multiplex Fast Trade Kit, Malta for detection of influenza virus (H1N1, B, rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, human parechovirus, bocavirus, metapneumovirus, and human coronavirus. The prevalence of viral infection was estimated and association tests were used (χ2 or Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: 104 samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate and blood were analyzed. The median age was 12 ± 5.2 years, 51% males, 68% whites, 32% had repeated ARIs, 32% prior antibiotic use, 19.8% cough, and 8% contact with ARIs. A total of 94.3% were in good general status. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (42.3% was the most prevalent neoplasia. Respiratory viruses were detected in 50 samples: rhinoviruses (23.1%, respiratory syncytial virus AB (8.7%, and coronavirus (6.8%. Co-detection occurred in 19% of cases with 2 viruses and in 3% of those with 3 viruses, and was more frequent between rhinovirus and coronavirus 43. Fever in neutropenic patients was observed in 13%, of which four (30.7 were positive for viruses. There were no deaths. CONCLUSIONS: the prevalence of respiratory viruses was relevant in the infectious episode, with no increase in morbidity and mortality. Viral co-detection was frequent in patients with cancer and ARIs.

  14. Spatiotemporal interplay of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and respiratory mucosal cells drives viral dissemination in rhesus macaques.

    Liu, L; Wei, Q; Nishiura, K; Peng, J; Wang, H; Midkiff, C; Alvarez, X; Qin, C; Lackner, A; Chen, Z

    2016-07-01

    Innate immune responses have a critical role in the control of early virus replication and dissemination. It remains unknown, however, how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) evades respiratory innate immunity to establish a systemic infection. Here we show in Chinese macaques that SARS-CoV traversed the mucosa through the respiratory tract within 2 days, resulting in extensive mucosal infiltration by T cells, MAC387(+), and CD163(+) monocytes/macrophages followed by limited viral replication in the lung but persistent viral shedding into the upper airway. Mucosal monocytes/macrophages sequestered virions in intracellular vesicles together with infected Langerhans cells and migrated into the tonsils and/or draining lymph nodes within 2 days. In lymphoid tissues, viral RNA and proteins were detected in infected monocytes upon differentiation into dendritic cells (DCs) within 3 days. Systemic viral dissemination was observed within 7 days. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the spatiotemporal interactions of SARS-CoV, monocytes/macrophages, and the DC network in mucosal tissues and highlights the fact that, while these innate cells contribute to viral clearance, they probably also serve as shelters and vehicles to provide a mechanism for the virus to escape host mucosal innate immunity and disseminate systemically. PMID:26647718

  15. Man-made mineral fibers and the respiratory tract.

    Costa, Roser; Orriols, Ramon

    2012-12-01

    Man-made mineral fibers are produced using inorganic materials and are widely used as thermal and acoustic insulation. These basically include continuous fiberglass filaments, glass wool (fiberglass insulation), stone wool, slag wool and refractory ceramic fibers. Likewise, in the last two decades nanoscale fibers have also been developed, among these being carbon nanotubes with their high electrical conductivity, mechanical resistance and thermal stability. Both man-made mineral fibers and carbon nanotubes have properties that make them inhalable and potentially harmful, which have led to studies to assess their pathogenicity. The aim of this review is to analyze the knowledge that currently exists about the ability of these fibers to produce respiratory diseases. PMID:22763045

  16. Measurement techniques for respiratory tract deposition of airborne nanoparticles: a critical review.

    Löndahl, Jakob; Möller, Winfried; Pagels, Joakim H; Kreyling, Wolfgang G; Swietlicki, Erik; Schmid, Otmar

    2014-08-01

    Determination of the respiratory tract deposition of airborne particles is critical for risk assessment of air pollution, inhaled drug delivery, and understanding of respiratory disease. With the advent of nanotechnology, there has been an increasing interest in the measurement of pulmonary deposition of nanoparticles because of their unique properties in inhalation toxicology and medicine. Over the last century, around 50 studies have presented experimental data on lung deposition of nanoparticles (typical diameter≤100 nm, but here≤300 nm). These data show a considerable variability, partly due to differences in the applied methodologies. In this study, we review the experimental techniques for measuring respiratory tract deposition of nano-sized particles, analyze critical experimental design aspects causing measurement uncertainties, and suggest methodologies for future studies. It is shown that, although particle detection techniques have developed with time, the overall methodology in respiratory tract deposition experiments has not seen similar progress. Available experience from previous research has often not been incorporated, and some methodological design aspects that were overlooked in 30-70% of all studies may have biased the experimental data. This has contributed to a significant uncertainty on the absolute value of the lung deposition fraction of nanoparticles. We estimate the impact of the design aspects on obtained data, discuss solutions to minimize errors, and highlight gaps in the available experimental set of data. PMID:24151837

  17. Community Respiratory Viruses as a Cause of Lower Respiratory Tract Infections Following Suppressive Chemotherapy in Cancer Patients

    Community respiratory viruses are an important cause of respiratory disease in the immunocompromised patients with cancer. To evaluate the occurrence and clinical significance of respiratory virus infections in hospitalized cancer patients at National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, during anticancer treatment, we studied cases that developed episodes of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). Patients and Methods: Thirty patients with LRTI were studied clinically, radiologically, and microbiologically. Sputum cultures were done and an immunofluorescence search for IgM antibodies of influenza A and B, parainfluenza serotypes 1,2 and 3, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, Legionella pneumophila, Coxiella burnettii, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae were performed on serum samples of patients. The main presenting symptom was cough and expectoration. Hematologic malignancy was the underlying disease in 86.6% of cases. Blood cultures were positive in II patients (36.6%) only. Sputum cultures revealed a bacterial pathogen in [3 cases and fungi in 3; whereas viral and atypical bacterial lgM antibodies were detected in 13 and 4 patients; respectively. Influenza virus was the commonest virus detected, being of type B in 4 cases, type A in one case and mixed A and B in another 5 cases; followed by RSV in 5 patients. Taken together, bacteria were identified as a single cause of LRTI in 10 cases, viruses in 6, fungi in 3 and mixed causes in 7. Still, there were 4 undiagnosed cases. This study showed that respiratory viruses are common in LRTI, either as a single cause or mixed with bacterial pathogens. in hospitalized cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Diagnostic tests for respiratory viruses should be incorporated in the routine diagnostic study of patients with hematologic malignancies. Also, it must be emphasized that early CT chest is crucial as a base-line prior to initiation of anti-fungal or anti-viral therapy. In cancer patients with a

  18. Consensus for the manaegment of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Chinese Medical Association,China Association of C

    2003-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Since recognition of the first case of sever acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Guangdong Province in November 2002,health care worker engaged in basic medicine,clinical medicine and preventive progress in the understanding of the etiology,epidemiology,diagnosis,treatment and prevention of SARS.

  19. Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Allergen Exposure: Screening For Sensitization Potential

    Rationale: An in vitro assay to identify respiratory sensitizers will provide a rapid screen and reduce animal use. The study goal was to identify biomarkers that differentiate allergen versus non-allergen responses following an acute exposure. Methods: Female BALB/c mice rec...

  20. Non-invasive ventilation for surgical patients with acute respiratory failure

    Lee, Byoung Chul; Kyoung, Kyu Hyouck; Kim, Young Hwan; Hong, Suk-Kyung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Acute respiratory failure is a relatively common complication in surgical patients, especially after abdominal surgery. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is increasingly used in the treatment of acute respiratory failure. We have assessed the usefulness of NIV in surgical patients with acute respiratory failure. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of patients who were admitted to a surgical intensive care unit between March 2007 and February 2008 with acute respiratory...

  1. The role of rhinovirus in children hospitalized for acute respiratory disease, Santa Fe, Argentina.

    Rudi, Juan Manuel; Molina, Fabiana; Díaz, Rocío; Bonet, Virginia; Ortellao, Lucila; Cantarutti, Diego; Gómez, Alejandra; Pierini, Judith; Cociglio, Raquel; Kusznierz, Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) were historically considered upper airway pathogens. However, they have recently been proven to cause infections in the lower respiratory tract, resulting in hospitalization of children with pneumonia, bronchiolitis, and chronic pulmonary obstruction. In this report, HRV frequency and seasonality are described together with patient clinical-epidemiological aspects. From a total of 452 surveyed samples, the HRV nucleic acids was detected in 172 (38.1%) and found in every month of the study year. 60% of inpatients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) associated with HRV were under 6 months of age and 31% had a clinical history, being preterm birth and recurrent wheezing the prevailing conditions. The most frequent discharge diagnoses were pneumonia (35.2%), bronchiolitis (32.4%), and bronchitis (12.4%). Fifteen point nine percent of patients required admission into intensive care units. The results obtained in this study demonstrated the association between HRV and children hospitalizations caused by ARI. PMID:25983014

  2. Drugs in upper respiratory tract infections in paediatric patients in North Trinidad

    Thurston P

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We explored the prescribing patterns of physicians in North Trinidad in treating upper respiratory tract infections (URTI in paediatric patients and the appropriateness of drugs prescribed.Methods: A retrospective observational study was conducted, with a sample size of 523 paediatric patients, diagnosed with an URTI during the period of June 2003 to 22 June 2005. The study was conducted at five Primary Health Care Facilities in North Trinidad.Results: The three most frequent URTIs diagnosed were non-specific URTI, common cold, and acute tonsillitis in rank order. Four patterns of prescribing were identified, (1 no drug therapy [1.9%]; (2 antibiotic therapy alone [6.1%]; (3 antibiotic and symptomatic therapy [53.0%]; and (4 symptomatic therapy alone [39.0%]. The, most frequently prescribed antibiotics were penicillins (amoxicillin [46.3%] and amoxicillin/clavulanate [5.3%] and a macrolide (erythromycin [6.1%]. The three symptomatic agents most frequently prescribed were paracetamol [40.1%]; diphenhydramine [29.1%]; and normal saline nasal drops [14.2%]. In 112 cases with swab analyses done, of these, 98.2% revealed a growth of commensals only, while 1.8% grew pathogenic micro-organisms. Of the cases showing commensal growth only, 84.6% were treated with an antibiotic, 14.5% were treated with symptomatic agents alone and 0.9% received no drug therapy at all. Conclusions: A large proportion of paediatric patients diagnosed with an URTI in North Trinidad was prescribed antibiotics although not indicated The inappropriate use of antibiotics can potentiate the worldwide trend of antimicrobial resistance.

  3. Upper respiratory tract disease, force of infection, and effects on survival of gopher tortoises.

    Ozgul, Arpat; Oli, Madan K; Bolker, Benjamin M; Perez-Heydrich, Carolina

    2009-04-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) caused by Mycoplasma agassizii has been hypothesized to contribute to the decline of some wild populations of gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus). However, the force of infection (FOI) and the effect of URTD on survival in free-ranging tortoise populations remain unknown. Using four years (2003-2006) of mark-recapture and epidemiological data collected from 10 populations of gopher tortoises in central Florida, USA, we estimated the FOI (probability per year of a susceptible tortoise becoming infected) and the effect of URTD (i.e., seropositivity to M. agassizii) on apparent survival rates. Sites with high (> or = 25%) seroprevalence had substantially higher FOI (0.22 +/- 0.03; mean +/- SE) than low (tortoises had higher apparent survival (0.99 +/- 0.0001) than seronegatives (0.88 +/- 0.03), possibly because seropositive tortoises represent individuals that survived the initial infection, developed chronic disease, and experienced lower mortality during the four-year span of our study. However, two lines of evidence suggested possible effects of mycoplasmal URTD on tortoise survival. First, one plausible model suggested that susceptible (seronegative) tortoises in high seroprevalence sites had lower apparent survival rates than did susceptible tortoises in low seroprevalence sites, indicating a possible acute effect of infection. Second, the number of dead tortoise remains detected during annual site surveys increased significantly with increasing site seroprevalence, from approximately 1 to approximately 5 shell remains per 100 individuals. If (as our results suggest) URTD in fact reduces adult survival, it could adversely influence the population dynamics and persistence of this late- maturing, long-lived species. PMID:19425439

  4. [The curative action of Monticelli Term's water in upper respiratory tract diseases (author's transl)].

    Turchi, R; Jemmi, G; Barani, B

    1976-01-01

    The Authors study the action of the sodio bromide-iodic water of Monticelli Terme in upper respiratory tract disease and particularly assert that is not to neglect the organic ground on which establishes mucosa's disease. Therman treatment gives the best therapeutic results in every patient presenting chronic inflammatory processes of the upper respiratory trach alternating periods of quiescency and of activity, and poor therapeutic action in patients presenting chronic inveterate diseases with great alterations in vascular and glandular components of the mucosa. PMID:1021139

  5. 11.3.Upper respiratory tract disease and bronchial asthma

    1993-01-01

    930295 Factors influencing carboxyhemog-lobin kinetics in inhalation lung injury.WU Wenxi (吴文溪).ist Affili Hosp,Nanjing MedCoil,210029.Chin J Intern Med 1992;31 (11):689—691.Anesthetized dogs were ventilated with 1%carbon monoxide (CO) in air for 10 minutes toproduce CO poisoning and then with room air (n=5) or pure oxygen (n=5) for 3 hours as con-trol.Acute lung injury was produced by intratra-cheal injection of 0.1 N HC1 (2 ml/kg) 30 min-utes before CO poisoning in another 10 experi-mental dogs.Arterial blood gas and earboxyhe-moglobin (COHb) were monitored before andafter CO poisoning.Pharmacokinetic analysis

  6. Serum biomarkers in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome an ailing prognosticator

    Pneumatikos Ioannis

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of biomarkers in medicine lies in their ability to detect disease and support diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. New research and novel understanding of the molecular basis of the disease reveals an abundance of exciting new biomarkers who present a promise for use in the everyday clinical practice. The past fifteen years have seen the emergence of numerous clinical applications of several new molecules as biologic markers in the research field relevant to acute respiratory distress syndrome (translational research. The scope of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge about serum biomarkers in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome and their potential value as prognostic tools and present some of the future perspectives and challenges.

  7. Respiratory viral infections detected by multiplex PCR among pediatric patients with lower respiratory tract infections seen at an urban hospital in Delhi from 2005 to 2007

    Kaushik Samander

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in young children worldwide. Information on viral etiology in ALRI from India is limited. The aim of the present study was to develop a simple, sensitive, specific and cost effective multiplex PCR (mPCR assay without post PCR hybridization or nested PCR steps for the detection of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, influenza viruses, parainfluenza viruses (PIV1–3 and human metapneumovirus (hMPV. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs were collected from children with ALRI ≤ 5 years of age. The sensitivity and specificity of mPCR was compared to virus isolation by centrifugation enhanced culture (CEC followed by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF. Results From April 2005–March 2007, 301 NPAs were collected from children attending the outpatient department or admitted to the ward of All India Institute of Medical Sciences hospital at New Delhi, India. Multiplex PCR detected respiratory viruses in 106 (35.2% of 301 samples with 130 viruses of which RSV was detected in 61, PIV3 in 22, PIV2 in 17, hMPV in 11, PIV1 in 10 and influenza A in 9 children. CEC-IIF detected 79 viruses only. The sensitivity of mPCR was 0.1TCID50 for RSV and influenza A and 1TCID50 for hMPV, PIV1, PIV2, PIV3 and Influenza B. Mixed infections were detected in 18.8% of the children with viral infections, none detected by CEC-IIF. Bronchiolitis was significantly associated with both total viral infections and RSV infection (p 0.05. Conclusion Multiplex PCR offers a rapid, sensitive and reasonably priced diagnostic method for common respiratory viruses.

  8. Sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract in patients with active Crohn's disease.

    Smiéjan, J M; Cosnes, J; Chollet-Martin, S; Soler, P; Basset, F M; Le Quintrec, Y; Hance, A J

    1986-01-01

    To re-evaluate the relationship between Crohn's disease and sarcoidosis, we compared the numbers and types of cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage from normal volunteers and patients with Crohn's disease, with other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, and with sarcoidosis. Patients with Crohn's disease, but not patients with other inflammatory bowel disorders, had an increase in the number of T lymphocytes on the surface of the lower respiratory tract similar to that seen in patients with sarcoidosis. As in sarcoidosis, this lymphocytosis results from an expansion of the T4+ T-lymphocyte subset, is characteristic of patients with active disease only, and is not associated with similar abnormalities in the peripheral blood. Thus, patients with apparently localized Crohn's disease have sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract, a finding that emphasizes the systemic nature of Crohn's disease and the disorder's close relationship to sarcoidosis. PMID:3940500

  9. Upper Respiratory Tract Disease in the Gopher Tortoise Is Caused by Mycoplasma agassizii†

    Brown, M B; McLaughlin, G. S.; Klein, P A; Crenshaw, B. C.; Schumacher, I M; Brown, D R; Jacobson, E R

    1999-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) has been observed in a number of tortoise species, including the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus). Clinical signs of URTD in gopher tortoises are similar to those in desert tortoises and include serous, mucoid, or purulent discharge from the nares, excessive tearing to purulent ocular discharge, conjunctivitis, and edema of the eyelids and ocular glands. The objectives of the present study were to determi...

  10. Tissue damage and nutritional factors in experimental respiratory tract (Co-)carcinogenesis.

    Reuzel, P G; Feron, V.J.; Spit, B J; Beems, R. B.; Kroes, R.

    1983-01-01

    Cofactors involved in respiratory tract carcinogenesis were studied in Syrian golden hamsters or in rats using benzo(a)pyrene as the carcinogenic agent. These factors included severe tissue damage induced by electro-coagulation, glass fibers administered by intratracheal instillation, acetaldehyde as irritant vapor, food restriction, and nutrients such as vitamin A and saturated and unsaturated fats. In addition, the effects of a combined exposure to four different major gaseous cigarette smo...

  11. Upper Respiratory Tract Symptoms, Renal Involvement and Vasculitis: A Case Report and Review of Wegener Granulomatosis

    Said, Mohd Shahrir Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Wegener’s Granulomatosis is a condition associated with systemic vasculitis which can present with upper respiratory tract symptoms initially. On September 2001, a 15-year-old girl presented with symptoms of nasal block for 3 weeks. She later developed joint pains and worsening renal status requiring dialysis. A renal biopsy was performed which showed pauci-immune cresentric glomerulonephritis. Her cANCA levels were positive. She was treated with oral cyclophosphamide and steroids and later r...

  12. The Efficacy of Systemic Corticosteroids in Treatment of Respiratory Tract Infections During Hajj 2012

    Tabatabaei, Aminreza; Heidarzadeh, Abbas; Shamspour, Navvab; Kolivand, Pirhosein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections (RTI) in a mass-gathering situation such as hajj is a medical challenge that requires quick decision-making and considerable knowledge about its etiology and treatment methods. High prevalence of RTI during Hajj and tendency of caravan physicians to treat of patients quickly in such situation lead to prescription of parenteral steroids. Nonetheless, no study has focused on the short-term and long-term effects of systemic ster...

  13. Evaluation of the upper respiratory tract in the horse during treadmill exercise - A review. 1. Endoscopy

    Kästner, S B; Weishaupt, Michael A; Townsend, H. G. G.

    1998-01-01

    Literature pertaining to the evaluation of the upper respiratory tract of the horse during exercise was reviewed. Articles were found by searching two databases. Videoendoscopy, upper airway pressure measurement and airflow measurements are used for assessing upper airway function. Treadmill accomodation and exercise protocols, examination protocols, the endoscopy technique, indications for the examination during exercise and normal and abnormal functions of the upper airways are described in...

  14. Macrolide overuse for treatment of respiratory tract infections in general practice

    Hinnerskov, Mette; Therkildsen, Julie Maria; Cordoba, Gloria;

    2011-01-01

    High consumption of macrolides has been linked to increased macrolide resistance in the common pathogens of respiratory tract infections (RTIs). According to Danish recommendations, penicillin is the first-choice treatment for RTIs and macrolides should only be prescribed when a patient is allergic...... to penicillin or for treatment of mycoplasma pneumonias. The aim of the present study was to explore the prescription of macrolides for different RTIs to patients without penicillin allergy in general practice in Denmark....

  15. Mycoplasmas isolated from the respiratory tract of cattle in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Zinka, Maksimović; Maid, Rifatbegović

    2012-01-01

    This study represents Mycoplasma species isolated from the respiratory tract of cattle in Bosnia and Herzegovina between 2002 and 2010. A total of 328 nasal swabs and 59 lung samples were submitted for isolation of mycoplasmas. Mycoplasmas were isolated from 27 samples (6.9%). M. bovis was recovered from eight nasal swabs and two lungs, while M. bovirhinis (n=4) and Acholeplasma sp. (n=1) were detected only in nasal swabs. Twelve mycoplasma isolates were unidentified (44.4%).

  16. Factors Associated with Antibiotic Misuse in Outpatient Treatment for Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    Schroeck, Jennifer L.; Ruh, Christine A.; Sellick, John A.; Ott, Michael C.; Mattappallil, Arun; Mergenhagen, Kari A.

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has promoted the appropriate use of antibiotics since 1995 when it initiated the National Campaign for Appropriate Antibiotic Use in the Community. This study examined upper respiratory tract infections included in the campaign to determine the degree to which antibiotics were appropriately prescribed and subsequent admission rates in a veteran population. This study was a retrospective chart review conducted among outpatients with a diagnosis of...

  17. Does homeopathic medicine have a preventive effect on respiratory tract infections? A real life observational study

    Beghi, Gianfranco Maria; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Homeopathic medicine is a branch of integrative medicine that has been gaining increasing popularity. However, its clinical application remains controversial. To improve the understanding of homeopathy, observational studies-which monitor the effects of homeopathy in real-life clinical settings-are a helpful adjunct to randomized controlled trials. The goal of this controlled observational study was to investigate the role of the homeopathic medicine in preventing respiratory tract...

  18. Treatment of Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Primary Care: A Randomized Study Using Aromatic Herbs

    Yoseph Rakover; Elad Schiff; Moshe Torem; Anat Eini; Nativ Dudai; Eran Ben-Arye

    2011-01-01

    This study is a prospective randomized double-blind controlled trial whose aim was to investigate the clinical effects of aromatic essential oils in patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The trial was conducted in six primary care clinics in northern Israel. A spray containing aromatic essential oils of five plants (Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Mentha piperita, Origanum syriacum, and Rosmarinus officinalis)as applied 5 times a day for 3 days and compared with a plac...

  19. Epidemiological associations between brachycephaly and upper respiratory tract disorders in dogs attending veterinary practices in England

    O’Neill, Dan G; Jackson, Caitlin; Guy, Jonathan H.; Church, David B.; McGreevy, Paul D.; Thomson, Peter C.; Brodbelt, Dave C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Brachycephalic dog breeds are increasingly common. Canine brachycephaly has been associated with upper respiratory tract (URT) disorders but reliable prevalence data remain lacking. Using primary-care veterinary clinical data, this study aimed to report the prevalence and breed-type risk factors for URT disorders in dogs. Results The sampling frame included 170,812 dogs attending 96 primary-care veterinary clinics participating within the VetCompass Programme. Two hundred dogs were...

  20. Hemoglobin level as a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infections in Lebanese children

    Sawsan Mourad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pneumonia is the biggest single cause of childhood death under the age of 5 years, and anemia affects approximately 30% of infants and children all over the world. Aim: Determination of the relationship between anemia and lower respiratory tract infection as a risk factor in Lebanese children. Patients and Methods A total number of two hundred infants and children aged nine months to twelve years were included; One hundred cases were hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infection in Department of Pediatrics, Makassed General Hospital, and one hundred healthy, age and sex matched controls, were selected from outpatient department. Complete blood count, iron level, ferritin level, and total iron binding capacity were taken if hemoglobin level less than eleven gram per deci-liter. In addition peripheral blood smear, chest radiograph and C-reactive protein were done to hospitalized cases. Definition of iron deficiency anemia and normal laboratory values were predetermined. Results: Anemia was found in 32% of hospitalized cases and 16% of healthy controls. Mean hemoglobin level was 9.99 ± 0.62 gram per deci-liter and 11.99 ± 0.92 gram per deci-liter in anemic and non-anemic group respectively with a significant P-value of 0.001. C-reactive protein levels and number hospitalization days were similar among the anemic and non-anemic group. History of recurrent chest infections was significantly higher in both anemic group and hospitalized cases compared to non-anemic group and healthy controls. Low hemoglobin level was a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infection with a P-value of 0.008. Conclusion: Anemic children were two times more susceptible to lower respiratory tract infection compared to the control group, and iron deficiency anemia was predominating. Accurate diagnosis and prevention of anemia, whatever its etiology, is essential.

  1. Hemoglobin level as a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infections in Lebanese children

    Sawsan Mourad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pneumonia is the biggest single cause of childhood death under the age of 5 years, and anemia affects approximately 30% of infants and children all over the world. Aim: Determination of the relationship between anemia and lower respiratory tract infection as a risk factor in Lebanese children. Patients and Methods A total number of two hundred infants and children aged nine months to twelve years were included; One hundred cases were hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infection in Department of Pediatrics, Makassed General Hospital, and one hundred healthy, age and sex matched controls, were selected from outpatient department. Complete blood count, iron level, ferritin level, and total iron binding capacity were taken if hemoglobin level less than eleven gram per deci-liter. In addition peripheral blood smear, chest radiograph and C-reactive protein were done to hospitalized cases. Definition of iron deficiency anemia and normal laboratory values were predetermined. Results: Anemia was found in 32% of hospitalized cases and 16% of healthy controls. Mean hemoglobin level was 9.99 ΁ 0.62 gram per deci-liter and 11.99 ΁ 0.92 gram per deci-liter in anemic and non-anemic group respectively with a significant P-value of 0.001. C-reactive protein levels and number hospitalization days were similar among the anemic and non-anemic group. History of recurrent chest infections was significantly higher in both anemic group and hospitalized cases compared to non-anemic group and healthy controls. Low hemoglobin level was a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infection with a P-value of 0.008. Conclusion: Anemic children were two times more susceptible to lower respiratory tract infection compared to the control group, and iron deficiency anemia was predominating. Accurate diagnosis and prevention of anemia, whatever its etiology, is essential.

  2. Prognostic value of procalcitonin in hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections

    NOBRE Vandack; Borges, Isabela

    2016-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections are common and potentially lethal conditions and are a major cause of inadequate antibiotic prescriptions. Characterization of disease severity and prognostic prediction in affected patients can aid disease management and can increase accuracy in determining the need for and place of hospitalization. The inclusion of biomarkers, particularly procalcitonin, in the decision taken process is a promising strategy. This study aims to present a narrative review of...

  3. Appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in general practice

    Sigurðardóttir, Nanna Rún; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Munck, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) in two countries with different prevalence of antimicrobial resistance: Denmark and Iceland. Design: A cross-sectional study. Settings and subjects. General practitioners (GPs...... and Iceland could not fully be explained by different symptoms and signs among patients. Conclusion: Icelandic GPs have a higher antibiotic prescribing rate compared with Danish GPs, but the percentage of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing is highest in Denmark for sinusitis, and in Iceland...

  4. Azithromycin does not improve disease course in hospitalized infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease : A randomized equivalence trial

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Woensel, Job B. M.; Uijtendaal, Esther; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Kimpen, Jan L. L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Nearly halt of all hospitalized infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease (LRTD) are treated with (parenteral) antibiotics. The present study was designed to test our hypothesis that the use of antibiotics would not lead to a reduced duration of hospi

  5. Association of residential dampness and mold with respiratory tract infections and bronchitis: a meta-analysis

    Fisk, William J.; Eliseeva, Ekaterina A.; Mendell, Mark J.

    2010-11-15

    Dampness and mold have been shown in qualitative reviews to be associated with a variety of adverse respiratory health effects, including respiratory tract infections. Several published meta-analyses have provided quantitative summaries for some of these associations, but not for respiratory infections. Demonstrating a causal relationship between dampness-related agents, which are preventable exposures, and respiratory tract infections would suggest important new public health strategies. We report the results of quantitative meta-analyses of published studies that examined the association of dampness or mold in homes with respiratory infections and bronchitis. For primary studies meeting eligibility criteria, we transformed reported odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) to the log scale. Both fixed and random effects models were applied to the log ORs and their variances. Most studies contained multiple estimated ORs. Models accounted for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed. One set of analyses was performed with all eligible studies, and another set restricted to studies that controlled for age, gender, smoking, and socioeconomic status. Subgroups of studies were assessed to explore heterogeneity. Funnel plots were used to assess publication bias. The resulting summary estimates of ORs from random effects models based on all studies ranged from 1.38 to 1.50, with 95% CIs excluding the null in all cases. Use of different analysis models and restricting analyses based on control of multiple confounding variables changed findings only slightly. ORs (95% CIs) from random effects models using studies adjusting for major confounding variables were, for bronchitis, 1.45 (1.32-1.59); for respiratory infections, 1.44 (1.31-1.59); for respiratory infections excluding nonspecific upper respiratory infections, 1.50 (1.32-1.70), and for respiratory infections in children or infants, 1.48 (1.33-1.65). Little effect of publication

  6. Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract

    Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract. Exposure to ionising radiation at medium to high doses results in the manifestation of mixed pathologies. Following the analysis of several radiation accidents it is clear that intestinal injury influences patient survival. However the appearance of the classically defined gastrointestinal syndrome is not always evident. Nevertheless injury to the gastrointestinal tract, in particular loss of barrier function, seems to play an important role in the development of Multiple Organ Failure such as reported in the recent accident at Tokai Mura. Ionising radiation overexposure results in changes in intestinal motility and nutrient, fluid and electrolyte absorption and secretion all which may contribute to the genesis of diarrhea. In addition to modified cellular transport properties for nutrients or electrolytes, important loss of epithelial cells is also a major contributing factor. Intestinal functions are controlled by many factors such as neurotransmitters, locally released mediators from endocrine cells or immunocompetent cells in addition to luminal agents. To date, treatment of radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury is mainly symptomatic. However treatments such as growth factors, anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as cellular transplantation remain to be validated in the radiation accident situation. (author)

  7. Inhalation of uranium nanoparticles: respiratory tract deposition and translocation to secondary target organs in rats.

    Petitot, Fabrice; Lestaevel, Philippe; Tourlonias, Elie; Mazzucco, Charline; Jacquinot, Sébastien; Dhieux, Bernadette; Delissen, Olivia; Tournier, Benjamin B; Gensdarmes, François; Beaunier, Patricia; Dublineau, Isabelle

    2013-03-13

    Uranium nanoparticles (decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Explosions and fires in nuclear reactors and the use of ammunition containing depleted uranium can also produce such aerosols. The risk of accidental inhalation of uranium nanoparticles by nuclear workers, military personnel or civilian populations must therefore be taken into account. In order to address this issue, the absorption rate of inhaled uranium nanoparticles needs to be characterised experimentally. For this purpose, rats were exposed to an aerosol containing 10⁷ particles of uranium per cm³ (CMD=38 nm) for 1h in a nose-only inhalation exposure system. Uranium concentrations deposited in the respiratory tract, blood, brain, skeleton and kidneys were determined by ICP-MS. Twenty-seven percent of the inhaled mass of uranium nanoparticles was deposited in the respiratory tract. One-fifth of UO₂ nanoparticles were rapidly cleared from lung (T(½)=2.4 h) and translocated to extrathoracic organs. However, the majority of the particles were cleared slowly (T(½)=141.5 d). Future long-term experimental studies concerning uranium nanoparticles should focus on the potential lung toxicity of the large fraction of particles cleared slowly from the respiratory tract after inhalation exposure. PMID:23296105

  8. Molecular detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii in patients with respiratory tract infections

    Oyebode Armstrong Terry Alli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pneumocystis jirovecii, formerly known as P. carinii, is an opportunistic fungus causing Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia especially in immunocompromised patients. Aim: The aim of this study was to detect P. jirovecii in sputum samples from patients suspected of having respiratory tract infections. Materials and Methods: In this study, 230 acid fast bacilli negative sputum samples from 230 patients presenting with respiratory tract infections submitted to three teaching hospitals′ medical microbiology laboratories in Osun and Oyo States, Nigeria for routine investigation were examined for P. jirovecii by microscopical and polymerase chain reaction methods. Results: P. jirovecii cysts were observed in 15 (6.5% samples and polymerase chain reaction was positive for 29 (12.6% samples out of 230 samples examined. It was observed that the detection of P. jirovecii was associated with age (P 0.05. Polymerase chain reaction was showed to be a better method for the detection of P. jirovecii based on the 51.7% sensitivity and 100% specificity of the microscopy. Conclusion: The study concluded that P. jirovecii is prevalent in patients with respiratory tract infections in hospitals from the southwestern part of Nigeria and should be included in diagnosis of these infections in this part of the world.

  9. Change of immune indexes and oxidative stress state of children with recurrent respiratory tract infection

    Wei-Qing Wu; Shu-Ping Liao; Xiao-Lan Lin; Qiong-Fang Huang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To observe and analyze the change situation of immune indexes and oxidative stress state of children with recurrent respiratory tract infection.Methods:75 children with recurrent respiratory tract infection in our hospital from January 2014 to June 2015 were selected as observation group, 75 healthy children with health examination at the same time were selected as control group, then the immune indexes and oxidative stress state related serum indexes of two groups were detected,and the detection results of observation group with boys and girls, mild, moderate and severe disease were compared.Results: The cellular immune and erythrocyte immune and oxidative stress state related serum indexes of observation group were all worse than those of control group,and the detection results of observation group with mild, moderate and severe disease had obvious differences too, allP0.05.Conclusion:The change of immune indexes and oxidative stress state of children with recurrent respiratory tract infection are obvious,and the differences of children with mild, moderate and severe disease are obvious too,while the differences of boys and girls are not obvious.

  10. Antimicrobial susceptibility of communityacquired respiratory tract pathogens isolated from patients in primary hospitals in Shanghai from 2007 to 2010

    周春妹

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the etiology of communityacquired respiratory tract infections (CARTI) and the antimicrobial resistance of the major pathogens in primary hospitals in Shanghai.Methods Patients with CARTI were prospectively recruited from 30 primary hospitals

  11. Treatment of 31 Cases of Infant Respiratory Tract Infection by Health-care Tuina plus Medicated Bath

    LI Jie; WU Xue-fei

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-one cases of infant respiratory tract infection were treated by no-pain health-care Tuina plus medicated bath. Since the therapeutic effects were satisfactory, so parents and infants are willing to accept.

  12. Respiratory and allergic diseases: from upper respiratory tract infections to asthma.

    Jaber, Raja

    2002-06-01

    patient, mind-body interventions such as yoga, hypnosis, and biofeedback-assisted relaxation and breathing exercises are beneficial for stress reduction in general and may be helpful in further controlling asthma. Encouraging parents to learn how to massage their asthmatic children may appeal to some parents and provide benefits for parents and children alike. Acupuncture and chiropractic treatment cannot be recommended at this time, although some patients may derive benefit because of the placebo effect. For patients with allergic rhinitis, there are no good clinical research data on the use of quercetin and vitamin C. Similarly, freeze-dried stinging nettle leaves may be tried, but the applicable research evidence also is poor. Further studies are needed to assess the efficacy of these supplements and herbs. Homeopathic remedies based on extreme dilutions of the allergen may be beneficial in allergic rhinitis but require collaboration with an experienced homeopath. There are no research data on constitutional homeopathic approaches to asthma and allergic rhinitis. Patients with COPD are helped by exercise, pulmonary rehabilitation, and increased caloric protein and fat intake. Vitamin C and n-3 supplements are safe and reasonable; however, studies are needed to establish their efficacy in COPD. On the other hand, there are convincing data in favor of N-acetyl-cysteine supplementation for the patient with COPD at doses ranging between 400 and 1200 mg daily. Red blood cell magnesium levels may guide the use of magnesium replacement. The use of L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 in patients with COPD needs further study. The addition of essential oils to the dietary regimen of patients with chronic bronchitis is worth exploring. Patients with upper respiratory tract infections can expect a shorter duration of symptoms by taking high doses of vitamin C (2 g) with zinc supplements, preferably the nasal zinc gel, at the onset of their symptoms. Adding an herb such as echinacea or

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Procalcitonin-Guided Antibiotic Therapy in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    Werner C. Albrich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 14 randomized controlled studies to date, a procalcitonin (PCT-based algorithm has been proven to markedly reduce the use of antibiotics along with an unimpaired high safety and low complication rates in patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs. However, compliance with the algorithm and safety out of controlled study conditions has not yet been sufficiently investigated. Methods: We performed a prospective international multicenter observational post-study surveillance of consecutive adults with community-acquired LRTI in 14 centers (Switzerland (n = 10, France (n = 3 and the United States (n = 1. Results: Between September 2009 and November 2010, 1,759 patients were enrolled (median age 71; female sex 44.4%. 1,520 (86.4% patients had a final diagnosis of LRTI (community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, 53.7%; acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD, 17.1%; and acute bronchitis, 14.4%. Compliance with the PCT-guided therapy (overall 68.2% was highest in patients with bronchitis (81.0% vs. AECOPD, 70.1%; CAP, 63.7%; p < 0.001, outpatients (86.1% vs. inpatients, 65.9%; p < 0.001 and algorithm-experienced centers (82.5% vs. algorithm-naive, 60.1%; p < 0.001 and showed significant geographical differences. The initial decision about the antibiotic therapy was based on PCT value in 72.4%. In another 8.6% of patients, antibiotics were administered despite low PCT values but according to predefined criteria. Thus, the algorithm was followed in 81.0% of patients. In a multivariable Cox hazard ratio model, longer antibiotic therapy duration was associated with algorithm-non-compliance, country, hospitalization, CAP vs. bronchitis, renal failure and algorithm-naïvety of the study center. In a multivariable logistic regression complications (death, empyema, ICU treatment, mechanical ventilation, relapse, and antibiotic-associated side effects were significantly associated with increasing CURB65-Score, CAP

  14. Extracorporeal life support for acute respiratory distress syndromes

    Don Hayes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The morbidity and mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome remain to be high. Over the last 50 years, the clinical management of these patients has undergone vast changes. Significant improvement in the care of these patients involves the development of mechanical ventilation strategies, but the benefits of these strategies remain controversial. With a growing trend of extracorporeal support for critically ill patients, we provide a historical review of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO including its failures and successes as well as discussing extracorporeal devices now available or nearly accessible while examining current clinical indications and trends of ECMO in respiratory failure.

  15. Effects of Acetaminophen on Oxidant and Irritant Respiratory Tract Responses to Environmental Tobacco Smoke in Female Mice

    Smith, Gregory J.; Cichocki, Joseph A.; Doughty, Bennett J.; Manautou, Jose E.; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Morris, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although it is known that acetaminophen causes oxidative injury in the liver, it is not known whether it causes oxidative stress in the respiratory tract. If so, this widely used analgesic may potentiate the adverse effects of oxidant air pollutants. Objectives: The goal of this study was to determine if acetaminophen induces respiratory tract oxidative stress and/or potentiates the oxidative stress and irritant responses to an inhaled oxidant: environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). M...

  16. Message concerning Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome ("SARS")

    2003-01-01

    IMPORTANT REMINDER If you have just come back from one of the regions identified by the WHO as being infected with SARS, it is essential to monitor your state of health for ten days after your return. The syndrome manifests itself in the rapid onset of a high fever combined with respiratory problems (coughing, breathlessness, breathing difficulty). Should these signs appear, you must contact the CERN Medical Service as quickly as possible on number 73802 or 73186 during normal working hours, and the fire brigade at all other times on number 74444, indicating that you have just returned from one of the WHO-identified areas with recent local transmission.China: Beijing, Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region), Guangdong Province, Inner Mongolia, Shanxi Province, Tianjin ProvinceTaiwan:TaipeiMoreover, until further notice the CERN Management requests that all trips to these various regions of the world be reduced to a strict minimum and then only with the consent of the Division Leader concerned. Anyone comin...

  17. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury in children and adults

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF), defined as acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are critical conditions. AHRF results from a number of systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has...

  18. Early Treatment of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Przybysz, Thomas M; Heffner, Alan C

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is defined by acute diffuse inflammatory lung injury invoked by a variety of systemic or pulmonary insults. Despite medical progress in management, mortality remains 27% to 45%. Patients with ARDS should be managed with low tidal volume ventilation. Permissive hypercapnea is well tolerated. Conservative fluid strategy can reduce ventilator and hospital days in patients without shock. Prone positioning and neuromuscular blockers reduce mortality in some patients. Early management of ARDS is relevant to emergency medicine. Identifying ARDS patients who should be transferred to an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation center is an important task for emergency providers. PMID:26614238

  19. Brazilian medicinal plants to treat upper respiratory tract and bronchial illness: systematic review and meta-analyses—study protocol

    Lopes, Luciane C; Silva, Maria Carolina O; Motta, Cristiane Bergamashi; Macho Quirós, Antonio; Biavatti, Maique Weber; de Oliveira, Jardel Corrêa; Guyatt, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory illness, often associated with cough and sputum, is frequent. In Brazil, herbal medicines are often recommended as a first-line treatment for respiratory illness. There exists uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of these treatments. No systematic review has evaluated Brazilian medicinal plants (BMP) to treat upper respiratory tract and bronchial illness (URTI). Methods and analysis We will conduct a systematic review and, if appropriate, a series of meta-analyses evaluating the safety and effectiveness of BMP for URTI. Eligible randomised controlled trials and observational studies will enrol adult or paediatric patients presenting with URTI treated by BMP approved by the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency compared with placebo, no treatment or an alternative therapy. Our search will include the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), which contains the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Illness Group's Specialized Register; MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature); Web of Science; AMED; LILACS; CAB abstracts; clinical trial.gov; the WHO Trial Register and the Brazilian thesis database (CAPES) without any language restrictions. Outcomes of interest are time to resolution of clinical symptoms and/or signs (cough, sputum production or activity limitations), severity of symptoms prior to resolution and major/minor adverse events. Teams of reviewers will, independently and in duplicate, screen titles and abstracts and the complete full text to determine eligibility. For eligible studies, reviewers will perform data abstraction and assess risk of bias of eligible trials. When appropriate, we will conduct meta-analyses. We will also assess the quality of body of evidence (confidence in estimates of effect) for each of the outcomes using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Ethics and dissemination The systematic review will be published in

  20. Observer variation in chest radiography of acute lower respiratory infections in children: a systematic review

    Knowledge of the accuracy of chest radiograph findings in acute lower respiratory infection in children is important when making clinical decisions. I conducted a systematic review of agreement between and within observers in the detection of radiographic features of acute lower respiratory infections in children, and described the quality of the design and reporting of studies, whether included or excluded from the review. Included studies were those of observer variation in the interpretation of radiographic features of lower respiratory infection in children (neonatal nurseries excluded) in which radiographs were read independently and a clinical population was studied. I searched MEDLINE, HealthSTAR and HSRPROJ databases (1966 to 1999), handsearched the reference lists of identified papers and contacted authors of identified studies. I performed the data extraction alone. Ten studies of observer interpretation of radiographic features of lower respiratory infection in children were identified. Seven of the studies satisfied four or more of the seven design and reporting criteria. Six studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. Inter-observer agreement varied with the radiographic feature examined. Kappa statistics ranged from around 0.80 for individual radiographic features to 0.27–0.38 for bacterial vs viral etiology. Little information was identified on observer agreement on radiographic features of lower respiratory tract infections in children. Agreement varied with the features assessed from 'fair' to 'very good'. Aspects of the quality of the methods and reporting need attention in future studies, particularly the description of criteria for radiographic features

  1. Factors associated with antibiotic misuse in outpatient treatment for upper respiratory tract infections.

    Schroeck, Jennifer L; Ruh, Christine A; Sellick, John A; Ott, Michael C; Mattappallil, Arun; Mergenhagen, Kari A

    2015-07-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has promoted the appropriate use of antibiotics since 1995 when it initiated the National Campaign for Appropriate Antibiotic Use in the Community. This study examined upper respiratory tract infections included in the campaign to determine the degree to which antibiotics were appropriately prescribed and subsequent admission rates in a veteran population. This study was a retrospective chart review conducted among outpatients with a diagnosis of a respiratory tract infection, including bronchitis, pharyngitis, sinusitis, or nonspecific upper respiratory tract infection, between January 2009 and December 2011. The study found that 595 (35.8%) patients were treated appropriately, and 1,067 (64.2%) patients received therapy considered inappropriate based on the Get Smart Campaign criteria. Overall the subsequent readmission rate was 1.5%. The majority (77.5%) of patients were prescribed an antibiotic. The most common antibiotics prescribed were azithromycin (39.0%), amoxicillin-clavulanate (13.2%), and moxifloxacin (7.5%). A multivariate regression analysis demonstrated significant predictors of appropriate treatment, including the presence of tonsillar exudates (odds ratio [OR], 0.6; confidence interval [CI], 0.3 to 0.9), fever (OR, 0.6; CI, 0.4 to 0.9), and lymphadenopathy (OR, 0.4; CI, 0.3 to 0.6), while penicillin allergy (OR, 2.9; CI, 1.7 to 4.7) and cough (OR, 1.6; CI, 1.1 to 2.2) were significant predictors for inappropriate treatment. Poor compliance with the Get Smart Campaign was found in outpatients for respiratory infections. Results from this study demonstrate the overprescribing of antibiotics, while providing a focused view of improper prescribing. This article provides evidence that current efforts are insufficient for curtailing inappropriate antibiotic use. PMID:25870064

  2. Multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli in lower respiratory tract infections.

    Shashidhar Vishwanath

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lower respiratory tract infections are among important causes of morbidity and mortality for all age groups. The emergence of multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli is an issue of increasing concern.A retrospective study including respiratory specimens (sputum and BAL was conducted in our tertiary care centre. Samples were processed for microscopy, culture and susceptibility testing following standard methods. Multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli causing lower respiratory tract infections were studied for their causation of disease. The effect of appropriate treatment on clinical outcome was observed.A total of 472 Gram-negative pathogens were isolated from sputum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid specimens during the study period. Among these Gram-negative pathogens 175 (37% were found to be multidrug resistant. Klebsiella pneumoniae 85 (48.6% and Acinetobacter spp. 59 (33.7% were the predominant multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli isolated. Based on clinico-microbiological correlation, 138 (78.9% multidrug resistant isolates were found to be pathogenic and the rest 37 (21.1% were considered as colonizers. After initiating appropriate antibiotic therapy, clinical improvement was seen in 110 (79.7% patients. In the patients who showed improvement, amikacin (34.3% and cefoperazone-sulbactum (21.8% were found to be the most effective drugs.A large majority of the isolated multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli were found to be pathogenic. Regular surveillance which directs appropriate empirical therapy; and good clinic-microbiological workup of each case of lower respiratory tract infection can reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with multidrug resistant organisms.

  3. Surfactant alteration and replacement in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Walmrath Dieter; Grimminger Friedrich; Markart Philipp; Schmidt Reinhold; Ruppert Clemens; Günther Andreas; Seeger Werner

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a frequent, life-threatening disease in which a marked increase in alveolar surface tension has been repeatedly observed. It is caused by factors including a lack of surface-active compounds, changes in the phospholipid, fatty acid, neutral lipid, and surfactant apoprotein composition, imbalance of the extracellular surfactant subtype distribution, inhibition of surfactant function by plasma protein leakage, incorporation of surfactan...

  4. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Options

    Pierrakos, Charalampos; Karanikolas, Menelaos; Scolletta, Sabino; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Velissaris, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a common entity in critical care. ARDS is associated with many diagnoses, including trauma and sepsis, can lead to multiple organ failure and has high mortality. The present article is a narrative review of the literature on ARDS, including ARDS pathophysiology and therapeutic options currently being evaluated or in use in clinical practice. The literature review covers relevant publications until January 2011. Recent developments in the therapeut...

  5. Acute respiratory distress syndrome--two decades later.

    Cunningham, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    Twenty years have now elapsed since Ashbaugh and Petty first described the syndrome of acute respiratory failure associated with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. During the past two decades, significant advances have emerged in our understanding of the clinical conditions associated with the syndrome and the pathophysiological changes affecting the alveolar-capillary membrane responsible for the characteristic non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Recent data have reaffirmed the notion that...

  6. Scrub Typhus with Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Kurup, Asok; Issac, Aneesh; Loh, Jin Phang; Lee, Too Bou; Chua, Robert; Bist, Pradeep; Chao, Chien-Chung; Lewis, Michael; Gubler, Duane J.; Ching, Wei Mei; Ooi, Eng Eong; Sukumaran, Bindu

    2013-01-01

    Scrub typhus is a major infectious threat in the Asia-Pacific region. We report an unusual case of scrub typhus in a patient in Singapore who presented with sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome but lacked the pathognomonic eschar. The patient recovered after appropriate diagnosis and doxycycline treatment. Rickettsial diseases should be included in the differential diagnosis of febrile illnesses in regions where the diseases are endemic, and absence of eschar should not be the crite...

  7. Vaccination against acute respiratory virus infections and measles in man.

    Osterhaus, Ab; Vries, Petra

    1992-01-01

    textabstractSeveral viruses may cause more or less severe acute respiratory infections in man, some of which are followed by systemic infection. Only for influenza and measles are licensed vaccines available at present. The protection induced by influenza vaccines, which are based on inactivated whole virus or viral subunits, depends largely on the matching of vaccine strain and circulating virus. Measles vaccines, which are based on attenuated live virus, have been quite effective in control...

  8. Extracorporeal life support for acute respiratory distress syndromes

    Don Hayes; Joseph D Tobias; Jasleen Kukreja; Preston, Thomas J.; Yates, Andrew R; Stephen Kirkby; Whitson, Bryan A.

    2013-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome remain to be high. Over the last 50 years, the clinical management of these patients has undergone vast changes. Significant improvement in the care of these patients involves the development of mechanical ventilation strategies, but the benefits of these strategies remain controversial. With a growing trend of extracorporeal support for critically ill patients, we provide a historical review of extracorporeal membrane oxygena...

  9. Non-invasive mechanic ventilation in treating acute respiratory failure

    Federico Lari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Non invasive ventilation (NIV in acute respiratory failure (ARF improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, decrease mortality and endo tracheal intubation (ETI rate also outside the intensive care units (ICUs. Objective of this study is to verify applicability of NIV in a general non respiratory medical ward. We enrolled 68 consecutive patients (Pts with Hypoxemic or Hyper capnic ARF: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE, exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, Pneu - monia, acute lung injury / acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS. NIV treatment was CPAP or PSV + PEEP. 12 Pts (18,5% met primary endpoint (NIV failure: 11 Pts (17% needed ETI (5ALI/ARDS p < 0,0001, 6COPD 16,6%, 1 Patient (1,5% died (Pneumonia. No Pts with ACPE failed (p = 0,0027. Secondary endpoints: significant improvement in Respiratory Rate (RR, Kelly Score, pH, PaCO2, PaO2 vs baseline. Median duration of treatment: 16:06 hours: COPD 18:54, ACPE 4:15. Mean length of hospitalisation: 8.66 days. No patients discontinued NIV, no side effects. Results are consistent with literature. Hypoxemic ARF related to ALI/ARDS and pneumonia show worst outcome: it is not advisable to manage these conditions with NIV outside the ICU. NIV for ARF due to COPD and ACPE is feasible, safe and effective in a general medical ward if selection of Pts, staff’s training and monitoring are appropriate. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting. According to strong evidences in literature, NIV should be considered a first line and standard treatment in these clinical conditions irrespective of the setting.

  10. The Current Care for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Kawamae, Kaneyuki; Iseki, Ken

    2003-01-01

    The mortality rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been still high. A many kinds of strategies for ARDS are being tried in the world. The important factors which influence for pathological-physiology of ARDS during the mechanical ventilation are gravity consolidation, atelectasis, and ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). VILI is caused by shear stress that is induced by the repeated collapse and recruit of alveolus. Alveolar over-distention caused by large tidal volume als...

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with severe ulcerative colitis

    Shiho; Sagara; Yasuo; Horie; Yumiko; Anezaki; Hideaki; Miyazawa; Masahiro; Iizuka

    2010-01-01

    Various extraintestinal manifestations including pulmonary abnormalities have been reported in patients with ulcerative colitis. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious and fatal pulmonary manifestation. We have experienced a 67-year-old male patient with ARDS associated with a severe type of ulcerative colitis (UC). Severe dyspnea symptoms occurred during the treatment of UC in a previous hospital and the patient was transferred to our hospital on June 27, 2007. Both blood and sputa culture...

  12. Anti-infectious treatment in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Gao, Min; Xiao, Zhen-Liang; Fu-xiang LI

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is closely correlated with infection. Severe infection, e.g., sepsis and septic shock, can result in ARDS. Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is one of the common complications in ARDS related infection. As regards ARDS related infection, community acquired infection (CAI) is different from hospital acquired infection (HAI) in bacterial spectrum. The former is mainly caused by Streptococcus pneumonia, Hemophilus influenzae, Moraxelle catarrhalis, ...

  13. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome: Clinical and Laboratory Manifestations

    Lam, Christopher W.K.; Chan, Michael H M; Wong, Chun K.

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently emerged infectious disease with significant morbidity and mortality. An epidemic in 2003 affected 8,098 patients in 29 countries with 774 deaths. The aetiological agent is a new coronavirus spread by droplet transmission. Clinical and general laboratory manifestations included fever, chills, rigor, myalgia, malaise, diarrhoea, cough, dyspnoea, pneumonia, lymphopenia, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase...

  14. [Pharmacological effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the respiratory tract. (I). Quantitative and qualitative changes in respiratory tract fluid and sputum (author's transl)].

    Kogi, K; Saito, T; Kasé, Y; Hitoshi, T

    1981-06-01

    The following three experiments were performed to determine the effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on the quantity and quality of respiratory tract fluid (RTF) and sputum. All drugs used were administered into the stomach through a gastric tube. 1) Indirect measurement of bronchial secretion in rats, which was expressed by the amounts of dye excreted into the respiratory tract, was carried out according the the Sakuno's method, with some modification. Some expectorants of the secretomotor type, such as bromhexine and pilocarpine, significantly increased the secretion, even at low doses. On the other hand, mucolytic agents such as NAC augmented the secretion only in doses of 500 to 1500 mg/kg. 2)As a direct method of measurements, Kasé's modification of Perry and Boyd's method was used to collect RTF, quantitatively, from rabbits. The RTF of healthy rabbits was colorless and watery. The administration of NAC in doses of 500 to 1500 mg/kg augmented the output volume and RTF became slightly turbid, probably due to an increase in the viscous mucus. 3) Rabbits with subacute bronchitis were prepared by long-term exposure to air contaminated with SO2 gas and sputa were collected before and after administration of NAC, respectively, according to the Kase's method. The sputa were opalescent and viscous gel included nodular masses. The administration of NAC, 1000 and 1500 mg/kg resulted in a dose dependent decrease in the relative viscosity. The percent-decreased in viscosity with NAC was statistically correlated with that in amounts of dry matter, those in protein and polysaccharide in the sputa. From the results described above, it was concluded that NAC given into the stomach can liquefy sputum by splitting mucoprotein disulphide linkages, that is, altering the rheological characteristics of sputum to facilitate expectoration. PMID:7286849

  15. Development of Medication Reminder System for Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infection Based on Association Rules Algorithm%基于关联规则算法构建 急性上呼吸道感染用药提示系统

    王丰; 王昱; 李鹏飞; 尹巍巍; 李劲松

    2015-01-01

    Along with the constant improvement and expansion of the hospital information system, the database of various businesses are also increasingly expanding. In face of massive clinical information data, we need to apply techniques of Data Mining to discover useful information. Acute upper respiratory tract infection is called AURTI for short. Broadly speaking AURTI is not just one disease, but a group of diseases. As a common disease, AURTI is frequent and complicated rather than a single disease. Thus, how to choose the most effective treatment methods to improve the treatment efficiency has played a key role. In this paper, we apply the methods of data mining and use association rules algorithm to analyze the associations between vital signs and medications. We design and develop a reminder system of AURTI medication based on association algorithm to determine which drug should be taken according to the specific signs and to offer suggestions to doctors. The system helps to reduce medication errors, improves the patients' safety and overall quality of care.%随着医院信息系统的不断完善扩大,各项业务的数据库日益膨胀.面对海量的临床信息数据,需要应用数据挖掘技术手段发掘出其中潜在的信息.急性上呼吸道感染(简称上感),广义上是一系列疾病的总称,具有常见多发的特点,所以选择一种有效的治疗方法对提高诊疗质量将起到关键性作用.利用数据挖掘的手段,应用关联规则算法对患有急性上呼吸道感染的病人进行分析,找到病人相关特征信息与用药之间的关联规则;并基于该关联规则构建急性上呼吸道感染用药的提示系统,对医生为病人用药进行评估,提高病人安全和整体医疗质量.

  16. Caudal Nuclei Of The Rat Nucleus Of The Solitary Tract Differentially Innervate Respiratory Compartments Within The Ventrolateral Medulla

    Alheid, George F.; Jiao, Weijie; McCrimmon, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    A substantial array of respiratory, cardiovascular, visceral and somatic afferents are relayed via the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) to the brainstem (and forebrain). Despite some degree of overlap within the NTS, specificity is maintained in central respiratory reflexes driven by 2nd order afferent relay neurons in the NTS. While the topographical arrangement of respiratory-related afferents targeting the NTS has been extensively investigated, their higher order brainstem targets beyon...

  17. Epidemiological pattern of community-acquired respiratory tract infections of the conscripts in the North Fleet during a vaccine-challenged period

    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the new military units in the North fleet is accompanied by vaccination using Exhausted diphtheria tetanus vaccine, modified. The accination coincides with periods of a rising number of army conscripts being taken ill with community-acquired infection of respiratory tracts: acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia. We need to study is to ascertain whether there is the correlation between the periods of the increase in the number of ervicemen fallen ill with community-acquired infection of respiratory tracts and the diphtheria and tetanus vaccination. The study was carried out on the North fleet conscripts who were drawn blood samples from the ulnar vein before and after the vaccination using Exhausted diphtheria tetanus vaccine, modified. The blood was examined for the presence of antibodies to diphtheria and tetanus using direct hemagglutination test. The health status of the vaccinated conscripts was under observation for 4 months, during which acute illnesses (acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia were registered. Serologic testing demonstrated a high rate of immunological protection against diphtheria and tetanus before vaccination. After the diphtheria and tetanus vaccination, the number of conscripts, who were taken ill in the first month, was significantly higher compared to the following months. The conscripts, who fell ill, had high antibody titers against diphtheria and tetanus in the vaccine-challenged period. Vaccination of the servicemen using Exhausted diphtheria tetanus vaccine, modified, is serologically unfounded; it leads to complications such as acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia during the vaccinechallenged period especially during the first month and less considerably during the following months.

  18. [Serological studies of the role of the respiratory syncytial virus in acute respiratory diseases in children].

    Vancea, D; Saşcă, C; Matinca, D; Ivanof, A

    1975-01-01

    The presence of the syncytial respiratory virus was determined by CF in 281 children admitted with acute respiratory diseases between 15 Sept. 1971 and 30 Dec. 1973, using the Long antigen prepared in the "St. Nicolau" Institute of Virology, Bucharest. In 38 children (13.5%) a serologic diagnosis of infection with the syncytial virus was established; in the other cases of respiratory infection of different etiology, antibodies to the syncytial virus were found in low but constant titers in both serum samples. The presence of these antibodies in a high proportion of the children points to the wide circulation of the syncytial virus in the infantile population, with all its clinico-epidemiologic implications. PMID:173009

  19. The development of lavage procedures for the upper and lower respiratory tract of the cat

    New techniques for routine bronchopulmonary lavage (BPL) and nasal flushing in the anaesthetized cat which are safe, reproducible and simple to use have been developed. Five adult mixed-breed cats from a specific pathogen-free colony were selected, fasted overnight and weighed. The feeding tube was passed through the endotracheal tube and down the trachea until it became wedged in the bronchus. Nasal flushing was then immediately carried out after the BPL with the endotracheal tube in position. Radiological and fluoroscopic examinations were carried out to determine the position of the feeding tube in the lung. Lateral and dorsoventral views of the thorax of each cat were taken. These examinations identified the tube most frequently in the caudal lobe of the lung. The lavage techniques described provide a definite procedure for investigating the cellular and humoral mechanisms operating in the upper and lower respiratory tract of the cat. These methods can be used to sample directly the cellular and humoral constituents contributing to defence mechanisms in the feline respiratory tract and to monitor the local changes accompanying respiratory disease

  20. Human Pharyngeal Microbiome May Play A Protective Role in Respiratory Tract Infections

    Zhancheng Gao; Yu Kang; Jun Yu; Lufeng Ren

    2014-01-01

    The human pharyngeal microbiome, which resides at the juncture of digestive and respi-ratory tracts, may have an active role in the prevention of respiratory tract infections, similar to the actions of the intestinal microbiome against enteric infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that the pharyngeal microbiome comprises an abundance of bacterial species that interacts with the local epithelial and immune cells, and together, they form a unique micro-ecological system. Most of the microbial species in microbiomes are obligate symbionts constantly adapting to their unique surroundings. Indigenous commensal species are capable of both maintaining dominance and evoking host immune responses to eliminate invading species. Temporary damage to the pha-ryngeal microbiome due to the impaired local epithelia is also considered an important predisposing risk factor for infections. Therefore, reinforcement of microbiome homeostasis to prevent invasion of infection-prone species would provide a novel treatment strategy in addition to antibiotic treat-ment and vaccination. Hence continued research efforts on evaluating probiotic treatment and developing appropriate procedures are necessary to both prevent and treat respiratory infections.

  1. Fungi in the respiratory tract of horses with recurrent airway obstruction

    M.O. Xavier

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to compare the concentration of viable fungi, especially those of the genus Aspergillus in the respiratory tract of stabled horses with and without Recurrent Airway Obstruction (RAO. Thirty two housed horses from four equestrian centers in Brazil were included in the study. These animals were submitted to clinical examination and to a respiratory sample collection. They were categorized into two groups: healthy and RAO-affected horses. Samples obtained by tracheobronchial washes were evaluated for fungal microscopy, quantitative culture and Aspergillus spp. quantification. Eighteen healthy and 14 RAO-affected horses were studied. Fungi were more frequently recovered in the RAO group, in comparison to controls, for both fungal microscopy (P<0.0001, fungal culture (P<0.0001 and Aspergillus spp. quantitative culture (p=0.001. In conclusion, horses with RAO have significantly higher fungal load in the respiratory tract in comparison to healthy horses. The implications of these findings in terms of the pathogenesis of RAO deserve additional investigation.

  2. Acute respiratory distress syndrome assessment after traumatic brain injury

    Shahrooz Kazemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is one of the most important complications associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI. ARDS is caused by inflammation of the lungs and hypoxic damage with lung physiology abnormalities associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Aim of this study is to determine the epidemiology of ARDS and the prevalence of risk factors. Methods: This prospective study performed on patients with acute traumatic head injury hospitalization in the intensive care unit of the Shohaday-e Haftom-e-Tir Hospital (September 2012 to September 2013 done. About 12 months, the data were evaluated. Information including age, sex, education, employment, drug and alcohol addiction, were collected and analyzed. The inclusion criteria were head traumatic patients and exclusion was the patients with chest trauma. Questionnaire was designed with doctors supervision of neurosurgery. Then the collected data were analysis. Results: In this study, the incidence of ARDS was 23.8% and prevalence of metabolic acidosis was 31.4%. Most injury with metabolic acidosis was Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH 48 (60% and Subdural hemorrhage (SDH was Next Level with 39 (48% Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS were significantly decreased (P< 0.0001. The level of consciousness in patients with skull fractures significantly lower than those without fractures (P= 0.009 [(2.3±4.6 vs (4.02±7.07]. Prevalence of metabolic acidosis during hospitalization was 80 patients (31.4%. Conclusion: Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Management and treatment is essential to reduce the mortality. In this study it was found the age of patients with ARDS was higher than patients without complications. ARDS risk factor for high blood pressure was higher in men. Most victims were pedestrians. The most common injury associated with ARDS was SDH. Our analysis

  3. The peculiarities of food allergies in accordance with the level of injury of respiratory tract in children of Eastern Siberia

    Irina V. Borisova

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the course of food allergy in accordance with the level of respiratory tract injury in children of Eastern Siberia. Design of the research. We have examined 70 children aged 2–16, who have food sensibilization. We divided them into 2 groups: group I (n=32 with diseases of the upper and middle respiratory tract; and group II (n=38 with diseases of the lower respiratory tract. Methods. Allergological medical history, clinical laboratory examination and immunological examination, including the determination of IgA, IgM, IgG and IgE in blood serum. In cases where causal allergens were found, elimination diets were recommended. Results. Onset of upper respiratory tract injury in group I was more often registered in children aged 0–1; in group II, it was in the 3–7 age group. Isolated food sensibilization was more often marked in group I as compared to group II. Atopic mechanisms of respiratory tract injuries were more often registered in group II children. In the course of the elimination diet, we marked positive dynamics in 100% of group I and in 75% of group II. Conclusion. The most frequent allergens that cause respiratory forms of food allergy are hen eggs, cow milk, nutritive cereals, vegetables and fruit. Indices of a humoral link of immunity in the examined patients were more often registered as normal or their level is increased. Timely etiotropic therapy in the majority of cases allows for a stabilization of allergic inflammation.

  4. Characterization of human metapneumovirus from pediatric patients with acute respiratory infections in a 4-year period in Beijing, China

    ZHU Ru-nan; QIAN Yuan; ZHAO Lin-qing; DENG Jie; SUN Yu; WANG Fang; LIAO Bin; LI Yan; HUANG Rong-yan

    2011-01-01

    Background Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) was discovered by scientists in the Netherlands as a novel respiratory virus in 2001 and had been found in children with acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI) in China. The objective of this study was to determine the importance of hMPV infection in children in Beijing and the genotypes of the circulating virus by the surveillance during a four-consecutive-year period.Methods Clinical specimens collected from children with ARTI from January 2006 to December 2009 were tested for hMPV by RT-PCR using primers targeting the matrix (M) gene, followed by genotyping of hMPV directly from positive samples by diplex PCR with primers for glycoprotein (G) genes. Sequence analysis was used for genotyping of those un-typable samples. Common respiratory viruses in these clinical specimens were tested by virus isolation and antigen detection, in addition to hMPV detection.Results Of 4730 tested specimens, 191 (4.0%) were positive for hMPV and 62.8% of 191 were identified as genotype A. The positive rate of hMPV from hospitalized patients was higher than that from outpatients each year. Most of hMPV positive children were under five years old. The peak of hMPV activity mostly occurred in late spring and overlapped with or followed that of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and followed by parainfluenza virus 3. Of hMPV infected cases,68.6% were lower respiratory tract infection, among which 79.4% were hospitalized, and upper respiratory tract infection was diagnosed for 31.4% of hMPV infected children. The 9.4% of hMPV positive samples were found to co-exist with other respiratory viruses.Conclusions hMPV was an important pathogen for ARTI in pediatric patients, especially those under five years old.Both genotypes A and B circulated simultaneously in Beijing.

  5. [Bacteriological and virological status in upper respiratory tract infections of cats (cat common cold complex)].

    Adler, Kerstin; Radeloff, Isabel; Stephan, Bernd; Greife, Heinrich; Hellmann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Between October 2002 and January 2005,460 bacteriological samples from cats with an acute upper respiratory tract infection were analysed in clinical field studies in two accredited laboratories in Germany. Oropharyngeal swabs were taken from these cats and sent to the laboratories for routine diagnostics. In the swab samples of 460 cats 382 bacteria strains were isolated. The following bacteria were isolated most frequently: Pasteurella spp. (32.5 %), Staphylococcus spp. (18.5 %), Escherichia coli (17.0 %), Streptococcus spp. (9.1 %), Pseudomonas spp. (6.9 %) and Klebsiella spp. (3.0 %). Bordetella bronchiseptica was found in 0.4 % of the animals To evaluate possible regional and time influences, the animals were split into three populations: 1: Germany, laboratory A; 2: Germany, laboratory B; 3: France and Belgium, laboratory B. In population 1 an 2 Pasteurella spp. were found most frequently with 42.2 % and 36.5 %, respectively. The second most frequently isolated bacterial species were Staphylococcus spp. with 14.1 % and 21.4 % and E. coli with 13.6 % and 17.5 % respectively. In population 3 Staphylococcus spp., E. coli (20 % each) and Pasteurella spp. (18.5 %) were isolated at almost the same frequency. Virological parameter were additionally analysed in 328 cats (population 2 and 3). Serum samples were analysed for antibodies specific for Feline Calicivirus (FCV) and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) and for Feline Leukaemia Virus (FeLV) antigen. Oropharyngeal swabs were analysed for Feline Herpesvirus (FHV) by using PCR. Calicivirus-specific antibodies were found in 99.6 % of the cats of population 2 and in 100 % of the animals in population 3. Herpesvirus was detected in 15.3 % and 23.3 % of the cats, respectively. FeLV-Antigen was found in 0.4 % of the animals in population 2 and in 10.1 % of the cats in population 3, while FIV-antibodies were identified in 8.7 % of the animals of population 2 and in 6.1 % of the cats of population 3. In total FHV was

  6. Role of Ventilation in Cases of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome /Acute Lung injury

    Hemant M Shah; Shilpa B Sutariya; Parul M Bhatt; Nishil Shah; Shweta Gamit

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute lung injury (ALI) and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by refractory hypoxemia that develops secondary to high-permeability pulmonary edema. These syndromes are gaining more attention as a means of better comprehending the pathophysiology of ARDS and possiblyfor modifying ventilatory management. In this context a study was done to compare role of invasive and non-invasive ventilation in cases of ARDS/ALI. Methods: in this study patients of AR...

  7. Drug resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections: role for an emerging antibacterial

    Lorenzo Aguilar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lorenzo Aguilar1, María-José Giménez1, José Barberán21Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid; 2Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The nasopharynx is the ecological niche where evolution towards resistance occurs in respiratory tract isolates. Dynamics of different bacterial populations in antibiotic-free multibacterial niches are the baseline that antibiotic treatments can alter by shifting the competitive balance in favor of resistant populations. For this reason, antibiotic resistance is increasingly being considered to be an ecological problem. Traditionally, resistance has implied the need for development of new antibiotics for which basic efficacy and safety data are required prior to licensing. Antibiotic development is mainly focused on demonstrating clinical efficacy and setting susceptibility breakpoints for efficacy prediction. However, additional information on pharmacodynamic data predicting absence of selection of resistance and of resistant subpopulations, and specific surveillance on resistance to core antibiotics (to detect emerging resistances and its link with antibiotic consumption in the community are valuable data in defining the role of a new antibiotic, not only from the perspective of its therapeutic potential but also from the ecologic perspective (countering resistances to core antibiotics in the community. The documented information on cefditoren gleaned from published studies in recent years is an example of the role for an emerging oral antibacterial facing current antibiotic resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections.Keywords: respiratory tract infection, antibiotic resistance, cefditoren, community

  8. Comparison of old and new ICRP models for respiratory tract dosimetry

    This paper examines the historical development and application of respiratory tract dosimetry models by the International Commission for Radiological Protection, ICRP, for health protection from inhaled radioactive aerosols. Three different models are discussed, those that were included in ICRP recommendations published in 1960 and 1979, and the new ICRP Publication 66. Basic features of these models are compared and contrasted. These features include model structure, sites and frequencies of particle deposition, processes and rates of clearance of the deposited material from the respiratory tract, and consideration of the parameters involved in these processes and how various factors can influence these parameters. All three models lead to the calculation of absorbed radiation doses with differing degrees of regional and local specificity. These calculations are achieved using different tools ranging from quick hand calculations to sophisticated computerized modeling approaches. A side-by-side review of these models indicates several important trends in respiratory tract dosimetry models, the most obvious of which is the increased complexity of each new model over the past 30+ years. These increases reflect both the increasing size of the knowledge base derived from studies in laboratory animals and in human subjects and the need for models more broadly applicable for both occupational and environmental exposures. It is likely that future research will be directed to those key aspects of the new model having the largest uncertainties. The detailed design of the new model and its associated software provide excellent means of identifying useful research areas and using the resulting new information in organized and productive ways

  9. Silent gastro-esophageal reflux in children presenting with recurrent lower respiratory tract infections

    Introduction: Paediatric respiratory tract infections are one of the most common reasons for physician visits and hospitalisation, and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The socioeconomic impact of these recurrent infections is staggering. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) has long been associated with pulmonary symptoms and diseases. Aims: The present retrospective analysis was undertaken to find out the incidence of GER in children suffering from recurrent lower respiratory tract infections without any typical gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of GER. Materials and Methods: A total of 297 children with a mean age of 2.7 years and range 9-months to 8 years were evaluated. All studies were performed using a dose of 100-200 micro Curie (3.7-7.4MBq) of Tc99m-sulphur colloid, which was administered via a nasogastric tube into the stomach in younger children. Adequate intragastric volume was ensured by instilling water of 50-ml volume for children less than 6 months and 100-ml volume for children between 6-12 months of age. The nasogastric tube was removed with the patient held in erect position and a small volume of water was pushed to avoid any contamination. In older children the isotope was administered in a capsule and was swallowed with 150-300 ml of water. Results: Of the total 297 children, 111(37%) children had GER on scintigraphy. Conclusion: There is a high incidence of silent GER in children suffering from recurrent lower respiratory tract infections. Scintiscanning can be used as a screening modality in these children

  10. Dosimetry model for bronchial and extrathoracic tissues of the respiratory tract

    The Task Group to Review the Lung Model for the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is proposing to revise the dosimetry model for the respiratory tract on the basis of the relative radiosensitivities of the various tissue components. The task group considers that if all tissues were to receive the same radiation dose, approximately 64% of fatal cancers would be likely to arise in the bronchi, about 12% in the bronchioles, about 20% in extrathoracic tissues (divided between the naso-- and oropharynx and larynx), and only about 4% in the alveolar-interstitial tissue, with a very small fraction of all cancers (less than 0.1%) in lymph nodes. A new and detailed treatment of dose received by epithelia in the tracheo-bronchiolar and extra-thoracic regions of the respiratory tract is therefore required. This paper describes the approach proposed by the task group to evaluate doses to presumed target cells in each of these tissues at risk in the respiratory tract from non-uniform irradiation by α-, β- and electron-emitters. The task group's approach takes into account the impact of observed phenomena that may cause long-lived radionuclides to be retained in epithelial tissues: the uptake of particles by the airway wall; the chemical binding of sparingly soluble nuclides in epithelial tissues; and, especially in the bronchi and bronchicles, the slow clearance of particles by mucus. Values of dose, weighted by the task group's proposed relative risk factors are calculated for several types of α- and β- emitters. These weighted doses are compared with the committed effective dose equivalent calculated using the current ICRP lung model, in which the simplifying assumption is made that all of the activity retained in the thorax uniformly irradiates the 1 kg mass of a ''composite'' lung. 11 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs

  11. Detection of respiratory pathogens in air samples from acutely infected pigs

    Hermann, Joseph R.; Brockmeier, Susan L.; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Zimmerman, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    Pathogens causing significant respiratory disease in growing pigs include Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, Porcine circovirus 2, swine influenza virus, porcine respiratory coronavirus, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, and Bordetella bronchiseptica. The objective of this research was to characterize the respiratory excretion of these pathogens by acutely infected pigs. Pigs were inoculated under experimental conditions with 1 pathogen. Samples were collected from the upper respira...

  12. The comparative analysis on the curative effect of amoxicillin clavulanate combined with compound pholcodine syrup for children with acute bacterial upper respiratory tract infection%阿莫西林克拉维酸钾联合复方福尔可定治疗小儿急性细菌性上呼吸道感染的临床疗效随机对照分析

    王冰; 徐洁; 唐新业; 姚红兵

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the curative effect of amoxicillin clavulanate combined with compound phol-codine syrup for children with acute bacterial upper respiratory tract infection.Methods One hundred and sixty chil-dren with acute bacterial upper respiratory tract infection were chosen,and divided into treatment group(80 cases) and control group(80 cases)randomly.Amoxicillin clavulanic(7∶1)combined with compound pholcodine syrup were enrolled in the treatment group,while amoxicillin clavulanic(7∶1)combined with lung cough syrup were in the con-trol group.The bacterial clearance rate,oral secretory SIgA and total effective rate were compared before and after the treatment for 7 days.Results There was no significant difference in the bacterial clearance rate in the two groups (P >0.05).The oral secretory SigA increased after treatment comparing with that before treatment(P 0.05)in the control one.The total effective rate in the treatment group was higher than that in the control one(93.75% vs.86.25%)(P <0.05).No serious side effect occurred in the two groups.Conclusion It has significant effect using amoxicillin clavulanic combined with compound pholcodine syrup in treatment of pediatric acute bacterial upper respiratory tract infection.%目的:观察阿莫西林克拉维酸钾干混悬剂联合复方福尔可定治疗小儿急性细菌性上呼吸道感染的临床疗效。方法选择急性细菌性上呼吸道感染患儿160例,分为治疗组(80例)和对照组(80例),治疗组选用阿莫西林克拉维酸钾干混悬剂(7∶1)+复方福尔可定口服溶液,对照组选用阿莫西林克拉维酸钾干混悬剂(7∶1)+肺力咳糖浆。治疗疗程均为7 d,比较治疗前后两组细菌清除率、口腔分泌性 SIgA 和总有效率。结果细菌清除率两组差异无统计学意义(P >0.05),治疗后实验组患儿口腔分泌性 SIgA 较治疗前有升高(P <0.05),而对照组

  13. 阿莫西林克拉维酸钾联合复方福尔可定治疗小儿急性细菌性上呼吸道感染的临床疗效随机对照分析%The comparative analysis on the curative effect of amoxicillin clavulanate combined with compound pholcodine syrup for children with acute bacterial upper respiratory tract infection

    王冰; 徐洁; 唐新业; 姚红兵

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察阿莫西林克拉维酸钾干混悬剂联合复方福尔可定治疗小儿急性细菌性上呼吸道感染的临床疗效。方法选择急性细菌性上呼吸道感染患儿160例,分为治疗组(80例)和对照组(80例),治疗组选用阿莫西林克拉维酸钾干混悬剂(7∶1)+复方福尔可定口服溶液,对照组选用阿莫西林克拉维酸钾干混悬剂(7∶1)+肺力咳糖浆。治疗疗程均为7 d,比较治疗前后两组细菌清除率、口腔分泌性 SIgA 和总有效率。结果细菌清除率两组差异无统计学意义(P >0.05),治疗后实验组患儿口腔分泌性 SIgA 较治疗前有升高(P <0.05),而对照组差异无统计学意义(P >0.05),治疗组总有效率93.75%。显著高于对照组86.25%(P <0.05),两组患儿均无严重的不良反应发生。结论阿莫西林克拉维酸钾干混悬剂联合复方福尔可定治疗小儿急性细菌性上呼吸道感染疗效显著。%Objective To observe the curative effect of amoxicillin clavulanate combined with compound phol-codine syrup for children with acute bacterial upper respiratory tract infection.Methods One hundred and sixty chil-dren with acute bacterial upper respiratory tract infection were chosen,and divided into treatment group(80 cases) and control group(80 cases)randomly.Amoxicillin clavulanic(7∶1)combined with compound pholcodine syrup were enrolled in the treatment group,while amoxicillin clavulanic(7∶1)combined with lung cough syrup were in the con-trol group.The bacterial clearance rate,oral secretory SIgA and total effective rate were compared before and after the treatment for 7 days.Results There was no significant difference in the bacterial clearance rate in the two groups (P >0.05).The oral secretory SigA increased after treatment comparing with that before treatment(P 0.05)in the control one.The total effective rate in the treatment group was higher than that

  14. Cancer screening via infrared spectral cytopathology (SCP): results for the upper respiratory and digestive tracts.

    Diem, Max; Miljković, Miloš; Bird, Benjamin; Mazur, Antonella I; Schubert, Jen M; Townsend, Douglas; Laver, Nora; Almond, Max; Old, Oliver

    2016-01-21

    Instrumental advances in infrared micro-spectroscopy have made possible the observation of individual human cells and even subcellular structures. The observed spectra represent a snapshot of the biochemical composition of a cell; this composition varies subtly but reproducibly with cellular effects such as progression through the cell cycle, cell maturation and differentiation, and disease. The aim of this summary is to provide a synopsis of the progress achieved in infrared spectral cytopathology (SCP) - the combination of infrared micro-spectroscopy and multivariate methods of analysis - for the detection of abnormalities in exfoliated human cells of the upper respiratory and digestive tract, namely the oral and nasopharyngeal cavities, and the esophagus. PMID:26421636

  15. Comparison of the respiratory tract models of ICRP and US EPA

    An index for the integral characterization of risk is necessary for improving risk management, comparing the effects of various practices on the environment and keeping risk as low as reasonably achievable while allowing economic development. Public health risk has been used as an index to compare and combine the risks from the presence of a variety of contaminants. In 1994, International Commission on Radiological Protection published the Publication 66 'Human Respiratory Tract Model for Radiological Protection'. Meanwhile US EPA published 'Methods for Derivation of Inhalation Reference Concentrations and Application of Inhalation Dosimetry'. Basically the concept of Reference Concentration (RfC) is similar to that of DAC used in radiation protection. Both of them are derived from the deposited amount of interested contaminants in the respiratory tract. In an attempt to assess the public health risk by combining the ICRP model and the deposited amount corresponding to values of RfC, the main application, especially the fractional deposition, of the respiratory tract model of US EPA is compared with the new respiratory tract model of ICRP. For normal nose breather, when the AMADs of monodisperse aerosol are 0.5 η m, 1 η m, 2 η m, 3 η m, 5 η m, 7 η m and 10 η m, minute volume is 1.2m3/h (20L/mim), the corresponding total fractional depositions calculated by the model of the US EPA are 0.33, 0.50, 0.72, 0.85, 0.95, 0.97 and 0.93. With the same condition, the total fractional deposition calculated by the ICRP model is 0.35, 0.51, 0.70, 0.78, 0.82, 0.81 and 0.77. For polydisperse aerosol with default values of ICRP for occupational and environmental exposures, the fractional depositions calculated by US EPA model are 0.82 and 0.50 while that by ICRP are 0.82 and 0.47. In conclusion, (1) The ICRP model is more accurate than the US EPA model and has a wider application. (2) For monodisperse aerosol, when the AMAD of aerosol is less than 3 η m there is no

  16. The potential of methylxanthine-based therapies in pediatric respiratory tract diseases.

    Oñatibia-Astibia, Ainhoa; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Franco, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Caffeine, theophylline and theobromine are the most known methylxanthines as they are present in coffee, tea and/or chocolate. In the last decades, a huge experimental effort has been devoted to get insight into the variety of actions that these compounds exert in humans. From such knowledge it is known that methylxanthines have a great potential in prevention, therapy and/or management of a variety of diseases. The benefits of methylxanthine-based therapies in the apnea of prematurity and their translational potential in pediatric affections of the respiratory tract are here presented. PMID:26880379

  17. European H16N3 gull influenza virus attaches to the human respiratory tract and eye.

    Cecilia Lindskog

    Full Text Available We explored the attachment of an H16N3 influenza virus to human, mallard, and gull tissues using virus histochemistry applied to tissue microarrays and employing human and mallard viruses as references. Of the viruses tested, the H16N3 gull virus most readily attached to the human respiratory tract and eye. These results underscore the need to assess the potential for gull influenza viruses to replicate in human tissues and further investigate the role of gulls in influenza virus ecology.

  18. The Chlamydia Infections in Children Who Were Hospitalized For Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

    Alhan, S. Emre; Evliyaoğlu, Nurdan; Güven, Hasan; Kibar, Filiz; Yıldızdaş, Dinçer; Köksal, Fatih

    1996-01-01

    The frequency and clinical course of Chlamydia infections were investiagated in 59 children who were hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infection 46 patients were 78 were younger than five group I whereas 13 patients were 22 older than five group II with means of 11 9±8 3 months and 9 8±2 8 years respectively Clinical and radiologic evidences of pneumonia were present in 50 84 7 patients while 7 11 9 patients were diagnosed as bronchiolitis and 2 3 4 as laryngotracheitis Using indirect ...

  19. Interventions to improve adherence to first-line antibiotics in respiratory tract infections

    Llor, Carl; Monedero, María José; García, Guillermo;

    2015-01-01

    intervention (II), aimed to improve the adherence to recommendations on first-line antibiotics in patients with respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Methods: General practitioners (GPs) from different regions of Spain were offered two different interventions on antibiotic prescribing. They registered all...... included training and access to point-of-care tests in practice. Results: The GPs registered 15 073 RTIs before the intervention and 12 760 RTIs after. The antibiotic prescribing rate reduced from 27.7% to 19.8%. Prescribing of first-choice antibiotics increased after the intervention in both groups...

  20. Antibiotic prescriptions for suspected respiratory tract infection in primary care in South America

    Cordoba Currea, Gloria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe and compare antibiotic prescribing patterns for primary care patients with respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in four South American countries. Methods: Prospective observational study. General practitioners (GPs) from Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay registered data...... across countries, but prescription rates varied between 45% in Bolivia and 69% in Uruguay. Compared with the overall mean prescribing rate and after adjusting for clinical presentation and demographics, prescribing of antibiotics varied by a factor of 6, the odds ratio ranging from 0.37 (95% CI 0.21; 0...

  1. Quality indicators for treatment of respiratory tract infections? An assessment by Danish general practitioners

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Bjerrum, Lars; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente;

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2008, a set of 41 quality indicators for antibiotic treatment of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in general practice were developed in an international setting as part of the European project HAPPY AUDIT. Objectives: To investigate Danish general practitioners' (GPs') assessment...... of 62 (61%) responded. Quality indicators focusing on the frequency of prescribing of narrow-spectrum penicillin were rated as suitable by more than 80% of the Danish GPs, while quality indicators concerning cephalosporins or quinolones were rated suitable by less than half of the GPs. The antibiotic...... treatment of RTIs, only a few of them were rated suitable by the GPs, who are supposed to use them....

  2. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    Keravec, Marlene; Mounier, Jerome; Prestat , Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Bergaud , Gaetaqn; Rosec, Silvain; Gourious, Stephanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, George; Hery-Arnaud, Geneveieve

    2015-08-09

    Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  3. Novel diversity of bacterial communities associated with bottlenose dolphin upper respiratory tracts.

    Johnson, Wesley R; Torralba, Manolito; Fair, Patricia A; Bossart, Gregory D; Nelson, Karen E; Morris, Pamela J

    2009-12-01

    Respiratory illness is thought to be most the common cause of death in both wild and captive populations of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). The suspected pathogens that have been isolated from diseased animals have also been isolated from healthy individuals, suggesting they may be part of the normal flora. Our current understanding of the bacteria associated with the upper respiratory tract (URT) of bottlenose dolphins is based exclusively upon culture-based isolation and identification. Because Tenacibaculum, Fluviicola and Flavobacterium; however, they were sufficiently different from database sequences from both cultured and uncultured organisms to suggest they represent novel genera and species. Our findings also demonstrate the dominance of three of the four bacterial phyla that dominate other mammalian microbiomes, including those of humans, and show tremendous diversity at the species/strain level, suggesting tight coevolution of the dolphin host and its URT bacterial community. PMID:23765934

  4. Microbial Communities in the Upper Respiratory Tract of Patients with Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Park, HeeKuk; Shin, Jong Wook; Park, Sang-Gue; Kim, Wonyong

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory infections are well-known triggers of chronic respiratory diseases. Recently, culture-independent tools have indicated that lower airway microbiota may contribute to pathophysiologic processes associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the relationship between upper airway microbiota and chronic respiratory diseases remains unclear. This study was undertaken to define differences of microbiota in the oropharynx of asthma and COPD patients relative to those in healthy individuals. To account for the qualitative and quantitative diversity of the 16S rRNA gene in the oropharynx, the microbiomes of 18 asthma patients, 17 COPD patients, and 12 normal individuals were assessed using a high-throughput next-generation sequencing analysis. In the 259,572 total sequence reads, α and β diversity measurements and a generalized linear model revealed that the oropharynx microbiota are diverse, but no significant differences were observed between asthma and COPD patients. Pseudomonas spp. of Proteobacteria and Lactobacillus spp. of Firmicutes were highly abundant in asthma and COPD. By contrast, Streptococcus, Veillonella, Prevotella, and Neisseria of Bacteroidetes dominated in the healthy oropharynx. These findings are consistent with previous studies conducted in the lower airways and suggest that oropharyngeal airway microbiota are important for understanding the relationships between the various parts of the respiratory tract with regard to bacterial colonization and comprehensive assessment of asthma and COPD. PMID:25329665

  5. Therapeutic options for acute cough due to upper respiratory infections in children.

    Paul, Ian M

    2012-02-01

    Cough due to upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) is one of the most frequent complaints encountered by pediatric health-care providers, and one of the most disruptive symptoms for children and families. Despite the frequency of URIs, there is limited evidence to support the few therapeutic agents currently available in the United States (US) to treat acute cough due to URI. Published, well-designed, contemporary research supporting the efficacy of narcotics (codeine, hydrocodone) and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved over-the-counter (OTC) oral antitussives and expectorants (dextromethorphan, diphenhydramine, chlophedianol, and guaifenesin) is absent for URI-associated pediatric cough. Alternatively, honey and topically applied vapor rubs may be effective antitussives. PMID:21892785

  6. Surveillance of acute respiratory infections among outpatients: A pilot study in Isfahan city

    Abbasali Javadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering that there was not any regional survey in Isfahan, Iran regarding the epidemiology of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI in different age groups of general population, the aim of this study was to determine the epidemiologic feature of ARTIs in Isfahan using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, patients aged 15 years old. Rhinovirus was the most common cause of ARTI in patients aged 50 years. Influenza virus B was the most common cause of ARTI in patients aged 5-50 years. Conclusion: Our study provides baseline information on the epidemiologic and clinical feature of outpatients with ARTIs in Isfahan city. Though our findings in this pilot study could be helpful in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of ARTI, planning preventive interventional.

  7. Respiratory syncytial virus shedding by children hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infection.

    Takeyama, Aya; Hashimoto, Koichi; Sato, Masatoki; Kawashima, Ryoko; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-06-01

    Children with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection shed virus for variable periods. The aim of this study was to quantify the viral load in nasopharyngeal aspirates of children with RSV throughout their hospitalization. This study included 37 children who were admitted with a diagnosis of RSV infection based on a positive rapid diagnostic test. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from patients every day, from admission to discharge. Viral detection and quantification were performed using quantitative real-time PCR. Of the 37 patients, RSV-A was detected in 29 and RSV-B in 6. Two patients were PCR-negative for any type of RSV. RSV-A was detected in 12 of 16 patients (75%) 6 days after admission. These patients shed detectable virus from days 1 to 12, and for a significantly longer period (mean 5.7 days) than RSV-B (mean 3.8 days) patients. Half of the RSV-A patients were also positive on day 14 following onset. RSV-A was detected in patients <12 months of age for significantly longer periods after onset than in patients ≥12 months of age. RSV-A viral load was negatively correlated with days from admission and days from onset. Because RSV shedding was frequently prolonged, the hospitalized children may have contracted RSV as a nosocomial infection. To prevent nosocomial RSV infections in hospital wards, healthcare workers must take appropriate infection control measures and provide adequate guidance on hand washing to the family of the patient. J. Med. Virol. 88:938-946, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26588816

  8. Airflow effects on regional disposition of particles and gases in the upper respiratory tract

    Precise determination of deposition and uptake sites of inhaled particles and gases in the upper respiratory tract is difficult because of the rapid translocation by the mucociliary apparatus, metabolism by the airway mucosa, or other means of removal from the original deposition site. An important approach to understanding interspecies differences in regional airway dosimetry involves studies of airflow characteristics in the upper respiratory tract, combined with mathematical modelling of flow patterns and their influence on transfer of airborne materials to the airway lining. Nasal inspiratory airflow patterns were determined for the F-344 rat and rhesus monkey using clear acrylic nasal moulds, combined with video analysis. Reynolds' numbers, derived from regional velocity vectors and morphometric data, were determined at several cross sectional levels for the F-344 rat and rhesus monkey. Preliminary mathematical models in two dimensions were developed to simulate and compare airflow effects on mass transport for parabolic flow in a straight channel, and for flow involving a vortex. Results indicated that differing airflow patterns may significantly affect the distribution of inhaled material reaching airway walls, and studies in this laboratory reveal good qualitative correlation between regional nasal airflow characteristics and the distribution of lesions induced by inhaled irritant gases. (author)

  9. Radionuclide detection of gastroesophageal reflux in children suffering from recurrent lower respiratory tract infection

    Radionuclide gastro-esophageal scintigraphy was performed on 25 control and 183 children suffering from recurrent lower respiratory tract inspection. Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) of varying grades was observed in 135 patients. The severity of clinical symptoms in the patients was found to be directly related to the severity of reflux observed in the radionuclide study. In some patients an attempt was also made to quantitate GER by calculating the gastro-esophageal reflex index. The results of the scintigraphic study were correlated with the results of the other commonly used and more conventional barium swallow and fluoroscopy study. Gastro-esophageal scintigraphy was found to be much superior in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in detecting GER. It was also possible to objectively evaluate and monitor response to treatment following conservative or corrective surgical therapy using the radionuclide technique. The results of the study demonstrated a remarkably high incidence of GER in the patients. Whether GER is the cause of recurrent lower respiratory tract infection or not is difficult to establish firmly. But within the perview of the study the association seems to be very strong and cannot be easily ignored. (author). 26 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs

  10. Prevalence and emerging resistance of Moraxella catarrhalis in lower respiratory tract infections in Karachi

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of Moraxella catarrhalis in sputum cultures from patients with lower respiratory tract infection and their antimicrobial sensitivity profiles. Methods: The study comprised sputum specimens of 776 patients at various branches of Dr Essa's Diagnostic Lab, Karachi. The specimens were cultured on blood, chocolate, and eosin methylene blue agars between October 2010 and October 2011. The isolates were identified by conventional methods and anti-biograms were determined by the Kirby-Bauer Agar Disc Diffusion Method. Results: Moraxella catarrhalis was isolated from 39 (5.02%) sputa of which 18 (46.15%) belonged to males. The bimodal age prevalence was 238 (30.7%) in age group 20-29 years, and 180 (23.1%) in 70 years and above. Amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone were most effective (100%). Very high resistance was seen with amikacin (92.3%), cefixime (92.3%), fosfomycin (84.6%), cefuroxime (84.6%), erythromycin and amoxicillin (76.9%), cotrimoxazole (90%) and doxycycline (76.9%). Conclusions: The incidence of Moraxella catarrhalis in sputum encourages routine culture and sensitivity of sputa from patients suffering from lower respiratory tract infection, especially the elderly and immunocompromised, for tailored drug prescription. (author)

  11. ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF BACTERIAL AGENTS OF THE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT IN SOUTH INDIAN POPULATION

    K. Kousalya

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at determining bacterial agents of the upper respiratory tract and the susceptibility patterns of isolates to antibiotics. The throat swab samples from 250 patients suspected of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI were obtained from the General Medicine outpatient department of a Rural Health Centre of Rajah Muthiah Medical College and Hospital (RMMC and H, Annamalai University, Chidambaram, Tamilnadu, India and inoculated in the culture medium. The bacterial infection was confirmed only in 228 patients. The organisms isolated on medium were identified by their cultural, morphological and biochemical characteristics. Staphylococcus aureus was identified as the most prevalent bacterial isolate (45.61% followed by β hemolytic streptococci (22.81%. Thirty four strains (14.91% were identified as Klebsiella penumoniae, 19 (8.33% as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the rest belonged to α hemolytic streptococci, Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. All Staphylococcus spp. were resistant to penicillin, ampicillin and co-trimoxazole. All the isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic. The overall resistance rates were generally low for gentamicin, cefixime and ceftazidime respectively.

  12. Control dynamics of severe acute respiratory syndrome transmission

    WANG Haiying; RONG Feng; KE Fujiu; BAI Yilong

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a serious disease with many puzzling features. We present a simple, dynamic model to assess the epidemic potential of SARS and the effectiveness of control measures. With this model, we analysed the SARS epidemic data in Beijing. The data fitting gives the basic case reproduction number of 2.16 leading to the outbreak, and the variation of the effective reproduction number reflecting the control effect. Noticeably, our study shows that the response time and the strength of control measures have significant effects on the scale of the outbreak and the lasting time of the epidemic.

  13. Acute respiratory failure due to ehrlichiosis - CT findings: case report

    Ehrlichiosis is a rare disease, with approximately 400 cases having been documented in the US since its recognition in 1986. Most of the reported cases were in the southeastern US, although 6 cases have been described in Washington state. Although most of these reported patients were admitted to hospital, severe complications developed in only a small proportion. Findings on chest imaging have been described in 3 children. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of computed tomographic (CT) findings in a young adult with erhlichiosis in whom acute respiratory failure developed. (author)

  14. Small molecules targeting severe acute respiratory syndrome human coronavirus

    Wu, Chung-Yi; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Ma, Shiou-Hwa; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Cheng, Yih-Shyun E; Hsu, Hsien-Hua; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Wu, Douglass; Brik, Ashraf; Liang, Fu-Sen; Liu, Rai-Shung; Fang, Jim-Min; Chen, Shui-Tein; Liang, Po-Huang

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an infectious disease caused by a novel human coronavirus. Currently, no effective antiviral agents exist against this type of virus. A cell-based assay, with SARS virus and Vero E6 cells, was developed to screen existing drugs, natural products, and synthetic compounds to identify effective anti-SARS agents. Of >10,000 agents tested, ≈50 compounds were found active at 10 μM; among these compounds, two are existing drugs (Reserpine 13 and Aescin 5) ...

  15. Deposition and clearance for radon progeny in the human respiratory tract

    In vivo counting of 214Pb was conducted to estimate the deposition and retention of radon progeny in the human respiratory tract. Two volunteer subjects were exposed to high radon concentrations. After the exposures, activity deposited in the extrathoracic (ET) region for each subject was measured using a NaI(Tl) detector. According to the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) model, a reference value for particle transport rate from ET2 to the GI tract is 100 d-1 (half-time, 10 min). The effective half-time of 214Pb deposited in the ET region was calculated for pure nose and mouth breathers, using the ICRP reference transport rate. While the measured half-times for nose breathers were generally consistent with the calculated values, those for mouth breathers were significantly larger than the calculated values. The results indicated that the particle transport rate from ET2 to the GI tract was much smaller than the reference value in the ICRP model. (author)

  16. Glass fibers and vapor phase components of cigarette smoke as cofactors in experimental respiratory tract carcinogenesis

    Feron, V.J.; Kuper, C.F.; Spit, B.J.; Reuzel, P.G.; Woutersen, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Syrian golden hamsters were given intratracheal instillations of glass fibers with or without BP suspended in saline, once a fortnight for 52 weeks; the experiment was terminated at week 85. No tumors of the respiratory tract were observed in hamsters treated with glass fibers alone. There was no indication that glass fibers enhanced the development of respiratory tract tumors induced by BP. In another study Syrian golden hamsters were exposed to fresh air or to a mixture of 4 major vapor phase components of cigarette smoke, viz. isoprene (800----700 ppm), methyl chloride (1000----900 ppm), methyl nitrite (200----190 ppm) and acetaldehyde (1400----1200 ppm) for a period of at most 23 months. Some of the animals were also given repeated intratracheal instillations of BP or norharman in saline. Laryngeal tumors were found in 7/31 male and 6/32 female hamsters exposed only to the vapor mixture, whereas no laryngeal tumors occurred in controls. The tumor response of the larynx most probably has to be ascribed entirely to the action of acetaldehyde. Simultaneous treatment with norharman or BP did not affect the tumor response of the larynx. Acetaldehyde may occur in the vapor phase of cigarette smoke at levels up to 2000 ppm. Chronic inhalation exposure of rats to acetaldehyde at levels of 0 (controls), 750, 1500 or 3000----1000 ppm resulted in a high incidence of nasal carcinomas, both squamous cell carcinomas of the respiratory epithelium and adenocarcinomas of the olfactory epithelium. It was discussed that acetaldehyde may significantly contribute to the induction of bronchogenic cancer by cigarette smoke in man.

  17. Radiologic features of lower respiratory tract infections associated with adenovirus in children

    To describe the radiologic features of lower respiratory infections associated with adenovirus in children and to determine whether these can be differentiated from other lower respiratory infections. We retrospectively reviewed the radiologic features of 48 lower respiratory tract infections associated with adenovirus in children and diagnosed between December 1990 and August 1996 at Seoul National University Children's Hospital. Adenovirus was identified by either viral culture or immunofluorescent staining of nasal aspirates and/or pleural fluid, and serotested by microneutralization. They were divided into three groups, as follows: type 7 epidemic infection (group I); type 3 sporadic infection (group II); and others (types 1, 2, 4, 5, 6) sporadic infection (group III). Each radiological finding was tested for differences among three groups with fisher's exact test. Pulmonary consolidation and pleural effusion, regarded as characteristics of bacterial pneumonia, were common findings in types 7 and 3 adenovirus infections. Parahilar peribronchial infiltration, hyperaeration, and bilateral, multiple, extensive consolidation may be features which can determine whether an infection is adenoviral or due to bacterial pneumonia. (author). 27 refs., 5 figs

  18. Reducing general practice trainees' antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections: an evaluation of a combined face-to-face workshop and online educational intervention.

    Magin, Parker J; Morgan, Simon; Tapley, Amanda; Davis, Joshua S; McArthur, Lawrie; Henderson, Kim M; Mulquiney, Katie J; Dallas, Anthea; Davey, Andrew R; Scott, John; van Driel, Mieke L

    2016-03-01

    Over-prescription of antibiotics for non-pneumonia respiratory tract infections (RTIs) is a major concern in general practice. Australian general practice registrars (trainees) have inappropriately high rates of prescription of antibiotics for RTIs. The 'apprenticeship' educational model and the trainee-trainer relationship are drivers of this inappropriate prescribing. We aimed to reduce registrars' non-pneumonia RTI antibiotic prescribing via an educational intervention (a 90-min face-to-face workshop supported by online modules), complemented by delivery of the same intervention, separately, to their trainers. We conducted a pre- and post-intervention comparison of the registrars' intention to prescribe antibiotics for common RTIs using McNemar's test. We similarly tested changes in supervisors' intended prescribing. Prescribing intentions were elicited by responses to six written clinical vignettes (upper respiratory tract infection, otitis media, sore throat and three acute bronchitis vignettes). We found that, for registrars, there were statistically significant reductions in antibiotic prescribing for the sore throat (24.0% absolute reduction), otitis media (17.5% absolute reduction) and two of the three acute bronchitis (12.0% and 18.0% absolute reduction) vignettes. There were significant reductions in supervisors' antibiotic prescribing intentions for the same four vignettes. We conclude that our intervention produced a significant change in registrars' intention to prescribe antibiotics for non-pneumonia RTIs. PMID:27005837

  19. Clinical and radiological analysis of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Objective: To study the X-ray features of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Methods: The clinical data and X-ray appearances of 29 cases with SARS were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Epidemic outbreak of SARS has occurred at this area. 29 cases of SARS in this group began with a fever. 15 cases (51.7%) experienced mild respiratory symptoms. In 10 patients (34.5%) the antibacterial medication showed inefficacy before hospitalization. Leucocyte counting was normal in 18 cases (62.1%) and decreased in 11 cases (37.9%). Platelet counting slightly decreased in 7 cases (24.1%). Hepatic function test was abnormal in 16 patients (55.2%), mostly with a decrease of serum enzymology. Obvious abnormalities were seen on the chest films, which were in sharp contrast with the mild clinical respiratory signs. Chest X-ray findings were as follows: Exaggerated and indistinct lung markings with reticular shadow in 7 cases (24.1%), ground-glass opacity in 3 cases (10.4%), small patchy and multi-patchy imaging in 12 cases (41.4%), and large patchy shadow in 7 cases (24.1%). X-ray abnormality was presented later and absorbed slower. Conclusion: SARS carries a variety of X-ray appearances. The combined use of epidemiologic history, clinical situation, laboratory tests, and imaging examinations can make a definite diagnosis

  20. Acute gross sterile pyuria after oral ciprofloxacin treatment of urinary tract infection

    Pathoom Sukkaromdee; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2016-01-01

    The sterile pyuria is an interesting problem in urology. Acute gross sterile pyuria is not a common clinical problem and is difficult to make a correct diagnosis. Here, the authors reported a case of acute gross sterile pyuria after oral ciprofloxacin treatment of urinary tract infection. The patient developed problem after complete course of 7-day acute upper urinary tract treatment. The patient was observed with cloudy whitish urine that had never seen before. The urinalysis showed sterile pyuria. This case was treated by conservative method and the problem was resolved within 7 days.

  1. Respiratory action of capsaicin microinjected into the nucleus of the solitary tract: involvement of vanilloid and tachykinin receptors

    Mazzone, Stuart B.; Geraghty, Dominic P

    1999-01-01

    The respiratory response to microinjection of capsaicin into the commissural nucleus of the solitary tract (cNTS) of urethane-anaesthetized rats was investigated in the absence and presence of the competitive vanilloid (capsaicin) antagonist, capsazepine, and selective tachykinin NK1, NK2 and NK3 antagonists (RP 67580, SR 48968 and SR 142801, respectively).Microinjection of capsaicin reduced respiratory frequency but not tidal volume (VT), leading to an overall reduction in minute ventilation...

  2. Upper respiratory tract diseases in captive orangutans (Pongo abelii, Pongo pygmaeus): prevalence in 20 European zoos and possible predisposing factors

    Zimmermann, N.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic upper respiratory tract diseases are severe problems in captive orangutans (Pongo abelii, P. pygmaeus), but the etiology and pathogenesis are unknown. This study recorded the prevalence of such diseases in captive European orangutans (201 animals; 20 zoos) and investigated possible predisposing factors. Bornean orangutans (P. pygmaeus) showed chronic respiratory signs (13.8% of all animals) significantly more often than Sumatran (P. abelii; 3.6%), and male animals more often (15.8%) t...

  3. The use of household cleaning products during pregnancy and lower respiratory tract infections and wheezing during early life.

    Casas, L.; Zock, J. P.; Carsin, A.E.; Fernández-Somoano, A.; A.Esplugues; Santa-Marina, L.; Tardón, A.; Ballester, F; Basterrechea, M.; Sunyer, J.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of household use of cleaning products during pregnancy on infant wheezing and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). In four prospective Spanish birth cohorts (n = 2,292), pregnant women reported the use of household cleaning products. When infants were 12-18 months old, current cleaning product use and infant's wheezing and LRTI were reported. Cohort-specific associations between the use of specific products and respiratory outcomes were evaluated using multivaria...

  4. Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC®) supplementation and gastrointestinal and respiratory-tract illness symptoms: a randomised control trial in athletes

    Hopkins William G; Cripps Allan W; Pyne David B; West Nicholas P; Eskesen Dorte C; Jairath Ashok; Christophersen Claus T; Conlon Michael A; Fricker Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Probiotics purportedly reduce symptoms of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory-tract illness by modulating commensal microflora. Preventing and reducing symptoms of respiratory and gastrointestinal illness are the primary reason that dietary supplementation with probiotics are becoming increasingly popular with healthy active individuals. There is a paucity of data regarding the effectiveness of probiotics in this cohort. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effecti...

  5. Immune parameters, symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections, and training-load indicators in volleyball athletes

    Dias R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rodrigo Dias1, Anelena Bueno Frollini1, Diego Trevisan Brunelli1, André Katayama Yamada1, Richard Diego Leite4, Ricardo Adamoli Simões1, Guilherme Souza Lobo Salles1, Débora Trevisan1, Idico Luiz Pellegrinotti1, Marcelo de Castro César1, Silvia Cristina Crepaldi Alves1, Rozangela Verlengia1, João Paulo Borin2, Jonato Prestes2,3, Claudia Regina Cavaglieri21Núcleo de Performance Humana, Mestrado em Educação Física, Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brasil; 2Faculdade de Educação Física (FEF Universidade Estadual de Campinas – UNICAMP, Campinas, Brasil; 3Programa de Mestrado e Doutorado em Educação Física, Universidade Católica de Brasília, Brasília, Brasil; 4Laboratório de Pesquisa Clínica e Experimental em Biologia Vascular (BioVasc, Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrasilBackground: The control of immunological alterations becomes important during in-season training, as a result of increased incidence of infectious diseases, and may assist in avoiding interruptions to training due to illness.Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate 28 weeks of chronic immune modulations in female volleyball athletes.Methods: The sample was composed of twelve athletes aged 19.47 ± 2.49 years, height 1.78 ± 0.08 cm, and body mass 66.77 ± 7.8 kg. Leukocytes, individual immune cell count, interleukin (IL-2, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α plasma cytokines were measured during the competitive period.Results: Results revealed that immune variables were correlated with symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections and training-load indicators, indicating a possible marker of immune status. There was a statistically significant increase in total leukocytes, neutrophils, and monocyte count, a decrease in lymphocytes, and an increase in upper respiratory tract infection symptoms, with no change

  6. New Epidemiological and Clinical Signatures of 18 Pathogens from Respiratory Tract Infections Based on a 5-Year Study.

    Xiaohong Liao

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infections (RTIs are a heavy burden on society. However, due to the complex etiology of RTIs, the clinical diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of these infections remain challenging, especially in developing countries.To determine the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 18 respiratory pathogens, we analyzed 12,502 patients with acute respiratory infections (ARIs by performing polymerase chain reaction (PCR on patient pharyngeal swabs.Samples positive for at least 1 pathogen were obtained from 48.42% of the total patients. Of these pathogen-positive patients, 17.99% were infected with more than 1 pathogen. Of the 18 pathogens analyzed, four were detected with a positive detection rate (PDR > 5%: influenza A virus (IAV > respiratory syncytial virus (RSV >Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP > human coronavirus (HCoV. The pathogens with the 4 highest co-infection rates (CIRs were as follows: HCoV > human bocavirus (HBoV > enterovirus (EV > parainfluenza virus (PIV. The overall positive detection rate (PDR varied significantly according to patient age, the season and year of detection, and the disease subgroup, but not according to patient sex. The individual PDRs of the pathogens followed 3 types of distributions for patient sex, 4 types of distributions for patient age, 4 types of seasonal distributions, 2 types of seasonal epidemic trends, 4 types of yearly epidemic trends, and different susceptibility distributions in the disease subgroups. Additionally, the overall CIR showed significantly different distributions according to patient sex, patient age, and the disease subgroup, whereas the CIRs of individual pathogens suggested significant preference characteristics.IAV remains the most common pathogen among the pathogens analyzed. More effort should be directed toward the prevention and control of pathogens that show a trend of increasing incidence such as HCoV, human adenovirus (ADV, and RSV. Although clinically

  7. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fibrosis versus Repair.

    Im, Daniel; Shi, Wei; Driscoll, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and basic experimental approaches to pediatric acute lung injury (ALI), including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), have historically focused on acute care and management of the patient. Additional efforts have focused on the etiology of pediatric ALI and ARDS, clinically defined as diffuse, bilateral diseases of the lung that compromise function leading to severe hypoxemia within 7 days of defined insult. Insults can include ancillary events related to prematurity, can follow trauma and/or transfusion, or can present as sequelae of pulmonary infections and cardiovascular disease and/or injury. Pediatric ALI/ARDS remains one of the leading causes of infant and childhood morbidity and mortality, particularly in the developing world. Though incidence is relatively low, ranging from 2.9 to 9.5 cases/100,000 patients/year, mortality remains high, approaching 35% in some studies. However, this is a significant decrease from the historical mortality rate of over 50%. Several decades of advances in acute management and treatment, as well as better understanding of approaches to ventilation, oxygenation, and surfactant regulation have contributed to improvements in patient recovery. As such, there is a burgeoning interest in the long-term impact of pediatric ALI/ARDS. Chronic pulmonary deficiencies in survivors appear to be caused by inappropriate injury repair, with fibrosis and predisposition to emphysema arising as irreversible secondary events that can severely compromise pulmonary development and function, as well as the overall health of the patient. In this chapter, the long-term effectiveness of current treatments will be examined, as will the potential efficacy of novel, acute, and long-term therapies that support repair and delay or even impede the onset of secondary events, including fibrosis. PMID:27066462

  8. [Current approaches to the treatment of severe hypoxic respiratory insufficiency (acute lung injury; acute respiratory distress syndrome)].

    Kluge, S; Müller, T; Pfeifer, M

    2011-02-01

    Lung-protective ventilation with a low tidal volume, plateau pressure 90% and permissive hypercapnia results in reduction of the mortality rate in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The level of the positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) must be chosen in relation to oxygen requirement. High frequency oscillatory ventilation and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist are promising methods. However, further studies with firm end-points have to be awaited before a final judgment is possible. Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can ensure life-sustaining gas exchange in patients with severe vitally compromised pulmonary failure, to provide time for lung tissue to heal and reduce ventilatory stress. The latest guidelines for analgesia and sedation in intensive care medicine demand consistent monitoring of the level of sedation and the intensity of pain. The sedation should be interrupted daily, with phases of awakenings and, if possible, spontaneous breathing. Methods of supportive treatment: Positional treatment (prone position) and inhalation of vasodilators can improve ventilation/perfusion mismatch and thus oxygenation. However, administration of surfactant is currently not advised in adult respiratory failure. PMID:21271478

  9. Viral Respiratory Tract Infections in Adult Patients Attending Outpatient and Emergency Departments, Taiwan, 2012-2013: A PCR/Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Study.

    Shih, Hsin-I; Wang, Hsuan-Chen; Su, Ih-Jen; Hsu, Hsiang-Chin; Wang, Jen-Ren; Sun, Hsiao Fang Sunny; Chou, Chien-Hsuan; Ko, Wen-Chien; Hsieh, Ming-I; Wu, Chi-Jung

    2015-09-01

    Viral etiologies of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) have been less studied in adult than in pediatric populations. Furthermore, the ability of PCR/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) to detect enteroviruses and rhinoviruses in respiratory samples has not been well evaluated. We sought to use PCR/ESI-MS to comprehensively investigate the viral epidemiology of adult RTIs, including testing for rhinoviruses and enteroviruses. Nasopharyngeal or throat swabs from 267 adults with acute RTIs (212 upper RTIs and 55 lower RTIs) who visited a local clinic or the outpatient or emergency departments of a medical center in Taiwan between October 2012 and June 2013 were tested for respiratory viruses by both virus isolation and PCR/ESI-MS. Throat swabs from 15 patients with bacterial infections and 27 individuals without active infections were included as control samples. Respiratory viruses were found in 23.6%, 47.2%, and 47.9% of the 267 cases by virus isolation, PCR/ESI-MS, and both methods, respectively. When both methods were used, the influenza A virus (24.3%) and rhinoviruses (9.4%) were the most frequently identified viruses, whereas human coronaviruses, human metapneumovirus (hMPV), enteroviruses, adenoviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza viruses were identified in small proportions of cases (old age, and immunosuppression were independently associated with lower RTIs. In conclusion, PCR/ESI-MS improved the diagnostic yield for viral RTIs. Non-influenza respiratory virus infections were associated with patients with comorbidities and with lower RTIs. Additional studies that delineate the clinical need for including non-influenza respiratory viruses in the diagnostic work-up in these populations are warranted. PMID:26402811

  10. A HYBRID CFD-PBPK MODEL OF INHALED CHLORINE GAS UPTAKE AND TISSUE DOSIMETRY IN THE ISOLATED UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT (URT) OF F344 RATS

    Chlorine (Cl2), an important commercial gas, is highly reactive in water, causing irritant effects in the respiratory tract on inhalation. Nasal extraction of Cl2 is high and resultant lesions in the respiratory tract show a proximal to distal distribution ...

  11. ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporters of the Human Respiratory Tract Pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis: Role in Virulence.

    Murphy, Timothy F; Brauer, Aimee L; Johnson, Antoinette; Kirkham, Charmaine

    2016-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media (middle ear infections) in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In view of the huge global burden of disease caused by M. catarrhalis, the development of vaccines to prevent these infections and better approaches to treatment have become priorities. In previous work, we used a genome mining approach that identified three substrate binding proteins (SBPs) of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as promising candidate vaccine antigens. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive assessment of 19 SBPs of 15 ABC transporter systems in the M. catarrhalis genome by engineering knockout mutants and studying their role in assays that assess mechanisms of infection. The capacity of M. catarrhalis to survive and grow in the nutrient-limited and hostile environment of the human respiratory tract, including intracellular growth, account in part for its virulence. The results show that ABC transporters that mediate uptake of peptides, amino acids, cations and anions play important roles in pathogenesis by enabling M. catarrhalis to 1) grow in nutrient-limited conditions, 2) invade and survive in human respiratory epithelial cells and 3) persist in the lungs in a murine pulmonary clearance model. The knockout mutants of SBPs and ABC transporters showed different patterns of activity in the assay systems, supporting the conclusion that different SBPs and ABC transporters function at different stages in the pathogenesis of infection. These results indicate that ABC transporters are nutritional virulence factors, functioning to enable the survival of M catarrhalis in the diverse microenvironments of the respiratory tract. Based on the role of ABC transporters as virulence factors of M. catarrhalis, these molecules represent potential drug targets to eradicate the organism from the human respiratory tract. PMID:27391026

  12. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure due to H1N1 influenza

    Mohapatra, Prasanta R.; Naveen Dutt; Sushant Khanduri; Baijayantimala Mishra; Janmeja, Ashok K

    2011-01-01

    We present a case of severe H1N1 influenza with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure necessitating mechanical ventilation benefited from noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV). The NIPPV may be of great use in treating patients with H1N1-related acute respiratory distress syndrome in a resource poor setting or when invasive ventilator is unavailable.

  13. Acute respiratory failure due to thyroid storm developing immediately after delivery

    Kitazawa, Chie; Aoki, Shigeru; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Acute respiratory failure occurs in less than 0.1% of pregnancies. Thyroid storm should be included in the differential diagnosis of possible causes of acute respiratory failure occurring immediately after delivery, and delivery is a high risk factor for thyroid storm in pregnant women with thyrotoxicosis.

  14. Pros and cons of recruitment maneuvers in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Rocco, Patricia R M; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama

    2010-08-01

    In patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, a protective mechanical ventilation strategy characterized by low tidal volumes has been associated with reduced mortality. However, such a strategy may result in alveolar collapse, leading to cyclic opening and closing of atelectatic alveoli and distal airways. Thus, recruitment maneuvers (RMs) have been used to open up collapsed lungs, while adequate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels may counteract alveolar derecruitment during low tidal volume ventilation, improving respiratory function and minimizing ventilator-associated lung injury. Nevertheless, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the appropriateness of RMs. The most commonly used RM is conventional sustained inflation, associated with respiratory and cardiovascular side effects, which may be minimized by newly proposed strategies: prolonged or incremental PEEP elevation; pressure-controlled ventilation with fixed PEEP and increased driving pressure; pressure-controlled ventilation applied with escalating PEEP and constant driving pressure; and long and slow increase in pressure. The efficiency of RMs may be affected by different factors, including the nature and extent of lung injury, capability of increasing inspiratory transpulmonary pressures, patient positioning and cardiac preload. Current evidence suggests that RMs can be used before setting PEEP, after ventilator circuit disconnection or as a rescue maneuver to overcome severe hypoxemia; however, their routine use does not seem to be justified at present. The development of new lung recruitment strategies that have fewer hemodynamic and biological effects on the lungs, as well as randomized clinical trials analyzing the impact of RMs on morbidity and mortality of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome patients, are warranted. PMID:20658909

  15. Behavioral Effects of Upper Respiratory Tract Illnesses: A Consideration of Possible Underlying Cognitive Mechanisms

    Andrew P. Smith

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that both experimentally induced upper respiratory tract illnesses (URTIs and naturally occurring URTIs influence mood and performance. The present study investigated possible cognitive mechanisms underlying the URTI-performance changes. Those who developed a cold (N = 47 had significantly faster, but less accurate, performance than those who remained healthy (N = 54. Illness had no effect on manipulations designed to influence encoding, response organisation (stimulus-response compatilibility or response preparation. Similarly, there was no evidence that different components of working memory were impaired. Overall, the present research confirms that URTIs can have an effect on performance efficiency. Further research is required to identify the physiological and behavioral mechanisms underlying these effects.

  16. Assessment of mucous transport in the respiratory tract by radioisotopic techniques

    One of the body's major defense mechanisms is the mucociliary transport system of the respiratory tract. The function of this system is to remove secretions and trapped inhaled biological and nonbiological particles-including, for example, viruses, bacteria, industrial dusts, and aspirated material-from the lung, thus keeping the airway surface clean and sterile. This cleansing process is accomplished by the action of vigorously beating cilia in the airway epithelium on secretions lining the surface of the airways, which entrap the inhaled foreign materials to be removed from the lung. In this way, normal secretions are moved progressively upward toward the pharynx to be swallowed or, if secretions are produced to excess, expectorated

  17. Quality indicators for diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections in general practice

    Plejdrup, Malene; Bjerrum, Lars; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente;

    Objective: To develop a set of quality indicators focusing on the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections in general practice.  Material and methods: A modified 2-round Delphi study was conducted from April to July 2008. A panel of 27 experts (13 countries) comprising mainly general...... indicators were considered. The experts were asked to rate the relevance of 59 quality indicators with regard to reducing antimicrobial resistance and improving patient health. Consensus for a quality indicator was reached if ≥ 75 % of experts scored the item ≥ 5 on a 7-point Likert scale, ranging from 1...... (completely disagree) through 4 (=uncertain) to 7 (completely agree). Results: A 96% response rate was achieved in both Delphi rounds. A total of 41 of the proposed 59 indicators attained consensus. None of the indicators focusing on the diagnostic process achieved consensus. Consensus was attained for 14...

  18. Surfactant therapy for acute respiratory distress in infants

    Corrado Moretti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS remains the primary indication for admission to paediatric intensive care units and accounts for significant mortality, morbidity and resource utilization. Respiratory infections, in particular pneumonia and severe bronchiolitis, are the most common causes of respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation in infants and children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and the management of paediatric patients with acute lung injury. Data indicate that adoption of a lung protective ventilation with low tidal volumes and of an open-lung ventilation strategy, characterized by sufficient positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP to avoid atelectasis, provides the greatest likelihood of survival and minimizes lung injury. The relative benefits of strategies such as high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO, recruiting manoeuvres and prone position are also considered. Moreover this article examines exogenous lung surfactant replacement therapy and its efficacy in the treatment of paediatric ARDS. In infants and children with acute lung injury the endogenous surfactant system is not only deficient, as observed in preterm infants, but altered via a variety of other mechanisms like inhibition and dysfunction. All factors contribute to the altered physiology seen in ARDS. The role of exogenous surfactant in lung injury beyond the neonatal period is therefore more complex and its limited efficacy may be related to a number of factors, among them inadequacy of pharmaceutical surfactants, insufficient dosing or drug delivery, poor drug distribution or, simply, an inability of the drug to counteract the underlying pathophysiology of ARDS. Several trials have found no clinical benefit from various surfactant supplementation methods in adult patients with ARDS, however some studies have shown that this therapy can improve oxygenation and decrease mortality in some specific

  19. Morphologic observations on respiratory tracts of chickens after hatchery infectious bronchitis vaccination and formaldehyde fumigation.

    Di Matteo, A M; Soñez, M C; Plano, C M; von Lawzewitsch, I

    2000-01-01

    The histologic changes in the respiratory tracts of chickens were evaluated after hatchery fumigation with 40% formaldehyde vapors and vaccination against infectious bronchitis virus with live attenuated vaccine (Massachusetts serotype). One-day-old chickens were housed in four isolation units in controlled environmental conditions, fed and watered ad libitum, and separated into four groups: 1) fumigated and vaccinated birds (FV group); 2) nonfumigated and vaccinated birds (NFV group); 3) fumigated and nonvaccinated birds (FNV group); and 4) control group (C group). All birds were tested to be free from Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae. After necropsy on the first, eighth, and twenty-sixth days after birth, samples from tracheal upper portion and lungs were conventionally processed for light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. Tissue response was monitored by microscopic examination of trachea and lung. On the first day of observation, fumigated and vaccinated birds (FV group) showed extensively damaged tracheal epithelium with exfoliated areas and some active glands with electrodense granules, and in the lung, the primary bronchi epithelium had disorganized cilia and abundant lymphocytes, with emphysematous areas in tertiary bronchus. On day 8 after vaccination, cubical and cylindrical tracheal cell proliferation was observed, and on day 26, ciliated columnar epithelium was almost regenerated with heterophil corion infiltration, and hyaline cartilage nodules appeared in parabronchi. The nonfumigated and vaccinated birds (NFV) revealed less injury on the epithelial surface and a more rapid response to epithelial regeneration than the in only fumigated animals (FNV). The control group did not show remarkable morphologic changes. Postvaccinal and fumigation effects on the upper respiratory tract were temporary, whereas in lungs, increased emphysema, cartilage nodules in the interchange zone, and general lymphocyte infiltration had caused

  20. Aminomethyl spectinomycins as therapeutics for drug-resistant respiratory tract and sexually transmitted bacterial infections.

    Bruhn, David F; Waidyarachchi, Samanthi L; Madhura, Dora B; Shcherbakov, Dimitri; Zheng, Zhong; Liu, Jiuyu; Abdelrahman, Yasser M; Singh, Aman P; Duscha, Stefan; Rathi, Chetan; Lee, Robin B; Belland, Robert J; Meibohm, Bernd; Rosch, Jason W; Böttger, Erik C; Lee, Richard E

    2015-05-20

    The antibiotic spectinomycin is a potent inhibitor of bacterial protein synthesis with a unique mechanism of action and an excellent safety index, but it lacks antibacterial activity against most clinically important pathogens. A series of N-benzyl-substituted 3'-(R)-3'-aminomethyl-3'-hydroxy spectinomycins was developed on the basis of a computational analysis of the aminomethyl spectinomycin binding site and structure-guided synthesis. These compounds had ribosomal inhibition values comparable to spectinomycin but showed increased potency against the common respiratory tract pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Legionella pneumophila, and Moraxella catarrhalis, as well as the sexually transmitted bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. Non-ribosome-binding 3'-(S) isomers of the lead compounds demonstrated weak inhibitory activity in in vitro protein translation assays and poor antibacterial activity, indicating that the antibacterial activity of the series remains on target against the ribosome. Compounds also demonstrated no mammalian cytotoxicity, improved microsomal stability, and favorable pharmacokinetic properties in rats. The lead compound from the series exhibited excellent chemical stability superior to spectinomycin; no interaction with a panel of human receptors and drug metabolism enzymes, suggesting low potential for adverse reactions or drug-drug interactions in vivo; activity in vitro against a panel of penicillin-, macrolide-, and cephalosporin-resistant S. pneumoniae clinical isolates; and the ability to cure mice of fatal pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis at a dose of 5 mg/kg. Together, these studies indicate that N-benzyl aminomethyl spectinomycins are suitable for further development to treat drug-resistant respiratory tract and sexually transmitted bacterial infections. PMID:25995221

  1. Respiratory Tract Lung Geometry and Dosimetry Model for Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2015-07-24

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague-Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  2. Prevalence and susceptibility patterns of bacteria causing respiratory tract infections in North Waziristan, Pakistan.

    Shah, Said Nasir; Ullah, Bait; Basit, Abdul; Begum, Asia; Tabassum, Anum; Zafar, Shaista; Saleha, Shamim

    2016-03-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are the most common infectious diseases in humans and are the major cause of mortality and morbidity in Pakistan. These infections are the leading causes of consultations in primary care in Pakistan. Therefore, this study was aimed at determining bacterial pathogens of respiratory tract infections and the susceptibility patterns of bacterial isolates to antibiotics. The study was conducted between February, 2013 and March, 2014 in North Waziristan region of Pakistan. Sputum specimens were collected aseptically from 227 patients and cultured on the appropriate bacteriological media. Bacterial isolates were identified by biochemical tests and their antibiotics susceptibility patterns were determined by standard methods. Out of 227, various species of bacteria were isolated from 152 (75%) specimens. The prevalence of bacteria species isolated were as follows Pseudomonas aeruginosa (42.8%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (26.7%), Corynebacterium diphtheria (10.6%), Staphylococcus aureus (5.9%), Proteus vulgaris (4.6%), Micrococcus species (3.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (2.6%) and Bacillus species (2.6%). The susceptibility patterns varied among bacterial species depending on the antibiotics. For the susceptibility test 11 commercially available antibiotics against bacterial isolates were used. The results revealed that generally the bacterial isolates were susceptible to gentamicin (80.9%), meropenem (75 %), ceftazidime (62.5%), cefotaxime (57.9%) and ceftriazone (57.9%) and resistant to penicillin (84.9%) and doxycycline (78.9%). The antibiotics gentamicin (100%) meropenem (100%), ceftriaxone (58.5%), ciprofloxacin (60%) trimethoprim (60%), ceftazidime (66.2%) and cefotaxime (64.6%) were observed effective against the P. aeruginosa isolates. The findings of our study provide significant information for empiric therapy of patients with RTIs in North Waziristan region of Pakistan. PMID:27113300

  3. Promoter hyper-methylation of P16 during neoplastic transformation of rat respiratory tract epithelial cells

    To investigate whether p16 hyper-methylation is involved in the silencing of p16 expression and the development of rat lung tumors, p16 status and neoplastic transformation of several respiratory tract epithelial cell lines were examined. Analysis utilizing methylation specific PCR (MSP) method revealed that virus-immortalized SV40T2 cells had un-methylated status and that benzo [a ] pyrene-induced BP cells displayed heterogeneous methylation status of the p6 promoter region. On the other hand, BP130, BP270 and BP(P)Tu cells derive d from BP cells, and gamma ray-transformed RTiv3 cells displayed complete methylation of the gene. The MSP and PCR of genomic DNA in the p16 region did not amplify product in PuD2 cells established from the plutonium-induced lung tumor. Expression analysis of p16 mRNA by RT-PCR demonstrated that SV40T2 and BP cells expressed the p16 transcript. De-methylating agent, 5AzaC de-methylated partially the p16 promoter region of BP(P)Tu and BP cells and increased expression of the p16 transcript. Tumorigenicity assay utilizing inoculation of the cells into nude mouse revealed that SV40T2 and RTiv3 cells had no tumorigenicity. Treatment of BP(P)Tu and BP cells with 5AzaC decreased the cell growth in nude mouse. These results indicate that the hyper-methylation of p16 promoter region occurs at the early stage of neoplastic transformation processes and the gene silencing following the methylation is partially concerned with the tumorigenicity of rat respiratory tract cells. Homozygous deletion and lack of expression of the p16 may also account for the mechanisms of tumorigenicity. (author)

  4. Sources of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and its role in respiratory tract colonization and nosocomial pneumonia in intensive care unit patients

    HUANG Jie; CHEN Er-zhen; QU Hong-ping; MAO En-qiang; ZHU Zheng-gang; NI Yu-xing; HAN Li-zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) is an important and emerging hospital-acquired pathogen worldwide.This study was conducted to identify the sources of MDRAB and its role in respiratory tract colonization and nosocomial pneumonia in intensive care unit (ICU) patients.Methods We conducted a prospective active surveillance study of MDRAB in three ICUs at a Chinese Hospital from April to August 2011,to identify the sources of MDRAB and its role in respiratory tract colonization and nosocomial pneumonia.Results One hundred and fourteen (13.0%) MDRAB isolates were detected from 876 specimens,with a sensitivity of 11.6% (55/474) in screening of the pharyngeal and tracheal swabs,and 14.7% (59/402) of the sputum/endotracheal aspirates.MDRAB colonization/infection was found in 34 (26.8%) of 127 patients,including 16 (12.6%) cases of pure colonization and 18 (14.2%) cases of pneumonia (two pre-ICU-acquired cases of pneumonia and 16 ICU-acquired cases of pneumonia).Previous respiratory tract MDRAB colonization was found in 22 (17.3%) patients:eight (6.3%)were pre-ICU-acquired colonization and 14 (11.0%) ICU-acquired colonization.Of eight pre-ICU-colonized patients,five were transferred from other wards or hospitals with hospitalization >72 hours,and three came from the community with no previous hospitalization.Overall,6/22 colonized patients presented with secondary pneumonia; only two (9.1%) colonized MDRAB strains were associated with secondary infections.Respiratory tract MDRAB colonization had no significant relationship with nosocomial pneumonia (P=-0.725).In addition,acute respiratory failure,mechanical ventilation,renal failure,and prior carbapenem use were risk factors for MDRAB colonization/infection.Conclusions A high proportion of cases of MDRAB colonization/infection in ICU patients were detected through screening cultures.About one-third were acquired from general wards and the community before ICU admission

  5. An undiagnosed myasthenia gravis presenting as isolated recurrent acute respiratory failure

    Shri Ram Sharma; Nalini Sharma; Yeolekar, M E

    2012-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure is an uncommon initial presentation of myasthenia gravis (MG). In our case a 22-year-old woman of unrecognized MG presented to the emergency department with isolated respiratory failure as the first presenting symptom. Initially she presented with dysphonia and was managed by speech therapist and ENT surgeons for 3 months. Subsequently, she presented with signs and symptoms of sepsis and went into acute respiratory failure. This case highlights the need to consider M...

  6. The use of household cleaning products during pregnancy and lower respiratory tract infections and wheezing during early life.

    Casas, L.; Zock, J.P.; Carsin, A.E.; Fernández-Somoano, A.; Esplugues, A.; Santa-Marina, L.; Tardón, A.; Ballester, F.; Basterrechea, M.; Sunyer, J.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of household use of cleaning products during pregnancy on infant wheezing and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). In four prospective Spanish birth cohorts (n = 2,292), pregnant women reported the use of household cleaning products. When infants were 12-18 months old,

  7. College Students, Shared Decision Making, and the Appropriate Use of Antibiotics for Respiratory Tract Infections: A Systematic Literature Review

    Blyer, Kristina; Hulton, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This systematic review examines shared decision making to promote the appropriate use of antibiotics for college students with respiratory tract infections. Participants/Methods: CINAL, Cochrane, PubMed, EBSCO, and PsycNET were searched in October 2014 using the following criteria: English language, human subjects, peer-reviewed, shared…

  8. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of MMPs in the respiratory tract: Potential implications in asthma and other lung diseases

    Guéders, Maud; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noël, Agnès; Cataldo, Didier

    2006-01-01

    In healthy lung, Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their physiological inhibitors, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), are produced in the respiratory tract by a panel of different structural cells. These activities are mandatory for many physiological processes including development, wound healing and cell trafficking. Deregulation of proteolytic-antiproteolytic network and inappropriate secretion of various MMPs by stimulated structural or inflammatory cells is though...

  9. The upper respiratory tract microbiome of hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia of unknown aetiology: a pilot study

    Timothy L Wiemken

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   The composition of the upper respiratory tract microbiome may play an important role in the development of lower respiratory tract infections. Here, we characterised the microbiome of the nasopharynx and oropharynx of hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP with unknown aetiology in an attempt to obtain insight into the aetiology of CAP. A random sample of 10 patients hospitalised with CAP previously enrolled in a separate clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov registry, Study ID: NCT01248715 in which a complete microbiological workup was not able to define an aetiology were analysed in this pilot study. This larger trial (n = 1,221 enrolled patients from 9 adult hospitals in Louisville, Kentucky, USA. Nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs were obtained for metagenomic analysis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR for Streptococcus pneumoniae was performed in all patients. One patient had a distinct nasophararyngeal microbiome consisting largely of Haemophilus influenzae. This was the only patient with a negative PCR for S. pneumoniae in both nasophararyngeal and oropharyngeal specimens. Overall, substantial differences were found between nasophararyngeal and oropharyngeal microbiomes. The upper respiratory tract microbiome of only one patient suggested H. influenzae as a probable aetiology of CAP. Although this was a pilot study of only 10 patients, the presence of S. pneumoniae in the upper respiratory tract of the other 9 patients warrants further investigation.

  10. Clinical Observation on 46 Cases of Infantile Repeated Respiratory Tract Infection Treated by Mild-Moxibustion over Acupoints on Back

    龙训; 常奇; 寿琼

    2001-01-01

    @@Repeated respiratory tract infection is a frequently-occurring disease during childhood. At present, western medicine doctors generally adopt anti-infectives and immunomodulators to treat the disease, while traditional Chinese medicine doctors mainly administer decoction of Chinese herbs. The authors treated 46 cases of repeated respiratory tract infection from March 1990 to April 1996 by applying mild-moxibustion over points on the back with satisfactory therapeutic results. A report follows. Clinical Data All the 86 cases were outpatients in our hospital with duration of common cold for over 10 days and characterized by relapse of respiratory tract infection. There were over 7-time relapse of respiratory tract infection on each case within a year. Eighty-six cases were randomly divided into treatment group (46 cases) and control group (40 cases). Of the 46 cases in the treatment group, 22 were boys and 24 girls. 17 cases (36.9%) were 6 months to 4 years old, 18 (39.1%) 4 to 6 years, and 11 (23.9%) 6 to 12 years. Among the 40 cases in the control group, 19 cases were boys and 21 girls.

  11. Intervention with educational outreach at large scale to reduce antibiotics for respiratory tract infections : a controlled before and after study

    Smeets, H. M.; Kuyvenhoven, M. M.; Akkerman, A. E.; Welschen, I.; van Essen, G. A.; Verheij, T. J. M.; Schouten, G.P.

    2009-01-01

    Background. A multiple intervention targeted to reduce antibiotic prescribing with an educational outreach programme had proven to be effective in a randomized controlled trial in 12 peer review groups, demonstrating 12% less prescriptions for respiratory tract infections. Objective. To assess the e

  12. Progress in pediatrics in 2013: choices in allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Dascola, Carlotta Povesi; Mirra, Virginia; Sperli, Francesco; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    This review will provide new information related to pathophysiology and management of specific diseases that have been addressed by selected articles published in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2013, focusing on allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses in children. Recommendations for interpretation of skin prick test to foods in atopic eczema, management of allergic conjunctivitis,...

  13. Deposition of Thorium and Plutonium oxides in the respiratory tract of the mouse

    Studies are being made of the early and later effects of plutonium oxide (239PuO2) deposited in the mouse lung and of the dependence on particle size and dose. A system has been developed for preparing discrete size fractions of PuO2, by using water sedimentation, for their aerosolization and administration to mice by inhalation. Experiments were carried out, to commission the exposure system, with sized thorium oxide (ThO2) particles labeled with 233Pa (half-life, 27 days) by neutron activation. Regional depositions of particles with activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD's) of 1.4, 1.6, and 2.0 μm were measured. Although deposition in the respiratory tract increased with particle size, deposition in the alveolar region decreased. Alveolar-deposition data from a number of PuO2 inhalation exposure experiments are also presented. Some inconsistencies were shown between the alveolar deposition of ThO2 and of PuO2. Lobar distributions of alveolar-deposited ThO2 and PuO2 were not homogeneous. The inhomogeneities increased with particle size. Data obtained from ThO2 experiments indicated that the clearances of dust from the nasal passages, airways, gastrointestinal tract, and pelt were quite rapid. Levels of pelt contamination were soon reduced, by the animals' own preening, to levels that would be safe for personnel involved in PuO2 experiments

  14. Effects of acute oligohydramnios on respiratory system of fetal sheep.

    Savich, R D; Guerra, F A; Lee, C C; Padbury, J F; Kitterman, J A

    1992-08-01

    Prolonged oligohydramnios, or a lack of amniotic fluid, is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia and subsequent perinatal morbidity, but it is unclear whether short-term or acute oligohydramnios has any effect on the fetal respiratory system. To investigate the acute effects of removal of amniotic fluid, we studied nine chronically catheterized fetal sheep at 122-127 days gestation. During a control period, we measured the volume of fluid in the fetal potential airways and air spaces (VL), production rate of that fluid, incidence and amplitude of fetal breathing movements, tracheal pressures, and fetal plasma concentrations of cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. We then drained the amniotic fluid for a short period of time [24-48 h, 30.0 +/- 4.0 (SE) h] and repeated the above measurements. The volume of fluid drained for the initial studies was 1,004 +/- 236 ml. Acute oligohydramnios decreased VL from 35.4 +/- 2.9 ml/kg during control to 22.0 +/- 1.6 after oligohydramnios (P less than 0.004). Acute oligohydramnios did not affect the fetal lung fluid production rate, fetal breathing movements, or any of the other measured variables. Seven repeat studies were performed in six of the fetuses after reaccumulation of the amniotic fluid at 130-138 days, and in four of these studies the lung volume also decreased, although the overall mean for the repeat studies was not significantly different (27.0 +/- 5.2 ml/kg for control vs. 25.5 +/- 5.5 ml/kg for oligohydramnios). Again, none of the other measured variables were altered by oligohydramnios in the repeat studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1399988

  15. Atmospheric particulate matter and hospital admission due to lower respiratory tract infection: a case-cross study in Shijiazhuang, China

    Zi-na BAI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the association between atmospheric particulate matter (PM10/PM2.5 levels and hospital admissions due to lower respiratory tract infection in Shijiazhuang. Methods  Data of air pollution, meteorologic data, and the data of patients admitted to hospital due to lower respiratory tract infection were retrospectively analyzed. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated to analyze correlations between atmospheric particulate matter and meteorologic factors. Data of hospital admission due to lower respiratory tract infection and of atmospheric air pollution levels in Shijiazhuang were obtained, a bidirectional case-crossover design was used to investigate the association between hospital admissions due to lower respiratory tract infection and levels of atmospheric particles. Stratified analyses of exposure based on age, gender, complications and season were performed to evaluate the effect. Results  Pearson's correlation analysis showed positive correlations among PM2.5, PM10, SO2, NO2 and CO. The concentration of all these five pollutants were negatively correlated with O3 and daily mean temperature, while a positive correlation was found between concentrations of the 5 pollutants and daily average temperature and O3. In single-pollutant model, every 10μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 and PM10 at lag5 brought the corresponding OR values (95%CI up to 1.010(1.005-1.015 and 1.006(1.003-1.009 respectively. In the multi-pollutant models, the observed effects of PM2.5 remained significant. Stratified analysis based on gender, age, season and comorbidities showed that the effect of PM2.5 exposure on lower respiratory tract infection admissions was stronger in males, persons younger than 60 years of age and persons without comorbidities, and even more stronger in cold season. The effect of PM10 exposure on lower respiratory tract infection admissions was stronger in females, persons older than 60 years of age and persons with

  16. Anti-infectious treatment in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Min GAO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is closely correlated with infection. Severe infection, e.g., sepsis and septic shock, can result in ARDS. Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP is one of the common complications in ARDS related infection. As regards ARDS related infection, community acquired infection (CAI is different from hospital acquired infection (HAI in bacterial spectrum. The former is mainly caused by Streptococcus pneumonia, Hemophilus influenzae, Moraxelle catarrhalis, atypical pathogens and Klebsiella pneumoniae. However, HAI is mainly caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA, and other drug-resistant bacteria. The drug-resistant bacterial infection not only makes treatment difficult, but also leads to an increase in mechanical ventilation time, length of ICU stay, mortality rate, and medical costs. The present paper has reviewed the relationship between ARDS and infection, therapeutic principles and measures of ARDS related infection, and introduced the optimal strategy of anti-infectious treatment of ARDS.

  17. The respiratory tract deposition model proposed by the ICRP Task Group

    The Task Group has developed a new model of the deposition of inhaled aerosols in each anatomical region of the respiratory tract. The model is used to evaluate the fraction of airborne activity that is deposited in respiratory regions having distinct retention characteristics and clearance pathways: the anterior nares, the extrathoracic airways of the naso- and oropharynx and larynx, the bronchi, the bronchioles, and the alveolated airways of the lung. Drawn from experimental data on total and regional deposition in human subjects, the model is based on extrapolation of these data by means of a detailed theoretical model of aerosol transport and deposition within the lung. The Task Group model applies to all practical conditions, and for aerosol particles and vapors from atomic size up to very coarse aerosols with an activity median aerodynamic diameter of 100 μm. The model is designed to predict regional deposition in different subjects, including adults of either sex, children of various ages, and infants, and also to account for anatomical differences among Caucasian and non-Caucasian subjects. The Task Group model represents aerosol inhalability and regional deposition in different subjects by algebraic expressions of aerosol size, breathing rates, standard lung volumes, and scaling factors for airway dimensions. 35 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Treatment of upper respiratory tract infections in primary care: a randomized study using aromatic herbs.

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Dudai, Nativ; Eini, Anat; Torem, Moshe; Schiff, Elad; Rakover, Yoseph

    2011-01-01

    This study is a prospective randomized double-blind controlled trial whose aim was to investigate the clinical effects of aromatic essential oils in patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The trial was conducted in six primary care clinics in northern Israel. A spray containing aromatic essential oils of five plants (Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Mentha piperita, Origanum syriacum, and Rosmarinus officinalis) as applied 5 times a day for 3 days and compared with a placebo spray. The main outcome measure was patient assessment of the change in severity of the most debilitating symptom (sore throat, hoarseness or cough). Sixty patients participated in the study (26 in the study group and 34 in the control group). Intention-to-treat analysis showed that 20 minutes following the spray use, participants in the study group reported a greater improvement in symptom severity compared to participants in the placebo group (P = .019). There was no difference in symptom severity between the two groups after 3 days of treatment (P = .042). In conclusion, spray application of five aromatic plants reported in this study brings about significant and immediate improvement in symptoms of upper respiratory ailment. This effect is not significant after 3 days of treatment. PMID:21052500

  19. Treatment of Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Primary Care: A Randomized Study Using Aromatic Herbs

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Dudai, Nativ; Eini, Anat; Torem, Moshe; Schiff, Elad; Rakover, Yoseph

    2011-01-01

    This study is a prospective randomized double-blind controlled trial whose aim was to investigate the clinical effects of aromatic essential oils in patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The trial was conducted in six primary care clinics in northern Israel. A spray containing aromatic essential oils of five plants (Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Mentha piperita, Origanum syriacum, and Rosmarinus officinalis) as applied 5 times a day for 3 days and compared with a placebo spray. The main outcome measure was patient assessment of the change in severity of the most debilitating symptom (sore throat, hoarseness or cough). Sixty patients participated in the study (26 in the study group and 34 in the control group). Intention-to-treat analysis showed that 20 minutes following the spray use, participants in the study group reported a greater improvement in symptom severity compared to participants in the placebo group (P = .019). There was no difference in symptom severity between the two groups after 3 days of treatment (P = .042). In conclusion, spray application of five aromatic plants reported in this study brings about significant and immediate improvement in symptoms of upper respiratory ailment. This effect is not significant after 3 days of treatment. PMID:21052500

  20. The respiratory tract deposition model proposed by the ICRP Task Group

    The Task Group has developed a new model of the deposition of inhaled aerosols in each anatomical region of the respiratory tract. The model is used to evaluate the fraction of airborne activity that is deposited in respiratory regions having distinct retention characteristics and clearance pathways, and/or tissue sensitivity: the extrathoracic airways of the naso- and oropharynx and larynx, the bronchi, the bronchioles, and the alveolated airways of the lung. Drawn from experimental data on total and regional deposition in human subjects, the model is based on extrapolation of these data by means of a detailed theoretical model of aerosol transport and deposition within the lung. The Task Group model applies to all practical conditions, and for aerosol particles and vapours from atomic size up to very coarse aerosols with an activity median aerodynamic diameter of 100 μm. The model is designed to predict regional deposition in different subjects, including adults of either sex, children of various ages, and infants, and also to account for anatomical differences among Caucasian and non-Caucasian subjects. The Task Group model represents aerosol inhalability and regional deposition in different subjects by algebraic expressions of aerosol size, breathing rates, standard lung volumes, and scaling factors for airway dimensions. It is emphasised that the current version of the model described here is still provisional. (author)

  1. Treatment of Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Primary Care: A Randomized Study Using Aromatic Herbs

    Eran Ben-Arye

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is a prospective randomized double-blind controlled trial whose aim was to investigate the clinical effects of aromatic essential oils in patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The trial was conducted in six primary care clinics in northern Israel. A spray containing aromatic essential oils of five plants (Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Mentha piperita, Origanum syriacum, and Rosmarinus officinalisas applied 5 times a day for 3 days and compared with a placebo spray. The main outcome measure was patient assessment of the change in severity of the most debilitating symptom (sore throat, hoarseness or cough. Sixty patients participated in the study (26 in the study group and 34 in the control group. Intention-to-treat analysis showed that 20 minutes following the spray use, participants in the study group reported a greater improvement in symptom severity compared to participants in the placebo group (=.019. There was no difference in symptom severity between the two groups after 3 days of treatment (=.042. In conclusion, spray application of five aromatic plants reported in this study brings about significant and immediate improvement in symptoms of upper respiratory ailment. This effect is not significant after 3 days of treatment.

  2. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient

    Paolo Ruggeri; Salvatore Calcaterra; Antonio Bottari; Giuseppe Girbino; Vincenzo Fodale

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drow...

  3. Acute respiratory infections in Pakistan: Have we made any progress?

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are the leading cause of death in young children in Pakistan, responsible for 20-30% of child deaths under age 5 years. This paper summarizes the research and technical development efforts over the last 15 years which have contributed to improving the effectiveness of the case management strategy to reduce mortality from 5' pneumonia in children in Pakistan. Community intervention is viable, effective and practical. Rising antimicrobial resistance among commonly used and A low-cost oral agent is of significant concern. Appropriate monitoring and evaluation of the impact of the ARI control programme is lacking. Lack of funding for programmatic activities, lack of coordination with other child survival programs, inadequate training for community health workers and general practitioners in the private sector, lack of public awareness about seeking timely and appropriate care and insufficient planning and support for ARI in the programmatic activities at provincial and district levels are major hindrances in decreasing the burden of ARI in the country. The recent introduction of the community-based Lady Health Worker (LHW) Programme and WHO and UNICEF-sponsored integrated management of childhood illness initiative present ideal opportunities for re-emphasizing early case detection and appropriate case management of ARI. Ultimately, focusing on preventive strategies such as improving nutrition, reducing indoor pollution, improving mass vaccination, as well as introduction of new vaccines effective against important respiratory pathogens will likely have the most impact on reducing severe ARI and deaths from severe disease. (author)

  4. Fibromyalgia after severe acute respiratory syndrome: a case report

    TIAN Xin-ping; ZENG Xiao-feng; XU Wen-bin

    2006-01-01

    @@ Since November 2002, an infectious disease with unknown cause occurred in China and many countries had been involved. Cases were reported in 28 countries and more than 5050 individuals had been infected.1 Lung is the most frequently involved organ and can be fatal in severe cases. At the end of February 2003, it was defined as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) by World Health Organization. China had a SARS epidemic in the spring of 2003. More than 1000 patients were infected and some patients died of respiratory failure.Finally, a new variant of coronavirus was suspected to be the pathogen although the pathogenesis was still unclear. Since it is a new disease and we have very limited knowledge about its clinical sequela, we followed the survived patients closely in order to understand it in depth. During the follow up, we discovered an interesting patient who was finally diagnosed as fibromyalgia. We report this case herein to share our experience with clinicians who may see patients with SARS or fibromyalgia.

  5. Epidemiology of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): adults and children.

    Zhong, Nan-Shan; Wong, Gary W K

    2004-12-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly described respiratory infection with pandemic potential. The causative agent is a new strain of coronavirus most likely originating from wild animals. This disease first emerged in November 2002 in Guangdong Province, China. Early in the outbreak the infection had been transmitted primarily via household contacts and healthcare settings. In late February 2003 the infection was transmitted to Hong Kong when an infected doctor from the mainland visited there. During his stay in Hong Kong at least 17 guests and visitors were infected at the hotel at which he stayed. By modern day air travel, the infection was rapidly spread to other countries including Vietnam, Singapore and Canada by these infected guests. With the implementation of effective control strategies including early isolation of suspected cases, strict infection control measures in the hospital setting, meticulous contact tracing and quarantine, the outbreak was finally brought under control by July 2003. In addition, there were another two events of SARS in China between the end of December 2003 and January 2004 and from March to May 2004; both were readily controlled without significant patient spread. PMID:15531250

  6. Some viral and bacterial respiratory tract infections of dairy cattle during the summer season

    Kale M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, dairy cattle with respiratory system problems that were brought to a private slaughterhouse in Burdur province were investigated for viral and bacterial infections present in the summer season. The blood samples were collected from 56 animals. The samples were tested for antibodies against bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV, bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3 and bovine adenovirus 3 (BAV-3 by ELISA. Bacteriological cultivation was carried out from lung samples taken after cutting the same animals. The seropositivity rates which were determined for 5 viruses in cattle (BoHV- 1, BVDV, BRSV, BPIV-3 and BAV-3 were 7.14%, 50%, 94.64%, 94.64% and 82.14% respectively. The presence of antibodies against the viruses was as follows; 5.36% of cattle had antibodies against only one virus, 14.29% against two, 30.36% against three, 44.64% against four and 5.36% against five viruses. A total of 36 bacterial agents were isolated from 30 out of 56 lung samples. From the lung samples, only one bacterium was isolated from 39.3% (22/56 samples, and more than one bacterium from 14.3% (8/56. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus spp. were detected as the most often isolated agents. Compared to bacteria, the rates of viral infections associated with Escherichia coli (BRSV+BPIV-3+BAV- 3+Escherichia coli; 8.92% and BRSV+BPIV-3+Escherichia coli; 5.35% were higher. As a consequence, it was thought that primary agents which were the viruses and bacteria may have attended as secondary factors in respiratory tract infections of dairy cattle.

  7. Inhable particulate matter from lime industries: Chemical composition and deposition in human respiratory tract

    Godoi, Ricardo H. M.; Braga, Darci M.; Makarovska, Yaroslava; Alfoldy, Balint; Carvalho Filho, Marco A. S.; Van Grieken, Réne; Godoi, Ana Flavia L.

    Air pollution caused by the lime production industry has become a serious problem with potential effects to human health, especially in developing countries. Colombo is a city included in the Metropolitan Region of Curitiba (capital of Paraná State) in South Brazil. In Colombo city, a correlation has been shown between the lime production and the number of persons who need respiratory treatment in a local hospital, indicating that the lime industry can cause deleterious health effects in the exposed workers and population. This research was conducted to deal firstly with the characterization of the size distribution and chemical compositions of particles emitted from lime manufacturing and subsequently to assess the deposition rate of inhaled dolomitic lime aerosol particles in the human respiratory tract. The elemental chemical composition and particle size of individual atmospheric particles was quantitatively elucidated, including low-Z components like C, N and O, as well as higher-Z elements, using automated electron probe microanalysis. Information concerning the bulk composition is provided by energy-dispersive X-ray detection. The majority of the respirable particulate matter identified was composed of aluminosilicates, Ca-Mg oxides, carbon-rich particles, mixtures of organic particles and Ca-Mg carbonates, soot and biogenic particles. In view of the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, local deposition efficiencies in the human respiratory system were calculated, revealing the deposition of CaO·MgO at extrathoracic, tracheobronchial and pulmonary levels. The results of this study offer evidence to the threat of the fine and coarse particles emitted from dolomite lime manufacturing, allowing policy-makers to better focus their mitigation strategies in an effective way, as well as to the dolomite producers for the purpose of designing and/or implementing improved emission controls.

  8. Factors associated with acute respiratory infection in children under the age of 5 years: evidence from the 2011 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey

    Gebertsadik A; Worku A; Berhane Y

    2015-01-01

    Achamyelesh Geberetsadik,1 Alemayehu Worku,2 Yemane Berhane3 1School of Public and Environmental Health, Hawassa University, Hawassa, 2School of Public Health, Addis Ababa University, 3Addis Continental Institute of Public Health, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Background: Acute respiratory tract infection (ARI) remains the major cause of child mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa. Various factors are associated with its occurrence and vary by context. However, available large-scale, population-based data ...

  9. Factors associated with acute respiratory infection in children under the age of 5 years: evidence from the 2011 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey

    Gebertsadik Tekle, Achamyelesh

    2015-01-01

    Achamyelesh Geberetsadik,1 Alemayehu Worku,2 Yemane Berhane31School of Public and Environmental Health, Hawassa University, Hawassa, 2School of Public Health, Addis Ababa University, 3Addis Continental Institute of Public Health, Addis Ababa, EthiopiaBackground: Acute respiratory tract infection (ARI) remains the major cause of child mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa. Various factors are associated with its occurrence and vary by context. However, available large-scale, population-based data ar...

  10. Detection of respiratory pathogens in aerosols from acutely infected pigs

    Infectious agents that cause respiratory disease in pigs include porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), swine influenza virus (SIV), porcine respiratory corona virus (PRCV), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, and Bordetella bronchiseptica. The objective of...

  11. Silicone Modeling of the Interior Spaces of Hollow Organs: Use in Dog and Manatee Respiratory Tract and in a Beef Heart

    Charles J. Grossman; Richard Hamilton; Lisa A. Close-Jacob; Martine D. Wit; Jeffery Werwa

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The mechanism, by which the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) vocalizes, remains unknown because the manatee larynx does not contain true vocal cords. Since sound can be generated when air passes through a narrow respiratory structure we needed to visualize the internal anatomy of manatee respiratory tract to locate any candidate regions for study. Approach: To visualize the internal anatomy of upper and lower manatee respiratory tract we ...

  12. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV in upper respiratory tract mucosa in a group of pre-school children

    Jaroslaw Szydłowski

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction[/b]. Human Papillomavirus (HPV is a group of DNA viruses which is an etiological factor of many benign and malignant diseases of the upper respiratory tract mucosa, female genital tract and the skin. HPV infection is considered a sexually-transmitted infection, but can also be transmitted by non-sexual routes, including perinatal vertical transmission, physical contact, iatrogenic infection and autoinoculation. Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis (RRP in children is connected with HPV infection transmitted vertically from mother to child during the passage of the foetus through an infected birth canal. [b]objective. [/b]The aim of this study was to establish the level of Human Papillomaviruses carrier state in upper respiratory tract mucosa in healthy pre-school children, and to identify potential risk factors for HPV infection. [b]materials and method[/b]. After obtaining consent from their parents, 97 pre-school children were examined – 51 girls and 46 boys between the ages of 3 – 5 years; average age – 4 years and 5 months. 68 children were urban dwellers and 29 came from a rural environment. A questionnaire with detailed history was taken including parents’ and child`s personal data, as well as perinatal risk factors in pregnancy. Socio-demographic information was also obtained, including the standard of living, and chosen environmental factors. Routine ENT examination was performed. Exfoliated oral squamous cells were collected from swabs and analysed for the presence of DNA papillomaviruses by polymerase chain reaction. [b]results.[/b] The presence of HPV in the respiratory tract in children was detected in 19.6% cases. ‘High oncogenic potential’ HPVs, such as HPV-16 and HPV-18, were not observed in squamous cell mucosa of the respiratory tract in the children. No significant differences were observed between the HPV carrier state in urban and rural inhabitants.

  13. Association of alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position in acute respiratory disease syndrome patients.

    Costa, Daniela Caetano; Rocha, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Tatiane Flores

    2009-06-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome is the clinical presentation of acute lung injury characterized by diffuse alveolar damage and development of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema due to increased pulmonary alveolar-capillary membrane permeability. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position can be used in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome. The objective of this review of literature was to identify possible benefits, indications, complications and care of the associated recruitment maneuvers and prone position for treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. This national and international scientific literature review was developed according to the established criteria for searching the databases MedLine, LILACS, SciElo, PubMed, Cochrane, from 1994 to 2008 in Portuguese and English, with the key words: acute respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar recruitment maneuver and prone position. Despite advances in the understanding of acute respiratory distress syndrome pathophysiology, mortality is still expressive. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position significantly contribute to treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome patient aiming to improve oxygenation and minimizing complications of refractory hypoxemia and reduction of pulmonary compliance. However,as there are few studies in literature associating alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position for treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome, additional research and evidences of clinical application are required. PMID:25303351

  14. Intravenous moxifloxacin in routine hospital treatment of respiratory tract infections in China: results of a multicenter, noninterventional study

    Chen R

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Rongchang Chen1, Wenjiang Ma2, Xuezhong Yu3, Xinmin Liu4, Jihong Zhu5, Hong Liang6, Xiaomei Wu7, Tao Guo81State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, China; 2Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School of Zhejiang University, China; 3Emergency Department, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, China; 4Geriatric Department, Peking University First Hospital, China; 5Emergency Department, Peking University People's Hospital, China; 6Respiratory Department, Huadong Hospital Affiliated to Fudan University, China; 7Respiratory Department, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, China; 8Hematology Department, Wuhan Union Hospital, ChinaObjective: To investigate the effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of moxifloxacin (MXF (intravenous [IV] or sequential therapy [IV followed by oral] under daily treatment conditions in a large number of patients with respiratory tract infections.Design: Patients with a diagnosis of respiratory tract infection should be treated with MXF IV and/or tablets 400 mg once daily for a duration at the physician's discretion. For each patient, the physician documented data at an initial visit and at the end of therapy (EOT visit and/or, in the case of sequential therapy, an interim visit when the patient switched to oral treatment.Results: A total of 1953 patients treated with MXF were documented and were valid for an effectiveness and safety evaluation. An improvement was observed in 98.1% (n = 1911/1949 of patients treated with MXF. Recovery was documented in 89.9% (n = 1754/1951 of the patients. At the EOT visit, severity of infection was assessed to be "relieved" or at least "improved" in 96.5% (n = 1873/1940 of the patients. Physicians assessed overall effectiveness as "good" or "very good" in 93.3% (n = 1822/1953 of all patients. The physicians' overall tolerability rating was "very good" or "good" in 93.5% (n

  15. Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Volutrauma and Molecular Effects

    Carrasco Loza, R; Villamizar Rodríguez, G; Medel Fernández, N

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical condition secondary to a variety of insults leading to a severe acute respiratory failure and high mortality in critically ill patients. Patients with ARDS generally require mechanical ventilation, which is another important factor that may increase the ALI (acute lung injury) by a series of pathophysiological mechanisms, whose common element is the initial volutrauma in the alveolar units, and forming part of an entity known clinically...

  16. [Role of computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Franchi, Federico; Volterrani, Luca; Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Macarini, Luca

    2012-11-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a complex pulmonary pathology with high mortality rates, manifesting over a wide range of severity. Clinical diagnosis relies on the following 4 criteria stated by the American-European Consensus Conference: acute onset of impaired gas exchange, severe hypoxemia defined as a PaO2 to FiO2 ratio <300 (PaO2 in mmHg), bilateral diffuse infiltration on chest X-ray; pulmonary artery wedge pressure of ≤18 mmHg to rule out cardiogenic causes of pulmonary edema. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of CT in the diagnosis and management of this condition. PMID:23096732

  17. Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC® supplementation and gastrointestinal and respiratory-tract illness symptoms: a randomised control trial in athletes

    Hopkins William G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probiotics purportedly reduce symptoms of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory-tract illness by modulating commensal microflora. Preventing and reducing symptoms of respiratory and gastrointestinal illness are the primary reason that dietary supplementation with probiotics are becoming increasingly popular with healthy active individuals. There is a paucity of data regarding the effectiveness of probiotics in this cohort. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a probiotic on faecal microbiology, self-reported illness symptoms and immunity in healthy well trained individuals. Methods Competitive cyclists (64 males and 35 females; age 35 ± 9 and 36 ± 9 y, VO2max 56 ± 6 and 52 ± 6 ml.kg-1.min-1, mean ± SD were randomised to either probiotic (minimum 1 × 109 Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC® per day or placebo treatment for 11 weeks in a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial. The outcome measures were faecal L. fermentum counts, self-reported symptoms of illness and serum cytokines. Results Lactobacillus numbers increased 7.7-fold (90% confidence limits 2.1- to 28-fold more in males on the probiotic, while there was an unclear 2.2-fold (0.2- to 18-fold increase in females taking the probiotic. The number and duration of mild gastrointestinal symptoms were ~2-fold greater in the probiotic group. However, there was a substantial 0.7 (0.2 to 1.2 of a scale step reduction in the severity of gastrointestinal illness at the mean training load in males, which became more pronounced as training load increased. The load (duration×severity of lower respiratory illness symptoms was less by a factor of 0.31 (99%CI; 0.07 to 0.96 in males taking the probiotic compared with placebo but increased by a factor of 2.2 (0.41 to 27 in females. Differences in use of cold and flu medication mirrored these symptoms. The observed effects on URTI had too much uncertainty for a decisive outcome. There were clear reductions in

  18. CLINICAL PROFILE OF CHILDREN IN THE AGE GROUP 6 MONTHS TO 60 MONTHS WITH LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTION

    Bharath Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT : Infections of the respiratory tract are perhaps the most common human ailments. Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI has quite a high morbidity and mortality in children in developing countries 1 ARI is responsible for about 30 - 50 percent of visits to health facilities and for about 20 - 40 percent of hospital admissions. Pneumonia is a leading cause of mortality in children worldwide. Because mortality due to pneumonia in developing countries is attributable mainly to bacterial etiology , IM NCI strategy recommends the use of antibiotics when a child presented with tachypnea as defined previously . AIMS : To re - define or refine tachypnea as a specific indicator of bacterial pneumonia. To identify other clinical predictors for identifying bacteri al pneumonia. DESIGNS : The study was designed to be done in two phases . In the first phase it is to be carried out as a descriptive study of children presenting with fever and respiratory distress in the OPD to identify the specific markers for bacterial p neumonia. In the second phase presenting clinical features in children with radiological pneumonia will be analysed to validate the findings from Phase I. MATERIALS AND METHODS : This was a hospital based study and was conducted in Sri Manakula V inayagar Me dical College and Hospital , Puducherry . The study included 100 Children in the age group 6 months to 5 years presenting in the out patients department with fever and respiratory distress Children attending the out - patient department on a fixed day of the w eek (Monday and who come under this study population during the study period were admitted and recruited in the study and informed verbal consent for participation was taken from the parents. Their clinical profiles were recorded as in phase I. All childr en coming under this study population were given antibiotics and supportive treatment. The cases were monitored for any worsening or improvement every 6 th hourly on day 1 and

  19. Sublingual immunotherapy as an alternative to induce protection against acute respiratory infections.

    Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Rial, Analía; Saavedra, José M; Chabalgoity, José A

    2014-01-01

    Sublingual route has been widely used to deliver small molecules into the bloodstream and to modulate the immune response at different sites. It has been shown to effectively induce humoral and cellular responses at systemic and mucosal sites, namely the lungs and urogenital tract. Sublingual vaccination can promote protection against infections at the lower and upper respiratory tract; it can also promote tolerance to allergens and ameliorate asthma symptoms. Modulation of lung's immune response by sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is safer than direct administration of formulations by intranasal route because it does not require delivery of potentially harmful molecules directly into the airways. In contrast to intranasal delivery, side effects involving brain toxicity or facial paralysis are not promoted by SLIT. The immune mechanisms underlying SLIT remain elusive and its use for the treatment of acute lung infections has not yet been explored. Thus, development of appropriate animal models of SLIT is needed to further explore its potential advantages. This work shows how to perform sublingual administration of therapeutic agents in mice to evaluate their ability to protect against acute pneumococcal pneumonia. Technical aspects of mouse handling during sublingual inoculation, precise identification of sublingual mucosa, draining lymph nodes and isolation of tissues, bronchoalveolar lavage and lungs are illustrated. Protocols for single cell suspension preparation for FACS analysis are described in detail. Other downstream applications for the analysis of the immune response are discussed. Technical aspects of the preparation of Streptococcus pneumoniae inoculum and intranasal challenge of mice are also explained. SLIT is a simple technique that allows screening of candidate molecules to modulate lungs' immune response. Parameters affecting the success of SLIT are related to molecular size, susceptibility to degradation and stability of highly concentrated

  20. Surfactant alteration and replacement in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Walmrath Dieter

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a frequent, life-threatening disease in which a marked increase in alveolar surface tension has been repeatedly observed. It is caused by factors including a lack of surface-active compounds, changes in the phospholipid, fatty acid, neutral lipid, and surfactant apoprotein composition, imbalance of the extracellular surfactant subtype distribution, inhibition of surfactant function by plasma protein leakage, incorporation of surfactant phospholipids and apoproteins into polymerizing fibrin, and damage/inhibition of surfactant compounds by inflammatory mediators. There is now good evidence that these surfactant abnormalities promote alveolar instability and collapse and, consequently, loss of compliance and the profound gas exchange abnormalities seen in ARDS. An acute improvement of gas exchange properties together with a far-reaching restoration of surfactant properties was encountered in recently performed pilot studies. Here we summarize what is known about the kind and severity of surfactant changes occuring in ARDS, the contribution of these changes to lung failure, and the role of surfactant administration for therapy of ARDS.

  1. Acute respiratory failure induced by bleomycin and hyperoxia

    Bleomycin, a chemotherapeutic agent, and oxygen at concentrations greater than 20%, induce acute pulmonary damage separately and when administered together. The interaction of 5 U/kg intratracheal bleomycin and 24 hours of exposure to 80% oxygen in hamsters produces delayed onset acute respiratory distress syndrome three days after treatment. As little as 12 hours of 80% O2 exposure, after intratracheal bleomycin, induces severe pulmonary damage. Lung lesions are characterized as diffuse alveolar damage. Significantly pulmonary edema, measured by iodine-125-bovine serum albumin and technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate, occurs 72 hours after treatment. Lesions progress from focal mild alveolar interstitial and air-space macrophage and granulocyte infiltrates at 24 hours to marked infiltrates and severe interstitial and air space edema with hemorrhages and hyaline membranes at 96 hours. Significant changes measured by electron microscopy morphometry are increases in volume fractions of neutrophils, alveolar tissue and mononuclear leukocytes. Surfactant assay of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid shows a marked decrease in the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio at 72 hours. Proposed mechanisms of bleomycin and hyperoxia synergism include enhanced production of superoxide radicals either directly or indirectly by increasing neutrophil activity or numbers, or by alteration of cell mediators. The pulmonary edema, without evidence of severe morphological changes, may be secondary to alterations of transalveolar transport mechanisms

  2. Acute respiratory failure as a manifestation of an arachnoid cyst

    Pillai Lalitha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Arachnoid cysts are the most common congenital cystic lesions in the brain occurring in the middle fossa, suprasellar region and occasionally in the posterior fossa. Conventionally all cysts are considered as benign and symptoms are attributed to expansion of cysts causing compression of adjacent neurological structures, bleeds within the cyst or due to the development of acute hydrocephalus. We are reporting this case of a 15-year-old female patient with non-progressive weakness in the limbs since the age of seven years who presented with acute onset syncopal attacks and respiratory failure. She was intubated and ventilated. An magnetic resonance imaging scan showed large posterior fossa cyst extending up to mid second cervical vertebra causing compression of the medulla and pons, with mild hydrocephalus. After a failed attempt to wean her from the ventilator a cysto peritoneal shunt surgery was performed following which she was weaned from the ventilator successfully. Weakness in the upper and lower limbs, which had increased in the preceding month, also improved following the surgery.

  3. Respiratory protection and emerging infectious diseases: lessons from severe acute respiratory syndrome

    John H. Lange

    2005-01-01

    @@ The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) that emerged 2002-2003 and apparently again 2004 (reported by the news media on December 27, 2003) as the first confirmed case by the World Health Organization (WHO)1,2 raised awareness of emerging infectious diseases.3 Every year there are both new and old infectious diseases emerging as potential pandemic agents.4-6 However, few of these diseases receive the public attention and concern expressed as occurred during the emergence of SARS. Much of this concern was a result of the rapid spread of the novel coronavirus (CoV) to different regions of the world and its high infectivity, especially for health care workers (HCW).3 In many ways, the high percent of HCW infected is a warning of the potential hazards of old and emerging infectious diseases.6 However, SARS was not the only disease (e.g. Monkeypox) that emerged in 2003,3 rather it received the greatest attention.

  4. Implementing hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections caused by influenza and other respiratory pathogens in New Zealand

    Q Sue Huang; Michael Baker; Colin McArthur; Sally Roberts; Deborah Williamson; Cameron Grant; Adrian Trenholme; Conroy Wong; Susan Taylor; Lyndsay LeComte; Graham Mackereth; Don Bandaranayake; Tim Wood; Ange Bissielo; Ruth Seeds

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent experience with pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 highlighted the importance of global surveillance for severe respiratory disease to support pandemic preparedness and seasonal influenza control. Improved surveillance in the southern hemisphere is needed to provide critical data on influenza epidemiology, disease burden, circulating strains and effectiveness of influenza prevention and control measures. Hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infection (SARI)...

  5. Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS): the mechanism, present strategies and future perspectives of therapies

    Luh, Shi-Ping; Chiang, Chi-huei

    2006-01-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), which manifests as non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, respiratory distress and hypoxemia, could be resulted from various processes that directly or indirectly injure the lung. Extensive investigations in experimental models and humans with ALI/ARDS have revealed many molecular mechanisms that offer therapeutic opportunities for cell or gene therapy. Herein the present strategies and future perspectives of the treatment for ALI/AR...

  6. Distribution patterns of influenza virus receptors and viral attachment patterns in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of seven avian species

    Costa Taiana

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study assessed the presence of sialic acid α-2,3 and α-2,6 linked glycan receptors in seven avian species. The respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, golden pheasant, ostrich, and mallard were tested by means of lectin histochemistry, using the lectins Maackia amurensis agglutinin II and Sambucus nigra agglutinin, which show affinity for α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors, respectively. Additionally, the pattern of virus attachment (PVA was evaluated with virus histochemistry, using an avian-origin H4N5 virus and a human-origin seasonal H1N1 virus. There was a great variation of receptor distribution among the tissues and avian species studied. Both α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors were present in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, and golden pheasant. In ostriches, the expression of the receptor was basically restricted to α-2,3 in both the respiratory and intestinal tracts and in mallards the α-2,6 receptors were absent from the intestinal tract. The results obtained with the lectin histochemistry were, in general, in agreement with the PVA. The differential expression and distribution of α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors among various avian species might reflect a potentially decisive factor in the emergence of new viral strains.

  7. Airflow and Aerosol-Drug Delivery in a CT Scan based Human Respiratory Tract with Tumor using CFD

    Vivek K.Srivastav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on to study the effect of a tumor present in the respiratory tract (in trachea on airflow pattern and aerosol-drug deposition. A realistic model of human respiratory tract was constructed from spiral computed tomography (CT scan data and a bifocal tumor (Glomus tumor was constructed in the tract. The inspiratory flow characteristics of the realistic human airway models (with and without tumor was numerically solved using the realizable k turbulence model for airflow and Shear Stress Transport (SST k-ω turbulence model for two-phase flow. The velocity (contours and vector plots, wall shear stress and deposition efficiency of aerosol were obtained at different locations to the upstream and downstream region of the bifocal tumor in respiratory tract. The flow pattern shows that the maximum flow disturbance occurs around the tumor and at downstream of the flow. Magnitude and location of maximum wall shear stress in the presence of the tumor helps in identifying the extent and probable location of the wall injury during the normal and heavy breathing conditions. Deposition efficiency of aerosol-drug on tumor location will be useful for designing the efficient targeted drug delivery system.

  8. Determinants of Noninvasive Ventilation Outcomes during an Episode of Acute Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: The Effects of Comorbidities and Causes of Respiratory Failure

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the effect of the cause of acute respiratory failure and the role of comorbidities both acute and chronic on the outcome of COPD patients admitted to Respiratory Intensive Care Unit (RICU) with acute respiratory failure and treated with NIV. Design. Observational prospective study. Patients and Methods. 176 COPD patients consecutively admitted to our RICU over a period of 3 years and treated with NIV were evaluated. In all patients demographic, clinical, and functio...

  9. Pathology of upper respiratory tract disease of gopher tortoises in Florida.

    McLaughlin, G S; Jacobson, E R; Brown, D R; McKenna, C E; Schumacher, I M; Adams, H P; Brown, M B; Klein, P A

    2000-04-01

    Between August 1993 and September 1995, 24 gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus) were received for pathological evaluations from various locations in Florida (USA). All tortoises were examined for clinical signs of upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) including nasal and ocular discharge, palpebral edema, and conjunctivitis. Of the 24 tortoises, 10 had current or previously observed clinical signs of URTD and 14 did not. A blood sample was drawn for detection of anti-mycoplasma antibodies by ELISA, and nasal lavage samples were collected for culture and detection of Mycoplasma agassizii gene sequences by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of the 14 clinically healthy tortoises, eight were sero-, culture- and PCR-negative, and six were seropositive for antibodies against M. agassizii. Of those six, five were culture- and/or PCR-positive for M. agassizii, and one was culture- and PCR-negative. Of the 10 ill tortoises, nine were seropositive by the ELISA and one was in the suspect range. Nine of the ill tortoises, including the suspect tortoise, were culture- and/or PCR-positive for M. agassizii, and one was culture- and PCR-negative. For histologic evaluation and discussion, the eight sero-, culture-, and PCR-negative tortoises were designated URTD-negative, and the other 16 were classified as URTD-positive. Histologic evaluation of the upper respiratory tract (URT) indicated the presence of mild to severe inflammatory, hyperplastic, or dysplastic changes in 14 URTD-positive tortoises. Seven of eight URTD-negative tortoises had normal appearing nasal cavities; one had mild inflammatory changes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed an organism consistent with Mycoplasma spp. on the nasal mucosal surface of tortoises with clinical signs and lesions of URTD. Additionally, gram-negative bacteria were isolated more frequently from the nasal cavities of URTD-positive tortoises than URTD-negative tortoises. Because clinical signs of URTD were never observed in six of

  10. Determining the basic characteristics of aerosols suitable for studies of deposition in the respiratory tract.

    Legáth, L; Naus, A; Halík, J

    1988-01-01

    Studies of aerosol particle deposition in the respiratory tract requires experimental inhalation of artificial model aerosols. The paper formulates some of the most important requirements for the properties of such aerosols. Several suitable fractions were prepared as part of a research project dealing with the use of microporous polymers for diagnostic purposes. 5 fractions of the polymer designated G-gel 60 with the particle size as stated by the manufacturer, ranging from 3 to 7 micron were evaluated using a 16-channel particle dispersity analyzer HIAC/ROYCO MT 3210 with the sensor 1200 and operated by a microprocessor, the equipment being coupled to an APPLE IIe computer. G-gel 60 particles introduced into the aerosol were characterized by the parameters CMAD, MMAD and sg both numerically and graphically. The measurement procedure was found to be very sensitive with respect to all fractions in evaluating the subtile differences between different lot numbers of the aerosol. G-gel 60 fractions characterized both numerically and graphically were compared with the known aerosols from paraffin oil and atmospheric air. The equipment MT 3210 enables prompt determination of the percentages of aerosol particles distribution by size class. The authors conclude that the procedure, both in its numerical and graphical versions, is particularly suitable for the diagnosis of aerosol particles deposition in the respiratory tract, offering a new application for HIAC/ROYCO in the field of medicine. In evaluating atmospheric aerosol in exhaled air, the number of particles was found to be below that in inhaled air, the difference being dependent on the choice of investigation methods. Percentual distribution of deposited particles following one minute ventilation proved to be at its maximum, as regards atmospheric aerosol, in the 0.30-0.50 micron range. The deposition curve was similar to already published curves, being characterized by an S-shaped pattern with maximum deposition

  11. A linear, time-varying simulation of the respiratory tract system

    Hernandez, O.

    1992-11-01

    These results show that regional deposition efficiencies of inhaled particles are highly dependent on the level of physical activity in all the spectrum of thermodynamic and aerodynamic aerosol particle sizes; also it was shown that for particles in the aerodynamic size range, the values of regional deposition efficiencies at the inner regions of the lung are highly dependent on age. In addition, the shape of regional deposition efficiency curves as a function of particle size have a similar behavior for all ages; thus, any variation of the airway geometry and respiratory physiological parameters such as tidal volumes and breathing frequencies due to age difference do not cause a change in the fundamental mechanisms of deposition. Thus, for all the cases of physical activity and age dependency, the deposition of ultrafine aerosol particles is highly enhanced by diffusive processes in all regions of the respiratory tract, and for very large aerosol size particles this behavior is repeated again due to impaction and sedimentation mechanisms. Although the results presented at this work, are the result of computer simulations based on different sources of experimental data, the structure of the computer simulation code BIODEP is flexible enough to the acquisition of any kind of new experimental information in terms of biokinetic analysis and regional deposition parameters. In addition, since the design of BIODEP was intended for easy access to the users, then with exception of the subroutine DIVPAG, at this moment, the modular design of BIODEP using FORTRAN 77 allows the implementation of all the subroutines of BIODEP to be used in a interactive mode with any microcomputer.

  12. Infants with recurrent lower respiratory tract symptoms – who benefits of extensive investigations?

    Anne Kotaniemi-Syrjänen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available There is limited information on lung function and exhaled nitric oxide fraction (FeNO in infants with recurrent lower respiratory tract symptoms. In 2000–2003, 201 recurrently symptomatic infants were referred to a tertiary center for further investigation. As part of the clinical investigation, whole-body plethysmography, tidal FeNO measurements, and skin prick tests were performed. In addition, 77 (38% of the children underwent bronchoscopy. Increased work of breathing in clinical examination (in 22%, and abnormal chest radiograph (in 30%, were associated with decreased airway conductance (sGaw z-score –1.65 (p<0.001 and p = 0.048, respectively and hyperinflation of the lungs (FRC z-score 1.65(p = 0.004 and p = 0.038, respectively. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS was associated with FeNO 40 ppb (p = 0.009. Increased work of breathing, sGaw z-score –1.65, and FRC z-score 1.65, were associated with low FeNO (p = 0.002, p = 0.005, p = 0.026, respectively. A definitive diagnosis was made in 184 (92% children; asthma was diagnosed in 149 (74%, infection in 23 (11%, and a structural abnormality in 12 (6%. Abnormal findings in clinical examination predicted the diagnosis of asthma or a structural abnormality in 96% of cases, whereas in children with underlying respiratory infection or no definitive diagnosis, clinical examination was normal in 92% (p<0.001. In conclusion, clinical findings of bronchial obstruction predict well lung function and the diagnosis of asthma in recurrently symptomatic infants. FeNO is affected by ETS exposure, clinical state of the child, and the used methods, and the information obtained should be interpreted with care.

  13. Prediction of Acute Respiratory Disease in Current and Former Smokers With and Without COPD

    Kim, Victor; Regan, Elizabeth; Williams, André A. A.; Santorico, Stephanie A.; Make, Barry J.; Lynch, David A.; Hokanson, John E.; Washko, George R.; Bercz, Peter; Soler, Xavier; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Criner, Gerard J.; Ramsdell, Joe; Han, MeiLan K.; Demeo, Dawn; Anzueto, Antonio; Comellas, Alejandro; Crapo, James D.; Dransfield, Mark; Wells, J. Michael; Hersh, Craig P.; MacIntyre, Neil; Martinez, Fernando; Nath, Hrudaya P.; Niewoehner, Dennis; Sciurba, Frank; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Silverman, Edwin K.; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Wilson, Carla; Wendt, Christine; Wise, Robert A.; Curtis, Jeffrey; Kazerooni, Ella; Hanania, Nicola; Alapat, Philip; Bandi, Venkata; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha; Guy, Elizabeth; Lunn, William; Mallampalli, Antara; Trinh, Charles; Atik, Mustafa; DeMeo, Dawn; Hersh, Craig; Jacobson, Francine; Graham Barr, R.; Thomashow, Byron; Austin, John; MacIntyre, Neil; Washington, Lacey; Page McAdams, H.; Rosiello, Richard; Bresnahan, Timothy; McEvoy, Charlene; Tashjian, Joseph; Wise, Robert; Hansel, Nadia; Brown, Robert; Casaburi, Richard; Porszasz, Janos; Fischer, Hans; Budoff, Matt; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Niewoehner, Dennis; Allen, Tadashi; Rice, Kathryn; Foreman, Marilyn; Westney, Gloria; Berkowitz, Eugene; Bowler, Russell; Friedlander, Adam; Meoni, Eleonora; Criner, Gerard; Kim, Victor; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Satti, Aditi; James Mamary, A.; Steiner, Robert; Dass, Chandra; Bailey, William; Dransfield, Mark; Gerald, Lynn; Nath, Hrudaya; Ramsdell, Joe; Ferguson, Paul; Friedman, Paul; McLennan, Geoffrey; van Beek, Edwin JR; Martinez, Fernando; Han, MeiLan; Thompson, Deborah; Kazerooni, Ella; Wendt, Christine; Allen, Tadashi; Sciurba, Frank; Weissfeld, Joel; Fuhrman, Carl; Bon, Jessica; Anzueto, Antonio; Adams, Sandra; Orozco, Carlos; Santiago Restrepo, C.; Mumbower, Amy; Crapo, James; Silverman, Edwin; Make, Barry; Regan, Elizabeth; Samet, Jonathan; Willis, Amy; Stinson, Douglas; Beaty, Terri; Klanderman, Barbara; Laird, Nan; Lange, Christoph; Ionita, Iuliana; Santorico, Stephanie; Silverman, Edwin; Lynch, David; Schroeder, Joyce; Newell, John; Reilly, John; Coxson, Harvey; Judy, Philip; Hoffman, Eric; San Jose Estepar, Raul; Washko, George; Leek, Rebecca; Zach, Jordan; Kluiber, Alex; Rodionova, Anastasia; Mann, Tanya; Crapo, Robert; Jensen, Robert; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Murphy, James; Everett, Douglas; Wilson, Carla; Hokanson, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk factors for acute episodes of respiratory disease in current and former smokers who do not have COPD are unknown. METHODS: Eight thousand two hundred forty-six non-Hispanic white and black current and former smokers in the Genetic Epidemiology of COPD (COPDGene) cohort had longitudinal follow-up (LFU) every 6 months to determine acute respiratory episodes requiring antibiotics or systemic corticosteroids, an ED visit, or hospitalization. Negative binomial regression was used to determine the factors associated with acute respiratory episodes. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for time to first episode and an acute episode of respiratory disease risk score. RESULTS: At enrollment, 4,442 subjects did not have COPD, 658 had mild COPD, and 3,146 had moderate or worse COPD. Nine thousand three hundred three acute episodes of respiratory disease and 2,707 hospitalizations were reported in LFU (3,044 acute episodes of respiratory disease and 827 hospitalizations in those without COPD). Major predictors included acute episodes of respiratory disease in year prior to enrollment (HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.15-1.24 per exacerbation), airflow obstruction (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.91-0.96 per 10% change in % predicted FEV1), and poor health-related quality of life (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.06-1.08 for each 4-unit increase in St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire score). Risks were similar for those with and without COPD. CONCLUSIONS: Although acute episode of respiratory disease rates are higher in subjects with COPD, risk factors are similar, and at a population level, there are more episodes in smokers without COPD. PMID:24945159

  14. Hemodynamics of Acute Right Heart Failure in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    McLean, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    In critically ill patients with circulatory shock, the role of the left ventricle has long been appreciated and the object of measurement and therapeutic targeting. The right ventricle is often under appreciated and dysfunction may be overlooked. Generally, the right ventricle operates passively to support the ejection of the left ventricular diastolic volume. A loss of right ventricular wall compliance secondary to pulmonary pressures may result in an alteration in the normal pressure-volume relationship, ultimately affecting the stroke volume and cardiac output. Traditional right heart filling indices may increase because of decreasing compliance, further complicating the picture. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome combined with the effects of a mean airway pressure strategy may create an acute cor pulmonale. PMID:26567491

  15. Prophylactic antibody treatment and intramuscular immunization reduce infectious human rhinovirus 16 load in the lower respiratory tract of challenged cotton rats

    Jorge C.G. Blanco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human rhinoviruses (HRV represent the single most important etiological agents of the common cold and are the most frequent cause of acute respiratory infections in humans. Currently the performance of available animal models for immunization studies using HRV challenge is very limited. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus is a well-recognized model for the study of human respiratory viral infections. In this work we show that, without requiring any genetic modification of either the host or the virus, intranasal infection of cotton rats with HRV16 resulted in measurable isolation of infective virus, lower respiratory tract pathology, mucus production, and expression of interferon-activated genes. Intramuscular immunization with live HRV16 generated robust protective immunity that correlated with high serum levels of neutralizing antibodies. In addition, cotton rats treated prophylactically with hyperimmune anti-HRV16 serum were protected against HRV16 intranasal challenge. Finally, protection by immunization was efficiently transferred from mothers to newborn animals resulting in a substantial reduction of infectious virus loads in the lung following intranasal challenge. Overall, our results demonstrate that the cotton rat provides valuable additional model development options for testing vaccines and prophylactic therapies against rhinovirus infection.

  16. Pulmonary radiographic findings and mortality in hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) remain a widespread problem and have a significant impact on primary healthcare resources. Previous studies have reported conflicting results on whether pulmonary radiographic findings at presentation predict lethality for patients with LRTIs. The aim of this study was to determine if the pulmonary radiographic findings at the third day of hospitalisation were independently associated with lethality in patients with LRTIs. A total of 616 patients with LRTIs, admitted to our hospital, were evaluated with regard to radiographic data. The prognostic analysis included an univariate approach of the following radiographic findings: focal alveolar infiltrates in one or more segments, focal alveolar infiltrates in one or more lobes, cavitations, diffuse infiltrates, solitary or multiple nodules, pleural effusion and fibrosis. Of the 616 patients, 560 patients (90.0%) had at least one pulmonary radiographic finding confirmed by a panel of radiologists. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows. Eleven independent radiographic variables were examined for association with lethality. Overall lethality was 10.2% (553 survivors, 63 non-survivors). The only parameter found to be significantly different between survivors and non-survivors was cavitations on chest radiograph (p-value: 0.047). In conclusion, the presence of cavitations on chest radiograph at third day of hospitalisation can help physicians' assessment of prognosis in patients with LRTIs, as it is an independent predictor of lethality

  17. Pulmonary radiographic findings and mortality in hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections

    Trakada, G. [Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Patras Medical School, Patras 26500 (Greece)]. E-mail: gtrakada@hotmail.com; Pouli, A. [Agios Savas Hospital, Athens (Greece); Goumas, P. [Department of ORL, University Hospital of Patras Medical School, Patras (Greece)

    2006-02-15

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) remain a widespread problem and have a significant impact on primary healthcare resources. Previous studies have reported conflicting results on whether pulmonary radiographic findings at presentation predict lethality for patients with LRTIs. The aim of this study was to determine if the pulmonary radiographic findings at the third day of hospitalisation were independently associated with lethality in patients with LRTIs. A total of 616 patients with LRTIs, admitted to our hospital, were evaluated with regard to radiographic data. The prognostic analysis included an univariate approach of the following radiographic findings: focal alveolar infiltrates in one or more segments, focal alveolar infiltrates in one or more lobes, cavitations, diffuse infiltrates, solitary or multiple nodules, pleural effusion and fibrosis. Of the 616 patients, 560 patients (90.0%) had at least one pulmonary radiographic finding confirmed by a panel of radiologists. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows. Eleven independent radiographic variables were examined for association with lethality. Overall lethality was 10.2% (553 survivors, 63 non-survivors). The only parameter found to be significantly different between survivors and non-survivors was cavitations on chest radiograph (p-value: 0.047). In conclusion, the presence of cavitations on chest radiograph at third day of hospitalisation can help physicians' assessment of prognosis in patients with LRTIs, as it is an independent predictor of lethality.

  18. Diagnosis and Management of Recurrent Respiratory Tract Infections in Children: A Practical Guide

    Schaad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Respiratory tract infections (RTIs affect children all over the world and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. RTIs are usually triggered by viruses, though bacterial infections are also common. Results Children are particularly susceptible to RTIs due to the relative immaturity of their immune systems, and genetic factors (such as family history of atopy and/or environmental factors (such as exposure to pollution and pathogens also render certain populations more vulnerable to infection. Furthermore, RTIs tend to be recurrent and can result in multiple infections per year. The management of recurrent RTIs poses a tremendous challenge for physicians, who have a limited armamentarium with which to alleviate patients’ symptoms, treat their disease, and prevent recurrences. Conclusions Though antibiotics are rarely indicated, they are often still used to treat RTIs. The resulting increase in bacterial resistance, the lack of treatment efficacy, and drug-related side effects all underscore the need for alternative strategies to manage recurrent RTIs. This article uses a typical pediatric case study to review central issues in the diagnosis and management of recurrent RTIs in children, with an emphasis on the role of immunomodulation as a preventive strategy.

  19. Morphology of respiratory tract lesions in rats exposed to radon progeny

    Dagle, G.E.; Cross, F.T.; Gies, R.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    We will discuss the morphologic features of lesions in the respiratory tract of rats exposed to radon and radon progeny. Groups of male Wister rats were exposed to from 10 to 1000 working levels (WL) of radon progeny in the presence of less than 1 to about 15 mg m{sup {minus}3} uranium ore dust. Cumulative exposures ranged from 20 to approximately 10,000 working level months (WLM). Higher exposure levels produced radiation pneumonitis characterized by interstitial fibrosis, associated with alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia and accumulations of alveolar macrophages containing phagocytosed uranium ore dust. Nodular fibrosis and alveolar proteinosis were correlated with deposits of uranium ore dust. Vesicular emphysema also occurred at higher exposure levels. Pulmonary adenomatosis appeared to be a preneoplastic lesion; it was composed of nodular proliferation of bronchioloalveolar epithelium without disruption of the general architecture of the parenchyma. At exposure levels where rats lived longer than 1 y, lung tumors and a few tumors of the nasal cavity developed. The principal lung tumors were pulmonary adenomas, bronchioloalveolar carcinomas, papillary adenocarcinomas, epidermoid carcinomas, and adenosquamous carcinomas. Occasionally, malignant mesotheliomas and sarcomas were also present. The malignant lung tumors were characterized by invasion and occasionally metastasized to regional lymph nodes. Lower exposure rates produced more tumors, generally of different histologic types, and more fatal tumors than higher exposure rates. The similarity to relationships of human radon progeny exposure as far as incidence and types of lung tumors establish the validity of this animal model for studying radon carcinogenesis in humans.

  20. Characterisation of Candida within the Mycobiome/Microbiome of the Lower Respiratory Tract of ICU Patients.

    Robert Krause

    Full Text Available Whether the presence of Candida spp. in lower respiratory tract (LRT secretions is a marker of underlying disease, intensive care unit (ICU treatment and antibiotic therapy or contributes to poor clinical outcome is unclear. We investigated healthy controls, patients with proposed risk factors for Candida growth in LRT (antibiotic therapy, ICU treatment with and without antibiotic therapy, ICU patients with pneumonia and antibiotic therapy and candidemic patients (for comparison of truly invasive and colonizing Candida spp.. Fungal patterns were determined by conventional culture based microbiology combined with molecular approaches (next generation sequencing, multilocus sequence typing for description of fungal and concommitant bacterial microbiota in LRT, and host and fungal biomarkes were investigated. Admission to and treatment on ICUs shifted LRT fungal microbiota to Candida spp. dominated fungal profiles but antibiotic therapy did not. Compared to controls, Candida was part of fungal microbiota in LRT of ICU patients without pneumonia with and without antibiotic therapy (63% and 50% of total fungal genera and of ICU patients with pneumonia with antibiotic therapy (73% (p<0.05. No case of invasive candidiasis originating from Candida in the LRT was detected. There was no common bacterial microbiota profile associated or dissociated with Candida spp. in LRT. Colonizing and invasive Candida strains (from candidemic patients did not match to certain clades withdrawing the presence of a particular pathogenic and invasive clade. The presence of Candida spp. in the LRT rather reflected rapidly occurring LRT dysbiosis driven by ICU related factors than was associated with invasive candidiasis.

  1. Characteristics of Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains Colonizing Upper Respiratory Tract of Healthy Preschool Children in Poland

    Izabela Korona-Glowniak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistant and invasive pneumococci may spread temporally and locally in day care centers (DCCs. We examined 267 children attending four DCCs located in the same city and 70 children staying at home in three seasons (autumn, winter, and spring to determine prevalence, serotype distribution, antibiotic resistance patterns, and transmission of pneumococcal strains colonizing upper respiratory tract of healthy children without antipneumococcal vaccination. By pheno- and genotyping, we determined clonality of pneumococci, including drug-resistant strains. The average carriage of pneumococci in three seasons was 38.2%. 73.4% and 80.4% of the isolates belonged to serotypes present in 10- and 13-valent conjugate vaccine, respectively. Among the pneumococcal strains, 33.3% were susceptible to all antimicrobial tested and 39.2% had decreased susceptibility to penicillin. Multidrug resistance was common (35.7%; 97.5% of drug-resistant isolates represented serotypes included to 10- and 13-valent conjugate vaccine. According to BOX-PCR, clonality definitely was observed only in case of serotype 14. Multivariate analysis determined DCC attendance as strongly related to pneumococcal colonization in all three seasons, but important seasonal differences were demonstrated. In children attending DCCs, we observed dynamic turnover of pneumococcal strains, especially penicillin nonsusceptible and multidrug resistant, which were mostly distributed among serotypes included to available pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

  2. Morphology of respiratory tract lesions in rats exposed to radon progeny

    We will discuss the morphologic features of lesions in the respiratory tract of rats exposed to radon and radon progeny. Groups of male Wister rats were exposed to from 10 to 1000 working levels (WL) of radon progeny in the presence of less than 1 to about 15 mg m-3 uranium ore dust. Cumulative exposures ranged from 20 to approximately 10,000 working level months (WLM). Higher exposure levels produced radiation pneumonitis characterized by interstitial fibrosis, associated with alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia and accumulations of alveolar macrophages containing phagocytosed uranium ore dust. Nodular fibrosis and alveolar proteinosis were correlated with deposits of uranium ore dust. Vesicular emphysema also occurred at higher exposure levels. Pulmonary adenomatosis appeared to be a preneoplastic lesion; it was composed of nodular proliferation of bronchioloalveolar epithelium without disruption of the general architecture of the parenchyma. At exposure levels where rats lived longer than 1 y, lung tumors and a few tumors of the nasal cavity developed. The principal lung tumors were pulmonary adenomas, bronchioloalveolar carcinomas, papillary adenocarcinomas, epidermoid carcinomas, and adenosquamous carcinomas. Occasionally, malignant mesotheliomas and sarcomas were also present. The malignant lung tumors were characterized by invasion and occasionally metastasized to regional lymph nodes. Lower exposure rates produced more tumors, generally of different histologic types, and more fatal tumors than higher exposure rates. The similarity to relationships of human radon progeny exposure as far as incidence and types of lung tumors establish the validity of this animal model for studying radon carcinogenesis in humans

  3. A Computer Model for the Simulation of Nonspherical Particle Dynamics in the Human Respiratory Tract

    Robert Sturm

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the study presented here deposition of spheres and nonspherical particles with various aspect ratios (0.01–100 in the human respiratory tract was theoretically modeled. Shape of the nonspherical particles was considered by the application of the latest aerodynamic diameter concepts. Particle deposition was predicted by using a stochastic model of the lung geometry and simulating particle transport trajectories according to the random-walk algorithm. Concerning fibers total deposition is significantly enhanced with respect to that of spheres for μm-sized particles, whereby at normal breathing conditions peripheral lung compartments serve as primary deposition targets. In the case of oblate disks, total deposition becomes mostly remarkable for submicron particles, with the bronchioli and alveoli being targeted to a high extent. Enhancement of the aerodynamic diameter and/or flow rate generally causes a displacement of deposition maxima from peripheral to more proximal lung regions. From these findings, it can be concluded that these particle classes may represent tremendous occupational hazards, especially if they are attached with radioactive elements or heavy metals.

  4. The impact of passive smoking on the development of lower respiratory tract infections in children.

    Keskinoglu, Pembe; Cimrin, Dilek; Aksakoglu, Gazanfer

    2007-10-01

    Environmental tobacco smoke is an important public health problem. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of passive smoking on lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in children aged 2-12 years. A case-control study was conducted on matched-pair design. One-hundred and fifty children with LRTIs and 150 healthy children were included in the study. Data were collected through questionnaire and urine samples for the determination of cotinine levels, and were analysed by McNemar chi-square, paired t-test and Pearson correlation tests. The prevalence of parental self-reported, indoor smoking was 71.3% in children with LRTI and 72.0% in healthy children. Employing 30 ng mg(-1), the cut-off level of urinary cotinine/creatinine as commonly accepted, 87.3% of the children with LRTIs and 84.7% of healthy children were found to be passive smokers (p = 0.61, odds ratio (OR) = 0.93; confidence interval (CI) = 0.34-2.53). If 60 ng mg(-1) of urinary cotinine/creatinine was accepted as a cut-off level, it was observed that the rates of passive smoking were 76.7% and 50.7%, respectively (p = 0.000, OR = 4.72; 95% CI = 2.62-8.52). Dose-dependent exposure to environmental tobacco smoke was found to be associated with the incidence of LRTI. PMID:17517813

  5. STUDY OF FOSFOMYCIN TROMETAMOL IN ACUTE LOWER URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS

    Preetkamal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES To evaluate the efficacy of single oral dose of Fosfomycin Trometamol (FT in patients of uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections. METHODS One hundred women between 18-65 years’ age group with uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infection (UTI with culture positive for E. coli and Enterococcus were enrolled in this prospective study. Patients with culture positive for E. coli and Enterococcus and with in-vitro susceptibility to Fosfomycin Trometamol (FT as tested by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method were given single oral dose of Fosfomycin trometamol, i.e. 3 g. These patients were followed up for clinical and bacteriological cure and any adverse effects. RESULTS The incidence of E. coli infection was 86% and Enterococcus infection was 14%; 78% of E. coli isolates were susceptible to FT with 22% being resistant; 86% of Enterococcus isolates were susceptible to FT with 14% being resistant. Incidence of adverse effects of FT was only 2%. CONCLUSIONS Fosfomycin trometamol might be considered as a promising single dose oral antibiotic for uncomplicated UTI due to E. coli and Enterococcus spp.

  6. Comparative studies on virus detection in acute respiratory diseases in humans by means of RIA and cultivation

    In winter 1981, 146 patients with an acute respiratory infection were examined. Nasopharyngeal specimens were obtained by intranasal catheter. Comparative investigations were performed by cultivation in tissue culture and by a four-layer radioimmunoassay. In the radioimmunoassay, polystyrene beads were used as the solid phase, ginea pig antivirus immunoglobulins as the captive antibodies, rabbit anti-virus immunoglobulins as the secondary antibodies and 125I-labelled sheep anti-rabbit immunoglobulins were used as the indicator antibodies. The radioimmunoassay was developed for the detection of adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B virus and parainfluenza type 1, type 2 and type 3 virus. Tissue culture seems to be more sensitive for detection of adenovirus and influenza A virus, though some infections with influenza A virus could only be diagnosed by the radioimmunoassay. In other cases (respiratory syncytial virus, influenza B virus) antigen detection by radioimmunoassay is more efficient. Presently the combination of both antigen-detection-systems still is the optimal diagnostic procedure for detecting virus infections of the respiratory tract. (orig./MG)

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): HRCT findings in survivors

    Jung, Jung Im; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Song, Jeong Sup; Lee, Kyo Young [The Catholic Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings of the lung in survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Among eleven patients who survived ARDS for one year, chest radiography and HRCT revealed pulmonary fibrosis in four. Causes of ARDS included pneumonia during pregnancy, near drowning, pneumonia during liver cirrhosis, and postoperative sepsis. Thoracoscopic biopsy and histopathologic correlation were available in one patient. HRCT showed diffuse interlobular septal thickening, ground glass opacity, parenchymal distortion, and traction bronchiectasis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules were seen in two patients and one patient had multiple, large bullae in the left hemithorax. In all patients, lesions affected the upper and anterior zones of the lung more prominently. The distribution of pulmonary fibrosis was characteristic and reflected the pathogenesis of lung injury; fibrosis was largely due to hyperoxia caused by ventilator care. In one patient, histopathologic correlation showed that imaging findings were accounted for by thickening of the alveolar septum along with infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells and fibrosis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules corresponded with bronchiolitis.

  8. Current status of severe acute respiratory syndrome in China

    Qing-He Nie; Xin-Dong Luo; Jian-Zhong Zhang; Qin Su

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), also called infectious atypical pneumonia, is an emerging infectious disease caused by a novel variant of coronavirus (SARS associated coronavirus, SARS-CoV). It is mainly characterized by pulmonary infection with a high infectivity and fatality.SARS is swept across almost all the continents of the globe, and has currently involved 33 countries and regions, including the mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, North America and Europe. On June 30, 2003, an acumulative total reached 8450 cases with 810 deaths. SARS epidemic was very rampant in March, April and May 2003 in the mainland of China and Hong Kong. Chinese scientists and healthcare workers cooperated closely with other scientists from all over the world to fight the disease. On April 16, 2003, World Health Organization (WHO) formally declared that SARSCoV was an etiological agent of SARS. Currently, there is no specific and effective therapy and prevention method for SARS. The main treatments include corticosteroid therapy,antiviralagents, anti-infection, mechanical ventilation and isolation. This disease can be prevented and controlled, and it is also curable. Under the endeavor of the Chinese Government, medical staffs and other related professionals,SARS has been under control in China, and Chinese scientists have also made a great contribution to SARS research.Otherstudies in developing new detection assays and therapies, and discovering new drugs and vaccines are in progress. In this paper, we briefly review the current status of SARS in China.

  9. Pulmonary hypertension due to acute respiratory distress syndrome

    S.A. Ñamendys-Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Our aims were to describe the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, to characterize their hemodynamic cardiopulmonary profiles, and to correlate these parameters with outcome. All consecutive patients over 16 years of age who were in the intensive care unit with a diagnosis of ARDS and an in situ pulmonary artery catheter for hemodynamic monitoring were studied. Pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed when the mean pulmonary artery pressure was >25 mmHg at rest with a pulmonary artery occlusion pressure or left atrial pressure <15 mmHg. During the study period, 30 of 402 critically ill patients (7.46% who were admitted to the ICU fulfilled the criteria for ARDS. Of the 30 patients with ARDS, 14 met the criteria for pulmonary hypertension, a prevalence of 46.6% (95% CI; 28-66%. The most common cause of ARDS was pneumonia (56.3%. The overall mortality was 36.6% and was similar in patients with and without pulmonary hypertension. Differences in patients' hemodynamic profiles were influenced by the presence of pulmonary hypertension. The levels of positive end-expiratory pressure and peak pressure were higher in patients with pulmonary hypertension, and the PaCO2 was higher in those who died. The level of airway pressure seemed to influence the onset of pulmonary hypertension. Survival was determined by the severity of organ failure at admission to the intensive care unit.

  10. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: vaccine on the way

    ZHANG Ding-mei; WANG Guo-ling; LU Jia-hai

    2005-01-01

    @@ In November 2002, a new disease-severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS-first emerged in Guangdong Province, China. Subsequently, it spread to more than 30 countries worldwide.1 The causative agent was identified to be a previously unknown member of the coronaviridae family, and was named SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). SARS coronavirus is a large, enveloped, positive-sense RNA virus. The genome is about 30 kb, which is predicted to contain 14 functional open reading frames (ORFs). Two large 5'-terminal ORFs (1a and 1b) encode the polymerases that are required for viral RNA synthesis. The remaining twelve ORFs encode four structural proteins [spike protein (S), envelope protein (E), membrane protein (M) and nucleocapsid protein (N)] and eight accessory proteins.2 Though the SARS-CoV genome is clear, a great deal more work will be required to develop an efficient vaccine and effective drugs. Neutralizing antibodies were detectable in the convalescent sera of SARS patients, and sera from recovered patients could be used to treat newly infected individuals.3 The data suggest that protective humoral immunity is achievable and that vaccines can be developed for prevention of SARS. In this article, we review and discuss progress towards development of a SARS vaccine.

  11. Fluid in the management of the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Karki S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is the hallmark of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. The amount of fluid and which fluid should be used in these patients is controversial. Methods 43 patients with ARDS treated in the intensive care unit (ICU of the Second Hospital, Jilin University between November 1, 2011-November 1, 2012 were prospectively analyzed and was observational. Volume and the type of fluid administered were compared to 90 day mortality and the 24 and 72 hour sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score, lactate level, oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2, duration of ICU stay, total ventilator days, and need for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT. Results Mortality was increased when hydroxylethyl starch (HES was used in the first day or plasma substitutes were used during the first 3 days (P3000 ml during the first 24 hours or >8000 ml during the first 72 hours were associated with higher SOFA scores at 24 and 72 hours (P<0.05, both comparisons. Colloid, especially higher volume colloid use was also associated with increased SOFA scores at either 24 or 72 hours. Conclusions Limiting the use of colloids and the total amount of fluid administered to patients with ARDS is associated with improved mortality and SOFA scores.

  12. Lung tissue remodeling in the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Souza Alba Barros de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage, and evolves progressively with three phases: exsudative, fibroproliferative, and fibrotic. In the exudative phase, there are interstitial and alveolar edemas with hyaline membrane. The fibropro­liferative phase is characterized by exudate organization and fibroelastogenesis. There is proliferation of type II pneumocytes to cover the damaged epithelial surface, followed by differentiation into type I pneumocytes. The fibroproliferative phase starts early, and its severity is related to the patient?s prognosis. The alterations observed in the phenotype of the pulmonary parenchyma cells steer the tissue remodeling towards either progressive fibrosis or the restoration of normal alveolar architecture. The fibrotic phase is characterized by abnormal and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, mainly collagen. The dynamic control of collagen deposition and degradation is regulated by metalloproteinases and their tissular regulators. The deposition of proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix of ARDS patients needs better study. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling, in normal conditions or in several pulmonary diseases, such as ARDS, results from a complex mechanism that integrate the transcription of elements that destroy the matrix protein and produce activation/inhibition of several cellular types of lung tissue. This review article will analyze the ECM organization in ARDS, the different pulmonary parenchyma remodeling mechanisms, and the role of cytokines in the regulation of the different matrix components during the remodeling process.

  13. The possibility of evaluation on inflammatory change at respiratory tract in chronic bronchial asthma using 67Ga scintigraphy

    67Ga scintigraphy was performed in 17 patients with chronic bronchial asthma to grasp the inflammatory change of respiratory tract. On 67Ga scintigraphy, abnormal accumulations were detected on lung fields in 6 cases (35.3%) of 17 cases. In 5 cases of these 6 cases, the defect areas which were pointed out on 81mKr ventilation scintigraphy were matched to the abnormal accumulation areas which were pointed out on 67Ga scintigraphy. In dynamics, the abnormal accumulation areas which were pointed out on 67Ga scintigraphy were matched to the defect areas which had been at all times pointed out on 81mKr ventilation scintigraphy. 67Ga scintigraphy was expected to be one of index to grasp the inflammatory change of respiratory tract in patients with chronic bronchial asthma. (author)

  14. Quality indicators for diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections in general practice: a modified Delphi study

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Bjerrum, Lars; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente;

    2010-01-01

    , clinical microbiologists, and clinical pharmacologists were asked to rate the relevance of 59 quality indicators for diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections with regard to reducing antimicrobial resistance and improving patient health. A thorough literature review was carried out to ensure......OBJECTIVE: To develop a set of quality indicators focusing on the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections in general practice. DESIGN: A modified 2-round Delphi study. SETTING: General practice. SUBJECTS: A panel of 27 experts (13 countries) comprising mainly general practitioners...... that all potential quality indicators were considered. OUTCOME: Consensus for a quality indicator was reached if > or =75% of experts scored the item > or =5 on a 7-point Likert scale, ranging from 1 (=completely disagree) through 4 (=uncertain) to 7 (=completely agree). RESULTS: A 96% response rate...

  15. Focus assessed transthoracic echocardiography (FATE) in patients acutely admitted with respiratory symptoms

    Laursen, Christian Borbjerg; Jakobsen, Carl-Johan; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg;

    2012-01-01

    appraisal in patients acutely admitted with respiratory symptoms. Method: We conducted a prospective crosssectional, blinded observational study in a medical emergency department. Patients were included if one of the following symptoms or clinical findings was present: respiratory rate >20, saturation ... the diagnostic performance of the clinical examination in patients with acute respiratory symptoms [3]. Thus FATE could be integrated as a part of the patient assessment, potentially improving diagnostics. We evaluated the use of a sonographic examination, including FATE, performed within one hour of the primary....... Discussion: FATE is a fast, highly feasible and non-invasive bedside method. In acute admissions with respiratory symptoms, routine use of FATE may help the clinician to diagnose acute life threatening conditions, which could otherwise be missed. As use of the FATE protocol seems to improve the diagnostic...

  16. Mortality and morbidity of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome in infants and young children

    ZHU Yan-feng; YU Wen-liang; XIE Min-hui; YAN Chao-ying; LU Zhu-jin; SUN Bo; XU Feng; LU Xiu-lan; WANG Ying; CHEN Jian-li; CHAO Jian-xin; ZHOU Xiao-wen; ZHANG Jian-hui; HUANG Yan-zhi

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) often develops acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS),and its incidence and mortalities in critically ill pediatric patients in China were 2% and 40% respectively.This study aimed at prospectively investigating incidence,causes,mortality and its risk factors,and any relationship to initial tidal volume (VT) levels of mechanical ventilation,in children ≤5 years of age with AHRF and ARDS.Methods In 12 consecutive months in 23 pediatric intensive care units (PICU),AHRF and ARDS were identified in those requiring >12 hour intratracheal mechanical ventilation and followed up for 90 days or until death or discharge.ARDS was diagnosed according to the American-European Consensus definitions.The mortality and ventilation free days (VFD) were measured as the primary outcome,and major complications,initial disease severity,and burden were measured as the secondary outcome.Results In 13 491 PICU admissions,there were 439 AHRE,of which 345 (78.6%) developed ARDS,resulting in incidences of 3.3% and 2.6%,and corresponding mortalities of 30.3% and 32.8% respectively along with 8.2 and 6.7 times of relative risk of death in those with pneumonia (62.9%) and sepsis (33.7%) as major underlying diseases respectively.No association was found in VT levels during the first 7 days with mortality,nor for VT at levels <6,6-8,8-10,and >10 ml/kg in the first 3 days with mortality or length of VFD.By binary Logistic regression analyses,higher pediatric risk of mortality score Ⅲ,higher initial oxygenation index,and age <1 year were associated with higher mortality or shorter VFD in AHRF.Conclusions The incidence and mortalities of AHRF and ARDS in children ≤5 years were similar to or lower than the previously reported rates (in age up to 15 years),associated with initial disease severity and other confounders,but causal relationship for the initial VT levels as the independent factor to the major outcome

  17. Modeling the deposition of bioaerosols with variable size and shape in the human respiratory tract – A review

    Sturm, R.

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of bioaerosol particles with various size and shape in the human respiratory tract was simulated by using a probabilistic model of the lung and an almost realistic mathematical approach to particle deposition. Results obtained from the theoretical computations clearly show that biogenic particle deposition in different lung compartments does not only depend on physical particle properties, but also on breathing mode (nose or mouth breathing) and inhalative flow rate (=tidal volum...

  18. Effect of Carbon Dioxide on Testing of Susceptibilities of Respiratory Tract Pathogens to Macrolide and Azalide Antimicrobial Agents

    Johnson, M M; Hill, S. L.; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    1999-01-01

    The in vitro activities of erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin against 178 clinical isolates from the lower respiratory tract of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were determined by an agar dilution method. The plates were incubated in air alone or in 5% carbon dioxide. The MICs measured in air alone were lower for most isolates than those measured in 5% carbon dioxide, illustrating the “pH effect” of incubation in carbon dioxide. Testing of isolates in 5% carbon ...

  19. Detection of antibodies to a pathogenic mycoplasma in desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) with upper respiratory tract disease.

    Schumacher, I M; Brown, M B; Jacobson, E R; Collins, B R; Klein, P A

    1993-01-01

    Mycoplasma agassizii (proposed species novum) is the etiologic agent of an upper respiratory tract disease in the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), which is threatened in most of its range. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of M. agassizii-specific antibodies in desert tortoises was developed with a monoclonal antibody with specificity for desert tortoise immunoglobulin light chain. Plasma samples from one group of tortoises were tested immediately before and ...

  20. Inhibitory substances produced by Streptococcus salivarius and colonization of the upper respiratory tract with group A streptococci.

    Huskins, W. C.; Kaplan, E. L.

    1989-01-01

    It has been proposed that inhibitory substances produced by viridans streptococci colonizing the upper respiratory tract aid in eradication of established group A streptococcal colonization of that site. We studied the prevalence of inhibitory-substance producing strains of Streptococcus salivarius in throat cultures from three groups of children: 16 children with persistently positive throat cultures for group A streptococci despite receiving recommended therapeutic courses of antibiotics (group I), 26 children from whom group A streptococci were eradicated from the upper respiratory tract by antibiotic therapy (group II), and 18 children who never harboured group A streptococci in their upper respiratory tract during the study period (group III). An in vitro deferred antagonism method was employed to detect inhibitory substances; 5233 strains of S. salivarius were examined. Strains of S. salivarius producing inhibitory substances were isolated from 76-88% of the children in each group on at least one occasion. However, only a small percentage of subjects in each group harboured strains producing these substances in every throat culture. The mean total percentage of S. salivarius strains producing inhibitory substances was 21.8% in children in group I, 22.4% in children in group II, and 16.4% in children in group III; these percentages were not statistically different (P greater than 0.1). In this study, we could not confirm a significant role for inhibitory substances produced by S. salivarius in the eradication of group A streptococci from the upper respiratory tract of colonized individuals. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2500355

  1. Metagenomic Analysis of Respiratory Tract DNA Viral Communities in Cystic Fibrosis and Non-Cystic Fibrosis Individuals

    Willner, Dana; Furlan, Mike; Haynes, Matthew; Schmieder, Robert; Angly, Florent E.; Silva, Joas; Tammadoni, Sassan; Nosrat, Bahador; Conrad, Douglas; Rohwer, Forest

    2009-01-01

    The human respiratory tract is constantly exposed to a wide variety of viruses, microbes and inorganic particulates from environmental air, water and food. Physical characteristics of inhaled particles and airway mucosal immunity determine which viruses and microbes will persist in the airways. Here we present the first metagenomic study of DNA viral communities in the airways of diseased and non-diseased individuals. We obtained sequences from sputum DNA viral communities in 5 individuals wi...

  2. Probiotics and vitamin C for the prevention of respiratory tract infections in children attending preschool: a randomised controlled pilot study

    Garaiova, I.; Muchová, J; Nagyová, Z; Wang, D; Li, J. V.; Országhová, Z; Michael, D R; Plummer, S F; Ďuračková, Z

    2014-01-01

    Background: This pilot study investigates the efficacy of a probiotic consortium (Lab4) in combination with vitamin C on the prevention of respiratory tract infections in children attending preschool facilities. Subjects/methods: In a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled pilot study with children aged 3–6 years, 57 received 1.25 × 1010 colony-forming units of Lactobacillus acidophilus CUL21 (NCIMB 30156), Lactobacillus acidophilus CUL60 (NCIMB 30157), Bifidobacterium bifidum CUL20 (NC...

  3. Correlates of lower respiratory tract infections and nutritional state in children with severe generalized cerebral palsy and intellectual disability

    Calis, Elsbeth

    2011-01-01

    textabstractChildren with severe generalized cerebral palsy and intellectual disability represent a small part of the general Dutch population. Their share in healthcare, however, is disproportionally large. Due to their disabilities they are particularly susceptible to various medical problems, which cause much distress, and may even shorten their life expectancy. Many children do not reach adulthood, the main cause of death in this population being lower respiratory tract infections. The pr...

  4. Association between respiratory tract diseases and secondhand smoke exposure among never smoking flight attendants: a cross-sectional survey

    Murawski Judith

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about long-term adverse health consequences experienced by flight attendants exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS during the time smoking was allowed on airplanes. We undertook this study to evaluate the association between accumulated flight time in smoky airplane cabins and respiratory tract diseases in a cohort of never smoking flight attendants. Methods We conducted a mailed survey in a cohort of flight attendants. Of 15,000 mailed questionnaires, 2053 (14% were completed and returned. We excluded respondents with a personal history of smoking (n = 748 and non smokers with a history of respiratory tract diseases before the age of 18 years (n = 298. The remaining 1007 respondents form the study sample. Results The overall study sample was predominantly white (86% and female (89%, with a mean age of 54 years. Overall, 69.7% of the respondents were diagnosed with at least one respiratory tract disease. Among these respondents, 43.4% reported a diagnosis of sinusitis, 40.3% allergies, 30.8% bronchitis, 23.2% middle ear infections, 13.6% asthma, 13.4% hay fever, 12.5% pneumonia, and 2.0% chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. More hours in a smoky cabin were observed to be significantly associated with sinusitis (OR = 1.21; p = 0.024, middle ear infections (OR = 1.30; p = 0.006, and asthma (OR = 1.26; p = 0.042. Conclusion We observed a significant association between hours of smoky cabin exposure and self-reported reported sinusitis, middle ear infections, and asthma. Our findings suggest a dose-response between duration of SHS exposure and diseases of the respiratory tract. Our findings add additional evidence to the growing body of knowledge supporting the need for widespread implementation of clean indoor air policies to decrease the risk of adverse health consequences experienced by never smokers exposed to SHS.

  5. PspA Family Distribution, Antimicrobial Resistance and Serotype of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolated from Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Japan

    Muneki Hotomi; Akihisa Togawa; Masamitsu Kono; Yorihiko Ikeda; Shin Takei; Hollingshead, Susan K.; Briles, David E.; Kenji Suzuki; Noboru Yamanaka

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The protection against pneumococcal infections provided by currently available pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are restricted to the limited number of the serotypes included in the vaccine. In the present study, we evaluated the distribution of the pneumococcal capsular type and surface protein A (PspA) family of pneumococcal isolates from upper respiratory tract infections in Japan. METHODS: A total of 251 S. pneumoniae isolates from patients seeking treatment for ...

  6. Extracellular DNA Is Essential for Maintaining Bordetella Biofilm Integrity on Abiotic Surfaces and in the Upper Respiratory Tract of Mice

    Conover, Matt S.; Mishra, Meenu; Deora, Rajendar

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria form complex and highly elaborate surface adherent communities known as biofilms which are held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. We have previously shown that by adopting a biofilm mode of existence in vivo, the Gram negative bacterial pathogens Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella pertussis are able to efficiently colonize and persist in the mammalian respiratory tract. In general, the bacterial biofilm matrix includes polysaccharides, proteins and extracellular...

  7. Evaluation of physiological parameters before and after respiratory physiotherapy in newborns with acute viral bronchiolitis

    S Gonçalves, Rodrigo A; Feitosa, Sérgio; de Castro Selestrin, Cláudia; Vitor E. Valenti; de Sousa, Fernando H; F Siqueira, Arnaldo A; Petenusso, Márcio; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute viral bronchiolitis is a respiratory disease with high morbidity that affects newborn in the first two years of life. Its treatment with physiotherapy has been highlighted as an important tool, however, there is no consensus regarding its effects on patients improvement. We aimed to evaluate the physiological parameters before and after the procedure respiratory therapy in newborn with acute viral bronchiolitis. Method This was a cross sectional observational study in 30 newb...

  8. Acute Respiratory Failure due to Neuromyelitis Optica Treated Successfully with Plasmapheresis

    Massa Zantah; Coyle, Timothy B.; Debapriya Datta

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) is a demyelinating autoimmune disease involving the central nervous system. Acute respiratory failure from cervical myelitis due to NMO is known to occur but is uncommon in monophasic disease and is treated with high dose steroids. We report a case of a patient with NMO who developed acute respiratory failure related to cervical spinal cord involvement, refractory to pulse dose steroid therapy, which resolved with plasmapheresis.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells - a promising therapy for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Hayes M; Curley G; Laffey JG.

    2012-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) constitutes a spectrum of severe acute respiratory failure in response to a variety of inciting stimuli that is the leading cause of death and disability in the critically ill. Despite decades of research, there are no therapies for ARDS, and management remains supportive. A growing understanding of the complexity of the pathophysiology of ARDS, coupled with advances in stem cell biology, has lead to a renewed interest in the therapeutic potential of...

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress following Intravenous Injection of an Oil-Steroid Solution

    Michael Russell; Aric Storck; Martha Ainslie

    2011-01-01

    Several case reports have described acute lung injury and respiratory distress following the intravascular injection of oil. Although biochemical and mechanical theories explaining the pathological mechanism of pulmonary oil embolism have been proposed, the phenomenon is not completely understood. This report describes a case of acute respiratory distress and hypoxemia involving a 21-year-old bodybuilder who self-administered an injection of anabolic steroids suspended in oil. The ensuing bri...

  11. Altered molecular specificity of surfactant phosphatidycholine synthesis in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Dushianthan, Ahilanandan; Goss, Victoria; Cusack, Rebecca; Grocott, Michael P. W.; Postle, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening critical illness, characterised by qualitative and quantitative surfactant compositional changes associated with premature airway collapse, gas-exchange abnormalities and acute hypoxic respiratory failure. The underlying mechanisms for this dysregulation in surfactant metabolisms are not fully explored. Lack of therapeutic benefits from clinical trials, highlight the importance of detailed in-vivo analysis and charact...

  12. Intravenous colistin-induced acute respiratory failure: A case report and a review of literature.

    Shrestha, Amardeep; Soriano, Sheryll Mae; Song, Mingchen; Chihara, Shingo

    2014-07-01

    The emergence of multi-drug-resistant gram negative bacillary infections has regained popularity of ancient drugs such as polymyxins. We report a case of acute respiratory failure induced by use of intravenous colistimethate, which is one of the forms of polymyxin. The patient is a 31 year old female with paraplegia due to spina bifida who underwent excisional debridement of large lumbosacral decubitus ulcer with osteomyelitis infected with pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA. Six days after initiation of intravenous colistimethate and vancomycin, she developed acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Pan-culture was negative including a chest radiograph. V/Q scan showed low probability for pulmonary embolism. Echocardiogram showed normal right ventricle with no strain or pulmonary hypertension. Colistimethate was discontinued. Within 24 hours, she was extubated. In the early years after introduction of polymyxin, there were several reports of acute respiratory paralysis. The mechanism is thought to be noncompetitive myoneuronal presynaptic blockade of acetylcholine release. Though a direct causal relationship for respiratory failure is often difficult to establish in current era with multiple co morbidities, the timeframe of apnea, acuity of onset as well as rapid recovery in our case clearly point out the causal relationship. In addition, our patient also developed acute renal failure, presumably due to colistimethate induced nephrotoxicity, a possible contributing factor for her acute respiratory failure. In summary, colistimethate can induce acute neurotoxicity including respiratory muscular weakness and acute respiratory failure. Clinicians should consider its toxicity in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure especially in critically ill patients. PMID:25337492

  13. Acute Respiratory Failure due to Neuromyelitis Optica Treated Successfully with Plasmapheresis

    Massa Zantah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO is a demyelinating autoimmune disease involving the central nervous system. Acute respiratory failure from cervical myelitis due to NMO is known to occur but is uncommon in monophasic disease and is treated with high dose steroids. We report a case of a patient with NMO who developed acute respiratory failure related to cervical spinal cord involvement, refractory to pulse dose steroid therapy, which resolved with plasmapheresis.

  14. January 2015 Phoenix pulmonary journal club: noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    Mathew M

    2015-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation has expanded its role in the treatment of both chronic and acute respiratory failure. Its initial use in conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea, neuromuscular disease and tracheobronchomalacia, have been shown to improve quality of life and reduce mortality. Over the past 20 years studies have looked at using noninvasive ventilation in the management of acute respiratory failure from pulmon...

  15. Acute Stridor and Respiratory Failure due to Retrosternal Subglottic Stenosis of Unknown Origin

    Linda Smith; Nicola Jane Willis; Tharindu Vithanage; Gerben Keijzers; Tara Cochrane

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory failure due to subglottic stenosis is a rare but serious condition. A 22-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED) with shortness of breath, stridor, and change in tone of voice. The patient did not complain of B-symptoms (fever, weight loss, and night sweats). In the week before this presentation, he was diagnosed with an upper respiratory tract infection with associated bronchospasm and discharged on oral antibiotics and inhaled salbutamol without effect. He devel...

  16. A chest radiograph scoring system in patients with severe acute respiratory infection: a validation study

    Taylor, Emma; Haven, Kathryn; Reed, Peter; Bissielo, Ange; Harvey, Dave; McArthur, Colin; Bringans, Cameron; Freundlich, Simone; Ingram, R. Joan H.; Perry, David; Wilson, Francessa; Milne, David; Modahl, Lucy; Huang, Q. Sue; Gross, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Background The term severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) encompasses a heterogeneous group of respiratory illnesses. Grading the severity of SARI is currently reliant on indirect disease severity measures such as respiratory and heart rate, and the need for oxygen or intensive care. With the lungs being the primary organ system involved in SARI, chest radiographs (CXRs) are potentially useful for describing disease severity. Our objective was to develop and validate a SARI CXR severity s...

  17. Radon and daughters in cigarette smoke measured with SSNTD and corresponding committed equivalent dose to respiratory tract

    Uranium (238U) and Thorium (232Th) contents were measured inside various tobacco samples by using a method based on determining detection efficiencies of the CR-39 and LR-115 II solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) for the emitted alpha particles. Alpha and beta activities per unit volume, due to radon (222Rn), thoron (220Rn) and their decay products, were evaluated inside cigarette smokes of tobacco samples studied. Annual committed equivalent doses due to short-lived radon decay products from the inhalation of various cigarette smokes were determined in the thoracic and extrathoracic regions of the respiratory tract. Three types of cigarettes made in Morocco of black tobacco show higher annual committed equivalent doses in the extrathoracic and thoracic regions of the respiratory tract than the other studied cigarettes (except one type of cigarettes made in France of yellow tobacco); their corresponding annual committed equivalent dose ratios are larger than 1.8. Measured annual committed equivalent doses ranged from 1.8x10-9 to 1.10x10-3 Sv yr-1 in the extrathoracic region and from 1.3x10-10 to 7.6x10-6 Sv yr-1 in the thoracic region of the respiratory tract for a smoker consuming 20 cigarettes a day

  18. Seasonal behavior of radon decay products in indoor air and resulting radiation dose to human respiratory tract

    A.M.A. Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of radiation hazard of indoor radon is largely due to the radon progenies, which are inhaled and deposited in the human respiratory tract. It is essential to evaluate aerodynamic characteristics of the radon progenies, which are either attached or unattached to aerosol particles, because the dose is strongly dependent on the location of deposition in respiratory tract and hence on the aerodynamic characteristics of the aerosol particles. This paper presents the seasonal behavior of radon decay products in indoor air under domestic conditions at Nagoya University, Japan. A low pressure cascade impactor as an instrument for classifying aerosol sizes and imaging plate as a radiation detector have been employed to characterize the activity size distribution of short-lived radon decay products. In parallel, radon and its progenies concentrations were measured. Taking into account the progeny characteristics, the inhalation dose in the different seasons was also estimated based on a lung dose model with the structure that is related to the ICRP66 respiratory tract model. The result evident that, the highest dose 0.22 mSvy−1 was observed during the winter where the highest value of equilibrium equivalent concentration of radon (EEC and lowest value of the activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD were found in this season; whereas, the dose in spring appeared to be lowest 0.02 mSvy−1.

  19. Clinical reactions of upper respiratory tract and their coupering by pulsed laser radiation under conditions of the Chernobyl' NPP effect elimination

    The unified chart for complex medical surveillance of head and neck organs in the case of professional contacts with radioactive aerosols is developed 484 persons are examined using the technique discussed. 3% of persons being surveyed have increased sensitivity of respiratory tract organs under unfavourable factor effects, or they have not such sensitivity at all. The character of changes in upper respiratory tract correlates with peculiarities of sanitary-hygeinic working conditions. High-intensity laser radiation is applied for coupering the upper respiratory tract reaction. Practical recovery or considerable progress are observed for 80% of the treated patients in the mean. High efficiency of the laser therapy technique in coupering and preventive treatment of upper respiratory tract reaction for persons being engaged in the Chernobyl' NPP zone

  20. Bacterial Respiratory Tract Infections are Promoted by Systemic Hyperglycemia after Severe Burn Injury in Pediatric Patients

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Mlcak, Ronald P; Finnerty, Celeste C; Cox, Robert A; Williams, Felicia N; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Background Burn injuries are associated with hyperglycemia leading to increased incidence of infections with pneumonia being one of the most prominent and adverse complication. Recently, various studies in critically ill patients indicated that increased pulmonary glucose levels with airway/blood glucose threshold over 150 mg/dl lead to an overwhelming growth of bacteria in the broncho-pulmonary system, subsequently resulting in an increased risk of pulmonary infections. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a similar cutoff value exists for severely burned pediatric patients. Methods One-hundred six severely burned pediatric patients were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided in two groups: high (H) defined as daily average glucose levels >75% of LOS >150 mg/dl), and low (L) with daily average glucose levels >75% of the LOS <150 mg/dl). Incidences of pneumonia, atelectasis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were assessed. Incidence of infections, sepsis, and respiratory parameters were recorded. Blood was analyzed for glucose and insulin levels. Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s t-test and chi-square test. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results Patient groups were similar in demographics and injury characteristics. Pneumonia in patients on the mechanical ventilation (L: 21% H: 32%) and off mechanical ventilation (L: 5% H: 15%), as well as ARDS were significantly higher in the high group (L: 3% H: 19%), p<0.05, while atelectasis was not different. Patients in the high group required significantly longer ventilation compared to low patients (p<0.05). Furthermore, incidence of infection and sepsis were significantly higher in the high group, p<0.05. Conclusion Our results indicate that systemic glucose levels over 150 mg/dl are associated with a higher incidence of pneumonia confirming the previous studies in critically ill patients. PMID:24074819

  1. Simptomi in znaki s področja spodnjih dihal v ambulanti družinskega zdravnika: Lower respiratory tract symptoms in family practice:

    Kopčavar Guček, Nena; Mazej Poredoš, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Cough, dyspnea.chest pain, wheezing, hemoptysis, hemoptoe, abnormal breathing patterns and sputum are the main symptoms of lower respiratory tract disease, which can easily be recognized via a thorough examination of medical history in a family practice. The specificity of the symptoms varies greatly. While cough can indicate the involvement of several organs, wheezing is highly indicative of lower respiratory tract disease. This article discusses some of the lung symptoms and signs, their ch...

  2. Effect of vitamin D supplementation on prevention of upper respiratory tract infections : a systematic review of randomized controlled trials / y Guo Jing

    Guo, Jing; 郭婧

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevention of chronic diseases has always been a major focus in the medical field as a measure to improve public health. As a potential prevention to one of the most common chronic diseases, vitamin D was previously reported to show some signs of positive effect on the prevention of upper respiratory tract infections. Although trials were performed to demonstrate the association between the effectiveness of vitamin D and upper respiratory tract infections in the past few yea...

  3. Chemical exposure-response relationship between air pollutants and reactive oxygen species in the human respiratory tract.

    Lakey, Pascale S J; Berkemeier, Thomas; Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M; Lucas, Kurt; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution can cause oxidative stress and adverse health effects such as asthma and other respiratory diseases, but the underlying chemical processes are not well characterized. Here we present chemical exposure-response relations between ambient concentrations of air pollutants and the production rates and concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the human respiratory tract. In highly polluted environments, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) containing redox-active transition metals, quinones, and secondary organic aerosols can increase ROS concentrations in the ELF to levels characteristic for respiratory diseases. Ambient ozone readily saturates the ELF and can enhance oxidative stress by depleting antioxidants and surfactants. Chemical exposure-response relations provide a quantitative basis for assessing the relative importance of specific air pollutants in different regions of the world, showing that aerosol-induced epithelial ROS levels in polluted megacity air can be several orders of magnitude higher than in pristine rainforest air. PMID:27605301

  4. Chemical exposure-response relationship between air pollutants and reactive oxygen species in the human respiratory tract

    Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M.; Lucas, Kurt; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution can cause oxidative stress and adverse health effects such as asthma and other respiratory diseases, but the underlying chemical processes are not well characterized. Here we present chemical exposure-response relations between ambient concentrations of air pollutants and the production rates and concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the human respiratory tract. In highly polluted environments, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) containing redox-active transition metals, quinones, and secondary organic aerosols can increase ROS concentrations in the ELF to levels characteristic for respiratory diseases. Ambient ozone readily saturates the ELF and can enhance oxidative stress by depleting antioxidants and surfactants. Chemical exposure-response relations provide a quantitative basis for assessing the relative importance of specific air pollutants in different regions of the world, showing that aerosol-induced epithelial ROS levels in polluted megacity air can be several orders of magnitude higher than in pristine rainforest air. PMID:27605301

  5. Surveillance of acute community acquired urinary tract bacterial infections

    Sibanarayan Rath; Rabindra N. Padhy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To record the antibiotic resistance of community acquired uropathogens over a period of 24 months (May 2011-April 2012). Methods: Urine samples from patients of outpatient department (OPD) were used for isolating urinary tract infection (UTI)-causing bacteria that were cultured on suitable selective media and identified by biochemical tests. Their antibiograms were ascertained by Kirby-Bauer’s disc diffusion method, using 17 antibiotics of 5 different classes. Results: From 2137 urine samples 1332 strains of pathogenic bacteria belonging to 11 species were isolated. Two Gram-positives, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis and nine Gram-negatives, Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter sp., Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated. Both S. aureus and E. faecalis were vancomycin resistant, and resistant-strains of all pathogens increased in each 6-month period of study. Particularly, all Gram-negatives were resistant to nitrofurantoin and co-trimoxazole, the most preferred antibiotics of empiric therapy for UTI, but were moderately resistant to gentamicin, ampicillin, amoxyclav, ofloxacin and gatifloxacin. Most Gram-negatives produced extended spectrum β-lactamase. Conclusions: It was concluded that periodic surveillance of pathogens is an essential corollary in effective health management in any country, as empiric therapy is a common/essential practice in effective clinical management.

  6. Comparisons of calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles based on the NCRP/ITRI model and the new ICRP66 model

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Phalen, R.F. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Chang, I. [Lovelace Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) in the United States and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been independently reviewing and revising respiratory tract dosimetry models for inhaled radioactive aerosols. The newly proposed NCRP respiratory tract dosimetry model represents a significant change in philosophy from the old ICRP Task Group model. The proposed NCRP model describes respiratory tract deposition, clearance, and dosimetry for radioactive substances inhaled by workers and the general public and is expected to be published soon. In support of the NCRP proposed model, ITRI staff members have been developing computer software. Although this software is still incomplete, the deposition portion has been completed and can be used to calculate inhaled particle deposition within the respiratory tract for particle sizes as small as radon and radon progeny ({approximately} 1 nm) to particles larger than 100 {mu}m. Recently, ICRP published their new dosimetric model for the respiratory tract, ICRP66. Based on ICRP66, the National Radiological Protection Board of the UK developed PC-based software, LUDEP, for calculating particle deposition and internal doses. The purpose of this report is to compare the calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles using the NCRP/ITRI model and the ICRP66 model, under the same particle size distribution and breathing conditions. In summary, the general trends of the deposition curves for the two models were similar.

  7. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus persistence in Vero cells

    Gustavo Palacios; Omar Jabado; Neil Renwick; Thomas Briese; W. Ian Lipkin

    2005-01-01

    Background Several coronaviruses establish persistent infections in vitro and in vivo, however it is unknown whether persistence is a feature of the severe acute respiratory syndorme coronavirus (SARS-CoV) life cycle. This study was conducted to investigate viral persistence.Methods We inoculated confluent monolayers of Vero cells with SARS-CoV at a multiplicity of infection of 0.1 TCID50 and passaged the remaining cells every 4 to 8 days for a total of 11 passages. Virus was titrated at each passage by limited dilution assay and nucleocapsid antigen was detected by Western blot and immunofluoresence assays. The presence of viral particles in passage 11 cells was assessed by electron microscopy. Changes in viral genomic sequences during persistent infection were examined by DNA sequencing. Results Cytopathic effect was extensive after initial inoculation but diminished with serial passages. Infectious virus was detected after each passage and viral growth curves were identical for parental virus stock and virus obtained from passage 11 cells. Nucleocapsid antigen was detected in the majority of cells after initial inoculation but in only 10%-40% of cells at passages 2-11. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of viral particles in passage 11 cells. Sequence analysis at passage 11 revealed fixed mutations in the spike (S) gene and ORFs 7a-8b but not in the nucleocapsid (N) gene. Conclusions SARS-CoV can establish a persistent infection in vitro. The mechanism for viral persistence is consistent with the formation of a carrier culture whereby a limited number of cells are infected with each round of virus replication and release. Persistence is associated with selected mutations in the SARS-CoV genome. This model may provide insight into SARS-related lung pathology and mechanisms by which humans and animals can serve as reservoirs for infection.

  8. The severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic in mainland China dissected

    Wuchun Cao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of a recently published series of studies that give a detailed and comprehensive documentation of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS epidemic in mainland China, which severely struck the country in the spring of 2003. The epidemic spanned a large geographical extent but clustered in two areas: first in Guangdong Province, and about 3 months later in Beijing with its surrounding areas. Reanalysis of all available epidemiological data resulted in a total of 5327 probable cases of SARS, of whom 343 died. The resulting case fatality ratio (CFR of 6.4% was less than half of that in other SARS-affected countries or areas, and this difference could only partly be explained by younger age of patients and higher number of community acquired infections. Analysis of the impact of interventions demonstrated that strong political commitment and a centrally coordinated response was the most important factor to control SARS in mainland China, whereas the most stringent control measures were all initiated when the epidemic was already dying down. The long-term economic consequence of the epidemic was limited, much consumption was merely postponed, but for Beijing irrecoverable losses to the tourist sector were considerable. An important finding from a cohort study was that many former SARS patients currently suffer from avascular osteo­necrosis, as a consequence of the treatment with corticosteroids during their infection. The SARS epidemic provided valuable information and lessons relevant in controlling outbreaks of newly emerging infectious diseases, and has led to fundamental reforms of the Chinese health system. In particular, a comprehensive nation-wide internet-based disease reporting system was established.

  9. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Outcomes after Near-hanging

    Mansoor, Sahar; Afshar, Majid; Barrett, Matthew; Smith, Gordon S.; Barr, Erik A.; Lissauer, Matthew E.; McCurdy, Michael T.; Murthi, Sarah B.; Netzer, Giora

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Assess the case rate of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) after near-hanging, and the secondary outcomes of traumatic and/or anoxic brain injury, and death. Risk factors for the outcomes were assessed. Method Single-center, state-wide retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients admitted between August, 2002, and September, 2011, with a primary diagnosis of non-judicial "hanging injury". Results Of 56 patients, 73% were male. The median age was 31 (IQR: 16–56). Upon arrival, 9% (5/56) did not have a pulse, and 23% (13/56) patients were intubated. The median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 13 (IQR: 3–15); 14% (8/56) had a GCS=3. ARDS developed in 9% (5/56) of patients. Traumatic anoxic brain injury resulted in 9% (5/56) of patients. The in-hospital case fatality was 5% (3/56). Lower median GCS [3 (IQR: 3–7) vs. 14 (IQR: 3–15), p=0.0003] and intubation in field or in trauma resuscitation unit [100% (5/5) vs. 16% (8/51), p=0.0003] were associated with ARDS development. Risk factors of death were GCS=3 [100% (3/3) vs. 9% (5/53), p=0.002]; pulselessness upon arrival of emergency medical services [100% (3/3) vs. 4% (2/53), p<0.001]; and abnormal neurologic imaging [50% (1/2) vs. zero, p=0.04]. Conclusions The ARDS case rate after near-hanging is similar to the general trauma population. Low GCS and intubation are associated with increased risk of ARDS development. The rate of traumatic and/or anoxic brain injury in this population is low. PMID:25596627

  10. Visualization and quantitative analysis of nanoparticles in the respiratory tract by transmission electron microscopy

    Gehr Peter

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nanotechnology in its widest sense seeks to exploit the special biophysical and chemical properties of materials at the nanoscale. While the potential technological, diagnostic or therapeutic applications are promising there is a growing body of evidence that the special technological features of nanoparticulate material are associated with biological effects formerly not attributed to the same materials at a larger particle scale. Therefore, studies that address the potential hazards of nanoparticles on biological systems including human health are required. Due to its large surface area the lung is one of the major sites of interaction with inhaled nanoparticles. One of the great challenges of studying particle-lung interactions is the microscopic visualization of nanoparticles within tissues or single cells both in vivo and in vitro. Once a certain type of nanoparticle can be identified unambiguously using microscopic methods it is desirable to quantify the particle distribution within a cell, an organ or the whole organism. Transmission electron microscopy provides an ideal tool to perform qualitative and quantitative analyses of particle-related structural changes of the respiratory tract, to reveal the localization of nanoparticles within tissues and cells and to investigate the 3D nature of nanoparticle-lung interactions. This article provides information on the applicability, advantages and disadvantages of electron microscopic preparation techniques and several advanced transmission electron microscopic methods including conventional, immuno and energy-filtered electron microscopy as well as electron tomography for the visualization of both model nanoparticles (e.g. polystyrene and technologically relevant nanoparticles (e.g. titanium dioxide. Furthermore, we highlight possibilities to combine light and electron microscopic techniques in a correlative approach. Finally, we demonstrate a formal quantitative, i.e. stereological

  11. Alternative Treatment Applications in Children with Respiratory Tract Infections in the West of Turkey

    Naci Topaloğlu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is known that the trend toward alternative treatments is increasing each day regardless of the differences between communities. We aimed to detect alternative treatments in our region and to determine the thoughts of families about these treatments. Materials and Methods: A total of 214 patients presenting to General Pediatrics Outpatient Clinics of Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Teaching and Research Hospital between October 2012 and February 2012 with fever, coughs, sore throat, wheezing and diagnosed as upper or lower respiratory tract infection and their parents are included in the study. Results: A total of 93.7% of parents were using non-drug applications with varying frequencies. Alternative practices are being used prior to drug treatment (62.7%, with drugs (28.7%, when there is no response to drugs (6.7% or never (1.9%. Most common used applications to reduce cough was to give pure honey (30.6% and the most common application to lower the fever was to use warm shower (48.1%. Most common source of information for these applications was relatives and family members. It was shown that the most requested resources to get information were doctors, nurses and other health care professionals with 84.5%. There was statistically significant correlation between educational status and frequency of usage of non-drug applications. However, requested source of information did not change according to the educational status. Conclusions: As a result we thought that doctors and nurses dealing with child health and disease should obtain information about alternative treatments and help the parents about logical managements. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2013; 11: 23-6

  12. Four country healthcare-associated infection prevalence survey: pneumonia and lower respiratory tract infections.

    Humphreys, H

    2010-03-01

    In 2006, the Hospital Infection Society was funded by the respective health services in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland to conduct a prevalence survey of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI). Here, we report the prevalence of pneumonia and lower respiratory tract infection other than pneumonia (LRTIOP) in these four countries. The prevalence of all HCAIs was 7.59% (5743 out of 75 694). Nine hundred (15.7%) of these infections were pneumonia, and 402 (7.0%) were LRTIOP. The prevalence of both infections was higher for males than for females, and increased threefold from those aged <35 to those aged >85 years (P<0.001). At the time of the survey or in the preceding seven days, 23.7% and 18.2% of patients with pneumonia and LRTIOP, respectively, were mechanically ventilated compared to 5.2% of patients in the whole study population. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was the cause of pneumonia and LRTIOP in 7.6% and 18.1% of patients, respectively (P<0.001). More patients with LRTIOP (4.2%) had concurrent diarrhoea due to Clostridium difficile compared to patients with pneumonia (2.4%), but this did not reach statistical significance. Other HCAIs were present in 137 (15.2%) of patients with pneumonia and 66 (16.4%) of those with LRTIOP. The results suggest that reducing instrumentation, such as mechanical ventilation where possible, should help reduce infection. The higher prevalence of MRSA as a cause of LRTIOP suggests a lack of specificity in identifying the microbial cause and the association with C. difficile emphasises the need for better use of antibiotics.

  13. Aspergillus infection of the respiratory tract after lung transplantation: chest radiographic and CT findings

    The objective of our study was to assess radiographic and CT findings in lung transplant patients with evidence of Aspergillus colonization or infection of the airways and correlate the findings with clinical, laboratory, bronchoalveolar lavage, biopsy and autopsy findings. The records of 189 patients who had undergone lung transplantation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of Aspergillus colonization or infection of the airways. Aspergillus was demonstrated by culture or microscopy of sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or histologically from lung biopsies or postmortem studies in 44 patients (23 %). Notes and radiographs were available for analysis in 30 patients. In 12 of the 30 patients (40 %) chest radiographs remained normal. In 11 of 18 patients with abnormal radiographs pulmonary abnormalities were attributed to invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in the absence of other causes for pulmonary abnormalities (8 patients) or because of histological demonstration of IPA (3 patients). In these 11 patients initial radiographic abnormalities were focal areas of patchy consolidation (8 patients), ill-defined pulmonary nodules (2 patients) or a combination of both (1 patient). In some of the lesions cavitation was demonstrated subsequently. At CT a ''halo'' of decreased density was demonstrated in some of the nodules and lesion morphology and location were shown more precisely. Demonstration of Aspergillus from the respiratory tract after lung transplantation does not necessarily reflect IPA but may represent colonization of the airways or semi-invasive aspergillosis. The findings in patients with IPA did not differ from those described in the literature in other immunocompromised patients, suggesting that surgical disruption of lymphatic drainage and nervous supply or effects of preservation and transport of the transplant lung do not affect the radiographic appearances. (orig.)

  14. Optimizing the management of community-acquired respiratory tract infections in the age of antimicrobial resistance.

    Doern, Gary V

    2006-10-01

    Community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTIs) are the most common reason for prescribing antibiotics in the primary care setting. However, over the last decade, the management of CARTIs has become increasingly complicated by the steady increase in prevalence of drug-resistant pathogens responsible for these infections. As a result, significant attention has been directed at understanding the mechanisms of pathogen acquisition of resistance, drivers of resistance and methods for preventing the development of resistance. Data from recent surveillance studies suggest a slowing or decline in resistance rates to agents, such as beta-lactams, macrolides, tetracyclines and folic acid metabolism inhibitors. However, resistance to one antimicrobial family--the fluoroquinolones--while still low, appears to be on the increase. This is of significant concern given the rapid increase in resistance noted with older antibiotics in recent history. While the clinical implications of antibacterial resistance are poorly understood, the overall rates of antimicrobial resistance, as reported in recent surveillance studies, do not correspond to current rates of failure in patients with CARTIs. This disconnection between laboratory-determined resistance and clinical outcome has been termed the in vitro-in vivo paradox and several explanations have been offered to explain this phenomenon. Solving the problem of antimicrobial resistance will be multifactorial. Important factors in this effort include the education of healthcare providers, patients and the general healthcare community regarding the hazards of inappropriate antibiotic use, prevention of infections through vaccination, development of accurate, inexpensive and timely point-of-care diagnostic tests to aid in patient assessment, institution of objective treatment guidelines and use of more potent agents, especially those with a focused spectrum of activity, earlier in the treatment of CARTIs as opposed to reserving

  15. Upper respiratory tract tumors in Cpb:WU (Wistar random) rats.

    Feron, V J; Woutersen, R A; van Garderen-Hoetmer, A; Dreef-van der Meulen, H C

    1990-01-01

    A survey is given of upper respiratory tract tumors in Cpb:WU (Wistar random) rats. Data were collected from ten 24- to 30-month toxicity/carcinogenicity studies and from one 12-month study. Nasal tumors may lead to dyspnea, mouth breathing, and nasal discharge. These clinical signs mainly occurred in rats bearing squamous cell carcinomas. The large nasal tumors were often osteolytic, they invaded the subcutis over the premaxilla, resulting in swellings on the back of the nose, and extended into the brain. The incidence of nasal tumors in untreated male controls was 1.1% (7/661), the tumors invariably being squamous cell carcinomas. There were no nasal tumors found in untreated female controls. The type of compound-induced nasal tumor most frequently observed was adenocarcinoma (of the olfactory epithelium) followed, in order of decreasing incidence, by squamous cell carcinoma, carcinoma in situ, polypoid adenoma, Schwannoma, and carcinosarcoma. It was proposed that adenocarcinomas of the olfactory epithelium should be classified as neuroepitheliomas. It was also suggested that squamous cell carcinomas, seen in association with necrotizing inflammation of an incisor tooth, should be considered as part of the malocclusion syndrome. No spontaneous tracheal tumors were observed, and only one out of 422 untreated female controls (0.2%) was seen to have a laryngeal tumor, an adenoma. Induced laryngeal tumors included carcinoma in situ, squamous cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma was the only type of treatment-related tracheal tumor found. The incidences of induced laryngeal and tracheal tumors were very low, and in no case were these tumors statistically significantly different from the respective incidences in controls. Images PLATE 1. PLATE 2. PLATE 3. PLATE 4. PLATE 5. PLATE 6. PLATE 7. PLATE 8. PLATE 9. PLATE 10. PLATE 11. PLATE 12. PLATE 13. PLATE 14. PLATE 15. PMID:2384064

  16. Rapid diagnostic method for the identification of Mycoplasma pneumoniae respiratory tract infection.

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Kato, Tadashi; Tanaka, Takaaki; Akaike, Hiroto; Teranishi, Hideto; Nakano, Takashi; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Okimoto, Niro

    2016-05-01

    Rapid diagnostic tests are useful tools in the early diagnosis of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) caused by a specific pathogens. We investigated the sensitivity and specificity of a rapid and simple antigen test for the detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Ribotest Mycoplasma(®) in adolescent and adult patients with RTIs. In addition, we evaluated the accuracy of clinical and laboratory findings for the early presumptive diagnosis of M. pneumoniae RTI. We compared 55 cases with laboratory-confirmed M. pneumoniae infection using serology, culture, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and 346 cases without laboratory-confirmed M. pneumoniae infection. Pneumonia cases were excluded in this study. Among patients with M. pneumoniae infection, the incidences of cough, sore throat, and sputum production were high, with rates of 98%, 61%, and 67%, respectively, but the specificity was low. The prevalence of nasal symptoms was significantly lower in patients with M. pneumoniae infection (9%) than in non-M. pneumoniae infection (70%; p < 0.0001). When PCR was used as the control test, the sensitivity, specificity, and overall agreement rates with Ribotest(®) were 71%, 89%, and 87%, respectively. Clinical symptoms and laboratory data were of limited value in making the diagnosis of M. pneumoniae RTI in adolescent and adult patients. Our results suggested that Ribotest(®) may be helpful in distinguishing M. pneumoniae RTI patients from those without the disease. Physicians should consider the use of Ribotest(®) when patients have a persistent cough without nasal symptoms. PMID:26993174

  17. Respiratory tract infection is the major cause of the ambulatory visits in children

    Lue KoHuang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As children represent the future, ensuring that they receive proper health care should be a primary concern of our societies. Epidemiological research underpins the importance of effective child health care strategies, and highlights the need for accurate data collection; such surveys are currently lacking in Taiwan. In our descriptive studies, we compared the differences of the ten most common diseases in the year 2000 and 2009 among Taiwanese children. Methods Data for a total of 174,651 and 142,200 visits under eighteen years old were collected from the National Health Insurance Research Database in year 2000 and 2009. A maximum of three outpatient diagnostic codes (the International Classification of Disease [ICD], ninth revision could be listed for every visit. Data were categorized according to the principal diagnoses, age and different specialties of physicians. Results Respiratory tract infection was the most common disease (58.21% to 44.77%. Teeth (4.90% to 5.16% and eye (2.52% to 3.15% problems were the also in the list of top ten diseases. In year 2009, the rate of allergic rhinitis was 2.87% in 7-18 years old group. Pediatricians were the first option for consultation, followed by ear, nose and throat specialists and family physicians. However, for the school age children group, the role of pediatricians with regards to children's health care showed a decrease in its importance. Conclusions The amount of information relevant to child health care is rapidly expanding. The ten most common diseases of the present analysis may serve as baseline data for future evaluations of the changes of type of diseases among children.

  18. Micromachined polymerase chain reaction system for multiple DNA amplification of upper respiratory tract infectious diseases.

    Liao, Chia-Sheng; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Chang, Chih-Ching; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Huang, Fu-Chun; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2005-01-15

    This paper presents a micro polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for the DNA-based diagnosis of microorganism genes and the detection of their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The micro PCR chip comprises cheap biocompatible soda-lime glass substrates with integrated thin-film platinum resistors as heating/sensing elements, and is fabricated using micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) techniques in a reliable batch-fabrication process. The heating and temperature sensing elements are made of the same material and are located inside the reaction chamber in order to ensure a uniform temperature distribution. This study performs the detection of several genes associated with upper respiratory tract infection microorganisms, i.e. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemopilus influenze, Staphylococcu aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Neisseria meningitides, together with their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The lower thermal inertia of the proposed micro PCR chip relative to conventional bench-top PCR systems enables a more rapid detection operation with reduced sample and reagent consumption. The experimental data reveal that the high heating and cooling rates of the system (20 and 10 degrees C/s, respectively) permit successful DNA amplification within 15 min. The micro PCR chip is also capable of performing multiple DNA amplification, i.e. the simultaneous duplication of multiple genes under different conditions in separate reaction wells. Compared with the large-scale PCR system, it is greatly advantageous for fast diagnosis of multiple infectious diseases. Multiplex PCR amplification of two DNA segments in the same well is also feasible using the proposed micro device. The developed micro PCR chip provides a crucial tool for genetic analysis, molecular biology, infectious disease detection, and many other biomedical applications. PMID:15590288

  19. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review.

    Fitzgerald, Marianne; Millar, Jonathan; Blackwood, Bronagh; Davies, Andrew; Brett, Stephen J; McAuley, Daniel F; McNamee, James J

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) continues to have significant mortality and morbidity. The only intervention proven to reduce mortality is the use of lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategies, although such a strategy may lead to problematic hypercapnia. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO₂R) devices allow uncoupling of ventilation from oxygenation, thereby removing carbon dioxide and facilitating lower tidal volume ventilation. We performed a systematic review to assess efficacy, complication rates, and utility of ECCO₂R devices. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), case-control studies and case series with 10 or more patients. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde), and ISI Web of Science, in addition to grey literature and clinical trials registries. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers against predefined criteria and agreement was reached by consensus. Outcomes of interest included mortality, intensive care and hospital lengths of stay, respiratory parameters and complications. The review included 14 studies with 495 patients (two RCTs and 12 observational studies). Arteriovenous ECCO₂R was used in seven studies, and venovenous ECCO₂R in seven studies. Available evidence suggests no mortality benefit to ECCO₂R, although post hoc analysis of data from the most recent RCT showed an improvement in ventilator-free days in more severe ARDS. Organ failure-free days or ICU stay have not been shown to decrease with ECCOvR. Carbon dioxide removal was widely demonstrated as feasible, facilitating the use of lower tidal volume ventilation. Complication rates varied greatly across the included studies, representing technological advances. There was a general paucity of high-quality data and significant variation in both practice and technology used among studies, which confounded analysis. ECCO₂R is a rapidly evolving technology and is an efficacious treatment

  20. Evaluation of corticospinal tract injury with three-dimensional diffusion tensor tract in patients with acute cerebral infarction

    Hui Xiao; Ziqian Chen; Biyun Zhang; Ping Ni

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three-dimensional diffusion tensor tract (DTT) is the newest imaging to describe the structure of white matter fiber in three-dimensions, it has great significance in dividing the concrete anatomic site of gray and white matter lesions, displaying the correlation with fibrous band and judging clinical prognosis, which is incomparable by other imagings.OBJECTTVE: To observe the conditions of corticospinal tract (CST) in acute cerebral ischemic stroke patients,and analyze the relationship between motor function and the severity of CST injury.DESIGN: A case-control observation.SETTTNG: Department of Medical Imaging, Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.PARTTCTPANTS: Fifteen patients with acute cerebral infarction were selected from Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA from February to December in 2005. They all suffered from acute attack and motor disorder of hemiplegic limbs to different extent, and were conformed by CT or MRI.There were 9 males and 6 females, aging 16-87 years old, the median age was 51.7 years, and all were right handed. Fifteen right-handed normal subjects, who were matched by age and sex with the patients in the cerebral infarction group, were selected from the relatives of patients and physicians of the Imaging Department as the control group. All the subjects were informed and agreed with the study.METHODS: The patients with acute cerebral infarction and subjects in the control group received MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with GE 1.5 T nuclear magnetic resonance system, fiber tracking with the software of dTV- Ⅱ. Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps and three-dimensional tractography of bilateral CST of all patients were created. Displacement, continuity and destroy of fibrous bands were observed. At the same time, muscle strength of ipsilateral hand of patients with cerebral infarction was measured with Brunnstrom standard. The correlation between the severity

  1. Implementing hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections caused by influenza and other respiratory pathogens in New Zealand

    Q Sue Huang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent experience with pandemic influenza A(H1N1pdm09 highlighted the importance of global surveillance for severe respiratory disease to support pandemic preparedness and seasonal influenza control. Improved surveillance in the southern hemisphere is needed to provide critical data on influenza epidemiology, disease burden, circulating strains and effectiveness of influenza prevention and control measures. Hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infection (SARI cases was established in New Zealand on 30 April 2012. The aims were to measure incidence, prevalence, risk factors, clinical spectrum and outcomes for SARI and associated influenza and other respiratory pathogen cases as well as to understand influenza contribution to patients not meeting SARI case definition. Methods/Design: All inpatients with suspected respiratory infections who were admitted overnight to the study hospitals were screened daily. If a patient met the World Health Organization’s SARI case definition, a respiratory specimen was tested for influenza and other respiratory pathogens. A case report form captured demographics, history of presenting illness, co-morbidities, disease course and outcome and risk factors. These data were supplemented from electronic clinical records and other linked data sources. Discussion: Hospital-based SARI surveillance has been implemented and is fully functioning in New Zealand. Active, prospective, continuous, hospital-based SARI surveillance is useful in supporting pandemic preparedness for emerging influenza A(H7N9 virus infections and seasonal influenza prevention and control.

  2. Empiric antibiotic therapy in acute uncomplicated urinary tract infections and fluoroquinolone resistance: a prospective observational study

    Düzgün Nurşen; Altunsoy Adalet; Aypak Cenk

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The aims of this study were to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of urinary isolates from community acquired acute uncomplicated urinary tract infections (uUTI) and to evaluate which antibiotics were empirically prescribed in the outpatient management of uUTI. Methods Among the patients which were admitted to outpatient clinics of Ankara University Medical Faculty, Ibni-Sina Hospital during 2005-2006, a total of 429 women between the age of 18 and 65 year...

  3. Effect of Antimicrobial Consumption and Production Type on Antibacterial Resistance in the Bovine Respiratory and Digestive Tract.

    Catry, Boudewijn; Dewulf, Jeroen; Maes, Dominiek; Pardon, Bart; Callens, Benedicte; Vanrobaeys, Mia; Opsomer, Geert; de Kruif, Aart; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between antimicrobial use and the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in the digestive and respiratory tract in three different production systems of food producing animals. A longitudinal study was set up in 25 Belgian bovine herds (10 dairy, 10 beef, and 5 veal herds) for a 2 year monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibilities in E. coli and Pasteurellaceae retrieved from the rectum and the nasal cavity, respectively. During the first year of observation, the antimicrobial use was prospectively recorded on 15 of these farms (5 of each production type) and transformed into the treatment incidences according to the (animal) defined daily dose (TIADD) and (actually) used daily dose (TIUDD). Antimicrobial resistance rates of 4,174 E. coli (all herds) and 474 Pasteurellaceae (beef and veal herds only) isolates for 12 antimicrobial agents demonstrated large differences between intensively reared veal calves (abundant and inconstant) and more extensively reared dairy and beef cattle (sparse and relatively stable). Using linear mixed effect models, a strong relation was found between antimicrobial treatment incidences and resistance profiles of 1,639 E. coli strains (p<0.0001) and 309 Pasteurellaceae (p≤0.012). These results indicate that a high antimicrobial selection pressure, here found to be represented by low dosages of oral prophylactic and therapeutic group medication, converts not only the commensal microbiota from the digestive tract but also the opportunistic pathogenic bacteria in the respiratory tract into reservoirs of multi-resistance. PMID:26820134

  4. Effect of Antimicrobial Consumption and Production Type on Antibacterial Resistance in the Bovine Respiratory and Digestive Tract.

    Boudewijn Catry

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between antimicrobial use and the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in the digestive and respiratory tract in three different production systems of food producing animals. A longitudinal study was set up in 25 Belgian bovine herds (10 dairy, 10 beef, and 5 veal herds for a 2 year monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibilities in E. coli and Pasteurellaceae retrieved from the rectum and the nasal cavity, respectively. During the first year of observation, the antimicrobial use was prospectively recorded on 15 of these farms (5 of each production type and transformed into the treatment incidences according to the (animal defined daily dose (TIADD and (actually used daily dose (TIUDD. Antimicrobial resistance rates of 4,174 E. coli (all herds and 474 Pasteurellaceae (beef and veal herds only isolates for 12 antimicrobial agents demonstrated large differences between intensively reared veal calves (abundant and inconstant and more extensively reared dairy and beef cattle (sparse and relatively stable. Using linear mixed effect models, a strong relation was found between antimicrobial treatment incidences and resistance profiles of 1,639 E. coli strains (p<0.0001 and 309 Pasteurellaceae (p≤0.012. These results indicate that a high antimicrobial selection pressure, here found to be represented by low dosages of oral prophylactic and therapeutic group medication, converts not only the commensal microbiota from the digestive tract but also the opportunistic pathogenic bacteria in the respiratory tract into reservoirs of multi-resistance.

  5. Detection of Respiratory Viruses by Molecular Methods

    Mahony, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Clinical laboratories historically diagnose seven or eight respiratory virus infections using a combination of techniques including enzyme immunoassay, direct fluorescent antibody staining, cell culture, and nucleic acid amplification tests. With the discovery of six new respiratory viruses since 2000, laboratories are faced with the challenge of detecting up to 19 different viruses that cause acute respiratory disease of both the upper and lower respiratory tracts. The application o...

  6. Electrophysiological correlates of respiratory failure in acute organophosphate poisoning: Evidence for differential roles of muscarinic and nicotinic stimulation

    Jayawardane, Pradeepa; Senanayake, Nimal; Buckley, Nick A.; Dawson, Andrew H

    2012-01-01

    Background. Respiratory failure in acute organophosphate (OP) poisoning can occur early and also relatively late in the clinical course, and the pathophysiology of respiratory failure at these different phases may have important clinical implications. Objective. To compare the electrophysiological findings in patients with early and late respiratory failure following acute OP poisoning. Methods. A prospective observational case series of consenting symptomatic patients with acute OP poisoning...

  7. Acute Respiratory Infections among Under-Five Age Group Children at Urban Slums of Gulbarga City: A Longitudinal Study

    Pattankar, Jayashree; Puttahonnappa, Suresh Kuralayanapalya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Among all illness, Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) account for 30-60% of paediatric outpatient attendance and 20-30% of hospital admissions. Aim To study the morbidity pattern of ARI among under-five-age group children and to assess the determinants. Materials and Methods A longitudinal cohort study was conducted for a one year period, comprising a cumulative sample of 400 children from 3 urban slums of Gulbarga city. History of nasal discharge, cough, fever, sore throat, breathing difficulty, any discharge from ear alone or in combination, was used in the recognition of an ARI episode. Respiratory rate >60/minute (50(2-11 months) and >40(1-5 years) in a child with cough, cold or fever singly or in combination was considered the criteria for recognition of pneumonia. Results Out of the 400 surveyed, ARI was detected among 109 children giving an incidence of 27.25%. Among these, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection (URTI) was found among 19.25% and Lower Respiratory Tract Infection (LRTI) among 8%. ARI was observed among 38.04% of infants, 37.84% of 2-3-year-old children, 36.87% of boys, 40.43% of children born to illiterate father’s, 35.77% of SES class IV & 40.79% of SES class V, and 41.89% of children with family history of respiratory illness. All these data were found to be statistically significant. High rates of ARI were also observed among 41.36% of children living in households with firewood fuel usage, 35.04% of children with pets in the household, 34.82% of children with delayed milestones, 53.85% of children with grade IV and 66.67% of children with grade V malnutrition. More episodes occurred during winter months of the year (Oct – Jan). During the follow-up phase of study done on a cohort of 112 children for a period of one year, an attack rate of 3.27 episodes/child/year was observed. Conclusion Community education programs should focus on addressing specific issues viz. identification of respiratory illness, simple case management

  8. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: clinical and laboratory manifestations.

    Lam, Christopher W K; Chan, Michael H M; Wong, Chun K

    2004-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently emerged infectious disease with significant morbidity and mortality. An epidemic in 2003 affected 8,098 patients in 29 countries with 774 deaths. The aetiological agent is a new coronavirus spread by droplet transmission. Clinical and general laboratory manifestations included fever, chills, rigor, myalgia, malaise, diarrhoea, cough, dyspnoea, pneumonia, lymphopenia, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LD), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK) activities. Treatment has been empirical; initial potent antibiotic cover, followed by simultaneous ribavirin and corticosteroids, with or without pulse high-dose methylprednisolone, have been used. The postulated disease progression comprises (1) active viral infection, (2) hyperactive immune response, and (3) recovery or pulmonary destruction and death. We investigated serum LD isoenzymes and blood lymphocyte subsets of SARS patients, and found LD1 activity as the best biochemical prognostic indicator for death, while CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and natural killer cell counts were promising predictors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Plasma cytokine and chemokine profiles showed markedly elevated Th1 cytokine interferon (IFN)-gamma, inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and IL-12, neutrophil chemokine IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and Th1 chemokine IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) for at least two weeks after disease onset, but there was no significant elevation of inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Corticosteroid reduced IL-8, MCP-1 and IP-10 concentrations from 5-8 days after treatment. Measurement of biochemical markers of bone metabolism demonstrated significant but transient increase in bone resorption from Day 28-44 after onset of fever, when pulse steroid was most frequently given. With tapering down of steroid

  9. MicroRNA Regulation of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Pattarayan, Dhamotharan; Rajaguru, P; Sudhakar Gandhi, P S; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K

    2016-10-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe form of acute lung injury (ALI), is a very common condition associated with critically ill patients, which causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite decades of research, effective therapeutic strategies for clinical ALI/ARDS are not available. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding molecules have emerged as a major area of biomedical research as they post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression in diverse biological and pathological processes, including ALI/ARDS. In this context, this present review summarizes a large body of evidence implicating miRNAs and their target molecules in ALI/ARDS originating largely from studies using animal and cell culture model systems of ALI/ARDS. We have also focused on the involvement of miRNAs in macrophage polarization, which play a critical role in regulating the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. Finally, the possible future directions that might lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ALI/ARDS are also reviewed. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2097-2106, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26790856

  10. Impact on respiratory tract infections of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine administered at 3, 5 and 11 months of age

    Cesati Laura

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical and public health importance of pneumococcal infections justifies the implementation of measures capable of reducing their incidence and severity, and explains why the recently marketed heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7 has been widely studied by pediatricians. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of PCV-7 administered at 3, 5 and 11 months of age on respiratory tract infections in very young children. Methods A total of 1,571 healthy infants (910 males aged 75–105 days (median 82 days were enrolled in this prospective cohort trial to receive a hexavalent vaccine (DTaP/IPV/HBV/Hib and PCV-7 (n = 819 or the hexavalent vaccine alone (n = 752 at 3, 5 and 11 months of age. Morbidity was recorded for the 24 months following the second dose by monthly telephone interviews conducted by investigators blinded to the study treatment assignment using standardised questionnaires. During these interviews, the caregivers and the children's pediatricians were questioned about illnesses and the use of antibiotics since the previous telephone call. All of the data were analysed using SAS Windows v.12. Results Among the 1,555 subjects (98.9% who completed the study, analysis of the data by the periods of follow-up demonstrated that radiologically confirmed community-acquired pneumonia (CAP was significantly less frequent in the PCV-7 group during the follow-up as a whole and during the last period of follow-up. Moreover, there were statistically significant between-group differences in the incidence of acute otitis media (AOM in each half-year period of follow-up except the first, with significantly lower number of episodes in children receiving PCV-7 than in controls. Furthermore, the antibiotic prescription data showed that the probability of receiving an antibiotic course was significantly lower in the PCV-7 group than in the control group. Conclusion Our findings show the effectiveness of the simplified

  11. Upper Respiratory Tract Disease in the Gopher Tortoise Is Caused by Mycoplasma agassizii†

    Brown, M. B.; McLaughlin, G. S.; Klein, P. A.; Crenshaw, B. C.; Schumacher, I. M.; Brown, D. R.; Jacobson, E. R.

    1999-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) has been observed in a number of tortoise species, including the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus). Clinical signs of URTD in gopher tortoises are similar to those in desert tortoises and include serous, mucoid, or purulent discharge from the nares, excessive tearing to purulent ocular discharge, conjunctivitis, and edema of the eyelids and ocular glands. The objectives of the present study were to determine if Mycoplasma agassizii was an etiologic agent of URTD in the gopher tortoise and to determine the clinical course of the experimental infection in a dose-response infection study. Tortoises were inoculated intranasally with 0.5 ml (0.25 ml/nostril) of either sterile SP4 broth (control group; n = 10) or 108 color-changing units (CCU) (total dose) of M. agassizii 723 (experimental infection group; n = 9). M. agassizii caused clinical signs compatible with those observed in tortoises with natural infections. Clinical signs of URTD were evident in seven of nine experimentally infected tortoises by 4 weeks postinfection (p.i.) and in eight of nine experimentally infected tortoises by 8 weeks p.i. In the dose-response experiments, tortoises were inoculated intranasally with a low (101 CCU; n = 6), medium (103 CCU; n = 6), or high (105 CCU; n = 5) dose of M. agassizii 723 or with sterile SP4 broth (n = 10). At all time points p.i. in both experiments, M. agassizii could be isolated from the nares of at least 50% of the tortoises. All of the experimentally infected tortoises seroconverted, and levels of antibody were statistically higher in infected animals than in control animals for all time points of >4 weeks p.i. (P tortoises in both experiments did not show clinical signs, did not seroconvert, and did not have detectable M. agassizii by either culture or PCR at any point in the study. Histological lesions were compatible with those observed in tortoises with natural infections

  12. Upper respiratory tract disease in the gopher tortoise is caused by Mycoplasma agassizii.

    Brown, M B; McLaughlin, G S; Klein, P A; Crenshaw, B C; Schumacher, I M; Brown, D R; Jacobson, E R

    1999-07-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) has been observed in a number of tortoise species, including the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus). Clinical signs of URTD in gopher tortoises are similar to those in desert tortoises and include serous, mucoid, or purulent discharge from the nares, excessive tearing to purulent ocular discharge, conjunctivitis, and edema of the eyelids and ocular glands. The objectives of the present study were to determine if Mycoplasma agassizii was an etiologic agent of URTD in the gopher tortoise and to determine the clinical course of the experimental infection in a dose-response infection study. Tortoises were inoculated intranasally with 0.5 ml (0.25 ml/nostril) of either sterile SP4 broth (control group; n = 10) or 10(8) color-changing units (CCU) (total dose) of M. agassizii 723 (experimental infection group; n = 9). M. agassizii caused clinical signs compatible with those observed in tortoises with natural infections. Clinical signs of URTD were evident in seven of nine experimentally infected tortoises by 4 weeks postinfection (p.i.) and in eight of nine experimentally infected tortoises by 8 weeks p.i. In the dose-response experiments, tortoises were inoculated intranasally with a low (10(1) CCU; n = 6), medium (10(3) CCU; n = 6), or high (10(5) CCU; n = 5) dose of M. agassizii 723 or with sterile SP4 broth (n = 10). At all time points p.i. in both experiments, M. agassizii could be isolated from the nares of at least 50% of the tortoises. All of the experimentally infected tortoises seroconverted, and levels of antibody were statistically higher in infected animals than in control animals for all time points of >4 weeks p.i. (P tortoises in both experiments did not show clinical signs, did not seroconvert, and did not have detectable M. agassizii by either culture or PCR at any point in the study. Histological lesions were compatible with those observed in tortoises with natural

  13. New developments in antibacterial choice for lower respiratory tract infections in elderly patients.

    Ferrara, Anna Maria; Fietta, Anna Maria

    2004-01-01

    Elderly patients are at increased risk of developing lower respiratory tract infections compared with younger patients. In this population, pneumonia is a serious illness with high rates of hospitalisation and mortality, especially in patients requiring admission to intensive care units (ICUs). A wide range of pathogens may be involved depending on different settings of acquisition and patient's health status. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common bacterial isolate in community-acquired pneumonia, followed by Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and atypical pathogens such as Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. However, elderly patients with comorbid illness, who have been recently hospitalised or are residing in a nursing home, may develop severe pneumonia caused by multidrug resistant staphylococci or pneumococci, and enteric Gram-negative bacilli, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, anaerobes may be involved in aspiration pneumonia. Timely and appropriate empiric treatment is required in order to enhance the likelihood of a good clinical outcome, prevent the spread of antibacterial resistance and reduce the economic impact of pneumonia. International guidelines recommend that elderly outpatients and inpatients (not in ICU) should be treated for the most common bacterial pathogens and the possibility of atypical pathogens. The algorithm for therapy is to use either a selected beta-lactam combined with a macrolide (azithromycin or clarithromycin), or to use monotherapy with a new anti-pneumococcal quinolone, such as levofloxacin, gatifloxacin or moxifloxacin. Oral (amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefuroxime axetil) and intravenous (sulbactam/ampicillin, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime) beta-lactams are agents of choice in outpatients and inpatients, respectively. For patients with severe pneumonia or aspiration pneumonia, the specific algorithm is to use either a macrolide or a quinolone in combination

  14. Drug-resistant genes carried by Acinetobacter baumanii isolated from patients with lower respiratory tract infection

    DAI Ning; ZHANG Wei; LI Jia-shu; YU Qin; WAN Huan-ying; MU Lan; ZHONG Xiao-ning; WEI Li-ping; MA Jian-jun; WANG Qiu-yue; HU Ke; LI De-zhi; TIAN Gui-zhen; CAI Shao-xi; WANG Rui-qin; HE Bei; WANG Si-qin; WANG Zhan-wei; ZHAO Su-rui; GAO Zhan-cheng; CHEN Ji-chao; CHEN Yu-sheng; GENG Rong; HU Ying-hui; YANG Jing-ping; DU Juan; HU Cheng-ping

    2010-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumanii (A. baumanii) remains an important microbial pathogen resulting in nosocomial acquired infections with significant morbidity and mortality. The mechanism by which nosocomial bacteria, like A.baumanii, attain multidrug resistance to antibiotics is of considerable interest. The aim in this study was to investigate the spread status of antibiotic resistance genes, such as multiple β-lactamase genes and aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes, from A. baumanii strains isolated from patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs).Methods Two thousand six hundred and ninety-eight sputum or the bronchoalveolar lavage samples from inpatients with LRTIs were collected in 21 hospitals in the mainland of China from November 2007 to February 2009. All samples were routinely inoculated. The isolated bacterial strains and their susceptibility were analyzed via VITEK-2 expert system.Several kinds of antibiotic resistant genes were further differentiated via polymerase chain reaction and sequencing methods.Results Totally, 39 A. baumanii strains were isolated from 2698 sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage samples. There was not only a high resistant rate of the isolated A. baumanii strains to ampicillin and first- and second-generation cephalosporins (94.87%, 100% and 97.44%, respectively), but also to the third-generation cephalosporins (ceftriaxone at 92.31%, ceftazidine at 51.28%) and imipenem (43.59%) as well. The lowest antibiotic resistance rate of 20.51% was found to amikacin. The OXA-23 gene was identified in 17 strains of A. baumanii, and the AmpC gene in 23 strains. The TEM-1 gene was carried in 15 strains. PER-1 and SHV-2 genes were detected in two different strains.Aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene aac-3-la was found in 23 strains, and the aac-6'-lb gene in 19 strains, aac-3-la and aac-6'-lb genes hibernated in three A. baumanii strains that showed no drug-resistant phenotype.Conclusions A. baumaniican carry multiple drug

  15. Use and feasibility of delayed prescribing for respiratory tract infections: A questionnaire survey

    Lindbæk Morten

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delayed prescribing of antibiotics for respiratory tract infections (RTIs lowers the amount of antibiotics consumed. Several national treatment guidelines on RTIs recommend the strategy. When advocating treatment innovations, the feasibility and credibility of the innovation must be taken into account. The objective of this study was to explore GPs use and patients uptake of wait-and-see prescriptions for RTIs, and to investigate the feasibility of the strategy from GPs' and patients' perspectives. Methods Questionnaire survey among Norwegian GPs issuing and patients receiving a wait-and-see-prescription for RTIs. Patients reported symptoms, confidence and antibiotics consumption, GPs reported diagnoses, reason for issuing a wait-and-see-prescription and their opinion about the method. Results 304 response pairs from consultations with 49 GPs were received. The patient response rate was 80%. The most common diagnosis for the GPs to issue a wait-and-see prescription was sinusitis (33% and otitis (21%. 46% of the patients reported to consume the antibiotics. When adjusted for other factors, the diagnosis did not predict antibiotic consumption, but both being 16 years or more (p = 0,006 and reporting to have a fever (p = 0,012 doubled the odds of antibiotic consumption, while feeling very ill more than quadrupled the odds (p = 0,002. In 210 cases (69%, the GP found delayed prescribing a very reasonable strategy, and 270 patients (89% would prefer to receive a wait-and-see prescription in a similar situation in the future. The GPs found delayed prescribing very reasonable most frequently in cases of sinusitis (79%, p = 0,007 and least frequently in cases of lower RTIs (49%, p = 0,002. Conclusion Most patients and GPs are satisfied with the delayed prescribing strategy. The patients' age, symptoms and malaise are more important than the diagnosis in predicting antibiotic consumption. The GP's view of the method as a reasonable

  16. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin

    Jolley, Caroline J.; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F.; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% 10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. PMID:26495843

  17. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    Caroline J Jolley

    Full Text Available Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone (IOT, and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%, end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2% and neural respiratory drive (NRD (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography. Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% 10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression.

  18. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    Jolley, Caroline J; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% 10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. PMID:26495843

  19. Use of Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Insufficiency after Cardiac Surgery

    Mohamed Abdel Rahman Salem

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV using bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP ventilation is a safe and effective mean of improving gas exchange in many types of respiratory failure. The results of application of NIPPV to patients who had cardiac surgery and developed respiratory failure after extubation still to be investigated. Aim of work: To compare the efficacy of NIPPV delivered through a face mask with the efficacy of conventional mechanical ventilation (CV delivered through an endotracheal tube and investigates its hemodynamic effects in this group of patients. Materials and Methods: NIPPV and CV were applied to twenty four patients in two groups who had open heart surgery and suffered from severe respiratory deterioration after tracheal extubation. Respiratory and invasive hemodynamic parameters were measured before starting ventilation, 1, 6, 12 hours, and before and after weaning of ventilation and incidence of ventilatory complications were recorded. Results: Respiratory parameters improved significantly in patients in both groups after one hour but one patient was intubated in NIPPV group. There were no significant differences between the two groups as regards the hemodynamics and respiratory parameters. Respiratory complications and infection were not noticed in NIPPV group during the study. Conclusion: NIPPV is considered an effective method of treating patients with acute respiratory insufficiency after cardiac surgery with minimal effects on respiratory and hemodynamic parameters. It reduces the respiratory complications and infection during mechanical ventilation.

  20. Biological fractionation of lead isotopes in Sprague-Dawley rats lead poisoned via the respiratory tract.

    Jing Wu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: It was considered that lead isotope ratios did not change during physical, chemical, or biological processes. Thus, lead isotope ratios have been used as fingerprints to identify possible lead sources. However, recent evidence has shown that the lead isotope ratios among different biological samples in human are not always identical from its lead origins in vitro. An animal experiment was conducted to explore the biological fractionation of lead isotopes in biological systems. METHODS: 24 male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were divided into groups that received acute lead exposure (0, 0.02, 0.2, or 2 mg/kg body weight of lead acetate via the respiratory route every day for 5 days. Biological samples (i.e., blood, urine, and feces were collected for comparison with the lead acetate (test substance and the low-lead animal feed (diet administered to the rats. The lead isotope ratios were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. RESULTS: There are significant differences (p<0.05 in lead isotope ratios between blood, urine, and feces. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead concentration and the blood lead isotope ratios was observed. There is also a threshold effect to the fractionation function. Only the blood isotope ratio of (204Pb/(206Pb matches the test substance well. As for feces, when (204Pb/(206Pb ratio is considered, there is no significant difference between feces-test substance pairs in medium and high dose group. CONCLUSIONS: The biological fractionation of lead isotopes in SD rats was observed. Moreover, there might be a threshold for the biological fractionation of lead isotopes which is depending on whole blood lead level. It is considered to be more reliable that we compared the isotope ratios of potential lead hazards with both blood and feces lead fingerprints especially for (204Pb/(206Pb ratio under high-dose exposure.