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Sample records for acute myeloblastic leukemia

  1. Acute acalculous cholecystitis complicating chemotherapy for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Olfa Kassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a rare complication in the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukemia. Diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis remains difficult during neutropenic period. We present two acute myeloblastic leukemia patients that developed acute acalculous cholecystitis during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. They suffered from fever, vomiting and acute pain in the epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder. Surgical management was required in one patient and conservative treatment was attempted in the other patient. None treatment measures were effective and two patients died. Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a serious complication in neutropenic patients. Earlier diagnosis could have expedited the management of these patients.

  2. Diagnosis of large granular lymphocytic leukemia in a patient previously treated for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Sinem Civriz Bozdag; Sinem Namdaroglu; Omur Kayikci; Gülsah Kaygusuz; Itir Demiriz; Murat Cinarsoy; Emre Tekgunduz; Fevzi Altuntas

    2013-01-01

    Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia is a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by the clonal expansion of cytotoxic T or natural killer cells. We report on a patient diagnosed with T-cell LGL leukemia two years after the achievement of hematologic remission for acute myeloblastic leukemia.

  3. Analyses of karyotypic characteristics and prognosis in pediatric acute myeloblastic leukemia

    阮敏

    2012-01-01

    Objective Acute myeloblastic leukemia(AML) accounts for 15 to 25 percent of childhood acute leukemias. Cytogenetic information is important for diagnosis,classification and prognosis of AML. Our aim was to analyze the relationship between karyotypic characteristics and prognosis of childhood

  4. Transient thrombocytosis with megathrombocytes in a case of acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Kotru Mrinalini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombocytosis is commonly seen in reactive conditions and certain neoplastic states, such as chronic myeloproliferative disorders. It is rarely seen in acute leukemia. A 12-year-old girl with acute myeloblastic leukemia (FAB M2 in remission presented with pyoderma. Her hemogram revealed anemia (Hb-6.4g/dl, leucopenia (TLC - 1.2 x 109/L and thrombocytosis (platelet count- 580 x 109/L. A peripheral blood film showed numerous abnormally large platelets with few atypical cells. The thrombocytosis subsided with the clearance of infection but atypical cells persisted. One month later, she relapsed. Cytogenetic analysis revealed variable results (trisomy 9 and deletion 3. This case has been presented because thrombocytosis is rare in AML and its appearance calls for a close follow-up.

  5. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  6. Effect of Acupressure on Nausea-Vomiting in Patients With Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia.

    Avc, Hatice Sevil; Ovayolu, Nimet; Ovayolu, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of acupressure, applied at P6 (Neiguan) acupuncture point, on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. This was a randomized controlled trial conducted on patients with myeloblastic leukemia. A total of 90 patients, who received the same chemotherapy regimen and antiemetic therapy, were included in the study as 30 patients in the control group, 30 patients in the band group, and 30 patients in the pressure group. Although acupressure was applied by placing wristbands at P6 acupuncture point of both wrists in patients of the band group for totally 4 days, acupressure was applied with the use of finger pressure in patients of the pressure group for totally 4 days. No intervention was made in patients of the control group other than the routine antiemetic therapy. The data of the study were collected by using a questionnaire and nausea-vomiting chart. Severity of nausea-vomiting was assessed by using the visual analog scale on this chart. It was determined that the acupressure band applied to the patients included in the study reduced number and severity of nausea-vomiting (P acupressure applied with pressure did not affect number and severity of nausea-vomiting (P > .05). It was found that the acupressure band was effective for reducing the chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. PMID:27501207

  7. Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Induced Sweet’s Syndrome Following Autologous Transplantation in a Child with Relapsed Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

    Kaya, Zühre; Belen, Fatma Burcu; Akyürek, Nalan

    2014-01-01

    Sweet’s syndrome is characterized by the triad of fever, erythematous skin lesions and neutrophilia. The etiologic factors are quite variable, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) use is an extremely rare cause in children with Sweet’s syndrome. We report a G-CSF induced Sweet’s syndrome following autologous transplantation in a child with relapsed acute myeloblastic leukemia.

  8. [Ceruloplasmin and peptides of medium molecular weight as parameters in development of acute myeloblastic leukemia].

    Kovtunova, M E; Pan'kov, V N; Perevalova, N N

    2003-05-01

    A dynamic content of ceruloplasmin and medium-molecular peptides were studied in the blood serum of 28 patients with an acute clinical course of myeloblast-type leucosis during a scheduled chemotherapy. The mentioned biochemical criteria were shown to be able to characterize indirectly an intensity of the clinical course, functional liver condition and the efficiency of chemotherapy. PMID:12822312

  9. Acute myeloblastic leukemia-associated Marfan syndrome and Davidoff-Dyke-Masson syndrome: a case report

    Ahmet Faik Öner

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We present herein a 23-year-old man with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML associated with Davidoff-Dyke-Masson syndrome (DDMS and Marfan syndrome (MS. The diagnosis of DDMS was based on findings including left facial asymmetry, left hemiparesis, mental retardation, right cerebral hemiatrophy, dilatation of the ipsilateral lateral ventricle and calvarial thickening. The diagnosis of MS was based on clinical findings including tall stature, myopia, retinitis pigmentosa, blue scleras, scoliosis, pectus excavatum, arachnodactyly and low ratio of upper/lower body segment. The patient developed hepatosplenomegaly, gingival hypertrophy and pancytopenia. Peripheral blood film and bone marrow examination showed that most of nucleated cells were blasts; immunophenotype of those cells showed CD11+, CD13+, CD14+, CD33+ and HLA-DR+. These findings confirmed the diagnosis of AML (FAB-M5. After induction chemotherapy, remission was obtained. To the best of our knowledge, our case is the third report of AML in MS syndrome, while AML associated with DDMS and MS has not been previously reported in the literature.

  10. FLT3 and NPM1 gene mutations in childhood acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    Mukda, Ekchol; Pintaraks, Katsarin; Sawangpanich, Rachchadol; Wiangnon, Surapon; Pakakasama, Samart

    2011-01-01

    Mutations of receptor tyrosine kinases are implicated in the constitutive activation and development of human hematologic malignancies. Mutations in fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene including internal tandem duplication (ITD) and point mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) as well as in nucleoplasmin (NPM1) gene are associated with pathogenesis of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). Several reports have demonstrated high incidences of the FLT3 and NPM1 mutations in adult AML patients. Since the pathogenesis of pediatric AML is different from that of adult and the FLT3 and NPM1 mutations have not been well characterized in childhood AML. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the frequencies of FLT3 and NPM1 mutations in 64 newly diagnosed childhood AML patients. All blood and bone marrow samples were previously diagnosed with AML by using flow cytometry and/or cytochemistry. FLT3-ITD and FLT3-TKD were detected by PCR and PCR-RFLP methods, respectively. The NPM1 mutation was analyzed by PCR and direct DNA sequencing. The FLT3 mutations were detected in 7 of 64 (11.1%), including FLT3-ITD in 4 of 64 (6.3%) and FLT-TKD in 3 of 62 (4.8%). The NPM1 mutation was not detected in this cohort. By multivariate analysis, white blood cell counts, peripheral blood and bone marrow blast cell counts at diagnosis were significantly higher in children with FLT3-ITD (P<0.05). In addition, the median percentage of CD117 was significantly higher in leukemic blast cells with FLT3-ITD than those with wild type (P=0.01). We did not find any FLT3 mutations in children aged less than 5 years. The AML M3 cell type was most frequently associated with FLT3 gene mutations (50%). In conclusion, the FLT3 mutations was found in 11.1% but none of NPM1 mutation was detected in Thai children with AML. These data support the hypothesis of different biology and pathogenesis between adult and childhood AML. PMID:22126574

  11. Hypertension and Life-Threatening Bleeding in Children with Relapsed Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Treated with FLT3 Inhibitors.

    Yılmaz Karapınar, Deniz; Karadaş, Nihal; Önder Siviş, Zühal; Balkan, Can; Kavaklı, Kaan; Aydınok, Yeşim

    2015-09-01

    Experiences with new multikinase inhibitors are limited, especially in children. In this report we summarize our experience with 2 patients with relapsed acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), one with FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3-internal tandem duplication mutation and the other with a single base mutation (D835Y). Both patients received sorafenib, one for 19 days and the other for 42 days, with clofarabine-including chemotherapy. One additionally received sunitinib for a total of 20 days. Both patients developed severe pancytopenia, hypertension, life-threatening bleedings from the gastrointestinal system, and, finally, intrapulmonary hemorrhage. Although both reached severe aplasia of the bone marrow without blastic infiltration, death occurred with neutropenic sepsis. PMID:25912283

  12. Hypertension and Life-Threatening Bleeding in Children with Relapsed Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Treated with FLT3 Inhibitors

    Deniz Yılmaz Karapınar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Experiences with new multikinase inhibitors are limited, especially in children. In this report we summarize our experience with 2 patients with relapsed acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML, one with FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3-internal tandem duplication mutation and the other with a single base mutation (D835Y. Both patients received sorafenib, one for 19 days and the other for 42 days, with clofarabine-including chemotherapy. One additionally received sunitinib for a total of 20 days. Both patients developed severe pancytopenia, hypertension, life-threatening bleedings from the gastrointestinal system, and, finally, intrapulmonary hemorrhage. Although both reached severe aplasia of the bone marrow without blastic infiltration, death occurred with neutropenic sepsis.

  13. Lapatinib induces autophagic cell death and differentiation in acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Chen YJ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Jen Chen,1–4 Li-Wen Fang,5 Wen-Chi Su,6,7 Wen-Yi Hsu,1 Kai-Chien Yang,1 Huey-Lan Huang8 1Department of Medical Research, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, 3Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, 4Institute of Pharmacology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 5Department of Nutrition, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, 6Research Center for Emerging Viruses, China Medical University Hospital, 7Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, 8Department of Bioscience Technology, College of Health Science, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China Abstract: Lapatinib is an oral-form dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or ErbB/Her superfamily members with anticancer activity. In this study, we examined the effects and mechanism of action of lapatinib on several human leukemia cells lines, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells. We found that lapatinib inhibited the growth of human AML U937, HL-60, NB4, CML KU812, MEG-01, and ALL Jurkat T cells. Among these leukemia cell lines, lapatinib induced apoptosis in HL-60, NB4, and Jurkat cells, but induced nonapoptotic cell death in U937, K562, and MEG-01 cells. Moreover, lapatinib treatment caused autophagic cell death as shown by positive acridine orange staining, the massive formation of vacuoles as seen by electronic microscopy, and the upregulation of LC3-II, ATG5, and ATG7 in AML U937 cells. Furthermore, autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine and knockdown of ATG5, ATG7, and Beclin-1 using short hairpin RNA (shRNA partially rescued lapatinib-induced cell death. In addition, the induction of phagocytosis and ROS production as well as the upregulation of surface markers CD14 and CD68 was detected in lapatinib-treated U937 cells, suggesting the induction of

  14. Intraparenchymal Myeloid Sarcoma and Subsequent Spinal Myeloid Sarcoma for Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

    Eom, Ki Seong; Kim, Tae Young

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a solid, extramedullary tumor composed of leukemic myeloblasts or immature myeloid cells. Intraparenchymal myeloid sarcoma without the involvement of the skull or meninges is extremely rare. Here, we present the case of a 49-year-old man who developed intraparenchymal myeloid sarcoma on the left cerebellum after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). He received radiotherapy after complete removal of intraparenchymal myeloid sarcoma, but he was diagnosed spinal myelo...

  15. Case Report: CD19-positive acute myeloblastic leukemia with trisomy 21 as a sole acquired karyotypic abnormality

    Hua-feng WANG; Yi-zhi CHENG; Huan-ping WANG; Zhi-mei CHEN; Ji-yu LOU; Jie JIN

    2009-01-01

    We report that a 63-year-old Chinese female had acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) in which trisomy 21 (+21) was found as the sole acquired karyotypic abnormality. The blasts were positive for myeloperoxidase, and the immunophenotype was positive for cluster of differentiation 19 (CDI9), CD33, CD34, and human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-DR. The chromosomal analysis of bone marrow showed 47,XX,+21 [2]/46,XX[18]. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that three copies of AML1 were situated in separate chromosomes, and that t(8;21) was negative. The patient did not have any features of Down syndrome. A diagnosis of CD19-positive AML-M5 was established with trisomy 21 as a sole acquired karyotypic abnormality. The patient did not respond well to chemotherapy and died three months after the diagnosis. This is the first reported case of CD19-positive AM L with trisomy 21 as the sole cytogenetic abnormality. The possible prognostic significance of the finding in AML with +21 as the sole acquired karyotypic abnormality was discussed.

  16. An adult case of chronic myelogenous leukemia with myeloblastic involvement of the central nervous system.

    Watanabe,Akiharu

    1984-06-01

    Full Text Available A 31-year-old female with chronic myelogenous leukemia, who developed myeloblastic involvement of the central nervous system during acute myeloblastic transformation of the disease, was treated with methotrexate intrathecally. The therapy produced prompt clinical response and complete reversal of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid findings. However, the patient expired 10 months following the acute blastic crisis.

  17. Hydrocortisone in culture protects the blast cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia from the lethal effects of cytosine arabinoside

    The blast cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) respond to many of the same regulatory mechanisms that control normal hemopoiesis. These include the growth factors that bind to membrane receptors and steroid hormones or vitamins that have intracellular receptors. The authors report the effects in culture of the steroid glucocorticoid hydrocortisone on freshly explanted AML blasts from patients and on two continuous AML cell lines. Only small changes in clonogenic cell numbers in suspension cultures were seen in the presence of hydrocortisone. The most striking effect of the hormone was on the sensitivity of blasts cells to cytosine arabinoside (ara-C). In contrast to the response of AML blast cells to retinoic acid, a ligand for intracellular steroid receptors that sensitizes some blast populations to ara-C, hydrocortisone reduced the toxic effects of the drug. The protective action of hydrocortisone was not mediated through the cell cycle since exposure of blasts to hydrocortisone did not affect the percentage of cells in DNA synthesis as measured with the tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) suicide technique. The hydrocortisone effect could be demonstrated using a pulse (20 min) exposure protocol. Blasts pulsed with increasing specific activities of 3HTdR showed the usual response pattern with an initial loss in plating efficiency to about 50% of control, followed by a plateau, regardless of whether the cells had been exposed to hydrocortisone. Control blasts exposed to increasing ara-C concentrations gave very similar dose-response curves; in striking contrast, blast cells cultured in hydrocortisone, then pulsed with ara-C did not lose colony-forming ability even though the same population was sensitive to 3HTdR

  18. [Acute myeloblastic leukemia and adenocarcinoma of the rectum as secondary malignancies after treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma].

    Hasanbegović, E; Sabanović, S; Sporisević, L

    2000-01-01

    It is shown very rare case of eight years old girl with two secondary sicknesses: myeloic leucosis and adenocarcinoma of rectum that developed after six years of successful treatment. The diagnose of embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma was set up in Sarajevo six years ago after surgical extirpation of tumor from orbitae and its pathohistology finding. Complete chemo and radiotherapy was performed in Germany (Bonn) according protocol (CWS 91). Diagnoses of acute myeloic leucosis and adenocarcinoma of rectum was set up according: clinical picture, peripheral blood smear, bone marrow smear and biopsy of bleeding polyp of rectum. PMID:10934835

  19. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  20. [Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant system status in patients with acute myeloblast leukemia and toxic damage of the liver].

    Kuzieva, G Z; Kholmatova, N M; Shevchenko, L I; Khuzhakhmedov, Zh D; Zavgorodniaia, S V

    2009-01-01

    Patients with acute myelogenous leucosis with toxic damage of the liver against polychemotherapy have an expressed disbalance in the lipid peroxidation-anti-oxidant system, which is possible to correct effectively using S-adenozilmetionin (heptral) was observed. PMID:19953992

  1. [Spinal stroke in the acute myeloblast leucosis].

    Kotova, N A; Klimovich, A V; Krasnoruzhskiĭ, A I; Skoromets, A A; Aliev, K T; Volkova, S A; Lalaian, T V

    2013-01-01

    Data of literature on the frequency of the nervous system lesions in different variants of leucosis are analyzed. A case of a man with petechial skin rash and bruises on the body, gingival hemorrhage and general sickness is described in details. The hematologic tests revealed acute myeloblast leucosis. A lumbar puncture revealed blood in the cerebrospinal fluid and MRI showed an epidural hematoma in lumbar segments 3 and 4. At this level, the hematoma compressed the dural bag and roots of the horse tail with accompanying vessels (the radicular medullar artery and large radicular veins). A paracentetic removal of the hematoma with the decompression of spinal roots was carried out. The blasts in the cerebrospinal fluid and symptoms of the left facial nerve lesion allowed to diagnose neuroleucosis. This case presented the mixed pathogenesis of myeloischemia. The epidural hematoma compressed not only the roots of the horse tail but the accompanying vessels (arteries and veins). The venous outflow obstruction along radicular veins worsened the microcirculation in the cross-sectional area of the spinal cord. Complex polychemotherapy in the combination with neuroprotectors (cortexin, gliatiline), antiaggregants and vitamins is recommended. PMID:23612398

  2. Modification of the cerebral perfusion during a chemotherapy by arabinoside cytosine (A.R.A.C.) among patients suffering of an acute myelo-blastic leukemia (A.M.L.)

    Cytosine arabinoside in high doses is a major treatment in acute myelo-blastic leukemia (A.M.L.). This treatment leads to neurological complications in 3-16% of cases, but the EEG, CT or MRI are normal.This prospective study examines brain perfusion in single photon emission tomography (SPECT) for patients receiving high dose arabinoside cytosine (H.D. A.R.A.C.). The SPECT of perfusion with hexamethyl propylene amine oxime (H.M.P.A.O.) for patients suffering of A.M.L. allowed to show a reduction of perfusion at the cerebellum level, of the occipito-parietal cortex and thalami, after conventional doses of A.R.A.C., while the patients had not any neurological accidents. (N.C.)

  3. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2016-03-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  4. Identification of patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia who benefit from the addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin: results of the MRC AML15 trial

    Burnett, Alan K; Hills, Robert K; Milligan, Donald; Kjeldsen, Lars; Kell, Jonathan; Russell, Nigel H; Yin, John A L; Hunter, Ann; Goldstone, Anthony H; Wheatley, Keith

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Antibody-directed chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may permit more treatment to be administered without escalating toxicity. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) is an immunoconjugate between CD33 and calicheamicin that is internalized when binding to the epitope. We previously establ...

  5. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    2016-02-22

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  6. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Myeloid sarcoma in a child with acute myeloblastic leukaemia

    We report a rare occurrence of myeloid sarcoma in a 7 years old child with acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML - FAB type M2). He presented with fever, generalized weakness, bilateral proptosis and left parotid swelling. CT scan revealed a mass in paranasal sinuses extending into brain and retro-orbital region. Diagnosis of AML M2 was made on bone marrow aspiration and special stains. Induction therapy for AML was given according to standard protocol. The extramedullary lesion as well as the acute leukaemia went into complete remission. (author)

  8. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2013-09-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Clofarabine and Melphalan Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplasia or Acute Leukemia in Remission

    2016-06-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2015-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  12. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Clofarabine or Daunorubicin Hydrochloride and Cytarabine Followed By Decitabine or Observation in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2014-09-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Modification of the cerebral perfusion during a chemotherapy by arabinoside cytosine (A.R.A.C.) among patients suffering of an acute myelo-blastic leukemia (A.M.L.); Modification de la perfusion cerebrale au cours d'une chimiotherapie par cytosine arabinoside (ARAC) chez les patients atteints d'une leucemie aigue myeloblastique (LAM)

    Modzelewski, R.; Vera, P. [Universite de Medecine de Rouen, QUANT.I.F-LITIS EA4108, departement de medecine nucleaire, 76 (France); Lepretre, S.; Tilly, H. [Centre Henri-Becquerel, departement d' hematologie, 76 - Rouen (France); Martinaud, O.; Hannequin, D. [CHU de Rouen, departement de neurologie, 76 (France); Habert, M.O. [CHU de la Pitie-Salpetriere, departement de medecine nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-07-01

    Cytosine arabinoside in high doses is a major treatment in acute myelo-blastic leukemia (A.M.L.). This treatment leads to neurological complications in 3-16% of cases, but the EEG, CT or MRI are normal.This prospective study examines brain perfusion in single photon emission tomography (SPECT) for patients receiving high dose arabinoside cytosine (H.D. A.R.A.C.). The SPECT of perfusion with hexamethyl propylene amine oxime (H.M.P.A.O.) for patients suffering of A.M.L. allowed to show a reduction of perfusion at the cerebellum level, of the occipito-parietal cortex and thalami, after conventional doses of A.R.A.C., while the patients had not any neurological accidents. (N.C.)

  15. Skin changes in acute myelogenous leukemia

    Mittal R

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year old woman developed progressive, firm, mild to moderately itchy, erythematous, papular and nodular lesions, over cheeks, extensors of limbs, scalp and lower back without any accompanying systemic complaints except for severe backache. Initially clinical diagnosis was cutaneous sarcoidosis. However presence of myeloblasts, monoblasts, myelocytes and metamyelocytes in peripheral blood smear and typical histopathology of nodule with mixed cellular infiltrate more around blood vessels, sweat glands and hair follicles with admixture of larger polymorphonuclears (myeloblasts/myelocytes, eosinophils with double nuclei, and larger phagocytic cells confirmed the diagnosis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML.

  16. Acute myelogenous leukemia cells with the MLL-ELL translocation convert morphologically and functionally into adherent myofibroblasts

    Bone marrow-myofibroblasts, a major component of bone marrow-stroma, are reported to originate from hematopoietic stem cells. We show in this paper that non-adherent leukemia blasts can change into myofibroblasts. When myeloblasts from two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with a fusion product comprising mixed lineage leukemia and RNA polymerase II elongation factor, were cultured long term, their morphology changed to that of myofibroblasts with similar molecular characteristics to the parental myeloblasts. The original leukemia blasts, when cultured on the leukemia blast-derived myofibroblasts, grew extensively. Leukemia blasts can create their own microenvironment for proliferation.

  17. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    2016-06-14

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  18. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    Ye Zixing; Wang Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To highlight the current understanding of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).Data sources We collected the relevant articles in PubMed (from 1985 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia","hybrid acute leukemia","biphenotypic acute leukemia",and "mixed lineage leukemia".We also collected the relevant studies in WanFang Data base (from 2000 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia" and "hybrid acute leukemia".Study selection We included all relevant studies concerning mixed phenotype acute leukemia in English and Chinese version,with no limitation of research design.The duplicated articles are excluded.Results MPAL is a rare subgroup of acute leukemia which expresses the myeloid and lymphoid markers simultaneously.The clinical manifestations of MPAL are similar to other acute leukemias.The World Health Organization classification and the European Group for Immunological classification of Leukaemias 1998 cdteria are most widely used.MPAL does not have a standard therapy regimen.Its treatment depends mostly on the patient's unique immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features,and also the experience of individual physician.The lack of effective treatment contributes to an undesirable prognosis.Conclusion Our understanding about MPAL is still limited.The diagnostic criteria have not been unified.The treatment of MPAL remains to be investigated.The prognostic factor is largely unclear yet.A better diagnostic cdteria and targeted therapeutics will improve the therapy effect and a subsequently better prognosis.

  19. Congenital acute megakaryocytic leukemia

    N B Mathur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital leukemia (CL is an extremely rare disorder in the newborn, significant proportion of which is of myeloid origin, primarily of M4 or M5 morphology. As compared to pediatric leukemia, CL is a more aggressive disease. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M7 or acute megakaryocytic leukemia is a rare type of AML with an incidence of 0.5 per million per year. Median age of presentation is 6 years, and children may present with a broad variety of symptoms including low-grade fever, diarrhea, easy bruising, failure to gain weight and life-threatening conditions.

  20. LEUKEMIC PLEURAL EFF USION AS INITIAL MAN IFESTATION OF ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA: A RARE CASE REPORT

    Rajeev Kumar; Kanchan; Shaila; Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    Leukemic effusion is an uncommon presentation of Acute Myeloid leukemia with only isolated reports in literature. We report a case of 45 years old female who presented with unilateral pleural effusion and was diagnosed with haematological malignancy on pleural fluid cytology which revealed presence of myeloblasts. Subsequent, peripheral blood smear...

  1. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    Jeha S, Pui CH. Clinical manifestations and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. ...

  2. Human Myeloblastic Leukemia Cells (HL-60) Express a Membrane Receptor for Estrogen that Signals and Modulates Retinoic Acid-induced Cell Differentiation

    Kauss, M. Ariel; Reiterer, Gudrun; Rodica P Bunaciu; Yen, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen receptors are historically perceived as nuclear ligand activated transcription factors. An estrogen receptor has now been found localized to the plasma membrane of human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60). Its expression occurs throughout the cell cycle, progressively increasing as cells mature from G1 to S to G2/M. To ascertain that the receptor functioned, the effect of ligands, including a non-internalizable estradiol-BSA conjugate and tamoxifen, an antagonist of nuclear estrogen...

  3. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Yang, Jun J; Hunger, Stephen P;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. METHODS: A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was...

  4. Distribution of ABO blood group in children with acute leukemias

    Meliha Sakić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study is the fi rst study about the distribution ABO blood types at children with acute leukemia in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The aim of the study is to point out distribution of blood type groups at children with acute leukemia (ALMethods: The number of children in this study was the following: 145 children with acute leukemia and 27 of children with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML. All of the children were treated at Hemato- Oncology Unitof Pediatric Clinic in Sarajevo, in the period January 2000 until December 2010. Age of children was between 1 month and 15 years.Results: The results showed that different blood types were registered in 93. 1% of children who got ill and treated from acute leukemia for the mentioned period. At 6. 9 % of children, none of the blood types wereregistered. It was noticed that 40.9 % children who have registered blood type O, 37% blood type A,16% blood type B and 6.5% blood type AB had AL, too. It has been observed that children with following bloodtypes had AML: O, 47.8%, A, 47.7% and AB, 30.4%.Conclusion: Signifi cance ABO types distribution was confi rmed for children with ALL, p<0, 05. The analysis of the distribution of ABO types based on gender showed that signifi cance was confi rmed at females with both ALL and AML (p<0.05.

  5. LEUKEMIC PLEURAL EFF USION AS INITIAL MAN IFESTATION OF ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA: A RARE CASE REPORT

    Rajeev Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Leukemic effusion is an uncommon presentation of Acute Myeloid leukemia with only isolated reports in literature. We report a case of 45 years old female who presented with unilateral pleural effusion and was diagnosed with haematological malignancy on pleural fluid cytology which revealed presence of myeloblasts. Subsequent, peripheral blood smear and bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML M1. This case report highlights the uncommon presentation of AML as well as utility of meticulous examination of effusion fluids for diagnosing unsuspected malignancies.

  6. Aleukemic leukemia cutis in a patient with Philadelphia chromosome-positive biphenotypic leukemia.

    Onozawa, Masahiro; Hashino, Satoshi; Kanamori, Hiroe; Izumiyama, Koh; Yonezumi, Masakatsu; Chiba, Koji; Kondo, Takeshi; Fukuhara, Takashi; Tanaka, Junji; Imamura, Masahiro; Asaka, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    Aleukemic leukemia cutis is a rare condition characterized by the invasion of leukemic blasts into the skin before their appearance in the peripheral blood. Leukemia cutis usually occurs in patients with myeloid leukemia, especially the myelomonocytic and monocytic types of acute myeloblastic leukemia. We describe the case of a 62-year-old woman with aleukemic leukemia cutis who developed Philadelphia-positive acute leukemia 1 month after skin involvement. Leukemic cells expressed both myeloi...

  7. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) -- children

    ... Leung WH, Pounds S, Cao X, e t al. Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. Cancer . ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  8. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  9. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  10. Acute childhood leukemia: Nursing care

    Modern therapy for childhood acute leukemia has provided a dramatically improved prognosis over that of just 30 years ago. In the early 1960's survival rates for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were 4% and 3%, respectively. By the 1980's survival rates had risen to 72% for all and 25% to 40% for AML. Today, a diagnosis of all carries an 80% survival rate and as high as a 90% survival rate for some low-risk subtypes. Such high cure rates depend on intense and complex, multimodal therapeutic protocols. Therefore, nursing care of the child with acute leukemia must meet the demands of complicated medical therapies and balance those with the needs of a sick child and their concerned family. An understanding of disease process and principles of medical management guide appropriate and effective nursing interventions. Leukemia is a malignant disorder of the blood and blood- forming organs (bone marrow, lymph nodes and spleen). Most believe that acute leukemia results from a malignant transformation of a single early haematopoietic stem cell that is capable of indefinite self-renewal. These immature cells of blasts do not respond to normal physiologic stimuli for differentiation and gradually become the predominant cell in the bone marrow

  11. Acute leukemia of childhood: A single institution's experience

    Slavković Bojana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate distribution of immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features of childhood acute leukemia (AL in the cohort of 239 newly diagnosed patients registered at the leading pediatric oncohematology center in the country during a six-year period (1996-2002. With approximately 60-70% of all childhood AL cases in Serbia and Montenegro being diagnosed and treated in this institution the used data represent a valid research sample to draw conclusions for entire country. On the basis of five phenotypic markers, the distribution of immunological subtypes was as follows: 169 (70.7% expressed B-cell marker CD19 (137 were CD10 positive and 32 CD10 negative, 37 (15.5% belonged to T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL (cyCD3 positive, and 33 (13.8% were acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML (CD13 positive and/or CD33 positive in the absence of lymphoid-associated antigens. The ratio of males and females was 1.5:1. Most of the cases were between the ages of 2 and 4, and were predominantly B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL cases. Another peak of age distribution was observed at the age of 7. The frequency of T-ALL (18% of ALL was similar to that reported for Mediterranean countries: France (19.4%, Greece (28.1%, Southern Italy (28.3%, and Bulgaria (28.0%. Cytogenetic analyses were performed in 193 patients: 164 ALL and 29 AML. Normal karyotype was found in 57% of ALL and in 55% of AML patients, while cytogenetic abnormalities including structural, numerical, and complex chromosomal rearrangements were found in 43% of ALL and in 45% of AML patients. Our results represent a contribution to epidemiological aspects of childhood leukemia studies.

  12. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    Bekker-Méndez Vilma

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR, and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level. Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3; acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million, followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million, and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million. The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million. For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million. The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8% were

  13. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  16. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  17. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  18. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  19. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  20. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  1. Acute lymphocytic Leukemia masquerading as acute osteomyelitis

    Two children each developed a focal destructive bone lesion accompanied by intermittent fever, swelling, tenderness and elevated ESR. Blood counts were normal; bone marrow aspiration showed acute leukemia. The bone lesions healed in both patients after anti-leukemic therapy. We suggest that the similar roentgenographic appearance of osteomyelitis, bone infarction and focal destructive lesions in leukemia probably reflects a common, basically ischemic process of bone. (orig.)

  2. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    2016-04-07

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Polyradiculoneuritis revealing an acute monoblastic leukemia 5

    Wafa Allam; Hassan Errihani; Yahya Hsaini

    2010-01-01

    Acute polyradiculoneuritis has been frequently reported in association with malignant disorders, especially those of the lymphoid system. To date, there have been no reported cases of acute monoblastic leukemia associated with this polyradiculopathy. The authors tell us about a very rare case of leukemia presenting as acute monoblastic leukemia 5 (AML5) in a 28 years old patient from Morroco

  4. Leukemia Stem Cells and Human Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Bernt, Kathrin M.; Armstrong, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Leukemias and other cancers have been proposed to contain a subpopulation of cells that display characteristics of stem cells, and which maintain tumor growth. That most anti-cancer therapy is directed against the bulk of the tumor, and possibly spares the cancer stem cells, may lie at the heart of treatment failures with conventional modalities. Leukemia stem cells are fairly well described for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but their existence and relevance for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (...

  5. Acute leukemia in early childhood

    M. Emerenciano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia in early childhood is biologically and clinically distinct. The particular characteristics of this malignancy diagnosed during the first months of life have provided remarkable insights into the etiology of the disease. The pro-B, CD10 negative immunophenotype is typically found in infant acute leukemia, and the most common genetic alterations are the rearrangements of the MLL gene. In addition, the TEL/AML1 fusion gene is most frequently found in children older than 24 months. A molecular study on a Brazilian cohort (age range 0-23 months has detected TEL/AML1+ve (N = 9, E2A/PBX1+ve (N = 4, PML/RARA+ve (N = 4, and AML1/ETO+ve (N = 2 cases. Undoubtedly, the great majority of genetic events occurring in these patients arise prenatally. The environmental exposure to damaging agents that give rise to genetic changes prenatally may be accurately determined in infants since the window of exposure is limited and known. Several studies have shown maternal exposures that may give rise to leukemogenic changes. The Brazilian Collaborative Study Group of Infant Acute Leukemia has found that mothers exposed to dipyrone, pesticides and hormones had an increased chance to give birth to babies with infant acute leukemia [OR = 1.48 (95%CI = 1.05-2.07, OR = 2.27 (95%CI = 1.56-3.31 and OR = 9.08 (95%CI = 2.95-27.96], respectively. This review aims to summarize recent clues that have facilitated the elucidation of the biology of early childhood leukemias, with emphasis on infant acute leukemia in the Brazilian population.

  6. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Acute appendicitis caused by acute myeloid leukemia

    Zhang, Shanxiang; Chen, Shaoxiong

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A case of appendiceal involvement by acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in an adult with recent history of AML transformed from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) was presented. Being aware of this rare presentation in particular in a patient with history of MDS and/or AML is important for prompt clinical diagnosis and management.

  8. Clinical Presentations of Acute Leukemia

    Objective: To document the clinical presentation and epidemiology of various types of acute leukemia with their respective referral source at a tertiary level centre in Peshawar. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pathology, Hayatabad Medical Complex (HMC), Peshawar, from January 2011 to May 2012. Methodology: A total of 618 bone marrow biopsy reports were reviewed. All biopsy reports labeled as acute leukemia were reviewed for age, gender, address, referring unit, diagnosis on bone marrow examination, presenting complaints, duration of illness and findings of clinical examination. Results: Ninety-two patients were diagnosed as suffering from acute leukemias (15%). ALL was most prevalent (46%), followed by AML (38%) and undifferentiated acute leukemia (16%). Males were affected more compared to females (60% vs. 40%). ALL and AML were predominant in pediatric (64%) and adults (77%) patients respectively. Patients from Afghanistan accounted for 33% of all cases followed by Peshawar (14%). Fever (77%), pallor (33%) and bleeding disorders (23%) were the main presenting complaints. Enlargement of liver, spleen and lymph nodes together was associated with ALL compared with AML (p = 0.004). Conclusion: ALL-L1 and AML-M4 were the most common sub-types. Fever, pallor and bleeding disorders were the main presenting complaints. Enlargement of liver, spleen and lymph nodes was more frequently associated with ALL compared to AML. (author)

  9. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  10. Lack of Correlation Between the CCR5-Δ32 Mutation and Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Iranian Patients

    Khorramdelazad, Hossein; Mortazavi, Yousef; Momeni, Mohammad; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Khandany, Behjat Kalantary; Moogooei, Mozhgan; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are crucially important in the pathogenesis of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a specific chemokine receptor for CC chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3), CCL4 and CCL5 which all play key roles in identifying cancer properties and localization of leukemia cells. It has been demonstrated that the known mutation in CCR5 gene (CCR5-Δ32) leads to mal-expression of the receptor and affect its function. The aim of this study was to determi...

  11. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    2010-08-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent

  12. Acute myelogenous leukemia switch lineage upon relapse to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa; Arreguin-Gonzalez, Farina; Rodriguez-Osorio, Carlos A; Sadowinski, Stanislaw; Pelayo, Rosana; Medina-Sanson, Aurora

    2009-01-01

    Acute leukemia, the most common form of cancer in children, accounts for approximately 30% of all childhood malignancies, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia being five times more frequent than acute myeloid leukemia. Lineage switch is the term that has been used to describe the phenomenon of acute leukemias that meet the standard French-American-British system criteria for a particular lineage (either lymphoid or myeloid) upon initial diagnosis, but meet the criteria for the opposite lineage a...

  13. FHL2 interacts with CALM and is highly expressed in acute erythroid leukemia

    The t(10;11)(p13;q14) translocation results in the fusion of the CALM (clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid leukemia protein) and AF10 genes. This translocation is observed in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML M6), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and malignant lymphoma. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, the four and a half LIM domain protein 2 (FHL2) was identified as a CALM interacting protein. Recently, high expression of FHL2 in breast, gastric, colon, lung as well as in prostate cancer was shown to be associated with an adverse prognosis. The interaction between CALM and FHL2 was confirmed by glutathione S-transferase-pulldown assay and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. The FHL2 interaction domain of CALM was mapped to amino acids 294–335 of CALM. The transcriptional activation capacity of FHL2 was reduced by CALM, but not by CALM/AF10, which suggests that regulation of FHL2 by CALM might be disturbed in CALM/AF10-positive leukemia. Extremely high expression of FHL2 was seen in acute erythroid leukemia (AML M6). FHL2 was also highly expressed in chronic myeloid leukemia and in AML with complex aberrant karyotype. These results suggest that FHL2 may play an important role in leukemogenesis, especially in the case of AML M6

  14. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  15. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    ... of WBC) are produced, a child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood leukemia, affecting about 75% of kids with this cancer of the blood cells. Kids ... (AML) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Cancer ...

  16. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury

  17. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting as Acute Appendicitis

    Sherri Rauenzahn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Appendicitis in leukemic patients is uncommon but associated with increased mortality. Additionally, leukemic cell infiltration of the appendix is extremely rare. While appendectomy is the treatment of choice for these patients, diagnosis and management of leukemia have a greater impact on remission and survival. A 59-year-old Caucasian female was admitted to the surgical service with acute right lower quadrant pain, nausea, and anorexia. She was noted to have leukocytosis, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Abdominal imaging demonstrated appendicitis with retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymphadenopathy for which she underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. Peripheral smear, bone marrow biopsy, and surgical pathology of the appendix demonstrated acute myeloid leukemia (AML with nonsuppurative appendicitis. In the setting of AML, prior cases described the development of appendicitis with active chemotherapy. Of these cases, less than ten patients had leukemic infiltration of the appendix, leading to leukostasis and nonsuppurative appendicitis. Acute appendicitis with leukemic infiltration as the initial manifestation of AML has only been described in two other cases in the literature with an average associated morbidity of 32.6 days. The prompt management in this case of appendicitis and AML resulted in an overall survival of 185 days.

  18. Congenital acute lymphocytic leukemia associated with hyperleucocytic leukemia syndrome

    A two-month-old female infant had congenital acute lymphocytic leukemia 39 days after birth. Cranial CT showed many small high dense spots over the whole brain. The mechanism of occurrence of central neurologic symptoms and the association of hyperleucocytic leukemia are discussed with a review of the literature. (Namekawa, K.)

  19. CXXC5 (Retinoid-Inducible Nuclear Factor, RINF) is a Potential Therapeutic Target in High-Risk Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Astori, Audrey; Fredly, Hanne; Aloysius, Thomas Aquinas; Bullinger, Lars; Mas, Véronique Mansat-De; de la Grange, Pierre; Delhommeau, François; Hagen, Karen Marie; Récher, Christian; Dusanter-Fourt, Isabelle; Knappskog, Stian; Lillehaug, Johan Richard; Pendino, Frédéric; Bruserudg, Øystein

    2013-01-01

    The retinoid-responsive gene CXXC5 localizes to the 5q31.2 chromosomal region and encodes a retinoid-inducible nuclear factor (RINF) that seems important during normal myelopoiesis. We investigated CXXC5/RINF expression in primary human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells derived from 594 patients, and a wide variation in CXXC5/RINF mRNA levels was observed both in the immature leukemic myeloblasts and in immature acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, patients with low-risk cytogene...

  20. Diagnostic value of CD117 in differential diagnosis of acute leukemias.

    Ahmadi, Abbas; Poorfathollah, Ali-Akbar; Aghaiipour, Mahnaz; Rezaei, Mansour; Nikoo-ghoftar, Mahin; Abdi, Mohammad; Gharib, Alireza; Amini, Amir

    2014-07-01

    C-kit receptor (CD117) and its ligand, stem cell factor, play a key role in normal hematopoiesis. It has been demonstrated that its expression extremely increases in leukemias with myeloid commitment. We analyzed findings on CD117 expression together with other myeloid related markers in 203 de novo acute leukemias, referred to Iranian immunophenotyping centers: Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization (IBTO) and Baghiatallah Hospital (BH). All cases were characterized based on the French American British cooperative group (FAB) and European Group for Immunological Classification of Leukemias (EGIL). The cases comprised of 111 acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), 86 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 6 acute undifferentiated leukemia (AUL). CD117 was positive in 75 % of AML and 50 % of AUL, whereas none of the ALL cases was positive for this marker. Although CD117 was positive in 100 % of M5a cases, no M5b positive was found (p = 0.036). The calculated specificity for myeloid involvement was 100 % for CD117 and CD33, and 98 % for CD13 and CD15 (p < 0.001). The calculated sensitivity for myeloid involvement was 83, 76, 64, and 41 % for CD13, CD117, CD33, and CD15, respectively (p < 0.001). We concluded that CD117 expression is a specific and rather sensitive marker for differential diagnosis between AML and ALL, and except for M5 subtypes, it fails to determine FAB subtypes; lack of expression in M5 can identify M5b. Therefore, it should be included in the routine primary panel for diagnosis of acute leukemias. PMID:24722823

  1. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. A case of acute myelogenous leukemia following aplastic anemia after radiotherapy and chemotherapy for breast cancer

    A 53 years old mastectomized woman for breast cancer treated with radiotherapy (total doses 12,600 rad) and with long term oral administration of cyclophosphamide (CPM) and ftorafur (FT), developed aplastic anemia and thereafter acute myelogenous leukemia. About six months after discontinuation of the above therapies, she developed anemia and leukopenia and was referred to our clinic. Hematological improvement was obtained by the administration of anabolic hormone, however, two months later she became pancytopenic again. At that time, quite atypical myeloblasts contained peroxidase positive granules, were found 39% in the peripheral blood and 89.4% in the bone marrow, respectively. Leukemic hiatus was present. A bone marrow biopsy revealed coexistence of leukemic cells and breast cancer cells. A diagnosis of breast cancer complicated with acute myelogenous leukemia was made. A combined therapy of adriamycin, CPM and FT was ineffective. OAP regimen of vincristine, cytosine arabinoside and predonisolone revealed transient hematologic improvement. Finally, the patient died of septicemia due to klebsiella. Autopsy revealed wide spread coexistence of leukemia and cancer in the bone marrow, liver, and thyroid. The authors discuss some possible explanations for development of acute leukemia after radiotherapy and chemotherapy. (author)

  3. Acute Leukemia: Diagnosis, Management, and Potential for Cure

    Stewart, Keith; Keating, Armand

    1988-01-01

    Acute leukemia is an uncommon malignant disorder resulting from the clonal proliferation of hematopoietic precursors of the myeloid or lymphoid lineages. Of the two major subgroups, acute lymphoblastic leukemia is more common in children, while acute myelogenous leukemia predominates in adults. With modern chemotherapy 60%-70% of all children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia can be long-term survivors and are potentially cured. Although the prognosis in acute myelogenous leukemia is less fav...

  4. Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Isolated Trisomy 19 Associated with Diffuse Myelofibrosis and Osteosclerosis

    Adam Stelling

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary myelofibrosis (PMF, per WHO criteria, is a clonal myeloproliferative neoplasm that usually presents with a proliferation of granulocytic and megakaryocytic lineages with an associated fibrous deposition and extramedullary hematopoiesis. The bone marrow histologic findings of this disorder are typically characterized by the presence of myeloid metaplasia with an associated reactive fibrosis, angiogenesis, and osteosclerosis. However, marked myelofibrosis is not solely confined to PMF and may also be associated with other conditions including but not limited to acute megakaryoblastic leukemias (FAB AML-M7. Here, we describe a rare case of a non-megakaryoblastic acute myeloid leukemia with marked myelofibrosis with osteosclerosis and an isolated trisomy 19. A 19-year-old male presented with severe bone pain of one week duration with a complete blood cell count and peripheral smear showing a mild anemia and occasional circulating blasts. A follow up computed tomography (CT scan showed diffuse osteosclerosis with no evidence of hepatosplenomegaly or lymphadenopathy. Subsequently, the bone marrow biopsy showed markedly sclerotic bony trabeculae and a hypercellular marrow with marked fibrosis and intervening sheets of immature myeloid cells consistent with myeloblasts with monocytic differentiation. Importantly, these myeloblasts were negative for megakaryocytic markers (CD61 and vWF, erythroid markers (hemoglobin and E-cadherin, and lymphoid markers (CD3, CD19, and TdT. Metaphase cytogenetics showed an isolated triosomy 19 with no JAK2 V617F mutation. The patient was treated with induction chemotherapy followed by allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which subsequently resulted in a rapid resolution of bone marrow fibrosis, suggesting graft-anti-fibrosis effect. This is a rare case of a non-megakaryoblastic acute myeloid leukemia with myelofibrosis and osteosclerosis with trisomy 19 that may provide insights into the prognosis and

  5. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  6. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2016-08-10

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Ommen, Hans Beier; Nederby, Line; Toft-Petersen, Marie;

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses how minimal residual disease (MRD) is detected and managed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. The most commonly used techniques to detect residual leukemia in patients in complete remission (CR) are quantitative PCR (qPCR) and multicolor flow cytometry (MFC). While q...

  8. Leukemia cutis with lymphoglandular bodies: a clue to acute lymphoblastic leukemia cutis

    Obiozor, Cynthia; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Fraga, Garth R.

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia cutis describes cutaneous lesions produced by infiltrates of leukemic cells. It usually manifests contemporaneously with the initial diagnosis of systemic leukemia, but may also precede or follow systemic leukemia. Most cases are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. Adult B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cutis is very rare. We report a 59-year-old woman with a history of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapsed with aleukemic lymphoblastic leukemia cutis. Lymphoglandular bodi...

  9. Cancer Statistics: Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)

    ... population data for older age groups are available. Statistics at a Glance Show More At a Glance ... acute lymphocytic leukemia in the United States. Survival Statistics Show More How Many People Survive 5 Years ...

  10. Aberrant Mer receptor tyrosine kinase expression contributes to leukemogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Lee-Sherick, A B; Eisenman, K M; Sather, S; McGranahan, A; Armistead, P M; McGary, C S; Hunsucker, S A; Schlegel, J; Martinson, H; Cannon, C; Keating, A K; Earp, H S; Liang, X; DeRyckere, D; Graham, D K

    2013-11-14

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continues to be extremely difficult to treat successfully, and the unacceptably low overall survival rates mandate that we assess new potential therapies to ameliorate poor clinical response to conventional therapy. Abnormal tyrosine kinase activation in AML has been associated with poor prognosis and provides strategic targets for novel therapy development. We found that Mer receptor tyrosine kinase was over-expressed in a majority of pediatric (29/36, 80%) and adult (10/10, 100%) primary AML patient blasts at the time of diagnosis, and 100% of patient samples at the time of relapse. Mer was also found to be expressed in 12 of 14 AML cell lines (86%). In contrast, normal bone marrow myeloid precursors expressed little to no Mer. Following AML cell line stimulation with Gas6, a Mer ligand, we observed activation of prosurvival and proliferative signaling pathways, including phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, MSK1, CREB, ATF1, AKT and STAT6. To assess the phenotypic role of Mer in AML, two independent short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs were used to decrease Mer expression in the AML cell lines Nomo-1 and Kasumi-1. Reduction of Mer protein levels significantly increased rates of myeloblast apoptosis two to threefold in response to serum starvation. Furthermore, myeloblasts with knocked-down Mer demonstrated decreased colony formation by 67-87%, relative to control cell lines (P<0.01). NOD-SCID-gamma mice transplanted with Nomo-1 myeloblasts with reduced levels of Mer had a significant prolongation in survival compared with mice transplanted with the parental or control cell lines (median survival 17 days in parental and control cell lines, versus 32-36 days in Mer knockdown cell lines, P<0.0001). These data suggest a role for Mer in acute myeloid leukemogenesis and indicate that targeted inhibition of Mer may be an effective therapeutic strategy in pediatric and adult AML. PMID:23474756

  11. Radioimmunotherapy for Treatment of Acute Leukemia.

    Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Eugène, Thomas; Guérard, François; Gaschet, Joëlle; Bailly, Clément; Mougin, Marie; Bourgeois, Mickaël; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chérel, Michel; Chevallier, Patrice

    2016-03-01

    Acute leukemias are characterized by accumulation of immature cells (blasts) and reduced production of healthy hematopoietic elements. According to the lineage origin, two major leukemias can be distinguished: acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). Although the survival rate for pediatric ALL is close to 90%, half of the young adults with AML or ALL and approximately 90% of older patients with AML or ALL still die of their disease, raising the need for innovative therapeutic approaches. As almost all leukemic blasts express specific surface antigens, targeted immunotherapy appears to be particularly promising. However, published results of immunotherapy alone are generally modest. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) brings additional therapeutic mechanisms using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed to tumor antigens, thus adding radiobiological cytotoxicity to immunologic cytotoxicity. Because of the high radiosensitivity of tumor cells and the diffuse widespread nature of the disease, making it rapidly accessible to circulating radiolabeled mAbs, acute leukemias represent relevant indications for RIT. With the development of recombinant and humanized mAbs, innovative radionuclides, and more efficient radiolabeling and pretargeting techniques, RIT has significantly improved over the last 10 years. Different approaches of α and β RIT targeting CD22, CD33, CD45, or CD66 antigens have already been evaluated or are currently being developed in the treatment of acute leukemia. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical studies demonstrating the potential of RIT in treatment of AML and ALL. PMID:26897718

  12. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  14. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    2016-04-08

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  15. [A myeloma (IgG-kappa) terminating in acute myelogenous leukemia].

    Fujii, H; Yashige, H; Taniwaki, M; Urata, Y; Kuzuyama, Y; Kitagawa, Y; Horishi, M; Suyama, Y; Miyoshi, M

    1990-04-01

    A 71-year-old man was hospitalized in November, 1983 for a back pain and a diagnosis of multiple myeloma was made, based on the Bence Jones proteinuria, The serum M-component of a IgG-kappa type (3.3 g/dl), and plasmacytosis in the bone marrow (37%). Treatment consisted of melphalan and prednisolone. A blood count in March, 1986 revealed 6000/microliters of WBC with 30% of a blast form and 8% plasma cells, and 20,000/microliters of platelets. A bone marrow aspirate revealed that 14% were myeloblasts and 26% were plasma cells. Distinguishing the myeloblasts from the immature plasma cells in the peripheral blood proved difficult. Studies by electron microscopy and an immunological inspection of phenotypes were helpful in achieving a determination. A karyotypic analysis of the bone marrow cells indicated a hypodiploid cell population, a marker chromosome, and a karyotypic instability. These findings indicate that his multiple myeloma had undergone a leukemic change associated with acute myelogenous leukemia. PMID:2109137

  16. Two methods for the quantitative analysis of surface antigen expression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML.

    Jolanta Woźniak

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The expression of lineage molecules (CD13 and CD33, c-Kit receptor (CD117, CD34, HLA-DR and adhesion molecule CD49d was assessed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML blast cells from 32 cases, using direct and indirect quantitative cytometric analysis. High correlation (r=0.8 was found between antigen expression intensity values calculated by direct analysis method (ABC and by indirect analysis method (RFI. Moreover, the differences in expression intensity of CD13, CD117 and CD34 antigens were found between leukemic and normal myeloblasts. This may be helpful in identification of leukemic cells in the diagnostics of minimal residual disease after treatment in AML patients.

  17. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    ... treatment for acute lymphocytic leukemia? What should you ask your doctor about acute lymphocytic leukemia? It is ... with your doctor. You should feel free to ask any question that’s on your mind, no matter ...

  18. What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    ... both ALL and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Japanese atomic bomb survivors had a greatly increased risk of developing ... cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. Most cases occur in Japan and the Caribbean area. This disease is not ...

  19. Do We Know What Causes Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    ... Topic Can acute myeloid leukemia be prevented? Do we know what causes acute myeloid leukemia? Some people ... genes – the instructions for how our cells function. We tend to look like our parents because they ...

  20. Total body irradiation and syngeneic marrow transplantation in an inbred rat model of acute myelogenous leukemia

    While acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) occurs rarely in laboratory animals, over 20 model systems have been reported. One of these, AML of the inbred Wistar/Furth rat, has been shown to be pathophysiologically similar to human AML. Ten days after intravenous inoculation of 1.0 x 106 cells of a tissue culture grown clonal line, rats demonstrated peripheral blood leukemia, replacement of greater than 90% of the bone marrow with distinctive malignant myeloblasts and a syndrome of hypermuramidase (lysozyme) emia and muramidasuria. Total body irradiation (TBI) at 10 days after leukemia cell passage with a marrow lethal dose (950 rad, 140 rad/min, 137Cs source, 663 kV) followed by intravenous inoculation of 5.0 x 108/kg viable syngeneic bone marrow cells produced transient complete remissions. Repopulation with transplanted marrow was detected along with increasing numbers of recognizable W/Fu AML cells in peripheral blood, marrow, and central nervous system. The delayed leukemia relapse in irradiated transplanted rats compared to irradiated non-transplanted controls suggests an interaction between surviving W/Fu AML cells and transplanted marrow. This model may be of value in studies designing a therapeutic interaction against AML by donor marrow in the chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and total body irradiated patient

  1. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2016-02-12

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Psychological Risk Factors in Acute Leukemia

    Gouva M.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Several theoretical models have been occasionally proposed to account for the involvement of psychological factors in cancer genesis. Family environment and relations as well as certain personality traits were correlated to cancer onset. However, little is known in the case of acute leukemia. The present study examined family environment, state-trait anxiety, hostility and the direction of hostility as well as alexithymia in 41 acute leukemia patients and their first degree relatives (70. In accordance with previous findings, the present results showed that family cohesion, conflict and organization as well as guilt, state anxiety and alexithymia were significant risk factors for the development of the disease.

  3. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-04-21

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    2015-07-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  5. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  6. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Molecular Insights in MLL Rearranged Acute Leukemia

    R.W. Stam (Ronald)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants (<1 year of age) is characterized by a high incidence (~80%) of rearrangements of the MLL gene, resistance to several important chemotherapeutic drugs, and a poor treatment outcome. With overall survival rates for infant ALL not exceeding 50%

  8. Bilateral breast involvement in acute myeloid leukemia

    Hakeem A, Mandakini BT, Asif K, Firdaus, Shagufta RC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast involvement by leukemic infiltration is usually bilateral, but may be unilateral. Clinically patients can present with either single or multiple masses, or with diffuse breast engorgement, with or without nodularity. The affected patients are predominantly young adults. We present a case of an adolescent girl with acute myeloid leukemia having bilateral breast infiltration by leukemic cells.

  9. P-GLYCOPROTEIN QUANTITATION IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    Mali in Nikougoftar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Multi drug resistance(MDR is a major problem in the treatment of cancer and hemalological malignancies. This resistance is multi factorial and is the result of decreased intra cellular drug accumulation. This is partly due to the presence of a 170KD intra membranous protein termed P-glycoprotein(P-gp that is an energy-dependent efflux pump which has increased expression on drug-resistance cells. In this study we identified the presence of P-gp by staining with Fluorescent Iso Thio Cyanate (FITC conjugated anti P-gp in acute leukemia patients and flow cytometry in addition to performing immunophenotype analysis and French, American British (FAB classification. Results revealed that one fifth of leuke¬mic patients expressed P-gp and this phenotype was more prevalent in Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia(AUL and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML than in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia(ALL. Other findings showed a logical rela¬tionship between this phenotype and age groups. There was not any association between P-gp+ phenotype and FAB and Immunophenotyping sub classification, but there was a linear relationship between CD34 and CD7 expression and P-gp+ phenotype. The accumulation of P-gp molecule that was stated as Mean Fluores¬cence Intensity (MFI on the blasts1 membrane of AUL and AML patients showed marked increase in comparison to ALL. Furthermore MFI in P-gp+ relapsed patients was much more than P-gp+ pretreatment patients.

  10. Use of clofarabine for acute childhood leukemia

    A Pession

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A Pession, R Masetti, K Kleinschmidt, A MartoniPediatric Oncology and Hematology “Lalla Seràgnoli”, University of Bologna, ItalyAbstract: A second-generation of purine nucleoside analogs, starting with clofarabine, has been developed in the course of the search for new therapeutic agents for acute childhood leukemia, especially for refractory or relapsed disease. Clofarabine is a hybrid of fludarabine and cladribine, and has shown to have antileukemic activity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia as well as in myeloid disorders. As the only new antileukemic chemotherapeutic agent to enter clinical use in the last 10 years, clofarabine was approved as an orphan drug with the primary indication of use in pediatric patients. Toxicity has been tolerable in a heavily pretreated patient population, and clofarabine has been demonstrated to be safe, both as a single agent and in combination therapies. Liver dysfunction has been the most frequently observed adverse event, but this is generally reversible. Numerous Phase I and II trials have recently been conducted, and are still ongoing in an effort to find the optimal role for clofarabine in various treatment strategies. Concomitant use of clofarabine, cytarabine, and etoposide was confirmed to be safe and effective in two independent trials. Based on the promising results when used as a salvage regimen, clofarabine is now being investigated for its potential to become part of frontline protocols.Keywords: clofarabine, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia, pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

  11. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Elzbieta Gocek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17(q22;q12 chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  12. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML

  13. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  14. Severe Rotavirus gastroenteritis in a patient with infant leukemia

    Hatice Uygun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children. Reports about the clinical relevance of rotavirus in immunocompromised children are rare. We herein presented a case of life-threatening Rotavirus gastroenteritis in an infant with acute myeloblastic leukemia which could be prevented by recently recommended Rotavirus vaccination.

  15. MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE IN ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) offers a way to precisely assess early treatment response and detect relapse. Established methods to study MRD are flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of antigen-receptor genes, and PCR amplification of fusion transcripts. The strong correlation between MRD levels and risk of relapse in childhood ALL is well established; studies in...

  16. Use of clofarabine for acute childhood leukemia

    Masetti, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    A Pession, R Masetti, K Kleinschmidt, A MartoniPediatric Oncology and Hematology “Lalla Seràgnoli”, University of Bologna, ItalyAbstract: A second-generation of purine nucleoside analogs, starting with clofarabine, has been developed in the course of the search for new therapeutic agents for acute childhood leukemia, especially for refractory or relapsed disease. Clofarabine is a hybrid of fludarabine and cladribine, and has shown to have antileukemic activity i...

  17. Systemic mastocytosis with associated acute myelogenous leukemia

    Zhrebker, Leah; Cooper, Barry; Krause, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is a condition associated with a clonal neoplastic proliferation of mast cells. Approximately 40% of patients with SM present with an associated clonal hematological non–mast cell lineage disorder. Patients presenting with SM–acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have the worst prognosis. We present a case of a 62-year-old woman who was diagnosed with SM-AML. After initial treatment with a standard regimen of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C)/idarubicin, her bone marrow showed re...

  18. Novel Therapies for Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Fullmer, Amber; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias

    2009-01-01

    The outcome of salvage therapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor. Salvage therapy mimics regimens with activity in newly diagnosed ALL. Novel strategies under investigation as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy improve the treatment of relapsed disease. For some ALL subsets, specific therapies are indicated. The addition of targeted therapy in Philadelphia chromosome–positive ALL has improved responses in relapsed patients without resistance to availabl...

  19. Pathogenesis and prognostication in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Zuckerman, Tsila; Rowe, Jacob M.

    2014-01-01

    The process of lymphoid maturation is tightly controlled by the hierarchical activation of transcription factors and selection through functional signal transduction. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represents a group of B/T-precursor-stage lymphoid cell malignancies arising from genetic alterations that block lymphoid differentiation and drive aberrant cell proliferation and survival. With recent advances in next-generation sequencing, we are discovering new mutations affecting normal lym...

  20. Cytogenetic studies of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Tarek Abd -Alla Atia

    2010-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) describes as a group of hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by expansion of undifferentiated myeloid progenitors. Acquired chromosomal anomaly particularly reciprocal translocations constitute one of the major events contribute to leukemogenesis. Patient and Methods: 45 untreated, newly diagnosed patients with de novo AML were enrolled in the present study and subjected to cytogenetic analysis. Four ml of heparinized peripheral blood were collected for...

  1. Frank hematuria as the presentation feature of acute leukemia

    Suriya Owais

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Muco-cutaneous bleeding is a common presenting feature of acute leukemias. Mucosal bleeding usually manifests as gum bleeding and/or epistaxis but may occur in any mucosal surface of the body. Hematuria as an isolated or main presenting feature of acute leukemia is rare. We describe two cases of acute leukemia, a 19 year old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a 52 year old male with acute myeloid leukemia, both presenting with gross hematuria. There was no demonstrable leukemic infiltration of the urinary tract on imaging studies. Hematuria in these patients was likely to be due to occult leukemic infiltration of the urinary system, aggravated by thrombocytopenia, as it subsided after starting chemotherapy. Our cases highlight that hematuria should be remembered as a rare presenting feature of acute leukemia.

  2. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients. PMID:23532815

  3. Pathologic rupture of the spleen in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and leukostasis

    Gil Cunha De Santis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of the spleen can be classified as spontaneous, traumatic, or pathologic. Pathologic rupture has been reported in infectious diseases such as infectious mononucleosis, and hematologic malignancies such as acute and chronic leukemias. Splenomegaly is considered the most relevant factor that predisposes to splenic rupture. A 66-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia evolved from an unclassified myeloproliferative neoplasm, complaining of fatigue and mild upper left abdominal pain. He was pale and presented fever and tachypnea. Laboratory analyses showed hemoglobin 8.3 g/dL, white blood cell count 278 × 109/L, platelet count 367 × 109/L, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT ratio 2.10, and international normalized ratio (INR 1.60. A blood smear showed 62% of myeloblasts. The immunophenotype of the blasts was positive for CD117, HLA-DR, CD13, CD56, CD64, CD11c and CD14. Lactate dehydrogenase was 2384 U/L and creatinine 2.4 mg/dL (normal range: 0.7-1.6 mg/dL. Two sessions of leukapheresis were performed. At the end of the second session, the patient presented hemodynamic instability that culminated in circulatory shock and death. The post-mortem examination revealed infiltration of the vessels of the lungs, heart, and liver, and massive infiltration of the spleen by leukemic blasts. Blood volume in the peritoneal cavity was 500 mL. Acute leukemia is a rare cause of splenic rupture. Male gender, old age and splenomegaly are factors associated with this condition. As the patient had leukostasis, we hypothesize that this, associated with other factors such as lung and heart leukemic infiltration, had a role in inducing splenic rupture. Finally, we do not believe that leukapheresis in itself contributed to splenic rupture, as it is essentially atraumatic.

  4. Kinetics of indium-111-labeled leukemic cells in patients with acute non-lymphocytic leukemia

    The kinetics of autologous leukemic cells labeled with In-111 oxine were studied in 5 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and one patient with acute premyelocytic leukemia (APL), and kinetics of OKM1 monoclonal antibody-treated leukemic cells were studied in one patient with acute monoblastic leukemia (AMoL). Recoveries of 33.7 +- 23.3%(range, 22.0 to 48.1%) were achieved at 10min after injection of In-111 oxine labeled leukemic cells in AML and APL patients. However, in a patient with AMoL recovery of 12.3% was only achieved at 10min after injection of OKM1-treated leukemic cells. Clearance of the activity from blood was rapid up to one in all patients. The clearance curve of the activity in 5 AML patients showed a hump or a plateau from one to 5hr after injection of labeled leukemic cells. In APL patient and AMoL patient, however, this hump or plateau was not noted. In AML and APL patients the activity over the spleen was higher than that of over the liver at from 30min to 3hr after and showed a plateau or gradual rising thereafter. In a patient with AMoL, the hepatic activity was higher than the splenic activity at 30min after, but thereafter the latter became higher than the former. Liver activity curves showed transient fall at 3hr after and then gradual uprising in all patients. In a patient with APL, high activity was noted over the kidneys. This rose to a maximum after 3hr and then decreased rapidly. Since In-111 oxine stays firmly attached to the cells in spite of the possibility of radiation damage in a long-term survey, it seems an ideal label for studying leukemic cell kinetics

  5. Recurrent deletions of IKZF1 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D.E.; Beuling, Eva; Marry M van den Heuvel-Eibrink; Obulkasim, Askar; Baruchel, André; Trka, Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Sonneveld, Edwin; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Pieters, Rob; Zimmermann, Martin; Zwaan, C. Michel; Fornerod, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    IKAROS family zinc finger 1/IKZF1 is a transcription factor important in lymphoid differentiation, and a known tumor suppressor in acute lymphoid leukemia. Recent studies suggest that IKZF1 is also involved in myeloid differentiation. To investigate whether IKZF1 deletions also play a role in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a panel of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia samples for deletions of the IKZF1 locus using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and for mutations...

  6. Systemic mastocytosis with acute myelomonocytic leukemia: a case report

    Kar, Rakhee; Rao, Seema; Pati, Hara Prasad

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow mastocytosis may be associated with many clonal non mast cell hematological neoplasms and its association with acute myeloid leukemia especially with t (8; 21) has been described. We describe an interesting case of coexistence of systemic mastocytosis with acute myelomonocytic leukemia in a young child. Diagnosis of acute myelomonocytic leukemia was based on bone marrow aspirate findings coupled with cytochemistry. Systemic mastocytosis was diagnosed on the basis of bone marrow bi...

  7. Activation of coagulation system and d-dimer levels in children with acute leukemia

    Harun Wijaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background D-dimer is a molecule as result of breaking down of excessive fibrin formation from the activation of coagulation system. There is evidence of increased activation of coagulation in patients with acute leukemia which was showed by the increment of d-dimer levels. Objective To evaluate the incidence of activation of coagulation system in children with acute leukemia before receiving chemotherapy. Method This cross-sectional study was performed at Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. All newly-diagnosed children with acute leukemia were included in this study, prior to their receiving any chemotherapy treatment. Blast count, prothrombin time (PTT, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT, and D-dimer levels were examined after the diagnosis was confirmed by morphology and immunophenotyping studies on bone marrow specimens. Results Out of 22 subjects, 13 subjects had increased D-dimer values. The median D-dimer level of this elevated group was 1,000 (range 500-14,700 ng/mL. In the acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML patients, activation of coagulation was found in 7 out of 8 subjects. The median D-dimer levels was 950 (range 100-14,700 ng/mL. In the acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL patients, 6 out of 14 subjects had increased activation of coagulation with median D-dimer level of 300 (range 100-3,800 ng/mL. Nine out of 10 subjects with blast cells on peripheral blood smear had a median D-dimer level of 1,000 (range 500-3,800 ng/mL. Both PT and APTT were found normal in all subjects. Conclusion Activation of coagulation system occurs at the time of diagnosis as shown by increased D-dimer levels. The characteristics of activation of coagulation system are different between ALL and AML subjects, as well as between subjects with positive and negative blast counts on peripheral blood smears. Despite the increased activation of coagulation, PT and APTT remain normal. [Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:227-31.].

  8. Leukemia.

    Juliusson, Gunnar; Hough, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Leukemias are a group of life threatening malignant disorders of the blood and bone marrow. In the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population, the acute leukemias are most prevalent, with chronic myeloid leukemia being infrequently seen. Factors associated with more aggressive disease biology tend to increase in frequency with increasing age, whilst tolerability of treatment strategies decreases. There are also challenges regarding the effective delivery of therapy specific to the AYA group, consequences on the unique psychosocial needs of this age group, including compliance. This chapter reviews the current status of epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment strategies and outcomes of AYA leukemia, with a focus on acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27595359

  9. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Methylation of Gene CHFR Promoter in Acute Leukemia Cells

    GONG Hui; LIU Wengli; ZHOU Jianfeng; XU Huizhen

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore whether gene CHFR was inactivated by methylation in leukemia cells, the expression of CHFR was examined before and after treatment with demethylation agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 leukemia cell lines by means of RT-PCR. The methylation of promoter in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 cells as well as 41 acute leukemia patients was analyzed by MS-PCR. The results showed that methylation of CHFR promoter was inactivated and could be reversed by treatment with a demethylating agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937. CHFR promoter methylation was detected in 39 % of acute leukemia patients. There was no difference in incidence of CHFR promoter methylation between acute myelocytic leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia. In conclusion, CHFR is frequently inactivated in acute leukemia and is a good candidate for the leukemia supper gene. By affecting mitotic checkpoint function, CHFR inactivation likely plays a key role in tumorigenesis in acute leukemia. Moreover, the methylation of gene CHFR appears to be a good index with which to predict the sensitivity of acute leukemia to microtubule inhibitors.

  11. Criteria and Classification of Hybrid Acute Leukemia in 72 Acute Leukemias Based Mainly on Flow Cytometric Analysis

    Aoki, Sadao; Nomoto, Nobuhiko; Maruyama, Souichi; Shinada, Shoji; Shibata, Akira

    1991-01-01

    Phenotypes of leukemic cells can be determined through dual staining with pairs of FITC-labeled and PE-labeled monoclonal antibodies using a laser flow cytometer. Hybrid acute leukemia (HAL) was diagnosed when leukemic cells expressed 2 or more lymphoid markers and at least on myeloid marker simultaneously. Based on this criteria, nineteen out of 72 cases with untreated acute leukemia were diagnosed as HAL, 15 of 29 (51%) patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 4 of 43 (9%) patients wi...

  12. Acute nonlymphocytic leukemia following bladder instillations with thiotepa.

    Easton, D. J.; Poon, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    A case of therapy-related leukemia is described. Other cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia have been associated with the intramuscular administration of thiotepa (an alkylating agent), but this patient received only intravesical instillations of the drug. The interval between the start of chemotherapy and the onset of leukemia was 56 months.

  13. Silencing HIF-1α reduces the adhesion and secretion functions of acute leukemia hBMSCs

    Zeng, Dong-Feng [Department of Hematology, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing (China); Liu, Ting [Department of Ophthalmology, DaPing Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing (China); Chang, Cheng; Zhang, Xi; Liang, Xue; Chen, Xing-Hua; Kong, Pei-Yan [Department of Hematology, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing (China)

    2012-06-29

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is an important transcription factor, which plays a critical role in the formation of solid tumor and its microenvironment. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expression and function of HIF-1α in human leukemia bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and to identify the downstream targets of HIF-1α. HIF-1α expression was detected at both the RNA and protein levels using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) were detected in stromal cells by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HIF-1α was blocked by constructing the lentiviral RNAi vector system and infecting the BMSCs. The Jurkat cell/BMSC co-cultured system was constructed by putting the two cells into the same suitable cultured media and conditions. Cell adhesion and secretion functions of stromal cells were evaluated after transfection with the lentiviral RNAi vector of HIF-1α. Increased HIF-1α mRNA and protein was detected in the nucleus of the acute myeloblastic and acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared with normal BMSCs. The lentiviral RANi vector for HIF-1α was successfully constructed and was applied to block the expression of HIF-1α. When HIF-1α of BMSCs was blocked, the expression of VEGF and SDF-1α secreted by stromal cells was decreased. When HIF-1α was blocked, the co-cultured Jurkat cell's adhesion and migration functions were also decreased. Taken together, these results suggest that HIF-1α acts as an important transcription factor and can significantly affect the secretion and adhesion functions of leukemia BMSCs.

  14. Silencing HIF-1α reduces the adhesion and secretion functions of acute leukemia hBMSCs

    Zeng Dong-Feng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α is an important transcription factor, which plays a critical role in the formation of solid tumor and its microenviroment. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expression and function of HIF-1α in human leukemia bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs and to identify the downstream targets of HIF-1α. HIF-1α expression was detected at both the RNA and protein levels using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α were detected in stromal cells by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HIF-1α was blocked by constructing the lentiviral RNAi vector system and infecting the BMSCs. The Jurkat cell/BMSC co-cultured system was constructed by putting the two cells into the same suitable cultured media and conditions. Cell adhesion and secretion functions of stromal cells were evaluated after transfection with the lentiviral RNAi vector of HIF-1α. Increased HIF-1α mRNA and protein was detected in the nucleus of the acute myeloblastic and acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared with normal BMSCs. The lentiviral RANi vector for HIF-1α was successfully constructed and was applied to block the expression of HIF-1α. When HIF-1α of BMSCs was blocked, the expression of VEGF and SDF-1 secreted by stromal cells were decreased. When HIF-1α was blocked, the co-cultured Jurkat cell’s adhesion and migration functions were also decreased. Taken together, these results suggest that HIF-1α acts as an important transcription factor and can significantly affect the secretion and adhesion functions of leukemia BMSCs.

  15. Silencing HIF-1α reduces the adhesion and secretion functions of acute leukemia hBMSCs

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is an important transcription factor, which plays a critical role in the formation of solid tumor and its microenvironment. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expression and function of HIF-1α in human leukemia bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and to identify the downstream targets of HIF-1α. HIF-1α expression was detected at both the RNA and protein levels using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) were detected in stromal cells by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HIF-1α was blocked by constructing the lentiviral RNAi vector system and infecting the BMSCs. The Jurkat cell/BMSC co-cultured system was constructed by putting the two cells into the same suitable cultured media and conditions. Cell adhesion and secretion functions of stromal cells were evaluated after transfection with the lentiviral RNAi vector of HIF-1α. Increased HIF-1α mRNA and protein was detected in the nucleus of the acute myeloblastic and acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared with normal BMSCs. The lentiviral RANi vector for HIF-1α was successfully constructed and was applied to block the expression of HIF-1α. When HIF-1α of BMSCs was blocked, the expression of VEGF and SDF-1α secreted by stromal cells was decreased. When HIF-1α was blocked, the co-cultured Jurkat cell's adhesion and migration functions were also decreased. Taken together, these results suggest that HIF-1α acts as an important transcription factor and can significantly affect the secretion and adhesion functions of leukemia BMSCs

  16. The genetic signature of acute leukemia in infacy

    Chantrain, Christophe; Poirel, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    Infant leukemia is a rare malignant disease with clinical and biological features distinct from older children. It is characterized by a high incidence of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangement and a poor outcome despite intensive chemotherapy. Recent genetic studies argue in favor of a unique biology of infant acute leukemia. This review describes the specific genetic signature of infant leukemia. It discusses the important insights it provides into the understanding of leukemogenes...

  17. Retinoid Differentiation Therapy for Common Types of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Philip Hughes; Geoffrey Brown

    2012-01-01

    Many cancers arise in a tissue stem cell, and cell differentiation is impaired resulting in an accumulation of immature cells. The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in 1987 to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), pioneered a new approach to obtain remission in malignancies by restoring the terminal maturation of leukemia cells resulting in these cells having a limited lifespan. Differentiation therapy also offers the prospect o...

  18. Data quality in the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    Ostgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Severinsen, Marianne Tang;

    2013-01-01

    The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data.......The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data....

  19. DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASSIFICATION OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Sabina Chiaretti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a disseminated malignancy of B- or T-lymphoblasts which imposes a rapid and accurate diagnostic process to support an optimal risk-oriented therapy and thus increase the curability rate. The need for a precise diagnostic algorithm is underlined by the awareness that both ALL therapy and related success rates may vary greatly in function of ALL subset, from standard chemotherapy in patients with standard-risk ALL, to allotransplantation (SCT and targeted therapy in high-risk patients and cases expressing suitable biological targets, respectively. This review offers a glimpse on how best identify ALL and the most relevant ALL subsets.

  20. Evaluation of the radiosensitivity of acute myeloblastic leukaemia progenitor cells by culture methods exploring self-renewal. Evaluation de la radiosensibilite des progeniteurs de leucemie aigue myeloblastique par des methodes de culture explorant ou non l'autorenouvellement

    Cowen, D.; Richaud, P.; Landriau, S.; Lagarde, P.; Gualde, N. (Fondation Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France)); Boiron, J.M. (Hopital du Haut-Leveque, 33 - Pessac (France)); Mahon, F.X.; Belloc, F. (Hopital Regional, 33 - Bordeaux (France)); Reiffers, J. (Hopital du Haut-Leveque, 33 - Pessac (France) Hopital Regional, 33 - Bordeaux (France))

    1993-01-01

    The progenitor cells of acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML) are usually cultured in methylcellulose which selects for terminal dividing cells. Suspension cultures have been developed because they reflect self-renewal: the exponential growth of the progenitors of AML cultured in suspension is due to self-renewal. We have compared the radiosensitivity of the progenitors of AML grown either in methylcellulose alone or first in suspension for 7 days before being plated in methylcellulose. Cells were harvested from leukaemic bone marrows at the moment of diagnosis. The myeloblastic lineage of the colonies was assessed by morphological, cytochemical and immunophenotypic analysis and by the use of growth factors which do not stimulate T-lymphocytes. The cell-cycle distribution of leukaemic blasts was comparable for all the samples. This method enabled aggressive leukaemias to be selected. The radiosensitivity showed wide variations from one patient to another (Do ranging from 0.35 to 2.6 Gy) whichever culture method used. The progenitor cells capable of self-renewal were more radiosensitive (Mean Do 0.9[+-]0.4 Gy) than terminal dividing cells (Mean Do = 1.35[+-]0.5 Gy). In two cases, a shoulder was found in the initial part of the cell-survival curves of cells capable of self-renewal. The shape of the curves was better fitted by the linear quadratic model with very low values of [alpha]/[beta], suggesting a reduced antileukaemic effect in case of fractionation.

  1. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    2016-04-26

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  2. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML. PMID:26113060

  3. Skin changes in acute myelogenous leukemia

    Mittal R; Kullar Jastinder; Sethi P; Puneeth

    2000-01-01

    A 65-year old woman developed progressive, firm, mild to moderately itchy, erythematous, papular and nodular lesions, over cheeks, extensors of limbs, scalp and lower back without any accompanying systemic complaints except for severe backache. Initially clinical diagnosis was cutaneous sarcoidosis. However presence of myeloblasts, monoblasts, myelocytes and metamyelocytes in peripheral blood smear and typical histopathology of nodule with mixed cellular infiltrate more around blood vessels, ...

  4. How Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia Classified?

    ... also form the basis for treating these leukemias. Markers on the leukemia cells If the leukemia cells ... no signs or symptoms of the disease. A molecular complete remission means there is no evidence of ...

  5. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, unlike acute erythroid leukemia, predicts an unfavorable outcome after allogeneic HSCT.

    Ishiyama, Ken; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Eto, Tetsuya; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Uchida, Naoyuki; Kanamori, Heiwa; Fukuda, Takahiro; Miyamura, Koichi; Inoue, Yoshiko; Taguchi, Jun; Mori, Takehiko; Iwato, Koji; Morishima, Yasuo; Nagamura-Inoue, Tokiko; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Takami, Akiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Acute erythroid leukemia (FAB-M6) and acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (FAB-M7) exhibit closely related properties in cells regarding morphology and the gene expression profile. Although allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is considered the mainstay of the treatment for both subtypes of leukemia due to their refractoriness to chemotherapy and high rates of relapse, it remains unclear whether allo-HSCT is curative in such cases due to their scarcity. We retrospectively examined the impact of allo-HSCT in 382 patients with M6 and 108 patients with M7 using nationwide HSCT data and found the overall survival (OS) and relapse rates of the M6 patients to be significantly better than those of the M7 patients after adjusting for confounding factors and statistically comparable with those of the patients with M0/M1/M2/M4/M5 disease. Consequently, the factors of age, gender, performance status, karyotype, disease status at HSCT and development of graft-vs.-host disease predicted the OS for the M6 patients, while the performance status and disease status at HSCT were predictive of the OS for the M7 patients. These findings substantiate the importance of distinguishing between M6 and M7 in the HSCT setting and suggest that unknown mechanisms influence the HSCT outcomes of these closely related subtypes of leukemia. PMID:27244257

  6. Age Difference in Immunophenotype of Acute Leukemia

    Kazunori Nakase

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the immunophenotype of 880 cases with acute leukemia and analyzed their age difference in relation to the morphological subtype and the karyotype. We divided the patients into 3 age groups: child (0-15 years, adult (16-59 years and elderly (60 years and older group. The diagnoses based on the French-American-British (FAB criteria and the immunophenotype as follows: 453 patients as acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 366 as precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL (24 CD10- cases and 342 CD10+ cases, 10 B-cell ALL and 51 T-cell ALL. In AML, there were no significant age differences in the frequency of FAB subtypes. Karyotypically, the frequencies of t(8;21 and 11q23 decreased with age and that of 5/7/8 abnormality increased with age. As for the immunophenotype in each FAB subtype, CD11b in M2 (0% and CD34 in M3 (0% were less commonly expressed in the child group than in the other age groups. Whereas Both CD11b (100% and CD34 (60% in M4 were more predominantly expressed in the child group than in the other age groups. Lymphoid antigen, CD19 showed a higher frequency (38.5% in the child M2 than did other age M2 groups, reflecting the distribution pattern of t(8;21 among the 3 age groups. Additionally, the child group more frequently expressed this antigen (33.3% than the older groups among CD7+ AML. In ALL, the frequency of CD10+ precursor B ALL was more common in the child group (84% than in the adult group. On the other hand, B-cell ALL showed a lower frequency (0.7% in the child group and T-cell ALL did a higher frequency (18.3% in the adult group than any other age groups, respectively. Although the frequency of t(9;22 increased with age in CD10+ precursor-B ALL, myeloid antigen (CD13/CD33 expression evenly distributed among the 3 age groups. Our results suggest that phenotypic heterogeneity gradually emerged with age irrespective of the pattern of karyotype.

  7. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  8. Role of autophagy in acute myeloid leukemia therapy

    Su-Ping Zhang; Yu-Na Niu; Na Yuan; Ai-Hong Zhang; Dan Chao; Qiu-Ping Xu; Li-Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Despite its dual role in determining cell fate in a wide array of solid cancer cell lines,autophagy has been robustly shown to suppress or kill acute myeloid leukemia cells via degradation of the oncogenic fusion protein that drives leukemogenesis.However,autophagy also induces the demise of acute leukemia cells that do not express the known fusion protein,though the molecular mechanism remains elusive.Nevertheless,since it can induce cooperation with apoptosis and differentiation in response to autophagic signals,autophagy can be manipulated for a better therapy on acute myeloid leukemia.

  9. Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the Nordic countries

    Oskarsson, Trausti; Söderhäll, Stefan; Arvidson, Johan;

    2016-01-01

    Relapse is the main reason for treatment failure in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Despite improvements in the up-front therapy, survival after relapse is still relatively poor, especially for high-risk relapses. The aims of this study were to assess outcomes following acute lymphoblastic...... leukemia relapse after common initial Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology protocol treatment; to validate currently used risk stratifications, and identify additional prognostic factors for overall survival. Altogether, 516 of 2735 patients (18.9%) relapsed between 1992 and 2011 and were...... development of novel approaches is urgently needed to increase survival in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia....

  10. Cranial computerized tomography in children suffering from acute leukemia

    Cranial computerized (axial) tomography permits a more complete neurologic supervision of children with acute leukemia and a better knowledge of the frequency and varieties of cerebral complications in leukemia. Endocranial complications in acute leukemia are essentially infiltrative, hemorrhagic, infectious or iatrogenic. Cranial computerized tomography can demonstrate cerebral changes in meningeal leukemia, hemorrhages, calcifications, brain atrophy or leukencephalopathy. The preliminary results of cranial computerized tomography in childhood leukemia suggest that the iatrogenic main lesion of the brain due to combined radiation-chemotherapy is atrophy whereas that of the intrathecal cytostatic therapy is demyelination. Accurate diagnostics and control of possible cerebral complications in therapy of leukemia is essentially for appropriate therapeutic management. For that cranial computerized tomography is the best method to a effective supervision of the brain. (author)

  11. Prethymic Cytoplasmic CD3 Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia: A Case Report

    Elisa Cannizzo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute undiffentiated leukemia (AUL is an acute leukemia with no more than one membrane marker of any given lineage. Blasts often express HLA-DR, CD34, and/or CD38 and may be positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT. The expression of CD34, HLA-DR, and CD38 has been shown in pro-T-ALL, although in this case, blasts should also express CD7 and cyCD3. However, some cases of T-ALL without CD3 in the cytoplasm and all TCR chain genes in germ line configuration are reported, features that fit well with a very early hematopoietic cell. We report a case of acute leukemia CD34+/−HLADR+CD7+CD38+cyCD3− in which a diagnosis of AUL was considered. However the blasts were also positive for CD99 and TCR delta gene rearrangement which was found on molecular studies. Therefore a differential diagnosis between AUL and an early cyCD3 negative T-ALL was debated.

  12. Minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) offers a way to precisely assess early treatment response and detect relapse. Established methods to study MRD are flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of antigen-receptor genes, and PCR amplification of fusion transcripts. The strong correlation between MRD levels and risk of relapse in childhood ALL is well demonstrated; studies in adult patients also support its prognostic value. Hence, results of MRD studies can be used to select treatment intensity and duration, and to estimate the optimal timing for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Practical issues in the implementation of MRD assays in clinical studies include determining the most informative time point to study MRD and the levels of MRD that will trigger changes in treatment intensity, as well as the relative cost and informative power of different methodologies. The identification of new markers of leukemia and the use of increasingly refined assays should further facilitate routine monitoring of MRD and help to clarify the cellular and biologic features of leukemic cells that resist chemotherapy in vivo. PMID:19100372

  13. ERYTHEMA NODOSUM REVEALING ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Chebbi Wafa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Erythema nodosum (EN is the most common type of panniculitis. It may be idiopathic or secondary to various etiologies. However, the occurrence of erythema nodosum in malignant hemopathy had rarely been reported. Case report: A 42 year-old woman presented with a four week history of recurrent multiple painful erythematous nodules developed on the lower limbs associated with arthralgia of the ankles and fever. The clinical features of skin lesions with contusiform color evolution allowed establishing the diagnosis of EN. No underlying cause was found. The skin lesions were improved with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. Three months later, the patient consulted for recurrence of EN associated with fever, inflammatory polyarthralgia and hepatosplenomegaly. The peripheral blood count revealed pancytopenia. A bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia type 2. Initiation of chemotherapy was followed by the complete disappearance of skin lesions of EN. Conclusion: Paraneoplastic erythema nodosum is a rare entity. In the literature, a few cases of association with leukemia have been reported. Exploration for solid neoplasms or hemopathy in case of recurrent EN or resistance to conventional treatment should be systematic

  14. Survival in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia in Germany and the United States: Major differences in survival in young adults.

    Pulte, Dianne; Jansen, Lina; Castro, Felipe A; Krilaviciute, Agne; Katalinic, Alexander; Barnes, Benjamin; Ressing, Meike; Holleczek, Bernd; Luttmann, Sabine; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-09-15

    Previous epidemiologic studies on AML have been limited by the rarity of the disease. Here, we present population level data on survival of patients with AML in Germany and the United States (US). Data were extracted from 11 population-based cancer registries in Germany and the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER13) database in the US. Patients diagnosed with AML in 1997-2011 were included. Period analysis was used to estimate 5-year relative survival (RS) and trends in survival in the early 21st century. Overall 5-year age-adjusted RS for patients with AML in 2007-2011 was greater in Germany than in the US at 22.8% and 18.8%, respectively. Five-year RS was higher in Germany than in the US at all ages, with particularly large differences at ages 15-24 for whom 5-year RS was 64.3% in Germany and 55.0% in the US and 35-44, with 5-year RS estimates of 61.8% in Germany and 46.6% in the US. Most of the difference in 5-year RS was due to higher 1-year RS, with overall 1-year RS estimates of 47.0% in Germany and 38.5% in the US. A small increase in RS was observed between 2003-2005 and 2009-2011 in both countries, but no increase in survival was observed in either country for ages 75+. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed description of AML survival in Germany. Comparison to the US suggests that further analysis into risk factors for poor outcomes in AML in the US may be useful in improving survival. PMID:27176899

  15. Mixed Phenotypic Acute Leukemia Presenting as Mediastinal Mass-2 Cases.

    Vardhan, Rig; Kotwal, Jyoti; Ganguli, Prosenjit; Ahmed, Rehan; Sharma, Ajay; Singh, Jasjit

    2016-06-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia symbolizes a very small subset of acute leukemia that simply cannot be allocated as lymphoid or myeloid lineage. The 2008 World Health Organisation classification established stringent standard for diagnosis of mixed phenotype acute leukemia, accentuating myeloperoxidase for myeloid lineage, cytoplasmic CD3 for T lineage and CD19 with other B markers for B lineage obligation. Mixed phenotype leukemia is rare and 3-5 % of acute leukmias of all age groups, is associated with poor outcome with overall survival of 18 months. We wish to present two cases of mixed phenotypic acute leukemia who presented with mediastinal masses, were suspected to be T cell lymphoma/leukemia clinically and radiologically. In one case, tissue diagnosis was given as lymphoma for which treatment was given. These cases show that patients diagnosed as lymphoma on histopathology can be cases of mixed phenotype acute leukemia and varying specific treatment protocols and follow up are required. Awareness of these entities will help in proper diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27408360

  16. Molecular mechanisms in differentiation-induction in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Nigten, Jeannet

    2007-01-01

    Leukemia is a hematological malignancy that is characterized by the clonal expansion of immature hematopoietic cells, which have escaped from the tightly coordinated cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis controls. In general, leukemia is characterized by a variety of mutations in pathways that are required for normal hematopoiesis. This thesis describes target genes of the mutated transcription factor PML-RAR , which is expressed in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells. APL...

  17. Abrupt evolution of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute myeloid leukemia in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Fukunaga, Akiko; Sakoda, Hiroto; Iwamoto, Yoshihiro; Inano, Shojiro; Sueki, Yuki; Yanagida, Soshi; Arima, Nobuyoshi

    2013-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal disorder arising from an alteration in multipotent stem cells, which lose the ability of normal proliferation and differentiation. Disease progression occurs in approximately 30% MDS cases. Specific chromosomal alterations seem responsible for each step in the evolution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Multiple genetic aberrations occur during the clonal evolution of MDS; however, few studies report the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. We report a rare case of Ph-positive AML, which evolved during the course of low-risk MDS. The patient, a 76-year-old man with mild leukocytopenia, was diagnosed with MDS, refractory neutropenia (RN). After 1.5 yr, his peripheral blood and bone marrow were suddenly occupied by immature basophils and myeloblasts, indicating the onset of AML. A bone marrow smear showed multilineage dysplasia, consistent with MDS evolution. Chromosomal analysis showed an additional t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation. Because progression occurred concurrently with emergence of the Ph chromosome, we diagnosed this case as Ph-positive AML with basophilia arising from the clonal evolution of MDS. The patient was initially treated with nilotinib. A hematological response was soon achieved with disappearance of the Ph chromosome in the bone marrow. Emergence of Ph-positive AML in the course of low-risk MDS has rarely been reported. We report this case as a rare clinical course of MDS. PMID:23240925

  18. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, Julian; Burmeister, T;

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia...... patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All...... patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79...

  19. MOLECULAR PATHOGENESIS OF SECONDARY ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Neil Osheroff

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Balanced chromosomal translocations that generate chimeric oncoproteins are considered to be initiating lesions in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. The most frequent is the t(15;17(q22;q21, which fuses the PML and RARA genes, giving rise to acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. An increasing proportion of APL cases are therapy-related (t-APL, which develop following exposure to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapeutic agents that target DNA topoisomerase II (topoII, particularly mitoxantrone and epirubicin. To gain insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of the t(15;17 we mapped the translocation breakpoints in a series of t-APLs, which revealed significant clustering according the nature of the drug exposure. Remarkably, in approximately half of t-APL cases arising following mitoxantrone treatment for breast carcinoma or multiple sclerosis, the chromosome 15 breakpoint fell within an 8-bp “hotspot” region in PML intron 6, which was confirmed to be a preferential site of topoII-mediated DNA cleavage induced by mitoxantrone.  Chromosome 15 breakpoints falling outside the “hotspot”, and the corresponding RARA breakpoints were also shown to be functional topoII cleavage sites. The observation that particular regions of the PML and RARA loci are susceptible to topoII-mediated DNA damage induced by epirubicin and mitoxantrone may underlie the propensity of these agents to cause APL.

     

  20. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  1. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    2015-02-24

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. JAK kinase inhibitors for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Degryse, Sandrine; Cools, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have identified activating mutations in components of the interleukin-7 receptor complex (IL7R, JAK1, and JAK3). It will be of interest to investigate both JAK1 and JAK3 kinase inhibitors as targeted agents for these leukemias.

  3. Serum metabonomics of acute leukemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Shamsi, Tahir; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-ur

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a critical neoplasm of white blood cells. In order to differentiate between the metabolic alterations associated with two subtypes of acute leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the serum of ALL and AML patients and compared with two controls (healthy and aplastic anemia) using 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Thirty-seven putative metabolites were identified using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The use of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA models gave results with 84.38% and 90.63% classification rate, respectively. The metabolites responsible for classification are mainly lipids, lactate and glucose. Compared with controls, ALL and AML patients showed serum metabonomic differences involving aberrant metabolism pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipoprotein changes, choline and fatty acid metabolisms. PMID:27480133

  4. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Ibrahim Bayram

    2014-01-01

    In children patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, according to the European bone marrow transplant handbook, the indications for stem cell transplantation, conditioning regimen, donor selection and information about sources of stem cells will be evaluated.

  5. Epigenetic regulators as promising therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia

    Gallipoli, Paolo; Giotopoulos, George; Huntly, Brian J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most prevalent acute leukemia in adults, is an aggressive hematological malignancy arising in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. With the exception of a few specific AML subtypes, the mainstays of treatment have not significantly changed over the last 20 years, and are still based on standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. As a result, clinical outcome remains poor for the majority of patients, with overall long-term survival in the region of 20?30%. Recent su...

  6. Advances in Management of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia with Arsenic Trioxide

    MA Jun

    2007-01-01

    @@ Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), with specific features in cell morphology, is classified as M3 by French-American-British (FAB).Among M3, 95% of patients show specific chromosome translocation t(15;17)q(22;21) with PML-RAR α fusion gene, and 5% of patients show other subtypes. According to the statistical analysis of 2 540 adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML)cases in Harbin Institute of Hematology & Oncology, APL accounted for 23%.

  7. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias

    Jakubowski Ann A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8% displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5% displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6% did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  8. PML-RARα co-operates with Sox4 in acute myeloid leukemia development in mice

    Omidvar, Nader; Maunakea, Mei Lin; Jones, Letetia; Sevcikova, Sabina; Yin, Bin; Himmel, Karen L.; Tennant, Thelma R.; Le Beau, Michelle M; Largaespada, David A.; Kogan, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia is characterized by a chromosomal translocation involving the retinoic acid receptor alpha gene. To identify co-operating pathways to leukemogenesis, we crossed MRP8-PML/RARA transgenic mice with BXH-2 mice which harbor an endogenous murine leukemia virus that causes acute myeloid leukemia. Approximately half of the leukemias that arose in this cross showed features of acute promyelocytic leukemia. We identified 22 proviral insertion sites in acute promyelocytic-l...

  9. The JAK2V617F activating mutation occurs in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, but not in acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Levine, Ross L.; Loriaux, Marc; Huntly, Brian J. P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Beran, Miroslav; Stoffregen, Eric; Berger, Roland; Clark, Jennifer J.; Willis, Stephanie G.; Nguyen, Kim T.; Flores, Nikki J.; Estey, Elihu; Gattermann, Norbert; Armstrong, Scott; Look, A. Thomas; Griffin, James D.; Bernard, Olivier A.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Gilliland, D. Gary; Druker, Brian; Deininger, Michael W. N.

    2005-01-01

    Activating mutations in tyrosine kinases have been identified in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic malignancies. Recently, we and others identified a single recurrent somatic activating mutation (JAK2V617F) in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) tyrosine kinase in the myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myeloid metaplasia with myelofibrosis. We used direct sequence analysis to determine if the JAK2V617F mutation was present in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML)/atypical chronic myelogenous leukemia (aCML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), T-cell ALL, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Analysis of 222 patients with AML identified JAK2V617F mutations in 4 patients with AML, 3 of whom had a preceding MPD. JAK2V617F mutations were identified in 9 (7.8%) of 116 CMML/a CML samples, and in 2 (4.2%) of 48 MDS samples. We did not identify the JAK2V617F disease allele in B-lineage ALL (n = 83), T-cell ALL (n = 93), or CLL (n = 45). These data indicate that the JAK2V617F allele is present in acute and chronic myeloid malignancies but not in lymphoid malignancies. PMID:16081687

  10. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Philippe; Kastner; Susan; Chan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene.Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia.In particular,Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.Its role in T-cell leukemia,however,has been more controversial.While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell leukemias,loss of Ikaros appears to be rare in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).We review here the evidence linking Ikaros to T-ALL in mouse and human systems.

  11. Meta-Analysis of Cytochrome P2D6 Gene Polymorphisms and Susceptibility to Acute Leukemia

    Ma Limin; Ruan Linhai

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To provide a more robust assessment to the effect of cytochrome P2D6 (CYP2D6) polymorphisms on the risk of acute leukemia (AL), and to evaluate the association between the two most commonly studied CYP2D6 polymorphisms (CYP2D6*3 and CYP2D6*4) and AL risk by meta-analysis. Methods:All case-control studies investigating an association between the CYP2D6*3 or CYP2D6*4 polymorphisms and AL risk were included. Either fixed-effects or random-effects models were applied to combine odds ratios (ORs) and 95%conifdence intervals (CIs) by RevMan 5.1. Q-statistic was used to evaluate the heterogeneity, and both Egger’s test and funnel plots were used to assess publication bias. Results:Six studies were included in the meta-analysis. The results we acquired were that the OR value and 95%CI of CYP2D6*4 wild type, heterozygous mutant and homozygous mutant were 0.94 (0.66-1.35), 1.04(0.74-1.45) and 1.63 (0.95-2.81), respectively with Z=0.33, 0.23 and 1.76 (P>0.05), indicating that there was no signiifcant association between CYP2D6*4 polymorphism and the risk of AL. We also performed subgroup analysis by the AL immunophenotype for those groups with heterogeneity. The results of the combined analysis of CYP2D6*4 wild type, heterozygous mutant and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were Z=0.08, 0.08 (P>0.05), for acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) were Z=0.17, 0.26 (P>0.05), indicating that there was no signiifcant association between CYP2D6*4 polymorphism and the development of both ALL and AML. Conclusion:CYP2D6 polymorphisms are not associated with AL risk.

  12. Leukemia cutis

    Angoori G Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia cutis is the infiltration of neoplastic leukocytes or their precursors into the epidermis, the dermis, or the subcutis, resulting in clinically identifiable cutaneous lesions. Leukemia cutis may follow, precede or occur concomitantly with the diagnosis of systemic leukemia. A 50-year-old woman presented with asymptomatic multiple cutaneous nodules all over the body of 4 months duration. Cutaneous examination showed multiple hyperpigmented nodules and plaques involving face, trunk, and extremities. Peripheral smear showed abnormally elevated leucocyte count (TLC-70,000 with abnormal cells: myeloblasts 40%, promyelocytes 8% and myelocytes 39%. Auer rods were present in few myeloblasts. Bone marrow aspiration showed increased cellularity, erythroid hyperplasia with megaloblastic change, increased myeloblasts with maturation arrest. Immunohistochemistry showed strongly positive myeloperoxidase infiltrating cells and negative for CD20 and CD3 consistent with the diagnosis of AML-M 2 with leukemia cutis. This case is reported for its rarity.

  13. PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF EXPRESSION OF SURVIVIN IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    王晓娟; 戴国仪; 曹利民; 王国华; 朱慧芬; 张悦; 沈关心

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of survivin gene and its significance in acute leukemia. Methods: The expression of surviving in 134 acute leukemia patients and 4 leukemia cell lines was detected by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Results: We detected survivin expression in 78 of 134 acute leukemia patients and all the cell lines but not in normal controls and anemia patients. Survivin gene expression correlated with a lower white blood cell count, which was 11×109/L and 48×109/L in the positive and negative group respectively (P<0.01 by the Mann-Whitney test). In 55 cases of FAB M1/M2/M3, it was associated with leukemic cell maturation(P<0.01 by the Fisher test). Survivin expression was strongly related to survival time of acute leukemia patients (P<0.05). Conclusion: These data suggest that survivin expression may be considered as a new unfavorable prognostic factor for acute leukemia due to its important role in apoptosis inhibition that influences disease outcome.

  14. Preleukemia: hematological disorders prior to onset of leukemia

    Takahashi,Isao

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available Published data on Japanese leukemia patients with a preleukemic hematological disorder were assessed. The reexamined cases were from the "Japona Centra Revuo Medicina" reported during the period from 1952 to 1971. Among preleukemic hematological disorders, hypoplastic anemia was the most frequently reported (41 of 62 cases. These "hypoplastic preleukemia" patients were rather elderly and terminated mostly in atypical myelocytic leukemia. The chief hematological feature of the hypoplastic preleukemia cases was the coexistence of a relative erythroid hyperplasia and a slight increase of myeloblasts in the bone marrow that was unusual in hypoplastic anemia. The presence of pancytopenia and hypocellular marrow with a relative erythroid hyperplasia combined with a slight increase of myeloblasts probably indicates hypoplastic preleukemia that terminates later in acute leukemia.

  15. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    2016-04-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. The Epigenetic Landscape of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Emma Conway O’Brien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a genetically heterogeneous disease. Certain cytogenetic and molecular genetic mutations are recognized to have an impact on prognosis, leading to their inclusion in some prognostic stratification systems. Recently, the advent of high-throughput whole genome or exome sequencing has led to the identification of several novel recurrent mutations in AML, a number of which have been found to involve genes concerned with epigenetic regulation. These genes include in particular DNMT3A, TET2, and IDH1/2, involved with regulation of DNA methylation, and EZH2 and ASXL-1, which are implicated in regulation of histones. However, the precise mechanisms linking these genes to AML pathogenesis have yet to be fully elucidated as has their respective prognostic relevance. As massively parallel DNA sequencing becomes increasingly accessible for patients, there is a need for clarification of the clinical implications of these mutations. This review examines the literature surrounding the biology of these epigenetic modifying genes with regard to leukemogenesis and their clinical and prognostic relevance in AML when mutated.

  18. Acute myeloid leukemia masquerading as hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Abu-Zeinah, Ghaith F; Weisman, Paul; Ganesh, Karuna; Katz, Seth S; Dogan, Ahmet; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K; Stein, Eytan M; Jarnagin, William; Mauro, Michael J; Harding, James J

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often diagnosed on the basis of high quality imaging without a biopsy in the cirrhotic liver. This is a case of a 64-year-old Caucasian man with no history of liver disease or cirrhosis that presented with fatigue, weight loss, and abdominal distension and was found to have a large, isolated liver mass with arterial enhancement and portal venous washout on triple-phase computed tomography (CT) suspicious for HCC. The patient was initially referred for a surgical evaluation. Meanwhile, he developed fevers, pancytopenia, and worsening back pain, and a subsequent spinal MRI revealed a heterogeneous bone marrow signal suspicious for metastatic disease. A bone marrow biopsy that followed was diffusely necrotic. A core biopsy of the patient's liver mass was then performed and was diagnostic of acute monocytic-monoblastic leukemia. Findings from peripheral flow cytometry and a repeat bone marrow biopsy were also consistent with this diagnosis, and induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and idarubicin was initiated. This case describes a rare presentation of myeloid sarcoma (MS) as an isolated, hypervascular liver mass that mimics HCC in its radiographic appearance. Due to the broad differential for a liver mass, a confirmatory biopsy should routinely be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284485

  19. Acute myeloid leukemia in the older patient.

    Godwin, John E; Smith, Scott E

    2003-10-15

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an extremely heterogeneous disorder. The biology of AML is incompletely understood, but much data indicates that older patients have a more biologically diverse and chemotherapy resistant form of AML that is quite different from that seen in the younger patients. Approximately 60% of AML cases are in patients greater than 60 years of age, so the predominant burden is in older patients. This problem will be magnified in the future, because the US population is both growing and aging. When one examines the treatment outcomes of older AML patients over the last three decades, there is little progress in long-term survival. Nine major published randomized placebo controlled trials of myeloid growth factors given during induction for AML have been conducted. All of these trials with one exception demonstrated no significant impact on the clinical outcomes of complete response (CR) rate, disease-free, and overall survival. However, the duration of neutropenia was consistently and uniformly reduced by the use of growth factor in all nine of these trials. Because of the favorable impact of the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) on resource use, antibiotic days, hospital days, etc., it can be more economical and beneficial to use CSFs in AML than to withhold use. The overall dismal outlook for the older AML patient can only be altered by clinical trials with new therapeutic agents. New cellular and molecularly targeted agents are entering clinical trials and bring hope for progress to this area of cancer therapy. PMID:14563517

  20. Genetic abnormalities associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Yokota, Takafumi; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occurs with high frequency in childhood and is associated with high mortality in adults. Recent technical advances in next-generation sequencing have shed light on genetic abnormalities in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as the precursor to ALL pathogenesis. Based on these genetic abnormalities, ALL is now being reclassified into newly identified subtypes. Philadelphia chromosome-like B-lineage ALL is one of the new high-risk subtypes characterized by genetic alterations that activate various signaling pathways, including those involving cytokine receptors, tyrosine kinases, and epigenetic modifiers. Philadelphia chromosome-like ALL is essentially heterogeneous; however, deletion mutations in the IKZF1 gene encoding the transcription factor IKAROS underlie many cases as a key factor inducing aggressive phenotypes and poor treatment responses. Whole-genome sequencing studies of ALL patients and ethnically matched controls also identified inherited genetic variations in lymphoid neoplasm-related genes, which are likely to increase ALL susceptibility. These findings are directly relevant to clinical hematology, and further studies on this aspect could contribute to accurate diagnosis, effective monitoring of residual disease, and patient-oriented therapies. PMID:26991355

  1. Acute myeloid leukemia masquerading as hepatocellular carcinoma

    Abu-Zeinah, Ghaith F.; Weisman, Paul; Ganesh, Karuna; Katz, Seth S.; Dogan, Ahmet; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K.; Stein, Eytan M.; Jarnagin, William; Mauro, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often diagnosed on the basis of high quality imaging without a biopsy in the cirrhotic liver. This is a case of a 64-year-old Caucasian man with no history of liver disease or cirrhosis that presented with fatigue, weight loss, and abdominal distension and was found to have a large, isolated liver mass with arterial enhancement and portal venous washout on triple-phase computed tomography (CT) suspicious for HCC. The patient was initially referred for a surgical evaluation. Meanwhile, he developed fevers, pancytopenia, and worsening back pain, and a subsequent spinal MRI revealed a heterogeneous bone marrow signal suspicious for metastatic disease. A bone marrow biopsy that followed was diffusely necrotic. A core biopsy of the patient’s liver mass was then performed and was diagnostic of acute monocytic-monoblastic leukemia. Findings from peripheral flow cytometry and a repeat bone marrow biopsy were also consistent with this diagnosis, and induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and idarubicin was initiated. This case describes a rare presentation of myeloid sarcoma (MS) as an isolated, hypervascular liver mass that mimics HCC in its radiographic appearance. Due to the broad differential for a liver mass, a confirmatory biopsy should routinely be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284485

  2. [Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia Following Etoposide Based Chemotherapy in Germ Cell Tumor].

    Okumura, Yoshinaga; Oae, Masashi; Shiraishi, Yusuke; Soda, Takeshi; Kanamaru, Hiroshi; Arima, Nobuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    A 27-year-old man visited our hospital with painless swelling of the left scrotum. Hematologic studies showed the following levels of lactate dehydrogenase, 3,171 IU/l ; alpha-fetoprotein, 2.2 ng/ml ; and β- human chorionic gonadotropin, 0.4 ng/ml, and abdominal computed tomography revealed a mass of 10×8 ×4 cm in the left testis, and that of 3.5×3.0×5.0 cm in the left renal hilar lymph node, without any other metastasis. Left high inguinal orchiectomy was performed, and histopathological examination revealed mixed form with seminoma and teratoma. He was diagnosed to have a left germ cell tumor with left renal hilar lymph node metastases, pT1, N3, M0, stage II C, indicating poor prognosis with IGCCC. The patient received four cycles of chemotherapy, COMPE regimen (CDDP, VCR, MTX, PEP, VP-16 [etoposide]). After lactate dehydrogenase, alpha-fetoprotein, and β -human chorionic gonadotropin all normalized, retroperitoneal lymph node dissection was performed. Histopathological examination revealed only a mature teratoma. Two and half years later, hematologic studies showed blast transformation. Bone marrow biopsy revealed acute myeloblastic lymphoma (M2). The patient received one cycle of AraC and daunorubicin, one cycle of high dose AraC, and three cycles of AraC and mitoxantrone. After chemotherapy, he has maintained a disease-free status for 11 years. In this case, etoposide, a topoisomerase II inhibitor, was the presumed cause of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia. After administering chemotherapeutic agents especially etoposide, it is important to check blood count periodically for a long time. PMID:27320120

  3. Intestinal mucus accumulation in a child with acutemyeloblastic leukemia

    Namık Özbek

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal mucus accumulation is a very rare situation observed in some solid tumors, intestinal inflammation, mucosal hyperplasia, elevated intestinal pressure, and various other diseases. However, it has never been described in acute myeloblastic leukemia. The pathogenesis of intestinal mucus accumulation is still not clear. Here, we report a 14-year-old girl with acute myeloblastic leukemia and febrile neutropenia in addition to typhlitis. She was also immobilized due to joint contractures of the lower extremities and had intestinal mucus accumulation, which was, at first, misdiagnosed as intestinal parasitosis. We speculate that typhlitis, immobilization and decreased intestinal motility due to usage of antiemetic drugs might have been the potential etiologic factors in this case. However, its impact on prognosis of the primary disease is unknown.

  4. Identification of homogeneously staining regions in leukemia patients

    Mohammad Heydarian Moghadam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneously staining regions (HSR or double minute chromosomes (dmin are autonomously replicating extra-chromosomal elements that are frequently associated with gene amplification in a variety of cancers. The diagnosis of leukemia patients was based on characterization of the leukemic cells obtained from bone marrow cytogenetics. This study report two cases, one with Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia without maturation (AML-M1, aged 23-year-old female, and the other with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML-blast crisis, a 28-year-old female associated with double minute chromosomes. Most cases of acute myeloid leukemia with dmin in the literature (including our cases have been diagnosed as having acute myeloid leukemia.

  5. Fatal lymphoproliferation and acute monocytic leukemia-like disease following infectious mononucleosis in the elderly

    Hehlmann, R.; Walther, B; ZÖLLNER, N.; Wolf, Hans J.; Deinhardt, F; Schmid, M.

    1981-01-01

    Three elderly patients are reported, in whom serologically confirmed recent infectious mononucleosis is followed by fatal lymphoproliferation (case 1), by acute monocytic leukemia (case 2), and by acute probably monocytic leukemia (case 3).

  6. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  8. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  9. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  10. Retinoic acid. Inhibition of the clonal growth of human myeloid leukemia cells.

    Douer, D; Koeffler, H P

    1982-01-01

    Vitamin A and its analogues (retinoids) affect normal and malignant hematopoietic cells. We examined the effect of retinoids on the clonal growth in vitro of myeloid leukemia cells. Retinoic acid inhibited the clonal growth of the KG-1, acute myeloblastic leukemia, and the HL-60, acute promyelocytic leukemia, human cell lines. The KG-1 cells were extremely sensitive to retinoic acid, with 50% of the colonies inhibited by 2.4-nM concentrations of the drug. A 50% growth inhibition of HL-60 was ...

  11. Karyotype complexity and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia

    Stölzel, F.; Mohr, B.; Kramer, M.; Oelschlägel, U; Bochtler, T; Berdel, W E; Kaufmann, M; Baldus, C D; Schäfer-Eckart, K; R. Stuhlmann; Einsele, H; Krause, S W; Serve, H; Hänel, M.; Herbst, R.

    2016-01-01

    A complex aberrant karyotype consisting of multiple unrelated cytogenetic abnormalities is associated with poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The European Leukemia Net classification and the UK Medical Research Council recommendation provide prognostic categories that differ in the definition of unbalanced aberrations as well as the number of single aberrations. The aim of this study on 3526 AML patients was to redefine and validate a cutoff for karyotype complexity...

  12. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Focus on Novel Therapeutic Strategies

    Lin, Tara L.; M. Yair Levy

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcomes. Cytogenetic analysis reveals which patients may have favorable risk disease, but 5-year survival in this category is only approximately 60%, with intermediate and poor risk groups faring far worse. Advances in our understanding of the biology of leukemia pathogenesis and prognosis have not been matched with clinical improvements. Unsatisfactory outcomes persist for the majority of patients with AML, parti...

  13. Vitamin D Protects Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells from Dexamethasone

    Antony, Reuben; Sheng, Xia; Ehsanipour, Ehsan A.; Ng, Emily; Pramanik, Rocky; Klemm, Lars; Ichihara, Brian; Mittelman, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked with increased cancer risk, and vitamin D has been shown to be cytotoxic to some cancer cells in vitro. In the present study we evaluated whether vitamin D would have antiproliferative or cytotoxic effects on human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Contrary to our hypotheses, calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, had no effect on leukemia cell proliferation. Calcitriol actually had a modest effect to impair dexamethasone cytotoxicity and induct...

  14. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Kastner, Philippe; Chan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene. Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia. In particular, Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Its role in T-cell leukemia, however, has been more controversial. While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell l...

  15. Temozolomide and cisplatin in relapsed/refractory acute leukemia

    Rasul Muhammad

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cisplatin depletes MGMT and increases the sensitivity of leukemia cells to temozolomide. We performed a phase I study of cisplatin and temozolomide in patients with relapsed and refractory acute leukemia. Fifteen patients had AML, 3 had ALL, and 2 had biphenotypic leukemia. The median number of prior chemotherapy regimens was 3 (1–5. Treatment was well tolerated up to the maximal doses of temozolomide 200 mg/m2/d times 7 days and cisplatin 100 mg/m2 on day 1. There was one complete remission in this heavily pretreated patient population. Five of 20 (25% patients demonstrated a significant reduction in bone marrow blasts.

  16. Veliparib and Topotecan With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, High-Risk Myelodysplasia, or Aggressive Myeloproliferative Disorders

    2016-04-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative, BCR-ABL1 Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  17. Cytogenetic studies of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Tarek Abd -Alla Atia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML describes as a group of hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by expansion of undifferentiated myeloid progenitors. Acquired chromosomal anomaly particularly reciprocal translocations constitute one of the major events contribute to leukemogenesis. Patient and Methods: 45 untreated, newly diagnosed patients with de novo AML were enrolled in the present study and subjected to cytogenetic analysis. Four ml of heparinized peripheral blood were collected for 72 hours synchronized culture, and then chromosome G- banding analysis was performed using standard methods. The karyotypes were designated according to the International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature (ISCN. The collected data were analyzed statistically. Result: Cytogenetic analysis and karyotype results were obtained in 45 patients with de novo AML. Males constituted 33.3%, and females constituted 66.7% of this group. The patients' age ranged from 17-60 years. Chromosomal anomalies have been detected in 21 out of 45 patients (46.7%. However five different types of chromosome anomalies have been detected; where seven cases (33.3% carrying t(15;17( q22;q21; six cases (28.5% carrying t(8;21(q22;q22; three cases (14.3% had trisomy 8; three cases (14.3% had monosomy 7; and lastly two cases (9.5% carrying inv(3(q21q26. Conclusion: Conventional cytogenetic analysis reliability detects chromosomal abnormalities in AML patients at the time of diagnosis. Chromosomal anomalies detected in Egyptian AML patients, are similar to some extent to those recorded in other areas of the world

  18. Philadelphia Chromosome-positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Lymphoid Blast Crisis.

    Kolenova, Alexandra; Maloney, Kelly W; Hunger, Stephen P

    2016-08-01

    The clinical characteristics of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in lymphoid blast crisis (BC) can resemble those of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph ALL). Because of this, there can be concern as to whether a patient with newly diagnosed Ph leukemia has Ph ALL or CML in lymphoid BC. This distinction has significant potential therapeutic implications because most children with Ph ALL are now treated with chemotherapy plus a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, whereas allogeneic stem cell transplant is usually recommended for any patient with CML that presents in or later develops BC. PMID:27164534

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic leukemia

    The Cancergram covers both acute and chronic leukemia in all of its forms (acute lymphocytic, acute monocytic, acute or sub-acute granulocytic, chronic granulocytic, chronic lymphocytic, chronic monocytic, plasma cell, stem cell, and hairy cell). Other neoplastic conditions of the reticuloendothelial system, lymphatic system, spleen, multiple myeloma, macroglobulinemia and other monoclonal gammopathies are excluded, and will be coveted by other Cancergrams now under development. This Cancergram includes abstracts concerning all clinical aspects of the disease, such as diagnosis and staging, supportive care, evaluation, and therapy. Animal models, tissue culture experiments, carcinogenesis and other pre-clinical studies are generally excluded, except for those considered to have direct clinical relevance

  20. What's New in Adult Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) in Adults Research?

    ... Learn About Cancer » Leukemia - Acute Lymphocytic (ALL) in Adults » Detailed Guide » What’s new in acute lymphocytic leukemia ... What`s New in Leukemia - Acute Lymphocytic (ALL) in Adults Research? TOPICS Document Topics GO » SEE A LIST » ...

  1. Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    2015-12-30

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

  2. The JAK2V617F activating mutation occurs in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, but not in acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Levine, Ross L; Loriaux, Marc; Huntly, Brian J.P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Beran, Miroslav; Stoffregen, Eric; Berger, Roland; Clark, Jennifer J; Willis, Stephanie G; Kim T. Nguyen; Flores, Nikki J.; Estey, Elihu; Gattermann, Norbert; Armstrong, Scott; Look, A. Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Activating mutations in tyrosine kinases have been identified in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic malignancies. Recently, we and others identified a single recurrent somatic activating mutation (JAK2V617F) in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) tyrosine kinase in the myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myeloid metaplasia with myelofibrosis. We used direct sequence analysis to determine if the JAK2V617F mutation was present in acute myeloid leukemia (A...

  3. Esophageal strictures during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Kelly, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal stricture is a rare complication of paediatric cancer treatment that usually occurs after esophageal exposure to radiotherapy. We describe 4 cases of esophageal stricture during chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. All patients presented with refractory vomiting and were diagnosed with radiologic contrast studies. None of the patients had received radiotherapy. Esophageal candidiasis was seen in 2 patients but the remaining 2 patients had earlier systemic candidiasis. High-dose dexamethasone may predispose these children to both esophageal candidiasis and peptic esophagitis. The etiology of esophageal strictures during treatment for acute leukemia is likely to be multifactorial but systemic candidiasis may play a significant role.

  4. Ploidy and clinical characteristics of childhood acute myeloid leukemia

    Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2014-01-01

    We report the first large series (n = 596) of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) focusing on modal numbers (MN) from the population-based NOPHO-AML trials. Abnormal karyotypes were present in 452 cases (76%) and numerical aberrations were present in 40% (n = 237) of all pediatric AML. Among...... with early onset (median age 2 years), female sex (57%), and a dominance of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) (29%). Hypodiploidy constituted 8% of all AML and was associated with older age (median age 9 years), male predominance (60%), FAB M2 (56%), and t(8;21)(q22;q22) (56%) with loss of sex...

  5. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-07-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    ... fluid (CSF, the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord) for examination in a lab. Flow cytometry tests. Using markers on leukemia cells collected from the blood, bone marrow, and/or CSF, doctors can determine the type ...

  7. Dasatinib in high-risk core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: a French Acute Myeloid Leukemia Intergroup trial

    Boissel, Nicolas; Renneville, Aline; Leguay, Thibaut; Lefebvre, Pascale Cornillet; Recher, Christian; Lecerf, Thibaud; Delabesse, Eric; Berthon, Céline; Blanchet, Odile; Prebet, Thomas; Pautas, Cécile; Chevallier, Patrice; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Girault, Stéphane; Bonmati, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia is a favorable acute myeloid leukemia subset cytogenetically defined by t(8;21) or inv(16)/t(16;16) rearrangements, disrupting RUNX1 (previously CBFA/AML1) or CBFB transcription factor functions. The receptor tyrosine kinase KIT is expressed in the vast majority of these acute myeloid leukemias and frequent activating KIT gene mutations have been associated with a higher risk of relapse. This phase II study aimed to evaluate dasatinib as maintenance ...

  8. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Arising in CALR Mutated Essential Thrombocythemia

    Stephen E. Langabeer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in an existing myeloproliferative neoplasm is rare with historical cases unable to differentiate between concomitant malignancies or leukemic transformation. Molecular studies of coexisting JAK2 V617F-positive myeloproliferative neoplasms and mature B cell malignancies indicate distinct disease entities arising in myeloid and lymphoid committed hematopoietic progenitor cells, respectively. Mutations of CALR in essential thrombocythemia appear to be associated with a distinct phenotype and a lower risk of thrombosis yet their impact on disease progression is less well defined. The as yet undescribed scenario of pro-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia arising in CALR mutated essential thrombocythemia is presented. Intensive treatment for the leukemia allowed for expansion of the original CALR mutated clone. Whether CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms predispose to the acquisition of additional malignancies, particularly lymphoproliferative disorders, is not yet known.

  9. Radiolabeled BC8 Antibody, Busulfan, Cyclophosphamide Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in First Remission

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  10. Genetics Home Reference: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA

    ... myelodysplastic syndrome/acute leukemia syndromes: a review and utility for translational investigations. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2014 Mar;1310:111-8. doi: ... 17, 2016 The resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about a ...

  11. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  12. Radiotherapy of the central nervous system in acute leukemia

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a site of occult and overt involvement with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children. Prophylactic treatment of the cranial and spinal meninges can significantly reduce the incidence of CNS relapse. This review addresses the issues associated with the role of radiation therapy in the treatment of the CNS in ALL.20 references

  13. Etiology of common childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: the adrenal hypothesis

    Schmiegelow, K.; Vestergaard, T.; Nielsen, S.M.;

    2008-01-01

    The pattern of infections in the first years of life modulates our immune system, and a low incidence of infections has been linked to an increased risk of common childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We here present a new interpretation of these observations--the adrenal hypothesis...

  14. Pharmacokineties of vincristine monotherapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Groninger, E; Meeuwsen-de Boer, T; Koopmans, P; UGes, D; Sluiter, W; Veerman, A; Kamps, W

    2002-01-01

    We studied vincristine pharmacokinetics in 70 children newly diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, after a single dose of vincristine as monotherapy. Vincristine plasma concentrations were measured by HPLC analysis. A two-compartment, first-order pharmacokinetic model was fitted to the data b

  15. Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in acute myeloid leukemia

    Kampen, Kim R.; ter Elst, Arja; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    This review is designed to provide an overview of the current literature concerning vascular endothelial growth factor signaling (VEGF) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Aberrant VEGF signaling operates in the bone marrow of AML patients and is related to a poor prognosis. The altered signaling pathw

  16. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    W.J.E. Tissing (Wim)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common form of cancer in children, with 110 – 120 newly diagnosed children in the Netherlands each year. ALL is a haematological malignancy of lymphoid precursor cells and can be divided into two sub-groups: B-cell precursor ALL and T-cell p

  17. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Schmiegelow, K.; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe;

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 1980...

  18. Acute myocardial infarction during induction chemotherapy for acute MLL t(4;11) leukemia with lineage switch and extreme leukocytosis

    Čolović Nataša; Bogdanović Andrija; Virijević Marijana; Vidović Ana; Tomin Dragica

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with acute leukemias hemorrhage is the most frequent problem. Vein thrombotic events may appear rarely but arterial thromboses are exceptionally rare. We present a patient with acute leukemia and bilateral deep leg vein thrombosis who developed an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) during induction chemotherapy. The etiology and treatment of AMI in patients with acute leukemia, which is a rare occurrence, is discussed. Case Outline....

  19. A single center analysis of nucleophosmin in acute myeloid leukemia: value of combining immunohistochemistry with molecular mutation analysis.

    Woolthuis, Carolien M; Mulder, André B; Verkaik-Schakel, Rikst Nynke; Rosati, Stefano; Diepstra, Arjan; van den Berg, Eva; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo; Kluin, Philip M; Huls, Gerwin

    2013-10-01

    Mutations of nucleophosmin 1 are frequently found in acute myeloid leukemia and lead to aberrant cytoplasmic accumulation of nucleophosmin protein. Immunohistochemical staining is therefore recommended as the technique of choice in front-line screening. In this study, we assessed the sensitivity and specificity of immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed bone marrow biopsies compared with gold standard molecular analysis to predict nucleophosmin 1 mutation status in 119 patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Discrepant cases were further characterized by gene expression analyses and fluorescence in situ hybridization. A large overlap between both methods was observed. Nevertheless, nine patients demonstrated discordant results at initial screening. Five cases demonstrated nuclear staining of nucleophosmin 1 by immunohistochemistry, but a nucleophosmin 1 mutation by molecular analysis. In two cases this could be attributed to technical issues and in three cases minor subpopulations of myeloblasts had not been discovered initially. All tested cases exhibited the characteristic nucleophosmin-mutated gene expression pattern. Four cases had cytoplasmic nucleophosmin 1 staining and a nucleophosmin-mutated gene expression pattern without a detectable nucleophosmin 1 mutation. In two of these cases we found the chromosomal translocation t(3;5)(q25;q35) encoding the NPM-MLF1 fusion protein. In the other discrepant cases the aberrant cytoplasmic nucleophosmin staining and gene expression could not be explained. In total six patients (5%) had true discordant results between immunohistochemistry and mutation analysis. We conclude that cytoplasmic nucleophosmin localization is not always caused by a conventional nucleophosmin 1 mutation and that in the screening for nucleophosmin 1 abnormalities, most information will be obtained by combining immunohistochemistry with molecular analysis. PMID:23716555

  20. Leukemias

    Riccardo Masetti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood and adolescence cancer, characterized by clonal proliferation of variably differentiated myeloid or lymphoid precursors. Recent insights into the molecular pathogenesis of leukemia have shown that epigenetic modifications, such as deacetylation of histones and DNA methylation, play crucial roles in leukemogenesis, by transcriptional silencing of critical genes. Histone deacetylases (HDACs are potential targets in the treatment of leukaemia, and, as a consequence, inhibitors of HDACs (HDIs are being studied for therapeutic purposes. HDIs promote or enhance several different anticancer mechanisms, such as apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and cellular differentiation and, therefore, are in evidence as promising treatment for children and adolescents with acute leukemia, in monotherapy or in association with other anticancer drugs. Here we review the main preclinical and clinical studies regarding the use of HDIs in treating childhood and adolescence leukemia.

  1. BCL11A expression in acute phase chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Yin, Jiawei; Zhang, Fan; Tao, Huiquan; Ma, Xiao; Su, Guangsong; Xie, Xiaoli; Xu, Zhongjuan; Zheng, Yanwen; Liu, Hong; He, Chao; Mao, Zhengwei Jenny; Wang, Zhiwei; Chang, Weirong; Gale, Robert Peter; Wu, Depei; Yin, Bin

    2016-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has chronic and acute phases. In chronic phase myeloid differentiation is preserved whereas in acute phase myeloid differentiation is blocked. Acute phase CML resembles acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Chronic phase CML is caused by BCR-ABL1. What additional mutation(s) cause transition to acute phase is unknown and may differ in different persons with CML. BCL11A encodes a transcription factor and is aberrantly-expressed in several haematological and solid neoplasms. We analyzed BCL11A mRNA levels in subjects with chronic and acute phase CML. BCL11A transcript levels were increased in subjects with CML in acute phase compared with those in normals and in subjects in chronic phase including some subjects studied in both phases. BCL11A mRNA levels were correlated with percent bone marrow blasts and significantly higher in lymphoid versus myeloid blast crisis. Differentiation of K562 with butyric acid, a CML cell line, decreased BCL11A mRNA levels. Cytology and flow cytometry analyses showed that ectopic expression of BCL11A in K562 cells blocked differentiation. These data suggest BCL11A may operate in transformation of CML from chronic to acute phase in some persons. PMID:27285855

  2. Oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A review

    Kadalagere Lakshmana Girish Babu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia is a malignancy of the bone marrow and blood. It is the most common childhood cancer in India. Advances in the treatment regimens have greatly increased the chances of survival. Both the disease and its treatment change the oral environment. In some cases, oral manifestations are the presenting feature of the disease and it will be the dentist′s responsibility to identify the underlying disorder and guide the diagnosis of the patient. Hence, the aim of present article is to review the literature concerning the oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL.

  3. Radiation treatment of testicular relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Ten patients with testicular relapse among 128 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are reported. At the time of the initial diagnosis of leukemia all patients with later testicular relapse showed one or more risk factors as predictive for leukemic infiltration of the testicles. All patients except one, who underwent orchiectomy and died 11 weeks after surgical intervention, received radiation therapy with doses ranging from 12 to 20 Gy and chemotherapy. The local control was excellent. Average survival time from testicular relapse to death was 68 weeks in 8 of 9 patients treated by irradiation and chemotherapy. One patient is still alive without signs of disease after 6 years. (orig.)

  4. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2016-07-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  5. Pleural effusion as the initial extramedullary manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/PEKat0

    José Nieves-Nieves

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Leukemias rarely debut by pleural involvement as the first manifestation of the hematologic malignancy. This complication is most commonly seen in solid tumors such as carcinomas of the breast, lung, gastrointestinal tract and lymphomas. We present a case of a 66 year old male who presented with a pleural leukemic infiltration of his undiagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia that was not a complication of the disease extension, but the acute presentation of the illness. Progressive shortness of breath for two weeks, cough, clear sputum and weight loss were the initial complaints. Serum dyscrasia suggested a hematologic abnormality. A chest x-ray performed demonstrated a buildup of fluid with layering in the left pleural cavity. Diagnostic thoracentesis suggested an exudative etiology with cytology remarkable for 62% leukemic myeloblast. The diagnosis was confirmed by bone marrow biopsy with expression of the antigens CD 34+ and CD13+, with unfavorable cytogenetic prognosis and a trisomy 21 chromosomal defect. Chemotherapy was initiated, though no remission achieved with induction chemotherapy. Complications and disease progression precludes in the patient’s death. Although rare, due to the unusual presentation of the disease, this case clearly demonstrates the importance of biochemical analysis and cytopathology specimens obtained in pleural fluid.

  6. Acute Hepatitis A Induction of Precursor B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Causal Relationship?

    Senadhi, V.; Emuron, D.; R. Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Background Precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia accounts for 2% of all lymphoid neoplasms in the United States and occurs most frequently in childhood, but can also occur in adults with a median age of 39 years. It is more commonly seen in males and in Caucasians. Case Report We present a case of a 51-year-old Caucasian female with the development of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia after suffering acute hepatitis A 4 weeks prior to her diagnosis. She presented with mala...

  7. Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins

    Larson, R.A.; LeBeau, M.M.; Vardiman, J.W.; Rowley, J.D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-12-01

    One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase 11, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11 q23 or 21 q22. The MLL gene at 11 q23 or the AML1 gene at 21 q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 1 1 q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11 q23 or 21 q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

  8. The acute lymphoblastic leukemia of Down Syndrome - Genetics and pathogenesis.

    Izraeli, Shai

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down Syndrome (DS) are at markedly increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ALL is of B cell precursor (BCP) phenotype. T-ALL is only rarely diagnosed as well as infant leukemia. Gene expression profiling and cytogenetics suggest that DS-ALL is an heterogeneous disease. More than half of the leukemias are characterized by aberrant expression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor CRLF2 caused by genomic rearrangements. These rearrangements are often associated with somatic activating mutations in the receptors or in the downstream components of the JAK-STAT pathway. The activation of JAK-STAT pathway suggests that targeted therapy with JAK or downstream inhibitors may be effective for children with DS-ALL. The basis of the increased risk of BCP-ALL and in particular of the CRLF2 aberrations is presently unknown. Neither is it known which genes on the trisomic chromosome 21 are involved. PMID:26631987

  9. Side effects of treatment in childhood acute leukemia, 2

    We evaluated delayed neurotoxicities in treatment of childhood acute leukemia. Of 28 patients treated over 2 years who were examined on computed tomography of brain scans, 7 patients had abnormal findings. These abnormalities included two cases of leukoencephalopathy, three cases of intracranial calcifications, and two of ventricular dilatation. These patients were under 6 years old at the onset of disease, especially under 3 years old. Also, delayed neurotoxicities developed after relapse of leukemia, especially CNS relapse. It was considered that these were caused by cranial irradiation, intravenous methotrexate injection, intrathecal methotrexate, and sometimes high-dose Ara-C therapy, etc. Most of the cases of leukoencephalopathy were associated with treatment of intermediate-dose or high-dose methotrexate after relapse. These abnormalities must be carefully considered in the treatment of younger children with leukemia and patients with relapse. (author)

  10. Aberrant Phenotype in Iranian Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Mehdi Jahedi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of aberrant phenotypes and possible prognostic value in peripheral and bone marrow blood mononuclear cells of Iranian patients with AML. Methods: 56 cases of de novo AML (2010-2012 diagnosed by using an acute panel of monoclonal antibodies by multiparametric flowcytometry. Immunophenotyping was done on fresh bone marrow aspirate and/or peripheral blood samples using the acute panel of MoAbs is stained with Phycoerythrin (PE /fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC, Allophycocyanin (APC and Peridinin-chlorophyll protein complex (perCP. We investigated Co-expression of lymphoid-associated markers CD2, CD3, CD7, CD 10, CD19, CD20 and CD22 in myeloblasts. Results: Out of the 56 cases, 32 (57.1% showed AP. CD7 was positive in 72.7% of cases in M1 and 28.5% in M2 but M3 and M4 cases lacked this marker. We detected CD2 in 58.35 of M1cases, 21.40% of M2 cases, 33.3 of M3 and 20% of M5; but M4 patients lacked this marker. The CBC analysis demonstrated a wide range of haemoglobin concentration, Platelet and WBC count which varied from normal to anaemia, thrombocytopenia to thrombocytosis and leukopenia to hyper leukocytosis. Conclusions: Our findings showed that CD7 and CD2 were the most common aberrant marker in Iranian patients with AML. However, we are not find any significant correlation between aberrant phenotype changing and MRD in our population. Taken together, this findings help to provide new insights in to the investigation of other aberrant phenotypes that may play roles in diagnosis and therapeutic of AML.

  11. Spectrum of acute and chronic leukemia at a tertiary care hospital, Haryana, India

    Gajender Singh; Padam Parmar; Sant Prakash Kataria; Sunita Singh; Rajeev Sen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leukemias are primary neoplasms arising from the malignant proliferations of blood cells or their precursors. Leukemias are classified into acute/chronic myeloid and lymphoid subtype. Typing of leukemia is essential for effective therapy because prognosis and survival rate are different for each type and sub-type. Methods: A total of 356 patients diagnosed to have acute/chronic leukemia were included in our study. Only newly diagnosed cases were included in this study and patie...

  12. Prevalence of transient hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus in pediatric patients with acute leukemia

    Banihashem, A; Ghasemi, A.; N. Ghaemi; Moazzen, N; Amirabadi, A

    2014-01-01

    Background The most common malignancy of children is Leukemia, accounting approximately one third of cancer diagnosis. Available data demonstrate improvement in survival of pediatric leukemia, so evaluation of side effects of treatment is very important. This study investigates hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus prevalence in pediatric patients with acute leukemia. Materials and Methods This study was performed in children with acute leukemia. At the first admission, demographic data was col...

  13. Dronabinol has preferential antileukemic activity in acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia with lymphoid differentiation patterns

    Kampa-Schittenhelm, Kerstin Maria; Salitzky, Olaf; Akmut, Figen; Illing, Barbara; Kanz, Lothar; Salih, Helmut Rainer; Schittenhelm, Marcus Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been previously demonstrated in several cancer models, that Dronabinol (THC) may have anti-tumor activity – however, controversial data exists for acute leukemia. We have anecdotal evidence that THC may have contributed to disease control in a patient with acute undifferentiated leukemia. Methods To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the antileukemic efficacy of THC in several leukemia cell lines and native leukemia blasts cultured ex vivo. Expression analysis for the CB1/2 ...

  14. Rationale for an international consortium to study inherited genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Sherborne, Amy L.; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv; Bartram, Claus R.; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Petridou, Eleni; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Szalai, Csaba; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Healy, Jasmine; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo; Indaco, Stefania; El-Ghouroury, Eman A; Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Hongeng, Suradej; Pakakasama, Samart; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ugarte, Evelia L.; Leal, Valeria P.; Espinoza, Juan P.M.; Kamel, Azza M.; Ebid, Gamal T.A.; Radwan, Eman R.; Yalin, Serap; Yalin, Erdinc; Berkoz, Mehmet; Simpson, Jill; Roman, Eve; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hosking, Fay J.; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. To date most association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been based on the candidate gene approach and have evaluated a restricted number of polymorphisms. Such studies have served to highlight difficulties in conducting statistically and methodologically rigorous investigations into acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Recent genome-wide association studies of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have provided robust evidence that common variation at four genetic loci confers a modest increase in risk. The accumulated experience to date and relative lack of success of initial efforts to identify novel acute lymphoblastic leukemia predisposition loci emphasize the need for alternative study designs and methods. The International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Genetics Consortium includes 12 research groups in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas engaged in studying the genetics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The initial goal of this consortium is to identify and characterize low-penetrance susceptibility variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia through association-based analyses. Efforts to develop genome-wide association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in terms of both sample size and single nucleotide polymorphism coverage, and to increase the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms taken forward to large-scale replication should lead to the identification of additional novel risk variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ethnic differences in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well recognized and thus in assessing the interplay between inherited and non-genetic risk factors, analyses using different population cohorts with different incidence rates are likely to be highly informative. Given that the frequency of many acute lymphoblastic leukemia subgroups is small, identifying differential effects will realistically only be

  15. FLT3 mutations in canine acute lymphocytic leukemia

    FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is a commonly mutated protein in a variety of human acute leukemias. Mutations leading to constitutively active FLT3, including internal tandem duplications of the juxtamembrane domain (ITD), result in continuous cellular proliferation, resistance to apoptotic cell death, and a poorer prognosis. A better understanding of the molecular consequences of FLT3 activation would allow improved therapeutic strategies in these patients. Canine lymphoproliferative diseases, including lymphoma and acute leukemias, share evolutionarily conserved chromosomal aberrations and exhibit conserved mutations within key oncogenes when compared to their human counterparts. A small percentage of canine acute lymphocytic leukemias (ALL) also exhibit FLT3 ITD mutations. We molecularly characterized FLT3 mutations in two dogs and one cell line, by DNA sequencing, gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time PCR, and sensitivity to the FLT3 inhibitor lestaurtinib via in vitro proliferation assays. FLT 3 and downstream mediators of FLT3 activation were assessed by Western blotting. The canine B-cell leukemia cell line, GL-1, and neoplastic cells from 2/7 dogs diagnosed cytologically with ALL were found to have FLT3 ITD mutations and FLT3 mRNA up-regulation. Lestaurtinib, a small molecule FLT3 inhibitor, significantly inhibited the growth of GL-1 cells, while not affecting the growth of two other canine lymphoid cell lines without the FLT3 mutation. Finally, western blots were used to confirm the conserved downstream mediators of FLT3 activating mutations. These results show that ALL and FLT3 biology is conserved between canine and human patients, supporting the notion that canine ALL, in conjunction with the GL-1 cell line, will be useful in the development of a relevant large animal model to aid in the study of human FLT3 mutant leukemias

  16. A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with an intracerebellar mass

    A 3-year-old boy, who had a complaint of hemorrhagic diathesis, was diagnosed as having acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Remission was induced by a combination of vincristine and prednisolone. Prophylactic intrathecal methotrexate and cranial irradiation were administered. Two years later, he was hospitalized for CNS leukemia and treated with multiple doses of intrathecal methotrexate. At the time, the results of CT scanning were normal. Six months later, though, he developed vomiting and lethargy. CT scanning showed a mass of an increased density in the right cerebellar hemisphere that displaced the fourth ventricle to the left and resulted in an obstructive hydrocephalus. Decompression was done by means of Ommaya reservoir setting. Soon his consciousness returned to normal, and CT scanning revealed no abnormal mass three weeks later. A month later, though, the CNS leukemia returned. He developed vomiting and a headache, and CT scanning showed a high-density mass in the right cerebellar hemisphere. The mass was diagnosed as hematoma. He died one month later. In this case, the previous mass showed evidence of a relatively uniform contrast enhancement, which is consistent with the intracerebral leukemic mass reported by Wendling. In Japan, this is the first report of an intracerebellar mass of acute lymphoblastic leukemia as perceived by CT scanning. (author)

  17. Acute parotitis during induction therapy including L-asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Sica, S; Pagano, L; Salutari, P; Di Mario, A; Rutella, S; Leone, G

    1994-02-01

    In a patient affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and subjected to therapy with Erwinia L-asparaginase, acute parotitis was observed. Microbiological studies excluded any infectious etiology. Regression of parotitis was spontaneous. This complication has not been previously reported and could be due to the same mechanism of pancreatic injury. The occurrence of acute parotitis needs to be promptly recognized in order to avoid the continuation of L-asparaginase. PMID:8148421

  18. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a child with fanconi's anaemia

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder with progressive bone marrow failure, associated congenital malformation and solid and haematological malignancies. Acute myeloid leukemia is the commonest haematological malignancy followed by myelodysplastic syndrome in children with FA. FA transformed into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a rare phenomenon and one of the rarest haematological malignancies associated with this disorder. We are reporting a 13 years old girl with FA and positive chromosomal breakage. She required regular blood product transfusion. She was planned for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) but the sibling-matched donor was found to have chromosomal breaks as well. Later on, her peripheral smear showed blast cell. Bone marrow showed pre-B ALL. She was started on chemotherapy but died shortly due to complications of the treatment. For this rare condition conservative management is indeed essential, however, safe and appropriate chemotherapy regimen is needed. (author)

  19. New decision support tool for acute lymphoblastic leukemia classification

    Madhukar, Monica; Agaian, Sos; Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we build up a new decision support tool to improve treatment intensity choice in childhood ALL. The developed system includes different methods to accurately measure furthermore cell properties in microscope blood film images. The blood images are exposed to series of pre-processing steps which include color correlation, and contrast enhancement. By performing K-means clustering on the resultant images, the nuclei of the cells under consideration are obtained. Shape features and texture features are then extracted for classification. The system is further tested on the classification of spectra measured from the cell nuclei in blood samples in order to distinguish normal cells from those affected by Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. The results show that the proposed system robustly segments and classifies acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on complete microscopic blood images.

  20. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia with increased hematogones in children.

    Anton-Harisi, Marieta; Douna, Varvara; Baka, Margarita; Servitzoglou, Marina; Kosmidis, Helen V; Georgouli, Helen; Anastasiou, Theodora

    2012-11-01

    We describe 2 patients, a 4-month-old male and a 17-month-old female, with de novo acute megakaryoblastic leukemia with increased number of hematogones at diagnosis. Both children were admitted in the hospital with thrombocytopenia. The bone marrow smears in the first child revealed the presence of 60% cells with morphologic features consistent with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia. In the other, the initial bone marrow aspirate was dry tap but on the following aspirate 10% cells with lymphoblastic morphology could be seen. The bone marrow flow cytometry showed the presence of hematogones-38% in the first case and 20% in the second-with absence of blasts. Repeated bone marrow aspirates, trephines, and immunophenotypic as well as molecular studies, confirmed the diagnosis of M7. Both children were treated according to the Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster 2004 protocol. PMID:22983420

  1. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    ... Z. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia: novel insights into the mechanisms of cure. Nat Rev Cancer. 2010 Nov;10( ... with a qualified healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Contact Us Selection Criteria for Links ...

  2. New Fusion Transcripts Identified in Normal Karyotype Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Hongxiu Wen; Yongjin Li; Malek, Sami N.; Kim, Yeong C.; Jia Xu; Peixian Chen; Fengxia Xiao; Xin Huang; Xianzheng Zhou; Zhenyu Xuan; Shiva Mankala; Guihua Hou; Rowley, Janet D.; Zhang, Michael Q; San Ming Wang

    2012-01-01

    Genetic aberrations contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, half of AML cases do not contain the well-known aberrations detectable mostly by cytogenetic analysis, and these cases are classified as normal karyotype AML. Different outcomes of normal karyotype AML suggest that this subgroup of AML could be genetically heterogeneous. But lack of genetic markers makes it difficult to further study this subgroup of AML. Using paired-end RNAseq method, we performed a transcriptome analy...

  3. The clinically relevant pharmacogenomic changes in acute myelogenous leukemia

    Emadi, Ashkan; Karp, Judith E.

    2012-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is an extremely heterogeneous neoplasm with several clinical, pathological, genetic and molecular subtypes. Combinations of various doses and schedules of cytarabine and different anthracyclines have been the mainstay of treatment for all forms of AMLs in adult patients. Although this combination, with the addition of an occasional third agent, remains effective for treatment of some young-adult patients with de novo AML, the prognosis of AML secondary to myel...

  4. A robust xenotransplantation model for acute myeloid leukemia

    Sanchez, PV; Perry, RL; Sarry, JE; Perl, AE; Murphy, K.; Swider, CR; Bagg, A; Choi, JK; Biegel, JA; Danet-Desnoyers, G; Carroll, M.

    2009-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in immunocompromised animals has been critical for defining leukemic stem cells. However, existing immunodeficient strains of mice have short life spans and low levels of AML cell engraftment, hindering long-term evaluation of primary human AML biology. A recent study suggested that NOD/LtSz-scid IL2Rγc null (NSG) mice have enhanced AML cell engraftment, but this relied on technically challenging neonatal injections. Here, we performed...

  5. Functional Integration of Acute Myeloid Leukemia into the Vascular Niche

    Cogle, Christopher R.; Goldman, Devorah C.; Madlambayan, Gerard J; Leon, Ronald P.; Masri, Azzah Al; Clark, Hilary A.; Asbaghi, Steven A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Dunlap, Jennifer; Fan, Guang; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Liu, Qiuying; Meacham, Amy; Hamlin, Kimberly L.; Hromas, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are a critical component of the hematopoietic microenvironment that regulates blood cell production. Recent studies suggest the existence of functional cross-talk between hematologic malignancies and vascular endothelium. Here, we show that human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) localizes to the vasculature in both patients and in a xenograft model. A significant number of vascular tissue-associated AML cells (V-AML) integrate into vasculature in vivo and can fuse with ...

  6. Recent advances in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Levine, Ross L.

    2010-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a disorder with significant molecular and clinical heterogeneity. Although there have been clear advances in the identification of somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations present in the malignant cells of patients with AML, translating this knowledge into an integrated view with an impact on the clinical treatment of AML has been slower to evolve. Recent clinical advances in the treatment of AML include studies demonstrating the benefit of dose-intense dauno...

  7. Minimal Residual Disease Assessment in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Thörn, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, response to treatment in hematological malignancies is evaluated by light microscopy of bone marrow (BM) smears, but due to more effective therapies more sensitive methods are needed. Today, detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) using immunological and molecular techniques can be 100 times more sensitive than morphology. The main aim of this thesis was to compare and evaluate three currently available MRD methods in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL): (i) real-t...

  8. Estimation of physical development of children at acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    The problem of the work is data of 124 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Hodgkin's disease after combination treatment.The objective of the work is to detect physical stature of children after cancer therapy in children and comparison of their antropometrical data before and after therapy.The possibility of detection of combination therapy's influence on physical stature of children in remission was shown. (authors)

  9. Chromosome aberrations and environmental exposures in acute leukemia

    Lindquist, Ragnhild Rosengren

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this thesis are to evaluate the role of environmental exposures, especially professional exposure to organic solvents and petroleum products in the etiology of acute leukemia and to investigate if there is a correlation between the exposure to a specific leukemogen factor and a clonal chromosome aberration of the leukemic cells. Papers I and II present results of a case-control study of environmental exposures, in all occupations during life-time, medical treatm...

  10. Prognostic significance of cell surface phenotype in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Shiek Aejaz Aziz; Susheel Kumar Sharma; Iram Sabah; M Aleem Jan

    2015-01-01

    Context: To find out the phenotypic character of lymphoblasts of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients in our study cohort and their possible effect on the prognosis. Aims: To investigate the phenotype in ALL in our demographic population and to prognosticate various upfront current protocols employed in our hospital. Settings and Design: The study spanned over a period of 4 years with retrospective and prospective data of January 2008 through December 2011. Materials and Methods: 159 p...