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Sample records for acute pancreatitis due

  1. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis.

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-04-28

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  2. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis

    Georgios K Georgiou; Haralampos Harissis; Michalis Mitsis; Haralampos Batsis; Michalis Fatouros

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse.The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy,trauma or surgery,and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention.However,when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly,the patient may present with signs of peritonitis.Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation,appendicitis or visceral ischemia.Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported.Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis.This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis,and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis.The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer,since,due to hypertriglyceridemia,serum amylase values appeared within the normal range.Moreover,abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis.Following abdominal lavage and drainage,the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide.

  3. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of “chyle” occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative...

  4. Acute Pancreatitis Due to Pravastatin Therapy

    Anagnostopoulos GK

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Few data exist about the incidence of drug-induced pancreatitis in the general population. Drugs are related to the etiology of pancreatitis in about 1.4-2% of cases. Statins are generally well tolerated. Acute pancreatitis has been reported in a few cases treated with atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin and simvastatin. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 56-year-old patient who, after 6 months of treatment with pravastatin 20 mg once daily for hypercholesterolemia, presented with acute pancreatitis. Other causes of the disease were ruled out. Five months later, the patient, on his own initiative, reintroduced pravastatin and acute pancreatitis recurred after 3 days. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge this is the first report of pravastatin-induced pancreatitis and further strengthens the fact that statins may cause acute pancreatitis.

  5. Acute pancreatitis due to scrub typhus

    Atif Shaikh Iqbal Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is endemic in large parts of India and can cause multi-organ failure and death. Acute pancreatitis as a complication is very rare and is potentially fatal. This case series describes seven adult patients who presented with an acute febrile illness and were diagnosed to have scrub typhus with acute pancreatitis. The mean age of the seven patients with acute pancreatitis was 49.4 years, and mean duration of fever prior to presentation was 7.7 days. All seven patients had abdominal pain, and three had a pathognomonic eschar. The mean serum lipase level was 1,509 U/L (normal value: <190 U/L and the mean serum amylase level was 434 U/L (normal value: <200 U/L. Six patients had evidence of multi-organ dysfunction. Hematological and respiratory system dysfunction was seen in five patients, hepatic and renal dysfunction in four, and central nervous system dysfunction in three patients. Three patients who had ≥4 organs involved, died (mortality rate: 42.8%. Our case series shows that pancreatitis in scrub typhus is an extremely rare complication and when present, is associated with increased mortality (42.8%. Physicians may be familiar with the various complications of scrub typhus but less so with acute pancreatitis and hence may be underdiagnosed.

  6. Acute Pancreatitis and Splenic Vein Thrombosis due to Hypertriglyceridemia

    Ercan Gündüz; Recep Dursun; Mustafa İçer; Yılmaz Zengin; Cahfer Güloğlu

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a condition characterised by the activation of the normally inactive digestive enzymes due to an etiological factor and digestion of the pancreatic tissues, resulting in extensive inflammation and leading to local, regional, and systemic complications in the organism. It may vary from the mild edematous to the hemorrhagic and severely necrotising form. The most common causes are biliary stones and alcohol abuse. In this case study, we would like to present a patient...

  7. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    ... Acute Pancreatitis > Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  8. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingest...

  9. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion....

  10. Acute pancreatitis due to ascariasis: a sonographic pictorial essay on four cases.

    Lynser, Donboklang; Thangkhiew, R S; Laloo, Demitrost; Hek, M D; Marbaniang, Evarisalin; Tariang, Satisfy

    2016-06-01

    Ascariasis is the commonest helminthic disease to infect humans. Due to their wandering nature, the roundworms from the second part of the duodenum migrate through the biliary opening into the hepatobiliary and pancreatic ducts. Ascariasis is the most common parasitic cause of pancreatitis in endemic region. Pancreatitis can result due to pancreatic ascariasis, biliary ascariasis or both. Pancreatitis due to ascariasis can be severe and life-threatening. We present a pictorial essay of acute pancreatitis due to ascariasis on four cases. PMID:27059341

  11. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions: Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  12. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions : Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  13. ERCP in acute pancreatitis

    Jijo V Cherian; Joye Varghese Selvaraj; Rajesh Natrayan; Jayanthi Venkataraman

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the management of acute pancreatitis has evolved over years since its introduction in 1968. Its importance in diagnosing the etiology of pancreatitis has steadily declined with the advent of less invasive diagnostic tools. The therapeutic implications of ERCP in acute pancreatitis are many fold and are directed towards management of known etiological factors or its related complications. This article highlights the current status of ERCP in acute pancreatitis. DATA SOURCES:An English literature search using PubMed database was conducted on ERCP in acute pancreatitis, the etiologies and complications of pancreatitis amenable to endotherapy and other related subjects, which were reviewed. RESULTS: ERCP serves as a primary therapeutic modality for management of biliary pancreatitis in speciifc situations, pancreatitis due to microlithiasis, speciifc types of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, pancreas divisum, ascariasis and malignancy. In recurrent acute pancreatitis and smoldering pancreatitis it has a deifnite therapeutic utility. Complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic-duct disruptions or leaks, benign pancreatic-lfuid collections and pancreatic necrosis can be beneifcially dealt with. Intraductal ultrasound and pancreatoscopy during ERCP are useful in detecting pancreatic malignancy. CONCLUSIONS:The role of ERCP in acute pancreatitis is predominantly therapeutic and occasionally diagnostic. Its role in the management continues to evolve and advanced invasive procedures should be undertaken only in centers dedicated to pancreatic care.

  14. Recurrent Episodes of Acute Pancreatitis Due to Duodenal Gangliocytic Paraganglioma: Report of a Case

    Natalia Asimakopoulou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Gangliocytic paraganglioma is a rare tumor, almost always located in the second portion of the duodenum, andmanifested with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and abdominal pain. To date, only one case of duodenal gangliocyticparaganglioma presented with recurrent acute pancreatitis has been reported in the literature. Case report We present a72-year-old woman admitted to the hospital due to recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis. Paraclinical examinationsshowed a polypoid mass in the second portion of duodenum which was removed surgically by local excision. Thepreoperative differential diagnosis was suggestive with gastrointestinal stromal tumor or adenoma. The histopathologyexamination revealed a duodenal gangliocytic paraganglioma. After a follow up period of seventeen months the patientremained without clinical evidence of tumor recurrence. Conclusion Our case report draws attention to the need forincluding in our differential diagnosis of recurrent acute pancreatitis the mechanical obstruction of the pancreatic duct dueto this tumor.

  15. Acute pancreatitis

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000287.htm Acute pancreatitis To use the sharing features on this page, ... fatty foods after the attack has improved. Outlook (Prognosis) Most cases go away in a week. However, ...

  16. Splenic artery pseudoaneurysm due to acute pancreatitis in a 6-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treated with L-aspariginase

    Larsen, Cæcilie Crawley; Laursen, Christian B; Dalby, Kasper;

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare phenomenon in children but its incidence seems to be increasing. In children, it is generally caused due to systemic illness, biliary disease, trauma, idiopathy and side effects of medicines like L-aspariginase. Acute pancreatitis is difficult to diagnose in children...... pseudoaneurysm due to acute pancreatitis in a 6-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treated with L-aspariginase. He presented with fever, irritability and pain in his left groin region....

  17. Acute pancreatitis

    Al Mofleh Ibrahim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The past few years have witnessed a tremendous progress in our knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and classification of acute pancreatitis. The role of ischemia, lysosomal enzymes, oxygen free radicals, polymorphnuclear cells-byproducts and inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of pancreatic necrosis and multiple organ failure has been emphasized. Furthermore, the recent knowledge about agents infecting pancreatic necrosis, routes of infection, bacteriological examination of fine needle aspirate and appropriate antibiotics have changed the concept of acute pancreatitis. New diagnostic tests such as rapid urinary trypsinogen-2 test and inflammatory mediators including polymorphnuclear elastase, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 contribute to early diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and initiation of an appropriate therapy.

  18. Acute Pancreatitis due to Rupture of the Hydatid Cyst into the Biliary Tract: A Case Report

    Zulfu Bayhan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is still endemic in our country and in many parts of the world. Liver is the most common site of hydatid disease. Rupture of hydatid cysts of liver into the biliary ducts can be seen as a complication. Obstructive jaundice, acute cholangitis and much more rarely acute pancreatitis may occur due to rupture of hydatid cysts into the biliary ducts. In this case report, a 38-year-old male patient with findings of acute pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice due to rupture of hydatid cyst into the biliary tract were presented . In our case, Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP was performed to the patient with diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Parts of germinative membrane located within the common bile duct and causing the obstruction of papillary orifice was seen in ERCP. Germinative membrane components were removed during the process. Endoscopic sphincterotomy was performed to the patient. After the procedure, the clinical findings and laboratory findings of the patient returned to normal rapidly. As a result, it should be noted that rupture of hepatic hydatid cysts into the bile ducts might be a rare cause of biliary pancreatitis. It must be kept in mind that endoscopic sphincterotomy and endoscopic removal of cyst membranes is a very important method for the diagnosis and treatment of the acute pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice due to rupture of hydatid cyst into the biliary tract. [Natl J Med Res 2014; 4(1.000: 92-94

  19. A Case of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis Due to Intra-Articular Corticosteroid Injection

    Patompong Ungprasert

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Corticosteroid is a well-established cause of drug-induced pancreatitis. However, acute pancreatitis from intraarticularinjection of corticosteroid has never been described. Case report A 69-year-old male presented with acuteabdominal pain and was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. The patient had one episode of acute pancreatitis two yearearlier. Both episodes occurred after intra-articular cortisone injection. Investigations for other causes of pancreatitis werenegative. Conclusion We report the first case of acute pancreatitis from intra-articular corticosteroid injection. Physiciansshould be aware of this adverse reaction of corticosteroid that can even occur with local administration.

  20. Acute pancreatitis; Pancreatite aigue

    Mehdi, M.; Deutsch, J.P.; Arrive, L.; Ayadi, K.; Ladeb, M.F.; Tubiana, J.M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Saint-Antoine, 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is based on clinical examination and basic laboratory tests. The main role of sonography in acute pancreatitis is to evaluate gallstones and small fluid collections. However, sonography is frequently difficult due to intestinal ileus related to pancreatitis. CT is indicated early in the clinical course of acute severe pancreatitis when the diagnosis is uncertain or when complications such as abscess, hemorrhage, or necrosis, are suspected. In addition, CT may be used to assess the prognosis and follow-up of patients. (authors). 20 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Loperamide-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Halla Vidarsdottir; Hanna Vidarsdottir; Pall Helgi Moller; Einar Stefan Bjornsson

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common disease leading to hospitalizations, most often caused by gallstones or alcohol. We present a case of a patient diagnosed with acute pancreatitis considered to be due to loperamide treatment for diarrhea.

  2. Continuous Regional Arterial Infusion Therapy for Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in a Child

    A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was treated in an 8-year-old girl. She experienced acute pancreatitis during treatment for M. pneumoniae. Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed necrotizing pancreatitis. The computed tomographic severity index was 8 points (grade E). A protease inhibitor, ulinastatin, was provided via intravenous infusion but was ineffective. Continuous regional arterial infusion therapy was provided with gabexate mesilate (FOY-007, a protease inhibitor) and meropenem trihydrate, and the pancreatitis improved. This case suggests that infusion therapy is safe and useful in treating necrotizing pancreatitis in children.

  3. Acute pancreatitis

    A prospective study was performed on the relationship of CT findings to the clinical course of 148 patients with acute pancreatitis. The type of pancreatic inflammation seen on CT was classified into six categories based on an overall assessment of size, contour and density of the gland, and peripancreatic abnormalities. The majority (94%) of patients in whom CT showed mild pancreatic changes (grades A, B and C) had two or less positive clinical indicaters of severe pancreatitis (Ranson's signs). In contrast, 92% of patients in whom CT showed more severe changes of pancreatitis (grades D, E or F) had three or more positive signs. The nine patients who died with pancreatitis-related complications were in grades D, E or F. We wish to draw attention to a CT appearance which we have called 'fat islets' (low density intrapancreatic or peripancreatic areas, the contents of which approach fat in attenuation values); there was a strong correlation between this appearance and subsequent infection. (author). 24 refs.; 7 figs.; 4 tabs

  4. Severe Acute Pancreatitis Due to Tamoxifen-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia with Positive Rechallenge

    Jaballah Sakhri

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatitis is a very rare adverse effect of tamoxifen with only six cases of tamoxifen-associated pancreatitis reported in the English literature until now. In these cases, rechallenge with tamoxifen was not carried out. Case report We report a case of recurrent severe acute pancreatitis in a 44-year-old female induced by tamoxifen therapy and review the literature with regards to tamoxifen-associated pancreatitis. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware of the risks of developing severe acute pancreatitis when using tamoxifen therapy. If tamoxifen is suspected as the probable causative agent, rechallenge with this drug should be prohibited.

  5. Severe Acute Pancreatitis Due to Tamoxifen-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia with Positive Rechallenge

    Jaballah Sakhri; Houssem Harbi; Rached Ltaief; Chaker Ben Salem; Neila Fathallah

    2010-01-01

    Context Pancreatitis is a very rare adverse effect of tamoxifen with only six cases of tamoxifen-associated pancreatitis reported in the English literature until now. In these cases, rechallenge with tamoxifen was not carried out. Case report We report a case of recurrent severe acute pancreatitis in a 44-year-old female induced by tamoxifen therapy and review the literature with regards to tamoxifen-associated pancreatitis. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware of the risks of developing sev...

  6. A Rare and Unexpected Side-Effect of Cannabis Use: Abdominal Pain due to Acute Pancreatitis

    Mehmet Husamettin Akkucuk; Mustafa Erbayrak

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a frequently encountered disorder in patients presenting to emergency units. Biliary system disorders, alcohol consumption, infections, and drugs are among the causes of acute pancreatitis. However, it is sometimes difficult to determine the etiology of this disorder, particularly if the patient does not wish to disclose his consumption of cannabis, the use of which is illegal.

  7. Severe acute pancreatitis due to tamoxifen-induced hypertriglyceridemia with diabetes mellitus

    Kim, Young Ae; Lee, Sol; Jung, Ji Woong; Kwon, Yu Jin; Lee, Gyeong Bok; Shin, Dong Gue; Park, Sang Su; Yun, Jin; Jang, Yong-Seog

    2014-01-01

    The side effects of tamoxifen are generally mild, including the effect on lipoprotein metabolism. However, there are few cases of severe tamoxifen induced hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia is a marked risk factor for acute pancreatitis and approximately 2% to 5% of cases of acute pancreatitis are related to drugs. We report on tamoxifen-induced hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis in a 40 years old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus occurred by dexamethasone. She was treated with insulin infusion and fenofibrate, and goserelin acetate was started instead of tamoxifen after discharge from the hospital. Also, probable pathogenic hypotheses about the correlation between tamoxifen and dexamethasone induced type 2 diabetes mellitus on severe acute pancreatitis are provided. Clinicians should take care of risks of severe acute pancreatitis on using tamoxifen, especially for patients with dexamethasone induced diabetes mellitus. These individuals should undergo pre-post tamoxifen lipid screening and careful history taking of drugs, including dexamethasone. PMID:25035662

  8. Metformin induced acute pancreatitis

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis frequently presents with abdomen pain but may presents with various skin manifestations as rash and rarely, pancreatic panniculitis. Metformin, one of the most effective and valuable oral hypoglycemic agents in the biguanide class was linked to acute pancreatitis in few cases. Here, we report a case of metformin induce acute pancreatitis in young healthy man with normal renal function.

  9. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    ... a feeding tube or an IV to prevent malnutrition and improve healing. Does my child have to ... intestines. Can my child die from acute pancreatitis? Death from acute pancreatitis is quite rare in children– ...

  10. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  11. Acute pancreatitis complicating severe dengue

    Vishakha Jain; O P Gupta; Tarun Rao; Siddharth Rao

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is an arthropod borne viral infection endemic in tropical and subtropical continent. Severe dengue is life threatening. Various atypical presentations of dengue have been documented. But we present a rare and fatal complication of severe dengue in form of acute pancreatitis. A 27-year-old male had presented with severe dengue in decompensated shock and with pain in abdomen due to pancreatitis. The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in dengue is not clearly understood, but various mecha...

  12. Acute pancreatitis

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... include: Abdominal CT scan Abdominal MRI Abdominal ultrasound

  13. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with 86RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory

  14. Prevention and Intervention Strategies in Acute Pancreatitis

    Besselink, M.G.H.

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common, costly, potentially lethal, and poorly understood disease, mostly caused by gallstones. In the past decade the incidence of acute pancreatitis in the Netherlands increased by 50% to over 3400 admissions in 2006, most likely due to an increase of gallstone disease. About 20% of patients will develop severe acute pancreatitis, a disease characterized by organ failure and/or pancreatic necrosis, resulting in a high mortality rate. Because the incidence of acute pa...

  15. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    Max Petrov

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis.

  16. Imaging of acute pancreatitis

    Merkle, Elmar M.; Goerich, Johannes [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Ulm, Steinhoevel Strasse 9, 89075 Ulm (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is defined as an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of peripancreatic tissues or remote organ systems. This article reports the current classification, definition and terminology, epidemiology and etiology, pathogenesis and pathological findings, clinical and laboratory findings, and finally imaging findings of acute pancreatitis with emphasis on cross-sectional imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  17. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy

    Pitchumoni, Capecomorin S; Yegneswaran, Balaji

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a rare event in pregnancy, occurring in approximately 3 in 10 000 pregnancies. The spectrum of AP in pregnancy ranges from mild pancreatitis to serious pancreatitis associated with necrosis, abscesses, pseudocysts and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes. Pregnancy related hematological and biochemical alterations influence the interpretation of diagnostic tests and assessment of severity of AP. As in any other disease associated with pregnancy, AP is associated wit...

  18. Treatment of acute pancreatitis

    Al-Mofleh Ibrahim

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no specific treatment for acute pancreatitis. Majority of patients with acute pancreatitis respond to medical therapy. Supportive measures and close observations represent the cornerstone of the medical therapy. Failure to respond to medical treatment may indicate choledocholithiasis or infected necrosis. Endoscopic papillotomy with stone retrieval is beneficial in patients with severe biliary pancreatitis. Image-guided fine needle aspiration and bacteriological examination of aspirate is reliable in detecting infection and deliniating causative pathogen. Surgical debridement is the method of choice for treatment of infected necrosis. In contrast, in pancreatic abscess, surgery is preserved for those, who do not respond to percutaneous drainage combined with antibiotics. The benefit of antisecretory and antiproteolytic agents is debatable. A combination of antioxidants, calcium channel antagonists and antibiotics may play a major role in the treatment of acute pancreatitis in the future.

  19. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    Eland, I.A.

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are considered as potential risk factors for acute pancreatitis, but have received relatively little attention in the medical literature. In this thesis, several epidemiological studies were performed to ass...

  20. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    I.A. Eland

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are consid

  1. Acute pancreatitis and Cushing's syndrome.

    Clague, H W; B. Warren; Krasner, N.

    1984-01-01

    A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in a 53-year-old man with an ectopic adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) producing bronchial carcinoma is described. The aetiology of acute pancreatitis in relation to steroid therapy and malignancy is discussed and it is suggested that excess endogenous steroid production may also cause acute pancreatitis.

  2. Gadolinium induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Blasco-Perrin, H; Glaser, B; Pienkowski, M; Peron, J M; Payen, J L

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. The two most common causes are alcohol use and biliary stones. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis are rare (1.4-2%). In this present study, we present a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis induced by a specific magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) contrast agent called gadobenate dimeglumine. PMID:23395575

  3. Prevention and Intervention Strategies in Acute Pancreatitis

    Besselink, M.G.H.

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common, costly, potentially lethal, and poorly understood disease, mostly caused by gallstones. In the past decade the incidence of acute pancreatitis in the Netherlands increased by 50% to over 3400 admissions in 2006, most likely due to an increase of gallstone disease. Abo

  4. Ischemic Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis in a Marathon Runner

    Jay J Mast

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Acute pancreatitis due to pancreatic ischemia is a rare condition. Case report In this case report we describe a 57-year-old male who developed an acute necrotizing pancreatitis after running a marathon and visiting a sauna the same evening, with an inadequate fluid and food consumption during both events. Conclusions Pancreatic ischemia imposed by mechanical and physical stress and dehydration can induce the development of acute pancreatitis. Separately, these factors are rare causes of ischemic acute pancreatitis. But when combined, as in this particular case, the risk of an acute necrotizing pancreatitis cannot be neglected

  5. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy

    Capecomorin S Pitchumoni; Balaji Yegneswaran

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a rare event in pregnancy,occurring in approximately 3 in 10 000 pregnancies.The spectrum of AP in pregnancy ranges from mild pancreatitis to serious pancreatitis associated with necrosis, abscesses, pseudocysts and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes. Pregnancy related hematological and biochemical alterations influence the interpretation of diagnostic tests and assessment of severity of AP. As in any other disease associated with pregnancy, AP is associated with greater concerns as it deals with two lives rather than just one as in the nonpregnant population. The recent advances in clinical gastroenterology have improved the early diagnosis and effective management of biliary pancreatitis. Diagnostic studies such as endoscopic ultrasound,magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and therapeutic modalities that include endoscopic sphincterotomy, biliary stenting, common bile duct stone extraction and laparoscopic cholecystectomy are major milestones in gastroenterology. When properly managed AP in pregnancy does not carry a dismal prognosis as in the past.

  6. CLINICAL STUDY ON ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    Suhaib Rehaman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Early diagnosis and severity evaluation on patients with acute pancreatitis are very important due to its potential morbidity and mortality. Given the wide spectrum of disease seen, the care of patients with pancreatitis must be highly individualized. Sev eral clinical, laboratory and radiologic factors and many scoring systems have been proposed for outcome prediction. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To study the symptomatology, clinical presentation and management in pancreatitis . To study the severity of acute panc reatitis according to Glasgow Scale . METHODS: Present study includes consecutive 38 patients hospitalized in CSI Holdsworth Memorial Hospital over the period of 2 years. All patients were thoroughly investigated and were stratified according to the Glasgow criteria. Data was collected on complications, investigations and interventions undertaken, outcome, duration of stay in hospital and ICU. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Descriptive, Chi square tests, Crosstabs (Contingency coefficient analysis . RESULTS : Mean age of presentation in our study was 43.1 years. There was a male predominance accounting for 68.4% compared to 31.6% females. Alcohol was the main etiological factor in about 50% of the patients. Sensitivity to S. amylase was about 100%. Accuracy of USG abdomen in diagnosing pancreatitis was about 88.5%. Ascitis was the commonest complication seen in 13.2%. Mean duration of hospital stay was 6.2 days. The patient were stratified according to Glasgow scoring system into mild (0 - 3 and severe (>3 panc reatitis. In our study 32 people were graded with mild pancreatitis, all improved and in 6 people who were graded with severe pancreatitis, 83.3 % improved and 2.6% expired because of complications. Test statistics showed Contingency coefficient 0.355 and P 0.019 (NS. CONCLUSION : Glasgow scoring system remains a valid predicting system for the outcome in patients with acute pancreatitis. It is simple easy to apply with

  7. Lung Injury in Acute Pancreatitis

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Lara Bellacosa; Cristina Felicani

    2009-01-01

    Most knowledge has been accumulated on the mechanisms involved in the development of distant organ injuries during the course of severe acute pancreatitis. Among the various distant organ dysfunctions, both the development of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome represent serious complications. In the following paragraphs the pathophysiological mechanisms capable of determining lung injury during the course of acute pancreatitis will be reviewed. Pancreatic Enzymes and...

  8. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery. PMID:8139793

  9. Obstructive Jaundice Due to a Pancreatic Mass: A Rare Presentation of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia in an Adult

    Sudin Varghese Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context To highlight a rare presentation of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Case report A 39-year-old man presented with a 4 month history of weight loss and a 6 week history of upper abdominal pain radiating to the back with nausea and vomiting. Liver function tests showed an obstructive picture, full blood count was normal and on computerised tomography there was diffuse enlargement of the pancreas, with dilatation of the common bile duct and intra hepatic biliary radicles. Four weeks after presenting, the white cell count became elevated with blasts on the blood film and bone marrow biopsy revealed a precursor B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. After induction chemotherapy his jaundice resolved, the pancreatic mass reduced in size and he is now in a complete remission. Conclusion Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia may mimic common causes of a pancreatic mass such as adenocarcinoma and should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis when atypical features are present.

  10. Nutrition Support in Acute Pancreatitis

    Orestis Ioannidis; Athina Lavrentieva; Dimitrios Botsios

    2008-01-01

    The management of acute pancreatitis differs according to its severity. Approximately 75% of patients with acute pancreatitis have mild disease with a mortality rate below 1%. Mortality increases up to 20% if the disease progresses to its severe necrotizing form and, in the most severe cases, mortality can increase to 30-40%. Severe acute pancreatitis is usually accompanied by systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) which results in hypermetabolism with prominent protein catabolism. Ac...

  11. ACUTE PANCREATITIS - THE SEVERE FORM

    Ioana Grigoras

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory disease. Frequently it is a challenging condition for the surgeon and for the intensive care physician, taking into account that etiology is sometimes obscure, the pathophysiology is complex and incompletely understood, the timing of surgical treatment is still under debate and the general treatment is mostly supportive. The incidence is about 30 – 50 / 100.000 / year. In 80% of cases the disease is associated with interstitial edema, mild infiltration with inflammatory cells and intra- or peripancreatic fat necrosis. Evolution is benign and self-limited with proper treatment. The severe form occurs less frequent (15 - 20%, results in long lasting hospitalization and is associated with high mortality (30 - 40%, due to infected necrosis and multiple organ failure. Alcoholism and biliary disease account for 80% of cases. Rare etiologies of disease include metabolic factors (hypercalcemia, hyperlipoproteinemia, drug ingestion, obstructive factors (abdominal tumors, trauma, endoscopic retrograde cholecistopancreatography, and s.o., infections (viral, parasitic and hemodynamic factors. Postoperative pancreatitis is a complication after major abdominal surgery (abdominal aorta aneurism repair, extensive upper abdominal surgery, hepatic or cardiac transplant, so.. The common pathophysiological mechanism is pancreatic hypoperfusion. Acute pancreatitis is not a stable disease, being characterized by time-dependent stages with specific morphologic and clinical patterns. The terminology used to designate these stages is stated in the Ulm classification. Since the consensus Conference in Atlanta (1992 the severe form of acute pancreatitis is defined by the presence of organ dysfunction/failure or by the presence of local complications. The initiating event is the premature zymogene activation and the impairment of the exocytosis process with local consequences (ongoing tissue necrosis and general consequences

  12. Hypocalcemia in acute pancreatitis revisited

    Armin Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypocalcemia is a frequent finding in acute pancreatitis. Severe hypocalcemia can present with neurological as well as cardiovascular manifestations. Correction of hypocalcemia by parenteral calcium infusion remains a controversial topic as intracellular calcium overload is the central mechanism of acinar cell injury in pancreatitis. The current article deals with the art and science of calcium correction in pancreatitis patients.

  13. Reversible bilateral ureteric obstruction due to a pancreatic pseudocyst.

    Gibson, G E; Tiernan, E; Cronin, C. C.; Ferriss, J B

    1993-01-01

    An unusual case of bilateral ureteric obstruction and hydronephrosis due to pancreatic pseudocyst formation, after an episode of acute pancreatitis is reported. All abnormalities resolved with conservative management. Possible reasons for such ureteric obstruction include periureteric fat necrosis by pancreatic enzymes and compression by the inflammatory mass.

  14. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. PMID:26520203

  15. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Bahiyah Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes.

  16. Contemporary Management of Acute Biliary Pancreatitis

    Orhan Ozkan

    2014-01-01

    Acute biliary pancreatitis is one of the major causes of acute pancreatitis.Gallstones, biliary sludge and microlithiasis, especially in pancreatitis without detectable reason, can be the cause of acute pancreatitis. Acute biliary pancreatitis has many controversions in the literature, and its classification and guidelines are being updated very frequently. Atlanta classifications which determine the definitions and guidelines about acute pancreatitis were renewed and published in 2013. It ha...

  17. Hypertriglyceridemia-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Mindaugas Serpytis; Jurate Dementaviciene; Kestutis Strupas; Audrius Sileikis; Vytautas Karosas; Jurate Sipylaite; Rokas Tamosauskas

    2012-01-01

    Context Hypertriglyceridemia is a well known phenomenon of pregnancy occurring due to physiologic changes in sex hormone levels. Occasionally, it could lead to development of acute pancreatitis. Gestational hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis occurs in pregnant women usually with preexisting abnormalities of the lipid metabolism and is associated with additional diagnostic and therapeutic challenges related to hypertriglyceridemia and pregnancy. Case report We present a case of hy...

  18. Acute pancreatitis following paracetamol overdose

    Fernandes, Roland

    2009-01-01

    A 17-year-old woman presented with acute abdominal pain and vomiting 3 h after she attempted to commit suicide by ingesting 30×500 mg paracetamol tablets. The woman was found to have a raised amylase level, and a CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. According to the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale, it is likely that the pancreatitis was induced by the paracetamol ingestion. A literature search reported 36 cases of pancreatitis following excessive doses of par...

  19. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats

    B. van Ooijen (Baan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe specific aim of the present study was to investigate whether eicosanoids play a role in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Because of the limited number of patients with acute pancreatitis admitted to the hospital each year, as well as the practical difficulties encountered in studying

  20. Pancreatic Enzyme Supplementation in Acute Pancreatitis

    R. V. Patankar; R. Chand; Johnson, C. D.

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of oral pancreatic enzyme supplements on pain, analgesic requirement and the incidence of complications in patients with acute pancreatitis. This double blind, prospectively randomised placebo controlled study included 23 patients. Pain was monitored using a visual analogue scale; the analgesic requirement was assessed with a numerical score. No significant differences were noted between the median (range) pain scores of patients who received placebo: 22 (17.1–...

  1. Acute Pancreatitis: Surgery, Pathophysiology and Probiotic Prophylaxis

    Minnen, L.P. van

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a challenging disease with a clinical course that is often difficult to predict. In severe acute pancreatitis, mortality increases significantly if intestinal bacteria translocate from the intestine and infect pancreatic necrosis. Surgical and prophylactic treatment strategies

  2. Acute pancreatitis in acute viral hepatitis

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the frequency and characteristics of pancreatic involvement in the course of acute (nonfulminant) viral hepatitis.METHODS: We prospectively assessed the pancreatic involvement in patients with acute viral hepatitis who presented with severe abdomimanl pain.RESULTS: We studied 124 patients with acute viral hepatitis, of whom 24 presented with severe abdominal pain. Seven patients (5.65%) were diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. All were young males. Five patients had pancreatitis in the first week and two in the fourth week after the onset of jaundice. The pancreatitis was mild and all had uneventful recovery from both pancreatitis and hepatitis on conservative treatment.The etiology of pancreatitis was hepatitis E virus in 4,hepatitis A virus in 2, and hepatitis B virus in 1 patient.One patient had biliary sludge along with HEV infection.The abdominal pain of remaining seventeen patients was attributed to stretching of Glisson's capsule.CONCLUSION: Acute pancreatitis occurs in 5.65% of patients with acute viral hepatitis, it is mild and recovers with conservative management.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging for acute pancreatitis

    Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is characterized by acute chemical injury of the pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissue. The increased frequency of death in acute pancreatitis is directly correlated with the degree and progress of pancreatic necrosis. Moreover, the occurrence of some local complications in acute pancreatitis, such as pancreatic hemorrhage, peripancreatic abscess or large pseudocyst, and pseudoaneurysm, could influence the choice of treatment for these patients. Magnetic resonance...

  4. Acute pancreatitis: Etiology and common pathogenesis

    Guo-Jun Wang; Chun-Fang Gao; Dong Wei; Cun Wang; Si-Qin Ding

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The etiology and pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have been intensively investigated for centuries worldwide. Many causes of acute pancreatitis have been discovered, but the pathogenetic theories are controversial. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstone impacting the distal common bile-pancreatic duct. The majority of investigators accept that the main factors for acute billiary pancreatitis are pancreatic hyperstimulation and bile-pancreatic duct obstruction which increase pancreatic duct pressure and active trypsin reflux. Acute pancreatitis occurs when intracellular protective mechanisms to prevent trypsinogen activation or reduce trypsin activity are overwhelmed. However, little is known about the other acute pancreatitis. We hypothesize that acute biliary pancreatitis and other causes of acute pancreatitis possess a common pathogenesis. Pancreatic hyperstimulation and pancreatic duct obstruction increase pancreatic duct pressure, active trypsin reflux, and subsequent unregulated activation of trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells. Enzyme activation within the pancreas leads to auto-digestion of the gland and local inflammation. Once the hypothesis is confirmed, traditional therapeutic strategies against acute pancreatitis may be improved. Decompression of pancreatic duct pressure should be advocated in the treatment of acute pancreatitits which may greatly improve its outcome.

  5. On obesity in acute pancreatitis

    Segersvärd, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    Over-nutrition is one of today s most visible public health problems. Currently over 40% of the Swedish population is either overweight or obese. Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of regional tissues and/or remote organ systems. The morbidity and mortality associated with acute pancreatitis is largely determined by the involvement of distant organs such as the liver and lung and by the development of organ fail...

  6. Pancreatic Panniculitis: A rare manifestation of Acute Pancreatitis

    Ronak Patel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication associated with pancreatic disease and perhaps even a presage to pancreatic pathology. Case report We present a case of pancreatic panniculitis in a 61 year old patient who was treated for sudden onset of abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting secondary to acute pancreatitis of unknown etiology. He subsequently developed skin lesions consistent with pancreatic panniculitis which gradually improved after resolution of his acute condition and treatment with topical steroid cream. Conclusion We discuss and review the literature along with highlighting for the readers the important clinical and histopathologic features of acute pancreatitis associated pancreatic panniculitis.

  7. Atorvastatin-induced acute pancreatitis

    Deshpande, Prasanna R.; Kanav Khera; Girish Thunga; Manjunath Hande; Gouda, Siddalingana T. G.; Anantha Naik Nagappa

    2011-01-01

    Atorvastatin-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) is one of the rare adverse effects available in the literature. We report a case of 53-year-old patient developed AP after treatment with atorvastatin monotherapy which resolved after drug withdrawal. Extensive workup on AP failed to reveal any other etiology for it. To our knowledge, this is one of the rare case reports of AP caused due to atorvastatin monotherapy and it further strengthens the fact that statins may cause AP. There is need of cont...

  8. Atorvastatin-induced acute pancreatitis

    Prasanna R Deshpande

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atorvastatin-induced acute pancreatitis (AP is one of the rare adverse effects available in the literature. We report a case of 53-year-old patient developed AP after treatment with atorvastatin monotherapy which resolved after drug withdrawal. Extensive workup on AP failed to reveal any other etiology for it. To our knowledge, this is one of the rare case reports of AP caused due to atorvastatin monotherapy and it further strengthens the fact that statins may cause AP. There is need of continued reporting of such a rare adverse effect of atorvastatin for increasing awareness and to manage and avoid the same.

  9. Nutrition Support in Acute Pancreatitis

    Orestis Ioannidis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The management of acute pancreatitis differs according to its severity. Approximately 75% of patients with acute pancreatitis have mild disease with a mortality rate below 1%. Mortality increases up to 20% if the disease progresses to its severe necrotizing form and, in the most severe cases, mortality can increase to 30-40%. Severe acute pancreatitis is usually accompanied by systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS which results in hypermetabolism with prominent protein catabolism. Acute malnutrition, commonly observed in patients with acute pancreatitis, is associated with immunological disturbances, septic complications and delayed healing of surgical wounds, and may lead to multiorgan dysfunction or failure syndrome (MODS or MOFS and increased morbidity and mortality [1].

  10. Carbofuran-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Rizos E

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Carbamate insecticides are widely used in commercial agriculture and home gardening. A serious side effect of organophosphate and carbamate intoxication is the development of acute pancreatitis. CASE REPORT: A 36-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our hospital with cholinergic crisis and pancreatitis soon after the ingestion of a carbamate insecticide (carbofuran. An abdominal CT scan disclosed pancreatic necrosis with intrapancreatic fluid collection, consistent with the development of a pancreatic pseudocyst in a subsequent CT scan. No predisposing factor for pancreatitis was evident. Pseudocholinesterase levels returned to normal 7 days later and the patient was discharged in good physical condition one month after admission. DISCUSSION: Although acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after organophosphate intoxication, it is quite rare after carbamate ingestion and has not been previously reported after carbofuran intoxication.

  11. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months

  12. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    Bang, Ulrich-Christian; Semb, Synne; Nojgaard, Camilla;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may....... Evidence based pharmacological treatment of AP is limited and studies on the effect of potent anti-inflammatory drugs are warranted....

  13. Acute pancreatitis after a course of clarithromycin.

    Schouwenberg, B.J.J.W.; Deinum, J.

    2003-01-01

    We present a case of acute pancreatitis after a course of clarithromycin. An 84-year-old woman died of suspected pneumonia and cardiac failure. Autopsy surprisingly revealed acute pancreatitis. Except for the use of clarithromycin no other cause for her acute pancreatitis was obvious. Pancreatitis i

  14. Crohn's Disease and Acute Pancreatitis: A Review of Literature

    Sarfaraz Jasdanwala

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease, a transmural inflammatory bowel disease, has many well-known extra-intestinal manifestations and complications. Although acute pancreatitis has a higher incidence in patients with Crohn's disease as compared to the general population, acute pancreatitis is still relatively uncommon in patients with Crohn's disease. Patients with Crohn's disease are at an approximately fourfold higher risk than the general population to develop acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute pancreatitis is higher in females as compared to males. Acute pancreatitis can occur at any age with higher incidence reported in patients in their 20s and between 40- 50 years of age. The severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease is the same as in general population. Acute pancreatitis can occur before onset of intestinal Crohn's disease, this presentation being more common in children than adults. It can also occur as the presenting symptom. However, most commonly it occurs after intestinal symptoms have manifest with a mean time interval between the initial presentation and development of acute pancreatitis being 2 years. There are several etiological factors contributing to acute pancreatitis in patients with crohn's disease. It is not clear whether acute pancreatitis is a direct extra-intestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease; however majority of the cases of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease are due to GS and medications. Drugs used for the treatment of Crohn's disease that have been reported to cause acute pancreatitis include 5-ASA agents, azathioprine and 6 mercaptopurine, metornidazole and corticosteroids. Recent evidence has emerged correlating both type 1 and 2 autoimmune pancreatitis with Crohn's disease. Understanding the association between the two disease entities is key to effectively manage patients with Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis.

  15. Diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis and acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis in 5 severe acute pancreatitis by plain computed tomography

    The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is still mainly based on the clinical signs and symptoms of patients. In a prospective study of 64 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomography (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical types of acute pancreatitis. We were able to correctly diagnose 3 acute necrotizing pancreatitis with autopsy and 2 acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis by plain CT about 48 hours after onset. At present, CT about 48 hours after onset seems to be the most accurate method for the early detection of necrotizing, hemorrhagic and edematous forms of acute pancreatitis. (author)

  16. Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome Following Acute Pancreatitis

    Sinha A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Haemolytic uraemic syndrome is a common cause of renal failure in children but it is a rare condition in adults. Acute pancreatitis in adult as a cause of haemolytic uraemic syndrome is very rare. CASE REPORT: A 19-year-old male presented with symptom and signs suggestive of acute pancreatitis which was confirmed as his serum amylase was significantly raised. Within three days of admission he developed acute renal failure with evidence of haemolytic anaemia and thrombocytopenia. A clinical diagnosis of haemolytic uraemic syndrome was made and he was treated with plasma exchange. He made a complete recovery. CONCLUSION: Renal failure in a patient with acute pancreatitis is rarely due to haemolytic uraemic syndrome. But it is important to consider this differential diagnosis so that early treatment can be instituted to prevent mortality.

  17. Acute Recurrent Pancreatitis: A Possible Clinical Manifestation of Ampullary Cancer

    Athanasios Petrou; Timothy Williams; Konstantinos Bramis; Alexandros Papalambros; Eleftherios Mantonakis; Evangelos Felekouras

    2011-01-01

    Context Acute recurrent pancreatitis still poses diagnostic difficulties. The coexistence or moreover the causative relationship of carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater and acute recurrent pancreatitis is fairly rare. Case report We present a case of carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater that presented with acute recurrent necrotizing pancreatitis complicated with pseudocysts. A diagnosis of malignancy in the ampulla was only made after several ERCP attempts due to residual inflammation at the peria...

  18. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy causing maternal death

    Jeon, Hae Rin; Kim, Suk Young; Cho, Yoon Jin; Chon, Seung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is rare and occurs in approximately 3 in 10,000 pregnancies. It rarely complicates pregnancy, and can occur during any trimester, however over half (52%) of cases occur during the third trimester and during the post-partum period. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, acute pancreatitis caused by hypertriglyceridemia due to increase of estrogen during the gestational period is very unusual, but complication carries a hig...

  19. Surgical treatment of acute pancreatitis

    Klose, K.J.; Neher, M.; Kuhn, F.P.; Kuemmerle, F.; Thelen, M.

    1983-03-31

    The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is based on anamnestic, clinical and chemical data. Ultrasound and computed tomography permit direct visualisation of the pancreas and establish the diagnosis. In cases of haemorrhagic-necrotising pancreatitis they demonstrate the extent of morphological changes and permit exclusion of other causes of an acute abdomen. The imaging methods support indications for operation in cases of subtotal or total parenchymatous necrosis and in pancreatic abscesses. Conservative expectant approaches in patients with severe clinical course and slight morphological changes as well as in agreement of clinical and morphological findings are facilitated. Complete demonstration of parenchymatous and peripancreatic necroses furnishes useful additional information for total extirpation. Gallstone disease can be demonstrated or excluded preoperatively. Since introduction of ultrasound and computed tomography for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis a marked diminution of early surgical intervention and delayed operation has been achieved.

  20. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    Mariani, Alberto; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreatitis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis. There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation, hereditary a...

  1. Acute Pancreatitis-Induced Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Mohan Gurjar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Acute pancreatitis due to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a well recognized condition. Here, we are reporting a rare converse phenomenon, in which thrombocytopenic purpura occurred secondary to acute pancreatitis. Case report A 19-year-old male referred to our intensive care unit with diagnosis of acute pancreatitis with multi-organ dysfunction. He had history of severe abdominal pain and recurrent vomiting about one month ago, requiring hospital admission. There, on diagnostic work-up at admission, abdominal ultrasonography was suggestive of pancreatitis. His serum amylase and lipase were 1,900 and 1,582 U/L, respectively. Other laboratory parameters were within normal limits. He was managed conservatively with intravenous fluids, antibiotics and analgesics; and discharged after about 2 weeks One week after discharge he was readmitted in same hospital with abdominal pain, multiple episodes of bilious vomiting and abdominal distention. Later on he was referred to our intensive care unit; having classical pentad of thrombocytopenic purpura, i.e., thrombocytopenia, micro-angiopathic hemolytic anemia, renal failure, encephalopathy, and fever. His condition improved with plasma exchange therapy and transferred out from our ICU to ward after 10 days of stay. Conclusion Thrombocytopenic purpura may be precipitate by acute pancreatitis due to multiple mechanisms. A high clinical suspicion is required to make an early diagnosis and allow early initiation of plasma exchange therapy, resulting in a goodprognosis.

  2. Acute pancreatitis - severity classification, complications and outcome

    Andersson, Bodil

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis, with an annual incidence of approximately 35 per 100 000 inhabitants in Sweden, is in most cases mild and self-limiting. Severe acute pancreatitis, affecting 10-15% of the cases is, however, associated with severe complications and even death. The optimal management of acute pancreatitis includes accurate early prediction of the disease severity. The aims of this thesis were to investigate early severity classification, complications and outcome in acute pancreatitis patie...

  3. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    SUZUKI, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The e...

  4. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: Does it exist?

    Tenner, Scott

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absenc...

  5. Liraglutide-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Jeyaraj, Santhosh; Shetty, Ananth Samith; Kumar, Champat Raj Roopesh; Nanditha, Arun; Krishnamoorthy, Satheesh; Raghavan, Arun; Raghavan, K; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2014-01-01

    An obese lady of 51 year with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus for 13 years was prescribed Liraglutide, a glucagon like peptide (GLP-1) analogue (Victoza) for glycaemic control and reduction of weight. She was on gliclazide and Insulin prior to initiation of Liraglutide. Eight weeks after initiation of GLP -1 analogue, she developed severe abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. She was admitted to a private hospital and evaluated. Biochemical tests and CT scan revealed presence of pancreatitis and she was treated for acute pancreatitis. Liraglutide was withdrawn and symptoms subsided. Subsequent follow-up showed that pancreatic enzyme levels were normal. PMID:25327099

  6. Acute pancreatitis caused by bortezomib.

    Solakoglu, Tevfik; Akyol, Pinar; Guney, Tekin; Dilek, Imdat; Atalay, Roni; Koseoglu, Huseyin; Akin, Ebru; Demirezer Bolat, Aylin; Buyukasik, Naciye Semnur; Ersoy, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis has been reported rarely. Bortezomib is a selective and reversible proteasome inhibitor used for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Recently, one case report about acute pancreatitis (AP) caused by bortezomib was published in the international literature. Herein we report a case of AP in a 67-year-old male on bortezomib therapy. On the fourth day after the first administration of bortezomib, the patient admitted to the hospital with symptoms of AP. The common etiological factors for AP were all excluded. Than the patient was diagnosed as bortezomib-induced pancreatitis. PMID:23561979

  7. Biliary acute pancreatitis: a review

    Osvaldo M. Tiscomia; Susana Hamamura; Enriqueta S. de Lehmann; Graciela Otero; Hipólito Waisman; Patricia Tiscornia-Wasserman; Simmy Bank

    2000-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION It is axiomatic that the most effective and soundly based plan of treatment of any disorder is one aimed at the mechanism or mechanisms responsible for its development[1]. This basic notion, coupled with recent reports[2- 11] in which, surprisingly there is a total lack of reference to the probable involvement of autonomic-arc-reflexes in the physiopathogenesis of biliary acute pancreatitis have prompted this presentation. Undoubtedly, this disease entity has numerous causes, an obscure physiopathology, few effective remedies, and, often, an unpredictable outcome. At the turn of the century, Opie[12,13] brought to light the association between gallstone migration and acute pancreatitis.

  8. Pancreatic panniculitis: a cutaneous manifestation of acute pancreatitis

    Laureano, A; Mestre, T; Ricardo, L; Rodrigues, AM; Cardoso, J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thi...

  9. Fatal Pancreatic Panniculitis Associated with Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report

    Lee, Woo Sun; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Sang Woo; Paik, Chang Nyol; Kim, Hyung Ok; Park, Young Min

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thi...

  10. Pancreatic encephalopathy- a rare complication of severe acute biliary pancreatitis

    Vlad Denis Constantin; Alexandru Carȃp; Bogdan Socea; Simona Bobic

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pancreatic encephalopathy is a rare complication of severe acute pancreatitis, with high mortality, being difficult to diagnose and treat, thus requiring continuous research regarding its management. Materials and Methods. Of 20 patients diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis on admission at Department of Emergency and Admission (DEA), from January 1st 2010 to March 31st 2014, 5 cases complicated by pancreatic encephalopathy were analyzed using a descriptive observational...

  11. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    Alberto Mariani; Pier Alberto Testoni

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreaUtis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis.There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association.Cystic fibrosis transmembrane con ductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation,hereditary and obstructive pancreatitis seem an acute disease that progress to chronic pancreatitis,likely as a consequence of the activation and proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells that produce and activate collagen and therefore fibrosis.From the diagnostic point of view,in patients with acute recurrent pancreatitis Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) seems the more reliable technique for an accurate evaluation and follow-up of some ductal and parenchymal abnormalities suspected for early chronic pancreatitis.

  12. Pancreas Divisum and Acute or Chronic Pancreatitis

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of pancreas divisum as a pancreatic ductal anomaly able to induce acute or chronic pancreatitis is still under debate; some authors consider the pancreas as a variant of the pancreatic ductal system able to induce acute or chronic pancreatitis as a result of relative outflow obstruction [1, 2, 3], whereas others consider this finding a simple morphological anomaly of the pancreatic ductal system without any clinical consequence [4, 5, 6].

  13. Acute pancreatitis : new frontiers in diagnosis and treatment

    van Santvoort, H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas mostly caused by gallstones and alcohol abuse. Around 15 to 20% of patients show a severe clinical course, which is characterised by multiple organ failure and necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma and/ or peripancreatic fat tissue. In around 30% of patients with necrotising pancreatitis, secondary infection of necrosis occurs, probably due to bacterial translocation from the patient’s own gut. Infected necrosis is an indication for ...

  14. Action of Antiproteases on the Inflammatory Response in Acute Pancreatitis

    Chun-Chia Chen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of acute pancreatitis ranges from mild edematous disease to a severe necrotizing process which is usually accompanied by local or systemic complications and even mortality. Early deaths (within the first week due to severe acute pancreatitis are generally caused by massive inflammatory responses which result in multiple organ failure. Although the exact mechanisms which trigger the inflammatory and necrotizing processes are not completely understood, it is generally accepted that autodigestion and activated leukocytes play important roles in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Proinflammatory cytokines are associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ failure syndrome in acute pancreatitis. A compensatory anti-inflammatory response occurs in parallel with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Trypsin secreted by the pancreatic acinar cells activates proteaseactivated receptor-2 which can result in the production of cytokines. Protease inhibitors such as aprotinin, gabexate mesilate, nafamostat mesilate, ulinastatin, etc. can inhibit the various enzymes and inflammatory response in experimental and clinical studies. Thus, protease inhibitors have been considered as a potential treatment to inhibit the pancreatic inflammation in acute pancreatitis. The beneficial effects of antiproteases on experimental severe acute pancreatitis may be, in part, due to the modulation of inflammatory cytokine responses. The effect of protease inhibitors on the inflammatory response in human acute pancreatitis deserves further study.

  15. Acute Recurrent Pancreatitis: A Possible Clinical Manifestation of Ampullary Cancer

    Athanasios Petrou

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Acute recurrent pancreatitis still poses diagnostic difficulties. The coexistence or moreover the causative relationship of carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater and acute recurrent pancreatitis is fairly rare. Case report We present a case of carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater that presented with acute recurrent necrotizing pancreatitis complicated with pseudocysts. A diagnosis of malignancy in the ampulla was only made after several ERCP attempts due to residual inflammation at the periampullary area. Conclusion Malignancy at the ampulla of Vater causing recurrent episodes of pancreatitis represents a realistic risk and attempts to diagnose the underlying cause should always take into account the possibility of cancer.

  16. Lessons Learnt in Management of Acute Pancreatitis

    Deshpande Aparna; Velhal Rishikesh; Thanky Harsh; Soman Sundeep; Shah Ritesh

    2008-01-01

    Objective Acute Pancreatitis continues to be a confounding clinical problem and can pose a formidable challenge in its management. This invited review discusses the various clinical studies done while managing cases of acute pancreatitis and the possible avenues for further studies. Method Clinical studies done on various aspects of pancreatitis viz. severity prediction using bedside index of severity in acute pancreatitis score and its validation in Indian patients, current status of interve...

  17. Diet and risk of acute pancreatitis

    Oskarsson, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden inflammation of the pancreas. It has a broad spectrum of clinical outcomes, ranging from mild and self-limiting to severe and potentially fatal, and is often followed by recurrent attacks and/or progression to a chronic disease state (so-called chronic pancreatitis); especially if it is classified as non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis. Alcohol abuse is considered to be the most important risk factor for non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis. Even though...

  18. Acute Pancreatitis: Surgery, Pathophysiology and Probiotic Prophylaxis

    van Minnen, L. P.

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a challenging disease with a clinical course that is often difficult to predict. In severe acute pancreatitis, mortality increases significantly if intestinal bacteria translocate from the intestine and infect pancreatic necrosis. Surgical and prophylactic treatment strategies are challenged by complex pathophysiology of the disease. This thesis addresses some key aspects of acute pancreatitis: surgical management, pathophysiology and probiotic prophylaxis. Outcome in pa...

  19. The outcome of management of acute pancreatitis

    T. R. Nagarjuna; Prasad H. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute pancreatitis is a potentially life threatening disease. The initial management of patients with pancreatitis focuses on establishing the diagnosis, estimating its severity, addressing the major symptoms (i.e., pain, nausea, vomiting, and hypovolemia), and limiting its progression. Therefore, the present study has been undertaken to record the outcome of management of acute pancreatitis. Methods: The study population consisted of 40 cases of acute pancreatitis that fulfill...

  20. Acute pancreatitis: Manifestation of acute HIV infection in an adolescent

    Bitar, Anas; Altaf, Muhammad; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Pancreatitis in the pediatric age group is not as common as in adults. Etiologies are various and differ from those in adults. Although infectious etiology accounts for a significant number of cases of pancreatitis, acute infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was rarely reported as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in adults. Acute pancreatitis has never been reported as a presenting manifestation of acute HIV infection in children. Case Report: We des...

  1. Prognostic Indicators in Acute Pancreatitis

    2003-01-01

    Several approaches have been used in an attempt to predict the severity and prognosis of attacks of acute pancreatitis. The Ranson and Glasgow criteria include a variety of simple laboratory parameters that are measured on admission and again within 48 h. They are the most widely used indices in clinical practice. The Acute Physiological and Chronic Health Evaluation II system is more complicated, but can be applied to a wide variety of conditions, especially in intensive care settings. The u...

  2. [Prolonged acute pancreatitis after bone marrow transplantation].

    De Singly, B; Simon, M; Bennani, J; Wittnebel, S; Zagadanski, A-M; Pacault, V; Gornet, J-M; Allez, M; Lémann, M

    2008-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after allogenic marrow transplantation. Several causes can predispose to pancreatitis, including Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD), a condition which is probably underestimated. In the literature, few description of pancreatic GVHD can be found. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis can be difficult if pancreatic involvement occurs without other typical manifestations of GVHD. We report the case of a woman, 54 years old, suffering from prolonged, painful pancreatitis two months after allogenic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leucemia. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis was performed after five weeks on duodenal biopsies despite the absence of diarrheoa. The patient dramatically improved within few days on corticosteroids. PMID:18378104

  3. Respiratory failure in acute pancreatitis.

    Banerjee, A K; Haggie, S J; Jones, R B; Basran, G. S.

    1995-01-01

    There are a number of important pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis which make a significant contribution to the morbidity and mortality of the condition. The pathophysiology and management guidelines are given for each and approaches towards better treatment in the future are discussed.

  4. Acute biliary pancreatitis: Diagnosis and treatment

    Hazem Zakaria

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gallstones are the commonest cause of acute pancreatitis (AP, a potentially life-threatening condition, worldwide. The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis has not been fully understood. Laboratory and radiological investigations are critical for diagnosis as well prognosis prediction. Scoring systems based on radiological findings and serologic inflammatory markers have been proposed as better predictors of disease severity. Early endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP is beneficial in a group of patients with gallstone pancreatitis. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy with preoperative endoscopic common bile duct clearance is recommended as a treatment of choice for acute biliary pancreatitis. The timing of cholecystectomy, following ERCP, for biliary pancreatitis can vary markedly depending on the severity of pancreatitis

  5. Acute Pancreatitis: The Role of Imaging and Interventional Radiology

    Acute pancreatitis can manifest as a benign condition with minimal abdominal pain and hyperamylasemia or can have a fulminant course, which can be life-threatening usually due to the development of infected pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure. Fortunately, 70-80% of patients with acute pancreatitis have a benign self-limiting course. The initial 24-48 hours after the initial diagnosis is usually the period that determines the subsequent course, and for many of the 20-30% of patients who subsequently have a fulminant course, this becomes apparent within this time frame. With reference to long-term outcome following acute pancreatitis, most cases recover without long-term sequelae with only a minority of cases progressing to chronic pancreatitis. In the initial management of acute pancreatitis, assessment of metabolic disturbances and systemic organ dysfunction is critical. However, the advent and continued refinement of cross-sectional imaging modalities over the past two decades has led to a prominent role for diagnostic imaging in assessing acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, these cross-sectional imaging modalities have enabled the development of diagnostic and therapeutic interventional techniques in the hands of radiologists. In this article we review the diagnostic features of acute pancreatitis, the clinical staging systems, complications and the role of imaging. The role of interventional radiology techniques in the management of acute pancreatitis will be discussed as well as potential complications associated with these treatments

  6. Radiological observation of acute pancreatitis

    The radiologic study of the pancreas oriented in the upper retroperitoneal space is difficult because the specific density of this viscus is the same as that of its surrounding tissue. so that it cannot be visualized directly. Furthermore, it is one of the few viscera in the abdomen which cannot be outlined by a contrast medium. In the abdomen, the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is very important since the present treatment of this disease is conservative, which emergency laparatomy is indicated in most other abdominal crisaes. However, the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis cannot be made by roentgen studies alone, yet such studies can at times confirm an uncertain clinical diagnosis when evaluated with clinical findings and can occasionally alert the unsuspecting clinician to the possible presence of this disease. Because a radiologic examination plays such an important role in the differential diagnosis of the acute abdomen and at present augmenting interest for pancreatic disease, we present this discussion in order to focus attention on the radiologic features of acute pancreatitis.1. From Nov. 1968 to June 1978, roentgenologic studies of 275 patients diagnosed as acute pancreatitis were reviewed. 2. In this series, the important findings on the chest roentgenograms of 275 cases were as follows. 1) Fifty-five cases (20.0%) of these represented pleural effusion. 2) Platelike atelectasis at the lung bases was noted in 44 cases (16.0%). 3) There was elevation of the diaphragm in 33 cases (12.0%). 3. The significant findings on the simple abdomen of 247 cases were as follows. 1) The presence of a sentinel loop occurred in 168 cases (68.0%). 2) Colon 'cut-off' sign was noted in 106 cases (42.9%). 3) Obliteration of psoas shadows in 8 cases (3.2%). 4) Gastrocolic separation in 4 cases (1.6%). 4. One hundred and seventy-five barium meal studies of the stomach and duodenum were available for review.

  7. Intra-abdominal hypertension and acute pancreatitis.

    Mifkovic, A; Skultety, J; Sykora, P; Prochotsky, A; Okolicany, R

    2013-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) contributes to organ dysfunction and leads to the development of the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). IAH and ACS are relatively frequent findings in patiens with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and are associated with deterioration in organ functions. The most affected are cardiovascular, respiratory and renal functions. The incidence of IAH in patients with SAP is approximately 60-80%. There is an accumulating evidence in human and animal studies that changes of perfusion, particularly to the microvasculature, are crucial events in the progression of acute pancreatitis (AP). The perfusion of the small and large intestine is impaired due to reduced arterial pressure, increased vascular resistence and diminished portal blood flow. Bacterial translocation has been described in patients with ACS, and this may apply to patients with SAP. Approximately 30-40% of SAP patients develop ACS because of pancreatic (retroperitoneal) inflammation, peripancreatic tissue edema, formation of fluid collections or abdominal distension. Surgical debridement was the preferred treatment to control necrotizing pancreatitis in the past. However, the management of necrotizing pancreatitis has changed over the last decade. The main objective of this article is to describe the association between IAH and AP and to emphasize this situation in clinical praxis as well (Fig. 1, Ref. 38). PMID:23406186

  8. Diabetes due to recurrent pancreatitis secondary to hypercalcemia due to primary hyperparathyroidism

    Sumit Kumar Chakrabarti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis due to hypercalcemia associated with hyperparathyroidism (HPT is not very common. We herein report a case of a 21-year-old woman, who presented with acute pancreatitis. She had a past history of recurrent nephrolithiasis. Subsequent evaluation revealed hypercalcemia (serum calcium: 12.6 mg/dL; low phosphate (2.9 mg/dL with elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH, 156.7 pg/mL and HbA1c (6.9%. Diagnosis of primary HPT (PHPT was made. Recurrent pancreatitis due to hypercalcemia may have resulted in diabetes mellitus.

  9. PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF CT IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS AND ITS COMPLICATIONS

    Shivanand S .

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Visualization of the pancreas was far better by CT than b y ultrasound. Ultrasound had certain limitation. Due to bowel gas the pancreas may not be visualized. Extra pancreatic spread of inflammation and vascular complications was not always picked up by Ultrasonography. These limitations were overcome with the u se of CT which yielded more diagnostic information in the evaluation of acute pancreatitis. CT is a confirmative investigation in diagnosis and staging of acute pancreatitis. MCTSI is a very useful tool for the screening of patients with acute pancreatitis for the classification of severity accurately and to predict the clinical outcome. OBJECTIVES OF STUDY: To determine the value of computed tomography in evaluation of early diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. To evaluate the complications using computed tom ography severity index. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted on 100 patients with clinical suspicion of acute pancreatitis, altered biochemical parameters (Serum amylase, Serum lipase in favor of acute pancreatitis, ultrasonography suggestive of acute pancreatitis and complications known case of chronic pancreatitis with features of acute symptoms who were referred to the department of Radiodiagnosis, Basaveshwar teaching & General Hospital, Kalaburagi. Before evaluating a patient by CT imaging, i nformed consent was obtained from the patient or guardian. The patient were informed about the radiation exposure in the examination. CT was carried out using Philips 6 slice scanner. Scan was obtained with both plain and contrast study. RESULT: 100 patien ts were included in the study. 83% patients were males and 17% patients were females. Majority of patients belonged to 31 - 40 yrs. of age group. Alcohol was the most common cause of acute pancreatitis. 73 patients had positive ultrasound finding while CT wa s positive in all cases. According to, MCTSI 63 patients had moderate, 26 patients had mild and 11 patients had severe

  10. Nutritional support for acute pancreatitis.

    Pisters, P W; Ranson, J H

    1992-09-01

    The current review has summarized current data relevant to the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis. Selection of the most appropriate form of nutritional support for patients with acute pancreatitis is intimately linked to a thorough understanding of the effects of various forms of enteral and parenteral nutrition on physiologic exocrine secretory mechanisms. Two basic concepts have emerged from the multiple studies that have addressed these issues to date: 1, enteral feeds should have low fat composition and be delivered distal to the ligament of Treitz to minimize exocrine pancreatic secretion and 2, parenteral substrate infusions, alone or in combinations similar to those administered during TPN, do not stimulate exocrine pancreatic secretion. From a practical standpoint, most patients with acute pancreatitis are diagnosed by nonoperative means and will manifest some degree of paralytic ileus during the early phase of the disease. Therefore, jejunal feeds are usually not a therapeutic option early in the course of this disease. On the basis of the clinical studies reviewed herein we propose general guidelines for the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis: 1, most patients with mild uncomplicated pancreatitis (one to two prognostic signs) do not benefit from nutritional support; 2, nutritional support should begin early in the course of patients with moderate to severe disease (as soon as hemodynamic and cardiorespiratory stability permit); 3, initial nutritional support should be through the parenteral route and include fat emulsion in amounts sufficient to prevent essential fatty acid deficiency (no objective data exist to recommend specific amino acid formulations); 4, patients requiring operation for diagnosis or complications of the disease should have a feeding jejunostomy placed at the time of operation for subsequent enteral nutrition using a low fat formula, such as Precision HN (Sandoz, 1.3 percent calories as fat

  11. Immunomodulatory therapies for acute pancreatitis

    Li, Jing; Yang, Wen-Juan; Huang, Lu-Ming; Tang, Cheng-Wei

    2014-01-01

    It is currently difficult for conventional treatments of acute pancreatitis (AP), which primarily consist of anti-inflammatory therapies, to prevent the progression of AP or to improve its outcome. This may be because the occurrence and progression of AP, which involves various inflammatory cells and cytokines, includes a series of complex immune events. Considering the complex immune system alterations during the course of AP, it is necessary to monitor the indicators related to immune cells...

  12. ERCP in acute biliary pancreatitis

    Kapetanos, Dimitrios J

    2010-01-01

    The role of urgent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in acute biliary pancreatitis is for many years a subject for disagreement among physicians. Although the evidence seemed to be in favor of performing ERCP, endoscopists usually hesitate to conform to the guidelines. ERCP is an invasive procedure, with complications which can affect patients’ outcome. Recent evidence suggests that we should probably modify our policy, recruiting less invasive procedures, like magnetic re...

  13. Rapid Evolution from the First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis to Chronic Pancreatitis in Human Subjects

    Elie Aoun; Adam Slivka; Papachristou, Dionysios J.; David C. Whitcomb; Ferga C. Gleeson; Georgios I Papachristou

    2007-01-01

    Context Growing evidence suggests that recurrent acute pancreatitis leads to chronic pancreatitis, but this sequence is seldom reported in human subjects. The sentinel acute pancreatitis event hypothesis suggests that an initial episode of acute pancreatitis is the first step in a complicated series of events ultimately leading to chronic pancreatitis. Objective To identify patients who evolved from recurrent acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis. Setting The Severity of Acute Pancreatit...

  14. Pazopanib-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Hata, Hiroo; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Kuwatani, Masaki; Kawahata, Shuhei; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Imafuku, Keisuke; Kitamura, Shinya; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and c-Kit approved for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and soft tissue sarcoma. Nonselective kinase inhibitors, such as sunitinib and sorafenib, are known to be associated with acute pancreatitis. There are few case reports of severe acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment. We present a case of severe acute pancreatitis caused by pazopan...

  15. Acute pancreatitis following medical abortion: Case report

    Amini Hashem

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute pancreatitis rarely complicates pregnancy. Although most pregnant women with acute pancreatitis have associated gallstones, less common causes such as drugs have been reported. Case presentation We report the case of a 34-year-old woman who underwent medical abortion with mifepristone and gemeprost and received codeine as pain-relief during the induction of abortion. She developed a severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis which required 14 days of intensive care. Other possible etiological factors, i.e. gallstone, alcohol intake and hyperlipidemia, were excluded. Conclusions The reported case of acute pancreatitis was most likely drug-induced.

  16. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    Mitsuyoshi; Suzuki; Jin; Kan; Sai; Toshiaki; Shimizu

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treat-ment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the dif-ferential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often differ-ent than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms(such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and im-aging studies. Several scoring systems have been pro-posed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly dif-fer between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our under-standing of the pathology, optimal treatment, assess-ment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pan-creatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severeacute pancreatitis in children is becoming better under-stood and more controllable.

  17. Contemporary Management of Acute Biliary Pancreatitis

    Orhan Ozkan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute biliary pancreatitis is one of the major causes of acute pancreatitis.Gallstones, biliary sludge and microlithiasis, especially in pancreatitis without detectable reason, can be the cause of acute pancreatitis. Acute biliary pancreatitis has many controversions in the literature, and its classification and guidelines are being updated very frequently. Atlanta classifications which determine the definitions and guidelines about acute pancreatitis were renewed and published in 2013. It has various clinical aspects, ranging from a mild form which is easily treated, to a severe form that causes complications leading to mortality. The pathogenesis of this disease has not been fully elucidated and several theories have been suggested. New scoring systems and laboratory methods such as proteomics have been suggested for both diagnosis and to predict disease severity, and research on these topics is still in progress. Novel therapeutic approaches with technological developments such as ERCP, ES, MRCP, and EUS are also suggested.

  18. Pancreatic encephalopathy- a rare complication of severe acute biliary pancreatitis

    Vlad Denis Constantin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pancreatic encephalopathy is a rare complication of severe acute pancreatitis, with high mortality, being difficult to diagnose and treat, thus requiring continuous research regarding its management. Materials and Methods. Of 20 patients diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis on admission at Department of Emergency and Admission (DEA, from January 1st 2010 to March 31st 2014, 5 cases complicated by pancreatic encephalopathy were analyzed using a descriptive observational, retrospective, single-center study. Results. The study shows different types of diagnostic algorithm and therapeutical approaches, in correlation with morbidity and mortality rates. Conclusions. Our study highlighted the fact that speed is critical, early management being the key to outcome.

  19. [Biochemical diagnostics in acute pancreatitis recognition and outcome predicition].

    Olczyk, Paweł; Kozma, Ewa M; Olczyk, Krystyna; Komosińska-Vassev, Katarzyna

    2004-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common disease associated with an improper activation of pancreatic zymogens leading to autodigestion of the gland and if excessive--to multiple organ dysfunction. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis manifested by 20% of patients with acute pancreatitis is a life threatening disorder requiring subsequent management in intensive care unit. Unfortunately, none of biochemical tests presently used for laboratory assessment of acute pancreatitis at the early stage of the disease is able to estimate accurately: diagnosis, etiology and severity. At present, diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is based on evaluation of serum amylase and lipase activity due to easy availability and simplicity of these enzymatic tests. Low specificity of the mentioned enzymes resulted in studies concerning pancreatic isoamylase, elastase-1, chymotrypsine, procarboxy-peptidase B, trypsinogen-2 and immunoreactive trypsinogen usefulness in the laboratory diagnosis of AP. The prediction of severity in acute pancreatitis using multifactorial scoring systems is cumbersome especially due to their complexity. On the other hand the biochemical method of choice, estimation of serum C reactive protein, is useless in the early phase of disease. Unfortunately, the computed tomography--the most accurate method in severity assessing--is not always available. Recent studies have brought some progress in severity predicting, such as phospholipase A2, cellular immunity markers, cytokines, activation peptides of trypsinogen and carboxypeptidase B, procalcitonine, pancreatitis associated protein and serum amyloid A. All these newly introduced biochemical methods allow to look optimistically into the future of laboratory diagnostics of the acute pancreatitis believing that the problem of diagnosing and predicting the AP severity will be solved. PMID:15850341

  20. Plasmablastic Lymphoma Mimicking Acute Pancreatitis.

    Inayat, Faisal; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Cheema, Ahmad R; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare B-cell neoplasm. It predominantly occurs in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and exhibits a highly aggressive clinical behavior. Case Presentation. We describe an unusual case of a 37-year-old HIV-positive male who presented with acute pancreatitis secondary to multiple peripancreatic masses compressing the pancreas. Histopathological examination of the lesions showed diffuse and cohesive pattern of large B-cells resembling immunoblasts or plasmablasts. The neoplastic cells were positive for BOB1 and MUM1, partially positive for CD79a, and negative for CD20, CD56, CD138, CD3, CD5, AE1/AE3, and HHV8. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA in situ hybridization was positive. These features were consistent with PBL. The patient was initiated on cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy, demonstrating a striking response. Conclusion. To our research, this is the first report of PBL with the initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. The findings in this case suggest that PBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. PMID:27034868

  1. Burkitt lymphoma mimicking acute pancreatitis

    Lívia Moscardi Bacchi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Burkitt lymphoma (BL is a highly aggressive B cell lymphoma, presenting in extranodal sites or as an acute leukemia. Three clinical variants of BL are recognized: endemic BL, sporadic BL and immunodeficiency associated BL. Sporadic BL is seen worldwide, mainly in children and young adults involving the abdominal organs mostly the ileocaecal area. Pancreatic involvement is rare. The authors report a unique case of abdominal Burkitt lymphoma, initially diagnosed and treated as acute pancreatitis. Clinically, the patient presented severe abdominal pain and vomiting. Imaging findings were suggestive of inflammatory involvement of the pancreas, heading treatment towards this hypothesis. Unfortunately, the patient died during the diagnostic work up, and the autopsy findings demonstrated advanced Burkitt lymphoma with extensive involvement of pancreatic parenchyma and other organs within the abdominal cavity. Once Burkitt lymphoma is a potentially curable disease, early diagnosis is crucial for better outcomes.

  2. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) in acute alcoholic and biliary pancreatitis

    An analysis of the ERP findings in 31 patients with acute pancreatitis enable us to define the terminology of the pancreatogram in these diseases. Irregularities of the ducts indicate previous damage to the organ. A frequent phenomenon is thinning of lateral branches, which can be explained by compression due to oedema. Early parenchymal staining indicates abnormal permeability of the duct epithelium. Cavities are an expression of acute pseudo-cysts. A sign characteristic of alcoholic pancreatitis is the presence of contrast defects due to protein plugs and due to increased viscosity of pancreatic secretions. These observations confirm the theory that protein precipitates due to abnormal secretions play an important role in acute pancreatitis. (orig.)

  3. STUDY ANALYSIS OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS BY CT

    Bulabai; Hemhnath

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Study analysis of pancreatitis by computed tomography in terms of morphology of pancreas in acute pancreatitis, complications of pancreatitis and duration of hospital stay by grading the severity of disease using Modified CT severity index. MATERIAL AND METHOD: This prospective study of 100 patients suspected of pancreatitis was evaluated with multidetector spiral CT scanner, somatom, (Spirit) Siemens at Tertiary care center, for period of one year. The series consists of pat...

  4. PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF CT IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS AND ITS COMPLICATIONS

    Shivanand S; Shrishail; Mahesh; Govinda Raju

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of the pancreas was far better by CT than b y ultrasound. Ultrasound had certain limitation. Due to bowel gas the pancreas may not be visualized. Extra pancreatic spread of inflammation and vascular complications was not always picked up by Ultrasonography. These limitations were overcome with the u se of CT which yielded more diagnostic information in the evaluation of acute pancreatitis. CT is a confirmative investigation in diagnosis and staging of acute ...

  5. Action of Antiproteases on the Inflammatory Response in Acute Pancreatitis

    Chun-Chia Chen; Sun-Sang Wang; Fa-Yauh Lee

    2007-01-01

    The spectrum of acute pancreatitis ranges from mild edematous disease to a severe necrotizing process which is usually accompanied by local or systemic complications and even mortality. Early deaths (within the first week) due to severe acute pancreatitis are generally caused by massive inflammatory responses which result in multiple organ failure. Although the exact mechanisms which trigger the inflammatory and necrotizing processes are not completely understood, it is generally accepted tha...

  6. Computerized tomography in acute and chronic pancreatitis

    Modern imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnostic evaluation of pancreatitis, primarily demonstrating its complications. Computerized tomography (CT) is a more sensitive method than ultrasonography and pancreatic ductography. A chart review revealed 214 patients at our hospital with a discharge diagnosis of pancreatitis. Sixty patients had CT for evaluation of possible complications. Only five scans were normal. Of 37 cases of acute pancreatitis, 92% demonstrated localized or diffuse enlargement, and 65% showed loss of pancreatic outline. Other frequent findings included thickening of perirenal fascia (49%), ileus (43%), edema of mesentery (35%), and inflammatory exudate (32%). Abscess and pseudocyst were each detected in 8% of cases. In chronic pancreatitis 65% of patients showed localized or diffuse pancreatic enlargement. Atrophy of the gland (30%), calcification (30%), pseudocyst (26%), and dilated pancreatic ducts (17%) were also seen. CT is effective in evaluating pancreatitis and its complications. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables

  7. Tamoxifen-induced hypertriglyceridemia causing acute pancreatitis

    Hemant Kumar Singh; Mahendranath S Prasad; Kandasamy, Arun K.; Kadambari Dharanipragada

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen has both antagonistic and agonistic tissue-specific actions. It can have a paradoxical estrogenic effect on lipid metabolism resulting in elevated triglyceride and chylomicron levels. This can cause life-threatening complications like acute pancreatitis. To our knowledge, very few cases of tamoxifen-induced pancreatitis have been reported in the literature. We report a case of severe hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis following tamoxifen use. A 50-year-old diabetic lady was...

  8. An unreported complication of acute pancreatitis

    Muthukumarasamy, G; V. Shanmugam; Yule, SR; Ravindran, R

    2007-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis constitutes 3% of all admissions with abdominal pain. There are reports of osteal fat necrosis leading to periosteal reactions and osteolytic lesions following severe pancreatitis, particularly in long bones. A 54-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with acute pancretitis, who later developed spinal discitis secondary to necrotizing pancreatitis. He was treated conservatively with antibiotics and after a month he recovered completely without any neurological deficit. ...

  9. Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis in Anorexia and Bulimia

    Marti JL; Herring S; Stephenson KE; Morris LG

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: Mild pancreatitis has been reported as a consequence of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or what has been termed the "dietary chaos syndrome". Either chronic malnutrition, or refeeding after periods of malnutrition, may precipitate acute pancreatitis through several pathogenetic mechanisms. CASE REPORT: A 26-year-old woman with a ten-year history of anorexia and bulimia presented with a third episode of acute pancreatitis in three months. The patient had been abstinent from alcohol...

  10. Cytokines and organ failure in acute pancreatitis

    Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Hansen, Mark Berner; Andersen, Anders Møller;

    2012-01-01

    We aimed at synchronously examining the early time course of 4 proinflammatory cytokines as predictive factors for development of organ failure in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP).......We aimed at synchronously examining the early time course of 4 proinflammatory cytokines as predictive factors for development of organ failure in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP)....

  11. The outcome of management of acute pancreatitis

    T. R. Nagarjuna

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: Predicting the prognosis of a patient with acute pancreatitis at admission forms a very important strategy in management of acute pancreatitis, which will enable to practice guidelines for standardization of management of the patient which will in turn translate into improved outcomes. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(7.000: 2998-3001

  12. Acute Biliary Pancreatitis: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Hazem Zakaria

    2009-01-01

    Gallstones are the commonest cause of acute pancreatitis (AP), a potentially life-threatening condition, worldwide. The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis has not been fully understood. Laboratory and radiological investigations are critical for diagnosis as well prognosis prediction. Scoring systems based on radiological findings and serologic inflammatory markers have been proposed as better predictors of disease severity. Early endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is benef...

  13. Obstructive Jaundice Due to a Pancreatic Mass: A Rare Presentation of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia in an Adult

    Sudin Varghese Daniel; Andrew Melvin Smith; Quentin Antony Hill; Krishna Viswanath Menon; Deven Harshad Vani

    2010-01-01

    Context To highlight a rare presentation of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Case report A 39-year-old man presented with a 4 month history of weight loss and a 6 week history of upper abdominal pain radiating to the back with nausea and vomiting. Liver function tests showed an obstructive picture, full blood count was normal and on computerised tomography there was diffuse enlargement of the pancreas, with dilatation of the common bile duct and intra hepatic biliary radicles. Four weeks after ...

  14. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    Ulrich Christian Bang; Synne Semb; Camilla Nφjgaard; Flemming Bendtsen

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP)based on experimental animal models and clinical trials.Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may be useful as prophylaxis against Post Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography Pancreatitis (PEP). The protease inhibitor Gabexate mesilate (GM) is used routinely as treatment to AP in some countries, but randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis do not support this practice. Nitroglycerin (NGL) is a nitrogen oxide (NO) donor, which relaxes the sphincter of Oddi.Studies show conflicting results when applied prior to ERCP and a large multicenter randomized study is warranted. Steroids administered as prophylaxis against PEP has been validated without effect in several randomized trials. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) indomethacin and diclofenac have in randomized studies showed potential as prophylaxis against PEP. Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is a cytokine with anti-inflammatory properties but two trials testing IL-10 as prophylaxis to PEP have returned conflicting results.Antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)have a potential as rescue therapy but no clinical trials are currently being conducted. The antibiotics betalactams and quinolones reduce mortality when necrosis is present in pancreas and may also reduce incidence of infected necrosis. Evidence based pharmacological treatment of AP is limited and studies on the effect of potent anti-inflammatory drugs are warranted.

  15. THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE BILIARY PANCREATITIS

    Elena Gologan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute gallstone pancreatitis represents about half of all pancreatitis and it has still a high mortality despite the progress in the early diagnosis and proper treatment. There are certain difficulties in choosing the optimal treatment because of the polymorphism of presentations, the diversity of pathological types, the particularities of the cases and the risks that are to assume in any kind of treatment strategy the doctor choose. Another difficult factor to assume is the moment of the interventional approach, which is still controversial due to its high dependence of too many factors. The conservative treatment of acute gallstone pancreatitis is not usually followed by the remission of the inflammatory process but leads to the aggravation of the disease. The removal of the cause of the ampular obstruction (the stone can be spontaneously in some cases; however, in most cases of severe disease the removal requires surgical or endoscopic interventional approach. The most important controversy lies between these two methods, and to choose the proper moment of each intervention.

  16. Mental disorders in patients with acute necrotic pancreatitis

    Stefanović Dejan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The prognosis of patients with acute pancreatitis is still uncertain regardless of modern therapeutic procedures. It is even more emphasized if the acute pancreatitis is followed by psychic disorders. Objective The aim of the study was to provide an overview of the incidence of certain psychosomatic disorders in patients with acute pancreatitis and evaluate priority therapeutic procedures. Method In this study, we analyzed 16 patients with psychosomatic disorders followed by the episode of acute pancreatitis among 202 patients that were hospitalized in the period from 1993 until 2000. The diagnosis was based on anamnesis, clinical and laboratory findings and diagnostic procedures such as X-ray, US, CT and MRI. Results Among 16 patients with psychosomatic disorders followed by acute pancreatitis, 13 (81.25% patients were operated on and 3 (18.75% patients were medically treated. 6 patients experienced hallucinations, 5 memory deficiency, 16 disorientation and 14 confabulation. Conclusion Psychosomatic disorders in patients with acute pancreatitis require complex medical treatment. Due to the already mentioned complications, the management of these conditions is very difficult and with uncertain.

  17. Pancreatite aguda devida a hematoma intramural do duodeno por uso de anticoagulante Acute pancreatitis due to intramural hematoma of the duodenum by use of anticoagulant therapy

    Samer FARHOUD

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Racional - A hemorragia intramural espontânea do duodeno causada por complicações da terapêutica anticoagulante é rara e seu tratamento controverso. Objetivo -- Apresentar a experiência advinda do tratamento de doente com essa condição clínica. Relato do caso - Expõe-se o caso de uma mulher de 71 anos de idade, que há 3 meses fazia uso de anticoagulante oral para tratamento de trombose venosa profunda dos membros inferiores. Apresentou-se com cefaléia e dores abdominais intensas no andar superior do abdome, associadas a náuseas e vômitos. Os exames laboratoriais e de imagem comprovaram o diagnóstico de surto agudo de pancreatite, decorrente de hematoma intramural de duodeno. Os valores de protrombina (49,7 s e o sangramento de tecidos moles cervicais e urinário, sugeriam complicação da terapêutica anticoagulante. Resultados - A terapêutica conservadora foi efetiva, tendo a doente recebido alta, assintomática, no 10º dia de internação. Conclusão - É recomendado o emprego do anticoagulante em doses menores nos doentes de risco e adequado controle dos parâmetros da coagulação. Acredita-se ser ideal a conduta conservadora e recomenda-se a cirurgia somente nos casos que evoluem com complicações.Background - Spontaneous intramural hemorrhage of the duodenum due to anticoagulant therapy is rare and the treatment is controversial. Objective - To present the acquired knowledge with the treatment of these disease. Case report - A 71-year-old women receiving for a 3 month period an anticoagulant therapy presented cervical bleeding of soft tissues and symptoms of acute pancreatitis and high small bowel obstruction. Early noninvasive diagnosis by computed tomographic scan was possible and conservative therapy proved successful in complete resolution of the pancreatitis and obstructive symptoms, with resumption of oral intake in the fourth day of treatment. The frequency of bleeding in high risk patients during warfarin therapy

  18. Advances in Management of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Janisch, Nigeen H; Gardner, Timothy B

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews advances in the management of acute pancreatitis. Medical treatment has been primarily supportive for this diagnosis, and despite extensive research efforts, there are no pharmacologic therapies that improve prognosis. The current mainstay of management, notwithstanding the ongoing debate regarding the volume, fluid type, and rate of administration, is aggressive intravenous fluid resuscitation. Although antibiotics were used consistently for prophylaxis in severe acute pancreatitis to prevent infection, they are no longer used unless infection is documented. Enteral nutrition, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis, is considered a cornerstone in management of this disease. PMID:26895677

  19. Pancreatic microcirculatory impairment in experimental acute pancreatitis in rats

    Zong-Guang Zhou; You-Dai Chen; Wei Sun; Zhong Chen

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the feature of pancreatic microcirculatoryimpairment, especially the initial changes, in caerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis (AP).METHODS: The pancreatic microcirculation of caerulein-induced AP model was studied by intravital fluorescencemicroscopy with FITC-labeled erythrocytes (FITC-RBC),scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts,and light microscopy of Chinese ink-injected/cleared tissues.RESULTS: Animals in caerulein-treated group showedhyperamylemia (× 2), pancreatic oedema, infiltration ofinflammatory cells in pancreas. Constrictions of intralobulararteriolar sphincters, presence of vacuoles in all layers ofsphincter, and gross irregularity in capillary network of aciniwere found in the AP specimens. The decrease of pancreaticcapillary blood flow (0.34±0.10 nl @ min-1 vs0.910.06 nl @rain-1 of control, P<0.001), reduction of functional capillarydensity(277± 13 cm-1 vs349±8 cm-1 of control, P<0.001),and irregular intermittent perfusion were observed incaerulein-induced groups.CONCLUSION: Impairment and constriction of pancreaticintralobular arteriolar sphincter are the initial microcirculatorylesions in the early phase of acute pancreatitis, and play akey role in the pancreatic ischaemia and pancreaticmicrovascular failure in acute pancreatitis.

  20. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: An autoimmune disease?

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2008-01-01

    In this review article,we will briefly describe the main characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and then we will concentrate on our aim,namely,evaluating the clinical characteristics of patients having recurrence of pain from the disease.In fact,the open question is to evaluate the possible presence of autoimmune pancreatitis in patients with an undefined etiology of acute pancreatitis and for this reason we carried out a search in the literature in order to explore this issue.In cases of recurrent attacks of pain in patients with "idiopathic"pancreatitis,we need to keep in mind the possibility that our patients may have autoimmune pancreatitis.Even though the frequency of this disease seems to be quite low,we believe that in the future,by increasing our knowledge on the subject,we will be able to diagnose an ever-increasing number of patients having acute recurrence of pain from autoimmune pancreatitis.

  1. Protease Activation and Inflammation in Acute Pancreatitis

    Regnér, Sara

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 10—20 % of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) develop a severe disease with high mortality and morbidity. Activation of pancreatic proteases, the inflammatory response and impaired pancreatic circulation are pathophysiological events that are important in order for the disease to develop. There is no specific treatment for severe AP, and no useful marker for predicting the severity of the disease upon admission to the hospital. In this thesis, markers of early pathophysio...

  2. Saxagliptin-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Lee, Chien-Feng; Sun, Meng-Shun; Tai, Yen-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    Although dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have been implicated in the development of acute pancreatitis, the causality of this phenomenon is not well established. We herein report the case of an 85-year-old woman who presented with epigastric pain after taking saxagliptin for five months. A high serum lipase level with characteristic computed tomography findings confirmed the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. The patient's symptoms rapidly resolved after admission, although they recurred when she resumed treatment with saxagliptin for 18 days after discharge. In the absence of any identifiable causes of pancreatitis and considering the temporal sequence of events, the saxagliptin therapy was highly suspected to be the triggering factor. Although drug-induced pancreatitis is rare, treatment with DPP-4 inhibitors should be included as a potential etiology of acute pancreatitis. PMID:24930656

  3. Gallium-67 scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    Al-Suhaili, A.R.; Bahar, R.; Nawaz, K.; Higazy, E.; Wafai, I.; Nema, T.A.; Eriksson, S.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.

    1988-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a serious surgical problem with a high incidence of mortality. Both ultrasound and X-ray CT have problems in identifying the extent and severity of the disease and the response to therapy. /sup 67/Ga-citrate has been used in 21 patients with clinically diagnosed acute pancreatitis: 9 patients had X-ray CT and 15 had US examination. Gallium scans were more sensitive than X-ray CT and US in detecting the extent and severity of acute pancreatitis. In addition, gallium was helpful to monitor the response to therapy when the scan was repeated at various intervals in three patients. A subtraction technique using /sup 99m/Tc-tin colloid and /sup 67/Ga-citrate was helpful to mask the liver uptake of gallium and clearly identify the extent of acute pancreatitis.

  4. Acute pancreatitis : CT Grading and its significance

    To assess the prognostic value of computed tomography (CT) in acute pancreatitis, initial CT examinations were classified into 5 grades in terms of the degree of disease severity and CT findings were correlated with clinical course, objective prognostic signs, and complications. In 29 consecutive patients with acute pancreatitis, the CT examination and clinical course were reviewed without knowledge of each other finding. Both Ranson's prognostic signs and modified Glascow prognostic signs were used for evaluation of acute pancreatitis. Of the 29 patients, 25 patients recovered with medical treatment while 4 patients (14%) developed pseudocysts and the other 4 patients (14%) developed abscesses. CT findings of the acute pancreatitis are as follows ; 10 patients (35%) in grade A with normal pancreas, 2 patients (7%) in grade B with pancreatic enlargement, 2 patients (7%) in grade C with intrinsic pancreatic abnormalities associated with haziness, 3 patients (10%) in grade D with single, ill-defined fluid collection, and 12 patients (41%) in grade E with extensive and two or multiple fluid collections or presence of gas in or adjacent to the pancreas. Correlation co-efficient is 0.46 (p=0.012) between CT findings and Ranson's prognostic signs, 462 (p=0.0115) between CT findings and modified Glascow prognostic signs. CT grading of acute pancreatitis may be useful in predicting clinical course

  5. Enteral Nutrition in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Rudra Prasad Doley; Thakur Deen Yadav; Jai Dev Wig; Gurpreet Singh; Kishore Gurumoorthy Subramanya Bharathy; Ashwini Kudari; Rajesh Gupta; Vikas Gupta; Rakesh Kochhar; Kuchhangi Sureshchandra Poornachandra; Usha Dutta; Chetna Vaishnavi

    2009-01-01

    Context There is controversy concerning the merits of enteral and pa renteral nutrition in the manage ment of patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Objective This study was undertaken to evalua te the effect of enteral nutrition versus parenteral nutrition on serum markers of inflammation and outcome in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Setting Tertiary care centre in North India. Design A prospective clinical trial. Metho...

  6. Detection of gall stones after acute pancreatitis.

    Goodman, A J; Neoptolemos, J. P.; Carr-Locke, D L; Finlay, D B; Fossard, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    Four methods of gall stone diagnosis after an attack of acute pancreatitis are analysed. Of 128 consecutive patients with acute pancreatitis, 99 patients were discharged from hospital without a definite aetiology. These patients had biochemical tests performed on admission and ultrasonography and oral cholecystography performed six weeks later. The sensitivity for ultrasonography was 87% and the specificity was 93%; the respective figures for oral cholecystography were 83% and 90%. The predic...

  7. Urinary trypsinogen-2 dipstick in acute pancreatitis

    Andersen, Anders Møller; Novovic, Srdan; Ersbøll, Annette Kjaer;

    2010-01-01

    In acute pancreatitis (AP), rapid diagnosis and early treatment are of importance for clinical outcome. Urinary trypsinogen-2 has been suggested as a promising diagnostic marker; however, studies using the urinary trypsinogen-2 dipstick test (UTDT) have provided varying results.......In acute pancreatitis (AP), rapid diagnosis and early treatment are of importance for clinical outcome. Urinary trypsinogen-2 has been suggested as a promising diagnostic marker; however, studies using the urinary trypsinogen-2 dipstick test (UTDT) have provided varying results....

  8. Protective Effect of Melatonin on Acute Pancreatitis

    Jolanta Jaworek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, a product of the pineal gland, is released from the gut mucosa in response to food ingestion. Specific receptors for melatonin have been detected in many gastrointestinal tissues including the pancreas. Melatonin as well as its precursor, L-tryptophan, attenuates the severity of acute pancreatitis and protects the pancreatic tissue from the damage caused by acute inflammation. The beneficial effect of melatonin on acute pancreatitis, which has been reported in many experimental studies and supported by clinical observations, is related to: (1 enhancement of antioxidant defense of the pancreatic tissue, through direct scavenging of toxic radical oxygen (ROS and nitrogen (RNS species, (2 preservation of the activity of antioxidant enzymes; such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, or glutathione peroxidase (GPx, (3 the decline of pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis α (TNFα production, accompanied by stimulation of an anti-inflammatory IL-10, (4 improvement of pancreatic blood flow and decrease of neutrophil infiltration, (5 reduction of apoptosis and necrosis in the inflamed pancreatic tissue, (6 increased production of chaperon protein (HSP60, and (7 promotion of regenerative process in the pancreas. Conclusion. Endogenous melatonin produced from L-tryptophan could be one of the native mechanisms protecting the pancreas from acute damage and accelerating regeneration of this gland. The beneficial effects of melatonin shown in experimental studies suggest that melatonin ought to be employed in the clinical trials as a supportive therapy in acute pancreatitis and could be used in people at high risk for acute pancreatitis to prevent the development of pancreatic inflammation.

  9. Gallium-67 scintigraphy for acute pancreatitis

    Gallium-67 citrate has been evaluated in six patients diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis based on clinical picture, urine and serum amylase level, Ultrasanography and CT scan findings. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was confirmed by gallium-67 scan in four patients (True positive). One of them showed evidence of acute cholecysitis and pancreatitis. No gallium uptake was detected in the region of pancreas in the other two (True negative). Repeated gallium scan in two of the true positive patients showed decreased gallium concentration in the pancreas in response to medical treatment. The scan became normal in one of these two after four weeks. We conclude that gallium-67 scintigraphy is useful to determine extent and severity of acute pancreatitis and in following the response to medical treatment. Gallium (67Ga) has been under utilised in acute pancreatitis. The aim of the present study is to find the value of gallium-67 scintigraphy in determining the extent and severity of acute pancreatitis at the initial diagnosis and for follow up of medically treated patients. (Author)

  10. Acute pancreatitis and amiodarone: A case report

    Yen-Yuan Chen; Ching-Yu Chen; Kai-Kuen Leung

    2007-01-01

    Amiodarone, a class m antiarrhythmic drug, is one of the most effective drugs used in the treatment of ventricular and paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmia. Adverse effects of amiodarone including pulmonary toxicity, hepatotoxicity, aggravation of arrhythmia, and thyroid diseases are well understood. A 66-year old woman with acute pancreatitis was admitted to our hospital with the complaint of epigastralgia radiating to both flanks for two months. Her symptoms and elevation of pancreatic enzymes did not respond to conventional medical treatment of pancreatitis for 18 d. No known causal factors for pancreatitis such as biliary tract stone, hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol consumption could be identified. Under the suspicion of amiodarone-induced acute pancreatitis, amiodarone was substituted by propafenone. Her symptoms soon alleviated and serum lipase level declined. Three months after hospital discharge, the abdominal pain did not recur. Amiodarone was approved to treat recurrent ventricular fibrillation or sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmia that has been resistant to other medications since 1986. Pancreatitis is a very rare adverse effect associated with the use of amiodarone, and only four cases of amiodarone-induced pancreatitis have been reported in literature. We report a patient who developed acute pancreatitis during amiodarone therapy.

  11. Management of Acute Pancreatitis in Critical Care Unit

    Güniz Meyancı Köksal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is characterized by an inflammation occuring due to digestion of pancreatic self tissues and other organs after activation of digestive enzymes which are stable under normal conditions . For all the pancreatitis cases, the mortality rate is <%15. In the acute pancreatitis cases, the monitorization of the inspiration system, cardiovascular system and the metabolic status are needed. There is no primary therapy for the pancreatitis. All the therapy protocols are support therapy. The basic support therapy methods are: Liquid replacement, respiration support, pain management, pancreas secretion inhibition, metabolic support, intra-abdominal monitoring and decompression, nutrition, antibiotherapy, immunomodulation, coagulation mechanism monitoring. In the acute pancreatitis, the causes of early deaths are pancreatic shock and acute pulmonary thrombohemorrhage, within the first 7 days the causes of the 75% deaths are pulmonary shock and congestion and after 7 days the causes of the 77% are pancreas abscess, MOF (multiple organ failure, purulent peritonitis and erosive hemorrhage. (Journal of the Turkish Society of Intensive Care 2010; 8: 85-9

  12. Colonic Necrosis in a 4-Year-Old with Hyperlipidemic Acute Pancreatitis.

    Patton, Tiffany J; Sentongo, Timothy A; Mak, Grace Z; Kahn, Stacy A

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the case of a 4-year-old male with severe acute pancreatitis due to hyperlipidemia, who presented with abdominal pain, metabolic abnormalities, and colonic necrosis. This colonic complication was secondary to the extension of a large peripancreatic fluid collection causing direct serosal autodigestion by pancreatic enzymes. Two weeks following the initial presentation, the peripancreatic fluid collection developed into a mature pancreatic pseudocyst, which was percutaneously drained. To our knowledge, this is the youngest documented pediatric case of colonic necrosis due to severe pancreatitis and the first descriptive pediatric case of a colonic complication due to hyperlipidemia-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:26925282

  13. Colonic Necrosis in a 4-Year-Old with Hyperlipidemic Acute Pancreatitis

    Tiffany J. Patton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the case of a 4-year-old male with severe acute pancreatitis due to hyperlipidemia, who presented with abdominal pain, metabolic abnormalities, and colonic necrosis. This colonic complication was secondary to the extension of a large peripancreatic fluid collection causing direct serosal autodigestion by pancreatic enzymes. Two weeks following the initial presentation, the peripancreatic fluid collection developed into a mature pancreatic pseudocyst, which was percutaneously drained. To our knowledge, this is the youngest documented pediatric case of colonic necrosis due to severe pancreatitis and the first descriptive pediatric case of a colonic complication due to hyperlipidemia-induced acute pancreatitis.

  14. Acute Pancreatitis Following Doxycycline and Ornidazole Coadministration

    Serkan Ocal

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Drugs are related to the etiology of acute pancreatitis in approximately 1.4-2.0% of cases. Although antibiotics constitute a small number of the drugs suspected, tetracycline is the most encountered antibiotic among those drugs. Case report A 33-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency room complaining of nausea and abdominal pain after the use of doxycycline 500 mg and ornidazole 500 mg twice daily for three days for a vaginal infection. She experienced epigastric pain, which worsened over time and radiated to her back. After a detailed evaluation, she was diagnosed as having mild acute pancreatitis which improved with medical treatment. All other possible causes of pancreatitis were eliminated. Conclusions Antibiotic-associated pancreatitis usually has a silent and mild course. To the best of our knowledge the literature reports only two cases of doxycycline-induced acute pancreatitis reported and there are no reports of pancreatitis associated with ornidazole. Our case is the first case reported in which doxycycline and ornidazole coadministration induced acute pancreatitis.

  15. An Acute Edematous Pancreatitis Case caused by Probably Hypertriglyceridemia: Case Report

    Ayse Demir; Ruhusen Kutlu; Ertugrul Kayacetin

    2010-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is one of the non-biliary, eluding important causes of acute pancreatitis. Currently, there is no standardized protocol to treat these patients. We presented a case with acute edematous pancreatitis caused by hypertriglyceridemia in this case report. The patient, then, complicated with a pseudocyst in the pancreas and bilateral pleural effusion. We aimed to present this case with acute pancreatitis due to the probable hypertriglyceridemia and to show how one can handle th...

  16. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection with Acute Pancreatitis Associated with Cholestatic Hepatitis

    Kang, Seok-Jin; Yoon, Ka-Hyun; Hwang, Jin-Bok

    2013-01-01

    Infection-induced acute hepatitis complicated with acute pancreatitis is associated with hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus or hepatitis E virus. Although rare, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection should be considered also in the differential diagnosis if the patient has acute hepatitis combined with pancreatitis. We report a case of EBV infection with cholestatic hepatitis and pancreatitis with review of literature. An 11-year-old female was admitted due to 1-day history of abdominal pain a...

  17. Inferior phrenic artery pseudoaneurysm complicating drug-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Salem, Jean F; Haydar, Ali; Hallal, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Inferior phrenic artery (IPA) pseudoaneurysm is an extremely rare complication of chronic pancreatitis with only three cases reported in the literature so far. It is a serious condition that can be life-threatening if not diagnosed promptly. Recent advances in endovascular interventions made angiography with embolisation the modality of choice for diagnosis and treatment. We presented the first report of a case of ruptured IPA pseudoaneurysm complicating a drug-induced acute pancreatitis that was successfully treated by transcatheter arterial embolisation. Despite its rarity, rupture of pseudoaneurysm due to drug-induced pancreatitis should be suspected and included in the differential diagnosis when associated with haemodynamic instability. PMID:24385392

  18. Antiproteases in the Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis

    Motoji Kitagawa

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis relates to the inappropriate activation of trypsinogen to trypsin and a lack of the prompt elimination of the active trypsin inside the pancreas. Therefore, trypsin is believed to be the key enzyme in the initiation and exacerbation of acute pancreatitis by activating pancreatic zymogens. The activation of digestive enzymes causes pancreatic injury and results in an inflammatory response. The acute inflammatory response in the pancreas induces the systemic production of cytokines causing substantial tissue damage, and may progress beyond the pancreas to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, multi-organ failure (MOF or death [1]. In several studies, protease inhibitors have not been shown to be of significant value in the treatment of acute pancreatitis and are not available in the United States [2]. Several guidelines [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12] on the treatment of acute pancreatitis do not recommend them and the debate about the use of protease inhibitors is mentioned.

  19. Acute Pancreatitis Caused By Mushroom Poisoning

    Karahan, Samet; Erden, Abdulsamet; Cetinkaya, Ali; Avci, Deniz; Ortakoyluoglu, Adile Irfan; Karagoz, Hatice; Bulut, Kadir; Basak, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Of the more than 5000 species of mushrooms known, 100 types are toxic and approximately 10% of these toxic types can cause fatal toxicity. A type of mushroom called Amanita phalloides is responsible for 95% of toxic mushroom poisonings. In this article, we report 2 cases of mushroom poisonings caused by Lactarius volemus, known as Tirmit by the local people. The patient and his wife were admitted to the emergency room with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting 20 hours after consuming Lactarius volemus, an edible type of mushroom. The patients reported that they had been collecting this mushroom from the mountains and eating them for several years but had never developed any clinicopathology to date. Further examination of the patients revealed a very rare case of acute pancreatitis due to mushroom intoxication. The male patient was admitted to the intensive care unit while his wife was followed in the internal medicine service, because of her relative mild clinical symptoms. Both patients recovered without sequelae and were discharged. In this article, we aimed to emphasize that gastrointestinal symptoms are often observed in mushroom intoxications and can be confused with acute pancreatitis, thus leading to misdiagnosis of patients. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can improve patients’ prognosis and prevent the development of complications. PMID:26835473

  20. Improvements in Care in Acute Pancreatitis by the Adoption of an Acute Pancreatitis Algorithm

    Jack D Bragg

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir, Acute pancreatitis is a serious condition that significantly impacts both patients and the healthcare system. The incidence of acute pancreatitis in the United States has been estimated to be 33-80 per 100,000 per year [1, 2]. From 1985-2005, hospitalizations rates for acute pancreatitis have nearly doubled, although case fatality rates have declined, likely attributed to improved therapeutic options and management [2, 3]. Despite a decrease in mortality, acute pancreatitis significantly impacts healthcare cost, with an estimated cost of acute pancreatitis in 2003 being $2.2 billion, approximately $10,000 per patient [4]. Given the significant impact on patient outcomes and healthcare costs, we, at the University of Missouri Hospital and Clinics in Columbia, examined the issue further.

  1. Dexamethasone mediates protection against acute pancreatitis via upregulation of pancreatitis-associated proteins

    Kandil, Emad; Lin, Yin-yao; Bluth, Martin H; Zhang, Hong; Levi, Gabriel; Zenilman, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To examine the influence of dexamethasone on pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) gene expression using both in vitro and in vivo models of acute pancreatitis and to study how PAP gene expression correlates with severity of pancreatitis.

  2. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Acute Pancreatitis Treatment.

    Francisco García Valdés; Jorge Luis Ulloa Capestany; Reinaldo Jiménez Prendes; Rudis Miguel Monzón Rodríguez; Carlos Jaime Geroy Gómez

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Acute Pancreatitis Treatment. It is the acute inflammatory reaction of the pancreas, affecting a gland that was previously healthy and causes its self-digestion with variable complications of local and distal systems of organs. Its etiological agents, clinical presentation, diagnostic methods and therapy are described. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  3. Bortezomib-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Bouraoui Elouni

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir, Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA and indicated for patients with multiple myeloma refractory to at least one prior therapy [1]. The most common adverse effects of bortezomib include hematological toxicities (especially transient thrombocytopenia, gastrointestinal disturbances, peripheral neuropathy, fatigue, fever, dyspnea, rash, and myalgia [2]. We herein present the first case of acute pancreatitis induced by bortezomib. A 58-year-old female was treated with vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone for a myeloma. She had no history of dyslipidemia or alcohol abuse. In relation to the relapse of the myeloma, two doses of bortezomib (1.3 mg/m2 were administered intravenously at a 4-day time interval. Concomitant medications in our patient included dexamethasone, levothyroxine for hypothyroidism, and paracetamol. Two days later, she presented because of abdominal pain of medium intensity localized in the epigastrium for which she was hospitalized. On admission, the patient had normal vital signs without fever. Abdominal examination revealed only mild epigastric tenderness. There was no rigidity or guarding. There were no palpable abdominal masses. The remainder of the examination was normal. A laboratory work-up showed a normal blood cell count and did not demonstrate hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia or hypercalcemia. A liver test, renal function, serum electrolytes and blood sugars were all normal.

  4. Enteral versus parenteral nutrition in acute pancreatitis.

    Guillou, P J

    1999-07-01

    Conventional wisdom has previously dictated that, in order to avoid stimulation of pancreatic secretion during acute pancreatitis, and thus avoid the perpetuation of the enzymatic activation from which the pancreatitis originated, enteral feeding should be avoided. With greater understanding of the potential role of the gastrointestinal tract in the development of a systemic inflammatory response within a number of scenarios, this dogma has recently been challenged. Moreover, there is some evidence to suggest that starving the gastrointestinal tract and providing nutritional support via the parenteral route may be associated with an increased incidence of septic complications. Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that feeding the gut may diminish intestinal permeability to endotoxin and diminish bacterial translocation, thus reducing the cytokine drive to the generalized inflammatory response and preventing organ dysfunction. Preliminary experience suggests that the institution of jejunal (but not gastric or duodenal) nutrition within 48 hours of the onset of severe acute pancreatitis diminishes endotoxic exposure, diminishes the cytokine and systemic inflammatory responses, avoids antioxidant consumption and does not cause the radiological appearances of the pancreas to deteriorate. These observations are paralleled by improvements in clinical outcome measures such as intensive care unit stay, septic complications and mortality. Whist parenteral nutrition continues to have a role in the management of acute pancreatitis particularly when complicated by fistulae or prolonged ileus, the early introduction of jejunal nutrition merits further investigation in acute pancreatitis. PMID:11030611

  5. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of 99/sup m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of 99/sup m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained in 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis

  6. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained on 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis

  7. Mild acute pancreatitis with vildagliptin use

    Ravikant Saraogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vildagliptin has not been associated with the development of acute pancreatitis in postmarketing reports except one case report from Sydney, Australia. We present the case report of 42 year old male, diabetic, with no historyof alcohol use, on vildagliptin 50 mg and metformin 500 mg daily since 6 months, who presented with severe abdominal pain radiating to back, nausea and fever. On evaluation, serum pancreatic enzymes were elevated, triglycerides were not raised and ultrasound showed swollen and echogenic pancreas, loss of peripancreatic fat plane and pancreatic duct was not dilated. Vildagliptin was stopped and the pancreatits resolved. On Follow up, no secondary cause was not identified. This appears to be the first reported case of acute pancreatitis from India probably attributable to use of vildagliptin, thus raising the possibility that this rare reaction may be a class effect of the DPP-4 inhibitors.

  8. Mild acute pancreatitis with vildagliptin use

    Ravikant Saraogi; Ritwika Mallik; Sujoy Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Vildagliptin has not been associated with the development of acute pancreatitis in postmarketing reports except one case report from Sydney, Australia. We present the case report of 42 year old male, diabetic, with no historyof alcohol use, on vildagliptin 50 mg and metformin 500 mg daily since 6 months, who presented with severe abdominal pain radiating to back, nausea and fever. On evaluation, serum pancreatic enzymes were elevated, triglycerides were not raised and ultrasound showed swolle...

  9. Dengue Fever Presenting as Acute Pancreatitis

    Prasad Seetharam; Gabriel Rodrigues

    2010-01-01

    A 56-year-old non-alcoholic male was admitted with complaints of severe abdominal pain and was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis after blood investigations and a computed tomography scan of the abdomen. He developed a high-grade fever on the third day of admission, and serology tested positive for dengue. Treatment for dengue was instituted, leading to a good response and complete resolution of pancreatitis. The patient has been doing well and has had no recurrence of pancreatitis at the end ...

  10. THE DIAGNOSIS OF ACUTE GALLSTONE PANCREATITIS

    Elena Gologan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute gallstone pancreatitis is a severe form of pancreatitis caused by an ampullary blocked gallstone. The clinical course combines elements of severe pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice with angiocolitis. Complications are very frequent in the absence of spontaneous, interventional or surgical desobstruction. The diagnosis is based upon clinical features, biochemical paramethers with cholestasis, hyperamilasemia, hyperamilasuria, hyperlipasemia, metabolic disorders. Imagistic assay is undoubtful necessary for the diagnosis; it allows identifying most of the complications, and some of these investigations are very useful in the desobstruction procedures, done at proper moment.

  11. STUDY ANALYSIS OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS BY CT

    Bulabai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Study analysis of pancreatitis by computed tomography in terms of morphology of pancreas in acute pancreatitis, complications of pancreatitis and duration of hospital stay by grading the severity of disease using Modified CT severity index. MATERIAL AND METHOD: This prospective study of 100 patients suspected of pancreatitis was evaluated with multidetector spiral CT scanner, somatom, (Spirit Siemens at Tertiary care center, for period of one year. The series consists of patients of pancreatitis which were clinically diagnosed and sent directly for CT examination and in the patients in whom abdominal ultrasound examination was suggestive of pancreatitis. Water with iodinated contrast is used as oral contrast so as to distend the stomach and small bowel followed by IV contrast study. All images were viewed at window width-300, window level-40 with a wide and narrow window setting as necessary. RESULT ANALYSIS: Acute Pancreatitis was more common in males than females with alcohol consumption was the commonest etiological factor in 79.5%. In contrary biliary pathology was the commonest factor in females of 41.6%. Among the 100 cases 41 patients (41% developed complications. CONCLUSION: We had documented a statistically significant correlation between the numeric score obtained with the Modified CT Severity index and the presence of infection, the need for surgery and percutaneous interventions, and the length of the hospital stay. Finally the modified CTSI closely indicates with patient outcome in all study parameters, especially with the length of the hospital stay and the development of organ failure.

  12. Acute pancreatitis induced by methimazole therapy.

    Abraham, Albin; Raghavan, Pooja; Patel, Rajshree; Rajan, Dhyan; Singh, Jaspreet; Mustacchia, Paul

    2012-05-01

    Among the causative factors for acute pancreatitis, adverse drug reactions are considered to be rare. The diagnosis of drug-induced pancreatitis (DIP) is challenging to establish, and is often underestimated because of the difficulties in determining the causative agent and the need for a retrospective re-evaluation of the suspected agent. We present the case of an 80-year-old woman who presented with complaints of abdominal pain. Her medications included methimazole (MMI) which she had been on for the past 3 months. Computed tomography of her abdomen showed peripancreatic fat stranding with trace amount of surrounding fluid, along with amylase and lipase levels suggestive of acute pancreatitis. In the absence of classical risk factors for acute pancreatitis, a diagnosis of DIP secondary to MMI use was made. Withdrawal of the drug from her medication regimen was accompanied by relief of symptoms and resolution of clinical evidence of pancreatitis. The aim of this paper is to report only the fourth case of MMI-induced pancreatitis in the published literature, and to illustrate the significance of an appropriate and timely diagnosis of DIP. PMID:22679409

  13. Genetic and immunologic aspects of acute pancreatitis : An odyssey

    Nijmeijer, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the leading cause of acute hospitalization for gastrointestinal diseases. The course of acute pancreatitis is often mild and self-limiting, but in 15-25% of patients, pancreatitis is severe with an increased mortality risk. Infectious complications, and especially bacterial inf

  14. Secondary pancreatic involvement by a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis

    M Wasif Saif; Sapna Khubchandani; Marek Walczak

    2007-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. More than 50% of patients have some site of extra-nodal involvement at diagnosis,including the gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow.However, a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis is rare. A 57-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and matted lymph nodes in her axilla. She was admitted with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan showed diffusely enlarged pancreas due to infiltrative neoplasm and peripancreatic lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of the axillary mass revealed a large B-cell lymphoma.The patient was classified as stage Ⅳ, based on the Ann Arbor Classification, and as having a high-risk lymphoma,based on the International Prognostic Index. She was started on chemotherapy with CHOP (cyclophosphamide,doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone). Within a week after chemotherapy, the patient's abdominal pain resolved. Follow-up CT scan of the abdomen revealed a marked decrease in the size of the pancreas and peripancreatic lymphadenopathy. A literature search revealed only seven cases of primary involvement of the pancreas in B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis. However, only one case of secondary pancreatic involvement by B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis has been published. Our case appears to be the second report of such a manifestation.Both cases responded well to chemotherapy.

  15. Role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in acute pancreatitis

    Canlas, Karen R; Malcolm S. Branch

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a useful tool in the evaluation and management of acute pancreatitis. This review will focus on the role of ERCP in specific causes of acute pancreatitis, including microlithiasis and gallstone disease, pancreas divisum, Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, tumors of the pancreaticobiliary tract, pancreatic pseudocysts, and pancreatic duct injury. Indications for endoscopic techniques such as biliary and pancreatic sphincterotomy, stenting, s...

  16. Serine proteases mediate inflammatory pain in acute pancreatitis

    Ceppa, Eugene P; Lyo, Victoria; Grady, Eileen F.; Knecht, Wolfgang; Grahn, Sarah; Peterson, Anders; Nigel W. Bunnett; Kirkwood, Kimberly S.; Cattaruzza, Fiore

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a life-threatening inflammatory disease characterized by abdominal pain of unknown etiology. Trypsin, a key mediator of pancreatitis, causes inflammation and pain by activating protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), but the isoforms of trypsin that cause pancreatitis and pancreatic pain are unknown. We hypothesized that human trypsin IV and rat P23, which activate PAR2 and are resistant to pancreatic trypsin inhibitors, contribute to pancreatic inflammation and pain. Inje...

  17. Pathogenesis of pancreatic encephalopathy in severe acute pancreatitis

    Xi-Ping Zhang; Hua Tian

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreatic encephalopathy (PE) is a serious complication of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). In recent years, more and more PE cases have been reported worldwide, and the onset PE in the early stage was regarded as a poor prognosis sign of SAP, but the pathogenesis of PE in SAP still has not been clariifed in the past decade. The purpose of this review is to elucidate the possible pathogenesis of PE in SAP. DATA SOURCES:The English-language literature concern-ing PE in this review came from the Database of MEDLINE (period of 1991-2005), and the keywords of severe acute pancreatitis and pancreatic encephalopathy were used in the searching. RESULTS:Many factors were involved in the pathogenesis of PE in SAP. Pancreatin activation, excessive release of cytokines and oxygen free radicals, microcirculation abnormalities of hemodynamic disturbance, ET-1/NO ratio, hypoxemia, bacterial infection, water and electrolyte imbalance, and vitamin B1 deifciency participated in the development of PE in SAP. CONCLUSIONS:The pathogenesis of PE in SAP has not yet been fully understood. The development of PE in SAP may be a multi-factor process. To ifnd out the possible inducing factor is essential to the clinical management of PE in SAP.

  18. Case of severe acute pancreatitis with near total pancreatic necrosis diagnosed by dynamic CT scanning

    Takeda, Kazunori; Kakugawa, Yoichiro; Amikura, Katsumi; Miyagawa, Kikuo; Matsuno, Seiki; Sato, Toshio

    1987-09-01

    A 42 year-old woman with severe acute pancreatitis had drainage of the pancreatic bed, cholecystostomy and jejunostomy on admission, but symptoms were not improved. Fourteen days after admission, clinical sepsis and septisemia were recognized. Dynamic CT scanning of the pancreas showed near total pancreatic necrosis. Symptoms were improved after necrosectomy of the pancreas and debridement of the peripancreatic necrotic tissue were performed. Our experience suggests the usefulness of dynamic CT scanning for detection of pancreatic necrosis in severe acute pancreatitis.

  19. Acute Pancreatitis with Normal Serum Lipase: A Case Series

    Anish M Shah

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Acute pancreatitis is diagnosed on the basis of clinical features, biochemical tests and imaging studies. Normal serum amylase level has been reported in the setting of acute pancreatitis but normal serum lipase level in acute pancreatitis is extremely rare. Case report Herein, we present a case series of acute pancreatitis with normal serum lipase levels along with a review of the topic. Conclusion In appropriate clinical setting, the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis should be entertained even with normal serum amylase and lipase levels.

  20. Infarto esplénico secundario a pancreatitis aguda Splenic infarction secondary to acute pancreatitis

    J. J. Arenal Vera

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento y objetivo: la estrecha relación anatómica del páncreas con los vasos esplénicos y el bazo es responsable de complicaciones esplénicas en el curso de la pancreatitis aguda. El objetivo es presentar dos casos clínicos de pancreatitis aguda grave que sufrieron infarto esplénico como complicación de la enfermedad pancreática. Pacientes, participantes: en un periodo de tres meses, dos pacientes fueron diagnosticados de infarto esplénico secundario a pancreatitis aguda. En ambos casos el diagnóstico y seguimiento evolutivo del infarto esplénico se hizo a través de tomografía axial computerizada. Resultados: en el primer paciente, las imágenes muestran de forma inequívoca la afectación de la arteria esplénica por el proceso inflamatorio pancreático. En el segundo, no se pudo demostrar afectación de los vasos esplénicos, por lo que la única posible explicación etiológica es un incremento de coagulabilidad intravascular. Conclusiones: sería recomendable añadir las complicaciones esplénicas al conjunto de complicaciones graves extrapancreáticas de la pancreatitis aguda. La tomografía axial computerizada es de gran utilidad para la detección y seguimiento de las complicaciones esplénicas de la pancreatitis aguda.Background and objective: the close anatomic relationship of the pancreas with the splenic vessels and the spleen is responsible for splenic complications in the course of acute pancreatitis. Our objective was to report two cases of severe acute pancreatitis complicated by splenic infarction. Patients: in a three-month period of time two patients were diagnosed with splenic infarction secondary to acute pancreatitis. In both cases splenic infarction diagnosis and follow-up were carried out using computed tomography. Results: in the first case images clearly showed a narrowing of the splenic artery due to the inflammatory pancreatic condition. In the second case no involvement of the splenic vessels could

  1. Acute Pancreatitis Classifications: Basis and Key Goals.

    Xu, Xiao Dong; Wang, Zhe Yuan; Zhang, Ling Yi; Ni, Rui; Wei, Feng Xian; Han, Wei; Zhang, Hui Han; Zhang, Ya Wu; Wei, Zhen Gang; Guo, Xiao Hu; Guo, Liu Qiang; Ma, Jian Zhong; Zhang, You Cheng

    2015-12-01

    To explore the efficacy of the revised Atlanta classification (RACAP) and the determinant-based classification of acute pancreatitis severity (DBCAPS) on the basis of clinical data and feedback from patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). The authors retrospectively investigated a total of 573 patients with AP admitted to our hospital between December 2011 and December 2014. The definitions of severity and local complications in AP using RACAP and DBCAPS are presented and common points and mutual differences between the 2 groups are analyzed and discussed. Classification according to RACAP and DBCAPS found 86 (15%) and 178 (31.1%) mild cases (P peripancreatic fluid collection (236 patients, 75.40%), pancreatic pseudocysts (20 patients, 6.4%), acute necrotic collection (42 patients, 13.4%), and walled-off necrosis (15 patients, 4.8%) were observed. Among the 153 DBCAPS-defined cases, sterile peripancreatic necrosis (105 patients, 68.6%), sterile pancreatic necrosis (44 patients, 28.8%), infected peripancreatic necrosis (2 patients, 1.3%), and infected pancreatic necrosis (2/153 patients, 1.3%) were observed. Both classifications adopted organ failure and complications as determinants of severity. Revised Atlanta classification refined local complications and DBCAPS modified severity to include critical AP. In accordance with the demands of precision medicine, a combination of the 2 could be important for further clinical practice and scientific research. PMID:26632905

  2. Radiological appearances of acute pancreatitis in children

    15 cases of acute pancreatitis presented to the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street, London and the Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital over a 5-year period. The aim of the study was to assess the role of radiology in the diagnosis and management of pancreatitis in children. The radiological findings are varied. Plain abdominal films may be normal or show a localised ileus arousing the suspicion of pancreatitis. Ultrasound was useful, not only in the intial diagnosis, but in the follow-up and detection of complications. CT was valuable in defining collections particularly in the retroperitoneum. ERCP is increasingly being used in both centres to exclude an underlying biliary or pancreatic abnormality. (author). 12 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 tab

  3. Endoscopic therapy in acute recurrent pancreatitis

    John Baillie

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has evolved from a largely diagnostic to a largely therapeutic rnodality.Cross-sectional imaging,such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),and less invasive endoscopy,especially endoscopic ultrasound (EUS),have largely taken over from ERCP for diagnosis.However,ERCP remains the"first line" therapeutic tool in the management of mechanical causes of acute recurrent pancreatitis,including bile duct stones(choledocholithiasis),ampullary masses (benign and malignant),congenital variants of biliary and pancreatic anatomy (e.g.pancreas divisum,choledochoceles),sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD),pancreatic stones and strictures,and parasitic disorders involving the biliary tree and/or pancreatic duct(e.g Ascariasis,Clonorchiasis).

  4. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Presented as Acute Pancreatitis. Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Abdulzahra Hussain

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Small cell carcinoma of the lung is an aggressive cancer with gloomy prognosis. Links to acute pancreatitis is extremely rare. Case report We are reporting a 53-year-old patient who was admitted because of acute pancreatitis. She had no history of gallstones, alcohol abuse, medications or any other predisposition for acute pancreatitis. Further investigations of blood, CT of chest abdomen and neck and ultrasound scan of abdomen, bone marrow and neck lymph node biopsies confirmed advanced small cell carcinoma of the lung with hypercalcemia, which was the only definite cause of acute pancreatitis. The patient made good recovery from pancreatitis after controlling the hypercalcemia. She was referred to respiratory team for further management of lung cancer. Conclusion Acute pancreatitis due to hypercalcemia of advanced small cell carcinoma of the lung is an extremely rare condition. Acute pancreatitis due to hypercalcemia should be thoroughly investigated to exclude serious pathology as in our case.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis: The Pancreatogram

    Gosset J

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Acute pancreatitis has been reported in many cases after therapeutic ERCP. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 65 year man old who, after ERCP, manifested biologically acute pancreatitis. The patient was observed using dynamic MR pancreatography with secretin administration before and after the ERCP. The dynamic MR pancreatography prominently displays a radiological sign of early chronic pancreatitis: the pancreatogram. CONCLUSION: Our case demonstrates a new sign of biologically acute pancreatitis in dynamic MR pancreatography: the pancreatogram.

  6. Genetic and immunologic aspects of acute pancreatitis : An odyssey

    Nijmeijer, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the leading cause of acute hospitalization for gastrointestinal diseases. The course of acute pancreatitis is often mild and self-limiting, but in 15-25% of patients, pancreatitis is severe with an increased mortality risk. Infectious complications, and especially bacterial infection of pancreatic necrosis, are commonly accepted as the major cause of death for patients with this disease. The aim of the research described in this thesis was to gain more insight in some of...

  7. Acute Pancreatitis. Studies on smoking and protease activation.

    Lindkvist, Björn

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: Activation of pancreatic proteases is considered to be a crucial event in the early phase of acute pancreatitis but the cause of this activation is not known. Most cases of acute pancreatitis can be attributed to either gallstone disease or alcohol abuse. However, little is known about other risk factors. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the mechanisms involved in the initiation of acute pancreatitis, trends in the incidence, and risk factors for the disease. The ...

  8. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis as fi rst manifestation of primary hyperparathyroidism

    Jeroen; I; Lenz; Jimmy; M; Jacobs; Bart; Op; de; Beeck; Ivan; A; Huyghe; Paul; A; Pelckmans; Tom; G; Moreels

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a female patient with severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis associated with hypercalcemia as first manifestation of primary hyperparathyroidism caused by a benign parathyroid adenoma.Initially the acute pancreatitis was treated conservatively.The patient subsequently underwent surgical resection of the parathyroid adenoma and surgical clearance of a large infected pancreatic pseudocyst.Although the association of parathyroid adenoma-induced hypercalcemia and acute pancreatitis is a kno...

  9. Pancreatic Perfusion CT in Early Stage of Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Yoshihisa Tsuji; Naoki Takahashi; Chiba Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Early intensive care for severe acute pancreatitis is essential for improving SAP mortality rates. However, intensive therapies for SAP are often delayed because there is no ideal way to accurately evaluate severity in the early stages. Currently, perfusion CT has been shown useful to predict prognosis of SAP in the early stage. In this presented paper, we would like to review the clinical usefulness and limitations of perfusion CT for evaluation of local and systemic complications in early s...

  10. Prognostic value of CT in acute pancreatitis

    The presence and degree of pancreatic necrosis and peripancreatic phlegmon were evaluated by dynamic, bolus-contrast-enhanced CT in 88 patients with acute pancreatitis and were correlated with clinical evaluation; morbidity (infection, pseudocyst); and mortality. Patients with necrosis had a 23% mortality and 82% morbidity, compared with 0% mortality and 6% morbidity in patients without necrosis. Patients with peripancreatic phlegmons and necrosis had a 26% mortality and 84% morbidity compared with 0% mortality and 22% morbidity in individuals with phlegmons but without necrosis. In this study, the CT severity index, which combines necrosis and peripancreatic phlegmon into a grading system at the initial CT examination, was a good prognostic indicator of severity of acute pancreatitis

  11. Development of acute pancreatitis after Nissen fundoplication.

    Inoue, Mikihiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Otake, Kohei; Okigami, Masato; Maji, Tomoaki; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis subsequent to Nissen fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an extremely rare adverse event. We describe a pediatric case of acute pancreatitis resulting from superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) and gas bloat after fundoplication. Gas bloat is one of the known postoperative complications after Nissen fundoplication. Poor nutrition status, which is often associated with severe pediatric GERD, is a risk factor for SMAS. In this case, development of gas bloat and SMAS led to the formation of a closed loop and increased intraluminal pressure of the duodenum and pancreatic duct. Many pediatric patients who need anti-reflux surgery face the risk of developing this entity. Preventive measures, such as treatment with prokinetics and frequent small-volume meals, should be considered until improvement of nutritional status after fundoplication. PMID:25868962

  12. Impaired glucose tolerance in acute pancreatitis

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory disease of the exocrine pancreas. In spite of the pivotal role of the endocrine pancreas in glucose metabolism, the impact of impaired glucose tolerance on AP has not been fully elucidated. A meta-analysis of seven observational studies showed that type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) was associated with an increased risk of AP. The increased risk of AP shown in the meta-analysis was independent of hyperlipidemia, alcohol use and gallstones. Anti-diab...

  13. Bilateral spontaneous adrenal haemorrhage complicating acute pancreatitis

    Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage is an event that mandates prompt diagnosis and treatment to prevent primary adrenocortical insufficiency and potential death. Presentation can be non-specific and incidentally diagnosed with imaging alone, primarily CT. We present a case of acute pancreatitis with spontaneous bilateral adrenal haemorrhage and briefly discuss imaging and treatment implications

  14. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and other current concepts in the radiological assessment of acute pancreatitis*

    Cunha, Elen Freitas de Cerqueira; Rocha, Manoel de Souza; Pereira, Fábio Payão; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition caused by intracellular activation and extravasation of inappropriate proteolytic enzymes determining destruction of pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissues. This is a fairly common clinical condition with two main presentations, namely, endematous pancreatitis - a less severe presentation -, and necrotizing pancreatitis - the most severe presentation that affects a significant part of patients. The radiological evaluation, particularly...

  15. Improving the Outcome of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Bruno, Marco J

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is the most common indication for hospital admission and its incidence is rising. It has a variable prognosis, which is mainly dependent upon the development of persistent organ failure and infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In the past few years, based on large-scale multicenter randomized trials, some novel insights regarding clinical management have emerged. In patients with infected pancreatic necrosis, a step-up approach of percutaneous catheter drainage followed by necrosectomy only when the patient does not improve, reduces new-onset organ failure and prevents the need for necrosectomy in about a third of patients. A randomized pilot study comparing surgical to endoscopic necrosectomy in patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis showed a striking reduction of the pro-inflammatory response following endoscopic necrosectomy. These promising results have recently been tested in a large multicenter randomized trial whose results are eagerly awaited. Contrary to earlier data from uncontrolled studies, a large multicenter randomized trial comparing early (within 24 h) nasoenteric tube feeding compared with an oral diet after 72 h, did not show that early nasoenteric tube feeding was superior in reducing the rate of infection or death in patients with AP at high risk for complications. Although early ERCP does not have a role in the treatment of predicted mild pancreatitis, except in the case of concomitant cholangitis, it may ameliorate the disease course in patients with predicted severe pancreatitis. Currently, a large-scale randomized study is underway and results are expected in 2017. PMID:27336312

  16. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts: A case report

    Jang, Yong Suk; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Chan Sub; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck [Kwandong Univ., Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Pancreatic panniculitis is an inflammation and necrosis of fat at distant foci in patients with pancreatic disorders, most frequently, pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Clinically, pancreatic panniculitis is manifested by painless or painful subcutaneous nodules on the legs, buttocks, or trunk. The usual sites are the distal parts of the lower extremities. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been many reports for the radiologic findings of pancreatic panniculitis. In this article, we report a case of pancreatic panniculitis, including radiologic findings of CT and ultrasonography. The patient was presented with painful subcutaneous nodules on the trunk, and had underlying acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts.

  17. Cardiocirculatory pathophysiological mechanisms in severe acute pancreatitis

    Mónica; García; José; Julián; Calvo

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and potentially lethal acute inflammatory process. Although the majority of patients have a mild episode of AP, 10%-20% develop a severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and suffer systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and/or pancreatic necrosis. The main aim of this article is to review the set of events, f irst localized in the pancreas, that lead to pancreatic inflammation and to the spread to other organs contributing to multiorganic shock. The early pathogenic mechanisms in SAP are not completely understood but both premature activation of enzymes inside the pancreas, related to an impaired cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis, as well as release of pancreatic enzymes into the bloodstream are considered important events in the onset of pancreatitis disease. Moreover, afferent f ibers within the pancreas release neurotransmitters in response to tissue damage. The vasodilator effects of these neurotransmitters and the activation of pro-inflammatory substances play a crucial role in amplifying the inflammatory response, which leads to systemic manifestation of AP. Damage extension to other organs leads to SIRS, which is usually associated with cardiocirculatoryphysiology impairment and a hypotensive state. Hypotension is a risk factor for death and is associated with a signif icant hyporesponsiveness to vasoconstrictors. This indicates that stabilization of the patient, once this pathological situation has been established, would be a very diff icult task. Therefore, it seems particularly necessary to understand the pathological mechanisms involved in the f irst phases of AP to avoid damage beyond the pancreas. Moreover, efforts must also be directed to identify those patients who are at risk of developing SAP.

  18. Crohn's Disease and Acute Pancreatitis: A Review of Literature

    Sarfaraz Jasdanwala; Mark Babyatsky

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease, a transmural inflammatory bowel disease, has many well-known extra-intestinal manifestations and complications. Although acute pancreatitis has a higher incidence in patients with Crohn's disease as compared to the general population, acute pancreatitis is still relatively uncommon in patients with Crohn's disease. Patients with Crohn's disease are at an approximately fourfold higher risk than the general population to develop acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute ...

  19. [A case of chronic hepatitis C with pancreas divisum and acute pancreatitis during combination treatment with telaprevir/peginterferon/ribavirin].

    Morio, Reona; Imamura, Michio; Fukuhara, Takayuki; Kan, Hiromi; Fujino, Hatsue; Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Hiramatsu, Akira; Aikata, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Tamito; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2014-10-01

    A 47-year-old man developed acute pancreatitis during combination treatment with telaprevir/peginterferon/ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Cessation of telaprevir, fasting, and gabexate mesilate improved the pancreatitis. Although peginterferon and ribavirin treatment was continued, there was no recurrence of the pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography incidentally showed a pancreas divisum. We definitively diagnosed drug-induced acute pancreatitis due to telaprevir. PMID:25283229

  20. Exocrine pancreatic function during the early recovery phase of acute pancreatitis

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Patrizia Simoni; Riccardo Casadei; Antonio M. Morselli-Labate

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exocrine pancreatic dysfunction has been reported in humans in the convalescent period after acute pancreatitis, but the data are scarce and conlficting. This study aimed to prospectively assess the exocrine pancreatic function in patients with acute pancreatitis at the time of their refeeding. METHODS: Fecal elastase-1 was determined on the day of refeeding in all consecutive acute pancreatitis patients with their ifrst episode of the disease. They were 75 patients including 60 (80.0%) patients with mild acute pancreatitis and 15 (20.0%) patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Etiologically 61 patients (81.3%) had biliary disease, 1 (1.3%) had alcoholic disease and 3 (4.0%) had hypertriglyceridemia. No causes of acute pancreatitis were found in the remaining 10 patients (13.3%). The mean (±SD) refeeding time after the attack of acute panereatitis was 11.2±10.2 days. RESULTS: Pathological values of FE-1 were found in 9 of the 75 patients (12.0%): 7 (9.3%) patients with mild pancreatitis and 2 (2.7%) patients with severe pancreatitis (P=1.000). The frequency of the pathological values of fecal elastase-1 was signiifcantly different from that of various etiologies of the disease (P=0.030). It was signiifcantly lower in patients with biliary pancreatitis (9.8%;P=0.035) than in one patient with alcoholic pancreatitis (P=0.126), one patient with hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis (33.3%;P=0.708), and one patient with idiopathic pancreatitis (10.0%;P=0.227). Pathological fecal elastase-1 was not signiifcantly related to sex, age or day of refeeding.CONCLUSION: Exocrine pancreatic function should be routinely assessed in patients with acute pancreatitis at the time of refeeding in order to supplement their diet with pancreatic extracts.

  1. Acute pancreatitis: diagnostic value of ultrasonography and computed tomography

    Blery, M.; Hautefeuille, P.; Jacquenod, P. and others

    1987-09-01

    The value of ultrasonography and computed tomography for the diagnosis, extension, pronostic, complications and etiology of acute pancreatitis is discussed. Ultrasonography and computed tomography guided interventional radiology techniques are valuable in the management of pancreatitis complications such as abscesses.

  2. Acute pancreatitis: diagnostic value of ultrasonography and computed tomography

    The value of ultrasonography and computed tomography for the diagnosis, extension, pronostic, complications and etiology of acute pancreatitis is discussed. Ultrasonography and computed tomography guided interventional radiology techniques are valuable in the management of pancreatitis complications such as abscesses

  3. Acute pancreatitis : complication of chicken pox in an immunocompetent host.

    Roy, Pinaki; Maity, Pranab; Basu, Arindam; Dey, Somitra; Das, Biman; Ghosh, U S

    2012-12-01

    Chicken pox is a benign self limited disease. But it may rarely be complicated with acute pancreatitis in otherwise healthy patient. We present a case of varicella pancreatitis and its marked recovery with acyclovir. PMID:23781673

  4. Role of oxygen free radicals in patients with acute pancreatitis

    Park, Byung Kyu; Chung, Jae Bock; Lee, Jin Heon; Suh, Jeong Hun; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Kim, Hyeyoung; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kang, Jin Kyung

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The generation of oxygen free radicals has been implicated in the pathogenesis of experimental pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to determine the role of oxygen free radicals in patients with acute pancreatitis.

  5. NECESSITY TO REVIEW ATLANTA CLASSIFICATION OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    V. Păunescu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The universal credit of the acute pancreatitis description goes to Reginald Fitz Huber, who in 1889 classified acute pancreatitis in: hemorrhagic, gangrenous and suppurative, following surgical and autopsy findings. Over time were used different criteria for classification of acute pancreatitis. Classification of acute pancreatitis in 1992 in Atlanta introduced a uniform system for assessing clinical severity and various complications of the disease, widely accepted classification. In this classification, acute pancreatitis is presented in two forms: mild and severe. Mild pancreatitis is associated with minimal dysfunction of organs and, eventually, it heals. Severe form is associated with organ failure and/or local complications, such as necrosis, abscess and pseudocyst. The increase of knowledge of pathophysiology in acute pancreatitis, the introduction of advanced diagnostic and treatment means showed that some definitions have created confusion and made absolutely necessary the revision of Atlanta classification. The review includes criteria for assessing the severity and description of local complications. The revised classification of acute pancreatitis in 2012 identifies in the dynamic evolution of the disease, early stage and late stage, and classifies severity as: mild, moderate and severe, based on the presence or absence of multiple organ failure and local complications in the two forms of acute pancreatitis: interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis. Local complications are: acute peripancreatic fluid complications, pancreatic pseudocyst, acute necrotic collections and wall formed necrosis. CONCLUSION: This review demonstrates that revised Atlanta classification is an useful tool for the management of acute pancreatitis and will allow to decrease the morbidity and mortality of severe pancreatitis.

  6. Panniculitis – A Rare Manifestation of Acute Pancreatitis

    Zélia Neves; Úrsula Segura; André Valente; M. Helena Pacheco; José Malhado

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare skin disorder that occurs in 2–3% of pancreatic diseases, mostly associated with acute or chronic pancreatitis. Its pathophysiology is still unclear, but the release of pancreatic enzymes in circulation can be responsible for this disorder. The typical histological features are adipocyte necrosis with neutrophils infiltrate and typical “ghost cells”. Its treatment, clinical course and prognosis are usually related with the pancreatic disease. We present a ...

  7. Acute pancreatitis : a newly recognised potential complication of canine babesiosis

    A.J. Möhr; Lobetti, R. G.; J.J. Van der Lugt

    2000-01-01

    This retrospective study describes 4 cases of canine babesiosis with histologically confirmed acute pancreatitis. In addition, 16 dogs with babesiosis are reported with serum amylase (>3500 U/l ) and/or lipase (>650 U/l ) activity elevations of a magnitude that would support a diagnosis of probable acute pancreatitis, although extra-pancreatic sources of the enzymes could not be excluded in these cases. Median time of pancreatitis diagnosis was 2.5 days post-admission, with primarily yo...

  8. Comparison of biohumoral and morphological parameters in acute pancreatitis

    Tasić Tomislav; Grgov Saša; Nagorni Aleksandar; Benedeto-Stojanov Danijela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Acute pancreatitis occurs as a result of autodigestive activation of pancreatic proenzymes, within the parenchyma of the glands. Objective. The goal of the work was to establish possible connection of etiology and severity of the acute pancreatitis and biohumoral parameters, ultrasound and CT. Methods. The study included 273 patients with pancreatitis, classified by Ranson’s score, according to degree of severity and etiology, whose biohumoral...

  9. Acute Pancreatitis Associated with Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Pancreas

    José Jukemura; André Luis Montagnini; José Luiz Jesus de Almeida; Joaquim José Gama Rodrigues; José Eduardo Monteiro da Cunha; Marcos Vinícius Perini

    2006-01-01

    Context :Endocrine tumors are a less commonly known cause of acute pancreatitis. This report presents the case of a patient who have had acute pancreatitis secondary to a pancreatic endocrine neoplasm. The majority of the cases previously reported were nonfunctioning tumors and the pancreatitis tended to be mild. Moreover, the majority of the tumors were diagnosed in advanced stages, hindering curative treatment. Case report: A 31-year-old female patient presented with epigastric pain and a ...

  10. Acute pancreatitis complicated with splenic rupture: A case report

    Bruno; L; Hernani; Pedro; C; Silva; Ricardo; T; Nishio; Henrique; C; Mateus; José; C; Assef; Tercio; De; Campos

    2015-01-01

    Atraumatic splenic rupture is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis. This report describes the case of a 30-year-old man with acute pancreatitis and splenic vein thrombosis complicated by splenic rupture. The patient was admitted to the emergency department with pain in the upper abdomen that had been present for six hours and was associated with vomiting and sweating. He was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis of alcoholic etiology. Upon computed tomography(CT) of the abdomen, the pancreatitis was scored as Balthazar C grade, and a suspicious area of necrosis affecting 30% of the pancreas with splenic vein thrombosis was revealed. Seventytwo hours after admission, the patient had significant improvement in symptoms. However, he showed clinical worsening on the sixth day of hospitalization, with increasing abdominal distension and reduced hemoglobin levels. A CT angiography showed a large amount of free fluid in the abdominal cavity, along with a large splenic hematoma and contrast extravasation along the spleen artery. The patient subsequently underwent laparotomy, which showed hemoperitoneum due to rupture of the splenic parenchyma. A splenectomy was then performed, followed by ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage.

  11. Hereditary Angioedema Presenting as Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis.

    Berger, Tal D; Garty, Ben-Zion

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) may manifest with swelling of the face, extremities, and upper airways. Gastrointestinal symptoms are also common and may include abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea. However, pancreatic involvement is rare and has been reported only in a few adults with previously diagnosed HAE. We describe a 6-year-old boy who presented with recurrent severe abdominal pain accompanied by an elevation in pancreatic enzyme levels, without subcutaneous or cutaneous angioedema. His symptoms had begun 18 months earlier, and he was hospitalized several times before the present admission with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. More comprehensive analysis yielded low levels of C2, C4, CH50, and C1 esterase inhibitor, establishing the diagnosis of HAE. One year after diagnosis, swelling of the extremities appeared for the first time. This is the first report of a child in whom pancreatic disease was the presenting symptom of HAE. HAE should be included in the differential diagnosis of recurrent pancreatitis in children. PMID:26812927

  12. Is Bortezomib a Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis?

    Tevfik Solakoglu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently we have read an interesting case with bortezomib-induced pancreatitis in JOP. Journal of the Pancreas (Online by Elouni et al. [1]. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first reported case of bortezomib-induced acute pancreatitis in the English literature. We know that drug-induced pancreatitis is rare and each year the list of drugs associated with acute pancreatitis increases. Bortezomib is a new drug which is selective and reversible proteasome inhibitor used for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma [2]. Herein we present a case of acute pancreatitis induced by bortezomib.

  13. A Case of Probable Ibuprofen-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Paul Magill

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Context :The incidence of drug-induced pancreatitis is rare. There have been no prior definite cases reported of ibuprofen-induced pancreatitis. Case report: We present a case of a young man with acute pancreatitis probably secondary to an ibuprofen overdose. Immediately preceding the onset of the attack he took a 51 mg/kg dose of ibuprofen. He had other causes of acute pancreatitis excluded by clinical history, serum toxicology and abdominal imaging. Discussion :In the absence of re-challenge we believe it is probable that ibuprofen has acausative link with acute pancreatitis.

  14. Pancreatic Perfusion CT in Early Stage of Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Yoshihisa Tsuji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Early intensive care for severe acute pancreatitis is essential for improving SAP mortality rates. However, intensive therapies for SAP are often delayed because there is no ideal way to accurately evaluate severity in the early stages. Currently, perfusion CT has been shown useful to predict prognosis of SAP in the early stage. In this presented paper, we would like to review the clinical usefulness and limitations of perfusion CT for evaluation of local and systemic complications in early stage of SAP.

  15. Diagnostic evaluation of acute pancreatitis in two patients with hypertriglyceridemia

    Yoshifumi Okura; Kozo Hayashi; Tetsuji Shingu; Goro Kajiyama; Yoshiyuki Nakashima; Keijiro Saku

    2004-01-01

    We present two diagnostically challenging cases of acute pancreatitis with hypertriglyceridemia accompanied with chylomicronemia caused with a deficiency of lipoprotein lipase and with the presence of type V hyperlipidemia.Both cases suffered from acute abdomen following the ingestion of fatty food and revealed the increase in parameters of inflammation without significant elevation of serum amylase levels. The imaging examination of ultrasonography could not detect significant findings of acute pancreatitis and a computer tomography scan eventually confirmed the findings of acute pancreatitis. Both cases responded to a low fat diet and administration of a cholecystokinin receptor antagonist, exhibiting a relief of abdominal symptoms. As in the present cases with acute abdomen following the ingestion of fatty food, the identification of serum hypertriglyceridemia and an abdominal computer tomography scan might be useful in establishing the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and in developing the therapeutic regimen, when hypertriglyceridemia interferes with the evaluation of pancreatic enzyme activities and ultrasound examination provides poor pancreatic visualization.

  16. Enteral Nutrition and Acute Pancreatitis: A Review

    Spanier, B.W.M.; Bruno, M.J.; Mathus-Vliegen, E.M.H.

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction. In patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), nutritional support is required if normal food cannot be tolerated within several days. Enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition. We reviewed the literature about enteral nutrition in AP. Methods. A MEDLINE search of the English language literature between 1999-2009. Results. Nasogastric tube feeding appears to be safe and well tolerated in the majority of patients with severe AP, rendering the concept of panc...

  17. Isoprenylation and NET formation in acute pancreatitis

    Merza, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammation disease that characterized by activation of protease and the innate immune system, leading to infiltration of neutrophils and tissue damage in the pancreas. The aim of this thesis was to determine the role of isoprenylation (farnesyltransferase and geranylgeranyltransferase) as well as NET formation in regulating recruitment of neutrophils and tissue damage in severe AP. AP in mice was induced by retrograde infusion of Na-taurocholate into the pa...

  18. Signaling and Adhesive Mechanisms in Acute Pancreatitis

    Awla, Darbaz

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease with variable severity ranging from mild interstitial edematous to severe necrotizing disease. The overall mortality rate of AP is 8-9%. Specific treatment of AP is lacking which is partly related to an incomplete understanding of the basic pathophysiology behind the disease. It is widely held that premature intra-cellular trypsinogen activation and leukocyte recruitment play key roles in the pathophysiology of the AP. However, the signaling ...

  19. Enteral nutrition and immune modulation of acute pancreatitis

    Hegazi, Refaat A.; DeWitt, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    Enteral nutrition has been strongly recommended by major scientific societies for the nutritional management of patients with acute pancreatitis. Providing severe acute pancreatitis patients with enteral nutrition within the first 24-48 h of hospital admission can help improve outcomes compared to parenteral nutrition and no feeding. New research is focusing in on when and what to feed to best improve outcomes for acute pancreatitis patients. Early enteral nutrition have the potential to modu...

  20. Alcohol abuse-related severe acute pancreatitis with rhabdomyolysis complications

    Su, Mao-Sheng; Jiang, Ying; YAN, XIAO-YUAN HU; Zhao, Qing-hua; Liu, Zhi-Wei; Wen-zhi ZHANG; He, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis. One of the major risk factors of both acute pancreatitis and rhabdomyolysis is alcohol abuse. However, only a few studies have reported the prognosis and association of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and rhabdomyolysis in alcohol abuse patients. In the present study, we report two cases presenting with SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis following high-dose alcohol intake. The disease onset, clinical manifestations, lab...

  1. Early Prediction of Severity in Acute Pancreatitis. Is This Possible?

    Sandberg AA; Borgstrom A

    2002-01-01

    One out of ten cases of acute pancreatitis develops into severe acute pancreatitis which is a life threatening disorder with a high mortality rate. The other nine cases are self limiting and need very little therapy. The specificity of good clinical judgement on admission, concerning the prognosis of the attack, is high (high specificity) but misses a lot of severe cases (low sensitivity). The prediction of severity in acute pancreatitis was first suggested by John HC Ranson in 1974. Much eff...

  2. Mental disorders in patients with acute necrotic pancreatitis

    Stefanović Dejan; Lekić Nebojša; Dimitrijević Ivan; Žuvela Marinko; Galun Danijel; Radovanović Nebojša; Kerkez Mirko; Kalezić Nevena

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The prognosis of patients with acute pancreatitis is still uncertain regardless of modern therapeutic procedures. It is even more emphasized if the acute pancreatitis is followed by psychic disorders. Objective The aim of the study was to provide an overview of the incidence of certain psychosomatic disorders in patients with acute pancreatitis and evaluate priority therapeutic procedures. Method In this study, we analyzed 16 patients with psychosomatic disorders followed by the ...

  3. Acute pancreatitis complicated with splenic rupture: A case report

    Hernani, Bruno L; Silva, Pedro C; Nishio, Ricardo T; Mateus, Henrique C; Assef, José C; De Campos, Tercio

    2015-01-01

    Atraumatic splenic rupture is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis. This report describes the case of a 30-year-old man with acute pancreatitis and splenic vein thrombosis complicated by splenic rupture. The patient was admitted to the emergency department with pain in the upper abdomen that had been present for six hours and was associated with vomiting and sweating. He was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis of alcoholic etiology. Upon computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen, the pa...

  4. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumor as a Possible Cause of Acute Pancreatitis

    Okanoue T

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Acute pancreatitis is not commonly seen in the first presentation of pancreatic neoplasms. Solid pseudopapillary tumor as a cause of acute pancreatitis has not yet been reported. This is the first report of acute pancreatitis resulting from solid pseudopapillary tumor. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 21-year-old female who presented with a sudden onset of severe abdominal pain associated with elevated serum pancreatic enzyme concentration. The initial diagnosis was acute pancreatitis. However, subsequent ultrasonography and computed tomography showed an abdominal mass in the tail of the pancreas, retroperitoneal fluid and left pleural effusion. There was scarce pain relief even with large doses of analgesics. A distal pancreatectomy was then performed and a final diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary tumor was made histologically. The surrounding pancreatic tissue was characterized as hemorrhagic edematous pancreatitis. CONCLUSIONS: Solid pseudopapillary tumor is generally known as a slow-growing pancreatic neoplasm with few, if any, symptoms. However, solid pseudopapillary tumors should be kept in mind as a possible cause of acute pancreatitis, especially in cases of non-alcoholic young women having an acute pancreatitis attack.

  5. Imaging lexicon for acute pancreatitis: 2012 Atlanta Classification revisited.

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Patidar, Yashwant; Arora, Ankur

    2016-02-01

    The original 1992 Atlanta Classification System for acute pancreatitis was revised in 2012 by the Atlanta Working Group, assisted by various national and international societies, through web-based consensus. This revised classification identifies two phases of acute pancreatitis: early and late. Acute pancreatitis can be either oedematous interstitial pancreatitis or necrotizing pancreatitis. Severity of the disease is categorized into three levels: mild, moderately severe and severe, depending upon organ failure and local/systemic complications. According to the type of pancreatitis, collections are further divided into acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pseudocyst, acute necrotic collection, and walled-off necrosis. Insight into the revised terminology is essential for accurate communication of imaging findings. In this review article, we will summarize the updated nomenclature and illustrate corresponding imaging findings using examples. PMID:26224684

  6. Hemoconcentration is a poor predictor of severity in acute pancreatitis

    José M. Remes-Troche; Andrés Duarte-Rojo; Gustavo Morales; Guillermo Robles-Díaz

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the hematocrit (Hct) at admission or at 24 h after admission was associated with severe acute pancreatitis (AP), organ failure (OF), and pancreatic necrosis.METHODS: A total of 336 consecutive patients with a first AP episode were studied. Etiology, Hct values at admission and at 24 h, development of severe AP according to Atlanta's criteria, pancreatic necrosis, OF and mortality were recorded. Hemoconcentration was defined as Hct level >44% for males and >40% for females. The t-test and χ2 test were used to assess the association of hemoconcentration to the severity, necrosis and OF.Diagnostic accuracy was also determined.RESULTS: Biliary disease was the most frequent etiology(n = 148). Mean Hct levels at admission were 41±6%for females and 46±7% for males (P<0.01). Seventyeight (23%) patients had severe AP, and OF developed in 45 (13%) patients. According to contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan, 36% (54/150) patients showed pancreatic necrosis. Hct levels were elevated in58% (55/96) and 61% (33/54) patients with interstitial and necrotizing pancreatitis, respectively. Neither Hct levels at admission nor hemoconcentration at 24 h were associated with the severity, necrosis or OF. Sensitivity,specificity and positive predictive values for both determinations were very low; and negative predictive values were between 61% and 86%, being the highest value for OF.CONCLUSION: Hct is not a useful marker to predict a worse outcome in acute pancreatitis. In spite of the high negative predictive value of hemoconcentration, the prognosis gain is limited due to an already high incidence of mild disease.

  7. Effect of copaiba oil on acute pancreatitis in mice

    Daniel L Medeiros; Thiago E. V. Lemos; Luiz H. F. Junior; Tarciso B. S. Montenegro; Paula R. S. Camara

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The anti-inflammatory activity of copaiba oil was evaluated using a cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis model in mice. Methods: Mice were pretreated with Copaiba sp oleoresin before induction of pancreatitis. Pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal injection (five injections at hourly intervals) of cerulein solution and, 6 h later, pancreatic and lung damage were analyzed macroscopically for the severity of necrosis, and by protein plasma extravasation and plasma amylase ac...

  8. Parathyroid Cyst Presenting as Acute Pancreatitis: Report of a Case

    Kim, Mi-Young; Chung, Cho-Yun; Kim, Jong-Sun; Myung, Dae-Seong; Cho, Sung-Bum; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Young; Joo, Young-Eun

    2013-01-01

    We report the first case of hypercalcemia-induced acute pancreatitis caused by a functioning parathyroid cyst in a 67-year-old man. Laboratory investigation revealed increased serum amylase and lipase, increased serum ionized calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, and decreased serum phosphate, indicating pancreatitis and primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed mild swelling of the pancreatic head with peri-pancreatic fat infiltration and fluid c...

  9. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis-sonographic pictorial essay on four pediatric cases with acute biliary colic.

    Lynser, Donboklang; Marbaniang, Evarisalin

    2016-04-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis occur due to migration of the round worm ascaris lumbricoides through the bile duct orifice finally reaching the common bile duct, main pancreatic duct, intrahepatic ducts or gallbladder. These resulted in acute epigastric and right hypochondriac region colicky pain. Ultrasound is the investigation of choice in hepatobiliary ascariasis. We present here sonographic images on four pediatric patients with acute biliary colic. PMID:26690772

  10. Comparative Analysis of Selected Scales to Assess Prognosis in Acute Pancreatitis

    Koziel, Dorota; Gluszek, Stanislaw; Matykiewicz, Jaroslaw; Lewitowicz, Piotr; Drozdzak, Zuzanna

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the utility of selected scales to prognosticate the severity and risk for death among patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) according to the revised Atlanta classification published in 2012.METHODS: Prospective data regarding patients hospitalized due to AP were analyzed. The final analysis included a total of 1014 patients. The bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis (BISAP), Panc 3 scores and Ranson scales were calculated using data from the first 24 h of adm...

  11. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis: Yet to be explored

    Neeru Sahni; Amit Kumar Mandal; Namrata Maheshwari

    2015-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is an important yet often missed cause of acute pancreatitis. The diagnostic dilemma and no specific guidelines for management of this condition further add to difficulty in treating a patient with hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis. We present a thirty five year old, diabetic male patient with hypertriglyceridemia induced pancreatitis, enumerating the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment of our patient. A brief review of literature summariz...

  12. Early diagnosis and staging of acute pancreatitis on computed tomography

    In 108 patients with acute pancreatitis, the CT findings were correlated with pathological staging; in 63 the diagnosis had been confirmed at operation and in 45 it was made on clinical grounds. CT differentiation between interstitial and necrotizing pancreatitis had a sensitivity of 0.87 and specificity of 1.0. In addition, exact estimation of the extent of intrapancreatic necrosis was possible. This high accuracy makes CT the method of choice for the early diagnosis and staging of acute pancreatitis. (orig.)

  13. THERAPEUTIC APPROACH IN THE COMPLICATIONS OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    G. Veselu; M. Paduraru; C. Baciu; Doina Veselu

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a disease with severe local, regional and general complications. Material and methods: During 1999 – 2004 in our unit were treated 32 cases of acute pancreatitis. The etiology of the pancreatitis was: biliary lithiasis in 25 cases (78.12%). Only 7 cases have a severe evolution. All the cases were evaluated by abdominal ultrasound exam, computed tomography and severity scores (Ranson and Apache). Also, the patients were treated and monitored in the intensive care unit. We...

  14. Endoscopic Ultrasound Assisted Etiological Localization in Acute Pancreatitis

    Appasani, Sreekanth; Basha, Jahangeer; Singh, Kartar; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is an uncommon cause of pancreatitis and one should look for its telltale evidence on history (renal stone disease) and investigations (hypercalcemia). Endosonography has an upcoming role in the management of acute pancreatitis, especially in the presence of fluid collection. We report a case of parathyroid adenoma related acute pancreatitis complicated with pseudocyst, which was managed with percutaneous drainage and endosonographic localization of the adenoma to the left...

  15. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following acute pancreatitis during chemotherapy for acute monocytic leukemia.

    Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Koh, Hideo; Bingo, Masato; Yoshida, Masahiro; Nanno, Satoru; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Nakane, Takahiko; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Shimono, Taro; Hino, Masayuki

    2014-05-01

    We describe an 18-year-old man with acute leukemia who presented with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) shortly after developing acute pancreatitis. On day 15 after the third consolidation course with high-dose cytarabine, treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics was initiated for febrile neutropenia. On day 16, he developed septic shock, and subsequently, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). After adding vancomycin, micafungin and high-dose methylprednisolone (mPSL) to his treatment regimen, these manifestations subsided. On day 22, he received hemodialysis for drug-induced acute renal failure. On day 24, he developed acute pancreatitis possibly due to mPSL; the following day he had generalized seizures, and was intubated. Cerebrospinal fluid findings were normal. Brain MRI revealed hyperintense signals on FLAIR images and increased apparent diffusion coefficient values in the sub-cortical and deep white matter areas of the bilateral temporal and occipital lobes, indicative of vasogenic edema. Thus, we diagnosed PRES. Blood pressure, seizures and volume status were controlled, with MRI findings showing improvement by day 42. He was extubated on day 32 and discharged on day 49 without complications. Although little is known about PRES following acute pancreatitis, clinicians should be aware that this condition may develop. PMID:24881921

  16. Acute pancreatitis : new frontiers in diagnosis and treatment

    van Santvoort, H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas mostly caused by gallstones and alcohol abuse. Around 15 to 20% of patients show a severe clinical course, which is characterised by multiple organ failure and necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma and/ or peripancreatic fat tissue. In arou

  17. Activity of neutrophil elastase reflects the progression of acute pancreatitis

    Novovic, Srdan; Andersen, Anders M; Nord, Magnus;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Neutrophil elastase (NE) concentration is associated with progression of acute pancreatitis (AP), but measuring total NE concentration includes biologically inactive NE. This study aims to investigate the relationship between NE activity and the aetiology and severity of AP and...... was associated with predicted severity of AP and AP-associated respiratory failure. Specific NE inhibitors may have therapeutic potential in acute pancreatitis....

  18. Isoniazid Induced Acute Pancreatitis in a Young Girl

    Isoniazid (INH) is the mainstay of management against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. INH-induced acute pancreatitis is an uncommon association and with dearth of literature on it. We are reporting a case of an 11 years old girl who developed acute pancreatitis after 2 weeks of antituberculous therapy. An INH free regimen was started. She was discharged and followed without complications. (author)

  19. Conservative Management of Pancreatic Pseudocysts in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Spraker, Holly L.; Spyridis, Georgios P.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Howard, Scott C.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment with asparaginase for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) can cause acute pancreatitis. Complication of pancreatitis by pancreatic pseudocyst formation can prolong the hospital stay, delay chemotherapy, and necessitate long-term parenteral nutrition. We report five children with ALL who developed acute pancreatitis complicated by pancreatic pseudocysts. They required modifications to their chemotherapy regimen and prolonged parenteral nutrition but no surgical intervention. All five ...

  20. Acute Septal Panniculitis. A Cutaneous Marker of a Very Early Stage of Pancreatic Panniculitis Indicating Acute Pancreatitis

    Surendran E; Rajendran S; Jeswanth S; Balachandar TG; Kannan DG; Johnson MA

    2005-01-01

    CONTEXT: Pancreatitis may occasionally be complicated by panniculitis as a result of the release of pancreatic enzymes. Pancreatic panniculitis is rare, occurring in 2-3% of all patients with pancreatic disorders, with a higher incidence among alcoholic males. CASE REPORT: A 29-year-old male was admitted to our Department with acute abdominal pain one day following alcohol consumption. On physical examination, tender erythematous plaques and nodules were present on the left ankle and the pret...

  1. THERAPEUTIC APPROACH IN THE COMPLICATIONS OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    G. Veselu

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a disease with severe local, regional and general complications. Material and methods: During 1999 – 2004 in our unit were treated 32 cases of acute pancreatitis. The etiology of the pancreatitis was: biliary lithiasis in 25 cases (78.12%. Only 7 cases have a severe evolution. All the cases were evaluated by abdominal ultrasound exam, computed tomography and severity scores (Ranson and Apache. Also, the patients were treated and monitored in the intensive care unit. We performed the antibiotic prophylaxy with tienam (500 mg x 4/ day associated with metronidazole (1 g/ day. In some cases we used another therapy: ceftazidime + amikacina + metronidazole. We also used enteral nutrition where was possible, but in some cases total parenteral nutrition was required. Results: After the diagnosis of biliary lithiasis some surgical procedures were performed: cholecystectomies ? the drainage of the main biliary duct. For the 7 cases of severe acute pancreatitis we performed necrosectomies and the drainage of the pancreatic abcesses. Two patients with severe acute pancreatitis died. No surgical interventions were performed for non-biliary acute pancreatitis with good results. Conclusions: 1 The prophylactic use of antibiotics decrease the arte of pancreatic and extrapancreatic infections. 2 We performed the exploratory laparotomy in all the cases with uncertain diagnosis. 3 Cholecystectomies ? the drainage of the main biliary duct were performed in all the cases with biliary lithiasis. 4 In the cases with acute severe pancreatitis we prefer late surgical intervention

  2. Biliary Obstruction Due to Isolated Pancreatic Tuberculosis

    Sietze A Koopal

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old male from Iraq without any history of previous infections presented at our institute with recently developed jaundice caused by a pancreatic head mass. A CT scan of the abdomen showed the mass in the pancreatic head without lymph node involvement or infiltration of the vascular structures (Image 1. ERCP revealed a double duct sign. Endoscopic stent placement adequately decompressed the common bile duct. At laparotomy, frozen section analysis of the lymph node samples (located at the hepatoduodenal ligament, diameter 1 cm, and the radix mesenterii, diameter 0.5 cm showed no malignancy. A 4-cm mass was palpable in the pancreatic head and a pylorus-preserving pancreatic-duodenectomy was performed. Pathological examination of the specimen showed chronic pancreatitis caused by an extensive necrotizing granulomatous inflammation (Image 2; staining for acid fast bacilli were positive. The peripancreatic lymph nodes also showed typical caseating granulomas (Image 3. The patient was successfully treated with anti-tubercular therapy and is doing well. Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis is extremely rare [1] and is usually not suspected prior to exploratory laparotomy or even definitive histological examinations.

  3. MDCT features of subperitoneal space involvement in acute pancreatitis

    Objective: To investigate the MDCT features of subperitoneal space involvement in acute pancreatitis (AP). Methods: CT features of 43 consecutive cases of acute pancreatitis confirmed by clinical and laboratory examination were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Retroperitoneal space involvement in acute pancreatitis was manifested as increased density or fluid collection in the subperitoneal space. Of 43 patients with acute pancreatitis, mesentery of small intestine was involved in 38(88%), transverse mesocolon in 23(53%), hepatoduodenal ligament in 17(40%), gastrohepatic ligament in 16(37%), gastro-splenic ligament in 21(49%) and greater omentum in 8(19%). Conclusion: MDCT can precisely depict the location and extent of the subperitoneal space involvement in acute pancreatitis. (authors)

  4. Ascaris lumbricoides-Induced Acute Pancreatitis: Diagnosis during EUS for a Suspected Small Pancreatic Tumor

    Benedetto Mangiavillano; Silvia Carrara; Maria Chiara Petrone; Paolo Giorgio Arcidiacono; Pier Alberto Testoni

    2009-01-01

    Context Ascaris lumbricoides is the second most common intestinal parasite world-wide and, although the infection can be asymptomatic, in some cases it can present with complications, such as acute pancreatitis. Case report We describe the case of a 37- year-old man, with a history of travelling in Eastern countries who presented with Ascaris lumbricoides-induced acute pancreatitis mimicking a small pancreatic cancer, diagnosed during an upper EUS. The endoscopy revealeda roundworm floating i...

  5. Acute Pancreatitis Complicating Acute Hepatitis E Virus Infection: A Case Report and Review

    Hemanta Kumar Nayak; Nitish L Kamble; Nishant Raizada; Sandeep Garg,; Mradul Kumar Daga

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis complicating fulminant viral hepatitis has been well recognized; however, acute pancreatitis occurring in nonfulminant hepatitis is very rare. The case presented describes moderate pancreatitis in a young male, manifesting during the course of nonfulminant acute hepatitis E infection. The diagnosis of acute viral hepatitis E was confirmed by serology and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to demonstrate Hepatitis E virus (HEV) RNA in both stool and ser...

  6. Early Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis: Do Not Forget the Need for Water

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available FV: fluid volume; FV48: fluid volume administered during the initial 48 h; FVH: fluid volume during hospitalization; FVR: FV ratio as FV48/FVH An Italian survey on the treatment of acute pancreatitis published in 2007 [1] assessed the compliance of 56 medical and surgical centers equally distributed throughout Italy to the Italian guidelines on acute pancreatitis [2]. The severity of the disease was clinically assessed according to the Atlanta criteria [3] and the majority of patients were observed and treated early after the onset of acute pancreatitis; in fact, the mean interval between the onset of pain and hospital admission was 14.9±37.2 hours (mean±SD in patients with mild acute pancreatitis and 17.8±39.1 hours (mean±SD in those with severe pancreatitis. One of the results of this study was that the amount of fluids administered to acute pancreatitis patients was significantly higher in patients with severe acute pancreatitis than in those with the mild form. The appropriate fluid replacement may be one of reasons for the low mortality (3.1% observed in the patients with acute pancreatitis enrolled in this study. Low mortality due to early fluid administration is now supported by the findings of three recent studies coming from Japan and the United States [4, 5, 6]. In the first study we examined [4], the authors revised the data of 9,489 acute pancreatitis patients 18 years of age or older who were categorized into four study groups: ventilation, hemodialysis, a combination of ventilation and hemodialysis, and neither ventilation nor hemodialysis. They analyzed the fluid volume (FV administered during the initial 48 h (FV48 and during hospitalization (FVH, and calculated the FV ratio (FVR as FV48/FVH. The authors found that FV48 and FVR were higher in patients requiring ventilation as compared to those not requiring ventilation.

  7. Luminal lactate in acute pancreatitis - validation and relation to disease severity

    Pynnönen, Lauri; Minkkinen, Minna; Räty, Sari;

    2012-01-01

    systemic inflammation. In acute pancreatitis (AP) bacterial translocation is considered as the key event leading to infection of necrotic pancreatic tissue and high severity of illness. METHODS: We used rectal luminal equilibration dialysis for the measurement of gut luminal lactate in 30 consecutive...... patients admitted to hospital due to acute pancreatitis to test the hypothesis that a single measurement of rectal luminal lactate predicts the severity of acute pancreatitis, the length of hospital stay, the need of intensive care and ultimately, mortality. We also tested the physiological validity of...... the physiological validity of the method. Rectal luminal lactate at the hospital admission was not associated with the first day or the highest SOFA score, CRP level, hospital length of stay, length of stay in intensive care or mortality. In this cohort of unselected consecutive patients with acute...

  8. Pancreatitis

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  9. Pulmonary Thromboembolism Complicating Acute Pancreatitis With Pancreatic Ascites: A Series of 4 cases

    Ruchir Patel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease often associated with local and systemic complications. Portosplenic and splanchnic vascular complications of acute pancreatitis are common, but extrasplanchnic vessel thrombosis is less commonly seen. Among them, pulmonary thromboembolism is a very rare complication to be encountered with. We report four cases of acute pulmonary thromboembolism in patients with acute pancreatitis superimposed on chronic pancreatitis. All the patients had abdominal pain on presentation and distention of abdomen during the course. Dyspnea was present in all the patients. All patients were found to have pancreatic ascites, whose association with pulmonary thromboembolism is reported only in two patients till date upto our knowledge. Two of them had deep vein thrombosis and rest two had no venous thrombosis. All of them were managed conservatively using subcutaneous heparin, intravenous fluids and analgesics. We provide the causative mechanism for occurrence of pulmonary thromboembolism in acute on chronic pancreatitis. We have also hypothesized pancreatic ascites as the possible cause for pulmonary thromboembolism and provide explanation for it. We conclude that pulmonary thromboembolism in acute pancreatitis has good prognosis if diagnosed timely. Whenever patient with pancreatic ascites presents with dyspnea, pulmonary thromboembolism must be ruled out.

  10. [Determinant-based classification of acute pancreatitis severity. International multidisciplinary classification of acute pancreatitis severity: the 2013 German edition

    Layer, P.; Dellinger, E.P.; Forsmark, C.E.; Levy, P.; Maravi-Poma, E.; Shimosegawa, T.; Siriwardena, A.K.; Uomo, G.; Whitcomb, D.C.; Windsor, J.A.; Petrov, M.S.; Geenen, E.J.M. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to develop a new international classification of acute pancreatitis severity on the basis of a sound conceptual framework, comprehensive review of published evidence, and worldwide consultation. BACKGROUND: The Atlanta definitions of acute pancreatitis severity a