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Sample records for acute neurological diseases

  1. [Demyelinating diseases in children with acute neurological symptoms].

    Olofsson, Isa Amalie; Skov, Liselotte; Miranda, Maria Jose

    2015-12-01

    Demyelinating diseases in children is a broad group of illnesses, which affect the central nervous system. Demyelinating diseases can be monophasic or chronic and comprise acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Demyelinating diseases are rare, but it is important for the physician to recognize these diseases, as well as to understand the differential diagnoses. This review summarizes the current knowledge of demyelinating disorders in children, focusing on an approach to diagnosis and management. PMID:26651911

  2. Neurologic Diseases

    The brain, spinal cord, and nerves make up the nervous system. Together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong ... develops, such as spina bifida Degenerative diseases, where nerve cells are ... to the spinal cord and brain Seizure disorders, such as epilepsy ...

  3. Borna disease virus induces acute fatal neurological disorders in neonatal gerbils without virus- and immune-mediated cell destructions

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a noncytolytic, neurotropic RNA virus that is known to cause neurological disturbances in various animal species. Our previous experiment demonstrated that neonate gerbils develop an acute fatal neurological disease following infection with BDV , Virology 282, 65-76). The study suggested that BDV directly causes functional damage of neuronal cells resulting in the lethal disorder in neonatal gerbils. To extend this finding, we examined whether BDV can induce neurological diseases in the absence of virus- and immune-mediated cell destruction, by using cyclosporine A (CsA)-treated neonatal gerbils. Although CsA completely suppressed specific antibody production and brain inflammation in the infected gerbil brains, the fatal neurological disorder was not inhibited by the treatment. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CsA treatment significantly decreased brain levels of cytokines, except interleukin (IL)-1β, in the infected gerbils. These results suggested that BDV replication, as well as brain cytokines, at least IL-1β, rapidly induces fatal disturbances in gerbil brain. We demonstrate here that BDV exhibits a unique neuropathogenesis in neonatal gerbil that may be pathologically and immunologically different from those in two other established rodent models, rats and mice. With this novel rodent model of virus infection it should be possible not only to examine acute neurological disturbances without severe neuroanatomical and immunopathological alterations but also to analyze molecular and cellular damage by virus replication in the central nervous system

  4. Creativity and neurological disease.

    Acosta, Lealani Mae Y

    2014-08-01

    Although humans have long valued creativity, the generation of such innovation is still incompletely understood. Looking at the healthy brain, researchers have localized certain parts for a basic understanding of these mechanisms. By researching the brain affected by neurological disease, scientists have observed unique manifestations of creativity, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and parkinsonian spectrum disorders, and stroke, which help clarify these creative underpinnings. Incorporating both healthy and disease models of cerebral functioning, neurological and neuroscientific research from recent years has built on established theories and expanded current knowledge. PMID:24938215

  5. Astroglia in neurological diseases

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Parpura, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), s. 149-158. ISSN 1479-6708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA309/09/1696 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : amyotrophic lateral sclerosis * Alzheimer's disease * Alexander disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  6. Astroglia in neurological diseases

    VERKHRATSKY, ALEXEI; Rodríguez, José J.; Parpura, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Astroglia encompass a subset of versatile glial cells that fulfill a major homeostatic role in the mammalian brain. Since any brain disease results from failure in brain homeostasis, astroglial cells are involved in many, if not all, aspects of neurological and/or psychiatric disorders. In this article, the roles of astrocytes as homeostatic cells in healthy and diseased brains are surveyed. These cells can mount the defence response to the insult of the brain, astrogliosis, when and where th...

  7. Pyroptosis and neurological diseases

    Zhen Xie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pyroptosis is a new process of programmed cell death, which has been discovered and confirmed in recent years. Its cardinal features include activation of caspase-1 and a massive release of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL-1β, IL-18, etc. The morphological characteristics, occurrence and regulatory mechanisms of the pyroptosis greatly, differ from other cell death mechanisms such as apoptosis and necrosis. It has already been proven that pyroptosis participates and plays an important role in a wide range of neuronal diseases. Here, we review the current understanding of the pyroptosis and its roles in neurological diseases.

  8. Neurologic Complications of Celiac Disease

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with celiac disease (CD [n=l 11] and controls (n=211 were questioned regarding neurologic disorders, their charts were reviewed, and they received neurologic evaluations, including brain imaging or EEG if indicated, in a study of neurologic complications of CD at Carmel Medical Center, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

  9. Neurology of acute organophosphate poisoning

    Singh Gagandeep

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute organophosphate (OP poisoning is one of the most common poisonings in emergency medicine and toxicological practice in some of the less-developed nations in South Asia. Traditionally, OP poisoning comes under the domain of emergency physicians, internists, intensivists, and toxicologists. However, some of the complications following OP poisoning are neurological and involve neurologists. The pathophysiological basis for the clinical manifestations of OP poisoning is inactivation of the enzyme, acetylcholinesterase at the peripheral nicotinic and muscarinic and central nervous system (CNS nerve terminals and junctions. Nicotinic manifestations occur in severe cases and late in the course; these comprise of fasciculations and neuromuscular paralysis. There is a good correlation between the electrophysiological abnormalities and the severity of the clinical manifestations. Neurophysiological abnormalities characteristic of nicotinic junctions (mainly neuromuscular junction dysfunction include: (1 single, supramaximal electrical-stimulus-induced repetitive response/s, (2 decrement-increment response to high frequency (30 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS, and (3 decremental response to high frequency (30 Hz RNS. Atropine ameliorates muscarinic manifestations. Therapeutic agents that can ameliorate nicotinic manifestations, mainly neuromuscular, are oximes. However, the evidence for this effect is inconclusive. This may be due to the fact that there are several factors that determine the therapeutic effect of oximes. These factors include: The OP compound responsible for poisoning, duration of poisoning, severity of poisoning, and route of exposure. There is also a need to study the effect of oximes on the neurophysiological abnormalities.

  10. Neurologic manifestations of Kanzaki disease.

    Umehara, F; Matsumuro, K; Kurono, Y; Arimura, K; Osame, M; Kanzaki, T

    2004-05-11

    We describe the neurologic findings in a patient with alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency (Kanzaki disease). Clinical and electrophysiologic studies revealed sensory-motor polyneuropathy, and sural nerve pathology showed decreased density of myelinated fibers with axonal degeneration. The patient had mildly impaired intellectual function with abnormal brain MRI and sensory-neuronal hearing impairment with repeated episodes of vertigo attacks. These findings suggest that Kanzaki disease may develop neurologic complications in the CNS and peripheral nervous system. PMID:15136691

  11. Neurological complications of acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy.

    Brownlee, W J; Anderson, N E; Sims, J; Pereira, J A

    2016-09-01

    Acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (AMPPE) is an autoimmune chorioretinal disease that can be complicated by neurological involvement. There is limited information on this potentially treatable condition in the neurological literature. The objective of this patient series is to describe the neurological complications of AMPPE. We retrospectively identified patients with neurological complications of AMPPE seen at Auckland Hospital between 2008 and 2013 and summarised cases in the literature between 1976 and 2013. We identified five patients with neurological complications of AMPPE at Auckland Hospital and 47 reported patients. These patients demonstrated a spectrum of neurological involvement including isolated headache, stroke or transient ischaemic attack, seizures, venous sinus thrombosis, optic neuritis, sensorineural hearing loss and peripheral vestibular disorder. We propose criteria to define AMPPE with neurological complications. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytosis in a patient with isolated headache may predict the development of cerebrovascular complications of AMPPE. Patients with cerebrovascular complications of AMPPE have a poor prognosis with high rates of death and neurological disability among survivors. Predictors of poor outcome in those who develop neurological complications of AMPPE are a relapsing course, generalised seizures and multifocal infarction on MRI. All patients with neurological complications of AMPPE, including headache alone, should be investigated with an MRI brain and CSF examination. Patients with focal neurological symptoms should receive intravenous (IV) methylprednisolone followed by a tapering course of oral steroids for at least 3months. Patients with AMPPE and an isolated headache with a CSF pleocytosis should be treated with oral steroids. PMID:27183958

  12. [Nutritional and metabolic aspects of neurological diseases].

    Planas Vilà, Mercè

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system regulates food intake, homoeostasis of glucose and electrolytes, and starts the sensations of hunger and satiety. Different nutritional factors are involved in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases. Patients with acute neurological diseases (traumatic brain injury, cerebral vascular accident hemorrhagic or ischemic, spinal cord injuries, and cancer) and chronic neurological diseases (Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease) increase the risk of malnutrition by multiple factors related to nutrient ingestion, abnormalities in the energy expenditure, changes in eating behavior, gastrointestinal changes, and by side effects of drugs administered. Patients with acute neurological diseases have in common the presence of hyper metabolism and hyper catabolism both associated to a period of prolonged fasting mainly for the frequent gastrointestinal complications, many times as a side effect of drugs administered. During the acute phase, spinal cord injuries presented a reduction in the energy expenditure but an increase in the nitrogen elimination. In order to correct the negative nitrogen balance increase intakes is performed with the result of a hyper alimentation that should be avoided due to the complications resulting. In patients with chronic neurological diseases and in the acute phase of cerebrovascular accident, dysphagia could be present which also affects intakes. Several chronic neurological diseases have also dementia, which lead to alterations in the eating behavior. The presence of malnutrition complicates the clinical evolution, increases muscular atrophy with higher incidence of respiratory failure and less capacity to disphagia recuperation, alters the immune response with higher rate of infections, increases the likelihood of fractures and of pressure ulcers, increases the incapacity degree and is an independent factor to increase mortality. The periodic nutritional

  13. Neurological manifestations in Fabry's disease

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    . Neurological symptoms, such as burning sensations (occasionally accompanied by acroparesthesia) and stroke, are among the first to appear, and occur in both male and female patients. A delay in establishing the diagnosis of Fabry's disease can cause unnecessary problems, especially now that enzyme replacement...... treatment is available to prevent irreversible organ damage. Females with Fabry's disease who present with pain have often been ignored and misdiagnosed because of the disorder's X-linked inheritance. This Review will stress the importance of recognizing neurological symptoms for the diagnosis of Fabry...

  14. Neurological findings of Lyme disease.

    Pachner, A. R.; Steere, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    Neurologic involvement of Lyme disease typically consists of meningitis, cranial neuropathy, and radiculoneuritis, alone or in combination, lasting for months. From 1976 to 1983, we studied 38 patients with Lyme meningitis. Headache and mild neck stiffness, which fluctuated in intensity, and lymphocytic pleocytosis were the common findings. Half of the patients also had facial palsies, which were unilateral in 12 and bilateral in seven. In addition, 12 patients had motor and/or sensory radicu...

  15. Acute cerebellar ataxia: A neurological manifestation in malaria

    Peddametla Shravan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the bite of an infected female anopheles mosquito presents with varied clinical manifestations. Neurological manifestations include headaches, confusion, convulsions, hemiplegia, ataxia, cerebral palsy, cortical blindness, and Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. We are presenting a case report of acute cerebellar ataxia in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with fever and positive for Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria antibodies.

  16. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases

    Shiari, Reza

    2012-01-01

    How to Cite this Article: Shiari R. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases.  Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012; 6(4): 1-7.Children with rheumatic disorders may have a wide variety of clinical features ranging from fever or a simple arthritis to complex multisystem autoimmune diseases. Information about the prevalence of neurological manifestations in children with rheumatologic disorders is limited. This review describes the neurologic complications of childhood Rheumatic dis...

  17. Astaxanthin as a Potential Neuroprotective Agent for Neurological Diseases

    Haijian Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurological diseases, which consist of acute injuries and chronic neurodegeneration, are the leading causes of human death and disability. However, the pathophysiology of these diseases have not been fully elucidated, and effective treatments are still lacking. Astaxanthin, a member of the xanthophyll group, is a red-orange carotenoid with unique cell membrane actions and diverse biological activities. More importantly, there is evidence demonstrating that astaxanthin confers neuroprotective effects in experimental models of acute injuries, chronic neurodegenerative disorders, and neurological diseases. The beneficial effects of astaxanthin are linked to its oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic characteristics. In this review, we will focus on the neuroprotective properties of astaxanthin and explore the underlying mechanisms in the setting of neurological diseases.

  18. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature.MethodsThis prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed.ResultsIn neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5% of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations.ConclusionIt is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  19. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    ... may begin with flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pain. Neurological complications most often occur in the second stage ... such as fever, stiff neck, and severe headache. Other problems, which ...

  20. Imaging of acute neurological conditions in pregnancy and the puerperium

    Dineen, R. [Department of Neuroradiology, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: robert.dineen@nhs.net; Banks, A. [Department of Anaesthesia, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Lenthall, R. [Department of Neuroradiology, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-01

    Eclampsia is one of the most common acute neurological events occurring during pregnancy. However, there are many other conditions that can present during pregnancy and the puerperium and that may either mimic eclampsia or produce other acute neurological manifestations. Frequently the symptoms and signs are non-specific, and it can be difficult to differentiate between these conditions on clinical grounds alone. Neuroradiological studies can provide valuable diagnostic information, and interventional radiological procedures may play a part in the subsequent management of these conditions. This review focuses on the imaging of acute neurological conditions which may be associated with, or present during, pregnancy and the puerperium.

  1. Astaxanthin as a Potential Neuroprotective Agent for Neurological Diseases

    Haijian Wu; Huanjiang Niu; Anwen Shao; Cheng Wu; Brandon J Dixon; Jianmin Zhang; Shuxu Yang; Yirong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Neurological diseases, which consist of acute injuries and chronic neurodegeneration, are the leading causes of human death and disability. However, the pathophysiology of these diseases have not been fully elucidated, and effective treatments are still lacking. Astaxanthin, a member of the xanthophyll group, is a red-orange carotenoid with unique cell membrane actions and diverse biological activities. More importantly, there is evidence demonstrating that astaxanthin confers neuroprotective...

  2. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases

    Reza SHIARI

    2013-01-01

    . Halimiasl A, Hosseini AH, Shiari R, Ghadamli P,Mojtahedzadeh S. Concomitant Coronary Artery Aneurysm and Myocarditis as a Rare Manifestation of Kawasaki Disease: A Case Report. J Compr Ped.2012;3(1:34-6. 11. Ichiyama T, Nishikawa M, Hayashi T, Koga M, Tashiro N, Furukawa S. Cerebral hypoperfusion during acute Kawasaki disease. Stroke. 1998 Jul;29(7:1320-1. 12. Muneuchi J, Kusuhara K, Kanaya Y, Ohno T, Furuno K,Kira R, Mihara F, Hara T. Magnetic resonance studies of brain lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease. Brain Dev. 2006 Jan;28(1:30-3. 13. Scolding NJ, Wilson H, Hohlfeld R, Polman C, Leite I,Gilhus N. The recognition, diagnosis and management of cerebral vasculitis: a European survey. Eur J Neurol. 2002Jul;9(4:343-7. 14. Guillevin L, Durand-Gasselin B, Cevallos R, Gayraud M, Lhote F, Callard P et al. Microscopic polyangiitis:clinical and laboratory findings in eighty-five patients.Arthritis Rheum. 1999 Mar;42(3:421-30. 15. Rahman A, Isenberg DA. Systemic lupus erythematosus.N Engl J Med. 2008 Feb;358(9:929-39. 16. Farivar S, Shiari R, Nejad Hosseinian M, Eshtad S. New genetic finding in systemic lupus erythematosus. Genet inthe 3rd Millen 2008;6(2:1333-8. 17. Sibbitt WL Jr, Brandt JR, Johnson CR, Maldonado ME,Patel SR, Ford CC et al. The incidence and prevalence of neuropsychiatric syndromes in pediatric onset systemic lupus erythematosus. J Rheumatol. 2002 Jul;29(7:1536-42. 18. Harel L, Sandborg C, Lee T, von Scheven E.Neuropsychiatric manifestations in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus and association with antiphospholipid antibodies. J Rheumatol. 2006 Sep;33(9:1873-7. 19. Hawro T, Bogucki A, Sysa-Jedrzejowska A, BogaczewiczJ, Wozniacka A. [Neurological disorders in systemic lupus erythematosus patients]. Pol Merkur Lekarski. 2009 Jan;26(151:43-8. 20. Greenberg BM. The neurologic manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. Neurologist. 2009May;15(3:115-21.21. Sofat N, Malik O, Higgens CS. Neurological involvementin patients with rheumatic disease. QJM

  3. Astrocytes: a central element in neurological diseases

    M. Pekny; M. Pekna; A. Messing; C. Steinhäuser; J.M. Lee; V. Parpura; E.M. Hol; M.V. Sofroniew; A. Verkhratsky

    2016-01-01

    The neurone-centred view of the past disregarded or downplayed the role of astroglia as a primary component in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. As this concept is changing, so is also the perceived role of astrocytes in the healthy and diseased brain and spinal cord. We have started to unr

  4. Astrocytes : a central element in neurological diseases

    Pekny, Milos; Pekna, Marcela; Messing, Albee; Steinhäuser, Christian; Lee, Jin Moo; Parpura, Vladimir; Hol, Elly M.; Sofroniew, Michael V.; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    The neurone-centred view of the past disregarded or downplayed the role of astroglia as a primary component in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. As this concept is changing, so is also the perceived role of astrocytes in the healthy and diseased brain and spinal cord. We have started to unr

  5. Mitochondrial Biology and Neurological Diseases.

    Arun, Siddharth; Liu, Lei; Donmez, Gizem

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are extremely active organelles that perform a variety of roles in the cell including energy production, regulation of calcium homeostasis, apoptosis, and population maintenance through fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the form of oxidative stress and mutations can contribute to the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's (PD), Alzheimer's (AD), and Huntington's diseases (HD). Abnormalities of Complex I function in the electron transport chain have been implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases, inhibiting ATP production and generating reactive oxygen species that can cause major damage to mitochondria. Mutations in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA can contribute to neurodegenerative disease, although the pathogenesis of these conditions tends to focus on nuclear mutations. In PD, nuclear genome mutations in the PINK1 and parkin genes have been implicated in neurodegeneration [1], while mutations in APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 have been implicated in a variety of clinical symptoms of AD [5]. Mutant htt protein is known to cause HD [2]. Much progress has been made to determine some causes of these neurodegenerative diseases, though permanent treatments have yet to be developed. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of these diseases. PMID:26903445

  6. Regenerative cellular therapies for neurologic diseases.

    Levy, Michael; Boulis, Nicholas; Rao, Mahendra; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-05-01

    The promise of stem cell regeneration has been the hope of many neurologic patients with permanent damage to the central nervous system. There are hundreds of stem cell trials worldwide intending to test the regenerative capacity of stem cells in various neurological conditions from Parkinson׳s disease to multiple sclerosis. Although no stem cell therapy is clinically approved for use in any human disease indication, patients are seeking out trials and asking clinicians for guidance. This review summarizes the current state of regenerative stem cell transplantation divided into seven conditions for which trials are currently active: demyelinating diseases/spinal cord injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, Parkinson׳s disease, Huntington׳s disease, macular degeneration and peripheral nerve diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: PSC and the brain. PMID:26239912

  7. The Neurologic Manifestations of Mitochondrial Disease

    Parikh, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    The nervous system contains some of the body's most metabolically demanding cells that are highly dependent on ATP produced via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, the neurological system is consistently involved in patients with mitochondrial disease. Symptoms differ depending on the part of the nervous system affected. Although almost…

  8. Diagnostic imaging of acute neurologic symptoms in children

    The diagnostic imaging of children with acute, non-traumatic, neurologic symptoms enables a fast and non-invasive localization and diagnosis. A spectrum of typical disorders will be described dependent on the location of neurologic symptoms (central, spinal, or peripheral nervous system). Different non-invasive imaging modalities e.g. US with colour-coded doppler, CT, MRI are utilized dependent on age of the patient and neurologic symptoms. The purpose of this article is to describe the spectrum of diagnostic imaging for each of these common disorders. (orig.)

  9. Toward precision medicine in neurological diseases.

    Tan, Lin; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-03-01

    Technological development has paved the way for accelerated genomic discovery and is bringing precision medicine into view. The goal of precision medicine is to deliver optimally targeted and timed interventions tailored to an individual's molecular drivers of disease. Neurological diseases are promisingly suited models for precision medicine because of the rapidly expanding genetic knowledge base, phenotypic classification, the development of biomarkers and the potential modifying treatments. Moving forward, it is crucial that through these integrated research platforms to provide analysis both for accurate personal genome analysis and gene and drug discovery. Here we describe our vision of how precision medicine can bring greater clarity to the clinical and biological complexity of neurological diseases. PMID:27127757

  10. Caval variations in neurologically diseased patients

    The import of the cavum variation and its prevalence rate in healthy individuals is still not clear, likewise in neurologically diseased patients. To evaluate the frequency and pattern of caval variations in neurologically diseased patients. The presence or absence of the cavum septum pellucidum (CSP), cavum vergae (CV), or cavum velum interpositum (CVI) was reviewed from successive cranial computerized tomography (CT) images of patients who were aged 6 months and above. Two hundred and seventeen cranial CT images were reviewed. At least a cavum variation was noted in 130 (59.9%) of the CT scan images reviewed. The CV, CVI, and CSP were noted in 86 (39.6%), 53 (24.4%), and 50 images (23%), respectively. Caval multiplicity was noted in 102 patients (47%). There was no significant difference in the rate of occurrence of cavum variations in patients with congenital brain diseases and acquired brain conditions (P = 0.484), neither was there a significant difference in the frequency of cavum variation in children aged older than 6 months compared to adults (P = 0.101). Cava variations are relatively common in neurological brain diseases. Patients with congenital brain diseases did not have a higher frequency of cava variation when compared with those that had acquired lesions. The most common type of cavum variation noted in this study was the vergae variety, while the CSP is the rarest

  11. Neuroelectrophysiological studies on neurological autoimmune diseases

    Yin-hong LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neuroelectrophysiological manifestations of four clinical typical neurological autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, myasthenia gravis (MG, and polymyositis and dermatomyositis were reviewed in this paper. The diagnostic value of evoked potentials for multiple sclerosis, nerve conduction studies (NCS for Guillain-Barré syndrome, repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS and single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG for myasthenia gravis, and needle electromyography for polymyositis and dermatomyositis were respectively discussed. This review will help to have comprehensive understanding on electrophysiological examinations and their clinical significance in the diagnosis of neurological autoimmune diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.004

  12. RNA Regulation in Neurologic Disease and Cancer

    Darnell, Robert B

    2010-01-01

    The paraneoplastic neurologic diseases (PNDs) are brain degenerations that develop in the setting of clinically inapparent cancers. PNDs arise when common cancers express brain proteins, triggering an anti-tumor immune response and tumor immunity. Research on these brain-cancer proteins has revealed a new world of neuron-specific RNA binding proteins whose functions may be aberrantly used by tumor cells. Efforts to gain insight into their function has led to the development of new methods and...

  13. Acute intermittent porphyria presenting with neurological emergency: Review of six cases

    Kochar Dhanpat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria presenting with short duration of gastrointestinal symptoms followed by rapidly progressive fulminant neurological syndrome during first attack is relatively uncommon. It is a neurological emergency and mimics many other psychiatric and medical disorders and can be fatal if it remains undiagnosed and untreated. Further, specific treatment in the form of Heme arginate is not universally available and very costly, so high clinical suspicion and early diagnosis and management of acute attack and prevention of further attacks are very important. We report a series of six cases who presented with convulsion and/or polyneuropathy early in the course of disease to highlight this fact.

  14. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Jorge eLandgrave-Gómez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS´s regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure.Epigenetics, introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB, regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression.This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of

  15. Neurological manifestations of Batch s disease

    To determine the prevalence, clinical manifestations, and laboratory features of Neuro-Behcets disease. This prospective study was carried out in the Behcets Research Clinic in Shiraz (south-west Iran) and included the patients referred from 1990-1999. The patients' clinical records, images, CSF analyses, and electrodiagnostic studies were reviewed. Eighteen (15 males and 3 females) out of 690 Behcet s patients (2.6%, 95% CI = 1.4-3.8%) were found to have neurological involvement. The mean +/- standard deviation age of these patients was 34.7 +/- 8.6 years. All fulfilled the criteria of the International Study Group of Behcet s Disease. Central nervous system involvement was more common than peripheral nervous system manifestations. Headache, weakness, tingling, and numbness were the most common symptoms. Hyperreflexia, upward plantar reflex, and somatosensory findings were the most frequent signs. Hemispheral and brainstem stroke-like syndromes and cerebral venous thrombosis were the major neurologic presentations. There were also cases of myelitic, pure meningoencephalitic, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-like, multiple sclerosis-like, and Guillain Barre syndromes. Neuro-Behcets disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of stroke in young adults, chronic meningitis, intracranial hypertension, multiple sclerosis, myelopathies, and peripheral neuropathies. (author)

  16. Statins in acute neurologic disease:which one, which dose, when to start, and when not to stop

    Bong-Su Kang; Gene Sung; May Kim-Tenser; Nerses Sanossian

    2016-01-01

    Statins could have physiologic properties that may beneift patients that have been diagnosed with various acute neurological diseases. This review aims tosummarize the literature pertaining to stain use in acute neurological disease such as subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), cerebral ischemia (CI), traumatic brain injury, status epilepticus and meningitis. The authors reviewed published abstracts and manuscripts pertaining to experimental and clinical trials relevant to statins in acute neurological disease. Although acute statin therapy in the setting of subarachnoid hemorrhage might reduce delayed cerebral ischemia and mortality, it should not be considered standard care at this time. Acute statins therapy has not demonstrated anybeneift yet folowing an ICH or CI. Acute statin withdrawal may worsen outcome in acute CI. Observational and case-control studies suggest that pretreatment with statin at time of onset may be associated with better outcomes. Even though preclinical studies have shown statins to have beneifcial effects, there has been no clinical evidence. In conclusion, current published studies have not shown that acute statin therapy has any beneifcal effects in acute neurologic diseases and therefore further large randomized clinical trials are needed.

  17. Acute mountain sickness in athletes with neurological impairments

    Deepan C. Kamaraj, MD

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute mountain sickness (AMS is a symptom complex noticed commonly among high altitude travelers. The occurrence of AMS depends on multiple factors that have been studied extensively. However, AMS in individuals with neurological impairments has not been considered in detail. A total of 168 subjects, including active controls, inactive controls, and those with spinal cord injury (SCI, multiple sclerosis, and traumatic brain injury (TBI, were studied at the National Veterans Winter Sports Clinic in Snowmass, Colorado, from 2007 to 2009 for the occurrence of AMS. Lake Louise Score was used to quantify symptoms. A higher than anticipated occurrence of AMS (42.85% among the study population was noted, with significantly higher Lake Louis Scores among athletes with neurological impairments. Disability group, prior history of AMS, and prior occurrence of headache at high altitude could be used as predictors for the development of AMS symptoms. More research is warranted specifically targeting the interaction between factors affecting AMS and the pathophysiology of neurological impairments like SCI and TBI to further our understanding about prophylactic medications and treatments for AMS, especially because many military personnel with neurological impairments continue on Active Duty.

  18. Neuroimmunology I: Immunoregulation in neurological disease.

    Weiner, H L; Hauser, S L

    1982-05-01

    Aberrations in immune function that ultimately result in disease states may involve three aspects of immune regulation: (1) regulatory T cells, which both suppress and induce immune responses; (2) idiotype-antiidiotype networks, which serve as internal regulatory networks during generation of an immune response; and (3) immune response genes, which determine genetic differences in an individual's immune response. Three major diseases of the nervous system, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and acute inflammatory polyneuropathy (Guillain-Barré syndrome), are classified as "autoimmune" in nature and may be due to underlying disorders of immunoregulation. In multiple sclerosis there is a loss of suppressor T cells in the peripheral blood during attacks, in myasthenia gravis there are thymic abnormalities and antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor, and in acute inflammatory polyneuropathy, macrophage-mediated destruction of peripheral nerve myelin occurs in the context of sensitized T cells and is usually associated with a preceding viral illness. In each of these diseases the following central questions must be answered: (1) against what antigen (or antigens) of the nervous system is the autoimmune response directed? (2) what is the mechanism of immune damage? and (3) what initiates, or triggers, the autoimmune response? PMID:6179458

  19. Neurological diseases as primary gliopathies: a reassessment of neurocentrism

    Albee Messing

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of the human brain are almost universally attributed to malfunction or loss of nerve cells. However, a considerable amount of work has, during the last decade, expanded our view on the role of astrocytes in CNS (central nervous system, and this analysis suggests that astrocytes contribute to both initiation and propagation of many (if not all neurological diseases. Astrocytes provide metabolic and trophic support to neurons and oligodendrocytes. Here, we shall endeavour a broad overviewing of the progress in the field and forward the idea that loss of homoeostatic astroglial function leads to an acute loss of neurons in the setting of acute insults such as ischaemia, whereas more subtle dysfunction of astrocytes over periods of months to years contributes to epilepsy and to progressive loss of neurons in neurodegenerative diseases. The majority of therapeutic drugs currently in clinical use target neuronal receptors, channels or transporters. Future therapeutic efforts may benefit by a stronger focus on the supportive homoeostatic functions of astrocytes.

  20. [Prevention of virus-related neurological diseases by vaccines].

    Takahashi, M

    1997-04-01

    Prevention of virus-related neurological diseases are surveyed. Patients of poliomyelitis has recently been drastically reduced by world-wide administrating live vaccines. In view of rare incidence of paralysis after giving live vaccine, adoption of inactivated vaccine has recently been reconsidered. A live varicella vaccine was developed and has been world-wide used for normal and high-risk children. Incidence of zoster in vaccinated acute leukemic children is several times higher in those who with rash after vaccination as compared with those without rash, and as no or few rash appears after vaccination of normal children, it is expected that vaccination of normal children would lead to reduction of zoster after their aging. Measles encephalitis has rapidly been reduced by world-wide use of live vaccines. Mouse-brain derived vaccine against Japanese encephalitis(JE) has been used in Asian countries. Development of tissue-culture derived JE vaccine is under way. PMID:9103901

  1. Molecular Imaging in Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapy for Neurological Diseases

    Zefeng Wang; Haitong Wan; Jinhui Li; Hong Zhang(Department of Physics and Center for Quantum Spacetime (CQUeST), Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul, 121-742 Korea); Mei Tian

    2013-01-01

    With the speeding tendency of aging society, human neurological disorders have posed an ever increasing threat to public health care. Human neurological diseases include ischemic brain injury, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and spinal cord injury, which are induced by impairment or specific degeneration of different types of neurons in central nervous system. Currently, there are no more effective treatments against these diseases. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is focused on, ...

  2. Neurological Effects of Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Children

    Coskun YARAR

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning (COP is one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity due to poisoning in all over the world. Although the incidence of COP has not been known exactly in the childhood, almost one-third of CO exposures occurred in children. The data regarding COP in children are inconclusive. Children may be more vulnerable to CO exposure than adults as a result of their high respiration and metabolic rates, high oxygen metabolism, and immature central nervous system. Recent researches proposed new theories about neurological effects of CO toxicity. The clinical presentations associated acute COP may be various and nonspecific. Unrecognized CO exposure may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. CO exposed children often become symptomatic earlier, and recover more rapidly, than similarly CO exposed adults. Mild clinical signs and symptoms associated with COP are headache, dizziness, weakness, lethargy, and myalgia; however, severe signs and symptoms such as blurred vision, syncope, convulsion, coma, cardiopulmonary arrest and death can also accompany with COP. Neurologic manifestations can include altered mental status at different degrees, neck stiffness, tremor, ataxia, and positive Babinski's sign. Delayed neurologic sequels (DNS of COP might be seen in children like adults. DNS symptoms and signs in children include memory problems, mental retardation, mutism, fecal and urinary incontinence, motor deficits, facial palsy, psychosis, chronic headache, seizures, and epilepsy. After CO exposure children must be cared to detect and treat DNS. Although hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is reported to prevent development of DNS, its indications, application duration and procedures are controversial in both of the children and adults. Although their predictive values are limited, exposing to CO more than eight hours and suffering from CO-induced coma, cardiac arrest, lactic acidosis, high COHb levels, and pathologic findings

  3. Childhood central nervous system leukemia: historical perspectives, current therapy, and acute neurological sequelae

    Laningham, Fred H. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Kun, Larry E. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Reddick, Wilburn E.; Ogg, Robert J. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Translational Imaging Research, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Morris, E.B. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); Pui, Ching-Hon [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2007-11-15

    During the past three decades, improvements in the treatment of childhood leukemia have resulted in high cure rates, particularly for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Unfortunately, successful therapy has come with a price, as significant morbidity can result from neurological affects which harm the brain and spinal cord. The expectation and hope is that chemotherapy, as a primary means of CNS therapy, will result in acceptable disease control with less CNS morbidity than has been observed with combinations of chemotherapy and radiotherapy over the past several decades. In this review we discuss the poignant, historical aspects of CNS leukemia therapy, outline current methods of systemic and CNS leukemia therapy, and present imaging findings we have encountered in childhood leukemia patients with a variety of acute neurological conditions. A major objective of our research is to understand the neuroimaging correlates of acute and chronic effects of cancer and therapy. Specific features related to CNS leukemia and associated short-term toxicities, both disease- and therapy-related, are emphasized in this review with the specific neuroimaging findings. Specific CNS findings are similarly important when treating acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and details of leukemic involvement and toxicities are also presented in this entity. Despite contemporary treatment approaches which favor the use of chemotherapy (including intrathecal therapy) over radiotherapy in the treatment of CNS leukemia, children still occasionally experience morbid neurotoxicity. Standard neuroimaging is sufficient to identify a variety of neurotoxic sequelae in children, and often suggest specific etiologies. Specific neuroimaging findings frequently indicate a need to alter antileukemia therapy. It is important to appreciate that intrathecal and high doses of systemic chemotherapy are not innocuous and are associated with acute, specific, recognizable, and often serious neurological

  4. Childhood central nervous system leukemia: historical perspectives, current therapy, and acute neurological sequelae

    During the past three decades, improvements in the treatment of childhood leukemia have resulted in high cure rates, particularly for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Unfortunately, successful therapy has come with a price, as significant morbidity can result from neurological affects which harm the brain and spinal cord. The expectation and hope is that chemotherapy, as a primary means of CNS therapy, will result in acceptable disease control with less CNS morbidity than has been observed with combinations of chemotherapy and radiotherapy over the past several decades. In this review we discuss the poignant, historical aspects of CNS leukemia therapy, outline current methods of systemic and CNS leukemia therapy, and present imaging findings we have encountered in childhood leukemia patients with a variety of acute neurological conditions. A major objective of our research is to understand the neuroimaging correlates of acute and chronic effects of cancer and therapy. Specific features related to CNS leukemia and associated short-term toxicities, both disease- and therapy-related, are emphasized in this review with the specific neuroimaging findings. Specific CNS findings are similarly important when treating acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and details of leukemic involvement and toxicities are also presented in this entity. Despite contemporary treatment approaches which favor the use of chemotherapy (including intrathecal therapy) over radiotherapy in the treatment of CNS leukemia, children still occasionally experience morbid neurotoxicity. Standard neuroimaging is sufficient to identify a variety of neurotoxic sequelae in children, and often suggest specific etiologies. Specific neuroimaging findings frequently indicate a need to alter antileukemia therapy. It is important to appreciate that intrathecal and high doses of systemic chemotherapy are not innocuous and are associated with acute, specific, recognizable, and often serious neurological

  5. Insomnia in central neurologic diseases--occurrence and management

    Mayer, Geert; Jennum, Poul; Riemann, Dieter;

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this review is to highlight the impact of insomnia in central neurological disorders by providing information on its prevalence and give recommendations for diagnosis and treatment. Insomnia in neurological disorders is a frequent, but underestimated symptom. Its occurrence may be...... the cause of insomnia must be clearly identified. First line treatment aims at the underlying neurologic disease. The few high quality treatment studies show that short term treatment with hypnotics may be recommended in most disorders after having ruled out high risk for adverse effects. Sedating...... associated with most of the central neurological diseases. The prevalence and treatment of insomnia in neurological diseases still need to be studied in larger patient groups with randomized clinical trials to a) better understand their impact and causal relationship and b) to develop and improve specific...

  6. Remote Physical Activity Monitoring in Neurological Disease: A Systematic Review

    Block, Valerie A. J.; Pitsch, Erica; Tahir, Peggy; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Allen, Diane D.; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review of studies using remote physical activity monitoring in neurological diseases, highlighting advances and determining gaps. Methods Studies were systematically identified in PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 2004 to December 2014 that monitored physical activity for ≥24 hours in adults with neurological diseases. Studies that measured only involuntary motor activity (tremor, seizures), energy expenditure or sleep were excluded. Feasibility, findings, and protocols were examined. Results 137 studies met inclusion criteria in multiple sclerosis (MS) (61 studies); stroke (41); Parkinson's Disease (PD) (20); dementia (11); traumatic brain injury (2) and ataxia (1). Physical activity levels measured by remote monitoring are consistently low in people with MS, stroke and dementia, and patterns of physical activity are altered in PD. In MS, decreased ambulatory activity assessed via remote monitoring is associated with greater disability and lower quality of life. In stroke, remote measures of upper limb function and ambulation are associated with functional recovery following rehabilitation and goal-directed interventions. In PD, remote monitoring may help to predict falls. In dementia, remote physical activity measures correlate with disease severity and can detect wandering. Conclusions These studies show that remote physical activity monitoring is feasible in neurological diseases, including in people with moderate to severe neurological disability. Remote monitoring can be a psychometrically sound and responsive way to assess physical activity in neurological disease. Further research is needed to ensure these tools provide meaningful information in the context of specific neurological disorders and patterns of neurological disability. PMID:27124611

  7. Suicide and patients with neurologic diseases. Methodologic problems

    Stenager, E N; Stenager, Egon

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The suicide risk in patients with many neurologic diseases has been reported to be greater than that in the general population. Studies on the subject are, however, often encumbered with methodologic problems. We appraised these problems and, based on an evaluation, reappraised knowledge...... of the suicide risk in patients with specific neurologic diseases. DATA SOURCE: Using the computerized database MEDLINE, we identified all published reports with the key words suicide, attempted suicide, and neurologic diseases. STUDY SELECTION: We assessed and reviewed studies concerning the most...... common neurologic diseases for methodologic problems in the study design. DATA EXTRACTION: The following methodologic problems emerged during our review: (1) choice of study type, ie, autopsy study or follow-up study; (2) choice of study population; (3) choice of control groups; (4) epidemiologic...

  8. Ketogenic diets, mitochondria, and neurological diseases

    Gano, Lindsey B.; Patel, Manisha; Rho, Jong M

    2014-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a broad-spectrum therapy for medically intractable epilepsy and is receiving growing attention as a potential treatment for neurological disorders arising in part from bioenergetic dysregulation. The high-fat/low-carbohydrate “classic KD”, as well as dietary variations such as the medium-chain triglyceride diet, the modified Atkins diet, the low-glycemic index treatment, and caloric restriction, enhance cellular metabolic and mitochondrial function. Hence, the broad...

  9. PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases

    Human neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are caused by loss of different types of neurons and glial cells in the brain and spinal cord. At present, there are no effective therapies against these disorders. Discovery of the therapeutic potential of stem cells offers new strategies for the treatment of neurological diseases. Direct assessment of stem cells' survival, interaction with the host and impact on neuronal functions after transplantation requires advanced in vivo imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potential molecular imaging modality to evaluate the viability and function of transplanted tissue or stem cells in the nervous system. This review focuses on PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. (orig.)

  10. PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases

    Wang, Jiachuan; Zhang, Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Tian, Mei [University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Human neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are caused by loss of different types of neurons and glial cells in the brain and spinal cord. At present, there are no effective therapies against these disorders. Discovery of the therapeutic potential of stem cells offers new strategies for the treatment of neurological diseases. Direct assessment of stem cells' survival, interaction with the host and impact on neuronal functions after transplantation requires advanced in vivo imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potential molecular imaging modality to evaluate the viability and function of transplanted tissue or stem cells in the nervous system. This review focuses on PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. (orig.)

  11. Acute radiation disease

    Features of clinical trends in acute period of radiation disease at personnel who suffered from Chernobyl accident are considered. The main attention is paid to the results of 10 year observation of organs, systems and metabolic processes in patients. Used therapeutic, rehabilitation and preventive actions in stationary, ambulatory and sanatorium - health resort stages are described

  12. Astrocytes conspire with neurons during progression of neurological disease

    McGann, James C.; Lioy, Daniel T.; Mandel, Gail

    2012-01-01

    As astrocytes are becoming recognized as important mediators of normal brain function, studies into their roles in neurological disease have gained significance. Across mouse models for neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, astrocytes are considered key regulators of disease progression. In Rett syndrome and Parkinson’s disease, astrocytes can even initiate certain disease phenotypes. Numerous potential mechanisms have been offered to explain these results, but research into the ...

  13. Multiple sclerosis or neurological manifestations of Celiac disease

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS and celiac disease (CD are considered to be T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. We discuss about a known case of CD-showed relapsing - remitting neurological symptoms compatible with MS. In this rare co-occurrence subject, MS-CD patient, the interaction between MS - and CD-related inflammatory processes is open to discussion.

  14. Ketogenic diets, mitochondria, and neurological diseases.

    Gano, Lindsey B; Patel, Manisha; Rho, Jong M

    2014-11-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a broad-spectrum therapy for medically intractable epilepsy and is receiving growing attention as a potential treatment for neurological disorders arising in part from bioenergetic dysregulation. The high-fat/low-carbohydrate "classic KD", as well as dietary variations such as the medium-chain triglyceride diet, the modified Atkins diet, the low-glycemic index treatment, and caloric restriction, enhance cellular metabolic and mitochondrial function. Hence, the broad neuroprotective properties of such therapies may stem from improved cellular metabolism. Data from clinical and preclinical studies indicate that these diets restrict glycolysis and increase fatty acid oxidation, actions which result in ketosis, replenishment of the TCA cycle (i.e., anaplerosis), restoration of neurotransmitter and ion channel function, and enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Further, there is mounting evidence that the KD and its variants can impact key signaling pathways that evolved to sense the energetic state of the cell, and that help maintain cellular homeostasis. These pathways, which include PPARs, AMP-activated kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and the sirtuins, have all been recently implicated in the neuroprotective effects of the KD. Further research in this area may lead to future therapeutic strategies aimed at mimicking the pleiotropic neuroprotective effects of the KD. PMID:24847102

  15. Prediction and prognostication of neurological deterioration in patients with acute ICH

    Ovesen, Christian; Christensen, Anders Fogh; Havsteen, Inger;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) are at high risk of neurological deterioration (ND). We aimed at establishing predictors of early ND (END) as well as late ND (LND) and at exploring the impact of neurological stability during the first week on long-term prognosis. DESIGN: We...... conducted this study as a retrospective cohort study. ND was evaluated based on the consciousness and severity of neurological symptoms. ND during the first 24 h after admission was defined as early ND and from 24 h to 7 days as LND. Patients were followed up until February 2015. PARTICIPANTS: We included...... 300 patients with acute ICH (≤4.5 h from symptom onset) who were admitted to our institution from March 2009 to January 2015. SETTING: Section of Acute Neurology, Department of Neurology, Bispebjerg Hospital is a specialised referral centre receiving patients with acute stroke from the entire capital...

  16. Dynamic diseases in neurology and psychiatry

    Milton, John; Black, Deborah

    1995-03-01

    Thirty-two (32) periodic diseases of the nervous system are identified in which symptoms and/or signs recur. In 10/32, the recurrence of a symptom complex is one of the defining features of the illness, whereas in 22/32 oscillatory signs occur in the setting of an ongoing nervous system disorder. We discuss the possibility that these disorders may be dynamic diseases.

  17. Association of Pesticide Exposure with Neurologic Dysfunction and Disease

    Kamel, Freya; Hoppin, Jane A

    2004-01-01

    Poisoning by acute high-level exposure to certain pesticides has well-known neurotoxic effects, but whether chronic exposure to moderate levels of pesticides is also neurotoxic is more controversial. Most studies of moderate pesticide exposure have found increased prevalence of neurologic symptoms and changes in neurobehavioral performance, reflecting cognitive and psychomotor dysfunction. There is less evidence that moderate exposure is related to deficits in sensory or motor function or per...

  18. APOPTOSIS, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND NEUROLOGICAL DISEASE

    P. Formichi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a selective cell deletion process which requires the triggering of a specific cell death programme. Two main pathways determining cell death have been identified: the extrinsic or receptor-mediated pathway, activated in response to extracellular pro-apoptotic signals, and the intrinsic pathway, activated by extracellular receptor-independent stimuli or by intracellular insults, such as DNA damage and oxidative stress. All these stress signals are integrated by mitochondria which participate by releasing the main effectors of this process: a family of aspartic-specific proteases known as caspase. Today there is much evidence to suggest that deregulation of apoptosis is a key feature of many neurodegenerative disease. Our group sought cell models for the study of apoptotic pathways and for the evaluation of the role of apoptosis in specific neurodegenerative diseases. We focused on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. In our in-vitro model, lymphocytes from patients and control subjects were cultured both in basal conditions and with 2-deoxy-D-ribose (dRib, a reducing sugar which induces apoptosis through oxidative stress. In the last ten years, we evaluated the role of apoptosis in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases: Ataxiatelangiectasia,Rett syndrome, Mitochondrial disease, Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL. Here we report some of our ongoing and recently published articles.

  19. Serious unexpected sinus infection discovered by CT scanning for presumed neurological disease.

    Swift, A C; Gill, G. V.

    1994-01-01

    Serious infection in the paranasal sinuses may present with symptoms suggestive of neurological disease and thus lead to delay in the diagnosis and subsequent treatment. We present three such cases in whom the initial diagnoses had been acute optic neuritis, a posterior communicating aneurysm and an intracranial space occupying lesion. The fourth patient had meningitis but the paranasal sinuses had not initially been considered as a possible source of infection. The current methods of diagnos...

  20. Obsessive–Compulsive Symptoms in Neurologic Disease: A Review

    M. S. George

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD is an increasingly recognized disorder with a prevalence of 2–3% (Robins et al., 1984. Once thought to be psychodynamic in origin, OCD is now generally recognized as having a neurobiological cause. Although the exact pathophysiology of OCD in its pure form remains unknown, there are numerous reports of obsessive–compulsive symptoms arising in the setting of known neurological disease. In this paper, we review the reported cases of obsessive–compulsive symptoms associated with neurologic diseases and outline the known facts about the underlying neurobiology of OCD. Finally, we synthesize these findings into a proposed theory of the pathophysiology of OCD, in both its pure form and when it accompanies other neurological illness.

  1. Management of acute neurologic syndromes in infants and children.

    Shaywitz, B A

    1984-01-01

    Neurological problems in the pediatric intensive care unit all too frequently seem to be among the most mysterious of disorders. This review provides a framework to diagnose and treat four frequently observed neurological syndromes: coma, status epilepticus, central nervous system infections, and post-infectious polyneuropathy (Guillain-Barré syndrome). An emphasis is placed on the diagnosis of coma due to metabolic disorders, the most common cause of coma, and coma as a result of supratentor...

  2. Patterns of histone acetylation as targets for novel therapeutic approaches in neurological diseases

    Ebrahimi, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases, in particular brain tumors and neurodegenerative disorders, cause significant socio-economic burdens on societies. Exploring epigenetic mechanisms in neurological disorders in recent decades has been an emerging tool for describing the pathogenesis of neurological diseases as well as developing new therapeutics. Global histone acetylation is an epigenetic entity whose alternating patterns in various neurological diseases have recently raised special attention concer...

  3. Neuroinflammation and neurological alterations in chronic liver diseases

    Carmina Montoliu; Marta Llansola; Vicente Felipo

    2015-01-01

    Several million people with chronic liver diseases (cirrhosis, hepatitis) show neurological alterations, named hepatic encephalopathy (HE) with cognitive and motor alterations that impair quality of life and reduces life span. Inflammation acts synergistically with hyperammonemia to induce cognitive and motor alterations in patients with chronic liver disease and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Previous studies in animal models have suggested that neuroinflammation is a major player in ...

  4. Biomarker discovery in neurological diseases: a metabolomic approach

    Afaf El-Ansary

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Afaf El-Ansary, Nouf Al-Afaleg, Yousra Al-YafaeeBiochemistry Department, Science College, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Biomarkers are pharmacological and physiological measurements or specific biochemicals in the body that have a particular molecular feature that makes them useful for measuring the progress of disease or the effects of treatment. Due to the complexity of neurological disorders, it is very difficult to have perfect markers. Brain diseases require plenty of markers to reflect the metabolic impairment of different brain cells. The recent introduction of the metabolomic approach helps the study of neurological diseases based on profiling a multitude of biochemical components related to brain metabolism. This review is a trial to elucidate the possibility to use this approach to identify plasma metabolic markers related to neurological disorders. Previous trials using different metabolomic analyses including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis will be traced.Keywords: metabolic biomarkers, neurological disorders. metabolome, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, chromatography

  5. Proton MRS in Behcet's disease with and without neurological findings

    Our aim was to investigate whether neurological impairment in Behcet's disease (BD) can be assessed by means of proton MRS and whether it can assist in prognosis. We used single-voxel MRS to measure metabolites in regions of normal-appearing pons, basal ganglia and periventricular white matter (PWM) in 32 patients with chronic BD patients with and without neurological deficits and 29 control subjects. Patients had significantly higher N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) and choline (Cho)/Cr ratios in the basal ganglia than the controls. The Cho/Cr ratio in the PWM was also significantly higher in the patients. MRS enabled clear discrimination of patients and controls and also revealed spectral differences between non-neuro-Behcet's disease and neuro-Behcet's disease in the basal ganglia. MRS can be used to assess brain involvement in BD even if structural changes are absent. (orig.)

  6. Synaptic pathology: A shared mechanism in neurological disease.

    Henstridge, Christopher M; Pickett, Eleanor; Spires-Jones, Tara L

    2016-07-01

    Synaptic proteomes have evolved a rich and complex diversity to allow the exquisite control of neuronal communication and information transfer. It is therefore not surprising that many neurological disorders are associated with alterations in synaptic function. As technology has advanced, our ability to study the anatomical and physiological function of synapses in greater detail has revealed a critical role for both central and peripheral synapses in neurodegenerative disease. Synapse loss has a devastating effect on cellular communication, leading to wide ranging effects such as network disruption within central neural systems and muscle wastage in the periphery. These devastating effects link synaptic pathology to a diverse range of neurological disorders, spanning Alzheimer's disease to multiple sclerosis. This review will highlight some of the current literature on synaptic integrity in animal models of disease and human post-mortem studies. Synaptic changes in normal brain ageing will also be discussed and finally the current and prospective treatments for neurodegenerative disorders will be summarised. PMID:27108053

  7. Blood levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP in patients with neurological diseases.

    Christoph A Mayer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The brain-specific astroglial protein GFAP is a blood biomarker candidate indicative of intracerebral hemorrhage in patients with symptoms suspicious of acute stroke. Comparably little, however, is known about GFAP release in other neurological disorders. In order to identify potential "specificity gaps" of a future GFAP test used to diagnose intracerebral hemorrhage, we measured GFAP in the blood of a large and rather unselected collective of patients with neurological diseases. METHODS: Within a one-year period, we randomly selected in-patients of our university hospital for study inclusion. Patients with ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack and intracerebral hemorrhage were excluded. Primary endpoint was the ICD-10 coded diagnosis reached at discharge. During hospital stay, blood was collected, and GFAP plasma levels were determined using an advanced prototype immunoassay at Roche Diagnostics. RESULTS: A total of 331 patients were included, covering a broad spectrum of neurological diseases. GFAP levels were low in the vast majority of patients, with 98.5% of cases lying below the cut-off that was previously defined for the differentiation of intracerebral hemorrhage and ischemic stroke. No diagnosis or group of diagnoses was identified that showed consistently increased GFAP values. No association with age and sex was found. CONCLUSION: Most acute and chronic neurological diseases, including typical stroke mimics, are not associated with detectable GFAP levels in the bloodstream. Our findings underline the hypothesis that rapid astroglial destruction as in acute intracerebral hemorrhage is mandatory for GFAP increase. A future GFAP blood test applied to identify patients with intracerebral hemorrhage is likely to have a high specificity.

  8. Node of Ranvier disruption as a cause of neurological diseases

    Keiichiro Susuki

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction and/or disruption of nodes of Ranvier are now recognized as key contributors to the pathophysiology of various neurological diseases. One reason is that the excitable nodal axolemma contains a high density of Nav (voltage-gated Na+ channels that are required for the rapid and efficient saltatory conduction of action potentials. Nodal physiology is disturbed by altered function, localization, and expression of voltage-gated ion channels clustered at nodes and juxtaparanodes, and by disrupted axon–glial interactions at paranodes. This paper reviews recent discoveries in molecular/cellular neuroscience, genetics, immunology, and neurology that highlight the critical roles of nodes of Ranvier in health and disease.

  9. Nutritional Alterations Associated with Neurological and Neurosurgical Diseases

    Dionyssiotis, Yannis; Papachristos, Aris; Petropoulou, Konstantina; Papathanasiou, Jannis; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis

    2016-01-01

    Neurological and neurosurgical diseases lead to complications producing malnutrition increasing pathology and mortality. In order to avoid complications because of malnutrition or overcome deficiencies in nutrients supplements are often used for these subjects. The physiopathological mechanisms of malnutrition, methods of nutritional assessment and the supplemental support are reviewed in this paper based on the assumption that patients need to receive adequate nutrition to promote optimal recovery, placing nutrition as a first line treatment and not an afterthought in the rehabilitation.

  10. Nutritional Alterations Associated with Neurological and Neurosurgical Diseases.

    Dionyssiotis, Yannis; Papachristos, Aris; Petropoulou, Konstantina; Papathanasiou, Jannis; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis

    2016-01-01

    Neurological and neurosurgical diseases lead to complications producing malnutrition increasing pathology and mortality. In order to avoid complications because of malnutrition or overcome deficiencies in nutrients supplements are often used for these subjects. The physiopathological mechanisms of malnutrition, methods of nutritional assessment and the supplemental support are reviewed in this paper based on the assumption that patients need to receive adequate nutrition to promote optimal recovery, placing nutrition as a first line treatment and not an afterthought in the rehabilitation. PMID:27563361

  11. Neurological manifestations of ear disease in dogs and cats.

    Garosi, Laurent S; Lowrie, Mark L; Swinbourne, Natalie F

    2012-11-01

    There are four major neuroanatomical structures associated with the ear that, when damaged, result in different neurologic clinical signs. These structures are the facial nerve, the ocular sympathetic tract, the vestibular receptors, and the cochlea. The clinical signs associated with disorders of each structure are discussed, followed by a summary of the diseases that should be considered in each case. The article begins with a description of the neuroanatomy of each of these structures. PMID:23122174

  12. Spasmodic dysphonia: description of the disease and associated neurologic disorders

    Coelho, Marina Serrato

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spasmodic dysphonia (SD is a problem that affects speech and vocalization, one of the most devastating disorders of oral communication. It is characterized by vocal quality tensaestrangulada, harshly and / or interspersed with abrupt vocal attack and a great tension in the vocal tract. The etiology of spasmodic dysphonia is unclear. Some authors point to psychogenic causes, neurological or even unknown. Objective: To assess the prevalence of muscular dystonias and other neurological symptoms in patients with ED. Method: A retrospective study of 10 cases with diagnosis of ED for symptoms and neurological disorders associated. Results: There was a significant predominance of the disease in females (9:1. The average age of onset of symptoms was 32 years, ranging between 14 and 60 years. The mean disease duration was 10 years. Among the patients, 87.5% had a diagnosis of disorders of movement made by a neurologist, including orofacial dystonias (50%, essential tremor (50% and spastic paraparesis (12%. Conclusion: The presence of movement disorders followed almost all cases of spasmodic dysphonia. More studies are needed to clarify the pathophysiological basis of disease.

  13. Therapeutic Effects of Bee Venom on Immunological and Neurological Diseases

    Hwang, Deok-Sang; Kim, Sun Kwang; Bae, Hyunsu

    2015-01-01

    Bee Venom (BV) has long been used in Korea to relieve pain symptoms and to treat inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. The underlying mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory and analgesic actions of BV have been proved to some extent. Additionally, recent clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that BV and BV-derived active components are applicable to a wide range of immunological and neurodegenerative diseases, including autoimmune diseases and Parkinson’s disease. These effects of BV are known to be mediated by modulating immune cells in the periphery, and glial cells and neurons in the central nervous system. This review will introduce the scientific evidence of the therapeutic effects of BV and its components on several immunological and neurological diseases, and describe their detailed mechanisms involved in regulating various immune responses and pathological changes in glia and neurons. PMID:26131770

  14. Neurological Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Celiac Disease: A Comprehensive Review

    Shahriar Nikpour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity may initially present asone or more neurological signs and/or symptoms. On the other hand, it may be associated with or complicated by neurological manifestations. Neurological presentations are rare in children but as many as 36% of adult patients present with neurological changes. With severe malnutrition after progression of celiac disease, different vitamin deficiencies may develop. Such problems can in turn overlap with previous neurological abnormalities including ataxia,epilepsy, neuropathy, dementia, and cognitive disorders. Inthis study, we aimed to review the neurological aspects of celiac disease. Early diagnosis and treatment could prevent related disability in patients with celiac disease.

  15. Insomnia in central neurologic diseases--occurrence and management

    Mayer, Geert; Jennum, Poul; Riemann, Dieter;

    2011-01-01

    of insomnia is primarily based on medical history and validated questionnaires. Actigraphy is a helpful diagnostic tool for assessing the circadian sleep-wake rhythm. For differential diagnosis and to measure the duration of sleep full polysomnography may be recommended. Prior to initiating treatment...... antidepressants may be an effective treatment for insomnia in stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Melatonin and light treatment can stabilize the sleep-wake circadian rhythm and shorten sleep latency in dementias and PD. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be effective in treating insomnia symptoms......The objective of this review is to highlight the impact of insomnia in central neurological disorders by providing information on its prevalence and give recommendations for diagnosis and treatment. Insomnia in neurological disorders is a frequent, but underestimated symptom. Its occurrence may be...

  16. Texas Occurrence of Lyme Disease and Its Neurological Manifestations

    Dandashi, Jad A; Nizamutdinov, Damir; Dayawansa, Samantha; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Huang, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    Today, Lyme disease is the most commonly reported tick-borne disease in the United States and Europe. The culprits behind Lyme disease are the Borrelia species of bacteria. In the USA, Borrelia burgdorferi causes the majority of cases, while in Europe and Asia Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii carry the greatest burden of disease. The clinical manifestations of Lyme disease have been identified as early localized, early disseminated, and late chronic. The neurological effects of Lyme disease include both peripheral and central nervous systems involvement, including focal nerve abnormalities, cranial neuropathies, painful radiculoneuritis, meningitis, and/or toxic metabolic encephalopathy, known as Lyme encephalopathy. Given the geographic predominance of Lyme disease in the Northeast and Midwest of the USA, no major studies have been conducted regarding Southern states. Between 2005 and 2014, the Center for Disease Control has reported 582 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in Texas. Because of the potential for increased incidence and prevalence in Texas, it has become essential for research and clinical efforts to be diverted to the region. The Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Lyme Lab has been investigating the ecology of Lyme disease in Texas and developing a pan-specific serological test for Lyme diagnosis. This report aimed to exposure materials and raise awareness of Lyme disease to healthcare providers. PMID:27478852

  17. Emerging Links between Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity and Neurological Disease

    Dion eDickman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic signaling systems are ubiquitous forms of biological regulation, having been studied for hundreds of years in the context of diverse physiological processes including body temperature and osmotic balance. However, only recently has this concept been brought to the study of excitatory and inhibitory electrical activity that the nervous system uses to establish and maintain stable communication. Synapses are a primary target of neuronal regulation with a variety of studies over the past 15 years demonstrating that these cellular junctions are under bidirectional homeostatic control. Recent work from an array of diverse systems and approaches has revealed exciting new links between homeostatic synaptic plasticity and a variety of seemingly disparate neurological and psychiatric diseases. These include autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disabilities, schizophrenia, and Fragile X Syndrome. Although the molecular mechanisms through which defective homeostatic signaling may lead to disease pathogenesis remain unclear, rapid progress is likely to be made in the coming years using a powerful combination of genetic, imaging, electrophysiological, and next generation sequencing approaches. Importantly, understanding homeostatic synaptic plasticity at a cellular and molecular level may lead to developments in new therapeutic innovations to treat these diseases. In this review we will examine recent studies that demonstrate homeostatic control of postsynaptic protein translation, retrograde signaling, and presynaptic function that may contribute to the etiology of complex neurological and psychiatric diseases.

  18. Uncommon acute neurologic presentation of canine distemper in 4 adult dogs

    Galán, Alba; Gamito, Araceli; Carletti, Beatrice E.; Guisado, Alicia; de las Mulas, Juana Martín; Pérez, José; Martín, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Four uncommon cases of canine distemper (CD) were diagnosed in vaccinated adult dogs. All dogs had acute onset of neurologic signs, including seizures, abnormal mentation, ataxia, and proprioceptive deficits. Polymerase chain reaction for CD virus was positive on cerebrospinal fluid in 2 cases. Due to rapid deterioration the dogs were euthanized and CD was confirmed by postmortem examination.

  19. Uncommon acute neurologic presentation of canine distemper in 4 adult dogs.

    Galán, Alba; Gamito, Araceli; Carletti, Beatrice E; Guisado, Alicia; de las Mulas, Juana Martín; Pérez, José; Martín, Eva M

    2014-04-01

    Four uncommon cases of canine distemper (CD) were diagnosed in vaccinated adult dogs. All dogs had acute onset of neurologic signs, including seizures, abnormal mentation, ataxia, and proprioceptive deficits. Polymerase chain reaction for CD virus was positive on cerebrospinal fluid in 2 cases. Due to rapid deterioration the dogs were euthanized and CD was confirmed by postmortem examination. PMID:24688139

  20. Vascular endothelial growth factor: a neurovascular target in neurological diseases.

    Lange, Christian; Storkebaum, Erik; de Almodóvar, Carmen Ruiz; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Brain function critically relies on blood vessels to supply oxygen and nutrients, to establish a barrier for neurotoxic substances, and to clear waste products. The archetypal vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, arose in evolution as a signal affecting neural cells, but was later co-opted by blood vessels to regulate vascular function. Consequently, VEGF represents an attractive target to modulate brain function at the neurovascular interface. On the one hand, VEGF is neuroprotective, through direct effects on neural cells and their progenitors and indirect effects on brain perfusion. In accordance, preclinical studies show beneficial effects of VEGF administration in neurodegenerative diseases, peripheral neuropathies and epilepsy. On the other hand, pathologically elevated VEGF levels enhance vessel permeability and leakage, and disrupt blood-brain barrier integrity, as in demyelinating diseases, for which blockade of VEGF may be beneficial. Here, we summarize current knowledge on the role and therapeutic potential of VEGF in neurological diseases. PMID:27364743

  1. Human gene therapy and imaging in neurological diseases

    Molecular imaging aims to assess non-invasively disease-specific biological and molecular processes in animal models and humans in vivo. Apart from precise anatomical localisation and quantification, the most intriguing advantage of such imaging is the opportunity it provides to investigate the time course (dynamics) of disease-specific molecular events in the intact organism. Further, molecular imaging can be used to address basic scientific questions, e.g. transcriptional regulation, signal transduction or protein/protein interaction, and will be essential in developing treatment strategies based on gene therapy. Most importantly, molecular imaging is a key technology in translational research, helping to develop experimental protocols which may later be applied to human patients. Over the past 20 years, imaging based on positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been employed for the assessment and ''phenotyping'' of various neurological diseases, including cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and brain gliomas. While in the past neuro-anatomical studies had to be performed post mortem, molecular imaging has ushered in the era of in vivo functional neuro-anatomy by allowing neuroscience to image structure, function, metabolism and molecular processes of the central nervous system in vivo in both health and disease. Recently, PET and MRI have been successfully utilised together in the non-invasive assessment of gene transfer and gene therapy in humans. To assess the efficiency of gene transfer, the same markers are being used in animals and humans, and have been applied for phenotyping human disease. Here, we review the imaging hallmarks of focal and disseminated neurological diseases, such as cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and glioblastoma multiforme, as well as the attempts to translate gene therapy's experimental knowledge into clinical applications and the way in which this process is being promoted through the use of

  2. Pictorial essay: Acute neurological complications in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Seema A Kembhavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the commonest childhood malignancy with high cure rates due to recent advances in central nervous system (CNS prophylaxis. The disease per se, as well as the prophylactic therapy, predisposes the child to complications such as cerebrovascular events, infections, drug toxicities, etc. The purpose of this study is to highlight the pathophysiology and the imaging features (with appropriate examples of these complications and to propose a diagnostic algorithm based on MRI. Interpreting these scans in the light of clinical inputs very often helps the radiologist reach an appropriate diagnosis and help treatment and management.

  3. [Neurological and psychiatric aspects of some gastrointestinal diseases].

    Aszalós, Zsuzsa

    2008-11-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is controlled by the independent enteric nervous system. It is also closely connected to the central nervous system, and bi-directional communication exists between them. The communication involves neural pathways as well as immune and endocrine mechanisms. The brain-gut axis plays a prominent role in the modulation of gut functions. Signals from different sources (e.g. sound, sight, smell, somatic and visceral sensations, pain) reach the brain. These inputs are modified by memory, cognition and affective mechanisms and integrated within the neural circuits of the central nervous system, spinal cord, autonomic and enteral nervous systems. These inputs can have physiologic effects, such as changes in motility, secretion, immune function, and blood flow to the gastrointestinal tract. One of the most important neurotransmitters is serotonin that plays a key role in the pathogenesis of the most common chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder: the irritable bowel syndrome. It is a biopsychosocial disease, resulting from the dysregulation of the brain-gut axis. Endogenous pain facilitation rather than inhibition, pathologic gradation of visceral perception and reduced threshold for pain are all evident in these patients. Abuse history is common in their anamnesis. Exaggerated conscientiousness, perfectionism, oversensitivity, feeling of deficiency in effectiveness, and higher demand for social parity, neuroticism and alexithymia have been detected among their constant personality features. Females are also characterized by gender role conflict and low assertiveness. Antidepressants and psychotherapy have important roles in their treatment. Also patients with inflammatory bowel disease are characterized by neuroticism and alexithymia and altered mother-child attachment is often described in their anamnesis. Autonomic neuropathy is a frequent and early neurological complication. Reflux disease and obstructive sleep apnea mutually generate

  4. MRI findings of neurologic complications in the enterovirus 71-infected hand-foot-mouth disease

    Objective: To explore the imaging characteristics of neurologic complications associated with the enterovirus 71 (EV71) epidemic by analyzing 25 cases and reviewing the literature. Methods: Twenty-five cases of hand-foot-mouth disease with neurologic complications during the recent EV71 outbreaks of Hainan province were studied for the clinical features and imaging findings, and literature were reviewed. Results: In 5 cases, acute flaccid paralysis associated with EV71-infected hand-foot-mouth disease was related to the linear high signal in the spinal cord on sagittal images. Two cases showed symmetrical, well- defined hyperintense lesions in the spinal cord on T2WI transverse. Strong enhancement of the ventral horns and root was seen on the contrast-enhanced axial T1WI. In brainstem encephalitis, all lesions presented with significant hyperintensity on T2WI and hypointense on T1WI in the posterior portions of the medulla oblongata, midbrain, and pons. The manifestations of aseptic meningitis (AM) on MRI have no characteristics, but subdural effusion, meningeal enhancement and hydrocephalus can be the indirect signs of AM. Conclusions: MRI is an effective method to investigate neurologic complications associated with the EV71 epidemic. Posterior portions of the medulla oblongata and pons, bilateral ventral horns of spinal involvement are characteristic findings of enteroviral encephalomyelitis. (authors)

  5. Neurological Disease Rises from Ocean to Bring Model for Human Epilepsy to Life

    John S. Ramsdell

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid of macroalgal origin was used for traditional and medicinal purposes in Japan and largely forgotten until its rediscovery in diatoms that poisoned 107 people after consumption of contaminated mussels. The more severely poisoned victims had seizures and/or amnesia and four died; however, one survivor unexpectedly developed temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE a year after the event. Nearly a decade later, several thousand sea lions have stranded on California beaches with neurological symptoms. Analysis of the animals stranded over an eight year period indicated five clusters of acute neurological poisoning; however, nearly a quarter have stranded individually outside these events with clinical signs of a chronic neurological syndrome similar to TLE. These poisonings are not limited to sea lions, which serve as readily observed sentinels for other marine animals that strand during domoic acid poisoning events, including several species of dolphin and whales. Acute domoic acid poisoning is five-times more prominent in adult female sea lions as a result of the proximity of their year-round breeding grounds to major domoic acid bloom events. The chronic neurological syndrome, on the other hand, is more prevalent in young animals, with many potentially poisoned in utero. The sea lion rookeries of the Channel Islands are at the crossroads of domoic acid producing harmful algal blooms and a huge industrial discharge site for dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDTs. Studies in experimental animals suggest that chronic poisoning observed in immature sea lions may result from a spatial and temporal coincidence of DDTs and domoic acid during early life stages. Emergence of an epilepsy syndrome from the ocean brings a human epilepsy model to life and provides unexpected insights into interaction with legacy contaminants and expression of disease at different life stages.

  6. Pertussis immunisation and serious acute neurological illness in children.

    Ebrahim, Shah

    1981-01-01

    The first 1000 cases notified to the National Childhood Encephalopathy Study were analysed. The diagnoses included encephalitis/encephalopathy, prolonged convulsions, infantile spasms, and Reye's syndrome. Eighty-eight of the children had had a recent infectious disease, including 19 with pertussis. Only 35 of the notified children (3.5%) had received pertussis antigen within seven days before becoming ill. Of 1955 control children matched for age, sex, and area of residence, 34 (1.7%) had be...

  7. A study on subsequent neurologic complications in children with acute leukemia

    Twenty-seven children with acute leukemia were studied in order to detect the subsequent neurologic complications due to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Twenty-four patients with ALL received central nervous system prophylaxis including cranial irradiation. The methods of evaluation consisted of electroencephalogram (EEG), computed tomography of the head (CT scan), soft neurological sign, intelligence quotient (IQ) and Bender Gestalt test. The patients with relapse showed severe abnormalities in various kinds of examinations. Younger children at diagnosis were associated with a higher abnormality rate of soft neurological signs and Bender Gestalt test. Factors which were found to be closely associated with a lower IQ score included younger children at diagnosis and longer duration of remission time. These results indicate the need for caution for the dosage of cranial irradiation for younger patients in CNS prophylaxis, and improvement of a lower IQ score in long-term survivors requires further investigation as to the appropriate intellectual environment for their development after remission. (author)

  8. [Palliative Care for Neurological Intractable Diseases and Home Medical Support].

    Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Ogino, Mieko; Ishigaki, Yasunori; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2015-08-01

    Many medical doctors regard the end stage and palliative care of neurological intractable diseases as the point at which aggressive treatment should be interrupted and death is imminent. However, the definition of health by the World Health Organization as the physical, psychological, and social goal to achieve a fully favorable health condition should be revisited. In the real clinical setting, the health condition, as the ability to adapt and self-manage in the face of social, physical, and emotional challenges with the aim to overcome stress (resilience), is dynamic and involves a healthy condition and satisfaction with one's own living. The most important step in palliative therapy that is shared by neurologists is the maintenance of the health status with the help of multi-disciplinary team with the view to improving the quality of life. PMID:26241362

  9. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis

  10. Chagas disease in a Texan horse with neurologic deficits.

    Bryan, Laura K; Hamer, Sarah A; Shaw, Sarah; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Auckland, Lisa D; Hodo, Carolyn L; Chaffin, Keith; Rech, Raquel R

    2016-01-30

    A 10-year-old Quarter Horse gelding presented to the Texas A&M University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a six month-history of ataxia and lameness in the hind limbs. The horse was treated presumptively for equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) based on clinical signs but was ultimately euthanized after its condition worsened. Gross lesions were limited to a small area of reddening in the gray matter of the thoracic spinal cord. Histologically, trypanosome amastigotes morphologically similar to Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease in humans and dogs, were sporadically detected within segments of the thoracic spinal cord surrounded by mild lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. Ancillary testing for Sarcocystis neurona, Neospora spp., Toxoplasma gondii and Leishmania spp. was negative. Conventional and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of affected paraffin embedded spinal cord were positive for T. cruzi, and sequencing of the amplified T. cruzi satellite DNA PCR fragment from the horse was homologous with various clones of T. cruzi in GenBank. While canine Chagas disease cases have been widely reported in southern Texas, this is the first report of clinical T. cruzi infection in an equid with demonstrable amastigotes in the spinal cord. In contrast to previous instances of Chagas disease in the central nervous system (CNS) of dogs and humans, no inflammation or T. cruzi amastigotes were detected in the heart of the horse. Based on clinical signs, there is a potential for misdiagnosis of Chagas disease with other infectious diseases that affect the equine CNS. T. cruzi should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with neurologic clinical signs and histologic evidence of meningomyelitis that originate in areas where Chagas disease is present. The prevalence of T. cruzi in horses and the role of equids in the parasite life cycle require further study. PMID:26801589

  11. Neuroinflammation and neurological alterations in chronic liver diseases

    Carmina Montoliu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several million people with chronic liver diseases (cirrhosis, hepatitis show neurological alterations, named hepatic encephalopathy (HE with cognitive and motor alterations that impair quality of life and reduces life span. Inflammation acts synergistically with hyperammonemia to induce cognitive and motor alterations in patients with chronic liver disease and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE. Previous studies in animal models have suggested that neuroinflammation is a major player in HE. This would also be the case in patients with liver cirrhosis or hepatitis C with HE. Rats with MHE show microglial activation and neuroinflammation that is associated with cognitive impairment and hypokinesia. The anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen reduces microglial activation and neuroinflammation and restores cognitive and motor functions in rats with MHE. Chronic hyperammonemia per se induces neuroinflammation. Both peripheral inflammation and hyperammonemia would contribute to neuroinflammation in chronic liver failure. Therefore, neuroinflammation may be a key therapeutic target to improve the cognitive and motor alterations in MHE and overt HE. Identifying new targets to reduce neuroinflammation in MHE without inducing secondary effects would serve to develop new therapeutic tools to reverse the cognitive and motor alterations in patients with HE associated with chronic liver diseases.

  12. Enfermedad neurologica por adenovirus Neurologic disease due to adenovirus infection

    Cristina L. Lema

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la prevalencia de adenovirus (ADV en las infecciones del sistema nervioso central (SNC. Se analizaron 108 muestras de líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR provenientes de 79 casos de encefalitis, 7 meningitis y 22 de otras patologías neurológicas, recibidas en el período 2000-2002. Cuarenta y nueve (47.35% se obtuvieron de pacientes inmunocomprometidos. La presencia de ADV se investigó mediante reacción en cadena de la polimerasa en formato anidado (Nested-PCR. La identificación del genogrupo se realizó mediante análisis filogenético de la secuencia nucleotídica parcial de la región que codifica para la proteína del hexón. Se detectó la presencia de ADV en 6 de 108 (5.5% muestras de LCR analizadas. Todos los casos positivos pertenecieron a pacientes con encefalitis que fueron 79, (6/79, 7.6%. No se observó diferencia estadísticamente significativa entre los casos de infección por ADV en pacientes inmunocomprometidos e inmunocompetentes (p>0.05. Las cepas de ADV detectadas se agruparon en los genogrupos B1 y C. En conclusión, nuestros resultados describen el rol de los ADV en las infecciones neurológicas en Argentina. La información presentada contribuye al conocimiento de su epidemiología, en particular en casos de encefalitis.The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of adenovirusm (ADV infections in neurological disorders. A total of 108 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from 79 encephalitis cases, 7 meningitis and 22 other neurological diseases analysed in our laboratory between 2000 and 2002 were studied. Forty nine (47.4% belonged to immunocompromised patients. Viral genome was detected using nested polymerase chain reaction (Nested-PCR and ADV genotypes were identified using partial gene sequence analysis of hexon gene. Adenovirus were detected in 6 of 108 (5.5% CSF samples tested. All of these were from encephalitis cases, 6/79, representing 7.6% of them. No statistically

  13. Cannabinoids: new promising agents in the treatment of neurological diseases.

    Giacoppo, Sabrina; Mandolino, Giuseppe; Galuppo, Maria; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, Cannabis sativa is considered the most extensively used narcotic. Nevertheless, this fame obscures its traditional employ in native medicine of South Africa, South America, Turkey, Egypt and in many regions of Asia as a therapeutic drug. In fact, the use of compounds containing Cannabis and their introduction in clinical practice is still controversial and strongly limited by unavoidable psychotropic effects. So, overcoming these adverse effects represents the main open question on the utilization of cannabinoids as new drugs for treatment of several pathologies. To date, therapeutic use of cannabinoid extracts is prescribed in patients with glaucoma, in the control of chemotherapy-related vomiting and nausea, for appetite stimulation in patients with anorexia-cachexia syndrome by HIV, and for the treatment of multiple sclerosis symptoms. Recently, researcher efforts are aimed to employ the therapeutic potentials of Cannabis sativa in the modulation of cannabinoid receptor activity within the central nervous system, particularly for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as well as psychiatric and non-psychiatric disorders. This review evaluates the most recent available data on cannabinoids utilization in experimental and clinical studies, and highlights their beneficial effects in the prevention of the main neurological diseases and for the clinical treatment of symptoms with them correlated. PMID:25407719

  14. Cannabinoids: New Promising Agents in the Treatment of Neurological Diseases

    Sabrina Giacoppo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Cannabis sativa is considered the most extensively used narcotic. Nevertheless, this fame obscures its traditional employ in native medicine of South Africa, South America, Turkey, Egypt and in many regions of Asia as a therapeutic drug. In fact, the use of compounds containing Cannabis and their introduction in clinical practice is still controversial and strongly limited by unavoidable psychotropic effects. So, overcoming these adverse effects represents the main open question on the utilization of cannabinoids as new drugs for treatment of several pathologies. To date, therapeutic use of cannabinoid extracts is prescribed in patients with glaucoma, in the control of chemotherapy-related vomiting and nausea, for appetite stimulation in patients with anorexia-cachexia syndrome by HIV, and for the treatment of multiple sclerosis symptoms. Recently, researcher efforts are aimed to employ the therapeutic potentials of Cannabis sativa in the modulation of cannabinoid receptor activity within the central nervous system, particularly for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as well as psychiatric and non-psychiatric disorders. This review evaluates the most recent available data on cannabinoids utilization in experimental and clinical studies, and highlights their beneficial effects in the prevention of the main neurological diseases and for the clinical treatment of symptoms with them correlated.

  15. Unstable mutations: cause of some neurological hereditary diseases

    Unstable mutations or amplification of triplets constitute a kind of genetic alteration discovered during the last decade. They had been found inside or near genes important for the normal neurological function of the human being. In some cases, the presence of the amplification causes the inactivation of the gene or the synthesis of a new product which functions different from the original protein. Some common characteristics of diseases caused by the amplification of triplets are that it affects the nervous system and are degenerative in nature. The expression of the manifestations varies according to age. Most of them show genetic anticipation in which the severity of the manifestations increases with each generation and appear at an earlier age. In most cases, the severity of the symptoms is correlated positively to the size of the amplification. The diagnosis of an affected individual in a family may indicate the presence of an altered gene in other relatives. These relatives may not present evident signs of the illness either because it is of late onset or because they carry premutations. The molecular diagnosis of these mutations is important to estimate the risk of developing the disease and/or of transmitting the illness to the descendants and to eliminate the fears of healthy relatives who have inherited normal copies of the gene. (Author)

  16. Neurological and cardiac complications in a cohort of children with end-stage renal disease

    Jumana H Albaramki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult patients with chronic kidney disease are at risk of major neurologic and cardiac complications. The purpose of this study is to review the neurological and cardiac complications in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. A retrospective review of medical records of children with ESRD at Jordan University Hospital was performed. All neurological and cardiac events were recorded and analyzed. Data of a total of 68 children with ESRD presenting between 2002 and 2013 were reviewed. Neurological complications occurred in 32.4%; seizures were the most common event. Uncontrolled hypertension was the leading cause of neurological events. Cardiac complications occurred in 39.7%, the most common being pericardial effusion. Mortality from neurological complications was 45%. Neurological and cardiac complications occurred in around a third of children with ESRD with a high mortality rate. More effective control of hypertension, anemia, and intensive and gentle dialysis are needed.

  17. The predictive value of thyroid hormone levels on the neurological outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Guo-dong CHEN

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the correlation between thyroid hormone levels in patients with acute ischemic stroke and the severity of disease and short-term prognosis. Methods According to the level of serum total triiodothyronine (TT3, 98 patients who presented first acute ischemic stroke and without history of thyroid abnormality were divided into low TT3 group and normal TT3 group. Thyroid hormone levels and neurological function defect of those patients were tested, and their neural functional recovery after 3 months was evaluated.  Results Low TT3 group had more severe neural function defect compared to normal TT3 group (χ2 = 58.134, P = 0.000. There were no significant differences on total thyroxine (TT4; t = 1.636, P = 0.105 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH; t = 1.059, P = 0.292 between 2 groups. There was a significantly negative correlation between TT3 levels and National Insititute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score on admission (r = -0.672, P = 0.000. Patients with low TT3 showed a significantly smaller percentage of neurological function improvement on both NIHSS ( χ2 = 8.993, P = 0.003 and modified Rankin Scale (mRS; χ2 = 6.247, P = 0.012 scores compared to those with normal TT3 at 90 d after onset.  Conclusions Low T3 level is associated with the severity of acute ischemic stroke and neural functional recovery, suggesting serum T3 level may be a predictor of neural function improvement in patients with acute ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.02.009

  18. R778L, H1069Q, and I1102T mutation study in neurologic Wilson disease

    Kalita Jayantee; Somarajan Bindu; Misra Usha; Mittal Balraj

    2010-01-01

    There is paucity of the studies on mutations in neurologic Wilson disease (WD) in India. We studied H1069Q, R778L, I1102T mutations in 26 patients with neurologic WD from 25 families in north India. The basis of diagnosis of neurologic WD was clinical, Kayser-Fleischer (KF) ring, and ceruloplasmin. Data collected included: family history, clinical characteristics, laboratory data, ultrasound findings, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and severity of the disease. DNA was isolated fro...

  19. Neurological Manifestations of an Old Disease: A Case Report

    Zia ISLAMI

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Islami Z, Ataee Nakhaei MH. Neurological Manifestations of An Old Disease: A Case Report. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Summer; 7(3: 55-57. ObjectiveNeurological manifestations of neonatal disorders have various causes, among them neonatal tetanus, albeit rare, is a potentially fatal and preventable disease, which is seen in underdeveloped and developing countries. Although thedisease has been eradicated from I.R. Iran, pregnant women immigrating to Iran from neighboring countries, especially from eastern border, may carry a risk of neonatal tetanus to the child due to inadequate tetanus immunization and inappropriate post-delivery care. It is then important to maintain a high index of suspicion for early diagnosis and prompt treatment, when infants present with poor feeding and abnormal behavior.Case presentation Here, we report the clinical course of a newborn with neonatal tetanus, who was admitted with complaints of poor feeding and muscle rigidity, more than a decade after eradication of the disorder. References1. WHO. Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals. Availablefrom: http://www.who.int/immunization/topics/tetanus/en/; 2008 [Access 25.10.2011].2. Lum SH, Chew MF. Neonatal Tetanus: A Study of Five Cases in Sandakan, Sabah. Med J Malaysia 2009;64(1:80-2.3. Ilic M, Pejcic L, Tiodorovic B, Hasani B, Stankovic S, Milojevic D, et al. Neonatal tetanus – report of a case. Turk J pediatr 2010;52:404-8.4. Chang SC, Wang CL. Neonatal tetanus after home delivery:report of one case. Pediatr Neonatol 2010;51(3:182-5.5. Cook TM, Protheroe RT, Handel JM. Tetanus: a review ofthe literature. Br J Anaesth 2001;87(3:477-87.6. Richard F. Edlich, MD, PhD, Lisa G. Hill, Chandra A.Mahler, et al. Management and Prevention of Tetanus.Long Term Eff Med Implants 2003;13(3139–54.7. Ministry of Health and Medical Education. Pediatricimmunization. Available from: http://behdasht.gov.ir/index.aspx?siteid=1&pageid=24979&newsvie=11776&pro

  20. Awareness Of The Neurological Diseases: Comparisons Of The Attendies At Secondary and Tertiary Neurological Oupatient Centers In The Sample Of Ankara City

    Emrah Aytaç

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Both neurological diseases and related disabilities are growing all over the world and in our country. Awareness of the neurological diseases is thought to be less than the expected. METHODS: The aim of this study is; to investigate the awareness of the neurological diseases in the secondary and tertiary neurological outpatient service attendies and to assess its correlations between the patient’s demographics. RESULTS: A total of 540 patients were included in the study. Alzheimer disease was found to be most known neurological disease and Multiple sclerosis was the least one. The awareness of the diseases correlated with the level of education. Younger patients were seem to be more aware about the neurological diseases than the older patients. Although currently widespread usage of internet/media, we found that patients prefer mostly to take advice from their family practitioners for being to attend to the neurological outpatient services. We comment that this result is a positive finding in terms of usage of health care system and patient-physician relationships. CONCLUSION: There is need for increasing the awareness of the neurological diseases for both early diagnosis of neurological diseases and to decrease the related disability.

  1. Ultrasonic investigations of brain in infants with some neurological diseases

    Ulezko, E. A.; Shan'ko, G. G.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have studied 197 infants (1-12 months old) with normal psychomotor development and with various neurological disturbances. Neurosonography and dopplerometry were used to investigate the blood flow pattern and structural changes in the brain.

  2. EFNS guidelines for the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in treatment of neurological diseases: EFNS task force on the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in treatment of neurological diseases

    Elovaara, I.; Apostolski, S.; Doorn, P. van;

    2008-01-01

    Despite high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is widely used in treatment of a number of immune-mediated neurological diseases, the consensus on its optimal use is insufficient. To define the evidence-based optimal use of IVIG in neurology, the recent papers of high relevance were reviewed...... second or third-line therapy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, if conventional immunomodulatory therapies are not tolerated (level B), and in relapses during pregnancy or post-partum period (good clinical practice point). IVIG seems to have a favourable effect also in paraneoplastic neurological...

  3. Interferon-gamma in progression to chronic demyelination and neurological deficit following acute EAE

    Renno, T; Taupin, V; Bourbonnière, L;

    1998-01-01

    The cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) is implicated in the induction of acute CNS inflammation, but it is less clear what role if any IFNgamma plays in progression to chronic demyelination and neurological deficit. To address this issue, we have expressed IFNgamma in myelinating oligodendrocytes...... of transgenic mice. MHC I immunostaining and iNOS mRNA were upregulated in their CNS, but such transgenic mice showed no spontaneous CNS inflammation or demyelination, and the incidence, severity, and histopathology of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) were similar to nontransgenic...

  4. Transverse Myelitis in Acute Hepatitis A Infection: The Rare Co-Occurrence of Hepatology and Neurology

    Piyanant Chonmaitree

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transverse myelitis refers to the inflammatory process involving the spinal cord. Clinical features can be either acute or subacute onset that results in neurological deficits such as weakness and/or numbness of extremities as well as autonomic dysfunctions. While there are some etiologies related, a viral infection is common. However, the hepatitis A virus rarely causes myelitis. This report provides details of a hepatitis A infectious patient who developed myelitis as comorbidity. Although, the disability was initially severe, the patient successfully recovered with corticosteroid treatment.

  5. Transverse Myelitis in Acute Hepatitis A Infection: The Rare Co-Occurrence of Hepatology and Neurology.

    Chonmaitree, Piyanant; Methawasin, Kulthida

    2016-01-01

    Transverse myelitis refers to the inflammatory process involving the spinal cord. Clinical features can be either acute or subacute onset that results in neurological deficits such as weakness and/or numbness of extremities as well as autonomic dysfunctions. While there are some etiologies related, a viral infection is common. However, the hepatitis A virus rarely causes myelitis. This report provides details of a hepatitis A infectious patient who developed myelitis as comorbidity. Although, the disability was initially severe, the patient successfully recovered with corticosteroid treatment. PMID:27403101

  6. [Cannabinoid drugs for neurological diseases: what is behind?].

    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier

    2012-05-16

    In recent years progress has been made in the development of pharmaceuticals based on the plant Cannabis sativa or on synthetic molecules with a similar action. Some of these pharmaceuticals, such as the mouth spray Sativex, have recently been approved for the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis, but they are not the first and others, such as Marinol or Cesamet for the treatment of vomiting and nausea, and anorexia-cachexia syndrome, had already been approved. This incipient clinical use of cannabinoid drugs confirms something that was already known from fairly ancient times up to practically the last century, which is the potential use of this plant for medicinal applications - something which was brought to a standstill by the abusive use of preparations of the plant for recreational purposes. In any case, this incipient clinical use of cannabinoid drugs is not backed just by the anecdote of the medicinal use of cannabis since ancient times, but instead the boost it has been given by scientific research, which has made it possible to identify the target molecules that are activated or inhibited by these substances. These targets are part of a new system of intercellular communication that is especially active in the central nervous system, which is called the 'endogenous cannabinoid system' and, like many other systems, can be manipulated pharmacologically. The aim of this review is to probe further into the scientific knowledge about this system generated in the last few years, as a necessary step to justify the development of pharmaceuticals based on its activation or inhibition and which can be useful in different neurological diseases. PMID:22573509

  7. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  8. Hippotherapy acute impact on heart rate variability non-linear dynamics in neurological disorders.

    Cabiddu, Ramona; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Trimer, Renata; Trimer, Vitor; Ricci, Paula Angélica; Italiano Monteiro, Clara; Camargo Magalhães Maniglia, Marcela; Silva Pereira, Ana Maria; Rodrigues das Chagas, Gustavo; Carvalho, Eliane Maria

    2016-05-15

    Neurological disorders are associated with autonomic dysfunction. Hippotherapy (HT) is a therapy treatment strategy that utilizes a horse in an interdisciplinary approach for the physical and mental rehabilitation of people with physical, mental and/or psychological disabilities. However, no studies have been carried out which evaluated the effects of HT on the autonomic control in these patients. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of a single HT session on cardiovascular autonomic control by time domain and non-linear analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). The HRV signal was recorded continuously in twelve children affected by neurological disorders during a HT session, consisting in a 10-minute sitting position rest (P1), a 15-minute preparatory phase sitting on the horse (P2), a 15-minute HT session (P3) and a final 10-minute sitting position recovery (P4). Time domain and non-linear HRV indices, including Sample Entropy (SampEn), Lempel-Ziv Complexity (LZC) and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), were calculated for each treatment phase. We observed that SampEn increased during P3 (SampEn=0.56±0.10) with respect to P1 (SampEn=0.40±0.14, pdisabilities attributable to neurological disorders by eliciting an acute autonomic response during the therapy and during the recovery period. PMID:26988283

  9. A Case-Control study of the prevalence of neurological diseases in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD

    Francisco de Assis Aquino Gondim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurological diseases are common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients, but their exact prevalence is unknown. Method We prospectively evaluated the presence of neurological disorders in 121 patients with IBD [51 with Crohn's disease (CD and 70 with ulcerative colitis (UC] and 50 controls (gastritis and dyspepsia over 3 years. Results Our standard neurological evaluation (that included electrodiagnostic testing revealed that CD patients were 7.4 times more likely to develop large-fiber neuropathy than controls (p = 0.045, 7.1 times more likely to develop any type of neuromuscular condition (p = 0.001 and 5.1 times more likely to develop autonomic complaints (p = 0.027. UC patients were 5 times more likely to develop large-fiber neuropathy (p = 0.027 and 3.1 times more likely to develop any type of neuromuscular condition (p = 0.015. Conclusion In summary, this is the first study to prospectively establish that both CD and UC patients are more prone to neuromuscular diseases than patients with gastritis and dyspepsia.

  10. Adult Hip Flexion Contracture due to Neurological Disease: A New Treatment Protocol—Surgical Treatment of Neurological Hip Flexion Contracture

    Alberto Nicodemo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital, traumatic, or extrinsic causes can lead people to paraplegia; some of these are potentially; reversible and others are not. Paraplegia can couse hip flexion contracture and, consequently, pressure sores, scoliosis, and hyperlordosis; lumbar and groin pain are strictly correlated. Scientific literature contains many studies about children hip flexion related to neurological diseases, mainly caused by cerebral palsy; only few papers focus on this complication in adults. In this study we report our experience on surgical treatment of adult hip flexion contracture due to neurological diseases; we have tried to outline an algorithm to choose the best treatment avoiding useless or too aggressive therapies. We present 5 cases of adult hips flexion due to neurological conditions treated following our algorithm. At 1-year-follow-up all patients had a good clinical outcome in terms of hip range of motion, pain and recovery of walking if possible. In conclusion we think that this algorithm could be a good guideline to treat these complex cases even if we need to treat more patients to confirm this theory. We believe also that postoperation physiotherapy it is useful in hip motility preservation, improvement of muscular function, and walking ability recovery when possible.

  11. Bilirubin/Albumin Ratio for Predicting Acute Bilirubin-induced Neurologic Dysfunction

    Gholamreza Esmaeeli Djavid

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The aim of this study was to evaluate the bilirubin albumin (B/A ratio in comparison with total serum bilirubin (TSB for predicting acute bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND. Methods:Fifty two term and near term neonates requiring phototherapy and exchange transfusion for severe hyperbilirubinemia in Childrens Medical Center, Tehran, Iran, during September 2007 to September 2008, were evaluated. Serum albumin and bilirubin were measured at admission. All neonates were evaluated for acute BIND based on clinical findings. Findings:Acute BIND developed in 5 (3.8% neonates. B/A ratio in patients with BIND was significantly higher than in patients without BIND (P<0.001. Receiver operation characteristics (ROC analysis identified a TSB cut off value of 25 mg/dL [area under the curve (AUC 0.945] with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 85%. Also, according to the ROC curve, B/A ratio cut off value for predicting acute BIND was 8 (bil mg/al g (AUC 0.957 with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 94%. Conclusion:Based on our results, we suggest using B/A ratio in conjunction with TSB. This can improve the specificity and prevent unnecessary invasive therapy such as exchange transfusion in icteric neonates.

  12. Cerebrolysin effects on neurological outcomes and cerebral blood flow in acute ischemic stroke

    Amiri-Nikpour, Mohammad Reza; Nazarbaghi, Surena; Ahmadi-Salmasi, Babak; Mokari, Tayebeh; Tahamtan, Urya; Rezaei, Yousef

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebrolysin, a brain-derived neuropeptide, has been shown to improve the neurological outcomes of stroke, but no study has demonstrated its effect on cerebral blood flow. This study aimed to determine the cerebrolysin impact on the neurological outcomes and cerebral blood flow. Methods In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, 46 patients who had acute focal ischemic stroke were randomly assigned into two groups to receive intravenously either 30 mL of cerebrolysin diluted in normal saline daily for 10 days (n=23) or normal saline alone (n=23) adjunct to 100 mg of aspirin daily. All patients were examined using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and transcranial Doppler to measure the mean flow velocity and pulsatility index (PI) of their cerebral arteries at baseline as well as on days 30, 60, and 90. Results The patients’ mean age was 60±9.7 years, and 51.2% of patients were male. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was significantly lower in the cerebrolysin group compared with the placebo group on day 60 (median 10, interquartile range 9–11, P=0.008) and day 90 (median 11, interquartile range 10–13.5, P=0.001). The median of PI in the right middle cerebral artery was significantly lower in the cerebrolysin group compared with the placebo group on days 30, 60, and 90 (P<0.05). One patient in the cerebrolysin group and two patients in the placebo group died before day 30 (4.3% versus 8.7%). Conclusion Cerebrolysin can be useful to improve the neurological outcomes and the PI of middle cerebral artery in patients with acute focal ischemic stroke. PMID:25516711

  13. Is Further Examination Necessary in Patients with Behcets Disease Without Any Neurological Signs or Symptoms?

    Halit YAsAR

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Visually evoked potential examination may be used as a conductive method to detect the subclinical neurological pathologies in Behcets disease. The possible silent neurological involvement should be evaluated with further neuro-screening methods. [Dis Mol Med 2015; 3(3.000: 29-34

  14. Ultrasound in Acute Kidney Disease.

    Meola, Mario; Nalesso, Federico; Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys' imaging provides useful information in acute kidney injury (AKI) diagnosis and management. Today, several imaging techniques give information on kidneys anatomy, urinary obstruction, differential diagnosis between AKI and chronic kidney disease (CKD), renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. Ultrasound is a safe, non-invasive and repeatable imaging technique so it is widely used in the first level work-up of AKI. The utility of contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in AKI or in AKI during CKD is limited because of renal toxicity associated with contrast agents used. PMID:27169556

  15. Predictors of major neurological improvement after intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke: A hospital-based study from south India

    Boddu Demudu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Despite the increasing use of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA in acute ischemic stroke, uncertainty persists about the short- and long-term outcome of the thrombolysed patients. Objective : To identify predictors of major neurological improvement at 24 h after intravenous rt-PA administration in patients of acute ischemic stroke and their relationship with outcome at 12 months. Materials and Methods : We analyzed the data of the patients with acute ischemic stroke treated as per the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS criteria with intravenous rt-PA between January 2000 and June 2009 at a tertiary care center in south India. Major neurological improvement was defined by an 8-point improvement in National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score or an NIHSS score of 0 or 1 at 24 h. Good outcome was defined as a 12-month modified Rankin Scale (mRS of 0 to 1. Results : Of the 72 patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous rt-PA, 23 (32% patients had major neurological improvement at 24 h. Age <60 years (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.7 to3.2, admission glucose levels <8 mmol/L (OR 3.87, 95% CI 1.9 to 9.2 and mild to moderate baseline stroke severity (NIHSS median score 10+ 6 were associated with major neurological improvement after adjusting for co variables. Major neurological improvement at 24 h was an independent predictor of good outcome (mRS=1 at 12 months (OR 13.9, 95% CI 6.84 to 40.2. Conclusions : Age <60 years, glucose levels <8 mmol/L and mild to moderate stroke severity (NIHSS median score 10±6 was associated with major neurological improvement after intravenous rt-PA. Major neurological improvement at 24 h after the administration of intravenous thrombolysis independently predicted good outcome at 12 months.

  16. Cerebrolysin effects on neurological outcomes and cerebral blood flow in acute ischemic stroke

    Amiri-Nikpour MR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Reza Amiri-Nikpour,1 Surena Nazarbaghi,1 Babak Ahmadi-Salmasi,1 Tayebeh Mokari,2 Urya Tahamtan,2 Yousef Rezaei3 1Department of Neurology, Imam Khomeini Hospital, 2School of Medicine, 3Seyyed-al-Shohada Heart Center, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran Background: Cerebrolysin, a brain-derived neuropeptide, has been shown to improve the neurological outcomes of stroke, but no study has demonstrated its effect on cerebral blood flow. This study aimed to determine the cerebrolysin impact on the neurological outcomes and cerebral blood flow. Methods: In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, 46 patients who had acute focal ischemic stroke were randomly assigned into two groups to receive intravenously either 30 mL of cerebrolysin diluted in normal saline daily for 10 days (n=23 or normal saline alone (n=23 adjunct to 100 mg of aspirin daily. All patients were examined using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and transcranial Doppler to measure the mean flow velocity and pulsatility index (PI of their cerebral arteries at baseline as well as on days 30, 60, and 90. Results: The patients’ mean age was 60±9.7 years, and 51.2% of patients were male. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was significantly lower in the cerebrolysin group compared with the placebo group on day 60 (median 10, interquartile range 9–11, P=0.008 and day 90 (median 11, interquartile range 10–13.5, P=0.001. The median of PI in the right middle cerebral artery was significantly lower in the cerebrolysin group compared with the placebo group on days 30, 60, and 90 (P<0.05. One patient in the cerebrolysin group and two patients in the placebo group died before day 30 (4.3% versus 8.7%. Conclusion: Cerebrolysin can be useful to improve the neurological outcomes and the PI of middle cerebral artery in patients with acute focal ischemic stroke. Keywords: ischemic stroke, cerebrolysin, neuroprotection, NIHSS, mean

  17. Acute Chagas Disease in a Returning Traveler

    Carter, Yvonne L.; Juliano, Jonathan J; Montgomery, Susan P.; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    Acute Chagas disease is rarely recognized, and the risk for acquiring the disease is undefined in travelers to Central America. We describe a case of acute Chagas disease in a traveler to Costa Rica and highlight the need for increased awareness of this infection in travelers to Chagas-endemic areas.

  18. Bile Acid Signaling Is Involved in the Neurological Decline in a Murine Model of Acute Liver Failure.

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Ashfaq, Samir; de los Santos, Mario; Grant, Stephanie; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2016-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious neurological complication of liver failure. Serum bile acids are elevated after liver damage and may disrupt the blood-brain barrier and enter the brain. Our aim was to assess the role of serum bile acids in the neurological complications after acute liver failure. C57Bl/6 or cytochrome p450 7A1 knockout (Cyp7A1(-/-)) mice were fed a control, cholestyramine-containing, or bile acid-containing diet before azoxymethane (AOM)-induced acute liver failure. In parallel, mice were given an intracerebroventricular infusion of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) Vivo-morpholino before AOM injection. Liver damage, neurological decline, and molecular analyses of bile acid signaling were performed. Total bile acid levels were increased in the cortex of AOM-treated mice. Reducing serum bile acids via cholestyramine feeding or using Cyp7A1(-/-) mice reduced bile acid levels and delayed AOM-induced neurological decline, whereas cholic acid or deoxycholic acid feeding worsened AOM-induced neurological decline. The expression of bile acid signaling machinery apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, FXR, and small heterodimer partner increased in the frontal cortex, and blocking FXR signaling delayed AOM-induced neurological decline. In conclusion, circulating bile acids may play a pathological role during hepatic encephalopathy, although precisely how they dysregulate normal brain function is unknown. Strategies to minimize serum bile acid concentrations may reduce the severity of neurological complications associated with liver failure. PMID:26683664

  19. Acute flaccid paraplegia:neurological approach, diagnostic workup, and therapeutic options

    Gentian Vyshka; Altin Kuqo; Serla Grabova; Eris Ranxha; Liro Buda; Jera Kruja

    2015-01-01

    Acute flaccid paraplegia is a clinical occurrence with extreme importance, due to the dramatic presentation, the severity of the underlying disorder, and the generally poor prognosis that follows such a condition. Among etiological factors, the traumatic events are of particular interest, with the clinical treating dealing with a severely ill patient, following fall from height, motor vehicle collisions, and direct shocks applied over the vertebral column. The non-traumatic list is more numerous;however the severity of the acute paraplegia is not necessarily of a lesser degree. Viral infections, autoimmune disorders, and ischemic events involving feeding spinal arteries have been imputed. However, chemical and medications injected during procedures or accidentally intrathecal administration can produce acute flaccid paraplegia. A careful neurological assessment and complete electrophysiological and imaging studies must follow. In spite of the poor prognosis, different therapeutic options have been proposed and applied. Neurosurgical and orthopedic interventions are often necessary when trauma is present, with high dose glucocorticoids treatment preceding the intervention, in a hope to decrease edema-related compression over the spinal cord. Immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis are logical and helpful options when a polyradiculoneuritis produces such a clinical picture. The role of decompression, as neurosurgical exclusivity, has been considered as well.

  20. Neurological diseases as primary gliopathies: a reassessment of neurocentrism

    Verkhratsky, A.; Sofroniew, M. V.; Messing, A.; deLanerolle, N. C.; Rempe, D.; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Nedergaard, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2012), e00082. ISSN 1759-0914 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/09/1696; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA305/08/1384; GA ČR GA309/08/1381 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : aging * astrocyte * brain Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.638, year: 2012

  1. Psychiatric side effects of acute high-dose corticosteroid therapy in neurological conditions.

    Lotan, Itay; Fireman, Liora; Benninger, Felix; Weizman, Abraham; Steiner, Israel

    2016-07-01

    It has been implied that high-dose corticosteroids (CSs) commonly cause psychiatric side effects. Here, we examined the rate and risk factors of psychiatric side effects during high-dose CS treatment in patients with neurological disorders. Patients treated with high-dose intravenous CSs for neurological disorders were evaluated for depression, mania, and psychosis using the Beck Depression Inventory, the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Young Mania Rating Scale, and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale before CS treatment, immediately after, and 1 month following treatment. Forty-nine consecutive patients were monitored. There was a reduction in the Beck Depression Inventory and Geriatric Depression Scale scores as well as in the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale scores throughout the study period and a transitory increase in the Young Mania Rating Scale score immediately after CS administration. Thus, a tendency to develop transient mild euphoria during high-dose CS treatment exists, but is reversible at 1 month, whereas a reduction in depressive symptoms tended to persist. Overall, our data indicate that high-dose CS treatment for neurological diseases is relatively safe with respect to psychiatric complications. PMID:26938038

  2. Unusual presentations of acute kidney injury and neurologic complications due to snake bite

    Hamid Noshad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vascularity of kidneys is very high, so these organs are potentially susceptible to be affected with toxins including snake venom. Hypersensitivity to snake venous could cause some neurological problem. Case Report: We present a 14-year-old boy with acute kidney injury (AKI due to snake bite. After a few days, kidney failure with hematuria was developed. His serum creatinine level rose to 3 mg/dl and following 2 weeks gradually and decreased to normal level without any special treatment except for anti-venom, which was not prescribed inappropriate time (this type of AKI is not reported previously. He had seizure attacks, which were according to magnetic resonance imaging due to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES (This neurologic complication has been seen in other kidney injuries but up to now it was not reported in snake bite victims. Conclusion: Sanke venom could cause PRES due to AKI and seizure could be one of the most important complications in snake bite.

  3. Enterovirus 71-induced neurological disorders in young gerbils, Meriones unguiculatus: development and application of a neurological disease model.

    Ping-Ping Yao

    Full Text Available A reliable disease model mimicking Enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection in humans is essential for understanding pathogenesis and for developing a safe and effective vaccine. Commonly used rodent models including mouse or rat models are not suitable for vaccine evaluation because the rodents are resistant to EV71 infection after they reach the age of 6 days. In this study, 21-day-old gerbils inoculated intraperitoneally (IP with a non mouse-adapted EV71 strain developed neurological lesion-related signs including hind limb paralysis, slowness, ataxia and lethargy similar to those of central nervous system (CNS infection of EV71 in humans. The infected gerbils eventually died of the neurological lesions and EV71 could be isolated from lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, spinal cord, brain cortex, brainstem and skeletal muscle. Significantly high virus replication was detected in spinal cord, brainstem and skeletal muscle by cellular analysis, real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining. Histopathologic changes such as neuronal degeneration, neuronal loss and neuronophagia were observed in spinal cord, brain cortex, brainstem, and skeletal muscle along with necrotizing myositis and splenic atrophy. Gerbils that received two doses of inactive whole-virus vaccine showed no EV71-specific symptoms after challenged with EV71. In contrast, gerbils that received mock vaccination died of EV71-induced neuropathology after challenged with EV71. The result indicates that gerbils can serve as a reliable disease model for evaluating safety and efficacy of EV71 vaccine.

  4. Focus on acute diarrhoeal disease

    Fabio Baldi; Maria Antonia Bianco; Gerardo Nardone; Alberto Pilotto; Emanuela Zamparo

    2009-01-01

    Diarrhoea is an alteration of normal bowel movement characterized by an increase in the water content,volume, or frequency of stools. Diarrhoea needs to be classified according to the trends over time (acute or chronic) and to the characteristics of the stools (watery, fatty, inflammatory). Secretory diarrhoeas,mostly acute and of viral aetiology in more than 70% of cases, are by far the most important subtype of diarrhoeas in terms of frequency, incidence and mortality (over 2.5 million deaths/year in developing countries). Natural and synthetic opiates such as morphine, codeine, and loperamide which react with endogenous opiates (enkephalins, beta-endorphins,dynorphins) mainly act on intestinal motility and slow down transit. An antidiarrhoeal drug developed in recent years, racecadotril, acts as an enkephalinase inhibitor.Clinical studies have shown that it is just as effective as loperamide in resolving acute diarrhoea but with greater reduction in pain and abdominal distension.Some studies have explored the prevalence of diarrhoea in old age. An epidemiological study carried out in Italy by 133 General Practitioners on 5515 elderly outpatients reported a prevalence of diarrhoea, defined according to the Rome criteria, of 9.1%. Infectious diseases (19%) and drug use (16%) were the most commoncauses of diarrhoea in old age. Regardless of the cause,the treatment of elderly patients with diarrhoea must include rehydration and nutritional support. Every year,more than 50 million tourists travel from industrialized countries to places where hygiene levels are poor. At least 75% of those travelling for short periods mention health problems, and in particular traveller's diarrhoea.

  5. Regulations in the United States for cell transplantation clinical trials in neurological diseases

    He Zhu; Yuanqing Tan; Qi Gu; Weifang Han; Zhongwen Li; Jason S Meyer; Baoyang Hu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to use a systematic approach to evaluate the current utilization, safety, and effectiveness of cell therapies for neurological diseases in human. And review the present regulations, considering United States (US) as a representative country, for cell transplantation in neurological disease and discuss the challenges facing the field of neurology in the coming decades. Methods:A detailed search was performed in systematic literature reviews of cellular‐based therapies in neurological diseases, using PubMed, web of science, and clinical trials. Regulations of cell therapy products used for clinical trials were searched from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Results: Seven most common types of cell therapies for neurological diseases have been reported to be relatively safe with varying degrees of neurological recovery. And a series of regulations in US for cellular therapy was summarized including preclinical evaluations, sourcing material, stem cell manufacturing and characterization, cell therapy product, and clinical trials. Conclusions:Stem cell‐based therapy holds great promise for a cure of such diseases and will value a growing population of patients. However, regulatory permitting activity of the US in the sphere of stem cells, technologies of regenerative medicine and substitutive cell therapy are selective, theoretical and does not fit the existing norm and rules. Compiled well‐defined regulations to guide the application of stem cell products for clinical trials should be formulated.

  6. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    Mariani, Alberto; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreatitis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis. There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation, hereditary a...

  7. Evaluation of neurological complications using who warning signs for dengue disease severity

    In 2009 a new classification of dengue was proposed by WHO Tropical Disease Research, which classifies dengue into dengue (D), dengue with warning signs (DW) and severe dengue (SD). This classification highlights the warning signs of dengue disease severity. Neurological complications are one of the most serious complications of dengue disease. This study was carried out to see association of neurological complications of dengue patients with WHO warning signs for dengue disease severity, and their outcome. Methods: It was a cross-sectional analytical study and included 180 diagnosed and registered cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever. The participants were subjected to a detailed clinical evaluation, laboratory assessment including blood counts, hematocrit, serology for dengue fever and sonography at 24 hours and 48 hours of their admission. Results: Twenty-six percent patients were suffering from neurological complications due to dengue. The warning signs for dengue disease severity like altered sensorium (85.5%, p=0.001), raised hematocrit (n=47, p=0.029), gall bladder wall thickening, pleural effusion and ascites on sonographic report (n=47, p=0.024), were strongly associated with the neurological complications. Conclusion: Our study reveals significant association of WHO warning signs for dengue disease severity with neurological complications of dengue disease. (author)

  8. Acute neurological signs as the predominant clinical manifestation in four dogs with Angiostrongylus vasorum infections in Denmark

    Pors Susanne E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Four dogs with acute neurological signs caused by haemorrhages in the central nervous system were diagnosed with Angiostrongylus vasorum infection as the underlying aetiology. Two dogs presented with brain lesions, one dog with spinal cord lesions and one with lesions in both the brain and spinal cord. Only one dog presented with concurrent signs of classical pulmonary angiostrongylosis (respiratory distress, cough, and only two dogs displayed overt clinical signs of haemorrhages. Results of coagulation assays were inconsistent. Neurological signs reflected the site of pathology and included seizures, various cranial nerve deficits, vestibular signs, proprioceptive deficits, ataxia and paraplegia. One dog died and three were euthanised due to lack of improvement despite medical treatment. This emphasises canine angiostrongylosis as a potential cause of fatal lesions of the central nervous system and the importance of including A. vasorum as a differential diagnosis in young dogs with acute neurological signs in Denmark.

  9. Acute intermittent porphyria with syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH and neurological crisis, successfully treated with haemodialysis

    P. S. Singh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a 35 years old male, a case of Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP with Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone secretion (SIADH and neurological crisis for its rarity. Since specific parenteral medication (hemin was not available, patient was empirically treated with haemodialysis with satisfactory outcome. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(2.000: 795-797

  10. Therapeutic Effects of Bee Venom on Immunological and Neurological Diseases

    Deok-Sang Hwang; Sun Kwang Kim; Hyunsu Bae

    2015-01-01

    Bee Venom (BV) has long been used in Korea to relieve pain symptoms and to treat inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. The underlying mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory and analgesic actions of BV have been proved to some extent. Additionally, recent clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that BV and BV-derived active components are applicable to a wide range of immunological and neurodegenerative diseases, including autoimmune diseases and Parkinson’s disease. T...

  11. Herpes simplex serious neurological disease in young children: incidence and long-term outcome

    Ward, Katherine N.; Ohrling, Anu; Bryant, Naomi J; Bowley, Jennifer S; Ross, Euan M; Verity, Christopher M

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the contribution of herpes simplex virus (HSV) to serious neurological disease. Setting and patients A 3-year prospective survey of children aged 2–23 months in Britain and Ireland. Results 19 children had HSV central nervous system (CNS) infection; 13 aged 2–11 months had focal neuroimaging abnormalities and 11 long-term neurological sequelae. Of six aged 12–35 months, one had abnormal neuroimaging and three long-term neurological sequelae. 17 of the 19 had serious neu...

  12. Lipid imbalance in the progressive neurological metabolic disorder, Farber disease

    Ribeiro, Maria Gil Roseira; Ferreira, Natália; Alves, Mariana; Ribeiro, Isaura

    2010-01-01

    Farber disease is a neurodegenerative metabolic inherited disease caused by the deficient activity of acid ceramidase which leads to ceramide accumulation within lysosomes. Besides the structural role in biomembranes ceramide also acts as signalling molecule. The present study investigated whether intracellular trafficking of lipid molecules is blocked in diseased fibroblasts. The observation of secondary lysosomal glycosphingolipids and cholesterol storage in Farber cells rein...

  13. Red cell distribution width and neurological scoring systems in acute stroke patients

    Kara H

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hasan Kara,1 Selim Degirmenci,1 Aysegul Bayir,1 Ahmet Ak,1 Murat Akinci,1 Ali Dogru,1 Fikret Akyurek,2 Seyit Ali Kayis3 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey; 2Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey; 3Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, Karabuk University, Karabuk, Turkey Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the association between the red blood cell distribution width (RDW and the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, Canadian Neurological Scale (CNS, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores in patients who had acute ischemic stroke. Methods: This prospective observational cohort study included 88 patients who have had acute ischemic stroke and a control group of 40 patients who were evaluated in the Emergency Department for disorders other than acute ischemic stroke. All subjects had RDW determined, and stroke patients had scoring with the GCS, CNS, and NIHSS scores. The GCS, CNS, and NIHSS scores of the patients were rated as mild, moderate, or severe and compared with RDW. Results: Stroke patients had significantly higher median RDW than control subjects. The median RDW values were significantly elevated in patients who had more severe rather than milder strokes rated with all three scoring systems (GCS, CNS, and NIHSS. The median RDW values were significantly elevated for patients who had moderate rather than mild strokes rated by GCS and CNS and for patients who had severe rather than mild strokes rated by NIHSS. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.760 (95% confidence interval, 0.676–0.844. Separation of stroke patients and control groups was optimal with RDW 14% (sensitivity, 71.6%; specificity, 67.5%; accuracy, 70.3%. Conclusion: In stroke patients who have symptoms <24 hours, the RDW may be useful in predicting the severity and functional outcomes of the stroke

  14. Current neurology

    The topics covered in this book include: Duchenne muscular dystrophy: DNA diagnosis in practice; Central nervous system magnetic resonance imaging; and Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neurologic diseases

  15. Approach to Neurometabolic Diseases from a Pediatric Neurological Point of View

    KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh

    2015-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Karimzadeh P. Approach to Neurometabolic Diseases from a Pediatric Neurological Point of View. Iran J Child Neurol. 2015 Winter;9(1): 1-16. AbstractObjectiveNeurometabolic disorders are an important group of diseases that mostly arepresented in newborns and infants.Neurological manifestations are the prominent signs and symptoms in this groupof diseases. Seizures are a common sign and are often refractory to antiepileptic drugs in untreated neurometabolic patients.Th...

  16. The pharmacology of neurotrophic treatment with Cerebrolysin: brain protection and repair to counteract pathologies of acute and chronic neurological disorders.

    Masliah, E; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2012-04-01

    Neurotrophic factors are considered as part of the therapeutic strategy for neurological disorders like dementia, stroke and traumatic brain injury. Cerebrolysin is a neuropeptide preparation which mimics the action of endogenous neurotrophic factors on brain protection and repair. In dementia models, Cerebrolysin decreases β-amyloid deposition and microtubule-associated protein tau phosphorylation by regulating glycogen synthase kinase-3β and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity, increases synaptic density and restores neuronal cytoarchitecture. These effects protect integrity of the neuronal circuits and thus result in improved cognitive and behavioral performance. Furthermore, Cerebrolysin enhances neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, the basis for neuronal replacement therapy in neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental studies in stroke animal models have shown that Cerebrolysin stabilizes the structural integrity of cells by inhibition of calpain and reduces the number of apoptotic cells after ischemic lesion. Cerebrolysin induces restorative processes, decreases infarct volume and edema formation and promotes functional recovery. Stroke-induced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone was also promoted by Cerebrolysin, thus supporting the brain's self-repair after stroke. Both, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury conditions stimulate the expression of natural neurotrophic factors to promote repair and regeneration processes -axonal regeneration, neuronal plasticity and neurogenesis- that is considered to be crucial for the future recovery. Neuroprotective effects of Cerebrolysin on experimentally induced traumatic spinal cord injury have shown that Cerebrolysin prevents apoptosis of lesioned motoneurons and promotes functional recovery. This section summarizes the most relevant data on the pharmacology of Cerebrolysin obtained from in vitro assays (biochemical and cell cultures) and in vivo animal models of acute and chronic neurological disorders. PMID

  17. Obstructive lung disease in acute medical patients.

    Seemungal, T.; Harrinarine, R.; Rios, M.; Abiraj, V.; Ali, A.; Lacki, N.; Mahabir, N.; Ramoutar, V.; King, C. P.; Bhowmik, A.; Wedzicha, J A

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the proportion of adult medical patients who have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), using the Global initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines (GOLD), and its relation to vascular disease. METHODS: This is a prospective cross-sectional study of adult patients admitted to acute medical wards. Interviewer administered questionnaire, anthropometric and spirometric measurements were done. RESULTS: Spirometry was performed in 720 acute admissio...

  18. Recent achievements in restorative neurology: Progressive neuromuscular diseases

    This book contains 27 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Computed Tomography of Muscles in Neuromuscular Disease; Mapping the Genes for Muscular Dystrophy; Trophic Factors and Motor Neuron Development; Size of Motor Units and Firing Rate in Muscular Dystrophy; Restorative Possibilities in Relation to the Pathology of Progressive Neuromuscular Disease; and An Approach to the Pathogenesis of some Congenital Myopathies

  19. Diarrheal Diseases - Acute and Chronic

    ... and drinking contaminated or raw foods and beverages. Screening/Diagnosis Most episodes of acute diarrhea resolve quickly without antibiotic therapy and with simple dietary modifications. See a ...

  20. Dock protein family in brain development and neurological disease

    Shi, Lei

    2013-01-01

    The family of dedicator of cytokinesis (Dock), a protein family that belongs to the atypical Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rac and/or Cdc42 GTPases, plays pivotal roles in various processes of brain development. To date, 11 members of Docks have been identified in the mammalian system. Emerging evidence has suggested that members of the Dock family are associated with several neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases, including Alzheimer disease and autism spectrum ...

  1. Human gene therapy and imaging in neurological diseases

    Jacobs, Andreas H.; Winkler, Alexandra; Maria G Castro; Lowenstein, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    Molecular imaging aims to assess non-invasively disease-specific biological and molecular processes in animal models and humans in vivo. Apart from precise anatomical localisation and quantification, the most intriguing advantage of such imaging is the opportunity it provides to investigate the time course (dynamics) of disease-specific molecular events in the intact organism. Further, molecular imaging can be used to address basic scientific questions, e.g. transcriptional regulation, signal...

  2. Approach to Neurometabolic Diseases from a Pediatric Neurological Point of View

    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Karimzadeh P. Approach to Neurometabolic Diseases from a Pediatric Neurological Point of View. Iran J Child Neurol. 2015 Winter;9(1: 1-16. AbstractObjectiveNeurometabolic disorders are an important group of diseases that mostly arepresented in newborns and infants.Neurological manifestations are the prominent signs and symptoms in this groupof diseases. Seizures are a common sign and are often refractory to antiepileptic drugs in untreated neurometabolic patients.The onset of symptoms for neurometabolic disorders appears after an interval ofnormal or near normal growth and development.Additionally, affected childrenmay fare well until a catabolic crisis occurs.Patients with neurometabolic disorders during metabolic decompensation havesevere clinical presentation, which include poor feeding, vomiting, lethargy,seizures, and loss of consciousness.This symptom is often fatal but severe neurological insult and regression inneurodevelopmental milestones can result as a prominent sign in patients whosurvived.Acute symptoms should be immediately treated regardless of the cause.A number of patients with neurometabolic disorders respond favorably and, insome instances, dramatically respond to treatment.Early detection and early intervention is invaluable in some patients to preventcatabolism and normal or near normal neurodevelopmental milestones.This paper discusses neurometabolic disorders, approaches to this group ofdiseases (from the view of a pediatric neurologist, clinical and neurologicalmanifestations, neuroimaging and electroencephalography findings, earlydetection, and early treatment. ReferencesFiliano JJ. Neurometabolic Disease in the Newborn. ClinPerinatol 33, 2006, 411-479.Van Karnebeek CDM, Stockler S. Treatable inborn errors of metabolism causing intellectual disability: A systematic literature review. Molecular Genetics and Metabolism, 105, 2012, 369-381.Abdel-Salam GMH, Abdel-Kader AA, Effat L, Gouda A

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids and acute neurological trauma: a perspective on clinical translation*

    Gladman Stacy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute neurological trauma remains one of the clinical areas with the most significant unmet needs worldwide. In the central nervous system, acute trauma has two stages: the primary injury and the secondary injury. The former is irreversible, and is a direct consequence of the impact. In the aftermath of the injury, a complex series of processes exacerbate the injury and amplify tissue damage. Some of these processes are local, others involve a systemic response. It is these processes which ultimately determine the clinical outcome. The aim of the treatments is a to confer neuroprotection and b to promote neuroregeneration. The results reported so far with omega-3 fatty acids in animal models of neurotrauma suggest that these compounds have the potential to offer a novel therapeutic approach and target both protection and regeneration. They lead to increased neuronal and glial survival, they can limit the damaging neuroinflammation and they can also protect neurites. Long chain omega-3 fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid have a complex pharmacodynamics, which leads potentially to the activation of a multitude of targets, including voltage and ligand-gated ion channels, transcription factors and G-protein coupled receptors. They can produce tissue-specific metabolites which have intrinsic activity, either on the same or on different cellular targets. The apparent large therapeutic window of omega-3 fatty acids is an advantage in the context of trauma, with patients in an unstable state, with multiple injuries. The specific use of omega-3 fatty acids in spinal cord injury and peripheral nerve injury will be discussed, focusing on issues which need to be addressed in order to translate successfully to the clinic the efficacy reported in the initial proof of concept animal studies.

  4. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    Alberto Mariani; Pier Alberto Testoni

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreaUtis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis.There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association.Cystic fibrosis transmembrane con ductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation,hereditary and obstructive pancreatitis seem an acute disease that progress to chronic pancreatitis,likely as a consequence of the activation and proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells that produce and activate collagen and therefore fibrosis.From the diagnostic point of view,in patients with acute recurrent pancreatitis Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) seems the more reliable technique for an accurate evaluation and follow-up of some ductal and parenchymal abnormalities suspected for early chronic pancreatitis.

  5. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: typical findings in an atypical disease

    Skelton, Brandon W.; Phillips, C.D. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Neuroradiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Hollingshead, Michael C.; Castillo, Mauricio [University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Neuroradiology Section, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Sledd, Andrew T. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Pediatrics, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC) is a disease entity seen nearly exclusively in East Asian children that is characterized by multifocal, symmetric lesions involving the thalami, brainstem, cerebellum, and white matter. We present a child who developed dramatic neurologic symptoms following a viral prodrome. Serial MRI examinations demonstrated characteristic lesions of ANEC, while laboratory analyses revealed evidence of acute infection with human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6). We highlight the MRI findings in both the acute and convalescent phases of ANEC, discuss the implications of neuroimaging on the child's clinical course, and emphasize the integral role of the radiologist in correctly diagnosing this rare disease. (orig.)

  6. Identification and validation of clinical predictors for the risk of neurological involvement in children with hand, foot, and mouth disease in Sarawak

    del Sel Sylvia; Clear Daniella; Perera David; Mohan Anand; Podin Yuwana; Wong See; Ooi Mong; Chieng Chae; Tio Phaik; Cardosa Mary; Solomon Tom

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) can cause Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with neurological complications, which may rapidly progress to fulminant cardiorespiratory failure, and death. Early recognition of children at risk is the key to reduce acute mortality and morbidity. Methods We examined data collected through a prospective clinical study of HFMD conducted between 2000 and 2006 that included 3 distinct outbreaks of HEV71 to identify risk factors associated with neu...

  7. Resting-state networks link invasive and noninvasive brain stimulation across diverse psychiatric and neurological diseases

    Fox, Michael D.; Buckner, Randy L.; Liu, Hesheng; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Lozano, Andres M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Brain stimulation is a powerful treatment for an increasing number of psychiatric and neurological diseases, but it is unclear why certain stimulation sites work or where in the brain is the best place to stimulate to treat a given patient or disease. We found that although different types of brain stimulation are applied in different locations, targets used to treat the same disease most often are nodes in the same brain network. These results suggest that brain networks might be used to und...

  8. Lymphatics in Neurological Disorders: A Neuro-Lympho-Vascular Component of Multiple Sclerosis and Alzheimer's Disease?

    Louveau, Antoine; Da Mesquita, Sandro; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Lymphatic vasculature drains interstitial fluids, which contain the tissue's waste products, and ensures immune surveillance of the tissues, allowing immune cell recirculation. Until recently, the CNS was considered to be devoid of a conventional lymphatic vasculature. The recent discovery in the meninges of a lymphatic network that drains the CNS calls into question classic models for the drainage of macromolecules and immune cells from the CNS. In the context of neurological disorders, the presence of a lymphatic system draining the CNS potentially offers a new player and a new avenue for therapy. In this review, we will attempt to integrate the known primary functions of the tissue lymphatic vasculature that exists in peripheral organs with the proposed function of meningeal lymphatic vessels in neurological disorders, specifically multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. We propose that these (and potentially other) neurological afflictions can be viewed as diseases with a neuro-lympho-vascular component and should be therapeutically targeted as such. PMID:27608759

  9. Thrombolysis in Acute Cerebrovascular Disease

    刘泽霖

    2003-01-01

    @@ Large-scale trials have shown that thrombolytic therapy reduces mortality and preserves left ventricular function in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). That's a rationale for the use of thrombolytic agents in the management of ischemic stroke.

  10. Helicobacter pylori and neurological diseases: Married by the laws of inflammation

    Lourdes; álvarez-Arellano; Carmen; Maldonado-Bernal

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review current infor-mation about the role of inflammation caused by He-licobacter pylori(H. pylori) infection in neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s dis-ease, Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, and other inflammatory diseases including ischemic stroke. Infection with H. pylori usually persists throughout life, resulting in a chronic inflammatory response with local secretion of numerous inflammatory mediators includ-ing chemokines [interleukin(IL)-8, macrophage che-motactic protein, growth-regulated oncogene(GRO)-α, chemokine(C-X-C motif) ligand 1] and cytokines [IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, IL-12, interferon-g], which can pass into the circulation and have a systemic effect. The persistence of detectable systemic and lo-cal concentrations of inflammatory mediators is likely to alter the outcome of neurological diseases. These proinflammatory factors can induce brain inflammation and the death of neurons and could eventually be asso-ciated to Parkinson’s disease and also may be involved in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. However,most neurological diseases are the result of a combina-tion of multiple factors, but the systemic inflammatory response is a common component and determinant in the onset, evolution, and outcome of diseases. How-ever, more studies are needed to allow understanding of the effects and mechanisms by which the inflamma-tory response generated by H. pylori infection affects neurological diseases.

  11. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases III: Manganese, neurological diseases, and associated pathologies

    Anthony Samsel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Manganese (Mn is an often overlooked but important nutrient, required in small amounts for multiple essential functions in the body. A recent study on cows fed genetically modified Roundup ® -Ready feed revealed a severe depletion of serum Mn. Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup ® , has also been shown to severely deplete Mn levels in plants. Here, we investigate the impact of Mn on physiology, and its association with gut dysbiosis as well as neuropathologies such as autism, Alzheimer′s disease (AD, depression, anxiety syndrome, Parkinson′s disease (PD, and prion diseases. Glutamate overexpression in the brain in association with autism, AD, and other neurological diseases can be explained by Mn deficiency. Mn superoxide dismutase protects mitochondria from oxidative damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction is a key feature of autism and Alzheimer′s. Chondroitin sulfate synthesis depends on Mn, and its deficiency leads to osteoporosis and osteomalacia. Lactobacillus, depleted in autism, depend critically on Mn for antioxidant protection. Lactobacillus probiotics can treat anxiety, which is a comorbidity of autism and chronic fatigue syndrome. Reduced gut Lactobacillus leads to overgrowth of the pathogen, Salmonella, which is resistant to glyphosate toxicity, and Mn plays a role here as well. Sperm motility depends on Mn, and this may partially explain increased rates of infertility and birth defects. We further reason that, under conditions of adequate Mn in the diet, glyphosate, through its disruption of bile acid homeostasis, ironically promotes toxic accumulation of Mn in the brainstem, leading to conditions such as PD and prion diseases.

  12. Neurological disease mutations compromise a C-terminal ion pathway in the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase

    Poulsen, Hanne; Khandelia, Himanshu; Morth, J Preben;

    2010-01-01

    severe neurological diseases. This novel model for ion transport by the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is established by electrophysiological studies of C-terminal mutations in familial hemiplegic migraine 2 (FHM2) and is further substantiated by molecular dynamics simulations. A similar ion regulation is likely to...

  13. Creation of an open-access, mutation-defined fibroblast resource for neurological disease research.

    Selina Wray

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of many neurological disorders has been greatly enhanced by the discovery of mutations in genes linked to familial forms of these diseases. These have facilitated the generation of cell and animal models that can be used to understand the underlying molecular pathology. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the use of patient-derived cells, due to the development of induced pluripotent stem cells and their subsequent differentiation into neurons and glia. Access to patient cell lines carrying the relevant mutations is a limiting factor for many centres wishing to pursue this research. We have therefore generated an open-access collection of fibroblast lines from patients carrying mutations linked to neurological disease. These cell lines have been deposited in the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS Repository at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research and can be requested by any research group for use in in vitro disease modelling. There are currently 71 mutation-defined cell lines available for request from a wide range of neurological disorders and this collection will be continually expanded. This represents a significant resource that will advance the use of patient cells as disease models by the scientific community.

  14. Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and Bartonella henselae bacteremia in a father and daughter with neurological disease

    Woods Christopher W; Hegarty Barbara C; Lantos Paul M; Maggi Ricardo G; Breitschwerdt Edward B; Bradley Julie M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii is an important, emerging, intravascular bacterial pathogen that has been recently isolated from immunocompetent patients with endocarditis, arthritis, neurological disease and vasoproliferative neoplasia. Vector transmission is suspected among dogs and wild canines, which are the primary reservoir hosts. This investigation was initiated to determine if pets and family members were infected with one or more Bartonella species. Methods ...

  15. Recent onset neck pain with associated neurological deficit--Pott's disease remains an important differential diagnosis.

    Bourke, M G

    2010-11-05

    The incidence of spinal tuberculosis is increasing in developed nations. In Ireland, half of all cases seen in the most recent decade for which figures are available were diagnosed in 2005-2007, the three most recent years for which there is complete data. We discuss a patient who presented with neurological complications due to destructive spinal tuberculous disease affecting the sixth cervical vertebra.

  16. Leukocytosis in Patients with Neurologic Deterioration after Acute Ischemic Stroke is Associated with Poor Outcomes

    Kumar, Andre D.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Siegler, James E.; Gillette, Michael; Albright, Karen C.; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurologic deterioration (ND) after acute ischemic stroke (AIS) has been shown to result in poor outcomes. ND is thought to arise from penumbral excitotoxic cell death caused in part by leukocytic infiltration. Elevated admission peripheral leukocyte levels are associated with poor outcomes in stroke patients who suffer ND, but little is known about the dynamic changes that occur in leukocyte counts around the time of ND. We sought to determine if peripheral leukocyte levels in the days surrounding ND are correlated with poor outcomes. Methods Patients with AIS who presented to our center within 48 hours of symptom onset between July 2008 and June 2010 were retrospectively identified by chart review and screened for ND (defined as an increase in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≥2 within a 24-hour period). Patients were excluded for steroid use during hospitalization or in the month before admission and infection within the 48 hours before or after ND. Demographics, daily leukocyte counts, and poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale score 3–6) were investigated. Results Ninety-six of the 292 (33%) patients screened had ND. The mean age was 69.5 years; 62.5% were male and 65.6% were black. Patients with a poor functional outcome had significantly higher leukocyte and neutrophil levels 1 day before ND (P =.048 and P =.026, respectively), and on the day of ND (P =.013 and P =.007, respectively), compared to patients with good functional outcome. Conclusions Leukocytosis at the time of ND correlates with poor functional outcomes and may represent a marker of greater cerebral damage through increased parenchymal inflammation. PMID:23031742

  17. The interplay between microRNAs and histone deacetylases in neurological diseases

    Bourassa, Megan W.; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2014-01-01

    Neurological conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease and stroke, represent a prevalent group of devastating illnesses with few treatments. Each of these diseases or conditions is in part characterized by the dysregulation of many genes, including those that code for microRNAs (miRNAs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Recently, a complex relationship has been uncovered linking miRNAs and HDACs and their ability to regulate one another. This provides a new avenue for potential therapeutics as ...

  18. Neurological and Psychiatric Diseases and Their Unique Cognitive Profiles: Implications for Nursing Practice and Research

    Vance, David E; Dodson, Joan E.; Watkins, Jason; Kennedy, Bridgett H.; Keltner, Norman L.

    2013-01-01

    To successfully negotiate and interact with one’s environment, optimal cognitive functioning is needed. Unfortunately, many neurological and psychiatric diseases impede certain cognitive abilities such as executive functioning or speed of processing; this can produce a poor fit between the patient and the cognitive demands of his or her environment. Such non-dementia diseases include bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress syndrome, depression, and anxiety disorders, just to na...

  19. Maternal Stress Induces Epigenetic Signatures of Psychiatric and Neurological Diseases in the Offspring

    Zucchi, Fabiola C. R.; Youli Yao; Ward, Isaac D.; Yaroslav Ilnytskyy; Olson, David M; Karen Benzies; Igor Kovalchuk; Olga Kovalchuk; Metz, Gerlinde A. S.

    2013-01-01

    The gestational state is a period of particular vulnerability to diseases that affect maternal and fetal health. Stress during gestation may represent a powerful influence on maternal mental health and offspring brain plasticity and development. Here we show that the fetal transcriptome, through microRNA (miRNA) regulation, responds to prenatal stress in association with epigenetic signatures of psychiatric and neurological diseases. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were assigned to stress from gesta...

  20. Diffusion-based tractography by neurological diseases: concepts, clinical application and perspectives

    Diffusion-based tractography enables the graphical reconstruction of the white matter pathways in the brain and spinal cord of living humans. This technique has many potential clinical applications, including the investigation of stroke, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, and spinal cord disorder and it enables hypotheses to be tested that could not previously be considered in living humans. This review will outline the limitations of tractography, describe its current clinical applications in the most common neurological diseases, and highlight future opportunities. (authors)

  1. Neurological complications in late-stage hospitalized patients with HIV disease

    Rakendra Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The nervous system is the most frequent and serious targets of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. In spite of a wide prevalence of neurological manifestations in HIV there are not many studies to look into it, especially from this part of the world. We investigated various neurological manifestations of HIV and their association with CD4 and CD8 counts at the time of presentation. Materials and Methods: All HIV-infected patients who presented to 750 bedded teaching hospital in North India were subjected to thorough neurological and neuropsychological evaluation. Wherever indicated, neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid study, electromyography, and nerve-conduction studies were performed to confirm the diagnosis. CD4 and CD8 counts were calculated. Results: A total of 416 HIV-positive patients were seen. Of them 269 were males. A total of 312 neurological events were identified in 268 patients having evidence of neurological involvement. HIV-associated dementia (HAD was the most common cause of morbidity (33.65%, followed by CNS infections (21.63%. Most common CNS infection was tuberculosis (65.56%. CD4 counts in CNS infections and HAD were 64.8/ml and 83.52/ml, respectively. Most of the patients in our study had low scores on MMSE (22.32. Conclusions: Even in the absence of overt neurological disease, subclinical involvement in the form of subtle cognitive and motor decline is found to occur with greater frequency. Most of these patients have lower CD4 and CD8 counts, thus substantiating the proposition that neuroAIDS is a late manifestation. Significant correlation exists between CD4 counts and type of neurological manifestation. We concluded that neuropsychological assessment should be mandatory for all HIV-positive patients.

  2. MicroRNAs: Key Regulators in the Central Nervous System and Their Implication in Neurological Diseases

    Dan-Dan Cao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small, well-conserved noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They have been demonstrated to regulate a lot of biological pathways and cellular functions. Many miRNAs are dynamically regulated during central nervous system (CNS development and are spatially expressed in adult brain indicating their essential roles in neural development and function. In addition, accumulating evidence strongly suggests that dysfunction of miRNAs contributes to neurological diseases. These observations, together with their gene regulation property, implicated miRNAs to be the key regulators in the complex genetic network of the CNS. In this review, we first focus on the ways through which miRNAs exert the regulatory function and how miRNAs are regulated in the CNS. We then summarize recent findings that highlight the versatile roles of miRNAs in normal CNS physiology and their association with several types of neurological diseases. Subsequently we discuss the limitations of miRNAs research based on current studies as well as the potential therapeutic applications and challenges of miRNAs in neurological disorders. We endeavor to provide an updated description of the regulatory roles of miRNAs in normal CNS functions and pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  3. Frontiers in therapeutic development of allopregnanolone for Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders

    Ronald W. Irwin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Allopregnanolone (Allo, a neurosteroid, has emerged as a promising promoter of endogenous regeneration in brain. In a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, Allo induced neurogenesis, oligodendrogenesis, white matter generation and cholesterol homeostasis while simultaneously reducing β-amyloid and neuroinflammatory burden. Allo activates signaling pathways and gene expression required for regeneration of neural stem cells and their differentiation into neurons. In parallel, Allo activates systems to sustain cholesterol homeostasis and reduce β-amyloid generation. To advance Allo into studies for chronic human neurological conditions, we examined translational and clinical parameters: dose, regimen, route, formulation, outcome measures, and safety regulations. A treatment regimen of once per week at sub-sedative doses of Allo was optimal for regeneration and reduction in Alzheimer’s pathology. This regimen had a high safety profile following chronic exposure in aged normal and Alzheimer’s mice. Formulation of Allo for multiple routes of administration has been developed for both preclinical and clinical testing. Preclinical evidence for therapeutic efficacy of Allo spans multiple neurological diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, Niemann-Pick, diabetic neuropathy, status epilepticus, and traumatic brain injury. To successfully translate Allo as a therapeutic for multiple neurological disorders, it will be necessary to tailor dose and regimen to the targeted therapeutic mechanisms and disease etiology. Treatment paradigms conducted in accelerated disease models in young animals have a low probability of successful translation to chronic diseases in adult and aged humans. Gender, genetic risks, stage and burden of disease are critical determinants of efficacy. This review focuses on recent advances in development of Allo for Alzheimer’s disease that have the potential to accelerate therapeutic translation for

  4. Minds on replay: musical hallucinations and their relationship to neurological disease.

    Golden, Erin C; Josephs, Keith A

    2015-12-01

    The phenomenon of musical hallucinations, in which individuals perceive music in the absence of an external auditory stimulus, has been described sparingly in the literature through small case reports and series. Musical hallucinations have been linked to multiple associated conditions, including psychiatric and neurologic disease, brain lesions, drug effect, and hearing impairment. This study aimed to review the demographics of subjects with musical hallucinations and to determine the prevalence of neurological disorders, particularly neurodegenerative disease. Through the Mayo medical record, 393 subjects with musical hallucinations were identified and divided into five categories based on comorbid conditions that have been associated with musical hallucinations: neurological, psychiatric, structural, drug effect and not otherwise classifiable. Variables, including hearing impairment and the presence of visual and other auditory hallucinations, were evaluated independently in all five groups. The mean age at onset of the hallucinations was 56 years, ranging from 18 to 98 years, and 65.4% of the subjects were female. Neurological disease and focal brain lesions were found in 25% and 9% of the total subjects, respectively. Sixty-five subjects were identified with a neurodegenerative disorder, with the Lewy body disorders being the most common. Visual hallucinations were more common in the group with neurological disease compared to the psychiatric, structural, and not otherwise classifiable groups (P musical hallucinations involved both hemispheres with a preference towards the left, and all but two included the temporal lobe. Hearing impairment was common, particularly in the not otherwise classifiable category where 67.2% had documented hearing impairment, more than in any other group (P music, which was often religious and patriotic compared to those with a structural lesion, where more modern music was heard, and those with psychiatric disorders where music was

  5. Epilepsy and other neurological diseases in the parents of children with infantile autism. A case control study

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the broader phenotype of infantile autism (IA) we compared the rates and types of epilepsy and other neurological diseases in the parents of 111 consecutively admitted patients with IA with a matched control group of parents of 330 children from the general population. All...... participants were screened through the nationwide Danish National Hospital Register (DNHR). We inquired about epilepsy and other neurological diseases during an observation period of 27 years. A similar proportion of case- and control mothers had a diagnosis of any neurological disease, 9.9% vs 10.6%. For case...... fathers the proportion was 5.7% vs 9.7%. No single neurological disease was significantly more frequent among parents of persons with IA. Our study lent support to the notion that epilepsy and other neurological diseases are not part of the broader IA phenotype....

  6. Epilepsy and other neurological diseases in the parents of children with infantile autism. A case control study

    Mouridsen, S.E.; Rich, B.; Isager, T.

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the broader phenotype of infantile autism (IA) we compared the rates and types of epilepsy and other neurological diseases in the parents of 111 consecutively admitted patients with IA with a matched control group of parents of 330 children from the general population. All...... participants were screened through the nationwide Danish National Hospital Register (DNHR). We inquired about epilepsy and other neurological diseases during an observation period of 27 years. A similar proportion of case- and control mothers had a diagnosis of any neurological disease, 9.9% vs 10.6%. For case...... fathers the proportion was 5.7% vs 9.7%. No single neurological disease was significantly more frequent among parents of persons with IA. Our study lent support to the notion that epilepsy and other neurological diseases are not part of the broader IA phenotype Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  7. RNA Structures as Mediators of Neurological Diseases and as Drug Targets.

    Bernat, Viachaslau; Disney, Matthew D

    2015-07-01

    RNAs adopt diverse folded structures that are essential for function and thus play critical roles in cellular biology. A striking example of this is the ribosome, a complex, three-dimensionally folded macromolecular machine that orchestrates protein synthesis. Advances in RNA biochemistry, structural and molecular biology, and bioinformatics have revealed other non-coding RNAs whose functions are dictated by their structure. It is not surprising that aberrantly folded RNA structures contribute to disease. In this Review, we provide a brief introduction into RNA structural biology and then describe how RNA structures function in cells and cause or contribute to neurological disease. Finally, we highlight successful applications of rational design principles to provide chemical probes and lead compounds targeting structured RNAs. Based on several examples of well-characterized RNA-driven neurological disorders, we demonstrate how designed small molecules can facilitate the study of RNA dysfunction, elucidating previously unknown roles for RNA in disease, and provide lead therapeutics. PMID:26139368

  8. Proton MRS in Behcet's disease with and without neurological findings

    Baysal, T.; Sarac, K.; Dusak, A. [Department of Radiology, Inonu University School of Medicine, 44069, Malatya (Turkey); Ozisik, H.I.; Ozcan, C. [Department of Neurology, Inonu University School of Medicine, 44069, Malatya (Turkey); Karlidag, R. [Department of Psychiatry, Inonu University School of Medicine, 44069, Malatya (Turkey); Baysal, O. [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Inonu University School of Medicine, 44069, Malayta (Turkey); Hazneci, E. [Department of Dermatology, Inonu University School of Medicine, 44069, Malatya (Turkey)

    2003-12-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether neurological impairment in Behcet's disease (BD) can be assessed by means of proton MRS and whether it can assist in prognosis. We used single-voxel MRS to measure metabolites in regions of normal-appearing pons, basal ganglia and periventricular white matter (PWM) in 32 patients with chronic BD patients with and without neurological deficits and 29 control subjects. Patients had significantly higher N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) and choline (Cho)/Cr ratios in the basal ganglia than the controls. The Cho/Cr ratio in the PWM was also significantly higher in the patients. MRS enabled clear discrimination of patients and controls and also revealed spectral differences between non-neuro-Behcet's disease and neuro-Behcet's disease in the basal ganglia. MRS can be used to assess brain involvement in BD even if structural changes are absent. (orig.)

  9. Phenotype variability of infantile-onset multisystem neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease IMNEPD.

    Picker-Minh, Sylvie; Mignot, Cyril; Doummar, Diane; Hashem, Mais; Faqeih, Eissa; Josset, Patrice; Dubern, Béatrice; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Kraemer, Nadine; Kaindl, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Infantile-onset multisystem neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease (IMNEPD) has been recently linked to biallelic mutation of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase 2 gene PTRH2. Two index patients with IMNEPD in the original report had multiple neurological symptoms such as postnatal microcephaly, intellectual disability, developmental delay, sensorineural deafness, cerebellar atrophy, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. In addition, distal muscle weakness and abnormalities of thyroid, pancreas, and liver were found. Here, we report five further IMNEPD patients with a different homozygous PTRH2 mutation, broaden the phenotypic spectrum of the disease and differentiate common symptoms and interindividual variability in IMNEPD associated with a unique mutation. We thereby hope to better define IMNEPD and promote recognition and diagnosis of this novel disease entity. PMID:27129381

  10. Association of traumatic brain injury with subsequent neurological and psychiatric disease: a meta-analysis.

    Perry, David C; Sturm, Virginia E; Peterson, Matthew J; Pieper, Carl F; Bullock, Thomas; Boeve, Bradley F; Miller, Bruce L; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Berger, Mitchel S; Kramer, Joel H; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A

    2016-02-01

    OBJECT Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been proposed as a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, and other illnesses. This study's objective was to determine the association of prior mild TBI with the subsequent diagnosis (that is, at least 1 year postinjury) of neurological or psychiatric disease. METHODS All studies from January 1995 to February 2012 reporting TBI as a risk factor for diagnoses of interest were identified by searching PubMed, study references, and review articles. Reviewers abstracted the data and assessed study designs and characteristics. RESULTS Fifty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria. A random effects meta-analysis revealed a significant association of prior TBI with subsequent neurological and psychiatric diagnoses. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for the development of any illness subsequent to prior TBI was 1.67 (95% CI 1.44-1.93, p depression, mixed affective disorders, and bipolar disorder in individuals with previous TBI as compared to those without TBI. This association was present when examining only studies of mild TBI and when considering the influence of study design and characteristics. Analysis of a subset of studies demonstrated no evidence that multiple TBIs were associated with higher odds of disease than a single TBI. CONCLUSIONS History of TBI, including mild TBI, is associated with the development of neurological and psychiatric illness. This finding indicates that either TBI is a risk factor for heterogeneous pathological processes or that TBI may contribute to a common pathological mechanism. PMID:26315003

  11. Cerebrolysin effects on neurological outcomes and cerebral blood flow in acute ischemic stroke

    Amiri-Nikpour MR; Nazarbaghi S; Ahmadi-Salmasi B; Mokari. T.; Tahamtan U; Rezaei Y

    2014-01-01

    Mohammad Reza Amiri-Nikpour,1 Surena Nazarbaghi,1 Babak Ahmadi-Salmasi,1 Tayebeh Mokari,2 Urya Tahamtan,2 Yousef Rezaei3 1Department of Neurology, Imam Khomeini Hospital, 2School of Medicine, 3Seyyed-al-Shohada Heart Center, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran Background: Cerebrolysin, a brain-derived neuropeptide, has been shown to improve the neurological outcomes of stroke, but no study has demonstrated its effect on cerebral blood flow. This study aimed to determine the ce...

  12. Depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and in non-neurological medical illnesses

    Assogna F

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Assogna,1 Sabrina Fagioli,1 Luca Cravello,1 Giuseppe Meco,2 Mariangela Pierantozzi,3 Alessandro Stefani,3 Francesca Imperiale,2 Carlo Caltagirone,1,3 Francesco E Pontieri,4 Gianfranco Spalletta11I.R.C.C.S. Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Neurology and Psychiatry (Parkinson’s Centre and Research Centre of Social Diseases (CIMS, University “Sapienza”, Rome, Italy; 3Department of Neuroscience, University “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy; 4Department of Neuroscience, Mental Health and Sensory Systems, University “Sapienza”, Movement Disorder Unit, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Rome, ItalyBackground: Patients with neurological and non-neurological medical illnesses very often complain of depressive symptoms that are associated with cognitive and functional impairments. We compared the profile of depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD patients with that of control subjects (CS suffering from non-neurological medical illnesses.Methods: One-hundred PD patients and 100 CS were submitted to a structured clinical interview for identification of major depressive disorder (MDD and minor depressive disorder (MIND, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR, criteria. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were also administered to measure depression severity.Results: When considering the whole groups, there were no differences in depressive symptom frequency between PD and CS apart from worthlessness/guilt, and changes in appetite reduced rates in PD. Further, total scores and psychic and somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI did not differ between PD and CS. After we separated PD and CS in those with MDD, MIND, and no depression (NODEP, comparing total scores and psychic/somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI, we found increased total depression severity in NODEP PD and reduced severity of the psychic symptoms of

  13. Activation analysis in a multitechnique study of trace element imbalances in age-related neurological diseases

    It has been suggested that several age-related neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis may be related to environmental toxins. Bulk sample multielemental analyses by INAA alone are not adequate to define the role of trace elements in these diseases. A multitechnique approach has been developed that incorporates 14 MeV, instrumental reactor, radiochemical, and pre-irradiation chemical neutron activation analysis, together with laser microprobe mass spectrometry. The analytical scheme is able to provide bulk or protein normalized elemental concentrations, as well as microstructural, cellular, and subcellular localization information. (author) 21 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  14. Clinical and neuroimaging features as diagnostic guides in neonatal neurology diseases with cerebellar involvement.

    Klein, Jessica L; Lemmon, Monica E; Northington, Frances J; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar abnormalities are encountered in a high number of neurological diseases that present in the neonatal period. These disorders can be categorized broadly as inherited (e.g. malformations, inborn errors of metabolism) or acquired (e.g. hemorrhages, infections, stroke). In some disorders such as Dandy-Walker malformation or Joubert syndrome, the main abnormalities are located within the cerebellum and brainstem. In other disorders such as Krabbe disease or sulfite oxidase deficiency, the main abnormalities are found within the supratentorial brain, but the cerebellar involvement may be helpful for diagnostic purposes. In In this article, we review neurological disorders with onset in the neonatal period and cerebellar involvement with a focus on how characterization of cerebellar involvement can facilitate accurate diagnosis and improved accuracy of neuro-functional prognosis. PMID:26770813

  15. When dialogue fails. Music therapy with elderly with neurological degenerative diseases

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2004-01-01

    When dialogue fails. Music therapy with elderly with neurological degenerative diseases. In persons suffering from neurological degenerative diseases we often see the following symptoms: difficulties in remembering, concentrating, perceiving input, and controlling and timing movements. Normal every...... it is possible to adjust the communication in order to enter dialogue. The dialogue is the potential for sharing emotions and meeting psychosocial needs. The core of the music therapy is seen as the moments where interaction and dialogue occurs. But these moments are only “highlights” of the sessions, and before....... Conclusion 1. In order to compensate for missing short-term memory it is important to work deliberately with cuing. A specific song in the beginning of the music therapy session will e.g. signalise that the music therapy is to start. Using songs as cues activates cortical memory function, and work as memory...

  16. Error awareness and the insula: links to neurological and psychiatric diseases

    Tilmann A Klein

    2013-02-01

    We first discuss the main findings on error awareness in healthy subjects. A region, that appears consistently involved in error awareness processes, is the insula, which also provides a link to the clinical conditions reviewed here. Then we focus on a neurological condition whose core element is an impaired awareness for neurological consequences of a disease: anosognosia for hemiplegia (AHP. The insular cortex has been implicated in both error awareness and AHP, with anterior insular regions being involved in conscious error processing and more posterior areas being related to AHP. In addition to cytoarchitectonic and connectivity data, this reflects a functional and structural gradient within the insula from anterior to posterior. Furthermore, studies dealing with error awareness and lack of insight in a number of psychiatric diseases are reported. Especially in schizophrenia, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and autism spectrum disorders the performance monitoring system seems impaired, thus conscious error perception might be altered.

  17. Neurological diseases and health care utilization among first-generation immigrants.

    Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Nembrini, Stefano; Concoreggi, Carlo; Magoni, Mauro; Padovani, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Migrants may constitute a risk group and should have specific targets for health policy. To identify their health needs, it is important to investigate their epidemiological profile and their access to health services. The aim of this study was to identify the pattern of hospital and neurological services use among immigrants living in Brescia (Italy). The analysis took into account the records of 45,645 immigrants admitted to the ER (Emergency Room) as well as the discharge data of 6419 patients hospitalized in the Department of Neurology of the Azienda Ospedaliera Spedali Civili di Brescia, over a 3.5 years period. To take confounding factors into account, immigrant patients admitted to the department of Neurology were compared to a selection of Italian patients matched by age and sex. The main objectives were to explore causes of admission of the immigrant population-along with socio-demographic characteristics-to the Emergency Room and to the Neurology Units. Immigrants showed a similar pattern of hospital use to the Italian patients, although with a higher frequency of infective diseases and traumatic injuries. They also showed a higher mean Diagnosis-Related Group (DRG) weight than the Italians. Average length of hospitalization was longer in immigrant population. However, the use of neurological services by migrants is less than their demographic share. Poorer economic and social conditions, as well as a worse labor market experienced by immigrants may expose them to risk factors for injuries and infective diseases. Reducing the language and bureaucratic barriers, as well as enhancing cross-cultural skills of physicians, might be crucial in decreasing the length and the cost of hospitalization. PMID:26872665

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in neurologic diseases--comparison with computed tomography.

    Chang, K. H.; Han, M. C.; Kim, C. W.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) imagings were compared in 121 patients with various neurologic diseases. MR was performed with either 0.15 Tesla resistive or 2.0 Tesla superconducting systems developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), using multi-slice spin echo technique with a variety of pulse sequences reflecting proton density, T1 and T2 relaxation times. MR was more advantageous in the detection of the lesions, accurate depiction of the ...

  19. Genetics of complex neurological disease: Challenges and opportunities for modeling epilepsy in mice and rats

    Frankel, Wayne N.

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is a complex neurological disease. Currently ~20 genetic variants are known to cause Mendelian forms of human epilepsy, leaving a vast heritability undefined with future hopes resting on candidate gene resequencing and/or large scale genome-wide association studies. Rodent models for genetically complex epilepsy have been studied for many years, but only recently have strong candidate genes emerged, including Cacna1g in the GAERS rat model of absence epilepsy and Kcnj10 in the low se...

  20. Error awareness and the insula: links to neurological and psychiatric diseases

    Klein, Tilmann A.; Markus Ullsperger

    2013-01-01

    Becoming aware of errors that one has committed might be crucial for strategic behavioral and neuronal adjustments to avoid similar errors in the future. This review addresses conscious error perception (“error awareness”) in healthy subjects as well as the relationship between error awareness and neurological and psychiatric diseases. We first discuss the main findings on error awareness in healthy subjects. A region, that appears consistently involved in error awareness processes, is the...

  1. Error awareness and the insula: links to neurological and psychiatric diseases

    Klein, T.A.; Ullsperger, M.; Danielmeier, C.

    2013-01-01

    Becoming aware of errors that one has committed might be crucial for strategic behavioral and neuronal adjustments to avoid similar errors in the future. This review addresses conscious error perception ("error awareness") in healthy subjects as well as the relationship between error awareness and neurological and psychiatric diseases. We first discuss the main findings on error awareness in healthy subjects. A brain region, that appears consistently involved in error awareness processes, is ...

  2. Infection of Immunodeficient Horses with Sarcocystis neurona Does Not Result in Neurologic Disease

    Sellon, Debra C.; Knowles, Donald P.; Ellis C Greiner; Long, Maureen T.; Hines, Melissa T.; Hochstatter, Tressa; Tibary, Ahmed; Dame, John B

    2004-01-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis is a progressive neurologic disease of horses most commonly caused by infection with the apicomplexan parasite Sarcocystis neurona. Factors affecting neuroinvasion and neurovirulence have not been determined. We investigated the pathogenesis of infection with S. neurona in horses with severe combined immune deficiency (SCID). Two immunocompetent (IC) Arabian horses and two Arabian horses with SCID were infected orally with 5 × 105 sporocysts of S. neurona. F...

  3. An Acute Hemorrhagic Infectious Disease: Ebola Virus Disease

    Lei JIAO

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus disease (EVD is an acute hemorrhagic infectious disease caused by ebola virus, with high infectivity and fatality rate. At present, it mainly occurs in areas of Central Africa and West Africa and no effective vaccine and antiviral drugs are available for the clinical treatment.

  4. Iodobenzamide SPET in neurological and psychiatric diseases: technical aspects and clinical impact

    Cerebral dopamine receptor assessment using single photon emission tomography (SPET) was recently accepted as a valuable method for a relative quantification of these receptors. We have performed 45 examinations using iodobenzamide (123-IBZM), which is a ligand for post-synaptic D2 receptors, in a variety of neurological or psychiatric diseases in which the dopaminergic system could be involved. The relative quantification of these D2 receptors was performed using different ratios with striatal, cerebellar and total tracer uptake. We observed a significant decrease in 123-IBZM striatal tracer uptake in Parkinson's disease, supra-nuclear palsy, Alzheimer disease or Huntington disease, in comparison with control subjects (p<0.05). The present study indicates that 123-IBZM SPET could be easily performed in the different nuclear medicine departments and is useful in atypical Parkinson's disease to access the diagnosis and drug efficacy. This could be of prognostic value in suspected or marked Huntington's disease. (authors). 27 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  5. Neutron activation analysis of the central nervous system tissues in neurological diseases

    As the diseases due to excessive metals in living bodies and the metals of their causes, Minamata disease due to Hg, itai-itai disease due to Cd, dialysis brain disease due to Al, hemochromatosis due to Fe, Wilson disease due to Cu and so on have been known. Also as the neural diseases, in which the possibility that metals take part in them is presumed, there are amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, Parkinsonism dementia and so on. In order to know the causes of the diseases due to excessive metals in living bodies and neurological diseases, the authors have measured Cu, Ca, Al, Mn, Zn and Fe in central nervous system tissues by activation analysis nondestructive method. The cases investigated were 4 cases of hepatocerebral diseases, 6 cases of ALS, 4 cases of Parkinson disease, 4 cases of Parkinsonism dementia, 4 cases of multiple sclerosis and 5 cases without CNS disease for the control. The method of measurement is described. The results for respective diseases are reported. Cu and Fe are in the relation of mirror images, and Cu formed Cu-superoxide dismutase (SOD) similarly to Zn and Mn as SOD carrier metals, and protects living bodies and CNS from oxidative stress. (K.I.)

  6. [Swiss scrapie surveillance. I. Clinical aspects of neurological diseases in sheep and goats].

    Maurer, E; Botteron, C; Ehrensperger, F; Fatzer, R; Jaggy, A; Kolly, C; Meylan, M; Zurbriggen, A; Doherr, M G

    2005-10-01

    Small ruminants infected with scrapie show a large range of often unspecific clinical symptoms. The most-often described signs, locomotion, sensibility and behavioural disorders and emaciation, rarely occur together, and cases have been described in which only one of those signs was detectable.Thus, formulating a well-circumscribed definition of a clinical suspect case is difficult. Most animals with CNS-effecting diseases such as listeriosis, polioencephalomacia, cerebrospinal nematidiasis and enterotoxemia will, in a thorough neurological examination, show at least some scrapie-like symptoms. Among the 22 neurological field cases examined in this study, a goat with cerebral gliomatosis and hair lice showed the closest similarity to clinical scrapie. The unilateral deficiency of the cerebral nerves has potential as an clinical exclusion criterion for scrapie. However, the laboratory confirmation--or exclusion--of scrapie remains important. It thus needs to be realized that a consistent and thorough examination of neurologically diseased small ruminants (including fallen stock) is the backbone of a good surveillance system for these diseases. This should be a motivation for submitting adult sheep and goats for neuropathological examination. PMID:16259408

  7. HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot reactivity in a cohort of patients with neurological disease.

    Soldan, S S; Graf, M D; Waziri, A; Flerlage, A N; Robinson, S M; Kawanishi, T; Leist, T P; Lehky, T J; Levin, M C; Jacobson, S

    1999-09-01

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is associated with a chronic, progressive neurological disease known as HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Screening for HTLV-I involves the detection of virus-specific serum antibodies by EIA and confirmation by Western blot. HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot patterns have been described worldwide. However, the significance of this blot pattern is unclear. We identified 8 patients with neurological disease and an HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot pattern, none of whom demonstrated increased spontaneous proliferation and HTLV-I-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity. However, HTLV-I tax sequence was amplified from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of 4 of them. These data suggest that patients with chronic progressive neurological disease and HTLV-I/II Western blot seroindeterminate reactivity may harbor either defective HTLV-I, novel retrovirus with partial homology to HTLV-I, or HTLV-I in low copy number. PMID:10438355

  8. Neurogenesis in neurological and psychiatric diseases and brain injury: from bench to bedside.

    Ruan, Linhui; Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Wang, Jixian; Huang, Lijie; Zhuge, Qichuan; Wang, Brian; Jin, Kunlin; So, Kwok-Fai

    2014-04-01

    Researchers who have uncovered the presence of stem cells in an adult's central nervous system have not only challenged the dogma that new neurons cannot be generated during adulthood, but also shed light on the etiology and disease mechanisms underlying many neurological and psychiatric disorders. Brain trauma, neurodegenerative diseases, and psychiatric disorders pose enormous burdens at both personal and societal levels. Although medications for these disorders are widely used, the treatment mechanisms underlying the illnesses remain largely elusive. In the past decade, an increasing amount of evidence indicate that adult neurogenesis (i.e. generating new CNS neurons during adulthood) may be involved in the pathology of different CNS disorders, and thus neurogenesis may be a potential target area for treatments. Although new neurons were shown to be a major player in mediating treatment efficacy of neurological and psychotropic drugs on cognitive functions, it is still debatable if the altered production of new neurons can cause the disorders. This review hence seeks to discuss pre and current clinical studies that demonstrate the functional impact adult neurogenesis have on neurological and psychiatric illnesses while examining the related underlying disease mechanisms. PMID:24384539

  9. Microcirculation in Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    Zafrani, Lara; Ince, Can

    2015-12-01

    The renal microvasculature is emerging as a key player in acute and chronic kidney diseases. Renal microvascular disease involves alterations in endothelial barrier permeability, exaggerated inflammation, impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation involving the nitric oxide system, increased oxidative stress, and loss of angiogenic factors. Moreover, evidence suggests that there is a microvascular component to the pathogenesis of renal scarring. New technology is being developed to explore renal microcirculation in vivo in experimental models and humans. This technology will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of kidney diseases and will help guide specific therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring the renal microcirculation. This article reviews the cellular and molecular mechanisms of renal microvascular dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney diseases and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these findings. Recent developments in the monitoring of renal microcirculation are described with respect to their advantages and limitations, and future directions are outlined. PMID:26231789

  10. Benefit of intravenous antibiotic therapy in patients referred for treatment of neurologic Lyme disease

    Stricker RB

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Raphael B Stricker1,3, Allison K DeLong2, Christine L Green1,3, Virginia R Savely1,3, Stanley N Chamallas1,4, Lorraine Johnson1,31International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3California Lyme Disease Association, Marysville, CA, USA; 4QMedRx Inc, Maitland, FL, USABackground: We have shown previously that extended intravenous antibiotic therapy is associated with low morbidity and no mortality in patients referred for treatment of neurologic Lyme disease. In this study, we evaluated the benefit of extended intravenous antibiotic therapy in patients with symptoms of neurologic Lyme disease.Methods: Patients with significant neurologic symptoms and positive testing for Borrelia burgdorferi were treated with intravenous antibiotics, and biweekly evaluation of symptom severity was performed using a six-level ordinal scale. Four symptoms were selected a priori as primary outcome measures in the study, ie, fatigue, cognition, myalgias, and arthralgias. Patients were placed into five groups according to time on treatment (1–4, 5–8, 9–12, 13–24, and 25–52 weeks, and changes in the primary symptoms as a function of time on treatment were analyzed using a mixed-effects proportional odds model.Results: Among 158 patients with more than one follow-up visit who were monitored for up to 1 year, there were on average 6.7 visits per person (median 5, range 2–24. The last follow-up day was on average 96 days after enrollment (median 69, range 7–354 days, corresponding to the length of antibiotic therapy. Each primary symptom was significantly improved at one or more time points during the study. For cognition, fatigue, and myalgias, the greatest improvement occurred in patients on the longest courses of treatment (25–52 weeks with odds ratios (OR for improvement of 1.97 (P = 0.02, 2.22 (P < 0.01, and 2.08 (P = 0.01, respectively. In contrast

  11. Crohn's Disease and Acute Pancreatitis: A Review of Literature

    Sarfaraz Jasdanwala; Mark Babyatsky

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease, a transmural inflammatory bowel disease, has many well-known extra-intestinal manifestations and complications. Although acute pancreatitis has a higher incidence in patients with Crohn's disease as compared to the general population, acute pancreatitis is still relatively uncommon in patients with Crohn's disease. Patients with Crohn's disease are at an approximately fourfold higher risk than the general population to develop acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute ...

  12. Strain Echocardiography in Acute Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Favot, Mark; Courage, Cheryl; Ehrman, Robert; Khait, Lyudmila; Levy, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Echocardiography has become a critical tool in the evaluation of patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute cardiovascular diseases and undifferentiated cardiopulmonary symptoms. New technological advances allow clinicians to accurately measure left ventricular (LV) strain, a superior marker of LV systolic function compared to traditional measures such as ejection fraction, but most emergency physicians (EPs) are unfamiliar with this method of echocardiographic assessment. This article discusses the application of LV longitudinal strain in the ED and reviews how it has been used in various disease states including acute heart failure, acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and pulmonary embolism. It is important for EPs to understand the utility of technological and software advances in ultrasound and how new methods can build on traditional two-dimensional and Doppler techniques of standard echocardiography. The next step in competency development for EP-performed focused echocardiography is to adopt novel approaches such as strain using speckle-tracking software in the management of patients with acute cardiovascular disease. With the advent of speckle tracking, strain image acquisition and interpretation has become semi-automated making it something that could be routinely added to the sonographic evaluation of patients presenting to the ED with cardiovascular disease. Once strain imaging is adopted by skilled EPs, focused echocardiography can be expanded and more direct, phenotype-driven care may be achievable for ED patients with a variety of conditions including heart failure, ACS and shock. PMID:26823931

  13. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Ommen, Hans Beier; Nederby, Line; Toft-Petersen, Marie;

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses how minimal residual disease (MRD) is detected and managed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. The most commonly used techniques to detect residual leukemia in patients in complete remission (CR) are quantitative PCR (qPCR) and multicolor flow cytometry (MFC). While q...

  14. Acute dysautonomia associated with Hodgkin's disease.

    van Lieshout, J. J.; Wieling, W.; van Montfrans, G A; Settels, J J; Speelman, J D; Endert, E.; Karemaker, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A patient is described with acute dysautonomia associated with Hodgkin's disease. Testing of cardiovascular reflex control showed that this patient had a rare manifestation of autonomic cardiovascular neuropathy, namely intact parasympathetic heart rate control in combination with a sympathetic postganglionic lesion affecting the control of the vascular tree.

  15. Association of neurological diseases with metabolic syndrome among out-patients

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent in Japan; however, most previous surveys have studied only adults able to engage fully in normal daily activities, after excluding persons with diseases or disabilities. Recently, lifestyle-related risk factors have been strongly linked to a number of major diseases. In particular, the incidence of atherosclerotic vascular diseases associated with MetS has increased markedly, and this trend is projected to continue. We focused on the prevalence of MetS among out-patients with neurological diseases. The subjects for this hospital-based study were 713 out-patients with various neurological diseases (329 men, mean age 65.2±14.5 yr, age range 40-78 yr, and 384 women, mean age 64.6±15.3 yr, age range 40-88 yr) who presented at the Department of Neurology, Nara Medical University Hospital. A total of 120 patients had cerebral infarction, 102 Parkinson's disease, 32 spinal spondylosis, 30 headache, 32 myositis, and the rest various other neurological diseases. MetS was diagnosed according to the criteria proposed by The Japanese Society of Internal Medicine in 2005. The cutoff values for waist circumference (WC) were greater than 85 cm in men and 90 cm in women. A diagnosis of MetS additionally required two or more of the following: a serum triglyceride level (TG) of at least 150 mg/dl and/or a high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (HDL-C) of less than 40 mg/dl; a blood pressure (BP) of greater than 130/85; or a fasting plasma glucose level (FPG) of greater than 110 mg/dl. Visceral fat accumulation was measured by abdominal CT scanning (N2system, K.K., Japan). WC positively correlated with visceral fat area as determined by CT scanning. WC also positively correlated with TG in both sexes and fasting blood sugar (FBS) in women, but negatively correlated with HDL-C in both sexes. The mean prevalence of MetS among subjects 40 to 70 years of age was 25.1% in men and 12.6% in women. To assess the incidence of MetS in the

  16. Focused ultrasound as a non-invasive intervention for neurological disease: a review.

    Piper, Rory J; Hughes, Mark A; Moran, Carmel M; Kandasamy, Jothy

    2016-06-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) is an incision-less intervention that is a Food and Drug Association (FDA) approved surgical treatment for various pathologies including uterine fibroids and bone metastases. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging thermometry and ability to use FUS across the intact calvarium have re-opened interest in the use of FUS in the treatment of neurological diseases. FUS currently has a European CE mark for use in movement disorders. However, it shows potential in the treatment of other neuropathologies including tumours and as a lesional tool in epilepsy. FUS may exert its therapeutic effect through thermal or mechanical fragmentation of intracranial lesions, or by enhancing delivery of pharmaceutical agents across the blood-brain barrier. In this review, we summarise the mechanisms, clinical applications and potential future of FUS for the treatment of neurological disease. We have searched for and described the recently completed and on-going clinical trials investigating FUS for the treatment of neurological disorders. We identified phase one trials investigating utility of FUS in: movement disorders (including essential tremor and Parkinson's disease), chronic pain, obsessive-compulsive disorder and cerebral tumours. Current literature also reports pre-clinical work exploring utility in epilepsy, neurodegenerative conditions (such as Alzheimer's disease) and thrombolysis. Safety and early efficacy data are now emerging, suggesting that transcalvarial FUS is a feasible and safe intervention. Further evidence is required to determine whether FUS is an effective alternative in comparison to current neurosurgical interventions. The cost of requisite hardware is currently a barrier to widespread uptake in UK neurosurgical centres. PMID:27101792

  17. Functional Neurons Generated from T Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disease Modeling

    Takuya Matsumoto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of neurological diseases using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs derived from the somatic cells of patients has provided a means of elucidating pathogenic mechanisms and performing drug screening. T cells are an ideal source of patient-specific iPSCs because they can be easily obtained from samples. Recent studies indicated that iPSCs retain an epigenetic memory relating to their cell of origin that restricts their differentiation potential. The classical method of differentiation via embryoid body formation was not suitable for T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs. We developed a neurosphere-based robust differentiation protocol, which enabled TiPSCs to differentiate into functional neurons, despite differences in global gene expression between TiPSCs and adult human dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Furthermore, neurons derived from TiPSCs generated from a juvenile patient with Parkinson's disease exhibited several Parkinson's disease phenotypes. Therefore, we conclude that TiPSCs are a useful tool for modeling neurological diseases.

  18. Neurological PRESentations in Sickle Cell Patients Are Not Always Stroke: A Review of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Sickle Cell Disease.

    Solh, Ziad; Taccone, Michael S; Marin, Samantha; Athale, Uma; Breakey, Vicky R

    2016-06-01

    Acute neurological changes in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients often raise the suspicion for stroke. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) can mimic stroke in its clinical presentation. We aimed to (i) review the PRES literature in SCD patients including clinical presentation, risk factors, pathophysiology, and management and (ii) elucidate the distinction between PRES and stroke in SCD. The exact pathophysiology of PRES in SCD remains elusive but is likely multifactorial and related to sickling, ischemia, and chronic anemia predisposing to vasogenic edema. PRES and stroke in SCD are distinguishable conditions. Our review may help elucidate a clinical approach to this distinction. PMID:26871763

  19. Clinical studies on rising and re-rising neurological diseases in Japan--a personal contribution.

    Igata, Akihiro

    2010-01-01

    Throughout my research life, I experienced to discover the causes of some neurological diseases in Japan. 1) SMON (subacute myelo-optico-neuropathy). Since the early 1960s, a peculiar neurological disease became prevalent throughout Japan. Through the chemical analysis of the green urine, characteristic of this disease, it was found that this disease was caused by intoxication of the administered clioquinol, an anti-diarrheal drug. This discovery is a big topic in the history of Japanese medicine. 2) In early 1970s, I experienced many young patients with oedema and polyneuropathy in Kagoshima. Finally it was found that the disease was the long-forgotten beriberi, which had disappeared several decades ago. We must always be aware of beriberi even now, as far as we eat well-polished rice. 3) In 1972, we noticed a group of sporadic paraparesis in Kagoshima, which was 20 years later confirmed to be induced by human T lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV-I). We named this disease as "HTLV-I associated myelopathy" (HAM). It gave a strong impact that the causative virus of adult T cell leukemia (ATL) can induce entirely different diseases, in terms of both the clinical course and the pathological features. It was also proven that HAM was identical with tropical spastic paraparesis, (TSP), which had been prevalent in many areas of tropical zones. These experiences are good examples of our slogan "to keep in mind to send message of scientific progress from the local area to the international stage. PMID:20431261

  20. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: An autoimmune disease?

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2008-01-01

    In this review article,we will briefly describe the main characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and then we will concentrate on our aim,namely,evaluating the clinical characteristics of patients having recurrence of pain from the disease.In fact,the open question is to evaluate the possible presence of autoimmune pancreatitis in patients with an undefined etiology of acute pancreatitis and for this reason we carried out a search in the literature in order to explore this issue.In cases of recurrent attacks of pain in patients with "idiopathic"pancreatitis,we need to keep in mind the possibility that our patients may have autoimmune pancreatitis.Even though the frequency of this disease seems to be quite low,we believe that in the future,by increasing our knowledge on the subject,we will be able to diagnose an ever-increasing number of patients having acute recurrence of pain from autoimmune pancreatitis.

  1. Replication Validity of Initial Association Studies: A Comparison between Psychiatry, Neurology and Four Somatic Diseases

    Dumas-Mallet, Estelle; Button, Katherine; Boraud, Thomas; Munafo, Marcus; Gonon, François

    2016-01-01

    Context There are growing concerns about effect size inflation and replication validity of association studies, but few observational investigations have explored the extent of these problems. Objective Using meta-analyses to measure the reliability of initial studies and explore whether this varies across biomedical domains and study types (cognitive/behavioral, brain imaging, genetic and “others”). Methods We analyzed 663 meta-analyses describing associations between markers or risk factors and 12 pathologies within three biomedical domains (psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases). We collected the effect size, sample size, publication year and Impact Factor of initial studies, largest studies (i.e., with the largest sample size) and the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial studies were considered as replicated if they were in nominal agreement with meta-analyses and if their effect size inflation was below 100%. Results Nominal agreement between initial studies and meta-analyses regarding the presence of a significant effect was not better than chance in psychiatry, whereas it was somewhat better in neurology and somatic diseases. Whereas effect sizes reported by largest studies and meta-analyses were similar, most of those reported by initial studies were inflated. Among the 256 initial studies reporting a significant effect (p<0.05) and paired with significant meta-analyses, 97 effect sizes were inflated by more than 100%. Nominal agreement and effect size inflation varied with the biomedical domain and study type. Indeed, the replication rate of initial studies reporting a significant effect ranged from 6.3% for genetic studies in psychiatry to 86.4% for cognitive/behavioral studies. Comparison between eight subgroups shows that replication rate decreases with sample size and “true” effect size. We observed no evidence of association between replication rate and publication year or Impact Factor. Conclusion The differences in reliability

  2. MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE IN ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) offers a way to precisely assess early treatment response and detect relapse. Established methods to study MRD are flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of antigen-receptor genes, and PCR amplification of fusion transcripts. The strong correlation between MRD levels and risk of relapse in childhood ALL is well established; studies in...

  3. Using phosphate supplementation to reverse hypophosphatemia and phosphate depletion in neurological disease and disturbance.

    Håglin, Lena

    2016-06-01

    Hypophosphatemia (HP) with or without intracellular depletion of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and adenosine triphosphate has been associated with central and peripheral nervous system complications and can be observed in various diseases and conditions related to respiratory alkalosis, alcoholism (alcohol withdrawal), diabetic ketoacidosis, malnutrition, obesity, and parenteral and enteral nutrition. In addition, HP may explain serious muscular, neurological, and haematological disorders and may cause peripheral neuropathy with paresthesias and metabolic encephalopathy, resulting in confusion and seizures. The neuropathy may be improved quickly after proper phosphate replacement. Phosphate depletion has been corrected using potassium-phosphate infusion, a treatment that can restore consciousness. In severe ataxia and tetra paresis, complete recovery can occur after adequate replacement of phosphate. Patients with multiple risk factors, often with a chronic disease and severe HP that contribute to phosphate depletion, are at risk for neurologic alterations. To predict both risk and optimal phosphate replenishment requires assessing the nutritional status and risk for re-feeding hypophosphatemia. The strategy for correcting HP depends on the severity of the underlying disease and the goal for re-establishing a phosphate balance to limit the consequences of phosphate depletion. PMID:25909152

  4. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases

  5. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    Kaper, Tasso J., E-mail: tasso@bu.edu; Kramer, Mark A., E-mail: mak@bu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Rotstein, Horacio G., E-mail: horacio@njit.edu [Department of Mathematical Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases.

  6. Intravenous thrombolytic treatment experiences in patients with acute ischemic stroke at the University of Kocatepe, Neurology Clinics

    Serdar Oruç

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to discuss the results of the intravenous thrombolytic treatment (IV-tPA to acute ischemic stroke patients, in the light of the literature. METHODS: We performed our study with forty acute ischemic stroke patients who were receiving the IV-tPA in the intensive care unit of our neurology clinic between 2011 and 2015.. The demographic, clinical and radiological data were collected retrospectively. The intracranial hemorrhage detected within 3 months after discharge and neurological status at the end of the 3rd month were evaluated by using modified Rankin scale (MRS and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores. The symptom-to-needle time, Alberta stroke programe early computed tomography score (ASPECT and initial and follow-up scores of NIHSS were analyzed. RESULTS: Fifteen patients were female, twenty-five were male, and the mean age was 66.45±10.56. The initial mean NIHSS score was 13±4.33, whereas it was 4,10±3,37at 3rd month. The initial mean ASPECT score was 8.23±1.20. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was detected in 1 patient and asymptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was detected in 6. The mean symptom-to-needle time was 139,0±48,1 minutes. The neurological disability of 13 patients ( %32.5 were fully recovered at the end of the 3rd month, while 7 patients were died. (% 17,5 The initial NIHSS and ASPECT scores were significantly different between group of patients with a MRS score between 0-2 and between 3-6 (p=0.03 and p=0.006; respectively, while the symptom-to-needle time was not different (p=0.79. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The results of the current study are in accordance with previous studies in the literature. These results have shown that the IV-tPA treatment is efficient and safe treatment modality in acute ischemic stroke, and reduces disability at the end of the 3rd month.

  7. Neurological status predicts response to alpha-blockers in men with voiding dysfunction and Parkinson's disease

    Cristiano M. Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate predictors of the response to doxazosin, a selective alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist, when used for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms in men with Parkinson's disease. METHODS: In a prospective study, 33 consecutive men (mean age 59.2±7.0 years with Parkinson's disease and lower urinary tract symptoms were evaluated. Neurological dysfunction was assessed with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Urological assessment was performed at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment with 4 mg/day of extended-release doxazosin, including symptom evaluation with the International Continence Society male short-form questionnaire, an assessment of the impact of lower urinary tract symptoms on quality of life and urodynamics. Clinical and urodynamic predictors of response were specifically evaluated. RESULTS: Compared with the score at baseline, the total International Continence Society male short-form score was reduced after doxazosin administration, from 17.4±7.5 to 11.1±6.9 (p<0.001. The impact of lower urinary tract symptoms on quality of life was also significantly reduced, from 1.8±1.1 to 1.0±1.0 (p<0.001 and the maximum urinary flow varied from 9.3±4.4 to 11.2±4.6 ml/s (p = 0.025. The severity of neurological impairment was the only predictor of the clinical response. Additionally, patients with a Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score lower than 70 had a significantly higher chance of clinical improvement with doxazosin treatment than those with higher Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores did (RR = 3.10, 95% CI = [1.15 to 5.37], p = 0.011. CONCLUSIONS: Doxazosin resulted in the improvement of lower urinary tract symptoms and the maximum flow rate and was well tolerated in men with Parkinson's disease. The response to treatment is dependent on the severity of neurological disability.

  8. Resting-state networks link invasive and noninvasive brain stimulation across diverse psychiatric and neurological diseases.

    Fox, Michael D; Buckner, Randy L; Liu, Hesheng; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Lozano, Andres M; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-10-14

    Brain stimulation, a therapy increasingly used for neurological and psychiatric disease, traditionally is divided into invasive approaches, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), and noninvasive approaches, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation. The relationship between these approaches is unknown, therapeutic mechanisms remain unclear, and the ideal stimulation site for a given technique is often ambiguous, limiting optimization of the stimulation and its application in further disorders. In this article, we identify diseases treated with both types of stimulation, list the stimulation sites thought to be most effective in each disease, and test the hypothesis that these sites are different nodes within the same brain network as defined by resting-state functional-connectivity MRI. Sites where DBS was effective were functionally connected to sites where noninvasive brain stimulation was effective across diseases including depression, Parkinson's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorder, essential tremor, addiction, pain, minimally conscious states, and Alzheimer's disease. A lack of functional connectivity identified sites where stimulation was ineffective, and the sign of the correlation related to whether excitatory or inhibitory noninvasive stimulation was found clinically effective. These results suggest that resting-state functional connectivity may be useful for translating therapy between stimulation modalities, optimizing treatment, and identifying new stimulation targets. More broadly, this work supports a network perspective toward understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disease, highlighting the therapeutic potential of targeted brain network modulation. PMID:25267639

  9. Studies of generalized elemental imbalances in neurological disease patients using INAA [instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Evidence has been presented in the literature to implicate trace elements in the etiology of several age-related neurological diseases. Most of these studies are based on brain analyses. Using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), we have observed trace element imbalances in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Picks's disease. The most prevalent elemental imbalances found in the brain were for bromine, mercury, and the alkali metals. In this study the authors report INAA studies of trace elements in nonneural tissues from Alzheimer's disease and ALS patients. Samples from household relatives were collected for use as controls wherever possible. Hair samples were washed according to the International Atomic Energy Agency recommended procedure. Fingernail samples were scraped with a quartz knife prior to washing by the same procedure. For ALS patients, blood samples were also collected. These data indicate that elemental imbalances in Alzheimer's disease and ALS are not restricted to the brain. Many elements perturbed in the brain are also altered in the several nonneural tissues examined to date. The imbalances in different tissues, however, are not always in the same direction. The changes observed may represent causes, effects, or simply epiphenomena. Longitudinal studies of nonneural tissues and blood, as well as tissue microprobe analyses at the cellular and subcellular level, will be required in order to better assess the role of trace elements in the etiology of these diseases

  10. Clinical NMR imaging of the brain in children: normal and neurologic disease

    Johnson, M.A, (Hammersmith Hospital, London, England); Pennock, J.M.; Bydder, G.M.; Steiner, R.E.; Thomas, D.J.; Hayward, R.; Bryant, D.R.T.; Payne, J.A.; Levene, M.I.; Whitelaw, A.; Dubowitz, L.M.S.; Dubowitz, V.

    1983-11-01

    The results of initial clinical nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in eight normal and 52 children with a wide variety of neurologic diseases were reviewed. The high level of gray-white matter contrast available with inversion-recovery sequences provided a basis for visualizing normal myelination as well as delays or deficits in this process. The appearances seen in cases of parenchymal hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and proencephalic cysts are described. Ventricular enlargement was readily identified and marginal edema was demonstrated with spin-echo sequences. Abnormalities were seen in cerebral palsy, congenital malformations, Hallervorden-Spatz disease, aminoaciduria, and meningitis. Space-occupying lesions were identified by virtue of their increased relaxation times and mass effects. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has considerable potential in pediatric neuroradiologic practice, in some conditions supplying information not available by computed tomography or sonography.

  11. Clinical NMR imaging of the brain in children: normal and neurologic disease

    The results of initial clinical nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in eight normal and 52 children with a wide variety of neurologic diseases were reviewed. The high level of gray-white matter contrast available with inversion-recovery sequences provided a basis for visualizing normal myelination as well as delays or deficits in this process. The appearances seen in cases of parenchymal hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and proencephalic cysts are described. Ventricular enlargement was readily identified and marginal edema was demonstrated with spin-echo sequences. Abnormalities were seen in cerebral palsy, congenital malformations, Hallervorden-Spatz disease, aminoaciduria, and meningitis. Space-occupying lesions were identified by virtue of their increased relaxation times and mass effects. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has considerable potential in pediatric neuroradiologic practice, in some conditions supplying information not available by computed tomography or sonography

  12. Maternal stress induces epigenetic signatures of psychiatric and neurological diseases in the offspring.

    Fabiola C R Zucchi

    Full Text Available The gestational state is a period of particular vulnerability to diseases that affect maternal and fetal health. Stress during gestation may represent a powerful influence on maternal mental health and offspring brain plasticity and development. Here we show that the fetal transcriptome, through microRNA (miRNA regulation, responds to prenatal stress in association with epigenetic signatures of psychiatric and neurological diseases. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were assigned to stress from gestational days 12 to 18 while others served as handled controls. Gestational stress in the dam disrupted parturient maternal behaviour and was accompanied by characteristic brain miRNA profiles in the mother and her offspring, and altered transcriptomic brain profiles in the offspring. In the offspring brains, prenatal stress upregulated miR-103, which is involved in brain pathologies, and downregulated its potential gene target Ptplb. Prenatal stress downregulated miR-145, a marker of multiple sclerosis in humans. Prenatal stress also upregulated miR-323 and miR-98, which may alter inflammatory responses in the brain. Furthermore, prenatal stress upregulated miR-219, which targets the gene Dazap1. Both miR-219 and Dazap1 are putative markers of schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder in humans. Offspring transcriptomic changes included genes related to development, axonal guidance and neuropathology. These findings indicate that prenatal stress modifies epigenetic signatures linked to disease during critical periods of fetal brain development. These observations provide a new mechanistic association between environmental and genetic risk factors in psychiatric and neurological disease.

  13. Crohn's Disease and Acute Pancreatitis: A Review of Literature

    Sarfaraz Jasdanwala

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease, a transmural inflammatory bowel disease, has many well-known extra-intestinal manifestations and complications. Although acute pancreatitis has a higher incidence in patients with Crohn's disease as compared to the general population, acute pancreatitis is still relatively uncommon in patients with Crohn's disease. Patients with Crohn's disease are at an approximately fourfold higher risk than the general population to develop acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute pancreatitis is higher in females as compared to males. Acute pancreatitis can occur at any age with higher incidence reported in patients in their 20s and between 40- 50 years of age. The severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease is the same as in general population. Acute pancreatitis can occur before onset of intestinal Crohn's disease, this presentation being more common in children than adults. It can also occur as the presenting symptom. However, most commonly it occurs after intestinal symptoms have manifest with a mean time interval between the initial presentation and development of acute pancreatitis being 2 years. There are several etiological factors contributing to acute pancreatitis in patients with crohn's disease. It is not clear whether acute pancreatitis is a direct extra-intestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease; however majority of the cases of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease are due to GS and medications. Drugs used for the treatment of Crohn's disease that have been reported to cause acute pancreatitis include 5-ASA agents, azathioprine and 6 mercaptopurine, metornidazole and corticosteroids. Recent evidence has emerged correlating both type 1 and 2 autoimmune pancreatitis with Crohn's disease. Understanding the association between the two disease entities is key to effectively manage patients with Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis.

  14. Neurological complications and risk factors of cardiopulmonary failure of EV-A71-related hand, foot and mouth disease

    Lili Long; Lin Xu; Zhenghui Xiao; Shixiong Hu; Ruping Luo; Hua Wang; Xiulan Lu; Zhiyue Xu; Xu Yao; Luo Zhou; Hongyu Long; Jiaoe Gong; Yanmin Song; Li Zhao; Kaiwei Luo

    2016-01-01

    From 2010 to 2012, large outbreaks of EV-A71-related- hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occurred annually in China. Some cases had neurological complications and were closely associated with fatal cardiopulmonary collapse, but not all children with central nervous system (CNS) involvement demonstrated a poor prognosis. To identify which patients and which neurological complications are more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure, we retrospectively studied 1,125 paediatric inpatients ...

  15. Burden of invasive group B Streptococcus disease and early neurological sequelae in South African infants.

    Ziyaad Dangor

    Full Text Available Group B Streptococcus (GBS is a leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. We aimed to evaluate the burden of invasive early-onset (0-6 days of life, EOD and late-onset (7-89 days, LOD GBS disease and subsequent neurological sequelae in infants from a setting with a high prevalence (29.5% of HIV among pregnant women.A case-control study was undertaken at three secondary-tertiary care public hospitals in Johannesburg. Invasive cases in infants <3 months age were identified by surveillance of laboratories from November 2012 to February 2014. Neurodevelopmental screening was done in surviving cases and controls at 3 and 6 months of age.We identified 122 cases of invasive GBS disease over a 12 month period. Although the incidence (per 1,000 live births of EOD was similar between HIV-exposed and HIV-unexposed infants (1.13 vs. 1.46; p = 0.487, there was a 4.67-fold (95%CI: 2.24-9.74 greater risk for LOD in HIV-exposed infants (2.27 vs. 0.49; p<0.001. Overall, serotypes Ia, Ib and III constituted 75.8% and 92.5% of EOD and LOD, respectively. Risk factors for EOD included offensive draining liquor (adjusted Odds Ratio: 27.37; 95%CI: 1.94-386.50 and maternal GBS bacteriuria (aOR: 8.41; 95%CI: 1.44-49.15, which was also a risk-factor for LOD (aOR: 3.49; 95%CI: 1.17-10.40. The overall case fatality rate among cases was 18.0%. The adjusted odds for neurological sequelae at 6 months age was 13.18-fold (95%CI: 1.44-120.95 greater in cases (13.2% than controls (0.4%.The high burden of invasive GBS disease in South Africa, which is also associated with high case fatality rates and significant neurological sequelae among survivors, is partly due to the heightened risk for LOD in infants born to HIV-infected women. An effective trivalent GBS conjugate vaccine targeted at pregnant women could prevent invasive GBS disease in this setting.

  16. Decrease of CBF measured by SPECT correlates to neurological features in Wilson's disease

    Objective: To investigate changes of cerebral blood flow and its association with neurological features in the patients with Wilson's disease (WD). Methods: In 13 WD patients and 12 age-matched control subjects, the authors quantitatively determined CBF and rCBF with SPECT using the non-blood-withdraw method. Five neurological signs including dysarthria, dystonia, bradykinesia/rigidity, tremor and gait ataxia were assessed semi-quantitatively. The severity of each sign was scored from 0 (absent) to 3 (severe). The individual scores collected from a subject were then summed up, resulting in a 'total clinical score' (TCS). The authors studied the correlations between the CBF or rCBF and semiquantitative clinical scores. Results: CBF in case group was (40.94 +- 2.33) mL·100 g-1·min-1 and was significantly lower than that in control group [(43.82 +- 1.58) mL·100 g-1·min-1] (P<0.01). Statistical comparison found more significant rCBF reduction in bilateral basal ganglia, thalamus, front lobe (P<0.01) and left temporal lobe (P<0.05). The reduction in CBF was correlated with the TCS (r = -0.620, P<0.05). The reduction in rCBF of bilateral basal ganglia correlated with the severity of dysarthria (r = -0.770, P<0.01 and -0.576, P<0.05). The reduction in rCBF of right parietal lobe and bilateral thalamus correlated with the severity of bradykinesia/rigidity (r = -0.757, P<0.01 and -0.635, P<0.05). Conclusions: These results suggest Wilson's disease patients have CBF or rCBF reduction to different degrees, and lower rCBF was found in bilateral basal ganglia, thalamus, front lobe and left temporal lobe. The neurological deficits may have relationship with reduction of cerebral blood flow in Wilson's disease. SPECT is useful for evaluation of cerebral function in Wilson's disease patients

  17. Clinical features, MRI brain, and MRS abnormalities of drug-naïve neurologic Wilson′s disease

    Satyabrata Pulai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI helps in the diagnosis of neurologic Wilson′s disease (WD. The literature regarding MR spectroscopy (MRS and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI in WD is limited. Objectives: To evaluate the clinical features and neuroimaging findings in drug-naοve neurologic WD and to find correlation between clinical stage and disease duration with different imaging findings. Materials and Methods: The study subjects included consecutive and follow-up neurologic WD patients attending movement disorder clinic. The initial clinical and MRI features before commencement of chelation therapy were noted. Of 78 patients, 34 underwent DWI study and MRS was done in 38 patients and in 32 control subjects. Results: Dystonia, dysarthria, tremor, and behavioral abnormality were common presenting features. All patients had MRI abnormality with major affection of basal ganglia. The clinical severity and anatomical extent of MRI abnormalities were positively correlated (P < 0.001; r s = 0.709. Presence of diffusion restriction was inversely related to duration of disease (P < 0.001; r s = 0.760. WD patients had reduced N-acetylaspartate/creatine (Cr and choline (Cho/Cr ratio (P < 0.001 as compared with control subjects in MRS study. Conclusion: Dystonia, dysarthria and tremor are common neurological features of WD. In this study, MRI abnormalities were positively correlated with disease severity; diffusion restriction was inversely correlated with the duration of the disease process. MRS was also a sensitive tool for diagnosing patient of neurologic WD.

  18. Progress in pediatrics in 2013: choices in allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Dascola, Carlotta Povesi; Mirra, Virginia; Sperli, Francesco; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    This review will provide new information related to pathophysiology and management of specific diseases that have been addressed by selected articles published in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2013, focusing on allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses in children. Recommendations for interpretation of skin prick test to foods in atopic eczema, management of allergic conjunctivitis,...

  19. Neurologic Complications Associated with Sjögren’s Disease: Case Reports and Modern Pathogenic Dilemma

    Michele Colaci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Sjögren’s syndrome (SS may be complicated by some neurological manifestations, generally sensory polyneuropathy. Furthermore, involvement of cranial nerves was described as rare complications of SS. Methods. We reported 2 cases: the first one was a 40-year-old woman who developed neuritis of the left optic nerve as presenting symptom few years before the diagnosis of SS; the second was a 54-year-old woman who presented a paralysis of the right phrenic nerve 7 years after the SS onset. An exhaustive review of the literature on patients with cranial or phrenic nerve involvements was also carried out. Results. To the best of our knowledge, our second case represents the first observation of SS-associated phrenic nerve mononeuritis, while optic neuritis represents the most frequent cranial nerve involvement detectable in this connective tissue disease. Trigeminal neuropathy is also frequently reported, whereas neuritis involving the other cranial nerves is quite rare. Conclusions. Cranial nerve injury is a harmful complication of SS, even if less commonly recorded compared to peripheral neuropathy. Neurological manifestations may precede the clinical onset of SS; therefore, in patients with apparently isolated cranial nerve involvement, a correct diagnosis of the underlying SS is often delayed or overlooked entirely; in these instances, standard clinicoserological assessment is recommendable.

  20. Transvaginal sonography of acute pelvic inflammatory disease

    To determine the value of transvaginal sonography in evaluating women with acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Transvaginal sonography was performed in 25 patients with clinically suggested PID during recent 36 months. The sonographic findings of fallopian tubes and ovaries were analyzed and correlated with pathological findings of 2 fallopian tubes and 19 ovaries in 16 patients who had operations. The correct diagnosis of acute PID was made in 20/25 (80%) by transvaginal sonography. the abnormal sonographic findings of the fallopian tube include tubal thickening or dilatation with internal echo. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for tubal abnormality were 88%, 96%, and 86% , respectively. Ovarian changes were seen on TVS in 14/19 (73%), which include multiple follicular enlargement in 5, tubo-ovarian complex in 9 (tubo-ovarian adhesion in 3, tubo-ovarian abscess in 6). At surgery, the ovay was not involved in all three women who showed tubo-ovarian adhesion on TVS. Among 6 women who showed tubo-ovarian abscess on TVS, tubo-ovarian abscess was confirmed in 3 and the remaining 3 had ovarian cysts. Trandvaginal sonography, a facilitative and accurate modality, is highly sensitive in detecting the abnormality of the tube and useful in differentiating the tubo-ovarian complex in patients with acute PID.

  1. Impact of Rhesus disease on the global problem of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction.

    Zipursky, Alvin; Bhutani, Vinod K

    2015-02-01

    Clinical experience with Rhesus (Rh) disease and its post-icteric sequelae is limited among high-income countries because of nearly over four decades of effective prevention care. We hypothesized that Rh disease is prevalent in other regions of the world because it is likely that protection is limited or non-existent. Following a worldwide study, it has been concluded that Rh hemolytic disease is a significant public health problem resulting in stillbirths and neonatal deaths, and is a major cause of severe hyperbilirubinemia with its sequelae, kernicterus and bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction. Knowing that effective Rh-disease prophylaxis depends on maternal blood-type screening, healthcare afforded to the high-risk mothers needs to be free of bottlenecks and coupled with unfettered access to effective Rh-immunoglobulin. Future studies that match the universal identification of Rh-negative status of women and targeted use of immunoprophylaxis to prevent childhood bilirubin neurotoxicity are within reach, based on vast prior experiences. PMID:25582277

  2. Acute renal dysfunction in liver diseases

    2007-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common in liver diseases, either as part of multiorgan involvement in acute illness or secondary to advanced liver disease. The presence of renal impairment in both groups is a poor prognostic indicator. Renal failure is often multifactorial and can present as pre-renal or intrinsic renal dysfunction. Obstructive or post renal dysfunction only rarely complicates liver disease. Hepatorenal syndrome (MRS) is a unique form of renal failure associated with advanced liver disease or cirrhosis, and is characterized by functional renal impairment without significant changes in renal histology. Irrespective of the type of renal failure, renal hypoperfusion is the central pathogenetic mechanism, due either to reduced perfusion pressure or increased renal vascular resistance. Volume expansion, avoidance of precipitating factors and treatment of underlying liver disease constitute the mainstay of therapy to prevent and reverse renal impairment. Splanchnic vasoconstrictor agents, such as terlipressin, along with volume expansion, and early placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) may be effective in improving renal function in HRS. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) and molecular absorbent recirculating system (MARS) in selected patients may be life saving while awaiting liver transplantation.

  3. A case of acute viral hepatitis interfering with acute fatty liver disease of pregnancy

    Abdulkadir Turgut

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute hepatitis A is a rarely seen infection during pregnancy.In terms of clinical and laboratory findings, it can beinterfere with acute fatty liver disease which can be quitemortal during pregnancy. Since liver function tests are elevatedin both conditions, hepatitis A infection should alsobe kept in mind in differential diagnosis. We present a 30year-old pregnant woman with 35 weeks of gestation whopresented to our clinic with a suspection of acute fattyliver disease but finally diagnosed as acute hepatitis A infection.J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (1: 123-125Key words: Hepatitis A, pregnancy, acute fatty liver disease

  4. [My way to "Keep Pioneering": integrated neuroscience and immunology research produces a paradigm shift for intractable neurological disease].

    Kira, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    The motto of Prof. Yoshigoro Kuroiwa, who established the first independent neurology department in Japan at Kyushu University, is "Keep Pioneering". His students have followed this motto in all fields. I hereby present my efforts to keep pioneering in the following fields: (1) multiple sclerosis (MS); (2) central nervous system (CNS) involvement associated with peripheral atopic inflammation; and (3) care network for patients with intractable neurological disease. In MS, I propose that Th1/Th17 cell-mediated connexin astrocytopathy may play a critical role in producing huge demyelinating lesions in MS, neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and Baló's concentric sclerosis. I discovered a peculiar myelitis that occurred in patients with atopic disorders, and designated it atopic myelitis. In this condition, allodynia and neuropathic pain are cardinal features, regardless of the presence or absence of spinal cord MRI lesions. We found that peripheral atopic inflammation in mice produces allodynia as well as activation of microglia and astroglia in the spinal cord. It is important to involve a variety of medical specialists and care coordinators for collaborative work on medical and social care issues for people with intractable disease. The motto of "Keep Pioneering" in neurology covers not only advanced research for the creation of new therapies for intractable neurological disease, but also caring for actual people with intractable disease, which I believe is the corporate social responsibility of our neurological society. I think that "Keep Pioneering" is a challenging process that never ends throughout one's life. PMID:25672676

  5. IgG-index predicts neurological morbidity in patients with infectious central nervous system diseases

    Deisenhammer Florian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prognosis assessment of patients with infectious and neoplastic disorders of the central nervous system (CNS may still pose a challenge. In this retrospective cross-sectional study the prognostic value of basic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF parameters in patients with bacterial meningitis, viral meningoencephalitis and leptomeningeal metastases were evaluated. Methods White blood cell count, CSF/serum glucose ratio, protein, CSF/serum albumin quotient and Immunoglobulin indices for IgG, IgA and IgM were analyzed in 90 patients with bacterial meningitis, 117 patients with viral meningoencephalitis and 36 patients with leptomeningeal metastases in a total of 480 CSF samples. Results In the initial spinal tap, the IgG-index was the only independent predictor for unfavorable outcome (GOS Conclusion The present study suggests that in infectious CNS diseases an elevated IgG-Index might be an additional marker for the early identification of patients at risk for neurological morbidity.

  6. Histone turnover and chromatin accessibility: Critical mediators of neurological development, plasticity, and disease.

    Wenderski, Wendy; Maze, Ian

    2016-05-01

    In postmitotic neurons, nucleosomal turnover was long considered to be a static process that is inconsequential to transcription. However, our recent studies in human and rodent brain indicate that replication-independent (RI) nucleosomal turnover, which requires the histone variant H3.3, is dynamic throughout life and is necessary for activity-dependent gene expression, synaptic connectivity, and cognition. H3.3 turnover also facilitates cellular lineage specification and plays a role in suppressing the expression of heterochromatic repetitive elements, including mutagenic transposable sequences, in mouse embryonic stem cells. In this essay, we review mechanisms and functions for RI nucleosomal turnover in brain and present the hypothesis that defects in histone dynamics may represent a common mechanism underlying neurological aging and disease. PMID:26990528

  7. Clinical impact of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the diagnosis of neurological diseases

    In this review it will be discussed in which neurological disorders positron emission tomography can yield important diagnostic information. Because positron emission tomography is an expensive method indications have to be cleary defined. One important question concerns the differentiation of tumor recurrence and scar due to radiation therapy or an operation. The grading of brain tumors is another application. In HIV patients fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography can separate lymphoma and toxoplasmosis. In the evaluation of dementia positron emission tomography can help to clarify the differential diagnosis. Another important area is the presurgical evaluation of epilepsy patients and patients with cerebrovascular disease in whom a surgical revascularization procedure is planned. In extrapyramidal disorders, positron emission tomography can often help to establish the final diagnosis. (author)

  8. The global burden of mental, neurological and substance use disorders: an analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010.

    Harvey A Whiteford

    Full Text Available The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010, estimated that a substantial proportion of the world's disease burden came from mental, neurological and substance use disorders. In this paper, we used GBD 2010 data to investigate time, year, region and age specific trends in burden due to mental, neurological and substance use disorders.For each disorder, prevalence data were assembled from systematic literature reviews. DisMod-MR, a Bayesian meta-regression tool, was used to model prevalence by country, region, age, sex and year. Prevalence data were combined with disability weights derived from survey data to estimate years lived with disability (YLDs. Years lost to premature mortality (YLLs were estimated by multiplying deaths occurring as a result of a given disorder by the reference standard life expectancy at the age death occurred. Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs were computed as the sum of YLDs and YLLs.In 2010, mental, neurological and substance use disorders accounted for 10.4% of global DALYs, 2.3% of global YLLs and, 28.5% of global YLDs, making them the leading cause of YLDs. Mental disorders accounted for the largest proportion of DALYs (56.7%, followed by neurological disorders (28.6% and substance use disorders (14.7%. DALYs peaked in early adulthood for mental and substance use disorders but were more consistent across age for neurological disorders. Females accounted for more DALYs in all mental and neurological disorders, except for mental disorders occurring in childhood, schizophrenia, substance use disorders, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy where males accounted for more DALYs. Overall DALYs were highest in Eastern Europe/Central Asia and lowest in East Asia/the Pacific.Mental, neurological and substance use disorders contribute to a significant proportion of disease burden. Health systems can respond by implementing established, cost effective interventions, or by supporting the research necessary to develop

  9. Pathophysiology of acute small bowel disease with CT correlation

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiology of acute small bowel diseases, and to correlate the mechanisms of disease with computed tomography (CT) findings. Disease entities will be classified into the following: immune mediated and infectious causes, vascular causes, mechanical causes, trauma, and others. Having an understanding of acute small bowel pathophysiology is a useful teaching tool, and can lead to imaging clues to the most likely diagnosis of acute small bowel disorders.

  10. Pathophysiology of acute small bowel disease with CT correlation

    Sarwani, N., E-mail: nsarwani@hmc.psu.ed [Department of Radiology, Section of Abdominal Imaging, Penn State Milton Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA (United States); Tappouni, R.; Tice, J. [Department of Radiology, Section of Abdominal Imaging, Penn State Milton Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiology of acute small bowel diseases, and to correlate the mechanisms of disease with computed tomography (CT) findings. Disease entities will be classified into the following: immune mediated and infectious causes, vascular causes, mechanical causes, trauma, and others. Having an understanding of acute small bowel pathophysiology is a useful teaching tool, and can lead to imaging clues to the most likely diagnosis of acute small bowel disorders.

  11. Identification and validation of clinical predictors for the risk of neurological involvement in children with hand, foot, and mouth disease in Sarawak

    del Sel Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human enterovirus 71 (HEV71 can cause Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD with neurological complications, which may rapidly progress to fulminant cardiorespiratory failure, and death. Early recognition of children at risk is the key to reduce acute mortality and morbidity. Methods We examined data collected through a prospective clinical study of HFMD conducted between 2000 and 2006 that included 3 distinct outbreaks of HEV71 to identify risk factors associated with neurological involvement in children with HFMD. Results Total duration of fever ≥ 3 days, peak temperature ≥ 38.5°C and history of lethargy were identified as independent risk factors for neurological involvement (evident by CSF pleocytosis in the analysis of 725 children admitted during the first phase of the study. When they were validated in the second phase of the study, two or more (≥ 2 risk factors were present in 162 (65% of 250 children with CSF pleocytosis compared with 56 (30% of 186 children with no CSF pleocytosis (OR 4.27, 95% CI2.79–6.56, p rd or later day of febrile illness, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of ≥ 2 risk factors predictive of CSF pleocytosis were 75%(57/76, 59%(27/46, 75%(57/76 and 59%(27/46, respectively. Conclusion Three readily elicited clinical risk factors were identified to help detect children at risk of neurological involvement. These risk factors may serve as a guide to clinicians to decide the need for hospitalization and further investigation, including cerebrospinal fluid examination, and close monitoring for disease progression in children with HFMD.

  12. Responsibilities of Health Care Professionals in Counseling and Educating Patients With Incurable Neurological Diseases Regarding "Stem Cell Tourism": Caveat Emptor.

    Bowman, Michelle; Racke, Michael; Kissel, John; Imitola, Jaime

    2015-11-01

    "Stem cell tourism" is a rising Internet-based industry that aims to offer unproven procedures to patients with incurable diseases. This unregulated activity is reaching the neurologist's office as well as across the world, as patients request information or clearance for such procedures. Herein, we posit the need for medical societies and licensing boards to bring this issue to the forefront of neurology because it has the potential to affect patient care with risk of morbidity and mortality, as well as to undermine public confidence in legitimate stem cell research for incurable neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:26322563

  13. Considerations on Intervention Goal and Efficacy Evaluation of Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Treatment of Neurological Diseases

    XIE Ren-ming; DU Bao-xin; HUANG Yan; ZHOU Dao-you; WANG yong-yan; HUANG pei-xin

    2007-01-01

    In the last several years, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has made much progress in the treatment of neurological diseases. The living space of TCM in neurological diseases lies in refractory diseases, aging and chronic diseases caused by multiple factors as well as sub-health state and chronic fatigue state. The effect model of TCM mainly consists of whole effect, self-organization,self-stable model, holographic effect and butterfly effect. The effective point of TCM in neurological diseases lies mainly in end-points and health-related events. Moreover, TCM has advantages in the evaluation of symptoms, syndrome and quality of life (QOL). Some key indexes should be included when evaluating the efficacy of TCM in neurological diseases. Meanwhile, the advantages of TCM such as end-points, health-related events and QOL should be highlighted. Multi-subject researching methods could be adopted to make a comprehensive evaluation of subjective and objective indexes.The clinical evidence on the TCM efficacy evaluation may come from RCTs, and other types of designs can also be considered.

  14. Noninvasive radioelectric asymmetric conveyor brain stimulation treatment improves balance in individuals over 65 suffering from neurological diseases: pilot study

    Margotti ML

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Vania Fontani1, Salvatore Rinaldi1, Alessandro Castagna1, Matteo Lotti Margotti21Department of Neuro Psycho Physio Pathology, Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Florence, Italy; 2Department of Information Technology and Statistical Analysis, Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Florence, ItalyPurpose: In the elderly population, problems with walking and balance are very common. These problems seriously affect the quality of life of the elderly. When gait and balance problems are caused by neurological disease, these problems can be more serious and difficult to handle. The aim of this pilot study was to verify the effect of a noninvasive radioelectric conveyor asymmetric brain stimulation protocol, named neuropostural optimization (NPO, to improve balance in neurological elderly.Patients and methods: Twelve patients suffering from various neurological diseases participated in this study. They were assessed with the Romberg test, which was performed on a computerized stabilometric platform before, immediately following, and 72 hours after NPO was used to improve balance.Results: The results showed that a stabilization of balance was recorded in all subjects a few minutes after administration of NPO. This stabilization increased 72 hours after treatment.Conclusion: The results show that NPO could be a valuable therapeutic approach to improve sensory-motor strategies and neurological control of balance in elderly patients suffering from various neurological diseases.Keywords: Romberg test, instability, imbalance, gait, REAC, neuropostural optimization

  15. Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and Bartonella henselae bacteremia in a father and daughter with neurological disease

    Woods Christopher W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii is an important, emerging, intravascular bacterial pathogen that has been recently isolated from immunocompetent patients with endocarditis, arthritis, neurological disease and vasoproliferative neoplasia. Vector transmission is suspected among dogs and wild canines, which are the primary reservoir hosts. This investigation was initiated to determine if pets and family members were infected with one or more Bartonella species. Methods PCR and enrichment blood culture in Bartonella alpha Proteobacteria growth medium (BAPGM was used to determine infection status. Antibody titers to B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotypes I-III and B. henselae were determined using a previously described indirect fluorescent antibody test. Two patients were tested sequentially for over a year to assess the response to antibiotic treatment. Results Intravascular infection with B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotype II and Bartonella henselae (Houston 1 strain were confirmed in a veterinarian and his daughter by enrichment blood culture, followed by PCR and DNA sequencing. Symptoms included progressive weight loss, muscle weakness, lack of coordination (the father and headaches, muscle pain and insomnia (the daughter. B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotype II was also sequenced from a cerebrospinal fluid BAPGM enrichment culture and from a periodontal swab sample. After repeated courses of antibiotics, post-treatment blood cultures were negative, there was a decremental decrease in antibody titers to non-detectable levels and symptoms resolved in both patients. Conclusions B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and B. henselae are zoonotic pathogens that can be isolated from the blood of immunocompetent family members with arthralgias, fatigue and neurological symptoms. Therapeutic elimination of Bartonella spp. infections can be challenging, and follow-up testing is recommended. An increasing number of arthropod

  16. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty. PMID:27188830

  17. Brain MRI and SPECT in the diagnosis of early neurological involvement in Wilson's disease

    Piga, Mario; Satta, Loredana; Serra, Alessandra; Loi, Gianluigi [Policlinico Universitario, University of Cagliari, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Medical Science, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Murru, Alessandra; Demelia, Luigi [Policlinico Universitario, University of Cagliari, Gastroenterology, Department of Medical Science, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Sias, Alessandro [Policlinico Universitario, University of Cagliari, Radiology, Department of Medical Science, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Marrosu, Francesco [Policlinico Universitario, University of Cagliari, Neurology, Department of Medical Science, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    To evaluate the impact of brain MRI and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in early detection of central nervous system abnormalities in patients affected by Wilson's disease (WD) with or without neurological involvement. Out of 25 consecutive WD patients, 13 showed hepatic involvement, ten hepatic and neurological manifestations, and twp hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric symptoms, including mainly movement disorders, major depression, and psychosis. Twenty-four healthy, age-gender matched subjects served as controls. All patients underwent brain MRI and {sup 99m}Tc-ethyl-cysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT before starting specific therapy. Voxel-by-voxel analyses were performed using statistical parametric mapping to compare differences in {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain uptake between the two groups. Brain MRI showed T2-weighted hyperintensities in seven patients (28%), six of whom were affected by hepatic and neurological forms. Brain perfusion SPECT showed pathological data in 19 patients (76%), revealing diffuse or focal hypoperfusion in superior frontal (Brodmann area (BA) 6), prefrontal (BA 9), parietal (BA 40), and occipital (BA 18, BA 39) cortices in temporal gyri (BA 37, BA 21) and in caudatus and putamen. Moreover, hepatic involvement was detected in nine subjects; eight presented both hepatic and neurological signs, while two exhibited WD-correlated hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric alterations. All but one patient with abnormal MRI matched with abnormal ECD SPECT. Pathologic MRI findings were obtained in six out of ten patients with hepatic and neurological involvement while abnormal ECD SPECT was revealed in eight patients. Both patients with hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric involvement displayed abnormal ECD SPECT and one displayed an altered MRI. These findings suggest that ECD SPECT might be useful in detecting early brain damage in WD, not only in the perspective of assessing and treating motor impairment but also in evaluating

  18. The use of herpes simplex virus vectors for gene therapy in neurological diseases.

    Kennedy, P G; Steiner, I

    1993-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) vectors have now been developed and enable the efficient delivery of foreign genes under the control of appropriate promoter elements into non-dividing neurons in vitro and in vivo. Their use is based on the natural ability of HSV-1 to spread throughout the nervous system and to establish a lifelong latent infection in neurons. HSV is present in an episomal form in the neuronal nucleus, and normal neuronal functions remain unaltered. A wide variety of foreign genes can theoretically be packaged into the large HSV genome. A number of technical problems will need to be overcome to ensure the stable expression of the foreign gene products, adequate control of the levels of their expression, the safety of the vectors and the correct targeting of the vectors to the appropriate neuronal cell populations. Such vectors have the potential to replace missing gene products in neurons in patients with a variety of metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases, and also to insert growth factors or enzymes into the local vicinity of neurological lesions to promote neuronal repair. HSV-1 vectors also have the potential to define the genetic basis of various neurophysiological functions which may prove to be useful in evaluating altered neuronal function encountered in disease. PMID:8265768

  19. Modeling Neurological Disease by Rapid Conversion of Human Urine Cells into Functional Neurons

    Shu-Zhen Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatic cells can be directly converted into functional neurons by ectopic expression of defined factors and/or microRNAs. Since the first report of conversion mouse embryonic fibroblasts into functional neurons, the postnatal mouse, and human fibroblasts, astroglia, hepatocytes, and pericyte-derived cells have been converted into functional dopaminergic and motor neurons both in vitro and in vivo. However, it is invasive to get all these materials. In the current study, we provide a noninvasive approach to obtain directly reprogrammed functional neurons by overexpression of the transcription factors Ascl1, Brn2, NeuroD, c-Myc, and Myt1l in human urine cells. These induced neuronal (iN cells could express multiple neuron-specific proteins and generate action potentials. Moreover, urine cells from Wilson’s disease (WD patient could also be directly converted into neurons. In conclusion, generation of iN cells from nonneural lineages is a feasible and befitting approach for neurological disease modeling.

  20. Epilepsy and Other Neurological Diseases in the Parents of Children with Infantile Autism. A Case Control Study

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the broader phenotype of infantile autism (IA) we compared the rates and types of epilepsy and other neurological diseases in the parents of 111 consecutively admitted patients with IA with a matched control group of parents of 330 children from the general population. All participants were screened through the nationwide Danish…

  1. Demyelinizing neurological disease after treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha-inhibiting agents in a rheumatological outpatient clinic

    Theibich, Ali; Dreyer, Lene; Magyari, Melinda;

    2014-01-01

    Biological treatment with inhibitors of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha has dramatically improved the disease course of several chronic rheumatologic conditions. Adverse events (AEs) are primarily infections and hypersensitivity reactions. Demyelinizing neurological symptoms resembling...... treatment with TNF inhibitors are aware of this potentially serious AE and report these events to the proper medical authorities....

  2. A case of acute viral hepatitis interfering with acute fatty liver disease of pregnancy

    Abdulkadir Turgut; Ali Özler; Neval Yaman Görük; Senem Yaman Tunç; Nurullah Peker; Recep Tekin

    2013-01-01

    Acute hepatitis A is a rarely seen infection during pregnancy.In terms of clinical and laboratory findings, it can beinterfere with acute fatty liver disease which can be quitemortal during pregnancy. Since liver function tests are elevatedin both conditions, hepatitis A infection should alsobe kept in mind in differential diagnosis. We present a 30year-old pregnant woman with 35 weeks of gestation whopresented to our clinic with a suspection of acute fattyliver disease but finally diagnosed ...

  3. Risk of psychiatric and neurological diseases in patients with workplace mobbing experience in Germany: a retrospective database analysis

    Kostev, Karel; Rex, Juliana; Waehlert, Lilia; Hog, Daniela; Heilmaier, Christina

    2014-01-01

    [english] Introduction: The number of mobbing experiences recorded has increased during recent years and it has now been established as global phenomenon among the working population. The goal of our study was to analyze the incidence of certain neurologic and psychiatric diseases as a consequence of mobbing as compared with a control group and to examine the possible influence of previous diseases that occurred within one year before the first mobbing documentation on the incidence of mobbin...

  4. Risk of psychiatric and neurological diseases in patients with workplace mobbing experience in Germany: a retrospective database analysis

    Kostev, K.; Rex, J.; Waehlert, L; Hog, D; Heilmaier, C

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The number of mobbing experiences recorded has increased during recent years and it has now been established as global phenomenon among the working population. The goal of our study was to analyze the incidence of certain neurologic and psychiatric diseases as a consequence of mobbing as compared with a control group and to examine the possible influence of previous diseases that occurred within one year before the first mobbing documentation on the incidence of mobbing.Materia...

  5. Hans von Bülow: creativity and neurological disease in a famous pianist and conductor.

    Wöhrle, Johannes C; Haas, Frithjof

    2007-01-01

    Hans von Bülow (1830-1894) was a conductor and pianist of worldwide reputation and founder of many stylistic interpretations of classic and romantic symphonies. The close friendship with Richard Wagner, but not the enthusiastic admiration of his dramatic musical opus, ended abruptly when Hans von Bülow became aware of the betrayal of his wife Cosima and Richard Wagner. Hans von Bülow reported symptoms and signs of neurological disease in many letters that were kept and edited by his second wife Marie. For decades he suffered from chronic neuralgiforme headaches, which were caused by a tumor of the cervical radicular nerves. At the age of 45 years, he suddenly developed a motorsensory deficit in the right arm and hand and a contralateral facial deficit, suggestive of brainstem infarction. He recovered and celebrated even greater successes as a musician, although phases of major depression also interfered with his professional life. In the last, phase of his life, he experienced the consequences of generalized atherosclerosis and cerebral microangiopathy. It was a second cerebrovascular accident of the brainstem that caused his death, only 10 months after his last concert performance. Although his death occurred in Egypt, an autopsy was performed by Professor Ludwig Edinger and the results will be presented. PMID:17495513

  6. Neurological disorders and travel.

    Awada, Adnan; Kojan, Suleiman

    2003-02-01

    Travel is associated with a number of neurological disorders that can be divided into two categories: (1) Neurological infections including encephalitides, neurotuberculosis, neurobrucellosis, cysticercosis and trichinosis. Some of these disorders can be prevented by vaccinations, such as Japanese B encephalitis and rabies, some by the use of insect repellents and some by avoiding raw milk products and undercooked meat. (2) Non-infective neurological disorders, such as acute mountain sickness and high altitude cerebral oedema, problems occurring during air travel such as syncope, seizures, strokes, nerve compression, barotrauma and vertigo, motion sickness and foodborne neurotoxic disorders such as ciguatera, shellfish poisoning and intoxication by cassava. This group of diseases and disorders could be prevented if the traveller knows about them, applies simple physiological rules, takes some specific medications and knows how to avoid intoxications in certain geographical areas. Meningococcal meningitis, malaria and jet lag syndrome are extensively discussed in other articles of this issue. The discussion in this paper will be limited to the other disorders. PMID:12615385

  7. Efficacy and safety comparison of DL-3-n-butylphthalide and Cerebrolysin: Effects on neurological and behavioral outcomes in acute ischemic stroke

    Xue, Li-Xia; Zhang, Ting; Zhao, Yu-Wu; Geng, Zhi; CHEN Jing-jiong; Chen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrolysin and DL-3-n-butylphthalide (NBP) have each shown neuroprotective efficacy in preclinical models of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and passed clinical trials as therapeutic drugs for AIS. The present study was a clinical trial to assess and compare the efficacy and safety of NBP and Cerebrolysin in the reduction of neurological and behavioral disability following AIS. A randomized, double-blind trial was conducted with enrolment of 60 patients within 12 h of AIS. In addition to routin...

  8. Role of Oxidative Stress in the Worsening of Neurologic Wilson Disease Following Chelating Therapy.

    Kalita, Jayantee; Kumar, Vijay; Ranjan, Abhay; Misra, Usha K

    2015-12-01

    Patients with neurologic Wilson disease (NWD) may worsen on treatment, but there is no study evaluating the role of oxidative stress. We report the role of plasma glutathione (GSH), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the worsening of NWD following treatment. Fifty-one treatment-naïve NWD patients were subjected to detailed clinical evaluation. The severity of NWD was noted, and dystonia was measured by Burke-Fahn-Marsden (BFM) score. Their hematological, serum chemistry, ultrasound abdomen and cranial MRI changes were noted. Plasma GSH, TAC and MDA, serum free copper (Cu) and 24-h urinary Cu were measured at admission and at 3 and 6 months after treatment. The patients were considered worsened if there was one or more grade deterioration in severity scale, >10 % deterioration in BFM score or appearance of new neurologic signs. The median age of the patients was 11 (5-37) years, and 12 were females. Following treatment, 25 patients improved, 12 worsened, and 14 had stationary course. The worsened group at 3 months had lower GSH (1.99 ± 0.17 vs. 2.30 ± 0.30 mg/dl; P = 0.004) and TAC (1.59 ± 0.12 vs. 1.82 ± 0.17 mmol Trolox equivalent/L; P = 0.001) and higher MDA (5.24 ± 0.22 vs. 4.34 ± 0.46 nmol/ml; P < 0.001) levels compared to the improved group. These changes were associated with increased serum free Cu (41.81 ± 3.31 vs. 35.62 ± 6.40 µg/dl; P = 0.02) and 24-h urinary Cu (206.42 ± 41.61 vs. 121.99 ± 23.72 µg/24 h; P < 0.001) in the worsened compared to the improved group. All the patients having worsening were on penicillamine. Worsening following chelating treatment in NWD may be due to oxidative stress which is induced by increased serum free Cu. These results may have future therapeutic implication and needs further study. PMID:26224517

  9. Acute Diarrhoeal Diseases Among Preschool Children in Western Maharashtra, India.

    Mahesh B Tondare , Vaishali V Raje, Satish V Kakade , Madhavi V Rayate

    2014-01-01

    "Background: Malnutrition and infectious diseases both occur in the same unfortunate children and together they play a major role in causing the high morbidity and mortality in them. Out of all the childhood illnesses, acute respiratory tract infections, diarrhoeal diseases and malnutrition are the principle causes of illness and death in the developing countries. Acute Diarrhoeal diseases (ADD’s) are reported to be the 2nd leading cause of child morbidity and mortality. Objectives: ...

  10. Minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) offers a way to precisely assess early treatment response and detect relapse. Established methods to study MRD are flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of antigen-receptor genes, and PCR amplification of fusion transcripts. The strong correlation between MRD levels and risk of relapse in childhood ALL is well demonstrated; studies in adult patients also support its prognostic value. Hence, results of MRD studies can be used to select treatment intensity and duration, and to estimate the optimal timing for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Practical issues in the implementation of MRD assays in clinical studies include determining the most informative time point to study MRD and the levels of MRD that will trigger changes in treatment intensity, as well as the relative cost and informative power of different methodologies. The identification of new markers of leukemia and the use of increasingly refined assays should further facilitate routine monitoring of MRD and help to clarify the cellular and biologic features of leukemic cells that resist chemotherapy in vivo. PMID:19100372

  11. Pathophysiology of coronary artery disease leading to acute coronary syndromes

    Ambrose, John A; Singh, Manmeet

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and sudden cardiac death (SCD) are among the most serious and catastrophic of acute cardiac disorders, accounting for hundreds of thousands of deaths each year worldwide. Although the incidence of AMI has been decreasing in the US according to the American Heart Association, heart disease is still the leading cause of mortality in adults. In most cases of AMI and in a majority of cases of SCD, the underlying pathology is acute intraluminal coronary thrombus f...

  12. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASE AS THE DEBUT OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    A. Yu. Ischenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus — a chronic autoimmune disease that is often associated with infectious processes. The paper presents two clinical cases of systemic lupus erythematosus , debuted with acute respiratory infection.

  13. [Acute pancreatitis with hypertriglyceridemia--an underestimated disease?].

    Wild, Wolfgang; Tajjiou, Morad; Ferschke, Melanie; Bormann, Fabian; Dörr, Pius; Schwarzbach, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is a rare, but since a long time well known etiology for acute pancreatitis. It could occure alone or coactive with other triggers like alcohlic excess. Nevertheless it found no approach to the current classifications and parameters of prognosis of the acute pancreatitis. We refer about two patients with hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis, whose initial disease was limited on the tail of the pancreas with just a circumscripted or--in the other case--no necrosis. However, in both cases and although a consequent treatment started immediately, a serious process developed including a life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome in one case, which necessitated an extracorporal membrane oxygenation. PMID:26710203

  14. Acute Demyelinating Disease after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts

    Alex Kostianovsky

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis constitute a group of diseases not completely understood in their physiopathology. Environmental and toxic insults are thought to play a role in priming autoimmunity. The aim of the present report is to describe a case of acute demyelinating disease with fatal outcome occurring 15 days after oral exposure to herbal extracts.

  15. ACUTE ATAXIA, TAKING PLACE AFTER ACUTE RESPIRATORY VIRAL INFECTION IN 2 Y. O. GIRL, AS A DEBUT NEUROLOGIC SIGN OF THE ANGELMAN SYNDROME

    E. B. Voropanova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Angleman syndrome (АS – is a chromosomal syndrome, which is manifested through atypical autism with feeble minding, epilepsy, outrage of the speech development, movement disorders, ataxia, as well as special (happy behavior of patients, combined with outbursts of laugh. The disease is caused by the mutation of 15q11.2–13 maternal locus or by the gene of UBE3A ubiquitinated complex. Such genes regulate the functional activity of hippocampus neurons, of olfactory bulbs, of the parastriate cortex, of the tentorium. We demonstrate the atypical AS case, which clinical presentation developed after acute respiratory viral infection with febrile temperature. The disease started with episodes of acute ataxia, interrupting daily activities of the child. Step by step the speech development was regressing – several words have fallen out,leaving the space for babbling sounds. Also appeared stereotypic movements of upper extremities (bending of arms in elbow joints, its retraction and joggling of hands, unmotivated laugh. Due to the nonrelevant starting presentation in the acute period following conditions were differentially diagnosed: 1 opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome; 2 cerebral circulation diseases; 3 epilepsy with absences and atonic attacks; 4 paroxysmal dyskenisias and ataxias; 5 start of the neurodegenerative disease; 6 early childhood autism. Results of laboratory research allowed to exclude opsoclonus-myoclonus, the magnetic and resonance tomography and vessels research allowed to exclude the cerebrovascular pathology. Changes, revealed in the course of the videoelectroencephalographic monitoring, as well as anamnesis data (clinical symptoms after fever allowed to narrow the diagnostic search; AS suspected. Provided the combination of ataxia with movement disorders, it was decided to carry out not molecular & genetic, but also micromatrix analysis, in order to exclude the channelopathy, as well as other genetic reasons. The method of

  16. Controlling the Regional Identity of hPSC-Derived Neurons to Uncover Neuronal Subtype Specificity of Neurological Disease Phenotypes

    Kent Imaizumi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The CNS contains many diverse neuronal subtypes, and most neurological diseases target specific subtypes. However, the mechanism of neuronal subtype specificity of disease phenotypes remains elusive. Although in vitro disease models employing human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs have great potential to clarify the association of neuronal subtypes with disease, it is currently difficult to compare various PSC-derived subtypes. This is due to the limited number of subtypes whose induction is established, and different cultivation protocols for each subtype. Here, we report a culture system to control the regional identity of PSC-derived neurons along the anteroposterior (A-P and dorsoventral (D-V axes. This system was successfully used to obtain various neuronal subtypes based on the same protocol. Furthermore, we reproduced subtype-specific phenotypes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and Alzheimer’s disease (AD by comparing the obtained subtypes. Therefore, our culture system provides new opportunities for modeling neurological diseases with PSCs.

  17. Neurology and international organizations

    Mateen, Farrah J.

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private–public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and c...

  18. Neurologic Music Therapy Training for Mobility and Stability Rehabilitation with Parkinson's Disease - A Pilot Study.

    Bukowska, Anna A; Krężałek, Piotr; Mirek, Elżbieta; Bujas, Przemysław; Marchewka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a progressive condition with gait disturbance and balance disorder as the main symptoms. Previous research studies focused on the application of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS) in PD gait rehabilitation. The key hypothesis of this pilot study, however, assumes the major role of the combination of all three Neurologic Music Therapy (NMT) sensorimotor techniques in improving spatio-temporal gait parameters, and postural stability in the course of PD. The 55 PD-diagnosed subjects invited to the study were divided into two groups: 30 in the experimental and 25 in the control group. Inclusion criteria included Hoehn and Yahr stages 2 or 3, the ability to walk independently without any aid and stable pharmacological treatment for the duration of the experiment. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the chosen therapy procedure the following measures were applied: Optoelectrical 3D Movement Analysis, System BTS Smart for gait, and Computerized Dynamic Posturography CQ Stab for stability and balance. All measures were conducted both before and after the therapy cycle. The subjects from the experimental group attended music therapy sessions four times a week for 4 weeks. Therapeutic Instrumental Music Performance (TIMP), Pattern Sensory Enhancement (PSE) and RAS were used in every 45-min session for practicing daily life activities, balance, pre-gait, and gait pattern. Percussion instruments, the metronome and rhythmic music were the basis for each session. The subjects from the control group were asked to stay active and perform daily life activities between the measures. The research showed that the combination of the three NMT sensorimotor techniques can be used to improve gait and other rhythmical activities in PD rehabilitation. The results demonstrated significant improvement in the majority of the spatiotemporal gait parameters in the experimental group in comparison to the control group. In the stability tests with eyes

  19. Clinical use of gadobutrol for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of neurological diseases

    Cheng KT

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth T Cheng1, Hannah Y Cheng2, Kam Leung31Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Freelance Technical Writer, New Orleans, LA, USA; 3National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI is an important clinical tool for diagnosing neurological diseases. The appropriate use of a suitable MRI contrast agent or contrast pharmaceutical is essential for CE-MRI to produce desirable diagnostic images. Currently, there are seven contrast agents (CAs or pharmaceuticals approved for clinical imaging of the central nervous system (CNS in the US, Europe, or Japan. All of the clinically approved CAs are water-soluble gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs which do not penetrate the CNS blood–brain barrier (BBB. These agents are used for imaging CNS areas without a BBB, or various pathologies, such as tumors and infection that break down the BBB and allow CAs to enter into the surrounding parenchyma. Clinically, GBCAs are most useful for detecting primary and secondary cerebral neoplastic lesions. Among these CNS GBCAs, gadobutrol (Gd-BT-DO3A, Gadovist™ is a neutral, nonionic, macrocyclic compound that showed promising results from clinical trials of CNS imaging. In comparison with other GBCAs, Gd-BT-DO3A has relatively high in vitro kinetic stability and r1 relaxivity. Gd-BT-DO3A has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in 2011 for CNS imaging. A review of available literature shows that Gd-BT-DO3A exhibits similar safety and clinical efficacy profiles to other GBCAs. Gd-BT-DO3A has the distinguishing feature that it is the only clinical agent commercially available in a formulation of 1.0 M concentration with a relatively higher in vitro T1 shortening per unit volume than other clinical GBCAs which are only

  20. Clinical features, neuroimaging and prognosis of adult patients with clinically diagnosed acute-onset encephalitis treated at a teaching neurology center in the Toyama area of Japan

    Although acute viral encephalitis (AVE) and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) are etiologically and pathologically distinct, a differential diagnosis between these two disorders is often difficult, especially if the patient exhibits a disturbance in consciousness. To identify useful clinical differences enabling a differential diagnosis to be made at an early stage, we retrospectively analyzed patients who had been admitted to our hospital within the past seven years because of acute-onset encephalitis with a disturbance in consciousness. Eleven adult patients were classified as having AVE, and 8 adult patients were classified as having ADEM within this period. The clinical characteristics of the two groups were then compared. Patients with AVE exhibited a disturbance in consciousness as their first neurological sign, whereas patients with ADEM initially showed focal signs like spastic paralysis, urinary disturbance and ataxia, which were followed by a disturbance in consciousness. ADEM is usually preceded by infection or vaccination, but obtaining a medical history from patients with disturbed consciousness is often difficult. Based on the present analysis, the initial manifestation of focal neurological signs may be very useful for distinguishing ADEM from AVE. (author)

  1. A cross-sectional evaluation of home health service in patients with chronic neurologic diseases in a province of Turkey.

    Senadim, Songul; Cabalar, Murat; Gedik, Habip; Kasim, Ali Bayram; Bulut, Anıl; Yayla, Vildan; Erdogdu, Zeynep

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare patients' characteristics, comorbid risk factors, medical supplies, and caregivers' demographics between stroke patients and patients with other chronic neurological diseases receiving home health services. In our study, between November 2013 and March 2014, chronic neurological disease (CND) patients having home health services were enrolled in the study. During patient visits, patients were assessed by the questionnaire comprising the modified Rankin scale (mRS), Barthel index, Zarit caregiver burden scale, and mini nutritional assessment (MNA). Stroke patients were classified as Group I, and the other neurologic diseases as Group II. A total of 202 patients including stroke patients (n = 112), dementia (n = 64), Parkinson's disease (n = 17), motor neuron disease (n = 4), brain cancer (n = 2), cerebral palsy (n = 1), multiple sclerosis (n = 1), and head trauma (n = 1) answered the questionnaire. The mean age of Group I (61K:51E) was 76.6 ± 9.1 years; the Group II (28M:62F) was 80.9 ± 12.3 years. The mean age of Group I was significantly lower than Group II (p = 0.005) and the number of male patients in Group I was significantly higher (p = 0.001). The educational status between the two groups was not significantly different in terms of duration of illness and addiction. There was no difference between the two groups in terms of Zarit caregiver burden scale, Barthel index, and mRS. The presence of malnutrition (MNA nutritional support and providing appropriate nutritional support in other CND patients are expected to increase the life quality. PMID:26189106

  2. Risk of psychiatric and neurological diseases in patients with workplace mobbing experience in Germany: a retrospective database analysis

    Kostev, Karel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: The number of mobbing experiences recorded has increased during recent years and it has now been established as global phenomenon among the working population. The goal of our study was to analyze the incidence of certain neurologic and psychiatric diseases as a consequence of mobbing as compared with a control group and to examine the possible influence of previous diseases that occurred within one year before the first mobbing documentation on the incidence of mobbing.Material & methods: We used a large database (IMS Disease Analyzer, Germany to collect data from general practitioners in Germany from 01/2003 until 12/2012. Based on age, gender, and health insurance, patients with experience of mobbing were matched with a control group of patients who had not reported workplace mobbing and who were being treated by the same physicians. At first, diseases that occurred within one year before the bullying experience took place (“index date” were noted and compared to a control group of similar composition in terms of gender, age, and health insurance. Subsequently, the prevalence of depression, anxiety, somatoform disorders, and sleep disorders following experiences of mobbing were determined. After adjustment to take into account the odds of bullying, the ratios of these diseases were assessed using a logistic regression model.Results: The study population consisted of n=2,625 patients and n=2,625 controls, of which 33% were men. The number of cases of bullying documented rose continuously from 2003 to 2011 and remained high in 2012. Those who would later become victims of mobbing demonstrated a considerably higher prevalence of diseases in general – these diseases were not confined to the neurologic-psychiatric spectrum. Following experiences of bullying, depression, anxiety, somatoform disorders, and sleep disorders were significantly more prevalent than in the control group (for all, p<0.05. Similarly, odds

  3. Congenital and inherited neurologic diseases in dogs and cats: Legislation and its effect on purchase in Italy.

    Passantino, Annamaria; Masucci, Marisa

    2016-05-01

    Many of the congenital neurologic diseases can result in incapacity or death of the animal. Some of them, such as idiopathic epilepsy and hydrocephalus, exhibit breed or familial predisposition and a genetic basis was proved or suggested. Some diseases can be presumptively diagnosed after a detailed signalment (breed predisposition), history (e.g. family history because many of these defects have familial tendencies), and through physical exam; other diagnostic methods (radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, electrophysiologic tests, etc.) can provide supportive evidence for the congenital defect and help to confirm the diagnosis. Some cases can lead to civil law-suits when the lesions are congenital, but not easily recognizable, or when the lesions are hereditary but tend to became manifest only after some time (more than 12 months after the date of purchase, e.g., after the vice-free guarantee period has expired). Moreover, quite frequently an early diagnosis is not made because there are delays in consulting the veterinarian or the general practitioner veterinarian does not perceive subtle signs. This study was designed to focus on the medico-legal aspects concerning the buying and selling in Italy of dogs and cats affected by congenital and hereditary neurologic diseases that could constitute vice in these animals. While adequate provisions to regulate in detail the various aspects of pet sale have still to be drawn up by legislators, it may be helpful to involve breeders, by obliging them by contract to extend guarantees in the case of hereditary lesions, including neurologic diseases. PMID:27284217

  4. Aspectos neurológicos da doença de chagas: sistema nervoso central Neurological aspects of Chagas' disease: central nervous system

    Sylvio de Vergueiro Forjaz

    1967-09-01

    Full Text Available The lesions of the nervous system in the Trypanosomiasis Cruzi are quite frequent and are not only limited to the encephalo-spinal-axis. Actually, they are much more common in the peripheral representations of the autonomic nervous system, resulting in the so-called enteromegalies (mega-esophagus, megacolon, etc. so frequent in Brazil. However, only the clinical manifestations due to the encephalic and spinal lesions have been included in the neurological aspects of Chagas' disease (as formerly contended for by Carlos Chagas. In the acute phase of the central nervous system infestation, the Trypanosoma cruzi,as leishmanias, is found in cellular elements of the neuroglia (microglia, astroglia and may be isolated from the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (inoculation in sensitive animals. The corresponding clinical manifestations are the severe difuse meningo-encephalo-myelitis with a high degree of lethality and also signs of infection, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. The infants from endemic areas are much more compromised. The clinical-pathologic as well as experimental confirmations on that acute phase of the disease are numerous and irrefutable. In the chronic phase of the disease, the neurological manifestations are not very clear. Early in 1909, Chagas, impressed with the great number of cases of infantile encephalopathy found in infested regions, imputed to the T. cruzithe etiology of such cases of encephalopathy and considered them as pertaining to a chronic phase of the disease. This has not been confirmed by other investigations, and even if the etiologic agent were the T. cruzithe clinical manifestations have no evolutive character and seem more sequelae than symptoms of a real chronic nervous phase. Even experimentally it has not been possible to demonstrate the presence of parasites in the nervous system of infested animals after clearing of the signs of the acute phase. In patients with chronic Chagas' disease with lesions in

  5. Modeling oscillatory dynamics in brain microcircuits as a way to help uncover neurological disease mechanisms: A proposal

    Skinner, F. K. [Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, Krembil Discovery Tower, Toronto Western Hospital, 60 Leonard Street, 7th floor, 7KD411, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8 (Canada); Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of Toronto, 200 Elizabeth Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4 (Canada); Department of Physiology, University of Toronto Medical Sciences Building, 3rd Floor, 1 King' s College Circle, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8 (Canada); Ferguson, K. A. [Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, Krembil Discovery Tower, Toronto Western Hospital, 60 Leonard Street, 7th floor, 7KD411, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8 (Canada); Department of Physiology, University of Toronto Medical Sciences Building, 3rd Floor, 1 King' s College Circle, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    There is an undisputed need and requirement for theoretical and computational studies in Neuroscience today. Furthermore, it is clear that oscillatory dynamical output from brain networks is representative of various behavioural states, and it is becoming clear that one could consider these outputs as measures of normal and pathological brain states. Although mathematical modeling of oscillatory dynamics in the context of neurological disease exists, it is a highly challenging endeavour because of the many levels of organization in the nervous system. This challenge is coupled with the increasing knowledge of cellular specificity and network dysfunction that is associated with disease. Recently, whole hippocampus in vitro preparations from control animals have been shown to spontaneously express oscillatory activities. In addition, when using preparations derived from animal models of disease, these activities show particular alterations. These preparations present an opportunity to address challenges involved with using models to gain insight because of easier access to simultaneous cellular and network measurements, and pharmacological modulations. We propose that by developing and using models with direct links to experiment at multiple levels, which at least include cellular and microcircuit, a cycling can be set up and used to help us determine critical mechanisms underlying neurological disease. We illustrate our proposal using our previously developed inhibitory network models in the context of these whole hippocampus preparations and show the importance of having direct links at multiple levels.

  6. Modeling oscillatory dynamics in brain microcircuits as a way to help uncover neurological disease mechanisms: A proposal

    There is an undisputed need and requirement for theoretical and computational studies in Neuroscience today. Furthermore, it is clear that oscillatory dynamical output from brain networks is representative of various behavioural states, and it is becoming clear that one could consider these outputs as measures of normal and pathological brain states. Although mathematical modeling of oscillatory dynamics in the context of neurological disease exists, it is a highly challenging endeavour because of the many levels of organization in the nervous system. This challenge is coupled with the increasing knowledge of cellular specificity and network dysfunction that is associated with disease. Recently, whole hippocampus in vitro preparations from control animals have been shown to spontaneously express oscillatory activities. In addition, when using preparations derived from animal models of disease, these activities show particular alterations. These preparations present an opportunity to address challenges involved with using models to gain insight because of easier access to simultaneous cellular and network measurements, and pharmacological modulations. We propose that by developing and using models with direct links to experiment at multiple levels, which at least include cellular and microcircuit, a cycling can be set up and used to help us determine critical mechanisms underlying neurological disease. We illustrate our proposal using our previously developed inhibitory network models in the context of these whole hippocampus preparations and show the importance of having direct links at multiple levels

  7. Modeling oscillatory dynamics in brain microcircuits as a way to help uncover neurological disease mechanisms: A proposal

    Skinner, F. K.; Ferguson, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    There is an undisputed need and requirement for theoretical and computational studies in Neuroscience today. Furthermore, it is clear that oscillatory dynamical output from brain networks is representative of various behavioural states, and it is becoming clear that one could consider these outputs as measures of normal and pathological brain states. Although mathematical modeling of oscillatory dynamics in the context of neurological disease exists, it is a highly challenging endeavour because of the many levels of organization in the nervous system. This challenge is coupled with the increasing knowledge of cellular specificity and network dysfunction that is associated with disease. Recently, whole hippocampus in vitro preparations from control animals have been shown to spontaneously express oscillatory activities. In addition, when using preparations derived from animal models of disease, these activities show particular alterations. These preparations present an opportunity to address challenges involved with using models to gain insight because of easier access to simultaneous cellular and network measurements, and pharmacological modulations. We propose that by developing and using models with direct links to experiment at multiple levels, which at least include cellular and microcircuit, a cycling can be set up and used to help us determine critical mechanisms underlying neurological disease. We illustrate our proposal using our previously developed inhibitory network models in the context of these whole hippocampus preparations and show the importance of having direct links at multiple levels.

  8. Blocking Interleukin-1β in Acute and Chronic Autoinflammatory Diseases

    Dinarello, Charles A

    2011-01-01

    An expanding spectrum of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases are considered “autoinflammatory” diseases. This review considers autoinflammatory diseases as being distinct from “autoimmune” diseases. Autoimmune diseases are associated with dysfunctional T-cells and treated with “biologicals” including anti-TNFα, CTLA-Ig, anti-IL-12/23, anti-CD20, anti-IL-17 and anti-IL-6 receptor. In contrast, autoinflammatory diseases are uniquely due to a dysfunctional monocyte caspase-1 activity and sec...

  9. An inside job: how endosomal Na+/H+ exchangers link to autism and neurological disease

    Rajini Rao

    2014-01-01

    Autism imposes a major impediment to childhood development and a huge emotional and financial burden on society. In recent years, there has been rapidly accumulating genetic evidence that links the eNHE, a subset of Na+/H+ exchangers that localize to intracellular vesicles, to a variety of neurological conditions including autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), intellectual disability, and epilepsy. By providing a leak pathway for protons pumped by the V-ATPase, eNHE determi...

  10. Neurological complications of dengue fever: Experience from a tertiary center of north India

    Rajesh Verma; Pawan Sharma; Ravindra Kumar Garg; Veerendra Atam; Maneesh Kumar Singh; Hardeep Singh Mehrotra

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Dengue, an acute viral disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, is highly endemic in many tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Neurological complications of dengue infection have been observed more frequently in the recent past and some studies highlighted varied neurological complications arising in the course of dengue illness. In this retrospective study, we report various neurological complications observed during the last 2 years in patients of dengue fever. Materia...

  11. Neurological deterioration in the acute phase of minor ischemic stroke is an independent predictor of poor outcomes at 1 year: results from the China National Stroke Registry (CNSR)

    JU Yi; ZHAO Xing-quan; WANG Chun-xue; WANG Yi-long; LIU Gai-fen; WANG Yong-jun

    2013-01-01

    Background The risk of clinical deterioration still exists in the acute phase despite the fact that patients with minor stroke may display less severe symptoms.The impact of this clinical deterioration on long-term outcomes is unknown.We characterized the clinical features of neurological deterioration (ND) in the acute phase of minor ischemic stroke (MIS) and investigated its impact on mid-and long-term outcomes.Methods This was a multi-centered,prospective clinical study involving patients with MIS (the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale,NIHSS <3) recruited from the China National Stroke Registry.Patients were included who had been hospitalized within 24 hours of stroke onset.Baseline characteristics,complication rates during hospitalization,etiology of stroke,as well as 3-,6-,and 12-month post-stroke outcomes were compared between patients with and without ND during the acute phase.Results A number of 368 (15.2%) out of 2424 patients included in the study exhibited ND in the acute phase.Compared to patients without ND,patients with ND had longer hospital stay,increased rate of baseline diabetes,and multiple complications.Multivariate Logistic regression indicated that ND in acute phase was an independent factor predictive of increased dependence (adjusted odds ratio =5.20,95% Cl,3.51-7.70,P <0.001) at 12-month post-stroke.Conclusions The risk of ND in the acute phase is high in patients with MIS.ND in the acute phase is an independent predictor for poor outcomes at 12 months post-stroke onset.

  12. Post dengue neurological complication

    Hasliza, AH; Tohid, H; Loh, KY; Santhi, P

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain–Barre syndrome (GBS) is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) followed by an upper respirator...

  13. Neurologic emergencies in pregnancy.

    Donaldson, J O

    1991-06-01

    Any one neurologic emergency is rare during pregnancy. As a group, neurologic disorders are a major cause of maternal mortality. Optimal management requires a multidisciplinary approach and ready access to the collective experience of other clinicians. This article discusses the management of status epilepticus, eclamptic hypertensive encephalopathy, stroke, including subarachnoid hemorrhage, myasthenic crisis, porphyric crisis, acute Guillain-Barré syndrome, autonomic hyperreflexia, malignant hyperthermia, chorea gravidarum, and Wernicke's encephalopathy. PMID:1945251

  14. Acute Chagas Disease Induces Cerebral Microvasculopathy in Mice

    Nisimura, Lindice Mitie; Estato, Vanessa; de Souza, Elen Mello; Reis, Patricia A.; Lessa, Marcos Adriano; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Pereira, Mirian Claudia de Souza; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is the main clinical form of Chagas disease (CD); however, cerebral manifestations, such as meningoencephalitis, ischemic stroke and cognitive impairment, can also occur. The aim of the present study was to investigate functional microvascular alterations and oxidative stress in the brain of mice in acute CD. Acute CD was induced in Swiss Webster mice (SWM) with the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Cerebral functional capillary density (the number of spontaneously perf...

  15. Neurological complications and risk factors of cardiopulmonary failure of EV-A71-related hand, foot and mouth disease.

    Long, Lili; Xu, Lin; Xiao, Zhenghui; Hu, Shixiong; Luo, Ruping; Wang, Hua; Lu, Xiulan; Xu, Zhiyue; Yao, Xu; Zhou, Luo; Long, Hongyu; Gong, Jiaoe; Song, Yanmin; Zhao, Li; Luo, Kaiwei; Zhang, Mengqi; Feng, Li; Yang, Liming; Sheng, Xiaoqi; Fan, Xuegong; Xiao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    From 2010 to 2012, large outbreaks of EV-A71-related- hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occurred annually in China. Some cases had neurological complications and were closely associated with fatal cardiopulmonary collapse, but not all children with central nervous system (CNS) involvement demonstrated a poor prognosis. To identify which patients and which neurological complications are more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure, we retrospectively studied 1,125 paediatric inpatients diagnosed with EV-A71-related HFMD in Hunan province, including 1,017 cases with CNS involvement. These patients were divided into cardiopulmonary failure (976 people) group and group without cardiopulmonary failure (149 people). A logistic regression analysis was used to compare the clinical symptoms, laboratory test results, and neurological complications between these two groups. The most significant risk factors included young age, fever duration ≥3 days, coma, limb weakness, drowsiness and ANS involvement. Patients with brainstem encephalitis and more CNS-involved regions were more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure. These findings can help front-line clinicians rapidly and accurately determine patient prognosis, thus rationally distributing the limited medical resources and implementing interventions as early as possible. PMID:27001010

  16. Intestinal acute graft versus host disease

    Rovani, C; Danse, E; Dragean, C

    2010-01-01

    Background: We present a case of a 23-year-old man having drug addiction. He is managed by the department of hematology for an idiopathic medullar aplasia. Two months before his admission, he was treated with bone marrow transplantation. During follow-up, we noted a nonspecific recent cutaneous lesion. He was admitted for acute digestive symptoms including anorexia, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.

  17. A case of neuro-Behcet's disease: comparison of neurological symptoms with PET, SPECT, and MRI findings

    We describe a 27-year-old man who developed gait disturbance and dysarthria 2 years after the onset of cardinal symptoms of Behect's disease. Position emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose revealed severe hypometabolism in the cerebellum, in accordance with cerebellar symptoms and signs of the patients. However, single-photon emission tomography with 99mTc-HMPAO and 99mTc-ECD did not disclose significant perfusion abnormalities in the brain. Routine brain magnetic resonance imaging did not show signal abnormalities. The findings of imaging studies compared with neurological manifestations of the patient are discussed

  18. A case of neuro-Behcet's disease: comparison of neurological symptoms with PET, SPECT, and MRI findings

    Kim, Jin Wook; An, Min; Kim, So Yon; Kim, Young Jung; Cho, Min Koo; Lee, Gwon Jun; Lim, Sang Mun; Hong, Sung Woon; Choi, Chang Woon [Korea Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    We describe a 27-year-old man who developed gait disturbance and dysarthria 2 years after the onset of cardinal symptoms of Behect's disease. Position emission tomography with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose revealed severe hypometabolism in the cerebellum, in accordance with cerebellar symptoms and signs of the patients. However, single-photon emission tomography with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO and {sup 99m}Tc-ECD did not disclose significant perfusion abnormalities in the brain. Routine brain magnetic resonance imaging did not show signal abnormalities. The findings of imaging studies compared with neurological manifestations of the patient are discussed.

  19. Relationship between acute and chronic disease epidemiology.

    Kuller, L.H. (Lewis H.)

    1987-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of epidemics. The primary goal of epidemiological studies should be the identification of the determinants of disease in order to decrease morbidity and mortality. Epidemiological studies evolve through descriptive, analytical, and experimental approaches. The traditional infectious disease epidemiology studies were primarily concerned with identification of an agent, incubation period, mode of transmission, population at risk, and methods of disease control. Chronic...

  20. Effect of long-term low dose of aspirin on severity of disease following onset of acute cerebral infarction

    Jun Xu; Lili Cao; Xiaomei Deng; Enji Han

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aspirin can decrease the incidence risk of high-risk crowdgroup of cerebral infarction, but there are still controversy if it might decrease the degree of disease in degree of patients with acute cerebral infarction.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of lower dose of aspirin during taking for a long time on disease degree of disease following onset of acute cerebral infarction.DESIGN: Grouping according to the admission time and 1:1 paired observation.SETTING: Department of Neurology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University.PARTICIPANTS: The participants in present study were 321 patients with acute cerebral infarction who received treatments in the Department of Neurology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University from January 1999 to June 2000. There were 190 male and 131 female ,with mean (65±11 )years of age. Inclusive criteria: ① A focal neurological disturbance occurred suddenly and had lasted for more than 24 hours, patients were admitted within 3 days after onset of disease; ② A computed tomography of the brain was performed and excluded hemorrhage in all patients; ③ The patients were proved internal carotid occlusions by clinical features and image findings; ④ The functions of limbs were normal (before the first stroke) or almost normal (before the second stroke). Exclusive criteria: ①The patients who had have cardiogenic cerebral embolism; ②The patients who had taken warfarin orally and other platelet agglutination drugs.METHODS: ①All the patients were divided into 2 groups according to whether they had taken aspirin before: aspirin-treated group (n=110) and blank control group (n=211). There were 70 male and 40 female in aspirin-treated group, with average(65±10) years of age.All patients had taken 50-100 mg/d aspirin for 6 months to 10 years before onset. There were 120 male and 91 female in blank control group, with average (65±13)years of age. Patients received a clinical scoring within 3 days and similar therapeutic measures (such

  1. Hepatitis E Virus and Neurologic Disorders

    Kamar, Nassim; Bendall, Richard P.; Peron, Jean Marie; Cintas, Pascal; Prudhomme, Laurent; MANSUY, Jean Michel; Rostaing, Lionel; Keane, Frances; Ijaz, Samreen; Izopet, Jacques; Dalton, Harry R.

    2011-01-01

    Information about the spectrum of disease caused by hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 is emerging. During 2004–2009, at 2 hospitals in the United Kingdom and France, among 126 patients with locally acquired acute and chronic HEV genotype 3 infection, neurologic complications developed in 7 (5.5%): inflammatory polyradiculopathy (n = 3), Guillain-Barré syndrome (n = 1), bilateral brachial neuritis (n = 1), encephalitis (n = 1), and ataxia/proximal myopathy (n = 1). Three cases occurred in non...

  2. Spectrum of diseases in acute intestinal obstruction

    To determine the etiological spectrum of acute intestinal obstruction in our clinical setup Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical department of Military Hospital, Rawalpindi from Jul 2012 to Jul 2013, over a period of about 1 year. Material and Methods: A total of 120 patients with acute mechanical intestinal obstruction who underwent laparotomy were included in our study while those with non-mechanical intestinal obstruction like history of trauma and paralytic ileus were excluded from the study. All the patients were selected by non-probability purposive sampling technique. Emergency laparotomy was done and operative findings were recorded. Results: A total of 120 patients with mechanical intestinal obstruction were included in this study out of which 93 (69.17%) were female and remaining 27 (30.83%) were males. Male to female ratio was 1:2.24. Age range of patients was 22-85 years. Out of 120 patients operated for acute intestinal obstruction post-op adhesions were found in 37 (30.83%) patients followed by intestinal tuberculosis in 23 (19.17%) patients, obstructed inguinal hernias in 13 (10.83%), gut malignancies in 15 (12.5%) , Meckel's diverticulum with bands in 7 (5.83%), volvulus in 7 (5.83%), perforated appendix in 6 (5%), intussusception in 2 (1.7%), inflammatory bands in 5 (4.17%), trichobezoar and faecal impaction in 2 (1.7%) while in 3 (2.5%) patients no definite cause was found. Conclusion: Post-op adhesions are the commonest cause of mechanical intestinal obstruction in our setup followed by intestinal tuberculosis as second most common clinical pattern of presentation. (author)

  3. An Inside Job: How Endosomal Na+/H+ Exchangers Link to Autism and Neurological Disease

    Kalyan C. Kondapalli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Autism imposes a major impediment to childhood development and a huge emotional and financial burden on society. In recent years, there has been rapidly accumulating genetic evidence that links the eNHE, a subset of Na+/H+ exchangers that localize to intracellular vesicles, to a variety of neurological conditions including autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, intellectual disability and epilepsy. By providing a leak pathway for protons pumped by the V-ATPase, eNHE determine luminal pH and regulate cation (Na+, K+ content in early and recycling endosomal compartments. Loss-of-function mutations in eNHE cause hyperacidification of endosomal lumen, as a result of imbalance in pump and leak pathways. Two isoforms, NHE6 and NHE9 are highly expressed in brain, including hippocampus and cortex. Here, we summarize evidence for the importance of luminal cation content and pH on processing, delivery and fate of cargo and on the surface expression and function of membrane receptors and neurotransmitter transporters, drawing upon insights from model organisms and mammalian cells. These studies lead to cellular models of eNHE activity in pre- and post-synaptic neurons and astrocytes, where they could impact synapse development and plasticity. The study of eNHE has provided new insight on the mechanism of autism and other debilitating neurological disorders and opened up new possibilities for therapeutic intervention.

  4. Blood transfusion for the treatment of acute anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease and other digestive diseases

    García-Erce, José Antonio; Gomollón, Fernando; Muñoz, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) is frequently used as the first therapeutic option for the treatment of acute anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially when it developed due to gastrointestinal or perioperative blood loss, but is not risk-free. Adverse effects of ABT include, but are not limited to, acute hemolytic reaction (wrong blood or wrong patient), febrile non-hemolytic transfusional reaction, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury...

  5. Risk factors for neurologic complications of hand, foot and mouth disease in the Republic of Korea, 2009.

    Kim, Seong Joon; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kang, Jin-Han; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Kyung-Hyo; Kim, Young-Hoon; Chung, Ju-Young; Bin, Joong Hyun; Jung, Da Eun; Kim, Ji Hong; Kim, Hwang Min; Cheon, Doo-Sung; Kang, Byung Hak; Seo, Soon Young

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, the first outbreak of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) or herpangina (HP) caused by enterovirus 71 occurred in the Republic of Korea. This study inquired into risk factors associated with complications of HFMD or HP. A retrospective medical records review was conducted on HFMD or HP patients for whom etiologic viruses had been verified in 2009. One hundred sixty-eight patients were examined for this investigation. Eighty patients were without complications while 88 were accompanied by complications, and 2 had expired. Enterovirus 71 subgenotype C4a was the most prevalent in number with 67 cases (54.9%). In the univariate analysis, the disease patterns of HFMD rather than HP, fever longer than 4 days, peak body temperature over 39℃, vomiting, headache, neurologic signs, serum glucose over 100 mg/dL, and having an enterovirus 71 as a causative virus were significant risk factors of the complications. After multiple logistic analysis, headache (Odds ratio [OR], 10.75; P < 0.001) and neurologic signs (OR, 42.76; P < 0.001) were found to be the most significant factors. Early detection and proper management of patients with aforementioned risk factors would be necessary in order to attain a better clinical outcome. PMID:23341722

  6. [Palliative care in neurology].

    Provinciali, Leandro; Tarquini, Daniela; De Falco, Fabrizio A; Carlini, Giulia; Zappia, Mario; Toni, Danilo

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care in neurology is characterized by the need of taking into account some distinguishing features which supplement and often differ from the general palliative approach to cancer or to severe organ failures. Such position is emphasized by a new concept of palliative assistance which is not limited to the "end of life" stage, as it was the traditional one, but is applied along the entire course of progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions. There are various reasons accounting for a differentiation of palliative care in neurology and for the development of specific expertise; the long duration of the advanced stages of many neurological diseases and the distinguishing features of some clinical problems (cognitive disorders, psychic disorders, etc.), in addition to the deterioration of some general aspects (nutrition, etc.), make the general criteria adopted for cancer, severe respiratory, hepatic or renal failures and heart failure inadequate. The neurological diseases which could benefit from the development of a specific palliative approach are dementia, cerebrovascular diseases, movement disorders, neuromuscular diseases, severe traumatic brain injury, brain cancers and multiple sclerosis, as well as less frequent conditions. The growing literature on palliative care in neurology provides evidence of the neurological community's increasing interest in taking care of the advanced and terminal stages of nervous system diseases, thus encouraging research, training and updating in such direction. This document aims to underline the specific neurological requirements concerning the palliative assistance. PMID:26228722

  7. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  8. Acute Diarrhoeal Diseases Among Preschool Children in Western Maharashtra, India.

    Mahesh B Tondare , Vaishali V Raje, Satish V Kakade , Madhavi V Rayate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available "Background: Malnutrition and infectious diseases both occur in the same unfortunate children and together they play a major role in causing the high morbidity and mortality in them. Out of all the childhood illnesses, acute respiratory tract infections, diarrhoeal diseases and malnutrition are the principle causes of illness and death in the developing countries. Acute Diarrhoeal diseases (ADD’s are reported to be the 2nd leading cause of child morbidity and mortality. Objectives: To study the attack rate of Acute Diarrhoeal Disease among pre-school children and to study the socio-demographic variables of pre-school children suffering from Acute Diarrhoeal Disease. Methods: A Longitudinal study was conducted among preschool children (3-5years who were selected from Private pre-primary school of urban area and followed for the period of one year. Mother/guardian/teacher was interviewed by using pre-tested proforma during this period. Results: About 56% of children found suffering from ADD with 0.6 episodes per children per year among private pre-primary school. Higher proportions of ADD affected children were residing in nuclear type of family, belonging to middle socio-economic class, mothers were literate & housewives, born with order >2 compared to non ADD affected children. Conclusion: Maximum number of children from private pre-primary schools suffered with nearly one attack of Acute Diarrhoeal Disease with maternal illiteracy and working mothers found favorable factors. Immunization coverage, EBF and proper weaning play a very important role in prevention of infections."

  9. Oxygen therapy in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Wedzicha, Wisia

    2014-01-01

    Simon E Brill, Jadwiga A Wedzicha Airway Disease Section, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK Abstract: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are important events in the history of this debilitating lung condition. Associated health care utilization and morbidity are high, and many patients require supplemental oxygen or ventilatory support. The last 2 decades have seen a substantial increase in our understanding of the best way to ma...

  10. Marcel Proust's diseases and doctors: the neurological story of a life.

    Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2007-01-01

    Marcel Proust (1871-1922), one of the greatest writers of all times, suffered from asthma beginning at age 9, in an era when the illness was considered a 'nervous' disorder belonging to what Beard, in 1870, called 'neurasthenia'. Proust's father, Adrien, was himself a professor of medicine (hygiene) who had met Charcot, and who contributed to neurology with studies on aphasia, stroke, hysteria, and neurasthenia - a condition about which he, along with Gilbert Ballet, published a book in 1897. Through his father, Proust met Edouard Brissaud, the co-founder of the Revue Neurologique in 1893, and, in 1896, the author of The Hygiene of the Asthmatics, with a foreword by Adrien Proust. Shortly after his mother's death in 1905, Proust contemplated admitting himself to a private hospital to reset his irregular sleep patterns and to improve his asthma. He hesitated in his choice of care between Jules Dejerine in Paris, Henry-Auguste Widmer at Valmont, and Paul Dubois in Bern. Finally, he decided to enter Paul Sollier's clinic, in Boulogne-sur-Seine, on the advice of Brissaud, and stayed there for 6 weeks in semi-isolation. Together with Babinski, Sollier was, at that time, considered the most gifted follower of Charcot. He was a forerunner of studies on emotional memory, which strongly influenced Proust. In Proust's opus magnum work In Search of Lost Time, 'involuntary memory' indeed forms the core mechanism of the entire novel, counterbalancing the decaying effects of time. A few years before his death from complicated bronchopneumonia at age 52, Proust became terrified of developing a stroke, like his mother and father, and he consulted with Joseph Babinski, who tried to reassure him. Proust's life followed an unusual neurological itinerary, which has been largely overlooked, but which is in fact critical for an understanding of his literary work. PMID:17495507

  11. Acute type II cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis mimicking atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease.

    Saeed, A

    2012-01-31

    Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease is a common presenting cause for digital ischaemia in life long smokers. Acute severe Type II Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis is a rare yet important cause, which may present with similar clinical features and which if undiagnosed may be rapidly fatal. Following the instigation of therapy with intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide this patient made an excellent recovery.

  12. Neurology of ciguatera

    Pearn, J

    2001-01-01

    Ciguatera is a widespread ichthyosarcotoxaemia with dramatic and clinically important neurological features. This severe form of fish poisoning may present with either acute or chronic intoxication syndromes and constitutes a global health problem. Ciguatera poisoning is little known in temperate countries as a potentially global problem associated with human ingestion of large carnivorous fish that harbour the bioaccumulated ciguatoxins of the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Gam...

  13. The role of nanotechnology and nano and micro-electronics in monitoring and control of cardiovascular diseases and neurological disorders

    Varadan, Vijay K.

    2007-04-01

    Nanotechnology has been broadly defined as the one for not only the creation of functional materials and devices as well as systems through control of matter at the scale of 1-100 nm, but also the exploitation of novel properties and phenomena at the same scale. Growing needs in the point-of-care (POC) that is an increasing market for improving patient's quality of life, are driving the development of nanotechnologies for diagnosis and treatment of various life threatening diseases. This paper addresses the recent development of nanodiagnostic sensors and nanotherapeutic devices with functionalized carbon nanotube and/or nanowire on a flexible organic thin film electronics to monitor and control of the three leading diseases namely 1) neurodegenerative diseases, 2) cardiovascular diseases, and 3) diabetes and metabolic diseases. The sensors developed include implantable and biocompatible devices, light weight wearable devices in wrist-watches, hats, shoes and clothes. The nanotherapeutics devices include nanobased drug delivery system. Many of these sensors are integrated with the wireless systems for the remote physiological monitoring. The author's research team has also developed a wireless neural probe using nanowires and nanotubes for monitoring and control of Parkinson's disease. Light weight and compact EEG, EOG and EMG monitoring system in a hat developed is capable of monitoring real time epileptic patients and patients with neurological and movement disorders using the Internet and cellular network. Physicians could be able to monitor these signals in realtime using portable computers or cell phones and will give early warning signal if these signals cross a pre-determined threshold level. In addition the potential impact of nanotechnology for applications in medicine is that, the devices can be designed to interact with cells and tissues at the molecular level, which allows high degree of functionality. Devices engineered at nanometer scale imply a

  14. Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells in neurological disease modeling: the importance of nonhuman primate models

    Qiu Z

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Zhifang Qiu,1,2 Steven L Farnsworth,2 Anuja Mishra,1,2 Peter J Hornsby1,21Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, TX, USA; 2Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USAAbstract: The development of the technology for derivation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells from human patients and animal models has opened up new pathways to the better understanding of many human diseases, and has created new opportunities for therapeutic approaches. Here, we consider one important neurological disease, Parkinson's, the development of relevant neural cell lines for studying this disease, and the animal models that are available for testing the survival and function of the cells, following transplantation into the central nervous system. Rapid progress has been made recently in the application of protocols for neuroectoderm differentiation and neural patterning of pluripotent stem cells. These developments have resulted in the ability to produce large numbers of dopaminergic neurons with midbrain characteristics for further study. These cells have been shown to be functional in both rodent and nonhuman primate (NHP models of Parkinson's disease. Patient-specific iPS cells and derived dopaminergic neurons have been developed, in particular from patients with genetic causes of Parkinson's disease. For complete modeling of the disease, it is proposed that the introduction of genetic changes into NHP iPS cells, followed by studying the phenotype of the genetic change in cells transplanted into the NHP as host animal, will yield new insights into disease processes not possible with rodent models alone.Keywords: Parkinson's disease, pluripotent cell differentiation, neural cell lines, dopaminergic neurons, cell transplantation, animal models

  15. Virtual reality interface devices in the reorganization of neural networks in the brain of patients with neurological diseases

    Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Méndez-Rebolledo, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Two key characteristics of all virtual reality applications are interaction and immersion. Systemic interaction is achieved through a variety of multisensory channels (hearing, sight, touch, and smell), permitting the user to interact with the virtual world in real time. Immersion is the degree to which a person can feel wrapped in the virtual world through a defined interface. Virtual reality interface devices such as the Nintendo® Wii and its peripheral nunchuks-balance board, head mounted displays and joystick allow interaction and immersion in unreal environments created from computer software. Virtual environments are highly interactive, generating great activation of visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems during the execution of a video game. In addition, they are entertaining and safe for the user. Recently, incorporating therapeutic purposes in virtual reality interface devices has allowed them to be used for the rehabilitation of neurological patients, e.g., balance training in older adults and dynamic stability in healthy participants. The improvements observed in neurological diseases (chronic stroke and cerebral palsy) have been shown by changes in the reorganization of neural networks in patients’ brain, along with better hand function and other skills, contributing to their quality of life. The data generated by such studies could substantially contribute to physical rehabilitation strategies. PMID:25206907

  16. REM sleep behavior disorder and REM sleep without atonia as an early manifestation of degenerative neurological disease.

    McCarter, Stuart J; St Louis, Erik K; Boeve, Bradley F

    2012-04-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia characterized by repeated episodes of dream enactment behavior and REM sleep without atonia (RSWA) during polysomnography recording. RSWA is characterized by increased phasic or tonic muscle activity seen on polysomnographic electromyogram channels. RSWA is a requisite diagnostic feature of RBD, but may also be seen in patients without clinical symptoms or signs of dream enactment as an incidental finding in neurologically normal individuals, especially in patients receiving antidepressant therapy. RBD may be idiopathic or symptomatic. Patients with idiopathic RBD often later develop other neurological features including parkinsonism, orthostatic hypotension, anosmia, or cognitive impairment. RSWA without clinical symptoms as well as clinically overt RBD also often occurs concomitantly with the α-synucleinopathy family of neurodegenerative disorders, which includes idiopathic Parkinson disease, Lewy body dementia, and multiple system atrophy. This review article considers the epidemiology of RBD, clinical and polysomnographic diagnostic standards for both RBD and RSWA, previously reported associations of RSWA and RBD with neurodegenerative disorders and other potential causes, the pathophysiology of which brain structures and networks mediate dysregulation of REM sleep muscle atonia, and considerations for the effective and safe management of RBD. PMID:22328094

  17. Virtual reality interface devices in the reorganization of neural networks in the brain of patients with neurological diseases.

    Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Méndez-Rebolledo, Guillermo

    2014-04-15

    Two key characteristics of all virtual reality applications are interaction and immersion. Systemic interaction is achieved through a variety of multisensory channels (hearing, sight, touch, and smell), permitting the user to interact with the virtual world in real time. Immersion is the degree to which a person can feel wrapped in the virtual world through a defined interface. Virtual reality interface devices such as the Nintendo® Wii and its peripheral nunchuks-balance board, head mounted displays and joystick allow interaction and immersion in unreal environments created from computer software. Virtual environments are highly interactive, generating great activation of visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems during the execution of a video game. In addition, they are entertaining and safe for the user. Recently, incorporating therapeutic purposes in virtual reality interface devices has allowed them to be used for the rehabilitation of neurological patients, e.g., balance training in older adults and dynamic stability in healthy participants. The improvements observed in neurological diseases (chronic stroke and cerebral palsy) have been shown by changes in the reorganization of neural networks in patients' brain, along with better hand function and other skills, contributing to their quality of life. The data generated by such studies could substantially contribute to physical rehabilitation strategies. PMID:25206907

  18. An Acoustic Study of the Relationships among Neurologic Disease, Dysarthria Type, and Severity of Dysarthria

    Kim, Yunjung; Kent, Raymond D.; Weismer, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined acoustic predictors of speech intelligibility in speakers with several types of dysarthria secondary to different diseases and conducted classification analysis solely by acoustic measures according to 3 variables (disease, speech severity, and dysarthria type). Method: Speech recordings from 107 speakers with…

  19. Difficulties with neurological prognostication in a young woman with delayed-onset generalised status myoclonus after cardiac arrest due to acute severe asthma

    Arvind Rajamani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological prognostication in cardiac arrest survivors is difficult, especially when the primary etiology is respiratory arrest. Prognostic factors designed to have zero false-positive rates to robustly confirm poor outcome are usually inadequate to rule out poor outcomes (i.e., high specificity and low sensitivity. One of the least understood prognosticators is generalised status myoclonus (GSM, with case reports confusing GSM, isolated myoclonic jerks and post-hypoxic intention myoclonus (Lance Adams syndrome [LAS]. With several prognostic indicators (including status myoclonus having been validated in the pre-hypothermia era, their current relevance is debatable. New modalities such as brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and continuous electroencephalography are being evaluated. We describe here a pregnant woman resuscitated from a cardiac arrest due to acute severe asthma, and an inability to reach a consensus based on published guidelines, with a brief overview of myoclonus, LAS and the role of MRI brain in assisting prognostication.

  20. [Neurologic aspects of clinical manifestations, pathophysiology and therapy of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (causalgia, Sudeck's disease)].

    Blumberg, H; Griesser, H J; Hornyak, M

    1991-04-01

    The symptomatology of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), a diagnostic term which today includes causalgia and M. Sudeck, is characterized clinically by a triad of autonomic (sympathetic), motor and sensory disturbances. They develop following a noxious event--though independent of its nature and location--in a generalized distribution pattern at the distal site of the affected extremity. Pathophysiologically, a complex disturbance of the sympathetic vasoconstrictor system is involved, which mediates the dominant symptoms of RSD, namely the spontaneous pain and the swelling. This disturbance is thought to be initiated by nociceptive impulses, occurring in conjunction with the preceding noxious event, and to be maintained reflexly, in a form of a vicious circle, by means of the typical pain sensation accompanying the RSD-syndrome. From these ideas, an important part of the RSD therapy is deduced; i.e. the early interruption of the neuronal sympathetic activity by means of a sympathetic blockade. Such a blockade can interrupt the pain and at the same time also the vicious circle of RSD. Altogether, for the RSD syndrome there are relevant neurological aspects with respect to its clinical symptomatology, its pathophysiology and its therapy. PMID:1713305

  1. Molecular underpinnings of Aprataxin RNA/DNA deadenylase function and dysfunction in neurological disease.

    Schellenberg, Matthew J; Tumbale, Percy P; Williams, R Scott

    2015-03-01

    Eukaryotic DNA ligases seal DNA breaks in the final step of DNA replication and repair transactions via a three-step reaction mechanism that can abort if DNA ligases encounter modified DNA termini, such as the products and repair intermediates of DNA oxidation, alkylation, or the aberrant incorporation of ribonucleotides into genomic DNA. Such abortive DNA ligation reactions act as molecular checkpoint for DNA damage and create 5'-adenylated nucleic acid termini in the context of DNA and RNA-DNA substrates in DNA single strand break repair (SSBR) and ribonucleotide excision repair (RER). Aprataxin (APTX), a protein altered in the heritable neurological disorder Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia 1 (AOA1), acts as a DNA ligase "proofreader" to directly reverse AMP-modified nucleic acid termini in DNA- and RNA-DNA damage responses. Herein, we survey APTX function and the emerging cell biological, structural and biochemical data that has established a molecular foundation for understanding the APTX mediated deadenylation reaction, and is providing insights into the molecular bases of APTX deficiency in AOA1. PMID:25637650

  2. [Acute cardiovascular disease and job retention].

    Fantoni-Quinton, Sophie; Tellart, Anne-Sophie; Cambier-Langrand, Evodie; Fassier, Jean Baptiste; Mounier-Vehier, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Since it allows a better quality of life, return to work must be considered ever since the early stages of the health care pathway following a cardiovascular disease. Seeing the occupational physician beforehand, so as to anticipate the return to work, is crucial. Dialogue between cardiologists, general practitioners and occupational physician, still observing medical confidentiality, must allow a better quality of return to work. Being recognized as a handicapped worker is a key element in the prevention of socio-professional exclusion. Even when dealing with long sick leave, permanent functional injuries or job loss, guiding the patients towards the appropriate person can improve return to work and job retention in the long term. PMID:27021479

  3. Pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Clinical management of acute and chronic disease.

    Torbicki, Adam

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism falls between the areas of pulmonology and cardiology, internal medicine and intensive care, radiology and nuclear medicine, and hematology and cardiothoracic surgery. Depending on their clinical background, physicians faced with a patient with a pulmonary thromboembolism may speak different languages and adopt different treatment approaches. Now, however, there is an opportunity to end the Tower of Babel surrounding pulmonary thromboembolism. There is a growing acknowledgement that the key clinical problems in both acute pulmonary embolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension are linked to right ventricular pressure overload and right ventricular failure. As a result, cardiologists and cardiac intensive care specialists are taking an increasing interest in understanding and combating these conditions. The European Society of Cardiology was the first to elaborate comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The task forces involved in producing these guidelines included radiologists, pulmonologists, hematologists, intensive care physicians and surgeons, which ensured that the final document was universally acceptable. The aim of this article was to provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of acute pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, while taking into account European Society of Cardiology guidelines and incorporating new evidence where necessary. PMID:20609317

  4. Acute renal failure: outcomes and risk of chronic kidney disease.

    Block, C A; Schoolwerth, A C

    2007-09-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common condition, especially among the critically ill, and confers a high mortality. The incidence of ARF is increasing. Efforts such as the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) are being undertaken to establish a consensus definition of ARF, and to distinguish between varying degrees of acute kidney injury that might confer a different prognosis. Data are emerging to allow comparison of the epidemiology of ARF across institutions internationally. There is ongoing recognition of the important interaction between ARF and chronic kidney disease and more information regarding recovery from ARF is available. Controversy exists regarding the optimal management of ARF. Recent publications emphasize the importance of timing and dose of renal replacement therapy rather than the modality of treatment (intermittent hemodialysis vs continuous therapies). These issues are explored in this review. PMID:17912228

  5. Antibodies against oligodendrocytes in serum and CSF in multiple sclerosis and other neurological diseases: 125I-protein A studies

    Antibodies against oligodendrocytes were determined in pairs of unconcentrated CSF serum from 12 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 25 control patients including 10 with aseptic meningoencephalitis (AM), using a 125I-protein A microassay. Antibody levels in serum and in CSF did not differ between MS and controls. Calculating the antibody index equal to (CSF/serum antibodies against oligodendrocytes):(CSF/serum albumin) in analogy to the CSF IgG index, thereby compensating for influence of serum antibody concentration as well as altered blood-brain barrier, no evidence was obtained for intrathecal antibody production in the patients with MS. Those with AM had higher antibody index values, probably reflecting intrathecal synthesis. Antibodies against oligodendrocytes seem to be regular component of CSF and serum in neurological diseases; intrathecal antibody production is less frequent in MS than in AM. (author)

  6. Effects of acute versus post-acute systemic delivery of neural progenitor cells on neurological recovery and brain remodeling after focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    Doeppner, T R; Kaltwasser, B; Teli, M K; Bretschneider, E; Bähr, M; Hermann, D M

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous transplantation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) induces functional recovery after stroke, albeit grafted cells are not integrated into residing neural networks. However, a systematic analysis of intravenous NPC delivery at acute and post-acute time points and their long-term consequences does not exist. Male C57BL6 mice were exposed to cerebral ischemia, and NPCs were intravenously grafted on day 0, on day 1 or on day 28. Animals were allowed to survive for up to 84 days. Mice and tissues were used for immunohistochemical analysis, flow cytometry, ELISA and behavioral tests. Density of grafted NPCs within the ischemic hemisphere was increased when cells were transplanted on day 28 as compared with transplantation on days 0 or 1. Likewise, transplantation on day 28 yielded enhanced neuronal differentiation rates of grafted cells. Post-ischemic brain injury, however, was only reduced when NPCs were grafted at acute time points. On the contrary, reduced post-ischemic functional deficits due to NPC delivery were independent of transplantation paradigms. NPC-induced neuroprotection after acute cell delivery was due to stabilization of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), reduction in microglial activation and modulation of both peripheral and central immune responses. On the other hand, post-acute NPC transplantation stimulated post-ischemic regeneration via enhanced angioneurogenesis and increased axonal plasticity. Acute NPC delivery yields long-term neuroprotection via enhanced BBB integrity and modulation of post-ischemic immune responses, whereas post-acute NPC delivery increases post-ischemic angioneurogenesis and axonal plasticity. Post-ischemic functional recovery, however, is independent of NPC delivery timing, which offers a broad therapeutic time window for stroke treatment. PMID:25144721

  7. Glycosphingolipid analysis in a naturally occurring ovine model of acute neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

    Karageorgos, Litsa; Hein, Leanne; Rozaklis, Tina; Adams, Melissa; Duplock, Stephen; Snel, Marten; Hemsley, Kim; Kuchel, Tim; Smith, Nicholas; Hopwood, John J

    2016-07-01

    Gaucher disease arises from mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene which encodes an enzyme required for the lysosomal catabolism of glucosylceramide. We have identified a naturally occurring mutation in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene in sheep that leads to Gaucher disease with acute neurological symptoms. Here we have examined the clinical phenotype at birth and subsequently quantified lipids in Gaucher lamb brain, in order to characterise the disorder. Enzyme activity assessments showed that a reduction in β-glucocerebrosidase activity to 1-5% of wild-type occurs consistently across newborn Gaucher lamb brain regions. We analyzed glucosylceramide, glucosylsphingosine, bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and ganglioside profiles in brain, liver, and spleen, and observed 30- to 130-fold higher glucosylceramide, and 500- to 2000-fold higher glucosylsphingosine concentrations in Gaucher diseased lambs compared to wild-type. Significant increases of bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and gangliosides [GM1, GM2, GM3] concentrations were also detected in the brain. As these glycosphingolipids are involved in many cellular events, an imbalance or disruption of the cell membrane lipid homeostasis would be expected to impair normal neuronal function. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed analysis of glycosphingolipids in various brain regions in a large animal model of neuronal disease, which permits the mechanistic investigation of lipid deregulation and their contribution to neurodegenerative process. PMID:26976737

  8. Child Neurology Services in Africa

    Wilmshurst, Jo M.; Badoe, Eben; Wammanda, Robinson D.; Mallewa, Macpherson; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Venter, Andre; Charles R. Newton

    2011-01-01

    The first African Child Neurology Association meeting identified key challenges that the continent faces to improve the health of children with neurology disorders. The capacity to diagnose common neurologic conditions and rare disorders is lacking. The burden of neurologic disease on the continent is not known, and this lack of knowledge limits the ability to lobby for better health care provision. Inability to practice in resource-limited settings has led to the migration of skilled profess...

  9. Migraine- and dystonia-related disease-mutations of Na+/K+-ATPases: Relevance of behavioral studies in mice to disease symptoms and neurological manifestations in humans

    Bøttger, Pernille; Doganli, Canan; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The two autosomal dominantly inherited neurological diseases: familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM2) and familial rapid-onset of dystonia-parkinsonism (Familial RDP) are caused by in vivo mutations of specific alpha subunits of the sodium–potassium pump (Na+/K+-ATPase). Intriguingly, patients...... with classical FHM2 and RDP symptoms additionally suffer from other manifestations, such as epilepsy/seizures and developmental disabilities. Recent studies of FHM2 and RDP mouse models provide valuable tools for dissecting the vital roles of the Na+/K+-ATPases, and we discuss their relevance to the...

  10. Clinical effects of comprehensive therapy of early psychological intervention and rehabilitation training on neurological rehabilitation of patients with acute stroke

    Duo-Yu Wu; Min Guo; Yun-Suo Gao; Yan-Hai Kang; Jun-Cheng Guo; Xiang-Ling Jiang; Feng Chen; Tao Liu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effects of comprehensive therapy of psychological intervention and rehabilitation training on the mental health of the patients with acute stroke. Methods: A total of 120 patients with acute stroke were randomly divided into trial group and control group. Both groups were given the corresponding drug therapy, medical basic nursing and convention nursing. Besides, psychological intervention and comprehensive rehabilitation training were added to the trial group. SCL-90, Europ stroke scales (ESS) score were assessed with each patient on day 3 for the first time and on day 21 for the second time;Barthel index was assessed on the day 90. Results: After psychological intervention, SCL-90 declined significantly in the trial group comparing with the control group, there were signicant differences in the somatization, obsession, depression, anxiety, fear, ESS score, Barthel index and other psychological factors between the trial group and control group (P<0.05). Conclusions:Comprehensive therapy of early psychological intervention and rehabilitation training can significantly improve the mental health, limb movement function, stress ability and activity of daily living on the patients with acute stroke.

  11. The role of vitamin D in the brain and related neurological diseases

    Mustafa Yılmaz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is a steroid hormone that is produced photochemicallyin epidermis. It is known that vitamin D involvedin the regulation of bone mineralization and calcium-phosphorus balance. However, in recent studies havesuggested that vitamin D may have a significant impactin the development of the cell proliferation, differentiation,neurotransmission, neuroplasticity, neurotropic andneuroprotective effects in central nervous system (CNS.For the reason of the effects, it can be considered as aneurosteroid was reported. It was discussed that the levelof vitamin D may be associated to neurodegenerativediseases such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease,multiple sclerosis (MS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS. The role of vitamin D and the mechanisms ofthese diseases will be discussed in the review. J Clin ExpInvest 2013; 4 (3: 411-415Key words: Vitamin D, neurosteroid, brain, neurologicdiseases

  12. Managing acute and chronic renal stone disease.

    Moran, Conor P; Courtney, Aisling E

    2016-02-01

    Nephrolithiasis, or renal stone disease, is common and the incidence is increasing globally. In the UK the lifetime risk is estimated to be 8-10%. On a population level, the increase in stone incidence, erosion of gender disparity, and younger age of onset is likely to reflect increasing prevalence of obesity and a Western diet with a high intake of animal protein and salt. Stones can be detected by a variety of imaging techniques. The gold standard is a non-contrast CT of kidneys, ureters and bladder (CT KUB) which can identify > 99% of stones. CT KUB should be the primary mode of imaging for all patients with colic unless contraindicated. In such instances, or if a CT KUB is not available, an ultrasound KUB is an alternative. This has advantages in terms of radiation exposure and cost, but is limited in sensitivity, particularly for ureteric stones. Once diagnosed, a plain film KUB can be used for follow-up of radiopaque stones. For most patients diclofenac is a reasonable first choice of analgesia, e.g. 50-100 mg rectally, or 75 mg IM. Opioid medication can worsen nausea and be less effective, but should be used if there is a contraindication to NSAIDs. A combination of diclofenac, paracetamol, and/or codeine regularly can provide adequate pain control in many cases. Failure of this analgesic combination should prompt consideration of secondary care support. If a ureteric stone 10 mm in diameter should be discussed with the urology service as they are unlikely to pass spontaneously. PMID:27032222

  13. Genetic screening for Niemann–Pick disease type C in adults with neurological and psychiatric symptoms: findings from the ZOOM study

    Bauer, Peter; Balding, David J.; Klünemann, Hans H.; Linden, David E. J.; Ory, Daniel S.; Pineda, Mercè; Priller, Josef; Sedel, Frederic; Muller, Audrey; Chadha-Boreham, Harbajan; Richard W D Welford; Strasser, Daniel S.; Patterson, Marc C.

    2013-01-01

    Niemann–Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a rare, autosomal-recessive, progressive neurological disease caused by mutations in either the NPC1 gene (in 95% of cases) or the NPC2 gene. This observational, multicentre genetic screening study evaluated the frequency and phenotypes of NP-C in consecutive adult patients with neurological and psychiatric symptoms. Diagnostic testing for NP-C involved NPC1 and NPC2 exonic gene sequencing and gene dosage analysis. When available, results of filipin stain...

  14. Type 2 Gaucher Disease (Acute Infantile Gaucher Disease or Neuropathic Type

    Mohammad Mehdi TAGHDIRI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Taghdiri MM. Type 2 Gaucher Disease (Acute Infantile Gaucher Disease or Neuropathic Type. Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012; 6:4 (suppl. 1:12. Pls see PDF. 

  15. Admission blood sugar level and prognosis and neurological improvement in acute stroke patients%急性脑卒中患者入院时血糖水平与神经功能改善程度及预后关系

    卢瑛; 范玉兰; 贾岩; 管艳敏; 王莹; 宋文彤

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the admission blood sugar level and prognosis and neurological improvement in acute stroke patients.Method 285 cases of acute stroke were reviewed wih a vies of possible correlation of admission blood sugar level to prognosis and admission condition.Result No significant correlation of blood sugar level to neurological deficits 1 month after stroke was showed(r=0.103,P >0.05).Improvement of neurological deficits was closely related to admission neurological deficits(P<0.01).Conclusion It seems to be a stress response that hyperglycemia appears in acute stroke.

  16. Aspirin as Primary Prevention of Acute Coronary Heart Disease Events

    Glasser, Stephen P.; Hovater, Martha; Brown, Todd M.; Howard, George; Safford, Monika M.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objective Aspirin for primary prophylaxis is controversial. This study evaluated associations between prophylactic aspirin use and incident acute coronary heart disease (CHD) events. Methods and Results The Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study was accessed for aspirin use examining black and white hazards for incident CHD, for men and women, each adjusting incrementally for sampling, sociodemographics, and CHD risk factors. Stratified models exami...

  17. Minimal Residual Disease Assessment in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Thörn, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, response to treatment in hematological malignancies is evaluated by light microscopy of bone marrow (BM) smears, but due to more effective therapies more sensitive methods are needed. Today, detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) using immunological and molecular techniques can be 100 times more sensitive than morphology. The main aim of this thesis was to compare and evaluate three currently available MRD methods in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL): (i) real-t...

  18. Investigation of the acute inflammatory response in Crohn's disease.

    MARKS, D. J. B.

    2006-01-01

    Most theories concerning the primary cause of Crohn's disease focus on over-activation of the immune response. Paradoxically, the defect may instead relate to diminished acute inflammation. Neutrophil accumulation to sites of dermal trauma has been shown to be reduced. Were the same phenomenon to occur in the gut, it might impair bacterial clearance thus provoking granuloma formation. In this thesis, a novel technique demonstrated attenuated neutrophil accumulation following trauma to the bow...

  19. Metabolomics and Its Application to Acute Lung Diseases.

    Stringer, Kathleen A; McKay, Ryan T; Karnovsky, Alla; Quémerais, Bernadette; Lacy, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly expanding field of systems biology that is gaining significant attention in many areas of biomedical research. Also known as metabonomics, it comprises the analysis of all small molecules or metabolites that are present within an organism or a specific compartment of the body. Metabolite detection and quantification provide a valuable addition to genomics and proteomics and give unique insights into metabolic changes that occur in tangent to alterations in gene and protein activity that are associated with disease. As a novel approach to understanding disease, metabolomics provides a "snapshot" in time of all metabolites present in a biological sample such as whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, and many other specimens that may be obtained from either patients or experimental models. In this article, we review the burgeoning field of metabolomics in its application to acute lung diseases, specifically pneumonia and acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS). We also discuss the potential applications of metabolomics for monitoring exposure to aerosolized environmental toxins. Recent reports have suggested that metabolomics analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) approaches may provide clinicians with the opportunity to identify new biomarkers that may predict progression to more severe disease, such as sepsis, which kills many patients each year. In addition, metabolomics may provide more detailed phenotyping of patient heterogeneity, which is needed to achieve the goal of precision medicine. However, although several experimental and clinical metabolomics studies have been conducted assessing the application of the science to acute lung diseases, only incremental progress has been made. Specifically, little is known about the metabolic phenotypes of these illnesses. These data are needed to substantiate metabolomics biomarker credentials so that clinicians can employ them for clinical decision-making and

  20. Modeling evolution and persistence of neurological viral diseases in wild populations.

    Dimitrov, Dobromir T; King, Aaron A

    2008-10-01

    Viral infections are one of the leading source of mortality worldwide. The great majority of them circulate and persist in wild reservoirs and periodically spill over into humans or domestic animals. In the wild reservoirs, the progression of disease is frequently quite different from that in spillover hosts. We propose a mathematical treatment of the dynamics of viral infections in wild mammals using models with alternative outcomes. We develop and analyze compartmental epizootic models assuming permanent or temporary immunity of the individuals surviving infections and apply them to rabies in bats. We identify parameter relations that support the existing patterns in the viral ecology and estimate those parameters that are unattainable through direct measurement. We also investigate how the duration of the acquired immunity affects the disease and population dynamics. PMID:19278278

  1. Using Administrative Data to Examine Health Disparities and Outcomes in Neurological Diseases of the Elderly.

    Willis, Allison W

    2015-11-01

    The fields of neurodegenerative disease and dementia research have grown considerably in the last several decades. Due to tremendous efforts of basic and clinical research scientists, we know a great deal about dementia risk factors and have multiple treatment options. Clinician recognition of cognitive impairment has increased considerably, national policies which support screening for and documenting cognitive dysfunction now exist, and public awareness of neurodegenerative disease has never been greater. These conditions promote (and demand) the growth of translational epidemiology and health services research, which focuses on examining outcomes in groups of individuals as a function of health care experiences. This review discusses the use of administrative data to answer health care outcomes and disparities questions in dementia. Of particular interest are publically available datasets that contain varying amounts of diagnostic, clinical, pharmacy, and patient information. Methodological challenges that are frequently encountered and must be understood to minimize biased inference are also discussed. PMID:26423637

  2. Targeting Astrocytes Ameliorates Neurologic Changes in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Furman, Jennifer L.; Sama, Diana M.; Gant, John C.; Beckett, Tina L.; Murphy, M. Paul; Bachstetter, Adam D.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Norris, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the brain and play a critical role in maintaining healthy nervous tissue. In Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and most other neurodegenerative disorders, many astrocytes convert to a chronically “activated” phenotype characterized by morphologic and biochemical changes that appear to compromise protective properties and/or promote harmful neuroinflammatory processes. Activated astrocytes emerge early in the course of AD and become increasingly prominent a...

  3. Pictures as a neurological tool: lessons from enhanced and emergent artistry in brain disease.

    Schott, G D

    2012-06-01

    Pictures created spontaneously by patients with brain disease often display impaired or diminished artistry, reflecting the patient's cerebral damage. This article explores the opposite: those pictures created in the face of brain disease that show enhanced or enduring artistry, and those that emerge for the first time in artistically naïve patients. After comments on background issues relating to the patient and the viewer, the paintings and drawings are considered in relation to the heterogeneous conditions in which this artistic creativity is seen. These conditions include various dementias-most notably frontotemporal lobar dementia, stroke, Parkinson's disease, autism and related disorders and psychiatric disease, epilepsy, migraine and trauma. In the discussion, it is argued that evidence of underlying brain dysfunction revealed by these pictures often rests on the abnormal context in which the pictures are created, or on changes in artistry demonstrated by a sequence of pictures. In the former, the compulsive element and sensory and emotional accompaniments are often important features; in the latter, evolving changes are evident, and have included depiction of increasing menace in portrayal of faces. The occurrence of synaesthesia, and its relation to creativity, are briefly discussed in respect of two unusual patients, followed by considering the role of the anterior and frontal lobes, mesolimbic connections and the right hemisphere. In at least some patients, impaired inhibition leading to paradoxical functional facilitation, with compensatory changes particularly in the right posterior hemisphere, is likely to be pivotal in enabling unusual artistry to emerge; preservation of language, however, is not a prerequisite. Many patients studied have been artists, and it appears possible that some of those with an artistic predisposition may be more likely to experience pathologically obsessive creativity. The discussion concludes that occasionally pictures

  4. Roles of dioxins and heavy metals in cancer and neurological diseases using ROS-mediated mechanisms.

    Matés, José M; Segura, Juan A; Alonso, Francisco J; Márquez, Javier

    2010-11-15

    Oxidants have critical functions inside healthy and unhealthy cells. Deregulated cell cycle and apoptosis, both regulated by oxidative stress, have been described as hallmarks of mitotic (cancer) and postmitotic (neuronal) cells. This review provides an updated revision of the oxidant effects of some environmental contaminants such as dioxins and the heavy metals cadmium, cobalt, and copper. Dioxins exert their toxic actions by acting on phase I and phase II enzymes, such as cytochromes P450, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, promoting cell proliferation, growth arrest, and apoptosis, affecting cancer homeostasis and neuronal function. Heavy metals manifest cytotoxic effects in various cells and tissues, and tight regulation of metals is essential to the health of organisms. Cadmium modulates gene expression and signal transduction and reduces activities of proteins involved in antioxidant defense, interfering with DNA repair and modifying cancer development and brain function. Cobalt provokes generation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in cancer cells and brain tissues, altering proliferation and differentiation and causing apoptosis. Copper is a key metal in cell division processes in both normal and tumor cells. Copper also has been shown to have an important role in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:20696237

  5. Aspectos neurológicos da moléstia de chagas Neurological aspects of Chagas disease

    Fritz Köberle

    1967-09-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Chagas related in more than two 200 cases, what he called "nervous forms" of trypanosomiasis, that is neurological manifestations from central origin (idiotism, infantilism, pseudo-bulbar paralysis, aphasia, cerebellar ataxia, atetosis, espostic or paralytic diplegia, disbasia. At that time Chagas expressed his concepts as follows: "In relation to the frequency of trypanosomiasis nervous forms we have performed many observations which allow us to state that this disease is the one which causes the largest number of organic affections of the central nervous system, in human pathology". We are plenty convinced by Chagas's statement. By experiments on animals of laboratory we have very often noticed a rather varied neurological symptomatology, being worth point out identical syndromes to those observed by Chagas. Our autopsy material non-rarely include chronic Chagas cases presenting a most varied symtomatology. Among them we have named only three cases of discerebral nanism, a rather rare affection in other parts of the world and relatively frequent in our material. The fact which we have demonstrated, i.e., a relatively great decreasing of number of nervous cells in the peripheral system could happen in the central nervous system as well. Provided that there are only two quantitative works on neuron number diminishing in the central nervous system in mice and rats we decline to go into further details about central neuropathies in man. We emphasized the necessity to perform researches on this field by means of intimate collaboration between clinicians and pathologists, as the only way to confirm on scientific basis all that was observed by the panoramic and genial vision of Carlos Chagas.

  6. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  7. Intravenous high-dose immunotherapy: practical recommendations for use in the treatment of neurological disimmune diseases

    N. A. Suponeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current publication summarizes main indications and benefits of intravenous high-dose immunotherapy (IHI in the treatment of various autoimmune diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Available products of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG on the Russian market are reviewed. Tactics for choosing optimal medication for IHI based on its effectiveness and safety are analyzed. Dosage calculation and way of administration of IVIG are described, beeing of a high practical value in neurologist’s daily work.

  8. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders. PMID:25890773

  9. Genomics in Neurological Disorders

    Guangchun Han; Jiya Sun; Jiajia Wang; Zhouxian Bai; Fuhai Song; Hongxing Lei

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders comprise a variety of complex diseases in the central nervous system, which can be roughly classified as neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. The basic and translational research of neurological disorders has been hindered by the difficulty in accessing the pathological center (i.e., the brain) in live patients. The rapid advancement of sequencing and array technologies has made it possible to investigate the disease mechanism and biomarkers from a systems perspective. In this review, recent progresses in the discovery of novel risk genes, treatment targets and peripheral biomarkers employing genomic technologies will be dis-cussed. Our major focus will be on two of the most heavily investigated neurological disorders, namely Alzheimer’s disease and autism spectrum disorder.

  10. The Complexity Signature: Developing a Tool to Communicate Biopsychosocial Severity of Disease for Children with Chronic Neurological Complexity.

    Krieg, Sandro M; Sonanini, Sebastian; Sollmann, Nico; Focke, Axel; Gerstl, Lucia; Heinen, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Aim For children with medical complexity, interdisciplinary treatment approaches are required to address the various aspects defined within the biopsychosocial model. Methods The present study identifies dimensions of the biopsychosocial model to generate a standardized visualized severity score for chronic neurological diseases in children. We demonstrate the score's applicability and usefulness in clinical practice among clinicians with and without pediatric board certification with the aid of illustrative patient cases. The results are compared by Spearman correlation coefficient. Results Nine dimensions were identified as the basis for the development of the score, which consists of five grades of severity for each of the selected neuropediatric subsections. All board-certified pediatricians would recommend the application of the severity score in clinical routine. Furthermore, a good correlation was revealed between direct and indirect (severity score) assessment. Interpretation The severity score developed in this study takes into account biopsychosocial aspects of chronic diseases while being comprehensible and easily applicable in clinical routine-a biopsychosocial signature serving as an excellent, striking communication basis within the interdisciplinary team. However, upcoming studies including more patient cases are needed for further refinement. PMID:27228000

  11. Ischemia-modified albumin levels in the prediction of acute critical neurological findings in carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Daş, Murat; Çevik, Yunsur; Erel, Özcan; Çorbacioğlu, Şeref Kerem

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether serum ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) levels in patients with carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning were higher compared with a control group of healthy volunteers. In addition, the study sought to determine if there was a correlation between serum IMA levels and carboxyhemoglobin (COHB) levels and other critical neurological findings (CNFs). In this prospective study, the IMA levels of 100 patients with CO poisoning and 50 control individuals were compared. In addition, the IMA and COHB levels were analyzed according to absence or presence CNFs in patients with CO poisoning. The levels of IMA (mg/dL) on admittance, and during the 1(st) hour and 3(rd) hour, in patients with CO poisoning (49.90 ± 35.43, 30.21 ± 14.81, and 21.87 ± 6.03) were significantly higher, compared with the control individuals (17.30 ± 2.88). The levels of IMA in the 6(th) hour were not higher compared with control individuals. The levels of IMA on admittance, and during the 1(st) hour, 3(rd) hour, and 6(th) hour, and COHB (%) levels in patients who had CNFs were higher compared with IMA levels and COHB levels in patients who had no CNFs (p < 0.001). However, when the multivariate model was created, it was observed that IMA level on admittance was a poor indicator for prediction of CNFs (odds ratio = 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.08). We therefore concluded that serum IMA levels could be helpful in the diagnosis of CO poisoning. However, we believe that IMA levels cannot be used to predict which patients will develop CNFs due to CO poisoning. PMID:27185603

  12. Neurological assessment.

    Maher, Ann Butler

    2016-08-01

    Neurological system assessment is an important skill for the orthopaedic nurse because the nervous system has such an overlap with the musculoskeletal system. Nurses whose scope of practice includes such advanced evaluation, e.g. nurse practitioners, may conduct the examination described here but the information will also be useful for nurses caring for patients who have abnormal neurological assessment findings. Within the context of orthopaedic physical assessment, possible neurological findings are evaluated as they complement the patient's history and the examiner's findings. Specific neurological assessment is integral to diagnosis of some orthopaedic conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome. In other situations such as crushing injury to the extremities, there is high risk of associated neurological or neurovascular injury. These patients need anticipatory examination and monitoring to prevent complications. This article describes a basic neurological assessment; emphasis is on sensory and motor findings that may overlap with an orthopaedic presentation. The orthopaedic nurse may incorporate all the testing covered here or choose those parts that further elucidate specific diagnostic questions suggested by the patient's history, general evaluation and focused musculoskeletal examination. Abnormal findings help to suggest further testing, consultation with colleagues or referral to a specialist. PMID:27118633

  13. Cerebellar Purkinje cells incorporate immunoglobulins and immunotoxins in vitro: implications for human neurological disease and immunotherapeutics

    Rose John W

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies reactive with intracellular neuronal proteins have been described in paraneoplastic and other autoimmune disorders. Because neurons have been thought impermeable to immunoglobulins, however, such antibodies have been considered unable to enter neurons and bind to their specific antigens during life. Cerebellar Purkinje cells - an important target in paraneoplastic and other autoimmune diseases - have been shown in experimental animals to incorporate a number of molecules from cerebrospinal fluid. IgG has also been detected in Purkinje cells studied post mortem. Despite the possible significance of these findings for human disease, immunoglobulin uptake by Purkinje cells has not been demonstrated in living tissue or studied systematically. Methods To assess Purkinje cell uptake of immunoglobulins, organotypic cultures of rat cerebellum incubated with rat IgGs, human IgG, fluorescein-conjugated IgG, and rat IgM were studied by confocal microscopy in real time and following fixation. An IgG-daunorubicin immunotoxin was used to determine whether conjugation of pharmacological agents to IgG could be used to achieve Purkinje cell-specific drug delivery. Results IgG uptake was detected in Purkinje cell processes after 4 hours of incubation and in Purkinje cell cytoplasm and nuclei by 24-48 hours. Uptake could be followed in real time using IgG-fluorochrome conjugates. Purkinje cells also incorporated IgM. Intracellular immunoglobulin did not affect Purkinje cell viability, and Purkinje cells cleared intracellular IgG or IgM within 24-48 hours after transfer to media lacking immunoglobulins. The IgG-daunomycin immunotoxin was also rapidly incorporated into Purkinje cells and caused extensive, cell-specific death within 8 hours. Purkinje cell death was not produced by unconjugated daunorubicin or control IgG. Conclusion Purkinje cells in rat organotypic cultures incorporate and clear host (rat and non

  14. Can cerebral blood flow measurement predict clinical outcome in the acute phase in patients with artherosclerotic occlusive carotid artery disease?

    It has been thought that the clinical course of patients with acute carotid occlusive disease depends on their collateral cerebral blood flow (CBF) and duration of ischemia. However, there have been few clinical reports to prove this hypothesis. Therefore, we performed CBF study in patients with artherosclerotic carotid occlusive disease in the very acute phase, and precisely assessed the prognosis of those patients under intensive medical therapy. This prospective study included a total of 44 patients (72±13 years) who were admitted to our hospital between April, 2007 and December, 2008. To evaluate their initial CBF, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies were performed within 6 hours after the onset. All patients included in this study were medically treated and were periodically followed up by neurological and radiological examination. Moreover, in patients with reduced CBF (ipsilateral CBF/contralateral CBF x 100: %CBF <80%), dobutamine-induce hyperdynamic therapy was performed. Multivariate analysis was performed to detect significant predictors for the occurrence of further cerebral infarction. Multivariate analysis showed that the occurrence of further infarction was associated with older age and smaller %CBF. Of 44 patients, 21 experienced further cerebral infarction within 10 days after onset. Fourteen out of 15 patients with %CBF <60% developed cerebral infarction. This study showed that the prognosis of the patients with artherosclerotic carotid occlusive disease in the acute phase is associated with their initial residual CBFs. It may be difficult to stop the developed cerebral infarction in those patients with %CBF <60% despite intensive medical therapy. (author)

  15. Avian gyrovirus 2 and avirulent Newcastle disease virus coinfection in a chicken flock with neurologic symptoms and high mortalities.

    Abolnik, Celia; Wandrag, Daniel B R

    2014-03-01

    A disease with severe neurologic symptoms caused 100% mortality in a small broiler operation in the Gauteng Province, South Africa in late March 2013. Routine diagnostic PCR testing failed to identify a possible cause of the outbreak; thus, samples were submitted for virus isolation, serology, and bacteriology. An avirulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain isolated was identified as a V4-like genotype 1 strain, by DNA sequencing, with a cleavage site of 112GKQGR decrease L117. Real-time reverse transcription PCR identified NDV in the brain but not in cecal tonsils or pooled tracheas, spleens, lungs, and livers. A random amplification deep sequencing of a transcriptome library generated from pooled tissues produced 927,966 paired-end reads. A contig of 2,309 nucleotides was identified as a near-complete avian gyrovirus 2 (AGV2) genome. This is the first report on the African continent of AGV2, which has been reported in southern Brazil, The Netherlands, and Hong Kong thus far. A real-time PCR for AGV2 only detected the virus in the brain but not in cecal tonsils or pooled tracheas, spleens, lungs, and livers. Sequence reads also mapped to the genomes of mycoplasma, Escherichia coli, avian leukosis virus subtype J, and Marek's disease virus but excluded influenza A virus, Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale, avian rhinotracheitis virus, avian encephalomyelitis virus, and West Nile virus. Air sac swabs were positive on bacterial culture for E. coli. The possibility of a synergistic pathogenic effect between avirulent NDV and AGV2 requires further investigation. PMID:24758119

  16. Noninvasive imaging in acute coronary disease. A clinical perspective

    Numerous highly complex and sensitive noninvasive imaging techniques have enhanced the care of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Optimum use requires specific objectives to be defined in advance, including a review of the potential impact of the test on subsequent decisions. An additional issue that is subject to scrutiny in the current climate of cost containment relates to the incremental value of a specific examination. The imaging modality to be used will partially depend on other issues, including accessibility, cost, and interindividual or institutional expertise with a particular technique. Major applications in noninvasive imaging in the acute coronary syndromes include the following: (1) diagnosis, including identification of associated diseases and contraindications for acute reperfusion; (2) evaluation and management of complications; (3) determination of prognosis (both early and late); (4) estimation of myocardial viability; (5) assessment of therapeutic efficacy; (6) investigational approaches, including 99mTc-sestamibi tomographic imaging, ultrafast cine computed tomographic scanning, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Previous studies in the prethrombolytic era have documented the powerful impact of radionuclide stress testing on prognosis, but this needs to be reevaluated in the light of the changing current population undergoing stress testing. Preliminary data imply that the prognostic accuracy of stress testing after thrombolytic therapy is diminished. Moreover, the role of the open infarct-related artery in traditional estimates of prognosis requires further study. Noninvasive imaging has multiple applications in the diagnosis and management of patients with acute coronary disease, but the decision to use a specific technology in a particular circumstance mandates good clinical judgment and selectivity. 82 references

  17. Lack of interleukin-1 type 1 receptor enhances the accumulation of mutant huntingtin in the striatum and exacerbates the neurological phenotypes of Huntington's disease mice

    Wang Chuan-En

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Huntington's disease results from expansion of a glutamine repeat (>36 glutamines in the N-terminal region of huntingtin (htt and is characterized by preferential neurodegeneration in the striatum of the brain. N171-82Q mice that express N-terminal 171 amino acids of htt with an 82-glutamine repeat show severe neurological phenotypes and die early, suggesting that N-terminal mutant htt is pathogenic. In addition, various cellular factors and genetic modifiers are found to modulate the cytotoxicity of mutant htt. Understanding the contribution of these factors to HD pathogenesis will help identify therapeutics for this disease. To investigate the role of interleukin type 1 (IL-1, a cytokine that has been implicated in various neurological diseases, in HD neurological symptoms, we crossed N171-82Q mice to type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1RI knockout mice. Mice lacking IL-1RI and expressing N171-82Q show more severe neurological symptoms than N171-82Q or IL-1RI knockout mice, suggesting that lack of IL-1RI can promote the neuronal toxicity of mutant htt. Lack of IL-1RI also increases the accumulation of transgenic mutant htt in the striatum in N171-82Q mice. Since IL-1RI signaling mediates both toxic and protective effects on neurons, its basal function and protective effects may be important for preventing the neuropathology seen in HD.

  18. Compared with parenteral nutrition, enteral feeding attenuates the acute phase response and improves disease severity in acute pancreatitis

    Windsor, A; Kanwar, S; Li, A.; Barnes, E.; Guthrie, J; Spark, J; Welsh, F.; Guillou, P; Reynolds, J

    1998-01-01

    Background—In patients with major trauma and burns, total enteral nutrition (TEN) significantly decreases the acute phase response and incidence of septic complications when compared with total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Poor outcome in acute pancreatitis is associated with a high incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. 
Aims—To determine whether TEN can attenuate the acute phase response and improve clinical disease severity in patients with ac...

  19. Lithium-induced minimal change disease and acute kidney injury

    Parul Tandon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Lithium carbonate is a psychiatric medication commonly used in the treatment of bipolar disorder. It has been implicated in inducing nephrogenic diabetes inspidus, chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, and acute tubular necrosis. We describe a case of lithium-induced minimal change disease (MCD and acute kidney injury (AKI. Case Report: A 32-year-old female with a medical history of bipolar disorder treated with chronic lithium therapy presented with anasarca, fatigue, and tremors. Work-up revealed supra-therapeutic lithium levels, hypoalbuminemia, and significant proteinuria. The patient was treated conservatively with fluids and discontinuation of lithium therapy. Subsequently, she developed significant AKI and persistent proteinuria. She underwent a renal biopsy that demonstrated effacement of podocyte foot processes consistent with lithium-induced MCD. This was treated with corticosteroids, which decreased the proteinuria and resolved all the patient′s symptoms. Conclusion: Lithium-induced MCD is a rare disease that affects patients of all ages. It is often associated with therapeutic lithium and is typically resolved with discontinuation of lithium. In some cases, concurrent AKI may result due to vascular obstruction from hyperalbuminuria and associated renal interstitial edema. Corticosteroids may be needed to reduce the proteinuria and prevent progression to chronic kidney disease. As such, patients on lithium therapy may benefit from monitoring of glomerular function via urinalysis to prevent the onset of nephrotic syndrome.

  20. Relationship Between Periodontal Disease and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    M Zamirian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventional risk factors for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction do not explain all of the clinical and epidemiological features of the disease. Periodontal disease is a common bacterial and destructive disorder of oral tissues. Many studies demonstrate close association between chronic periodontitis and development of generalized inflammation, vascular endothelial injury, and atherosclesis. Periodontal disease has been convincingly emerging as an important independent risk factor for ischemic heart disease. A case - control study was carried out to assess the prevalence of periodontitis in patients with Acute myocardial Infarction (AMI and evaluate the possible relationship between AMI and chronic periodontitis. Patients and Methods: A number of 160 patients, aged 35 to 70 years old, enrolled in the study. Eighty patients (43 men, 37 women were examined four days after hospitalization due to AMI. Control group consisted of 80 persons (38 men, 42 women with normal coronary angiography. The following periodontal parameters were examined: Plaque index (PI, gingiral index (GI, bleeding on probing (BOP, probing depth (PD, clinical attachment loss (CAL and number of sites with CAL.Results: The case, compared to control showed significantly worse results for some periodontal variables studied: The mean of PD and PD > 3 mm, CAL, and number of sites with CAL, had worse results compared to control despite similar oral hygiene and frequency of brushing. The confounding factors for the present study were found to be hypertension and diabetes. Conclusion: The association between periodontitis and acute myocardial infarction was significant after adjusting for conventional risk factors for AMI.

  1. Tembusu-like flavivirus (Perak virus) as the cause of neurological disease outbreaks in young Pekin ducks.

    Homonnay, Zalán Gábor; Kovács, Edit Walkóné; Bányai, Krisztián; Albert, Mihály; Fehér, Enikő; Mató, Tamás; Tatár-Kis, Tímea; Palya, Vilmos

    2014-01-01

    A neurological disease of young Pekin ducks characterized by ataxia, lameness, and paralysis was observed at several duck farms in Malaysia in 2012. Gross pathological lesions were absent or inconsistent in most of the cases, but severe and consistent microscopic lesions were found in the brain and spinal cord, characterized by non-purulent panencephalomyelitis. Several virus isolates were obtained in embryonated duck eggs and in cell cultures (Vero and DF-1) inoculated with the brain homogenates of affected ducks. After exclusion of other viruses, the isolates were identified as a flavivirus by flavivirus-specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays. Inoculation of 2-week-old Pekin ducks with a flavivirus isolate by the subcutaneous or intramuscular route resulted in typical clinical signs and histological lesions in the brain and spinal cord. The inoculated virus was detected by RT-PCR from organ samples of ducks with clinical signs and histological lesions. With a few days delay, the disease was also observed among co-mingled contact control birds. Phylogenetic analysis of NS5 and E gene sequences proved that the isolates were representatives of a novel phylogenetic group within clade XI (Ntaya virus group) of the Flavivirus genus. This Malaysian Duck Tembusu Virus (DTMUV), named Perak virus, has moderate genomic RNA sequence similarity to a related DTMUV identified in China. In our experiment the Malaysian strain of DTMUV could be transmitted in the absence of mosquito vectors. These findings may have implications for the control and prevention of this emerging group of flaviviruses. PMID:25299764

  2. Role of anaerobes in acute pelvic inflammatory disease

    Saini S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Pouch of Douglas aspirates were collected from 50 women with history and examination suggestive of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID and 20 healthy women admitted for tubal ligation served as control. A total of 57 microorganisms were isolated from 37 patients out of 50 in study group. Of 37 positive cultures 21(56.7% were monomicrobial and 16(43.2% were polymicrobial. Most common symptom in study group was lower abdominal pain (90%, vaginal discharge (70% and irregular bleeding (40% and 30% patients had history of intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD implantation. The predominant aerobic isolates were Escherichia coli, Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus (CONS, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae while common anaerobes were Bacteroides fragilis, Prevotella melaninogenica, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus spp. Our study shows that cefotaxime, cefuroxime and gentamicin may be used for gram negative aerobic bacilli; cloxacillin, cephaloridine and erythromycin for aerobic gram positive cocci and amikacin and ceftazidime for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus for optimum therapy of acute PID it is beneficial to keep in mind major conceptual changes and therapeutic realities that have influenced current understanding of acute PID and have affected the choice of therapy.

  3. Role of anaerobes in acute pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Saini, S; Gupta, N; Batra, G; Arora, D R

    2003-01-01

    Pouch of Douglas aspirates were collected from 50 women with history and examination suggestive of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and 20 healthy women admitted for tubal ligation served as control. A total of 57 microorganisms were isolated from 37 patients out of 50 in study group. Of 37 positive cultures 21(56.7%) were monomicrobial and 16(43.2%) were polymicrobial. Most common symptom in study group was lower abdominal pain (90%), vaginal discharge (70%) and irregular bleeding (40%) and 30% patients had history of intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) implantation. The predominant aerobic isolates were Escherichia coli, Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus (CONS), Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae while common anaerobes were Bacteroides fragilis, Prevotella melaninogenica, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus spp. Our study shows that cefotaxime, cefuroxime and gentamicin may be used for gram negative aerobic bacilli; cloxacillin, cephaloridine and erythromycin for aerobic gram positive cocci and amikacin and ceftazidime for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus for optimum therapy of acute PID it is beneficial to keep in mind major conceptual changes and therapeutic realities that have influenced current understanding of acute PID and have affected the choice of therapy. PMID:17643017

  4. Pathogenic mechanisms of Acute Graft versus Host Disease

    Ferrara James L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD is the major complication of allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT. Older BMT recipients are a greater risk for acute GVHD after allogeneic BMT, but the causes of this association are poorly understood. Using well-characterized murine BMT models we have explored the mechanisms of increased GVHD in older mice. GVHD mortality and morbidity, and pathologic and biochemical indices were all worse in old recipients. Donor T cell responses were significantly increased in old recipients both in vivo and in vitro when stimulated by antigen-presenting cells (APCs from old mice. In a haploidential GVHD model, CD4+ donor T cells mediated more severe GVHD in old mice. We confirmed the role of aged APCs in GVHD using bone marrow chimera recipient created with either old or young bone marrow. APCs from these mice also stimulated greater responses from allogeneic cells in vitro. In a separate set of experiments we evaluated whether alloantigen expression on host target epithelium is essential for tissue damage induced by GVHD. Using bone marrow chimeras recipients in which either MHC II or MHC I alloantigen was expressed only on APCs, we found that acute GVHD does not require alloantigen expression on host target epithelium and that neutralization of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 prevents acute GVHD. These results pertain to CD4-mediated GVHD and to a lesser extent in CD8-mediated GVHD, and confirm the central role of most APCs as well as inflammatory cytokines.

  5. The neurology of gluten sensitivity

    Pengiran Tengah, Dayangku Siti Nur Ashikin

    2013-01-01

    Classical coeliac disease (CD) is a well-defined syndrome of small bowel villous atrophy associated with abdominal pain, malabsorption, and weight loss as a result of gluten-sensitivity, reversed rapidly by gluten exclusion diet. Disease associations include dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), Addison’s disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroid disease and a variety of neurological disorders. This thesis aims to investigate the hypothesis of the existence of a gluten sensitive neurolog...

  6. Formas agudas de periodontitis Acute conditions of periodontal disease

    L. Pérez-Salcedo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available La clasificación de las Enfermedades Periodontales ha cambiado en las últimas décadas. En la clasificación la AAP de 1989 la periodontitis necrotizante ocupaba el cuarto lugar. En el Workshop Europeo de 1993 la periodontitis necrotizante aparece en el grupo de los descriptores primarios. Según el Internacional Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions 1999 en el que se revisó y se modificó la clasificación de las patologías periodontales, las enfermedades periodontales necrotizantes ocupan el punto cinco, diferenciándose entre Gingivitis Necrotizante y Periodontitis Necrotizante. Y se añade en la clasificación el grupo de abscesos periodontales. En este artículo de revisión vamos a profundizar acerca de las formas agudas de periodontitis.The Periodontal Diseases classification had changed in the last decades. In AAP classification of 1989 the necrotize was in the 4th position. In the European Workshop was in the group of primary descriptors. According to the International Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions 1999, review and modificated the classification of periodontal pathologies, the periodontal necrotize diseases are in the 5th position, distinguishing between Necrotize Gingivitis and Necrotize Periodontitis. And Peridontal Abscesses was add to the classification. In this paper we are going to review about the acute forms of Periodontal Diseases.

  7. A rare case of Niemann–Pick disease type C without neurological involvement in a 66-year-old patient

    C.R. Greenberg

    2015-06-01

    Synopsis: An elderly female patient with confirmed NP-C and isolated splenomegaly has remained asymptomatic for neurological, cognitive, psychiatric or ophthalmologic abnormailities into her seventh decade of life.

  8. Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: causes and impacts.

    Chhabra, Sunil K; Dash, Devi Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) are recognised clinically as episodes of increased breathlessness and productive cough requiring a more intensive treatment. A subset of patients with this disease is especially prone to such exacerbations. These patients are labelled as 'frequent exacerbators'. Though yet poorly characterised in terms of host characteristics, including any genetic basis, these patients are believed to represent a distinct phenotype as they have a different natural history with a more progressive disease and a poorer prognosis than those who get exacerbations infrequently. Most exacerbations appear to be associated with infective triggers, either bacterial or viral, although 'non-infective' agents, such as air pollution and other irritants may also be important. Susceptibility to exacerbations is determined by multiple factors. Several risk factors have been identified, some of which are modifiable. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are major drivers of health status and patient-centered outcomes, and are a major reason for health care utilisation including hospitalisations and intensive care admissions. These are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, both immediate and long-term. These episodes have a negative impact on the patient and the disease including high economic burden, increased mortality, worsening of health status, limitation of activity, and aggravation of comorbidities including cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and neuro-psychiatric complications. Exacerbations also increase the rate of progression of disease, increasing the annual decline in lung function and leading to a poorer prognosis. Evaluation of risk of exacerbations is now included as a major component of the initial assessment of a patient with COPD in addition to the traditionally used lung function parameter, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). Decreasing the risk of exacerbations

  9. Identification of a Common Epitope between Enterovirus 71 and Human MED25 Proteins Which May Explain Virus-Associated Neurological Disease

    Peihu Fan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is a major causative pathogen of hand, foot and mouth disease with especially severe neurologic complications, which mainly account for fatalities from this disease. To date, the pathogenesis of EV71 in the central neurons system has remained unclear. Cytokine-mediated immunopathogenesis and nervous tissue damage by virus proliferation are two widely speculated causes of the neurological disease. To further study the pathogenesis, we identified a common epitope (co-epitope between EV71 VP1 and human mediator complex subunit 25 (MED25 highly expressed in brain stem. A monoclonal antibody (2H2 against the co-epitope was prepared, and its interaction with MED25 was examined by ELISA, immunofluorescence assay and Western blot in vitro and by live small animal imaging in vivo. Additionally, 2H2 could bind to both VP1 and MED25 with the affinity constant (Kd of 10−7 M as determined by the ForteBio Octet System. Intravenously injected 2H2 was distributed in brain stem of mice after seven days of EV71 infection. Interestingly, 2H2-like antibodies were detected in the serum of EV71-infected patients. These findings suggest that EV71 infection induces the production of antibodies that can bind to autoantigens expressed in nervous tissue and maybe further trigger autoimmune reactions resulting in neurological disease.

  10. Risk factors for acute postoperative neurological deterioration after cervical myelopathy%颈椎病术后早期神经功能严重恶化原因分析

    王新伟; 袁文; 陈德玉; 唐勇; 曹鹏; 卢旭华; 周许辉; 陈华江; 陈雄生

    2009-01-01

    Objective To discuss the risk factors of neurologic deterioration secondary to cervical spinal surgery . Methods 3703 patients with cervical degenerative disease treated surgically from September 2002 to September 2007 were reviewed. 12 patients suffered with neurologic deterioration within one week after operation. Age, course of disease, extent of disease, JOA score, preoperative companied disease and cerebrospinal leak were recorded. The saggital diameter of spinal canal, Povlov ratio and dynamic spinal stenosis parameter were measured on X-ray. And the dynamic spinal stenosis were measured using a modified Rao method in which both the distance from infer-posterior edge of upper vertebral body to the super-anterior edge of the lower laminar (UV-LL) and distance from super-posterior edge of lower vertebral body to the infer-anterior edge of the upper laminar (LV-UL) were measured. And the percentage of compression of spinal cord at the narrowest level was measured on middle saggital MRI section. Result There were 9 male and 3 female were included in these patients suffered from postoperative neurologic deterioration. The average age was 51 years and the average duration of symptoms was 71 months. The average JOA score declined from 10 preoperatively to 5 postoperatively and improved to 9 at the final follow up. The preoperative diameter of spinal canal was 11.8mm and the preoperative average Pavlov ratio was 0.65. The average distance of LV-UL was 11.2mm before operation and 12.7 after operation, while the distance of UV-LL was 15.1mm before operation and 13.6 after operation. Conclusion The risk factors of acute postoperative neurologic deterioration include Patients with preoperative hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cervical stenosis, cervical dynamic stenosis and more than 3 levels to acute postoperative neurologic deterioration.%目的 分析12例颈椎病术后神经功能恶化患者的危险因素并探讨其预防措施.方法 回顾性分析2002年9

  11. Acute axonal polyneuropathy with predominant proximal involvement: an uncommon neurological complication of bariatric surgery Polineuropatia axonal aguda com acometimento proximal predominante: manifestação neurológica incomum de cirurgia bariátrica

    Flavia Costa Nunes Machado; Berenice Cataldo Oliveira Valério; Roberto Naun Franco Morgulis; Karlo Faria Nunes; Sílvia Mazzali-Verst

    2006-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is frequently indicated in the treatment of morbid obesity. Previously unreported complications have been associated to this surgery; among them, neurological complications have gained attention. We report the case of a 25-year-old man submitted to gastric surgery for treatment of morbid obesity who developed, two months after surgery, acute proximal weakness in lower limbs. The electroneuromyography revealed axonal peripheral polyneuropathy with predominant proximal involve...

  12. Detection of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in Mexico.

    Nunan, Linda; Lightner, Donald; Pantoja, Carlos; Gomez-Jimenez, Silvia

    2014-08-21

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), which has also been referred to as early mortality syndrome (EMS), initially emerged as a destructive disease of cultured shrimp species in Asia in 2009. The pathogen associated with the disease, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, subsequently spread to the Western Hemisphere and emerged in Mexico in early 2013. The spread to the Western Hemisphere is a major concern to shrimp producers in the region. To date, the only peer-reviewed published method for determining whether mortalities are due to AHPND is through histological examination. A novel PCR detection method was employed to assess samples from Mexico in order to confirm the presence of the pathogen in this country. This manuscript details the detection methods used to confirm the presence of AHPND in Mexico. Both immersion and per os challenge studies were used to expose the Penaeus vannamei to the bacteria in order to induce the disease. Histological analysis confirmed AHPND status following the challenge studies. Also provided are the details of the molecular test by PCR that was used for screening candidate V. parahaemolyticus isolates. A rapid PCR assay for detection of AHPND may help with early detection and help prevent the spread of AHPND to other countries. PMID:25144120

  13. Cannabinoids in neurology – Brazilian Academy of Neurology

    Sonia M.D. Brucki; Norberto Anísio Frota; Pedro Schestatsky; Adélia Henriques Souza; Valentina Nicole Carvalho; Maria Luiza Giraldes de Manreza; Maria Fernanda Mendes; Elizabeth Comini-Frota; Cláudia Vasconcelos; Vitor Tumas; HENRIQUE B. FERRAZ; Egberto Barbosa; Mauro Eduardo Jurno

    2015-01-01

    The use of cannabidiol in some neurological conditions was allowed by Conselho Regional de Medicina de São Paulo and by Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA). Specialists on behalf of Academia Brasileira de Neurologia prepared a critical statement about use of cannabidiol and other cannabis derivatives in neurological diseases.

  14. Genetic screening for Niemann-Pick disease type C in adults with neurological and psychiatric symptoms: findings from the ZOOM study.

    Bauer, Peter; Balding, David J; Klünemann, Hans H; Linden, David E J; Ory, Daniel S; Pineda, Mercè; Priller, Josef; Sedel, Frederic; Muller, Audrey; Chadha-Boreham, Harbajan; Welford, Richard W D; Strasser, Daniel S; Patterson, Marc C

    2013-11-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a rare, autosomal-recessive, progressive neurological disease caused by mutations in either the NPC1 gene (in 95% of cases) or the NPC2 gene. This observational, multicentre genetic screening study evaluated the frequency and phenotypes of NP-C in consecutive adult patients with neurological and psychiatric symptoms. Diagnostic testing for NP-C involved NPC1 and NPC2 exonic gene sequencing and gene dosage analysis. When available, results of filipin staining, plasma cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol assays and measurements of relevant sphingolipids were also collected. NPC1 and NPC2 gene sequencing was completed in 250/256 patients from 30 psychiatric and neurological reference centres across the EU and USA [median (range) age 38 (18-90) years]. Three patients had a confirmed diagnosis of NP-C; two based on gene sequencing alone (two known causal disease alleles) and one based on gene sequencing and positive filipin staining. A further 12 patients displayed either single mutant NP-C alleles (8 with NPC1 mutations and 3 with NPC2 mutations) or a known causal disease mutation and an unclassified NPC1 allele variant (1 patient). Notably, high plasma cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol levels were observed for all NP-C cases (n = 3). Overall, the frequency of NP-C patients in this study [1.2% (95% CI; 0.3%, 3.5%)] suggests that there may be an underdiagnosed pool of NP-C patients among adults who share common neurological and psychiatric symptoms. PMID:23773996

  15. Measurement properties and feasibility of clinical tests to assess sit-to-stand/stand-to-sit tasks in subjects with neurological disease: a systematic review

    Silva, Paula F. S.; Quintino, Ludmylla F.; Juliane Franco; Christina D. C. M. Faria

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subjects with neurological disease (ND) usually show impaired performance during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit tasks, with a consequent reduction in their mobility levels. OBJECTIVE: To determine the measurement properties and feasibility previously investigated for clinical tests that evaluate sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit in subjects with ND. METHOD: A systematic literature review following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) ...

  16. Predicción clínica de aspiración en pacientes con patología neurológica aguda CLINICAL PREDICTION OF ASPIRATION IN ACUTE NEUROLOGICAL PATIENTS

    Iván Caviedes S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La disfunción glótica es una entidad prevalente en enfermos con patología neurológica aguda: compromete aproximadamente entre el 45 al 51% de los pacientes que padecen un ataque cerebrovascular, incrementando su mortalidad en una relación de 3/1. Su complicación principal es el síndrome aspirativo, que involucra diversas especialidades, entre ellas enfermedades respiratorias y neurología. El propósito de este estudio ha sido evaluar la fonación húmeda, el test del vaso de agua y la auscultación cervical como indicadores clínicos de aspiración frente a la certificación nasolaringoscópica, considerada patrón estándar de evaluación al lado de la cama del enfermo. Evaluamos prospectivamente durante un año a pacientes neurológicos agudos hospitalizados en una unidad de tratamiento intensivo. La fonación húmeda, el test del vaso de agua y la auscultación cervical demostraron sensibilidades de 66,7, 88,9 y 77,8%, con una especificidad respectiva de 85,2, 59,3 y 77,8%. Los valores predictivos positivo fueron de 60, 42,1 y 53,8%, con valores predictivos negativo de 88,5, 94,1 y 91,3% respectivamente. Nuestros resultados permiten afirmar que el monitoreo clínico de aspiración es un instrumento sencillo y valioso, que puede ser realizado al lado de la cama del enfermoGlottic dysfunction is a frequent condition in patients with acute neurological diseases: the incidence in stroke patients is between 45 - 51% increasing mortality three times. The principal complication is aspiration, which demands the involvement of pulmonary physicians and neurologists. The purpose of this study is to evaluate wet voice, water swallow test and cervical auscultation as clinical predictors of aspiration using endoscopical observation as a gold standard. During a period of one year we have prospectively evaluated these tests in acute neurological patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit. Wet voice, 3 oz water swallow test and cervical

  17. Suppression of acute proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine upregulation by post-injury administration of a novel small molecule improves long-term neurologic outcome in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury

    Van Eldik Linda J

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI with its associated morbidity is a major area of unmet medical need that lacks effective therapies. TBI initiates a neuroinflammatory cascade characterized by activation of astrocytes and microglia, and increased production of immune mediators including proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. This inflammatory response contributes both to the acute pathologic processes following TBI including cerebral edema, in addition to longer-term neuronal damage and cognitive impairment. However, activated glia also play a neuroprotective and reparative role in recovery from injury. Thus, potential therapeutic strategies targeting the neuroinflammatory cascade must use careful dosing considerations, such as amount of drug and timing of administration post injury, in order not to interfere with the reparative contribution of activated glia. Methods We tested the hypothesis that attenuation of the acute increase in proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines following TBI would decrease neurologic injury and improve functional neurologic outcome. We used the small molecule experimental therapeutic, Minozac (Mzc, to suppress TBI-induced up-regulation of glial activation and proinflammatory cytokines back towards basal levels. Mzc was administered in a clinically relevant time window post-injury in a murine closed-skull, cortical impact model of TBI. Mzc effects on the acute increase in brain cytokine and chemokine levels were measured as well as the effect on neuronal injury and neurobehavioral function. Results Administration of Mzc (5 mg/kg at 3 h and 9 h post-TBI attenuates the acute increase in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels, reduces astrocyte activation, and the longer term neurologic injury, and neurobehavioral deficits measured by Y maze performance over a 28-day recovery period. Mzc-treated animals also have no significant increase in brain water content (edema, a major cause of the

  18. Pulmonary atelectasis in patients with neurological or muscular disease. Gravity-related lung compression by the heart and intra-abdominal organs on persistent supine position

    We report 10 cases of pulmonary atelectasis diagnosed by chest computed tomography in patients with neurological or muscular disease. Atelectasis was frequently seen in hypotonic patients who could not roll over on their own. The atelectases located mostly in the dorsal bronchopulmonary segments, adjacent to the heart or diaphragm. Atelectasis diminished in two patients after they became able to roll themselves over. Gravity-related lung compression by the heart and intra-abdominal organs on persistent supine position can cause pulmonary atelectasis in patients with neurological or muscular disease who can not roll over by their own power. To confirm that the prone position reduces compression of the lungs, chest computed tomography was performed in both the supine and the prone position in three patients. Sagittal images with three-dimensional computed tomographic reconstruction revealed significant sternad displacements of the heart and caudal displacements of the dorsal portion of the diaphragm on prone position compared with supine position. The prone position, motor exercises for rolling over, and biphasic cuirass ventilation are effective in reducing gravity-related lung compression. Some patients with intellectual disabilities were also able to cooperate in chest physiotherapy. Chest physiotherapy is useful in preventing atelectasis in patients with neurological or muscular disease. (author)

  19. Managing the acutely ill adult with sickle cell disease.

    Brown, Marvelle

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessively inherited condition, affecting the structure of the haemoglobin. SCD is a long-term chronic condition which is manifested by periods of acute painful sickling crisis, known as vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) and is the cause of 90% of sickle cell-related hospital admissions. SCD is one of the most common genetic conditions worldwide and in the UK there are approximately 12,500 people living with it (Streetly et al,1997; Howard et al, 2008), making it more common than cystic fibrosis, yet there still remains many challenges in managing these patients when they become acutely ill. Lack of awareness and understanding of the illness, concerns regarding addiction and limited attention to the psycho-social implications of the illness, leads to less than effective care for this patient group when they are hospitalized. The aims of this article are to outline the pathophysiology of SCD, identify the causes of VOC and discuss the key principles of nursing management for patients experiencing a VOC. PMID:22306637

  20. Oxygen therapy in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Brill SE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Simon E Brill, Jadwiga A Wedzicha Airway Disease Section, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK Abstract: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are important events in the history of this debilitating lung condition. Associated health care utilization and morbidity are high, and many patients require supplemental oxygen or ventilatory support. The last 2 decades have seen a substantial increase in our understanding of the best way to manage the respiratory failure suffered by many patients during this high-risk period. This review article examines the evidence underlying supplemental oxygen therapy during exacerbations of COPD. We first discuss the epidemiology and pathophysiology of respiratory failure in COPD during exacerbations. The rationale and evidence underlying oxygen therapy, including the risks when administered inappropriately, are then discussed, along with further strategies for ventilatory support. We also review current recommendations for best practice, including methods for improving oxygen provision in the future. Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, exacerbation, oxygen therapy, respiratory failure, hypercapnia

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inherited renal disease and acute kidney injury.

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Parikh, Samir M; Salviati, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria are increasingly recognized as key players in genetic and acquired renal diseases. Most mitochondrial cytopathies that cause renal symptoms are characterized by tubular defects, but glomerular, tubulointerstitial and cystic diseases have also been described. For example, defects in coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) biosynthesis and the mitochondrial DNA 3243 A>G mutation are important causes of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in children and in adults, respectively. Although they sometimes present with isolated renal findings, mitochondrial diseases are frequently associated with symptoms related to central nervous system and neuromuscular involvement. They can result from mutations in nuclear genes that are inherited according to classic Mendelian rules or from mutations in mitochondrial DNA, which are transmitted according to more complex rules of mitochondrial genetics. Diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders involves clinical characterization of patients in combination with biochemical and genetic analyses. In particular, prompt diagnosis of CoQ10 biosynthesis defects is imperative because of their potentially reversible nature. In acute kidney injury (AKI), mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the physiopathology of tissue injury, whereas mitochondrial biogenesis has an important role in the recovery of renal function. Potential therapies that target mitochondrial dysfunction or promote mitochondrial regeneration are being developed to limit renal damage during AKI and promote repair of injured tissue. PMID:26804019

  2. CT appearance of acute inflammatory disease of the renal interstitium

    Today, infection remains the most common disease of the urinary tract and constitutes almost 75% of patient problems requiring urologic evaluation. There have been several major factors responsible for our better understanding of the nature and pathophysiology of urinary tract infection. One has been quantitated urine bacteriology and another, the discovery that a significant part of the apparently healthy adult female population has asymptomatic bacteriuria. Abnormal conditions such as neurogenic bladder, bladder malignancy, prolonged catheter drainage and reflux, altered host resistance, diabetes mellitus, and urinary tract obstruction, as well as pregnancy, may either predispose to or be implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection. There is a wide range of conditions that result in acute renal inflammation and those under discussion affect primarily the interstitium. This term refers to the connective tissue elements separating the tubules in the cortex and medulla. Hence, the interstitial nephritides are to be distinguished from the glomerulonephritides and fall into two general etiologic categories: infectious and noninfectious

  3. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires’ Disease

    Ricardo Coentre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires’ disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms.

  4. Invasive fungal diseases in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia.

    Nicolato, Andrea; Nouér, Simone A; Garnica, Marcia; Portugal, Rodrigo; Maiolino, Angelo; Nucci, Marcio

    2016-09-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) represents an important complication in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of IFD in ALL patients with neutropenia, identify factors associated with IFD, and estimate the impact of IFD on the outcome. All patients with ALL who developed febrile neutropenia from 1987 to 2013 were evaluated. Cases of IFD were classified as proven or probable. Factors associated with IFD were evaluated by comparing episodes with and without a diagnosis of IFD. Among 350 episodes of febrile neutropenia, 31 IFDs were diagnosed (8.8%). Prolonged neutropenia was the only factor associated with IFD caused by yeasts. Factors associated with IFD caused by molds by multivariate analysis were the period after 2008, receipt of allogeneic transplant, relapsed ALL and prolonged neutropenia. Patients in relapse should receive induction chemotherapy in rooms with HEPA filter and receive antifungal prophylaxis. PMID:26949001

  5. Post dengue neurological complication.

    Hasliza, A H; Tohid, H; Loh, K Y; Santhi, P

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) followed by an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) weeks prior to her presentation rendering GBS secondary to the post viral URTI and AGE as the most likely diagnosis. Presence of thrombocytopenia was the only clue for dengue in this case. PMID:27099661

  6. Child neurology services in Africa.

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Badoe, Eben; Wammanda, Robinson D; Mallewa, Macpherson; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Venter, Andre; Newton, Charles R

    2011-12-01

    The first African Child Neurology Association meeting identified key challenges that the continent faces to improve the health of children with neurology disorders. The capacity to diagnose common neurologic conditions and rare disorders is lacking. The burden of neurologic disease on the continent is not known, and this lack of knowledge limits the ability to lobby for better health care provision. Inability to practice in resource-limited settings has led to the migration of skilled professionals away from Africa. Referral systems from primary to tertiary are often unpredictable and chaotic. There is a lack of access to reliable supplies of basic neurology treatments such as antiepileptic drugs. Few countries have nationally accepted guidelines either for the management of epilepsy or status epilepticus. There is a great need to develop better training capacity across Africa in the recognition and management of neurologic conditions in children, from primary health care to the subspecialist level. PMID:22019842

  7. Neurological complications in dengue infection: a review for clinical practice

    Marzia Puccioni-Sohler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is an important global public health problem. The World Health Organization estimates that 2/5 of entire world population are in risk of dengue infection. Almost 50 millions cases occur annually, with at least 20 thousand deaths. The etiological agent of this acute febrile disease is a single-strand positive-sense RNA virus of Flavivirus genus. It is an arboviral disease transmitted by Aedes sp. mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti and A. albopictus. Most infected individuals present asymptomatic infection, but some may develop clinical signs. Therefore, a wide spectrum of illness can be observed, ranging from unapparent, mild disease, called dengue fever, to a severe and occasionally fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. Currently, neurological manifestations related to dengue infections are increasingly been observed and appears as a challenge for medical practice. In this study the neurological complications of dengue infection will be reviewed, focusing a better understanding of the disease for the clinical practice.

  8. Preventive measures for Acute Rheumatic Fever/ Rheumatic Heart Disease : A literature review

    Shrestha, Usha; Kunwar, Nabina

    2013-01-01

    Acute rheumatic disease is a major burden in the developing countries and also a major cause of premature death in children and young adults every year. Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the factors contributing to prevention of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in developing countries. This will offers appropriate knowledge to the care provider to identify risk factors for acute rheumatic fever and implement in-terventions timely. The research questions are followi...

  9. Acute Kidney Injury due to Crescentic Glomerulonephritis in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Maggard, Reuben; Makary, Raafat; Monteiro, Carmela l.; James, Leighton R.

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease is an inherited condition, characterized by the development of cysts in the kidney, as well as in other organs. Patients with polycystic kidney can suffer from the same causes of acute kidney injury as the general population. Nephritic syndrome is an uncommon cause of acute kidney injury in the general population and less common in patients with polycystic kidney disease. We report the second case of crescentic glomerulonephritis, causing acute kidney injury, in a pa...

  10. Uric acid levels and their relation to incapacities in acute cerebrovascular disease

    Julio López Argüelles; Joan Rojas Fuentes; Ricardo Verdecia Fraga

    2010-01-01

    Background: cerebrovascular disease and ischemic cardiopathy can be considered as an epidemic and constitute the first cause of incapacities in developed countries. Multiple studies have shown the association between uric acid levels and cerebrovascular diseases. Objective: To correlate the levels of serum uric acid and incapacities in the acute phase of cerebrovascular disease. Methods: A correlational study was carried out with 217 patients with acute cerebrovascular disease. The patient’s ...

  11. Neurologic Music Therapy Training for Mobility and Stability Rehabilitation with Parkinson’s Disease – A Pilot Study

    Bukowska, Anna A.; Krężałek, Piotr; Mirek, Elżbieta; Bujas, Przemysław; Marchewka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a progressive condition with gait disturbance and balance disorder as the main symptoms. Previous research studies focused on the application of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS) in PD gait rehabilitation. The key hypothesis of this pilot study, however, assumes the major role of the combination of all three Neurologic Music Therapy (NMT) sensorimotor techniques in improving spatio-temporal gait parameters, and postural stability in the course of PD. The 55 PD-diagnosed subjects invited to the study were divided into two groups: 30 in the experimental and 25 in the control group. Inclusion criteria included Hoehn and Yahr stages 2 or 3, the ability to walk independently without any aid and stable pharmacological treatment for the duration of the experiment. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the chosen therapy procedure the following measures were applied: Optoelectrical 3D Movement Analysis, System BTS Smart for gait, and Computerized Dynamic Posturography CQ Stab for stability and balance. All measures were conducted both before and after the therapy cycle. The subjects from the experimental group attended music therapy sessions four times a week for 4 weeks. Therapeutic Instrumental Music Performance (TIMP), Pattern Sensory Enhancement (PSE) and RAS were used in every 45-min session for practicing daily life activities, balance, pre-gait, and gait pattern. Percussion instruments, the metronome and rhythmic music were the basis for each session. The subjects from the control group were asked to stay active and perform daily life activities between the measures. The research showed that the combination of the three NMT sensorimotor techniques can be used to improve gait and other rhythmical activities in PD rehabilitation. The results demonstrated significant improvement in the majority of the spatiotemporal gait parameters in the experimental group in comparison to the control group. In the stability tests with eyes

  12. NEUROLOGIC MUSIC THERAPY TRAINING FOR MOBILITY AND STABILITY REHABILITATION WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE – A PILOT STUDY.

    Anna A. Bukowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease (PD is a progressive condition with gait disturbance and balance disorder as the main symptoms. Previous research studies focused on the application of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS in PD gait rehabilitation. The key hypothesis of this pilot study, however, assumes the major role of the combination of all three Neurologic Music Therapy (NMT sensorimotor techniques in improving spatio-temporal gait parameters, and postural stability in the course of PD. The 55 PD-diagnosed subjects invited to the study were divided into two groups: 30 in the experimental and 25 in the control group. Inclusion criteria included Hoehn & Yahr stage 2 or 3, the ability to walk independently without any aid and stable pharmacological treatment for the duration of the experiment. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the chosen therapy procedure the following measures were applied: Optoelectrical 3D Movement Analysis System BTS Smart for gait, and Computerized Dynamic Posturography CQ Stab for stability and balance . All measures were conducted both before and after the therapy cycle. The subjects from the experimental group attended music therapy sessions 4 times a week for 4 weeks. Therapeutic Instrumental Music Performance (TIMP, Pattern Sensory Enhancement (PSE and Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS were used in every 45-minute session for practicing daily life activities, balance, pre-gait and gait pattern. Percussion instruments, the metronome and rhythmic music were the basis for each session. The subjects from the control group were asked to stay active and perform daily life activities between the measures. The research showed that the combination of the three NMT sensorimotor techniques can be used to improve gait and other rhythmical activities in PD rehabilitation.The results demonstrated significant improvement in the majority of the spatiotemporal gait parameters in the experimental group in comparison to the control

  13. Coronary heart disease is not significantly linked to acute kidney injury identified using Acute Kidney Injury Group criteria

    Yayan J

    2012-01-01

    Josef YayanDepartment of Internal Medicine, Vinzentius Hospital, Landau, GermanyBackground: Patients with unstable angina or myocardial infarction are at risk of acute kidney injury, which may be aggravated by the iodine-containing contrast agent used during coronary angiography; however, the relationship between these two conditions remains unclear.Objective: The current study investigated the relationship between acute kidney injury and coronary heart disease prior to coronary angiography.M...

  14. POEMS syndrome with Guillan-Barre syndrome-like acute onset: a case report and review of neurological progression in 30 cases.

    Isose, S; Misawa, S; Kanai, K; Shibuya, K; Sekiguchi, Y; Nasu, S; Fujimaki, Y; Noto, Y; Nakaseko, C; Kuwabara, S

    2011-06-01

    POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein and skin changes) syndrome is a rare cause of demyelinating neuropathy with monoclonal plasma cell proliferation, and POEMS neuropathy is usually chronically progressive. Herein, the authors report a 34-year-old woman with POEMS syndrome presenting as acute polyneuropathy. Within 2 weeks of disease onset, she became unable to walk with electrodiagnostic features of demyelination and was initially diagnosed as having Guillan-Barré syndrome. Other systemic features (oedema and skin changes) developed later, and an elevated serum level of vascular endothelial growth factor led to the diagnosis of POEMS syndrome. She received high-dose chemotherapy with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, resulting in good recovery. The authors also reviewed patterns and speed of progression of neuropathy in the 30 patients with POEMS syndrome; 22 (73%) of them were unable to walk independently with the median period of 9.5 months from POEMS onset (range 0.5-51 months). Whereas the speed of neuropathy progression varies considerably among patients, some POEMS patients can show acute or subacute polyneuropathy. The early diagnosis and treatment could result in rapid improvement as shown in the present patient. PMID:20562460

  15. Infant mouse brain passaged Dengue serotype 2 virus induces non-neurological disease with inflammatory spleen collapse in AG129 mice after splenic adaptation.

    Rajmane, Yogesh; Shaikh, Sameer; Basha, Khalander; Reddy, G E C Vidyadhar; Nair, Soumya; Kamath, Sangita; Sreejesh, Greeshma; Rao, Harinarayana; Ramana, Venkata; Kumar, A S Manoj

    2013-05-01

    AG129 mice are known to be permissive to infection by multiple serotypes of Dengue virus (DENV). There exists a concern that mouse passaged strains of the virus may induce neurological complications rather than increased vascular permeability in these mice, hence the use of human clinical isolates of the virus to develop the AG129 mouse model of Dengue disease with increased vascular permeability. The present study evaluated four mouse brain passaged DENV strains, each belonging to a different serotype and three of them having an original isolation history in India, for their suitability to serve as candidates to induce rapid lethal disease in AG129 mice. While all the viruses were able to establish a productive infection in the spleen, none of them induced paralysis despite their mouse brain passage history. Only the type-2 virus acquired the ability to induce a lethal disease after a single round of spleen to spleen passage, and became highly virulent after five more rounds. This apparently non-neurological lethal disease was characterized by high viral burden, elevated vascular permeability, serum TNF-α surge immediately before moribund stage, transient leukocytosis followed by severe leukopenia, lymphopenia throughout the course of the infection, and transient thrombocytopenia. The disease was also characterized by inflammatory splenic collapse during moribund stage, reminiscent of spontaneous splenic rupture reported in rare cases of severe Dengue in humans. PMID:23337909

  16. A novel missense mutation in the NDP gene in a child with Norrie disease and severe neurological involvement including infantile spasms.

    Lev, Dorit; Weigl, Yuval; Hasan, Mariana; Gak, Eva; Davidovich, Michael; Vinkler, Chana; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Watemberg, Nathan

    2007-05-01

    Norrie disease (ND) is a rare X-linked recessive disorder characterized by congenital blindness and in some cases, mental retardation and deafness. Other neurological complications, particularly epilepsy, are rare. We report on a novel mutation identified in a patient with ND and profound mental retardation. The patient was diagnosed at the age of 6 months due to congenital blindness. At the age of 8 months he developed infantile spasms, which were diagnosed at 11 months as his EEG demonstrated hypsarrhythmia. Mutation analysis of the ND gene (NDP) of the affected child and his mother revealed a novel missense mutation at position c.134T > A resulting in amino acid change at codon V45E. To the best of our knowledge, such severe neurological involvement has not been previously reported in ND patients. The severity of the phenotype may suggest the functional importance of this site of the NDP gene. PMID:17334993

  17. Diagnostic criteria for acute liver failure due to Wilson disease

    Christoph Eisenbach; Olivia Sieg; Wolfgang Stremmel; Jens Encke; Uta Merle

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To describe the diagnostic criteria for acute liver failure due to Wilson disease (WD), which is an uncommon cause of acute liver failure (ALF).METHODS: We compared findings of patients presenting with ALF due to WD to those with ALF of other etiologies.RESULTS: Previously described criteria, such as low alkaline phosphatase activity, ratio of low alkaline phosphatase to total bilirubin or ratio of high aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to alanine aminotransferase (ALT), failed to identify patients with ALF due to WD. There were significant differences in low ALT and AST activities (53 ± 43 vs 1982 ± 938, P < 0.0001 and 87 ± 44 vs 2756 ± 2941, P = 0.037, respectively), low choline esterase activity (1.79 ± 1.2 vs 4.30 ± 1.2, P = 0.009), high urine copper concentrations (93.4 ± 144.0 vs 3.5 ± 1.8, P = 0.001) and low hemoglobin (7.0 ± 2.2 vs 12.6 ± 1.8, P < 0.0001) in patients with ALF caused by WD as compared with other etiologies. Interestingly, 4 of 7 patients with ALF due to WD survived without liver transplantation.CONCLUSION: In ALF, these criteria can help establish a diagnosis of WD. Where applicable, slit-lamp examination for presence of Kayser-Fleischer rings and liver biopsy for determination of hepatic copper concentration still remain important for the diagnosis of ALF due to WD. The need for liver transplantation should be evaluated carefully as the prognosis is not necessarily fatal.

  18. Review of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses and Acute Hemorrhagic Disease.

    Long, Simon Y; Latimer, Erin M; Hayward, Gary S

    2016-02-24

    More than 100 young captive and wild Asian elephants are known to have died from a rapid-onset, acute hemorrhagic disease caused primarily by multiple distinct strains of two closely related chimeric variants of a novel herpesvirus species designated elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV1A and EEHV1B). These and two other species of Probosciviruses (EEHV4 and EEHV5) are evidently ancient and likely nearly ubiquitous asymptomatic infections of adult Asian elephants worldwide that are occasionally shed in trunk wash secretions. Although only a handful of similar cases have been observed in African elephants, they also have proved to harbor their own multiple and distinct species of Probosciviruses-EEHV2, EEHV3, EEHV6, and EEHV7-found in lung and skin nodules or saliva. For reasons that are not yet understood, approximately 20% of Asian elephant calves appear to be susceptible to the disease when primary infections are not controlled by normal innate cellular and humoral immune responses. Sensitive specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA blood tests have been developed, routine monitoring has been established, the complete large DNA genomes of each of the four Asian EEHV species have now been sequenced, and PCR gene subtyping has provided unambiguous evidence that this is a sporadic rather than epidemic disease that it is not being spread among zoos or other elephant housing facilities. Nevertheless, researchers have not yet been able to propagate EEHV in cell culture, determine whether or not human antiherpesvirus drugs are effective inhibitors, or develop serology assays that can distinguish between antibodies against the multiple different EEHV species. PMID:26912715

  19. Pathogenesis of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp.

    Lai, Hung-Chiao; Ng, Tze Hann; Ando, Masahiro; Lee, Chung-Te; Chen, I-Tung; Chuang, Jie-Cheng; Mavichak, Rapeepat; Chang, Sheng-Hsiung; Yeh, Mi-De; Chiang, Yi-An; Takeyama, Haruko; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o; Lo, Chu-Fang; Aoki, Takashi; Wang, Han-Ching

    2015-12-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), also called early mortality syndrome (EMS), is a recently emergent shrimp bacterial disease that has resulted in substantial economic losses since 2009. AHPND is known to be caused by strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus that contain a unique virulence plasmid, but the pathology of the disease is still unclear. In this study, we show that AHPND-causing strains of V. parahaemolyticus secrete the plasmid-encoded binary toxin PirAB(vp) into the culture medium. We further determined that, after shrimp were challenged with AHPND-causing bacteria, the bacteria initially colonized the stomach, where they started to produce PirAB(vp) toxin. At the same early time point (6 hpi), PirB(vp) toxin, but not PirA(vp) toxin, was detected in the hepatopancreas, and the characteristic histopathological signs of AHPND, including sloughing of the epithelial cells of the hepatopancreatic tubules, were also seen. Although some previous studies have found that both components of the binary PirAB(vp) toxin are necessary to induce a toxic effect, our present results are consistent with other studies which have suggested that PirB(vp) alone may be sufficient to cause cellular damage. At later time points, the bacteria and PirA(vp) and PirB(vp) toxins were all detected in the hepatopancreas. We also show that Raman spectroscopy "Whole organism fingerprints" were unable to distinguish between AHPND-causing and non-AHPND causing strains. Lastly, by using minimum inhibitory concentrations, we found that both virulent and non-virulent V. parahaemolyticus strains were resistant to several antibiotics, suggesting that the use of antibiotics in shrimp culture should be more strictly regulated. PMID:26549178

  20. Urgencias neurológicas y guardias de Neurología The problem of neurological emergencies and the need for specific neurology shifts

    A. Gómez Ibáñez

    2008-01-01

    ? Neurological emergencies account for between 2.6% and 14% of medical emergencies. Stroke represents a third of all neurological emergencies, while the diagnoses of acute cerebrovascular disease, epilepsy and cephalea constitute 50% of all neurological care in the emergency department. On the basis of quality of care criteria and professional competence, the best care for patients with a neurological emergency is provided by a specialist in neurology. The implementation of specific neurology shifts, with a 24 hour physical presence, is associated with greater quality of care, better diagnostic and therapeutic orientation from the moment the patient arrives in emergency department, reduces unnecessary admissions, reduces costs and strengthens the neurology service.

  1. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations

    Yu, Jeesuk

    2014-01-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disord...

  2. IMMUNOBIOLOGY OF ACUTE GRAFT-VERSUS-HOST DISEASE

    G. A. Efimov

    2016-01-01

    significant limitation for clinical applications of stem cell transplantation. Severe immunesuppression or depletion of mature donor T cells from the transplant leads to increased probability of relapse and weakens anti-infectious immunity. Hence, further search for alternative, more specific ways to prevent GVHD is required. This review will focus on the mechanisms of alloreactive T lymphocyte clone development and key pathogenetic stages of acute “graft versus host” disease.

  3. Correlation between serum fructosamine and hyperglycemia in patients with acute cerebrovascular disease

    Kaiqiu Chu; Pengpeng Liu; Lijuan Tan; Shuhua Zhou; Lisheng Ren

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus is one of the risk factors in patients with acute cerebral disease, and always leads to stroke or get it worse. There is often a high level of blood glucose in those patients with diabetes mellitus and cerebral disease, but it is hard to distinguish from both kinds of hyperglycemia. Serum fructosamine is said to be correlated with blood glucose.OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationship between serum fructosamine and blood glucose in patients with acute cerebrovascular disease.DESTGN: A case-controlled study.SETTINGS: Department of Clinical Laboratory, Health Department for Cadres and Department of Neurology of Affiliated Hospital, Qingdao University Medical College.PARTICIPANTS: Forty-eight inpatients and outpatients with cerebrovascular diseases were selected from the Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College from December 2004 to April 2005. All the patients were confirmed with CT and MRI. There were 25 patients with diabetes mellitus secondary cerebrovascular diseases, who met the diagnostic standards of diabetes mellitus set by WHO,including 12 males and 13 females with an average of (60±8) years old, the course of diabetes mellitus ranged from 1 to 21 years.. The other 23 patients had no diabetes mellitus (without diabetes mellitus group), including 14 males and 9 females with an average of (62±6) years old. Meanwhile, another 50 healthy physical examinees in the hospital were selected as control group, including 26 males and 24 females with the average age of (62±5) years old. Informed content was obtained from all the participants.METHODS: Venous blood was drawn from all the participants, and content of blood glucose was assayed by means of glucose oxidase, and the concentration of serum fructosamine was determined by nitroblue tetrazolium colorimetric method. Comparison between groups was performed by the analysis of variance and q test, and the correlation was tested by linear

  4. Acute kidney injury: Renal disease in the ICU.

    Seller-Pérez, G; Más-Font, S; Pérez-Calvo, C; Villa-Díaz, P; Celaya-López, M; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in the ICU frequently requires costly supportive therapies, has high morbidity, and its long-term prognosis is not as good as it has been presumed so far. Consequently, AKI generates a significant burden for the healthcare system. The problem is that AKI lacks an effective treatment and the best approach relies on early secondary prevention. Therefore, to facilitate early diagnosis, a broader definition of AKI should be established, and a marker with more sensitivity and early-detection capacity than serum creatinine - the most common marker of AKI - should be identified. Fortunately, new classification systems (RIFLE, AKIN or KDIGO) have been developed to solve these problems, and the discovery of new biomarkers for kidney injury will hopefully change the way we approach renal patients. As a first step, the concept of renal failure has changed from being a "static" disease to being a "dynamic process" that requires continuous evaluation of kidney function adapted to the reality of the ICU patient. PMID:27388683

  5. Retrovirus-induced spongiform encephalopathy: the 3'-end long terminal repeat-containing viral sequences influence the incidence of the disease and the specificity of the neurological syndrome.

    DesGroseillers, L; Rassart, E; Robitaille, Y; Jolicoeur, P

    1985-01-01

    Using chimeric murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) constructed in vitro with parental viral genomes from the neurotropic Cas-BR-E MuLV and the nonneurotropic amphotropic 4070-A MuLV, we previously mapped the paralysis-inducing determinant of Cas-BR-E MuLV within a pol-env region. To assess the role of the long terminal repeats (LTRs) in influencing the neurological disease, we constructed another chimeric MuLV (pNEMO-1)m harboring the gag-pol-env from Cas-BR-E MuLV and the LTR region from the str...

  6. Acute porcine model of huntington´s disease- a candidate for pre-clinical tests

    Hruška-Plocháň, Marian; Juhás, Štefan; Juhásová, Jana; Galik, J.; Miyanohara, A.; Maršala, M.; Bjarkam, C. R.; Cattaneo, E.; Difiglia, M.

    Amsterdam : European Neuroscience Society, 2010. s. 109-109. [FENS Forum of European Neuroscience /7./. 03.07.2010-07.07.2010, Amsterdam] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Huntington ´s disease * Animal model * Neurodegeneration Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  7. Etanercept for steroid-refractory acute graft versus host disease following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Park, Joo Han; Lee, Hyo Jung; Kim, Sei Rhan; Song, Ga Won; Lee, Seung Kyong; Park, Sun Young; Kim, Ki Chan; Hwang, Sun Hyuk; Park, Joon Seong

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The treatment for steroid-refractory acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) needs to be standardized. We report our clinical experience with etanercept for steroid-refractory acute GVHD. Methods Eighteen patients who underwent allo-SCT and presented with steroid-refractory acute GVHD at Ajou University Hospital were studied retrospectively. They were given 25 mg of etanercept subcutaneously twice weekly for 4 weeks. The cli...

  8. Effects of chronic kidney disease on platelet response to antiplatelet therapy in acute myocardial infarction patients

    邓捷

    2012-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the effects of dual antiplatelet therapy on platelet response in acute myocardial infarction patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods From September 2011 to June 2012,a total of 195 acute myocardial infarction patients with drug eluting stent implanting were enrolled. Among them,133 cases had normal

  9. Blood transfusion for the treatment of acute anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease and other digestive diseases

    José Antonio García-Erce, Fernando Gomollón, Manuel Muñoz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT is frequently used as the first therapeutic option for the treatment of acute anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, especially when it developed due to gastrointestinal or perioperative blood loss, but is not risk-free. Adverse effects of ABT include, but are not limited to, acute hemolytic reaction (wrong blood or wrong patient, febrile non-hemolytic transfusional reaction, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion associated circulatory overload, transfusion-related immuno-modulation, and transmission of almost all infectious diseases (bacteria, virus, protozoa and prion, which might result in increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the main physiological goal of ABT, i.e. to increase oxygen consumption by the hypoxic tissues, has not been well documented. In contrast, the ABT is usually misused only to increase the haemoglobin level within a fixed protocol [mostly two by two packed red blood cell (PRC units] independently of the patient’s tolerance to normovolemic anaemia or his clinical response to the transfusion of PRC units according to a “one-by-one” administration schedule. Evidence-based clinical guidelines may promote best transfusion practices by implementing restrictive transfusion protocols, thus reducing variability and minimizing the avoidable risks of transfusion, and the use of autologous blood and pharmacologic alternatives. In this regard, preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD consistently diminished the frequency of ABT, although its contribution to ABT avoidance is reduced when performed under a transfusion protocol. In addition, interpretation of utility of PABD in surgical IBD patients is hampered by scarcity of published data. However, the role of autologous red blood cells as drug carriers is promising. Finally, it must be stressed that a combination of methods used within well-constructed protocols

  10. {sup 1}H-MRS for the diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: insight into the acute-disease stage

    Ben Sira, Liat; Miller, Elka [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Artzi, Moran [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Imaging Center, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Constantini, Shlomi [Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv Medical Center, Paediatric Neurology Unit, The Paediatric Neurosurgery Department, Tel Aviv (Israel); Ben Bashat, Dafna [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Imaging Center, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2010-01-15

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). Differentiating ADEM from other inflammatory disorders, such as multiple sclerosis, is not always conclusive using conventional MRI. To evaluate longitudinal magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) changes that distinguish ADEM from other inflammatory disorders. MRI/MRS scans were performed in seven patients with ADEM during the acute and chronic phases of the disease. Partial recovery was detected between the acute and chronic phases in choline/creatine ratio. Major elevation of lipids and reduction in myo-inositol/creatine ratio was detected in all patients during the acute phase, followed by a reduction in lipids peak and elevation above normal in myo-inositol/creatine ratio during the chronic phase. Consistent and unique MRS changes in metabolite ratios between the acute and chronic presentations of the disease were found. To the best of our knowledge, these patterns have not been described in other inflammatory disorders and might assist in the early diagnosis of ADEM. (orig.)

  11. Acute Myocardial Infarction: The First Manifestation of Ischemic Heart Disease and Relation to Risk Factors

    Manfroi Waldomiro Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between cardiovascular risk factors and acute myocardial infarction as the first manifestation of ischemic heart disease, correlating them with coronary angiographic findings. METHODS: We carried out a cross-sectional study of 104 patients with previous acute myocardial infarction, who were divided into 2 groups according to the presence or absence of angina prior to acute myocardial infarction. We assessed the presence of angina preceding acute myocardial infarction and risk factors, such as age >55 years, male sex, smoking, systemic arterial hypertension, lipid profile, diabetes mellitus, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and familial history of ischemic heart disease. On coronary angiography, the severity of coronary heart disease and presence of left ventricular hypertrophy were assessed. RESULTS: Of the 104 patients studied, 72.1% were males, 90.4% were white, 73.1% were older than 55 years, and 53.8% were hypertensive. Acute myocardial infarction was the first manifestation of ischemic heart disease in 49% of the patients. The associated risk factors were systemic arterial hypertension (RR=0.19; 95% CI=0.06-0.59; P=0.04 and left ventricular hypertrophy (RR=0.27; 95% CI=0,.8-0.88; P=0.03. The remaining risk factors were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of acute myocardial infarction as the first manifestation of ischemic heart disease is high, approximately 50%. Hypertensive individuals more frequently have symptoms preceding acute myocardial infarction, probably due to ventricular hypertrophy associated with high blood pressure levels.

  12. Gender differences in the management and outcome of patients with acute coronary artery disease

    Raine, R; Black, N; Bowker, T; Wood, D.

    2002-01-01

    Study objectives: To compare the clinical management and health outcomes of men and women after admission with acute coronary syndromes, after adjusting for disease severity, sociodemographic, and cardiac risk factors.

  13. Neurological complications of rabies vaccines.

    Tullu, Millind S; Rodrigues, Sean; Muranjan, Mamta N; Bavdekar, Sandeep B; Kamat, Jaishree R; Hira, Priya R

    2003-02-01

    The rabies vaccines containing neural elements are used in some countries including India. We report three cases that presented with various neurological complications following the use of these vaccines. The presenting manifestations included those of encephalitis, radiculitis and acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. These neurological complications are highlighted so that scientific evidence compels the community to discontinue the use of the neural tissue rabies vaccines. Newer generation cell culture rabies vaccines should be preferred over the neural tissue rabies vaccines for post-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:12626831

  14. Anterior D-rod and titanium mesh fixation for acute mid-lumbar burst fracture with incomplete neurologic deficits A prospective study of 56 consecutive patients

    Zhe-yuan Huang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Good mid term clinicoradiological results of anterior decompression with D-rod and titanium mesh fixation for suitable patients with mid-lumbar burst fractures with incomplete neurologic deficits can be achieved. The incident rate of complications was low. D-rod is a reliable implant and has some potential advantages in L4 vertebral fractures.

  15. Elemental diet as primary treatment of acute Crohn's disease: a controlled trial.

    O'Moráin, C; Segal, A. W.; Levi, A J

    1984-01-01

    Acute exacerbations of Crohn's disease are usually treated with prednisolone or potentially more toxic immunosuppressive drugs or by surgery. In pilot studies replacing the normal diet by a protein free elemental diet also induced remission. A controlled trial was therefore conducted in which 21 patients acutely ill with exacerbations of Crohn's disease were randomised to receive either prednisolone 0.75 mg/kg/day or an elemental diet (Vivonex) for four weeks. Assessment at four and 12 weeks ...

  16. A CASE REPORT ON SICKLE CELL DISEASE WITH HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA, NEPHROTIC SYNDROME AND ACUTE CHEST SYNDROME

    Putta; Yamini Devi

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to abnormal hemoglobin. Sickling of RBCs occur due to abnormal hemoglobin which leads to vaso - occlusive crisis. This disease manifests as hemolytic anemia, acute chest syndrome, stroke, ischemic leg ulcers and nephrotic syndrome. This patient presented with hemolytic anemia, nephrotic syndrome and acute chest syndrome. This case was diagnosed by electrophoresis of h emoglobin and peripheral smear. Thi...

  17. Effect of revascularization strategy in patients with acute myocardial infarction and renal insufficiency with multivessel disease

    Park, Hyukjin; Hong, Young Joon; Rhew, Si Hyun; Kim, Sung Soo; Jeong, Young Wook; Jeong, Hae Chang; Cho, Jae Yeong; Jang, Soo Young; Lee, Ki Hong; Park, Keun Ho; Sim, Doo Sun; Yoon, Nam Sik; Yoon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Kye Hun; Park, Hyung Wook

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to compare the risk of complications and outcome between infarct-related artery (IRA)-only revascularization and multivessel (MV) revascularization in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) with renal insufficiency and MV disease. Methods A total of 1,031 acute MI patients with renal insufficiency and MV disease who were registered in the Korea Working Group on Myocardial Infarction were enrolled. They were divided into two groups (IRA-only re...

  18. Iodobenzamide SPET in neurological and psychiatric diseases: technical aspects and clinical impact; Tomoscintigraphie cerebrale a l`iodobenzamide en pathologie neuropsychiatrique: technique et pertinence clinique

    Tranquart, F.; Prunier-Levillion, C.; Guilloteau, D.; Toffol, B. de; Autret, A.; Besnard, J.C.; Baulieu, J.L. [Hopital Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France)

    1996-12-31

    Cerebral dopamine receptor assessment using single photon emission tomography (SPET) was recently accepted as a valuable method for a relative quantification of these receptors. We have performed 45 examinations using iodobenzamide (123-IBZM), which is a ligand for post-synaptic D2 receptors, in a variety of neurological or psychiatric diseases in which the dopaminergic system could be involved. The relative quantification of these D2 receptors was performed using different ratios with striatal, cerebellar and total tracer uptake. We observed a significant decrease in 123-IBZM striatal tracer uptake in Parkinson`s disease, supra-nuclear palsy, Alzheimer disease or Huntington disease, in comparison with control subjects (p<0.05). The present study indicates that 123-IBZM SPET could be easily performed in the different nuclear medicine departments and is useful in atypical Parkinson`s disease to access the diagnosis and drug efficacy. This could be of prognostic value in suspected or marked Huntington`s disease. (authors). 27 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  19. Targeting poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase1 in neurological diseases: A promising trove for new pharmacological interventions to enter clinical translation.

    Sriram, Chandra Shekhar; Jangra, Ashok; Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Bezbaruah, Babul Kumar

    2014-10-01

    The highly conserved abundant nuclear protein poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase1 (PARP1) functions at the center of cellular stress response and is mainly implied in DNA damage repair mechanism. Apart from its involvement in DNA damage repair, it does sway multiple vital cellular processes such as cell death pathways, cell aging, insulator function, chromatin modification, transcription and mitotic apparatus function. Since brain is the principal organ vulnerable to oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, upon stress encounters robust DNA damage can occur and intense PARP1 activation may result that will lead to various CNS diseases. In the context of soaring interest towards PARP1 as a therapeutic target for newer pharmacological interventions, here in the present review, we are attempting to give a silhouette of the role of PARP1 in the neurological diseases and the potential of its inhibitors to enter clinical translation, along with its structural and functional aspects. PMID:25049175

  20. Serum anti-GAGA4 IgM antibodies differentiate relapsing remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis from primary progressive multiple sclerosis and other neurological diseases.

    Brettschneider, Johannes; Jaskowski, Troy D; Tumani, Hayrettin; Abdul, Sana; Husebye, Dee; Seraj, Haniah; Hill, Harry R; Fire, Ella; Spector, Larissa; Yarden, Jennifer; Dotan, Nir; Rose, John W

    2009-12-10

    The serum level of IgM antibodies against Glc(alpha1,4)Glc(alpha) (GAGA4) is higher in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) compared to other neurological disease (OND) patients and healthy controls (HC). Detecting the level of anti-GAGA4 antibody by enzyme immunoassay and total IgM, we confirmed that anti-GAGA4 IgM can differentiate RRMS from OND patients and HC. Moreover, secondary progressive MS (SPMS) and RRMS patients have similar levels of anti-GAGA4 demonstrating the biomarker's presence throughout the disease. Interestingly, the anti-GAGA4 assay may also differentiate between primary progressive MS (PPMS) and RRMS/SPMS patients, since nearly all PPMS patients were negative for the assay. PMID:19879655

  1. Therapeutic Approach to the Management of Pediatric Demyelinating Disease: Multiple Sclerosis and Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    Brenton, J Nicholas; Banwell, Brenda L

    2016-01-01

    Acquired pediatric demyelinating diseases manifest acutely with optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, or with various other acute deficits in focal or polyfocal areas of the central nervous system. Patients may experience a monophasic illness (as in the case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis) or one that may manifest as a chronic, relapsing disease [e.g., multiple sclerosis (MS)]. The diagnosis of pediatric MS and other demyelinating disorders of childhood has been facilitated by consensus statements regarding diagnostic definitions. Treatment of pediatric MS has been modeled after data obtained from clinical trials in adult-onset MS. There are now an increasing number of new therapeutic agents for MS, and many will be formally studied for use in pediatric patients. There are important efficacy and safety concerns regarding the use of these therapies in children and young adults. This review will discuss acute management as well as chronic immunotherapies in acquired pediatric demyelination. PMID:26496907

  2. T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance in acute cardiac disease

    Eitel Ingo; Friedrich Matthias G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) using T2-weighted sequences can visualize myocardial edema. When compared to previous protocols, newer pulse sequences with substantially improved image quality have increased its clinical utility. The assessment of myocardial edema provides useful incremental diagnostic and prognostic information in a variety of clinical settings associated with acute myocardial injury. In patients with acute chest pain, T2-weighted CMR is able to identify acu...

  3. Bacterial etiology in acute hospitalized chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations

    Asli Gorek Dilektasli; Ezgi Demirdogen Cetinoglu; Nilufer Aylin Acet Ozturk; Funda Coskun; Guven Ozkaya; Ahmet Ursavas; Cuneyt Ozakin; Mehmet Karadag; Esra Uzaslan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The most common cause of acute COPD exacerbation (AECOPD) is the respiratory tract infections. We sought to determine the bacteriological etiology of hospitalized acute exacerbations of COPD requiring hospitalization in consecutive two years. Methods. We aimed to determine the bacteriological etiology underlying in patients whom admitted to Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and hospitalized with AECOPD in the last two years. Medical records ...

  4. Neurological Sequelae of Lupus

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Sequelae Of Lupus Information Page Synonym(s): Lupus - Neurological Sequelae, Systemic Lupus ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Sequelae Of Lupus? Lupus (also called systemic lupus erythematosus ) is a ...

  5. [The possibility of using music therapy in neurology on the example of multiple sclerosis].

    Boiko, E A; Ivanchuk, E V; Gunchenko, M M; Batysheva, T T

    2016-01-01

    Currently music therapy plays an important role in the drug-free treatment and rehabilitation of children and adults with acute and chronic neurological and somatic diseases including demyelinating diseases. Existing studies show the effectiveness of music therapy in the improvement of social skills, cognitive function and sleep as well as in the reduction in the severity of depression, anxiety and pain in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:27070365

  6. Inflammatory cascades driven by tumor necrosis factor-alpha play a major role in the progression of acute liver failure and its neurological complications.

    Anne Chastre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Acute liver failure (ALF due to ischemic or toxic liver injury is a clinical condition that results from massive loss of hepatocytes and may lead to hepatic encephalopathy (HE, a serious neuropsychiatric complication. Although increased expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α in liver, plasma and brain has been observed, conflicting results exist concerning its roles in drug-induced liver injury and on the progression of HE. The present study aimed to investigate the therapeutic value of etanercept, a TNF-α neutralizing molecule, on the progression of liver injury and HE in mice with ALF resulting from azoxymethane (AOM hepatotoxicity. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were administered saline or etanercept (10 mg/kg; i.p. 30 minutes prior to, or up to 6 h after AOM. Etanercept-treated ALF mice were sacrificed in parallel with vehicle-treated comatose ALF mice and controls. AOM induced severe hepatic necrosis, leading to HE, and etanercept administered prior or up to 3 h after AOM significantly delayed the onset of coma stages of HE. Etanercept pretreatment attenuated AOM-induced liver injury, as assessed by histological examination, plasma ammonia and transaminase levels, and by hepatic glutathione content. Peripheral inflammation was significantly reduced by etanercept as shown by decreased plasma IL-6 (4.1-fold; p<0.001 and CD40L levels (3.7-fold; p<0.001 compared to saline-treated ALF mice. Etanercept also decreased IL-6 levels in brain (1.2-fold; p<0.05, attenuated microglial activation (assessed by OX-42 immunoreactivity, and increased brain glutathione concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that systemic sequestration of TNF-α attenuates both peripheral and cerebral inflammation leading to delayed progression of liver disease and HE in mice with ALF due to toxic liver injury. These results suggest that etanercept may provide a novel therapeutic approach for the management of ALF patients awaiting

  7. LASER THERAPY IN CHILD NEUROLOGY

    D. A. Prityko

    2012-01-01

    The current review of studies devoted to efficacy and safety of laser therapy in the treatment of neurological diseases in children is proposed. The author discusses pathophysiological background of this method of therapy, general therapeutic approaches and definite schemes of therapy in different diseases.

  8. Risk of acute pancreatitis in patients with cronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard; Fonager, Kirsten; Sørensen, Henrik Toft;

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are few epidemiologic data about the risk of acute pancreatitis in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases; we therefore wanted to estimate the risk of a first episode of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis in the total Danish population. METHODS......: The study included all patients discharged from Danish hospitals with a diagnosis of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis registered in the Danish National Registry of Patients in the period from 1977 to 1992. The first episode of acute pancreatitis was identified in the cohort. The observed number...... of patients with acute pancreatitis was compared with expected numbers on the basis of age, sex, and calendar-specific incidence rates in the general population. RESULTS: Overall, 15,526 patients were discharged and followed up for 112,824 person-years. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) for...

  9. Transient global amnesia and neurological events: the Framingham Heart Study

    MelissaMercado

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/ objective: Transient global amnesia (TGA is a temporary amnestic syndrome characterized by lack of other focal neurological deficits. Cerebrovascular disease, migraine and seizures have been suggested as underlying mechanisms. TGA may be a risk factor for cerebrovascular or other neurological events. We studied the relation of TGA, vascular risk factors, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI indices of subclinical ischemia and neurological events in a community-based sample. Design/setting: A total of 12 TGA cases were ascertained using standard criteria by experienced neurologists, and matched to 41 stroke- and seizure-free controls. Vascular risk factors, brain MRI findings, and subsequent cerebrovascular or seizure events were compared in cases and controls. Participants: Framingham Heart Study (FHS original and offspring cohort participants were included. Results: No significant differences between the groups were observed in the prevalence of vascular risk factors, or brain MRI measures. Few incident stroke/transient ischemic attacks (TIA (1 event among the cases and 4 in controls or subsequent seizures occurred in either group. Head CT during the acute event (n=11 and brain MRI (n=7 were negative for acute abnormalities. Electroencephalograms (EEG (n=5 were negative for epileptiform activity. Extracranial vascular studies were negative for significant stenosis in all cases. Conclusions: In our community-based study TGA was not related to traditional vascular risk factors, or cerebrovascular disease. However, our study is limited by small sample size and power, and larger studies are required to exclude an association.

  10. [Neurological Disorders and Pregnancy].

    Berlit, P

    2016-02-01

    Neurological disorders caused by pregnancy and puerperium include the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, the amniotic fluid embolism syndrome (AFES), the postpartum angiopathy due to reversible vasoconstriction syndrome, and the Sheehan syndrome. Hypertension and proteinuria are the hallmarks of preeclampsia, seizures define eclampsia. Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets constitute the HELLP syndrome. Vision disturbances including cortical blindness occur in the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). The Sheehan syndrome presents with panhypopituitarism post partum due to apoplexia of the pituitary gland in severe peripartal blood loss leading to longstanding hypotension. Some neurological disorders occur during pregnancy and puerperium with an increased frequency. These include stroke, sinus thrombosis, the restless legs syndrome and peripheral nerve syndromes, especially the carpal tunnel syndrome. Chronic neurologic diseases need an interdisciplinary approach during pregnancy. Some anticonvulsants double the risk of birth defects. The highest risk exists for valproic acid, the lowest for lamotrigine and levetiracetam. For MS interval treatment, glatiramer acetate and interferones seem to be safe during pregnancy. All other drugs should be avoided. PMID:26953551

  11. Minocycline modulates antigen-specific CTL activity through inactivation of mononuclear phagocytes in patients with HTLV-I associated neurologic disease

    Enose-Akahata Yoshimi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activation of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs, including monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, contributes to central nervous system inflammation in various neurological diseases. In HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP, MPs are reservoirs of HTLV-I, and induce proinflammatory cytokines and excess T cell responses. The virus-infected or activated MPs may play a role in immuneregulation and disease progression in patients with HTLV-I-associated neurological diseases. Results Phenotypic analysis of CD14+ monocytes in HAM/TSP patients demonstrated high expression of CX3CR1 and HLA-DR in CD14lowCD16+ monocytes, compared to healthy normal donors (NDs and asymptomatic carriers (ACs, and the production of TNF-α and IL-1β in cultured CD14+ cells of HAM/TSP patients. CD14+ cells of HAM/TSP patients also showed acceleration of HTLV-I Tax expression in CD4+ T cells. Minocycline, an inhibitor of activated MPs, decreased TNF-α expression in CD14+ cells and IL-1β release in PBMCs of HAM/TSP patients. Minocycline significantly inhibited spontaneous lymphoproliferation and degranulation/IFN-γ expression in CD8+ T cells of HAM/TSP patients. Treatment of minocycline also inhibited IFN-γ expression in CD8+ T cells of HAM/TSP patients after Tax11-19 stimulation and downregulated MHC class I expression in CD14+ cells. Conclusion These results demonstrate that minocycline directly inhibits the activated MPs and that the downregulation of MP function can modulate CD8+ T cells function in HAM/TSP patients. It is suggested that activated MPs may be a therapeutic target for clinical intervention in HAM/TSP.

  12. Prediction of Acute Respiratory Disease in Current and Former Smokers With and Without COPD

    Kim, Victor; Regan, Elizabeth; Williams, André A. A.; Santorico, Stephanie A.; Make, Barry J.; Lynch, David A.; Hokanson, John E.; Washko, George R.; Bercz, Peter; Soler, Xavier; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Criner, Gerard J.; Ramsdell, Joe; Han, MeiLan K.; Demeo, Dawn; Anzueto, Antonio; Comellas, Alejandro; Crapo, James D.; Dransfield, Mark; Wells, J. Michael; Hersh, Craig P.; MacIntyre, Neil; Martinez, Fernando; Nath, Hrudaya P.; Niewoehner, Dennis; Sciurba, Frank; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Silverman, Edwin K.; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Wilson, Carla; Wendt, Christine; Wise, Robert A.; Curtis, Jeffrey; Kazerooni, Ella; Hanania, Nicola; Alapat, Philip; Bandi, Venkata; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha; Guy, Elizabeth; Lunn, William; Mallampalli, Antara; Trinh, Charles; Atik, Mustafa; DeMeo, Dawn; Hersh, Craig; Jacobson, Francine; Graham Barr, R.; Thomashow, Byron; Austin, John; MacIntyre, Neil; Washington, Lacey; Page McAdams, H.; Rosiello, Richard; Bresnahan, Timothy; McEvoy, Charlene; Tashjian, Joseph; Wise, Robert; Hansel, Nadia; Brown, Robert; Casaburi, Richard; Porszasz, Janos; Fischer, Hans; Budoff, Matt; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Niewoehner, Dennis; Allen, Tadashi; Rice, Kathryn; Foreman, Marilyn; Westney, Gloria; Berkowitz, Eugene; Bowler, Russell; Friedlander, Adam; Meoni, Eleonora; Criner, Gerard; Kim, Victor; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Satti, Aditi; James Mamary, A.; Steiner, Robert; Dass, Chandra; Bailey, William; Dransfield, Mark; Gerald, Lynn; Nath, Hrudaya; Ramsdell, Joe; Ferguson, Paul; Friedman, Paul; McLennan, Geoffrey; van Beek, Edwin JR; Martinez, Fernando; Han, MeiLan; Thompson, Deborah; Kazerooni, Ella; Wendt, Christine; Allen, Tadashi; Sciurba, Frank; Weissfeld, Joel; Fuhrman, Carl; Bon, Jessica; Anzueto, Antonio; Adams, Sandra; Orozco, Carlos; Santiago Restrepo, C.; Mumbower, Amy; Crapo, James; Silverman, Edwin; Make, Barry; Regan, Elizabeth; Samet, Jonathan; Willis, Amy; Stinson, Douglas; Beaty, Terri; Klanderman, Barbara; Laird, Nan; Lange, Christoph; Ionita, Iuliana; Santorico, Stephanie; Silverman, Edwin; Lynch, David; Schroeder, Joyce; Newell, John; Reilly, John; Coxson, Harvey; Judy, Philip; Hoffman, Eric; San Jose Estepar, Raul; Washko, George; Leek, Rebecca; Zach, Jordan; Kluiber, Alex; Rodionova, Anastasia; Mann, Tanya; Crapo, Robert; Jensen, Robert; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Murphy, James; Everett, Douglas; Wilson, Carla; Hokanson, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk factors for acute episodes of respiratory disease in current and former smokers who do not have COPD are unknown. METHODS: Eight thousand two hundred forty-six non-Hispanic white and black current and former smokers in the Genetic Epidemiology of COPD (COPDGene) cohort had longitudinal follow-up (LFU) every 6 months to determine acute respiratory episodes requiring antibiotics or systemic corticosteroids, an ED visit, or hospitalization. Negative binomial regression was used to determine the factors associated with acute respiratory episodes. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for time to first episode and an acute episode of respiratory disease risk score. RESULTS: At enrollment, 4,442 subjects did not have COPD, 658 had mild COPD, and 3,146 had moderate or worse COPD. Nine thousand three hundred three acute episodes of respiratory disease and 2,707 hospitalizations were reported in LFU (3,044 acute episodes of respiratory disease and 827 hospitalizations in those without COPD). Major predictors included acute episodes of respiratory disease in year prior to enrollment (HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.15-1.24 per exacerbation), airflow obstruction (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.91-0.96 per 10% change in % predicted FEV1), and poor health-related quality of life (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.06-1.08 for each 4-unit increase in St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire score). Risks were similar for those with and without COPD. CONCLUSIONS: Although acute episode of respiratory disease rates are higher in subjects with COPD, risk factors are similar, and at a population level, there are more episodes in smokers without COPD. PMID:24945159

  13. Low intensity areas observed T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the cerebral cortex in various neurological diseases

    We retrospectively studied magnetic resonance images of the brain in 158 patients (8 cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 16 cases of Alzheimer's disease, 8 cases of Parkinson's disease, 53 cases of multiple cerebral infarct, 20 cases of other central nervous system (CNS) diseases, and 53 cases without any CNS disease) to examine the appearance of T2-weighted low signal intensity areas (LIA) in the cerebral cortex. The age of subjects ranged from 36 to 85 years with the mean 65.0 and SD 9.9 years. LIA in the motor and sensory cortices, and brain atrophy were evaluated visually on axial images of the spin-echo sequence obtained with a 1.5 tesla system. The incidence of LIA in the motor cortex was significantly higher in all CNS diseases than in cases without any CNS disease, but not significantly different among CNS diseases. LIA in the motor cortex showed a correlation with age, temporal and parietal atrophy. The appearance of LIA in the sensory cortex correlated with that of LIA in the motor cortex, and parietal atrophy. These results suggest that LIA may appear according to age and be associated with the accumulation of nonheme iron in the cortex, especially in patients with CNS diseases. (author)

  14. Hippocrates: the forefather of neurology.

    Breitenfeld, T; Jurasic, M J; Breitenfeld, D

    2014-09-01

    Hippocrates is one of the most influential medical doctors of all times. He started observing and experimenting in times of mysticism and magic. He carried a holistic and humanitarian approach to the patient with examination as the principal approach-inspection, palpation and auscultation are still the most important tools in diagnosing algorithms of today. He had immense experience with the human body most likely due to numerous wound treatments he had performed; some even believe he performed autopsies despite the negative trend at the time. Hippocrates identified the brain as the analyst of the outside world, the interpreter of consciousness and the center of intelligence and willpower. Interestingly, Hippocrates was aware of many valid concepts in neurology; his treatise On the Sacred Disease was the most important for understanding neurology and epilepsy. His other ideas pioneered modern day neurology mentioning neurological diseases like apoplexy, spondylitis, hemiplegia, and paraplegia. Today, 10 % of neurological Pubmed and 7 % of neuroscience Scopus reviews mention Corpus Hippocraticum as one of the sources. Therefore, Hippocrates may be considered as the forefather of neurology. PMID:25027011

  15. THE RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF BLOOD IN THE MOST ACUTE STAGE OF ISCHEMIC STROKE AND THEIR RELATION TO THE SEVERITY OF NEUROLOGICAL IMPAIRMENT

    M. N. Azhermacheva; D. M. Plotnikov; O. I. Aliev; V. M. Alifirova; M. B. Plotnikov; K. I. Burkova

    2016-01-01

    The study evaluated the rheological parameters of blood: blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, hematocrit, red blood cell aggregation and deformability. The severity of the patients was assessed by clinical scales:Glasgowcoma scale, the scale NIHSS, Barthel index. The study found that in the acute phase of ischemic stroke increased blood viscosity by increasing red blood cell aggregation and reduced erythrocyte deformability. The increase in the viscosity of the blood in acute ischemic stroke is...

  16. Relationship Between Periodontal Disease and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    M. Zamirian; S Raoofi; Khosropanah, H; R Javanmardi

    2008-01-01

    Background: Conventional risk factors for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction do not explain all of the clinical and epidemiological features of the disease. Periodontal disease is a common bacterial and destructive disorder of oral tissues. Many studies demonstrate close association between chronic periodontitis and development of generalized inflammation, vascular endothelial injury, and atherosclesis. Periodontal disease has been convincingly emerging as an important independ...

  17. Neurological manifestations of celiac disease Manifestações neurológicas da doença celíaca

    José Ibiapina Siqueira Neto

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD/ Nontropicalsprue, gluten-sensitive enteropathy is a malabsortive condition in which an allergic reaction to the cereal grain-protein gluten (present in wheat, rye and barley causes small intestine mucosal injury. The onset is in the first four decades of life, with a female to male ratio of 2:1. It may be associated with a wide spectrum of neurological manifestations including cerebellar ataxia, epileptic seizures, dementia, neuropathy, myopathy and multifocal leucoencephalopathy. We report three patients with neurological manifestations related with CD: one with cerebellar ataxia, one with epilepsy and one with cognitive impairment. The diagnosis of CD was confirmed by serologic tests (antiendomysial and antigliadin antibodies and biopsy of the small intestine. In two patients the neurological symptoms preceded the gastrointestinal abnormalities and in all of them gluten restriction failed to improve the neurological disability. Conclusion: CD should be ruled out in the differential diagnosis of neurological dysfunction of unknown cause, including ataxia, epilepsy and dementia. A gluten free diet, the mainstay of treatment, failed to improve the neurological disability.A doença celíaca (DC, enteropatia sensível ao glúten é desordem caracterizada por mal absorção causada por reação alérgica ao glúten, proteína presente em diversos cereais. As manifestações iniciais ocorrem nas primeiras quatro décadas de vida, sendo cerca de duas vezes mais freqüente no sexo feminino. DC pode estar associada a largo espectro de manifestações neurológicas incluindo ataxia cerebelar, epilepsia, demência, neuropatia, miopatia e leucoencefalopatia multifocal. Relatamos três casos de pacientes com manifestações neurológicas da DC: um com ataxia cerebelar, outro com epilepsia e o último com déficit cognitivo. O diagnóstico de DC foi estabelecido com base em testes sorológicos (anticorpos antiendomísio e antigliadina e

  18. Neurological and functional outcomes of subdural hematoma evacuation in patients over 70 years of age

    Patrick Mulligan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subdural hematoma (SDH is a common disease entity treated by neurosurgical intervention. Although the incidence increases in the elderly population, there is a paucity of studies examining their surgical outcomes. Objectives: To determine the neurological and functional outcomes of patients over 70 years of age undergoing surgical decompression for subdural hematoma. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data on 45 patients above 70 years who underwent craniotomy or burr holes for acute, chronic or mixed subdural hematomas. We analyzed both neurological and functional status before and after surgery. Results: Forty-five patients 70 years of age or older were treated in our department during the study period. There was a significant improvement in the neurological status of patients from admission to follow up as assessed using the Markwalder grading scale (1.98 vs. 1.39; P =0.005, yet no improvement in functional outcome was observed as assessed by Glasgow Outcome Score. Forty-one patients were admitted from home, however only 20 patients (44% were discharged home, 16 (36% discharged to nursing home or rehab, 6 (13% to hospice and 3 (7% died in the postoperative period. Neurological function improved in patients who were older, had a worse pre-operative neurological status, were on anticoagulation and had chronic or mixed acute and chronic hematoma. However, no improvement in functional status was observed. Conclusion: Surgical management of SDH in patients over 70 years of age provides significant improvement in neurological status, but does not change functional status.

  19. Acute bone crises in sickle cell disease: the T1 fat-saturated sequence in differentiation of acute bone infarcts from acute osteomyelitis

    Aim: To prove the hypothesis that acute bone infarcts in sickle cell disease are caused by sequestration of red blood cells (RBCs) in bone marrow, and to evaluate the unenhanced T1 fat-saturated (fs) sequence in the differentiation of acute bone infarction from acute osteomyelitis in patients with sickle-cell disease. Materials and methods: Two studies were undertaken: an experimental study using in-vitro packed red blood cells and normal volunteers, and a retrospective clinical study of 86 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. For the experimental study containers of packed RBCs were placed between the knees of four healthy volunteers with a saline bag under the containers as an additional control, and were scanned with the pre-contrast T1-fs sequence. Signal intensity (SI) ratios were obtained for packed RBCs:skeletal muscle and packed RBCs:saline. For the clinical study, the SIs of normal bone marrow, packed RBCs, bone and/or soft-tissue lesions, and normal skeletal muscle of 74 patients (86 MRI studies) were measured using unenhanced, T1 fat-saturated MRI. The ratios of the above SIs to normal skeletal muscle were calculated and subjected to statistical analysis. Results: Fifty-one of 86 MRI studies were included in the final analysis. The ratios of SIs for normal bone marrow, packed red cells, bone infarction, acute osteomyelitis, and soft-tissue lesions associated with bone infarct, compared with normal skeletal muscle were (mean ± SD) 0.9 ± 0.2, 2.1 ± 0.7, 1.7 ± 0.5, 1.0 ± 0.3, and 2.2 ± 0.7, respectively. The difference in the ratio of SIs of bone infarcts and osteomyelitis was significant (p = 0.003). The final diagnoses were bone infarction (n = 50), acute osteomyelitis (n = 1), and co-existent bone infarction and osteomyelitis (n = 2). Seven patients who had suspected osteomyelitis underwent image-guided aspiration. Conclusion: Acute bone infarcts in sickle cell disease are caused by sequestration of red blood cells in the bone marrow. The

  20. Acute bone crises in sickle cell disease: the T1 fat-saturated sequence in differentiation of acute bone infarcts from acute osteomyelitis

    Jain, R. [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat (Oman)], E-mail: rajeevjn@yahoo.com; Sawhney, S. [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat (Oman); Rizvi, S.G. [Department of Community Medicine and Public Health, College of Medicine, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat (Oman)

    2008-01-15

    Aim: To prove the hypothesis that acute bone infarcts in sickle cell disease are caused by sequestration of red blood cells (RBCs) in bone marrow, and to evaluate the unenhanced T1 fat-saturated (fs) sequence in the differentiation of acute bone infarction from acute osteomyelitis in patients with sickle-cell disease. Materials and methods: Two studies were undertaken: an experimental study using in-vitro packed red blood cells and normal volunteers, and a retrospective clinical study of 86 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. For the experimental study containers of packed RBCs were placed between the knees of four healthy volunteers with a saline bag under the containers as an additional control, and were scanned with the pre-contrast T1-fs sequence. Signal intensity (SI) ratios were obtained for packed RBCs:skeletal muscle and packed RBCs:saline. For the clinical study, the SIs of normal bone marrow, packed RBCs, bone and/or soft-tissue lesions, and normal skeletal muscle of 74 patients (86 MRI studies) were measured using unenhanced, T1 fat-saturated MRI. The ratios of the above SIs to normal skeletal muscle were calculated and subjected to statistical analysis. Results: Fifty-one of 86 MRI studies were included in the final analysis. The ratios of SIs for normal bone marrow, packed red cells, bone infarction, acute osteomyelitis, and soft-tissue lesions associated with bone infarct, compared with normal skeletal muscle were (mean {+-} SD) 0.9 {+-} 0.2, 2.1 {+-} 0.7, 1.7 {+-} 0.5, 1.0 {+-} 0.3, and 2.2 {+-} 0.7, respectively. The difference in the ratio of SIs of bone infarcts and osteomyelitis was significant (p = 0.003). The final diagnoses were bone infarction (n = 50), acute osteomyelitis (n = 1), and co-existent bone infarction and osteomyelitis (n = 2). Seven patients who had suspected osteomyelitis underwent image-guided aspiration. Conclusion: Acute bone infarcts in sickle cell disease are caused by sequestration of red blood cells in the bone

  1. Erythropoietin in the Neurology ICU

    Robertson, Claudia; Sadrameli, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is an approved drug that is used in the treatment of chronic anemia associated with chronic renal failure. In the Neuro ICU, there are two potential uses for treatment with EPO. Anemia is common in patients with acute neurological disorders and may be a cause of secondary insults. Studies of EPO to treat anemia associated with critical illness have not conclusively shown a beneficial risk/benefit ratio. The relatively small reduction in transfusion requirement with EPO in...

  2. Levels of Acute Phase Reactants in Patients with Acute Brucellosis

    Mehmet Uluğ

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Infection, tissue damage, immunologic reactions and the inflammatory process rapidly cause a systemic response in the organism, generally termed as acute phase response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP, ferritin and fibrinogen in patients with acute brucellosis.Methods: This study was carried out in 48 patients (27 female, 21 male with acute brucellosis who were followed at the Departments of Infectious Diseases and Neurology, between April 2007 and August 2008, and in 42 healthy controls (22 female, 20 male.Results: Serum albumin levels significantly decreased (p<0.001, whereas CRP and ferritin levels significantly increased (p<0.001 and p=0.03 in patients with acute brucellosis.Conclusions: It was concluded that serum levels of CRP and ferritin increased, while albumin decreased in patients with acute brucellosis.

  3. Soluble CD163 is increased in patients with acute pancreatitis independent of disease severity.

    Karrasch, Thomas; Brünnler, Tanja; Hamer, Okka W; Schmid, Karin; Voelk, Markus; Herfarth, Hans; Buechler, Christa

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are crucially involved in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is specifically released from macrophages and systemic levels are increased in inflammatory diseases. Here, sCD163 was measured in serum of 50 patients with acute pancreatitis to find out possible associations with disease activity. Admission levels of systemic sCD163 were nearly three-fold higher in patients with acute pancreatitis compared to controls. In patients sCD163 did not correlate with C-reactive protein and leukocyte count as established markers of inflammation. Levels were not associated with disease severity assessed by the Schroeder score, Balthazar score, Acute Physiology, Age, and Chronic Health Evaluation (Apache) II score and peripancreatic necrosis score. Soluble CD163 was not related to complications of acute pancreatitis. These data show that serum sCD163 is increased in acute pancreatitis indicating activation of macrophages but is not associated with disease severity and outcome. PMID:26209500

  4. Optimal combinations of acute phase proteins for detecting infectious disease in pigs

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Stockmarr, Anders; Piñeiro, Matilde;

    2011-01-01

    The acute phase protein (APP) response is an early systemic sign of disease, detected as substantial changes in APP serum concentrations and most disease states involving inflammatory reactions give rise to APP responses. To obtain a detailed picture of the general utility of porcine APPs to dete...

  5. Relationship between haze and acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases in Beijing.

    Zhang, Jin-Jun; Cui, Meng-Meng; Fan, Da; Zhang, De-Shan; Lian, Hui-Xin; Yin, Zhao-Yin; Li, Jin

    2015-03-01

    Haze is an atmospheric phenomenon in which dry particulate pollutants obscure the sky. Haze has been associated with chronic diseases, but its relationship with acute diseases is less clear. We aimed to determine the association between haze and acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases, in order to determine the influence of haze on human health. We compared the number of cases of acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases in Beijing Emergency Center between 2006 and 2013, with haze data from Beijing Observatory. The relationship between the number of hazy days and the number of cases of the above types of diseases was analyzed using univariate analyses. Both the number of cases and the number of hazy days showed a rising trend. The average number of cases per day for all three diseases was higher on hazy days than on non-hazy days. There was a positive correlation between the number of hazy days and the number of cases, and this correlation showed a hysteretic quality. Haze has an influence on acute cardiovascular (CVDs), cerebrovascular (CBDs), and respiratory system (RSDs) diseases. Haze seems to have an additive effect, since the associations between haze and number of cases were stronger in the following month than in the preceding month. The increasing trend in the number of hazy days might worsen the problem of haze-related diseases. PMID:25292298

  6. Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease provide a unique opportunity to take care of patients

    Bianca Beghé

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (ECOPD identifies the acute phase of COPD. The COPD patient is often frail and elderly with concomitant chronic diseases. This requires the physician not only looks at specific symptoms or organs, but to consider the patient in all his or her complexity.

  7. Acute interstitial pneumonia in mink kits inoculated with defined isolates of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus

    Alexandersen, Søren; Larsen, S; Aasted, B;

    1994-01-01

    The present study addressed the causal role of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) in acute interstitial pneumonia in mink kits. All the examined isolates of ADV caused interstitial pneumonia in newborn kits, although the severity of disease and the mortality varied. These findings indicate that...

  8. Neurological complications of chickenpox

    Girija A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the neurological complications of chickenpox with prognosis. Background: The neurological complications occur in 0.03% of persons who get chickenpox. There is no universal vaccination against chicken pox in India. Most patients prefer alternate modalities of treatment. Hence these complications of chickenpox are likely to continue to occur. Study Design: A prospective study was conducted for 2 years (from March 2002 on the admitted cases with neurological complications after chickenpox (with rash or scar. Patients were investigated with CT/MRI, CSF study, EEG and nerve conduction studies and hematological workup. They were followed-up for 1 year and outcome assessed using modified Rankin scale. Results: The latency for the neurological complications was 4-32 days (mean: 16.32 days. There were 18 cases: 10 adults (64% and 8 children (36%. Cerebellar ataxia (normal CT/MRI was observed in 7 cases (32% (mean age: 6.85 years. One patient (6 years had acute right hemiparesis in the fifth week due to left capsular infarct. All these cases spontaneously recovered by 4 weeks. The age range of the adult patients was 13-47 years (mean: 27 years. The manifestations included cerebellar and pyramidal signs (n-4 with features of demyelination in MRI who recovered spontaneously or with methylprednisolone by 8 weeks. Patient with encephalitis recovered in 2 weeks with acyclovir. Guillain Barre syndrome of the demyelinating type (n-2 was treated with Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG and they had a slow recovery by a modified Rankin scale (mRs score of 3 and 2 at 6 months and 1 year, respectively. One case died after hemorrhage into the occipital infarct. There were two cases of asymmetrical neuropathy, one each of the seventh cranial and brachial neuritis. Conclusion: Spontaneous recovery occurs in post-chickenpox cerebellar ataxia. Rarely, serious complications can occur in adults. The demyelinating disorders, either of the central or peripheral

  9. Acute Porphyria in a Patient with Arnold Chiari Malformation

    Shen, Jianbin; O’Keefe, Kevin; Webb, Lisa B.; DeGirolamo, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 33 Final Diagnosis: Acute porphyria Symptoms: Abdominal pain • alternating bowel habits Medication: Metronidazole • bactrim • oxybutynin Clinical Procedure: EMG • porhyria workup Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Acute porphyria and Arnold Chiari malformation are both uncommon genetic disorders without known association. The insidious onset, non-specific clinical manifestations, and precipitating factors often cause diagnosis of acute porphyria to be mi...

  10. MR Imaging of The Wilson’s Disease

    Amar Taksande

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Wilson’s disease is known to have various hepatic manifestations like acute hepatitis, chronic hepatitis,cirrhosis of liver and acute fulminant hepatic failure can occur in early childhood. However, we report hereWilson’s disease, presented with neurological manifestations without hepatic involvement

  11. FIRST REPORT OF ACUTE CHAGAS DISEASE BY VECTOR TRANSMISSION IN RIO DE JANEIRO STATE, BRAZIL

    Luiz Henrique Conde SANGENIS

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Chagas disease (CD is an endemic anthropozoonosis from Latin America of which the main means of transmission is the contact of skin lesions or mucosa with the feces of triatomine bugs infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. In this article, we describe the first acute CD case acquired by vector transmission in the Rio de Janeiro State and confirmed by parasitological, serological and PCR tests. The patient presented acute cardiomyopathy and pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade. Together with fever and malaise, a 3 cm wide erythematous, non-pruritic, papule compatible with a "chagoma" was found on his left wrist. This case report draws attention to the possible transmission of CD by non-domiciled native vectors in non-endemic areas. Therefore, acute CD should be included in the diagnostic workout of febrile diseases and acute myopericarditis in Rio de Janeiro.

  12. Acute Splenic Sequestration Crisis in a 70-Year-Old Patient With Hemoglobin SC Disease.

    Squiers, John J; Edwards, Anthony G; Parra, Alberto; Hofmann, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old African American female with a past medical history significant for chronic bilateral shoulder pain and reported sickle cell trait presented with acute-onset bilateral thoracolumbar pain radiating to her left arm. Two days after admission, Hematology was consulted for severely worsening microcytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the patient's peripheral blood smear from admission revealed no cell sickling, spherocytes, or schistocytes. Some targeting was noted. A Coombs test was negative. The patient was eventually transferred to the medical intensive care unit in respiratory distress. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed a diagnosis of hemoglobin SC disease. A diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration crisis complicated by acute chest syndrome was crystallized, and red blood cell exchange transfusion was performed. Further research is necessary to fully elucidate the pathophysiology behind acute splenic sequestration crisis, and the role of splenectomy to treat hemoglobin SC disease patients should be better defined. PMID:27047980

  13. [Acute gastrointestinal involvement in dengue disease by serotype 4: a case report and literature review].

    Marín, Johan; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Forshey, Brett M; Celis-Salinas, Juan C; Ramal-Asayag, Cesar; Morrison, Amy C; Laguna-Torres, Alberto; Casapía, Martín; Halsey, Eric S

    2013-10-01

    Dengue fever is the world's most important arboviral disease, presenting a wide clinical spectrum. We report for the first time in Peru, a case caused by dengue virus serotype 4 with significant gastrointestinal involvement (acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hepatitis). In addition we carried out a review of the literature atypical presentation illustrating the importance of the characteristics of abdominal pain (right upper quadrant); presence of Murphy's sign, ultrasound, and liver enzymes levels, for appropriate diagnosis and clinical management. PMID:24248170

  14. ACUTE PHASE REACTANCTS IN PERICARDIAL FLUID ARE INDICATORS OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE

    Yılmaz Mehmet Ali; Simsek Erdal; Karapinar Kasim; Azboy Davut; Erdolu Burak

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation in formation of atherosclerosis, and acute phase reactants in the site of inflammation have major functions. Thus, do the acute phase reactants constitute the biggest risk factor for coronary artery disease? 55 patients are included in the study. Patients with coronary artery bypass surgery are included in Group I (38 patients) and patients with valve operation are included in Group II (17 patients). CABG patients are further divided into two sub-groups as on-pump and off-pump. I...

  15. Review of ventilatory techniques to optimize mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Reddy, Raghu M.; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global healthcare problem. Studies vary widely in the reported frequency of mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbations of COPD. Invasive intubation and mechanical ventilation may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A good understanding of the airway pathophysiology and lung mechanics in COPD is necessary to appropriately manage acute exacerbations and respiratory failure. The basic pathophysiology in COPD exacerbat...

  16. Association of anti-cardiolipin antibodies with vascular thrombosis and neurological manifestation of Behçets disease.

    al-Dalaan, A N; al-Ballaa, S R; al-Janadi, M A; Bohlega, S; Bahabri, S

    1993-03-01

    We have studied 44 patients with Behçet's Disease (BD) to look for any correlation of arterial and venous thrombosis or central nervous system (CNS) manifestations with anti-cardiolipin antibodies (ACLA). Twenty patients were positive for ACLA by MELISA method. Ten patients had IgG antibody, four had IgM and six had both IgG and IgM. Of these patients, 11 had a history of vascular thrombosis and thrombophlebitis and nine had CNS manifestations. The association of ACLA with vascular thrombosis or CNS manifestation of Behçet's disease was statistically not significant. PMID:8467608

  17. Increased Serum Phospholipase A2 Activity in Advanced Chronic Liver Disease as an Expression of the Acute Phase Response

    Mario Pirisi; Carlo Fabris; Maria Piera Panozzo; Giorgio Soardo; Pierluigi Toniutto; Ettore Bartou

    1993-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) modifications were investigated in patients with acute and chronic liver diseases, PLA2 variations were related to indices of liver function as well as to parameters of the acute phase response. Serum PLA2 activity modifications were f1uorimetrically measured in 105 patients affected by acute and chronic liver diseases or extra-hepatic diseases. One-way ANOV A demonstrated a significant difference among groups (F= 4.53, P

  18. Medical marijuana in neurology.

    Benbadis, Selim R; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Bozorg, Ali; Giarratano, Melissa; Kalidas, Kavita; Katzin, Lara; Robertson, Derrick; Vu, Tuan; Smith, Amanda; Zesiewicz, Theresa

    2014-12-01

    Constituents of the Cannabis plant, cannabinoids, may be of therapeutic value in neurologic diseases. The most abundant cannabinoids are Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, which possesses psychoactive properties, and cannabidiol, which has no intrinsic psychoactive effects, but exhibits neuroprotective properties in preclinical studies. A small number of high-quality clinical trials support the safety and efficacy of cannabinoids for treatment of spasticity of multiple sclerosis, pain refractory to opioids, glaucoma, nausea and vomiting. Lower level clinical evidence indicates that cannabinoids may be useful for dystonia, tics, tremors, epilepsy, migraine and weight loss. Data are also limited in regards to adverse events and safety. Common nonspecific adverse events are similar to those of other CNS 'depressants' and include weakness, mood changes and dizziness. Cannabinoids can have cardiovascular adverse events and, when smoked chronically, may affect pulmonary function. Fatalities are rare even with recreational use. There is a concern about psychological dependence, but physical dependence is less well documented. Cannabis preparations may presently offer an option for compassionate use in severe neurologic diseases, but at this point, only when standard-of-care therapy is ineffective. As more high-quality clinical data are gathered, the therapeutic application of cannabinoids will likely expand. PMID:25427150

  19. Life-threatening acute pneumonitis in mixed connective tissue disease: a case report and literature review.

    Rath, Eva; Zandieh, Shahin; Löckinger, Alexander; Hirschl, Mirko; Klaushofer, Klaus; Zwerina, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a rare connective tissue disease frequently involving the lungs. The main characteristic is a systemic sclerosis-like picture of slowly progressing interstitial lung disease consistent with lung fibrosis, while pulmonary arterial hypertension is rare. Herein, we present a case of a newly diagnosed MCTD patient developing life-threatening acute pneumonitis similar to lupus pneumonitis. Previous literature on this exceptionally rare complication of MCTD is reviewed and differential diagnosis and management discussed. PMID:26142172

  20. Post-infectious glomerulonephritis presenting as acute renal failure in a patient with Lyme disease

    Rolla, Davide; Conti, Novella; Ansaldo, Francesca; Panaro, Laura; Lusenti, Tiziano

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We report a case of a patient with acute renal failure in Lyme disease-associated focal proliferative mesangial nephropathy. Lyme disease is a vector-borne disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, transmitted by the bite of an infected ixodes tick. Post-infectious glomerulonephritis (GN)secondary to Borrelia burgdorferi infection in man could be fatal, as it is in canine Lyme borreliosis. Case: A 61-year old man with chronic ethanolic hepatitis was admitted to a provincial hospit...

  1. Acute Kidney Injury after Using Contrast during Cardiac Catheterization in Children with Heart Disease

    Hwang, Young Ju; Hyun, Myung Chul; Choi, Bong Seok; Chun, So Young; Cho, Min Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is closely associated with the mortality of hospitalized patients and long-term development of chronic kidney disease, especially in children. The purpose of our study was to assess the evidence of contrast-induced AKI after cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease and evaluate the clinical usefulness of candidate biomarkers in AKI. A total of 26 children undergoing cardiac catheterization due to various heart diseases were selected and urine and blood ...

  2. Psychiatric Disease and Post-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Zgaljardic, Dennis J; Seale, Gary S; Schaefer, Lynn A; Temple, Richard O; Foreman, Jack; Elliott, Timothy R

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and can include depression, anxiety, and psychosis, as well as other maladaptive behaviors and personality changes. The epidemiologic data of psychiatric disorders post-TBI vary widely, although the incidence and prevalence rates typically are higher than in the general population. Although the experience of psychiatric symptoms may be temporary and may resolve in the acute period, many patients with TBI can experience psychopathology that is persistent or that develops in the post-acute period. Long-term psychiatric disorder, along with cognitive and physical sequelae and greater risk for substance use disorders, can pose a number of life-long challenges for patients and their caregivers, as they can interfere with participation in rehabilitation as well as limit functional independence in the community. The current review of the literature considers the common psychiatric problems affecting individuals with TBI in the post-acute period, including personality changes, psychosis, executive dysfunction, depression, anxiety, and substance misuse. Although treatment considerations (pharmacological and nonpharmacological) are referred to, an extensive description of such protocols is beyond the scope of the current review. The impact of persistent psychiatric symptoms on perceived caregiver burden and distress is also discussed. PMID:25629222

  3. 急性脑卒中患者血清瘦素的检测及对神经功能康复的影响%Detection of serum leptin and its effect on neurological rehabilitation in acute stroke patients

    王龙海

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate serum leptin levels in acute stroke patients and its impact on neurological rehabilita‐tion. Methods We randomly selected 80 patients with acute stroke as the experimental group and 60 healthy individuals as the control group. The fasting serum leptin was determined by radioimmunoassay and the body mass index was measured in all par‐ticipants the next day after admission. All patients with acute stroke were divided into six levels of underweight ,normal ,mod‐erate ,overweight ,obese and hyper‐obese subgroup according to body mass index. Then we detected neurological conditions of six subgroups based on NIHSS after 30‐day treatment. Results The serum leptin levels in the experimental group were signifi‐cantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.01) ,and the higher the patients had the levels of serum leptin ,the higher NIHSS scores were after 30‐day treatment (r=0.937 ,0.650 ,0.638 ,0.837 ,0.914 ,0.889 ;t=6.013 ,3.825 ,3.796 ,4.593 , 5.521 ,5.146 ,P<0.001).Conclusion Serum leptin levels in patients with acute stroke are significantly higher than that in controls ,and the higher the serum leptin levels ,the worse the situation neurological rehabilitation ,which can predict the level of the patient's neurological rehabilitation to some extent ,and can guide clinical treatment to improve the degree of recovery.%目的:探讨急性脑卒中患者血清瘦素的水平变化及对神经功能康复的影响。方法随机选取急性脑卒中患者80例为实验组,60例正常体检者为对照组,所有患者均于入院次日空腹采用放射免疫法检测其血清瘦素水平并测体重指数。据急性脑卒中患者的体重指数将患者分为过轻、正常、适中、过重、肥胖、非常肥胖6个亚组,治疗30 d后用美国国立卫生研究院卒中量表(National institute of health stroke scale ,NIHSS )检测6个亚组的神经功能情况。结果实验组血清瘦素水平

  4. Outcomes of Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in the United States, 1998–2008

    Chandra, Divay; Stamm, Jason A.; Taylor, Brian; Ramos, Rose Mary; Satterwhite, Lewis; Krishnan, Jerry A.; Mannino, David; Sciurba, Frank C.; Holguín, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: The patterns and outcomes of noninvasive, positive-pressure ventilation (NIPPV) use in patients hospitalized for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) nationwide are unknown.

  5. Neurology of endemic skeletal fluorosis

    Reddy D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Endemic skeletal fluorosis is widely prevalent in India and is a major public health problem. The first ever report of endemic skeletal fluorosis and neurological manifestation was from Prakasam district in Andhra Pradesh in the year 1937. Epidemiological and experimental studies in the endemic areas suggest the role of temperate climate, hard physical labor, nutritional status, presence of abnormal concentrations of trace elements like strontium, uranium, silica in water supplies, high fluoride levels in foods and presence of kidney disease in the development of skeletal fluorosis. Neurological complications of endemic skeletal fluorosis, namely radiculopathy, myelopathy or both are mechanical in nature and till date the evidence for direct neurotoxicity of fluoride is lacking. Prevention of the disease should be the aim, knowing the pathogenesis of fluorosis. Surgery has a limited role in alleviating the neurological disability and should be tailored to the individual based on the imaging findings.

  6. Mealtimes in a neurological ward

    Beck, Malene; Martinsen, Bente; Poulsen, Ingrid;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To examine the environment surrounding hospital meals for patients with neurological diseases. BACKGROUND: A determined effort has been made to optimise the nutrition of hospitalised patients. However, the organisation of mealtimes and their relational and aesthetic aspects...... challenged by the design of the physical space and institutional structures. CONCLUSION: This study contributes to our understanding of the environment surrounding hospital meals for patients with neurological diseases. Based on this study, it can be concluded that meals were at a high risk of being served...... as a mindless task without the recognition that mealtimes are sensed with the whole body of the patient and not only by the mouth. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The importance of the mealtime environment must be acknowledged because it serves as a communicative aspect for neurological patients by...

  7. Neurological complications of dengue fever: Experience from a tertiary center of north India

    Rajesh Verma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dengue, an acute viral disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, is highly endemic in many tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Neurological complications of dengue infection have been observed more frequently in the recent past and some studies highlighted varied neurological complications arising in the course of dengue illness. In this retrospective study, we report various neurological complications observed during the last 2 years in patients of dengue fever. Materials and Methods: The patients presenting with neurological complications with positive serology (IgM antibody for dengue infection were consecutively recruited from the Department of Neurology/Medicine from a tertiary center of Lucknow, India. These patients were subjected to a detailed clinical evaluation, laboratory assessment including blood count, hematocrit, coagulation parameters, biochemical assays, serology for dengue fever, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for human immunodeficiency virus and other relevant investigations. Results: Twenty-six patients with neurological complications associated with confirmed dengue infection were observed during the last 2 years. Eighteen of these patients were male. Of the 26 patients, 10 patients were suffering from brachial neuritis, four patients had encephalopathy, three patients were consistent with the diagnosis of Guillain Barre syndrome, three patients had hypokalemic paralysis associated with dengue fever and two patients had acute viral myositis. Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome was diagnosed in two patients, myelitis in one patient and acute disseminated encephalo-myelitis also in one patient. Conclusion: Dengue fever was associated with widespread neurological complications. Brachial neuritis and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome were observed for the first time in this study.

  8. Elemental diet as primary treatment of acute Crohn's disease: a controlled trial.

    O'Moráin, C; Segal, A W; Levi, A J

    1984-06-23

    Acute exacerbations of Crohn's disease are usually treated with prednisolone or potentially more toxic immunosuppressive drugs or by surgery. In pilot studies replacing the normal diet by a protein free elemental diet also induced remission. A controlled trial was therefore conducted in which 21 patients acutely ill with exacerbations of Crohn's disease were randomised to receive either prednisolone 0.75 mg/kg/day or an elemental diet (Vivonex) for four weeks. Assessment at four and 12 weeks showed that the patients treated with the elemental diet had improved as much as and by some criteria more than the steroid treated group. Elemental diet is a safe and effective treatment for acute Crohn's disease. PMID:6428577

  9. Acute pelvic inflammatory disease: pictorial essay focused on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Febronio, Eduardo Miguel; Rosas, George de Queiroz; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br [Department of Imaging Diagnosis, Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPMUnifesp), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    The present study was aimed at describing key computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with acute abdominal pain derived from pelvic inflammatory disease. Two radiologists consensually selected and analyzed computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies performed between January 2010 and December 2011 in patients with proven pelvic inflammatory disease leading to presentation of acute abdomen. Main findings included presence of intracavitary fluid collections, anomalous enhancement of the pelvic excavation and densification of adnexal fat planes. Pelvic inflammatory disease is one of the leading causes of abdominal pain in women of childbearing age and it has been increasingly been diagnosed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging supplementing the role of ultrasonography. It is crucial that radiologists become familiar with the main sectional imaging findings in the diagnosis of this common cause of acute abdomen (author)

  10. Acute pelvic inflammatory disease: pictorial essay focused on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    The present study was aimed at describing key computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with acute abdominal pain derived from pelvic inflammatory disease. Two radiologists consensually selected and analyzed computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies performed between January 2010 and December 2011 in patients with proven pelvic inflammatory disease leading to presentation of acute abdomen. Main findings included presence of intracavitary fluid collections, anomalous enhancement of the pelvic excavation and densification of adnexal fat planes. Pelvic inflammatory disease is one of the leading causes of abdominal pain in women of childbearing age and it has been increasingly been diagnosed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging supplementing the role of ultrasonography. It is crucial that radiologists become familiar with the main sectional imaging findings in the diagnosis of this common cause of acute abdomen (author)

  11. Plasticity in neurological disorders and challenges for noninvasive brain stimulation (NBS

    Mastaglia Frank L

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There has been considerable interest in trialing NBS in a range of neurological conditions, and in parallel the range of NBS techniques available continues to expand. Underpinning this is the idea that NBS modulates neuroplasticity and that plasticity is an important contributor to functional recovery after brain injury and to the pathophysiology of neurological disorders. However while the evidence for neuroplasticity and its varied mechanisms is strong, the relationship to functional outcome is less clear and the clinical indications remain to be determined. To be maximally effective, the application of NBS techniques will need to be refined to take into account the diversity of neurological symptoms, the fundamental differences between acute, longstanding and chronic progressive disease processes, and the differential part played by functional and dysfunctional plasticity in diseases of the brain and spinal cord.

  12. Atypical presentation of acute and chronic coronary artery disease in diabetics

    Hadi; AR; Hadi; Khafaji; Jassim; M; Al; Suwaidi

    2014-01-01

    In patients with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease is the principal cause of mortality and chest pain is the most frequent symptom in patients with stable and acute coronary artery disease. However, there is little knowledge concerning the pervasiveness of uncommon presentations in diabetics. The symptomatology of acute coronary syndrome, which comprises both pain and non-pain symptoms, may be affected by traditional risk factors such as age, gender, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Such atypical symptoms may range from silent myocardial ischemia to a wide spectrum of non-chest pain symptoms. Worldwide, few studies have highlighted this under-investigated subject, and this aspect of ischemic heart disease has also been under-evaluated in the major clinical trials. The results of these studies are highly diverse which makes definitive conclusions regarding the spectrum of atypical presentation of acute and even stable chronic coronay artery disease difficult to confirm. This may have a significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease in diabetics. In this up-to-date review we will try to analyze the most recent studies on the atypical presentations in both acute and chronic ischemic heart disease which may give some emphasis to this under-investigated topic.

  13. Uric acid levels and their relation to incapacities in acute cerebrovascular disease

    Julio López Argüelles

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: cerebrovascular disease and ischemic cardiopathy can be considered as an epidemic and constitute the first cause of incapacities in developed countries. Multiple studies have shown the association between uric acid levels and cerebrovascular diseases. Objective: To correlate the levels of serum uric acid and incapacities in the acute phase of cerebrovascular disease. Methods: A correlational study was carried out with 217 patients with acute cerebrovascular disease. The patient’s incapacity level was measured by using the Barthel Index and those results were related with the serum uric acid levels and other variables. Results: Male patients have higher levels of uric acid (p=0, 04; r=0, 13. Age and Barthel index were p < 0,001; r = -0, 30 and uric acid levels and Barthel Index were p=0, 03; r=-0, 14. The principal predicting factors of incapacity in the acute phase of cerebrovascular disease were the high levels of uric acid, age and diabetes mellitus. Conclusions: It is shown that the highest is the level of uric acid at advanced age; the greatest is the risk of suffering from incapacity in acute phases of cerebrovascular diseases.

  14. Risk Factors for Neurologic Complications of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in the Republic of Korea, 2009

    Kim, Seong Joon; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kang, Jin-Han; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Kyung-Hyo; Kim, Young-Hoon; Chung, Ju-Young; Bin, Joong Hyun; Jung, Da Eun; Kim, Ji Hong; Kim, Hwang Min; Cheon, Doo-Sung; Kang, Byung Hak; Seo, Soon Young

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, the first outbreak of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) or herpangina (HP) caused by enterovirus 71 occurred in the Republic of Korea. This study inquired into risk factors associated with complications of HFMD or HP. A retrospective medical records review was conducted on HFMD or HP patients for whom etiologic viruses had been verified in 2009. One hundred sixty-eight patients were examined for this investigation. Eighty patients were without complications while 88 were accompanie...

  15. Addressing the burden of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders: key messages from Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition.

    Patel, Vikram; Chisholm, Dan; Parikh, Rachana; Charlson, Fiona J; Degenhardt, Louisa; Dua, Tarun; Ferrari, Alize J; Hyman, Steve; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Levin, Carol; Lund, Crick; Medina Mora, María Elena; Petersen, Inge; Scott, James; Shidhaye, Rahul; Vijayakumar, Lakshmi; Thornicroft, Graham; Whiteford, Harvey

    2016-04-16

    The burden of mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders increased by 41% between 1990 and 2010 and now accounts for one in every 10 lost years of health globally. This sobering statistic does not take into account the substantial excess mortality associated with these disorders or the social and economic consequences of MNS disorders on affected persons, their caregivers, and society. A wide variety of effective interventions, including drugs, psychological treatments, and social interventions, can prevent and treat MNS disorders. At the population-level platform of service delivery, best practices include legislative measures to restrict access to means of self-harm or suicide and to reduce the availability of and demand for alcohol. At the community-level platform, best practices include life-skills training in schools to build social and emotional competencies. At the health-care-level platform, we identify three delivery channels. Two of these delivery channels are especially relevant from a public health perspective: self-management (eg, web-based psychological therapy for depression and anxiety disorders) and primary care and community outreach (eg, non-specialist health worker delivering psychological and pharmacological management of selected disorders). The third delivery channel, hospital care, which includes specialist services for MNS disorders and first-level hospitals providing other types of services (such as general medicine, HIV, or paediatric care), play an important part for a smaller proportion of cases with severe, refractory, or emergency presentations and for the integration of mental health care in other health-care channels, respectively. The costs of providing a significantly scaled up package of specified cost-effective interventions for prioritised MNS disorders in low-income and lower-middle-income countries is estimated at US$3-4 per head of population per year. Since a substantial proportion of MNS disorders run a

  16. Neurologic complications of thyroid dysfunction.

    Kudrjavcev, T

    1978-01-01

    Until such time as results of more rigorous studies are available, the morbidity rates for thyroid dysfunction cited here must suffice. The 1955 to 1956 outpatient "incidence" for England and Wales was 1.1 per 1,000 for thyrotoxicosis and 1.7 per 1,000 for myxedema (18). United States in-patient "incidence" for 1971 was 0.16 per 1,000 for thyrotoxicosis and 0.13 per 1,000 for myxedema (25). The 1935 to 1967 average annual incidence of Graves' disease for females in Olmsted County, Minnesota, was 30.5 per 100,000 (10). Well over 50% of hyperthyroid patients have clinical evidence of mild or moderate muscle weakness. Usually this weakness is proximal, and electro-myography and muscle biopsy confirm the existence of myopathic process (Table 11). Severe muscular weakness of acute onset is relatively rare and is encountered in approximately 1% of hyperthyroid patients (11,17,40). Ophthalmoplegia and psychosis are reported 4% and 2% of patients, respectively (17). Myasthenia gravis, although well publicized, is estimated to occur in less than 1% of patients (3,30). TPP is virtually nonexistent in the West; in the Orient it is reported in 2 to 8% of hyperthyroid patients and is 20 to 60 times more frequent in the hyperthyroid male than in the hyperthyroid female (Table 12). The neurologic symptomatology of myxedema is more extensive, and agreement among the various series is poor. The only unselected series addressing itself to neuromuscular manifestations of myxedema that is suitable for citation is that of Scarpalezos et al. (36). This comprehensive study was done without apparent patient selection, and it reported 2% of patients with definite carpal tunnel syndrome, 6% with myopathy, and 18% with polyneuropathy (Table 13). Reported percentages of hypothyroid patients found to have neurologic manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction are extremely diverse: ataxic gait was reported in 5 to 32% (6,7,12,27) of patients and dysdiadochokinesia in 6 to 52% (7,12,27). Psychosis

  17. Challenges in neurological practice in developing countries

    Sanjay Pandey

    2012-01-01

    The burden of neurological illness is much higher in developing countries. Neurological disorders in these countries are mainly due to poverty and malnutrition. Spectrums of diseases are also different in comparison with developed countries. Lack of resources, ignorance, and overpopulation make it very difficult and challenging to tackle this problem. Majority of the patients are seen by general practitioners who have little knowledge about neurological illnesses. Most of the countries have v...

  18. HIDA and ultrasound scans in the diagnosis of acute gall bladder disease

    97 patients with suspected acute gall bladder disease were subjected to cholescintigraphy (HIDA) and ultrasonography (US) to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy in detecting acute cholecystitis (AC). Three patients with non-biliary disease had normal HIDA and sonography scans, while the remaining 94 were operated on within 48 hours of admission to the hospital. Of these 62 (66%) were proved to have AC at operation and on histopathological examination. HIDA scans correctly diagnosed AC in 57 of them (92%), while sonography revealed dilated and oedematous gall bladders, and thus diagnosed AC in 30 patients (48%). (orig.)

  19. A Puzzle of Vestibular Physiology in a Meniere’s Disease Acute Attack

    Marta Martinez-Lopez; Raquel Manrique-Huarte; Nicolas Perez-Fernandez

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present for the first time the functional evaluation of each of the vestibular receptors in the six semicircular canals in a patient diagnosed with Meniere's disease during an acute attack. A 54-year-old lady was diagnosed with left Meniere's disease who during her regular clinic review suffers an acute attack of vertigo, with fullness and an increase of tinnitus in her left ear. Spontaneous nystagmus and the results in the video head-impulse test (vHIT) are shown ...

  20. Infliximab therapy for intestinal, neurological, and vascular involvement in Behcet disease: Efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics in a multicenter, prospective, open-label, single-arm phase 3 study.

    Hibi, Toshifumi; Hirohata, Shunsei; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Tateishi, Ukihide; Sato, Noriko; Ozaki, Kunihiko; Kondo, Kazuoki; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2016-06-01

    Behçet disease (BD) is a multisystem disease associated with a poor prognosis in cases of gastrointestinal, neurological, or vascular involvement. We conducted a multicenter, prospective, open-label, single-arm phase 3 study to determine the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of infliximab (IFX) in BD patients with these serious complications who had displayed poor response or intolerance to conventional therapy.IFX at 5 mg/kg was administered to 18 patients (11 intestinal BD, 3 neurological BD [NBD], and 4 vascular BD [VBD]) at weeks 0, 2, and 6 and every 8 weeks thereafter until week 46. In patients who showed inadequate responses to IFX after week 30, the dose was increased to 10 mg/kg. We then calculated the percentage of complete responders according to the predefined criteria depending on the symptoms and results of examinations (ileocolonoscopy, brain magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography angiography, positron emission tomography, cerebrospinal fluid, or serum inflammatory markers), exploring the percentage of complete responders at week 30 (primary endpoint).The percentage of complete responders was 61% (11/18) at both weeks 14 and 30 and remained the same until week 54. Intestinal BD patients showed improvement in clinical symptoms along with decrease in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels after week 2. Consistently, scarring or healing of the principal ulcers was found in more than 80% of these patients after week 14. NBD patients showed improvement in clinical symptoms, imaging findings, and cerebrospinal fluid examinations. VBD patients showed improvement in clinical symptoms after week 2 with reductions in CRP levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Imaging findings showed reversal of inflammatory changes in 3 of the 4 VBD patients. Irrespective of the type of BD, all patients achieved improvement in quality of life, leading to the dose reduction or withdrawal of steroids. IFX dose was increased to 10 mg/kg in 3 intestinal BD

  1. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  2. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive; Luciano de Paola; Renato Puppi Munhoz

    2014-01-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  3. Whipple's disease with neurological manifestions: case report Doença de Whipple com manifestações neurológicas: relato de caso

    Marcondes C. França Jr

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Whipple's disease (WD is an uncommon multisystem condition caused by the bacillus Tropheryma whipplei. Central nervous system involvement is a classical feature of the disease observed in 20 to 40% of the patients. We report the case of a 62 yeards old man with WD that developed neurological manifestations during its course, and discuss the most usual signs and symptoms focusing on recent diagnostic criteria and novel treatment regimens.A doença de Whipple (DW é distúrbio multissistêmico raro causado pelo bacilo Tropheryma whipplei. O envolvimento do sistema nervoso central é um aspecto clássico da doença, sendo observado em 20 a 40% dos pacientes. Relatamos o caso de homem de 62 anos com DW que desenvolveu manifestações neurológicas durante sua evolução, com o objetivo de discutir os sinais e sintomas mais comuns e destacar os critérios diagnósticos e propostas terapêuticas mais recentes.

  4. Feasibility and efficacy of thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke: A study from National Institute of Neurological and Allied Sciences, Kathmandu, Nepal

    Lekhjung Thapa; Shikher Shrestha; Pratyush Shrestha; Suman Bhattarai; D N Gongal; Devkota, U P

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stroke is the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The number of stroke patients receiving recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), also known as Alteplase, in the developing world is extremely low. We aim to study the feasibility and efficacy of thrombolysis for the 1st time in our country. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study (July 2012-August 2015), acute ischemic stroke patients who were thrombolyzed within 3 h of stroke onset were included....

  5. Intravenous administration of brain-targeted stable nucleic acid lipid particles alleviates Machado-Joseph disease neurological phenotype.

    Conceição, Mariana; Mendonça, Liliana; Nóbrega, Clévio; Gomes, Célia; Costa, Pedro; Hirai, Hirokazu; Moreira, João Nuno; Lima, Maria C; Manjunath, N; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2016-03-01

    Others and we showed that RNA interference holds great promise for the treatment of dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorders such as Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), for which there is no available treatment. However, successful experiments involved intracranial administration of viral vectors and there is a need for a safer and less invasive procedure. In this work, we successfully generated stable nucleic acid lipid particles (SNALPs), incorporating a short peptide derived from rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG-9r) and encapsulating small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can target mutant ataxin-3. The developed formulation exhibited important features that make it adequate for systemic administration: high encapsulation efficiency of siRNAs, ability to protect the encapsulated siRNAs, appropriate and homogeneous particle size distribution. Following optimization of the formulation and in vitro validation of its efficacy to silence the MJD-causing protein - mutant ataxin-3 - in neuronal cells, in vivo experiments showed that intravenous administration of RVG-9r-targeted SNALPs efficiently silenced mutant ataxin-3 reducing neuropathology and motor behavior deficits in two mouse models of MJD. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing beneficial impact of a non-viral gene silencing strategy in MJD and the first time that a non-invasive systemic administration proved to be beneficial on a polyglutamine disorder. Our study opens new avenues towards MJD therapy that can also be applied to other neurodegenerative diseases linked to the production of pathogenic proteins. PMID:26757259

  6. A Chaplain-led Spiritual Life Review Pilot Study for Patients with Brain Cancers and Other Degenerative Neurologic Diseases

    Katherine M. Piderman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This pilot study was designed to describe changes in spiritual well-being (SWB, spiritual coping, and quality of life (QOL in patients with brain cancer or other neurodegenerative diseases participating in a chaplain-led spiritual life review interview and development of a spiritual legacy document (SLD. Methods: Eligible participants were enrolled and completed baseline questionnaires. They were interviewed by a board-certified chaplain about spiritual influences, beliefs, practices, values, and spiritual struggles. An SLD was prepared for each participant, and one month follow-up questionnaires were completed. Two cases are summarized, and spiritual development themes are illustrated within a spiritual development framework. Results: A total of 27 patients completed baseline questionnaires and the interview; 24 completed the SLD, and 15 completed the follow-up questionnaire. Increases in SWB, religious coping, and QOL were detected. The majority maintained the highest (best scores of negative religious coping, demonstrating minimal spiritual struggle. Conclusions: Despite the challenges of brain cancers and other neurodegenerative diseases, participants demonstrated improvements in SWB, positive religious coping, and QOL. Patient comments indicate that benefit is related to the opportunity to reflect on and integrate spiritual experiences and to preserve them for others. Research with a larger, more diverse sample is needed, as well as clinical applications for those too vulnerable to participate in longitudinal follow-up.

  7. The ultrasonographic findings of acute pelvic inflammatory disease

    Choi, Yeon Nam; Park, Jai Soung; Lee, Hae Kyung; Chung, Moo Chan; Lee, Beong Ho; Kim, Ki Jung [Soonchunhyang University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-08-15

    Although ultrasonographic findings of female pelvic mass are frequently reported, those of acute PID are not well established. But differentiation of fluid collection and mass lesion of PID is exactly made by ultrasonography. We analysed the ultrasonographic findings in 26 cases of acute PID having satisfactory operative or histological proofs, examined at Soonchunhyang University Hospital from Oct. 1985 to Feb. 1987. The results were as follows: 1. The age was ranged from 17 years to 53 years of age and the majority was between 21 years and 50 years of age. 2. Ultrasonographic findings are classified to fluid collection in cul de sac 17, tuboovarian abscess, 7 pyosalpix 2, endometritis 1 and normal 2 cases. 3. In cases of pelvic mass formation, their ecnogenecity were cystic form in 6 cases (22%), mixed form in 19 cases (71%), solid form in 2 cases (7%), and shapes were mainly ovoid with irregular, ill-defined margin. The location of mass is unilateral in 17 cases (63%) bilateral in 10 cases (37%)

  8. The ultrasonographic findings of acute pelvic inflammatory disease

    Although ultrasonographic findings of female pelvic mass are frequently reported, those of acute PID are not well established. But differentiation of fluid collection and mass lesion of PID is exactly made by ultrasonography. We analysed the ultrasonographic findings in 26 cases of acute PID having satisfactory operative or histological proofs, examined at Soonchunhyang University Hospital from Oct. 1985 to Feb. 1987. The results were as follows: 1. The age was ranged from 17 years to 53 years of age and the majority was between 21 years and 50 years of age. 2. Ultrasonographic findings are classified to fluid collection in cul de sac 17, tuboovarian abscess, 7 pyosalpix 2, endometritis 1 and normal 2 cases. 3. In cases of pelvic mass formation, their ecnogenecity were cystic form in 6 cases (22%), mixed form in 19 cases (71%), solid form in 2 cases (7%), and shapes were mainly ovoid with irregular, ill-defined margin. The location of mass is unilateral in 17 cases (63%) bilateral in 10 cases (37%)

  9. Acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as the initial presentation of the disease

    K. Sakamoto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The clinical course of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is generally marked by a decline in pulmonary function over time, although recently there is increasing recognition that fatal deterioration from acute exacerbation can occur at any stage. The patient described in the present case study was a 65-yr-old male who presented with exertional dyspnoea and fever of 2 weeks' duration. He had no history of chronic lung disease or physiological or radiological hallmarks of pre-existing disease. He underwent surgical lung biopsy and the histological examination showed a background pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP with a pattern of focal acute diffuse alveolar damage (DAD in the area where normal lung architecture was preserved. It is notable that the pathological diagnosis of this rapidly progressive interstitial pneumonia was DAD on UIP, which is typically seen in acute exacerbations of IPF. Unusual findings on high-resolution computed tomography scan were also noted. We presume that in this case acute exacerbation developed in the very early course of IPF. Given the possibility that similar cases may have arisen among patients diagnosed with acute interstitial pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome, the histopathology of rapidly progressive interstitial pneumonia may need to be revisited.

  10. The role of inflammation and interleukin-1 in acute cerebrovascular disease

    Galea J

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available James Galea,1 David Brough21Manchester Academic Health Sciences Center, Brain Injury Research Group, Clinical Sciences Building, Salford Royal Foundation Trust, Salford, UK; 2Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, AV Hill Building, Manchester, UKAbstract: Acute cerebrovascular disease can affect people at all stages of life, from neonates to the elderly, with devastating consequences. It is responsible for up to 10% of deaths worldwide, is a major cause of disability, and represents an area of real unmet clinical need. Acute cerebrovascular disease is multifactorial with many mechanisms contributing to a complex pathophysiology. One of the major processes worsening disease severity and outcome is inflammation. Pro-inflammatory cytokines of the interleukin (IL-1 family are now known to drive damaging inflammatory processes in the brain. The aim of this review is to discuss the recent literature describing the role of IL-1 in acute cerebrovascular disease and to provide an update on our current understanding of the mechanisms of IL-1 production. We also discuss the recent literature where the effects of IL-1 have been targeted in animal models, thus reviewing potential future strategies that may limit the devastating effects of acute cerebrovascular disease.Keywords: cerebral ischemia, stroke, inflammation, microglia, interleukin-1, caspase-1

  11. MRI findings of neurologic complications in the enterovirus 71-infected hand-foot-mouth disease%肠道病毒71型感染手足口病合并神经系统损害的MRI表现

    陈峰; 李建军; 刘涛; 向伟; 文国强

    2010-01-01

    Objective To explore the imaging characteristics of neurologic complications associated with the enterovirus 71 ( EV71 ) epidemic by analyzing 25 cases and reviewing the literature. Methods Twenty-five cases of hand-foot-mouth disease with neurologic complications during the recent EV71 outbreaks of Hainan province were studied for the clinical features and imaging findings, and literature were reviewed.Results In 5 cases, acute flaccid paralysis associated with EV71-infected hand-foot-mouth disease was related to the linear high signal in the spinal cord on sagittal images. Two cases showed symmetrical, welldefined hyperintense lesions in the spinal cord on T2WI transverse. Strong enhancement of the ventral horns and root was seen on the contrast-enhanced axial T1WI. In brainstem encephalitis, all lesions presented with significant hyperintensity on T2WI and hypointense on T1WI in the posterior portions of the medulla oblongata, midbrain, and pons. The manifestations of aseptic meningitis (AM) on MRI have no characteristics, but subdural effusion, meningeal enhancement and hydrocephalus can be the indirect signs of AM. Conclusions MRI is an effective method to investigate neurologic complications associated with the EV71 epidemic. Posterior portions of the medulla oblongata and pons, bilateral ventral horns of spinal involvement are characteristic findings of enteroviral encephalomyelitis.%目的 探讨肠道病毒71型(EV71)感染手足口病(HFMD)合并神经系统损害的MRI表现及特征.方法 回顾性分析海南省EV71感染流行期间25例伴有神经系统损害HFMD患儿临床、MRI表现,并结合文献分析其可能机制.结果 HFMD合并急性弛缓性麻痹(AFP)5例,典型MRI表现为矢状面脊髓内长条形长T1、长T2信号,横断面显示相应节段脊髓前角点状长T2信号,增强扫描部分前角、脊神经前根明显强化.HFMD合并脑干脑炎15例,MRI横断面显示桥脑、延髓、中脑后部长T1、长T2

  12. Proprioception in Parkinson's disease is acutely depressed by dopaminergic medications

    O'Suilleabhain, P; Bullard, J; Dewey, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Impaired proprioception has been previously reported in patients with Parkinson's disease. It was hypothesised that dopaminergic medications transiently depress proprioception, with amplification of adventitious movements as a result. This study tested for effects on proprioception of dopaminergic drugs, and for associations between such effects and drug induced dyskinesias.
METHODS—In 17 patients with Parkinson's disease, arm proprioception was tested in the ...

  13. Psycho-social factors are important for the perception of disease in patients with acute coronary disease

    Bekke-Hansen, Sidsel; Weinman, John; Thastum, Mikael;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Little is presently known about determinants of cardiac illness perceptions, especially regarding psycho-social factors. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Questionnaire study among 97 consecutively recruited inpatients (72.2% male; mean age 60.6 years) with acute coronary syndrome. We examined...... the role of socio-demographic, illness-related and psycho-social factors (Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, General Self-Efficacy Scale and Life Orientation Test-Revised) for perceived consequences, controllability and causes (Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire) with standard....... Also, gender, educational status, previous heart disease and family history of cardiovascular disease were significantly related to illness perceptions, whereas present disease severity (Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events) was not. CONCLUSION: Psycho-social resources and illness history were more...

  14. Dosimetric studies in monocorte TC teams in adult and pediatric and its application in children with chronic neurological diseases; Estudio dosimetrico en equipos de TC monocorte en pacientes adultos y pediatricos, y su aplicacion en ninos con enfermedades neuronales cronicos

    Casal, M. D.; Jimenez, M.; Urena, A.; Sanchez, G.; Herrador, M.

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to measure and analyze some of the parameters directly related to the doses administrated both for adult and pediatric patients in clinical practice at the Hospital Virgen del Rocio, in Seville. Among the latter group of patients doses in also estimated in children suffering from chronic neurological diseases. (Author) 14 refs.

  15. Composite risk factors analysis of early neurological deterioration in acute ischemic stroke%急性缺血性脑卒中早期神经功能恶化相关复合危险因素分析

    宋旭霞; 张敏; 李冬梅; 王粤; 付先军

    2015-01-01

    Objective To find out the composite risk factors associated with early neurological deterioration (END) in acute ischemic stroke,to reveal the mechanism of END,and to provide the data base for the early prediction and prevention.Methods Five hundred and fifty-eight patients with cerebral infarction admitted to our hospital from October 2009 to December 2012,were screened.Among them,107 patients met the diagnostic criteria of END in acute ischemic stroke,451 patients met the diagnostic standard of early acute ischemic stroke without END.Neurological function scale and other variables included 58 related factors of 9 categories were selected.Association rule mining methods were used to analyze relations between END in acute ischemic stroke and risk factors sets.Results The results of association rule mining discovered that there were 2 individual risk factors,3 double-factor combinations,7 triple-factor combinations and 15 four-factor combinations related with END in the early stage of acute ischemic stroke;the more the composite factors,the higher the probability of neurological deterioration;the composite factors were mostly the combination of variables of different categories,involving neurological function scale scores,infection condition,dysphagia,personal life history (smoking and drinking),infarction location,age,and levels of electrolyte,C reactive protein,and homocysteine.Besides some independent risk factors which had been reported in the literatures,the results of this study found that heart rate and time interval from onset to hospitalization also related with END in early acute ischemic stroke.Conclusion END in acute ischemic stroke may be attributed to the combination effect of variable factors;all risk factors should be considered and a variety of targeted measures should be taken to prevent and treat the patients with END in early acute ischemic stroke.%目的 发现与急性缺血性脑卒中早期神经功能恶化(END)相关的复合危险因素,

  16. Proust, neurology and Stendhal's syndrome.

    Teive, Hélio A G; Munhoz, Renato P; Cardoso, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Marcel Proust is one of the most important French writers of the 20th century. His relationship with medicine and with neurology is possibly linked to the fact that his asthma was considered to be a psychosomatic disease classified as neurasthenia. Stendhal's syndrome is a rare psychiatric syndrome characterized by anxiety and affective and thought disturbances when a person is exposed to a work of art. Here, the authors describe neurological aspects of Proust's work, particularly the occurrence of Stendhal's syndrome and syncope when he as well as one of the characters of In Search of Lost Time see Vermeer's View of Delft during a visit to a museum. PMID:24642490

  17. A CASE REPORT ON SICKLE CELL DISEASE WITH HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA, NEPHROTIC SYNDROME AND ACUTE CHEST SYNDROME

    Putta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease is an autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to abnormal hemoglobin. Sickling of RBCs occur due to abnormal hemoglobin which leads to vaso - occlusive crisis. This disease manifests as hemolytic anemia, acute chest syndrome, stroke, ischemic leg ulcers and nephrotic syndrome. This patient presented with hemolytic anemia, nephrotic syndrome and acute chest syndrome. This case was diagnosed by electrophoresis of h emoglobin and peripheral smear. This patient recovered with blood transfusion, antibiotics, steroids, diuretics and oxygen inhalation. Sickle cell patients have a known predisposition to bacterial infection, particularly pneumococcal infection. The most si gnificant advance in the therapy of sickle cell anemia has been the introduction of hydroxyurea, but hydroxyurea should be considered in patients experiencing repeated episodes of acute chest syndrome. But in this patient as this is first episode, hydroxyu rea was not given and he recovered well.

  18. Challenges in neurological practice in developing countries

    Sanjay Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of neurological illness is much higher in developing countries. Neurological disorders in these countries are mainly due to poverty and malnutrition. Spectrums of diseases are also different in comparison with developed countries. Lack of resources, ignorance, and overpopulation make it very difficult and challenging to tackle this problem. Majority of the patients are seen by general practitioners who have little knowledge about neurological illnesses. Most of the countries have very few or no neurologist. There is a greater need of taking neurological care at primary care level where majority of the patients struggle with epilepsy, stroke and neuroinfections.

  19. Enfermidades do sistema nervoso dos ruminantes no sul do Rio Grande do Sul Neurological diseases in ruminants in southern Brazil

    Franklin Riet-Correa

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Descrevem-se os aspectos epidemiológicos, clínicos e patológicos das enfermidades do sistema nervoso central dos ruminantes, diagnosticadas na região Sul do Rio Grande do Sul, incluindo: abiotrofia cerebelar; hipoplasia cerebelar; hipermetria hereditária; artrogripose; hipomielinogênese congênita; abscesso cerebral; listeriose; tétano; botulismo; necrose simétrica focal; raiva; leucose; encefalite por herpesvírus bovino-5; febre catarral maligna; intoxicações por Solanum fastigiatum, Claviceps paspali, Ramaria flavo-brunnescens, Halimium brasiliense e Diplodia maydis; encefalopatia hepática causada por Senecio spp. e Echium plantagineum; cetose; coenurose; e síndrome espinhal.The main epidemiological, clinical and pathologic aspects of the diseases of the nervous system in cattle in Southern Rio Grande do Sul are described, including, the following conditions: cerebellar abiotrophy; cerebellar hypoplasia; congenital hypermetria; arthrogryposis; congenital hypomyelinogenesis; brain abscess; listeriose; tetanus; botulism; focal symmetrical encephalomalacia; rabies; leucosis; encephalitis by Herpesvirus Bovine-5; bovino malignant catarrh; intoxications by Solanum fastigiatum, Claviceps paspali, Halimium brasiliense, Diplodia maydis, and Ramaria flavo-brunnescens; hepatoencephalopaty caused by Senecio spp. and Echium plantagineum; ketosis; coenurosis; and spinal syndrome.

  20. Preclinical models of muscle spasticity: valuable tools in the development of novel treatment for neurological diseases and conditions.

    Bespalov, Anton; Mus, Liudmila; Zvartau, Edwin

    2016-05-01

    Poor validity of preclinical animal models is one of the most commonly discussed explanations for the failures to develop novel drugs in general and in neuroscience in particular. However, there are several areas of neuroscience such as injury-induced spasticity where etiological factor can be adequately recreated and models can focus on specific pathophysiological mechanisms that likely contribute to spasticity syndrome in humans (such as motoneuron hyperexcitability and spinal hyperreflexia). Methods used to study spasticity in preclinical models are expected to have a high translational value (e.g., electromyogram (EMG)-based electrophysiological tools) and can efficiently assist clinical development programs. However, validation of these models is not complete yet. First, true predictive validity of these models is not established as clinically efficacious drugs have been used to reverse validate preclinical models while newly discovered mechanisms effective in preclinical models are yet to be fully explored in humans (e.g., 5-HT2C receptor inverse agonists, fatty acid amid hydrolase inhibitors). Second, further efforts need to be invested into cross-laboratory validation of study protocols and tools, adherence to the highest quality standards (blinding, randomization, pre-specified study endpoints, etc.), and systematic efforts to replicate key sets of data. These appear to be readily achievable tasks that will enable development not only of symptomatic but also of disease-modifying therapy of spasticity, an area that seems to be currently not in focus of research efforts. PMID:26861550

  1. Gene rearrangement study for minimal residual disease monitoring in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    Juliana Godoy Assumpcao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To detect markers for minimal residual disease monitoring based on conventional polymerase chain reaction for immunoglobulin, T-cell receptor rearrangements and the Sil-Tal1 deletion in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia. METHODS Fifty-nine children with acute lymphocytic leukemia from three institutions in Minas Gerais, Brazil, were prospectively studied. Clonal rearrangements were detected by polymerase chain reaction followed by homo/heteroduplex clonality analysis in DNA samples from diagnostic bone marrow. Follow-up samples were collected on Days 14 and 28-35 of the induction phase. The Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox methods were used for survival analysis. RESULTS Immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor rearrangements were not detected in 5/55 children screened (9.0%. For precursor-B acute lymphocytic leukemia, the most frequent rearrangement was IgH (72.7%, then TCRG (61.4%, and TCRD and IgK (47.7%; for T-acute lymphocytic leukemia, TCRG (80.0%, and TCRD and Sil-Tal deletion (20.0% were the most common. Minimal residual disease was detected in 35% of the cases on Day 14 and in 22.5% on Day 28-35. Minimal residual disease on Day 28-35, T-acute lymphocytic leukemia, and leukocyte count above 50 x 109/L at diagnosis were bad prognostic factors for leukemia-free survival in univariate analysis. Relapse risk for minimal residual disease positive relative to minimal residual disease negative children was 8.5 times higher (95% confidence interval: 1.02-70.7. CONCLUSION Immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor rearrangement frequencies were similar to those reported before. Minimal residual disease is an independent prognostic factor for leukemia-free survival, even when based on a non-quantitative technique, but longer follow-ups are needed.

  2. The worldwide epidemiology of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    Seckeler, Michael D.; Hoke, Tracey R

    2011-01-01

    Michael D Seckeler, Tracey R HokeDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USAAbstract: Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are significant public health concerns around the world. Despite decreasing incidence, there is still a significant disease burden, especially in developing nations. This review provides background on the history of ARF, its pathology and treatment, and the current reported worldwide incidence...

  3. Association between Periodontal Disease and Elevated C-reactive Protein in Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients

    G. Radafshar; B. Shad; M. Mirfeizi

    2006-01-01

    Statement of problem: Periodontal disease (PD) has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events by unknown mechanisms. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a prognostic marker for cardiovascular disease, with reported elevated serum levels during PD.Purpose: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between PD and higher CRP levels in the serum of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients.Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, periodontal examinations and CRP serum l...

  4. [Sweet syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) and erythema nodosum in Crohn disease].

    Schlegel Gómez, R; Kiesewetter, F; von den Driesch, P; Hornstein, O P

    1990-07-01

    We report on 2 patients who developed an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet's syndrome) and erythema nodosum in association with Crohn's disease. The first patient showed symmetrical painful erythemas on her cheeks after hemicolectomy. Additionally, red painful nodules appeared on her lower legs. The second patient disclosed typical Sweet's syndrome-like lesions with pustules and plaques on her face, scalp and extremities after activation of Crohn's disease. Simultaneously, erythema nodosum-like lesions appeared on her lower legs. PMID:2144848

  5. Sympathoadrenal activation and endothelial damage in patients with varying degrees of acute infectious disease

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Gaïni, Shahin; Pedersen, Court;

    2015-01-01

    infectious disease severity, correlated with SOFA score, and predicted mortality together with plasma noradrenaline. Sympathoadrenal activation......PURPOSE: To investigate levels, associations between, and predictive value of plasma catecholamines and biomarkers of endothelial damage in patients with acute infectious illness stratified according to infection type and sepsis severity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a post hoc study of plasma...... with increasing disease severity (both P

  6. Acute myocardial ischemia in adults secondary to missed Kawasaki disease in childhood

    Rizk, SRY; El Said, G; Daniels, LB; Burns, JC; El Said, H; Sorour, KA; Gharib, S; Gordon, JB

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Coronary artery aneurysms that occur in 25% of untreated Kawasaki disease (KD) patients may remain clinically silent for decades and then thrombose resulting in myocardial infarction. Although KD is now the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children in Asia, the United States, and Western Europe, the incidence of KD in Egypt is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that young adults in Egypt presenting with acute myocardial ischemia may have ...

  7. Crypt abscess-associated microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease and acute self-limited colitis

    Harry; Sokol; Nadia; Vasquez; Nadia; Hoyeau-Idrissi; Philippe; Seksik; Laurent; Beaugerie; Anne; Lavergne-Slove; Philippe; Pochart; Philippe; Marteau

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate whether crypt abscesses frominflammatory bowel disease(IBD)patients containbacteria and to establish their nature.METHODS:We studied 17 ulcerative colitis patients,11 Crohn's disease patients,7 patients with acute selflimited colitis(ASLC)and normal colonic biopsies from5 subjects who underwent colonoscopy for colon cancer screening.A fluorescent in situ hybridization techniquewas applied to colonic biopsies to assess the microbiotacomposition of the crypts and crypt abscesses.RESULTS:Crypts...

  8. Bacteriology in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients admitted to hospital

    Larsen, Mette V; Janner, Julie H; Nielsen, Susanne D; Friis-Møller, Alice; Ringbaek, Thomas; Lange, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the bacterial flora and antimicrobial sensitivity in sputum from patients admitted to hospital with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) in order to recommend the best empirical treatment for these patients. The survey was a retrospective study of a...... AECOPD we recommend either cefuroxime for intravenous treatment or amoxicillin-clavulanate for oral treatment....

  9. Circulating endothelial cells in coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndrome

    Schmidt, David E; Manca, Marco; Höfer, Imo E

    2015-01-01

    Circulating endothelial cells (CECs) have been put forward as a promising biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes. This review entails current insights into the physiology and pathobiology of CECs, including their relationship with circulating en

  10. Duration of extracorporeal therapy in acute maple syrup urine disease: a kinetic model.

    Phan, Véronique; Clermont, Marie-José; Merouani, Aicha; Litalien, Catherine; Tucci, Marisa; Lambert, Marie; Mitchell, Grant; Jouvet, Philippe

    2006-05-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, MIM 248600) can be complicated by metabolic crises necessitating extracorporeal removal therapy (ECRT). Since leucine levels are usually not immediately available during therapy, an accurate kinetic model of leucine plasma levels during removal would be useful to establish the duration of ECRT. Such a kinetic model is available for neonates undergoing continuous ECRT (CECRT) with a leucine clearance>or=35 ml min-1 1.73 m-2. The current study tests the validity of this model in older children. Plasma leucine levels were obtained from eleven ECRT sessions [seven CECRT and four intermittent hemodialysis (HDi) sessions] in seven children aged 1-14 years. No hemodynamic instability or neurological complications were observed during treatment. HDi provided a higher leucine clearance and required shorter sessions than CECRT (5.4+/-0.6 vs. 17.1+/-6.0 h). All patients regained precrisis neurological status except for one patient who had severe neurological damage (severe cerebral edema) at the time of dialysis and subsequently died despite efficient leucine removal. A leucine clearance>or=50 ml min-1 1.73 m-2 is required to obtain a kinetic model similar to that reported in neonates, both with CECRT and HDi. This model should be helpful in predicting the duration of therapy needed to attain desired leucine levels. PMID:16518628

  11. Progress in pediatrics in 2015: choices in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, genetics, haematology, infectious diseases, neonatology, nephrology, neurology, nutrition, oncology and pulmonology.

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Di Mauro, Dora; Mastrorilli, Carla; Mirra, Virginia; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses key advances in different pediatric fields that were published in Italian Journal of Pediatrics and in international journals in 2015. Weaning studies continue to show promise for preventing food allergy. New diagnostic tools are available for identifying the allergic origin of allergic-like symptoms. Advances have been reported in obesity, short stature and autoimmune endocrine disorders. New molecules are offered to reduce weight gain and insulin-resistance in obese children. Regional investigations may provide suggestions for preventing short stature. Epidemiological studies have evidenced the high incidence of Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in patients with Down syndrome. Documentation of novel risk factors for celiac disease are of use to develop strategies for prevention in the population at-risk. Diagnostic criteria for non-celiac gluten sensitivity have been reported. Negative effect on nervous system development of the supernumerary X chromosome in Klinefelter syndrome has emerged. Improvements have been made in understanding rare diseases such as Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Eltrombopag is an effective therapy for immune trombocytopenia. Children with sickle-cell anemia are at risk for nocturnal enuresis. Invasive diseases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes are still common despite of vaccination. No difference in frequency of antibiotic prescriptions for acute otitis media between before the publication of the national guideline and after has been found. The importance of timing of iron administration in low birth weight infants, the effect of probiotics for preventing necrotising enterocolitis and perspectives for managing jaundice and cholestasis in neonates have been highlighted. New strategies have been developed to reduce the risk for relapse in nephrotic syndrome including prednisolone during upper respiratory infection. Insights into the pathophysiology of cerebral palsy, arterial ischemic stroke and acute encephalitis

  12. Managing the acute painful episode in sickle cell disease

    B. Kaya

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell pain is a complex but frequently experienced symptom. Acute painful events in children can be managed effectively in the community with appropriate support and education. If hospital management is required, rapid access to a consistent, reliable and safe analgesic pathway is recommended to ensure a good standard of care. Use of oral opiates in addition to short acting easily administrable forms of analgesia and strict adherence to protocoled monitoring will enable the acute event to be well managed and the negative pain experience minimised. An important part of the outpatient evaluation is determining the impact pain events are having on the child’s quality of life. Addressing psycho-social aspects, defining and modifying precipitating factors, if any are identified, and having a holistic approach to pain management is helpful. Education and use of self-management techniques can also be productive. Use of sickle modifying interventions such as hydroxycarbamide therapy or transfusion therapy can have a significant impact on reducing the severity and frequency of the acute pain event. 镰状细胞疼痛是一种复杂的常发症。 通过适当的支助和教育,儿童急性疼痛症可以得到有效抑制。 如果需要在医院进行护理,患者应尽快寻求持续可靠且安全的止痛方式,确保良好的护理。 除采取作用短、管理方便的止痛治疗和遵守监测协议之外,患者还需口服鸦片剂,这样,急性症状可以得到良好的抑制,还可尽量减轻疼痛感。 诊断门诊病人一个重要的部分就是确定疼痛症对患儿生活质量产生的影响。 问询生理社会方面问题,确定和修改诱发因子(如有),并整体分析可行的疼痛护理方法。 教育和使用个人护理法也很有效果。 采用镰状细胞修改干预法,例如羟基尿素疗法或输液疗法,对减轻急性疼痛症和减少发作频率有着显著效果。

  13. ACUTE PHASE REACTANCTS IN PERICARDIAL FLUID ARE INDICATORS OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE

    Yılmaz Mehmet Ali

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation in formation of atherosclerosis, and acute phase reactants in the site of inflammation have major functions. Thus, do the acute phase reactants constitute the biggest risk factor for coronary artery disease? 55 patients are included in the study. Patients with coronary artery bypass surgery are included in Group I (38 patients and patients with valve operation are included in Group II (17 patients. CABG patients are further divided into two sub-groups as on-pump and off-pump. In both groups, homocystein, high sensitivity C reactive protein, ceruloplasmin, lipoprotein A and serum amyloid A protein levels are analyzed from blood and pericardial fluid. In patients with coronary artery disease, the measured high specific C- reactive protein levels from blood and pericardial fluid are found to be significantly high compared to patients with valve operation.Homocystein levels of pericardial fluids of patients with CABG are found to be higher than patients with valve operation and it is confirmed that the situation is correlated with blood homocystein levels. Although there are lots studies expressing the relation between coronary artery disease and lipoprotein A, ceruloplasmin and serum amyloid A protein levels; no significant difference for those parameters was obtained in our study. We determined that other phase reactants are higher in patients with coronary artery disease, in accordance with the literature. We aimed to state that acute phase reactants not only increase as a result of disease, but their levels are also elevated beforehand, as an indicator of the disease.

  14. Neurology and diving.

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent. PMID:24365363

  15. Neurological manifestations of malaria

    Gustavo C. Román

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of the nervous system in malaria is reviewed in this paper. Cerebral malaria, the acute encephalopathy which complicates exclusively the infection by Plasmodium falciparum commonly affects children and adolescents in hyperendemic areas. Plugging of cerebral capillaries and venules by clumped, parasitized red cells causing sludging in the capillary circulation is one hypothesis to explain its pathogenesis. The other is a humoral hypothesis which proposes nonspecific, immune-mediated, inflammatory responses with release of vasoactive substances capable of producing endothelial damage and alterations of permeability. Cerebral malaria has a mortality rate up to 50%, and also a considerable longterm morbidity, particularly in children. Hypoglycemia, largely in patients treated with quinine, may complicate the cerebral symptomatology. Other central nervous manifestations of malaria include intracranial hemorrhage, cerebral arterial occlusion, and transient extrapyramidal and neuropsychiiatric manifestations. A self-limiting, isolated cerebellar ataxia, presumably caused by immunological mechanisms, in patients recovering from falciparum malaria has been recognized in Sri Lanka. Malaria is a common cause of febrile seizures in the tropics, and it also contributes to the development of epilepsy in later life. Several reports of spinal cord and peripheral nerve involvement are also available. A transient muscle paralysis resembling periodic paralysis during febrile episodes of malaria has been described in some patients. The pathogenesis of these neurological manifestations remains unexplored, but offers excellent perspectives for research at a clinical as well as experimental level.

  16. Neuro-Sweet's disease.

    Maxwell, Gemma; Archibald, Neil; Turnbull, Doug

    2012-04-01

    Sweet's syndrome, or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is a multisystem, inflammatory disease characterised by tender skin lesions and neutrophilic infiltration of various organs, including the nervous system. A rare condition, neuro-Sweet's can present with a wide variety of neurological symptoms dependent on the region of the CNS affected. Here we present a case of neuro-Sweet's disease in association with Crohn's disease. PMID:22450461

  17. [Urgent neurologic states: experience at the Neurology Clinic in Sarajevo].

    Loncarević, Nedim; Dimitrijević, Jovan; Hrnjica, Mehmed; Hećo, Suad

    2004-01-01

    There is a quite good definition of medical care for patients suffering from chronicle neurological diseases. However the neurologist role in taking care of urgent cases is substantially less determined. This paper is analyzing one year efforts of the on duty neurological team in the Out Patient Department and Emergency Division of the Neurology Department in Sarajevo. During this period the on duty neurological team examined the total of 3939 patients, out of which 1022 patients where kept for treatment. The patients where most frequently assigned to the Emergency unit for following reasons: vascular incident of the Central Nervous System(1955 patients or 50%), cerebrovascular accident represented with 1290 or 33%, and TIA of the carotid and vertebrobasilar area 544 or 14% along with hypertensive encephalopathia, 118 or 3%. This is followed by the group of the short-term disturbance of consciousness (472 or 125), out of which the consciousness crises represented 257 or 7%, and epileptic crises 215 or 5%. Following are the lower percentages of the headaches (287 or 7%), radicular painful syndrome of cervical and lumbal area (209 or 5%), vertigo (183 or 5%), neurophatia (167 or 4%), etc. The more extensive number of patients admitted at the Emergency Division where suffering from brain stroke (800 or 78%), TIA was represented by a lower number (172 or 17%). Only 50 patients had other diagnosis. The ischemic stroke represented 674 or 81% with patients suffering from the brain stroke and the hemorrhagic stroke 153 or 19%. Today, the urgent neurological conditions represent a particular area of Neurology, not only neurologists need to know but also other medical doctors, to enable the patients to be forwarded on time to the appropriate care institution. PMID:15202312

  18. Treatment disparities in acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, and kidney disease.

    McCullough, Peter A; Maynard, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    It has been consistently observed that patients with renal dysfunction have more premature, severe, complicated, and fatal cardiovascular disease than age- and sex-matched individuals with normal renal function. There have been 4 major explanations for this finding: (1) positive confounding by third variables associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), including diabetes mellitus and hypertension; (2) therapeutic nihilism or lesser use of beneficial therapies in CKD; (3) greater toxicities of therapies, such as bleeding from anticoagulants or contrast-induced kidney injury; (4) biological factors which result directly from CKD that work to promote and accelerate cardiovascular disease. In this paper, we focus on the issue of treatment disparities or therapeutic nihilism and its contribution to poor outcomes in the setting of acute coronary syndromes and acutely decompensated heart failure. This issue is important because if we can overcome barriers to the utilization of beneficial treatments, then clinical outcomes should improve over time. PMID:21625092

  19. Neurological manifestations of dengue viral infection

    Carod-Artal FJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Javier Carod-Artal1,21Neurology Department, Raigmore hospital, Inverness, UK; 2Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Dengue is the most common mosquito-borne viral infection worldwide. There is increased evidence for dengue virus neurotropism, and neurological manifestations could make part of the clinical picture of dengue virus infection in at least 0.5%–7.4% of symptomatic cases. Neurological complications have been classified into dengue virus encephalopathy, dengue virus encephalitis, immune-mediated syndromes (acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, myelitis, Guillain–Barré syndrome, neuritis brachialis, acute cerebellitis, and others, neuromuscular complications (hypokalemic paralysis, transient benign muscle dysfunction and myositis, and dengue-associated stroke. Common neuro-ophthalmic complications are maculopathy and retinal vasculopathy. Pathogenic mechanisms include systemic complications and metabolic disturbances resulting in encephalopathy, direct effect of the virus provoking encephalitis, and postinfectious immune mechanisms causing immune-mediated syndromes. Dengue viruses should be considered as a cause of neurological disorders in endemic regions. Standardized case definitions for specific neurological complications are still needed. Keywords: encephalitis, encephalopathy, dengue fever, neurological complications

  20. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia

    Marcelle G. Meseeha; Maximos N. Attia; Kolade, Victor O.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare present...