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Sample records for acute myeloid leukaemia

  1. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    Summary Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the bone marrow, affecting formation of blood cells during haematopoiesis. This thesis presents investigation of AML using mRNA gene expression profiles (GEP) of samples extracted from the bone marrow of healthy and diseased subjects...

  2. Molecular therapy for acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Coombs, Catherine C; Tallman, Martin S; Levine, Ross L

    2016-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease that is, in general, associated with a very poor prognosis. Multiple cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities that characterize different forms of AML have been used to better prognosticate patients and inform treatment decisions. Indeed, risk status in patients with this disease has classically been based on cytogenetic findings; however, additional molecular characteristics have been shown to inform risk assessment, including FLT3, NPM1, KIT, and CEBPA mutation status. Advances in sequencing technology have led to the discovery of novel somatic mutations in tissue samples from patients with AML, providing deeper insight into the mutational landscape of the disease. The majority of patients with AML (>97%) are found to have a clonal somatic abnormality on mutational profiling. Nevertheless, our understanding of the utility of mutation profiling in clinical practice remains incomplete and is continually evolving, and evidence-based approaches to application of these data are needed. In this Review, we discuss the evidence-base for integrating mutational data into treatment decisions for patients with AML, and propose novel therapeutic algorithms in the era of molecular medicine. PMID:26620272

  3. Variable detection of myeloid antigens in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Howard, M R; Thomas, L; Reid, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To determine whether the use of different sources of anti-CD13 and anti-CD33 monoclonal antibodies leads to discrepant results in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), which might contribute to the wide variation in the reported incidence of myeloid antigen expressing ALL in childhood. METHODS--Stored leukaemic cells from 10 children with previously defined myeloid positive ALL were examined. A range of commercially available anti-CD13 and anti-CD33 monoclonal antibodies, direc...

  4. Improved outcome after relapse in children with acute myeloid leukaemia

    Abrahamsson, Jonas; Clausen, Niels; Gustafsson, Göran;

    2007-01-01

    In the Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology paediatric study acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) 93, event-free survival was 50% and overall survival was 66%, indicating that many patients were cured following relapse. Factors influencing outcome in children with relapsed AML were...

  5. Acute Myeloid Leukaemia of Donor Cell Origin Developing 17 Years after Allogenic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia

    Jiménez, Pilar; Alvarez, J. Carlos; Garrido, Pilar; Lorente, J. Antonio; Palacios, Jorge; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Donor cell leukaemia (DCL) is a rare complication of allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We report the case of a female patient with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), FAB type M3, who developed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) type M5 of donor origin 17 years after allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from her HLA-matched sister. Morphology and immunophenotyping showed differences with the initial leukaemia, and short tandem repeat (STR) analysis confirmed donor-type ha...

  6. Myeloid sarcoma in a child with acute myeloblastic leukaemia

    We report a rare occurrence of myeloid sarcoma in a 7 years old child with acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML - FAB type M2). He presented with fever, generalized weakness, bilateral proptosis and left parotid swelling. CT scan revealed a mass in paranasal sinuses extending into brain and retro-orbital region. Diagnosis of AML M2 was made on bone marrow aspiration and special stains. Induction therapy for AML was given according to standard protocol. The extramedullary lesion as well as the acute leukaemia went into complete remission. (author)

  7. Acute Myeloid Leukaemia: Optimal Management and Recent Developments

    Villela, Luis; Bolaños-Meade, Javier

    2011-01-01

    The current treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia yields poor results, with expected cure rates in the order of 30–40% depending on the biological characteristics of the leukaemic clone. Therefore, new agents and schemas are intensively studied in order to improve patients’ outcomes. This review summarizes some of these new paradigms, including new questions such as which anthracycline is most effective and at what dose. High doses of daunorubicin have shown better responses in y...

  8. Harnessing the immune system in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Austin, Rebecca; Smyth, Mark J; Lane, Steven W

    2016-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive blood cancer caused by the proliferation of immature myeloid cells. The genetic abnormalities underlying AML affect signal transduction pathways, transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers. In solid tumours, it is emerging that the genetic landscape of the tumour has a direct effect on the anti-tumour immune responses and response to immunotherapeutic treatment. However, there remains little information as to whether genetic abnormalities affect anti-leukemic immune responses. This review discusses current knowledge of AML antigens and immune responses to AML with a particular focus on the role of T cells and natural killer cells. Understanding immune responses to AML has implications for the development and use of immunotherapies to treat AML patients with distinct genetic abnormalities. PMID:27247119

  9. CBL mutations do not frequently occur in paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia

    Coenen, Eva A.; Driessen, Emma M. C.; Zwaan, C. Michel; Stary, Jan; Baruchel, Andre; de Haas, Valerie; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Arentsen-Peters, Susan T. C. J. M.; Meyer, Claus; Marschalek, Rolf; Pieters, Rob; Stam, Ronald W.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2012-01-01

    RAS-pathway mutations, causing a proliferative advantage, occur in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and MLL-rearranged leukaemia. Recently, mutations in the Casitas B lineage lymphoma (CBL) gene were reported to be involved in RAS-pathway activation in various myeloid malignancies, but their role in pa

  10. A Hypothetical-Mathematical Model of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Pathogenesis

    Andrei Cucuianu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukaemia is defined by the expansion of a mutated haematopoietic stem cell clone, with the inhibition of surrounding normal clones. Haematopoiesis can be seen as an evolutionary tree, starting with one cell that undergoes several divisions during the expansion phase, afterwards losing functional cells during the aging-related contraction phase. During divisions, offspring cells acquire ‘variations’, which can be either normal or abnormal. If an abnormal variation is present in more than 25% of the final cells, a monoclonal, leukemic pattern occurs. Such a pattern develops if: (A1 The abnormal variation occurs early, during the first or second divisions; (A2 The variation confers exceptional proliferative capacity; (B A sizable proportion of the normal clones are destroyed and a previously non-significant abnormal clone gains relative dominance over a depleted environment; (C The abnormal variation confers relative ‘immortality’, rendering it significant during the contraction phase. Combinations of these pathways further enhance the leukemic risk of the system. A simple mathematical model is used in order to characterize normal and leukemic states and to explain the above cellular processes generating monoclonal leukemic patterns.

  11. Clofarabine in the treatment of poor risk acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Krawczyk, Janusz

    2010-09-01

    Clofarabine is a second generation nucleoside analogue. It inhibits DNA repair and activates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway leading to cell death. In vitro clofarabine has demonstrated synergy with daunorubicin and Ara-C and in phase II clinical trials has shown promising activity in poor risk Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. In our institution over a 24 month period 22 AML patients (11 M, 11 F) with poor risk features, deemed unsuitable for standard therapy, were treated with clofarabine, alone (eight patients) or in combination (14 patients) for up to three cycles of treatment. The median age was 67.5 years (24-76) with 16 patients > 60 years. At the time of treatment 18 patients had active AML. Four patients intolerant of standard induction received clofarabine as consolidation. The overall response rate (ORR) for the 18 patients with active AML was 61%, nine patients (50%) achieving a complete response (CR). Induction and consolidation were well tolerated with no unexpected toxicities. Predictably, all patients developed grade 4 neutropenia but the median duration was only 20 days (17-120). Induction mortality was acceptable at 17%. In conclusion, clofarabine (alone or in combination) is active in poor risk AML with an acceptable safety profile and should be considered a potential option in poor risk AML patients.

  12. Radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia in mice

    Ample epidemiological studies of human populations implicate ionizing radiation as a carcinogen and these quantitative studies provide the foundation for the core estimates of radiation cancer risk. The majority of the epidemiological data originate from situations of radiation exposure at high dose and high dose rate. The relevance of risk estimates based on such exposures to the more commonly encountered low dose and dose rate situation has been questioned frequently. Thus, there is a need to investigate and quantitate low dose and dose rate effects. A number of approaches may be considered, for example, very large scale epidemiology, very large scale animal experimentation; however, both of these present problems of a practical and/or ethical nature. A further possible approach is that of mechanistic modelling. This requires a fairly detailed understanding of neoplastic disease and how it develops post-irradiation. Many factors and variables have to be taken into consideration in mechanistic modelling approaches. Testing of mechanistic modelling schemes is best carried out using animal model systems. Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a radiogenic cancer of significance in man and several good mouse models of the disease are available. Here, recent studies conducted at NRPB with the aim of elucidating the post-irradiation development of AML will be discussed. In particular three areas critical for developing a sound mechanistic model will be covered, definition of the initiating event; study of disease progression, this addresses the question of the frequency of conversion of initiated cells into the neoplastic state and the influence of genetic background on leukaemogenesis. (author)

  13. A Case Report on the Progression of Myeloid Sarcoma to Form Multiple Metastatic Deposits without Developing Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    Sunita Kohli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Myeloid sarcomas (MS are rare tumours occurring at extramedullary sites. They are usually associated with other haematology disorders such as acute myeloid leukaemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. They frequently occur with a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML or with relapse of preexisting disease. Patients with myeloid sarcomas without history or evidence of myeloid leukaemia typically progress to form AML. Case Presentation. A case report of a patient diagnosed with an isolated myeloid sarcoma that rarely did not transform to AML but instead spread to form multiple myeloid sarcomas throughout the body. Discussion. This case identifies the risk of metastatic spread of these tumours rather than the development of AML which is poorly documented in the literature, due to the rarity of cases, and may be significant in the investigation and management of isolated myeloid sarcomas. This case highlights the need for clinicians to consider repeat cross-sectional imaging to investigate unexplained clinical decline or symptoms, when there is no sign of AML progression and to consider radiotherapy treatment early.

  14. Effect of glutathione S-transferases on the survival of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    Autrup, Judith; Hokland, Peter; Pedersen, Lars;

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of genetic polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferases (GST) on the survival of acute myeloid leukaemia patients receiving adriamycin induction therapy. A total of 89 patients were included in the study. Patients who carried at least one GSTM...

  15. Clinical relevance of molecular aberrations in paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia at first relapse

    Bachas, Costa; Schuurhuis, Gerrit Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Creutzig, Ursula; Kwidama, Zinia J.; Zwaan, C. Michel; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; De Bont, Evelina S. J. M.; Elitzur, Sarah; Rizzari, Carmelo; de Haas, Valerie; Zimmermann, Martin; Cloos, Jacqueline; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Outcome for relapsed paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) remains poor. Strong prognostic factors at first relapse are lacking, which hampers optimization of therapy. We assessed the frequency of molecular aberrations (FLT3, NRAS, KRAS, KIT, WT1 and NPM1 genes) at first relapse in a large set (n

  16. Epidural spinal cord compression as initial clinical presentation of an acute myeloid leukaemia: case report and literature review

    Dominique N'Dri Oka; Alpha Boubacar Bah; André Valentin Tokpa; Louis Derou

    2016-01-01

    Epidural localization of myeloid leukaemia is rarely reported.Spinal cord compression as an initial presentation of acute myeloid leukaemia is extremely rare.This is a report of a 17-year-old black boy who presented to emergency department with neurological symptoms of spinal cord compression.Imaging modalities showed multiple soft tissue masses in the epidural space.After surgical treatment,histopathological examination of the epidural mass showed myeloid leukaemia cells infiltration.Literature review on Medline and "scholar Google" database was done.The characteristics and management of extra-medullary leukaemia are discussed.Granulocytic sarcoma,myeloid sarcoma or chloroma with acute myeloid leukaemia should be considered as part of epidural spinal cord compression.Therefore surgery is indicated on an emergent basis.

  17. Changing bone marrow micro-environment during development of acute myeloid leukaemia in rats

    Mortensen, B T; Jensen, P O; Helledie, N;

    1998-01-01

    bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) to identify DNA replicating cells. The leukaemia progressed slowly until day 27 after which a rapid deterioration could be observed leading to severe changes over the following 5 d. In whole blood there was evidence of progressing metabolic acidosis. In bone marrow the fraction of......The Brown Norwegian rat transplanted with promyelocytic leukaemic cells (BNML) has been used as a model for human acute myeloid leukaemia. We have previously shown that both the blood supply to the bone marrow and the metabolic rate decrease in relation to the leukaemic development in these rats...

  18. Combined Bezafibrate and Medroxyprogesterone Acetate: Potential Novel Therapy for Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    Khanim, Farhat L.; Hayden, Rachel E.; Jane Birtwistle; Alessia Lodi; Stefano Tiziani; Davies, Nicholas J; Ride, Jon P.; Viant, Mark R.; Gunther, Ulrich L.; Mountford, Joanne C; Heinrich Schrewe; Green, Richard M.; Murray, Jim A.; Drayson, Mark T; Chris M Bunce

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The majority of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients are over sixty years of age. With current treatment regimens, survival rates amongst these, and also those younger patients who relapse, remain dismal and novel therapies are urgently required. In particular, therapies that have anti-leukaemic activity but that, unlike conventional chemotherapy, do not impair normal haemopoiesis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate the potent anti-leukaemic activity of the combination of t...

  19. Early molecular diagnosis of aspergillosis in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia

    Greco, R; Mancini, N.; Peccatori, J.; Cieri, N.; Vago, L.; F. Giglio; Morelli, M; Ghidoli, N; Carletti, S; Levati, G; Crucitti, L; E. Sala; Lupo Stanghellini, M T; Lorentino, F; Forcina, A

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of invasive fungal infection remains challenging. Here we report a case of early diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis in a neutropenic patient affected by acute myeloid leukaemia, achieved through the detection of Aspergillus fumigatus species-specific ribonucleic acid sequences by a sensitive multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction-based molecular assay. Thanks to the early diagnosis, targeted therapy was promptly established and the severe fungal infection controlled, allowin...

  20. Feedback mechanisms control coexistence in a stem cell model of acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Crowell, Helena L; MacLean, Adam L; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2016-07-21

    Haematopoietic stem cell dynamics regulate healthy blood cell production and are disrupted during leukaemia. Competition models of cellular species help to elucidate stem cell dynamics in the bone marrow microenvironment (or niche), and to determine how these dynamics impact leukaemia progression. Here we develop two models that target acute myeloid leukaemia with particular focus on the mechanisms that control proliferation via feedback signalling. It is within regions of parameter space permissive of coexistence that the effects of competition are most subtle and the clinical outcome least certain. Steady state and linear stability analyses identify parameter regions that allow for coexistence to occur, and allow us to characterise behaviour near critical points. Where analytical expressions are no longer informative, we proceed statistically and sample parameter space over a coexistence region. We find that the rates of proliferation and differentiation of healthy progenitors exert key control over coexistence. We also show that inclusion of a regulatory feedback onto progenitor cells promotes healthy haematopoiesis at the expense of leukaemia, and that - somewhat paradoxically - within the coexistence region feedback increases the sensitivity of the system to dominance by one lineage over another. PMID:27130539

  1. Distinctive patterns of microRNA expression associated with karyotype in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Amanda Dixon-McIver

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML is the most common acute leukaemia in adults; however, the genetic aetiology of the disease is not yet fully understood. A quantitative expression profile analysis of 157 mature miRNAs was performed on 100 AML patients representing the spectrum of known karyotypes common in AML. The principle observation reported here is that AMLs bearing a t(15;17 translocation had a distinctive signature throughout the whole set of genes, including the up regulation of a subset of miRNAs located in the human 14q32 imprinted domain. The set included miR-127, miR-154, miR-154*, miR-299, miR-323, miR-368, and miR-370. Furthermore, specific subsets of miRNAs were identified that provided molecular signatures characteristic of the major translocation-mediated gene fusion events in AML. Analysis of variance showed the significant deregulation of 33 miRNAs across the leukaemic set with respect to bone marrow from healthy donors. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation analysis using miRNA-specific locked nucleic acid (LNA probes on cryopreserved patient cells confirmed the results obtained by real-time PCR. This study, conducted on about a fifth of the miRNAs currently reported in the Sanger database (microrna.sanger.ac.uk, demonstrates the potential for using miRNA expression to sub-classify cancer and suggests a role in the aetiology of leukaemia.

  2. Acute myeloid leukaemia: a paradigm for the clonal evolution of cancer?

    Carolyn S. Grove

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML is an uncontrolled clonal proliferation of abnormal myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow and blood. Advances in cancer genomics have revealed the spectrum of somatic mutations that give rise to human AML and drawn our attention to its molecular evolution and clonal architecture. It is now evident that most AML genomes harbour small numbers of mutations, which are acquired in a stepwise manner. This characteristic, combined with our ability to identify mutations in individual leukaemic cells and our detailed understanding of normal human and murine haematopoiesis, makes AML an excellent model for understanding the principles of cancer evolution. Furthermore, a better understanding of how AML evolves can help us devise strategies to improve the therapy and prognosis of AML patients. Here, we draw from recent advances in genomics, clinical studies and experimental models to describe the current knowledge of the clonal evolution of AML and its implications for the biology and treatment of leukaemias and other cancers.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of transcriptional reprogramming in mouse models of acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Nicolas Bonadies

    Full Text Available Acute leukaemias are commonly caused by mutations that corrupt the transcriptional circuitry of haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. However, the mechanisms underlying large-scale transcriptional reprogramming remain largely unknown. Here we investigated transcriptional reprogramming at genome-scale in mouse retroviral transplant models of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML using both gene-expression profiling and ChIP-sequencing. We identified several thousand candidate regulatory regions with altered levels of histone acetylation that were characterised by differential distribution of consensus motifs for key haematopoietic transcription factors including Gata2, Gfi1 and Sfpi1/Pu.1. In particular, downregulation of Gata2 expression was mirrored by abundant GATA motifs in regions of reduced histone acetylation suggesting an important role in leukaemogenic transcriptional reprogramming. Forced re-expression of Gata2 was not compatible with sustained growth of leukaemic cells thus suggesting a previously unrecognised role for Gata2 in downregulation during the development of AML. Additionally, large scale human AML datasets revealed significantly higher expression of GATA2 in CD34+ cells from healthy controls compared with AML blast cells. The integrated genome-scale analysis applied in this study represents a valuable and widely applicable approach to study the transcriptional control of both normal and aberrant haematopoiesis and to identify critical factors responsible for transcriptional reprogramming in human cancer.

  4. A comparative assessment of the curative potential of reduced intensity allografts in acute myeloid leukaemia

    Russell, N H; Kjeldsen, L; Craddock, C;

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) provides the best mechanism of preventing relapse in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). However non-relapse mortality (NRM) negates this benefit in older patients. Reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) permits SCT with reduced NRM, but its contribution to cure...... is uncertain. In the MRC AML15 Trial, patients in remission without favourable risk disease could receive SCT from a matched sibling or unrelated donor (MUD). If aged >45 years, a RIC was recommended and in patients aged 35-44 years, either RIC or myeloablative conditioning was permitted. The aim...... was to determine which approach improved survival and within which prespecified cytogenetic groups. RIC transplants significantly reduced relapse (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0.66 (0.50-0.85), P=0.002) compared to chemotherapy The 5-year overall survival from a sibling RIC (61%) was superior to a MUD RIC (37...

  5. Isolation of Rhodotorula. A Case Report in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia

    Idalmis Reyes Martínez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Rhodotorula species are fungi that are part of the commensal microflora of the skin, nails and mucous membranes. They are playing a significant role as human pathogen in immunocompromised and permanently catheterized patients. In addition, they are included among the emerging infectious agents. We report the case of a 38-year-old female patient suffering from acute myeloid leukaemia, admitted to the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima Hospital in Cienfuegos for usual treatment and who started presenting fever and general malaise. Yeast of the genus Rhodotorula was isolated in the analysis of the catheter culture. The antifungal amphotericin B was used as treatment since it is effective against species of this genus, helping the patient progress satisfactorily. This case is reported given the rarity of the isolation in our area and the fact that this organism is emerging as an infectious agent.

  6. Activity of Bruton's tyrosine-kinase inhibitor ibrutinib in patients with CD117-positive acute myeloid leukaemia: a mechanistic study using patient-derived blast cells

    Rushworth, Stuart; Pillinger, Genevra; Abdul-Aziz, Amina; Piddock, Rachel; Shafat, Manar S.; Murray, Megan Y; Zaitseva, Lyubov; Lawes, Matthew J.; MacEwan, David J.; Bowles, Kristian M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Roughly 80% of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia have high activity of Bruton's tyrosine-kinase (BTK) in their blast cells compared with normal haemopoietic cells, rendering the cells sensitive to the oral BTK inhibitor ibrutinib in vitro. We aimed to develop the biological understanding of the BTK pathway in acute myeloid leukaemia to identify clinically relevant diagnostic information that might define a subset of patients that should respond to ibrutinib treatment. M...

  7. ZBTB7A mutations in acute myeloid leukaemia with t(8;21) translocation.

    Hartmann, Luise; Dutta, Sayantanee; Opatz, Sabrina; Vosberg, Sebastian; Reiter, Katrin; Leubolt, Georg; Metzeler, Klaus H; Herold, Tobias; Bamopoulos, Stefanos A; Bräundl, Kathrin; Zellmeier, Evelyn; Ksienzyk, Bianka; Konstandin, Nikola P; Schneider, Stephanie; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Graf, Alexander; Krebs, Stefan; Blum, Helmut; Middeke, Jan Moritz; Stölzel, Friedrich; Thiede, Christian; Wolf, Stephan; Bohlander, Stefan K; Preiss, Caroline; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Wichmann, Christian; Sauerland, Maria Cristina; Büchner, Thomas; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Wörmann, Bernhard J; Braess, Jan; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Spiekermann, Karsten; Greif, Philipp A

    2016-01-01

    The t(8;21) translocation is one of the most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and results in the RUNX1/RUNX1T1 rearrangement. Despite the causative role of the RUNX1/RUNX1T1 fusion gene in leukaemia initiation, additional genetic lesions are required for disease development. Here we identify recurring ZBTB7A mutations in 23% (13/56) of AML t(8;21) patients, including missense and truncating mutations resulting in alteration or loss of the C-terminal zinc-finger domain of ZBTB7A. The transcription factor ZBTB7A is important for haematopoietic lineage fate decisions and for regulation of glycolysis. On a functional level, we show that ZBTB7A mutations disrupt the transcriptional repressor potential and the anti-proliferative effect of ZBTB7A. The specific association of ZBTB7A mutations with t(8;21) rearranged AML points towards leukaemogenic cooperativity between mutant ZBTB7A and the RUNX1/RUNX1T1 fusion. PMID:27252013

  8. Radioimmunotherapy for treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. Conceptual chances

    The prognosis of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) has improved considerably by introduction of aggressive consolidation chemotherapy and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Nevertheless, only 20-30% of patients with AML achieve long-term disease-free survival after SCT. The most common cause of treatment failure is relapse. Additionally, mortality rates are significantly increased by therapy-related causes such as toxicity of chemotherapy and complications of SCT. Including radioimmunotherapies in the treatment of AML and myelodyplastic syndrome (MDS) allows for the achievement of a pronounced antileukaemic effect for the reduction of relapse rates on the one hand. On the other hand, no increase of acute toxicity and later complications should be induced. These effects are important for the primary reduction of tumour cells as well as for the myelblative conditioning before SCT. This paper provides a systematic and critical review of the currently used radionuclides and immunoconjugates for the treatment of AML and MDS and summarizes the literature on primary tumour cell reductive radioimmunotherapies on the one hand and conditioning radioimmunotherapies before SCT on the other hand. (orig.)

  9. Combined bezafibrate and medroxyprogesterone acetate: potential novel therapy for acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Farhat L Khanim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The majority of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML patients are over sixty years of age. With current treatment regimens, survival rates amongst these, and also those younger patients who relapse, remain dismal and novel therapies are urgently required. In particular, therapies that have anti-leukaemic activity but that, unlike conventional chemotherapy, do not impair normal haemopoiesis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate the potent anti-leukaemic activity of the combination of the lipid-regulating drug bezafibrate (BEZ and the sex hormone medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA against AML cell lines and primary AML cells. The combined activity of BEZ and MPA (B/M converged upon the increased synthesis and reduced metabolism of prostaglandin D(2 (PGD(2 resulting in elevated levels of the downstream highly bioactive, anti-neoplastic prostaglandin 15-deoxy Delta(12,14 PGJ(2 (15d-PGJ(2. BEZ increased PGD(2 synthesis via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and activation of the lipid peroxidation pathway. MPA directed prostaglandin synthesis towards 15d-PGJ(2 by inhibiting the PGD(2 11beta -ketoreductase activity of the aldo-keto reductase AKR1C3, which metabolises PGD(2 to 9alpha11beta-PGF(2alpha. B/M treatment resulted in growth arrest, apoptosis and cell differentiation in both AML cell lines and primary AML cells and these actions were recapitulated by treatment with 15d-PGJ(2. Importantly, the actions of B/M had little effect on the survival of normal adult myeloid progenitors. SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively our data demonstrate that B/M treatment of AML cells elevated ROS and delivered the anti-neoplastic actions of 15d-PGJ(2. These observations provide the mechanistic rationale for the redeployment of B/M in elderly and relapsed AML.

  10. Awareness of acute myeloid leukaemia risk induced by diagnosis of a myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Ousseine, Youssoufa M; Butow, Phyllis N; Julian-Reynier, Claire; Dring, Rebecca; Festy, Patrick; Fenaux, Pierre; Vey, Norbert; Mancini, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) can evolve to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in approximately 30% of cases. Knowing their AML risk is important for patients because it might impact adherence to care and psychological health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the awareness of AML risk among MDS patients and to study the factors associated with this awareness. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to all members of French and Australian patients' national MDS associations. Data of 301 patients were analysed. Patients were satisfied with the information they had received, but 33.2% did not know that they had an increased risk of developing AML. Younger age, higher-risk MDS treatment, preferences for health-related information and satisfaction with information provided about treatment were the factors independently associated with awareness of AML risk. Compared to unaware patients, patients knowing their risk were more likely to participate in a hypothetical clinical trial (83.0% vs 72.4%, p=0.043). More efforts are needed to provide more systematic information about AML risk to patients wishing to know it. More research is needed to study if increasing awareness can lead to more active engagement of MDS patients in their care and can increase the rate of clinical trial participation. PMID:27173089

  11. Metabolomic profiling of drug responses in acute myeloid leukaemia cell lines.

    Stefano Tiziani

    Full Text Available Combined bezafibrate (BEZ and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA exert unexpected antileukaemic activities against acute myeloid leukaemia (AML and these activities are associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS within the tumor cells. Although the generation of ROS by these drugs is supported by preceding studies including our own, the interrelationship between the cellular effects of the drugs and ROS generation is not well understood. Here we report the use of NMR metabolomic profiling to further study the effect of BEZ and MPA on three AML cell lines and to shed light on the underlying mechanism of action. For this we focused on drug effects induced during the initial 24 hours of treatment prior to the onset of overt cellular responses and examined these in the context of basal differences in metabolic profiles between the cell lines. Despite their ultimately profound cellular effects, the early changes in metabolic profiles engendered by these drugs were less pronounced than the constitutive metabolic differences between cell types. Nonetheless, drug treatments engendered common metabolic changes, most markedly in the response to the combination of BEZ and MPA. These responses included changes to TCA cycle intermediates consistent with recently identified chemical actions of ROS. Notable amongst these was the conversion of alpha-ketoglutarate to succinate which was recapitulated by the treatment of cell extracts with exogenous hydrogen peroxide. These findings indicate that the actions of combined BEZ and MPA against AML cells are indeed mediated downstream of the generation of ROS rather than some hitherto unsuspected mechanism. Moreover, our findings demonstrate that metabolite profiles represent highly sensitive markers for genomic differences between cells and their responses to external stimuli. This opens new perspectives to use metabolic profiling as a tool to study the rational redeployment of drugs in new disease

  12. Association between single nucleotide polymorphisms in deoxycytidine kinase and treatment response among acute myeloid leukaemia patients

    JYShi; ZZZhang; SJZhu; YMGu; BWLi; GBai; XTGao; XDHu; JJin; WHuang; WChen; ZChen

    2005-01-01

    Development of resistance to 1-beta-arabinofuranosylcytosine (AraC) is a major obstacle in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Deficiency of functional deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) plays an important role in AraC resistance in vitro. We screened 5378 bp sequences of the dCK gene, including all exons and the 5' flanking region, and identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the regulatory region (rSNPs) with high allele frequencies. These two rSNPs (-201 C>T and -360C>G) formed two major haplotypes. Genotyping with sequencing and MassARRAY system among 122 AML patients showed that those with -360CG/-201CT and -360GG/-201TT compound genotypes (n = 41) displayed a favourable response to chemotherapy whereas those with -360CC/-201CC (n= 81) tended to have a poor response (P = 0.025). Moreover, real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction showed that patients with -360CG/-201CT and -360GG/-201TT genotypes expressed higher level of dCK mRNA compared to those with the -360CC/-201CC genotype (P = 0.0034). Luciferase-reporter assay showed that dCK 5' regulatory region bearing -360G/-201T genotype alone had an eight-fold greater transcriptional activation activity compared to that with -360C/-201C genotype, whereas co-transfection of both -360G/-201T and -360C/-201C constructs mimicked the heterozygous genotype, which exhibited a four-fold greater activity compared to that with -360C/-201C. These results indicate that rSNP haplotypes of dCK gene may serve as a genetic marker for predicting drug responsiveness, which will be beneficial in establishing more effective AML chemotherapeutic regimens.

  13. Extreme hyperferritinemia in the setting of acute myeloid leukaemia: a case report of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    Denimal, Damien; Ménégaut, Louise; Rossi, Cédric; Duvillard, Laurence; Masson, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Major hyperferritinemia is a rare feature in clinical laboratories associated with a wide variety of disorders, including hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). The diagnosis of HLH is based on clinical and biological criteria, such as those proposed by the Histiocyte Society. However, several of these criteria are not relevant in the specific setting of hematologic malignancies. Materials and methods A 69-year-old male was treated for an acute myeloid leukaemia. On day 15 after the start of chemotherapy, he developed severe sepsis with high fever, low blood pressure and hepatosplenomegaly. Results Blood tests were marked by extreme hyperferritinemia (191,000 µg/L, reference range: 26-388 µg/L) with increased C-reactive protein (87.0 mg/L) and procalcitonin (1.94 µg/L) and aspartate aminotransferase (499 U/L 37 °C) in the setting of chemotherapy-induced aplasia. This unusual extreme ferritinemia led to suspect HLH triggered by an invasive infection. Under intensive treatment, the clinical status improved and ferritin levels significantly decreased. Conclusions The diagnosis of HLH is usually based on clinical and biological criteria, mainly fever, splenomegaly, cytopenias, hypertriglyceridemia, hypofibrinogenemia, hemophagocytosis and hyperferritinemia. In this patient, the diagnosis of HLH was challenging because several criteria, such as hypertriglyceridemia, hemophagocytosis and hypofibrinogenemia, were absent. In addition, some criteria of HLH are not relevant in the setting of hematologic malignancy, in which fever, splenomegaly, cytopenias and elevated lactate dehydrogenase are commonly observed independently of HLH. This unusual case of extremely high ferritinemia emphasizes the important weight of the ferritin level for the diagnosis of HLH in adult patients in the setting of hematologic malignancies.

  14. Chronic myeloid leukaemia occurring in a patient with hairy cell leukaemia

    Wandroo, F; Bareford, D; El-Jehani, F

    2000-01-01

    Occurrences of second malignancies in hairy cell leukaemia are well recognised. Most of these malignancies are either solid tumours or lymphoproliferative disorders. The association of myeloproliferative disorders with hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is very rare. This report describes a case of a patient with HCL who after remaining in remission developed Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), which rapidly transformed to acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with further cytog...

  15. Targeting CD13 (aminopeptidase-N) in turn downregulates ADAM17 by internalization in acute myeloid leukaemia cells

    Bouchet, Sandrine; TANG, RUOPING; Fava, Fanny; Legrand, Ollivier; Bauvois, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Secreted matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 and membrane-anchored aminopeptidase-N/CD13 are abnormally expressed in human acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We previously showed that CD13 ligation by anti-CD13 monoclonal antibodies can induce apoptosis in AML cells. Here, we assessed ADAM17 expression in primary blood blasts CD13+CD33+ from patients with AML. Primary AML cells expressed ADAM17 transcript and its surface expression was higher in subtype M4 (myelomonocytic) and M5 (monocyt...

  16. Haemostatic function and biomarkers of endothelial damage before and after platelet transfusion in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    Larsen, A M; Leinøe, E B; Johansson, P I; Larsen, R; Wantzin, P; Birgens, H; Ostrowski, S R

    2015-01-01

    and after platelet transfusion in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood was sampled before, 1 and 24 h after platelet transfusion. Primary and secondary haemostasis was evaluated by whole blood aggregometry (Multiplate) and thromboelastography (TEG). Endothelial...... values of most TEG parameters and slightly increased platelet aggregation (all P < 0·05). Endothelial biomarkers were not significantly affected by transfusion. The 1 h sCD40L level correlated positively with Syndecan-1 and soluble thrombomodulin delta values, biomarkers of endothelial damage (both P = 0...

  17. Clofarabine and high-dose cytosine arabinoside in the treatment of refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia

    Tse, Eric; Anskar Y. H. Leung; Sim, Joycelyn; Lee, Harold K.K.; Liu, Herman S. Y.; Yip, Sze-Fai; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2011-01-01

    Clofarabine (40 mg/m 2/day×5) and high-dose cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C, 1-2 g/m 2/day×5) were used in 10 men and 11 women, at a median age of 45 (22-62) years, with refractory (N=4) and relapsed (N=17) acute myeloid leukaemia, after a median of 3 (2-5) prior regimens. Grade 4 myelosuppression was observed in all cases, with two patients dying of bacterial sepsis. Nine patients achieved a complete remission. Disease status, number of prior therapies, and cytogenetic aberrations were not assoc...

  18. Amino-acid substitutions at codon 13 of the N-ras oncogene in human acute myeloid leukaemia

    Bos, Johannes L.; Toksoz, Deniz; Marshall, Christopher J.; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty; Veeneman, Gerrit H.; van der Eb, Alex J.; van Boom, Jacques H.; Janssen, Johannes W. G.; Steenvoorden, Ada C. M.

    1985-06-01

    DNAs from four out of five patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) tested by an in vivo selection assay in nude mice using transfected mouse NIH 3T3 cells were found to contain an activated N-ras oncogene. Using a set of synthetic oligonucleotide probes, we have detected a mutation at codon 13 in all four genes. The same codon is mutated in an additional AML DNA that is positive in the focus-formation assay on 3T3 cells. DNA from the peripheral blood of one patient in remission does not contain a codon 13 mutation.

  19. A Fatal Case of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia-Methotrexate Related or Primary Autoimmune Disease Related: A Rare Case Report.

    Agarwal, Saurabh; Kaeley, Nidhi; Gupta, Priyanka; Gupta, Vibha; Bhatia, Rohan

    2016-03-01

    Methotrexate is being used for many years in the treatment of chronic medical disorders e.g. rheumatoid arthritis since 1951. It has been associated with various systemic toxicities and complications including bone marrow suppression and lymphomas. The development of leukaemia in a patient of chronic rheumatoid arthritis is either related with the primary disease or due to the drugs which are used in the treatment like cyclophosphamide. In our present case, a 70-year-old female who was a known case of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and was on methotrexate once a week orally for the past 20 years presented with complaints of loss of appetite, loss of weight and anaemia since 2 months. After thorough examination and investigation, she was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML-M4) with bilateral chest consolidation. PMID:27134915

  20. Maintenance treatment with azacytidine for patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or acute myeloid leukaemia following MDS in complete remission after induction chemotherapy

    Grövdal, Michael; Karimi, Mohsen; Khan, Rasheed;

    2010-01-01

    This prospective Phase II study is the first to assess the feasibility and efficacy of maintenance 5-azacytidine for older patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia and MDS-acute myeloid leukaemia syndromes in complete remission (CR) after induction ......-IV thrombocytopenia and neutropenia occurred after 9.5 and 30% of the cycles, respectively, while haemoglobin levels increased during treatment. 5-azacytidine treatment is safe, feasible and may be of benefit in a subset of patients....

  1. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of acute myeloid leukaemia in pregnancy.

    Ali, Sahra; Jones, Gail L; Culligan, Dominic J; Marsden, Philippa J; Russell, Nigel; Embleton, Nicholas D; Craddock, Charles

    2015-08-01

    Pregnant women should be managed by a multidisciplinary team that includes haematologists, obstetricians, neonatologists and anaesthetists (Grade 1C) As for non-pregnant patients, acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) should be diagnosed using the World Health Organization (WHO) classification (Grade 1A) Women diagnosed with AML in pregnancy should be treated without delay (Grade 1B) When the diagnosis of AML is made in the first trimester, a successful pregnancy outcome is unlikely and spontaneous pregnancy loss in this situation carries considerable risks for the mother. The reasons for and against elective termination should be discussed with the patient (Grade 2C) In the case of presentation beyond 32 weeks gestation, it may be reasonable to deliver the foetus prior to commencement of chemotherapy (Grade 2C) Between 24 and 32 weeks, risks of foetal chemotherapy exposure must be balanced against risks of prematurity following elective delivery at that stage of gestation (Grade 1C) The risk-benefit ratio must be carefully considered before using any drugs in pregnancy (Grade 1C) Where AML induction chemotherapy is delivered, a standard daunorubicin, cytarabine 3 + 10 schedule should be used (Grade 1B) Chemotherapy should be dosed according to actual body weight and adjustments made for weight changes during treatment (Grade 1C) Quinolones, tetracyclines and sulphonamide use should be avoided in pregnancy (Grade 1B) Amphotericin B or lipid derivatives are the antifungal of choice in pregnancy (Grade 2C) Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-negative blood products should be administered during pregnancy regardless of CMV serostatus (Grade 1B) A course of corticosteroids should be considered if delivery is anticipated between 24 and 35 weeks gestation, given over a 48-h period during the week prior to delivery (Grade 1A) Use of magnesium sulphate should be considered in the 24 h prior to delivery if this is before 30 weeks gestation (Grade 1A) Where possible, delivery should be

  2. Promoter hypermethylation of the retinoic acid receptor beta2 gene is frequent in acute myeloid leukaemia and associated with the presence of CBFβ-MYH11 fusion transcripts

    Rethmeier, Anita; Aggerholm, Anni; Olesen, Lene Hyldahl;

    2006-01-01

    Silencing of the putative tumour suppressor gene retinoic acid receptor beta2 (RARbeta2) caused by aberrant promoter hypermethylation has been identified in several solid tumours. In order to evaluate the extent of RARbeta2 hypermethylation and transcription in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) at...

  3. Myeloid Sarcoma of the Uterine Cervix as Presentation of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia after Treatment with Low-Dose Radioiodine for Thyroid Cancer: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Anne Sophie Weingertner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of acute myeloid leukaemia after low-dose radioiodine therapy and its presentation as a myeloid sarcoma of the uterine cervix are both rare events. We report a case of acute myeloid leukaemia revealed by a myeloid sarcoma of the uterine cervix in a 48-year-old woman, 17 months after receiving a total dose of 100 mCi 131I for papillary thyroid cancer. A strict hematological follow-up of patients treated with any dose of 131I is recommended to accurately detect any hematological complications which might have been underestimated. Unusual presentations, such as chloroma of the uterine cervix, may reveal myeloid malignancy and should be kept in mind.

  4. CD33 monoclonal antibody conjugated Au cluster nano-bioprobe for targeted flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia

    Retnakumari, Archana; Jayasimhan, Jasusri; Chandran, Parwathy; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Mony, Ullas; Koyakutty, Manzoor, E-mail: manzoork@aims.amrita.edu, E-mail: ullasmony@aims.amrita.edu [Amrita Centre for Nanoscience and Molecular Medicine, Amrita Institute of Medical Science, Cochin 682 041 (India)

    2011-07-15

    Protein stabilized gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) are biocompatible, near-infrared (NIR) emitting nanosystems having a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report the development of a Au-NC based targeted fluorescent nano-bioprobe for the flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. Au-NCs with {approx} 25-28 atoms showing bright red-NIR fluorescence (600-750 nm) and average size of {approx} 0.8 nm were prepared by bovine serum albumin assisted reduction-cum-stabilization in aqueous phase. The protein protected clusters were conjugated with monoclonal antibody against CD33 myeloid antigen, which is overexpressed in {approx} 99.2% of the primitive population of AML cells, as confirmed by immunophenotyping using flow cytometry. Au-NC-CD33 conjugates having average size of {approx} 12 nm retained bright fluorescence over an extended duration of {approx} a year, as the albumin protein protects Au-NCs against degradation. Nanotoxicity studies revealed excellent biocompatibility of Au-NC conjugates, as they showed no adverse effect on the cell viability and inflammatory response. Target specificity of the conjugates for detecting CD33 expressing AML cells (KG1a) in flow cytometry showed specific staining of {approx} 95.4% of leukaemia cells within 1-2 h compared to a non-specific uptake of {approx} 8.2% in human peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) which are CD33{sup low}. The confocal imaging also demonstrated the targeted uptake of CD33 conjugated Au-NCs by leukaemia cells, thus confirming the flow cytometry results. This study demonstrates that novel nano-bioprobes can be developed using protein protected fluorescent nanoclusters of Au for the molecular receptor targeted flow cytometry based detection and imaging of cancer cells.

  5. CD33 monoclonal antibody conjugated Au cluster nano-bioprobe for targeted flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia

    Retnakumari, Archana; Jayasimhan, Jasusri; Chandran, Parwathy; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Mony, Ullas; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-07-01

    Protein stabilized gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) are biocompatible, near-infrared (NIR) emitting nanosystems having a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report the development of a Au-NC based targeted fluorescent nano-bioprobe for the flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. Au-NCs with ~ 25-28 atoms showing bright red-NIR fluorescence (600-750 nm) and average size of ~ 0.8 nm were prepared by bovine serum albumin assisted reduction-cum-stabilization in aqueous phase. The protein protected clusters were conjugated with monoclonal antibody against CD33 myeloid antigen, which is overexpressed in ~ 99.2% of the primitive population of AML cells, as confirmed by immunophenotyping using flow cytometry. Au-NC-CD33 conjugates having average size of ~ 12 nm retained bright fluorescence over an extended duration of ~ a year, as the albumin protein protects Au-NCs against degradation. Nanotoxicity studies revealed excellent biocompatibility of Au-NC conjugates, as they showed no adverse effect on the cell viability and inflammatory response. Target specificity of the conjugates for detecting CD33 expressing AML cells (KG1a) in flow cytometry showed specific staining of ~ 95.4% of leukaemia cells within 1-2 h compared to a non-specific uptake of ~ 8.2% in human peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) which are CD33low. The confocal imaging also demonstrated the targeted uptake of CD33 conjugated Au-NCs by leukaemia cells, thus confirming the flow cytometry results. This study demonstrates that novel nano-bioprobes can be developed using protein protected fluorescent nanoclusters of Au for the molecular receptor targeted flow cytometry based detection and imaging of cancer cells.

  6. CD33 monoclonal antibody conjugated Au cluster nano-bioprobe for targeted flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia

    Protein stabilized gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) are biocompatible, near-infrared (NIR) emitting nanosystems having a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report the development of a Au-NC based targeted fluorescent nano-bioprobe for the flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. Au-NCs with ∼ 25-28 atoms showing bright red-NIR fluorescence (600-750 nm) and average size of ∼ 0.8 nm were prepared by bovine serum albumin assisted reduction-cum-stabilization in aqueous phase. The protein protected clusters were conjugated with monoclonal antibody against CD33 myeloid antigen, which is overexpressed in ∼ 99.2% of the primitive population of AML cells, as confirmed by immunophenotyping using flow cytometry. Au-NC-CD33 conjugates having average size of ∼ 12 nm retained bright fluorescence over an extended duration of ∼ a year, as the albumin protein protects Au-NCs against degradation. Nanotoxicity studies revealed excellent biocompatibility of Au-NC conjugates, as they showed no adverse effect on the cell viability and inflammatory response. Target specificity of the conjugates for detecting CD33 expressing AML cells (KG1a) in flow cytometry showed specific staining of ∼ 95.4% of leukaemia cells within 1-2 h compared to a non-specific uptake of ∼ 8.2% in human peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) which are CD33low. The confocal imaging also demonstrated the targeted uptake of CD33 conjugated Au-NCs by leukaemia cells, thus confirming the flow cytometry results. This study demonstrates that novel nano-bioprobes can be developed using protein protected fluorescent nanoclusters of Au for the molecular receptor targeted flow cytometry based detection and imaging of cancer cells.

  7. Haematological manifestations and frequency of fab subtypes in patients of acute myeloid leukaemia: a single center study

    To determine the clinical/haematological manifestations and frequency of different subtypes of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) according to the French-American-British (FAB) classification. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out at haematology department of Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi from January 2011 to September 2012. Material and Methods: Retrospective review of documents of patient diagnosed to have acute myeloid leukaemia on bone marrow aspiration was done. Patient's age, gender, major signs and symptoms at time of presentation and haematological parameters of peripheral blood and bone marrow were noted. The subtype of AML according to FAB classification was also documented. Data was entered and analyzed in SPSS 16.0. Results: During the selected study duration acute myeloid leukaemia was diagnosed in 173 patients on bone marrow examination. Out of these 123 (71.1%) were males and 50 (28.9%) were females. Thirty (17.3%) of the patients fell in paediatric age group (< 15 years) while the remaining 143 (82.7%) were in adult age category (> 15 years). The mean age of presentation was 9 years among paediatric patients and 44.5 years among adults. The overall mean age of both these two groups was 38.4 years (3-84 years). Fever (71.6%), generalized weakness (34.1%) and pallor (23.7%) were the three main complaints of the patients, followed by splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. The mean total leukocyte count, haemoglobin and platelet count were 57.4 * 109/L, 7.9 g/dL and 54 * 109/L respectively. AML-M2 was found to be the most frequent FAB AML subtype among 72 (41.6%) paediatric and adult patients. Conclusion: The main signs and symptoms of the patients of AML presenting to our centre were fever, generalized weakness and pallor. AML-M2 was found to be the most common FAB subtype among AML in children and adults. (author)

  8. Minimal residual disease evaluation by flow cytometry is a complementary tool to cytogenetics for treatment decisions in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Vidriales, María-Belén; Pérez-López, Estefanía; Pegenaute, Carlota; Castellanos, Marta; Pérez, José-Juan; Chandía, Mauricio; Díaz-Mediavilla, Joaquín; Rayón, Consuelo; de Las Heras, Natalia; Fernández-Abellán, Pascual; Cabezudo, Miguel; de Coca, Alfonso García; Alonso, Jose M; Olivier, Carmen; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Montesinos, Pau; Fernández, Rosa; García-Suárez, Julio; García, Magdalena; Sayas, María-José; Paiva, Bruno; González, Marcos; Orfao, Alberto; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2016-01-01

    The clinical utility of minimal residual disease (MRD) analysis in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is not yet defined. We analysed the prognostic impact of MRD level at complete remision after induction therapy using multiparameter flow cytometry in 306 non-APL AML patients. First, we validated the prognostic value of MRD-thresholds we have previously proposed (≥ 0.1%; ≥ 0.01-0.1%; and information on favourable and adverse cytogenetics, since patients with favourable cytogenetics and high MRD levels have poor prognosis and patients with adverse cytogenetics but undetectable MRD overcomes the adverse prognosis. Interestingly, in patients with intermediate or high MRD levels, intensification with transplant improved the outcome as compared with chemotherapy, while the type of intensification therapy did not influenced the outcome of patients with low MRD levels. Multivariate analysis revealed age, MRD and cytogenetics as independent variables. Moreover, a scoring system, easy in clinical practice, was generated based on MRD level and cytogenetics. PMID:26598032

  9. Pseudozyma aphidis fungaemia with invasive fungal pneumonia in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia: case report and literature review.

    Joo, Hyonsoo; Choi, Yeon-Geun; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Choi, Jae-Ki; Lee, Dong-Gun; Kim, Hee-Je; Jo, Irene; Park, Yeon-Joon; Lee, Kyo-Young

    2016-01-01

    Pseudozyma species rarely cause invasive diseases in humans, which are usually isolated from plants. There have been anecdotal reports regarding Pseudozyma species infections in patients with underlying diseases or in neonates. However, clinical data and the pathogenicity in humans are still insufficient. We experienced a case of Pseudozyma aphidis fungaemia with invasive fungal pneumonia that developed during reinduction chemotherapy in a 51-year-old male with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). P. aphidis was suspected based on the morphology of the yeast isolated from the blood and was confirmed via rDNA gene sequencing analysis. The patient successfully underwent stem cell transplantation with continuing antifungal treatment and finally completely recovered from both the AML and infectious complications. Here, we report a case of P. aphidis infection that developed during neutropenia in an AML patient and review the global literature. PMID:26608844

  10. Incidence and significance of FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutations in patients with normal karyotype acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Haslam, K

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a heterogeneous clonal disorder of haematopoietic progenitor cells. Approximately half of all adult AML patients have a normal karyotype (NK-AML) and an intermediate risk prognosis. AIMS: To determine the incidence and prognostic significance of NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations in a population of patients with NK-AML. METHODS: FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutation status was retrospectively sought in presentation samples from 44 NK-AML patients. RESULTS: FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutations were detected in 45.5 and 54.5% of patients, respectively, allowing stratification according to genotype. CONCLUSIONS: FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutation status can be defined in NK-AML. Prospective screening for these mutations is advocated in all NK-AML patients, as the genotype is of clinical importance when considering treatment options including stem cell transplantation.

  11. Biphenotypic acute leukaemia: Case reports of two paediatric patients

    Vujić Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Biphenotypic acute leukaemia is an uncommon type of leukaemia whose blasts co-express myeloid and B-or T-lymphoid antigens. Case report. We describe two cases of paediatric patients with biphenotypic acute leukaemia. A four-year-old female patient was found to have myeloid and B-lymphoid associated antigens in the same blast cells. Cytogenetic analysis showed a Philadelphia (Ph positivity t (9;22 (q34;q11 with rearrangements of M.bcr-Abl (p210. She was treated with combined acute myeloid leukaemia/acute lymphoblastic leukaemia induction therapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation. The patient died due to the complications of stem cell transplantation procedure. Another patient was a 20-month-old girl with myeloid and T-lymphoid associated antigens in the blast cells and with normal karyotype. She received acute myeloid leukaemia induction therapy. She has never achieved remission. Discussion. Immunophenotype is essential to establish the diagnosis of biphenotypic acute leukaemia according to the scoring system adopted by the European Group of Immunological Classification of Leukaemia. There is no agreement about uniformity in treatment for the patients with this type of leukaemia. Biphenotypic acute leukaemia is a high risk leukaemia which requires a more intensive treatment. Conclusion. Therapy for every patient with biphenotypic acute leukaemia should depend on their immunophenotype and gene rearrangement profiles.

  12. AML1/ETO proteins control POU4F1/BRN3A expression and function in t(8;21) acute myeloid leukaemia

    Dunne, Jenny; Gascoyne, Duncan M.; Lister, T. Andrew; Brady, Hugh J.M.; Heidenreich, Olaf; Young, Bryan D.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of genetic lesions, including chromosomal translocations, internal tandem duplications and mutations have been described in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Expression profiling has shown that chromosomal translocations, in particular, are associated with distinctive patterns of gene expression. AML exhibiting the translocation t(8;21), which fuses the AML1 and ETO genes, has such a characteristic expression profile. One gene whose expression is highly correlated with the presence of ...

  13. The value of molecular stratification for CEBPA_DM and NPM1_MUT_FLT3_WT genotypes in older patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    Dickson, G.J.; Bustraan, S.; Hills, R. K.; Ali, A; Goldstone, A. H.; Burnett, A K; Linch, D. C.; Gale, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    Older adult patients (≥60 years) with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) are generally considered to be poor-risk and there is limited information available regarding risk stratification based on molecular characterization in this age group, particularly for the double-mutant CEBPA (CEBPADM) genotype. To investigate whether a molecular favourable-risk genotype can be identified, we investigated CEBPA, NPM1 and FLT3 status and prognostic impact in a cohort of 301 patients aged 60 years or more with...

  14. Lack of structural rearrangement in c-kit and stem cell factor genes in Hong Kong Chinese patients with myelodysplastic syndromes or acute myeloid leukaemia

    Chui, CH; Leung, PHM; Lau, FY; Wan, TSK; Cheng, G.; Chan, LC

    1998-01-01

    Stem cell factor is a haemopoietic growth factor that interacts with the c-kit--encoded transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor during signal transduction in haemopoietic progenitor stem cells. We have screened 127 Chinese patients with myelodysplastic syndromes or acute myeloid leukaemia for structural rearrangements in the stem cell factor and c-kit genes using Southern blot analysis. No structural rearrangements were detected in any of the bone marrow samples that were tested. It seems that...

  15. Clofarabine with high dose cytarabine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming for relapsed and refractory acute myeloid leukaemia

    Becker, Pamela S.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Petersdorf, Stephen H.; Storer, Barry; Pierce, Sherry; Shan, Jianqin; Hendrie, Paul C.; Pagel, John M.; Shustov, Andrei R.; Stirewalt, Derek L.; Faderl, Stephan; Harrington, Elizabeth; Estey, Elihu H.

    2011-01-01

    This phase I/II study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose, toxicity, and efficacy of clofarabine in combination with high dose cytarabine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming (GCLAC), in the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Dose escalation of clofarabine occurred without dose-limiting toxicity, so most patients were treated at the maximum dose, 25 mg/m2/day with cytarabine 2 g/m2/day, each...

  16. Azacitidine prolongs overall survival and reduces infections and hospitalizations in patients with WHO-defined acute myeloid leukaemia compared with conventional care regimens: an update

    Fenaux, P; Mufti, GJ; Hellström-Lindberg, E; Santini, V; Gattermann, N; G. Sanz; List, AF; Gore, SD; Seymour, JF; Backstrom, J; Zimmerman, L.; McKenzie, D; Beach, CL; Silverman, LB

    2008-01-01

    Azacitidine (AZA), as demonstrated in the phase III trial (AZA-001), is the first MDS treatment to significantly prolong overall survival (OS) in higher risk MDS pts ((2007) Blood 110 817). Approximately, one-third of the patients (pts) enrolled in AZA-001 were FAB RAEB-T (≥20–30% blasts) and now meet the WHO criteria for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) ((1999) Blood 17 3835). Considering the poor prognosis (median survival

  17. Case report: hydroquinone and/or glutaraldehyde induced acute myeloid leukaemia?

    Alexopoulos Evangelos C

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposures to high doses of irradiation, to chemotherapy, benzene, petroleum products, paints, embalming fluids, ethylene oxide, herbicides, pesticides, and smoking have been associated with an increased risk of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. Although there in no epidemiological evidence of relation between X-ray developer, fixer and replenisher liquids and AML, these included glutaraldehyde which has weakly associated with lymphocytic leukemia in rats and hydroquinone has been increasingly implicated in producing leukemia, causing DNA and chromosomal damage, inhibits topo-isomerase II, alter hematopoiesis and inhibit apoptosis of neoplastic cells. Case presentation Two white females (A and B hired in 1985 as medical radiation technologists in a primary care center, in Greece. In July 2001, woman A, 38-years-old, was diagnosed as having acute monocytic leukaemia (FAB M5. The patient did not respond to therapy and died threeweeks later. In August 2001, woman B, 35-year-old, was diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (FAB M3. Since discharge, she is in continuous complete remission. Both women were non smokers without any medical history. Shortly after these incidents official inspectors and experts inspected workplace, examined equipment, archives of repairs, notes, interviewed and monitored employees. They concluded that shielding was inadequate for balcony's door but personal monitoring did not show any exceeding of TLV of 20 mSv yearly and cytogenetics analysis did not reveal findings considered to be characteristics of ionizing exposure. Equipment for developing photos had a long list of repairs, mainly leakages of liquids and increases of temperature. On several occasions the floor has been flooded especially during 1987–1993 and 1997–2001. Inspection confirmed a complete lack of ventilation and many spoiled medical x-ray films. Employees reported that an "osmic" level was continuously evident and frequently

  18. MiR-424 and miR-155 deregulated expression in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukaemia: correlation with NPM1 and FLT3 mutation status

    Faraoni Isabella; Laterza Serena; Ardiri Davide; Ciardi Claudia; Fazi Francesco; Lo-Coco Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background MicroRNA have a central role in normal haematopoiesis and are deregulated in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The purpose of the study was to investigate by qRT-PCR the expression of miRNAs involved in myeloid differentiation (miR-424, miR-155, miR-223, miR-17-5p) in 48 patients with cytogenetically normal AML well characterized for NPM1 and/or FLT3 mutations. Three types of normalization were used for the data validation. Findings We found that miR-424 was down-modulated in...

  19. Significance of Phi bodies in acute leukaemia.

    Cardullo, L de S; Morilla, R; Catovsky, D

    1981-01-01

    Material from 39 patients with acute leukaemia was investigated with the peroxidase cytochemical reaction using 3,3'diaminobenzidine (DAB) and other substrates in order to test their sensitivity in detecting myeloid differentiation. The proportion of positive blasts and of cases with Auer rods in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) was significantly greater with DAB than with benzidine. In addition, Phi bodies were demonstrated in AML blasts only when DAB was used; Phi bodies were also observed in two out of seven cases of chronic granulocytic leukaemia in "myeloid" blast crisis but were not seen in any case of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Phi bodies were more numerous when the reaction was carried out at pH 9.7, and their number was significantly reduced in the presence of 3-amino 1,2,4-triazole. Both findings suggest that the Phi bodies derive from catalase-containing granules (microperoxisomes) and are distinct from Auer rods, which derive from peroxidase-containing (primary) granules. Like Auer rods, Phi bodies appear to be characteristics of immature myeloid cells in leukaemia but are seen with a higher frequency than Auer rods in acute myeloid leukemia. Images p154-a PMID:6262384

  20. Pulmonary fungal infections in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia: is it the time to revise the radiological diagnostic criteria?

    Maccioni, Francesca; Vetere, Simone; De Felice, Carlo; Al Ansari, Najwa; Micozzi, Alessandra; Gentile, Giuseppe; Foà, Robin; Girmenia, Corrado

    2016-06-01

    The definition of pulmonary fungal infections (PFI) according to the EORTC-MSG criteria may lack diagnostic sensitivity due to the possible presentation of PFI with different radiological pictures. We evaluated the hypothesis to apply less restrictive radiological criteria to define PFI in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) submitted to chemotherapy. Overall, 73 consecutive episodes of pulmonary infiltrates associated to positive serum galactomannan test or fungal isolation or galactomannan detection from respiratory specimens were considered. CT scans acquired at the onset of symptoms (time-0) and within 4 weeks (time-1) were analysed to identify specific (group A) or aspecific radiological signs (group B). Pulmonary infiltrates fulfilled the EORTC-MSG criteria in 49 patients (group A), whereas in 24 patients (group B) they did not reach the criteria due to aspecific CT findings at time-0. Eleven of 21 (52.4%) patients of the group B evaluable for the evolution of the radiological findings fulfilled EORTC-MSG criteria at time-1. All the analysed clinical and mycological characteristics, response to antifungal therapy and survival were comparable in the two groups. Our study seems to confirm the possibility to extend the radiological suspicion of PFI to less restrictive chest CT findings when supported by microbiological criteria in high-risk haematological patients. PMID:26865204

  1. Single nucleotide polymorphism in IL1B is associated with infection risk in paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Sung, L; Dix, D; Cellot, S; Gillmeister, B; Ethier, M C; Roslin, N M; Johnston, D L; Feusner, J; Mitchell, D; Lewis, V; Aplenc, R; Yanofsky, R; Portwine, C; Price, V; Zelcer, S; Silva, M; Bowes, L; Michon, B; Stobart, K; Traubici, J; Allen, U; Beyene, J; den Hollander, N; Paterson, A D

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with infection risk in children with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We conducted a multicentre, prospective cohort study that included children aged ≤18 years with de novo AML. DNA was isolated from blood lymphocytes or buccal swabs, and candidate gene SNP analysis was conducted. Primary outcome was the occurrence of microbiologically documented sterile site infection during chemotherapy. Secondary outcomes were Gram-positive and -negative infections, viridans group streptococcal infection and proven/probable invasive fungal infection. Interpretation was guided by consistency in risk alleles and microbiologic agent with previous literature. Over the study period 254 children and adolescents with AML were enrolled. Overall, 190 (74.8%) had at least one sterile site microbiologically documented infection. Among the 172 with inferred European ancestry and DNA available, nine significant associations were observed; two were consistent with previous literature. Allele A at IL1B (rs16944) was associated with decreased microbiologically documented infection, and allele G at IL10 (rs1800896) was associated with increased risk of Gram-positive infection. We identified SNPs associated with infection risk in paediatric AML. Genotype may provide insight into mechanisms of infection risk that could be used for supportive-care novel treatments. PMID:26932518

  2. Permutation tests for centre effect on survival endpoints with application in an acute myeloid leukaemia multicentre study.

    Biard, L; Porcher, R; Resche-Rigon, M

    2014-07-30

    When analysing multicentre data, it may be of interest to test whether the distribution of the endpoint varies among centres. In a mixed-effect model, testing for such a centre effect consists in testing to zero a random centre effect variance component. It has been shown that the usual asymptotic χ(2) distribution of the likelihood ratio and score statistics under the null does not necessarily hold. In the case of censored data, mixed-effects Cox models have been used to account for random effects, but few works have concentrated on testing to zero the variance component of the random effects. We propose a permutation test, using random permutation of the cluster indices, to test for a centre effect in multilevel censored data. Results from a simulation study indicate that the permutation tests have correct type I error rates, contrary to standard likelihood ratio tests, and are more powerful. The proposed tests are illustrated using data of a multicentre clinical trial of induction therapy in acute myeloid leukaemia patients. PMID:24676752

  3. Acute leukaemia: making sense of a complex blood cancer.

    Meenaghan, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Acute leukaemia represents a diverse group of blood cancers that affect both children and adults. Treatment schedules for these haematology cancers are often prolonged, with many associated side effects and complications. Nurses caring for patients with acute leukaemia require an anticipatory approach, where care is aimed at minimizing the side effects of treatment and being constantly vigilant for any impending adverse effects. Moreover, patients require support for the psychosocial issues that can arise for patients during their illness. This article provides an overview of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia. Nursing considerations in the care of patients being treated for acute leukaemia are also explored.

  4. Chemotherapy in a transplantable myeloid leukaemia in brown Norway rats : studies on BNML as a model for human acute myeloid leukaemia

    L.P. Colly

    1980-01-01

    textabstractLeukaemia accounts for less than 5% of the total number of malignant diseases in the USA {McCredie et al., 1976),· while about 9% of all neeplasros in the Netherlands originate in the lymphatic and blood forming organs. Because of the relatively easy accessibility of the turnoor cells in

  5. Genomic imbalances are confined to non-proliferating cells in paediatric patients with acute myeloid leukaemia and a normal or incomplete karyotype.

    Erica Ballabio

    Full Text Available Leukaemia is often associated with genetic alterations such as translocations, amplifications and deletions, and recurrent chromosome abnormalities are used as markers of diagnostic and prognostic relevance. However, a proportion of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML cases have an apparently normal karyotype despite comprehensive cytogenetic analysis. Based on conventional cytogenetic analysis of banded chromosomes, we selected a series of 23 paediatric patients with acute myeloid leukaemia and performed whole genome array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH using DNA samples derived from the same patients. Imbalances involving large chromosomal regions or entire chromosomes were detected by aCGH in seven of the patients studied. Results were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH to both interphase nuclei and metaphase chromosomes using appropriate bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC probes. The majority of these copy number alterations (CNAs were confirmed by FISH and found to localize to the interphase rather than metaphase nuclei. Furthermore, the proliferative states of the cells analyzed by FISH were tested by immunofluorescence using an antibody against the proliferation marker pKi67. Interestingly, these experiments showed that, in the vast majority of cases, the changes appeared to be confined to interphase nuclei in a non-proliferative status.

  6. Acute myeloid leukaemia-derived Langerhans-like cells enhance Th1 polarization upon TLR2 engagement.

    Bock, Stephanie; Murgueitio, Manuela S; Wolber, Gerhard; Weindl, Günther

    2016-03-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) represent a highly specialized subset of epidermal dendritic cells (DCs), yet not fully understood in their function of balancing skin immunity. Here, we investigated in vitro generated Langerhans-like cells obtained from the human acute myeloid leukaemia cell line MUTZ-3 (MUTZ-LCs) to study TLR- and cytokine-dependent activation of epidermal DCs. MUTZ-LCs revealed high TLR2 expression and responded robustly to TLR2 engagement, confirmed by increased CD83, CD86, PD-L1 and IDO expression, upregulated IL-6, IL-12p40 and IL-23p19 mRNA levels IL-8 release. TLR2 activation reduced CCR6 and elevated CCR7 mRNA expression and induced migration of MUTZ-LCs towards CCL21. Similar results were obtained by stimulation with pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β whereas ligands of TLR3 and TLR4 failed to induce a fully mature phenotype. Despite limited cytokine gene expression and production for TLR2-activated MUTZ-LCs, co-culture with naive CD4(+) T cells led to significantly increased IFN-γ and IL-22 levels indicating Th1 differentiation independent of IL-12. TLR2-mediated effects were blocked by the putative TLR2/1 antagonist CU-CPT22, however, no selectivity for either TLR2/1 or TLR2/6 was observed. Computer-aided docking studies confirmed non-selective binding of the TLR2 antagonist. Taken together, our results indicate a critical role for TLR2 signalling in MUTZ-LCs considering the leukemic origin of the generated Langerhans-like cells. PMID:26794428

  7. The new low-toxic histone deacetylase inhibitor S-(2) induces apoptosis in various acute myeloid leukaemia cells.

    Cellai, C; Balliu, M; Laurenzana, A; Guandalini, L; Matucci, R; Miniati, D; Torre, E; Nebbioso, A; Carafa, V; Altucci, L; Romanelli, M N; Paoletti, F

    2012-08-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) induce tumour cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis, and some of them are currently used in cancer therapy. Recently, we described a series of powerful HDACi characterized by a 1,4-benzodiazepine (BDZ) ring hybridized with a linear alkyl chain bearing a hydroxamate function as Zn(++)--chelating group. Here, we explored the anti-leukaemic properties of three novel hybrids, namely the chiral compounds (S)-2 and (R)-2, and their non-chiral analogue 4, which were first comparatively tested in promyelocytic NB4 cells. (S)-2 and partially 4--but not (R)-2--caused G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest by up-regulating cyclin G2 and p21 expression and down-regulating cyclin D2 expression, and also apoptosis as assessed by cell morphology and cytofluorimetric assay, histone H2AX phosphorylation and PARP cleavage. Notably, these events were partly prevented by an anti-oxidant. Moreover, novel HDACi prompted p53 and α-tubulin acetylation and, consistently, inhibited HDAC1 and 6 activity. The rank order of potency was (S)-2 > 4 > (R)-2, reflecting that of other biological assays and addressing (S)-2 as the most effective compound capable of triggering apoptosis in various acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cell lines and blasts from patients with different AML subtypes. Importantly, (S)-2 was safe in mice (up to 150 mg/kg/week) as determined by liver, spleen, kidney and bone marrow histopathology; and displayed negligible affinity for peripheral/central BDZ-receptors. Overall, the BDZ-hydroxamate (S)-2 showed to be a low-toxic HDACi with powerful anti-proliferative and pro-apototic activities towards different cultured and primary AML cells, and therefore of clinical interest to support conventional anti-leukaemic therapy. PMID:22004558

  8. Analysis of the interaction of induction regimens with p-glycoprotein expression in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia: results from the MRC AML15 trial

    Pallis, M; Hills, R.; White, P.; Grundy, M.; Russell, N.; A Burnett

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective analyses in non-randomised cohorts suggest that regimens containing fludarabine/Ara C and/or idarubicin/ara C may be more effective than daunorubicin/AraC (DA)-containing regimens in cases of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) overexpressing p-glycoprotein (Pgp). We prospectively measured Pgp protein and function by flow cytometry in CD45-gated blasts from 434 AML15 trial patients randomised to remission induction therapy with two courses of FLAG-Ida or DA±etoposide (DA/ADE). In all,...

  9. Sepsis in acute myeloid leukaemia patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy: no impact of chitotriosidase and mannose-binding lectin polymorphisms

    Klostergaard, Anja; Steffensen, Rudi; Møller, Jens K;

    2010-01-01

    Infections after chemotherapy often cause significant morbidity in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Chitotriosidase (CHIT) and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) are part of the innate immune system. Polymorphism in the CHIT-coding gene (CHIT1) may be associated with Gram-negative sepsis in...... observed. The severe and long-lasting neutropenia and mucositis after chemotherapy may explain why the MBL system does not protect against sepsis in patients with AML. Replacement therapy with recombinant MBL is not likely to decrease the risk of sepsis in patients with AML....

  10. Azacitidine prolongs overall survival and reduces infections and hospitalizations in patients with WHO-defined acute myeloid leukaemia compared with conventional care regimens: an update.

    Fenaux, P; Mufti, G J; Hellström-Lindberg, E; Santini, V; Gattermann, N; Sanz, G; List, A F; Gore, S D; Seymour, J F; Backstrom, J; Zimmerman, L; McKenzie, D; Beach, C L; Silverman, L B

    2008-01-01

    Azacitidine (AZA), as demonstrated in the phase III trial (AZA-001), is the first MDS treatment to significantly prolong overall survival (OS) in higher risk MDS pts ((2007) Blood 110 817). Approximately, one-third of the patients (pts) enrolled in AZA-001 were FAB RAEB-T (≥20-30% blasts) and now meet the WHO criteria for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) ((1999) Blood 17 3835). Considering the poor prognosis (median survival <1 year) and the poor response to chemotherapy in these pts, this sub-group analysis evaluated the effects of AZA versus conventional care regimens (CCR) on OS and on response rates in pts with WHO AML. PMID:22275991

  11. Maintenance treatment with azacytidine for patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or acute myeloid leukaemia following MDS in complete remission after induction chemotherapy

    Grövdal, Michael; Karimi, Mohsen; Khan, Rasheed;

    2010-01-01

    This prospective Phase II study is the first to assess the feasibility and efficacy of maintenance 5-azacytidine for older patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia and MDS-acute myeloid leukaemia syndromes in complete remission (CR) after induction...... with CDKN2B methylation status or karyotype. Median overall survival was 20 months. Hypermethylation of CDH1 was significantly associated with low CR rate, early relapse, and short overall survival (P = 0.003). 5-azacytidine treatment, at a dose of 60 mg/m(2) was well tolerated. Grade III......-IV thrombocytopenia and neutropenia occurred after 9.5 and 30% of the cycles, respectively, while haemoglobin levels increased during treatment. 5-azacytidine treatment is safe, feasible and may be of benefit in a subset of patients....

  12. Extramedullary Myeloid Cell Tumour Presenting As Leukaemia Cutis

    Thappa Devinder Mohan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We herewith report a case of extramedullary myeloid cell tumour presenting as leukaemia cutis for its rarity. It occurred in a 50 year old male patient who presented to us with a 40 days history of painless raised solid skin swellings over the trunk. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsy and bone marrow biopsy showed features suggestive of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Immunophenotyping on skin biopsy specimens and bone marrow biopsy found tumour cells expressing CD43 and Tdt but were negative for CD3 and CD20. These features were consistent with extramedullary myeloid cell tumour involving skin and subcutis (cutaneous manifestation of acute myeloid leukaemia.

  13. The genetic landscape of paediatric de novo acute myeloid leukaemia as defined by single nucleotide polymorphism array and exon sequencing of 100 candidate genes.

    Olsson, Linda; Zettermark, Sofia; Biloglav, Andrea; Castor, Anders; Behrendtz, Mikael; Forestier, Erik; Paulsson, Kajsa; Johansson, Bertil

    2016-07-01

    Cytogenetic analyses of a consecutive series of 67 paediatric (median age 8 years; range 0-17) de novo acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients revealed aberrations in 55 (82%) cases. The most common subgroups were KMT2A rearrangement (29%), normal karyotype (15%), RUNX1-RUNX1T1 (10%), deletions of 5q, 7q and/or 17p (9%), myeloid leukaemia associated with Down syndrome (7%), PML-RARA (7%) and CBFB-MYH11 (5%). Single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A) analysis and exon sequencing of 100 genes, performed in 52 and 40 cases, respectively (39 overlapping), revealed ≥1 aberration in 89%; when adding cytogenetic data, this frequency increased to 98%. Uniparental isodisomies (UPIDs) were detected in 13% and copy number aberrations (CNAs) in 63% (median 2/case); three UPIDs and 22 CNAs were recurrent. Twenty-two genes were targeted by focal CNAs, including AEBP2 and PHF6 deletions and genes involved in AML-associated gene fusions. Deep sequencing identified mutations in 65% of cases (median 1/case). In total, 60 mutations were found in 30 genes, primarily those encoding signalling proteins (47%), transcription factors (25%), or epigenetic modifiers (13%). Twelve genes (BCOR, CEBPA, FLT3, GATA1, KIT, KRAS, NOTCH1, NPM1, NRAS, PTPN11, SMC3 and TP53) were recurrently mutated. We conclude that SNP-A and deep sequencing analyses complement the cytogenetic diagnosis of paediatric AML. PMID:27022003

  14. Acute myeloid leukaemia induced by mitoxantrone: case report Leucemia mielóide aguda induzida por mitoxantrone: relato de caso

    Walter Oleschko Arruda

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitoxantrone (MX is an immunosupressant drug used in secondarily progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS and in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS. It has a leukemogenesis potential induced by cytogenetic abnormalities, though with a low incidence. Promyelocitic leukaemia (type M3 and other forms of acute myeloblastic leukaemias (M4 and M5 have been described in a few MS patients who received MX during their treatment. We describe a white female patient, 47 year-old, with SPMS (EDSS = 4 with 14 years of disease. She received MX during her disease and developed acute promyelocytic leukaemia (M3, with severe thrombocytopenia 30 months later. She ultimately died due to intracerebral hemorrhage. Other cases of treatment related to AML are reviewed and discussed.Mitoxantrone (MX é uma agente imunossupressor utilizado nas formas progressivas secundárias de esclerose múltipla (EM ou formas surto-remissão sem resposta com outras formas de tratamento (p.ex. beta-interferon, acetato de glatirâmer. Com o uso desta medicação, ocorre uma incidência maior, embora pequena, de desenvolvimento de leucemia mielóide aguda induzida por quimioterápicos. Descrevemos o caso de uma paciente com forma progressiva secundária de EM, submetida a uma dose única de MX de 15mg e que 30 meses após desenvolveu quadro fulminante de leucemia promieloblástica aguda (M3, com trombocitopenia grave. A paciente faleceu por hemorragia intracerebral maciça. É feita revisão de outros casos relatados na literatura e os possíveis mecanismos de desenvolvimento desta complicação grave secundária ao uso do MX.

  15. Early related or unrelated haematopoietic cell transplantation results in higher overall survival and leukaemia-free survival compared with conventional chemotherapy in high-risk acute myeloid leukaemia patients in first complete remission.

    Basara, N; Schulze, A; Wedding, U; Mohren, M; Gerhardt, A; Junghanss, C; Peter, N; Dölken, G; Becker, C; Heyn, S; Kliem, C; Lange, T; Krahl, R; Pönisch, W; Fricke, H-J; Sayer, H G; Al-Ali, H; Kamprad, F; Niederwieser, D

    2009-04-01

    Between 1996 and 2004, a total of 708 patients were enrolled in the acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) '96 and '02 studies of the East German Study Group (OSHO). Of these, 138 patients (19.5%) had unfavourable cytogenetics defined as complex karyotype, del (5q)/-5, del (7q)/-7, abn (3q26) and abn (11q23). In all, 77 (56%) achieved complete remission 1 (CR1) after induction chemotherapy and were eligible for haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). HCT was performed after a median of two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy (CT) in the AML '96 and one cycle in the AML '02 study (P=0.03). After a median follow-up of 19 months, overall survival (OS) at two years was significantly better in the donor group (52+/-9%) versus the no-donor group (24+/-8%; P=0.005). Differences in outcomes were mainly because of a lower relapse incidence in patients after HCT (39+/-11%) compared with a higher relapse incidence in patients undergoing CT (77+/-10%; P=0.0005). Treatment-related mortality was low and not statistically significantly different between the two treatment groups (15+/-7 and 5+/-5% for HCT and chemotherapy, respectively; P=0.49).We conclude that early HCT from related or unrelated donors led to significantly better OS and leukaemia-free survival compared with chemotherapy in patients with unfavourable karyotype. PMID:19151786

  16. MiR-424 and miR-155 deregulated expression in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukaemia: correlation with NPM1 and FLT3 mutation status

    Faraoni Isabella

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNA have a central role in normal haematopoiesis and are deregulated in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML. The purpose of the study was to investigate by qRT-PCR the expression of miRNAs involved in myeloid differentiation (miR-424, miR-155, miR-223, miR-17-5p in 48 patients with cytogenetically normal AML well characterized for NPM1 and/or FLT3 mutations. Three types of normalization were used for the data validation. Findings We found that miR-424 was down-modulated in AMLs with NPM1mutA regardless of FLT3 status. On the contrary, miR-155 showed up-regulation in patients with FLT3 internal tandem duplications (ITD with or without NPM1 mutations. No significant associations were found by analyzing miR-223 and miR-17-5p in relation to FLT3 and NPM1 status. Conclusions This study supports the view that major genetic subsets of CN-AML are associated with distinct miRNA signatures and suggests that miR-424 and miR-155 deregulation is involved in the pathogenesis of CN-AML with NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations, respectively.

  17. The molecular biology of radiation-induced carcinogenesis: thymic lymphoma, myeloid leukaemia and osteosarcoma

    Janowski, M. (Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium)); Cox, R. (Medical Research Council, Harwell (UK). Radiobiological Research Unit); Strauss, P.G. (GSF, Neuherberg (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Molekulare Zellpathologie)

    1990-04-01

    In mice, external X- or {gamma}-irradiation may induce thymic lymphomas or myeloid leukaemias, while bone-seeking {alpha}-emitters may induce osteosarcomas, and to a lesser extent acute myeloid leukaemia. The paper reviews briefly some experimental data in respect to molecular mechanisms underlying these radio-carcinogenic processes. Thymic lymphomagenesis proceeds by an indirect mechanism in which recombinant proviruses could be involved. Myeloid leukaemogenesis is characterized by a very early putative initiating event, consisting of non-random rearrangements and/or deletions of chromosome 2. Osteosarcomagenesis in mice is often associated with the expression of proviruses, and the tumors often contain somatically acquired proviruses. (UK).

  18. The value of molecular stratification for CEBPA(DM) and NPM1(MUT) FLT3(WT) genotypes in older patients with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Dickson, Glenda J; Bustraan, Sophia; Hills, Robert K; Ali, Akbar; Goldstone, Anthony H; Burnett, Alan K; Linch, David C; Gale, Rosemary E

    2016-02-01

    Older adult patients (≥60 years) with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) are generally considered to be poor-risk and there is limited information available regarding risk stratification based on molecular characterization in this age group, particularly for the double-mutant CEBPA (CEBPA(DM) ) genotype. To investigate whether a molecular favourable-risk genotype can be identified, we investigated CEBPA, NPM1 and FLT3 status and prognostic impact in a cohort of 301 patients aged 60 years or more with intermediate-risk cytogenetics, all treated intensively. Overall survival (OS) at 1 year was highest in the 12 patients (4%) that were CEBPA(DM) compared to the 76 (28%) with a mutant NPM1 and wild-type FLT3 (NPM1(MUT) FLT3(WT) ) genotype or all other patients (75%, 54%, 33% respectively), with median survival 15·2, 13·6 and 6·6 months, although the benefit was short-term (OS at 3 years 17%, 29%, 12% respectively). Combination of the CEBPA(DM) and NPM1(MUT) FLT3(WT) genotype patients defined a molecular group with favourable prognosis (P < 0·0001 in multivariate analysis), with 57% of patients alive at 1 year compared to 33% for all other patients. Knowledge of genotype in older cytogenetically intermediate-risk patients might influence therapy decisions. PMID:26847745

  19. A novel RT-qPCR assay for quantification of the MLL-MLLT3 fusion transcript in acute myeloid leukaemia

    Abildgaard, Lotte; Ommen, Hans Beier; Lausen, Birgitte Frederiksen;

    2013-01-01

    heterogeneity of translocation break points, the MLL-MLLT3 fusion gene is a challenging target. We hypothesised that MRD monitoring using MLL-MLLT3 as a RT-qPCR marker is feasible in the majority of patients with t(9;11)-positive AML. METHODS: Using a locked nucleic acid probe, we developed a sensitive RT......-qPCR assay for quantification of the most common break point region of the MLL-MLLT3 fusion gene. Five paediatric patients with t(9;11)-positive AML were monitored using the MLL-MLLT3 assay. RESULTS: A total of 43 bone marrow (BM) and 52 Peripheral blood (PB) samples were collected from diagnosis until......OBJECTIVES: Patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) of the monocytic lineage often lack molecular markers for minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring. The MLL-MLLT3 fusion transcript found in patients with AML harbouring t(9;11) is amenable to RT-qPCR quantification but because of the...

  20. Oral manifestations of acute leukaemia

    Ivanović Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukaemia is the most common form of chilhood cancer. The aim of this paper was to underline the importance of oral manifestations in children with acute leukaemia. The disease and its treatment can directly or indirectly affect oral health. Oral manifestations are gingival inflammation and enlargement. Leukaemic cells are capable of infiltrating the gingiva and the deeper periodontal tissues which leads to ulceration and infection of oral tissues. Gingival bleeding is a common sign in patients with leukaemia. Symptoms include local lymphadenopathy, mucous membrane Petechiae and ecchymoses. Cytotoxic drugs have direct effects like mucositis, involving atrophy, desquamation and ulceration of the mucosa, with increasing the risk for local and systemic infections. Leukaemia can directly influence dental care and dental treatment, while oral lesions may have life-threatening consequences. Knowledge and skills among dentists may also not be adequate to treat children with acute leukaemia. It is therefore imperative that all stomatologists be aware of dental problems that occur in leukaemia in order to be able to effectively carry out appropriate measures to mitigate these problems.

  1. P-gp activity is a critical resistance factor against AVE9633 and DM4 cytotoxicity in leukaemia cell lines, but not a major mechanism of chemoresistance in cells from acute myeloid leukaemia patients

    AVE9633 is a new immunoconjugate comprising a humanized monoclonal antibody, anti-CD33 antigen, linked through a disulfide bond to the maytansine derivative DM4, a cytotoxic agent and potent tubulin inhibitor. It is undergoing a phase I clinical trial. Chemoresistance to anti-mitotic agents has been shown to be related, in part, to overexpression of ABC proteins. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential roles of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP in cytotoxicity in AVE9633-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). This study used AML cell lines expressing different levels of P-gp, MRP1 or BCRP proteins and twenty-five samples from AML patients. Expression and functionality of the transporter protein were analyzed by flow cytometry. The cytotoxicity of the drug was evaluated by MTT and apoptosis assays. P-gp activity, but not MRP1 and BCRP, attenuated AVE9633 and DM4 cytotoxicity in myeloid cell lines. Zosuquidar, a potent specific P-gp inhibitor, restored the sensitivity of cells expressing P-gp to both AVE9633 and DM4. However, the data from AML patients show that 10/25 samples of AML cells (40%) were resistant to AVE9633 or DM4 (IC50 > 500 nM), and this was not related to P-gp activity (p-Value: 0.7). Zosuquidar also failed to re-establish drug sensitivity. Furthermore, this resistance was not correlated with CD33 expression (p-Value: 0.6) in those cells. P-gp activity is not a crucial mechanism of chemoresistance to AVE9633. For patients whose resistance to conventional anthracycline AML regimens is related to ABC protein expression, a combination with AVE9633 could be beneficial. Other mechanisms such as microtubule alteration could play an important role in chemoresistance to AVE9633

  2. Value of monoclonal anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO7) for diagnosing acute leukaemia.

    Storr, J; Dolan, G.; Coustan-Smith, E; Barnett, D.; Reilly, J. T.

    1990-01-01

    The expression of myeloperoxidase (MPO) was studied in 100 cases of acute leukaemia (83 with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and 17 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) by both a conventional cytochemical method and the immunocytochemical antiperoxidase (APAAP) technique using the monoclonal antibody MPO7. In each case the staining was evaluated by light microscopical examination (percentage of positive cells). Of the 83 cases of AML, 78 (93.9%) were positive for MPO7 compared with 70 (84.3%) by...

  3. A systematic evaluation of the safety and toxicity of fingolimod for its potential use in the treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Enjeti, Anoop K; D'Crus, Angel; Melville, Kathleen; Verrills, Nicole M; Rowlings, Philip

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is challenging and emerging treatment options include protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activators. Fingolimod is a known PP2A activator that inhibits multiple signalling pathways and has been used extensively in patients with multiple sclerosis and other indications. The initial positive results of PP2A activators in vitro and mouse models of AML are promising; however, its safety for use in AML has not been assessed. From human studies of fingolimod in other indications, it is possible to evaluate whether the safety and toxicity profile of the PP2A activators will allow their use in treating AML. A literature review was carried out to assess safety before the commencement of Phase I trials of the PP2A activator Fingolimod in AML. From human studies of fingolimod in other indications, it is possible to evaluate whether the safety and toxicity profile of the PP2A activators will allow their use in treating AML. A systematic review of published literature in Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library of critical reviews was carried out. International standards for the design and reporting of search strategies were followed. Search terms and medical subject headings used in trials involving PP2A activators as well as a specific search were performed for 'adverse events', 'serious adverse events', 'delays in treatment', ' side effects' and 'toxicity' for primary objectives. Database searches were limited to papers published in the last 12 years and available in English. The search yielded 677 articles. A total of 69 journal articles were identified as relevant and included 30 clinical trials, 24 review articles and 15 case reports. The most frequently reported adverse events were nausea, diarrhoea, fatigue, back pain, influenza viral infections, nasopharyngitis and bronchitis. Specific safety concerns include monitoring of the heart rate and conduction at commencement of treatment as cardiotoxicity has been reported. There is

  4. A systematic evaluation of the safety and toxicity of fingolimod for its potential use in the treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia

    D’Crus, Angel; Melville, Kathleen; Verrills, Nicole M.; Rowlings, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is challenging and emerging treatment options include protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activators. Fingolimod is a known PP2A activator that inhibits multiple signalling pathways and has been used extensively in patients with multiple sclerosis and other indications. The initial positive results of PP2A activators in vitro and mouse models of AML are promising; however, its safety for use in AML has not been assessed. From human studies of fingolimod in other indications, it is possible to evaluate whether the safety and toxicity profile of the PP2A activators will allow their use in treating AML. A literature review was carried out to assess safety before the commencement of Phase I trials of the PP2A activator Fingolimod in AML. From human studies of fingolimod in other indications, it is possible to evaluate whether the safety and toxicity profile of the PP2A activators will allow their use in treating AML. A systematic review of published literature in Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library of critical reviews was carried out. International standards for the design and reporting of search strategies were followed. Search terms and medical subject headings used in trials involving PP2A activators as well as a specific search were performed for ‘adverse events’, ‘serious adverse events’, ‘delays in treatment’, ‘ side effects’ and ‘toxicity’ for primary objectives. Database searches were limited to papers published in the last 12 years and available in English. The search yielded 677 articles. A total of 69 journal articles were identified as relevant and included 30 clinical trials, 24 review articles and 15 case reports. The most frequently reported adverse events were nausea, diarrhoea, fatigue, back pain, influenza viral infections, nasopharyngitis and bronchitis. Specific safety concerns include monitoring of the heart rate and conduction at commencement of treatment as cardiotoxicity has been

  5. Analysis of the interaction of induction regimens with p-glycoprotein expression in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia: results from the MRC AML15 trial

    Retrospective analyses in non-randomised cohorts suggest that regimens containing fludarabine/Ara C and/or idarubicin/ara C may be more effective than daunorubicin/AraC (DA)-containing regimens in cases of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) overexpressing p-glycoprotein (Pgp). We prospectively measured Pgp protein and function by flow cytometry in CD45-gated blasts from 434 AML15 trial patients randomised to remission induction therapy with two courses of FLAG-Ida or DA±etoposide (DA/ADE). In all, 34% were positive for Pgp protein and 38% for function. Pgp protein-positive cases had a higher incidence of resistant disease (14% vs 5%), adjusted odds ratio 2.67 (1.14–6.24). There was a trend towards a higher cumulative incidence of relapse at 5 years for Pgp-positive cases (46% vs 55%), adjusted hazard ratio 1.42 (0.98–2.07) (P=0.06). For patients treated with FLAG-Ida, the complete remission (CR) rate was 86% for both Pgp-positive and Pgp-negative patients. In patients treated with DA/ADE, 78% of Pgp-positive and 90% of Pgp-negative cases achieved CR (P=0.06). In analyses of overall survival, there was no interaction between treatment received and Pgp expression. Data for Pgp function followed similar trends. Our data suggest that FLAG-Ida may improve the remission rate for Pgp-positive AML, but the malignant clone is reduced rather than eradicated such that the relapse rate remains high in Pgp-positive patients

  6. Quantitative multiplex quantum dot in-situ hybridisation based gene expression profiling in tissue microarrays identifies prognostic genes in acute myeloid leukaemia

    Highlights: ► Development of a quantitative high throughput in situ expression profiling method. ► Application to a tissue microarray of 242 AML bone marrow samples. ► Identification of HOXA4, HOXA9, Meis1 and DNMT3A as prognostic markers in AML. -- Abstract: Measurement and validation of microarray gene signatures in routine clinical samples is problematic and a rate limiting step in translational research. In order to facilitate measurement of microarray identified gene signatures in routine clinical tissue a novel method combining quantum dot based oligonucleotide in situ hybridisation (QD-ISH) and post-hybridisation spectral image analysis was used for multiplex in-situ transcript detection in archival bone marrow trephine samples from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Tissue-microarrays were prepared into which white cell pellets were spiked as a standard. Tissue microarrays were made using routinely processed bone marrow trephines from 242 patients with AML. QD-ISH was performed for six candidate prognostic genes using triplex QD-ISH for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, and for HOXA4, HOXA9, Meis1. Scrambled oligonucleotides were used to correct for background staining followed by normalisation of expression against the expression values for the white cell pellet standard. Survival analysis demonstrated that low expression of HOXA4 was associated with poorer overall survival (p = 0.009), whilst high expression of HOXA9 (p < 0.0001), Meis1 (p = 0.005) and DNMT3A (p = 0.04) were associated with early treatment failure. These results demonstrate application of a standardised, quantitative multiplex QD-ISH method for identification of prognostic markers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical samples, facilitating measurement of gene expression signatures in routine clinical samples.

  7. Quantitative multiplex quantum dot in-situ hybridisation based gene expression profiling in tissue microarrays identifies prognostic genes in acute myeloid leukaemia

    Tholouli, Eleni [Department of Haematology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9WL (United Kingdom); MacDermott, Sarah [The Medical School, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PT Manchester (United Kingdom); Hoyland, Judith [School of Biomedicine, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PT Manchester (United Kingdom); Yin, John Liu [Department of Haematology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9WL (United Kingdom); Byers, Richard, E-mail: richard.byers@cmft.nhs.uk [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, The University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Oxford Road, M13 9PT Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of a quantitative high throughput in situ expression profiling method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Application to a tissue microarray of 242 AML bone marrow samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of HOXA4, HOXA9, Meis1 and DNMT3A as prognostic markers in AML. -- Abstract: Measurement and validation of microarray gene signatures in routine clinical samples is problematic and a rate limiting step in translational research. In order to facilitate measurement of microarray identified gene signatures in routine clinical tissue a novel method combining quantum dot based oligonucleotide in situ hybridisation (QD-ISH) and post-hybridisation spectral image analysis was used for multiplex in-situ transcript detection in archival bone marrow trephine samples from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Tissue-microarrays were prepared into which white cell pellets were spiked as a standard. Tissue microarrays were made using routinely processed bone marrow trephines from 242 patients with AML. QD-ISH was performed for six candidate prognostic genes using triplex QD-ISH for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, and for HOXA4, HOXA9, Meis1. Scrambled oligonucleotides were used to correct for background staining followed by normalisation of expression against the expression values for the white cell pellet standard. Survival analysis demonstrated that low expression of HOXA4 was associated with poorer overall survival (p = 0.009), whilst high expression of HOXA9 (p < 0.0001), Meis1 (p = 0.005) and DNMT3A (p = 0.04) were associated with early treatment failure. These results demonstrate application of a standardised, quantitative multiplex QD-ISH method for identification of prognostic markers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical samples, facilitating measurement of gene expression signatures in routine clinical samples.

  8. Survival in France after childhood acute leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (1990-2000).

    Goubin, Aurélie; Auclerc, Marie-Françoise; Auvrignon, Anne; Patte, Catherine; Bergeron, Christophe; Hémon, Denis; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the survival after childhood acute leukaemia (AL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of French population aged less than 15 years. The French National Registry of Childhood Leukaemia and Lymphoma recorded 3995 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 812 of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and 1137 of NHL over the period from 1990 to 2000. Overall survival rates at 5 years were 82% (95% CI 80-83), 58% (95% CI 54-61) and 87% (95% CI 85-89) for ALL, AML and NHL, respectiv...

  9. P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein in acute myeloid leukaemia cells treated with the Aurora-B Kinase Inhibitor barasertib-hQPA

    Russell Nigel H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aurora kinases play an essential role in orchestrating chromosome alignment, segregation and cytokinesis during mitotic progression, with both aurora-A and B frequently over-expressed in a variety of human malignancies. Over-expression of the ABC drug transporter proteins P-glycoprotein (Pgp and Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP is a major obstacle for chemotherapy in many tumour types with Pgp conferring particularly poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML. Barasertib-hQPA is a highly selective inhibitor of aurora-B kinase that has shown tumouricidal activity against a range tumour cell lines including those of leukaemic AML origin. Methods Effect of barasertib-hQPA on the pHH3 biomarker and cell viability was measured in a panel of leukaemic cell lines and 37 primary AML samples by flow cytometry. Pgp status was determined by flow cytometry and BCRP status by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Results In this study we report the creation of the cell line OCI-AML3DNR, which over-expresses Pgp but not BCRP or multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP, through prolonged treatment of OCI-AML3 cells with daunorubicin. We demonstrate that Pgp (OCI-AML3DNR and KG-1a and BCRP (OCI-AML6.2 expressing AML cell lines are less sensitive to barasertib-hQPA induced pHH3 inhibition and subsequent loss of viability compared to transporter negative cell lines. We also show that barasertib-hQPA resistance in these cell lines can be reversed using known Pgp and BCRP inhibitors. We report that barasertib-hQPA is not an inhibitor of Pgp or BCRP, but by using 14[C]-barasertib-hQPA that it is effluxed by these transporters. Using phosphoHistone H3 (pHH3 as a biomarker of barasertib-hQPA responsiveness in primary AML blasts we determined that Pgp and BCRP positive primary samples were less sensitive to barasertib-hQPA induced pHH3 inhibition (p = 50 inhibition of pHH3 by barasertib-hQPA was achieved in 94.6% of these samples after 1

  10. P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein in acute myeloid leukaemia cells treated with the Aurora-B Kinase Inhibitor barasertib-hQPA

    Aurora kinases play an essential role in orchestrating chromosome alignment, segregation and cytokinesis during mitotic progression, with both aurora-A and B frequently over-expressed in a variety of human malignancies. Over-expression of the ABC drug transporter proteins P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is a major obstacle for chemotherapy in many tumour types with Pgp conferring particularly poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Barasertib-hQPA is a highly selective inhibitor of aurora-B kinase that has shown tumouricidal activity against a range tumour cell lines including those of leukaemic AML origin. Effect of barasertib-hQPA on the pHH3 biomarker and cell viability was measured in a panel of leukaemic cell lines and 37 primary AML samples by flow cytometry. Pgp status was determined by flow cytometry and BCRP status by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. In this study we report the creation of the cell line OCI-AML3DNR, which over-expresses Pgp but not BCRP or multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), through prolonged treatment of OCI-AML3 cells with daunorubicin. We demonstrate that Pgp (OCI-AML3DNR and KG-1a) and BCRP (OCI-AML6.2) expressing AML cell lines are less sensitive to barasertib-hQPA induced pHH3 inhibition and subsequent loss of viability compared to transporter negative cell lines. We also show that barasertib-hQPA resistance in these cell lines can be reversed using known Pgp and BCRP inhibitors. We report that barasertib-hQPA is not an inhibitor of Pgp or BCRP, but by using 14[C]-barasertib-hQPA that it is effluxed by these transporters. Using phosphoHistone H3 (pHH3) as a biomarker of barasertib-hQPA responsiveness in primary AML blasts we determined that Pgp and BCRP positive primary samples were less sensitive to barasertib-hQPA induced pHH3 inhibition (p = <0.001) than samples without these transporters. However, we demonstrate that IC50 inhibition of pHH3 by barasertib-hQPA was achieved in

  11. Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia with Trisomy 13: a Case Report

    Guo-yu Hu; Chao-hui Yuan; Kui Tan; Zhen-zhen Chen

    2011-01-01

    ATYPICAL chronic myeloid leukaemia (aCML),which shows both myeloproliferative and myeIodysplastic features,is a type of myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic disease as defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO) classification of the myeloid neoplasms.1 Because of the presence of neutrophilic leukocytosis,aCML may resemble chronic myeIogenous leukemia (CML).However,in contrast with CML,aCML does not have the Philadelphia chromosome or the bcr/abl fusion gene.

  12. Immunological and ultrastructural studies in acute biphenotypic leukaemia.

    Shetty, V; Chitale, A; Matutes, E; Buccheri, V; Morilla, R; Catovsky, D

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To compare the sensitivity of the ultrastructural method to detect myeloperoxidase (MPO) with light microscopy and immunocytochemistry using an anti-MPO antibody; to examine the expression of lymphoid antigens in relation to MPO activity in blast cells from cases of biphenotypic leukaemia. METHODS--Blast cells from 14 cases of biphenotypic acute leukaemia were analysed. Immunological markers were performed by single or double immunofluorescence staining on a flow cytometer. The presence of MPO was determined by light microscopy, electron microscopy on fixed and unfixed cells, and by immunoalkaline phosphatase with an anti-MPO antibody. The immunogold method was applied at the ultrastructural level to assess the expression of lymphoid and myeloid antigens at the same time as the MPO activity. RESULTS--Six of the 14 cases were initially classified as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and eight as acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). MPO activity was shown at the ultrastructural level in 4-99% blasts from all cases. Six of the 14 were MPO negative by light microscopy and three of these were negative with the antibody anti-MPO. Coexpression of lymphoid antigens (CD19, CD10, or CD2) and MPO was shown by the immunogold method in four out of 11 cases; in seven cases the blasts coexpressed myeloid antigens (CD13, CD33) and MPO. CONCLUSIONS--Electron microscopy is more sensitive for showing MPO than light microscopy and immunocytochemistry; the immunogold method combined with MPO used at the ultrastructural level can help to define the cell lineage involved in biphenotypic leukaemia by highlighting the myeloid component defined by MPO. Images PMID:8227405

  13. First-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia

    O'Dwyer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Since the introduction of imatinib just over a decade ago, there has been a dramatic change in the treatment and prognosis of early chronic phase chronic myeloid Leukaemia (CML). This review article focuses on recent advances, culminating in the approval of nilotinib by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed CML in the chronic phase.

  14. Tuberculosis complicating imatinib treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia

    Daniels, J. M. A.; Vonk-Noordegraaf, A.; Janssen, J. J. W. M.; Postmus, P. E.; van Altena, R.

    2009-01-01

    Although imatinib is not considered a predisposing factor for tuberculosis (TB), the present case report describes three patients in whom imatinib treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia was complicated by TB. This raises the question of whether imatinib increases susceptibility to TB. There are sev

  15. Two consecutive immunophenotypic switches in a child with immunogenotypically stable acute leukaemia

    Bierings, M; Szczepanski, T; van Wering, ER; Willemse, MJ; Langerak, AW; Revesz, T; van Dongen, JJM

    2001-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl presented with a CD33(+) precursor B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and seemed to respond well to ALL treatment. However. 2 weeks after diagnosis her leucocyte count rose rapidly with a predominance of myeloid blasts with M5b morphology and CD19(+) myeloid immunophenotype. Ac

  16. Autografting as first line treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    Singer, I O; Franklin, I M

    1998-01-01

    Interest in autografting for chronic myeloid leukaemia and its clinical relevance has revived in recent years. This followed observations that with various chemotherapeutic regimens it was possible to achieve, temporarily at least, peripheral blood and bone marrow that were Philadelphia negative. Bone marrow or peripheral blood progenitor cells could then be harvested and reinfused following a high dose procedure, hopefully eliminating any residual disease, and resulting in prolonged disease ...

  17. Expression profile of heat shock proteins in acute myeloid leukaemia patients reveals a distinct signature strongly associated with FLT3 mutation status--consequences and potentials for pharmacological intervention.

    Reikvam, Håkon; Hatfield, Kimberley J; Ersvaer, Elisabeth; Hovland, Randi; Skavland, Jørn; Gjertsen, Bjørn T; Petersen, Kjell; Bruserud, Oystein

    2012-02-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones that assist proteins in their folding to native structures. HSPs are regarded as possible therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We used bioinformatical approaches to characterize the HSP profile in AML cells from 75 consecutive patients, in addition to the effect of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-DMAG. Patients harbouring a FLT3-internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) were extensively overrepresented in the cluster with high HSP levels, indicating a strong dependence of HSPs in stabilizing FLT3-ITD encoded oncoproteins. FLT3 ligation further increased the levels of HSP90 and its co-chaperone HSP70. HSP90 inhibition had a stronger pro-apoptotic effect for AML cells with FLT3-ITD than for cells with wild-type FLT3, whereas the anti-proliferative effect of HSP90 inhibition was similar for the two patient subsets. HSP90 inhibition altered the constitutive cytokine release profile in an anti-angiogenic direction independent of FLT3 mutational status: (i) pro-angiogenic CXCL8, MMP-2 and MMP-9 showed a stronger decrease than anti-angiogenic CXCL9-11, (ii) the Tie-2 agonist Ang-1 showed a stronger decrease than the potentially antagonistic Ang-2, and (iii) VEGF and HGF levels were decreased. Finally, HSP90 inhibition counteracted the leukaemia-stimulating effect of endothelial cells. Our studies demonstrate that HSP90 inhibition mediates anti-leukaemic effects through both direct and indirect activity. PMID:22150087

  18. A Novel Three-Colour Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Approach for the Detection of t(7;12)(q36;p13) in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Reveals New Cryptic Three Way Translocation t(7;12;16)

    Naiel, Abdulbasit [Leukaemia and Chromosome Research Laboratory, Division of Biosciences, Brunel University, London, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Vetter, Michael [MetaSystems, Altlussheim 68804 (Germany); Plekhanova, Olga [Regional Children’s Hospital N 1, Ekaterinburg 620149 (Russian Federation); Fleischman, Elena; Sokova, Olga [N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center Russian Academy of Medical Science, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Tsaur, Grigory [Regional Children’s Hospital N 1, Ekaterinburg 620149 (Russian Federation); Research Institute of Medical Cell Technologies, Ekaterinburg 620149 (Russian Federation); Harbott, Jochen [Oncogenetic Laboratory, Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, Justus Liebig University, Giessen 35392 (Germany); Tosi, Sabrina, E-mail: sabrina.tosi@brunel.ac.uk [Leukaemia and Chromosome Research Laboratory, Division of Biosciences, Brunel University, London, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-11

    The t(7;12)(q36;p13) translocation is a recurrent chromosome abnormality that involves the ETV6 gene on chromosome 12 and has been identified in 20–30% of infant patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The detection of t(7;12) rearrangements relies on the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) because this translocation is hardly visible by chromosome banding methods. Furthermore, a fusion transcript HLXB9-ETV6 is found in approximately 50% of t(7;12) cases, making the reverse transcription PCR approach not an ideal screening method. Considering the report of few cases of variant translocations harbouring a cryptic t(7;12) rearrangement, we believe that the actual incidence of this abnormality is higher than reported to date. The clinical outcome of t(7;12) patients is believed to be poor, therefore an early and accurate diagnosis is important in the clinical management and treatment. In this study, we have designed and tested a novel three-colour FISH approach that enabled us not only to confirm the presence of the t(7;12) in a number of patients studied previously, but also to identify a cryptic t(7;12) as part of a complex rearrangement. This new approach has proven to be an efficient and reliable method to be used in the diagnostic setting.

  19. A phase I/II study of oral clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine in previously treated acute myeloid leukaemia and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients at least 60 years of age.

    Buckley, Sarah A; Mawad, Raya; Gooley, Ted A; Becker, Pamela S; Sandhu, Vicky; Hendrie, Paul; Scott, Bart L; Wood, Brent L; Walter, Roland B; Smith, Kelly; Dean, Carol; Estey, Elihu H; Pagel, John M

    2015-08-01

    Outcomes for older adults with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are generally poor, and new effective therapies are needed. We investigated oral clofarabine combined with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in patients aged 60 years and above with relapsed or refractory AML or high-risk MDS in a phase I/II trial. A 3 + 3 dose escalation of oral clofarabine was followed by a phase II expansion with the aim of obtaining a complete response (CR) rate ≥30%. We identified 20 mg/d for 5 d as the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of oral clofarabine. A total of 35 patients, with a median age of 72 years, were treated. Of 26 patients enrolled at the MTD, 4 had treatment-related grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicities, but none died within 28 d. The observed CR rate and median survival were 34% [95% confidence interval (CI), 18-50%] and 6.8 months overall and 38% [95% CI, 19-57%] and 7.2 months at the MTD. The median disease-free survival was 7.4 months. Fifty-two percent (23/44) of cycles administered at the MTD were done without hospital admission. This combination of oral clofarabine and LDAC demonstrated efficacy with a CR rate of >30% and acceptable toxicity in older patients. PMID:25854284

  20. A Novel Three-Colour Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Approach for the Detection of t(7;12)(q36;p13) in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Reveals New Cryptic Three Way Translocation t(7;12;16)

    The t(7;12)(q36;p13) translocation is a recurrent chromosome abnormality that involves the ETV6 gene on chromosome 12 and has been identified in 20–30% of infant patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The detection of t(7;12) rearrangements relies on the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) because this translocation is hardly visible by chromosome banding methods. Furthermore, a fusion transcript HLXB9-ETV6 is found in approximately 50% of t(7;12) cases, making the reverse transcription PCR approach not an ideal screening method. Considering the report of few cases of variant translocations harbouring a cryptic t(7;12) rearrangement, we believe that the actual incidence of this abnormality is higher than reported to date. The clinical outcome of t(7;12) patients is believed to be poor, therefore an early and accurate diagnosis is important in the clinical management and treatment. In this study, we have designed and tested a novel three-colour FISH approach that enabled us not only to confirm the presence of the t(7;12) in a number of patients studied previously, but also to identify a cryptic t(7;12) as part of a complex rearrangement. This new approach has proven to be an efficient and reliable method to be used in the diagnostic setting

  1. Giant Molluscum Contagiosum In Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia

    Venkatesan Sivaraman

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14 year old female with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia had a tumoral lesion over the face of 3 months duration. Excision biopsy of the lesion confirmed it to be molluscum contagiosum. Giant molluscum contagiosum attaining polypoidal character as seen in our patient is an uncommon presentation and hence being reported for its rarity.

  2. Granulocytic sarcoma of the femur in a patient with acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia

    Čolović Milica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Granulocytic sarcoma, chloroma or myeloblastoma are observed in 3% to7% of acute myeloid leukaemia and represents localized tumour composed of collection of immature leukaemic cells. It appears most frequently in patients with M2, M4 and M5 subtypes of acute myeloid leukaemia Case Outline. A 58-year-old female presented with pain and oedema of the right upper limb in November 2009. After two months the patinet had fracture dislocation and numerous osteolytic lesions of the right femur. Immunohistochemistry of tumour biopsy showed megakaryoblastic granulocytic sarcoma which was CD31++, F-XIII++, CD34-, FVIII+++, S100-, aktin-, EMA++, Bcl2++, CD43++, with positive proliferative marker measured with Ki-67 positivity in more of 50% of cells. Aspirate of bone marrow and immunophenotyping with flowcytometry revealed diagnosis of acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia. The course of the disease was rapid and the patient died before commencing chemotherapy, five months after first complaints. Conclusion. Granulocytic sarcoma is extramedullary localization of collection of leukaemia cells which can proceed, to arise concomitantly with leukaemia, or may be the only manifestation of the disease. The diagnosis can be established only with immunohystochemistry.

  3. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia presenting with arthritis in an adult patient

    Usalan, C.; Ozarslan, E; Zengin, N.; Buyukayk, Y.; Gullu, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The earliest manifestations of leukaemia often include rheumatic signs and symptoms. Arthritis is a well recognised complication of leukaemia in children, but acute and chronic leukaemia may also cause arthritis in adults. Leukaemic arthritis may occur at any time during the course of leukaemia and may be the presenting manifestation. It should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of both childhood and adult rheumatic disease. We present an adult patient presenting with arthr...

  4. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Sica, S; Morace, G; La Rocca, L M; Etuk, B; Di Mario, A; Pagano, L; Zini, G; Rutella, S; Leone, G

    1993-01-01

    We describe a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed rhinocerebral zygomycosis during the aplastic phase induced by antineoplastic chemotherapy. The patient was treated with fluconazole intravenously (400 mg daily) for 30 days and underwent surgical debridement. As a result of this treatment a complete remission of the zygomycosis-associated symptoms was observed. The possibility of treating zygomycosis with fluconazole is discussed. PMID:8015558

  5. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  7. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  8. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  9. MicroRNAs as Potential Biomarkers in Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia

    Imilia Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL is an M3 subtype of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML. This classification is based on the morphology of promyelocytic cell. The clinical characteristics of APL can be recognized by haemorrhagic episodes, a differentiation block at the promyelocytic stage, and sensitivity to the differentiation response to all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA. Cytogenetically, APL is characterized by a balanced reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 15 and 17, which results in the production of PML/RARα fusion protein. Recent studies reported that microRNAs (miRNAs have also been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of APL. miRNAs have been associated with the pathogenesis of cancer and their involvement as oncogenic and tumour suppressor activities have been identified. They are involved in various biological processes including the cell proliferation, differentiation, growth and development, metabolism, apoptosis, and haematopoiesis. The new discovery of miRNAs as possible therapeutic markers will provide new insight for the diagnosis and therapeutic entries for the treatment of APL. This review highlights the potential of miRNAs as biomarkers in APL.

  10. Analysis of images of acute human and animal leukaemia

    This research thesis first proposes a review of the development of stereology: historical backgrounds, basic principles. It discusses the choices regarding instrumentation: Coulter counter (principle and theory), quantitative analysis of particles, image analyser (optical microscope, epidiascope, scanners, detection, electronic pencil, computers, programming and data processing system), and stereo-logical parameters. The author then reports the stereo-logical study of acute human leukaemia: definition, classification, determination of spherical particle size distribution, lympho-blast size distributions. He reports the comparative study of rat L 5222 leukaemia and Brown Norway rat acute myelocytic leukaemia, and discusses their relationship with acute human leukaemia

  11. Present and future of molecular monitoring in chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    Soverini, Simona; De Benedittis, Caterina; Mancini, Manuela; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    Currently, physicians treating chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients can rely on a wide spectrum of therapeutic options: the best use of such options is essential to achieve excellent clinical outcomes and, possibly, treatment-free remission (TFR). To accomplish this, proper integration of expert clinical and laboratory monitoring of CML patients is fundamental. Molecular response (MR) monitoring of patients at defined time points has emerged as an important success factor for optimal disease management and BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutation screening is useful to guide therapeutic reassessment in patients who do not achieve optimal responses to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Deeper MRs might be associated with improved long-term survival outcomes. More importantly, they are considered a gateway to TFR. In molecular biology, novel procedures and technologies are continually being developed. More sophisticated molecular tools and automated analytical solutions are emerging as CML treatment endpoints and expectations become more and more ambitious. Here we provide a critical overview of current and novel methodologies, present their strengths and pitfalls and discuss what their present and future role might be. PMID:26947577

  12. The induction by 224Ra of myeloid leukaemia and osteosarcoma in male CBA mice

    Radium-224 was injected into 12-week-old male CBA mice in the range 2-64 kBq per mouse either as a single injection or as eight injections spaced at 3.5 day intervals over 4 weeks. Small but significant yields of myeloid leukaemia or osteosarcoma were obtained in all but the control groups. An effect of mode of administration (single or multiple injections) could not be demonstrated but the combined results showed: (1) a maximum yield of myeloid leukaemia in the region 8-16 kBq 224Ra; (2) a greater yield of osteosarcoma than myeloid leukaemia at 64 kBq 224Ra injected. (author)

  13. A Clinicopathological Correlation of Acute Leukaemias in relation to Immunophenotyping and Cytogenetics

    Sunil Pazhayanur Venkateswaran

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leukemia accounts for 0.15 – 0.6% of the total medical admissions in many general hospitals in India. Frequency of leukemia seen in India of Acute Myeloid leukaemia (AML is 20 - 25% and Acute Lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL is 15-25%. The Annual incidence rate of AML and ALL are 5.6 and 30.9 per million population respectively. Aims: To study the clinicopathological correlation in Acute myeloid and Acute Lymphoblastic leukaemias in relation to immunophenotyping and cytogenetics. Materials & Methods: All newly diagnosed cases of acute myeloid leukaemia that presented to our hospital from January 2007 to July 2009 were included in this study. The peripheral blood and bone marrow were tested for surface membrane, cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens and were classified by the French-American- British (FAB Cooperative Group Classification by using Romanowsky (Leishman and May Grunwald Giemsa[MGG] stained smears and cytochemical stains. Results & Summary: A series of available 100 cases of Acute Leukemia diagnosed during a period of 30 months (January 2007 to July 2009 were reviewed and various clinical, biochemical, immunophenotypic and cytogenetic parameters were assessed. 88 cases were subject to immunophenotyping and 60 cases were subject to cytogenetic analysis either by conventional Karyotyping, FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization and RT-PCR (Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The antigen expressions by immunophenotype in acute myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemias were compared with age, Haemoglobin, Total WBC count, Platelet counts, Lactate dehydrogenase levels and abnormal karyotypes. Analytical statistics showed a significant correlation in the expressions of CD13, CD33, CD117 and CD64 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and CD10, CD19, CD20 and CD22 in Acute Lymphoblastic leukemia and the expressions of CD13/CD117, CD3/CD10/CD22,CD3/CD5/CD2 and CD117/CD11c were related to the age, Haemoglobin, WBC count and Lactate

  14. Splenic irradiation before bone marrow transplantation for chronic myeloid leukaemia

    A total of 229 patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in chronic phase were randomized between 1986 and 1990 to receive or not receive additional splenic irradiation as part of their conditioning prior to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Both groups, 115 patients with and 114 patients without splenic irradiation, were very similar regarding distribution of age, sex, donor/recipient sex combination, conditioning, graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) prevention method and blood counts at diagnosis or prior to transplant. 135 patients (59%) are alive as of October 1995 with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. 52 patients have relapsed (23%), 26 patients in the irradiated, 26 patients in the non-irradiated group (n.s.) with a relapse incident at 6 years of 28%. The main risk factor for relapse was T-cell depletion as the method for GvHD prevention, and an elevated basophil count in the peripheral blood prior to transplant. Relapse incidence between patients with or without splenic irradiation was no different in patients at high risk for relapse, e.g. patients transplanted with T-cell-depleted marrows (P = n.s.) and in patients with low risk for relapse, e.g. patients transplanted with non-T-cell-depleted transplants and basophil counts 3% basophils in peripheral blood). In this patient group, relapse incidence was 11% at 6 years with splenic irradiation but 32% in the non-irradiated group (P = 0.05). Transplant-related mortality was similar whether patients received splenic irradiation or not. This study suggests an advantage in splenic irradiation prior to transplantation for CML in this subgroup of patients and illustrates the need for tailored therapy. (Author)

  15. Acute appendicitis caused by acute myeloid leukemia

    Zhang, Shanxiang; Chen, Shaoxiong

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A case of appendiceal involvement by acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in an adult with recent history of AML transformed from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) was presented. Being aware of this rare presentation in particular in a patient with history of MDS and/or AML is important for prompt clinical diagnosis and management.

  16. Estimation of current cumulative incidence of leukaemia-free patients and current leukaemia-free survival in chronic myeloid leukaemia in the era of modern pharmacotherapy

    Trněný Marek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current situation in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML presents a new challenge for attempts to measure the therapeutic results, as the CML patients can experience multiple leukaemia-free periods during the course of their treatment. Traditional measures of treatment efficacy such as leukaemia-free survival and cumulative incidence are unable to cope with multiple events in time, e.g. disease remissions or progressions, and as such are inappropriate for the efficacy assessment of the recent CML treatment. Methods Standard nonparametric statistical methods are used for estimating two principal characteristics of the current CML treatment: the probability of being alive and leukaemia-free in time after CML therapy initiation, denoted as the current cumulative incidence of leukaemia-free patients; and the probability that a patient is alive and in any leukaemia-free period in time after achieving the first leukaemia-free period on the CML treatment, denoted as the current leukaemia-free survival. The validity of the proposed methods is further documented in the data of the Czech CML patients consecutively recorded between July 2003 and July 2009 as well as in simulated data. Results The results have shown a difference between the estimates of the current cumulative incidence function and the common cumulative incidence of leukaemia-free patients, as well as between the estimates of the current leukaemia-free survival and the common leukaemia-free survival. Regarding the currently available follow-up period, both differences have reached the maximum (12.8% and 20.8%, respectively at 3 years after the start of follow-up, i.e. after the CML therapy initiation in the former case and after the first achievement of the disease remission in the latter. Conclusions Two quantities for the evaluation of the efficacy of current CML therapy that may be estimated with standard nonparametric methods have been proposed in

  17. Phenotypical difference in deamination of cytarabine is not evident in induction therapy for acute myeloid leukemia

    Krogh-Madsen, Mikkel; Hansen, Steen Honore'; Jensen, Morten Krogh;

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the uracil arabinoside/cytarabine (Ara-U/Ara-C) ratios with the lower dose in adult acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) induction therapy (100 mg/m2 Ara-C) where no enzyme saturation is expected. Methods A precise and robust high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method ...

  18. Phase 1 Dose- Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Dose of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Adults with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukaemias

    Zeidan, Amer M.; Ricklis, Rebecca M.; Carraway, Hetty E.; Yun, Hyun D.; Greer, Jacqueline M.; Smith, B. Douglas; Levis, Mark J.; McDevitt, Michael A.; Pratz, Keith W.; Showel, Margaret M.; Gladstone, Douglas E; Gore, Steven D.; Judith E Karp

    2012-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with relapsed and refractory acute leukaemia (RRAL) is very poor. Forty patients with RRAL were enrolled (28 acute myeloid leukaemia [AML], 12 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia [ALL]) in this Phase 1 dose-escalation trial of daily-infused clofarabine (CLO) followed by cyclophosphamide (CY) for 4 consecutive days (CLO-CYx4). The median age was 48.5 years. The median number of prior regimens was 2 (range 1–5), and 6/40 patients (15%) had prior allogeneic haematopoietic ste...

  19. Acute lymphocytic leukaemia in children in the Netherlands

    Some features, present at diagnosis in children with acute lymphocytic leukaemia, investigated during the period 1973-1975, and the results of treatment according to protocol AL II of the Dutch Childhood Leukaemia Study Group (SNWLK), are described. This report concerns the results of induction treatment, elective treatment of the central nervous system, and also of the prospective comparative study on the influence of the addition of cyclophosphamide to maintenance treatment with 6-mercaptopurine and methotrextate. In the context of the investigation of long-term side effects of disease and treatment, the immunocompetence of children with acute lymphocytic leukaemia in continuous remission after cessation of therapy was studied. (Auth.)

  20. The role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the elderly patient with acute myeloid leukaemia O papel do transplante de célula-tronco hematopoiética em pacientes idosos com leucemia mielóide aguda

    Attilio Olivieri

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Older adults with Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML, when compared to younger patients with the same disease, have a poor prognosis and represent a discrete population in terms of disease biology, treatment-related complications, and overall outcome. As a result, older patients require distinctive management approaches. For 85%-95% of older AML patients, any therapy ultimately will be purely palliative. No randomized trial has ever demonstrated that any amount of post-remission therapy in older AML patients provides better outcomes than no post-remission therapy. The only studies demonstrating that long-term Disease Free Survival (DFS is possible in older AML patients have included remission induction and post-remission therapy. For these reasons alternative post-remission strategies, including autologous or allogeneic transplantation have been explored also in people over sixty considered fit for aggressive therapy. Up to now the data available from clinical trials suggest that the stem cell transplant procedure is promising, and can lead to long-term survival, but it is feasible only in a minority of fit elderly patients. The main limits of Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation (ASCT are represented by the low percentage of patients able to mobilize a sufficient amount of stem cells and by the still high relapse incidence after ASCT, especially in those with poor prognostic factors; for these patients the allogeneic transplant procedure, by using non myeloablative conditioning regimens, could offer a better chance of cure, thanks to the Graft versus Leukemia (GVL effect, but there are no prospective trials showing the superiority of any transplant approach over conventional treatment in this subset of patients.Pacientes idosos com leucemia mielóide aguda (LMA, quando comparados com pacientes jovens com a mesma doença, apresentam prognóstico pobre e representam uma população particular em termos biológicos, complicações relacionadas ao

  1. Chilblain-like leukaemia cutis.

    Tran, Chi; McEwen, Gary; Fraga, Garth Robert

    2016-01-01

    Chilblain, also known as pernio, is an abnormal inflammatory response to cold, moist environmental conditions. Persistent or atypical lesions should prompt investigation to exclude underlying systemic illness. We describe a case of acute myeloid leukaemia that presented with chilblain-like leukaemia cutis. PMID:27095810

  2. The eye in acute leukaemia. 1

    The dose to the ocular lens during standard cranial irradiation prophylaxis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) has been studied both in patients and in an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses to the lens depend on patient set-up and in order that this is minimised, a simple immobilisation technique is recommended. Surface thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements seriously underestimate the dose received by the ocular lens. Previous measurements made in a phantom have used a large volume ionisation chamber and therefore the minimum cataractogenic dose of 400 cGy for a fractionated treatment is an underestimate. The exact position of the anterior orbital field margin and thus its distance behind the surface of the eye is also important as regards lens dose. Data from the phantom demonstrate accurately the dose gradient through the eye during standard cranial prophylaxis and may explain the lower incidence of leukaemic relapse in the posterior segment of the eye, and yet explain the persistence of isolated anterior chamber relapses. 17 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  3. Aetiology of childhood acute leukaemias: Current status of knowledge

    Acute leukaemia is a consequence of malignant transformation of a haematopoietic progenitor cell. Molecular studies have revealed a prenatal origin of many childhood leukaemias. According to current models, a pre-leukaemic stem cell clone is generated by a first mutation in utero which, in a minority of children, progresses to leukaemia after receiving further postnatal genetic hits. The nature of pre- and postnatal events involved in leukemogenesis in children is not well understood. Although genetic predisposition and specific environmental exposures may account for individual cases, the bulk of childhood leukaemia cannot be explained by any of these factors. The higher incidence of the most common leukaemia subtype in affluent societies, as well as the age peak between 2-5 y, suggest a contributory role of socioeconomic factors. An abnormal immune response during delayed exposure to common infections provides a plausible mechanism for malignant progression of pre-leukaemic clones in a subgroup of children. As highlighted in this review, a common cause for all types and subtypes of childhood leukaemia is highly unlikely. Deeper insights into the pathogenesis of childhood leukaemia will rely on large-scale and combined epidemiological and bio-molecular studies. (authors)

  4. Demonstration of cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens in acute leukaemia using flow cytometry.

    Farahat, N; van der Plas, D; Praxedes, M; Morilla, R; Matutes, E; Catovsky, D

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To detect cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens using flow cytometry in acute leukaemia and to use this technique for double marker combinations. METHODS--Cytoplasmic staining was carried out in samples from 40 cases of acute leukaemia with monoclonal antibodies against the myeloid antigen CD13, the lymphoid antigens CD3, CD22, mu chain and the enzymes terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). The cells were fixed with paraformaldehyde and permeabilised with Tween 20 and Becton Dickinson's FACS lysing solution. Flow cytometry results were compared in the same cases with immunocytochemistry results using the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase method. RESULTS--The gentle permeabilisation induced by this method permitted preservation of the membrane antigens and the size and morphology of the cells. The results using flow cytometry were comparable with those obtained using immunocytochemistry, with nearly complete concordance in most cases. CONCLUSIONS--This technique is simple, rapid, sensitive and reproducible and it is suitable for double staining procedures, such as nuclear and cytoplasmic, nuclear and membrane, or cytoplasmic and membrane. It therefore provides a powerful tool for extending the use of immunophenotyping for the diagnosis and follow up of acute leukaemia. It could also be used for the investigation of minimal residual disease. PMID:7962655

  5. Higher risk for acute childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia in Swedish population centres 1973-94

    Hjalmars, U; G. Gustafsson; . .

    1999-01-01

    A population-based sample of acute childhood leukaemia cases in Sweden 1973–94 was analysed by a geographical information system (GIS) for spatial leukaemia distribution in relation to population density. The annual incidence rate for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) was 3.6, and for acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia (ANLL) 0.7, cases per 100 000 children. Incidence rates in population centres, constituting 1.3% of Sweden's land area and approximately 80% of the population, compared with t...

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting as Acute Appendicitis

    Sherri Rauenzahn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Appendicitis in leukemic patients is uncommon but associated with increased mortality. Additionally, leukemic cell infiltration of the appendix is extremely rare. While appendectomy is the treatment of choice for these patients, diagnosis and management of leukemia have a greater impact on remission and survival. A 59-year-old Caucasian female was admitted to the surgical service with acute right lower quadrant pain, nausea, and anorexia. She was noted to have leukocytosis, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Abdominal imaging demonstrated appendicitis with retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymphadenopathy for which she underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. Peripheral smear, bone marrow biopsy, and surgical pathology of the appendix demonstrated acute myeloid leukemia (AML with nonsuppurative appendicitis. In the setting of AML, prior cases described the development of appendicitis with active chemotherapy. Of these cases, less than ten patients had leukemic infiltration of the appendix, leading to leukostasis and nonsuppurative appendicitis. Acute appendicitis with leukemic infiltration as the initial manifestation of AML has only been described in two other cases in the literature with an average associated morbidity of 32.6 days. The prompt management in this case of appendicitis and AML resulted in an overall survival of 185 days.

  7. Targeting BTK for the treatment of FLT3-ITD mutated acute myeloid leukemia

    Genevra Pillinger; Amina Abdul-Aziz; Lyubov Zaitseva; Matthew Lawes; MacEwan, David J.; Bowles, Kristian M.; Rushworth, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 20% of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) have a mutation in FMS-like-tyrosine-kinase-3 (FLT3). FLT3 is a trans-membrane receptor with a tyrosine kinase domain which, when activated, initiates a cascade of phosphorylated proteins including the SRC family of kinases. Recently our group and others have shown that pharmacologic inhibition and genetic knockdown of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) blocks AML blast proliferation, leukaemic cell adhesion to bone marrow stromal c...

  8. Identification of Bruton's tyrosine kinase as a therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia

    Rushworth, Stuart A.; Murray, Megan Y; Zaitseva, Lyubov; Bowles, Kristian M.; MacEwan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a cytoplasmic protein found in all hematopoietic cell lineages except for T cells. BTK mediates signalling downstream of a number of receptors. Pharmacological targeting of BTK using ibrutinib (previously PCI-32765) has recently shown encouraging clinical activity in a range of lymphoid malignancies. This study reports for the first time that ibrutinib inhibits blast proliferation from human acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and that treatment with ibrutinib sign...

  9. Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: a Single-Centre Experience

    Kakucs Enikő

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT is an important treatment modality for patients with acute myeloid leukemia with low and intermediate risk disease. It has served advantages over allogenic transplantation, because it does not need a matched donor, there is no graft versus host disease, there are less complications and a faster immune reconstitution than in the allo-setting. The disadvantage is the lack of the graft versus leukaemia effect.

  10. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia : recent molecular biology findings

    Kraszewska, Monika D.; Dawidowska, Malgorzata; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Witt, Michal

    2012-01-01

    For many years, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) has been considered and treated as a single malignancy, but divergent outcomes in T-ALL patients receiving uniform treatment protocols encouraged intensive research on the molecular biology of this disease. Recent findings in the field dem

  11. Academic career after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Kingma, A; Rammeloo, LAJ; van der Does-van den Berg, A; Rekers-Mombarg, L; Postma, A

    2000-01-01

    Aim-To evaluate academic career in long term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), in comparison to their healthy siblings. Patients-Ninety four children treated for ALL with cranial irradiation 18 or 25 Gy and intrathecal methotrexate as CNS prophylaxis. Median age at evaluati

  12. Reduced activity of TAFI (thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor) in acute promyelocytic leukaemia

    Meijers, JCM; Oudijk, EJD; Mosnier, LO; Nieuwenhuis, HK; Fijnheer, R; Bouma, Bonno N.; Bos, R

    2000-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) is a disease that is distinguished from other leukaemias by the high potential for early haemorrhagic death. Several processes are involved, such as disseminated intravascular coagulation and hyperfibrinolysis. Recently, TAFI (thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inh

  13. [Dasatinib. A novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia

    Dufva, I.H.; Stentoft, J.; Hasselbalch, H.C.;

    2008-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia is characterized by an abnormal tyrosin kinase in the cytoplasm of the clonal cells. The enzyme is derived from a fusion gene on the Philadelphia-chromosome, evolved by a translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22. Understanding the biology of the tyrosin kinase led to t...... targeted therapy, inhibiting the ATP-binding site by a small molecule--imatinib (Glivec). A novel 2nd generation tyrosin kinase inhibitor--dasatinib (Sprycel)--is now available in cases of insufficient response or intolerance to imatinib Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1/28...

  14. Cytogenetic studies of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Tarek Abd -Alla Atia

    2010-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) describes as a group of hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by expansion of undifferentiated myeloid progenitors. Acquired chromosomal anomaly particularly reciprocal translocations constitute one of the major events contribute to leukemogenesis. Patient and Methods: 45 untreated, newly diagnosed patients with de novo AML were enrolled in the present study and subjected to cytogenetic analysis. Four ml of heparinized peripheral blood were collected for...

  15. Do We Know What Causes Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    ... Topic Can acute myeloid leukemia be prevented? Do we know what causes acute myeloid leukemia? Some people ... genes – the instructions for how our cells function. We tend to look like our parents because they ...

  16. What Role for Angiogenesis in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia?

    P. Schneider

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of angiogenesis in acute leukaemia has been discussed since the cloning of the gene of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF from the acute myelogenous leukemia cell line (HL60 and, thereafter, when the first studies reported increased bone marrow vascularity and elevation of angiogenic cytokines in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL. VEGF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF are the major proangiogenic cytokines that have been studied, and evaluation of their prognostic impact in childhood ALL has been reported in several studies, though with controversial results. The antiangiogenic response, contributing to the angiogenic balance, has scarcely been reported. The origin of the factors, their prognostic value, and their relevance as good markers of what really happens in the bone marrow are discussed in this paper. The place of antiangiogenic drugs in ALL has to be defined in the global treatment strategy.

  17. BCR-ABL DERIVED PEPTIDE VACCINES FOR CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKAEMIA

    M. Bocchia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative pluripotent stem cell disorder characterized by the presence of a cytogenetic hallmark, the Philadelphia (Ph chromosome, and accounts for 15% of adult leukemias. The disease progresses from a chronic phase through an accelerated phase to a blast phase and its natural course accounts for a median 4 years survival1. The Ph chromosome is derived by a reciprocal translocation termed t(9;22 in which the c-abl oncogene has moved from chromosome 9 into the breakpoint cluster region (bcr, within the bcr gene on chromosome 22, resulting in a chimeric bcr-abl fusion gene that encodes a 210 KD protein (p210 with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. Two major alternative chimeric p210 can result from this fusion gene: p210-b2a2 where the junction occurs between bcr exon 2 (b2 and abl exon 2 (a2 and p210-b3a2 where the the junction occurs between bcr exon 3 (b3 and abl exon 2 (a2. About 40% of CML patients harbor the p210-b2a2 and about 60% of them show the p210-b3a2.

  18. Total lymphoid irradiation preceding bone marrow transplantation for chronic myeloid leukaemia

    Between August 1985 and October 1987 35 patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) were treated by high dose chemotherapy, total body irradiation (TBI) (1000 or 1200 cGy, n=31) and total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) (800 or 600 cGy, n=35) preceding allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Both TBI and TLI were given at 200 cGy/fraction. Twenty-three patients had HLA-identical sibling donors, nine patients had HLA-matched but unrelated donors, and three partially HLA-mismatched donors. Twenty-two patients received T-cell depleted marrow. TLI did not add greatly to the toxicity. Four patients had recurrent leukaemia before engraftment was evaluable. The other 31 patients engrafted and no graft failed. Twenty-two patients survive at a median time from transplant of 305 days (range 81-586 days). Fourteen have no evidence of disease; eight have or had only cytogenetic evidence of leukaemia. It is concluded that addition of TLI to pretransplant immunosuppression increases the probability of reliable engraftment in patients receiving T-cell depleted marrow. This is not associated with significantly increased toxicity. (author)

  19. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-04-21

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Elzbieta Gocek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17(q22;q12 chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  1. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML

  2. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  3. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. High-flow priapism in acute lymphatic leukaemia

    Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Vogt, Susanna; Kaiser, Werner A. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Bachstrasse 18, 07740, Jena (Germany); Kentouche, Karim; Doerfel, Claus; Zintl, Felix [Department of Paediatrics, University of Jena (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Priapism is defined as prolonged and persistent erection of the penis without sexual stimulation. It is associated with excessive hyperleukocytosis (e.g. in acute or chronic leukaemia); however, this complication is rarely seen in the pediatric population. We report a 12-year-old boy suffering from acute leukaemia presenting with, at first intermittent, but increasingly persistent erection. Doppler US revealed signs of high-flow priapism. MRI excluded intrapelvic tumour masses, and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography could not demonstrate an arteriovenous fistula or thrombosis. Cavernosal blood-gas measurement was in agreement with high-flow priapism. On the basis of the imaging findings, invasive therapeutic management was avoided in our patient with a successful outcome. (orig.)

  5. Oral mucositis in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Pels, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Oral mucositis is the most commonly reported side effect observed in neoplastic patients treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy of the head and neck region as well as in patients who have received a haematopoietic stem cell transplant. The aim of the study was to assess the oral mucosa status in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) during antineoplastic therapy. Material and methods The clinical examination included 78 children aged 2-18 with ALL. The clinica...

  6. Bilateral breast involvement in acute myeloid leukemia

    Hakeem A, Mandakini BT, Asif K, Firdaus, Shagufta RC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast involvement by leukemic infiltration is usually bilateral, but may be unilateral. Clinically patients can present with either single or multiple masses, or with diffuse breast engorgement, with or without nodularity. The affected patients are predominantly young adults. We present a case of an adolescent girl with acute myeloid leukemia having bilateral breast infiltration by leukemic cells.

  7. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Ommen, Hans Beier; Nederby, Line; Toft-Petersen, Marie;

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses how minimal residual disease (MRD) is detected and managed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. The most commonly used techniques to detect residual leukemia in patients in complete remission (CR) are quantitative PCR (qPCR) and multicolor flow cytometry (MFC). While q...

  8. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Fludarabine and cytarabine combined chemotherapy followed by transfusion of donor blood stem cells for treating relapse of acute leukaemia after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    YOU Yong; LI Qiu-bai; CHEN Zhi-chao; LI Wei-ming; XIA Ling-hui; ZHOU Hao; ZOU Ping

    2008-01-01

    Background Relapse remains an obstacle to successful allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alIo-HSCT) for patients with acute leukaemia and no standard treatment is available. We assessed fludarabine and cytarabine with transfusion of donor haematopoietic stem cell in treating the relapse of acute leukaemia after alIo-HSCT.Methods Seven patients, median age 34 years, with relapse of acute leukaemia after alIo-HSCT received combination chemotherapy of fludarabine with cytarabine for 5 days. Five patients suffered from acute myeloid leukaemia (2 refractory) and 2 refractory acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. After the transplantation, the median relapse time was 110 days (range,38-185 days). Two days after chemotherapy, 5 patients received infusion of donor's peripheral blood stem cells, mobilized by granulocyte colony stimulating factor. No prophylactic agents of graft versus host diseases were administered.Results Six patients achieved haematopoietic reconstitution. DNA sequence analysis at day 30 after treatment identified all as full donor chimera type. The median observation time was 189 days. After the treatment, the median time for neutrophilic granulocyte value ≥0.5x109/L and for platelet value >20x109/L were 13 days (range, 10-18 days) and 15 days (range, 11-24 days), respectively. Graft versus host disease occurred in 2 patients (acute) and 3 (chronic). Five patients suffered from pulmonary fungal infection (2 died), 3 haemorrhagic cystitis and 2 cytomegalovirus viraemia. The other patients died of leukaemia related deaths. Three patients with chronic graft versus host disease who had received donor peripheral blood stem cells reinfusion have survived for 375 days, 232 days and 195 days, respectively.Conclusions Fludarabine with cytarabine plus the donor haematopoietic stem cell should be considered as an effective therapeutic regimen for relapse of acute leukaemia after alIo-HSCT. The disease free state of patients may increase, thou.gh with

  10. A comparison of busulphan versus total body irradiation combined with cyclophosphamide as conditioning for autograft or allograft bone marrow transplantation in patients with acute leukaemia

    We retrospectively compared the outcome in patients in the EBMT database transplanted for acute leukaemia from January 1987 to January 1994 who received busulphan and cyclophosphamide (BU/CY) as a pretransplant regimen versus those who received cyclophosphamide and total-body irradiation (CY-TBI). The patients were matched for type of transplant (autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) versus allogenic (BMT)), diagnosis (acute lymphoblast leukaemia (ALL) ora cute myeloid leukaemia (AML)), status (early first complete remission, CR-1) versus intermediate (second or later remission, first relapse)), age, FAB classification for AML, prevention of graft-versus-host disease and year of transplantation. BU/CY and CY/TBI as pretransplant regimens gave similar results in all situations, except ABMT for ALL intermediate stages with more than 2 years from diagnosis to transplantation, where a lower RI and a higher LFS were associated with CY/TBI. (author)

  11. Anti-leukaemic effects induced by APR-246 are dependent on induction of oxidative stress and the NFE2L2/HMOX1 axis that can be targeted by PI3K and mTOR inhibitors in acute myeloid leukaemia cells.

    Ali, Dina; Mohammad, Dara K; Mujahed, Huthayfa; Jonson-Videsäter, Kerstin; Nore, Beston; Paul, Christer; Lehmann, Sören

    2016-07-01

    The small molecule APR-246 (PRIMA-1(MET) ) is a novel drug that restores the activity of mutated and unfolded TP53 protein. However, the mechanisms of action and potential off-target effects are not fully understood. Gene expression profiling in TP53 mutant KMB3 acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells showed that genes which protected cells from oxidative stress to be the most up-regulated. APR-246 exposure also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and depleted glutathione in AML cells. The genes most up-regulated by APR-246, confirmed by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction, were heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1, also termed HO-1), SLC7A11 and RIT1. Up-regulation of HMOX1, a key regulator of cellular response to ROS, was independent of TP53 mutational status. NFE2L2 (also termed Nrf2), a master regulator of HMOX1 expression, showed transcriptional up-regulation and nuclear translocation by APR-246. Down-regulation of NFE2L2 by siRNA in AML cells significantly increased the antitumoural effects of APR-246. The PI3K inhibitor wortmannin and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin inhibited APR-246-induced nuclear translocation of NFE2L2 and counteracted the protective cellular responses to APR-246, resulting in synergistic cell killing together with APR-246. In conclusion, ROS induction is important for antileukaemic activities of APR-246 and inhibiting the protective response of the Nrf-2/HMOX1 axis using PI3K inhibitors, enhances the antileukaemic effects. PMID:26991755

  12. Acute leukaemia after exposure to a weed killer, 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid.

    Timonen, T T; Palva, I P

    1980-01-01

    Acute leukaemia is known to develop in many cases of benzene-induced pancytopenia [1]. This is a report of the development of acute leukaemia in a patient who had apparently recovered from pancytopenia after chronic exposure to a weed killer, 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid. PMID:6769284

  13. Molecular mechanisms involved in chemoresistance in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Stanković Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL is the most common paediatric cancer. Despite cure rates approaching 80%, resistance to treatment and disease relapse remain a significant clinical problem. Identification of the genes and biological pathways responsible for chemoresistance is therefore crucial for the design of novel therapeutic approaches aiming to improve patient survival. Mutations in the membrane transporter P-glycoprotein genes, genetic variations in drug-metabolising enzymes and defects in apoptotic pathways are mechanisms of chemoresistance common to a wide spectrum of cancers and also play a role in paediatric ALL. In addition, several recent microarray studies have identified transcriptional profiles specifically associated with chemoresistance and pointed to a number of potentially novel therapeutic targets. These microarray studies have shown that genes discriminating between clinically responsive and resistant leukaemias tend to be involved in cellular processes such as regulation of cell cycle, proliferation, and DNA repair. Here we review the outcomes of these microarray studies and also present our own investigations into apoptotic resistance to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in paediatric ALL. We present stratification of paediatric ALL by the profile of DNA damage response following ionising radiation (IR in vitro. This approach allows classification of ALL tumours at presentation into IR-apoptotic sensitive and IR-apoptotic resistant. Furthermore, apoptotic resistant leukaemias exhibit abnormal response of NFkB pathway following irradiation and inhibition of this pathway can sensitise leukaemic cells to IR-induced DSBs.

  14. Oral squamous cell carcinoma following treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Waal, R.I.F. van der; Waal, I. van der [Univ. Hospital Vrije Univ., Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Oral Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Veerman, A.J.P. [Univ. Hospital Vrije Univ., Dept. of Paediatric Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Snow, G.B. [Univ. Hospital Vrije Univ., Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-02-01

    With substantially increased survival after most paediatric cancers over the past decades have come the late sequelae of treatment. Of all late complications of treatment, second malignancies are generally considered to be the most serious. We report on a 20-year-old man with an oral squamous cell carcinoma 17 years after initial chemotherapy and irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Although occurrence of the oral malignancy in this patient could have been treatment-related, one should keep in mind that the occurrence of second tumours may also be based on a shared genetic aetiology. (au) 9 refs.

  15. [Disseminated fusariosis in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Hermansen, N.E.; Ralfkiaer, E.M.; Kjeldsen, L.

    2008-01-01

    Invasive mould infections are a major cause of infectious mortality in highly immunosuppressed patients. Incidence in this high risk group is 10-20% with a death rate in excess of 50%. Most invasive moulds are Aspergillus spp. We present a case of a 74-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic...... leukaemia who developed a rare disseminated mould infection with Fusarium solani during induction chemotherapy. We present the case story and discuss the pathogenesis, clinical characteristics and treatment of invasive fusariosis Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9/8...

  16. Oral squamous cell carcinoma following treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    With substantially increased survival after most paediatric cancers over the past decades have come the late sequelae of treatment. Of all late complications of treatment, second malignancies are generally considered to be the most serious. We report on a 20-year-old man with an oral squamous cell carcinoma 17 years after initial chemotherapy and irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Although occurrence of the oral malignancy in this patient could have been treatment-related, one should keep in mind that the occurrence of second tumours may also be based on a shared genetic aetiology. (au) 9 refs

  17. Clinical efficacy of second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor and 5-azacytidine combination in chronic myelogenous leukaemia in myeloid blast crisis.

    Ghez, David; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Pasquier, Florence; Auger, Nathalie; Saada, Véronique; Spentchian, Marc; Ianotto, Jean-Christophe; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Anelyse; Terré, Christine; Castaigne, Sylvie; Rigaudeau, Sophie; Rousselot, Philippe; de Botton, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    Even in the tyrosine kinase inhibitors era, the prognosis of patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia in myeloid blast crisis remains dismal with few patients surviving longer than 6 months. Here we report the cases of 5 patients treated with the combination of 5-azacytidine and tyrosine kinase inhibitors for myeloid blast crisis CML. All patients achieved a complete haematological response including two with a complete cytogenetic and major molecular response. Two patients underwent an allogeneic stem cell transplantation. One died from relapse 34 months from diagnosis. The second is alive and free from disease at 11 months from diagnosis. The other 3 patients are still in complete haematological response after 15, 24 and 33 months of follow-up. These results suggest that the combination has a significant activity in myeloid blast crisis and may increase survival. PMID:23968731

  18. Recurrent deletions of IKZF1 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D.E.; Beuling, Eva; Marry M van den Heuvel-Eibrink; Obulkasim, Askar; Baruchel, André; Trka, Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Sonneveld, Edwin; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Pieters, Rob; Zimmermann, Martin; Zwaan, C. Michel; Fornerod, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    IKAROS family zinc finger 1/IKZF1 is a transcription factor important in lymphoid differentiation, and a known tumor suppressor in acute lymphoid leukemia. Recent studies suggest that IKZF1 is also involved in myeloid differentiation. To investigate whether IKZF1 deletions also play a role in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a panel of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia samples for deletions of the IKZF1 locus using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and for mutations...

  19. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Summary curves for patients transplanted for chronic myeloid leukaemia salvaged by a donor lymphocyte infusion: the current leukaemia-free survival curve

    Klein, John P.; Keiding, Niels; Shu, Youyi;

    2000-01-01

    CML, donor lymphocyte infusion, leukaemia-free survival, current leukaemia-free survival, statistical methods......CML, donor lymphocyte infusion, leukaemia-free survival, current leukaemia-free survival, statistical methods...

  1. Chromosomal mechanisms in murine radiation acute myeloid leukemogenesis

    Chromosome 2 abnormalities, particularly interstitial deletions, characterize murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemias (AMLs). Here, G-band analyses in CBA/H mice of early (1-6 month) post 3 Gy X-radiation events in bone marrow cells in vivo and karyotype evolution in one unusual AML are presented. The early event analysis showed that all irradiated animals carry chromosome 2 abnormalities, that chromosome 2 abnormalities are more frequent than expected and that interstitial deletions are more common in chromosome 2 than in the remainder of the genome. On presentation AML case N122 carried a t(2; 11) terminal translocation which, with passaging, evolved into a del2(C3F3). Therefore two pathways in leukaemogenesis might exist, one deletion-driven, the other terminal tranlocation-driven involving interstitial genes and terminal genes respectively of chromosome 2. As all irradiated individuals carried chromosome 2 abnormalities, the formation of these aberrations does not determine individual leukaemogenic sensitivity as only 20-25% of animals would be expected to develop AML. Similar lines of argument suggest that chromosome 2 abnormalities are necessary but not sufficient for radiation leukaemogenesis in CBA/H nor are they rate limiting in leukaemogenesis. (Author)

  2. Chromosomal mechanisms in murine radiation acute myeloid leukemogenesis

    Bouffler, S.D.; Breckon, G.; Cox, R. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    Chromosome 2 abnormalities, particularly interstitial deletions, characterize murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemias (AMLs). Here, G-band analyses in CBA/H mice of early (1-6 month) post 3 Gy X-radiation events in bone marrow cells in vivo and karyotype evolution in one unusual AML are presented. The early event analysis showed that all irradiated animals carry chromosome 2 abnormalities, that chromosome 2 abnormalities are more frequent than expected and that interstitial deletions are more common in chromosome 2 than in the remainder of the genome. On presentation AML case N122 carried a t(2; 11) terminal translocation which, with passaging, evolved into a del2(C3F3). Therefore two pathways in leukaemogenesis might exist, one deletion-driven, the other terminal tranlocation-driven involving interstitial genes and terminal genes respectively of chromosome 2. As all irradiated individuals carried chromosome 2 abnormalities, the formation of these aberrations does not determine individual leukaemogenic sensitivity as only 20-25% of animals would be expected to develop AML. Similar lines of argument suggest that chromosome 2 abnormalities are necessary but not sufficient for radiation leukaemogenesis in CBA/H nor are they rate limiting in leukaemogenesis. (Author).

  3. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid asparagine depletion during pegylated asparaginase therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Henriksen, Louise T; Nersting, Jacob; Raja, Raheel A;

    2014-01-01

    L-asparaginase is an important drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) asparagine depletion is considered a marker of asparaginase effect in the central nervous system (CNS) and may play a role in CNS-directed anti-leukaemia therapy. The...

  5. Current standard treatment of adult acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

    Lo-Coco, Francesco; Cicconi, Laura; Breccia, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    The outcome of patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) has dramatically improved over the last two decades, due to the introduction of combined all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy regimens and, more recently, to the advent of arsenic trioxide (ATO). ATRA and anthracycline-based chemotherapy remains a widely used strategy, providing cure rates above 80%, but it is associated with risk of severe infections and occurrence of secondary leukaemias. ATO is the most effective single agent in APL and, used alone or in combination with ATRA or ATRA and reduced-intensity chemotherapy, results in greater efficacy with considerably less haematological toxicity. The toxic profile of ATO includes frequent, but manageable, QTc prolongation and increase of liver enzymes. Two large randomized studies have shown that ATRA + ATO is superior to ATRA + chemotherapy for newly diagnosed low-risk APL resulting in 2-4 year event-free survival rates above 90% and very few relapses. According to real world data, the spectacular progress in APL outcomes reported in clinical trials has not been paralleled by a significant improvement in early death rates, this remains the most challenging issue for the final cure of the disease. PMID:26687281

  6. Probability Prediction in Multistate Survival Models for Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

    FANG Ya; Hein Putter

    2005-01-01

    In order to find an appropriate model suitable for a multistate survival experiment, 634 patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) were selected to illustrate the method of analysis.After transplantation, there were 4 possible situations for a patient: disease free, relapse but still alive, death before relapse, and death after relapse. The last 3 events were considered as treatment failure. The results showed that the risk of death before relapse was higher than that of the relapse,especially in the first year after transplantation with competing-risk method. The result of patients with relapse time less than 12 months was much poor by the Kaplan-Meier method. And the multistate survival models were developed, which were detailed and informative based on the analysis of competing risks and Kaplan-Meier analysis. With the multistate survival models, a further analysis on conditional probability was made for patients who were disease free and still alive at month 12 after transplantation. It was concluded that it was possible for an individual patient to predict the 4 possible probabilities at any time. Also the prognoses for relapse either death or not and death either before or afterrelapse may be given. Furthermore, the conditional probabilities for patients who were disease free and still alive in a given time after transplantation can be predicted.

  7. Orbital mass secondary to infantile acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Hossain, Ibtesham Tausif; Moosajee, Mariya; Abou-Rayyah, Yassir; Pavasovic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    An 8-month-old Asian infant girl was referred with a 1-week history of left periorbital swelling on a background of a narrowed left palpebral aperture over the preceding 8 weeks. There was no history of chronic illness, fever or other systemic features. Examination revealed a tender and fluctuant medial canthal swelling with associated periorbital haematoma. There were no other ophthalmic findings and neurological examination was normal. A MRI scan of the brain and orbit demonstrated abnormal soft tissue with features of an aggressive tumour in the left orbital region with no globe invasion. Peripheral blood smear revealed blast cells, confirmed by bone marrow aspirate. A diagnosis of infant acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was made. The patient was started on risk-stratified chemotherapy according to the Interfant-06 Protocol The periorbital swelling resolved by day eight following a course of prednisolone, the patient continues on chemotherapy and is currently in molecular remission. PMID:27143162

  8. Effect of azole antifungal therapy on vincristine toxicity in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Schie, R.M. van; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Loo, D.M. te

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vincristine is one of the cornerstones of the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Constipation, and peripheral and central neurotoxicities are the most common side effects. A comparative study exploring vincristine toxicity in individual patients receiving vin

  9. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  10. Acute myeloid leukemia in the older patient.

    Godwin, John E; Smith, Scott E

    2003-10-15

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an extremely heterogeneous disorder. The biology of AML is incompletely understood, but much data indicates that older patients have a more biologically diverse and chemotherapy resistant form of AML that is quite different from that seen in the younger patients. Approximately 60% of AML cases are in patients greater than 60 years of age, so the predominant burden is in older patients. This problem will be magnified in the future, because the US population is both growing and aging. When one examines the treatment outcomes of older AML patients over the last three decades, there is little progress in long-term survival. Nine major published randomized placebo controlled trials of myeloid growth factors given during induction for AML have been conducted. All of these trials with one exception demonstrated no significant impact on the clinical outcomes of complete response (CR) rate, disease-free, and overall survival. However, the duration of neutropenia was consistently and uniformly reduced by the use of growth factor in all nine of these trials. Because of the favorable impact of the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) on resource use, antibiotic days, hospital days, etc., it can be more economical and beneficial to use CSFs in AML than to withhold use. The overall dismal outlook for the older AML patient can only be altered by clinical trials with new therapeutic agents. New cellular and molecularly targeted agents are entering clinical trials and bring hope for progress to this area of cancer therapy. PMID:14563517

  11. New Complex Chromosomal Translocation in Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia: t(9;18;22)(q34;p11;q11)

    Abdeljabar El Andaloussi; Chrystele Bilhou-Nabera

    2007-01-01

    A Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) case with a new complex t(9;18;22)(q34;p11;q11) of a 29-year-old man is being reported. For the first time, this translocation has been characterized by karyotype complemented with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In CML, the complex and standard translocations have the same prognosis. The patient was treated with standard initial therapy based on hydroxyurea before he died due to heart failure four months later. Our finding indicates the importa...

  12. New Complex Chromosomal Translocation in Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia: t(9;18;22(q34;p11;q11

    Abdeljabar El Andaloussi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML case with a new complex t(9;18;22(q34;p11;q11 of a 29-year-old man is being reported. For the first time, this translocation has been characterized by karyotype complemented with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. In CML, the complex and standard translocations have the same prognosis. The patient was treated with standard initial therapy based on hydroxyurea before he died due to heart failure four months later. Our finding indicates the importance of combined cytogenetic analysis for diagnosis and guidance of treatment in clinical diagnosis of CML.

  13. Induction of apoptosis and bcl-2 expression in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in children.

    Pituch-Noworolska, A; Hajto, B; Balwierz, W; Klus, K

    2001-01-01

    bcl-2 expression is associated with the expression of the multidrug resistance molecule (p-gp) and the resistance of leukaemia cells to the induction of apoptosis. The activity of p-gp is the main mechanism of resistance of leukaemia cells to chemotherapy. This study assessed the induction of apoptosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) blastic cells following in vitro treatment with dexamethasone (DXM), vincristine (VCR), and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in relation to the expression of bcl-2 and p-gp. Common ALL (cALL; n = 24 patients), common ALL with co-expression of myeloid antigens (cALL + My; n = 9), ALL-T (n = 9), and NHL [n = 6 (T type, n = 2; B type, n = 4)] were included. The expression of bcl-2 and p-gp and apoptosis were assayed by flow cytometry. Spontaneous apoptosis was low ( 8%) in NHL and cALL + My. A high frequency of bcl-2 expression was noted in cALL and cALL + My. A high frequency of p-gp expression was observed in cALL + My, ALL-T, and NHL. There was a reverse association between bcl-2 expression and spontaneous apoptosis. DXM-induced apoptosis was observed in 52.63%, TNF-induced in 42.85%, VCR-induced in 36.36%, and GM-CSF-induced in 33.3% of leukaemia and lymphoma cases. DXM and GM-CSF-driven apoptosis was reversibly associated with bcl-2-expression (bcl-2-dependent mechanism). VCR and TNF-driven apoptosis was not associated with bcl-2 expression, suggesting a different, bcl-2-independent, mechanism(s) of its induction. The in vitro induction of apoptosis was not associated with expression of p-gp. PMID:11855781

  14. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    2015-02-24

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML. PMID:26113060

  16. CD19-Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia

    Lorentzen, C L; thor Straten, Per

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) for cancer represents a promising new treatment modality. ACT based on the administration of cytotoxic T cells genetically engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) recognizing CD19 expressed by B cell malignancies has been shown to induce complete lasting...... responses in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). So far, eleven clinical trials including 99 CLL and ALL patients treated with CAR T cells targeting CD19 have been published, and the results from these trials are promising with impressive clinical...... responses in heavily pretreated patients. Thus, CAR T cell therapy has induced complete responses in both CLL and ALL, and surprisingly, current results indicate that patients with ALL are more prone to respond than are CLL patients. Importantly, the majority of CAR cell studies have observed severe therapy...

  17. Oral methotrexate is as effective as intramuscular in maintenance therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Chessells, J M; Leiper, A D; Tiedemann, K.; Hardisty, R. M.; Richards, S.

    1987-01-01

    It has been postulated that variations in methotrexate absorption may influence the outcome of treatment in lymphoblastic leukaemia. One hundred and forty four children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia not of the T cell type were randomised to receive continuing treatment with daily 6-mercaptopurine, vincristine, and prednisolone six weekly and methotrexate once weekly, either as a single oral dose or an intramuscular injection. Analysis of results with a minimum follow up of three and a ha...

  18. Cytogenetic studies of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Tarek Abd -Alla Atia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML describes as a group of hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by expansion of undifferentiated myeloid progenitors. Acquired chromosomal anomaly particularly reciprocal translocations constitute one of the major events contribute to leukemogenesis. Patient and Methods: 45 untreated, newly diagnosed patients with de novo AML were enrolled in the present study and subjected to cytogenetic analysis. Four ml of heparinized peripheral blood were collected for 72 hours synchronized culture, and then chromosome G- banding analysis was performed using standard methods. The karyotypes were designated according to the International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature (ISCN. The collected data were analyzed statistically. Result: Cytogenetic analysis and karyotype results were obtained in 45 patients with de novo AML. Males constituted 33.3%, and females constituted 66.7% of this group. The patients' age ranged from 17-60 years. Chromosomal anomalies have been detected in 21 out of 45 patients (46.7%. However five different types of chromosome anomalies have been detected; where seven cases (33.3% carrying t(15;17( q22;q21; six cases (28.5% carrying t(8;21(q22;q22; three cases (14.3% had trisomy 8; three cases (14.3% had monosomy 7; and lastly two cases (9.5% carrying inv(3(q21q26. Conclusion: Conventional cytogenetic analysis reliability detects chromosomal abnormalities in AML patients at the time of diagnosis. Chromosomal anomalies detected in Egyptian AML patients, are similar to some extent to those recorded in other areas of the world

  19. L-asparaginase induced hyperlipidaemia in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Objective: To evaluate hyperlipidaemia in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) receiving L-asparaginase. Methods: A case-control study carried out between October 2007 and October 2010 with 77 patients undergoing chemotherapy at a teaching children hospital in Babol, Iran. Patients were treated with anti-leukaemic agents according to the protocols for standard-risk and high-risk ALL. Those patients who received asparaginase represented the cases and those who did not receive it were the controls. Biochemical markers were checked during the induction phase chemotherapy. Lipid profile of patients was recorded. Data was analysed using SPSS 16. Results: Of the 77 patients, 37 (48.05%) received asparaginase therapy and 40 (51.94%) patients did not. The mean peak triglyceride and cholesterol levels during asparaginase therapy in the first group were significantly higher than the levels in the second group. Conclusion: Severe hyperlipidaemia may be the cause of some morbidity in children receiving asparaginase. Asparaginase-induced hyperlipidaemia should be monitored in ALL patients during the induction phase of treatment. (author)

  20. Personalization of dexamethasone therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Jackson, Rosanna K; Irving, Julie A E; Veal, Gareth J

    2016-04-01

    Dexamethasone is a key component in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Despite playing a key role in the improved survival of ALL over several decades, intensification of dexamethasone therapy has also contributed to the increased toxicity associated with treatment, which is now seen to be at unacceptable levels given the favourable disease prognosis. Therefore the focus for treatment is now shifting towards reducing toxicity whilst maintaining current survival rates. As approximately 50% of patients were successfully treated on less intensive protocols of the 1980s, it has been questioned whether therapy intensification is necessary in all patients. Furthermore, there remains a subset of children who are still not cured of their disease. New strategies are therefore needed to identify patients who could benefit from dose reduction or intensification. However, adjusting a potentially life threatening therapy is a challenging task, particularly given the heterogeneous nature of ALL. This review focuses on the potential for patient stratification based on our current knowledge of dexamethasone pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenetics and the action of dexamethasone at the cellular level. A carefully designed, combined approach is needed if we are to achieve the aim of improved personalization of dexamethasone therapy for future patients. PMID:26729065

  1. BCL11A expression in acute phase chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Yin, Jiawei; Zhang, Fan; Tao, Huiquan; Ma, Xiao; Su, Guangsong; Xie, Xiaoli; Xu, Zhongjuan; Zheng, Yanwen; Liu, Hong; He, Chao; Mao, Zhengwei Jenny; Wang, Zhiwei; Chang, Weirong; Gale, Robert Peter; Wu, Depei; Yin, Bin

    2016-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has chronic and acute phases. In chronic phase myeloid differentiation is preserved whereas in acute phase myeloid differentiation is blocked. Acute phase CML resembles acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Chronic phase CML is caused by BCR-ABL1. What additional mutation(s) cause transition to acute phase is unknown and may differ in different persons with CML. BCL11A encodes a transcription factor and is aberrantly-expressed in several haematological and solid neoplasms. We analyzed BCL11A mRNA levels in subjects with chronic and acute phase CML. BCL11A transcript levels were increased in subjects with CML in acute phase compared with those in normals and in subjects in chronic phase including some subjects studied in both phases. BCL11A mRNA levels were correlated with percent bone marrow blasts and significantly higher in lymphoid versus myeloid blast crisis. Differentiation of K562 with butyric acid, a CML cell line, decreased BCL11A mRNA levels. Cytology and flow cytometry analyses showed that ectopic expression of BCL11A in K562 cells blocked differentiation. These data suggest BCL11A may operate in transformation of CML from chronic to acute phase in some persons. PMID:27285855

  2. Imatinib discontinuation in chronic phase myeloid leukaemia patients in sustained complete molecular response : A randomised trial of the Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial for Haemato-Oncology (HOVON)

    Thielen, Noortje; van der Holt, Bronno; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Verhoef, Gregor E. G.; Gussinklo, Titia; Biemond, Bart J.; Daenen, Simon M. G.; Deenik, Wendy; Kooy, Rien van Marwijk; Petersen, Eefke; Smit, Willem M.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Janssen, Jeroen J. W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment in responding chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients is generally continued indefinitely. In this randomised phase II trial, we investigated whether CML patients in molecular response(4.5) (MR4.5, quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain

  3. Tritiated Thymidine as Tracer in DNA Metabolism and Cell Dynamics of Experimental Myeloid Leukaemia

    Tritium has been used as an isotopic tracer in a variety of biological problems in Israel. We wish to report, in particular, some findings in which tritiated thymidine (TH3) has been used to follow the cell dynamics in experimental myeloid leukaemia and also to investigate the mechanism of its incorporation into the DNA of these and Ehrlich ascites tumour cells. The leukaemic cells were labelled in-vivo by injecting the TH3 into the jugular vein. The dose was 1 pc/g/rat. The rate of appearance of the labelled cells in the peripheral blood and in the ascitic tumour of the animal, was estimated. In other experiments the rate of the dilution of the label in the nuclei was evaluated and thus it was possible to estimate the cellular doubling time in the myelocyte population. The dynamics of transfused leukaemia cells were investigated by injecting labelled myelocytes into the jugular vein of normal and leukaemic rats. Their rate of disappearance from the blood was measured. Various organs were examined for the labelled cells and it was found that soon after injection the cells were mainly trapped by the lungs, later by the spleen and to a lesser extent by the liver. After 24 h no labelled cells were detectable in any of the organs. Information was thus obtained on the fate of the leukaemic myelocytes in various organs of the normal and leukaemic animals. In in-vitro experiments, TH3 was added to the cell suspension in a concentration of 1 p.c/ml. In the course of the in-vitro labelling it was observed that the number of labelled cells was 40 times higher than the number of mitoses. (The same was found also after administering the TH3 in-vivo.) The rate of incorporation of the TH3 was established. Concentrations between 0.0036 p mole x 103 and 1.8 μmolex 10-3 were tested. It was found that the per cent of cells incorporating the label is constant for the various concentrations of thymidine. The number of grains per nucleus increased with the increase of the

  4. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit;

    2016-01-01

    toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall......Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi...... method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis...

  5. Expression of partial tandem duplication of mixed lineage leukaemia in patients with acute leukaemia and their relatives

    He Yi; Wang Dongning; Li Xudong; Hu Yuan; Wang Wenwen; Huang Renwei

    2014-01-01

    Background Partial tandem duplication of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL-PTD) is detected both in patients with acute leukemia and in healthy people.However,MLL-PTD in relatives of patients with MLL-PTD has not been reported.The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of MLL-PTD in patients with acute leukemia and in their relatives.Methods The bone marrow or peripheral blood was collected from patients with acute leukaemia and their relatives.Nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was applied to detect the mRNA expression of the MLL-PTD fused gene,and further confirm in genomic DNA level.Results Analysing MLL-PTD in case 1,the patient's older brother and his younger brother were positive,while his mother and his son were negative.The exon type in case 1 was e9/3 fusion,but in his older brother,it was e9/3 and e11/3 fusion,and in his younger brother,it was e9/3,e10/3,and e11/3 fusion.MLL-PTD in case 2 was negative,but in the patient's older sister was positive,and the exon type was e9/3,e10/3,and e11/3.Conclusions The expression of MLL-PTD was present in cases with acute leukaemia with a single expression type.However,various expression types were detected in their healthy relatives.MLL-PTD can couple with other chromosome aberrations,and its impact on disease prognosis remains to be studied further.

  6. A Study of Haemostatic Parameters in Patients of Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

    Gupta, Naresh; Singh, Tejinder; Agarwal, Sunita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) is characterized by derangement of various components of the haemostatic system resulting in thrombo-haemorrhagic complications. Although less common than other myeloproliferative neoplasms, derangement of various components of the haemostatic system is observed in CML. Haemostatic abnormalities have been described in relation to hyperleucostasis and drugs used to treat CML. However, the correlation between haemostatic derangements and phase of CML is unclear in the literature. Aim The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assay various haemostatic parameters in patients of CML receiving Imatinib and to determine any correlation between them and phases of disease as well as the status of remission. Materials and Methods The study included 30 patients with CML (17 males, 13 females, mean age of 35.53 ± 8.92 years) receiving imatinib mesylate. Haemostatic parameters including platelet counts, Prothrombin Time (PT), activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (APTT), fibrinogen, D-dimers and Factor VIII levels were assayed for all patients using standard methods. Bcr-abl gene product (quantitative) was determined on the peripheral blood by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Patients were grouped into phases of disease (chronic, accelerated and blast) and their response to imatinib was determined in the form of remission (clinical, haematological and molecular). Correlations were drawn between them using spearman’s coefficient. Results A significant positive correlation was found between PT (p=0.002), fibrinogen (p=0.011), D-dimers (p=0.050), Factor VIII levels (p=0.006) with the phase of CML and a significant negative correlation was observed between PT (p=0.003, 0.006), fibrinogen (p=0.010, 0.005), D-dimers (p=0.035, 0.017), Factor VIII levels (p=0.005, 0.001) and clinical and haematological remission respectively. No significant correlation of platelet counts and APTT was seen with the phase of

  7. Late effects of treatment in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    The overall aim of this study was a comprehensive assessment of the nature and severity of the late effects of treatment in a group of children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. In the absence of damage preceding treatment, late effects could be ascribed to treatment. Cranial irradiation, methotrexate, L-asparaginase and cytosine arabinoside are therapeutic modalities most likely to cause injury to the central nervous system. Survivors of childhood leukaemia also showed an increase in weight-for-height during and after therapy which appeared to be the consequence of a loss in statural growth as well as increasing weight-for-age. Assessment of endocrine function in leukaemia survivors indicated abnormalities in the regulation of growth hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone in some patients. Survivors of childhood leukaemia were shown to have an intellectual deficit compared with their siblings and a high incidence of visual-perceptual defects. The intellectual effects of lower doses of cranial irradiation are as yet unknown. A variety of minor neurological abnormalities were detected among leukaemia survivors and thought to be related to preceding central nervous system 'prophylactic' chemotherapy and irradiation. A new instrument, the functional deficit score, was derived to reflect overall outcome in survivors of childhood leukaemia. With few exceptions, leukaemia survivors in this study had received 2400 rads of deep x-ray therapy as cranial irradiation. This dosage has since been reduced world-wide. Current cranial irradiation 'prophylaxis' consists of 1800 rad of megavoltage radiotherapy

  8. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2016-03-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  9. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2013-09-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Response rate of Pakistani children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia to medical research council acute lymphoblastic leukaemia 97 chemotherapy protocol

    Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), a malignancy of lymphoid lineage cells, has excellent prognosis in children. In Pakistan, a few studies highlighted the response of ALL to chemotherapy. The Present study was planned to see the response rate of Pakistani children with ALL to Medical Research Council ALL 97 (MRCALL97) chemotherapy protocol. This descriptive case series was conducted at the Department of Haematology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and the Department of Paediatric Oncology, Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi from February 16, 2007 to August 16, 2007. Methods: Diagnosed children with ALL fulfilling the inclusion criteria were interviewed regarding history of the present, past illnesses, and family history. Physical examination was performed. Presenting clinical features, blood counts and blood and bone marrow blasts percentage were used to see the response on day 29 post chemotherapy. The data was recorded on a structured proforma for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 33 patients were studied including 26 males and 7 females. Twenty-five patients belonged to age group 2-9 years, and 8 to 9 years, median age being 4.5 years. Presenting WBC count was 50 X 10/sup 9/L in 3 patients. At the end of induction, complete remission was achieved in 31 out of 33 (94%) patients while two patients did not achieve remission. Conclusion: Response rate of Pakistani children with ALL to chemotherapy was superior to the previously reported figures from Pakistan. (author)

  11. The Epigenetic Landscape of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Emma Conway O’Brien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a genetically heterogeneous disease. Certain cytogenetic and molecular genetic mutations are recognized to have an impact on prognosis, leading to their inclusion in some prognostic stratification systems. Recently, the advent of high-throughput whole genome or exome sequencing has led to the identification of several novel recurrent mutations in AML, a number of which have been found to involve genes concerned with epigenetic regulation. These genes include in particular DNMT3A, TET2, and IDH1/2, involved with regulation of DNA methylation, and EZH2 and ASXL-1, which are implicated in regulation of histones. However, the precise mechanisms linking these genes to AML pathogenesis have yet to be fully elucidated as has their respective prognostic relevance. As massively parallel DNA sequencing becomes increasingly accessible for patients, there is a need for clarification of the clinical implications of these mutations. This review examines the literature surrounding the biology of these epigenetic modifying genes with regard to leukemogenesis and their clinical and prognostic relevance in AML when mutated.

  12. Acute myeloid leukemia masquerading as hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Abu-Zeinah, Ghaith F; Weisman, Paul; Ganesh, Karuna; Katz, Seth S; Dogan, Ahmet; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K; Stein, Eytan M; Jarnagin, William; Mauro, Michael J; Harding, James J

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often diagnosed on the basis of high quality imaging without a biopsy in the cirrhotic liver. This is a case of a 64-year-old Caucasian man with no history of liver disease or cirrhosis that presented with fatigue, weight loss, and abdominal distension and was found to have a large, isolated liver mass with arterial enhancement and portal venous washout on triple-phase computed tomography (CT) suspicious for HCC. The patient was initially referred for a surgical evaluation. Meanwhile, he developed fevers, pancytopenia, and worsening back pain, and a subsequent spinal MRI revealed a heterogeneous bone marrow signal suspicious for metastatic disease. A bone marrow biopsy that followed was diffusely necrotic. A core biopsy of the patient's liver mass was then performed and was diagnostic of acute monocytic-monoblastic leukemia. Findings from peripheral flow cytometry and a repeat bone marrow biopsy were also consistent with this diagnosis, and induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and idarubicin was initiated. This case describes a rare presentation of myeloid sarcoma (MS) as an isolated, hypervascular liver mass that mimics HCC in its radiographic appearance. Due to the broad differential for a liver mass, a confirmatory biopsy should routinely be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284485

  13. [Cytogenetic monitoring acute myeloid leucosis in children].

    Fleĭshman, E V; Sokova, O I; Popa, A V; Konstantinova, L N; Metel'kova, N F; Serebriakova, I N; Peregudov, D A

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary results of cytogenetic monitoring acute myeloid leukosis (AML) in children are presented. Repeated chromosomal analyses were accomplished in 23 patients that presented with cell clones showing various karyotype abnormalities prior to the onset of therapy. All the patients were treated following identical protocols. Complete hematological remission was achieved in 20 cases. The majority of patients did not have cells with chromosomal abnormalities changes after a 2-4 month follow up. Anomalous metaphases persisted in 6 patients although their occurrence decreased. Five of them poorly responded to therapy whereas simultaneous achievement of morphological and cytogenetic remission ensured more beneficial outcome of the treatment. Results of the study agree with recent reports of delayed reversion to normal karyotype under effect of AML therapy that as a rule predicts an unfavourable prognosis Repeated analysis during stable hematological remission did not reveal cells with karyotype abnormalities in bone marrow with the exception of a single patient who had marrow cells with chromosomal translocation (16:16) up to the 8th month of complete hematological remission. This patient remains under observation (duration of remission is now 15 months). It was shown that the relative amount of cells with abnormal karyotype in bone marrow frequently exceeds that of blast cells (usually before the onset of therapy and sometimes in the beginning of morphological remission). During stable remission, such an excess is an antecedent of relapse. It is concluded that cytogenetic analysis for monitoring AML extends the possibility of detecting leukemia cells. PMID:19827640

  14. Acute myeloid leukemia masquerading as hepatocellular carcinoma

    Abu-Zeinah, Ghaith F.; Weisman, Paul; Ganesh, Karuna; Katz, Seth S.; Dogan, Ahmet; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K.; Stein, Eytan M.; Jarnagin, William; Mauro, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often diagnosed on the basis of high quality imaging without a biopsy in the cirrhotic liver. This is a case of a 64-year-old Caucasian man with no history of liver disease or cirrhosis that presented with fatigue, weight loss, and abdominal distension and was found to have a large, isolated liver mass with arterial enhancement and portal venous washout on triple-phase computed tomography (CT) suspicious for HCC. The patient was initially referred for a surgical evaluation. Meanwhile, he developed fevers, pancytopenia, and worsening back pain, and a subsequent spinal MRI revealed a heterogeneous bone marrow signal suspicious for metastatic disease. A bone marrow biopsy that followed was diffusely necrotic. A core biopsy of the patient’s liver mass was then performed and was diagnostic of acute monocytic-monoblastic leukemia. Findings from peripheral flow cytometry and a repeat bone marrow biopsy were also consistent with this diagnosis, and induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and idarubicin was initiated. This case describes a rare presentation of myeloid sarcoma (MS) as an isolated, hypervascular liver mass that mimics HCC in its radiographic appearance. Due to the broad differential for a liver mass, a confirmatory biopsy should routinely be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284485

  15. ERYTHEMA NODOSUM REVEALING ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Chebbi Wafa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Erythema nodosum (EN is the most common type of panniculitis. It may be idiopathic or secondary to various etiologies. However, the occurrence of erythema nodosum in malignant hemopathy had rarely been reported. Case report: A 42 year-old woman presented with a four week history of recurrent multiple painful erythematous nodules developed on the lower limbs associated with arthralgia of the ankles and fever. The clinical features of skin lesions with contusiform color evolution allowed establishing the diagnosis of EN. No underlying cause was found. The skin lesions were improved with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. Three months later, the patient consulted for recurrence of EN associated with fever, inflammatory polyarthralgia and hepatosplenomegaly. The peripheral blood count revealed pancytopenia. A bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia type 2. Initiation of chemotherapy was followed by the complete disappearance of skin lesions of EN. Conclusion: Paraneoplastic erythema nodosum is a rare entity. In the literature, a few cases of association with leukemia have been reported. Exploration for solid neoplasms or hemopathy in case of recurrent EN or resistance to conventional treatment should be systematic

  16. Optical spectroscopy investigation of peptides issued from the AML1-ETO–E-protein complex relevant to acute myeloid leukemia

    Porumb, H.

    2008-01-01

    The expression of AML1-ETO, resulting from the t(8; 21) chromosomal translocation causes 15% of acute myeloid leukaemias. The NHR2 region of ETO, bearing the motif LxxLL, is involved in the oligomerisation of the AML1-ETO. “Peptide NHR2” is one of the objects of the present investigation. The TAFH region of ETO may recruit AML1-ETO to transcription activators, such as E-protein. “Peptide TAFH” is another object of the present investigation. TAFH interacts with E-protein through the AD1 domain...

  17. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    2016-02-22

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  18. Birth weight in offspring and leukaemia risk in parents-A nation-wide register-based cohort study from Denmark

    Marklund, Maria; Rostgaard, Klaus; Hjalgrim, Lisa;

    2013-01-01

    Spurred by previous observations we assessed the relationship between offspring birth weight and parental leukaemia risk in a register-based investigation including 2.4 million parents of 2 million Danish children. Regardless of analytical approach, offspring birth weight was not associated with...... parental risk of leukaemia overall or of leukaemia subtypes except for a twofold increased acute lymphatic leukaemia risk in fathers of high birth weight offspring and an increasing paternal risk of chronic myeloid leukaemia with increasing offspring birth weight. These may both be chance findings. Our...... investigation indicates that offspring birth weight is not strongly associated with parental leukaemia risk....

  19. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Role of autophagy in acute myeloid leukemia therapy

    Su-Ping Zhang; Yu-Na Niu; Na Yuan; Ai-Hong Zhang; Dan Chao; Qiu-Ping Xu; Li-Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Despite its dual role in determining cell fate in a wide array of solid cancer cell lines,autophagy has been robustly shown to suppress or kill acute myeloid leukemia cells via degradation of the oncogenic fusion protein that drives leukemogenesis.However,autophagy also induces the demise of acute leukemia cells that do not express the known fusion protein,though the molecular mechanism remains elusive.Nevertheless,since it can induce cooperation with apoptosis and differentiation in response to autophagic signals,autophagy can be manipulated for a better therapy on acute myeloid leukemia.

  1. Aplastic anaemia preceding acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in an adult with isolated deletion of chromosome 9q.

    Kelly, Kevin

    2008-12-01

    Aplastic anaemia (AA) can precede acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in 2% of children but this is rarely reported to occur in adults. A 21-year-old male presented with bone marrow failure and bone marrow biopsy showed a profoundly hypocellular marrow. He recovered spontaneously but represented 2 months later when he was diagnosed with pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Chromosomal examination revealed 46,XY,del(9)(q13q34). To the best of our knowledge this is the first case to be reported of aplasia preceding ALL with 9q minus as the sole chromosomal abnormality.

  2. A four-point clinical criteria distinguishes immune thrombocytopenia from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Lum, S H; How, S J; Ariffin, H; Krishnan, S

    2016-02-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia is the most common diagnosis of isolated thrombocytopenia. The dilemma encountered by paediatricians is missing diagnosis of acute leukaemia in children with isolated thrombocytopenia. We demonstrated childhood ITP could be diagnosed using a four point clinical criteria without missing a diagnosis of acute leukaemia. Hence, bone marrow examination is not necessary in children with typical features compatible with ITP prior to steroid therapy. This can encourage paediatricians to choose steroid therapy, which is cheaper and non-blood product, as first line platelet elevating therapy in children with significant haemorrhage. PMID:27130741

  3. Prognostic significance of cellular vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression in the course of chronic myeloid leukaemia

    Vidović Ana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Increased angiogenesis in bone marrow is one of the characteristics of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML, a clonal myeloproliferative disorder that expresses a chimeric bcr/abl protein. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is one of the most potent and a specific regulator of angiogenesis which principally targets endothelial cells and regulates several of their functions, including mitogenesis, permeability and migration. The impact of elevated VEGF expression on the course of chronic myeloid leukaemia is unknown. Objective. The aim of this study was the follow-up of VEGF expression during the course of CML. Methods. We studied VEGF expression of 85 CML patients (median age 50 years, range 16-75 years. At the commencement of the study, 29 patients were in chronic phase (CP, 25 in an accelerated phase (AP, and 31 in the blast crisis (BC. The temporal expression (percentage positivity per 1000 analysed cells VEGF proteins over the course of CML were studied using the immunohistochemical technique utilizing relevant monoclonal antibodies. It was correlated with the laboratory (Hb, WBC and platelet counts, and the percentage of blasts and clinical parameters (organomegaly, duration of CP, AP, and BC of disease progression. Results. The expression of VEGF protein was most pronounced in AP (ANOVA, p=0.033. The level of VEGF expression correlated inversely with the degree of splenomegaly (Pearson, r=-0.400, p=0.011. High expression of VEGF correlated with a shorter overall survival (log rank, p=0.042. Conclusion. Immunohistochemically confirmed significance of the expression of VEGF in dependence of the CML stage could be of clinical importance in deciding on the timing therapy. These data suggest that VEGF plays a role in the biology of CML and that VEGF inhibitors should be investigated in CML.

  4. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: a Delphi consensus.

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Escherich, Gabriele; Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Halsey, Christina; Hough, Rachael; Jeha, Sima; Kato, Motohiro; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Möricke, Anja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Piette, Caroline; Putti, Maria Caterina; Raetz, Elizabeth; Silverman, Lewis B; Skinner, Roderick; Tuckuviene, Ruta; van der Sluis, Inge; Zapotocka, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14 toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall assessment of outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment, these expert opinion-based definitions will allow reliable comparisons of frequencies and severities of acute toxic effects across treatment protocols, and facilitate international research on cause, guidelines for treatment adaptation, preventive strategies, and development of consensus algorithms for reporting on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment. PMID:27299279

  5. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2015-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Risk factors for treatment related mortality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Lund, Bendik; Åsberg, Ann; Heyman, Mats;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of major improvements in the cure rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 2-4% of patients still die from treatment related complications. PROCEDURE: We investigated the pattern of treatment related deaths (TRDs) and possible risk factors in the NOPHO ALL-92 and...

  7. Prognosis in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia : a question of maturation?

    Plasschaert, SLA; Kamps, WA; Vellenga, E; de Vries, EGE; de Bont, ESJM

    2004-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is a disease diagnosed in children as well as adults. Progress in the treatment of ALL has led to better survival rates, however, children have benefited more from improved treatment modalities than adults. Recent evidence has underscored that the difference in ch

  8. Risk factors for treatment related mortality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Lund, Bendik; Åsberg, Ann; Heyman, Mats;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of major improvements in the cure rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 2-4% of patients still die from treatment related complications. PROCEDURE: We investigated the pattern of treatment related deaths (TRDs) and possible risk factors in the NOPHO ALL-92 and...... towards patients at risk. Pediatr Blood Cancer. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc....

  9. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-07-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Dasatinib in high-risk core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: a French Acute Myeloid Leukemia Intergroup trial

    Boissel, Nicolas; Renneville, Aline; Leguay, Thibaut; Lefebvre, Pascale Cornillet; Recher, Christian; Lecerf, Thibaud; Delabesse, Eric; Berthon, Céline; Blanchet, Odile; Prebet, Thomas; Pautas, Cécile; Chevallier, Patrice; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Girault, Stéphane; Bonmati, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia is a favorable acute myeloid leukemia subset cytogenetically defined by t(8;21) or inv(16)/t(16;16) rearrangements, disrupting RUNX1 (previously CBFA/AML1) or CBFB transcription factor functions. The receptor tyrosine kinase KIT is expressed in the vast majority of these acute myeloid leukemias and frequent activating KIT gene mutations have been associated with a higher risk of relapse. This phase II study aimed to evaluate dasatinib as maintenance ...

  11. New drugs in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia Novas drogas no tratamento da leucemia mielóide crônica

    Daniela Cilloni; Antonia Rotolo; Paolo Nicoli; Marco Bosa; Giuseppe Saglio

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of the BCR-ABL kinase inhibitor, imatinib mesylate (Gleevec®, Novartis) led to significant changes in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients. However, despite the impressive percentage of responding patients, some CML cases, particularly those in advanced phases of the disease, show primary resistance or relapse after the initial response. The second-generation BCR-ABL inhibitors nilotinib (Tasigna®, Novartis) and dasatinib (Sprycel®, Bristol-Myers Squibb) ...

  12. Changes in the expression of FGFR3 in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia receiving transplants of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cells

    Dvořáková, D.; Krejčí, P.; Mayer, J.; Fajkus, Jiří; Hampl, Aleš; Dvořák, Petr

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 3 (2001), s. 832-835. ISSN 0007-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA312/97/0393; GA MŠk ME 198 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 * chronic myeloid leukaemia * stem cell transplantation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.815, year: 2001

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in acute myeloid leukemia

    Kampen, Kim R.; ter Elst, Arja; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    This review is designed to provide an overview of the current literature concerning vascular endothelial growth factor signaling (VEGF) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Aberrant VEGF signaling operates in the bone marrow of AML patients and is related to a poor prognosis. The altered signaling pathw

  14. Retinoid Differentiation Therapy for Common Types of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Philip Hughes; Geoffrey Brown

    2012-01-01

    Many cancers arise in a tissue stem cell, and cell differentiation is impaired resulting in an accumulation of immature cells. The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in 1987 to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), pioneered a new approach to obtain remission in malignancies by restoring the terminal maturation of leukemia cells resulting in these cells having a limited lifespan. Differentiation therapy also offers the prospect o...

  15. Epigenetic regulators as promising therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia

    Gallipoli, Paolo; Giotopoulos, George; Huntly, Brian J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most prevalent acute leukemia in adults, is an aggressive hematological malignancy arising in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. With the exception of a few specific AML subtypes, the mainstays of treatment have not significantly changed over the last 20 years, and are still based on standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. As a result, clinical outcome remains poor for the majority of patients, with overall long-term survival in the region of 20?30%. Recent su...

  16. Acute leukaemoid reaction following cardiac surgery

    Webb Stephen T

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia is an atypical myeloproliferative disorder with a natural history of progression to acute myeloid leukaemia, a complex and poorly understood response by the bone marrow to stress. Cardiac surgery activates many inflammatory cascades and may precipitate a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. We present a case of undiagnosed chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia who developed rapidly fatal multi-organ dysfunction following cardiac surgery due to an acute leukaemoid reaction.

  17. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  18. Brachial Plexopathy due to Myeloid Sarcoma in a Patient With Acute Myeloid Leukemia After Allogenic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    Ha, Yumi; Sung, Duk Hyun; Park, Yoonhong; Kim, Du Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a solid, extramedullary tumor comprising of immature myeloid cells. It may occur in any organ; however, the invasion of peripheral nervous system is rare. Herein, we report the case of myeloid sarcoma on the brachial plexus. A 37-year-old woman with acute myelogenous leukemia achieved complete remission after chemotherapy. One year later, she presented right shoulder pain, progressive weakness in the right upper extremity and hypesthesia. Based on magnetic resonance images ...

  19. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Treatment-related toxicities in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia predisposition syndromes

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2016-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) do not harbor germline mutations that strongly predispose them to development of this malignancy, large syndrome registries and detailed mapping of exomes or whole genomes of familial leukaemia kindreds have revealed that 3-5% of all...... anticancer agents, while others are not. This review summarises our current knowledge on the risk of acute toxicities for these ALL patients and provides guidance for treatment adjustments....... patients is important in order to adjust therapy and offer genetic counseling and cancer surveillance to mutation carriers in the family. In the coming years large genomic screening projects are expected to reveal further hitherto unrecognised familial ALL syndromes. The treatment of ALL cases harboring...

  1. Unusual fungal sepsis of Alternaria alternata in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in an adult patient

    S Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of unusual fungal sepsis of Alternaria alternata in a patient of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in 62-year-old male who presented with complaints of 'off and on' fever with decreased oral intake. On evaluation, haemogram showed low platelet count and 68% blast cells in peripheral blood. On flow cytometry of peripheral blood, the gated blasts (approximately 55% highly express CD45, CD10, CD19, CD22 and condition was diagnosed as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. He was started on standard induction treatment along with supportive therapies. During the course of treatment, two sets of paired blood cultures were sent 48 h apart. All of blood cultures were done on Bac-T alert 3D system. All of them yielded fungus. The fungus was then grown on Sabouraud's Dextrose agar media. It was identified as A. alternata. The patient condition worsened and later had cardiac arrest in ICU and could not be revived.

  2. Frequency of various types of leukaemias diagnosed at PAF hospital mianwali

    Objective: To determine the frequencies of various types of leukaemias in a secondary care hospital. Study Design: Descriptive Place and Duration of Study: PAF Hospital Mianwali, from Jan 2009 to Dec 2012. Material and Methods: Record of all the cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) diagnosed during the period of study was retrieved from the laboratory and total number of leukaemia cases were counted. The ages and the genders of the patients were noted. Median age at diagnosis for each type of leukaemia was worked out. Frequency of each leukaemia type was noted and relative frequency was calculated as percentage. Results: Out of a total of 67 patients, AML was diagnosed in 22 (32.8%), CML in 16 (23.8%), ALL in 15 (22.4%) and CLL in 14 (20.9%) cases. Median age at diagnosis for ALL, AML, CLL and CML was 5, 41, 70 and 40 years respectively while male to female ratio was 2.7, 1.4, 1.3 and 1.5 respectively. Conclusion: AML was the commonest leukaemia type, followed by CML, ALL and CLL. In children, ALL was found to be four times more common than AML. (author)

  3. Competitive PCR for quantification of minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Nyvold, C; Madsen, H O; Ryder, L P;

    2000-01-01

    A very precise and reproducible polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed in order to quantify minimal residual disease (MRD) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). A clone-specific competitor was constructed by introducing a restriction site in a PCR product identical to...... at least one malignant cell in 10(5) normal cells. This method may be used for treatment stratification based on the early response to antileukaemic therapy. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Jan-13...

  4. Difficult diagnosis of invasive fungal infection predominantly involving the lower gastrointestinal tract in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Avcu, Gulhadiye; Karapinar, Deniz Yilmaz; Yazici, Pinar; Duyu, Muhterem; Polat, Suleyha Hilmioglu; Atabay, Berna; Doganavsargil, Basak; Karapinar, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are most commonly seen in immunocompromised patients and usually affect the respiratory system. Gastrointestinal system involvement of mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis is rarely reported in childhood. Here we describe a 5 year old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed invasive fungal infection particularly affecting the lower gastrointestinal system to emphasise the difficulties in diagnosis and management of invasive fungal infections in immun...

  5. Host genome variations and risk of infections during induction treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Lund, Bendik; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata; Lausen, Birgitte;

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate association of host genomic variation and risk of infections during treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Methods: We explored association of 34 000 singlenucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related primarily to pharmacogenomics and immune function...... to risk of infections among 69 ALL patients on induction therapy. Results: Forty-eight (70%) patients experienced infectious events including 23 with positive blood cultures. Infectious events and positive blood cultures were associated significantly with 24 and 21 SNPs, respectively (P

  6. The pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous cytosine arabinoside in patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia.

    Slevin, M L; Piall, E M; Aherne, G.W.; Johnston, A.; Sweatman, M C; Lister, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous cytosine arabinoside were compared with bolus intravenous injection and intravenous infusion in five patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia. 2 Subcutaneous cytosine arabinoside was rapidly absorbed and then declined biexponentially with initial and terminal half-lives similar to intravenous bolus injection. 3 Cytosine arabinoside levels declined rapidly after intravenous bolus and subcutaneous bolus injection, and fell below steady state infusion leve...

  7. Difficult diagnosis of invasive fungal infection predominantly involving the lower gastrointestinal tract in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Gulhadiye Avcu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections are most commonly seen in immunocompromised patients and usually affect the respiratory system. Gastrointestinal system involvement of mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis is rarely reported in childhood. Here we describe a 5 year old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed invasive fungal infection particularly affecting the lower gastrointestinal system to emphasise the difficulties in diagnosis and management of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients.

  8. The effect of game-based exercise on infant acute lymphocytic leukaemia patients

    Édgar Cortés-Reyes; Paola Escobar-Zabala; Laura González-García

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To establish the effect of a game-based exercise programme on Physical Deconditioning Syndrome (PDS) in 5 to 12 year-old children suffering Acute Lymphocytic Leukaemia (ALL). Materials and methods. This was a quasi-experimental study involving seven children being treated for ALL at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bogotá, Colombia. Fitness determinants (aerobic capacity, muscle strength, flexibility, motor skills and proprioception) were initially assessed to establish their...

  9. PLZF/RARalpha binding partners and their influence on the induction of acute promyelocytic leukaemia

    Frech, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) accounts for 10% of the adult AML patients. APL patients carry chromosomal translocations involving the rarα gene on chromosome 17. The most frequent translocations lead to the expression of the fusion proteins PML/RARα (98%; t(15;17)) and PLZF/RARα (1%; t(11;17)) (X-RARα). The APL is characterised by a differentiation block at the promyelocytic stage and leads to an increased amount of myel...

  10. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia among Spanish children and mothers' occupation: a case-control study.

    Infante-Rivard, C; Mur, P.; Armstrong, B; ALVAREZ-DARDET, C.; Bolumar, F

    1991-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: The aim was to investigate the association between mothers' occupational exposure during pregnancy and the incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children. DESIGN: The study was a case-control investigation. A face to face interview was used to assess exposures at work and relevant confounding variables. SETTING: The study was community based and was carried out in five provinces of Spain. SUBJECTS: 128 cases less than 15 years of age were interviewed (91% of those eli...

  11. Cognitive outcome in children and adolescents treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with chemotherapy only

    Lofstad, G Elisabeth; Reinfjell, Trude; Hestad, Knut; Diseth, Trond H

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine cognitive outcome in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in remission, treated with central nervous system prophylactic chemotherapy only. Method: Thirty-five children and adolescents, age 8.4–15.3 years in long-term remission from ALL, 4.2–12.4 years post diagnosis, without relapse and no prediagnosis history of neurodevelopmental disorder were compared with 35 healthy controls matched for gender and age, on measures of intellectual functio...

  12. New Fusion Transcripts Identified in Normal Karyotype Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Hongxiu Wen; Yongjin Li; Malek, Sami N.; Kim, Yeong C.; Jia Xu; Peixian Chen; Fengxia Xiao; Xin Huang; Xianzheng Zhou; Zhenyu Xuan; Shiva Mankala; Guihua Hou; Rowley, Janet D.; Zhang, Michael Q; San Ming Wang

    2012-01-01

    Genetic aberrations contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, half of AML cases do not contain the well-known aberrations detectable mostly by cytogenetic analysis, and these cases are classified as normal karyotype AML. Different outcomes of normal karyotype AML suggest that this subgroup of AML could be genetically heterogeneous. But lack of genetic markers makes it difficult to further study this subgroup of AML. Using paired-end RNAseq method, we performed a transcriptome analy...

  13. Karyotype complexity and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia

    Stölzel, F.; Mohr, B.; Kramer, M.; Oelschlägel, U; Bochtler, T; Berdel, W E; Kaufmann, M; Baldus, C D; Schäfer-Eckart, K; R. Stuhlmann; Einsele, H; Krause, S W; Serve, H; Hänel, M.; Herbst, R.

    2016-01-01

    A complex aberrant karyotype consisting of multiple unrelated cytogenetic abnormalities is associated with poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The European Leukemia Net classification and the UK Medical Research Council recommendation provide prognostic categories that differ in the definition of unbalanced aberrations as well as the number of single aberrations. The aim of this study on 3526 AML patients was to redefine and validate a cutoff for karyotype complexity...

  14. A robust xenotransplantation model for acute myeloid leukemia

    Sanchez, PV; Perry, RL; Sarry, JE; Perl, AE; Murphy, K.; Swider, CR; Bagg, A; Choi, JK; Biegel, JA; Danet-Desnoyers, G; Carroll, M.

    2009-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in immunocompromised animals has been critical for defining leukemic stem cells. However, existing immunodeficient strains of mice have short life spans and low levels of AML cell engraftment, hindering long-term evaluation of primary human AML biology. A recent study suggested that NOD/LtSz-scid IL2Rγc null (NSG) mice have enhanced AML cell engraftment, but this relied on technically challenging neonatal injections. Here, we performed...

  15. Functional Integration of Acute Myeloid Leukemia into the Vascular Niche

    Cogle, Christopher R.; Goldman, Devorah C.; Madlambayan, Gerard J; Leon, Ronald P.; Masri, Azzah Al; Clark, Hilary A.; Asbaghi, Steven A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Dunlap, Jennifer; Fan, Guang; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Liu, Qiuying; Meacham, Amy; Hamlin, Kimberly L.; Hromas, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are a critical component of the hematopoietic microenvironment that regulates blood cell production. Recent studies suggest the existence of functional cross-talk between hematologic malignancies and vascular endothelium. Here, we show that human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) localizes to the vasculature in both patients and in a xenograft model. A significant number of vascular tissue-associated AML cells (V-AML) integrate into vasculature in vivo and can fuse with ...

  16. Recent advances in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Levine, Ross L.

    2010-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a disorder with significant molecular and clinical heterogeneity. Although there have been clear advances in the identification of somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations present in the malignant cells of patients with AML, translating this knowledge into an integrated view with an impact on the clinical treatment of AML has been slower to evolve. Recent clinical advances in the treatment of AML include studies demonstrating the benefit of dose-intense dauno...

  17. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    Natasha Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case series of 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant with a matched related donor. Male to female ratio was 1:1. The main complication post-transplant was graft-versus-host disease (n=7 patients. Transplant-related mortality involved one patient; cause of death was multi-organ failure. After a median follow up of 36.0±11.3 months, overall survival was 16%.

  18. Amifostine Treatment of a Patient with Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Tekgündüz, Emre; ERİKÇİ, ALEV AKYOL; Ahmet ÖZTÜRK

    2009-01-01

    The prognosis for the majority of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients without a donor is dismal whether conventional salvage chemotherapy regimens or investigational strategies are used, and most of these patients will eventually die of their disease. There is no standard chemotherapy regimen that provides durable complete remission in patients with refractory AML. Beneficial effects of amifostine, either alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapy, was demonstrated in patients w...

  19. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Focus on Novel Therapeutic Strategies

    Lin, Tara L.; M. Yair Levy

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcomes. Cytogenetic analysis reveals which patients may have favorable risk disease, but 5-year survival in this category is only approximately 60%, with intermediate and poor risk groups faring far worse. Advances in our understanding of the biology of leukemia pathogenesis and prognosis have not been matched with clinical improvements. Unsatisfactory outcomes persist for the majority of patients with AML, parti...

  20. AML1 gene rearrangements and mutations in radiation-associated acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes

    Several studies suggested a causal link between AML1 gene rearrangements and both radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Fifty-three AML samples were analyzed for the presence of AML1 abnormalities using fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of these patients, 24 had experienced radiation exposure due to the Chernobyl accident, and 29 were non-irradiated spontaneous AML cases and served as controls. AML1/ETO translocations were found in 9 of 29 spontaneous AML but only in 1 of 24 radiation-associated AML cases. This difference between translocation frequencies is statistically significant in the age-unstratified cohorts (p=0.015). Following age stratification, the difference becomes less pronounced but remains on borderline significance (p=0.053). AML1 mutation status was assessed in 5 clean-up workers at Chemobyl NPP with MDS, or AML following MDS, by direct sequencing of genomic DNA from the coding region (exon 3 through 8). In one patient who developed MDS following an acute radiation syndrome, a hexanucleotide duplication of CGGCAT in exon 8 was found, inserted after base position 1502. Our results suggest that AML1 gene translocations are infrequent in radiation-induced leukemogenesis but are consistent with the idea that radiation may contribute to the development of MDS through AML1 gene mutation. (author)

  1. CD19 CAR immune pressure induces B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia lineage switch exposing inherent leukaemic plasticity.

    Jacoby, Elad; Nguyen, Sang M; Fountaine, Thomas J; Welp, Kathryn; Gryder, Berkley; Qin, Haiying; Yang, Yinmeng; Chien, Christopher D; Seif, Alix E; Lei, Haiyan; Song, Young K; Khan, Javed; Lee, Daniel W; Mackall, Crystal L; Gardner, Rebecca A; Jensen, Michael C; Shern, Jack F; Fry, Terry J

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) expressing T cells targeting the CD19 B lineage receptor has demonstrated marked success in relapsed pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Persisting CAR-T cells generate sustained pressure against CD19 that may drive unique mechanisms of resistance. Pre-B ALL originates from a committed pre-B cell or an earlier progenitor, with potential to reprogram into other hematopoietic lineages. Here we report changes in lineage markers including myeloid conversion in patients following CD19 CAR therapy. Using murine ALL models we study the long-term effects of CD19 CAR-T cells and demonstrate partial or complete lineage switch as a consistent mechanism of CAR resistance depending on the underlying genetic oncogenic driver. Deletion of Pax5 or Ebf1 recapitulates lineage reprogramming occurring during CD19 CAR pressure. Our findings establish lineage switch as a mechanism of CAR resistance exposing inherent plasticity in genetic subtypes of pre-B-cell ALL. PMID:27460500

  2. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2016-02-12

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Ploidy and clinical characteristics of childhood acute myeloid leukemia

    Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2014-01-01

    We report the first large series (n = 596) of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) focusing on modal numbers (MN) from the population-based NOPHO-AML trials. Abnormal karyotypes were present in 452 cases (76%) and numerical aberrations were present in 40% (n = 237) of all pediatric AML. Among...... with early onset (median age 2 years), female sex (57%), and a dominance of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) (29%). Hypodiploidy constituted 8% of all AML and was associated with older age (median age 9 years), male predominance (60%), FAB M2 (56%), and t(8;21)(q22;q22) (56%) with loss of sex...

  4. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in the NOPHO ALL2008 protocol

    Raja, Raheel A; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Albertsen, BK;

    2014-01-01

    L-asparaginase is an important drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Treatment is associated with several toxicities, including acute pancreatitis. Clinical course, presentation, re-exposure to L-asparginase after pancreatitis and risk of recurrent pancreatitis...... within an asparaginase-intensive protocol has been poorly reported. Children (1-17 years) on the ongoing Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) ALL2008 protocol with asparaginase-associated pancreatitis (AAP) diagnosed between 2008 and 2012 were identified through the online NOPHO...

  5. Hematopoietic Differentiation Is Required for Initiation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Ye, Min; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Henry; Koche, Richard; Staber, Philipp B; Cusan, Monica; Levantini, Elena; Welner, Robert S; Bach, Christian S; Zhang, Junyan; Krivtsov, Andrei V; Armstrong, Scott A; Tenen, Daniel G

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-associated oncogenes often arise in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and promote acquisition of leukemia stem cell (LSC) phenotypes. However, as LSCs often share features of lineage-restricted progenitors, the relative contribution of differentiation status to LSC transformation is unclear. Using murine MLL-AF9 and MOZ-TIF2 AML models, we show that myeloid differentiation to granulocyte macrophage progenitors (GMPs) is critical for LSC generation. Disrupting GMP formation by deleting the lineage-restricted transcription factor C/EBPa blocked normal granulocyte formation and prevented initiation of AML. However, restoring myeloid differentiation in C/EBPa mutants with inflammatory cytokines reestablished AML transformation capacity. Genomic analyses of GMPs, including gene expression and H3K79me2 profiling in conjunction with ATAC-seq, revealed a permissive genomic environment for activation of a minimal transcription program shared by GMPs and LSCs. Together, these findings show that myeloid differentiation is a prerequisite for LSC formation and AML development, providing insights for therapeutic development. PMID:26412561

  6. French “real life” experience of clofarabine in children with refractory or relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Trioche, Pascale; Nelken, Brigitte; Michel, Gérard; Pellier, Isabelle; Petit, Arnaud; Bertrand, Yves; Rohrlich, Pierre; Schmitt, Claudine; Sirvent, Nicolas; Boutard, Patrick; Margueritte, Geneviève; Pautard, Brigitte; Ducassou, Stéphane; Plantaz, Dominique; Robert, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Background Clofarabine alone or in combination with cyclophosphamide and etoposide has shown a good efficacy and a tolerable toxicity profile in previous studies of children with relapsed or refractory leukaemia. This report describes a retrospective study of 38 French patients who received clofarabine as a monotherapy or in combination for relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) outside of clinical trials after marketing authorization. Methods We retrospectively analysed d...

  7. Minor changes on cranial MRI during treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Paeaekkoe, E. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Vainionpaeae, L. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Pyhtinen, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Lanning, M. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Univ. of Oulu (Finland)

    1996-04-01

    Cranial MRI was used to study treatment-related changes in children undergoing therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or lymphoma. Nineteen children (18 with ALL, 1 with lymphoma) underwent MRI at the beginning of treatment and at intervals during it, to a total of 105 imaging studies and a minimum of 3 per case. Nine patients had finished all therapy, all received consolidation treatment. No patient had central nervous system (CNS) leukaemia at diagnosis or developed a CNS relapse. Mild treatment-related white matter changes were observed in only 2 patients after consolidation therapy with three 5 g/m{sup 2} pulses of intravenous methotrexate. Transient enlargement of the ventricles and cortical sulci was observed in 13 patients, always temporally related to steroid treatment. These preliminary data suggest that treatment-related white matter changes are rare and no routine MRI follow-up is needed during treatment in asymptomatic children after a baseline assessment. (orig.)

  8. Minor changes on cranial MRI during treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Cranial MRI was used to study treatment-related changes in children undergoing therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or lymphoma. Nineteen children (18 with ALL, 1 with lymphoma) underwent MRI at the beginning of treatment and at intervals during it, to a total of 105 imaging studies and a minimum of 3 per case. Nine patients had finished all therapy, all received consolidation treatment. No patient had central nervous system (CNS) leukaemia at diagnosis or developed a CNS relapse. Mild treatment-related white matter changes were observed in only 2 patients after consolidation therapy with three 5 g/m2 pulses of intravenous methotrexate. Transient enlargement of the ventricles and cortical sulci was observed in 13 patients, always temporally related to steroid treatment. These preliminary data suggest that treatment-related white matter changes are rare and no routine MRI follow-up is needed during treatment in asymptomatic children after a baseline assessment. (orig.)

  9. Femoral diaphyseal stress fracture as the initial presentation of acute leukaemia in an adolescent.

    Chase, Helen Emily; Pang, Joe Hwong; Sanghrajka, Anish Pradip

    2016-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy was referred to the orthopaedic clinic by his general practitioner, reporting of a 6-week history of left thigh pain. Clinical examination was unremarkable. Radiographs demonstrated a periosteal reaction at the proximal femur. MRI scans demonstrated a stress fracture of the femur, with no associated sinister features and no evidence of a pathological lesion. As the fracture healed and symptoms improved, the patient became unwell with weight loss, lethargy, chest and jaw pain and fevers. After multiple blood tests over a 25-day period, including five full blood counts and two normal blood films, a third blood film finally demonstrated blasts in keeping with acute leukaemia. We discuss a literature review of musculoskeletal manifestations of leukaemia and the often atypical presentations found. PMID:27353177

  10. Traffic-related air pollution and risk for leukaemia of an adult population.

    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Ketzel, Matthias; Harbo Poulsen, Aslak; Sørensen, Mette

    2016-03-01

    Air pollution causes lung cancer, but associations with other cancers have not been established. We investigated whether long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution is associated with the risk of the general population for leukaemia. We identified 1,967 people in whom leukaemia was diagnosed in 1992-2010 from a nation-wide cancer registry and selected 3,381 control people at random, matched on sex and year of birth, from the entire Danish population. Residential addresses since 1971 were traced in a population registry, and outdoor concentrations of NOx and NO2 , as indicators of traffic-related air pollution, were calculated at each address in a dispersion model. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate the risk for leukaemia after adjustment for income, educational level, cohabitation status and co-morbidity. In linear analyses, we found odds ratios for acute myeloid leukaemia of 1.20 (95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.38) per 20 µg/m(3) increase in NOx and 1.31 (1.02-1.68) per 10 µg/m(3) increase in NO2 , calculated as time-weighted average exposure at all addresses since 1971. We found no association with chronic myeloid or lymphocytic leukaemia. This study indicates an association between long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution and acute myeloid leukaemia in the general population, but not for other subtypes of leukaemia. PMID:26415047