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Sample records for acute psychiatric department

  1. Symptoms of epilepsy and organic brain dysfunctions in patients with acute, brief depression combined with other fluctuating psychiatric symptoms: a controlled study from an acute psychiatric department

    Linaker Olav M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In psychiatric acute departments some patients present with brief depressive periods accompanied with fluctuating arrays of other psychiatric symptoms like psychosis, panic or mania. For the purpose of the present study we call this condition Acute Unstable Depressive Syndrome (AUDS. The aims of the present study were to compare clinical signs of organic brain dysfunctions and epilepsy in patients with AUDS and Major Depressive Episode (MDE. Methods Out of 1038 consecutive patients admitted to a psychiatric acute ward, 16 patients with AUDS and 16 age- and gender-matched MDE patients were included in the study. Using standardized instruments and methods we recorded clinical data, EEG and MRI. Results A history of epileptic seizures and pathologic EEG activity was more common in the AUDS group than in the MDE group (seizures, n = 6 vs. 0, p = 0.018; pathologic EEG activity, n = 8 vs. 1, p = 0.015. Five patients in the AUDS group were diagnosed as having epilepsy, whereas none of those with MDE had epilepsy (p = 0.043. There were no differences between the groups regarding pathological findings in neurological bedside examination and cerebral MRI investigation. Conclusion Compared to patients admitted with mood symptoms fulfilling DSM 4 criteria of a major depressive disorder, short-lasting atypical depressive symptoms seem to be associated with a high frequency of epileptic and pathologic EEG activity in patients admitted to psychiatric acute departments. Trial registration NCT00201474

  2. Quantitative EEG findings in patients with acute, brief depression combined with other fluctuating psychiatric symptoms: a controlled study from an acute psychiatric department

    Linaker Olav M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with brief depressive episodes and concurrent rapidly fluctuating psychiatric symptoms do not fit current diagnostic criteria and they can be difficult to diagnose and treat in an acute psychiatric setting. We wanted to study whether these patients had signs of more epileptic or organic brain dysfunction than patients with depression without additional symptomatology. Methods Sixteen acutely admitted patients diagnosed with a brief depressive episode as well as another concurrent psychiatric diagnosis were included. Sixteen patients with major depression served as controls. Three electroencephalographic studies (EEG were visually interpreted and the background activity was also analysed with quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG. Results The group with brief depression and concurrent symptoms had multiple abnormal features in their standard EEG compared to patients with major depression, but they did not show significantly more epileptiform activity. They also had significantly higher temporal QEEG delta amplitude and interhemispheric temporal delta asymmetry. Conclusion Organic brain dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of patients with brief depressive episodes mixed with rapidly fluctuating psychiatric symptoms. This subgroup of depressed patients should be investigated further in order to clarify the pathophysiology and to establish the optimal evaluation scheme and treatment in an acute psychiatric setting.

  3. Psychiatric Disease and Post-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Zgaljardic, Dennis J; Seale, Gary S; Schaefer, Lynn A; Temple, Richard O; Foreman, Jack; Elliott, Timothy R

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and can include depression, anxiety, and psychosis, as well as other maladaptive behaviors and personality changes. The epidemiologic data of psychiatric disorders post-TBI vary widely, although the incidence and prevalence rates typically are higher than in the general population. Although the experience of psychiatric symptoms may be temporary and may resolve in the acute period, many patients with TBI can experience psychopathology that is persistent or that develops in the post-acute period. Long-term psychiatric disorder, along with cognitive and physical sequelae and greater risk for substance use disorders, can pose a number of life-long challenges for patients and their caregivers, as they can interfere with participation in rehabilitation as well as limit functional independence in the community. The current review of the literature considers the common psychiatric problems affecting individuals with TBI in the post-acute period, including personality changes, psychosis, executive dysfunction, depression, anxiety, and substance misuse. Although treatment considerations (pharmacological and nonpharmacological) are referred to, an extensive description of such protocols is beyond the scope of the current review. The impact of persistent psychiatric symptoms on perceived caregiver burden and distress is also discussed. PMID:25629222

  4. Acute and long-term psychiatric side effects of mefloquine

    Ringqvist, Asa; Bech, Per; Glenthøj, Birte;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to explore the profile of acute and long-term psychiatric side effects associated with mefloquine. METHODS: Subjects (n = 73) reported to a Danish national register during five consecutive years for mefloquine associated side effects were included. Acute...... psychiatric side effects were retrospectively assessed using the SCL-90-R and questions based on Present State Examination (PSE). Subjects reporting suspected psychotic states were contacted for a personal PSE interview. Electronic records of psychiatric hospitalizations and diagnoses were cross-checked. Long......-term effects were evaluated with SF-36. SCL-90-R and SF-36 data were compared to age- and gender matched controls. RESULTS: In the SCL-90-R, clinically significant scores for anxiety, phobic anxiety and depression were found in 55%, 51%, and 44% of the mefloquine group. Substantial acute phase psychotic...

  5. The Impact of Psychiatric Patient Boarding in Emergency Departments

    B. A. Nicks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Studies have demonstrated the adverse effects of emergency department (ED boarding. This study examines the impact of resource utilization, throughput, and financial impact for psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement. Methods. The authors retrospectively studied all psychiatric and non-psychiatric adult admissions in an Academic Medical Center ED (>68,000 adult visits from January 2007-2008. The main outcomes were ED length of stay (LOS and associated reimbursement. Results. 1,438 patients were consulted to psychiatry with 505 (35.1% requiring inpatient psychiatric care management. The mean psychiatric patient age was 42.5 years (SD 13.1 years, with 2.7 times more women than men. ED LOS was significantly longer for psychiatric admissions (1089 min, CI (1039–1140 versus 340 min, CI (304–375; <0.001 when compared to non-psychiatric admissions. The financial impact of psychiatric boarding accounted for a direct loss of ($1,198 compared to non-psychiatric admissions. Factoring the loss of bed turnover for waiting patients and opportunity cost due to loss of those patients, psychiatric patient boarding cost the department $2,264 per patient. Conclusions. Psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement remain in the ED 3.2 times longer than non-psychiatric patients, preventing 2.2 bed turnovers (additional patients per psychiatric patient, and decreasing financial revenue.

  6. Hostility and violence of acute psychiatric inpatients

    Azzoni Antonella

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The aim of the present study was to find out the extent of hostility and violence and the factors that are associated with such hostility and violence in a psychiatric intensive care unit. Methods Retrospective analysis of data prospectively collected in a 6-year period. Results No hostility was observed in 56.1%, hostility in 40.9%, and violence in 3.0% of the admitted cases. Seclusion was never used. Six cases (2,5‰ required physical restraint. Risk factors associated with violence were younger age, suicidal risk, and diagnosis of schizophrenia. Risk factors associated with hostile and violent behavior were younger age at the onset of the disorder, being single, having no children, lower GAF scores, higher BPRS hostility, SAPS, and CGI scores, lower BPRS anxiety-depression score, higher doses of psychoactive drugs, more frequent use of neuroleptics, diagnosis of mania, personality disorder, substance and alcohol related disorders, no diagnosis of depression. Conclusion The study confirms the low rate of violence among Italian psychiatric in-patients, the major relevance of clinical rather than socio-demographic factors in respect of aggressive behavior, the possibility of a no seclusion-no physical restraint policy, not associated either with higher rates of hostility or violence or with more severe drug side effects.

  7. Occupational Therapy and Multidisciplinary Working on Acute Psychiatric Wards: The Tompkins Acute Ward Study

    Simpson, A.; Bowers, L.; J. Alexander; Ridley, C.; Warren, J.

    2005-01-01

    There is limited research into occupational therapy and interprofessional working on acute psychiatric wards. This study aimed to explore relations between occupational therapists and other members of the multidisciplinary team through structured interviews with 47 staff on 14 acute psychiatric wards. The study found that occupational therapists provided assessments, group activities and individual therapeutic work, with the assessment and development of activities of daily living being c...

  8. Negative rumor: contagion of a psychiatric department.

    Novac, Andrei; McEwan, Stephanie; Bota, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few decades, a sizable body of literature on the effects of rumors and gossip has emerged. Addressing rumors in the workplace is an important subject, as rumors have a direct impact on the quality of the work environment and also on the productivity and creativity of the employees. To date, little has been written on the effect of rumors and gossip in psychiatric hospitals. This article presents case vignettes of rumors spread in psychiatric hospitals and the impact on team cohesion and morale among the staff implicated in these, too often, neglected occurrences. Dynamic aspects with particular focus on rumors in psychiatric units and suggestions for remedy and treatment are presented. PMID:25133051

  9. Decreasing Psychiatric Admission Wait Time in the Emergency Department by Facilitating Psychiatric Discharges.

    Stover, Pamela R; Harpin, Scott

    2015-12-01

    Limited capacity in a psychiatric unit contributes to long emergency department (ED) admission wait times. Regulatory and accrediting agencies urge hospitals nationally to improve patient flow for better access to care for all types of patients. The purpose of the current study was to decrease psychiatric admission wait time from 10.5 to 8 hours and increase the proportion of patients discharged by 11 a.m. from 20% to 50%. The current study compared pre- and post-intervention data. Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles aimed to improve discharge processes and timeliness through initiation of new practices. Admission wait time improved to an average of 5.1 hours (t = 3.87, p = 0.006). The proportion of discharges occurring by 11 a.m. increased to 46% (odds ratio = 3.42, p planning processes and timeliness in a psychiatric unit significantly decreased admission wait time from the ED, improving access to psychiatric care. PMID:26505524

  10. Children and adolescents in the Psychiatric Emergency Department: a 10-year survey in Copenhagen County

    Taastrøm, Annette; Klahn, Julie; Staal, Nina;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Knowledge on psychiatric emergencies in children and adolescents is limited. The Psychiatric Emergency Departments (PED) in Copenhagen enable the acute examination of children and adolescents 24 h a day, 7 days a week. However, very little is known about who presents to the PED, and the...... thorough analysis was performed, based on the individual emergency charts. Inter-rater reliability was high. Results: Visits increased nearly threefold during the period. Symptom score for 2003 and 2006 revealed that more than one third of the visitors had suicidal ideation. Depressive and anxiety symptoms...

  11. An observational study in psychiatric acute patients admitted to General Hospital Psychiatric Wards in Italy

    Margari Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives this Italian observational study was aimed at collecting data of psychiatric patients with acute episodes entering General Hospital Psychiatric Wards (GHPWs. Information was focused on diagnosis (DSM-IV, reasons of hospitalisation, prescribed treatment, outcome of aggressive episodes, evolution of the acute episode. Methods assessments were performed at admission and discharge. Used psychometric scales were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE-30. Results 864 adult patients were enrolled in 15 GHPWs: 728 (320 M; mean age 43.6 yrs completed both admission and discharge visits. A severe psychotic episode with (19.1% or without (47.7% aggressive behaviour was the main reason of admission. Schizophrenia (42.8% at admission and 40.1% at discharge and depression (12.9% at admission and 14.7% at discharge were the predominant diagnoses. The mean hospital stay was 12 days. The mean (± SD total score of MOAS at admission, day 7 and discharge was, respectively, 2.53 ± 5.1, 0.38 ± 2.2, and 0.21 ± 1.5. Forty-four (6.0% patients had episodes of aggressiveness at admission and 8 (1.7% at day 7. A progressive improvement in each domain/item vs. admission was observed for MOAS and BPRS, while NOSIE-30 did not change from day 4 onwards. The number of patients with al least one psychotic drug taken at admission, in the first 7 days of hospitalisation, and prescribed at discharge, was, respectively: 472 (64.8%, 686 (94.2% and 676 (92.9%. The respective most frequently psychotic drugs were: BDZs (60.6%, 85.7%, 69.5%, typical anti-psychotics (48.3%, 57.0%, 49.6%, atypical anti-psychotics (35.6%, 41.8%, 39.8% and antidepressants (40.9%, 48.8%, 43.2%. Rates of patients with one, two or > 2 psychotic drugs taken at admission and day 7, and prescribed at discharge, were, respectively: 24.8%, 8.2% and 13.5% in mono-therapy; 22.0%, 20

  12. Psychiatric and Medical Management of Marijuana Intoxication in the Emergency Department

    Bui, Quan M.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We use a case report to describe the acute psychiatric and medical management of marijuana intoxication in the emergency setting. A 34-year-old woman presented with erratic, disruptive behavior and psychotic symptoms after recreational ingestion of edible cannabis. She was also found to have mild hypokalemia and QT interval prolongation. Psychiatric management of cannabis psychosis involves symptomatic treatment and maintenance of safety during detoxification. Acute medical complications of marijuana use are primarily cardiovascular and respiratory in nature; electrolyte and electrocardiogram monitoring is indicated. This patient’s psychosis, hypokalemia and prolonged QTc interval resolved over two days with supportive treatment and minimal intervention in the emergency department. Patients with cannabis psychosis are at risk for further psychotic sequelae. Emergency providers may reduce this risk through appropriate diagnosis, acute treatment, and referral for outpatient care. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(3:414–417.

  13. Psychiatric patients turnaround times in the emergency department

    Ohlmeier Martin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the turnaround times of psychiatric patients within the Emergency Department (ED from registration to discharge or hospitalization in a University Hospital in 2002. Methods Data from a one-year period of psychiatric admissions to the emergency service at a University Hospital were monitored and analyzed focused on turnaround times within the ED. Information on patients variables such as age, sex, diagnosis, consultations and diagnostic procedures were extracted from the patients' charts. Results From 34.058 patients seen in the ED in 2002, 2632 patients were examined by psychiatrists on duty. Mean turnaround time in the ED was 123 (SD 97 minutes (median 95. Patients to be hospitalized on a psychiatric ward stayed shorter within the ED, patients who later were admitted to another faculty, were treated longer in the ED. Patients with cognitive or substance related disorders stayed longer in the ED than patients with other psychiatric diagnoses. The number of diagnostic procedures and consultations increased the treatment time significantly. Conclusion As the number of patients within the examined ED increases every year, the relevant variables responsible for longer or complicated treatments were assessed in order to appropriately change routine procedures without loss of medical standards. Using this basic data, comparisons with the following years and other hospitals will help to define where the benchmark of turnaround times for psychiatric emergency services might be.

  14. Clinical features and therapeutic management of patients admitted to Italian acute hospital psychiatric units: the PERSEO (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) survey

    Russo Federico; Righi Roberto; Minervini Lina; Margari Francesco; Casacchia Massimo; Boncompagni Giancarlo; Boccalon Roberto M; Ballerini Andrea; Salteri Andrea; Frediani Sonia; Rossi Andrea; Scatigna Marco

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The PERSEO study (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) is a naturalistic, observational clinical survey in Italian acute hospital psychiatric units, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura; in English, the psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). The aims of this paper are: (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients, including sociodemographic features, risk factors, life habits and psychiatric diagnoses; and...

  15. Switch Function and Pathological Dissociation in Acute Psychiatric Inpatients.

    Chui-De Chiu

    Full Text Available Swift switching, along with atypical ability on updating and inhibition, has been found in non-clinical dissociators. However, whether swift switching is a cognitive endophenotype that intertwines with traumatisation and pathological dissociation remains unknown. Unspecified acute psychiatric patients were recruited to verify a hypothesis that pathological dissociation is associated with swift switching and traumatisation may explain this relationship. Behavioural measures of intellectual function and three executive functions including updating, switching and inhibition were administered, together with standardised scales to evaluate pathological dissociation and traumatisation. Our results showed superior control ability on switching and updating in inpatients who displayed more symptoms of pathological dissociation. When all three executive functions were entered as predictors, in addition to intellectual quotient and demographic variables to regress upon pathological dissociation, switching rather than updating remained the significant predictor. Importantly, the relationship between pathological dissociation and switching became non-significant when the effect of childhood trauma were controlled. The results support a trauma-related switching hypothesis which postulates swift switching as a cognitive endophenotype of pathological dissociation; traumatisation in childhood may explain the importance of swift switching.

  16. Switch Function and Pathological Dissociation in Acute Psychiatric Inpatients

    Chiu, Chui-De; Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chien, Yi-Ling; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Liu, Chih-Min; Yeh, Yei-Yu; Hwu, Hai-Gwo

    2016-01-01

    Swift switching, along with atypical ability on updating and inhibition, has been found in non-clinical dissociators. However, whether swift switching is a cognitive endophenotype that intertwines with traumatisation and pathological dissociation remains unknown. Unspecified acute psychiatric patients were recruited to verify a hypothesis that pathological dissociation is associated with swift switching and traumatisation may explain this relationship. Behavioural measures of intellectual function and three executive functions including updating, switching and inhibition were administered, together with standardised scales to evaluate pathological dissociation and traumatisation. Our results showed superior control ability on switching and updating in inpatients who displayed more symptoms of pathological dissociation. When all three executive functions were entered as predictors, in addition to intellectual quotient and demographic variables to regress upon pathological dissociation, switching rather than updating remained the significant predictor. Importantly, the relationship between pathological dissociation and switching became non-significant when the effect of childhood trauma were controlled. The results support a trauma-related switching hypothesis which postulates swift switching as a cognitive endophenotype of pathological dissociation; traumatisation in childhood may explain the importance of swift switching. PMID:27123578

  17. Early Sleep Psychiatric Intervention for Acute Insomnia: Implications from a Case of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Abe, Yuichiro; Nishimura, Go; Endo, Takuro

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia is a common problem among patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and patients suffering from acute insomnia with psychiatric comorbidity are more likely to develop chronic insomnia without appropriate intervention. Here we report a case of obsessive-compulsive disorder with acute insomnia, successfully treated with early sleep psychiatric non-pharmacological intervention. The augmentation of medication runs a risk of exacerbating daytime impairment. Clinicians usually pre...

  18. An audit of acute psychiatric admission bed occupancy in Northern Ireland.

    Kelly, C. B.

    1998-01-01

    The Northern Ireland Section (Irish Division) of the Royal College of Psychiatrists were requested to investigate apparent increasing pressures on acute psychiatric beds. Information on bed occupancy and associated service activity was collected by clinicians on site in every psychiatric unit in Northern Ireland over the past eight years. Three separate years (1987, 1991 and 1995) were studied. Bed occupancy rose across these three years. There was an associated reduction in the number of acu...

  19. Violence prevention and management in acute psychiatric care: aspects of nursing practice

    Björkdahl, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The general aim of this thesis was to explore and evaluate different aspects of nursing practice in relation to prediction, prevention and management of patient violence in acute psychiatric care. The specific aims were: to evaluate the short-term predictive capacity of the violence risk assessment instrument Brøset Violence Checklist (BVC) when used by nurses in a psychiatric intensive care unit (study I), to compare the occurrences of coercive interventions and violence-rel...

  20. Factors predicting adherence with psychiatric follow-up appointments for patients assessed by the liaison psychiatric team in the emergency department.

    Agyapong, Vincent I O

    2010-01-01

    Several factors may predict adherence with psychiatric follow-up appointment for patients seen in the emergency department (ED) by liaison psychiatric teams. Awareness of these factors would allow for interventions targeted at vulnerable groups.

  1. Adverse incidents, patient flow and nursing workforce variables on acute psychiatric wards: the Tompkins Acute Ward Study

    Bowers, L.; Allan, T; Simpson, A.; Nijman, H.; Warren, J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Adverse incidents (violence, self-harm and absconding) can cause significant harm to patients and staff, are difficult to predict, and are driving an increase in security measures and defensive practice. Aims: To explore the relationship between adverse incidents on acute psychiatric wards, admissions and nursing workforce variables. Methods: A retrospective analysis of officially collected data covering a period of 30 months on 14 acute wards at three hospitals. This data...

  2. Junior staffing changes and the temporal ecology of adverse incidents in acute psychiatric wards

    Bowers, L.; Jeffery, D; Simpson, A; C. Daly; Warren, J.; Nijman, H.

    2007-01-01

    Aim.  This paper reports an examination of the relationship between adverse incident rates, the arrival of new junior staff on wards, and days of the week on acute psychiatric wards. Background.  Incidents of violence, absconding and self-harm in acute inpatient services pose risks to patients and staff. Previous research suggests that the arrival of inexperienced new staff may trigger more adverse incidents. Findings on the relationship between incidents and the weekly routine are incons...

  3. Behavioural and Psychiatric Symptoms in People with Dementia Admitted to the Acute Hospital: Prospective Cohort Study

    Sampson, E L; White, N.; Leurent, B.; Scott, S; Lord, K; Round, J; Jones, L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dementia is common in older people admitted to acute hospitals. There are concerns about the quality of care they receive. Behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD) seem to be particularly challenging for hospital staff. AIMS To define the prevalence of BPSD and explore their clinical associations. METHOD: Longitudinal cohort study of 230 people with dementia, aged over 70, admitted to hospital for acute medical illness, and assessed for BPSD at admission and every 4...

  4. Narcissism in patients admitted to psychiatric acute wards: its relation to violence, suicidality and other psychopathology

    Wallin Juliska

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to examine various aspects of narcissism in patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards and to compare their level of narcissism to that of an age- and gender-matched sample from the general population (NORM. Methods This cross-sectional study interviewed 186 eligible acute psychiatric patients with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF. The patients filled in the Narcissistic Personality Inventory-21 item version (NPI-21, The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. High and low narcissism was defined by the median of the total NPI-21 score. An age- and gender-matched control sample from the general population also scored the NPI-21 (NORM. Results Being male, involuntary admitted, having diagnosis of schizophrenia, higher self-esteem, and severe violence were significantly associated with high narcissism, and so were also low levels of suicidality, depression, anxiety and GAF scores. Severe violence and high self-esteem were significantly associated with high narcissism in multivariable analyses. The NPI-21 and its subscales showed test-retest correlations ≥0.83, while the BPRS and the HADS showed lower correlations, confirming the trait character of the NPI-21. Depression and suicidality were negatively associated with the NPI-21 total score and all its subscales, while positive association was observed with grandiosity. No significant differences were observed between patients and NORM on the NPI-21 total score or any of the NPI subscales. Conclusion Narcissism in the psychiatric patients was significantly associated with violence, suicidality and other symptoms relevant for management and treatment planning. Due to its trait character, use of the NPI-21 in acute psychiatric patients can give important clinical information. The similar level of narcissism found in patients and NORM is in need of further examination.

  5. Admissions to acute adolescent psychiatric units: a prospective study of clinical severity and outcome

    Jensen Gunnar; Hatling Trond; Heyerdahl Sonja; Hanssen-Bauer Ketil; Olstad Pål; Stangeland Tormod; Tinderholt Tarje

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Several countries have established or are planning acute psychiatric in-patient services that accept around-the-clock emergency admission of adolescents. Our aim was to investigate the characteristics and clinical outcomes of a cohort of patients at four Norwegian units. Methods We used a prospective pre-post observational design. Four units implemented a clinician-rated outcome measure, the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA), which ...

  6. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Violence by Psychiatric Acute Inpatients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Iozzino, Laura; Ferrari, Clarissa; LARGE, MATTHEW; Nielssen, Olav; de Girolamo, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Background Violence in acute psychiatric wards affects the safety of other patients and the effectiveness of treatment. However, there is a wide variation in reported rates of violence in acute psychiatric wards. Objectives To use meta-analysis to estimate the pooled rate of violence in published studies, and examine the characteristics of the participants, and aspects of the studies themselves that might explain the variation in the reported rates of violence (moderators). Method Systematic ...

  7. Failure of psychiatric referrals from the pediatric emergency department

    Delgado Sergio V

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition of mental illness in the pediatric emergency department (PED followed by brief, problem oriented interventions may improve health-care seeking behavior and quality of life. The objective of this study was to compare the frequency of mental health follow up after an enhanced referral compared to a simple referral in children presenting to the PED with unrecognized mental health problems. Methods A prospective randomized control trial comparing an enhanced referral vs. simple referral in 56 families of children who were screened for mental health symptoms was performed in a large tertiary care PED. Children presenting to the PED with stable medical problems were approached every fourth evening for enrollment. After consent/assent was obtained, children were screened for a mental health problem using both child and parent reports of the DISC Predictive Scales. Those meeting cutoffs for a mental health problem by either parent or child report were randomized to 1 simple referral (phone number for mental health evaluation by study psychiatrist or 2 enhanced referral (short informational interview, appointment made for child, reminder 2 days before and day of interview for an evaluation by study psychiatrist. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and Chi-Square test to calculate the proportion of children with mental health problems who completed mental health follow-up with and without the enhanced referral. Results A total of 69 families were enrolled. Overall 56 (81% children screened positive for a mental health problem as reported by either the child (self report or mother (maternal report of child mental health problem. Of these, 33 children were randomized into the enhanced referral arm and 23 into the simple referral arm. Overall, only 6 families with children screening positive for a mental health problem completed the psychiatric follow up evaluation, 2 in the enhanced referral arm and 4 in the simple

  8. Screening for Sexual Orientation in Psychiatric Emergency Departments

    Currier, Glenn W.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our goal was to explore whether emergency department (ED patients would disclose their sexual orientation in a research evaluation and to examine demographic and clinical characteristics of patients by self-identified sexual orientation. Methods: Participants (n=177 presented for psychiatric treatment at three urban EDs in New York City, Rochester, NY, and Philadelphia, PA. Participants were interviewed in the context of a larger study of a standardized suicide risk assessment. We assessed participants’ willingness to answer questions regarding sexual orientation along three dimensions: a self-description of sexual orientation, a self-description of sexual attraction, and the gender of any prior sexual partners. Results: No participants (0/177 refused to respond to the categorical question about sexual orientation, 168/177 (94.9% agreed to provide information about prior sexual partners, and 100/109 (91.7% provided information about current sexual attraction toward either gender. Of all 177 participants, 154 (87.0% self-identified as heterosexual, 11 (6.2% as bisexual, 10 (5.6% as gay or lesbian, and 2 (1.1% indicated they were not sure. As compared with heterosexual patients, lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB patients were significantly younger and more likely to be non-white, but did not differ significantly in terms of education, income, employment, or religious affiliation or participation. Further, LGB participants did not differ from self-identified heterosexual participants for lifetime suicide attempt rate or lifetime history of any mood, substance-related, psychotic spectrum, or other Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV Axis I disorder. Of self-identified heterosexual participants 5.6% (5/89 reported sexual attraction as other than ‘only opposite sex,’ and 10.3% (15/142 of sexually active ‘heterosexual’ participants reported previous same-gender sexual partners. Conclusion

  9. A systematic review of music therapy practice and outcomes with acute adult psychiatric in-patients.

    Catherine Carr

    Full Text Available There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported.A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis.98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions.No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to develop specific music therapy models for this

  10. Acute atropine intoxication with psychiatric symptoms by herbal infusion of Pulmonaria officinalis (Lungwort

    Enrique Baca-García

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Lungwort infusion is a preparation extracted from Pulmonaria officinalis which is occasionally used as a folk remedy for the common cold. The current report aims to describe acute atropine intoxications with delirium caused by Lungwort infusion in several members of the same family. Methods: Description of three case reports. Search of literature through Medline. Results: Three generations of a same family presented acute and moderately severe atropine intoxications after drinking an infusion prepared with Pulmonaria officinalis. Conclusions: Despite the lack of scientific evidence for its clinical use, medicinal plants continue being widely used. In spite of severe adverse effects reported, the general thought is that herbal remedies are harmless. To our knowledge, this is the first report of acute atropine intoxications with psychiatric symptoms secondary to Pulmonaria officinalis in several members of a family. We suspect that the lungwort infusion may have been contaminated with some other substance with atropinic properties.

  11. Treatment needs, diagnoses and use of services for acutely admitted psychiatric patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway

    Sørgaard Knut W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We compared demography, diagnoses and clinical needs in acutely admitted psychiatric hospital patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway. Method All acutely admitted psychiatric patients in 1 psychiatric hospital in north-west Russia and 2 in northern Norway were in a three months period assessed with HoNOS and a Norwegian form developed to study acute psychiatric services (MAP. Data from a total of 841 patients were analysed (377 Norwegian, 464 Russian with univariate and multivariate statistics. Results Russian patients were more often males who had paid work. 2/3 were diagnosed with alcohol and organic disorders, and 70% reported problems related to sleep. Depression was widespread, as were problems associated with occupation. Many more Norwegian patients were on various forms of social security and lived in community supported homes. They had a clinical profile of affective disorders, use of drugs, suicidality and problems with activities involved of daily life. Slightly more Norwegian patients were involuntary admitted. Conclusion Acutely admitted psychiatric patients in North West Russia and Northern Norwegian showed different clinical profiles: alcohol, depression and organic disorders characterised Russian patients, affective disorders, suicidality and use of drugs characterised the Norwegians. Whereas Norwegian patients are mainly referred from GPs the Russians come via 1.line psychiatric services (“dispensaries”. Average length of stay for Russian patients was 2.5 times longer than that of the Norwegian.

  12. Short-Term Diagnostic Stability of Acute Psychosis: Data from a Tertiary Care Psychiatric Center in South India

    Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C.; Virupaksha Harave Shanmugam; Dhanya Raveendranathan; Biju Viswanath; Kesavan Muralidharan

    2012-01-01

    Context: Studies on acute psychosis in patients from India report good outcome. A small proportion of these patients may suffer relapses or other develop major psychiatric disorders later. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the diagnostic stability of acute psychosis in patients from India. Materials and Methods: The records of patients who presented with the first episode of acute and transient psychotic disorder (n=57) over 1 year (2004) were analyzed, and the follow-up data at the e...

  13. Frequency and severity of aggressive incidents in acute psychiatric wards in Switzerland

    Fischer Joachim E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggression and violence and negative consequences thereof are a major concern in acute psychiatric inpatient care globally. Variations in study designs, settings, populations, and data collection methods render comparisons of the incidence of aggressive behaviour in high risk settings difficult. Objective To describe the frequency and severity of aggressive incidents in acute psychiatric wards in the German speaking part of Switzerland. Methods We conducted a prospective multicentre study on 24 acute admission wards in 12 psychiatric hospitals in the German speaking part of Switzerland. Aggressive incidents were recorded by the revised Staff Observation Aggression Scale (SOAS-R and we checked the data collection for underreporting. Our sample comprised 2344 treatment episodes of 2017 patients and a total of 41'560 treatment days. Results A total of 760 aggressive incidents were registered. We found incidence rates per 100 treatment days between 0.60 (95% CI 0.10–1.78 for physical attacks and 1.83 (1.70–1.97 for all aggressive incidents (including purely verbal aggression. The mean severity was 8.80 ± 4.88 points on the 22-point SOAS-R-severity measure; 46% of the purely verbally aggression was classified as severe (≥ 9 pts.. 53% of the aggressive incidents were followed by a coercive measure, mostly seclusion or seclusion accompanied by medication. In 13% of the patients, one ore more incidents were registered, and 6.9% of the patients were involved in one ore more physical attack. Involuntary admission (OR 2.2; 1.6–2.9, longer length of stay (OR 2.7; 2.0–3.8, and a diagnosis of schizophrenia (ICH-10 F2 (OR 2.1; 1.5–2.9 was associated with a higher risk for aggressive incidents, but no such association was found for age and gender. 38% of the incidents were registered within the first 7 days after admission. Conclusion Aggressive incidents in acute admission wards are a frequent and serious problem. Due to the

  14. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing. PMID:24393065

  15. The bulldozer and the ballet dancer: aspects of nurses' caring approaches in acute psychiatric intensive care.

    Björkdahl, A; Palmstierna, T; Hansebo, G

    2010-08-01

    Demanding conditions in acute psychiatric wards inhibit provision of safe, therapeutic care and leave nurses torn between humanistic ideals and the harsh reality of their daily work. The aim of this study was to describe nurses' caring approaches within this context. Data were collected from interviews with nurses working in acute psychiatric intensive care. Data were analysed using qualitative analysis, based on interpretive description. Results revealed a caring-approach continuum on which two approaches formed the main themes: the bulldozer and the ballet dancer. The bulldozer approach functioned as a shield of power that protected the ward from chaos. The ballet dancer approach functioned as a means of initiating relationships with patients. When examining the data from a theoretical perspective of caring and uncaring encounters in nursing, the ballet dancer approach was consistent with a caring approach, while the bulldozer approach was more complex and somewhat aligned with uncaring approaches. Conclusions drawn from the study are that although the bulldozer approach involves a risk for uncaring and harming actions, it also brings a potential for caring. This potential needs to be further explored and nurses should be encouraged to reflect on how they integrate paternalistic nursing styles with person-centred care. PMID:20633078

  16. Longitudinal assessment of quality of life in acute psychiatric inpatients: reliability and validity.

    Russo, J; Roy-Byrne, P; Reeder, D; Alexander, M; Dwyer-O'Connor, E; Dagadakis, C; Ries, R; Patrick, D

    1997-03-01

    This study examined the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of Lehman's Quality of Life Interview (QOLI) as an outcome measure on 981 acutely ill psychiatric inpatients assessed longitudinally at admission and discharge. Patients were stratified into five diagnostic (DX) (depressed bipolar, depressed unipolar, schizophrenia, mania, and other diagnoses) and two substance use disorder (SA) strata (with and without concurrent substance abuse/dependence) based on DSM-III-R criteria. There was good replication of the factor structure, excellent internal consistency, overall and within DX and SA groups. Intercorrelations showed that the functional and satisfaction indices measure unique aspects of the quality of life. The construct consistency of the QOLI was dependent upon psychiatric diagnosis and life domain. Intercorrelations of functional and satisfaction indices for patients with depression were greater than for manic patients. We demonstrated strong consistency of construct validity for family and social relation domains, but not safety or leisure activities. Construct validity was shown to hold longitudinally. Analyses of DX and SA group differences on satisfaction and functional indices of the 8 life domains supported discriminative validity: Depressed patients reported the most dissatisfaction, followed by schizophrenic patients, and manic patients reported the greatest satisfaction in most life domains. Patients with concurrent substance abuse generally reported less satisfaction and lower quality of life than patients without a dual diagnosis. Examination of longitudinal changes in satisfaction indicated the QOLI is responsive to changes in global life, leisure activities, living situation, and social relations from hospital admission to discharge (an average of 2 weeks). This study supports the use of the QOLI as an outcome measure to assess quality of life in acutely ill hospitalized psychiatric patients. PMID:9091598

  17. Duration of bed occupancy as calculated at a random chosen day in an acute care ward. Implications for the use of scarce resources in psychiatric care

    Restan Asbjørn; Berg John E

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Psychiatric acute wards are obliged to admit patients without delay according to the Act on Compulsive Psychiatric Care. Residential long term treatment facilities and rehabilitation facilities may use a waiting list. Patients, who may not be discharged from the acute ward or should not wait there, then occupy acute ward beds. Materials and methods Bed occupancy in one acute ward at a random day in 2002 was registered (n = 23). Successively, the length of stay of all patie...

  18. Clinical features and therapeutic management of patients admitted to Italian acute hospital psychiatric units: the PERSEO (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology survey

    Russo Federico

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PERSEO study (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology is a naturalistic, observational clinical survey in Italian acute hospital psychiatric units, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura; in English, the psychiatric service for diagnosis and management. The aims of this paper are: (i to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients, including sociodemographic features, risk factors, life habits and psychiatric diagnoses; and (ii to assess the clinical management, subjective wellbeing and attitudes toward medications. Methods A total of 62 SPDCs distributed throughout Italy participated in the study and 2521 patients were enrolled over the 5-month study period. Results Almost half of patients (46% showed an aggressive behaviour at admission to ward, but they engaged more commonly in verbal aggression (38%, than in aggression toward other people (20%. A total of 78% of patients had a psychiatric diagnosis at admission, most frequently schizophrenia (36%, followed by depression (16% and personality disorders (14%, and no relevant changes in the diagnoses pattern were observed during hospital stay. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly prescribed drugs, regardless of diagnosis, at all time points. Overall, up to 83% of patients were treated with neuroleptic drugs and up to 27% received more than one neuroleptic either during hospital stay or at discharge. Atypical and conventional antipsychotics were equally prescribed for schizophrenia (59 vs 65% during stay and 59 vs 60% at discharge, while atypical drugs were preferred in schizoaffective psychoses (72 vs 49% during stay and 70 vs 46% at discharge and depression (41 vs 32% during stay and 44 vs 25% at discharge. Atypical neuroleptics were slightly preferred to conventional ones at hospital discharge (52 vs 44%. Polypharmacy was in general widely used. Patient attitudes toward medications were on average positive and self

  19. A comprehensive psychiatric service

    Wang, A G

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive psychiatric service was established in 1969 in the Faroe Islands. This service was created as a department of a general hospital. The spheres covered by this department, operating in the midst of the community were: acute and chronic patients, a liaison-psychiatric service, and an...... outpatient service. The number of chronic patients has not decreased, due to an influx of unruly senile patients. The close proximity of the service to the community has increased the pressure with regard to the care of such patients. Other services, such as outpatient treatment of alcoholics and neurotics...

  20. Admissions to acute adolescent psychiatric units: a prospective study of clinical severity and outcome

    Jensen Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several countries have established or are planning acute psychiatric in-patient services that accept around-the-clock emergency admission of adolescents. Our aim was to investigate the characteristics and clinical outcomes of a cohort of patients at four Norwegian units. Methods We used a prospective pre-post observational design. Four units implemented a clinician-rated outcome measure, the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA, which measures mental health problems and their severity. We collected also data about the diagnoses, suicidal problems, family situations, and the involvement of the Child Protection Service. Predictions of outcome (change in HoNOSCA total score were analysed with a regression model. Results The sample comprised 192 adolescents admitted during one year (response rate 87%. Mean age was 15.7 years (range 10-18 and 70% were girls. Fifty-eight per cent had suicidal problems at intake and the mean intake HoNOSCA total score was 18.5 (SD 6.4. The largest groups of main diagnostic conditions were affective (28% and externalizing (26% disorders. Diagnoses and other patient characteristics at intake did not differ between units. Clinical psychiatric disorders and developmental disorders were associated with severity (on HoNOSCA at intake but not with outcome. Of adolescents ≥ 16 years, 33% were compulsorily admitted. Median length of stay was 8.5 days and 75% of patients stayed less than a month. Compulsory admissions and length of stay varied between units. Mean change (improvement in the HoNOSCA total score was 5.1 (SD 6.2, with considerable variation between units. Mean discharge score was close to the often-reported outpatient level, and self-injury and emotional symptoms were the most reduced symptoms during the stay. In a regression model, unit, high HoNOSCA total score at intake, or involvement of the Child Protection Service predicted improvement during admission

  1. Effects of Full-Moon Definition on Psychiatric Emergency Department Presentations

    Parmar, Varinder S.; Talikowska-Szymczak, Ewa; Downs, Emily; Szymczak, Peter; Meiklejohn, Erin; Groll, Dianne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The lunar cycle is believed to be related to psychiatric episodes and emergency department (ED) admissions. This belief is held by both mental health professionals and the general population. Previous studies analyzing the lunar effect have yielded inconsistent results. Methods. ED records from two tertiary care hospitals were used to assess the impact of three different definitions of the full-moon period, commonly found in the literature. The full-moon definitions used in this s...

  2. Acute effects of electroconvulsive therapy on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in psychiatric disorders

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is frequently used in the treatment of major depression and other psychiatric disorders; its mechanism of action is not established, but previous evidence suggests that it is associated with postictal metabolic suppression. The authors have used measurements of rCBF as an index of cortical metabolic activity to study the acute effects of ECT. Measurements of rCBF were made in 32 cortical regions in 10 patients (pts) following one minute breathing of Xe-133 (5mCi/L); the measurements were performed 30min before and 50min after ECT. Bilateral ECT was administered to six pts (five diagnosed as major depressives and one schizophrenic) and unilateral ECT to four (all diagnosed as unipolar or bipolar affective disorder). The total rCBF material consists of 52 measurements in these pts, made before and after 16 bilateral and 10 unilateral treatments. ECT was found to cause significant reduction of rCBF. Mean hemispheric flows (using the Initial Slope Index to measure grey-matter flow) were reduced by about 5% in both hemispheres following bilateral treatment. Unilateral treatment caused a 9% reduction of flow in the treated hemisphere, but only 2% contralaterally. Regional patterns of flow decreases also differed between the two treatment modes: bilateral frontal reductions were found after bilateral treatment, whereas unilateral ECT caused a widespread flow reduction in the treated hemisphere, and almost no effect contralaterally. These results suggest that rCBF studies are useful for assessing ECT, and indicate that the acute cerebral effects of ECT vary with the mode of treatment

  3. Acute psychiatric admissions from an out-of-hours Casualty Clinic; how do referring doctors and admitting specialists agree?

    Hansen Vidje

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decades there has been an increasing pressure on the acute psychiatric wards in Norway. The major contributor to psychiatric acute admissions at the University Hospital of North Norway in the city of Tromsø in 2001 was the GP-based Tromsø Casualty Clinic, only open out-of-hours. We explored all acute psychiatric referrals from Tromsø Casualty Clinic in 2001. The purpose of the study was to characterize the admissions and assess the agreement between the referring doctors and the hospital specialists according to the need for hospitalization, agreement on application of the law and the diagnostic evaluation to assess whether the admissions were appropriate. Methods Retrospective, record based, descriptive study comprising 101 psychiatric acute referrals from the Tromsø Casualty Clinic to the psychiatric acute wards at the University Hospital of North Norway. Results The specialists accepted all referrals except one, they mostly agreed upon the diagnoses suggested by the referring doctors and they mostly confirmed the application of the law. Seventy-five percent of the admissions took place during weekends, public holidays or nighttimes. Diagnoses of psychoses or suicidal attempts accounted for 76 % of the total referrals. Substance abuse was noted for 43 %, and in 22 % of all admissions the patients had stopped taking their psychopharmacological medication. The police assisted the referring doctors in one third of all admissions, and was the legal representative in 52 out of 59 involuntary admissions. Thirty percent of the admissions were first- time admissions. Thirty-two percent of the hospital stays lasted for three days or less. Median length of stay was 6.5 days. Conclusion The casualty clinic physicians and the hospital specialists mostly agreed in their evaluation of patients indicating that most of the admissions were appropriate. The police was more often involved in the involuntary admissions than

  4. Perceived stigma among attendees of psychiatric and nonpsychiatric outpatients department in an industrial township: A comparative study

    Abhishek Mahajan; Amitav Banerjee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Context: Stigma associated with psychiatric disorders and few somatic disorders such as sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), tuberculosis and leprosy, adversely effects treatment seeking behavior, leads to concealment, and poor compliance with treatment. In busy outpatient departments (OPDs), the issue of stigma is likely to be overlooked. Materials and Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional study collecting data on an 8-item stigma scale from patients attending psychiatr...

  5. Coping with suicidal urges among youth seen in a psychiatric emergency department.

    Czyz, Ewa K; Horwitz, Adam G; Arango, Alejandra; Cole-Lewis, Yasmin; Berona, Johnny; King, Cheryl A

    2016-07-30

    This study of youth seeking psychiatric emergency department (ED) services examined (1) youth self-efficacy to use suicide-specific coping strategies, (2) whether these self-efficacy beliefs varied by demographic and clinical characteristics, (3) and associations of these beliefs with suicide attempts and ED visits 3-5 months later. Participants were 286 psychiatric ED patients (59% Female), ages 13-25. Ratings of self-efficacy to engage in 10 suicide-specific coping behaviors were assessed at index visit. A total of 226 participants (79%) were assessed 3-5 months later. Youth endorsed low-to-moderate self-efficacy for different suicide-specific coping behaviors, with lowest ratings endorsed for limiting access to lethal means and accessing professional resources. More severe baseline psychopathology was associated with lower self-efficacy. Males endorsed higher self-efficacy for coping behaviors not requiring external support. Lower coping self-efficacy for some of the key strategies, and lower confidence that these strategies will be helpful, differentiated those with and without follow-up suicide attempts and ED visits. The generally low-to-moderate confidence in youths' ability to engage in coping behaviors to manage suicidal crises, and its association with follow-up suicidal crises, is concerning because many of these strategies are commonly included as part of discharge recommendations or safety planning. Implications of findings are discussed. PMID:27179183

  6. Psychiatric side effects of acute high-dose corticosteroid therapy in neurological conditions.

    Lotan, Itay; Fireman, Liora; Benninger, Felix; Weizman, Abraham; Steiner, Israel

    2016-07-01

    It has been implied that high-dose corticosteroids (CSs) commonly cause psychiatric side effects. Here, we examined the rate and risk factors of psychiatric side effects during high-dose CS treatment in patients with neurological disorders. Patients treated with high-dose intravenous CSs for neurological disorders were evaluated for depression, mania, and psychosis using the Beck Depression Inventory, the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Young Mania Rating Scale, and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale before CS treatment, immediately after, and 1 month following treatment. Forty-nine consecutive patients were monitored. There was a reduction in the Beck Depression Inventory and Geriatric Depression Scale scores as well as in the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale scores throughout the study period and a transitory increase in the Young Mania Rating Scale score immediately after CS administration. Thus, a tendency to develop transient mild euphoria during high-dose CS treatment exists, but is reversible at 1 month, whereas a reduction in depressive symptoms tended to persist. Overall, our data indicate that high-dose CS treatment for neurological diseases is relatively safe with respect to psychiatric complications. PMID:26938038

  7. Emergency Department Length-Of-Stay For Psychiatric Visits Was Significantly Longer Than For Nonpsychiatric Visits, 2002-11.

    Zhu, Jane M; Singhal, Astha; Hsia, Renee Y

    2016-09-01

    Despite increases in the use of emergency department (EDs) for mental health care, there are limited data on whether psychiatric patients disproportionately contribute to ED crowding. We conducted a retrospective analysis using a national database of ED visits in the period 2002-11 to describe trends in median and ninetieth-percentile length-of-stay for patients with psychiatric versus nonpsychiatric primary diagnoses. Psychiatric patients who visited the ED were transferred to another facility at six times the rate of nonpsychiatric patients. Median lengths-of-stay were similar for psychiatric and nonpsychiatric patients among those who were admitted to the hospital (264 versus 269 minutes) but significantly different for those who were admitted for observation (355 versus 279 minutes), transferred (312 versus 195 minutes), or discharged (189 versus 144 minutes). Overall, differences in ED length-of-stay between psychiatric and nonpsychiatric patients did not narrow over time. These findings suggest deficiencies in ED capacity for psychiatric care, which may necessitate improvements in both throughput and alternative models of care. PMID:27605653

  8. Challenges in Obtaining HIV Testing in an Acute Involuntary Inpatient Psychiatric Setting.

    Weller, Jennifer; Levitt, Gwen; Myers, Robert; Riley, Aaron; Gesmundo, Celsius-Kit

    2016-01-01

    Even in health care professions, a stigma remains for patients with co-occurring HIV and serious mental illness. Researchers at a large, urban medical center encountered this stigma when they attempted to initiate a study of cognition in psychiatric inpatients with and without HIV who were seen as vulnerable in the context of research. Education efforts and advocacy on the part of the research team was instrumental and resulted in system-wide changes in the hospital, including the addition of HIV testing to the psychiatric admission laboratory panel. Within the first year that routine laboratory orders included an HIV test, the rate of testing ordered by inpatient-attending psychiatrists reached 60% of admissions. As of 2014, 13 HIV tests were found to be HIV seropositive in inpatients, with four of those cases classified as new-onset, as opposed to two positive tests in the year prior to our study. PMID:27426407

  9. An Evaluative Study of the WOW Program on Patients' Satisfaction in Acute Psychiatric Units

    Xie Huiting; Li Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patient satisfaction is one of the key evidence of the quality of health-care delivery in nursing. Nursing is a patient-centered activity; although nurse-patient interaction is one of the key tenets of mental health nursing, a structured program to enhance this interaction is lacking. To address the gap, the WOW program was developed in a psychiatric hospital but its effectivenesss had not been evaluated.Objective: This study aims to compare satisfaction levels between patients wh...

  10. An Evaluative Study of the WOW Program on Patients' Satisfaction in Acute Psychiatric Units

    Xie Huiting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient satisfaction is one of the key evidence of the quality of health-care delivery in nursing. Nursing is a patient-centered activity; although nurse-patient interaction is one of the key tenets of mental health nursing, a structured program to enhance this interaction is lacking. To address the gap, the WOW program was developed in a psychiatric hospital but its effectivenesss had not been evaluated.Objective: This study aims to compare satisfaction levels between patients who have undertaken the WOW program and those who have not.Methodology: A comparative survey design was employed for this study. A purposive sample of 91 adults was obtained from two inpatient psychiatric units: one where the WOW program had beenimplemented and the other, a matched control unit. After patients had been admitted to one of the two inpatient psychiatric units for a week, a questionnaire, modified from the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scale (NSNS, was administered to participants to assess their level of satisfaction with nursing care.Results and Conclusion: When the satisfaction scores of participants in the WOW group and the control group were compared, it was revealed that the WOW group was more satisfied with nursing care than the control group. Though the difference was not statistically significant, the potential of a structured nurse-patient interaction program to enhance patients’ satisfaction is encouraging. Theresults of this study offer valuable information that may direct the future enhancement and development of programs to improve patient satisfaction.

  11. Psychiatric emergencies (part I): psychiatric disorders causing organic symptoms.

    Testa, A; Giannuzzi, R; Sollazzo, F; Petrongolo, L; Bernardini, L; Daini, S

    2013-02-01

    Psychiatric emergencies are conditions that mostly destabilize the already frenetic activity of the Emergency Department. Sometimes the emergency is clearly referable to primitive psychiatric illness. Other times, psychiatric and organic symptoms can independently coexist (comorbidity), or develop together in different conditions of substance abuse, including alcohol and prescription drugs. Differentiating between substance induced and pre-existing psychiatric disorder (dual diagnosis) may be difficult, other than controversial issue. Finally, an organic disease can hide behind a psychiatric disorder (pseudopsychiatric emergency). In this review (part I), psychiatric disorders that occur with organic symptoms are discussed. They include: (1) anxiety, conversion and psychosomatic disorders, and (2) simulated diseases. The physiologic mechanisms of the stress reaction, divided into a dual neuro-hormonal response, are reviewed in this section: (1) activation of the sympathetic nervous system and adrenal medulla with catecholamine production (rapid response), and (2) activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis with cortisol production (slow response). The concept of the fight-or-flight response, its adaptive significance and the potential evolution in paralyzing response, well showing by Yerkes-Dodson curve, is explained. Abnormal short- and long-term reactions to stress evolving toward well codified cluster of trauma and stressor-related disorders, including acute stress disorder, adjustment disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder, are examined. A brief review of major psychiatric disorder and related behaviour abnormalities, vegetative symptoms and cognitive impairment, according to DMS IV-TR classification, are described. Finally, the reactive psychic symptoms and behavioral responses to acute or chronic organic disease, so called "somatopsychic disorders", commonly occurring in elderly and pediatric patients, are presented. The specific conditions of

  12. Effects of psychiatric disorders on Type A acute aortic dissection pathogenesis and analysis of follow-up results

    Paolo Nardi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: A connection between psychiatric disorders (PDs and Type A acute aortic dissection (AAD has not been shown. The aim of this study was to define the psychological profile of patients treated for AAD, and to analyze the prevalence of PDs in their medical histories, in the immediate postoperative period, and at a mid-term follow-up. Patients and Methods: From March 2005 to October 2014, 240 consecutive patients underwent surgery for AAD. 60 patients (mean age 60+/-13 years; 43 males underwent psychiatric consultation postoperatively, and they represent the subjects of our retrospective study. Ascending aorta +/- arch replacement was performed in 43 patients, whereas the Bentall procedure +/- arch replacement was performed in 17. Data were retrospectively analyzed. Follow-ups were completed in 59 patients (mean duration 35+/-23 months. Results: PDs were present in the medical histories of 34 patients. Postoperatively, in 28 cases, a definitive diagnosis of PD (group PD was made in agreement with the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders-IV criteria, including: Major depression (n=13, anxious-depressive syndrome (n=6, bipolar disorder Type 2 (n=4, panic attacks (n=2, paranoid schizophrenia (n=1, and anxiety (n=2. 32 patients without a definitive psychiatric diagnosis were classified as Group non-PD. In the postoperative period, clinical manifestations of PDs, including delirium, persistent spatio-temporal disorientation, and psychomotor agitation were evident in 22 patients (78% in group PD versus 8 patients (25% in group non-PD (P<0.0001. During follow-up, only one death for non-cardiac reasons occurred in group PD. There were no suicides; only 10 patients of group PD required PD treatment (P<0.0001 vs. early postoperative findings; 4 patients in group non-PD required PD treatment. Conclusion: Our findings suggest a strong relationship between PD and AAD. Because the psychiatric conditions appeared to be largely stable after

  13. 精神专科医院外科住院患者精神病共病现状分析%Status analysis on psychiatric comorbidity of inpatients from surgery department of psychiatric hospitals

    沈萍; 沈仲夏; 徐美英; 陈海勤; 金莉; 陈海支

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析精神专科医院外科住院患者精神病共病的流行病学情况及特征.方法外科住院患者791例,对其中共患精神病者进行统计学分析.结果 791例患者中共患精神病59例,精神病前3位分别为精神分裂症、抑郁症、神经症;外科疾病前3位分别为骨折、脑外伤、肠梗阻.结论 精神专科医院外科住院患者精神病共病比例高,共患疾病有相关性.%Objective To study the cpidcmiological status and characteristics on psychiatric comorbidity of inpatients from surgery department of psychiatric hospitals. Method Take statistic analysis on patients with psychiatric comorbidity from 791 inpatients from surgery department. Result There arc 59 psychiatric comorbidity patients from 791 patients. The first three of psychosis arc schizophrenia, depression and neurosis and the first three surgical diseases arc fracture, brain injury and intestinal obstruction. Conclusion There is a high level of psychiatric comorbidity among inpatients from surgery department of psychiatric hospitals. There is correlation between comorbidity diseases.

  14. A replication study of the City nurse intervention: reducing conflict and containment on three acute psychiatric wards.

    Bowers, L; Flood, C; Brennan, G; Allan, T

    2008-11-01

    Conflict and containment on acute inpatient psychiatric wards pose a threat to patient and staff safety, and it is desirable to minimize the frequency of these events. Research has indicated that certain staff attitudes and behaviours might serve to accomplish this, namely, positive appreciation, emotional regulation and effective structure. A previous test of an intervention based on these principles, on two wards, showed a good outcome. In this study, we tested the same intervention on three further wards. Two 'City nurses' were employed to work with three acute wards, assisting with the implementation of changes according to the working model of conflict and containment generation. Evaluation was via before-and-after measures, with parallel data collected from five control wards. While simple before-and-after analysis of the two experimental wards showed significant reductions in conflict and containment, when a comparison with controls was conducted, with control for patient occupancy and clustering of results by ward, no effect of the intervention was found. The results were therefore ambiguous, and neither confirm nor contradict the efficacy of the intervention. A further intervention study may need to be conducted with a larger sample size to achieve adequate statistical power. PMID:18844799

  15. Duration of bed occupancy as calculated at a random chosen day in an acute care ward. Implications for the use of scarce resources in psychiatric care

    Restan Asbjørn

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychiatric acute wards are obliged to admit patients without delay according to the Act on Compulsive Psychiatric Care. Residential long term treatment facilities and rehabilitation facilities may use a waiting list. Patients, who may not be discharged from the acute ward or should not wait there, then occupy acute ward beds. Materials and methods Bed occupancy in one acute ward at a random day in 2002 was registered (n = 23. Successively, the length of stay of all patients was registered, together with information on waiting time after a decision was made on further treatment needs. Eleven patients waited for further resident treatment. The running cost of stay was calculated for the acute ward and in the different resident follow-up facilities. Twenty-three patients consumed a total of 776 resident days. 425 (54.8% of these were waiting days. Patients waited up to 86 days. Results Total cost of treatment was 0.69 million Euro (0.90 mill. $, waiting costs were 54.8% of this, 0.38 million Euro (0.50 million $. The difference between acute care costs and the costs in the relevant secondary resident facility was defined as the imputed loss. Net loss by waiting was 0.20 million Euro (0.26 million $ or 28.8% of total cost. Discussion This point estimate study indicates that treating patients too sick to be released to anything less than some other intramural facility locks a sizable amount of the resources of a psychiatric acute ward. The method used minimized the chance of financially biased treatment decisions. Costs of frustration to staff and family members, and delayed effect of treatment was set to zero. Direct extrapolation to costs per year is not warranted, but it is suggested that our findings would be comparable to other acute wards as well. The study shows how participant observation and cost effectiveness analysis may be combined.

  16. Comparing the Obvious: Interactional characteristics of staff in acute mental health nursing and forensic psychiatric nursing

    Hounsgaard, Lise; Alkier Gildberg, Frederik; Bradley, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    interviews. Findings show that both acute and forensic mental health nursing practice is characterized by two overriding themes; ‘trust and relationship-enabling care’ and ‘behavior and perception-corrective care.’ The comparison of the two studies shows no major differences in the characteristics of staff...

  17. The impact of mindfulness meditation in promoting a culture of safety on a acute psychiatric ward

    Meijel, Berno van

    2012-01-01

    Deze pilot studie naar de effecten van een aangepast Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction programma in cursus vorm aangeboden aan medewerkers van een acute psychiatrische unit biedt een indicatie voor positieve effecten ten aanzien van stress, aandacht, concentratie en zelfbewustzijn van de deelnemers

  18. Substance abuse in patients admitted voluntarily and involuntarily to acute psychiatric wards: a national cross-sectional study

    Anne Opsal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Substance abuse and mental disorder comorbidity is high among patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards. The aim of the study was to identify this co-occurrence as a reason for involuntary admission and if specific substance use-related diagnoses were associated with such admissions.Methods: The study was a part of a multicentre, cross-sectional national study carried out during 2005-2006 within a research network of acute mental health services. Seventy-five percent of Norwegian hospitals providing acute in-patient treatment participated. Substance use was measured using the Clinician Rating Scale and the ICD-10 diagnoses F10-19. Diagnostic assessments were performed by the clinicians during hospital stay.Results: Overall, 33.2% (n=1,187 of the total patient population (3,506 were abusing alcohol or drugs prior to admission according to the Clinician Rating Scale. No difference in the overall prevalence of substance abuserelated diagnoses between the two groups was found. Overall, 310 (26% of the admissions, 216 voluntarily and 94 involuntarily admitted patients received a double diagnosis. Frequent comorbid combinations among voluntarily admitted patients were; a combination of alcohol and either mood disorder (40% or multiple mental disorders (29%. Among involuntarily admitted patients, a combination of poly drug use and schizophrenia was most frequent (47%. Substance abusing patients diagnosed with mental and behavioral disorders due to the use of psychoactive stimulant substances had a significantly higher risk of involuntary hospitalization (OR 2.3.Conclusion: Nearly one third of substance abusing patients are involuntarily admitted to mental hospitals, in particular stimulant drug use was associated with involuntarily admissions.

  19. Patients' experiences of psychiatric care in emergency departments: A secondary analysis.

    Harris, Barbara; Beurmann, Ross; Fagien, Samantha; Shattell, Mona M

    2016-05-01

    The number of psychiatric emergencies presenting to EDs in the United States continues to rise. Evidence suggests that psychiatric ED care encounters can have less than optimal outcomes, and result in stress for providers. The primary aim of this study is to describe the perceptions of ED visits by persons experiencing emotional distress, identifying themes among these that may guide nursing interventions that minimize stress and optimize outcomes in the treatment of psychiatric emergency. This secondary analysis used a qualitative, phenomenological method to analyze a de-identified data set originally collected in a study of experiences of psychiatric emergency in a community based crisis management setting. Findings consist of three major themes: "Emergency rooms are cold and clinical", "They talk to you like you're a crazy person", and "You get put away against your will". An overarching theme through all three is the influence of RN communication, both positive and negative, on patient perceptions of their ED encounters. While nurse-patient communication is basic to all areas of practice, it may be a low priority in the urgent and chaotic context of the ED. However, our findings suggest that increased attention to timely, empathic and validating communication and openness to the patient's reality may decrease severity of symptoms, optimize outcomes, and decrease provider stress. PMID:26459607

  20. [Dichotomy of psychiatric and somatic emergency care; fundamental flaw should be addressed].

    Tuerlings, Joep H A M; Pelger, E C M Noor; de Pont, Boudewijn J H B; van Waarde, Jeroen A

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands, acute psychiatric care is characterised by mind-body dualism. For acute psychiatric patients, the first port of call is the general practitioner (GP); after-hour care is provided by the out-of-hours GP service. In contrast to patients with other medical illnesses, the out-of-hours GP service does not usually refer patients with acute psychiatric issues to the accident and emergency (A&E) department of the general hospital, but to the local ambulant psychiatric 'crisis' service. However, some of these patients still end up at the A&E department, as our three cases demonstrate. Integration of the out-of-hours GP service, A&E and acute psychiatric care, therefore, would enable elimination of the current partitioning of somatic and psychiatric medicine in acute emergency care. This solution would not only improve acute emergency care, but would also ensure a targeted and efficient implementation of services and might even lead to a decreased stigmatisation of psychiatric patients in general. PMID:26230348

  1. Clinical experience and institutional in a Department of Mental Health: The multifamily groups for parents and children with psychiatric illness in the time of post-modernity

    Luisella Ferraris

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The following work shows the beginning and development of a multifamily group, involving mental health professionals, parents and psychiatric patients, in a mental health center. The group goals and the main functions of this setting, will be described, observing also the social and community changes, occurring in recent years. Finally, starting from the analysis of the major psychoanalysis research findings, the concepts of inter-subjectivity, therapeutic alliance and institution's role regarding the psychiatric patients’ treatment, will be deepened. Keywords: Department of Mental Health; Multifamily group; Community changes; Therapeutic alliance; Psychiatric patients

  2. The association of psychiatric comorbidity and use of the emergency department among persons with substance use disorders: an observational cohort study

    Allee Elise

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychiatric and substance use problems are commonly found to be contributing factors to frequent Emergency Department (ED use, yet little research has focused on the association between substance use and psychiatric comorbidity. This study assesses the association of a psychiatric comorbidity on (ED use among patients with substance use disorders (SUDs. Methods The study focuses on 6,865 patients who were diagnosed with SUDs in the ED of a large urban hospital in the southern United States from January 1994 – June 1998. Patients were grouped by type of substance use disorder. After examining frequency of visits by diagnosis, the sample was assigned to the following groups–alcohol dependence (ICD9 = 303, alcohol abuse (ICD9 = 305.0, cocaine dependence/abuse (ICD9 = 304.2, 305.6, and polysubstance/mixed use (ICD9 = 305.9. A patient was classified with psychiatric comorbidity if a psychiatric diagnosis appeared during any of the patient's visits. The following psychiatric diagnoses were included–schizophrenia/psychoses, bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety, and dementia (ICD-9 codes available upon request. Results Patients with SUDs and psychiatric comorbidity had significantly higher mean number of ER visits (mean = 5.2 SD = 8.7 than SUD patients without psychiatric comorbidity (mean = 2.5, SD = 3.7. In logistic regressions predicting several categorizations of heavier use of the ED (either 4+, 8+, 12+, 16+, or 20+ visits over the span of the study SUD patients with psychiatric comorbidity had adjusted odds ratios of 3.0 to 5.6 (reference group = patients with SUDs but no psychiatric comorbidity. This association was found across all substance use diagnostic categories studied, with the strongest relationship observed among patients with cocaine disorders or alcohol dependence. Conclusion The results provide further support for the notion that the ED could and should serve as an important identification site for cost

  3. Effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in patients on an acute care psychiatric unit: a randomized three group effectiveness study.

    Silverman, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Stigma is a major social barrier that can restrict access to and willingness to seek psychiatric care. Psychiatric consumers may use secrecy and withdrawal in an attempt to cope with stigma. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in acute care psychiatric inpatients using a randomized design with wait-list control. Participants (N=83) were randomly assigned by cluster to one of three single-session group-based conditions: music therapy, education, or wait-list control. Participants in the music therapy and education conditions completed only posttests while participants in the wait-list control condition completed only pretests. The music therapy condition was a group songwriting intervention wherein participants composed lyrics for "the stigma blues." Results indicated significant differences in measures of discrimination (experienced stigma), disclosure (self-stigma), and total stigma between participants in the music therapy condition and participants in the wait-list control condition. From the results of this randomized controlled investigation, music therapy may be an engaging and effective psychosocial technique to treat stigma. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for clinical practice and psychiatric music therapy research are provided. PMID:24070990

  4. Young people's risk of suicide attempts after contact with a psychiatric department - a nested case-control design using Danish register data

    Christiansen, Erik; Juul Larsen, Kim

    2012-01-01

    . Methods:  A complete extraction of Danish register data for every individual born in the period 1983-1989 was made. Of these 403,431 individuals, 3,465 had attempted suicide. In order to control for confounder effects from gender, age and calendar-time, a nested case-control study was designed. A total...... population of 72,765 individuals was used to analyze the risk of suicide attempts after contact with a psychiatric department. The case-control data were analyzed using conditional logistic regression. Results:  This study shows that a child/adolescent's risk of suicide attempt peaks immediately after...... discharge from last contact with a psychiatric department. The risk of suicide attempt is highest for children and adolescents suffering from personality disorders, depression and substance use disorders. Children and adolescents with previous contact with a psychiatric department and parental income...

  5. Perceived stigma among attendees of psychiatric and nonpsychiatric outpatients department in an industrial township: A comparative study

    Abhishek Mahajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Context: Stigma associated with psychiatric disorders and few somatic disorders such as sexually transmitted diseases (STDs, tuberculosis and leprosy, adversely effects treatment seeking behavior, leads to concealment, and poor compliance with treatment. In busy outpatient departments (OPDs, the issue of stigma is likely to be overlooked. Materials and Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional study collecting data on an 8-item stigma scale from patients attending psychiatry and other OPDs of a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital in an industrial township. Information was collected by face to face interview from 400 patients attending psychiatry OPD and 401 patients attending other OPDs. Validations of the scale were done by face, content, and construct validity. Reliability was appraised by Cronbach′s alpha and Guttmann split-half coefficients. Significant differences in answers to the 8-item questionnaire were explored by Chi-square test for individual responses and Kruskal-Wallis test for difference in total stigma score. Results: Patients attending psychiatry OPD consistently gave responses indicating a greater degree of perceived stigma than those attending OPD for somatic disorders. This difference was almost 3-4 times more on most of the items (P < 0.001. Among somatic disorders, stigma was highest (even higher than psychiatric disorders among STDs, tuberculosis and leprosy patients among these and psychiatric disorders the score was almost 3 times more compared to other somatic disorders (P < 0.001. The scale demonstrated good face, content, and construct validity. Reliability was also very high with Cronbach′s alpha coefficient and Guttmann split-half reliability coefficient 0.932 and 0.901 indicating very good internal consistency of the 8-item scale. Conclusion: Stigma was higher among STD patients, tuberculosis, leprosy, and psychiatry patients as compared to patients suffering from somatic disorders. Assessment of

  6. Computerized Psychiatric Diagnostic Interview

    Zetin, Mark; Warren, Stacey; Lanssens, Ed; Tominaga, Doris

    1987-01-01

    A computerized psychiatric diagnostic interview was developed and administered to 121 adult acute psychiatric inpatients. Data on the 100 completers was evaluated for sensitivity and specificity of the computer diagnostic evaluation relative to the hospital discharge diagnosis and revealed sensitivity greater than 70% for major depression, alcohol/substance abuse, adjustment disorder, bipolar/mania, dependent personaltiy disorder, and histrionic personality disorder. Specificity was greater t...

  7. Young People's Risk of Suicide Attempts after Contact with a Psychiatric Department--A Nested Case-Control Design Using Danish Register Data

    Christiansen, Erik; Larsen, Kim Juul

    2012-01-01

    Background: There seems to be an increased risk of children and adolescents committing or attempting suicide after contact with a psychiatric department. Children and adolescents living in families with low socio-economic status (SES) might have an especially increased suicide attempt risk. Methods: A complete extraction of Danish register data…

  8. The Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry - II (ASAP-II: a comparative study of psychiatric intensive care units in the Netherlands

    van Venrooij Janine

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of patients in whom mental illness progresses to stages in which acute, and often forced treatment is warranted, is on the increase across Europe. As a consequence, more patients are involuntarily admitted to Psychiatric Intensive Care Units (PICU. From several studies and reports it has become evident that important dissimilarities exist between PICU's. The current study seeks to describe organisational as well as clinical and patient related factors across ten PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region, adjusted for or stratified by level of urbanization. Method/Design This paper describes the design of the Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry II (ASAP-II. This study is a prospective observational cohort study comparing PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region on various patient characteristics, treatment aspects and recovery related variables. Dissimilarities were measured by means of collecting standardized forms which were filled out in the framework of care as usual, by means of questionnaires filled out by mental health care professionals and by means of extracting data from patient files for every consecutive patient admitted at participating PICU's during a specific time period. Urbanization levels for every PICU were calculated conform procedures as proposed by the Dutch Central Bureau for Statistics (CBS. Discussion The current study may provide a deeper understanding of the differences between psychiatric intensive care units that can be used to promote best practice and benchmarking procedures, and thus improve the standard of care.

  9. The Practice of Seclusion and Time-out on English Acute Psychiatric Wards: The City-128 Study

    Bowers, L.; Merwe, M. van der; Nijman, H.L.I.; Hamilton, B.; Noorthoorn, E.O.; Stewart, D.; Muir-Cochrane, E.

    2010-01-01

    Background - Seclusion is widely used internationally to manage disturbed behavior by psychiatric patients, although many countries are seeking to reduce or eliminate this practice. Time-out has been little described and almost completely unstudied. Aim and method - To assess the relationship of sec

  10. Acute and chronic effects of cannabinoids on human brain: gene-environment interactions related to psychiatric disorders

    Batalla Cases, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Tesi realitzada a l'Institut Clínic de Neurociències / Hospital Clínic 1) Introduction Cannabis use has been associated to mental health problems and worsened outcome of established psychiatric disorders. Disturbances of the endocannabinoid system may be responsible for long-lasting effects, such as neuropsychological deficits and morphological brain alterations. As not all the exposed individuals are equally affected, proneness to cannabis induced impairment may rely on key factors su...

  11. Patient satisfaction in an acute medicine department in Morocco

    Soufi Mehdi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients' satisfaction is an important indicator for quality of care. Measuring healthcare quality and improving patient satisfaction have become increasingly prevalent, especially among healthcare providers and purchasers of healthcare. This is mainly due to the fact that consumers are becoming increasingly more knowledgeable about healthcare. No studies of inpatients' satisfaction with hospital care have been conducted in Morocco. The first objective of the present study was to confirm the reliability and validity of the Arabic version of the EQS-H (Echelle de Qualité des Soins en Hospitalisation. The second objective was to evaluate patient satisfaction in an acute medicine department in Morocco by using the EQS-H questionnaire; and also to assess the influence of certain demographics, socioeconomics, and health characteristics in patient satisfaction. Methods it was a patient survey conducted in an acute medicine department of a Moroccan University Hospital. We surveyed their socio demographic status, and health characteristics at admission. We performed structured face to face interviews with patients who were discharged from hospital. The core of the EQS-H questionnaire was translated to Arabic, adapted to the present setting, and then used to measure patient satisfaction with quality of care. The internal consistency of the EQS-H scale was assessed by Chronbach's coefficient alpha. Validity was assessed by factor analysis. Factors influencing inpatients' satisfaction were identified using multiple linear regression. Results The Arabic version of EQS-H demonstrated an excellent internal consistency for the two dimensions studied (0.889 for 'quality of medical information' (MI and 0.906 for 'Relationship with staff and daily routine' (RS. The principal component analysis confirmed the bidimensional structure of the questionnaire and explained 60% of the total variance. In the univariate analysis, urban residence, higher

  12. Prevalence of nosocomial infections in psychiatric department and nursing countermeasures%精神科医院感染现患率调查与护理对策

    裴建琴

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解精神科医院感染基本情况,发现医院感染管理中存在的问题,调整控制医院感染措施.方法 采取横断面调查方法,以床旁调查与病案调查相结合,填写统一的个案调查表.结果 调查住院精神科患者750例,医院感染现患率为1.87%,感染主要科室为老年精神科;主要部位为呼吸道50.00%、泌尿道42.86%.结论 加强老年精神科医院感染管理,特别是基础护理,能有效降低医院感染发生率.%OBJECTIVE To explore the status of nosocomial infections in the psychiatric department and find out the problems existing in the nosocomial infection management so as to adjust the control of nosocomial infections. METHODS By means of the cross-sectional investigation and the bedside investigation combined with the medical records investigation, the uniform questionnaire was filled out. RESULTS Totally 750 hospitalized patients in psychiatric department were investigated,the prevalence rate of nosocomial infections was 1. 86%, the infections mainly distributed in the geriatric department of psychiatrics; the respiratory tract and the urinary tract were the predominant infection sites, accounting for 50. 00% and 42. 86%, respectively. CONCLUSION It can effectively reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections that the control of nosocomial infections in the geriatric department of psychiatrics ,especially the primary nursing,is intensified.

  13. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDER

    2004-01-01

    2004536 Association study of clinical presentation in first-episode schizophrenia and possible candidate genes in chromosome 22. MA Xiaohong (马小红), et al. Dept Psychiatr, West China Hosp, Sichuan U-niv, Chengdu 610041. Chin J Psychiatr 2004;37(3): 145-148.

  14. [Psychiatric disability and work: assessment of a group of patients examined at the Occupational Medicine Outpatient Department of the Turin University in the period 2000-2012].

    Gullino, A; Coggiola, M; Accomazzo, V; Baracco, A; De Marzi, G P; Occhipinti, R; Perrelli, F; Romano, C

    2012-01-01

    Problems at workplace with psychiatric subjects are increasing and the role of occupational physicians is basic to achieve a suitable job role. The purpose of this study is to assess the main occupational factors and to evaluate the judgement of fitness to work in 1109 patients with psychiatric diseases examined in our outpatients department during the period 2000-2012. These subjects were sent to our service by family doctors or, more frequently, by the companies seeking for judgement of the working residual capacities. The psychiatric diseases were classified according to the DSM IV; for each group considered, we evaluated the production sector, the specific job role, the pharmacological therapy as compared to the final judgement. The most frequent diagnoses were depressive and anxious disorders. The pharmacological therapy does not seem to be related to the final judgement but the small number of subjects defined as unfit to work does not allow a final evaluation. The study suggests the relevance of team work among the different actors of prevention to achieve a successful management of these workers in a specific job role. PMID:23405627

  15. Transporting Forensic Psychiatric Patients.

    Dike, Charles C; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Young, John L

    2015-12-01

    Patients in a forensic psychiatric facility often require escorted transport to medical facilities for investigations or treatments of physical health ailments. Transporting these patients presents significant safety and custody challenges because of the nature of patients housed in forensic psychiatric facilities. A significant proportion of these patients may be transfers from the Department of Corrections (DOC) under legal mandates for psychiatric evaluation and treatment better provided in a hospital setting, and most of them will return to the DOC. Although departments of correction have protocols for escorting these potentially dangerous individuals, it is unclear whether receiving psychiatric hospitals have established procedures for maintaining the safety of others and custody of these individuals during transportation outside the hospital facility. The literature is sparse on precautions to be observed when transporting dangerous forensic psychiatric patients, including those with high escape risk. In this article, we describe one forensic inpatient facility's procedure for determining the appropriate level needed to transport these individuals outside of the forensic facility. We also describe the risk assessment procedure for determining level of transport. These are quality improvement measures resulting from a critical review of an incident of escape from the forensic facility several years ago. PMID:26668224

  16. Analysis of the Korean Emergency Department Syndromic Surveillance System: Mass Type Acute Diarrheal Syndrome

    Ahn, Shin; Lee, Jae Ho; KIM, WON; Lim, Kyung Soo

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to compare the data from the emergency department syndromic surveillance system of Korea in detection and reporting of acute diarrheal syndrome (mass type) with the data from the Korea Food and Drug Administration. And to offer fundamental materials for making improvements in current surveillance system was our purpose. Methods A study was conducted by reviewing the number of cases reported as acute diarrheal syndrome (mass type) from the Korean Center for D...

  17. Analgesia and Addiction in Emergency Department Patients with Acute Pain Exacerbations

    Gorchynski, Julie; Kelly, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: There is ongoing controversy regarding the appropriate use of narcotic analgesia for patients presenting frequently to the emergency department (ED) with subjective acute exacerbations of pain. "Are we treating pain or enabling addiction?” Objectives: To determine whether the presence o f specific factors could be used to identify adults complaining of acute exacerbations of pain for suspected drug addiction, to estimate the percentage of drug addicted patients, to asse...

  18. Applicability of the Chinese version of the Hypomania Symptom Checklist (HCL-32 scale for outpatients of psychiatric departments in general hospitals.

    Xiao Huang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the suitability of the Chinese version of the Hypomania Symptom Checklist (HCL-32 scale for psychiatric department outpatients with mood disorders in Chinese general hospitals, and provide a theoretical basis for the application of the HCL-32 scale. METHODS: Outpatients with mood disorders receiving continuous treatment in the psychiatric medicine department of three top-ranking general hospitals in three cities completed scoring the HCL-32 scale. RESULTS: A total of 1010 patients were recruited. 417 were diagnosed with bipolar disorder (236 for type I and 181 for type II and 593 were depression. Four factors with eigenvalues >1 were considered. Factor 1 with an eigenvalue of 5.5 was labeled "active/cheerful". Factor 2 with an eigenvalue of 2.7 was labeled "adventurous/irritable." The coefficient of internal consistency reliability of the HCL-32 total scale was 0.84, and the coefficients for factors 1 and 2 were 0.84 and 0.88, respectively. With the total score of HCL-32≥14 as positive standard, the sensitivity of HCL-32 was calculated at 69.30% and the specificity was 97.81%. CONCLUSIONS: Results showed that HCL-32 had a preferable reliability and validity and was suitable as auxiliary means for bipolar disorder screening in general hospitals.

  19. Manejo do paciente com transtornos relacionados ao uso de substância psicoativa na emergência psiquiátrica Management of patients with substance use illnesses in psychiatric emergency department

    Ricardo Abrantes do Amaral

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Transtornos por uso de substâncias são prevalentes em setores de emergência gerais e psiquiátricos, atingindo taxas de 28% das ocorrências em prontos-socorros gerais. Todavia, profissionais dos setores de emergência identificam menos que 50% dos casos de problemas relacionados ao álcool. Este artigo visa fornecer base fundamentada em evidências para o tratamento específico a pacientes que preencham os critérios diagnósticos de transtornos por uso de substâncias e que se apresentam ao pronto-socorro em quadros de intoxicação ou abstinência. MÉTODO: Uma revisão sobre o tema foi realizada na base de dados Medline, usando-se os descritores "intoxicação aguda", "abstinência", "álcool", "cocaína", "cannabis", "opioides", "inalantes" e "manejo", tendo o inglês como idioma. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÃO: O cuidado de pessoas com transtornos por uso de substâncias deve conter: avaliação completa (médica geral e psiquiátrica, tratamento dos quadros diagnosticados (abstinência, intoxicação e quadros clínicos que caracterizem uma emergência, sensibilização do paciente para realizar tratamento, se for necessário, e elaboração de encaminhamento.OBJECTIVE: Substance use disorders are prevalent in emergency departments in medical and psychiatric services, reaching rates of 28% of cases in medical emergency departments. However, professionals in the emergency department identify less than 50% of cases of alcohol-related problems. This article aims to provide evidence-based interventions for the specific treatment to patients who meet diagnostic criteria for substance use disorders and who present to emergency rooms during intoxication or abstinence. METHOD: A literature review was performed on Medline database, using the descriptors "acute intoxication", "withdrawal", "alcohol", "cocaine", "cannabis", "opioid", "inhalant", "management", using English as the language. RESULTS: AND CONCLUSION: The care of persons with

  20. Assessing and Treating the Patient with Acute Psychotic Disorders.

    Jensen, Lisa; Clough, Rebecca

    2016-06-01

    Patients with acute psychosis often present to emergency departments. Management of acute agitation and psychosis can be a challenge for the staff. Medical stabilization, appropriate assessment, and diagnosis are important. Verbal de-escalation and other psychosocial interventions are helpful in creating a safe and therapeutic environment. Psychiatric and emergency room nurses are poised to treat patients presenting with acute psychosis and must be knowledgeable of evidence-based approaches to treat these complex disorders. PMID:27229275

  1. Urgent and Nonurgent Presentations to a Psychiatric Emergency Service in Nigeria: Pattern and Correlates

    Increase Ibukun Adeosun; Abosede Adekeji Adegbohun; Oyetayo Oyewunmi Jeje; Olufemi Oyeleke Oyekunle; Modupeola Olugbemisola Omoniyi

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric emergencies are acute mental health disturbances that require immediate intervention. However, the emergency department is increasingly being utilised for nonurgent mental health problems, thereby compromising the quality of care available for patients with urgent problems. This study assessed the level and correlates of urgency of mental health problems among patients presenting to an emergency department in Nigeria. The Crisis Triage Rating Scale, Clinical Global Impression Scal...

  2. High Feasibility of Empiric HIV Treatment for Patients With Suspected Acute HIV in an Emergency Department.

    Jacobson, Kathleen R; Arora, Sanjay; Walsh, Kristin B; Lora, Meredith; Merjavy, Stephen; Livermore, Shanna; Menchine, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Earlier intervention in acute HIV infection limits HIV reservoirs and may decrease HIV transmission. We developed criteria for empiric antiretroviral therapy (ART) in an emergency department (ED) routine HIV screening program. We assessed the feasibility and willingness of patients with suspected acute HIV infection in the ED to begin ART. A suspected acute HIV infection was defined as a positive HIV antigen antibody combination immunoassay with pending HIV-antibody differentiation test results and HIV RNA viral load. During the study period, there were 16 confirmed cases of acute HIV infection: 11 met our criteria for empiric ART and agreed to treatment, 10 were prescribed ART, and 1 left the ED against medical advice without a prescription for ART. Eight patients completed at least one follow-up visit. Empiric HIV treatment in an ED is feasible, well received by patients, and offers a unique entry point into the HIV care continuum. PMID:27028498

  3. The impact of a standardised intramuscular sedation protocol for acute behavioural disturbance in the emergency department

    Downes Michael A; Calver Leonie A; Page Colin B; Bryant Jenni L; Isbister Geoffrey K

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Acute behavioural disturbance (ABD) is an increasing problem in emergency departments. This study aimed to determine the impact of a structured intramuscular (IM) sedation protocol on the duration of ABD in the emergency department. Methods A historical control study was undertaken comparing 58 patients who required physical restraint and parenteral sedation with the structured IM sedation protocol, to 73 historical controls treated predominantly by intravenous sedation, a...

  4. Efficacy comparison of nebulizator or spacer usage for acute bronchiolitis treatment in emergency department

    SAZ, Eylem Ulaş; MİDYAT, Levent; Duyu, Muhterem; OZANANAR, Yeliz; KARAPINAR, Bülent; ÖZÇETİN, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    Acute bronchiolitis is one of the most common causes of lower respiratory tract infections in children. Nebulization of inhaled beta-2 agonists in emergency departments is time-consuming. In this study, effects of inhalation of appropriate dose of inhaled salbutamol by nebulization or by spacer are compared. Thirty-five patients between ages of 1-24 months old who were admitted in daytime to Ege University Faculty of Medicine Child Emergency Department for cough and/or wheezing and diagnosed ...

  5. Excited delirium: Consideration of selected medical and psychiatric issues

    Edith Samuel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Edith Samuel1, Robert B Williams1, Richard B Ferrell21Department of Psychology, Atlantic Baptist University, Moncton, New Brunswick Canada; 2Department of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USAAbstract: Excited delirium, sometimes referred to as agitated or excited delirium, is the label assigned to the state of acute behavioral disinhibition manifested in a cluster of behaviors that may include bizarreness, aggressiveness, agitation, ranting, hyperactivity, paranoia, panic, violence, public disturbance, surprising physical strength, profuse sweating due to hyperthermia, respiratory arrest, and death. Excited delirium is reported to result from substance intoxication, psychiatric illness, alcohol withdrawal, head trauma, or a combination of these. This communication reviews the history of the origins of excited delirium, selected research related to its causes, symptoms, management, and the links noted between it and selected medical and psychiatric conditions. Excited delirium involves behavioral and physical symptoms that are also observed in medical and psychiatric conditions such as rhabdomyolysis, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and catatonia. A useful contribution of this communication is that it links the state of excited delirium to conditions for which there are known and effective medical and psychiatric interventions.Keywords: excited delirium, excited states, cocaine misuse, restraint or in custody deaths

  6. Predictors of early arrival at the emergency department in acute ischaemic stroke.

    Curran, C

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: A requirement of an effective acute stroke service is the early arrival of patients to the hospital emergency department (ED). This will allow the possible use of thrombolytic therapy or other acute interventions within a limited time window. AIMS: We investigated the predictors of early arrival in a single hospital serving a mixed urban and rural catchment area. METHODS: A retrospective review of all case notes for 1 year was performed. RESULTS: Of 105 acute strokes, 91 were cerebral infarcts and a total of 71 cases presenting initially to the ED had timing available for analysis. 39.4% presented within 3 h, and 12.7% were potentially suitable for thrombolysis. Those living closer to the hospital were not more likely to arrive within 3 h (Z = -0.411, p = 0.68). Presenting directly to the hospital by emergency services (or private transport) was significantly associated with early arrival in a univariate comparison (p < 0.001), and in a multivariate model. CONCLUSION: The only independent predictor of early arrival to the ED is direct presentation. Improved public education of the importance of recognition of stroke symptoms and rapid contact with the emergency services will improve the early attendance following acute stroke, allowing increased use of acute stroke treatments.

  7. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDER

    2007-01-01

    14.1 Schizophrenia2007133 A comparative study of intramuscular ziprasidone and haloperidol in treating acute agitation in schizophrenia. LI Lehua(李乐华), et al. Mental Health Insit, 2nd Xiangya Hosp, Centr South Univ, Changsha 410011. Chin J Psychiat 2006;39(4):216-219. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of injection ziprasidone in the treatment of acute agitation behavior in schizophrenia.

  8. Troubled Kids' Psychiatric Care Often Delayed by Insurance Rules

    ... html Troubled Kids' Psychiatric Care Often Delayed by Insurance Rules Dealing with red tape consumes clinicians' time, ... emergency department to a psychiatric hospital due to insurance companies' "prior authorization" requirements, a small study suggests. ...

  9. Implementing a Music Therapy Program at a New 72-Hour Acute Psychiatric Admissions Unit: A Case Study of a Patient Who Was Malingering

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Because of the relatively poor treatment available, the high financial costs of hospitalization, multiple and complex issues of persons with severe mental illnesses, and advancements in pharmacotherapy, psychiatric patients are often only hospitalized for a few days before they are discharged. Thus, brief psychosocial interventions for persons who…

  10. An Instrument to Prepare for Acute Care of the Individual with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Emergency Department

    Venkat, Arvind; Migyanka, Joann M.; Cramer, Ryan; McGonigle, John J.

    2016-01-01

    We present an instrument to allow individuals with autism spectrum disorder, their families and/or their caregivers to prepare emergency department staff for the care needs of this patient population ahead of acute presentation.

  11. Ventilator Strategies and Rescue Therapies for Management of Acute Respiratory Failure in the Emergency Department.

    Mosier, Jarrod M; Hypes, Cameron; Joshi, Raj; Whitmore, Sage; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Cairns, Charles B

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure is commonly encountered in the emergency department (ED), and early treatment can have effects on long-term outcome. Noninvasive ventilation is commonly used for patients with respiratory failure and has been demonstrated to improve outcomes in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive lung disease and congestive heart failure, but should be used carefully, if at all, in the management of asthma, pneumonia, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Lung-protective tidal volumes should be used for all patients receiving mechanical ventilation, and FiO2 should be reduced after intubation to achieve a goal of less than 60%. For refractory hypoxemia, new rescue therapies have emerged to help improve the oxygenation, and in some cases mortality, and should be considered in ED patients when necessary, as deferring until ICU admission may be deleterious. This review article summarizes the pathophysiology of acute respiratory failure, management options, and rescue therapies including airway pressure release ventilation, continuous neuromuscular blockade, inhaled nitric oxide, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. PMID:26014437

  12. Psychiatric Disorder

    2009-01-01

    2009477 The efficacy and safety of flexible doses of paliperidone extended-release tablets in the treatment of acute schizophrenia:a randomized,double blind olanzapine-controlled study.ZHANG Hongyan,et al.Peking Univ Ment Health Instit,Beijing 100191. Chin J Psychiat 2009;42(3):153-156.

  13. Practice of Acute and Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Psychiatric Clinic of a University Hospital from Turkey: between 2007 and 2013

    Sengul, Melike Ceyhan Balci; Kenar, Ayse Nur Inci; Hanci, Ezgi; Sendur, İbrahim; Sengul, Cem; Herken, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be given as the form of acute, continuation or maintenance ECT according to the process of administration. We report our 7 years’ observation with acute and maintenance ECT in a university hospital in Turkey. Methods The medical records of the hospitalized patients treated with acute or maintenance ECT between the years 2007 and 2013 was retrospectively analyzed. The sociodemographic characteristics, diagnosis, data of ECT and the co-administered ...

  14. A Prevalence and Management Study of Acute Pain in Children Attending Emergency Departments by Ambulance.

    Murphy, Adrian; McCoy, Siobhan; O'Reilly, Kay; Fogarty, Eoin; Dietz, Jason; Crispino, Gloria; Wakai, Abel; O'Sullivan, Ronan

    2016-01-01

    Pain is the most common symptom in the emergency setting and remains one of the most challenging problems for emergency care providers, particularly in the pediatric population. The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of acute pain in children attending emergency departments (EDs) in Ireland by ambulance. In addition, this study sought to describe the prehospital and initial ED management of pain in this population, with specific reference to etiology of pain, frequency of pain assessment, pain severity, and pharmacological analgesic interventions. A prospective cross-sectional study was undertaken over a 12-month period of all pediatric patients transported by emergency ambulance to four tertiary referral hospitals in Ireland. All children (management of acute pain in children transferred by ambulance to the ED in Ireland is currently poor, with documentary evidence of only 26% receiving prehospital analgesic agents. PMID:26024309

  15. Psychiatric symptoms and service utilization among refugee children referred to a child psychiatry department: a retrospective comparative case note study.

    Vaage, Aina Basilier; Garløv, Ida; Hauff, Edvard; Thomsen, Per Hove

    2007-09-01

    Refugee children may encounter barriers to accessing mental health services. We conducted a case-control study based on a systematic review of clinic records to compare psychopathology and service utilization in refugee and Norwegian children referred to a child psychiatry department in a county in southern Norway. Sixty-one refugee children were compared with 61 Norwegian-born children matched for gender, age and time of referral to the clinic. There was no significant difference in rates of referral or level of service utilization, which were proportional to the population. Compared with Norwegian children, refugee children were diagnosed more frequently with post-traumatic stress disorder and other affective and emotional disorders, and less often with pervasive developmental disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The results are discussed in terms of referral pathways and the need for culturally competent care for refugee children. PMID:17938155

  16. Multidetector computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric acute abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Lin, Chien-Heng

    2016-06-01

    The accurate diagnosis of pediatric acute abdominal pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department (ED) due to its unclear clinical presentation and non-specific findings in physical examinations, laboratory data, and plain radiographs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) performed in the ED on pediatric patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A retrospective chart review of children aged abdominal pain who visited the emergency department and underwent MDCT between September 2004 and June 2007 was conducted. Patients with a history of trauma were excluded. A total of 156 patients with acute abdominal pain (85 males and 71 females, age 1-17 years; mean age 10.9 ± 4.6 years) who underwent abdominal MDCT in the pediatric ED during this 3-year period were enrolled in the study. One hundred and eighteen patients with suspected appendicitis underwent abdominal MDCT. Sixty four (54.2%) of them had appendicitis, which was proven by histopathology. The sensitivity of abdominal MDCT for appendicitis was found to be 98.5% and the specificity was 84.9%. In this study, the other two common causes of nontraumatic abdominal emergencies were gastrointestinal tract (GI) infections and ovarian cysts. The most common etiology of abdominal pain in children that requires imaging with abdominal MDCT is appendicitis. MDCT has become a preferred and invaluable imaging modality in evaluating uncertain cases of pediatric acute abdominal pain in ED, in particular for suspected appendicitis, neoplasms, and gastrointestinal abnormalities. PMID:27154197

  17. Establishment of a local psychiatric service

    Wang, A G

    1981-01-01

    The Faroe Islands are a group of islands in the North Atlantic Ocean between Norway and Iceland inhabited by about 42,000 people. They are considered a nation with home rule within the Danish Kingdom. A Psychiatric Department was not established on the islands until 1969. Before this, psychiatric...

  18. A 5-year retrospective study of demographic, anamnestic, and clinical factors related to psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescent patients

    Di Lorenzo R

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosaria Di Lorenzo,1 Nina Cimino,2 Elena Di Pietro,3 Gabriella Pollutri,4 Vittoria Neviani,5 Paola Ferri2 1Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment, Department of Mental Health, AUSL Modena, Modena, 2School of Nursing, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 3School of Neuro-Psychiatry, 4School of Psychiatry, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 5 “The Medlar”, Villa Igea Hospital, Modena, Italy Background: Psychiatric emergencies of children and adolescents have greatly increased during the last years, but this phenomenon has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between acute psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescents and selected variables to highlight risk factors for psychiatric emergencies. Methods: This retrospective research was conducted in the acute psychiatric public ward, Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment (SPDT, and in the residential facility for adolescents, “The Medlar”, located in Modena. The sample was constituted by all adolescent patients (n=101, age range 14–18 who had acute hospitalizations (n=140 in SPDT and had been successively transferred to “The Medlar” (n=83, from February 2, 2010 to January 31, 2015. From clinical charts, we extracted demographic and anamnestic characteristics of patients and clinical variables related to hospitalizations. Data were statistically analyzed. Results: Sixty-one percent of our patients lived with one divorced parent, with adoptive or immigrant family, or in institutions; 51% had experienced stressful events during childhood; 81% had a normal intellective level, but only 6% presented regular school performance. Parental psychiatric illness was negatively related, in a statistically significantly way, with onset age of adolescent mental disorders (coefficient -2.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -3.53 to 1.01, P<0.001, single linear regression; odds ratio: 4.39, 95% CI: 1.43–13.47, P<0.010, single logistic

  19. Inpatient Psychiatric Prospective Payment System (IPF PPS)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This file contains case level data for inpatient psychiatric stays and is derived from 2011 MEDPAR data file and the latest available provider specific file. The...

  20. [Treatments for otorhinolaryngological patients with psychiatric disorders].

    Nishio, Ayako; Sumi, Takuro; Yamada, Masato; Kuwahata, Yuko

    2013-02-01

    There are few systems in place for patients with psychiatric disorders who need treatments for physical complications. In Tokyo, "The Tokyo metropolitan psychiatric emergency system" was established in 1981, and Ome Municipal General Hospital participated in it. Under this system, fifteen patients with psychiatric disorders were treated for otorhinolaryngological diseases in our department from April 2005 to March 2011. We reviewed the fifteen patients. The coexisting psychiatric disorders were schizophrenia in twelve patients, and mental retardation, Korsakoff's syndrome, and Alzheimer's dementia in one patient each, respectively. All the patients had been receiving psychiatric treatment. The otorhinolaryngological diseases were head and neck cancer in nine patients, chronic sinusitis in three patients, and benign salivary gland tumor, cholesteatoma, and epistaxis in one patient each, respectively. Among the fifteen patients, thirteen could complete their treatment, but two dropped out due to exacerbation of their psychiatric symptoms. The therapeutic course is uncertain in otorhinolaryngological diseases occurring concomitantly with psychiatric disorders, especially in head and neck cancer, because it may be difficult to prioritize the problem when determining the treatment options and delivering the treatment. Thus, we should treat patients with psychiatric disorders carefully on a case-by-case basis depending on their psychiatric symptoms. It is also important to cooperate with psychiatrists and patients' families. PMID:23539958

  1. Acute poisoning in children; changes over the years, data of pediatric clinic department of toxicology

    Keka Alije; Ramosaj A; Toro H; Azemi M; Baloku A; Sylaj B; Lenjani B; Kyseni K

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To present the frequency, etiology, changes over the years of acute poisoning in children admitted toPediatricClinic ofPristina and to determine the extent and characteristics of the problem, according to which related preventive measures can be taken.Methods:Retrospectively we have analyzed the epidemiology of accidental and suicidal poisonings in children hospitalization inPediatricClinicDepartment ofToxicology during the year2012. Our data we compared with data from previous studies on acute poisoning in children in the PediatricClinic conducted during the years1976-1985 and2001.Results:During the year2012, inPediatricClinic ofPristina5723 children were hospitalized,136 of them or2.3% were treated due to acute poisoning inDepartment ofToxicology,82 of them was boys and54 was girls, rate boys girls was1.5:1.The majority of cases101 or74.2% were under five years with peak age three and35% or25.7% were over five years.The most of the cases was accidentally97% and only 2.9% was suicidal and all of them were over the age of ten.Drugs were the most common agent causing the poisoning71(52.2%) followed by house cleaning products38(27.9%), food10(5.8%), pesticides7(5.14%), rare agent that caused poisoning were: narcotic substances, plant, heavy metals, alcohol, carbon monoxide, carburant.Poisoning occurred mostly in spring and the peak was observed inMay,(1.17% of all patients).January was the month of lowest rate of poisoning. During the years1976-1985, inPediatricClinic ofPristina900 children were hospitalized due to acute poisoning,44.11% were from drugs,15.88% from pesticides,65(7.2%), while during2001 in the unit care intensive were hospitalized66 children due to acute poisoning, among them51.5% were poisoning from drugs,30.03 from pesticides,12.2% from cleaning products.Conclusion:In our study drugs and house cleaning products are the most frequent agents causing accidental poisoning in children less than5 years-old, this age of children is the most

  2. Psychiatric disorders in bone marrow transplant patients

    To identify the psychiatric illnesses in patients with hematological/oncological disorders encountered during blood and bone marrow transplantation. All consecutive patients, aged 15 years and above, who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria and underwent blood and bone marrow transplantation, were enrolled in this study. Psychiatric assessment comprised of a semi-structured interview based on Present Status Examination (PSE). The psychiatric diagnosis was made on the basis of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) system of classification devised by W.H.O. Eighty patients, who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, were inducted in this study. Thirty (37.5%) cases were found to have psychiatric disorders. Out of the total, 60 (75%) were males and 20 (25%) females. Adjustment disorder was the most frequent diagnosis (n=12), followed by major depression (n=7). Rest of the diagnoses made were generalized anxiety disorder, acute psychotic disorder, delirium and depressive psychosis. High psychiatric morbidity associated with blood and bone marrow transplantation was observed. It indicates the importance of psychiatric intervention during the isolation period of BMT as well as pre-transplant psychiatric assessment and counseling regarding procedure. (author)

  3. Psychiatric Disorder

    2007-01-01

    15.1 Schizophrenia2007274 Effect and safety of combination therapy of valproate with lithium on recurrent mania. XU Wenwei(徐文炜), et al. Dept Psychiat, Wuxi Ment Health Center, Wuxi 214151. Chin J Psychiat 2007;40(2):86-89. Objective The study was to explore the effectiveness and safety of chronic combination reatment of valproate with lithium on recurrent mania. Method All 105 patients with mania-onset were andomly assigned to receive sodium valproate plus lithium (n=35), and monotherapy with lithium n=35) or sodium valproate (n=35), and were followed up for 5 years. At baseline, the symptom was valuated with the Bech-Rafaelsen Mania Rating Scale (BRMS). The drug dosage, times of relapse, effects nd safcty was compared among the three groups. Results After the acute therapy, the reductions in BRMS core were(43±29)% in lithium group, (42±27)% in valproate group, and (58±25)% in combination roup, respectively, with significant differences between the three groups (F=3.579, P=0.031). At ollowed-up, tile relapse times was significantly less in combination group than that in lithium and valproate roup(mean times of 2.0±1.5, 3.5±1.8, and 3.5±2.2, P=0.001). The combination therapy had etter effectiveness especially in patients with rapid cycling bipolar disorder(F=4.120, P=0.033) than the ther two monotherapy group. The mean dosage of single drug in combination group was significantly lower han that in lithium and valproate group (P<0.01; P<0.001). There were no significantly statistic differences on side-effects among three groups. Conclusion The efficacy of combination therapy of valproate with lithium on mania is better than the monotherapy of lithium or valproate in the light of safety and reduced occurrence.

  4. Lack of Gender Disparities in Emergency Department Triage of Acute Stroke Patients

    Madsen, Tracy E.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous literature has shown gender disparities in the care of acute ischemic stroke. Compared to men, women wait longer for brain imaging and are less likely to receive intravenous (IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA. Emergency department (ED triage is an important step in the rapid assessment of stroke patients and is a possible contributor to disparities. It is unknown whether gender differences exist in ED triage of acute stroke patients. Our primary objective was to determine whether gender disparities exist in the triage of acute stroke patients as defined by Emergency Severity Index (ESI levels and use of ED critical care beds. Methods: This was a retrospective, observational study of both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients age ≥18 years presenting to a large, urban, academic ED within six hours of symptom onset between January 2010, and December 2012. Primary outcomes were triage to a non-critical ED bed and Emergency Severity Index (ESI level. Primary outcome data were extracted from electronic medical records by a blinded data manager; secondary outcome data and covariates were abstracted by trained research assistants. We performed bivariate and multivariate analyses. Logistic regression was performed using age, race, insurance status, mode of and time to arrival, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and presence of atypical symptoms as covariates. Results: There were 537 patients included in this study. Women were older (75.6 vs. 69.5, p<0.001, and more women had a history of atrial fibrillation (39.8% vs. 25.3%, p<0.001. Compared to 9.5% of men, 10.3% of women were triaged to a non-critical care ED bed (p=0.77; 92.1% of women were triaged as ESI 1 or 2 vs. 93.6% of men (p=0.53. After adjustment, gender was not associated with triage location or ESI level, though atypical symptoms were associated with higher odds of being triaged to a non-critical care bed (aOR 1.98, 95%CI [1.03 – 3.81] and 3

  5. Psychiatric disorders after radiation exposure

    Kokai, Masahiro [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan); Soejima, Toshinori; Wang, Shangdong; Shinfuku, Naotaka

    2001-04-01

    This review focuses on the mental and psychological effects of medical radiation exposure, the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island, the Chernobyl disaster, atomic bomb explosions at Nagasaki and Hiroshima, and accidents at nuclear power plants and nuclear waste plants. Studies have shown that anxiety about the adverse effects of radiation in medicine (such as infertility, carcinogenicity, and genotoxicity) and fear for exposure has caused psychiatric disorders. Several studies on the mental health effects of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island were conducted, and the results indicated that psychiatric distress persisted for a certain period of time, particularly in pregnant women and women who have children, even when no evidence of substantial of radiation exposure is seen clinically. The psychological consequences of the Chernobyl disaster have been investigated continuously, and various problems, e.g., acute stress reaction, neurosis, and psychosis, have been identified, although no physical damage due to the radiation or PTSD have been reported. By contrast, PTSD has been seen in survivors of the Nagasaki and Hiroshima nuclear explosions. A study in Ohio, (United States), which has a nuclear waste plant, investigated PTSD in people living near the plant and found that the symptom level was mild. In general, the most common symptoms among people with mental and psychological disorders due to radiation exposure are depression and anxiety, with many people having associated somatoform disorders, and some people complain of PTSD. Vague anxiety and fear of sequelae, regardless of the exposure dose, appears to cause such psychiatric disorders. Although it is rare for psychiatrists to see such cases of psychiatric disorders due to radiation exposure, their number may increase as psychiatric services become more widely available. (K.H.)

  6. Psychiatric disorders after radiation exposure

    This review focuses on the mental and psychological effects of medical radiation exposure, the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island, the Chernobyl disaster, atomic bomb explosions at Nagasaki and Hiroshima, and accidents at nuclear power plants and nuclear waste plants. Studies have shown that anxiety about the adverse effects of radiation in medicine (such as infertility, carcinogenicity, and genotoxicity) and fear for exposure has caused psychiatric disorders. Several studies on the mental health effects of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island were conducted, and the results indicated that psychiatric distress persisted for a certain period of time, particularly in pregnant women and women who have children, even when no evidence of substantial of radiation exposure is seen clinically. The psychological consequences of the Chernobyl disaster have been investigated continuously, and various problems, e.g., acute stress reaction, neurosis, and psychosis, have been identified, although no physical damage due to the radiation or PTSD have been reported. By contrast, PTSD has been seen in survivors of the Nagasaki and Hiroshima nuclear explosions. A study in Ohio, (United States), which has a nuclear waste plant, investigated PTSD in people living near the plant and found that the symptom level was mild. In general, the most common symptoms among people with mental and psychological disorders due to radiation exposure are depression and anxiety, with many people having associated somatoform disorders, and some people complain of PTSD. Vague anxiety and fear of sequelae, regardless of the exposure dose, appears to cause such psychiatric disorders. Although it is rare for psychiatrists to see such cases of psychiatric disorders due to radiation exposure, their number may increase as psychiatric services become more widely available. (K.H.)

  7. Acute bacterial gastroenteritis: a study of adult patients with positive stool cultures treated in the emergency department

    Chan, S.; Ng, K; Lyon, D.; Cheung, W; Cheng, A.; Rainer, T

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the presenting clinical features of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in adult patients treated as outpatients in the emergency department (ED), and the pathogens responsible in this setting and population; and to identify the frequency with which positive stool culture result changes management.

  8. Neuropathological research at the "Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Psychiatrie" (German Institute for Psychiatric Research) in Munich (Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institute). Scientific utilization of children's organs from the "Kinderfachabteilungen" (Children's Special Departments) at Bavarian State Hospitals.

    Steger, Florian

    2006-09-01

    During National Socialism, the politically motivated interest in psychiatric genetic research lead to the founding of research departments specialized in pathological-anatomical brain research, the two Kaiser Wilhelm-Institutes (KWI) in Berlin and Munich. The latter was indirectly provided with brain material by Bavarian State Hospitals, to three of which "Kinderfachabteilungen" (Special Pediatric Units) were affiliated. As children became victims of the systematically conducted child "euthanasia" in these Special Pediatric Units, this paper will address the question whether and to which extent the organs from victims of child "euthanasia" were used for (neuro-) pathological research at the KWI in Munich. By means of case studies and medical histories (with focus on the situation in Kaufbeuren-Irsee), I will argue that pediatric departments on a regular base delivered slide preparations, that the child "euthanasia" conduced in these departments systematically contributed to neuropathological research and that slide preparations from victims of child "euthanasia" were used in scientific publications after 1945. PMID:16887759

  9. Acute heart failure in the emergency department: a follow-up study.

    Fabbri, Andrea; Marchesini, Giulio; Carbone, Giorgio; Cosentini, Roberto; Ferrari, Annamaria; Chiesa, Mauro; Bertini, Alessio; Rea, Federico

    2016-02-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a major public health issue due to high incidence and poor prognosis. Only a few studies are available on the long-term prognosis and on outcome predictors in the unselected population attending the emergency department (ED) for AHF. We carried out a 1-year follow-up analysis of 1234 consecutive patients from selected Italian EDs from January 2011 to June 2012 for an episode of AHF. Their prognosis and outcome-associated factors were tested by Cox proportional hazard model. Patients' mean age was 84, with 66.0% over 80 years and 56.2% females. Comorbidities were present in over 50% of cases, principally a history of acute coronary syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, valvular heart disease. Death occurred within 6 h in 24 cases (1.9%). At 30-day follow-up, death was registered in 123 cases (10.0%): 110 cases (89.4%) died of cardiovascular events and 13 (10.6%) of non-cardiovascular causes (cancer, gastrointestinal hemorrhages, sepsis, trauma). At 1-year follow-up, all-cause death was recorded in 50.1% (over 3 out of 4 cases for cardiovascular origin). Six variables (older age, diabetes, systolic arterial pressure <110 mm/Hg, high NT pro-BNP, high troponin levels and impaired cognitive status) were selected as outcome predictors, but with limited discriminant capacity (AUC = 0.649; SE 0.015). Recurrence of AHF was registered in 31.0%. The study identifies a cluster of variables associated with 1-year mortality in AHF, but their predictive capacity is low. Old age and the presence of comorbidities, in particular diabetes are likely to play a major role in dictating the prognosis. PMID:26506831

  10. Effect of harmless acute pancreatitis score, red cell distribution width and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio on the mortality of patients with nontraumatic acute pancreatitis at the emergency department

    Gülen, Bedia; Sonmez, Ertan; Yaylaci, Serpil; Serinken, Mustafa; Eken, Cenker; Dur, Ali; Turkdogan, Figen Tunali; Söğüt, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Harmless acute pancreatitis score (HAPS), neutrophile/lymphocyte ratio and red blood cell distribution width (RDW) are used to determine the early prognosis of patients diagnosed with nontraumatic acute pancreatitis in the emergency department (ED). METHODS: Patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis (K 85.9) in the ED according to the ICD10 coding during one year were included in the study. Patients with chronic pancreatitis and those who had missing data in their files were excluded from the study. Patients who did not have computed tomography (CT) in the ED were not included in the study. RESULTS: Ultimately, 322 patients were included in the study. The median age of the patients was 53.1 (IQR=36–64). Of the patients, 68.1% (n=226) had etiological causes of the biliary tract. The mortality rate of these patients within the first 48 hours was 4.3% (n=14). In the logistic regression analysis performed by using Balthazar classification, HAPS score, RDW, neutrophile/lymphocyte ratio, age, diabetes mellitus and systolic blood pressure, the only independent variable in determining mortality was assigned as Balthazar classification (OR: 15; 95% CI: 3.5 to 64.4). CONCLUSIONS: HAPS, neutrophile/lymphocyte ratio and RDW were not effective in determining the mortality of nontraumatic acute pancreatitis cases within the first 48 hours. The only independent variable for determining the mortality was Balthazar classification. PMID:25802563

  11. Usage of psychiatric emergency services by asylum seekers

    Reko, Amra; Bech, Per; Wohlert, Cathrine;

    2015-01-01

    given at the initial evaluation was ICD-10 F43.9 "reaction to severe stress, unspecified" (50%). Evaluations were made primarily by non-psychiatrists. No standardized screening or diagnostic instrument was used. CONCLUSION: This first description of the use of an acute psychiatric emergency service by......BACKGROUND: Asylum seekers are found to be at high risk of mental health problems. Little is known about the use of acute psychiatric emergency services by asylum seekers. AIM: To describe the usage of an inpatient/outpatient psychiatric emergency service in Denmark by adult asylum seekers, and...... predominantly male and married. The group consisted primarily (61%) of failed asylum seekers. Most patients (81%) presented with relevant mental health problems. The main reasons for presenting to the acute psychiatric emergency service were suicidal ideation and/or behaviour (60%). The most frequent diagnosis...

  12. The impact of a standardised intramuscular sedation protocol for acute behavioural disturbance in the emergency department

    Downes Michael A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute behavioural disturbance (ABD is an increasing problem in emergency departments. This study aimed to determine the impact of a structured intramuscular (IM sedation protocol on the duration of ABD in the emergency department. Methods A historical control study was undertaken comparing 58 patients who required physical restraint and parenteral sedation with the structured IM sedation protocol, to 73 historical controls treated predominantly by intravenous sedation, according to individual clinician preference. The primary outcome was the duration of the ABD defined as the time security staff were required. Secondary outcomes were the requirement for additional sedation, drug related-adverse effects and patient and staff injuries. Results The median duration of the ABD in patients with the new sedation protocol was 21 minutes (IQR: 15 to 35 minutes; Range: 5 to 78 minutes compared to a median duration of 30 minutes (IQR: 15 to 50 minutes; Range: 5 to 135 minutes in the historical controls which was significantly different (p = 0.03. With IM sedation only 27 of 58 patients (47%; 95% CI: 34% to 60% required further sedation compared to 64 of 73 historical controls (88%; 95%CI: 77% to 94%. There were six (10% drug-related adverse events with the new IM protocol [oxygen desaturation (5, oxygen desaturation/airway obstruction (1] compared to 10 (14% in the historical controls [oxygen desaturation (5, hypoventilation (4 and aspiration (1]. Injuries to staff occurred with three patients using the new sedation protocol and in seven of the historical controls. Two patients were injured during the new protocol and two of the historical controls. Conclusion The use of a standardised IM sedation protocol was simple, more effective and as safe for management of ABD compared to predominantly intravenous sedation.

  13. Efficacy of multislice computed tomography for the detection of acute coronary syndrome in the emergency department

    The diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), especially non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina in the emergency department (ED) still remains a challenge. Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) allows assessment of not only coronary artery stenoses and occlusions, but also assessment of coronary artery plaques and myocardial perfusion status. MSCT was performed in 31 patients who were admitted to the ED because of chest pain persisting at least 30 min and non-diagnostic electrocardiogram (ECG) changes and normal serum enzyme concentrations. Using MSCT, ACS was defined by coronary artery stenosis ≥75% accompanied by computed tomography (CT)-low-density plaques, and/or by the presence of myocardial perfusion defects. ACS was confirmed by coronary stenosis ≥75% by coronary angiography and/or subsequent elevation of troponin I concentration. In total, 22 patients were diagnosed as having ACS. MSCT detected stenoses with CT-low-density plaques in 21 and non-transmural myocardial perfusion defect in 3 patients. There was 1 false-positive and 1 false-negative result. The sensitivity and specificity of MSCT to identify ACS was 95.5% and 88.9%, respectively. MSCT provides diagnostic operating characteristics suitable for triage of patients with ACS in the ED. (author)

  14. Psychiatric disorders and pregnancy

    "SH. Akhondzadeh; L. Kashani "

    2006-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common in women during their childbearing years. Special considerations are needed when psychotic disorders present during pregnancy. Early identification and treatment of psychiatric disorders in pregnancy can prevent morbidity in pregnancy and in postpartum with the concomitant risks to mother and baby. Nevertheless, diagnosis of psychiatric illnesses during pregnancy is made more difficult by the overlap between symptoms of the disorders and symptoms of pregnancy....

  15. The role of neopterine in the diagnosis of patients with acute pancreatitis on admission to the emergency department

    Keziban Ucar Karabulut

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: There are difficulties observed in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in emergency departments due to its different clinical properties and the insufficiencies in the methods of diagnosis. Since there is no specific biochemical indicator, the diagnosis is made usually late or with difficulty. Neopterine is an enzyme secreted from the macrophages and is an indicator of cellular immunity activation. The aim of this study was to determine the role of neopterine in the early diagnosis of acute pancreatitis . Material and Methods: 39 patients, who had been hospitalized with the complaints of abdominal pain and diagnosed as acute pancreatitis via laboratory and screening methods, and 30 healthy controls were included in the study. Amylase, lipase, cholesterol and neopterine were measured in the patients' samples. The diagnoses were confirmed with abdominal ultrasound and computed tomography. Results: The neopterine values in patients with acute pancreatitis were significantly higher than those of the control group. Conclusion: Neopterine is an indicator which is elevated in certain inflammatory and autoimmune situations. We believe that it is important in the early diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Further experimental and clinical studies should be conducted on the subject. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(1.000: 51-54

  16. Development of interactive algorithm for clinical management of acute events related to sickle cell disease in emergency department

    Forni, G L; G. Finco; Graziadei, G.; M. Balocco; Rigano, P; S. Perrotta; Olivieri, O; Cappellini, M. D.; De Franceschi, L

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD ORPHA232; OMIM 603903) is a rare hereditary red cell disorder, which global distribution is changed in the last decade due to immigration-fluxes from endemic areas to Western-countries. One of the main clinical manifestations of SCD are the acute painful vaso-occlusive crisis, which cause frequent accesses of SCD patients to the emergency departments (EDs). This has generated the requirement of feasible tools for emergency givers. In the context of the scientific-Ital...

  17. The role of neopterine in the diagnosis of patients with acute pancreatitis on admission to the emergency department

    Keziban Ucar Karabulut; Mehmet Gul; Yildiz Ucar; Sami Erdem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There are difficulties observed in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in emergency departments due to its different clinical properties and the insufficiencies in the methods of diagnosis. Since there is no specific biochemical indicator, the diagnosis is made usually late or with difficulty. Neopterine is an enzyme secreted from the macrophages and is an indicator of cellular immunity activation. The aim of this study was to determine the role of neopterine in the early diagnosis o...

  18. Neurobiology of psychiatric disorders

    Đokić Gorica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurobiologically spoken, the supstrate of the mind is formed by neuronal networks, and dysregulated neurocircuitry can cause psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric disorders are diagnosed by symptom clusters that are the result of abnormal brain tissue, and/or activity in specialized areas of the brain. Dysregulated circuitry results from abnormal neural function, or abnormal neural connections from one brain area to another, which leads to neurotransmitter imbalances. Each psychiatric disorder has uniquely dysregulated circuitry and thereby unique neurotransmitter imbalance, such as: prefrontal cortical-limbic pathways in depression or prefrontal cortical-striatal pathways in schizophrenia ie. serotonin-norepinephrin-dopamin imbalance in depression, or dopamine hyperactivity in schizophrenia. Biological psychiatry has completely changed the farmacological treatment of psychiatric disorders, and new foundings in that field are supportive to futher more neuropsychopharmacological and nonpharmacological therapy studies, whish has as a result more safe and effective therapy for psychiatric disorders.

  19. Primary Psychiatric Diseases

    Sibel Mercan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of these dermatological diseases is entirely psychiatric origin. These patients show overconcern to their skin or self inflicted dermatoses unconsciously instead of facing with their real problems. In this group, delusions, dermatitis artefacta, trichotillomania, body dysmorphic disorder can be seen. They use denial as defence mechanism to their real psychiatric problems and prefer to apply dermatology instead of psychiatry. Dermatologist should be very careful before asking psychiatric consultation. Denial mechanism help patients to overcome agressive impulses like suicide or prevent further psychiatric damage like psychosis. Dermatologist should see these patients with short and frequent intervals with a good empathic approach. This will help to progress a powerful patient doctor relationship which will lead to a psychiatric evaluation.

  20. Psychiatric disorders and pregnancy

    "SH. Akhondzadeh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are common in women during their childbearing years. Special considerations are needed when psychotic disorders present during pregnancy. Early identification and treatment of psychiatric disorders in pregnancy can prevent morbidity in pregnancy and in postpartum with the concomitant risks to mother and baby. Nevertheless, diagnosis of psychiatric illnesses during pregnancy is made more difficult by the overlap between symptoms of the disorders and symptoms of pregnancy. In majority of cases both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy should be considered. However, psychiatric disorders in pregnancy are often under treated because of concerns about potential harmful effects of medication. This paper reviews findings about the presentation and course of major psychiatric disorders during pregnancy.

  1. Psychiatric comorbidities in patients with major depressive disorder

    Ittasakul, Pichai

    2014-01-01

    Papan Thaipisuttikul, Pichai Ittasakul, Punjaporn Waleeprakhon, Pattarabhorn Wisajun, Sudawan Jullagate Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand Background: Psychiatric comorbidities are common in major depressive disorder (MDD). They may worsen outcome and cause economic burden. The primary objective was to examine the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in MDD. The secondary objectives were to compare the presence of c...

  2. Psychiatric considerations in patients with decreased levels of consciousness.

    Young, James L; Rund, Douglas

    2010-08-01

    When patients present to the emergency department with changes in behavior and levels of consciousness, psychiatric causes often move to the top of the list of diagnostic considerations. It is important to thoroughly assess such patients for medical causes. Although it is not common for primary psychiatric conditions to present with altered levels of consciousness, severe cases may present in this fashion. Altered mental states may also be caused by adverse reactions to psychiatric medications. In this article, the authors review some of the psychiatric causes of decreased levels of consciousness, as well as certain adverse drug reactions to psychotropic medications. PMID:20709245

  3. Oxytocin and Psychiatric Disorders

    Gokce Nur Say

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a neuropeptide that plays critical role in mother-infant bonding, pair bonding and prosocial behaviors. Several neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, affective disorders, anxiety disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, alcohol/substance addiction, aggression, suicide, eating disorders and personality disorders show abnormalities of oxytocin system. These findings have given rise to the studies searching therapeutic use of oxytocin for psychi-atric disorders. The studies of oxytocin interventions in psychiatric disorders yielded potentially promising findings. This paper reviews the role of oxytocin in emotions, behavior and its effects in psychiatric disorders. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 102-113

  4. Occupational Psychiatric Disorders in Korea

    Choi, Kyeong-Sook; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    We searched databases and used various online resources to identify and systematically review all articles on occupational psychiatric disorders among Korean workers published in English and Korean before 2009. Three kinds of occupational psychiatric disorders were studied: disorders related to job stress and mental illness, psychiatric symptoms emerging in victims of industrial injuries, and occupational psychiatric disorders compensated by Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance (IACI). ...

  5. Hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity

    Brandt, Frans; Thvilum, Marianne; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind; Christensen, Kaare; Green, Anders; Hegedus, Laszlo; Brix, Thomas Heiberg

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development of the fetal brain, while hyperthyroidism in adults is associated with mood symptoms and reduced quality of life. We aimed to investigate the association and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity....

  6. PSYCHIATRIC COMPLICATIONS OF CHLOROQUINE

    Bhatia, M.S.; S.C. Malik

    1994-01-01

    Sixty patients with chloroquine induced psychiatric complications are reported in the present series. Psychosis was the most common complication followed by anxiety state and seizures. The maximum number of patients were between the ages of 6 and 10 years and females (70.0%) outnumbered the males (30.0%). Headache and sleeplessness were found to be more common amongpatients developing psychiatric complications of chloroquine. The symptoms disappeared within 2 to 21 days after the discontinuat...

  7. 42 CFR 415.184 - Psychiatric services.

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Psychiatric services. 415.184 Section 415.184 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM SERVICES FURNISHED BY PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS...

  8. Andrographolide inhibits growth of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and upregulation of p38 MAPK pathways

    Yang T; Yao S; Zhang X; Guo Y

    2016-01-01

    Tingfang Yang,1 Shuluan Yao,2 Xianfeng Zhang,3 Yan Guo2 1Department of Pediatrics, Jining No 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jining Medical University Affiliated Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Psychiatry, Jining Psychiatric Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) as a pr...

  9. Role of pharmaco-epidemiology in psychopharmacology: a study in psychiatric out-patient department of a tertiary care teaching hospital at Dehradun, Uttarakhand

    Shaktibala Dutta; Mirza Atif Beg; Saubhagya Sindhu; Nand Kishore Singh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prescription auditing studies are a part of drug utilization studies, are beneficial in clinical practice for rational prescribing of drugs and helpful for minimizing the medication errors. They are important tool to promote rational prescribing. Methods: This was a prospective drug utilization study conducted by the Department of Pharmacology in Psychiatry out-patient department at Shri Guru Ram Rai Institute of Medical and Health Sciences, Dehradun for a period of 6 months. A...

  10. Acupuncture Treatment for Acute Ankle Injury in the Emergency Department: A Preliminary Case Report.

    Tantivesruangdet, Nopmanee

    2016-02-01

    Acupuncture is an ancient medical treatment that is increasingly attracting the interest of the public. It is a complementary therapy that is widely used for management of pain, especially chronic discomfort caused by migraine, low-back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee(¹⁻³). The evidence base for the effectiveness of acupuncture and its clinical applications is controversial, and although its efficacy and safety in the management of acute pain have been demonstrated, the quality of this modality is still questionable. The present study reports a case of acute ankle injury, which was treated with acupuncture. A 33-year-old man presented with acute twisted ankle injury. He had pain with swelling around the ankle, and he was experiencing difficulty in walking. His clinical diagnosis was acute ankle sprain with severe pain. Several drug treatments are used for pain control, but in this case, we used acupuncture. After treatment, his pain diminished significantly with a decrease in VAS pain level from 8 to 4 in 20 minutes. At follow-up after one month, we found no skin infection in this case. PMID:27266242

  11. Using Fresh Frozen Plasma for Acute Airway Angioedema to Prevent Intubation in the Emergency Department: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    Aya Saeb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Angioedema (AE is a common condition which can be complicated by laryngeal edema, having up to 40% mortality. Although sporadic case reports attest to the benefits of fresh frozen plasma (FFP in treating severe acute bouts of AE, little evidence-based support for this practice is available at present. Study Objectives. To compare the frequency, duration of intubation, and length of intensive care unit (ICU stay in patients with acute airway AE, with and without the use of FFP. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was conducted, investigating adults admitted to large community hospital ICU with a diagnosis of AE during the years of 2007–2012. Altogether, 128 charts were reviewed for demographics, comorbidities, hospital courses, and outcomes. A total of 20 patients received FFP (108 did not. Results. Demographics and comorbidities did not differ by treatment group. However, nontreated controls did worse in terms of intubation frequency (60% versus 35%; p=0.05 and ICU stay (3.5 days versus 1.5 days; p<0.001. Group outcomes were otherwise similar. Conclusion. In an emergency department setting, the use of FFP should be considered in managing acute airway nonhereditary AE (refractory to steroid, antihistamine, and epinephrine. Larger prospective, better controlled studies are needed to devise appropriate treatment guidelines.

  12. Suicide Risk Assessments: Which Suicide Risk Factors Psychiatric Residents Consider Significant?

    Wang, Sheng-Min; Hwang, Sunyoung; Yeon, Bora; Choi, Kyoung Ho; Oh, Youngmin; Lee, Hae-Kook; Kweon, Yong-Sil; Lee, Chung Tai; Lee, Kyoung-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patients visiting the emergency department (ED) after a suicide attempt are generally assessed for suicide risk by psychiatric residents. Psychiatric residents' competence in evaluating the risk posed by the patients who attempted suicide is critical to preventing suicide. Methods We investigated factors considered important by psychiatric residents when evaluating suicide risk. This study included 140 patients admitted to the ED after attempting suicide. Psychiatric residents rated...

  13. Abortion and psychiatric practice.

    Stotland, Nada L

    2003-03-01

    The subject of abortion is fraught with politics, emotions, and misinformation. A widespread practice reaching far back in history, abortion is again in the news. Psychiatry sits at the intersection of the religious, ethical, psychological, sociological, medical, and legal facets of the abortion issue. Although the religions that forbid abortion are more prominent in the media, many religions have more liberal approaches. While the basic right to abortion has been upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court, several limitations have been permitted, including parental notification or consent (with the possibility of judicial bypass) for minors, waiting periods, and mandatory provision of certain, sometimes biased, information. Before the Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion in 1973, many women were maimed or killed by illegal abortions, and psychiatrists were sometimes asked to certify that abortions were justified on psychiatric grounds. Currently, there are active attempts to convince the public and women considering abortion that abortion frequently has negative psychiatric consequences. This assertion is not borne out by the literature: the vast majority of women tolerate abortion without psychiatric sequelae. The psychiatric outcome of abortion is best when patients are able to make autonomous, supported decisions. Psychiatrists need to know the medical and psychiatric facts about abortion. Psychiatrists can then help patients prevent unwanted pregnancies, make informed decisions consonant with their own values and circumstances when they become pregnant, and find appropriate social and medical resources whatever their decisions may be. PMID:15985924

  14. Psychiatric Aspects of Infertility

    Hacer Sezgin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as a crisis with cultural, religious, and class related aspects, which coexists with medical, psychiatric, psychological, and social problems. Relation between psychiatric and psychological factors stem from a mutual interaction of both. Family is an important institution in maintaining human existence and raising individuals in line with society's expectations. Fertility and reproduction are seen as universal functions unique to women with raising children as the expected result of the family institution. Incidence of infertility has increased recently and can become a life crisis for a couple. Even though not being able to have a child affects both sexes emotionally, women feel greater amounts of stress, pressure, anxiety, and depression.Consequences of infertility arise from short and long-term devastating effects on both individual's physical and mental health, and marital system. Many studies focus on infertility related psychological and psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, grief, marital conflict, gender differences, relation between the causes of infertility and psychopathology, the effects of psychiatric evaluation and intervention -when necessaryon the course of infertility treatment, pregnancy rates, and childbirth. The most important underlying causes of high levels of stress and anxiety that infertile women experience are the loss of maternity, reproduction, sense of self, and genetic continuity. In this review article is to investigate the relationship between medically unexplained symptoms and psychiatric symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 165-185

  15. FORGING PSYCHIATRIC CATEGORIES: A Philosophical Examination of the Creation and Stabilization of Diagnostic Knowledge

    Roome, Benjamin Reynolds

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation explores the entanglement of ethics and epistemology in the domain of psychiatric research, considering the ways that measurement practices and ethical values interrelate. If psychiatric clinicians, researchers, and patients are not acutely aware of the relationship between experimental configurations and the meaning of scientific data, unhealthy realities that take psychiatric constructs as fixed parts of nature will persist.The core of this work consists of case studies o...

  16. Emergency department use of oral ondansetron for acute gastroenteritis-related vomiting in infants and children

    Cheng, A.

    2011-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is one of the most common causes of emergency room visits. Although it is usually a self-limited infection, vomiting related to this illness can cause various degrees of dehydration, leading to intravenous insertion, electrolyte abnormalities and/or hospital admission. Ondansetron is a highly potent antiemetic drug that is effective in preventing chemotherapy-and radiation-induced nausea and vomiting with a very low risk of adverse effects. Recently, ondansetron has been...

  17. Psychiatric patient and anaesthesia

    Joginder Pal Attri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many patients with psychiatric illnesses are prescribed long-term drug treatment, and the anaesthesiologist must be aware of potential interactions with anaesthetic agents. Psychotropic drugs often given in combination with each other or with other non-psychiatric drugs generally exert profound effects on the central and peripheral neurotransmitter and ionic mechanisms. Hence, prior intake of these drugs is an important consideration in the management of the patient about to undergo anaesthesia and surgery. This article highlights the effects of anaesthetics on patients taking antipsychotics, tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors and lithium carbonate. The risk that should be considered in the perioperative period are the extent of surgery, the patient′s physical state, anaesthesia, the direct and indirect effects of psychotropics, risk of withdrawal symptoms and risk of psychiatric recurrence and relapse.

  18. The Profile of Acute Poisonings in South East of Turkey

    Davut Akın

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this prospective study was to analyze the rate characteristics of acute poisonning adults admitted to Departments emergency and hospitalized in Department of internal medicineAll cases of acute poisoning admitted to Dicle University Hospital, between, 2005 and 2006, were included in study. Clinical, laboratory, and demographic characteristics, type of poison and patient’s outcomes were recorded.Eighty poisoning cases included in the study. The mean age was 23±8 years and the majority of the patients (75% were in 15-25 years of ages. 85% of acute poisonings were self-inflicted. Medical drugs overdose were the major cause (62.5% of intoxication followed by agricultural chemicals (35%. The most frequently involved medicinal drugs were psychiatric drugs (20% and paracetamol (17.5%. There was a high rate of suicides attemp in groups of young singles, females, crowded families, patients with low education status, and patient living in cities.

  19. Psychiatric emergency services in Copenhagen 2012

    Moltke, Katinka; Høegh, Erica B; Sæbye, Ditte;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the first publication of the psychiatric emergency units (PEUs) in Copenhagen 1985, outpatient facilities have undergone considerable changes. Our aim is to examine how these changes have influenced the activities in the PEUs in the same catchment area. METHODS: We conducted a...... follow-up study to describe this development in the past 27 years by comparing 1985 variables with same measures in 2012. A random sample of all visits every 10 days in 2012 to three PEUs in Copenhagen were registered and compared with data collected, using the same study design in 1985. MAIN RESULTS...... has reduced the number of visits in the PEUs considerably. The results have shown a change of diagnostic distribution and more severe conditions requiring acute admissions for emergency treatment. Close collaboration with the patients' families, GPs, social authorities and specialized psychiatric...

  20. Migraine and its psychiatric comorbidities.

    Minen, Mia Tova; Begasse De Dhaem, Olivia; Kroon Van Diest, Ashley; Powers, Scott; Schwedt, Todd J; Lipton, Richard; Silbersweig, David

    2016-07-01

    Migraine is a highly prevalent and disabling neurological disorder associated with a wide range of psychiatric comorbidities. In this manuscript, we provide an overview of the link between migraine and several comorbid psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. We present data on psychiatric risk factors for migraine chronification. We discuss the evidence, theories and methods, such as brain functional imaging, to explain the pathophysiological links between migraine and psychiatric disorders. Finally, we provide an overview of the treatment considerations for treating migraine with psychiatric comorbidities. In conclusion, a review of the literature demonstrates the wide variety of psychiatric comorbidities with migraine. However, more research is needed to elucidate the neurocircuitry underlying the association between migraine and the comorbid psychiatric conditions and to determine the most effective treatment for migraine with psychiatric comorbidity. PMID:26733600

  1. Acute poisoning in children; changes over the years, data of pediatric clinic department of toxicology

    Alije Keka

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: In our study drugs and house cleaning products are the most frequent agents causing accidental poisoning in children less than 5 years-old, this age of children is the most susceptible in terms of morbidity. Compared with the previous studies in Pediatric Clinic of Pristina, drugs are still the most frequent cause of acute poisoning in children; the number of poisoning with pesticides has fallen but has increased the number of poisoning with cleaning products. All preventive measures against poisoning should be taken including preventive strategies of education at national level especially in drug and household product storage.

  2. Unenhanced computed tomography in acute renal colic reduces cost outside radiology department

    Lauritsen, J.; Andersen, J.R.; Nordling, J.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Unenhanced multidetector computed tomography (UMDCT) is well established as the procedure of choice for radiologic evaluation of patients with renal colic. The procedure has both clinical and financial consequences for departments of surgery and radiology. However, the financial effec......) saved the hospital USD 265,000 every 6 months compared to the use of IVU. CONCLUSION: Use of UMDCT compared to IVU in patients with renal colic leads to cost savings outside the radiology department Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12...

  3. CANNABIS AND PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS

    Loga, Slobodan; Loga-Zec, Svjetlana; Spremo, Mira

    2010-01-01

    There are connection between use of cannabis and many psychiatric disturbances in adolescents, especially “cannabis psychosis", depression, panic attacks and suicide. Negative effects could occur either as a result of a specific pharmacological effect of cannabis, or as the result of stressful experiences during the intoxication of cannabis in young people. Potentially is very dangerous high frequency suicidal ideation among cannabis users.

  4. Pathological Gambling: Psychiatric Models

    Westphal, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Three psychiatric conceptual models: addictive, obsessive-compulsive spectrum and mood spectrum disorder have been proposed for pathological gambling. The objectives of this paper are to (1) evaluate the evidence base from the most recent reviews of each model, (2) update the evidence through 2007 and (3) summarize the status of the evidence for…

  5. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

    Reighley, Joan

    A description is provided of a course, "Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing," designed to teach students at Level 3 of a two-year college nursing program about the role of the nurse in a psychiatric setting and about concepts of mental health and psychiatric disorders, using both classroom and clinical instruction. The first section of the course…

  6. 护理标识在精神科护理安全管理中的应用及效果%Application and Effect of Nursing Mark on Nursing Safety Management in Psychiatric Department

    申文英

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the nursing; identification application in nursing service in the Department of psychiatry ef ect.Methods To formulate a unified eye-catching care identification, specification, targeted use of nursing marks. Results The application of nursing marks, enhance safety consciousness of psychiatric nurses in hospital, to prevent accidents, improve the patients' satisfaction to nursing work. Conclusion The application of nursing marks, ef ective control of nursing adverse accidents. To ensure the safety of nursing.%目的探讨护理标识在精神科护理服务中应用的效果。方法制定统一醒目的护理标识,规范、有针对性使用护理标识。结果应用护理标识,增强精神科护士安全意识,杜绝院内事故的发生,提高患者对护理工作的满意度。结论护理标识的应用,有效控制护理不良事故的发生。确保了护理安全。

  7. Organisational Issues surrounding the Merger of Two Acute Mental Health Services: An Exploratory Study

    Hayes, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare services have engaged in domestic and international mergers in recent years in order to match the macroeconomic trends operating worldwide and to cope with the current global financial crisis. ‘Vision for Change’ (Department of Health and Children 2006) highlights the importance of closing all psychiatric institutions in an effort to enhance a community-based model of care and to modernise mental health service infrastructure. Therefore, considering acute mental health services wil...

  8. Robot-assisted upper-limb therapy in acute rehabilitation setting following stroke: Department of Veterans Affairs multisite clinical trial.

    Burgar, Charles G; Lum, Peter S; Scremin, A M Erika; Garber, Susan L; Van der Loos, H F Machiel; Kenney, Deborah; Shor, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    This randomized, controlled, multisite Department of Veterans Affairs clinical trial assessed robot-assisted (RA) upper-limb therapy with the Mirror Image Movement Enabler (MIME) in the acute stroke rehabilitation setting. Hemiparetic subjects (n = 54) received RA therapy using MIME for either up to 15 hours (low-dose) or 30 hours (high-dose) or received up to 15 hours of additional conventional therapy in addition to usual care (control). The primary outcome measure was the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA). The secondary outcome measures were the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Wolf Motor Function Test, Motor Power, and Ashworth scores at intake, discharge, and 6-month follow-up. Mean duration of study treatment was 8.6, 15.8, and 9.4 hours for the low-dose, high-dose, and control groups, respectively. Gains in the primary outcome measure were not significantly different between groups at follow-up. Significant correlations were found at discharge between FMA gains and the dose and intensity of RA. Intensity also correlated with FMA gain at 6 months. The high-dose group had greater FIM gains than controls at discharge and greater tone but no difference in FIM changes compared with low-dose subjects at 6 months. As used during acute rehabilitation, motor-control changes at follow-up were no less with MIME than with additional conventional therapy. Intensity of training with MIME was positively correlated with motor-control gains. PMID:21674393

  9. Predictors for Delayed Emergency Department Care in Medical Patients with Acute Infections – An International Prospective Observational Study

    Hausfater, Pierre; Amin, Devendra; Amin, Adina; Haubitz, Sebastian; Conca, Antoinette; Reutlinger, Barbara; Canavaggio, Pauline; Sauvin, Gabrielle; Bernard, Maguy; Huber, Andreas; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In overcrowded emergency department (ED) care, short time to start effective antibiotic treatment has been evidenced to improve infection-related clinical outcomes. Our objective was to study factors associated with delays in initial ED care within an international prospective medical ED patient population presenting with acute infections. Methods We report data from an international prospective observational cohort study including patients with a main diagnosis of infection from three tertiary care hospitals in Switzerland, France and the United States (US). We studied predictors for delays in starting antibiotic treatment by using multivariate regression analyses. Results Overall, 544 medical ED patients with a main diagnosis of acute infection and antibiotic treatment were included, mainly pneumonia (n = 218; 40.1%), urinary tract (n = 141; 25.9%), and gastrointestinal infections (n = 58; 10.7%). The overall median time to start antibiotic therapy was 214 minutes (95% CI: 199, 228), with a median length of ED stay (ED LOS) of 322 minutes (95% CI: 308, 335). We found large variations of time to start antibiotic treatment depending on hospital centre and type of infection. The diagnosis of a gastrointestinal infection was the most significant predictor for delay in antibiotic treatment (+119 minutes compared to patients with pneumonia; 95% CI: 58, 181; p<0.001). Conclusions We found high variations in hospital ED performance in regard to start antibiotic treatment. The implementation of measures to reduce treatment times has the potential to improve patient care. PMID:27171476

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea: management considerations in psychiatric patients

    Heck T

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Taryn Heck,1 Monica Zolezzi21Pharmacy Department, University of Alberta Hospital, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, AB, Canada; 2Clinical Pharmacy and Practice, College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, QatarAbstract: Psychiatric disorders and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA are often comorbid. However, there is limited information on the impact of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms, on how to manage psychiatric pharmacotherapy in patients presenting with OSA, or on the effectiveness and challenges of OSA treatments in patients with comorbid mental illness. As such, the objective of this article is to provide an overview of some epidemiological aspects of OSA and treatment considerations in the management of OSA in individuals with comorbid psychiatric disorders. Predefined keywords were used to search for relevant literature in electronic databases. Data show that OSA is particularly prevalent in patients with psychiatric disorders. The medical care that patients with these comorbidities require can be challenging, as some of the psychiatric medications used by these patients may exacerbate OSA symptoms. As such, continuous positive airway pressure continues to be the first-line treatment, even in patients with psychiatric comorbidity. However, more controlled studies are required, particularly to determine continuous positive airway pressure compliance in patients with mental illness, the impact of treating OSA on psychiatric symptoms, and the impact of the use of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms.Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea, psychiatric disorders, comorbidity, psychotropic medications

  11. Spectrum of emergency department presentation in patients of acute intermittent porphyria: Experience from a North Indian tertiary care center

    Kumar Susheel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Of the porphyrias, acute intermittent porphyria (AIP is the most frequently encountered porphyria. The clinical characterestics of thirteen patients of AIP who presented to the Emergency Department were analyzed. The most common precipitating factor was drugs. Eleven patients presented with pain abdomen. Neurological manifestations included: Seizures in six and motor weakness in six. Of the four patients with hyponatremia, three had associated neuropathy and the fourth patient demonstrated a severe course marked by pontine-extrapontine myelinolysis and profound adrenergic activity. In conclusion, even though AIP is less frequently reported from India the emergency physicians should be vigilant to exclude the diagnostic possibility of AIP in a patient with an appropriate clinical setting.

  12. Validation of the Excited Component of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS-EC in a naturalistic sample of 278 patients with acute psychosis and agitation in a psychiatric emergency room

    San Luis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the wide use of the Excited Component of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS-EC in a clinical setting to assess agitated patients, a validation study to evaluate its psychometric properties was missing. Methods Data from the observational NATURA study were used. This research describes trends in the use of treatments in patients with acute psychotic episodes and agitation seen in emergency departments. Exploratory principal component factor analysis was performed. Spearman's correlation and regression analyses (linear regression model as well as equipercentile linking of Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S, Agitation and Calmness Evaluation Scale (ACES and PANSS-EC items were conducted to examine the scale's diagnostic validity. Furthermore, reliability (Cronbach's alpha and responsiveness were evaluated. Results Factor analysis resulted in one factor being retained according to eigenvalue ≥1. At admission, the PANSS-EC and CGI-S were found to be linearly related, with an average increase of 3.4 points (p Conclusions The factorial analyses confirm the unifactorial structure of the PANSS-EC subscale. The PANSS-EC showed a strong linear correlation with rating scales such as CGI-S and ACES. PANSS-EC has also shown an excellent capacity to detect real changes in agitated patients.

  13. Psychiatric consequences of road traffic accidents.

    Mayou, R; Bryant, B.; Duthie, R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the psychiatric consequences of being a road traffic accident victim. DESIGN--Follow up study of road accident victims for up to one year. SETTING--Emergency department of the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford. SUBJECTS--188 consecutive road accident victims aged 18-70 with multiple injuries (motorcycle or car) or whiplash neck injury, who had not been unconscious for more than 15 minutes, and who lived in the catchment area. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Present state examinat...

  14. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY AMONG PATIENTS ATTENDING CARDIAC OPD

    Goyal, Ashok; Bhojak, M.M.; Verma, K. K.; Singhal, Ashok; Jhirwal, O.P.; Bhojak, Maneesh

    2001-01-01

    One hundred patients were selected from the cardiology outpatient department by non-probability purposive method. Each patient was evaluated by a psychiatrist and a consultant cardiologist The informations were recorded in a self designed proforma. The Hindi version of Goldberg′s General Health Questionnaire and modified adjective check list for type A and type B personality characteristics were administered. Seventy five percent of the patients were having psychiatric problems. The cardiac p...

  15. Gluten encephalopathy with psychiatric onset: case report

    Costantini Chiara; Bortolaso Paola; Bolla Emilio; Vender Simone; Poloni Nicola; Callegari Camilla

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Many cases of coeliac disease, a gastrointestinal autoimmune disorder caused by sensitivity to gluten, can remain in a subclinical stage or undiagnosed. In a significant proportion of cases (10–15%) gluten intolerance can be associated with central or peripheral nervous system and psychiatric disorders. A 38-year-old man was admitted as to our department an inpatient for worsening anxiety symptoms and behavioural alterations. After the addition of second generation antipsychotic to t...

  16. [Psychiatric treatment sentences.

    Stevens, Hanne; Nordentoft, Merete; Agerbo, Esben;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previous Danish studies of the increasing number of sentences to psychiatric treatment (SPT) have compared prevalent populations of persons undergoing treatment with incident measures of reported crimes. Examining the period 1990-2006, we studied incident sentences, taking the type...... and severity of crime into account. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using data from Statistics Denmark's national crime statistics, we have compared time-trends of SPT with time-trends of suspended and custodial sentences stratified by type of crime. RESULTS: We found that the rise in SPT is primarily......, leading to more confrontations and changes in practices, e.g., for reporting violence against staff. However, if a civil person is the victim of a violent offence, the probability of the perpetrator being a psychiatric patient is small and has remained virtually unchanged since 1990. Udgivelsesdato: 2010...

  17. Comparison of Mortality in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Accidentally Admitted to Non-cardiology Departments Versus That in Patients Admitted to Coronary Care Units

    D'Souza, Maria; Saaby, Lotte; Poulsen, Tina S; Diederichsen, Axel C P; Hosbond, Susanne; Diederichsen, Søren Z; Larsen, Torben B; Schmidt, Henrik; Gerke, Oke; Hallas, Jesper; Gislason, Gunnar; Thygesen, Kristian; Mickley, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate the clinical characteristics including symptoms and long-term mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) accidentally admitted to non-cardiology departments (NCDs). For comparison, similar observations in patients admitted to...

  18. Epidemiological, clinical anf pathogenetic studies of acute intermittent porphyria

    Bylesjö, Ingemar

    2008-01-01

    Porphyrias are inherited metabolic disorders characterised by an impairment of heme biosynthesis. Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is the most common of the acute porphyrias in Sweden. Acute attacks of AIP are characterised by neuro-psychiatric symptoms, including epileptic seizures. Environmental and acquired factors are related to the induction of symptoms. Acute attacks of AIP are treated with high doses of glucose and/or hematin infusions. The pathogenesis of the neuro-psychiatric sympt...

  19. Feigning Acute Intermittent Porphyria

    Rania Elkhatib; Modupe Idowu; Gregory S. Brown; Jaber, Yasmeen M.; Reid, Matthew B.; Cheryl Person

    2014-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant genetic defect in heme synthesis. Patients with this illness can have episodic life-threatening attacks characterized by abdominal pain, neurological deficits, and psychiatric symptoms. Feigning this illness has not been reported in the English language literature to date. Here, we report on a patient who presented to the hospital with an acute attack of porphyria requesting opiates. Diligent assessment of extensive prior treatment r...

  20. Depressive symptoms and disability in acute patients with comorbidities in departments of internal medicine

    Salvatore La Carrubba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are few data on the prevalence of depression among acute patients with comorbidities. The current study aimed to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms in hospitalized patients admitted to Internal Medicine Units and the correlation between these symptoms and comorbidities and disability indexes. Materials and methods: All consecutive patients admitted to 26 Internal Medicine Units of the Italian National Public Health System in Sicily, Italy, from September 2001 to March 2002 were screened. Within 24 hours of admission, patients were administered the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS, Mini-Mental State Examination, Activities of Daily Living (ADL, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL and Charlson’s Comorbidity Index. Results: 1,947 subjects were included in the analyses. Of the patients, 509 (26.1% showed depressive symptoms (indicated by GDS score > 15. Depression was significantly associated (univariate analyses with hypertension (OR 1.45; CI 95% 1.18-1.79, diabetes (OR 1.48, CI 95% 1.17-1.87, cerebrovascular disease (OR 1.50, CI 95% 1.08-2.07, cirrhosis (OR 1.49, CI 95% 1.01- 2.19, ADL score (OR 0.72: CI 95% 0.63-0.82, and IADL score (OR 0.83; CI 95% 0.78-0.87, but not with Charlson’s Comorbidity Index (OR 1.04; CI 95% 0.98-1.10. Multivariate analysis showed that independent predictive factors for depression were age (OR 1.02, CI 95% 1.01-1.02, female gender (OR 2.29, CI 95% 1.83 - 2.87, and IADL score (OR 0.86, CI 95% 0.81 - 0.93. Conclusions: The data suggest that depressive symptoms are not linked to worse clinical conditions but are associated with the loss of autonomy in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living.

  1. Unenhanced Computed Tomography in Acute Renal Colic Reduces Cost Outside Radiology Department

    Lauritsen, J.; Andersen, J.R.; Nordling, J.; Thomsen, H.S. [Dept.s of Diagnostic Radiology and Urology, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital, Herlev (Denmark)

    2008-12-15

    Background: Unenhanced multidetector computed tomography (UMDCT) is well established as the procedure of choice for radiologic evaluation of patients with renal colic. The procedure has both clinical and financial consequences for departments of surgery and radiology. However, the financial effect outside the radiology dept. is poorly elucidated. Purpose: To evaluate the financial consequences outside of the radiology dept., a retrospective study comparing the ward occupation of patients examined with UMDCT to that of intravenous urography (IVU) was performed. Material and Methods: A total of 594 consecutive patients were admitted for renal colic during two 6-month periods. One hundred seventy-three consecutive patients were examined with IVU in 2000 and 421 with UMDCT in 2005. The only difference between the two groups was the imaging procedure. The duration of hospital stay and pathology findings were registered. Results: In 50% of the patients undergoing UMDCT, a stone was found; a stone was found or suspected in 40% of patients undergoing IVU. Patients undergoing IVU stayed significantly longer in the ward than patients examined by UMDCT (P<0.0001). The new procedure (UMDCT) saved the hospital USD 265,000 every 6 months compared to the use of IVU. Conclusion: Use of UMDCT compared to IVU in patients with renal colic leads to cost savings outside the radiology department.

  2. Unenhanced Computed Tomography in Acute Renal Colic Reduces Cost Outside Radiology Department

    Lauritsen, J.; Andersen, J.R.; Nordling, J.; Thomsen, H.S. (Dept.s of Diagnostic Radiology and Urology, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital, Herlev (Denmark))

    2008-12-15

    Background: Unenhanced multidetector computed tomography (UMDCT) is well established as the procedure of choice for radiologic evaluation of patients with renal colic. The procedure has both clinical and financial consequences for departments of surgery and radiology. However, the financial effect outside the radiology dept. is poorly elucidated. Purpose: To evaluate the financial consequences outside of the radiology dept., a retrospective study comparing the ward occupation of patients examined with UMDCT to that of intravenous urography (IVU) was performed. Material and Methods: A total of 594 consecutive patients were admitted for renal colic during two 6-month periods. One hundred seventy-three consecutive patients were examined with IVU in 2000 and 421 with UMDCT in 2005. The only difference between the two groups was the imaging procedure. The duration of hospital stay and pathology findings were registered. Results: In 50% of the patients undergoing UMDCT, a stone was found; a stone was found or suspected in 40% of patients undergoing IVU. Patients undergoing IVU stayed significantly longer in the ward than patients examined by UMDCT (P<0.0001). The new procedure (UMDCT) saved the hospital USD 265,000 every 6 months compared to the use of IVU. Conclusion: Use of UMDCT compared to IVU in patients with renal colic leads to cost savings outside the radiology department

  3. Combined determination of highly sensitive troponin T and copeptin for early exclusion of acute myocardial infarction: first experience in an emergency department of a general hospital

    Müller K

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ulrich Lotze1, Holger Lemm2, Anke Heyer2, Karin Müller31Department of Internal Medicine, German Red Cross Hospital Sondershausen, Sondershausen, 2Department of Internal Medicine, 3Department of Laboratory Medicine, Saale-Unstrut Hospital Naumburg, Naumburg, GermanyBackground: The purpose of this observational study was to test the diagnostic performance of the Elecsys® troponin T high-sensitive system combined with copeptin measurement for early exclusion of acute myocardial infarction (MI in clinical practice.Methods: Troponin T high-sensitive (diagnostic cutoff: <14 pg/mL and copeptin (diagnostic cutoff: <14 pmol/L levels were determined at admission in addition to other routine laboratory parameters in patients with suspected acute MI presenting to the emergency department of a general hospital over a period of five months.Results: Data from 142 consecutive patients (mean age 71.2 ± 13.5 years, 76 men were analyzed. Final diagnoses were acute MI in 13 patients (nine ST elevation MI, four non-ST elevation MI, 9.2% unstable angina pectoris in three (2.1%, cardiac symptoms not primarily associated with myocardial ischemia in 79 (55.6%, and noncardiac disease in 47 patients (33.1%. The patients with acute MI were younger and had higher troponin T high-sensitive and copeptin values than patients without acute MI. Seventeen patients had very high copeptin values (>150 pmol/L, one of whom had a level of >700 pmol/L and died of pulmonary embolism. A troponin T high-sensitive level of <14 pg/mL in combination with copeptin <14 pmol/L at initial presentation ruled out acute MI in 45 of the 142 patients (31.7%, each with a sensitivity and negative predictive value of 100%.Conclusion: According to this early experience, a single determination of troponin T high-sensitive and copeptin may enable early and accurate exclusion of acute MI in one third of patients, even in an emergency department of a general hospital.Keywords: highly sensitive troponin T

  4. Age related clinical manifestation of acute bacterial meningitis in children presenting to emergency department of a tertiary care hospital

    Objective: To determine the signs and symptoms of acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) in different age groups of a paediatric population. Methods: The retrospective study comprised patients who had been admitted through the Emergency Department of Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi with the relevant diagnosis from September 2009 to September 2011. Case record forms were used to collect data from patient files. Data was collected using variables such as age, gender, presenting complaints, clinical signs and symptoms, computed tomography scan findings and final outcome of patients. There was a minimal risk of breach in patient confidentiality. SPSS 19 was used for data analysis. Results: A total of 192 patients were enrolled. The presenting complaint in 165 (86%) patients was fever; vomiting in 93 (48.43%); and 49 (52.68%) of them were more than 5 years old. Irritability was present in 54 (28.12%) children, of whom 27 (50%) were less than one year. Fits were present in 47 (24.47%) cases out of which 21 (44.68%) were less than one year. Neck stiffness and signs of meningeal irritation, Kerning's sign and Brudzincski's sign, were present in 53 (27.60%) patients; 26 (13.54%); and 18 (9.3%) respectively. These signs were more common in children over 5 years of age, reflected by 29 (54.7%), 16 (61.5%) and 11 (61.11%) patients respectively. On presentation, headache was found in 77 (40.10%) children among whom 56 (72.72%) were over 5 years. Besides, 151 (78.6%) patients required admission to the ward, while 40 (20.8%) were admitted in High Dependancy Unit/critical care units. Adverse outcome was observed in 6 (3.12%) patients. Conclusion: Younger children with acute bacterial meningitis presented with non-specific signs and symptoms. Headache and signs of meningeal irritation were common findings in children over 5 years. (author)

  5. Risk model for suspected acute coronary syndrome is of limited value in an emergency department

    Mogensen, Christian Backer; Christiansen, Maja; Jørgensen, Jess Bjerre; Stæhr, Peter Bisgaard

    2015-01-01

    assigned to the high-risk group was 3.0. Allocation to the high-risk group, male gender and age above 60 years was associated with a higher risk of ACS. For patients fulfilling the high-risk definition, sensitivity was 71%, specificity 55%, negative predictive value 90% and positive predictive value 24...... be treated at an emergency department (ED). The aim of this study was to describe a risk stratification model for a Danish context. METHODS: This was a historic prospective cohort study of patients with suspicion of ACS. The patient was defined as a low-risk patient and admitted to the ED if: 1......% for an ACS. CONCLUSIONS: The model for stratification separated patients into two equal groups, allocated 71% of all ACS directly to the CCU and could not be improved by any of the additional factors examined. Further development of referral strategies for chest pain patients is required. FUNDING...

  6. Munchausen syndrome mimicking psychiatric disease with concomitant genuine physical illness

    Almeida, Jaime; da Silva, Joaquim Alves; Xavier, Miguel; Gusmão, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Munchausen syndrome is a disorder in which patients intentionally produce symptoms mimicking physical or psychiatric illnesses with the aim to assume the sick role and to gain medical attention. Once a patient receives a Munchausen syndrome diagnosis every complaint made thence tends to be regarded with scepticism by clinical staff. However, it is possible that a bona fide illness, which might be disregarded, may coexist in these patients. We report a case of MS mimicking psychiatric disease with concomitant genuine acute physical illness. Despite the initial doubts about the veracity of the latter, due to its prompt recognition, treatment was successful. PMID:22798096

  7. Prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Shyam Chand Chaudhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychiatric disorders, especially anxiety and depression have been reported to have an increased prevalence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients, but there is a paucity of data from India. Aims and Objectives: Aim of our study is to study the frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients and their correlation with severity of COPD, as per global initiative for obstructive lung disease guidelines. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital (King George's Medical University. A total of 74 COPD patients were included in this study and compared with 74 controls. The diagnosis and severity of COPD were assessed by spirometry. Psychiatric comorbidities were assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview questionnaire. Results: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities was significantly higher (P < 0.05 in COPD patients (28.4% as compared to controls (2.7%. As regards to severity, the frequency was significantly increased in severe and very severe COPD. The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients increased significantly with the increase in duration of symptoms being present in 67% of patients with duration of symptoms more than 10 years and only 23% of patients with duration of symptoms ≤5 years. Conclusion: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities is increased in COPD patients as compared to controls. We recommend that all patients with COPD should be screened for psychiatric comorbidity, if any.

  8. Prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Chaudhary, Shyam Chand; Nanda, Satyan; Tripathi, Adarsh; Sawlani, Kamal Kumar; Gupta, Kamlesh Kumar; Himanshu, D; Verma, Ajay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Psychiatric disorders, especially anxiety and depression have been reported to have an increased prevalence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but there is a paucity of data from India. Aims and Objectives: Aim of our study is to study the frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients and their correlation with severity of COPD, as per global initiative for obstructive lung disease guidelines. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital (King George's Medical University). A total of 74 COPD patients were included in this study and compared with 74 controls. The diagnosis and severity of COPD were assessed by spirometry. Psychiatric comorbidities were assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview questionnaire. Results: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in COPD patients (28.4%) as compared to controls (2.7%). As regards to severity, the frequency was significantly increased in severe and very severe COPD. The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients increased significantly with the increase in duration of symptoms being present in 67% of patients with duration of symptoms more than 10 years and only 23% of patients with duration of symptoms ≤5 years. Conclusion: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities is increased in COPD patients as compared to controls. We recommend that all patients with COPD should be screened for psychiatric comorbidity, if any. PMID:27051106

  9. Adolescents and Dual Diagnosis in a Psychiatric Emergency Service.

    Matali, José Luis; Andión, Oscar; Pardo, Marta; Iniesta, Raquel; Serrano, Eduard; San, Luis

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, both the prevalence of drug use and related child and adolescent psychiatric emergencies have risen sharply. There are few studies about the impact on child and adolescent emergency services. This study has a twofold aim. The first is to describe the prevalence of substance use disorders, mental disorders and dual diagnosis (substance use problems plus mental disorder) in adolescents in psychiatric emergency service. The second is to analyze clinical and healthcare differences between patients with dual diagnosis and patients with a mental disorder without substance use disorder.We retrospectively reviewed 4012 discharge forms for emergencies treated at the psychiatric emergency department during the period 2007-2009. We obtained a sample of 1795 visits. This sample was divided into two groups: the dual diagnosis group (n = 477) and the psychiatric disorder group (n = 1318).The dual diagnosis group accounted for 26.5% of psychiatric emergencies analyzed. Compared to the psychiatric disorder group,the dual diagnosis group had significantly more conduct disorders, social problems, involuntariness in the visit, less hospital admissions and less connection with the healthcare network.Adolescents with a dual diagnosis account for a high percentage of visits at child and adolescent psychiatric emergency services. This patient group requires specialized care both at emergency services and in specific units. Accordingly, these units should play a triple role when handling dual diagnosis: detection, brief treatment and referral to a specialised unit. PMID:26990268

  10. Broader Indications for Psychiatric Consultation

    Steinberg, Paul

    1987-01-01

    A liaison approach to psychiatric consultation increases the patient population who can benefit from psychiatric assessment during hospitalization for medical or surgical conditions. It also broadens the scope of the psychiatric investigation of the individual patient. The meaning of the illness to the patient, and the patient's present methods of adapting to his or her illness are important considerations. Unconscious concerns, which interfere with the patient's compliance to medical treatme...

  11. Gene therapy for psychiatric disorders

    Thome, Johannes; HÄSSLER, FRANK; ZACHARIOU, VANNA

    2011-01-01

    There is no indication that gene therapy can be applied in psychiatric patients any time soon. However, there are several promising developments on the level of experimental neuroscience indicating that gene therapy approaches have an effect in animal models of several psychiatric disorders including drug addiction, affective disorders, psychoses and dementia, modifying behavioural parameters via interventions on the molecular and cellular level. However, before gene therapy in psychiatric di...

  12. Parricide: Psychiatric morbidity

    Dunjić Bojana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Parricide is defined as a murder of parents by their children; the patricide is murder of father, while matricide is murder of mother. This entity is classified as homicide, but it differs in the fact that victims are parents and the killers are their children. Mostly, it is associated with psychiatric morbidity. OBJECTIVE To describe sociodemographic and psychopathological characteristics of parricide committers and to analyze circumstances of parricide and psychiatric morbidity in order to achieve better recognition and prevention of risks. METHOD This retrospective study included all homicide autopsy records (1991-2005 performed at the Institute of Forensic Medicine, Medical School, University of Belgrade. For further analyses, all parricide records were selected out. The study analyzed all available parameters, which concerned parricide committers, victims and the act itself. Methods of descriptive statistics were used. RESULTS Between 1991 and 2005, there were 948 cases of homicide; of these, 3.5% were parricides. The committers of parricide were on average 31.2±11.9 years old, 87.8% were males, 60.6% with psychiatric symptoms most commonly with schizophrenia, alcohol dependence, personality disorder etc. Victims were on average 63.7±11.9 years old, 54.5% males, and 21.2% had a diagnosed mental illness. CONCLUSION Parricide is a rare kind of homicide accounting for 3% of all homicides. Committers are mostly unemployed males in early adulthood who have mental disorder. The phenomenon of parricide deserves a detailed analysis of the committer (individual bio-psycho-social profile and the environ- mental factors (family, closely related circumstances to enable a precise prediction of the act and prevention of the fatal outcome, which logically imposes the need of further studies.

  13. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Complications.

    Mason, Michael J; Aplasca, Alexis; Morales-Theodore, Rosa; Zaharakis, Nikola; Linker, Julie

    2016-07-01

    This article highlights the prevalence of co-occurring disorders among adolescents and underscores the complexity and opportunities of treating these patients in a systematic, comprehensive approach. As evidenced by this review, the need exists to develop and test models of care that integrate co-occurring disorders into both psychiatric and substance abuse treatment settings. The challenge for pediatric practitioners is to provide detailed assessments linked to evidence-based treatment plans to account for the variations in adolescent development and the unique risk factor profile of each patient. The issues related to co-morbidity are vast and continue to grow with rapidly increasing research literature. PMID:27338972

  14. Psychiatric assessment in transplantation

    Messias Erick

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of the presumptive donor law in Brazil is expected to increase the availability of organs for transplantation. As medical management of end-stage organ dysfunction continues to improve, increasing numbers of potential transplant recipients will be available to meet this supply. There is mounting evidence that supports the involvement of skilled psychiatric practitioners in the selection of transplant candidates. Data supporting the influence of psychosocial factors on compliance and therefore medical outcomes continues to grow. The literature review allows delineating the components and rationale for comprehensive psychosocial evaluations as a component of preoperative transplantation evaluation.

  15. Aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service

    Yves Chaput

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Yves Chaput1, Lucie Beaulieu2, Michel Paradis3, Edith Labonté41Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal (presently in private practice; 2Department of Psychiatry, Haut Richelieu Hospital, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec; 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Montreal, Montreal; 4Department of Psychiatry, Laval University, Quebec, CanadaIntroduction: Studies of aggressive behaviors in a nonforensic mental health setting have focused primarily on the inpatient ward and, on event prediction, using behavior-based clinical rating scales. Few studies have specifically targeted aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service or determined whether assessing the demographic and clinical characteristics of such patients might prove useful for their more rapid identification.Methods: We used a prospectively acquired database of over 20,900 visits to four services in the province of Quebec, Canada, over a two-year period from September 2002 onwards. A maximum of 72 variables could be acquired per visit. Visits with aggression (any verbally or physically intimidating behavior, both present and past, were tagged. Binary logistic regressions and cross-tabulations were used to determine whether the profile of a variable differed in visits with aggression from those without aggression.Results: About 7% of visits were marked by current aggression (verbal 49%, physical 12%, verbal and physical 39%. Including visits with a “past only” history of aggression increased this number to 20%. Variables associated with aggression were gender (male, marital status (single/separated, education (high school or less, employment (none, judicial history (any type, substance abuse (prior or active, medication compliance (poor, type of arrival to psychiatric emergency services (involuntary, police, judiciary, landlord, reason for referral (behavioral dyscontrol, diagnosis (less frequent in anxiety disorders, and outcome (more frequently placed under

  16. Etiology and Risk Factors of Acute Gastroenteritis in a Taipei Emergency Department: Clinical Features for Bacterial Gastroenteritis

    Chao-Chih Lai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The causative pathogen is rarely identified in the emergency department (ED, since the results of cultures are usually unavailable. As a result, antimicrobial treatment may be overused. The aim of our study was to investigate the pathogens, risk factors of acute gastroenteritis, and predictors of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in the ED. Methods: We conducted a matched case-control study of 627 stool samples and 612 matched pairs. Results: Viruses (41.3% were the leading cause of gastroenteritis, with noroviruses (32.2% being the most prevalent, followed by bacteria (26.8% and Giardia lamblia (12.4%. Taking antacids (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.57–6.53, household members/classmates with gastroenteritis (aOR 4.69; 95% CI, 2.76–7.96, attending a banquet (aOR 2.29; 95% CI, 1.64–3.20, dining out (aOR 1.70; 95% CI, 1.13–2.54, and eating raw oysters (aOR 3.10; 95% CI, 1.61–5.94 were highly associated with gastroenteritis. Elders (aOR 1.04; 05% CI, 1.02–1.05, those with CRP >10 mg/L (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62, or those who were positive for fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62 or fecal occult blood (aOR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.03–3.77 were more likely to be hospitalized in ED. In addition, presence of fecal leukocytes (time ratio [TR] 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06–1.41, abdominal pain (TR 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07–1.41, and frequency of vomiting (TR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.98 were significantly associated with the duration of acute gastroenteritis. Presence of fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.08; 95% CI, 1.42–3.05, winter season (aOR 0.45; 95% CI, 0.28–0.74, frequency of diarrhea (aOR 1.69; 95% CI, 1.01–2.83, and eating shrimp or crab (aOR 1.53; 95% CI, 1.05–2.23 were highly associated with bacterial gastroenteritis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the final model was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.55–0.63. Conclusions: Acute bacterial gastroenteritis was highly associated with

  17. [German pilot study of psychiatric inpatients with histories of migration].

    Koch, E; Hartkamp, N; Siefen, R G; Schouler-Ocak, M

    2008-03-01

    The work group on psychiatry and migration of the Conference of Directors of Psychiatric Hospitals in Germany conducted a study on the use of inpatient psychiatric services by migrants in 12 psychiatric and psychotherapeutic hospitals and hospital departments. In contrast to previous studies the proportion of migrants in psychiatric hospitals (17.4%) equaled that of migrants in the general population. However there still was a high rate of diagnostic and treatment problems resulting from cultural differences and, to a lesser extent, from language problems. A high proportion of migrants suffered from delusional and schizophrenic disorders, while there were considerable differences in the distribution of diagnoses between different groups of migrants, e.g. those from Turkey and eastern Europe, respectively. Roughly half of all migrants studied had German citizenship. Among the migrants of Turkish background, a high proportion was born in Germany. The number of asylum seekers and refugees was disproportionately high. PMID:18210042

  18. Bedside Ultrasonography as an Adjunct to Routine Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in the Emergency Department

    Samuel H.F. Lam

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Appendicitis is a common condition presenting to the emergency department (ED. Increasingly emergency physicians (EP are using bedside ultrasound (BUS as an adjunct diagnostic tool. Our objective is to investigate the test characteristics of BUS for the diagnosis of appendicitis and identify components of routine ED workup and BUS associated with the presence of appendicitis. Methods: Patients four years of age and older presenting to the ED with suspected appendicitis were eligible for enrollment. After informed consent was obtained, BUS was performed on the subjects by trained EPs who had undergone a minimum of one-hour didactic training on the use of BUS to diagnose appendicitis.They then recorded elements of clinical history, physical examination, white blood cell count (WBC with polymophonuclear percentage (PMN, and BUS findings on a data form. We ascertained subject outcomes by a combination of medical record review and telephone follow-up. Results: A total of 125 subjects consented for the study, and 116 had adequate image data for final analysis. Prevalence of appendicitis was 40%. Mean age of the subjects was 20.2 years, and 51% were male. BUS was 100% sensitive (95% CI 87-100% and 32% specific (95% CI 14-57% for detection of appendicitis, with a positive predictive value of 72% (95% CI 56-84%, and a negative predictive value of 100% (95% CI 52-100%. Assuming all non-diagnostic studies were negative would yield a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 81%. Subjects with appendicitis had a significantly higher occurrence of anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and a higher WBC and PMN count when compared to those without appendicitis. Their BUS studies were significantly more likely to result in visualization of the appendix, appendix diameter >6mm, appendix wall thickness >2mm, periappendiceal fluid, visualization of the appendix tip, and sonographic Mcburney’s sign (p6mm, appendix wall thickness >2mm, periappendiceal fluid were

  19. Influence of Liaison Psychiatric Approach on Quality of Life in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer

    Anton, Sanda; Mrđenović, Slobodan; Gugić, Damir; Tomanović, Katarina

    2008-01-01

    Having breast cancer represents traumatic stress event that can influence development of psychiatric disorders during psychological adjustment. The aim of research was to investigate influence of liaison psychiatric approach on quality of life in patients with breast cancer. Sample consisted of 120 women with breast cancer treated on Department for Oncology in University Hospital Osijek. Patients were in liaison psychiatric treatment for two months. They were estimated on the firs...

  20. Psychiatric Comorbidities in Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Kallweit, Ulf; Werth, Esther; Seiz, Angela; Sefidan, Sandra; Dahmen, Norbert; Manconi, Mauro; Ehlert, Ulrike; Bassetti, Claudio L A

    2016-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological sleep disorder with frequent (39%) coexisting psychiatric comorbidities. Patients with any psychiatric comorbidity had fewer periodic leg movements in sleep. Psychiatric disorders should be taken into account in patients with RLS. PMID:27019065

  1. Morale is high in acute inpatient psychiatry

    Bowers, L.; Allan, T; Simpson, A; Jones, J.; Whittington, R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Morale on acute psychiatric wards has been considered to be problematic, and is reported to contribute to low quality patient care. Aim: To assess the relationship of staff morale to patient, service environment, physical environment, patient routines, conflict, containment, staff demographics, and staff group variables. Method: A multivariate cross sectional study was undertaken collecting data on morale and other variables on 136 acute admission psychiatric wards in Engl...

  2. College Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

    Singh, Delar K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on college students with psychiatric disabilities. It defines and discusses various psychiatric conditions such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and personality disorders. It concludes with accommodations that a college professor can make to help these students succeed in higher education. (Contains 1…

  3. Psychiatric diagnosis in attempted suicide

    Baby, Sanjush; P, Manju; KF, Yesudas

    2006-01-01

    This is a retrospective study which assesses the various socio-demographic correlates, the methods adopted to commit suicide and the psychiatric disorders in patients attempting suicide. The most common psychiatric diagnosis was found to be Adjustment disorder followed by Depressive disorder. Organo-phosphorous compounds were the most frequent agent used among suicide attempt patients.

  4. Psychiatric aspects of burn

    Dalal P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries and their subsequent treatment cause one of the most excruciating forms of pain imaginable. The psychological aspects of burn injury have been researched in different parts of the world, producing different outcomes. Studies have shown that greater levels of acute pain are associated with negative long-term psychological effects such as acute stress disorder, depression, suicidal ideation, and post-traumatic stress disorder for as long as 2 years after the initial burn injury. The concept of allostatic load is presented as a potential explanation for the relationship between acute pain and subsequent psychological outcomes. A biopsychosocial model is also presented as a means of obtaining better inpatient pain management and helping to mediate this relationship.

  5. Acute Effects of Outdoor Air Pollution on Emergency Department Visits Due to Five Clinical Subtypes of Coronary Heart Diseases in Shanghai, China

    Xie, Juan; He, Mingzhen; Zhu, Weiying

    2014-01-01

    Background Air pollution can be a contributing cause to the development and exacerbation of coronary heart disease (CHD), but there is little knowledge about the acute effects of air pollution on different clinical subtypes of CHD. Methods We conducted a time-series study to investigate the association of air pollution (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < 10 µm [PM10], sulfur dioxide [SO2], and nitrogen dioxide [NO2]) on emergency department (ED) visits due to five different sub...

  6. Using risk factors to help in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with non-diagnostic electrocardiogram changes in emergency department

    Ali Arhami Dolatabadi; Parvin Kashani; Hamidreza Hatamabadi; Hamid Kariman; Alireza Baratloo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to determine the association of cardiac risk factors and the risk of Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) in Emergency Department (ED) patients with non-diagnostic ECG changes. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the ED of Imam Hossein Hospital during a period of one year. In this study, patients with symptoms suggestive of AMI including chest pain, dyspnea, palpitation, syncope, cerebrovascular incidents, nausea, vomitting, dizziness and loss of c...

  7. Psychiatric morbidity and pattern of dysfunctions in patients with leprosy

    Bhatia M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leprosy, being a chronic infectious disease with profound social stigma, remains associated with high psychological mortidity. PURPOSES: To find out the pattern of psychiatric morbidity in leprosy patients and the relationship of various factors with the morbidity. METHODS: Ninty patients attending leprosy clinic were randomly chosen for the study group alongwith 40 patients suffering from acute skin problem other than leprosy as control group. The socio-demographic data were recorded in semi-structural proforma; all patients were given Goldbery Health Questioneaire (GHQ. Patients having GHQ score> 2 was assessed by Disability Assessent Questionaire (DAQ. The psychiatric diagnoses was made according to ICD-10 by W ho0 and physical deformity by W ho 0 Disability Scale. FINDINGS: The mean GHQ score of the study grant was 3.44 and that of control group was 1.62. The mean DAQ score was 45.13. Psychiatric disorder was seen in 44.4% and 7.5% of study group and control group respectively. The psychiatric illness was generalised anoxidy disorder (GAD (27.8%. CONCLUSIONS: Leprosis highly associated with psychiatric mobidity. LIMITATIONS: The findings can not be generalised due to small sample size and clinic-based data.

  8. Use of a care bundle in the emergency department for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a feasibility study.

    McCarthy, Cormac

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To determine the efficacy and usefulness of a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) care bundle designed for the initial management of acute exacerbations of COPD and to assess whether it improves quality of care and provides better outcomes. Introduction: The level of care provided in the emergency department (ED) for COPD exacerbations varies greatly, and there is a need for a more systematic, consistent, evidence-based quality improvement approach to improve outcomes and costs. Methods: A prospective before and after study was carried out in a university teaching hospital. Fifty consecutive patients were identified in the ED with COPD exacerbations and their management was reviewed. Following the education of ED staff and the implementation of a COPD care bundle, the outcome for 51 consecutive patients was analyzed. This COPD care bundle consisted of ten elements considered essential to the management of COPD exacerbations and was scored 0–10 according to the number of items on the checklist implemented correctly. Results: Following implementation, the mean bundle score out of 10 improved from 4.6 to 7 (P,0.001). There was a significant decrease in the unnecessary use of intravenous corticosteroids from 60% to 32% (P=0.003) and also a marked improvement in the use of oxygen therapy, with appropriate treatment increasing from 76% to 96% (P=0.003). Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism also improved from 54% to 73% (P=0.054). The 30-day readmission rate did not significantly improve. Conclusion: The use of a bundle improves the delivery of care for COPD exacerbations in the ED. There is more appropriate use of therapeutic interventions, especially oxygen therapy and intravenous corticosteroids.

  9. 42 CFR 482.60 - Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals.

    2010-10-01

    ... hospitals. 482.60 Section 482.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals § 482.60 Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals. Psychiatric hospital must— (a) Be primarily engaged in providing, by or under the supervision of a doctor...

  10. Training psychiatric staff to treat a multicultural patient population.

    Collins, J L; Mathura, C B; Risher, D L

    1984-04-01

    Cultural and linguistic barriers have long been problems in establishing an effective therapeutic alliance between patients and therapists from different cultural, ethnic, and racial backgrounds. The current emphasis on cultural psychiatry has stimulated the inclusion of culturally relevant material in the curricula of American psychiatric residency programs, such as the program at Howard University Hospital in Washington, D.C. After a preliminary study of foreign patients treated on the psychiatry service, the department of psychiatry established a program of seminars and didactic sessions intended to familiarize staff and trainees with cultural patterns of the largest groups of foreign students attending the university. The department also participated in a transcultural fellowship program for medical students sponsored by the American Psychiatric Association and the National Institute of Mental Health. After describing the programs, the authors briefly discuss such culturally related issues as foreign patients' return to their original language when they develop psychiatric illnesses. PMID:6714949

  11. [Psychiatric complications of cannabis use].

    Coscas, Sarah; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel; Karila, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit substance, especially among young people. Cannabis use is extremely commonplace and frequently comorbid with psychiatric disorders that raise questions about the etiology. The use of cannabis is an aggravating factor of all psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric complications are related to the age of onset, duration of exposure and individual risk factors of the individual (mental and social health). The panic attack is the most common complication. The link with psychosis is narrow that leads to increased prevention for vulnerable populations. Cannabis is also an indicator of increased depressive vulnerability and an aggravating factor for bipolar disorder. PMID:24579344

  12. The cerebellum and psychiatric disorders

    Joseph ePhillips

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum has been considered for a long time to play a role solely in motor coordination. However, studies over the past two decades have shown that the cerebellum also plays a key role in many motor, cognitive, and emotional processes. In addition, studies have also shown that the cerebellum is implicated in many psychiatric disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders. In this review, we discuss existing studies reporting cerebellar dysfunction in various psychiatric disorders. We will also discuss future directions for studies linking the cerebellum to psychiatric disorders.

  13. Neuropsychological and psychiatric functioning in sheep farmers exposed to low levels of organophosphate pesticides

    Mackenzie Ross, Sarah Jane; Brewin, Chris Ray; Curran, Helen Valerie; Furlong, Clement Eugene; Abraham-Smith, Kelly Michelle; Harrison, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    The study aim was to determine whether low level exposure to organophosphate pesticides (OPs) causes neuropsychological or psychiatric impairment. Methodological weaknesses of earlier studies were addressed by: recruiting participants who had retired on ill health grounds; excluding participants with a history of acute poisoning, medical or psychiatric conditions that might account for ill health; and exploring factors which may render some individuals more vulnerable to the effects of OPs th...

  14. Analysis and Preventive Measures of the Related Factors of Nursing Risk in the Psychiatric Department%精神科护理风险的相关因素分析与防范对策

    徐亚莉; 孙国平

    2015-01-01

    目的本文的研究目的在于通过对精神科护理风险相关因素的分析,提出相应的防范对策,为精神科实际护理工作降低护理风险。方法统计某医院收治的66例出现护理意外的精神病患者,收集并整体66例出现护理意外的精神病患者的资料,并深入调查和了解出现护理意外的原因。结果通过对出现护理意外的66例精神病患者的调查,发现影响护理风险的因素有很多,包括护理人员因素,患者因素,医院内部人员编制,医院内部管理制度以及医院基础设施建设等因素。结论通过提高护理人员的护理风险防范意识,强化护理工作的安全管理,加强护理人员的素质建设,明确岗位职责以及提升护理人员的业务水平是降低精神科护理风险的有效途径。%Objective The aim this study is by analyzing related factors psychiatric nursing risk,put forward cor esponding countermeasures, reduce the risk nursing for actual psychiatric nursing work. Methods The statistics hospital admit ed 66 cases nursing accident psychiatric patients,col ected and overal nursing accident occur ed in 66 cases of psychiatric patients with data,and to understand why nursing accidents in-depth investigation.Results Based on investigation of 66 psychiatric patients with nursing accident,found that there are many factors that influence nursing risk factors, including nurses,patient factors,hospital internal staf ,hospital internal management system and hospital infrastructure construction and other factors.Conclusion By improving awareness of nursing risk prevention of nursing staf ,strengthening safety management of nursing work,strengthening construction of quality of nursing staf , clear job responsibilities and enhance nursing staf business level is ef ective way to reduce risk of psychiatric nursing.

  15. 精神科护理风险的相关因素分析与防范对策%Analysis and Preventive Measures of the Related Factors of Nursing Risk in the Psychiatric Department

    徐亚莉; 孙国平

    2015-01-01

    目的本文的研究目的在于通过对精神科护理风险相关因素的分析,提出相应的防范对策,为精神科实际护理工作降低护理风险。方法统计某医院收治的66例出现护理意外的精神病患者,收集并整体66例出现护理意外的精神病患者的资料,并深入调查和了解出现护理意外的原因。结果通过对出现护理意外的66例精神病患者的调查,发现影响护理风险的因素有很多,包括护理人员因素,患者因素,医院内部人员编制,医院内部管理制度以及医院基础设施建设等因素。结论通过提高护理人员的护理风险防范意识,强化护理工作的安全管理,加强护理人员的素质建设,明确岗位职责以及提升护理人员的业务水平是降低精神科护理风险的有效途径。%Objective The aim this study is by analyzing related factors psychiatric nursing risk,put forward cor esponding countermeasures, reduce the risk nursing for actual psychiatric nursing work. Methods The statistics hospital admit ed 66 cases nursing accident psychiatric patients,col ected and overal nursing accident occur ed in 66 cases of psychiatric patients with data,and to understand why nursing accidents in-depth investigation.Results Based on investigation of 66 psychiatric patients with nursing accident,found that there are many factors that influence nursing risk factors, including nurses,patient factors,hospital internal staf ,hospital internal management system and hospital infrastructure construction and other factors.Conclusion By improving awareness of nursing risk prevention of nursing staf ,strengthening safety management of nursing work,strengthening construction of quality of nursing staf , clear job responsibilities and enhance nursing staf business level is ef ective way to reduce risk of psychiatric nursing.

  16. [Psychiatric Nursing Internship and Promotion of Specialized Training Interest].

    Kasch, S; Wirkner, J; Klauer, T; Freyberger, H J; Fleßa, S; Merk, H; Kasch, R

    2016-04-01

    Qualified personnel in the field of medical psychiatry are crucial to providing comprehensive care. The importance of a nursing internship as an access point to the psychiatric field is not considered by key players. A survey conducted across German medical schools in 2012 analyzed medical care internships as viewed by medical school students. From among students surveyed, those who participated in a nursing internship, and would consider taking part in further internships within the psychiatric department ("PFJ"), were separated from those who were not sure ("PFU") or who would not ("PFN") consider further study in the field of psychiatry. The survey's conclusion was that a comparably small number of students opted for a psychiatric nursing internship based upon practical aspects of content, satisfaction, and access to nursing internships. A potential solution to the low numbers of students selecting psychiatric internships is to restructure the initial contact program that psychiatric departments use to introduce prospective medical school students to the field of psychiatry. PMID:27100846

  17. Suicide among older psychiatric inpatients

    Erlangsen, Annette; Zarit, Steven H; Tu, Xin;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Older adults have elevated suicide rates, especially in the presence of a psychiatric disorder, yet not much is known about predictors for suicide within this high-risk group. The current study examines the characteristics associated with suicide among older adults who are admitted to a...... psychiatric hospital. METHOD: All persons aged 60 and older living in Denmark who were hospitalized with psychiatric disorders during 1990-2000 were included in the study. Using a case-control design and logistic regression analysis, the authors calculated the suicide risk associated with specific patient...... characteristics. RESULTS: Affective disorders were found to be associated with an almost twofold higher risk of suicide among psychiatric inpatients than other types of disorders (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-2.6). Patients with dementia had a significantly lower risk ratio of 0.2 (95% CI: 0.1-0.3). In...

  18. Sleep disorders in psychiatric practice

    Szelenberger, Waldemar; SOLDATOS, CONSTANTIN

    2005-01-01

    Over the last years, a large body of evidence has accumulated showing that complaints of disordered sleep are quite prevalent in the community. Insomnia is by far the most common disturbance and is often associated with concurrent psychiatric illness, in particular anxiety and mood disorders. On the other hand, sleep complaints are frequently present among psychiatric patients and have been incorporated in the official diagnostic criteria for many mental disorders, such as m...

  19. CT scan in children with acute bacterial meningitis: experience from emergency department of a tertiary-care hospital in karachi, pakistan

    Objective: To determine the role of computed tomography scan in children presenting to emergency department with symptoms and signs of suspected acute bacterial meningitis. Methods: The retrospective analysis was done on children who were admitted through the Emergency Department at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from September 2009 to September 2011 with the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis. Information related to age, gender, presenting complaints, clinical signs and symptoms, computed tomography scan findings and final outcome of patients was gathered from the medical records. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 192 patients were admitted with the relevant diagnosis. The male-female ratio was 2.3:1. Computed tomography scan was done in 114 (59.4%) patients. The scan was reported normal in 90 (78.94%) patients. However, cerebral oedema was found in 16 (14.03%) patients, cerebral infarct in 6(5.26%) and hydrocephalus in 2 (1.75%) patients. Overall, there were 6 (3.1%) deaths. Conclusion: Computed tomography scan may have a beneficial role in children with acute bacterial meningitis. However, further studies are required to use the scan as a routine investigation for such a diagnosis. (author)

  20. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility PPS

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Since October 1, 1983, most hospitals have been paid under the hospital inpatient prospective payment system (PPS). However, certain types of specialty hospitals...

  1. Sudden psychotic episode probably due to meningoencephalitis and Chlamydia pneumoniae acute infection

    Canas Nuno

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 9% to 20% of all cases of acute psychosis presenting to an Emergency Department (ED are due to a general medical condition, cautious medical workup should be mandatory in such patients. Differential diagnosis must consider conditions as diverse as renal failure or CNS infection. Acute Chlamydia pneumoniae infection usually causes a self-limited respiratory syndrome. Rarely, acute neurological complications occur, with acute meningoencephalitis most frequently reported. Diagnosis requires a high level of suspicion and is difficult to confirm. Case report We describe a 22 year-old female Caucasian who, three days after a mild pharingitis, developed an acute psychosis with exuberant symptoms interspersed with periods of lucidity, in a background of normal consciousness and orientation. Initial medical and imagiological workup were inconclusive. After 20 days of unsuccessful treatment with antipsychotics she developed a high fever and was re-evaluated medically. Lumbar puncture revealed an inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid. MRI showed irregular thickening and nodularity of the lateral ventricles' lining. An anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae IgM antibody titter of 85 IU/ml was detected. All symptoms cleared after treatment with antibiotics and corticosteroids. Conclusion This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of acute CP-associated meningoencephalitis manifesting as an acute psychotic episode. It illustrates the principle that non-organic psychiatric syndromes must remain a diagnosis of exclusion in first-time acute psychosis.

  2. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Alcohol Dependence.

    Fein, George

    2015-12-01

    We review our clinical studies of psychiatric comorbidity in short-term and long-term abstinent and in treatment naïve alcoholics (STAA, LTAA and TNA). TNA ypically have less severe alcoholism than treated abstinent samples and evidence less severe psychiatric disturbance. Lifetime psychiatric diagnoses are the norm for STAA and LTAA but not for TNA. Individuals with alcohol and drug use disorders show greater antisocial personality disturbance, but do not show differences in the mood or anxiety domains or in borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms. The studies show that alcoholics can achieve and maintain abstinence in the face of ongoing mood, anxiety, or BPD problems. By contrast, for ASPD, LTAA essentially stop current antisocial behaviors in all seven domains of antisocial behaviors. We believe that ongoing antisocial behavior is not consistent with maintaining abstinence, and that LTAA modify their antisocial behavior despite continued elevated social deviance proneness and antisocial dispositionality. Abstinent individuals without lifetime psychiatric disorders and TNA show more (subdiagnostic threshold) psychiatric symptoms and abnormal psychological measures than non-alcoholic controls in the mood, anxiety, BPD, and antisocial domains. In summary, our studies show that although LTAA have achieved multi-year abstinence, they still report significant psychological distress compared to NAC. We believe this distress may negatively affect their quality of life. This suggests the importance of developing effective care models to address comorbid mental health problems in LTAA. We also show that antisocial personality disorder symptoms decline to the levels seen in normal controls, and that excluding individuals from research with a psychiatric diagnosis does not control for subdiagnostic psychiatric differences between alcoholics and controls. PMID:26590836

  3. Isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis: Prevalence, symptomatology and associated scapholunate ligament disruption in a population presenting to an accident and emergency department with acute wrist injuries

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis in a population presenting to an Accident and Emergency Department of Leicester Royal Infirmary with acute wrist injuries. Also to identify the presence of scapholunate ligament disruption in this patient group and quantify symptoms and loss of function in terms of the modified system of Green and O'Brien, a recognized clinical scoring system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 1711 radiographs of patients attending the Accident and Emergency Department were prospectively reviewed over a 5-month period. Those patients with isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis were invited for clinical review. RESULTS: Sixteen patients were identified with isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis. Two had a poor Green and O'Brien score and evidence of scapholunate ligament disruption (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis has a prevalence of 1% in a population presenting to an Accident and Emergency Department with acute wrist injuries over the age of 30 years. Isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis may be asymptomatic even though the changes in the joint are severe. Scapholunate ligament disruption is associated with a poor Green and O'Brien score, but is not present in the majority of cases. Higginson, A.P. et al. (2001)

  4. Satisfaction of patients hospitalised in psychiatric hospitals: a randomised comparison of two psychiatric-specific and one generic satisfaction questionnaires

    Cléopas Agatta

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While there is interest in measuring the satisfaction of patients discharged from psychiatric hospitals, it might be important to determine whether surveys of psychiatric patients should employ generic or psychiatry-specific instruments. The aim of this study was to compare two psychiatric-specific and one generic questionnaires assessing patients' satisfaction after a hospitalisation in a psychiatric hospital. Methods We randomised adult patients discharged from two Swiss psychiatric university hospitals between April and September 2004, to receive one of three instruments: the Saphora-Psy questionnaire, the Perceptions of Care survey questionnaire or the Picker Institute questionnaire for acute care hospitals. In addition to the comparison of response rates, completion time, mean number of missing items and mean ceiling effect, we targeted our comparison on patients and asked them to answer ten evaluation questions about the questionnaire they had just completed. Results 728 out of 1550 eligible patients (47% participated in the study. Across questionnaires, response rates were similar (Saphora-Psy: 48.5%, Perceptions of Care: 49.9%, Picker: 43.4%; P = 0.08, average completion time was lowest for the Perceptions of Care questionnaire (minutes: Saphora-Psy: 17.7, Perceptions of Care: 13.7, Picker: 17.5; P = 0.005, the Saphora-Psy questionnaire had the largest mean proportion of missing responses (Saphora-Psy: 7.1%, Perceptions of Care: 2.8%, Picker: 4.0%; P P Conclusion Despite differences in the intended target population, content, lay-out and length of questionnaires, none appeared to be obviously better based on our comparison. All three presented advantages and drawbacks and could be used for the satisfaction evaluation of psychiatric inpatients. However, if comparison across medical services or hospitals is desired, using a generic questionnaire might be advantageous.

  5. A study of psychiatric morbidity in patients of peptic ulcer diseases

    Jagpal Singh Klair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To study the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among patients of peptic ulcer disease and to study the patients of peptic ulcer disease with psychiatric morbidity in comparison to patients of peptic ulcer disease without psychiatric morbidity on following variables: sociodemographic variables and attributes/risk factors of peptic ulcer disease. Materials and Methods: Fifty cases of clinically proven acid peptic diseases and 30 cases of the control group were screened in department of General Medicine, outdoor as well as indoor patients. Instruments applied for the purpose of the study were Personal Bio-data Performa (Appendix-I, (SCL- 80 (Appendix-II, Hamilton rating scale for anxiety and depression, (P.S.L.E.; clinical diagnosis of psychiatric disorders was made as per ICD- 10 criteria. Data collected shall be subjected to statistical analysis. Results and Findings: The psychiatric morbidity was significantly (P10 years, compared to 23.80% in patients without psychiatric morbidity. Lastly, 48.27% of patients with psychiatric morbidity had significantly (P<0.01 stronger family history of acid peptic disease compared to 9.52% in patients without psychiatric morbidity. Conclusions: There is a significant relationship between the peptic ulcer disease and the various psychiatric morbidity factors as illustrated from the findings of this study.

  6. A model for emergency department end-of-life communications after acute devastating events--part II: moving from resuscitative to end-of-life or palliative treatment.

    Limehouse, Walter E; Feeser, V Ramana; Bookman, Kelly J; Derse, Arthur

    2012-11-01

    The model for emergency department (ED) end-of-life communications after acute devastating events addresses decision-making capacity, surrogates, and advance directives, including legal definitions and application of these steps. Part II concerns communications moving from resuscitative to palliative and end-of-life treatments. After completing the steps involved in determining decision-making, emergency physicians (EPs) should consider starting palliative measures versus continuing resuscitative treatment. As communications related to these end-of-life decisions increasingly fall within the scope of emergency medicine (EM) practice, we need to become educated about and comfortable with them. PMID:23167864

  7. OCCUPATIONAL ROLE AFTER PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITALIZATION

    GH.R GHASSEMI

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Severe Psychiatricillness is accompanied by gross disturbances in patient's occupational role. This study presents a comparative picture of work performance before and after psychiatric hospitalization. Method: Subjects comprised 440 psychiatric admitters from Noor Medical center - Isfahan - Iran, who were followed from November 1999 to November 2000. Their work adjustment was measured by means of Weiss man's index. Data were computer analyzed using SPSS by running paired t- student and ANOVA. Results: Majority of the patients (53 % were without permanent sources of income before psychiatric hospitalization, about 12 percent of those who were working prior to hospitalization lost their job after being discharged from hospital. Better work adjustment before hospitalization was positively correlated with better work adjustment after discharge for working patients (r =0/66. Working ability of the patients after discharge was lesser than before the attack f9r patients with regular and irregular job (P < 001. Discussion: Job loss or poor working ability after psychiatric admission reported by several researchers and has bean confirmed in this study as well. These observatoins have been discussed in view of the current socio economic problems in the society and nature of psychiatric disturbances.

  8. Who’s Boarding in the Psychiatric Emergency Service?

    Scott A. Simpson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: When a psychiatric patient in the emergency department requires inpatient admission, but no bed is available, they may become a “boarder.” The psychiatric emergency service (PES has been suggested as one means to reduce psychiatric boarding, but the frequency and characteristics of adult PES boarders have not been described. Methods: We electronically extracted electronic medical records for adult patients presenting to the PES in an urban county safety-net hospital over 12 months. Correlative analyses included Student’s t-tests and multivariate regression. Results: 521 of 5363 patient encounters (9.7% resulted in boarding. Compared to non-boarding encounters, boarding patient encounters were associated with diagnoses of a primary psychotic, anxiety, or personality disorder, or a bipolar manic/mixed episode. Boarders were also more likely to be referred by family, friends or providers than self-referred; arrive in restraints; experience restraint/ seclusion in the PES; or be referred for involuntary hospitalization. Boarders were more likely to present to the PES on the weekend. Substance use was common, but only tobacco use was more likely associated with boarding status in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Boarding is common in the PES, and boarders have substantial psychiatric morbidity requiring treatment during extended PES stays. We question the appropriateness of PES boarding for seriously ill psychiatric patients. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(6:669-674

  9. Psychiatric Adverse Effects of Dermatological Drugs

    Mine Özmen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dermatological drugs, mostly corticosteroids and isotretinoin, cause different psychiatric adverse effects. During steroid therapy, a wide range of psychiatric conditions, from minor clinical symptoms like insomnia and anxiety to serious psychiatric syndromes like psychosis and delirium might be seen. In medical literature, a causal connection is usually suggested between “isotretinoin”, which is used for treatment of acne vulgaris and depression and suicide attempts. However, there are no statistically significant double-blind randomized studies that support this connection. Clinicians must know patient’s psychiatric history before using any dermatological treatment known as causing psychiatric adverse effects, and psychiatric consultation should be established whenever necessary.

  10. Undergraduate college students' perceptions of psychiatric nurses.

    Wantz, Richard A; Firmin, Michael W; Stolzfus, Melissa J; Ray, Brigitte N; Holmes, Hannah J; Geib, Ellen F

    2012-11-01

    We surveyed undergraduate students' perceptions of psychiatric nurses' effectiveness and analyzed other sources of data. Students reported that psychiatric nurses' strengths include helping in situations that involve psychiatric symptoms, mental health evaluation, and drug abuse. Psychiatric nurses also were said to be effective when helping an individual with psychiatric symptoms, such as delusions and hallucinations. Friends or associates, common knowledge, school and education, and movies are some sources by which students learn about psychiatric nurses. Sources that provided less influential information include insurance carriers, newspapers, and personal experience. PMID:23146011

  11. Suspected acute appendicitis in female patients: Trends in diagnosis in emergency department in a University Hospital in Western region of Saudi Arabia

    Objective was to determine the negative appendectomy rate; utilization, accuracy of Alvarado scale, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) in diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Hospital records of 124 female patients admitted for suspicious of acute appendicitis from January 2003-January 2004 to the Emergency Department (ED) at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital Jeddah, Saudi Arabia were reviewed retrospectively. We reviewed the age of patients, clinical presentation, Alvarado scale, US, CT, histopathalogical diagnosis of appendicular specimen. A total of 124 female patients aged 6-64 years were presented to ED with right iliac fossa pain. Of the total, 103 patients have appendectomies (83.1%), 21 (16.9%) patients underwent conservative treatment. Prevalence of advanced appendicitis was 13.7% and negative appendectomy rate was 27.2%. Accuracy rate of appendicitis with Alvarado scale 67.7%, US was 57.9% CT was 66.7%. Postoperative correlation was found between advanced cases and Alvarado scale (r=0.338), and hospital stay duration (r=0.250, p<0.01). Clinical findings and experiments remain of major importance in appendicitis-diagnosis. When appendicitis appears with atypical presentations, it remains a clinical challenge. In such cases, laboratory and imaging investigation may be useful in establishing a correct diagnosis. Alvarado scoring system is easy, simple and cheap complementary aid for supporting the diagnosis of acute appendicitis especially for junior surgeons. (author)

  12. Nonurgent Use of the Emergency Department by Pediatric Patients: A Theory-Guided Approach for Primary and Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioners.

    Ohns, Mary Jean; Oliver-McNeil, Sandra; Nantais-Smith, Leanne M; George, Nancy M

    2016-01-01

    Providing quality, cost-effective care to children and their families in the appropriate setting is the goal of nurse practitioners in primary and acute care. However, increased utilization of the emergency department (ED) for nonurgent care threatens cost-effective quality care, interrupts continuity of care, and contributes to ED overcrowding. To date, descriptive research has identified demographics of those using the ED for nonurgent care, the chief complaints of children seeking nonurgent care, the cost to the health care system of pediatric nonurgent care, and characteristics of associated primary care settings. Using Donabedian's Model of Quality of Healthcare and a Theory of Dependent Care by Taylor and colleagues, acute and primary care pediatric nurse practitioners can incorporate interventions that will channel care to the appropriate setting and educate caregivers regarding common childhood illnesses and the value of continuity of care. By using a theoretical framework as a guide, this article will help both acute and primary care pediatric nurse practitioners understand why parents seek nonurgent care for their children in the ED and actions they can take to ensure that care is provided in an optimal setting. PMID:26489793

  13. Psychiatric comorbidity of childhood obesity.

    Kalarchian, Melissa A; Marcus, Marsha D

    2012-06-01

    The onset of psychiatric symptoms and disorders is relatively common in childhood, occurring among youths across the weight spectrum. However, available research suggests that certain psychiatric comorbidities are more prevalent in obese children and adolescents than in healthy weight youths. First, we review research on disordered eating, including evidence to suggest that loss of control eating is associated with weight gain and obesity in youths, as well as poor outcome in family-based treatment of paediatric obesity. Second, we highlight evidence on the relationship between depression and obesity, especially in girls. Third, we present data on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), particularly the symptoms of impulsivity and inattention, and childhood obesity. We also consider that some medical conditions and psychotropic medications contribute to weight gain and obesity in children and adolescents. Throughout the review, we emphasize that psychiatric comorbidity may be a cause or consequence of childhood obesity, or they may share common aetiological factors. PMID:22724645

  14. Religious ideas and psychiatric disorders.

    Beit-Hallahmi, B; Argyle, M

    1977-01-01

    The evidence presented above points to the need for considering factors other than purely religious ones in determining the role of religious ideas in psychiatric disorders. The occurrence of religious ideas as part of the content of individual delusional systems in psychiatric patients can be explained on the basis of exposure to religious ideas through the social environment. It may be also related to the prominence of religion, vis-a-vis other belief systems, in the social envirnment. When considering psychopathological explanations for intense religious experiences, one has to be conscious again of the social factors involved. When an unusual experience having religious content becomes normative in a certain group (for whatever reasons), trying to explain its appearance on the basis of individual psychodynamics or psychopathology becomes very difficult. There seems to be an inverse relationship between the social nature of a religious experience and its psychopathological nature, i.e., there is more psychopathology in individuals reporting solitary religious experiences, or individual religious ideas. Thus the solitary experience seems to be more influenced by disturbed individual dynamics, but in other cases social factors seem to be crucial. Our overall conclusion is that a psychiatric analysis of the role of religious factors in psychopathology has to be first a social-psychiatric analysis. An individual presenting psychiatric symptoms and religious ideas has to be evaluated in light of his social background, since the specific content of psychiatric symptoms seems to be determined by social background factors. Individual psychodynamics determine the appearance of symptoms, but their particular form will be the result of these background factors, one of which is religion. PMID:863602

  15. The nature of psychiatric disorders.

    Kendler, Kenneth S

    2016-02-01

    A foundational question for the discipline of psychiatry is the nature of psychiatric disorders. What kinds of things are they? In this paper, I review and critique three major relevant theories: realism, pragmatism and constructivism. Realism assumes that the content of science is real and independent of human activities. I distinguish two "flavors" of realism: chemistry-based, for which the paradigmatic example is elements of the periodic table, and biology-based, for which the paradigm is species. The latter is a much better fit for psychiatry. Pragmatism articulates a sensible approach to psychiatric disorders just seeking categories that perform well in the world. But it makes no claim about the reality of those disorders. This is problematic, because we have a duty to advocate for our profession and our patients against other physicians who never doubt the reality of the disorders they treat. Constructivism has been associated with anti-psychiatry activists, but we should admit that social forces play a role in the creation of our diagnoses, as they do in many sciences. However, truly socially constructed psychiatric disorders are rare. I then describe powerful arguments against a realist theory of psychiatric disorders. Because so many prior psychiatric diagnoses have been proposed and then abandoned, can we really claim that our current nosologies have it right? Much of our current nosology arose from a series of historical figures and events which could have gone differently. If we re-run the tape of history over and over again, the DSM and ICD would not likely have the same categories on every iteration. Therefore, we should argue more confidently for the reality of broader constructs of psychiatric illness rather than our current diagnostic categories, which remain tentative. Finally, instead of thinking that our disorders are true because they correspond to clear entities in the world, we should consider a coherence theory of truth by which disorders

  16. Cutaneous factitia in elderly patients: alarm signal for psychiatric disorders

    Chiriac A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Anca Chiriac,1 Liliana Foia,2 Cristina Birsan,1 Ancuta Goriuc,2 Caius Solovan3 1Department of Dermatology, Nicolina Medical Center, Iaşi, Romania; 2Surgical Department, Grigore T Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Iaşi, Romania; 3Department of Dermatology, Victor Babeş University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timişoara, Romania Background: The factitious disorders, more commonly known in daily practice as pathomimia, are expressed in dermatology units by skin lesions induced voluntarily by the patient, in order to draw attention of the medical staff and/or the family members. The disorder is often challenging to diagnose and even more difficult to document in front of the patient or relatives. It represents a challenge for the physician, and any attempt at treatment may be followed by recurrence of the self-mutilation. This paper describes two cases of pathomimia diagnosed by dermatologists and treated in a psychiatry unit, highlighting the importance of collaboration in these situations. Patients and methods: Two case reports, describing old female patients with pathomimia, hospitalized in a department of dermatology for bizarre skin lesions. Results: The first case was a 77-year-old female with unknown psychiatric problems and atrophic skin lesions on the face, self-induced for many months, with multiple hospitalizations in dermatology units, with no response to different therapeutic patterns, and full recovery after psychiatric treatment for a major depressive syndrome. The second case was a 61-year-old female patient with disseminated atrophic scars on the face, trunk, and limbs. She raised our interest because of possible psychiatric issues, as she had attempted to commit suicide. The prescription of antidepressants led to a significant clinical improvement. Conclusion: These cases indicate that a real psychiatric disease may be recorded in patients suffering from pathomimia. Therefore, complete psychiatric evaluation in order to

  17. Alcohol Abuse and Other Psychiatric Disorders

    Skip to main content National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Main Menu Search Search form ... Health & Health Disparities Other Psychiatric Disorders Other Substance Abuse HIV/AIDS Other Psychiatric Disorders In the current ...

  18. Biofeedback for psychiatric disorders: a systematic review

    Schoenberg, P.L.; David, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Biofeedback potentially provides non-invasive, effective psychophysiological interventions for psychiatric disorders. The encompassing purpose of this review was to establish how biofeedback interventions have been used to treat select psychiatric disorders [anxiety, autistic spectrum disorders, dep

  19. Alcohol Abuse and Other Psychiatric Disorders

    ... Health Disparities Other Psychiatric Disorders Other Substance Abuse HIV/AIDS Other Psychiatric Disorders In the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), alcohol abuse and other substance abuse ...

  20. Acute respiratory distress following the inhalation of an aerosol upholstery cleaner: the importance of reporting from the Emergency Department

    Mistry, Dipak; Meredith, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    Aerosols are commonplace in the home and in industry as they provide a quick and controlled way of distributing chemicals or perfumes. It is well known that deliberating concentrating and inhaling vapours may result in dizziness, euphoria, blackouts, respiratory distress, cardiac and renal failure. However, in the most part, warnings and guidance on use are sparse. Here, a proven case of acute respiratory distress is presented and a reporting mechanism via the UK National Poisons Information ...

  1. Robot-assisted upper-limb therapy in acute rehabilitation setting following stroke: Department of Veterans Affairs multisite clinical trial

    Charles G. Burgar, MD; Peter S. Lum, PhD; A. M. Erika Scremin, MD; Susan L. Garber, MA, OTR; H. F. Machiel Van der Loos, PhD; Deborah Kenney, MS, OTR; Peggy Shor, OTR

    2011-01-01

    This randomized, controlled, multisite Departmentof Veterans Affairs clinical trial assessed robot-assisted (RA)upper-limb therapy with the Mirror Image Movement Enabler(MIME) in the acute stroke rehabilitation setting. Hemipareticsubjects (n = 54) received RA therapy using MIME for either upto 15 hours (low-dose) or 30 hours (high-dose) or received up to15 hours of additional conventional therapy in addition to usualcare (control). The primary outcome measure was the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (F...

  2. Characteristics of HCV positive patients in an Italian urban psychiatric unit

    Azzoni Antonella

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives 1 to assess the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in a population of acute psychiatric in-patients; 2 to find out relationships between HCV comorbidity and clinical features of psychiatric patients. Methods Prospective observational study in a 6-year period. Results 2396 cases (1492 patients were admitted in the considered period. Forty-two patients (2.8% were affected by HCV infection. HCV infection was more frequent in patients with less years of education, lower social class, lower last year best Global Assessment of Functioning score, more hostile or violent behavior in hospital, with a lifetime history of previous suicide attempt, and with substance-related disorders. Conclusion HCV infection in psychiatric patients constitutes a major threat to the health of psychiatric patients and is related with unfavorable social background, worse global functioning, hostile or violent behavior, substance-related disorders. It appears also to be a significant risk of suicidal behavior.

  3. How to evacuate a psychiatric hospital: a Hurricane Katrina success story.

    Thomas, Joan; Lackey, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the successful evacuation of an entire psychiatric hospital from New Orleans, Louisiana, to Memphis, Tennessee, on a weekend night. The destination site was 400 miles away and buses were used for transport. The evacuation occurred shortly before Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans and included 73 adult, adolescent, and child acute psychiatric patients. Thirty-five staff members also participated in the evacuation with their families and pets. This report is significant because little is known about how to implement a disaster plan that involves the transport of an entire psychiatric hospital-patients, nurses, physicians, staff, and family members--to another city. The knowledge gained can also benefit psychiatric nurses and their organizations when establishing or modifying their disaster plans. PMID:18251350

  4. The value of pancreatic stone protein in predicting acute appendicitis in patients presenting at the emergency department with abdominal pain

    Tschuor Christoph

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic Stone Protein (PSP is a protein naturally produced mainly in the pancreas and the gut. There is evidence from experimental and clinical trials that blood PSP levels rise in the presence of inflammation or infection. However, it is not known whether PSP is superior to other established blood tests (e.g. White Blood Count, Neutrophils or C - reactive protein in predicting appendicitis in patients presenting with abdominal pain and a clinical suspicion of appendicitis at the emergency room. Methods/design The PSP Appendix Trial is a prospective, multi-center, cohort study to assess the value of PSP in the diagnostic workup of acute appendicitis. 245 patients will be prospectively recruited. Interim analysis will be performed once 123 patients are recruited. The primary endpoint of the study concerns the diagnostic accuracy of PSP in predicting acute appendicitis and therefore the evidence of appendicitis on the histopathological specimen after appendectomy. Discussion The PSP Appendix Trial is a prospective, multi-center, cohort study to assess the value of PSP in the diagnostic workup of acute appendicitis. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01610193; Institution Ethical Board Approval ID: KEKZH- Nr. 2011–0501

  5. Legal Considerations of Psychiatric Nursing Practice.

    Barloon, Linda Funk; Hilliard, Wanda

    2016-06-01

    There are major legal issues that affect psychiatric nursing and guidelines for practicing in a legal and responsible manner. Advances in understanding of psychiatric conditions and developments in how nurses care for psychiatric patients result in changes in regulations, case law, and policies that govern nursing practice. Professional development, keeping abreast of current research and literature regarding clinical practice and trends, and involvement in professional organizations are some of the ways that psychiatric nurses can meet the challenges of their profession. PMID:27229273

  6. Oral Health in Psychiatric Patients

    Ozlem Gurbuz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Although oral health is a major determinant of general health and quality of life, it has a low priority in the context of mental illness. Chronic mental illness and its treatment carry inherent risks for significant oral diseases. Both the disease itself and its various pharmacologic management modalities lead to a range of oral complications and side effects, with caries, periodontal disease and xerostomia being encountered most frequently. Older age, female gender, length of hospitalization, duration of mental illness, psychiatric diagnosis are the most discussed predictors for adverse dental outcomes in the reviewed studies. Poor oral hygiene, higher intake of carbonates, smoking, poor perception of oral health self-needs, length of psychiatric disorder, length of psychotropic treatment, and less access to dental care pose at high risk for poor oral health among this population. This article emphasizes the importance of preventive dentistry programs to improve dental healthcare psychiatric chronic inpatients and the signifance of bridging dental health education to psychiatric rehabilitation programs. In this review, general information concerning the oral manifestations of mental illness, effect of medication of mental illness on oral health, the factors affecting oral health among this special population have been provided.

  7. [Psychiatric evaluation in civil law].

    Foerster, K

    1992-03-01

    Aspects of civil law of importance for the psychiatrist as expert witness are those dealing with disability pensions accident insurance, compensation in civil law and rights of the seriously disabled. The legal basis of each is briefly outlined, and some guidelines given for psychiatric court reports. Some outstanding theoretical and practical problems are mentioned. PMID:1579170

  8. Psychiatric illness and sexual function.

    Segraves, R T

    1998-05-01

    Impaired sexual function has been noted to occur in various psychiatric illnesses. In affective disorders, disturbances of libido, erection and orgasm have been reported. Disordered sexual behavior has also been noted in patients with schizophrenia and anorexia nervosa. Clinical speculation suggests that anxiety disorders may also be associated with a higher prevalence of sexual problems. PMID:9647976

  9. Comorbidity of Psychiatric Disorders and Parental Psychiatric Disorders in a Sample of Iranian Children with ADHD

    Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Moini, Rozita

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the psychiatric comorbidity of a clinical sample of children with ADHD and the psychiatric disorders in their parents. Method: Structured psychiatric interviews assessing lifetime psychiatric disorders by "DSM-IV" criteria, using the Farsi version of the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia. Results: The mean age…

  10. Psychiatric morbidity in dermatology patients: Frequency and results of consultations

    Seyhan Muammer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dermatological patients quite commonly depict psychiatric morbidity. PURPOSES: To study the psychiatric morbidity among skin patients of our clinic. METHODS: In the present study, the patients who were treated in the Dermatology Clinic of Inonu University Medical Faculty were evaluated retrospectively. The age, gender, marital status, habits, dermatological and systemic diseases, previously used drugs, current therapy and psychiatric diagnosis of each patient were recorded. FINDINGS: Of 636 patients involved in the study, 15.3% had psychopathological problems, which were depression (32.0%, adjustment difficulty (15.5%, anxiety (13.4%, psychosomatic disorders (10.3%, obsessive-compulsive disorder and conversion (5.1%, dysthymic disorder (4.1%, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (2.1%, panic attack (1.0%, premenstrual syndrome, schizophrenia, somatization disorder, insomnia, alcohol dependency, bipolar affective disorder, mental retardation, agoraphobia, social phobia and dementia. The dermatological diseases defined for the patients with psychopathology diagnosis were chronic urticaria (25.8%; psoriasis (15.5%; alopecia areata, totalis and iniversalis (11.3%; acute urticaria, neurodermatitis and Behcet′s disease (5.1%; atopic dermatitis and drug eruptions (4.1%; pemphigus (3.1%; angioedema, contact dermatitis and generalized pruritus (2.1%; folliculitis and the others (1.0%. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric morbidity has an affect on the course of dermatological diseases. When required, psychiatric consultation should be sought by dermatology clinics and patients should be followed with the cooperation of dermatologists and psychiatrists. LIMITATION: The indoor-based study had not included any control group and any domicillary patient.

  11. Dilemmas in private psychiatric practice

    Nanasaheb M Patil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A practicing psychiatrist faces dilemmas on a number of occasions, in deciding the best course of action he/she needs to undertake while treating a patient. At times, this choice may not be in accordance with the ethical and moral principles and may in fact appear to violate patient′s autonomy and rights. Aim: To study the nature of psychiatric practice by the practicing psychiatrist in the areas of admission, discharge, consent, physical restraint, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT, certification, treatment, suicide and psychotherapy. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight psychiatrists gave consent to participate in the study. A special proforma was prepared, which addresses the common dilemmas in the clinical psychiatric practice. All the psychiatrists were given specially designed profoma and were requested to fill the proforma with appropriate answers. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software. Results: There were 42 male and 6 female psychiatrists. The age of the psychiatrists ranged from 28 to 65 years with a mean of 43.08 years. The mean duration of practice of these psychiatrists was 14.81΁11.07 years. Question and answers related to admission, discharge, consent, physical restraint, ECT, certification, treatment, suicide and psychotherapy are discussed. Conclusions: The present standard and practice especially in private psychiatric set-up does not confirm to the rules, recommendations, and regulations suggested by Mental Health Act 1987, Mental Health Authorities and various guidelines of practice. Indian Psychiatric Society and other professional bodies need to take steps to prepare guidelines for a good psychiatric practice.

  12. Nursing interventions in crisis-oriented and long-term psychiatric home care

    Boomsma, J.; Dassen, T.WN; Dingemans, T.; van den Heuvel, W.J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses in The Netherlands are moving out of residential mental health institutions and are pioneering home care for the acutely and chronically mentally ill. The purpose of this study was to identify the interventions nurses currently use and to describe the differences between crisis-or

  13. Acute CT perfusion changes in seizure patients presenting to the emergency department with stroke-like symptoms: correlation with clinical and electroencephalography findings

    Aim: To determine acute computed tomography perfusion (CTP) changes in seizure patients presenting with stroke-like symptoms and to correlate those changes with clinical presentation and electroencephalography (EEG). Materials and methods: The medical records of all patients who presented to the emergency department with acute stroke-like symptoms and underwent CTP (n=1085) over a 5.5-year period were reviewed. Patients were included who had primary seizure as the final diagnosis, and underwent CTP within 3 hours of symptom onset. A subset of patients had a follow-up EEG within 7 days. The perfusion changes and EEG findings were compared between different clinical presentations. Results: Eighteen of 1085 patients (1.7%) who underwent CTP following an acute stroke-like presentation were included. The abnormality on CTP was usually focal, unilateral hyperperfusion — increased relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and volume (rCBV) (n=14/18), which most often affected the temporal lobe. Those patients who presented with a motor or speech deficit (n=12) had a higher temporal lobe rCBV, and rCBF, and lower relative mean transit time (rMTT) compared to those with non-focal neurological deficit at presentation. Early EEG was available in 13 patients; a sharp-spike epileptiform EEG discharge pattern (n=5) was associated with higher temporal lobe ipsilateral rCBF and rCBV, and lower rMTT on admission CTP examination. Conclusion: Seizure patients who present with a unilateral motor or speech deficit most commonly have contralateral hyperperfusion in the corresponding eloquent brain regions on the acute-stage CTP examination. In such patients, epileptiform discharges on the early follow-up EEG are associated with ipsilateral hyperperfusion on the admission CTP. -- Highlights: •Seizure patients with stroke-mimic symptoms show contralateral hyperperfusion on acute phase CTP (<3 hours of onset). •Seizure patients with unilateral paralysis/aphasia showed asymmetric perfusion

  14. American Psychiatric Nurses Association-Transitions in Practice Certificate Program: Bridging the Knowledge Gap in Caring for Psychiatric Patients Within the General Nursing Workforce.

    Adams, Susie M; Black, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to publicize an important new Web-based educational program. Recognizing the growing gap in psychiatric-mental health knowledge and the need to better prepare new graduates and nurses transitioning from other service lines into psychiatric inpatient nursing settings, the American Psychiatric Nurses Association developed a 15-hour, modularized curriculum to provide foundational psychiatric-mental health knowledge. This modularized curriculum, called American Psychiatric Nurses Association Transitions in Practice (ATP) focuses on the knowledge and skills to insure the success of nurses new to psychiatric-mental health nursing settings and to improve the overall care for persons with mental health and substance use disorders. The ATP program is also proving to be useful content for nurses in emergency departments, hospitals, and other health settings to improve their care of patients with psychiatric and mental health needs. A summary of the program modules and a toolkit with suggested measures for nurses, patients, and agency outcomes is described. Feedback from participants completing the ATP program within the first 6 months is overwhelmingly positive and holds promise for widespread application across a variety of health care settings. PMID:27259126

  15. Psychiatric Aspects of Childhood Epilepsy

    Raman Deep PATTANAYAK

    2012-06-01

    of children with epilepsy. J Child Neurol 1997;12(3:187-92.44. Pavlou E, Gkampeta A. Learning disorders in children with epilepsy. Childs Nerv Sys 2011;27(3:373-9.45. Fastenau PS, Shen J, Dunn DW, Perkins SM, Hermann BP, Austin JK. Neuropsychological predictors of academic underachievement in pediatric epilepsy: moderating roles of demographic, seizure, and psychosocial variables. Epilepsia 2004;45(10:1261-72.46. Austin JK, Caplan R. Behavioral and psychiatric comorbidities in pediatric epilepsy: toward an integrative model. Epilepsia 2007;48(9:1639-51.47. Austin JK, McNelis AM, Shore CP, Dunn DW, Musick B. A feasibility study of a family seizure management program ‘Be seizure smart’. J Neurosci Nurs 2002;34:30-7.48. Ronen GM, Streiner DL, Rosenbaum P. Health-related quality of life in childhood epilepsy: Moving beyond ‘seizure control with minimal adverse effects’. Health Qual Life Outcomes 2003;1:36.49. Smith K, Siddarth P, Zima B, Sankar R, Mitchell W Gowrinathan R, et al. Unmet mental health needs in pediatric epilepsy: insights from providers. Epilepsy Behav 2007;11(3:401-8.50. Goldstein J, Plioplys S, Zelko F, Mass S, Corns C, Blaufuss R, et al. Multidisciplinary approach to childhood epilepsy: exploring the scientific rationale and practical aspects of implementation. J Child Neurol 2004;19(5:362-78.51. Achenbach TM. Manual for the child behavior checklist/4-18 and 1991 profile. Burlington, VT: Univ. of Vermont Department of Psychiatry; 1991.52. Gadow KD, Sprafkin J. Child symptom inventory-4 norms manual. Stony Brook, NY: Checkmate Plus; 1997.53. Sabaz M, Cairns DR, Lawson JA, Nheu N, Bleasel AF, Bye AM. Validation of a new quality of life scale for children with epilepsy. Epilepsia 2000;41(6:765-74.54. Camfield C, Breau L, Camfield P. Impact of pediatric epilepsy on the family: a new scale for clinical and research use. Epilepsia 2001;42(1:104-12.55. Lewis MA, Salas I, de la Sota A, Chiofalo N, Leake B. Randomized trial of

  16. An Unusual Psychiatric Emergency: Herpes Simplex Encephalitis

    H. Doyle

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of fatal herpes simplex virus (HSV encephalitis, presenting as a psychiatric emergency, is reported. The possibility of HSV encephalitis presenting mainly or solely with psychiatric symptoms is highlighted. HSV can cause a severe form of encephalitis which may present with mainly psychiatric symptoms in some cases. Early treatment with anti-viral agents can reduce mortality and morbidity, but accurate early diagnosis may be very difficult. HSV encephalopathy may mimic psychiatric illness and has been likened to syphilis as the great imitator. The case presented here should serve to raise awareness of the psychiatric features and the need to consider this diagnosis in patients with atypical behavioural disturbance.

  17. Robot-assisted upper-limb therapy in acute rehabilitation setting following stroke: Department of Veterans Affairs multisite clinical trial

    Charles G. Burgar, MD

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This randomized, controlled, multisite Departmentof Veterans Affairs clinical trial assessed robot-assisted (RAupper-limb therapy with the Mirror Image Movement Enabler(MIME in the acute stroke rehabilitation setting. Hemipareticsubjects (n = 54 received RA therapy using MIME for either upto 15 hours (low-dose or 30 hours (high-dose or received up to15 hours of additional conventional therapy in addition to usualcare (control. The primary outcome measure was the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA. The secondary outcome measureswere the Functional Independence Measure (FIM, Wolf MotorFunction Test, Motor Power, and Ashworth scores at intake, discharge,and 6-month follow-up. Mean duration of study treatmentwas 8.6, 15.8, and 9.4 hours for the low-dose, high-dose,and control groups, respectively. Gains in the primary outcomemeasure were not significantly different between groups at follow-up. Significant correlations were found at discharge betweenFMA gains and the dose and intensity of RA. Intensity also correlatedwith FMA gain at 6 months. The high-dose group hadgreater FIM gains than controls at discharge and greater tone butno difference in FIM changes compared with low-dose subjectsat 6 months. As used during acute rehabilitation, motor-controlchanges at follow-up were no less with MIME than with additionalconventional therapy. Intensity of training with MIME waspositively correlated with motor-control gains.

  18. Mental Disorders among Children and Adolescents Admitted to a French Psychiatric Emergency Service

    Laurent Boyer; Jean-Marc Henry; Jean-Claude Samuelian; Raoul Belzeaux; Pascal Auquier; Christophe Lancon; David Da Fonseca

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of children and adolescents admitted to the psychiatric emergency department (ED) of a French public teaching hospital over a six-year study period (2001–2006). Data for all episodes of care in the psychiatric ED from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2006, delivered to adolescents aged less than 18 years were retrospectively analyzed. During the six-year study period, 335 episodes of care in the psychiatric ED were experienced by 264 d...

  19. Mental health related Internet use among psychiatric patients

    Kalckreuth, Sophie; Trefflich, Friederike; Rummel-Kluge, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Internet is of great importance in today’s health sector, as most Internet users utilize online functions for health related purposes. Concerning the mental health care sector, little data exist about the Internet use of psychiatric patients. It is the scope of this current study to analyze the quantity and pattern of Internet usage among mental health patients. Methods: Patients from all services of the Department of Psychiatry at a university hospital were surveyed by comple...

  20. Comorbid psychiatric disorders in substance dependence patients: A control study

    Shantna, K.; Chaudhury, S.; Verma, A.N.; Singh, A. R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the comorbidity of mental disorders among a random sample of substance dependence patients from a psychiatric inpatients department and the general population. Materials and Methods: Comprehensive data was collected from inpatients with substance abuse/dependence and comorbidity of mental disorders at the Ranchi Institute of Neuropsychiatry and Allied Sciences (RINPAS) and from normal controls from the general population during the per...

  1. The importance of research and documentation in Psychiatric Physiotherapy

    Probst, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The importance of research and documentation in Psychiatric Physiotherapy Michel Probst KU Leuven, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences & UPC-KU Leuven, campus Kortenberg, Belgium The field of mental health is currently an import policy issue. The World Health Organisation (WHO), the European commission, and different national governments are engaged in the prevention and treatment of mental health disorders. Today, one out of four people are f...

  2. Psychiatric classification and subjective experience

    Cooper, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This article does not directly consider the feelings and emotions that occur in mental illness. Rather, it concerns a higher level methodological question: To what extent is an analysis of feelings and felt emotions of importance for psychiatric classification? Some claim that producing a phenomenologically informed descriptive psychopathology is a prerequisite for serious taxonomic endeavor. Others think that classifications of mental disorders may ignore subjective experience. A middle view...

  3. PSYCHIATRIC COMORBIDITY IN FORENSIC PSYCHIATRY

    Žarkovic Palijan, Tija; Mužinić, Lana; Radeljak, Sanja

    2009-01-01

    For the past several years a numerous studies in the field of forensic psychiatry confirmed a close relationship between violent offenders and comorbid substance abuse. The comorbid substance abuse in violent offenders was usually unrecognized and misdiagnosed. Furthermore, comorbidity in forensic psychiatry describes the co-occurrence of two or more conditions or psychiatric disorder known in the literature as dual diagnosis and defined by World Health Organization (WHO). In fact, many vi...

  4. Psychiatric Aspects of Childhood Epilepsy

    Pattanayak, Raman Deep; Sagar, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    How to Cite this Article: Pattanayak RD, Sagar R. Psychiatric Aspects of Childhood Epilepsy. Iran J Child Neurol 2012;6(2):9-18.Childhood epilepsy is a chronic, recurrent disorder of unprovoked seizures. Theonset of epilepsy in childhood has significant implications for brain growth anddevelopment. Seizures may impair the ongoing neurodevelopmental processes and compromise the child’s intellectual and cognitive functioning, leading totremendous cognitive, behavioral and psychosocial consequen...

  5. Psychiatric Thoughts in Ancient India

    Ravi Abhyankar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the literature regarding psychiatric thoughts in ancient India is attempted. Besides interesting reading, many of the concepts are still relevant and can be used in day-to-day practice especially towards healthy and happy living. Certain concepts are surprisingly contemporary and valid today. They can be used in psychotherapy and counselling and for promoting mental health. However, the description and classification of mental illness is not in tune with modern psychiatry.

  6. Dilemmas in Private Psychiatric Practice

    Patil, Nanasaheb M.; Nayak, Raghavendra B.; Bhogale, Govind S.; Chate, Sameeran S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: A practicing psychiatrist faces dilemmas on a number of occasions, in deciding the best course of action he/she needs to undertake while treating a patient. At times, this choice may not be in accordance with the ethical and moral principles and may in fact appear to violate patient′s autonomy and rights. Aim: To study the nature of psychiatric practice by the practicing psychiatrist in the areas of admission, discharge, consent, physical restraint, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)...

  7. Transforming subjectivities in psychiatric care

    Terkelsen, Toril Borch

    2009-01-01

    This paper is based upon ethnographic fieldwork in a Norwegian psychiatric unit practicing a psycho-educational treatment of young adults diagnosed with schizophrenia. An aim of the programme is that patients learn to detect and monitor their 'symptoms' in order to obtain 'insight into their own illness', thus transforming themselves into self-governed and self-responsible subjects who are able to cope with life outside institutions. The programme is constituted within a medical framework wit...

  8. Psychiatric aspects of therapeutic abortion *

    Doane, Benjamin K.; Quigley, Beverly G.

    1981-01-01

    A search of the literature on the psychiatric aspects of abortion revealed poor study design, a lack of clear criteria for decisions for or against abortion, poor definition of psychologic symptoms experienced by patients, absence of control groups in clinical studies, and indecisiveness and uncritical attitudes in writers from various disciplines. A review of the sequelae of therapeutic abortion revealed that although the data are vague, symptoms of depression were reported most frequently, ...

  9. Measuring quality of care in psychiatric emergencies: construction and evaluation of a Bayesian index.

    Gustafson, D. H.; Sainfort, F; Johnson, S W; Sateia, M

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study was conducted to determine whether an index for measuring quality of care for psychiatric emergencies is reliable and valid. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. The study used primary data collected over a 12-month period from two urban hospitals in the Northeast. One had 700 inpatient beds, an inpatient psychiatric unit, and community mental health personnel located in the emergency department. The other had 300 beds but none of the other hospital's features. STUDY DESIGN. The ...

  10. Forensic Psychiatric Evaluation of Persons with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Undergoing Criminal Trial

    Žarković Palijan, Tija; Kovač, Marina; Kovačević, Dražen; Hrastić, Sanja; Knez Turčinović, Marjeta

    2007-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine if there is a difference between the type of crime committed by persons diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and that committed by other offenders. The study included 389 male patients at the Department of Forensic Psychiatry in Popovaca who underwent forensic psychiatric evaluation to establish a psychiatric diagnosis, evaluate the mental capacity, and provide advice on further treatment. The data on the number of individuals w...