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Sample records for acute mucosal pathogenesis

  1. Acute mucosal pathogenesis of feline immunodeficiency virus is independent of viral dose in vaginally infected cats

    Egan Erin A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mucosal pathogenesis of HIV has been shown to be an important feature of infection and disease progression. HIV-1 infection causes depletion of intestinal lamina propria CD4+ T cells (LPL, therefore, intestinal CD4+ T cell preservation may be a useful correlate of protection in evaluating vaccine candidates. Vaccine studies employing the cat/FIV and macaque/SIV models frequently use high doses of parenterally administered challenge virus to ensure high plasma viremia in control animals. However, it is unclear if loss of mucosal T cells would occur regardless of initial viral inoculum dose. The objective of this study was to determine the acute effect of viral dose on mucosal leukocytes and associated innate and adaptive immune responses. Results Cats were vaginally inoculated with a high, middle or low dose of cell-associated and cell-free FIV. PBMC, serum and plasma were assessed every two weeks with tissues assessed eight weeks following infection. We found that irrespective of mucosally administered viral dose, FIV infection was induced in all cats. However, viremia was present in only half of the cats, and viral dose was unrelated to the development of viremia. Importantly, regardless of viral dose, all cats experienced significant losses of intestinal CD4+ LPL and CD8+ intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL. Innate immune responses by CD56+CD3- NK cells correlated with aviremia and apparent occult infection but did not protect mucosal T cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in viremic cats were more likely to produce cytokines in response to Gag stimulation, whereas aviremic cats T cells tended to produce cytokines in response to Env stimulation. However, while cell-mediated immune responses in aviremic cats may have helped reduce viral replication, they could not be correlated to the levels of viremia. Robust production of anti-FIV antibodies was positively correlated with the magnitude of viremia. Conclusions Our results indicate

  2. Gastroprotective activity of Nigella sativa L oil and its constituent, thymoquinone against acute alcohol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats

    Kanter, Mehmet; Demir, Halit; Karakaya, Cengiz; Ozbek, Hanefi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathogenesis of acute ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions and the effect of Nigella sativa L oil (NS) and its constituent thymoquinone (TQ) in an exper-imental model.

  3. Acute pancreatitis: Etiology and common pathogenesis

    Guo-Jun Wang; Chun-Fang Gao; Dong Wei; Cun Wang; Si-Qin Ding

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The etiology and pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have been intensively investigated for centuries worldwide. Many causes of acute pancreatitis have been discovered, but the pathogenetic theories are controversial. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstone impacting the distal common bile-pancreatic duct. The majority of investigators accept that the main factors for acute billiary pancreatitis are pancreatic hyperstimulation and bile-pancreatic duct obstruction which increase pancreatic duct pressure and active trypsin reflux. Acute pancreatitis occurs when intracellular protective mechanisms to prevent trypsinogen activation or reduce trypsin activity are overwhelmed. However, little is known about the other acute pancreatitis. We hypothesize that acute biliary pancreatitis and other causes of acute pancreatitis possess a common pathogenesis. Pancreatic hyperstimulation and pancreatic duct obstruction increase pancreatic duct pressure, active trypsin reflux, and subsequent unregulated activation of trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells. Enzyme activation within the pancreas leads to auto-digestion of the gland and local inflammation. Once the hypothesis is confirmed, traditional therapeutic strategies against acute pancreatitis may be improved. Decompression of pancreatic duct pressure should be advocated in the treatment of acute pancreatitits which may greatly improve its outcome.

  4. Mucosal transmission and pathogenesis of chronic wasting disease in ferrets.

    Perrott, Matthew R; Sigurdson, Christina J; Mason, Gary L; Hoover, Edward A

    2013-02-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) of cervids is almost certainly transmitted by mucosal contact with the causative prion, whether by direct (animal-to-animal) or indirect (environmental) means. Yet the sites and mechanisms of prion entry remain to be further understood. This study sought to extend this understanding by demonstrating that ferrets exposed to CWD via several mucosal routes developed infection, CWD prion protein (PrP(CWD)) amplification in lymphoid tissues, neural invasion and florid transmissible spongiform encephalopathy lesions resembling those in native cervid hosts. The ferrets developed extensive PrP(CWD) accumulation in the nervous system, retina and olfactory epithelium, with lesser deposition in tongue, muscle, salivary gland and the vomeronasal organ. PrP(CWD) accumulation in mucosal sites, including upper respiratory tract epithelium, olfactory epithelium and intestinal Peyer's patches, make the shedding of prions by infected ferrets plausible. It was also observed that regionally targeted exposure of the nasopharyngeal mucosa resulted in an increased attack rate when compared with oral exposure. The latter finding suggests that nasal exposure enhances permissiveness to CWD infection. The ferret model has further potential for investigation of portals for initiation of CWD infection. PMID:23100363

  5. Pathogenesis of acute lung injury in severe acute pancreatitis

    SHI Lei; YUE Yuan; ZHANG Mei; PAN Cheng-en

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To study the pathogenesis of acute lung injury in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Methods:Rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, 6, 9 and 12 h after establishment of inducing model. Pancreas and lung tissues were obtained for pathological study, microvascular permeability and MPO examination. Gene expressions of TNF-α and ICAM-1 in pancreas and lung tissues were detected by RT-PCR. Results:After inducing SAP model, the injury degree of the pancreas and the lung increased gradually, accompanied with gradually increased MPO activity and microvascular permeability. Gene expressions of TNF-α and ICAM-1 in pancreas rose at 1 h and reached peak at 7 h. Relatively, their gene expressions in the lungs only rose slightly at 1 h and reached peak at 9-12 h gradually. Conclusion:There is an obvious time window between SAP and lung injury, when earlier protection is beneficial to prevent development of acute lung injury.

  6. Pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    ZHANG Ding-mei; LU Jia-hai; ZHONG Nan-shan

    2008-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) first emerged in Guangdong province,China in November2002.During the following 3 months,it spread rapidly across the world,resulting in approximately 800 deaths.In 2004,subsequent sporadic cases emerged in Singapore and China.A novel coronavims,SARS-CoV,was identified as the etiological agent of SARS.1,2 This virus belongs to a family of large,positive,single-stranded RNA viruses.Nevertheless,genomic characterization shows that the SARS-CoV is only moderately related to other known coronaviruses.3 In contrast with previously described coronaviruses,SARS-CoV infection typically causes severe symptoms related to the lower respiratory tract.The SARS-CoV genome includes 14 putative open reading frames encoding 28 potential proteins,and the functions of many of these proteins are not known.4 A number of complete and partial autopsies of SARS patients have been reported since the first outbreak in 2003.The predominant pathological finding in these cases was diffuse alveolar damage (DAD).This severe pulmonary injury of SARS patients is caused both by direct viral effects and immunopathogenetic factors.5 Many important aspects of the pathogenesis of SARS have not yet been fully clarified.In this article,we summarize the most important mechanisms involved in the complex pathogenesis of SARS,including clinical characters,host and receptors,immune system response and genetic factors.

  7. Oral mucositis in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Pels, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Oral mucositis is the most commonly reported side effect observed in neoplastic patients treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy of the head and neck region as well as in patients who have received a haematopoietic stem cell transplant. The aim of the study was to assess the oral mucosa status in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) during antineoplastic therapy. Material and methods The clinical examination included 78 children aged 2-18 with ALL. The clinica...

  8. the Pathogenesis of acute on Chronic Hepatitis B liver Failure

    Zhao-chun Chi; Quan-jiang Dong; Chang-xin Geng

    2014-01-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure is a characteristic clinical liver syndrome, which should be differentiated from acute liver failure, acute decompensated liver cirrhosis and chronic liver failure. The pathogenesis of ACLF is not fully understood yet. Viral factors and immune injury have been reported to be the two major pathogenesis. This paper reviewed the researches on the pathogenesis of acute on chronic hepatitis B liver failure in recent years, to provide theoretical basis for prompt and accurate diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome. This would beneift for the prognosis and raise the survival rate of patients.

  9. MOLECULAR PATHOGENESIS OF SECONDARY ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Neil Osheroff

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Balanced chromosomal translocations that generate chimeric oncoproteins are considered to be initiating lesions in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. The most frequent is the t(15;17(q22;q21, which fuses the PML and RARA genes, giving rise to acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. An increasing proportion of APL cases are therapy-related (t-APL, which develop following exposure to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapeutic agents that target DNA topoisomerase II (topoII, particularly mitoxantrone and epirubicin. To gain insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of the t(15;17 we mapped the translocation breakpoints in a series of t-APLs, which revealed significant clustering according the nature of the drug exposure. Remarkably, in approximately half of t-APL cases arising following mitoxantrone treatment for breast carcinoma or multiple sclerosis, the chromosome 15 breakpoint fell within an 8-bp “hotspot” region in PML intron 6, which was confirmed to be a preferential site of topoII-mediated DNA cleavage induced by mitoxantrone.  Chromosome 15 breakpoints falling outside the “hotspot”, and the corresponding RARA breakpoints were also shown to be functional topoII cleavage sites. The observation that particular regions of the PML and RARA loci are susceptible to topoII-mediated DNA damage induced by epirubicin and mitoxantrone may underlie the propensity of these agents to cause APL.

     

  10. Depletion of mucosal substance P in acute otitis media

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Schmidt, Peter Thelin; Hermansson, Ann; Holst, Jens Juul; Thomsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The neuropeptide substance P (SP) is an inducer of neurogenic inflammation and bone resorption in the middle ear. Resorption of the bone tissue structures surrounding the middle ear cavity is a distinct feature of the initial stage of acute otitis media (AOM), which may be due to nerve...... fiber release of SP. MATERIAL AND METHODS: To investigate possible release of SP in the middle ear mucosa during AOM, we used a well-established rat model of AOM caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. Following tissue extraction on Days 1, 3 and 6 post-inoculation, the mucosal concentration of SP was...... measured using a radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: Compared to sham-inoculated control ears, the concentration of SP was significantly reduced on Day 1 and even further reduced on Day 3, whereas partial replenishment was found on Day 6. CONCLUSION: SP seems to be depleted in the rat middle ear mucosa in the...

  11. Pathogenesis and prognostication in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Zuckerman, Tsila; Rowe, Jacob M.

    2014-01-01

    The process of lymphoid maturation is tightly controlled by the hierarchical activation of transcription factors and selection through functional signal transduction. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represents a group of B/T-precursor-stage lymphoid cell malignancies arising from genetic alterations that block lymphoid differentiation and drive aberrant cell proliferation and survival. With recent advances in next-generation sequencing, we are discovering new mutations affecting normal lym...

  12. Current concept of pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis

    Xie Ning Wu

    2000-01-01

    @@ The pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis is very complicated. It is a multifactorial as well as multifaceted disease. First of all, the etiologic agents initiate the pancreatic acinar injury by release of pancreatic enzymes and overstimulation of macrophages and neutrophils, then the cytokines and inflammatory mediators are liberated. There is also interaction between neutrophils and endothelial cells producing free radicals, the cytokines cause increasing vascular permeability, activating complement component, resulting in microcirculatory impairment and imbalance of thrombo-fibrinolytic system. Many of these events occur not only in the pancreas itself, but also in the other vital organs and tissues, leading to severe acute pancreatitis and complications. The sequencial events are as follows.

  13. Pathogenesis of pancreatic encephalopathy in severe acute pancreatitis

    Xi-Ping Zhang; Hua Tian

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreatic encephalopathy (PE) is a serious complication of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). In recent years, more and more PE cases have been reported worldwide, and the onset PE in the early stage was regarded as a poor prognosis sign of SAP, but the pathogenesis of PE in SAP still has not been clariifed in the past decade. The purpose of this review is to elucidate the possible pathogenesis of PE in SAP. DATA SOURCES:The English-language literature concern-ing PE in this review came from the Database of MEDLINE (period of 1991-2005), and the keywords of severe acute pancreatitis and pancreatic encephalopathy were used in the searching. RESULTS:Many factors were involved in the pathogenesis of PE in SAP. Pancreatin activation, excessive release of cytokines and oxygen free radicals, microcirculation abnormalities of hemodynamic disturbance, ET-1/NO ratio, hypoxemia, bacterial infection, water and electrolyte imbalance, and vitamin B1 deifciency participated in the development of PE in SAP. CONCLUSIONS:The pathogenesis of PE in SAP has not yet been fully understood. The development of PE in SAP may be a multi-factor process. To ifnd out the possible inducing factor is essential to the clinical management of PE in SAP.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated disruption of mucosal barriers and its role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis of HIV/AIDS disease.

    Tugizov, Sharof

    2016-01-01

    Oral, intestinal and genital mucosal epithelia have a barrier function to prevent paracellular penetration by viral, bacterial and other pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HIV can overcome these barriers by disrupting the tight and adherens junctions of mucosal epithelia. HIV-associated disruption of epithelial junctions may also facilitate paracellular penetration and dissemination of other viral pathogens. This review focuses on possible molecular mechanisms of HIV-associated disruption of mucosal epithelial junctions and its role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis of HIV and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:27583187

  15. Acute effects of high-dose intragastric nicotine on mucosal defense mechanisms

    Lindell, G; Bukhave, Klaus; Lilja, I; Madsen, J. Rask; Graffner, H

    1997-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is overrepresented among smokers; they also heal slowly and relapse frequently. Data are accumulating that smoking is detrimental to gastroduodenal mucosal cytoprotection. This study was designed to assess acute effects of high-dose intragastric nicotine, as it has been shown...

  16. Acute mucosal reactions in patients with advanced head and neck cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    We conducted a clinical study to analyze the acute reactions in the oral cavity and the oropharyngeal (OCOPH) mucosa in patients with advanced head and neck cancer (HNC) undergoing a definitive treatment consisted of 3-D conformal radiotherapy combined with concomitant chemotherapy. Twenty nine patients with HNC who were treated between February 2008 and October 2009 were included in the study. The median age was 55 years (range 29-70). The site distribution was as follows: oropharynx, 20.7%; hypopharynx, 41.4%; larynx, 37.9%. The radiation technique used for 3-D conformal radiotherapy was named 'oblique photon fields' technique. The OCOPH mucosa as a critical normal tissue was delineated in every patient. Extraction of planning target volume (PTV50) from the volume of OCOPH mucosa led to formation of an OCOPH mucosa with extracted PTV50 (OCOPHEx mucosa). Acute mucosal reactions were recorded using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading system. The duration of a maximum grade of reaction was also recorded. A time intensity parameter, so-called Severity-Time Units (STU), quantifying the area under the acute reaction curve, was used to express the intensity of mucositis over time in every patient. Grade 3 acute mucosal reaction was manifested in 19 patients (65.5%). The median duration of confluent mucositis was 21 days (range 14-35). The STU less than 1000 mm2 and the STU more than 1500 mm2 was calculated in equal number of patients (9 patients, or 31.0%). Statistically significant difference in the distribution of the grade 3 reaction was found among patients with different site of the primary tumor (p = 0.003). Statistically significant difference was found between the grade of the acute mucositis and the volume of OCOPHEx mucosa, the dose in 50% of the volume of OCOPHEx (D50%, OCOPHEx) mucosa, and the mean dose to OCOPHEx mucosa (p = 0.02, p = 0.0002, p = 0.00001, respectively). The tested relation between STU and delineated volumes (PTV50 and OCOPHEx

  17. Mucosal Immunity and acute viral gastroenteritis: The example rotavirus

    Rose, Markus A

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a major killer of the very young worldwide. Rotavirus is the most common intestinal virus, causing acute gastroenteritis and extra-intestinal complications especially in young and chronically ill subjects. As early as 1991, the WHO recommended as high priority the development of a vaccine against rotavirus, the major pathogen causing enteric infections. Since the introduction of rotavirus vaccines for infant immunization programmes in different parts of the world in 2...

  18. The efficacy of a steroid mixture for chemoradiotherapy-induced acute mucositis

    Radiotherapy is an important therapeutic tool for malignant tumors in the head and neck and thoracic region. However, radiotherapy has also been known to cause acute mucositis and esophagitis during the early phase of treatment, for which there is no cure to date. A mixture of mucosal protective steroids has been shown to be beneficial in patients with these symptoms receiving radiotherapy alone. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of this agent to treat the mucositis that accompanies chemoradiotherapy. Moreover, the differences between the curative effects were examined retrospectively, according to the region irradiated. Radiotherapy was administered to the head and neck, and thoracic region, and the steroid mixture was prescribed for patients in the radiotherapy alone and chemoradiotherapy groups that exhibited acute radiation-induced mucositis symptoms. We then evaluated daily food consumption, total serum-protein value, serum-albumin value and body weight of the radiation-induced mucositis patients that were treated with the mixture. Moreover, we also examined the efficacy in patients undergoing irradiation of the oral cavity, and of the esophagus (which did not entail irradiation of the oral cavity). Two hundred and fourteen patients treated with the steroid mixture in this study had no treatment-related adverse events. In comparison between the radiotherapy alone and chemoradiotherapy groups, no significant differences were observed for daily food consumption. However, differences were observed for daily food consumption between the groups undergoing irradiation of the oral cavity and irradiation of the esophagus (p=0.0008). In the group experiencing irradiation of the mouth, decreased ability to swallow and digest food associated with the primary disease was also observed. Total serum-protein values, serum-albumin values and body weight exhibited a slight decrease despite the onset of radiation-induced mucositis, compared with the values

  19. Dysregulation of mucosal immune response in pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Xu, Xiao-rong; Liu, Chang-Qin; Feng, Bai-Sui; Liu, Zhan-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The exact etiology and pathology of IBD remain unknown. Available evidence suggests that an abnormal immune response against the microorganisms in the intestine is responsible for the disease in genetically susceptible individuals. Dysregulation of immune response in the intestine plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of IBD, involving a wide range of molecules including cytokines. On the other hand, besides...

  20. EFFECT OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION ON ACUTE STRESS-RELATED GASTRIC MUCOSAL DAMAGE OF SERIOUSLY ILL PATIENTS

    赵超; 肖文; 叶光福; 周建平; 周其璋

    2002-01-01

    Emergency endoscopy studies have shown that the most of seriously ill patients develop acute stress-related mucosal damage and ulceration within 24 hours of admission, which manifest the upper gastrointestinal tract

  1. Treatment of radiation-induced acute oral mucositis in a rat model

    The stem cells of the epithelial lining of the oral mucosa are non-specifically affected by many anti-cancer agents including radiation. Radiation-induced mucositis of upper aerodigestive tract is a major dose-limiting factor in the treatment of head and neck tumours. A new non-toxic drug (Compound A) consisting of Curcumin, -tocopherol and sun flower oil (SFO) was developed and its efficacy was tested in the treatment of radiation-induced normal tissue lesions. Mature (12 weeks old; 200-225g) female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in compliance with the Animal (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986. While under anaesthesia the animals tongue was slightly extended outside and a region of the underside of the tongue was irradiated in-situ with single doses of 2.27 MeV -rays from a 5mm diameter 90Sr/90Y plaque. The dose-rate of the source was ∼10Gy/min at the surface of the mucus membrane. Irradiations and subsequent assessment of the lesion were carried out under general anesthesia maintained by a 1.5% Halothane, oxygen mixture. Four groups of 36 animals were irradiated with single doses of either 13.5, 15, 16.5 or 18 Gy. Following irradiation the animals in each dose group were subdivided into four treatment subgroups of 9 rats to receive 0.5 ml per day of either Compound A, SFO, -tocopherol or water by oral gavage until the end of experiments. Nine animals were used at each dose point in each treatment group. Mucosal ulceration (erosion of mucosal epithelium) was considered as an end-point and this is referred by radiation-induced mucositis in the context of present experiments. From the day after irradiation until any acute radiation-induced oral mucosal lesion had healed the animals tongue were assessed daily for the presence of radiation-induced mucositis (mucosal ulceration). Quantal data for the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis were analysed using logit analysis and dose modification factor (DMF) was obtained. There was a modest increase in the ED50 values

  2. PATHOGENESIS AND TREATMENT OF THROMBOHEMORRHAGIC DIATHESIS IN ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Anna Falanga

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL is a distinct subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by t(15;17 chromosomal translocation, which involves the retinoic acid receptor-alpha (RAR-alpha. APL typically presents with a life-threatening hemorrhagic diathesis. Before the introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA for the cure of APL, fatal hemorrhages due, at least in part, to the APL-associated coagulopathy, were a major cause of induction remission failure. The laboratory abnormalities of blood coagulation found in these patients are compatible with a syndrome of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC. Major determinants of the coagulopathy of APL are endogenous factors expressed by the leukemic cells, including procoagulant factors, fibrinolytic proteins, and non-specific proteolytic enzymes. In addition, these cells have an increased capacity to adhere to the vascular endothelium, and to secrete inflammatory cytokines [i.e. interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha], which in turn stimulate the expression of prothrombotic activities by endothelial cells and leukocytes. ATRA can interfere with each of the principal hemostatic properties of the leukemic cell, thus reducing the APL cell procoagulant potential, in parallel to the induction of cellular differentiation. This effect occurs in vivo, in the bone marrow of APL patients receiving ATRA, and is associated with the improvement of the bleeding symptoms. Therapy with arsenic trioxide (ATO also beneficially affects coagulation in APL. However, early deaths from bleeding still remain a major problem in APL and further research is required in this field. In this review, we will summarize our current knowledge of the pathogenesis of the APL-associated coagulopathy and will overview the therapeutic approaches for the management of this complication.

  3. PATHOGENESIS AND TREATMENT OF THROMBOHEMORRHAGIC DIATHESIS IN ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Laura Russo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL is a distinct subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by t(15;17 chromosomal translocation, which involves the retinoic acid receptor-alpha (RAR-alpha. APL typically presents with a life-threatening hemorrhagic diathesis. Before the introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA for the cure of APL, fatal hemorrhages due, at least in part, to the APL-associated coagulopathy, were a major cause of induction remission failure. The laboratory abnormalities of blood coagulation found in these patients are compatible with a syndrome of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC.

    Major determinants of the coagulopathy of APL are endogenous factors expressed by the leukemic cells, including procoagulant factors, fibrinolytic proteins, and non-specific proteolytic enzymes. In addition, these cells have an increased capacity to adhere to the vascular endothelium, and to secrete inflammatory cytokines [i.e. interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha], which in turn stimulate the expression of prothrombotic activities by endothelial cells and leukocytes.

    ATRA can interfere with each of the principal hemostatic properties of the leukemic cell, thus reducing the APL cell procoagulant potential, in parallel to the induction of cellular differentiation. This effect occurs in vivo, in the bone marrow of APL patients receiving ATRA, and is associated with the improvement of the bleeding symptoms. Therapy with arsenic trioxide (ATO also beneficially affects coagulation in APL. However, early deaths from bleeding still remain a major problem in APL and further research is required in this field.

    In this review, we will summarize our current knowledge of the pathogenesis of the APL-associated coagulopathy and will overview the therapeutic approaches for the management of this complication.

  4. Protective Effects of the Traditional Herbal Formula Oryeongsan Water Extract on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Injury in Rats

    Jeon, Woo-Young; Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Lim, Hye-Sun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the protective effect and safety of Oryeongsan water extract (OSWE) on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury and an acute toxicity study in rats. Acute gastric lesions were induced via intragastric oral administration of absolute ethanol at a dose of 5 mL/kg. OSWE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was administered to rats 2 h prior to the oral administration of absolute ethanol. The stomach of animal models was opened and gastric mucosal lesions were examined. Ga...

  5. Acute mucosal radiation reactions in patients with head and neck cancer. Patterns of mucosal healing on the basis of daily examinations

    Wygoda, A.; Skladowski, K.; Rutkowski, T.; Hutnik, M.; Golen, M.; Pilecki, B.; Przeorek, W.; Lukaszczyk-Widel, B. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice (Poland). 1st Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The goal of this research was to evaluate the healing processes of acute mucosal radiation reactions (AMRR) in patients with head and neck cancer. Materials and methods: In 46 patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients irradiated with conventional (n = 25) and accelerated (n = 21) dose fractionation AMRR was evaluated daily during and after radiotherapy. Complex of morphological and functional symptoms according to the Dische score were collected daily until complete healing. Results: Duration of healing after the end of radiotherapy ranged widely (12-70 days). It was on the average 8 days longer for accelerated than for conventional radiotherapy (p = 0.016). Duration of dysphagia was also longer for accelerated irradiation (11 days, p = 0.027). Three types of morphological symptoms were observed as the last symptom at the end of AMRR healing: spotted and confluent mucositis, erythema, and edema. Only a slight correlation between healing duration and area of irradiation fields (r = 0.23) was noted. In patients with confluent mucositis, two morphological forms of mucosal healing were observed, i.e., marginal and spotted. The spotted form was noted in 71% of patients undergoing conventional radiotherapy and in 38% of patients undergoing accelerated radiotherapy. The symptoms of mucosal healing were observed in 40% patients during radiotherapy. Conclusion: The wide range of AMRR healing reflects individual potential of mucosa recovery with longer duration for accelerated radiotherapy. Two morphological forms of confluent mucositis healing were present: marginal and spotted. Healing of AMRR during radiotherapy can be observed in a significant proportion of patients. (orig.)

  6. Influence of plasma GSH level on acute radiation mucositis of the oral cavity

    The purpose of the study was to see how pretreatment plasma GSH level influences the severity of acute radiation mucositis of the oral cavity during therapeutic irradiation in patients with oral cancer. Thirteen patients with squamous cell circinoma of the oral cavity form the subject material. Radical radiotherapy (60 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks) was given using telecobalt. Pretreatment plasma GSH level was measured by Beutler's method. The normal tissue reaction during radiotherapy was monitored and graded. The GSH levels ranged from 10.6-90.5 μM/L (mean 30.6 μM/L). Those who had higher GSH levels developed less severe mucositis. The mean GSH levels in the groups with different severity of reactions were: Grade 2 (four patients) = 50.7 μM/L; Grade 3 (five patients) = 26.1 μM/L; Grade 4 (two patients) = 20.4 μM/L and Grade 5 (two patients) = 26.1 μM/L; Grade 4 (two patients) = 20.4 μM/L and Grade 5 (two patients) = 13.6 μM/L. Plasma GSH estimation has the potential to predict individual sensitivity to acute radiation mucositis and may particularly be useful in hyperfractionated regimes. The study also affirms the radioprotective role of GSH and suggests that this effect is either due to protection against membrane lipid perodixation (since GSH does not enter the cell freely) or DNA damage (fractionated radiotherapy may permit freer entry of GSH into cell). 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  7. XRCC1 codon 399Gln polymorphism is associated with radiotherapy-induced acute dermatitis and mucositis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    To evaluate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the 194 and 399 codons of XRCC1, and the risk of severe acute skin and oral mucosa reactions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients in China. 114 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were sequentially recruited in this study. Heparinized peripheral blood samples were taken for SNPs analysis before the start of radiation treatment. SNPs in XRCC1 (194Arg/Trp and 399Arg/Gln) gene were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Dermatitis at upper neck and oral mucositis were clinically recorded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v.3.0. The variant allele frequencies were 0.289 for XRCC1 194Trp and 0.263 for XRCC1 399Gln. Of the 114 patients, 24 experienced grade 3 acute dermatitis and 48 had grade 3 acute mucositis. The XRCC1 399Arg/Gln was significantly associated with the development of grade 3 dermatitis (Odds Ratio, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.04–6.73; p = 0.037, χ2 = 4.357). In addition, it was also associated with higher incidence of grade 3 mucositis with a borderline statistical significance (Odds Ratio, 2.11; 95% CI, 0.951–4.66; p = 0.065, χ2 = 3.411). The relationship between XRCC1 194Arg/Trp and acute dermatitis, and mucositis was not found. Our investigation shows, for the first time, that patients with the XRCC1 399Arg/Gln genotype were more likely to experience severe acute dermatitis and oral mucositis. With further validation, the information can be used to determine personalized radiotherapy strategy

  8. A randomized controlled multicenter trial of actovegin against acute oral mucositis induced by chemo-radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of actovegin against acute oral mucositis through a randomized controlled multicenter trial for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated by chemo-radiotherapy. Methods: From February 2006 to May 2007, a total of 161 patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IVA(1992 Fuzhou Stage) NPC were randomly assigned to the prevention group, the treatment group and the control group. All patients received current chemo-radiotherapy ± neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Radiation technique and dose were similar among the three groups. Intravenous infusion of actovegin was started when radiation started in the prevention group and when grade 2 mucositis occurred in the treatment group, which was given 30 ml daily, 5 times per week until the end of radiotherapy. Criteria of NCI CTC 2.0 and VRS were used to evaluate acute oral mucositis and pain degree, respectively. Results: 154 patients were eligible for the efficacy analysis, including 49 in the prevention group, 53 in the treatment group and 52 in the control group. In the prevention group and the control group, the incidence was 31% and 56% (P= 0.011) for grade 3-4 mucositis, 59% and 83% (P=0.009) for grade 2-3 pain. In the treatment group and the control group, the corresponding number was 38% and 60% (P=0.023), 70% and 90%, (P=0.014). The prevention group had a lower incidence (P=0.021) and longer average interval (P=0.009) of grade 2 mucositis when comparing with the control group. No drug-related adverse event was observed. Conclusions: Prophylactic or therapeutic use of actovegin by intravenous infusion can significantly reduce the severity of chemo-radiotherapy induced oral mucositis and pain. The prophylactic use may also postpone and decrease the incidence of grade 2 mucositis, which deserves clinic application. (authors)

  9. Role of Chemokines in the Pathogenesis of Acute Lung Injury

    Bhatia, Madhav; Zemans, Rachel L.; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is due to an uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response resulting from direct injury to the lung or indirect injury in the setting of a systemic process. Such insults lead to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which includes activation of leukocytes—alveolar macrophages and sequestered neutrophils—in the lung. Although systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a physiologic response to an insult, systemic leukocyte activation, if excessive, can lead ...

  10. Effect of diallyl disulfide on acute gastric mucosal damage induced by alcohol in rats.

    Lee, I-C; Baek, H-S; Kim, S-H; Moon, C; Park, S-H; Kim, S-H; Shin, I-S; Park, S-C; Kim, J-C

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the gastroprotective effects of diallyl disulfide (DADS), a secondary organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.) on experimental model of ethanol (EtOH)-induced gastric ulcer in rats. The antiulcerogenic activity of DADS was evaluated by gross/histopathological inspection, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and lipid peroxidation with antioxidant enzyme activities in the stomach. DADS (100 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage 2 h prior to EtOH treatment (5 ml/kg). The animals were killed 1 h after receiving EtOH treatment. Pretreatment with DADS attenuated EtOH-induced gastric mucosal injury, as evidenced by decreased severity of hemorrhagic lesions and gastric ulcer index upon visual inspection. DADS also prevented histopathological alterations and gastric apoptotic changes caused by EtOH. An increase in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase was observed in the gastric tissues of EtOH-treated rats that coincided with increased serum TNF-α and interleukin 6 levels. In contrast, DADS effectively suppressed production of pro-inflammatory mediators induced by EtOH. Furthermore, DADS prevented the formation of gastric malondialdehyde and the depletion of reduced glutathione content and restored antioxidant enzyme activities, such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase in the gastric tissues of EtOH-treated rats. These results indicate that DADS prevents gastric mucosal damage induced by acute EtOH administration in rats and that the protective effects of DADS may be due to its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:24972622

  11. Oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer during postoperative irradiation. An alleviating effect on acute radiation mucositis

    To evaluate the effect of oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer on alleviating acute radiation mucositis. Eighteen patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy for tongue and oral floor cancer were evaluated. Radiotherapy was given in 2 Gy per fraction, 5 times a week for a total dose of 50 Gy in most patients. Radiation field included the tongue and oral floor. During radiotherapy, 8 patients were treated by dento-maxillofacial radiologists with special concern on oral hygiene (oral hygiene group) and the remaining 10 patients were treated with routine dental care (standard medication group). Mucositis were evaluated using JCOG grade and EORTC/RTOG score by radiotherapists or dento-maxillofacial radiologists at 10 Gy intervals. Oral hygiene plans comprised motivation to maintain oral hygiene and establishing the habits of oral self care 4 times per day. Once a week, oral hygiene and oral cleaning of patients were checked by dento-maxillofacial radiologists. Oral self care included mechanical tooth brushing and a chemical mouthwash. No patients with grade 3 and score 4 mucositis were noted in the oral hygiene group. Severe mucositis occurred less frequently in the oral hygiene group than in the standard medication group. Interruption of radiotherapy due to severe mucositis did not occur in the oral hygiene group. On the other hand, interruption of radiotherapy occurred in four patients in the standard medication group, and in three it was due to severe oral pain. Our results suggested that our method of oral hygiene was more effective for alleviating acute radiation mucositis than other methods so far reported. In addition, our method is considered to be useful in preventing rampant dental caries and severe periodontitis due to the xerostomia induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  12. Oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer during postoperative irradiation. An alleviating effect on acute radiation mucositis

    Katsura, Kouji; Masuko, Noriko; Hayashi, Takafumi [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry; Sugita, Tadashi; Sakai, Kunio; Tsuchida, Emiko; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Sasamoto, Ryuta

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer on alleviating acute radiation mucositis. Eighteen patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy for tongue and oral floor cancer were evaluated. Radiotherapy was given in 2 Gy per fraction, 5 times a week for a total dose of 50 Gy in most patients. Radiation field included the tongue and oral floor. During radiotherapy, 8 patients were treated by dento-maxillofacial radiologists with special concern on oral hygiene (oral hygiene group) and the remaining 10 patients were treated with routine dental care (standard medication group). Mucositis were evaluated using JCOG grade and EORTC/RTOG score by radiotherapists or dento-maxillofacial radiologists at 10 Gy intervals. Oral hygiene plans comprised motivation to maintain oral hygiene and establishing the habits of oral self care 4 times per day. Once a week, oral hygiene and oral cleaning of patients were checked by dento-maxillofacial radiologists. Oral self care included mechanical tooth brushing and a chemical mouthwash. No patients with grade 3 and score 4 mucositis were noted in the oral hygiene group. Severe mucositis occurred less frequently in the oral hygiene group than in the standard medication group. Interruption of radiotherapy due to severe mucositis did not occur in the oral hygiene group. On the other hand, interruption of radiotherapy occurred in four patients in the standard medication group, and in three it was due to severe oral pain. Our results suggested that our method of oral hygiene was more effective for alleviating acute radiation mucositis than other methods so far reported. In addition, our method is considered to be useful in preventing rampant dental caries and severe periodontitis due to the xerostomia induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  13. The acute lymphoblastic leukemia of Down Syndrome - Genetics and pathogenesis.

    Izraeli, Shai

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down Syndrome (DS) are at markedly increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ALL is of B cell precursor (BCP) phenotype. T-ALL is only rarely diagnosed as well as infant leukemia. Gene expression profiling and cytogenetics suggest that DS-ALL is an heterogeneous disease. More than half of the leukemias are characterized by aberrant expression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor CRLF2 caused by genomic rearrangements. These rearrangements are often associated with somatic activating mutations in the receptors or in the downstream components of the JAK-STAT pathway. The activation of JAK-STAT pathway suggests that targeted therapy with JAK or downstream inhibitors may be effective for children with DS-ALL. The basis of the increased risk of BCP-ALL and in particular of the CRLF2 aberrations is presently unknown. Neither is it known which genes on the trisomic chromosome 21 are involved. PMID:26631987

  14. A Hypothetical-Mathematical Model of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Pathogenesis

    Andrei Cucuianu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukaemia is defined by the expansion of a mutated haematopoietic stem cell clone, with the inhibition of surrounding normal clones. Haematopoiesis can be seen as an evolutionary tree, starting with one cell that undergoes several divisions during the expansion phase, afterwards losing functional cells during the aging-related contraction phase. During divisions, offspring cells acquire ‘variations’, which can be either normal or abnormal. If an abnormal variation is present in more than 25% of the final cells, a monoclonal, leukemic pattern occurs. Such a pattern develops if: (A1 The abnormal variation occurs early, during the first or second divisions; (A2 The variation confers exceptional proliferative capacity; (B A sizable proportion of the normal clones are destroyed and a previously non-significant abnormal clone gains relative dominance over a depleted environment; (C The abnormal variation confers relative ‘immortality’, rendering it significant during the contraction phase. Combinations of these pathways further enhance the leukemic risk of the system. A simple mathematical model is used in order to characterize normal and leukemic states and to explain the above cellular processes generating monoclonal leukemic patterns.

  15. Pathogenesis of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp.

    Lai, Hung-Chiao; Ng, Tze Hann; Ando, Masahiro; Lee, Chung-Te; Chen, I-Tung; Chuang, Jie-Cheng; Mavichak, Rapeepat; Chang, Sheng-Hsiung; Yeh, Mi-De; Chiang, Yi-An; Takeyama, Haruko; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o; Lo, Chu-Fang; Aoki, Takashi; Wang, Han-Ching

    2015-12-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), also called early mortality syndrome (EMS), is a recently emergent shrimp bacterial disease that has resulted in substantial economic losses since 2009. AHPND is known to be caused by strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus that contain a unique virulence plasmid, but the pathology of the disease is still unclear. In this study, we show that AHPND-causing strains of V. parahaemolyticus secrete the plasmid-encoded binary toxin PirAB(vp) into the culture medium. We further determined that, after shrimp were challenged with AHPND-causing bacteria, the bacteria initially colonized the stomach, where they started to produce PirAB(vp) toxin. At the same early time point (6 hpi), PirB(vp) toxin, but not PirA(vp) toxin, was detected in the hepatopancreas, and the characteristic histopathological signs of AHPND, including sloughing of the epithelial cells of the hepatopancreatic tubules, were also seen. Although some previous studies have found that both components of the binary PirAB(vp) toxin are necessary to induce a toxic effect, our present results are consistent with other studies which have suggested that PirB(vp) alone may be sufficient to cause cellular damage. At later time points, the bacteria and PirA(vp) and PirB(vp) toxins were all detected in the hepatopancreas. We also show that Raman spectroscopy "Whole organism fingerprints" were unable to distinguish between AHPND-causing and non-AHPND causing strains. Lastly, by using minimum inhibitory concentrations, we found that both virulent and non-virulent V. parahaemolyticus strains were resistant to several antibiotics, suggesting that the use of antibiotics in shrimp culture should be more strictly regulated. PMID:26549178

  16. Assessment of the effect of local application of amifostine on acute radiation-induced oral mucositis in guinea pigs

    Li, Chang Jiang; Wang, Sheng Zi; Wang, Shu Yi; Zhang, Yan Ping

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present study was to assess the radioprotective effects of the local application of amifostine to treat acute buccal mucositis in guinea pigs. A total of 32 guinea pigs were randomized into four groups: (Group A) topically administered 50 mg of amifostine plus radiotherapy (RT); (Group B) 100 mg amifostine plus RT; (Group C) normal saline plus RT; and (Group D) normal saline plus sham RT. The opportunity for administration was 15 min before irradiation. When administered, the cotto...

  17. Gastroprotective activity of Nigella sativa L oil and its constituent, thymoquinone against acute alcohol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats

    Mehmet Kanter; Halit Demir; Cengiz Karakaya; Hanefi Ozbek

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathogenesis of acute ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions and the effect of Nigella sativa L oil (NS) and its constituent thymoquinone (TQ) in an experimental model.METHODS: Male Wistar albino rats were assigned into 4groups. Control group was given physiologic saline orally (10 mL/kg body weight) as the vehicle (gavage); ethanol group was administrated 1 mL (per rat) absolute alcohol by gavage; the third and fourth groups were given NS (10 mL/kg body weight) and TQ (10 mg/kg body weight p.o) respectively 1 h prior to alcohol intake. One hour after ethanol administration, stomach tissues were excised for macroscopic examination and biochemical analysis.RESULTS: NS and TQ could protect gastric mucosa against the injurious effect of absolute alcohol and promote ulcer healing as evidenced from the ulcer index (UI) values. NS prevented alcohol-induced increase in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), an index of lipid peroxidation. NS also increased gastric glutathione content (GSH), enzymatic activities of gastric superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Likewise, TQ protected against the ulcerating effect of alcohol and mitigated most of the biochemical adverse effects induced by alcohol in gastric mucosa, but to a lesser extent than NS. Neither NS nor TQ affected catalase activity in gastric tissue.CONCLUSION: Both NS and TQ, particularly NS can partly protect gastric mucosa from acute alcohol-induced mucosal injury, and these gastroprotective effects might be induced, at least partly by their radical scavenging activity.

  18. Prediction of Acute Radiation Mucositis using an Oral Mucosal Dose Surface Model in Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors.

    Atsushi Musha

    Full Text Available To evaluate the dose-response relationship for development of acute radiation mucositis (ARM using an oral mucosal dose surface model (OMDS-model in carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT for head and neck tumors.Thirty-nine patients receiving C-ion RT for head and neck cancer were evaluated for ARM (once per week for 6 weeks according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, version 4.0, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG scoring systems. The irradiation schedule typically used was 64 Gy [relative biological effectiveness (RBE] in 16 fractions for 4 weeks. Maximum point doses in the palate and tongue were compared with ARM in each patient.The location of the ARM coincided with the high-dose area in the OMDS-model. There was a clear dose-response relationship between maximum point dose and ARM grade assessed using the RTOG criteria but not the CTCAE. The threshold doses for grade 2-3 ARM in the palate and tongue were 43.0 Gy(RBE and 54.3 Gy(RBE, respectively.The OMDS-model was useful for predicting the location and severity of ARM. Maximum point doses in the model correlated well with grade 2-3 ARM.

  19. Divergent mucosal and systemic responses in children in response to acute otitis media.

    Verhoeven, D; Pichichero, M E

    2014-10-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM), induced by respiratory bacteria, is a significant cause of children seeking medical attention worldwide. Some children are highly prone to AOMs, suffering three to four recurrent infections per year (prone). We previously determined that this population of children could have diminished anti-bacterial immune responses in peripheral blood that could fail to limit bacterial colonization in the nasopharynx (NP). Here, we examined local NP and middle ear (ME) responses and compared them to peripheral blood to examine whether the mucosa responses were similar to the peripheral blood responses. Moreover, we examined differences in effector cytokine responses between these two populations in the NP, ME and blood compartments at the onset of an AOM caused by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. We found that plasma effector cytokines patterned antigen-recall responses of CD4 T cells, with lower responses detected in prone children. ME cytokine levels did not mirror blood, but were more similar to the NP. Interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17 in the NP were similar in prone and non-prone children, while IL-2 production was higher in prone children. The immune responses diverged in the mucosal and blood compartments at the onset of a bacterial ME infection, thus highlighting differences between local and systemic immune responses that could co-ordinate anti-bacterial immune responses in young children. PMID:24889648

  20. Antibody blockade of IL-17 family cytokines in immunity to acute murine oral mucosal candidiasis.

    Whibley, Natasha; Tritto, Elaine; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Kolbinger, Frank; Moulin, Pierre; Brees, Dominique; Coleman, Bianca M; Mamo, Anna J; Garg, Abhishek V; Jaycox, Jillian R; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Kammüller, Michael; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies targeting IL-17A or its receptor, IL-17RA, are approved to treat psoriasis and are being evaluated for other autoimmune conditions. Conversely, IL-17 signaling is critical for immunity to opportunistic mucosal infections caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans, as mice and humans lacking the IL-17R experience chronic mucosal candidiasis. IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-17AF bind the IL-17RA-IL-17RC heterodimeric complex and deliver qualitatively similar signals through the adaptor Act1. Here, we used a mouse model of acute oropharyngeal candidiasis to assess the impact of blocking IL-17 family cytokines compared with specific IL-17 cytokine gene knockout mice. Anti-IL-17A antibodies, which neutralize IL-17A and IL-17AF, caused elevated oral fungal loads, whereas anti-IL-17AF and anti-IL-17F antibodies did not. Notably, there was a cooperative effect of blocking IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F together. Termination of anti-IL-17A treatment was associated with rapid C. albicans clearance. IL-17F-deficient mice were fully resistant to oropharyngeal candidiasis, consistent with antibody blockade. However, IL-17A-deficient mice had lower fungal burdens than anti-IL-17A-treated mice. Act1-deficient mice were much more susceptible to oropharyngeal candidiasis than anti-IL-17A antibody-treated mice, yet anti-IL-17A and anti-IL-17RA treatment caused equivalent susceptibilities. Based on microarray analyses of the oral mucosa during infection, only a limited number of genes were associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis susceptibility. In sum, we conclude that IL-17A is the main cytokine mediator of immunity in murine oropharyngeal candidiasis, but a cooperative relationship among IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F exists in vivo. Susceptibility displays the following hierarchy: IL-17RA- or Act1-deficiency > anti-IL-17A + anti-IL-17F antibodies > anti-IL-17A or anti-IL-17RA antibodies > IL-17A deficiency. PMID:26729813

  1. The Role of Neutrophils in the Pathogenesis of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    Fung, Y.L.; Silliman, C. C.

    2009-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the major cause of transfusion related morbidity and mortality, world wide. Efforts to reduce or eliminate this serious complication of blood transfusion are hampered by an incomplete understanding of its pathogenesis. Currently, TRALI is thought to be mediated by donor alloantibodies directed against host leukocytes or the result of two distinct clinical events. For both proposed mechanisms the neutrophil (PMN) is the key effector cell. This p...

  2. Circulating microbial products and acute phase proteins as markers of pathogenesis in lymphatic filarial disease.

    R Anuradha

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis can be associated with development of serious pathology in the form of lymphedema, hydrocele, and elephantiasis in a subset of infected patients. Dysregulated host inflammatory responses leading to systemic immune activation are thought to play a central role in filarial disease pathogenesis. We measured the plasma levels of microbial translocation markers, acute phase proteins, and inflammatory cytokines in individuals with chronic filarial pathology with (CP Ag+ or without (CP Ag- active infection; with clinically asymptomatic infections (INF; and in those without infection (endemic normal [EN]. Comparisons between the two actively infected groups (CP Ag+ compared to INF and those without active infection (CP Ag- compared to EN were used preliminarily to identify markers of pathogenesis. Thereafter, we tested for group effects among all the four groups using linear models on the log transformed responses of the markers. Our data suggest that circulating levels of microbial translocation products (lipopolysaccharide and LPS-binding protein, acute phase proteins (haptoglobin and serum amyloid protein-A, and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-12, and TNF-α are associated with pathogenesis of disease in lymphatic filarial infection and implicate an important role for circulating microbial products and acute phase proteins.

  3. Spatiotemporal interplay of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and respiratory mucosal cells drives viral dissemination in rhesus macaques.

    Liu, L; Wei, Q; Nishiura, K; Peng, J; Wang, H; Midkiff, C; Alvarez, X; Qin, C; Lackner, A; Chen, Z

    2016-07-01

    Innate immune responses have a critical role in the control of early virus replication and dissemination. It remains unknown, however, how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) evades respiratory innate immunity to establish a systemic infection. Here we show in Chinese macaques that SARS-CoV traversed the mucosa through the respiratory tract within 2 days, resulting in extensive mucosal infiltration by T cells, MAC387(+), and CD163(+) monocytes/macrophages followed by limited viral replication in the lung but persistent viral shedding into the upper airway. Mucosal monocytes/macrophages sequestered virions in intracellular vesicles together with infected Langerhans cells and migrated into the tonsils and/or draining lymph nodes within 2 days. In lymphoid tissues, viral RNA and proteins were detected in infected monocytes upon differentiation into dendritic cells (DCs) within 3 days. Systemic viral dissemination was observed within 7 days. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the spatiotemporal interactions of SARS-CoV, monocytes/macrophages, and the DC network in mucosal tissues and highlights the fact that, while these innate cells contribute to viral clearance, they probably also serve as shelters and vehicles to provide a mechanism for the virus to escape host mucosal innate immunity and disseminate systemically. PMID:26647718

  4. Assessment of the effect of local application of amifostine on acute radiation-induced oral mucositis in guinea pigs.

    Li, Chang Jiang; Wang, Sheng Zi; Wang, Shu Yi; Zhang, Yan Ping

    2014-09-01

    The aim of present study was to assess the radioprotective effects of the local application of amifostine to treat acute buccal mucositis in guinea pigs. A total of 32 guinea pigs were randomized into four groups: (Group A) topically administered 50 mg of amifostine plus radiotherapy (RT); (Group B) 100 mg amifostine plus RT; (Group C) normal saline plus RT; and (Group D) normal saline plus sham RT. The opportunity for administration was 15 min before irradiation. When administered, the cotton pieces that had been soaked with 0.5 ml amifostine solution or saline were applied gently on the buccal mucosa of each guinea pig for 30 min. The animals in Groups A, B and C were irradiated individually with a single dose of 30 Gy to the bilateral buccal mucosa. Eight days after irradiation, the animals were scored macroscopically; they were then euthanized, and the buccal mucosal tissues were processed for hematoxylin-eosin staining and ICAM-1 immunohistochemical analysis. In Groups A and B, the mean macroscopic scores were 2.9 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 1.1, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). However, when they were separately compared with Group C (4.4 ± 0.7), a noticeable difference was obtained (P amifostine-treated groups were better than in Group C. The results demonstrated that topical administration of amifostine to the oral mucosa is effective treatment of acute radiation-induced mucositis. PMID:24706999

  5. CELECOXIB - Chemoradiation therapy for reducing mucositis and other acute side effects in advance head and neck carcinoma

    Izadi Sh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Chemo-radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis represents a therapeutic challenge frequently encountered in cancer patients. This side effect causes significant morbidity and may delay or interruption of treatment plan, cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2 is an inducible enzyme primarily expressed in inflamed and tumoral tissues. COX-2 inhibitors have shown promise to reduce chemoradiation induce toxicities. We conducted a phase III, randomized double blind clinical trial to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of celecoxib, a selective COX2 inhibitor, administered concurrently with chemoradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer. Here in we report the first report about the role of COX-2 inhibitor in acute toxicicities. "nMethods: Patients with stage III/IV (locally advance head and neck carcinoma who referred to department of radiation-oncology were eligible. Patients were treated with chemotherapy with cisplatin concurrently with radiation (60-70Gy. Celecoxib (100mg qid was started at the first day of radiotherapy and was given for a total of 8 weeks. Acute toxicities were evaluated every week by WHO scale. "nResults: One hundred twenty two patients were enrolled into the study, (61 patients for each group. In repeated mesurment analysis of variance there is a significant difference in the time of onset of grade II acute toxicities between the two groups; The mucositis, dysphagia, epidermitis and oral pain score changed significantly over the typical five weeks in two groups but these changes were more sever in placebo group (p=0.0001. In the analysis of the overall changes in the following laboratory parame-ters: WBC, hemoglobin and platelet showed that these parameters decreased over time in both groups without a significant difference between groups. "nConclusion: The results of these study showed that the use of a COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib that is a safe and inexpensive drug may reduce acute toxicities of chemoradiation specially

  6. Assessment of the effect of local application of amifostine on acute radiation-induced oral mucositis in guinea pigs

    The aim of present study was to assess the radioprotective effects of the local application of amifostine to treat acute buccal mucositis in guinea pigs. A total of 32 guinea pigs were randomized into four groups: (Group A) topically administered 50 mg of amifostine plus radiotherapy (RT); (Group B) 100 mg amifostine plus RT; (Group C) normal saline plus RT; and (Group D) normal saline plus sham RT. The opportunity for administration was 15 min before irradiation. When administered, the cotton pieces that had been soaked with 0.5 ml amifostine solution or saline were applied gently on the buccal mucosa of each guinea pig for 30 min. The animals in Groups A, B and C were irradiated individually with a single dose of 30 Gy to the bilateral buccal mucosa. Eight days after irradiation, the animals were scored macroscopically; they were then euthanized, and the buccal mucosal tissues were processed for hematoxylin-eosin staining and ICAM-1 immunohistochemical analysis. In Groups A and B, the mean macroscopic scores were 2.9 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 1.1, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). However, when they were separately compared with Group C (4.4 ± 0.7), a noticeable difference was obtained (P < 0.05). No mucositis was observed in Group D. Comparisons of the expression of ICAM-1 were in agreement with the macroscopic data. Histologically, superficial erosion, exudate and ulcer formation were all observed in the RT groups; only the severity and extent were different. The microscopic observations in the amifostine-treated groups were better than in Group C. The results demonstrated that topical administration of amifostine to the oral mucosa is effective treatment of acute radiation-induced mucositis. (author)

  7. Mucosa-adhesive water-soluble polymer film for treatment of acute radiation-induced oral mucositis

    Purpose: To examine the usefulness and safety of a mucosa-adhesive water-soluble polymer film (AD film) containing anesthetics and antibiotics for the treatment of acute radiation-induced oral mucositis. Materials and Methods: To prepare AD films, 600 mg of hydroxy-propyl-cellulose was dissolved in ethyl alcohol, and mixed with a solution containing tetracaine, ofloxacine, miconazole, guaiazulene, and triacetin. The gel obtained was dried to form 30 translucent round sheets (20 mg per sheet) of 7.5 cm in diameter and 0.2 mm in thickness. The AD film showed excellent adhesive and coating properties when placed on wet oral mucosa. From 1993 to 1994, we used the AD film in 25 patients with acute radiation-induced oral mucositis, in an attempt to alleviate their pain and prevent secondary oral infection. All patients had received definitive radiotherapy for oral carcinoma. Intensity and duration of oral pain from mucositis, relief rates at rest and while eating, and presence of bacterial and/or fungal infection were compared with those of 27 patients treated with topical anesthetics (viscous lidocaine, XylocaineTM) and/or general systemic analgesics from 1990 to 1992 (NonAD Group). Results: The intensity of oral pain was the same in the two groups. The mean duration of pain of the AD film Group (10 days) was significantly shortened compared with the NonAD Group (15 days). The rates of complete pain relief at rest and while eating of the AD film Group were statistically higher than those of the NonAD Group: 82% vs. 44%, and 68% vs. 22%, respectively. No secondary bacterial or fungal infections were observed in the AD film Group, whereas 4 cases of documented infections were found in the NonAD Group. No acute or chronic adverse effects of AD film were observed during the 3-year follow-up period. The rates for local control of oral carcinoma and overall survival, at the end of the follow-up period, were 96% and 87% for the AD film Group vs. 92% and 85% for the NonAD Group

  8. Clinical effectiveness of palifermin in prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia:a case-control study

    Dorina Lauritano; Massimo Petruzzi; Dario Di Stasio; Alberta Lucchese

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of palifermin, an N-terminal truncated version of endogenous keratinocyte growth factor, in the control of oral mucositis during antiblastic therapy. Twenty patients undergoing allogeneic stem-cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia were treated with palifermin, and compared to a control group with the same number of subjects and similar inclusion criteria. Statistical analysis were performed to compare the outcomes in the treatment vs. control groups. In the treatment group, we found a statistically significant reduction in the duration of parenteral nutrition (P50.002), duration of mucositis (P50.003) and the average grade of mucositis (P50.03). The statistical analysis showed that the drug was able to decrease the severity of mucositis. These data, although preliminary, suggest that palifermin could be a valid therapeutic adjuvant to improve the quality of life of patients suffering from leukaemia.

  9. Effect of ecoimmunonutrition supports on maintenance of integrity of intestinal mucosal barrier in severe acute pancreatitis in dogs

    2006-01-01

    Background One of the major causes of death in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is severe infection owing to bacterial translocation. Some clinical studies suggested that ecoimmunonutrition (EIN) as a new strategy had better treatment effect on SAP patients. But the experiment studies on the precise mechanism of the effect of EIN were less reported. In this study, we mainly investigated the effects of EIN on bacterial translocation in SAP model of dogs.Methods SAP was induced by retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct in healthy hybrid dogs. The SAP dogs were supported with either parenteral nutrition (PN) or elemental enteral nutrition (EEN) or EIN. The levels of serum amylase, serum aminotransferase and plasma endotoxin were detected before and after pancreatitis induction. On the 7th day after nutrition supports, peritoneal fluid, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, and pancreas were collected for bacterial culture with standard techniques to observe the incidence of bacterial translocation. Pathology changes of pancreas were analyzed by histopathologic grading and scoring of the severity of pancreas, and the degree of intestinal mucosal damage was assessed by measuring mucosal thickness, villus height, and crypt depth of ileum.Results Compared with PN and EEN, EIN significantly decreased the levels of serum amylase, serum aminotransferase, plasma endotoxin, and the incidence of bacterial translocation. Furthermore, compared with the others, the histology scores of inflammation in pancreas and the ileum injury (ileum mocosa thickness, villus height, and crypt depth) were significantly alleviated by EIN (P<0.05). Moreover, concerning liver function, the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and albumin were ameliorating significantly in the EIN group.Conclusion Our results suggested that EIN could maintain the integrity of intestinal mucosal barrier and reducing the incidence of bacterial translocation

  10. Role of platelet-activating factor in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis

    Li-Rong Liu; Shi-Hai Xia

    2006-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent proinflammatory phospholipid mediator that belongs to a family of biologically active, structurally related alkyl phosphoglycerides with diverse pathological and physiological effects. This bioactive phospholipid mediates processes as diverse as wound healing,physiological inflammation, angiogenesis, apoptosis,reproduction and long-term potentiation. PAF acts by binding to a specific G protein-coupled receptor to activate multiple intracellular signaling pathways.Since most cells both synthesize and release PAF and express PAF receptors, PAF has potent biological actions in a broad range of cell types and tissues.Inappropriate activation of this signaling pathway is associated with many diseases in which inflammation is thought to be one of the underlying features. Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common inflammatory disease.The onset of AP is pancreatic autodigestion mediated by abnormal activation of pancreatic enzyme caused by multiple agents, which subsequently induce pancreatic and systemic inflammatory reactions. A number of experimental pancreatitis and clinical trials indicate that PAF does play a critical role in the pathogenesis of AP. Administration of PAF receptor antagonist can significantly reduce local and systemic events that occur in AP. This review focuses on the aspects that are more relevant to the pathogenesis of AP.

  11. Acute Hendra virus infection: Analysis of the pathogenesis and passive antibody protection in the hamster model

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are recently-emerged, closely related and highly pathogenic paramyxoviruses. We have analysed here the pathogenesis of the acute HeV infection using the new animal model, golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), which is highly susceptible to HeV infection. HeV-specific RNA and viral antigens were found in multiple organs and virus was isolated from different tissues. Dual pathogenic mechanism was observed: parenchymal infection in various organs, including the brain, with vasculitis and multinucleated syncytia in many blood vessels. Furthermore, monoclonal antibodies specific for the NiV fusion protein neutralized HeV in vitro and efficiently protected hamsters from HeV if given before infection. These results reveal the similarities between HeV and NiV pathogenesis, particularly in affecting both respiratory and neuronal system. They demonstrate that hamster presents a convenient novel animal model to study HeV infection, opening new perspectives to evaluate vaccine and therapeutic approaches against this emergent infectious disease.

  12. Host immune response and acute disease in a zebrafish model of francisella pathogenesis

    Vojtech, L.N.; Sanders, G.E.; Conway, C.; Ostland, V.; Hansen, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Francisella are highly virulent and infectious pathogens. New models to study Francisella pathogenesis in evolutionarily distinct species are needed to provide comparative insight, as the mechanisms of host resistance and pathogen virulence are not well understood. We took advantage of the recent discovery of a novel species of Francisella to establish a zebrafish/Francisella comparative model of pathogenesis and host immune response. Adult zebraflsh were susceptible to acute Francisella-induced disease and suffered mortality in a dose-dependent manner. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we localized bacterial antigens primarily to lymphoid tissues and livers of zebraflsh following infection by intraperitoneal injection, which corresponded to regions of local cellular necrosis. Francisella sp. bacteria replicated rapidly in these tissues beginning 12 h postinfection, and bacterial titers rose steadily, leveled off, and then decreased by 7 days postinfection. Zebraflsh mounted a significant tissue-specific proinflammatory response to infection as measured by the upregulation of interleukin-l?? (IL-1??), gamma interferon, and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA beginning by 6 h postinfection and persisting for up to 7 days postinfection. In addition, exposure of zebraflsh to heat-killed bacteria demonstrated that the significant induction of IL-?? was highly specific to live bacteria. Taken together, the pathology and immune response to acute Francisella infection in zebraflsh share many features with those in mammals, highlighting the usefulness of this new model system for addressing both general and specific questions about Francisella host-pathogen interactions via an evolutionary approach. Copyright ?? 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. A prospective, randomized, multi-center trial to investigate Actovegin in prevention and treatment of acute oral mucositis caused by chemoradiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Purpose: A multi-center prospective randomized trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Actovegin in the prevention and treatment of chemoradiotherapy-induced acute oral mucositis. Methods and materials: Between February 2006 and May 2007, 156 evaluable patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were randomized to Group 1 (n = 53) for prevention, Group 2 (n = 51) for treatment, and Group 3 (n = 52) for control. All patients received concomitant chemoradiotherapy ± induction chemotherapy. Radiation technique and dose were similar among 3 groups. Intravenous Actovegin of 30 ml daily (5 days/week) was administrated from day 1 of the radiotherapy for Group 1 and from the onset of grade 2 mucositis for Group 2, until the end of the radiotherapy. Results: The incidence of grade 3 mucositis was lower in Group 1 compared with Group 3 (26.4% vs. 55.8%, P = 0.002). Group 2 had a lower progression rate of mucositis from grade 2 to 3 compared with Group 3 (39.2% vs. 60.4%, P = 0.035). There was no difference in the onset time of grade 3 mucositis among 3 groups. Actovegin was well tolerated and no treatment-related adverse events were observed. Conclusions: Actovegin is effective in the prevention and treatment of chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

  14. Relevance of keratinocyte growth factor administration protocol for amelioration of acute radiation-induced oral mucositis

    Keratinocyte growth factor (rHuKGF) significantly reduces oral mucositis in the mouse tongue model. The present study was initiated to optimise the KGF treatment protocol, using mucosal ulceration as the endpoint. Fractionated irradiation with 5x3 Gy/week was followed by test irradiation on day 7 or 14. In the first experiment, 1 or 3 injections (5 mg/kg/day) were applied either before the onset of fractionation (day -3, day -2, days -3 to -1) or over the first weekend (day +4. day +5, days +4 to +6), followed by one further injection at the subsequent weekend (day +4/day +11). In a second experiment, graded doses of KGF (1-30 mg/kg) were administered on days -3, +4 +11. After 5 or 10 fractions of 3 Gy, the ED50 for test irradiation was 5.1±1.9 Gy or 5.7±1.5 Gy, respectively, compared to 10.7±1.0 Gy for test irradiation alone. This indicates effective repopulation in week 2. KGF administration over the weekend before irradiation plus on day +4 increased the ED50 to 12.1-12.3 Gy, independent of the number of injections. Injections over the first weekend plus on day +11 resulted in ED50 values of 12.8-14.3 Gy, again independent of KGF injection number. In the dose optimisation study, KGF doses as low as 1 mg/kg resulted in a significant increase in ED50s for all days studied. Maximum efficacy was found with doses of 15-22.5 mg/kg, with ED50 values of 12.1±1.3 Gy (day -3), 14.4±1.3 Gy (day +4), and 13.7 Gy (day +11) Higher KGF doses did not result in a further increase in ED50. In conclusion, a marked increase in oral mucosal radiation tolerance by KGF was observed in all protocols tested. Repeated injections on consecutive days did not increase the effect. A significant effect of dose per injection was demonstrated, with optimum doses (mouse tongue mucosa) of 15-22.5 mg/kg

  15. Frequency and pathogenesis of silent subcortical brain infarction in acute first-ever ischemic stroke

    We have often observed silent subcortical brain lesions on CT or MRI in first-ever ischemic stroke, but there is little published information on the relationship of these lesions to stroke subtypes. Here, we describe the incidence of MRI-detected silent subcortical brain lesions, including infarctions and white matter lesions, in a series of patients with first-ever ischemic stroke classified according to stroke subtypes. We also discuss the pathogenesis of these silent subcortical lesions. We evaluated 171 patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. The subjects were divided into three groups: lacunar, atherothrombotic and cardioembolic infarction groups. We evaluated silent subcortical brain infarction (SSBI), enlargement of perivascular space (EPS), and other white-matter lesions using MRI. Hypertension was observed in 67.6% of lacunar infarction, 57.1% of atherosclerotic infarction, and 54.1% of cardioembolic infarction. SSBI was more frequently observed in lacunar infarction than the others (lacunar vs. atherothrombotic vs. cardiogenic infarction, 81.5% vs. 44.4% vs. 42.1%, p=0.006). High-grade EPS (grade 2 or higher) was also observed more frequently in lacunar infarction than in the others (lacunar vs. atherothrombotic vs. cardiogenic infarction, 63.3% vs. 24.2% vs. 0%, p<0.001). Scheltens' score of silent subcortical lesions was significantly higher in lacunar infarction than in the others. The frequency of silent subcortical ischemic brain lesions was significantly higher in lacunar infarction than in atherosclerotic or cardioembolic infarction. We suggest that the pathogenesis of silent subcortical ischemic brain lesions is common to that of lacunar infarction, that is, small-vessel vasculopathy. (author)

  16. A rare aggravation of severe mucositis post chemotherapy in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1tf

    Adlette Inati; Grace Akouri; Abbas, Hussein A.

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a debilitating manifestation in children undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Children with mucositis should be properly managed in order to prevent further exacerbation and adverse complications. We hereby present the first report of a severe chemotherapy-induced mucositis, plausibly aggravated by improper dental hygiene leading to shedding of the ventral part of the tongue in a child with pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The patient steadily and gradually rec...

  17. Efficacy and effects of palifermin for the treatment of oral mucositis in patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Lucchese, Alessandra; Matarese, Giovanni; Ghislanzoni, Luis Huanca; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Manuelli, Maurizio; Gherlone, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    This randomized-controlled trial studied the efficacy of palifermin, administered as a dose during hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) therapy, as primary prophylaxis on pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in order to reduce oral mucositis (OM). Patients in the palifermin group were randomly assigned to receive palifermin, 60 μg/kg, intravenously as a single dose 3 days before and 0, +1, and +2 post autologous HSCT infusion. The patients in the control group received only a placebo treatment. OM-related assessments were the WHO oral-toxicity scale and the patient-reported outcomes. There was a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of OM grade 3 and 4 in the palifermin group compared to the control group. There was also a reduction in the degree of severity of OM in the palifermin group (1.65 grade respect to 2.33 in the control group). Palifermin could prevent the recurrence of severe OM and improve the quality of life in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). PMID:26428409

  18. Grade 4 oral mucositis and prolonged pancytopenia with high dose intravenous methotrexate in a patient of philadelphia positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Vidisha M. Shah

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Antimetabolite drugs are rarely associated with grade 3 or 4 mucositis. However specific side effects such as bone marrow suppression, pancytopenia, hospitalization, high cost limit the use of intravenous methotrexate. Here we report a case of 25-year-old girl patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL treated with 24 hour methotrexate in her continuous phase of chemotherapy. After 12 hours of completing the treatment she developed oral mucosal pain & she was not able to speak. After a week, her White Blood Cell (WBC count was 600/cumm with fever and she could not speak and eat or drink. So she was hospitalized for few days till she can drink something. We report high grade mucositis with methotrexate. Hematologists should be aware of this possible side effect to undertake early intervention. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2012; 1(1.000: 36-38

  19. Pathogenesis of the mucosal hyperplasia in self-filling blind loops of rat jejunum: a morphometric study in germ free animals.

    Menge, H; Germer, C T; Stössel, R; Simes, G; Hahn, H.; Riecken, E O

    1987-01-01

    Bacterial overgrowth and high intraluminal concentrations of deconjugated bile acids are thought to be responsible for mucosal hyperplasia in self-filling blind loops of rat jejunum. To investigate this hypothesis further we have assessed the three dimensional architecture of these loops created in germ free animals without or with di- or mono-association of different bacterial species. It was found that mucosal hyperplasia develops in the absence of any bacterial contamination and that bacte...

  20. Mucosal invasion by fusobacteria is a common feature of acute appendicitis in Germany, Russia, and China

    Alexander Swidsinski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: To investigate the geographic occurrence of mucosa-invading Fusobacteria in acute appendicitis. Patients and Methods: Carnoy- and formalin-fixated appendices from Germany, Russia, and China were comparatively investigated. Bacteria were detected using fluorescent in situ hybridization. Cecal biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and other conditions were used as disease controls. Results: Fusobacteria represented mainly by Fusobacterium nucleatum were the major invasive component in bacterial infiltrates in acute appendicitis but were completely absent in controls. The occurrence of invasive Fusobacteria in Germany, Russia, and China was the same. The detection rate in Carnoy-fixated material was 70-71% and in formalin-fixated material was 30-36%. Conclusions: Acute appendicitis is a polymicrobial infectious disease in which F. nucleatum and other Fusobacteria play a key role.

  1. Amelioration of acute oral mucositis by Keratinocyte growth factor: fractionated irradiation

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to quantify the protective efficacy of recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (rHuKGF) in oral mucosa. Methods and Materials: Mouse tongue mucosal ulceration was analyzed as the clinically relevant end point. Fractionated irradiation of the snout with 5 daily fractions of 3 Gy was followed by graded test doses, given to a test area of the lower tongue, on Day 7. rHuKGF was injected s.c. in daily doses of 5 mg/kg before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy, over the weekend break, or a combination. Moreover, single rHuKGF injections (5 or 15 mg/kg) were given on Day -1 or on Day 4. Results: In a single-dose control experiment, the ED50, i.e., the dose after which ulcer induction is expected in 50% of the mice, was 10.9 ± 0.7 Gy. Fractionated irradiation without keratinocyte growth factor rendered an ED50 for test irradiation of 5.6 ± 3.7 Gy. Keratinocyte growth factor increased the ED50 values to 7.8 ± 3.3 Gy (Days -3 to -1, p=0.01), 8.3 ± 1.6 Gy (Days -4 to -2, p=0.0008), 10.5 ± 1.4 Gy (Days 0 to +2, p=0.0002), 11.0 ± 0.5 Gy (Days 0 to +4, p=0.002), 10.6 ± 1.4 Gy (Days +4 to +6, p=0.0021), 10 ± 0.07 (Days -3 to +1, p=0.0001) or 11.0 ± 0.02 (Days +4 to +8, p=0.0001). This is equivalent to compensation of approximately 1.5 fractions of 3 Gy when rHuKGF is given before radiotherapy and 3-4 fractions in all other protocols by rHuKGF treatment. Single rHuKGF injections were similarly (5 mg/kg) or more (15 mg/kg) effective. Conclusions: In conclusion, these results indicate a marked increase in oral mucosal radiation tolerance by rHuKGF, which is most pronounced if the growth factor is applied during fractionated radiotherapy. The effect seems to be based on complex mechanisms, predominantly changes in both epithelial proliferation and differentiation processes

  2. Disparate Requirement for T Cells in Resistance to Mucosal and Acute Systemic Candidiasis

    Jones-Carson, Jessica; Vazquez-Torres, Andres; Warner, Thomas; Balish, Edward

    2000-01-01

    Although highly susceptible to orogastric candidiasis, T-cell receptor δ- and α-chain knockout mice, deficient in γδ and αβ T cells, respectively, were found to be resistant to disseminated candidiasis of endogenous origin and to acute systemic candidiasis (resulting from intravenous injection).

  3. Genetic and metabolic determinants of methotrexate-induced mucositis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    den Hoed, M. A. H.; Lopez-Lopez, E.; te Winkel, M. L.; Tissing, W.; de Rooij, J. D. E.; Gutierrez-Camino, A.; Garcia-Orad, A.; den Boer, E.; Pieters, R.; Pluijm, S. M. F.; de Jonge, R.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an effective and toxic chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this prospective study, we aimed to identify metabolic and genetic determinants of MTX toxicity. One hundred and thirty-four Dutch pediatric ALL patients were treat

  4. 从肠黏膜免疫系统损害探讨AIDS脾虚病机%Discuss the spleen deficiency of AIDS pathogenesis from the point of view intestinal mucosal immune system damage

    王春芳; 李真; 徐立然

    2012-01-01

    HIV/AIDS patients with intestinal mucosal immune system damage promoting the immunodeficiency of body and the incidence of opportunistic infections, which is consistent with the evolution of spleen deficiency pathogenesis point of view of TCM. This paper discusses the spleen deficiency of AIDS pathogenesis from the point of view intestinal mucosal immune system damage, and proposed strengthening the spleen to improve immune function of intestinal mucosa of AIDS.%HIV/AIDS患者肠黏膜免疫系统损害促进了机体免疫功能的缺失和机会性感染的发生,AIDS以脾虚为主的中医病机演变过程,与HIV感染所致以肠黏膜损伤为重要表现的全身免疫损伤过程相符合.文章从肠黏膜免疫系统损害角度探讨AIDS脾虚病机,提出健脾扶正以改善肠黏膜免疫功能的中医药治疗AIDS思路.

  5. MicroRNA signature of intestinal acute cellular rejection in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded mucosal biopsies.

    Asaoka, T; Sotolongo, B; Island, E R; Tryphonopoulos, P; Selvaggi, G; Moon, J; Tekin, A; Amador, A; Levi, D M; Garcia, J; Smith, L; Nishida, S; Weppler, D; Tzakis, A G; Ruiz, P

    2012-02-01

    Despite continuous improvement of immunosuppression, small bowel transplantation (SBT) is plagued by a high incidence of acute cellular rejection (ACR) that is frequently intractable. Therefore, there is a need to uncover novel insights that will lead to strategies to achieve better control of ACR. We hypothesized that particular miRNAs provide critical regulation of the intragraft immune response. The aim of our study was to identify miRNAs involved in intestinal ACR. We examined 26 small intestinal mucosal biopsies (AR/NR group; 15/11) obtained from recipients after SBT or multivisceral transplantation. We investigated the expression of 384 mature human miRNAs and 280 mRNAs associated with immune, inflammation and apoptosis processes. We identified differentially expressed 28 miRNAs and 58 mRNAs that characterized intestinal ACR. We found a strong positive correlation between the intragraft expression levels of three miRNAs (miR-142-3p, miR-886-3p and miR-132) and 17 mRNAs including CTLA4 and GZMB. We visualized these miRNAs within cells expressing CD3 and CD14 proteins in explanted intestinal allografts with severe ACR. Our data suggested that miRNAs have a critical role in the activation of infiltrating cells during intestinal ACR. These differences in miRNA expression patterns can be used to identify novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets for immunosuppressive agents. PMID:22026534

  6. A New Model for Predicting Acute Mucosal Toxicity in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy With Altered Schedules

    Strigari, Lidia, E-mail: strigari@ifo.it [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Pedicini, Piernicola [Department of Medical Physics, Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); D' Andrea, Marco [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Pinnaro, Paola; Marucci, Laura; Giordano, Carolina [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Department of Medical Physics, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei tumori, Meldola (Italy)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: One of the worst radiation-induced acute effects in treating head-and-neck (HN) cancer is grade 3 or higher acute (oral and pharyngeal) mucosal toxicity (AMT), caused by the killing/depletion of mucosa cells. Here we aim to testing a predictive model of the AMT in HN cancer patients receiving different radiotherapy schedules. Methods and Materials: Various radiotherapeutic schedules have been reviewed and classified as tolerable or intolerable based on AMT severity. A modified normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model has been investigated to describe AMT data in radiotherapy regimens, both conventional and altered in dose and overall treatment time (OTT). We tested the hypothesis that such a model could also be applied to identify intolerable treatment and to predict AMT. This AMT NTCP model has been compared with other published predictive models to identify schedules that are either tolerable or intolerable. The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for all models, assuming treatment tolerance as the gold standard. The correlation between AMT and the predicted toxicity rate was assessed by a Pearson correlation test. Results: The AMT NTCP model was able to distinguish between acceptable and intolerable schedules among the data available for the study (AUC = 0.84, 95% confidence interval = 0.75-0.92). In the equivalent dose at 2 Gy/fraction (EQD2) vs OTT space, the proposed model shows a trend similar to that of models proposed by other authors, but was superior in detecting some intolerable schedules. Moreover, it was able to predict the incidence of {>=}G3 AMT. Conclusion: The proposed model is able to predict {>=}G3 AMT after HN cancer radiotherapy, and could be useful for designing altered/hypofractionated schedules to reduce the incidence of AMT.

  7. Comparative genomics reveals multistep pathogenesis of E2A-PBX1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Duque-Afonso, Jesús; Feng, Jue; Scherer, Florian; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Wong, Stephen H.K.; Wang, Zhong; Iwasaki, Masayuki; Cleary, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer; however, its genetic diversity limits investigation into the molecular pathogenesis of disease and development of therapeutic strategies. Here, we engineered mice that conditionally express the E2A-PBX1 fusion oncogene, which results from chromosomal translocation t(1;19) and is present in 5% to 7% of pediatric ALL cases. The incidence of leukemia in these mice varied from 5% to 50%, dependent on the Cre-driving promoter (Cd19, Mb1, or Mx1) used to induce E2A-PBX1 expression. Two distinct but highly similar subtypes of B cell precursor ALLs that differed by their pre–B cell receptor (pre-BCR) status were induced and displayed maturation arrest at the pro-B/large pre–B II stages of differentiation, similar to human E2A-PBX1 ALL. Somatic activation of E2A-PBX1 in B cell progenitors enhanced self-renewal and led to acquisition of multiple secondary genomic aberrations, including prominent spontaneous loss of Pax5. In preleukemic mice, conditional Pax5 deletion cooperated with E2A-PBX1 to expand progenitor B cell subpopulations, increasing penetrance and shortening leukemia latency. Recurrent secondary activating mutations were detected in key signaling pathways, most notably JAK/STAT, that leukemia cells require for proliferation. These data support conditional E2A-PBX1 mice as a model of human ALL and suggest targeting pre-BCR signaling and JAK kinases as potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26301816

  8. Study of Qingre Liyan Decoction(清热利咽汤)in Treating and Preventing Acute Radioactive Oral Mucositis

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of Qingre Liyan Decoction(清热利咽汤,QRLYD)in the prevention and treatment of acute radiative oral mucositis(AROM),and to explore the mechanism of QRLYD by detecting epidermal growth factor(EGF)and T lymphocytes(CD3,CD4,and CD8).Methods:Sixty patients conforming with the standard were randomly assigned to two groups,30patients in each group.Patients in the trial group were treated with QRLYD,and those in the control group were treated with Dobell's solution,both groups receiving conventional radiation treatment.The treatment course for both groups was 6 weeks on average.Blood routine test,CD3,CD4,and CD8in the peripheral blood and EGF in the saliva were detected one day before and on the 14th and 28th day of radio-therapy.Results:Patients in the trial group were in good condition with normal spirits and intake of food and drinks.The incidence of AROM is lower and the effect in preventing AROM is higher in the trial group than those in the control group(P<0.05).The EGF in saliva,and CD4 and CD8 in the blood of patients in the trial group were higher than those in the control group(P<0.05).Conclusion:QRLYD can cure and prevent AROM.The mechanism may be related with its effects in enhancing body immunity and promoting salivary EGF.

  9. Effect of acid secretion blockade on acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by Tityus serrulatus scorpion toxin in anaesthetized rats.

    Melo, Júnio Rios; de Araújo, Gnana Keith Marques; da Luz, Magda Maria Profeta; da Conceição, Sérgio Alexandre; Lisboa, Felipe Assis; Moraes-Santos, Tasso; Cunha-Melo, José Renan

    2006-10-01

    Scorpion venom (TX) promotes gastric acid and pepsin secretion leading to acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML), when injected in animals. The goal of the present study was to observe the effects of acid gastric secretion blockers over the incidence of TX-induced AGML in vivo. To verify this model, we used male albino rats, fasted 18-20 h (n=122) and anaesthetized with urethane (1.4 g/kg, i.p.). Their trachea and left femoral vein were both cannulated; the first to avoid airway obstructions during scorpion intoxication and the second for administration of saline, TX and acid blockers. Following the surgical procedure, the animals were divided in 10 groups of at least 10 animals each. Control groups were injected with NaCl 0.9% 1 ml/kg (n=10) or TX 375 microg/kg (n=32). Test groups (n=10, each) received atropine 5 mg/kg, cimetidine 10mg/kg, ranitidine 2.5mg/kg, ranitidine 5mg/kg, omeprazol 1 mg/kg, omeprazol 4 mg/kg, octreotide 80 and octreotide 100 microg/kg 10 min before the TX was injected. After 1h of intoxication, the stomach was resected for macroscopic study and the gastric secretion was collected for volume, pH and acid output assessment. We observed that all blockers were able to completely or partially prevent the TX-induced acid secretion as well as the AGML (p<0.05). Our data suggest the TX-induced AGML can be prevented by different class of acid blockers injected before the intoxication. PMID:16926041

  10. Reduced gastric acid production in burn shock period and its significance in the prevention and treatment of acute gastric mucosal lesions.

    Zhu, Li; Yang, Zhong-Cheng; Li, Ao; Cheng, De-Chang

    2000-02-01

    AIM:To investigate the changes of gastric acid production and its mechanism in shock period of severe burn in rats.METHODS:A rat model with 30% TBSA full thickness burn injury was employed and the gastric acid production,together with gastric mucosal blood flow (GMBF) and energy charge (EC) were measured serially within 48h postburn.RESULTS:The gastric acid production in the acute shock period was markedly inhibited after severe burn injury.At the 3rd h postburn,the gastric juice volume, total acidity and acid output were already significantly decreased (P anti-acid drugs during burn shock period was unreasonable in some respects. Therefore, taking effective measures to improve gastric mucosal blood perfusion as early as possible postburn might be more preferable for the AGML prevention and treatment. PMID:11819529

  11. Innate Lymphoid Cells are the Predominant Source of Interleukin-17A During the Early Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Muir, Roshell; Osbourn, Megan; Dubois, Alice V.; Doran, Emma; Small, Donna M; Monahan, Avril; O'Kane, Cecilia M.; McAllister, Katherine; Fitzgerald, Denise C; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; McAuley, Daniel F; Ingram, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: IL-17A is purported to help drive early pathogenesis in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) by enhancing neutrophil recruitment. Whilst IL-17A is the archetypal cytokine of T helper (Th)17 cells, it is produced by a number of lymphocytes, the source during ARDS being unknown. Objectives: To identify the cellular source and the role of IL17A in the early phase of lung injuryMethods: Lung injury was induced in WT (C57BL/6) and IL-17 KO mice with aerosolised LPS (100 µg) or Pse...

  12. Pancytopenic Prodrome (pre-ALL) of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adults: Possible Pathogenesis

    Sohn, Sang Kyun; Suh, Jang Soo; Lee, Jaetae; Lee, Kyu Bo

    1998-01-01

    We report two cases of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with preleukemic phase of pancytopenia with a few abnormal lymphoid cells in bone marrow aspirates. The initial diagnosis of each case was suspicious aplastic anemia and hypoplastic anemia. Both cases progressed to overt acute lymphoblastic leukemia within 1 year. We suggest that initial pancytopenic phase (pre-ALL) may precede the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults and differential diagnosis from myelodyspl...

  13. Effects of near-infrared laser radiation on the survival and inflammatory potential of Candida spp. involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

    Clemente, A M; Rizzetto, L; Castronovo, G; Perissi, E; Tanturli, M; Cozzolino, F; Cavalieri, D; Fusi, F; Cialdai, F; Vignali, L; Torcia, M G; Monici, M

    2015-10-01

    Candida spp. usually colonize ulcerative lesions of atrophic mucosa in patients with chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis inducing severe inflammation. The spread of antifungal-resistant strains strongly encouraged the search of complementary or alternative therapeutic strategies to cure inflamed mucosa. In this paper, we studied the effects of a near-infrared (NIR) laser system with dual-wavelength emission (808 nm + 904 nm) on the survival and inflammatory potential of C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. Laser treatment was performed with a Multiwave Locked System laser. Survival and apoptosis of fungal strains were evaluated by colony-forming units (CFU) counting and annexin V staining. Cytokine production was evaluated by ImmunoPlex array. Laser treatment significantly affected the survival of Candida spp. by inducing apoptosis and induced a lower production of inflammatory cytokines by dendritic cells compared to untreated fungi. No differences in the survival and inflammatory potential were recorded in treated or untreated Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, used as the control non-pathogenic microorganism. Laser treatment altered the survival and inflammatory potential of pathogenic Candida spp. These data provide experimental support to the use of NIR laser radiation as a co-adjuvant of antifungal therapy in patients with oral mucositis (OM) complicated by Candida infections. PMID:26173694

  14. Dose–response analysis of acute oral mucositis and pharyngeal dysphagia in patients receiving induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemo-IMRT for head and neck cancer

    Dose–response curves (DRCs) and the quantitative parameters describing these curves were generated for grade 3 oral mucositis and dysphagia in 144 patients using individual patient DVHs. Curve fits to the oral mucositis clinical data yielded parameter values of mean dose in 2 Gy equivalent, MD50 = 51 Gy (95% CI 40–61), slope of the curve, k = 1(95% CI 0.6–1.5). R2 value for the goodness of fit was 0.80. Fits to the grade 3 dysphagia clinical data yielded parameter values of MD50 = 44.5 Gy (95% CI 36–53), k = 2.6 (95% CI 0.8–4.5). R2 value for the goodness of fit was 0.65. This is the first study to derive DRCs in patients receiving induction chemotherapy followed by chemo-radiation (IC-C-IMRT) for head and neck cancer. The dose–response model described in this study could be useful for comparing acute mucositis rates for different dose–fractionation schedules when using IMRT for head and neck cancer.

  15. A C-type lectin receptor pathway is responsible for the pathogenesis of acute cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis in mice.

    Dejima, Takashi; Shibata, Kensuke; Yamada, Hisakata; Takeuchi, Ario; Hara, Hiromitsu; Eto, Masatoshi; Naito, Seiji; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2013-12-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis often arises after cyclophosphamide (CYP) administration. As yet, however, the mechanism involved in its pathogenesis is unknown. In this study, it was found that the Fc receptor γ chain (FcRγ)- caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9)-dependent pathway rather than the myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)-dependent pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of acute CYP-induced cystitis in mice. Rapid and transient production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β was detected in the bladder at 4 hr, preceding IL-23 and IL-17A production and an influx of neutrophils, which reached a peak at 24 hr after injection. As assessed by weight, edema and neutrophil infiltration, cystitis was significantly attenuated in CARD9 knockout (KO) and FcRγKO mice, this attenuation being accompanied by impaired production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23 and IL-17A. The major source of IL-17A is the vesical γδ T cell population: IL-17AKO, CδKO and Tyk2KO mice showed little IL-17A production and reduced neutrophil infiltration in the bladder after CYP injection. These results suggest that FcRγ-CARD9-dependent production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 and the subsequent activation of IL-17A-producing γδ T cells are at least partly involved in the pathogenesis of acute CYP-induced cystitis in mice. PMID:24102807

  16. Acute toxicity and gastroprotective role of M. pruriens in ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats.

    Golbabapour, Shahram; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Hadi, A Hamid A; Nordin, Noraziah; Abdulla, Mahmood A

    2013-01-01

    The investigation was to evaluate gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats. Forty-eight rats were divided into 8 groups: negative control, extract control, ulcer control, reference control, and four experimental groups. As a pretreatment, the negative control and the ulcer control groups were orally administered carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The reference control was administered omeprazole orally (20 mg/kg). The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was given orally to the extract control group (500 mg/kg) and the experimental groups (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg). After 1 h, CMC was given orally to the negative and the extract control groups. The other groups received absolute ethanol. The rats were sacrificed after 1 h. The ulcer control group exhibited significant mucosal injuries with decreased gastric wall mucus and severe damage to the gastric mucosa. The extract caused upregulation of Hsp70 protein, downregulation of Bax protein, and intense periodic acid schiff uptake of glandular portion of stomach. Gastric mucosal homogenate showed significant antioxidant properties with increase in synthesis of PGE2, while MDA was significantly decreased. The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was nontoxic (<5 g/kg) and could enhance defensive mechanisms against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. PMID:23781513

  17. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotective Role of M. pruriens in Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injuries in Rats

    Hassandarvish, Pouya; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Hadi, A. Hamid A.; Nordin, Noraziah; Abdulla, Mahmood A.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation was to evaluate gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats. Forty-eight rats were divided into 8 groups: negative control, extract control, ulcer control, reference control, and four experimental groups. As a pretreatment, the negative control and the ulcer control groups were orally administered carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The reference control was administered omeprazole orally (20 mg/kg). The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was given orally to the extract control group (500 mg/kg) and the experimental groups (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg). After 1 h, CMC was given orally to the negative and the extract control groups. The other groups received absolute ethanol. The rats were sacrificed after 1 h. The ulcer control group exhibited significant mucosal injuries with decreased gastric wall mucus and severe damage to the gastric mucosa. The extract caused upregulation of Hsp70 protein, downregulation of Bax protein, and intense periodic acid schiff uptake of glandular portion of stomach. Gastric mucosal homogenate showed significant antioxidant properties with increase in synthesis of PGE2, while MDA was significantly decreased. The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was nontoxic (<5 g/kg) and could enhance defensive mechanisms against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. PMID:23781513

  18. Role of ET and ANF in the pathogenesis of early acute pancreatitis

    Objective: To investigate the role played by endothelin (ET) and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in the development of acute pancreatitis. Methods: Plasma ET and ANF levels were measured with RIA in 35 patients with mild acute pancreatitis (MAP) and 17 patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) within 24-48h after onset of disease as well as in 30 controls. Patients with Imrie score>3, APACHE II score ≥8 were classified as severe. Results: Plasma ET levels in patients with SAP (59.20 + 10. 69pg/ml) were significantly higher than those in controls (P0.05. Conclusion: Increased Et levels in Sap patients might aggravate the ischemia and impairment of microcirculation, leading to endogenous injury of pancreatic tissue. Administration of ET/ET receptor antagonists early in the course might be therapeutically helpful. Effect of ANF seemed to be negligible. (authors)

  19. Serum amyloid A: An acute-phase protein involved in tumour pathogenesis

    Sodin-Semrl, S.; Kovacevic, A.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of acute-phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA) is largely regulated by inflammation-associated cytokines and a high concentration of circulating SAA may represent an ideal marker for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. However, SAA is also synthesized in extrahepatic tissues, e.g. human carcinoma metastases and cancer cell lines. An increasing body of in vitro data supports the concept of involvement of SAA in carcinogenesis and neoplastic diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests that SAA might be included in a group of biomarkers to detect a pattern of physiological events that reflect the growth of malignancy and host response. This review is meant to provide a broad overview of the many ways that SAA could contribute to tumour development, and accelerate tumour progression and metastasis, and to gain a better understanding of this acute-phase reactant as a possible link between chronic inflammation and neoplasia. PMID:18726069

  20. Systematic review of diet in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis: A tale of too much or too little?

    Tudor Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: The role of diet as the cause of acute pancreatitis (AP has been suggested. The aim of the current review was to determine if there exists sufficient evidence linking nutrition, or the lack of it, to the pathogenesis of AP. Patients and Methods: A systematic search of the scientific literature was carried out using Embase, PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for the years 1965 - 2011 to obtain access to studies involving dietary factors and the pathogenesis of AP. Results: A total of 17 studies were identified describing diet and AP. These included 12 human and 5 animal studies. 8 reports were found to link malnutrition and/or refeeding to the pathogenesis of AP. Two studies found an increased consumption of fats and proteins in patients with alcohol-related AP while 1 study noted a lesser intake of carbohydrate in patients. However, none of these differences attained statistical significance. A recent prospective case-control study found a significantly higher risk for AP amongst patients eating par-boiled rice and fresh water fish. Conclusions: Evidence from literature does not appear to support the role of diet as a single bolus meal as a cause for AP. Prolonged consumption of diets rich in proteins and fats may work synergistically with gallstones / alcohol to trigger an attack of AP indicating a possible role of diet as a cofactor in the development of AP possibly by lowering the threshold needed by these other agents to lead to the attack of AP.

  1. Swine-origin influenza-virus-induced acute lung injury:Novel or classical pathogenesis?

    Naoyoshi; Maeda; Toshimitsu; Uede

    2010-01-01

    Influenza viruses are common respiratory pathogens in humans and can cause serious infection that leads to the development of pneumonia.Due to their hostrange diversity,genetic and antigenic diversity,and potential to reassort genetically in vivo,influenza A viruses are continual sources of novel influenza strains that lead to the emergence of periodic epidemics and outbreaks in humans.Thus,newly emerging viral diseases are always major threats to public health.In March 2009,a novel influenza virus suddenly emerged and caused a worldwide pandemic.The novel pandemic influenza virus was genetically and antigenically distinct from previous seasonal human influenza A/H1N1 viruses;it was identified to have originated from pigs,and further genetic analysis revealed it as a subtype of A/H1N1,thus later called a swine-origin influenza virus A/H1N1.Since the novel virus emerged,epidemiological surveys and research on experimental animal models have been conducted,and characteristics of the novel influenza virus have been determined but the exact mechanisms of pulmonary pathogenesis remain to be elucidated.In this editorial,we summa-rize and discuss the recent pandemic caused by the novel swine-origin influenza virus A/H1N1 with a focus on the mechanism of pathogenesis to obtain an insight into potential therapeutic strategies.

  2. Elevation of S100A4 expression in buccal mucosal fibroblasts by arecoline: involvement in the pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis.

    Cheng-Chia Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: S100A4, a member of the calcium-binding proteins, is dramatically elevated in a variety of fibrotic diseases. Areca quid chewing is the most important etiological factor in the pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF. OSF has been considered as a pre-cancerous condition of oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to determine the critical role of S100A4 expression in the pathogenesis of OSF both in vitro and in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Thirty OSF tissues from areca quid chewers and ten normal buccal mucosa samples without areca quid chewing were analyzed by using immunohistochemistry for S100A4 expression in vivo. Collagen gel contraction capability and expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP1/MMP9 in arecoline-stimulated BMFs with S100A4 knockdown was presented in vitro. Initially, S100A4 expression was higher in areca quid chewing-associated OSF specimens than normal buccal mucosa specimens (p = 0.001. Arecoline, a major areca nut alkaloid, led to dose- and time-dependent elevation of S100A4 expression in normal buccal mucosa fibroblasts BMFs (p<0.05. The additions of pharmacological agents rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor, PD98059 (ERK inhibitor, and Bay117082 (NF-κB inhibitor were found to inhibit arecoline-induced S100A4 expression (p<0.05 in BMFs. Down-regulation of S100A4 by lentiviral infection significantly reversed arecoline-induced collagen gel contraction and TIMP1/MMP9 expression. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that S100A4 expression is significantly up-regulated in OSF specimens. Arecoline-induced S100A4 expression was down-regulated by rapamycin, PD98059, and Bay117082. Targeting S100A4 might be a potential therapeutic target for OSF through TIMP1/MMP9 down-regulation.

  3. Molecular pathogenesis of plasminogen Hakodate: the second Japanese family case of severe type I plasminogen deficiency manifested late-onset multi-organic chronic pseudomembranous mucositis.

    Osaki, Tsukasa; Souri, Masayoshi; Song, Young-Seok; Izumi, Naohiro; Law, Ruby; Ichinose, Akitada

    2016-08-01

    A 64-year-old man first developed ligneous conjunctivitis at the age of 58 years after right pulmonary resection because of suspected cancer; otherwise, he had been healthy. Since then, he began to suffer from various forms of chronic pseudomembranous mucositis. Laboratory tests demonstrated that he had 7.8 % of plasminogen activity and 5.9 % of the normal antigen level. Thus, he was diagnosed as having severe type I plasminogen deficiency, making him the third case in Japan. DNA sequencing and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses revealed that this patient was a compound heterozygote of a G-to-A missense mutation (G266E) in exon VIII and a g-to-a mutation at the obligatory splicing acceptor site in intron 12 (IVS12-1g>a). These two mutations were confirmed to be novel. Molecular modeling and splice site strength calculation predicted conformational disorder(s) for the Glu266 mutant and a drastic decrease in splicing efficiency for intron 12, respectively. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the patient contained a small amount of the normal-sized plasminogen protein. Mass spectrometric analysis of the patient's plasminogen revealed a peptide containing the wild-type Gly266 residue and no peptides with mutations at Glu266. However, he had never suffered from thrombosis. Low levels of fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products (FDP), D-dimer, and plasmin-α2-plasmin inhibitor complex clearly indicated a hypo-fibrinolytic condition. However, his plasma concentration of elastase-digested crosslinked FDPs was 4.8 U/mL, suggesting the presence of an on-going plasmin(ogen)-independent "alternative" fibrinolytic system, which may protect the patient from thrombosis. The patient has been free from recurrence of ligneous conjunctivitis for approximately 2.5 years. PMID:27193180

  4. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotective Role of M. pruriens in Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injuries in Rats

    Shahram Golbabapour; Maryam Hajrezaie; Pouya Hassandarvish; Nazia Abdul Majid; A. Hamid A. Hadi; Noraziah Nordin; Mahmood A. Abdulla

    2013-01-01

    The investigation was to evaluate gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats. Forty-eight rats were divided into 8 groups: negative control, extract control, ulcer control, reference control, and four experimental groups. As a pretreatment, the negative control and the ulcer control groups were orally administered carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The reference control was administered omeprazole orally (20 mg/kg). The e...

  5. Central role of neutrophil in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis.

    Yang, Zhi-Wen; Meng, Xiao-Xiao; Xu, Ping

    2015-11-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an acute abdominal disease with the strong systemic inflammatory response, and rapidly progresses from a local pancreatic damage into multiple organ dysfunction. For many decades, the contributions of neutrophils to the pathology of SAP were traditionally thought to be the chemokine and cytokine cascades that accompany inflammation. In this review, we focus mainly on those recently recognized aspects of neutrophils in SAP processes. First, emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic interventions targeting neutrophils significantly lower tissue damage and protect against the occurrence of pancreatitis. Second, trypsin activation promotes the initial neutrophils recruitment into local pancreas, and subsequently neutrophils infiltration in turn triggers trypsin production. Finally, neutrophils have the unique ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps even in the absence of pathogens. PMID:26249268

  6. Role of free radicals in the pathogenesis of acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease

    Farber Harrison W; Klings Elizabeth S

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Acute chest syndrome (ACS) of sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized pathologically by vaso-occlusive processes that result from abnormal interactions between sickle red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs) and/or platelets, and the vascular endothelium. One potential mechanism of vascular damage in ACS is by generation of oxygen-related molecules, such as superoxide (O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), peroxynitrite (ONOO-), and the hydroxyl (•OH) radical. The present review...

  7. An overview of animal models for investigating the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies in acute hepatic failure

    Tuñón, María Jesús; Alvarez, Marcelino; Jesús M. Culebras; González-Gallego, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Acute hepatic failure (AHF) is a severe liver injury accompanied by hepatic encephalopathy which causes multiorgan failure with an extremely high mortality rate, even if intensive care is provided. Management of severe AHF continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. Liver transplantation has been shown to be the most effective therapy, but the procedure is limited by shortage of donor organs. Although a number of clinical trials testing different liver assist de...

  8. Role of free radicals in the pathogenesis of acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease

    Farber Harrison W

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute chest syndrome (ACS of sickle cell disease (SCD is characterized pathologically by vaso-occlusive processes that result from abnormal interactions between sickle red blood cells (RBCs, white blood cells (WBCs and/or platelets, and the vascular endothelium. One potential mechanism of vascular damage in ACS is by generation of oxygen-related molecules, such as superoxide (O2-, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, peroxynitrite (ONOO-, and the hydroxyl (•OH radical. The present review summarizes the evidence for alterations in oxidant stress during ACS of SCD, and the potential contributions of RBCs, WBCs and the vascular endothelium to this process.

  9. The Role of Leucoyte-Derived Free Oxygen Radicals in the Pathogenesis of Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    Akpinar, E; Özden, I.; N. Savci; A. Emre

    1995-01-01

    The role of free oxygen radicals in experimental acute pancreatitis induced by common bile duct ligation was investigated by measuring malondialdehyde levels in the rat pancreas. Also, the potential role of leucocytes as the source of free oxygen radicals was tested by inducing leukopenia with methotrexate. The malondialdehyde levels in the control, pancreatitis and pancreatitis + methotrexate groups were 9.6 ± 2.0, 44.8 ± 11.4, and 25.6 ± 5.0 nmol malondialdehyde/ g pancreas tissue respectiv...

  10. Cannabinoid HU210 Protects Isolated Rat Stomach against Impairment Caused by Serum of Rats with Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    Cao, Ming-hua; Li, Yong-yu; Xu, Jing; Feng, Ya-jing; Lin, Xu-hong; Li, Kun; HAN Tong; Chen, Chang-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), especially severe acute pancreatitis often causes extra-pancreatic complications, such as acute gastrointestinal mucosal lesion (AGML) which is accompanied by a considerably high mortality, yet the pathogenesis of AP-induced AGML is still not fully understood. In this report, we investigated the alterations of serum components and gastric endocrine and exocrine functions in rats with experimental acute pancreatitis, and studied the possible contributions of these alte...

  11. Effects of acute chemotherapy-induced mucositis on spontaneous behaviour and the grimace scale in laboratory rats.

    Whittaker, A L; Leach, M C; Preston, F L; Lymn, K A; Howarth, G S

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a frequent side-effect of chemotherapy treatment. Many oncological research programs aim to identify novel treatments for this distressing condition, and these programs frequently use rat models. Little is known about the presence and progression of pain in these models and how this can best be treated by analgesic therapy. We used a number of behaviour-based methods of pain assessment to determine which tools were best suited for pain identification. Baseline measures for behavioural assessment, rat grimace score and sociability were determined through analysis of continuously recorded video data and an applied social interaction test (n = 16). Mucositis was then induced by intraperitoneal injection of 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) and further behavioural analyses undertaken. An assessment of enrichment interaction was also made by determining the mass of a plastic chew toy gnawed both pre- and post-chemotherapy injection. Behavioural scoring was performed 1, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after injection, with facial expression being scored at the 12, 24 and 48 h time-points. Sociability testing was performed once during the post-injection period. No significant differences were found in grimace scores between baseline and later daily measures. Behaviours similar to those previously reported post-laparotomy were observed. Writhing, twitching and back-arching behaviours were most evident in rats affected by mucositis and were increased in frequency (respectivePvalues: 0.002, 0.004 and 0.008) 48 h after chemotherapy injection compared with baseline, implying that pain onset occurred around this time-point. Social investigatory behaviour was also increased (P = 0.002) following disease onset. Each day, rats post-5FU injection gnawed a greater percentage of their nylabone enrichment by weight than the saline-injected control rats (P = 0.046). These data suggest that, of the tools tested, behavioural assessment scoring may find greatest

  12. A murine model of obesity implicates the adipokine milieu in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis.

    Zyromski, Nicholas J; Mathur, Abhishek; Pitt, Henry A; Lu, Debao; Gripe, John T; Walker, Julia J; Yancey, Kyle; Wade, Terence E; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A

    2008-09-01

    Obesity is clearly an independent risk factor for increased severity of acute pancreatitis (AP), although the mechanisms underlying this association are unknown. Adipokines (including leptin and adiponectin) are pleiotropic molecules produced by adipocytes that are important regulators of the inflammatory response. We hypothesized that the altered adipokine milieu observed in obesity contributes to the increased severity of pancreatitis. Lean (C57BL/6J), obese leptin-deficient (LepOb), and obese hyperleptinemic (LepDb) mice were subjected to AP by six hourly intraperitoneal injections of cerulein (50 microg/kg). Severity of AP was assessed by histology and by measuring pancreatic concentration of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IL-6, the chemokine MCP-1, and the marker of neutrophil activation MPO. Both congenitally obese strains of mice developed significantly more severe AP than wild-type lean animals. Severity of AP was not solely related to adipose tissue volume: LepOb mice were heaviest; however, LepDb mice developed the most severe AP both histologically and biochemically. Circulating adiponectin concentrations inversely mirrored the severity of pancreatitis. These data demonstrate that congenitally obese mice develop more severe AP than lean animals when challenged by cerulein hyperstimulation and suggest that alteration of the adipokine milieu exacerbates the severity of AP in obesity. PMID:18583460

  13. Pathogenesis of non-antibody mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury from bench to bedside.

    Peters, Anna L; van Hezel, Maike E; Juffermans, Nicole P; Vlaar, Alexander P J

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a major cause of transfusion-related mortality. Causative factors are divided in antibody mediated TRALI and non-antibody mediated TRALI. Antibody mediated TRALI is caused by passive transfusion of cognate antibodies and non-antibody mediated TRALI is caused by transfusion of aged cellular blood products. This review focuses on mechanisms in non-antibody mediated TRALI which includes soluble mediators accumulating during storage of red blood cells (RBCs) and platelets (PLTs), as well as changes in morphology and function of aged PLTs and RBCs. These mediators cause TRALI in two-hit animal models and have been implicated in TRALI onset in clinical studies. Pre-clinical studies show a clear relation between TRALI and increased storage time of cellular blood products. Observational clinical studies however report conflicting data. Knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms of TRALI is necessary to improve storage conditions of blood products, develop prevention strategies and develop a therapy for TRALI. PMID:25277811

  14. An overview of animal models for investigating the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies in acute hepatic failure

    María Jesús Tu(n)ón; Marcelino Alvarez; Jesús M Culebras; Javier González-Gallego

    2009-01-01

    Acute hepatic failure (AHF) is a severe liver injury accompanied by hepatic encephalopathy which causes multiorgan failure with an extremely high mortality rate, even if intensive care is provided. Management of severe AHF continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. Liver transplantation has been shown to be the most effective therapy, but the procedure is limited by shortage of donor organs. Although a number of clinical trials testing different liver assist devices are under way, these systems alone have no significant effect on patient survival and are only regarded as a useful approach to bridge patients with AHF to liver transplantation. As a result, reproducible experimental animal models resembling the clinical conditions are still needed. The three main approaches used to create an animal model for AHF are: surgical procedures, toxic liver injury and infective procedures. Most common models are based on surgical techniques (total/partial hepatectomy, complete/transient devascularization) or the use of hepatotoxic drugs (acetaminophen, galactosamine, thioacetamide, and others), and very few satisfactory viral models are available. We have recently developed a viral model of AHF by meansof the inoculation of rabbits with the virus of rabbit hemorrhagic disease. This model displays biochemical and histological characteristics, and clinical features that resemble those in human AHF. In the present article an overview is given of the most widely used animal models of AHF, and their main advantages and disadvantages are reviewed.

  15. Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis and Implications for Honey Bee Health

    Chen, Yan Ping; Pettis, Jeffery S.; Corona, Miguel; Chen, Wei Ping; Li, Cong Jun; Spivak, Marla; Visscher, P. Kirk; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Boncristiani, Humberto; Zhao, Yan; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Delaplane, Keith; Solter, Leellen; Drummond, Francis; Kramer, Matthew; Lipkin, W. Ian; Palacios, Gustavo; Hamilton, Michele C.; Smith, Barton; Huang, Shao Kang; Zheng, Huo Qing; Li, Ji Lian; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Ai Fen; Wu, Li You; Zhou, Ji Zhong; Lee, Myeong-L.; Teixeira, Erica W.; Li, Zhi Guo; Evans, Jay D.

    2014-01-01

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is a widespread RNA virus of honey bees that has been linked with colony losses. Here we describe the transmission, prevalence, and genetic traits of this virus, along with host transcriptional responses to infections. Further, we present RNAi-based strategies for limiting an important mechanism used by IAPV to subvert host defenses. Our study shows that IAPV is established as a persistent infection in honey bee populations, likely enabled by both horizontal and vertical transmission pathways. The phenotypic differences in pathology among different strains of IAPV found globally may be due to high levels of standing genetic variation. Microarray profiles of host responses to IAPV infection revealed that mitochondrial function is the most significantly affected biological process, suggesting that viral infection causes significant disturbance in energy-related host processes. The expression of genes involved in immune pathways in adult bees indicates that IAPV infection triggers active immune responses. The evidence that silencing an IAPV-encoded putative suppressor of RNAi reduces IAPV replication suggests a functional assignment for a particular genomic region of IAPV and closely related viruses from the Family Dicistroviridae, and indicates a novel therapeutic strategy for limiting multiple honey bee viruses simultaneously and reducing colony losses due to viral diseases. We believe that the knowledge and insights gained from this study will provide a new platform for continuing studies of the IAPV–host interactions and have positive implications for disease management that will lead to mitigation of escalating honey bee colony losses worldwide. PMID:25079600

  16. Mucosal immunoglobulins.

    Woof, Jenny M; Mestecky, Jiri

    2005-08-01

    Due to their vast surface area, the mucosal surfaces of the body represent a major site of potential attack by invading pathogens. The secretions that bathe mucosal surfaces contain significant levels of immunoglobulins (Igs), which play key roles in immune defense of these surfaces. IgA is the predominant antibody class in many external secretions and has many functional attributes, both direct and indirect, that serve to prevent infective agents such as bacteria and viruses from breaching the mucosal barrier. This review details current understanding of the structural and functional characteristics of IgA, including interaction with specific receptors (such as Fc(alpha)RI, Fc(alpha)/microR, and CD71) and presents examples of the means by which certain pathogens circumvent the protective properties of this important Ig. PMID:16048542

  17. Mechanism of the preventive effect of breviscapus on pathogenesis of acute kidney injury in rats with sepsis

    Mei YANG

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the inhibitory effect and its related mechanism of Erigeron breviscapus on pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI in rats with sepsis. Methods Thirty-six male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into control group, sepsis model group (CLP group, and breviscapine treatment group (treatment group, n=12 each. The sepsis model was reproduced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. The rats were sacrificed 24 h after operation. The levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN and serum creatinine (Scr were assayed with enzymatic assays, endothelin 1 (ET-1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS with ELISA, renal malondialdehyde (MDA and superoxide dismutase (SOD activities with xanthine oxide method, and the degree of renal tissue injury by micros copic examination after HE staining. Results Compared with the control group, the levels of Scr, BUN, ET-1, iNOS, MDA and iNOS in CLP groups significantly increased, while the SOD activities significantly decreased (P<0.05. Compared with the CLP group, the levels of Scr, BUN, ET-1, iNOS, MDA and iNOS were lower markedly in treatment group, while the SOD activity elevated markedly (P<0.05. Conclusions Breviscapine may reduce AKI in rats with sepsis, and the effect may be related to the improvement of renal microcirculation, reduction of antioxidant enzyme activity, and decrease in oxidation products. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.11.01

  18. Protective role of 1,25(OH2vitamin D3 in the mucosal injury and epithelial barrier disruption in DSS-induced acute colitis in mice

    Zhao Hongwei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intestinal hyper-permeability plays a critical role in the etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD by affecting the penetration of pathogens, toxic compounds and macromolecules. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH2D3], the active form of vitamin D, has been shown to be an important regulator of IBD and recent epidemiology suggests that patients with IBD have an impaired vitamin D status. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possible protective effects of 1,25(OH2D3 on mucosal injury and epithelial barrier disruption on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced acute colitis model. Methods We used DSS-induced acute colitis model to investigate the protective effects of 1,25(OH2D3 on mucosal injury and epithelial barrier integrity. Severity of colitis was evaluated by disease activity index (DAI, body weight (BW change, colon length, histology, myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, and proinflammatory cytokine production including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interferon-γ (IFN-γ. In vitro the protective role of 1,25(OH2D3 was assessed by incubating Caco-2 cells with or without DSS and measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-D. The intestinal permeability was analyzed by FITC-D, bacterial translocation and measurement of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Ultrastructural features of the colon tissue and Caco-2 cell monolayer were observed by electron microscopy. Expressions of tight junction (TJ proteins in the colon mucosa and Caco-2 cells were detected by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, Western blot and real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR, respectively. Results DSS-induced acute colitis model was characterized by a reduced BW, AUC of BW, serum calcium, higher DAI, AUC of DAI, shortened colon length, elevated MPO activity, worsened histologic inflammation, increased mononuclear cell numbers in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs and colonic lamina propria

  19. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccination does not induce a persisting mucosal IgA response in children with recurrent acute otitis media.

    Bogaert, D.; Veenhoven, R.H.; Ramdin, R.; Luijendijk, I.H.; Rijkers, G.T.; Sanders, E.A.M.; Groot, R. de; Hermans, P.W.M.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: In a prospective controlled study in young children with a history of recurrent acute otitis media, we analyzed the salivary IgA and IgG antibody titers upon vaccination with a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) given once or twice, followed by a 23-valent polysaccharide booster vacc

  20. Antioxidant Properties and Gastroprotective Effects of 2-(EthylthioBenzohydrazones on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Rats.

    Nafal Nazarbahjat

    Full Text Available A series of new 2-(ethylthiobenzohydrazone derivatives (1-6 were prepared and characterised by IR, 1H NMR, and 13C NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The newly prepared compounds were screened for their in vitro antioxidant activities using free radical scavenging 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays. Among them, most powerful antioxidant, compound 1 has been selected in order to illustrate anti-ulcer effect on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. Four groups of Sprague Dawley rats were respectively treated with 10% Tween 20 as ulcer control group, 20 mg/kg omeprazole as reference group, 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg compound 1 as experimental animals. Macroscopically, ulcer control group showed extensive hemorrhagic lesions of gastric mucosa compared with omeprazole or compound 1. Rats pre-treated with compound 1 showed increased in gastric pH and gastric mucus. Histologically, ulcer control group showed severe damage to gastric mucosa with edema and leucocytes infiltration of submucosal layer. In immunohistochemical analysis, rats which were pre-treated with compound 1 showed up-regulation of HSP70 and down-regulation of Bax proteins. In conclusion, the gastroprotective effect of compound 1 may be due to its antioxidant activity, and/or due to up-regulation of HSP70 and down-regulation of Bax protein in stained tissue section.

  1. Study on the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal injury in rats with duodenogastric reflux%十二指肠胃反流对大鼠胃黏膜损伤机制的研究

    张艳丽; 姚树坤; 刘俊宝

    2012-01-01

    successful .The expression index of TNF-a and IL-1? in group both A and B were significantly higher than those in control group (P0.05).The apoptosis cells could be seen intensively in mucosa in DGR model group.Apoptosis index in group both A and B were significantly higher than that of group C(P0.05).Conclusion (Different components in DGR induce gastric mucosa injury,over expression of TNF-a and IL-ip as well as cell apoptosis may play important roles in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal injury with DGR.

  2. Candidate genes and pathogenesis investigation for sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome based on gene expression profile

    WANG Min; Yan, Jingjun; He, Xingxing; Zhong, Qiang; Zhan, Chengye; Li, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially devastating form of acute inflammatory lung injury as well as a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Although researchers have made significant progresses in elucidating the pathophysiology of this complex syndrome over the years, the absence of a universal detail disease mechanism up until now has led to a series of practical problems for a definitive treatment. This study aimed to predict some genes or pathways asso...

  3. Pretherapeutic Plasma Pro- and Anti- Inflammatory Mediators Are Related to High Risk of Oral Mucositis in Pediatric Patients with Acute Leukemia: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Ye, Ying; Carlsson, Göran; Agholme, Monica Barr; Karlsson-Sjöberg, Jenny; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay; Pütsep, Katrin; Modéer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Objective This prospective study evaluated clinical risk indicators as well as pro- and anti- inflammatory mediators at the time of malignancy diagnosis in relation to chemotherapy-related oral mucositis in pediatric population. Methods Patients (n = 104) under 18 years of age with primary malignancies and undergoing chemotherapy were included. Potential risk indicators were analyzed using binary logistic regression with oral mucositis as the outcome. In a subgroup (n = 35), plasma samples at...

  4. Oral Mucositis: understanding the pathology and management

    Georgiou, M; Patapatiou, G; S. Domoxoudis; Pistevou-Gompaki, K; A. Papanikolaou

    2012-01-01

    Oral Mucositis is a common complication of cancer therapy which may limit the completion of treatment and affect the quality of life of the patient. As we have come to understand its pathogenesis new developments in its management and prevention have allowed us minimize this side effect.

  5. In Vivo and Cadaver Studies of the Canalicular/Lacrimal Sac Mucosal Folds

    Yongsheng You

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The study aimed to investigate canalicular/lacrimal sac mucosal folds (CLS-MFs in vivo and in cadavers in order to explore their functional roles in the lacrimal drainage system. Method. The observations of CLS-MFs in vivo were performed on 16 patients with chronic dacryocystitis after undergoing an endonasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (EE-DCR. The lacrimal sacs and common canaliculi of 19 adult cadavers were dissected. The opening/closing of an orifice and mucosal fold was recorded. All of the specimens were subjected to a histological examination. Results. The upper and lower lacrimal canaliculi in all of the samples united to form a common canaliculus that opened to the lacrimal sac. CLS-MFs were observed in 10 of the 16 patients (62.5% and 9 of the 19 cadavers (47.4%. The orifices or mucosal folds could be opened or closed when related muscles contracted or relaxed. Histological sections showed a mucosal fold at one side of an orifice. Conclusion. Common canaliculus is the most common type that the canaliculus opens to lacrimal sac. CLS-MFs exist in a certain ratio that can be opened/closed with the movement of the orifices. They may be involved in the drainage of tears or the pathogenesis of acute dacryocystitis or lacrimal sac mucocele.

  6. Mucosal Immunization with Surface-Displayed Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein on Lactobacillus casei Induces Neutralizing Antibodies in Mice

    Lee, Jong-Soo; Poo, Haryoung; Han, Dong P.; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Kwang; Cho, Michael W.; Kim, Eun; Sung, Moon-Hee; Kim, Chul-Joong

    2006-01-01

    Induction of mucosal immunity may be important for preventing SARS-CoV infections. For safe and effective delivery of viral antigens to the mucosal immune system, we have developed a novel surface antigen display system for lactic acid bacteria using the poly-γ-glutamic acid synthetase A protein (PgsA) of Bacillus subtilis as an anchoring matrix. Recombinant fusion proteins comprised of PgsA and the Spike (S) protein segments SA (residues 2 to 114) and SB (residues 264 to 596) were stably exp...

  7. Cytokines levels, Severity of acute mucositis and the need of PEG tube installation during chemo-radiation for head and neck cancer - a prospective pilot study

    The purpose of this pilot study was to detect a correlation between serum cytokine levels and severity of mucositis, necessitating installation of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube (PEG) in head and neck (H&N) cancer patients receiving combined chemo-radiation therapy. Fifteen patients with H&N epithelial cancer were recruited to this study. All patients received radiotherapy to the H&N region, with doses ranging from 50-70 Gy. Chemotherapy with cisplatin, carboplatin, 5-fluorouracil and taxanes was given to high-risk patients, using standard chemotherapy protocols. Patients were evaluated for mucositis according to WHO common toxicity criteria, and blood samples were drawn for inflammatory (IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine levels before and during treatment. A positive correlation was found between IL-6 serum levels and severity of mucositis and dysphagia; specifically, high IL-6 levels at week 2 were correlated with a need for PEG tube installation. A seemingly contradictory correlation was found between low IL-8 serum levels and a need for a PEG tube. These preliminary results, indicating a correlation between IL-6 and IL-8 serum levels and severity of mucositis and a need for a PEG tube installation, justify a large scale study

  8. Protective effects of alginate–chitosan microspheres loaded with alkaloids from Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss. Benth. (Zuojin Pill against ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats

    Wang QS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Qiang-Song Wang,1,2,* Xiao-Ning Zhu,1,* Heng-Li Jiang,1,* Gui-Fang Wang,3 Yuan-Lu Cui1 1Tianjin State Key Laboratory of Modern Chinese Medicine, Research Center of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 2Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Science & Peking Union Medical College, 3Pharmacy Department, Baokang Hospital, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Zuojin Pill (ZJP, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss. Benth. in a ratio of 6:1 (w/w and was first recorded in “Danxi’s experiential therapy” for treating gastrointestinal disorders in the 15th century. However, the poor solubility of alkaloids from ZJP restricted the protective effect in treating gastritis and gastric ulcer. The aim of the study was to investigate the protective mechanism of mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids from C. chinensis Franch. and E. rutaecarpa (Juss. Benth. on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats. Surface morphology, particle size, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, mucoadhesiveness, and fluorescent imaging of the microspheres in gastrointestinal tract were studied. The results showed that the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could sustain the release of drugs beyond 12 hours and had gastric mucoadhesive property with 82.63% retention rate in vitro. The fluorescence tracer indicated high retention of mucoadhesive microspheres within 12 hours in vivo. The mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could reduce the gastric injury by decreasing the mucosal lesion index, increasing the percentage of inhibition and increasing the amount of mucus in the gastric mucosa in an ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury rat model. Moreover, the

  9. Infectious agents in coronary atheromas: a possible role in the pathogenesis of plaque rupture and acute myocardial infarction

    Maria de Lourdes HIGUCHI; Jose A. F. RAMIRES

    2002-01-01

    In this review we report our recent findings of histopathological features of plaque instability and the association with Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) and Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) infection, studying thrombosed coronary artery segments (CAS) of patients who died due to acute myocardial infarction. Vulnerable plaques are known to be associated with fat atheromas and inflammation of the plaque. Here we demonstrated that vulnerability is also related with focal positive vessel remodeling that mai...

  10. Histopathology and pathogenesis of caerulein-, duct ligation-, and arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL6 mice.

    Zhang, Jun; Rouse, Rodney L

    2014-09-01

    Three classical rodent models of acute pancreatitis were created in an effort to identify potential pre-clinical models of drug-induced pancreatitis (DIP) and candidate non-invasive biomarkers for improved detection of DIP. Study objectives included designing a lexicon to minimize bias by capturing normal variation and spontaneous and injury-induced changes while maintaining the ability to statistically differentiate degrees of change, defining morphologic anchors for novel pancreatic injury biomarkers, and improved understanding of mechanisms responsible for pancreatitis. Models were created in male Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL6 mice through: 1) administration of the cholecystokinin analog, caerulein; 2) administration of arginine; 3) surgical ligation of the pancreatic duct. Nine morphologically detectable processes were used in the lexicon; acinar cell hypertrophy; acinar cell autophagy; acinar cell apoptosis; acinar cell necrosis; vascular injury; interstitial edema, inflammation and hemorrhage; fat necrosis; ductal changes; acinar cell atrophy. Criteria were defined for scoring levels (0 = absent, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, 3 = severe) for each lexicon component. Consistent with previous studies, histopathology scores were significant greater in rats compared to mice at baseline and after treatment. The histopathology scores in caerulein and ligation-treated rats and mice were significantly greater than those of arginine-treated rats and mice. The present study supports a multifaceted pathogenesis for acute pancreatitis in which intra-acinar trypsinogen activation, damage to acinar cells, fat cells, and vascular cells as well as activation/degranulation of mast cells and activated macrophages all contribute to the initiation and/or progression of acute inflammation of the exocrine pancreas. PMID:24585404

  11. Phase 3 Trial of Domiciliary Humidification to Mitigate Acute Mucosal Toxicity During Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: First Report of Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 07.03 RadioHUM Study

    Macann, Andrew, E-mail: amacann@adhb.govt.nz [Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Fua, Tsien [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Milross, Chris G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales (Australia); Porceddu, Sandro V. [Oncology Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Penniment, Michael [Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Wratten, Chris [Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Krawitz, Hedley [Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Poulsen, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radiation Oncology Mater Centre, South Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Tang, Colin I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Morton, Randall P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Middlemore Hospital, Otahuhu, Auckland (New Zealand); Hay, K. David [Department of Oral Health, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Thomson, Vicki [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Bell, Melanie L.; King, Madeleine T. [Psycho-oncology Cooperative Research Group, Univerity of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Fraser-Browne, Carol L. [Adult Oncology Research Centre, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Hockey, Hans-Ulrich P. [Biometrics Matters Ltd, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of domicile-based humidification on symptom burden during radiation therapy (RT) for head-and-neck (H and N) cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2007 through June 2011, 210 patients with H and N cancer receiving RT were randomized to either a control arm or to receive humidification using the Fisher and Paykel Healthcare MR880 humidifier. Humidification commenced on day 1 of RT and continued until Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0, clinical mucositis (CMuc) grade ≤1 occurred. Forty-three patients (42%) met a defined benchmark for humidification compliance and contributed to per protocol (PP) analysis. Acute toxicities, hospitalizations, and feeding tube events were recorded prospectively. The McMaster University Head and Neck Radiotherapy Questionnaire (HNRQ) was used for patient-reported outcomes. The primary endpoint was area under the curve (AUC) for CMuc grade ≥2. Results: There were no significant differences in AUC for CMuc ≥2 between the 2 arms. Humidification patients had significantly fewer days in hospital (P=.017). In compliant PP patients, the AUC for CTCAE functional mucositis score (FMuc) ≥2 was significantly reduced (P=.009), and the proportion who never required a feeding tube was significantly greater (P=.04). HNRQ PP analysis estimates also in the direction favoring humidification with less symptom severity, although differences at most time points did not reach significance. Conclusions: TROG 07.03 has provided efficacy signals consistent with a role for humidification in reducing symptom burden from mucositis, but the influence of humidification compliance on the results moderates recommendations regarding its practical utility.

  12. Phase 3 Trial of Domiciliary Humidification to Mitigate Acute Mucosal Toxicity During Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: First Report of Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 07.03 RadioHUM Study

    Purpose: To assess the impact of domicile-based humidification on symptom burden during radiation therapy (RT) for head-and-neck (H and N) cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2007 through June 2011, 210 patients with H and N cancer receiving RT were randomized to either a control arm or to receive humidification using the Fisher and Paykel Healthcare MR880 humidifier. Humidification commenced on day 1 of RT and continued until Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0, clinical mucositis (CMuc) grade ≤1 occurred. Forty-three patients (42%) met a defined benchmark for humidification compliance and contributed to per protocol (PP) analysis. Acute toxicities, hospitalizations, and feeding tube events were recorded prospectively. The McMaster University Head and Neck Radiotherapy Questionnaire (HNRQ) was used for patient-reported outcomes. The primary endpoint was area under the curve (AUC) for CMuc grade ≥2. Results: There were no significant differences in AUC for CMuc ≥2 between the 2 arms. Humidification patients had significantly fewer days in hospital (P=.017). In compliant PP patients, the AUC for CTCAE functional mucositis score (FMuc) ≥2 was significantly reduced (P=.009), and the proportion who never required a feeding tube was significantly greater (P=.04). HNRQ PP analysis estimates also in the direction favoring humidification with less symptom severity, although differences at most time points did not reach significance. Conclusions: TROG 07.03 has provided efficacy signals consistent with a role for humidification in reducing symptom burden from mucositis, but the influence of humidification compliance on the results moderates recommendations regarding its practical utility

  13. Infectious agents in coronary atheromas: a possible role in the pathogenesis of plaque rupture and acute myocardial infarction.

    Higuchi, Maria de Lourdes; Ramires, Jose A F

    2002-01-01

    In this review we report our recent findings of histopathological features of plaque instability and the association with Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) and Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) infection, studying thrombosed coronary artery segments (CAS) of patients who died due to acute myocardial infarction. Vulnerable plaques are known to be associated with fat atheromas and inflammation of the plaque. Here we demonstrated that vulnerability is also related with focal positive vessel remodeling that maintains relatively well preserved lumen even in the presence of large atheromatous plaques. This phenomena may explain why the cinecoronariography may not detect large and dangerous vulnerable plaques. Greater amount of these bacteria in vulnerable plaques is associated with adventitial inflammation and positive vessel remodeling: the mean numbers of lymphocytes were significantly higher in adventitia than in the plaque, good direct correlation was obtained between numbers of CD20 B cells and numbers of CP infected cells in adventitia, and between % area of MP-DNA in the plaque and cross sectional area of the vessel, suggesting a cause-effect relationship. Mycoplasma is a bacterium that needs cholesterol for proliferation and may increase virulence of other infectious agents. In conclusion, co-infection by Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae may represent an important co-factor for plaque instability, leading to coronary plaque thrombosis and acute myocardial infarction, since larger amount of these bacteria strongly correlated with histological signs of more vulnerability of the plaque. The search of CMV and Helicobacter pilori in these tissues resulted negative. PMID:12219114

  14. Infectious agents in coronary atheromas: a possible role in the pathogenesis of plaque rupture and acute myocardial infarction

    HIGUCHI Maria de Lourdes

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review we report our recent findings of histopathological features of plaque instability and the association with Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP and Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP infection, studying thrombosed coronary artery segments (CAS of patients who died due to acute myocardial infarction. Vulnerable plaques are known to be associated with fat atheromas and inflammation of the plaque. Here we demonstrated that vulnerability is also related with focal positive vessel remodeling that maintains relatively well preserved lumen even in the presence of large atheromatous plaques. This phenomena may explain why the cinecoronariography may not detect large and dangerous vulnerable plaques. Greater amount of these bacteria in vulnerable plaques is associated with adventitial inflammation and positive vessel remodeling: the mean numbers of lymphocytes were significantly higher in adventitia than in the plaque, good direct correlation was obtained between numbers of CD20 B cells and numbers of CP infected cells in adventitia, and between % area of MP-DNA in the plaque and cross sectional area of the vessel, suggesting a cause-effect relationship. Mycoplasma is a bacterium that needs cholesterol for proliferation and may increase virulence of other infectious agents. In conclusion, co-infection by Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae may represent an important co-factor for plaque instability, leading to coronary plaque thrombosis and acute myocardial infarction, since larger amount of these bacteria strongly correlated with histological signs of more vulnerability of the plaque. The search of CMV and Helicobacter pilori in these tissues resulted negative.

  15. Role of lysosomal enzymes released by alveolar macrophages in the pathogenesis of the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    J. L. Pérez-Arellano

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolytic enzymes are the major constituents of alveolar macrophages (AM and have been shown to be involved in many aspects of the inflammatory pulmonary response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of lysosomal enzymes in the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HPs. An experimental study on AM lysosomal enzymes of an HP-guinea-pig model was performed. The results obtained both in vivo and in vitro suggest that intracellular enzymatic activity decrease is, at least partly, due to release of lysosomal enzymes into the medium. A positive but slight correlation was found between extracellular lysosomal activity and four parameters of lung lesion (lung index, bronchoalveolar fluid total (BALF protein concentration, BALF LDH and BALF alkaline phosphatase activities. All the above findings suggest that the AM release of lysosomal enzymes during HP is a factor involved, although possibly not the only one, in the pulmonary lesions appearing in this disease.

  16. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  17. Mucosal and Peripheral Lin− HLA-DR+ CD11c/123− CD13+ CD14− Mononuclear Cells Are Preferentially Infected during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Moore, Andrew C.; Bixler, Sandra L.; Mark. G. Lewis; Verthelyi, Daniela; Mattapallil, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    Massive infection of memory CD4 T cells is a hallmark of early simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection, with viral infection peaking at day 10 postinfection (p.i.), when a majority of memory CD4 T cells in mucosal and peripheral tissues are infected. It is not clear if mononuclear cells from the monocyte and macrophage lineages are similarly infected during this early phase of explosive HIV and SIV infections. Here we show that, at day 10 p.i., Lin− HLA-DR+ CD11c/123− CD13+ CD14− macrop...

  18. INTERRELATIONS BETWEEN NEUTRO PHIL ENZYMES AND THEIR INHIBITORS IN PATHOGENESIS OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME ASSOCIATED WITH INFLUENZA PNEUMONIA

    E. V. Prutkina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Amounts of several neutrophil enzymes (elastase, myeloperoxidase (MPO, MMP-2 and their local inhibitors, i.e., Clara cell protein (CC16 and HSP-70, have been determined in blood plasma from fifty-two patients with various forms of influenza A/H1N1. Sixteen patients have developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. In cases of uncomplicated influenza, elastase and MPO levels were shown to be increased, while MMP-2 levels did not change, along with higher contents of HSP-70 and unchanged CC16 amounts. Upon development of influenza-associated pneumonia, elastase and MPO concentrations became elevated, whereas MMP-2 levels were decreased, along with unchanged amounts of CC16 and HSP-70. In cases of ARDS development, CC16 amounts exhibited a sharp decrease. Meanwhile, contents of other proteins remained at the levels shown for pneumonia patients. It has been shown that increased concentrations of neutrophil elastase and MPO with a relative CC16 deficiency and decreased MMP-2 may represent a mechanism of pneumonia development. Decreased CC16 concentration may serve as a risk predictor of ARDS development.

  19. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    P S Satheesh Kumar; Anita Balan; Arun Sankar; Tinky Bose

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concer...

  20. Effects of psychiatric disorders on Type A acute aortic dissection pathogenesis and analysis of follow-up results

    Paolo Nardi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: A connection between psychiatric disorders (PDs and Type A acute aortic dissection (AAD has not been shown. The aim of this study was to define the psychological profile of patients treated for AAD, and to analyze the prevalence of PDs in their medical histories, in the immediate postoperative period, and at a mid-term follow-up. Patients and Methods: From March 2005 to October 2014, 240 consecutive patients underwent surgery for AAD. 60 patients (mean age 60+/-13 years; 43 males underwent psychiatric consultation postoperatively, and they represent the subjects of our retrospective study. Ascending aorta +/- arch replacement was performed in 43 patients, whereas the Bentall procedure +/- arch replacement was performed in 17. Data were retrospectively analyzed. Follow-ups were completed in 59 patients (mean duration 35+/-23 months. Results: PDs were present in the medical histories of 34 patients. Postoperatively, in 28 cases, a definitive diagnosis of PD (group PD was made in agreement with the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders-IV criteria, including: Major depression (n=13, anxious-depressive syndrome (n=6, bipolar disorder Type 2 (n=4, panic attacks (n=2, paranoid schizophrenia (n=1, and anxiety (n=2. 32 patients without a definitive psychiatric diagnosis were classified as Group non-PD. In the postoperative period, clinical manifestations of PDs, including delirium, persistent spatio-temporal disorientation, and psychomotor agitation were evident in 22 patients (78% in group PD versus 8 patients (25% in group non-PD (P<0.0001. During follow-up, only one death for non-cardiac reasons occurred in group PD. There were no suicides; only 10 patients of group PD required PD treatment (P<0.0001 vs. early postoperative findings; 4 patients in group non-PD required PD treatment. Conclusion: Our findings suggest a strong relationship between PD and AAD. Because the psychiatric conditions appeared to be largely stable after

  1. Isolated mucosal Leishmaniasis

    Deepak Sundriyal; Naveen Kumar; Raj Kumar; Brijesh Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a term used to define a group of clinical syndrome caused by various species of parasite Leishmania. Three main clinical types of leishmaniasis are visceral leishmaniasis, cutaneous leishmaniasis and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. However, isolated presentation as mucosal disease is rare. We report a case of primarily mucosal leishmaniasis.

  2. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  3. Endothelial microparticles carrying hedgehog-interacting protein induce continuous endothelial damage in the pathogenesis of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    Nie, Di-Min; Wu, Qiu-Ling; Zheng, Peng; Chen, Ping; Zhang, Ran; Li, Bei-Bei; Fang, Jun; Xia, Ling-Hui; Hong, Mei

    2016-05-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endothelial microparticles (EMPs), a marker of endothelial damage, are elevated in acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), and that endothelial damage is implicated in the pathogenesis of aGVHD, but the mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we detected the plasma EMP levels and endothelial damage in patients and mice with aGVHD in vivo and then examined the effects of EMPs derived from injured endothelial cells (ECs) on endothelial damage and the role of hedgehog-interacting protein (HHIP) carried by EMPs in these effects in vitro. Our results showed that EMPs were persistently increased in the early posttransplantation phase in patients and mice with aGVHD. Meanwhile, endothelial damage was continuous in aGVHD mice, but was temporary in non-aGVHD mice after transplantation. In vitro, EMPs induced endothelial damage, including increased EC apoptosis, enhanced reactive oxygen species, decreased nitric oxide production and impaired angiogenic activity. Enhanced expression of HHIP, an antagonist for the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway, was observed in patients and mice with aGVHD and EMPs from injured ECs. The endothelial damage induced by EMPs was reversed when the HHIP incorporated into EMPs was silenced with an HHIP small interfering RNA or inhibited with the SHH pathway agonist, Smoothened agonist. This work supports a feasible vicious cycle in which EMPs generated during endothelial injury, in turn, aggravate endothelial damage by carrying HHIP into target ECs, contributing to the continuously deteriorating endothelial damage in the development of aGVHD. EMPs harboring HHIP would represent a potential therapeutic target for aGVHD. PMID:27009877

  4. Migraine Pathogenesis

    Nabih M. M.D. Ramadan

    2000-01-01

    @@Introduction Various theories of migraine pathogenesis have been developed over the years. To this date, none fully explains all the migraine phenomena. A complete description of each proposed theory is beyond the scope of this chapter. Nonetheless, a brief description of the arguments for and against the leading theories is noteworthy

  5. Multiple Mucosal Neuroma Syndrome

    Thami Gurvinder P

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of multiple mucosal neuroma syndrome recently classified as Multiple Endocrinal Neoplasia (MEN, type 2b, is reported for its rarity and importance of diagnosis at an early age.

  6. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    Biopsy - nasal mucosa; Nose biopsy ... to fast for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Nasal mucosal biopsy is usually done when abnormal tissue is seen during examination of the nose. It may also be done ...

  7. Live bacterial delivery systems for development of mucosal vaccines

    Thole, J.E.R.; Dalen, P.J. van; Havenith, C.E.G.; Pouwels, P.H.; Seegers, J.F.M.L.; Tielen, F.D.; Zee, M.D. van der; Zegers, N.D.; Shaw, M.

    2000-01-01

    By expression of foreign antigens in attenuated strains derived from bacterial pathogens and in non-pathogenic commensal bacteria, recombinant vaccines are being developed that aim to stimulate mucosal immunity. Recent advances in the pathogenesis and molecular biology of these bacteria have allowed

  8. Oral mucositis in myelosuppressive cancer therapy.

    Epstein, J B; Schubert, M M

    1999-09-01

    -inflammatory medications. These approaches to management have undergone initial study, but additional investigation is needed to determine their effectiveness with respect to the prevention of mucositis and symptom management and to determine appropriate doses and frequencies of intervention. Current studies and our increasing understanding of the pathogenesis of oral mucositis will lead to new approaches to management and improved quality of life for these patients. PMID:10503852

  9. The Effects of Combined Adiponectin-Metformin on Glucose and Lipids Levels in Mice and Acute Toxicity and Anti-Ulcerogenic Activity of Adiponectin Against Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injuries in Rat

    Mohammed A. Alshawsh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Adiponectin is a protein hormone secreted entirely by abdominal fat tissue. It exhibits various biological activities. The present study was performed to evaluate the effects of metformin alone or in combination with adiponectin on blood glucose, TG (triglyceride, CHOL (Total cholesterol, LDL (Low density lipoprotein and HDL (High density lipoprotein levels in mice and also to evaluate the anti-ulcerogenic activity of adiponectin against ethanol induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. Three groups of mice were gavaged with 1% volume/body weight high fat-sucrose. Metformin at a dosage of 250 mg/kg was added to the feed and a dosage of 2.5 mg/kg adiponectin was injected intraperitoneally (i.p. Blood glucose was measured at one hour intervals for five hours. Blood concentrations of TG, CHOL, LDL and HDL were also measured at the end of the fifth hour of the experiment. On the other hand, four groups of adult healthy rats were i.p. injected with distilled water, omeprazole 20 mg/kg, 2.5 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg adiponectin one hour before oral administration of absolute ethanol to generate gastric mucosal injury. After an additional hour the rats were sacrificed and the ulcer areas of the gastric walls were determined. Furthermore, an acute toxicity study has indicated no mortality with 5 mg/kg dose of adiponectin injected i.p in rats and no major clinical signs of toxicity were observed. The results indicate that the effect of a combination of metformin and adiponectin on blood glucose and HDL is quite effective. Histology of the gastric wall of negative control rats revealed severe damage of gastric mucosa, along with edema and leucocyte infiltration of the submucosal layer compared to rats pre-treated with either omeprazole or adiponectin extract where there was marked gastric protection along with reduction or inhibition of edema and leucocytes infiltration. The results suggest that combination of metfomin and adiponectin give a promising antidiabetic

  10. Pathogenesis of Candida vulvovaginitis.

    Sobel, J D

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of candida vulvovaginitis (CVV) has been estimated based on statistical data from Great Britain to be an increase to 200/100,000 over 10 years to 1984. CVV in the US is the 2nd commonest cause of vaginal infection, with bacterial vaginosis occurring twice as often. 85-90% of the yeasts isolated from the vagina are candida albicans, based on biotyping rather that the newer methods of DNA hybridization. The pathogenesis of CVV is discussed in terms of the microbiology (virulence factors, adherence, germ tube and mycelium formation, proteinase secretion, and switching colonies), asymptomatic vaginal colonization, transformation to symptomatic vaginitis, host predisposing factors (pregnancy, oral contraceptives, diabetes mellitus, antimicrobes, and other), vaginal defense mechanisms (humoral system, phagocytic system, cell mediated immunity, vaginal flora, other), and pathogenesis of recurrent and chronic CVV (internal reservoir, sexual transmission, vaginal relapse, and experimental models) The discussion of the development of virulent symptoms is capsuled in the following comments. Vaginal cell receptivity varies among individuals, but all strains of C. Albicans adhere to both exfoliated vaginal and buccal epithelial cells, or mucosal surfaces, through the yeast surface mannoprotein. It is suggested from in vitro studies that germ tube and mycelium formation facilitates vaginal mucosal invasion. Exogenous and endogenous factors may enhance germination and precipitate symptomatic vaginitis, or inhibit germination. Increased proteinase secretion may be a result of the transformation from the blastoconidium/colonization phase to the germinated invasive vaginitis stage or an independent virulence factor. It is reported that hereditable spontaneous switching may occur spontaneously in vivo also. Colonizing yeasts with a change in environment can transform to a more virulent phase. Colonization rates vary from 10-25%, and the critical issue is understanding

  11. 鱼油对重症急性胰腺炎大鼠肠黏膜屏障的影响%Fish oil protects the intestinal mucosal barrier in rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    张波; 刘燕燕; 刘丛丛; 武华

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨 -3鱼油脂肪乳剂对重症急性胰腺炎(SAP)大鼠早期肠黏膜功能屏障的影响.方法:♂Wistar大鼠30只随机分为:假手术组(So组,n=10),鱼油治疗组(F组,n=10)和生理盐水治疗组(N组,n=10).通过胰管逆行注射法建成SAP模型,并分别尾静脉注射 -3鱼油脂肪乳剂和生理盐水治疗.检测大鼠血浆D-乳酸和肠脂肪酸结合蛋白(I-FABP)的水平,观察小肠黏膜组织和胰腺组织并进行病理学评分.0.23,均P<0.05或0.01).结论:ω-3鱼油脂肪乳剂能降低D-乳酸和I-FABP的浓度,从而降低肠黏膜的通透性,减轻全身炎症反应,保护大鼠的肠黏膜屏障.%AIM: To evaluate the protective effect of omega-3 fish oil on the intestinal mucosal barrier in serious acute pancreatitis (SAP) rats.METHODS: Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operated group (n = 10), fish oil group (n = 10), and normal saline group (n = 10).SAP was induced in rats of the fish oil group and normal saline group by retrograde injection of 5% sodium cholate (1 mL/kg) into the pancreatic duct.These two groups were then intravenously given fish oil supplement (2 mL/kg) and normal saline (2mL/kg), respectively.The sham-operated group was subjected to sham operation.After treatment, plasma D-lactate and serum intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) were measured, and the severity of pancreatitis and intestinal changes was evaluated by histopathological scoring.RESULTS: Plasma D-lactate (mmol/L), serum I-FABP (μg/L), and histopathological scores of intestinal changes and pancreatitis in the normal saline group were markedly lower than those in the sham-operated group and fish oil group (0.43 ± 0.12 vs 0.07 ±0.02, 0.26 ± 0.05; 1 510.00 ± 72.72 vs 80.50 ± 5.60, 904.00 + 61.50; 2.60 ± 0.32 vs 0.20 ± 0.10, 1.85 ± 0.34; 8.60 ± 0.31 vs 0.30 ± 0.12, 7.30 ± 0.23; all P < 0.05 or 0.01).CONCLUSION: Omega-3 fish oil supplementation reduces plasma D-lactate and

  12. Radiation induced oral mucositis: a review of current literature on prevention and management.

    Mallick, Supriya; Benson, Rony; Rath, G K

    2016-09-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a major limiting acute side effect of radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. The spectrum of problems associated with mucositis includes oral pain, odynophagia, reduced oral intake, and secondary infections. Incidence of mucositis is increased with addition of concurrent chemotherapy as well as altered fractionation schedules. This leads to treatment interruption and suboptimal disease control. Hence, prevention as well as timely management of OM is necessary for optimum tumor control. We reviewed the English literature with key words "Radiation induced mucositis, Mucositis, Oral Mucositis" to find relevant articles describing incidence, pathophysiology, prophylaxis, and treatment of oral mucositis. Prevention and treatment of OM is an active area of research. Maintenance of oral hygiene is an important part in prevention of OM. A battery of agents including normal saline and alkali (soda bicarbonate) mouth washes, low level laser therapy, and benzydamine (non-steroidal analgesic and anti-inflammatory) have effectiveness in the prevention and treatment of radiation induced oral mucositis. Chlorhexidine mouth gargles are recommended for prevention of chemotherapy induced oral mucositis but is not recommended for radiotherapy associated mucositis. Treatment of co-existing infection is also important and both topical (povidone iodine) and systemic anti fungals should be used judiciously. Radiation induced oral mucositis is a common problem limiting the efficacy of radiation by increasing treatment breaks. Adequate prophylaxis and treatment may limit the severity of radiation mucositis and improve compliance to radiation which may translate in better disease control and survival. PMID:26116012

  13. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of...

  14. Alteration of the Redox State with Reactive Oxygen Species for 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis in Hamsters

    Yoshino, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Ayaka; Nakajima, Atsushi; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is often induced in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy treatment. It has been reported that oral mucositis can reduce quality of life, as well as increasing the incidence of mortality. The participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis is well known, but no report has actually demonstrated the presence of ROS. Thus, the purpose of this study was thus to demonstrate the involvement of ROS and the alteration of the redox state in oral muc...

  15. 重症急性胰腺炎并发胰腺脑病的发病机制研究进展%Advanced on the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis complicated with pancreatic encephalopathy

    刘补报; 李得溪

    2015-01-01

    胰腺脑病是重症急性胰腺炎的严重并发症,病死率高,预后差。目前关于胰腺脑病的发病机制主要有胰酶学说、细胞因子学说、营养缺乏学说、细菌和真菌感染学说、低氧血症与微循环障碍和组织代谢紊乱学说等,但尚未有哪一种学说能独立阐明其发病机制。笔者主要综述近几年来发展的各种学说。%Pancreatic encephalopathy (PE) is a severe complication of severe acute pancreatitis, and has the characteristics of the high mortality and poor prognosis. Although about the pathogenesis of pancreatic encephalopathy mainly include theory of pancreatic enzyme, the theory of cytokines, the theory of alimentary deficiency, the theory of bacterial and fungal infection, the theory of hypoxemia and microcirculation dysfunction, the theory of tissue metabolism disorder and so on, the pathogenesis of pancreatic encephalopathy still unclear at present. The author mainly reviews the development of the pathogenesis of pancreatic encephalopathy in recent years.

  16. Mucosal immunity in invertebrates

    Bilej, Martin

    Vol. 1. Elsevier: Academic Press, 2015 - (Městecký, J.; Strober, W.; Russell, M.; Kelsall, B.; Cheroutre, H.; Lambrecht, B.), s. 135-144. (Fourth Edition). ISBN 978-0-12-415847-4 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : mucosal immunity * invertebrates Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  17. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches. PMID:26117595

  18. Mucosal immunoregulation: transcription factors as possible therapeutic targets.

    Doganci, Aysefa; Neurath, Markus F; Finotto, Susetta

    2005-10-01

    Much progress has been recently made with regard to our understanding of the mucosal immune system in health and disease. In particular, it has been shown that uncontrolled mucosal immune responses driven by lymphocytes or non-lymphoid cells may lead to immunological diseases such as allergy, hypersensitivity and inflammation. Thus, a more detailed understanding of mucosal immune regulation and decision making at mucosal surfaces is essential for a better understanding of mucosal immune responses in health and disease. Antigen presenting cells and T lymphocytes play a key role in controlling mucosal immune responses. To deal with this key task, T helper cells differentiate into functionally distinct subsets: TH1 (CD4+ T Helper cells), TH2, TH3, Tr1, and CD4+CD25+ T (Treg) cells. This review summarizes the role of antigen presenting cells, eosinophils, mast cells and T-cell subsets in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation and intestinal inflammation. Furthermore, we discuss novel immunological treatment modalities for allergic inflammation (e.g. allergic asthma) and chronic intestinal inflammation (e.g. inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD)) such as the control of the expression of transcription factors to redirect pathological immune responses. PMID:16248825

  19. Allopurinol gel mitigates radiation-induced mucositis and dermatitis

    It has not been verified whether allopurinol application is beneficial in decreasing the severity of radiation-induced oral mucositis and dermatitis. Rats were divided into 4 groups and received 15 Gy irradiation on the left whisker pad. Group 1 received only irradiation. Group 2 was maintained by applying allopurinol/carrageenan-mixed gel (allopurinol gel) continuously from 2 days before to 20 days after irradiation. Group 3 had allopurinol gel applied for 20 days after radiation. Group 4 was maintained by applying carrageenan gel continuously from 2 days before to 20 days after irradiation. The intra oral mucosal and acute skin reactions were assessed daily using mucositis and skin score systems. The escape thresholds for mechanical stimulation to the left whisker pad were measured daily. In addition, the irradiated tissues at the endpoint of this study were compared with naive tissue. Escape threshold in group 2 was significantly higher than that in group 1, and mucositis and skin scores were much improved compared with those of group 1. Concerning escape threshold, mucositis and skin scores in group 3 began to improve 10 days after irradiation. Group 4 showed severe symptoms of mucositis and dermatitis to the same extent as that observed in group 1. In the histopathological study, the tissues of group 1 showed severe inflammatory reactions, compared with those of group 2. These results suggest that allopurinol gel application can mitigate inflammation reactions associated with radiation-induced oral mucositis and dermatitis. (author)

  20. Oral mucositis: recent perspectives on prevention and treatment

    Paulo Sérgio da Silva Santos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucositis is a result of toxicity and one of the most common side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in cancer treatment and in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Clinically these changes are characterized by epithelial atrophy, edema, erythema and the appearance of ulcerations that can affect the entire oral mucosa, causing pain and discomfort, impairing speech, and swallowing food. In addition to the major symptoms, the ulcers increase the risk of local and systemic infection, compromising function and interfering with oral antineoplastic treatment and may lead to it being discontinued. The diagnosis, prevention and therapeutic strategies in providing support in cases of oral mucositis are the dentist’s responsibility. Through critical analysis of literature, the aim of this article is to present oral mucositis, its pathogenesis, clinical features and treatments offered today to address or control the condition, highlighting the importance of dentists’ role in its management.

  1. Peptic ulcer pathophysiology: acid, bicarbonate, and mucosal function

    Højgaard, L; Mertz Nielsen, A; Rune, S J

    1996-01-01

    The previously accepted role of gastric acid hypersecretion in peptic ulcer disease has been modified by studies showing no correlation between acid output and clinical outcome of ulcer disease, or between ulcer recurrence rate after vagotomy and preoperative acid secretion. At the same time......, studies have been unable to demonstrate increased acidity in the duodenal bulb in patients with duodenal ulcer, and consequently more emphasis has been given to the mucosal protecting mechanisms. The existence of an active gastric and duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion creates a pH gradient from the...... cell removal and repair regulated by epidermal growth factor. Sufficient mucosal blood flow, including a normal acid/base balance, is important for subepithelial protection. In today's model of ulcer pathogenesis, gastric acid and H. pylori work in concert as aggressive factors, with the open question...

  2. Mucosal regeneration during radiotherapy

    Background and purpose: Regeneration of the aerodigestive mucosa is known to occur during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. The circumstances surrounding its time of onset and magnitude are not well understood, however. Material and methods: Mucosal reactions were observed in 100 patients undergoing conventionally fractionated treatment at 2 Gy/day over 7 weeks and 88 receiving accelerated treatment at 1.8 Gy twice daily over 3(1(2)) weeks on the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group head and neck cancer trials. Similar observations in 61 patients treated palliatively at dose rates between 0.8 and 240 Gy/h using ten 3.0-4.2 Gy fractions over 2 weeks are compared. Results: Several findings emerged from these studies: 1. Reactions evolved more quickly at oropharyngeal sites than in the hypopharynx. 2. Reactions at both sites evolved more rapidly at greater rates of dose accumulation. 3. The timing of reactions suggested the presence of a strong regenerative mucosal response that started before the manifestation of 'patchy' (grade II) mucosal reactions. 4. The regenerative response was strong enough to 'make good' damage accumulated at a rate of 2 Gy/day in over a third of cases. 5. The linear quadratic model without time correction failed to provide an adequate prediction of the frequency or intensity of mucosal reactions produced by any of the regimes. A simple model of the regenerative response is presented. Conclusions: This study suggests that the timing and magnitude of the regenerative response vary between sites and individuals but are linked to the amount of epithelial cellular depletion occurring during treatment

  3. Small intestinal mucosal toxicity of cis-platinum--comparison of toxicity with platinum analogues and dexamethasone.

    Allan, S G; Smyth, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    Cis-platinum causes profound gastrointestinal symptoms in patients and these may persist for many days after drug administration. Gut mucosal toxicity may be a factor in the pathogenesis of such prolonged nausea, vomiting and anorexia. The effects of cis-platinum on mouse ileal mucosal architecture, villus epithelial cell influx and disaccharidase activity are described in comparison with dhe effects of two platinum analogues, CBDCA and CHIP. In addition the effect of dexamethasone, a useful ...

  4. Collaborative studies in mucosal immunology in Goroka.

    Clancy, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A collaborative program between the Papua New Guinea (PNG) Institute of Medical Research and the Hunter Mucosal Group has completed studies relevant to protection of the airways against bacterial infection. Specifically, these studies addressed the mucosal capacity to produce local immunoglobulins and the capacity of the airways to respond to an oral vaccine containing inactivated nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). The mucosal IgA response to NTHi antigens was blunted in both children and adults in PNG compared with that found in Australian children and adults, whose airways are colonized only intermittently. Despite this, when oral NTHi is given to Papua New Guinean adults with chronic airways disease, it is followed by a significant (50%) reduction in incidence of acute bronchitic episodes, and a 3-log reduction in density of colonization, which persisted about 10 months. The implications of these key findings are discussed with respect to both mechanism and wider control of pathology emanating from abnormal airways colonization in a PNG environment. PMID:23163182

  5. New Pathways for Alimentary Mucositis

    Keefe, Dorothy M. K.; Joanne M. Bowen

    2008-01-01

    Alimentary mucositis is a major dose-limiting toxicity associated with anticancer treatment. It is responsible for reducing patient quality of life and represents a significant economic burden in oncology. The pathobiology of alimentary mucositis is extremely complex, and an increased understanding of mechanisms and pathway interactions is required to rationally design improved therapies. This review describes the latest advances in defining mechanisms of alimentary mucositis pathobiology in ...

  6. Hydrophobicity of mucosal surface and its relationship to gut barrier function.

    Qin, Xiaofa; Caputo, Francis J; Xu, Da-Zhong; Deitch, Edwin A

    2008-03-01

    Loss of the gut barrier has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and, thus, understanding the intestinal barrier is of potential clinical importance. An important, but relatively neglected, component of the gut barrier is the unstirred mucus layer, which through its hydrophobic and other properties serves as an important barrier to bacterial and other factors within the gut lumen. Thus, the goal of this study was to establish a reproducible method of measuring mucosal hydrophobicity and test the hypothesis that conditions that decrease mucosal hydrophobicity are associated with increased gut permeability. Hydrophobicity was measured in various segments of normal gut by measuring the contact angle of an aqueous droplet placed on the mucosal surface using a commercial goniometer. Second, the effect of the mucolytic agent N-acetyl cysteine on mucosal hydrophobicity and gut permeability was measured, as was the effects of increasing periods of in vivo gut ischemia on these parameters. Gut ischemia was induced by superior mesenteric artery occlusion, and gut permeability was measured by the mucosal-to-serosal passage of fluoresceine isothiocyanate-dextran (4.3 kDa) (FD4) across the everted sacs of ileum. Intestinal mucosal hydrophobicity showed a gradual increase from the duodenum to the end of the ileum and remained at high level in the cecum, colon, and rectum. Both N-acetyl cysteine treatment and ischemia caused a dose-dependent decrease in mucosal hydrophobicity, which significantly correlated increased gut permeability. Mucosal hydrophobicity of the intestine can be reproducibly measured, and decreases in mucosal hydrophobicity closely correlate with increased gut permeability. These results suggest that mucosal hydrophobicity can be a reliable method of measuring the barrier function of the unstirred mucus layer and a useful parameter in evaluating the pathogenesis of gut barrier dysfunction. PMID:17693944

  7. NOX1 is responsible for cell death through STAT3 activation in hyperoxia and is associated with the pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Carnesecchi, Stephanie; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Zanetti, Filippo; Singovski, Grigory; Deffert, Christine; Donati, Yves; Cagarelli, Thomas; Pache, Jean-Claude; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Reith, Walter; Barazzone-Argiroffo, Constance

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to alveolar cell death in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and we previously demonstrated that NOX1-derived ROS contributed to hyperoxia-induced alveolar cell death in mice. The study investigates whether NOX1 expression is modulated in epithelial cells concomitantly to cell death and associated to STAT3 signaling in the exudative phase of ARDS. In addition, the role of STAT3 activation in NOX1-dependent epithelial cell death was confirmed by...

  8. Motor response to acute dopaminergic challenge with apomorphine and levodopa in Parkinson's disease: implications for the pathogenesis of the on-off phenomenon.

    Colosimo, C.; MERELLO, M; Hughes, A J; Sieradzan, K; A. J. Lees

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate the contribution of postsynaptic changes to motor fluctuations, three groups of parkinsonian patients with differing responses to treatment were acutely challenged with two dopaminergic drugs-apomorphine and levodopa-having different mechanisms of action. METHODS--Forty two patients with Parkinson's disease (14 untreated, eight with a stable response to levodopa, and 20 with levodopa induced motor fluctuations) were challenged on two consecutive days with apomorphine a...

  9. New Concepts in the Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Control of Diseases Caused by the Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus

    1988-01-01

    The new information on the pathogenesis and epidemiology of mucosal disease of cattle is reviewed. It is now known that clinical mucosal disease occurs only in cattle which were infected with a pestivirus in early gestation and were born with persistent viral infection and specific immunotolerance. These animals may be clinically normal at birth but may develop fatal mucosal disease, perhaps following superinfection with another pestivirus, usually between 6 and 24 months of age. They may als...

  10. Mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis

    Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Coskun, Mehmet; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2013-01-01

    . With the introduction of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors for the treatment of UC, it has become increasingly evident that the disease course is influenced by whether or not the patient achieves mucosal healing. Thus, patients with mucosal healing have fewer flare-ups, a decreased risk of...

  11. Experience with registered mucosal vaccines.

    Dietrich, Guido; Griot-Wenk, Monika; Metcalfe, Ian C; Lang, Alois B; Viret, Jean-François

    2003-01-30

    Most pathogens gain access to their host through mucosal surfaces. It is therefore desirable to develop vaccination strategies that lead to mucosal immune responses. Ideally, a vaccine should be administered mucosally in order to elicit mucosal protection. Several attenuated live viral and bacterial pathogens are registered as oral vaccines for human use, including the oral polio vaccine (Sabin) as well as attenuated strains of Salmonella typhi and Vibrio cholerae. These attenuated bacterial live vaccines-S. typhi Ty21a as well as V. cholerae CVD 103-HgR-are employed as vaccines against typhoid and cholera, respectively. In this manuscript, we review the immune responses that are induced by these vaccines, with a focus on mucosal immunity. PMID:12531339

  12. Reverse Genetics for Fusogenic Bat-Borne Orthoreovirus Associated with Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Humans: Role of Outer Capsid Protein σC in Viral Replication and Pathogenesis.

    Kawagishi, Takahiro; Kanai, Yuta; Tani, Hideki; Shimojima, Masayuki; Saijo, Masayuki; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Nelson Bay orthoreoviruses (NBVs) are members of the fusogenic orthoreoviruses and possess 10-segmented double-stranded RNA genomes. NBV was first isolated from a fruit bat in Australia more than 40 years ago, but it was not associated with any disease. However, several NBV strains have been recently identified as causative agents for respiratory tract infections in humans. Isolation of these pathogenic bat reoviruses from patients suggests that NBVs have evolved to propagate in humans in the form of zoonosis. To date, no strategy has been developed to rescue infectious viruses from cloned cDNA for any member of the fusogenic orthoreoviruses. In this study, we report the development of a plasmid-based reverse genetics system free of helper viruses and independent of any selection for NBV isolated from humans with acute respiratory infection. cDNAs corresponding to each of the 10 full-length RNA gene segments of NBV were cotransfected into culture cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase, and viable NBV was isolated using a plaque assay. The growth kinetics and cell-to-cell fusion activity of recombinant strains, rescued using the reverse genetics system, were indistinguishable from those of native strains. We used the reverse genetics system to generate viruses deficient in the cell attachment protein σC to define the biological function of this protein in the viral life cycle. Our results with σC-deficient viruses demonstrated that σC is dispensable for cell attachment in several cell lines, including murine fibroblast L929 cells but not in human lung epithelial A549 cells, and plays a critical role in viral pathogenesis. We also used the system to rescue a virus that expresses a yellow fluorescent protein. The reverse genetics system developed in this study can be applied to study the propagation and pathogenesis of pathogenic NBVs and in the generation of recombinant NBVs for future vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26901882

  13. Cannabinoid HU210 protects isolated rat stomach against impairment caused by serum of rats with experimental acute pancreatitis.

    Cao, Ming-hua; Li, Yong-yu; Xu, Jing; Feng, Ya-jing; Lin, Xu-hong; Li, Kun; Han, Tong; Chen, Chang-jie

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), especially severe acute pancreatitis often causes extra-pancreatic complications, such as acute gastrointestinal mucosal lesion (AGML) which is accompanied by a considerably high mortality, yet the pathogenesis of AP-induced AGML is still not fully understood. In this report, we investigated the alterations of serum components and gastric endocrine and exocrine functions in rats with experimental acute pancreatitis, and studied the possible contributions of these alterations in the pathogenesis of AGML. In addition, we explored the intervention effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist HU210 and antagonist AM251 on isolated and serum-perfused rat stomach. Our results showed that the AGML occurred after 5 h of AP replication, and the body homeostasis was disturbed in AP rat, with increased levels of pancreatic enzymes, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), proinflammtory cytokines and chemokines in the blood, and an imbalance of the gastric secretion function. Perfusing the isolated rat stomach with the AP rat serum caused morphological changes in the stomach, accompanied with a significant increment of pepsin and [H+] release, and increased gastrin and decreased somatostatin secretion. HU210 reversed the AP-serum-induced rat pathological alterations, including the reversal of transformation of the gastric morphology to certain degree. The results from this study prove that the inflammatory responses and the imbalance of the gastric secretion during the development of AP are responsible for the pathogenesis of AGML, and suggest the therapeutic potential of HU210 for AGML associated with acute pancreatitis. PMID:23285225

  14. Alteration of the redox state with reactive oxygen species for 5-fluorouracil-induced oral mucositis in hamsters.

    Fumihiko Yoshino

    Full Text Available Oral mucositis is often induced in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy treatment. It has been reported that oral mucositis can reduce quality of life, as well as increasing the incidence of mortality. The participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis is well known, but no report has actually demonstrated the presence of ROS. Thus, the purpose of this study was thus to demonstrate the involvement of ROS and the alteration of the redox state in oral mucositis using an in vivo L-band electron spin resonance (ESR technique. An oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with 10% acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch was used. Lipid peroxidation was measured as the level of malondialdehyde determined by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. The rate constants of the signal decay of nitroxyl compounds using in vivo L-band ESR were calculated from the signal decay curves. Firstly, we established the oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch. An increased level of lipid peroxidation in oral mucositis was found by measuring malondialdehyde using isolated hamster cheek pouch ulcer. In addition, as a result of in vivo L-band ESR measurements using our model animals, the decay rate constants of carbamoyl-PROXYL, which is a reagent for detecting the redox balance in tissue, were decreased. These results suggest that a redox imbalance might occur by excessive generation of ROS at an early stage of oral mucositis and the consumption of large quantities of antioxidants including glutathione in the locality of oral mucositis. These findings support the presence of ROS involved in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis with anti-cancer therapy, and is useful for the development of novel therapies drugs for oral mucositis.

  15. Mucositis Grades and Yeast Species

    Ognjenović, Marina; Milatić, Katja; Parat, Katica; Kovačić, Ivan; Ježina Bušelić, Marina A.; Božić, Joško

    2013-01-01

    Surgically treated patients with oral, head and neck cancer commonly develop mucositis during additional irradiation therapy. Oral mucosa inflammation other than irradiation is mostly caused by Candida albicans, yeast of Candida genus. This study evaluated possible connection between grades of oral mucositis and oral yeast profile in irradiated patients before, during and after irradiation. In 25 examined patients mucosits grades »0« to »2« before irradiation with 20% positive smears and o...

  16. Cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes

    Siddappa K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes are characterized by pain, burning sensation, numbness or paraesthesia of a particular part of the skin or mucosal surface without any visible signs. They are usually sensory disorders, sometimes with a great deal of psychologic overlay. In this article various conditions have been listed and are described. The possible causative mechanisms are discussed when they are applicable and the outline of their management is described.

  17. Irradiation mucositis and oral flora

    This study, which is motivated by the substantial morbidity of local signs of mucositis and generalized symptoms that result from mucositis induced by therapeutic irradiation, has the following objectives: To investigate if it is possible to prevent irradiation mucositis via oral flora elimination, and, if it is true that flora plays a role in irradiation mucositis, what fraction of the oral flora may be involved; to evaluate oral Gram-negative bacillary carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate Gram-negative bacilli from the oral cavity; to evaluate oral yeast carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate yeasts stomatitis and the 'selectivity' of elimination of flora. Two methods are described for monitoring alterations of mucositis of the oral cavity and changes in oral flora. Chlorhexidine has been tested as the commonly used prophylaxis. The effect of chlorhexidine 0.1% rinses on oral flora and mucositis has been studied in a prospective placebo controlled double blind randomized programme. The results of the influence of saliva on the antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine and the results of selective elimination of oral flora in irradiated patients who have head and neck cancer are reported. Salivary inactivation of the topical antimicrobials used for selective elimination of oral flora has been studied and the results are reported. Finally, the objectives that have been achieved (or not) are delineated. The significance of the results of the study are discussed in terms of published information and further lines of research are suggested. (author). 559 refs.; 29 figs.; 20 tabs

  18. Pathogenesis of cerebral malaria

    Full text: Cerebral Malaria (CM) is the most severe complication of malaria and a major cause of death. The mechanisms underlying human CM pathogenesis might be due to mechanical cause, as demonstrated by cytoadherence of parasitised erythrocytes pRB, or to excessive cytokine production by the host in response to Plasmodium falciparum, or a combination of the two together with neuronal injury by malaria toxins. Antibody response, genetic traits and other factors have been proposed to explain why only some episodes have life-threatening complications. The microvascular endothelial cell is a major target of inflammatory cytokines overproduced in infectious diseases. Fatal CM is associated with widespread induction of endothelial activation markers, with significant higher levels of ICAM, VCAM and E-selectin expression on vessels in the brain. 199 patients were admitted at the hospital and were classified with malaria-based neurological disfunctions, such as acute psychosis, ataxia, hallucinations, fever and convulsions, prostration or coma. On a flow chart, 65 of those patients with the most acute syndromes mentioned above, were found to have negative BSN (blood slide), compared to 124 where the BSN showed to be positive. Identically to the 10 other patients from the severe form group, also presented positive BSN. The condition of some of these two subgroup patients (15), will later evolve into a more severe form with acute neurological disfunctions attributed to the cerebral malaria. The interesting aspect in regards to the 65 patients considered as having CM, upon severe manifestations of the disease, show no or little peripheral parasitemia. This fact confirms our experimental conclusion that, in the process of pRB adhesion to the microvessels of the brain, they are sequestered by monocytes and platelets, leading to vessel rupture. This fact could be an explanation of the lower % of circulating pRB and low peripheral parasitemia. There is a relationship between

  19. Pathogenesis of Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    Dunn, Winston; Shah, Vijay H

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic liver disease includes a broad clinical-histological spectrum from simple steatosis, cirrhosis, acute alcoholic hepatitis with or without cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma as a complication of cirrhosis. The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can be conceptually divided into (1) ethanol-mediated liver injury, (2) inflammatory immune response to injury, (3) intestinal permeability and microbiome changes. Corticosteroids may improve outcomes, but this is controversial and probably only impacts short-term survival. New pathophysiology-based therapies are under study, including antibiotics, caspase inhibition, interleukin-22, anakinra, FXR agonist and others. These studies provide hope for better future outcomes for this difficult disease. PMID:27373608

  20. A case of fatal acute intermittent porphyria: laboratory diagnosis and pathogenesis considerations / Un caz fatal de porfirie acută intermitentă: diagnostic de laborator şi consideraţii patogenice

    Bălaşa Rodica

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Porfiria acută intermitentă (PAI este o boală metabolică, cu transmitere autosomal dominantă, cu alterarea căii de biosinteză a hemului prin deficitul enzimei porphobilinogen (PBG dezaminaza. Acest diagnostic trebuie să fie evocate în toate cazurile de adultii care prezintă simptome inexplicabile, dar cu unele caracteristici clinice sugestive: femei cu vârstă reproductivă, dureri abdominale, slăbiciune musculară, hiponatremie prelungită şi severă, urină închisă la culoare sau roşie.

  1. Mucosal Leishmaniasis: An Underestimated Presentation of a Neglected Disease

    Alessio Strazzulla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of current knowledge about mucosal leishmaniasis (ML. Although involvement of mucous membranes is classically admitted in New World leishmaniasis, particularly occurring in infection by Leishmania (L. braziliensis species complex, ML is also a possible presentation of Old World leishmaniasis, in either L. donovani or L. major species complex infections. Thus, ML has to be considered not only as a Latin American disease but as an Old and New World disease. We describe ML epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinics, diagnosis, and therapy. Considering both its highly disfiguring lesions and its possible lethal outcome, ML should not be underestimated by physicians. Moreover, leishmaniasis is expected to increase its burden in many countries as sandfly vector distribution is widespreading towards non-endemic areas. Finally, the lack of clear understanding of ML pathogenesis and the absence of effective human vaccines strongly claim for more research.

  2. Oral mucositis and selective elimination of oral flora in head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy: a double-blind randomised clinical trial

    Stokman, MA; Spijkervet, FKL; Burlage, FR; Dijkstra, PU; Manson, WL; de Vries, EGE; Roodenburg, JLN

    2003-01-01

    Mucositis is an acute inflammation of the oral mucosa because of radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. All patients receiving radiotherapy in the head and neck region develop oral mucositis. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of selective oral flora elimination on radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis, in a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Sixty-five patients with a malignant tumour in the head and neck regions to be treated with primary curative or postoperative ra...

  3. High dose rate interstitial radiotherapy for tongue cancer with special reference to mucosal reaction

    To decide the most suitable dose schedule of high dose rate interstitial radiotherapy (HDRISR) for the tongue cancer, we paid attention to the acute mucosal reaction after radiation therapy. There is the European Organization for Research on Treatment of Cancer/Radiotherapy Oncology Group (EORTC/RTOG) scoring system for the intraoral mucosal reaction after radiation therapy, but this scoring system does not assess the degree of the mucosal reaction adequately at the disapprearing phase. So we modify the scoring system at the disappearing phase of mucosal reaction. When the mucositis turns to disappear phase, the score is 3.5 and when the coating area reduces less than 50% area at the peak mucosal reaction, the score is 2.5. When the coating becomes transparent, the score is further reduced by 1 degree. When there is only erythema, the score is 1, and when reaction disappears completely, the score is 0. We observed 10 cases of tongue cancer treated with interstitital brachytherapy; 5 cases were treated with HDRISR and 5 cases were low dose rate interstitital radiotherapy (LDRISR). During the appearing phase, we used the EORTC/RTOG scoring system and during the disappearing phase, the new scoring system. This system reflected the mucosal healing course very well. (author)

  4. Documentation of radiation-induced oral mucositis. Scoring Systems

    Background: Radiation therapy of tumors in the head and neck region is frequently associated with severe side effects in the oral mucosa which often necessitate interruption of the prescribed treatment protocol. In order to compare therapeutic strategies and, more important, in order to perform multicenter studies, generally accepted scoring systems have to be applied for uniform documentation of the oral mucosal response. Methods: Different scoring protocols are found in the literature. The scoring protocols most widely accepted are the CTC classification and the RTOG/EORTC classification. These are compared with more detailed systems. Results: In the CTC classification, grading of stomatitis is included in the responses of the gastrointestinal tract and emphasizes dietary effects. For effects of radiation alone or of radiochemotherapy, the RTOG/EORTC system, focusing on therapeutic interventions, has been established. However, there are only minor differences in the grading of mucositis between these 2 protocols. Based on the RTOG/EORTC classification, Maciejewski et al. introduced a classification system with inclusion of the area affected, but also changed the sensitivity of the scores. The latter may be confusing if the source of the system used is not cited in a report. An alternative system was proposed by Dische, which in addition to objective morphologic criteria also includes the symptoms induced by the mucosal response, and hence includes some subjective aspects reported by the patient. Conclusions: For routine documentation of acute radiation side effects in the oral cavity, the German version of the RTOG/EORTC classification can be recommended. In studies with particular interest in oral mucositis, a more sensitive scoring system may be applied. In any publication concerning mucositis, a table or a detailed description of the system used should be included. (orig.)

  5. Pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    Riederer, Peter; Lange, Klaus W.

    1992-01-01

    The importance of genetic aspects, ageing, environmental factors, head trauma, defective mitochondrial respiration, altered iron metabolism, oxidative stress and glutamatergic overactivity of the basal ganglia in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) are considered in this review.

  6. Arterivirus molecular biology and pathogenesis.

    Snijder, Eric J; Kikkert, Marjolein; Fang, Ying

    2013-10-01

    Arteriviruses are positive-stranded RNA viruses that infect mammals. They can cause persistent or asymptomatic infections, but also acute disease associated with a respiratory syndrome, abortion or lethal haemorrhagic fever. During the past two decades, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and, to a lesser extent, equine arteritis virus (EAV) have attracted attention as veterinary pathogens with significant economic impact. Particularly noteworthy were the 'porcine high fever disease' outbreaks in South-East Asia and the emergence of new virulent PRRSV strains in the USA. Recently, the family was expanded with several previously unknown arteriviruses isolated from different African monkey species. At the molecular level, arteriviruses share an intriguing but distant evolutionary relationship with coronaviruses and other members of the order Nidovirales. Nevertheless, several of their characteristics are unique, including virion composition and structure, and the conservation of only a subset of the replicase domains encountered in nidoviruses with larger genomes. During the past 15 years, the advent of reverse genetics systems for EAV and PRRSV has changed and accelerated the structure-function analysis of arterivirus RNA and protein sequences. These systems now also facilitate studies into host immune responses and arterivirus immune evasion and pathogenesis. In this review, we have summarized recent advances in the areas of arterivirus genome expression, RNA and protein functions, virion architecture, virus-host interactions, immunity, and pathogenesis. We have also briefly reviewed the impact of these advances on disease management, the engineering of novel candidate live vaccines and the diagnosis of arterivirus infection. PMID:23939974

  7. Search for compounds for prevention and treatment of oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy

    In the clinical setting, the frequency of adverse effects is directly linked to the results of treatment. However, in the case of head and neck radiotherapy for cancer, adverse effects are unavoidable and among them, oral mucositis is considered to be the most significant and debilitating acute complication associated with such radiation therapy. In patients receiving head and neck radiotherapy, the prevalence of mucositis is 85-100% and mucositis-associated pain is the main type of cancer treatment-related pain. A mouthwash or iceball containing sodium alginate, sodium azulene sulfonate and fibrinolysin deoxyribonuclease is widely used for the prevention and treatment of mucositis. In the USA, many strategies for the prevention of oral mucositis have been evaluated, but conflicting data has made the results inconclusive. Keratinocyte Growth Factor 1 (KGF1) has achieved promising results in therapy and is the only medication currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), though in Japan, it is not covered by the National Health Insurance scheme. Therefore, we feel it is important to establish useful strategies for the prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-induced mucositis based on significant scientific evidence. As oxidative stress is associated with radiation-induced mucositis, in this study, we used 60Co-γray-induced HO-1-N-1 cell injury to studying the characteristics of mucositis in this regard and found that two well-known antioxidants, N-Acetyl-L-cysteine and catechins, had preventive effects against γray-induced cytotoxicity. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine and catechins would therefore be good materials for the prevention of mucositis in patients undergoing cancer radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Poliovirus, pathogenesis of poliomyelitis, and apoptosis.

    Blondel, B.; Colbère-Garapin, F.; Couderc, T.; Wirotius, A.; Guivel-Benhassine, F.

    2005-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) is the causal agent of paralytic poliomyelitis, an acute disease of the central nervous system (CNS) resulting in flaccid paralysis. The development of new animal and cell models has allowed the key steps of the pathogenesis of poliomyelitis to be investigated at the molecular level. In particular, it has been shown that PV-induced apoptosis is an important component of the tissue injury in the CNS of infected mice, which leads to paralysis. In this review the molecular biolog...

  9. Gastric mucosal blood flow measurement

    Pertechnetate clearance (C/sub Tc/) by the stomach before and after betazole stimulation was compared to regional measurements of gastric blood flow utilizing nuclide (Chromium-51 and Cerium-141)-labeled microspheres in five piglets. Pertechnetate clearance closely correlated (correlation coefficient 0.926) with mucosal blood flow in the gastric corpus measured by the microsphere technique. Betazole increased blood flow in the corpus region by 100 percent but did not alter this relationship. Except in one experiment, microsphere blood flow valves in the antrum and fundus were unchanged by betazole and did not significantly correlate with pertechnetate clearance. Pertechnetate clearance appears to be a reliable method of determining gastric mucosal blood flow in experimental animals and may be considered as a noninvasive method for measuring such flow in humans. (U.S.)

  10. Acute pancreatitis

    Al Mofleh Ibrahim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The past few years have witnessed a tremendous progress in our knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and classification of acute pancreatitis. The role of ischemia, lysosomal enzymes, oxygen free radicals, polymorphnuclear cells-byproducts and inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of pancreatic necrosis and multiple organ failure has been emphasized. Furthermore, the recent knowledge about agents infecting pancreatic necrosis, routes of infection, bacteriological examination of fine needle aspirate and appropriate antibiotics have changed the concept of acute pancreatitis. New diagnostic tests such as rapid urinary trypsinogen-2 test and inflammatory mediators including polymorphnuclear elastase, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 contribute to early diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and initiation of an appropriate therapy.

  11. Therapeutic management of radiation-induced oral mucositis

    Background: Acute reactions of oral mucosa are a frequent side effect of radiotherapy, which often necessitates interruption of the treatment. Marked proliferation of tumor stem cells during treatment interruptions may occur in squamous cell carcinomata, which represent the majority of tumors in the head and neck area. Hence a fatal consequence of treatment breaks may be a significant decrease in tumor cure rates. Furthermore, marked acute responses frequently result in increased late sequelae ('consequential damage'). Therefore, amelioration of the mucosal response aiming at avoiding treatment breaks and at reduction of late reactions coul definitely increase the therapeutic success of radiation treatment. Results: A variety of prophylactic and therapeutic methods have been proposed for the management of acute radiation reactions of the oral mucosa. Frequently, their efficiacy has been established for chemotherapy or in combination with other immunosuppressive treatments. Hence, systemical rather than local effects have to be considered. Conclusions: In general, prophylaxis of oral mucositis is mainly based on dental restoration or edentation, in combination with frequent oral hygienic measures after the meals and with antiseptic mouthwashes. Intensive personal care is recommended. The necessity of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostoma is dependent on the status of the patient and on size and localization of the treatment area, i.e. the impairment of food uptake which is to be expected. Therapeutic intervention is restricted to local or systemic treatment of pain and local application of antimycotics and antibiotics. (orig./VHE)

  12. Citrulline as a Marker for Chemotherapy Induced Mucosal Barrier Injury in Pediatric Patients

    van Vilet, Michel J.; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; Koetse, Harma A.; Stellaard, Frans; Kamps, Willem A.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background. The Currently used National Cancer Institute (NCI) adverse events criteria for mucosal barrier injury (MBI) are insufficient for use in children. We searched for objective, easily measurable indicators for MBI in children with cancer. Purpose. In children with acute myeloid leukemia, var

  13. Ethanol Impairs Mucosal Immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection by Disrupting Interleukin 17 Gene Expression

    Trevejo-Nunez, Giraldina; Chen, Kong; Dufour, Jason P.; Bagby, Gregory J.; Horne, William T.; Nelson, Steve; Kolls, Jay K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute ethanol intoxication suppresses the host immune responses against Streptococcus pneumoniae. As interleukin 17 (IL-17) is a critical cytokine in host defense against extracellular pathogens, including S. pneumoniae, we hypothesized that ethanol impairs mucosal immunity against this pathogen by disrupting IL-17 production or IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) signaling. A chronic ethanol feeding model in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques and acute ethanol intoxication in a...

  14. A comparison between zinc sulfate and chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwashes in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis

    Mehdipour, M.; A Taghavi Zenoz; I Asvadi Kermani; Hosseinpour, A.

    2011-01-01

    "n Background and the Purpose of the Study: Patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy for hematological malignancies are susceptible to development of oral mucositis, and no effective modality has been reported for its prophylaxis and treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of zinc mouthwash on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis lesions. "nMethods: In this double-blind randomized trial, patients under chemotherapy for acute leukemia were divided...

  15. Enteral nutrition and mucosal immunity: implications for feeding strategies in surgery and trauma

    Sigalet, David L.; Mackenzie, Shannon L.; Hameed, S Morad

    2004-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory responses to severe trauma and surgical illnesses may be partly responsible for numerous complications, including sepsis, multiple organ failure and unregulated hypermetabolism leading to protein-calorie malnutrition. The integrity of the gastrointestinal tract appears to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of the systemic inflammatory response and sepsis. Resuscitation and nutrition support strategies for preserving gut mucosal integrity have therefore been stron...

  16. Mucosal Immune Regulation in Intestinal Disease. The role of bacterial products, food components and drugs

    Bol-Schoenmakers, M

    2009-01-01

    The challenge of the mucosal gut associated immune system is to remain unresponsive to food products and commensal microbiota, while mounting an appropriate immune response towards pathogens. This implicates the necessity of tight immune regulation within the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). Imbalance between tolerance and immunity (e.g. intestinal homeostasis) contributes to the pathogenesis of intestinal diseases like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and food allergies. The first part...

  17. Protective mucosal immunity mediated by epithelial CD1d and IL-10

    Olszak, Torsten; Neves, Joana F.; Dowds, C. Marie; Baker, Kristi; Glickman, Jonathan; Davidson, Nicholas O; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Jobin, Christian; Brand, Stephan; Sotlar, Karl; Wada, Koichiro; Katayama, Kazufumi; Nakajima, Atsushi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Kunito

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which mucosal homeostasis is maintained are of central importance to inflammatory bowel disease. Critical to these processes is the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC), which regulates immune responses at the interface between the commensal microbiota and the host1,2. CD1d presents self and microbial lipid antigens to natural killer T (NKT) cells, which are involved in the pathogenesis of colitis in animal models and human inflammatory bowel disease3–8. As CD1d crosslinking on ...

  18. Oral Mucositis Induced By Anticancer Therapies

    Al-Ansari, S.; Zecha, J.A.E.M.; Barasch, A.; Lange, de, J.; Rozema, F.R.; Raber-Durlacher, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis induced by conventional cytotoxic cancer therapies is a common and significant clinical problem in oncology. Mucositis symptoms, which include severe pain, may lead to dose reductions and unplanned interruptions of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, and often affect patients' quality of life. In addition, ulcerative mucositis represents a risk factor for local or systemic infectious complications that may be life-threatening in immunosuppressed patients. The development of biolo...

  19. Management of chemo/radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer: A review of the current literature.

    Moslemi, Dariush; Nokhandani, Akram Mohammadi; Otaghsaraei, Mahsa Taheri; Moghadamnia, Yasaman; Kazemi, Sohrab; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

    2016-07-01

    Oropharyngeal mucositis is an important complication in non-surgical cancer treatments. It represents the major complication in radiotherapy of tumors located in head and neck areas. Many results have been published in order to define the best clinical protocol for prophylaxis or treatment of mucositis, but a consensus has not been attained yet. In this review, some recent topics in prophylaxis and treatment of mucositis related to radiation therapy are reconsidered using PUBMED and GOOGLE SCHOOLAR search engines from 2000 to 2015. In this review, more than 100 clinical studies have been selected and divided into the prophylactic or therapeutic uses of the evaluated treatment agents. The number of patients and kind of study design, the clinical features, prevalence, risk factors, pathogenesis, diagnosis, complication, prophylaxis and the treatment of mucositis were also specified. Nevertheless, it has not been truly achieved a consensus protocol of prophylaxis and treatment of oral mucositis. PMID:27113797

  20. Study of reduction methods for irradiation on oral mucositis. The examination of reduction methods for mucosal failure

    Reduction methods for irradiation on oral mucosa examined concerning in acute phase of the carbon ion radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies. We enforced a mechanical teeth and gingival cleaning as an Oral hearth care and gargled a polaprezinc with sodium alginate, and azulene- lidocaine with glycerin sodium as a oral linces before radiation. The response of the mucosal failure was reduced compare with no care group. In this Result, we considered that oral hearth care for prevention of infection, and mucosa protection by the drug was important factor. (author)

  1. Pelvis dilatation and mucosal thickening of transplanted kidney: comparative study of resistive index and ultrasonographic finding

    Diagnostic ability of duplex Doppler ultrasonography relying on resistive index is limited when clinical symptoms and signs of rejection are subtle or renal dysfunction is caused by other conditions such as urinary tract infection. To investigate the significance in the changes of renal pelvis, a combined analysis of resistive index and ultrasonographic findings in cases of renal pelvis dilatation and mucosal thickening was undertaken. A mean resistive index was calculated from Doppler measurements of the main, segmental and interlobar arteries. The cause of mucosal thickening was retrospectively analysed using the clinical and laboratory findings. Twenty three cases of renal pelvis dilatation and 17 cases of mucosal thickening were found in a total of 159 renal transplantation cases. In 14 of the 23 cases with renal pelvis dilatation, renal function was normal and their mean resistive index was 0.64 ± 0.04. Pelvis and ureter dilatation caused by ureteral stenosis or compression was demonstrated in 6 cases and their mean resistive index (0.72 ± 0.05) was increased. Mucosal thickening of renal pelvis was found in 7 of 32 cases with acute injection and in 2 of 13 cases with chronic rejection, but their mean resistive index was not different from that of the cases without pelvic mucosal changes. Three cases of acute rejection associated with urinary tract infection and 2 cases of chronic rejection in whom resistive indices were indeterminate, but mucosal thickening of the renal pelvis was prominent at ultrasonography. In renal transplant patients having indeterminate resistive index and mucosal thickening of the renal pelvis, ultrasonographic features must be correlated with the clinical and laboratory findings for an accurate diagnosis and treatment of renal dysfunction

  2. A metaproteomic approach to study human-microbial ecosystems at the mucosal luminal interface.

    Xiaoxiao Li

    Full Text Available Aberrant interactions between the host and the intestinal bacteria are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of many digestive diseases. However, studying the complex ecosystem at the human mucosal-luminal interface (MLI is challenging and requires an integrative systems biology approach. Therefore, we developed a novel method integrating lavage sampling of the human mucosal surface, high-throughput proteomics, and a unique suite of bioinformatic and statistical analyses. Shotgun proteomic analysis of secreted proteins recovered from the MLI confirmed the presence of both human and bacterial components. To profile the MLI metaproteome, we collected 205 mucosal lavage samples from 38 healthy subjects, and subjected them to high-throughput proteomics. The spectral data were subjected to a rigorous data processing pipeline to optimize suitability for quantitation and analysis, and then were evaluated using a set of biostatistical tools. Compared to the mucosal transcriptome, the MLI metaproteome was enriched for extracellular proteins involved in response to stimulus and immune system processes. Analysis of the metaproteome revealed significant individual-related as well as anatomic region-related (biogeographic features. Quantitative shotgun proteomics established the identity and confirmed the biogeographic association of 49 proteins (including 3 functional protein networks demarcating the proximal and distal colon. This robust and integrated proteomic approach is thus effective for identifying functional features of the human mucosal ecosystem, and a fresh understanding of the basic biology and disease processes at the MLI.

  3. Voice disorders in mucosal leishmaniasis.

    Ana Cristina Nunes Ruas

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases-Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. RESULTS: 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81% were male and five (19% female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years. The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%, followed by dysphonia (38.5%, odynophagia (30.8% and dysphagia (26.9%. 23 patients (84.6% presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. CONCLUSION: We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some

  4. Mucositis reduction by selective elimination of oral flora in irradiated cancers of the head and neck: a placebo-controlled double-blind randomized study

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that aerobic Gram-negative bacteria (AGNB) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced mucositis; consequently, selective elimination of these bacteria from the oral flora should result in a reduction of the mucositis. Methods and Materials: Head-and-neck cancer patients, when scheduled for treatment by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), were randomized for prophylactic treatment with an oral paste containing either a placebo or a combination of the antibiotics polymyxin E, tobramycin, and amphotericin B (PTA group). Weekly, the objective and subjective mucositis scores and microbiologic counts of the oral flora were noted. The primary study endpoint was the mucositis grade after 3 weeks of EBRT. Results: Seventy-seven patients were evaluable. No statistically significant difference for the objective and subjective mucositis scores was observed between the two study arms (p=0.33). The percentage of patients with positive cultures of AGNB was significantly reduced in the PTA group (p=0.01). However, complete eradication of AGNB was not achieved. Conclusions: Selective elimination of AGNB of the oral flora did not result in a reduction of radiation-induced mucositis and therefore does not support the hypothesis that these bacteria play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of mucositis

  5. Imaging of acute pancreatitis

    Merkle, Elmar M.; Goerich, Johannes [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Ulm, Steinhoevel Strasse 9, 89075 Ulm (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is defined as an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of peripancreatic tissues or remote organ systems. This article reports the current classification, definition and terminology, epidemiology and etiology, pathogenesis and pathological findings, clinical and laboratory findings, and finally imaging findings of acute pancreatitis with emphasis on cross-sectional imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  6. Nutrition and Gut Mucositis in Pediatric Oncology

    Pontoppidan, Peter Erik Lotko

    . Unfortunately, effective treatment strategies against mucositis are not in general available. The overall aim of the present PhD was to study interactions between mucositis, inflammation and nutrition. We hypothesized that toxic reactions in the alimentary tract, induced by chemotherapy, followed by release...

  7. Schwannomas and their pathogenesis.

    Hilton, David A; Hanemann, Clemens Oliver

    2014-04-01

    Schwannomas may occur spontaneously, or in the context of a familial tumor syndrome such as neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), schwannomatosis and Carney's complex. Schwannomas have a variety of morphological appearances, but they behave as World Health Organization (WHO) grade I tumors, and only very rarely undergo malignant transformation. Central to the pathogenesis of these tumors is loss of function of merlin, either by direct genetic change involving the NF2 gene on chromosome 22 or secondarily to merlin inactivation. The genetic pathways and morphological features of schwannomas associated with different genetic syndromes will be discussed. Merlin has multiple functions, including within the nucleus and at the cell membrane, and this review summarizes our current understanding of the mechanisms by which merlin loss is involved in schwannoma pathogenesis, highlighting potential areas for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24450866

  8. Chronic rhinosinusitis pathogenesis.

    Stevens, Whitney W; Lee, Robert J; Schleimer, Robert P; Cohen, Noam A

    2015-12-01

    There are a variety of medical conditions associated with chronic sinonasal inflammation, including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and cystic fibrosis. In particular, CRS can be divided into 2 major subgroups based on whether nasal polyps are present or absent. Unfortunately, clinical treatment strategies for patients with chronic sinonasal inflammation are limited, in part because the underlying mechanisms contributing to disease pathology are heterogeneous and not entirely known. It is hypothesized that alterations in mucociliary clearance, abnormalities in the sinonasal epithelial cell barrier, and tissue remodeling all contribute to the chronic inflammatory and tissue-deforming processes characteristic of CRS. Additionally, the host innate and adaptive immune responses are also significantly activated and might be involved in pathogenesis. Recent advancements in the understanding of CRS pathogenesis are highlighted in this review, with special focus placed on the roles of epithelial cells and the host immune response in patients with cystic fibrosis, CRS without nasal polyps, or CRS with nasal polyps. PMID:26654193

  9. The pathogenesis of tendinopathy

    Magnusson, S Peter; Langberg, Henning; Kjær, Michael

    2010-01-01

    , such as tendinopathy, which is characterized by pain during activity, localized tenderness upon palpation, swelling and impaired performance. Tendon histological changes include reduced numbers and rounding of fibroblasts, increased content of proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans and water...... injury mechanisms, thus implying that one or more 'weak links' are present in the structure. Understanding how tendon tissue adapts to mechanical loading will help to unravel the pathogenesis of tendinopathy....

  10. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

    Walker, David H.; Yun, Nadezhda E.

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesi...

  11. Simian Varicella Virus Pathogenesis

    Mahalingam, Ravi; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Gilden, Don

    2010-01-01

    Because varicella zoster virus (VZV) is an exclusively human pathogen, the development of an animal model is necessary to study pathogenesis, latency, and reactivation. The pathological, virological, and immunological features of simian varicella virus (SVV) infection in nonhuman primates are similar to those of VZV infection in humans. Both natural infection of cynomolgus and African green monkeys as well as intrabronchial inoculation of rhesus macaques with SVV provide the most useful model...

  12. Mucosal Antibodies Induced by Intranasal but Not Intramuscular Immunization Block Norovirus GII.4 Virus-Like Particle Receptor Binding.

    Tamminen, Kirsi; Malm, Maria; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) account for the majority of diagnosed cases of viral acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines against NoV are currently under development. Serum antibodies that block the binding of NoV VLPs to histo-blood group antigens, the putative receptors for NoV, correlate with protection against NoV infection. The role of functional mucosal antibodies in protection is largely unknown, even though the intestinal mucosa is the entry port for NoV. Balb/c mice were immunized intramuscularly (IM) or intranasally (IN) with NoV GII.4 VLPs, and systemic and mucosal blocking antibody responses were studied. IN immunization elicited NoV-specific serum and mucosal IgG and IgA antibodies, whereas IM immunized animals completely lacked IgA. Both immunization routes induced similar blocking activity in serum but only IN route generated blocking antibodies in mucosa. The level of IgA in the mucosal (nasal) lavages strongly correlated (r = 0.841) with the blocking activity, suggesting that IgA, but not IgG, is the major NoV blocking antibody on mucosal surfaces. The results indicate that only mucosal immunization route induces the development of functional anti-NoV IgA on mucosal surface. PMID:27135874

  13. Management of radiation therapy-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Part I: Clinical significance, pathophysiology and prevention

    Wei Cheong Ngeow

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal mucositis is the acute inflammatory and ulcerative reaction of the oral mucosa following radiation therapy to the head and neck region. It is such a common problem that nearly all head and neck cancer patients develop some degree of mucositis. This complication is usually transient in nature but it also represents an important clinical problem as it is a painful, debilitating, dose-dependent side effect for which there is no widely acceptable prophylaxis or effective treatment. As several authoritative groups have recently either undertaken systematic reviews or issued guidelines on the management of mucositis, it is the aim of this review to provide instead an overview of all the possible remedies available, as well as highlighting to researchers the gaps that need to be filled. The first part of this review outlines the clinical significance and pathophysiology of radiation-induced mucositis, and looks into some of the preventive approaches available.

  14. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    Bagán-Sebastián, José V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the boolean operators “AND” and “NOT”. A total of 268 articles were obtained, of which 96 met the inclusion criteria. Results Several interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis, such as oral hygiene protocols, amifostine, benzidamine, calcium phosphate, cryotherapy and iseganan, among others, were found to yield only limited benefits. Other studies have reported a decrease in the appearance and severity of mucositis with the use of cytoprotectors (sucralfate, oral glutamine, hyaluronic acid), growth factors, topical polyvinylpyrrolidone, and low power laser irradiation. Conclusions Very few interventions of confirmed efficacy are available for the management of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy. However, according to the reviewed literature, the use of palifermin, cryotherapy and low power laser offers benefits, reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis – though further studies are needed to confirm the results obtained. Key words:Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Treatment. PMID:27034762

  15. Oral mucositis. A complication of radiotherapy

    Oral mucositis is a complication of head and neck radiotherapy. It is understood what causes the inflammation and what biological tissue changes occur, however, a definite cure for oral mucositis has not yet been found. Supportive treatments, analgesics, antimicrobials and anti-inflammatory agents have been prescribed, none of which has been a thorough measure of treatment. An effective cure for oral mucositis is still in the midst of scientific research. In the interim local palliative treatments will help to alleviate the patients', debilitating symptoms

  16. Molecular Pathogenesis of Spondyloarthritis

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing

    This dissertation includes a presentation of knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis achieved through a PhD programme at Aalborg University from 1.12.2011 - 1.12.2014. Work was carried out in the Laboratory of Medical Mass Spectrometry, headed by: Professor Svend Birkelund...... Associate Professor Allan Stensballe The output of this PhD programme, besides from this dissertation, includes 5 published papers, 30 ECTS PhD courses, oral presentations of posters in national and international research environment and a short-term scholarship at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and...

  17. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Autoimmune or Immune-mediated Pathogenesis?

    Zhonghui Wen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, is still unclear, but both autoimmune and immune-mediated phenomena are involved. Autoimmune phenomena include the presence of serum and mucosal autoantibodies against intestinal epithelial cells in either form of IBD, and against human tropomyosin fraction five selectively in UC. In addition, perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA are common in UC, whereas antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA are frequently found in CD. Immune-mediate phenomena include a variety of abnormalities of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and a generalized enhanced reactivity against intestinal bacterial antigens in both CD and UC. It is currently believed that loss of tolerance against the indigenous enteric flora is the central event in IBD pathogenesis. Various complementary factors probably contribute to the loss of tolerance to commensal bacteria in IBD. They include defects in regulatory T-cell function, excessive stimulation of mucosal dendritic cells, infections or variants of proteins critically involved in bacterial antigen recognition, such as the products of CD-associated NOD2/CARD15 mutations.

  18. Pathogenesis of Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

    Asimaki, Angeliki; Kleber, Andre G; Saffitz, Jeffrey E

    2015-11-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is a primary myocardial disease. It is characterized by frequent ventricular arrhythmias and increased risk of sudden cardiac death typically arising as an early manifestation before the onset of significant myocardial remodelling. Myocardial degeneration, often confined to the right ventricular free wall, with replacement by fibrofatty scar tissue, develops in many patients. ACM is a familial disease but genetic penetrance can be low and disease expression is highly variable. Inflammation might promote disease progression. It also appears that exercise increases disease penetrance and accelerates its development. More than 60% of probands harbour mutations in genes that encode desmosomal proteins, which has raised the possibility that defective cell-cell adhesion might play a role in disease pathogenesis. Recent advances have implicated changes in the canonical wingless-type mouse mammary tumour virus integration site (Wnt)/β-catenin and Hippo signalling pathways and defects in forwarding trafficking of ion channels and other proteins to the intercalated disk in cardiac myocytes. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the pathogenesis of ACM and highlight future research directions. PMID:26199027

  19. Lymphocyte Trafficking to Mucosal Tissues

    Mikhak, Zamaneh; Agace, William Winston; Luster, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphocytes are the key cells of the adaptive immune system that provide antigen-specific responses tailored to the context of antigen exposure. Through cytokine release and antibody production, lymphocytes orchestrate and amplify the recruitment and function of other immune cells and contribute to...... host defense against invading pathogens and the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases. Lymphocyte function is critically dependent on their ability to traffic into the correct anatomic locations at the appropriate times. This process is highly regulated and requires that lymphocytes interact with...

  20. Mucosal barrier, bacteria and inflammatory bowel disease: possibilities for therapy.

    Merga, Yvette; Campbell, Barry J; Rhodes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal barrier has three major components, the mucus layer, the epithelial glycocalyx and the surface epithelium itself, whose integrity largely depends on tight junction function. In health, there is relatively little direct interaction between the luminal microbiota and the epithelium - the continuous mucus layer in the colon keeps the surface epithelium out of contact with bacteria and the ileo-caecal valve ensures that the distal small intestine is relatively microbe free. Most interaction takes place at the Peyer's patches in the distal ileum and their smaller colonic equivalents, the lymphoid follicles. Peyer's patches are overlain by a 'dome' epithelium, 5% of whose cells are specialised M (microfold) epithelial cells, which act as the major portal of entry for bacteria. There are no goblet cells in the dome epithelium and M cells have a very sparse glycocalyx allowing easy microbial interaction. It is intriguing that the typical age range for the onset of Crohn's disease (CD) is similar to the age at which the number of Peyer's patches is greatest. Peyer's patches are commonly the sites of the initial lesions in CD and the 'anti-pancreatic' antibody associated with CD has been shown to have as its epitope the glycoprotein 2 that is the receptor for type-1 bacterial fimbrial protein (fimH) on M cells. There are many reasons to believe that the mucosal barrier is critically important in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These include (i) associations between both CD and ulcerative colitis (UC) with genes that are relevant to the mucosal barrier; (ii) increased intestinal permeability in unaffected relatives of CD patients; (iii) increased immune reactivity against bacterial antigens, and (iv) animal models in which altered mucosal barrier, e.g. denudation of the mucus layer associated with oral dextran sulphate in rodents, induces colitis. Whilst some IBD patients may have genetic factors leading to weakening of the mucosal barrier

  1. Effect of ageing on colonic mucosal regeneration

    Ferenc Sipos; Katalin Leiszter; Zsolt Tulassay

    2011-01-01

    The physiologic and pathologic cellular and molecular changes occurring with age in the human colon affect both the inflammatory process leading to mucosal injury and the regenerative capacity of the epithelium. On the one hand, age-related telomere shortening and inflamm-ageing may lead to the development of colonic inflammation, which results in epithelial damage. On the other hand, the altered migration and function of regenerative stem cells, the age-related methylation of mucosal healing-associated genes, together with the alterations of growth factor signaling with age, may be involved in delayed mucosal regeneration. The connections of these alterations to the process of ageing are not fully known. The understanding and customtailored modification of these mechanisms are of great clinical importance with regard to disease prevention and modern therapeutic strategies. Here, we aim to summarize the age-related microscopic and molecular changes of the human colon, as well as their role in altered mucosal healing.

  2. Exploiting Mucosal Immunity for Antiviral Vaccines.

    Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-20

    Mucosal surfaces provide a remarkably effective barrier against potentially dangerous pathogens. Therefore, enhancing mucosal immunity through vaccines-strengthening that first line of defense-holds significant promise for reducing the burden of viral diseases. The large and varied class of viral pathogens, however, continues to present thorny challenges to vaccine development. Two primary difficulties exist: Viruses exhibit a stunning diversity of strategies for evading the host immune response, and even when we understand the nature of effective immune protection against a given virus, eliciting that protection is technically challenging. Only a few mucosal vaccines have surmounted these obstacles thus far. Recent developments, however, could greatly improve vaccine design. In this review, we first sketch out our understanding of mucosal immunity and then compare the herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and influenza virus to illustrate the distinct challenges of developing successful vaccines and to outline potential solutions. PMID:27168245

  3. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians

    Bruno M Colombo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last twenty years we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacterias, archeas and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: i the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and ii the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota.

  4. Primary Mucosal Melanoma: Uncommonly Described Entity

    Kaushal Yadav

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of rarity and clinical challenges arising from different anatomic location, our understanding of optimal management of mucosal melanoma remains limited. The most common sites for primary mucosal melanoma are head and neck followed by anorectal, and vulvovaginal regions. Data are limited but improved understanding has led to change in management from more radical excision to conservative surgery with negative margins. We try to summarize available evidences for management this uncommonly described entity.

  5. Irritable bowel syndrome: Diagnosis and pathogenesis

    Magdy El-Salhy

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that considerably reduces the quality of life.It further represents an economic burden on society due to the high consumption of healthcare resources and the non-productivity of IBS patients.The diagnosis of IBS is based on symptom assessment and the Rome Ⅲ criteria.A combination of the Rome Ⅲ criteria,a physical examination,blood tests,gastroscopy and colonoscopy with biopsies is believed to be necessary for diagnosis.Duodenal chromogranin A cell density is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of IBS.The pathogenesis of IBS seems to be multifactorial,with the following factors playing a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS:heritability and genetics,dietary/intestinal microbiota,low-grade inflammation,and disturbances in the neuroendocrine system (NES) of the gut.One hypothesis proposes that the cause of IBS is an altered NES,which would cause abnormal GI motility,secretions and sensation.All of these abnormalities are characteristic of IBS.Alterations in the NES could be the result of one or more of the following:genetic factors,dietary intake,intestinal flora,or low-grade inflammation.Post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease-associated IBS (IBD-IBS) represent a considerable subset of IBS cases.Patients with PI-and IBD-IBS exhibit low-grade mucosal inflammation,as well as abnormalities in the NES of the gut.

  6. Stress gastric ulcer after cardiac surgery: Pathogenesis risk factors and medical management

    Mahdi Ait Houssa; Noureddine Atmani; Fouad Nya; Abdessamad Abdou; Younes Moutakiallah; Mehdi Bamous; Mohamed Drissi; Abdelatif Boulahya

    2013-01-01

    Stress ulcer lesions of upper gastrointestinal tract are well recognized in patients undergoing open cardiac surgery. Gastrointestinal bleeding following cardiac surgery is infrequent with significant morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of mucosal lesions and subsequent haemorrhage is complex and multifactorial. The diagnosis as well as the treatment of this complication remains a challenge for surgeons. Identifying the source of bleeding can be difficult. Despite of the successful con...

  7. Circumferential mucosal dissection and esophageal perforation in a patient with eosinophilic esophagitis

    Liguori, Gennaro; Cortale, Maurizio; Cimino, Fabrizio; Sozzi, Michele

    2008-01-01

    A young man with a previous history of episodes of mild solid food dysphagia was admitted with a total dysphagia. The esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS) showed an extensive disruption of mucosal layer with a cul-de-sac in the lower part of the esophagus. Soon after the procedure, the patient suffered from an acute chest pain and subsequent CT scan demonstrated an intramural circumferential dissection of thoracic esophagus, and a mediastinal emphysema. An emergency right thoracotomy was perform...

  8. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever.

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Walker, David H

    2012-10-01

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host's immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents. PMID:23202452

  9. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

    David H. Walker

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae, is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host’s immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents.

  10. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

    Yun, Nadezhda E.; Walker, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host’s immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents. PMID:23202452

  11. The effect of prebiotics on intestinal mucosal barrier protein occludin in model rats acutely exposed to high altitude%添加益生元对急进高原大鼠肠黏膜屏障紧密连接蛋白Occludin的作用研究

    段云; 张方信; 单体栋; 邵珂; 张盼

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of prebioties on the expression of occludin intestinal mueosal barrier in model rats acutely exposed to high altitude.Method Forty-eight rat medels in radical plateau hypoxia environment were established(3 848 m).These rats were randomly divided into hypoxia control group (n =24) and prebiotics group ( n = 24), then further randomly divided into six groups ( n = 8) by 2 d, 4 d and 6 d time points, respectively.The expression of occludin protein in intestinal mucosa was analyzed by immunohistochemistry method, and Tumor necrosis factorα (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in ileum tissue were determined with ELISA.Result At each time point, occludin protein in all hypoxia control groups were significantly lower than in prebiotica group (P < 0.01 ), while TNF-α was significantly increased and serum IL-10 was remarkably reduced(P <0.05).Conclusion Prebiotics has the effect of maintaining the integrity of epithelial cells by increasing occludin protein expression and reducing the damage of intestinal mucosal barrier caused by hypoxia.%目的 探讨通过灌胃的方式给予益生元(低聚半乳糖)对急进高原大鼠肠黏膜屏障紧密连接Occludin蛋白的表达及作用.方法 在3 848米建立高原缺氧模型大鼠共48只,随机选24只为高原缺氧对照组,另24只为添加益生元组,再按2 d,4 d和6 d时间点,分为6组,每组8只.采用免疫组织化学法检测Occludin蛋白表达,用ELISA法测定回肠组织肿瘤坏死因子-α(TNF-α)、白介素-10(IL-10).结果 和高原缺氧组各时间点比较,添加益生元组Occludin蛋白表达显著升高(P<0.01),TNF-α水平降低、IL-10水平升高(P<0.05).结论 益生元可以增加急进高原缺氧大鼠肠黏膜紧密连接蛋白Occludin的表达,改善高原缺氧对大鼠肠黏膜屏障的破坏.

  12. Pathogenesis of nasal polyposis.

    Hulse, K E; Stevens, W W; Tan, B K; Schleimer, R P

    2015-02-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is a complex inflammatory condition that affects a large proportion of the population world-wide and is associated with high cost of management and significant morbidity. Yet, there is a lack of population-based epidemiologic studies using current definitions of CRSwNP, and the mechanisms that drive pathogenesis in this disease remain unclear. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for the plethora of factors that likely contribute to CRSwNP pathogenesis. Defects in the innate function of the airway epithelial barrier, including diminished expression of antimicrobial products and loss of barrier integrity, combined with colonization by fungi and bacteria likely play a critical role in the development of chronic inflammation in CRSwNP. This chronic inflammation is characterized by elevated expression of many key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-5, thymic stromal lymphopoietin and CCL11, that help to initiate and perpetuate this chronic inflammatory response. Together, these factors likely combine to drive the influx of a variety of immune cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, group 2 innate lymphoid cells and lymphocytes, which participate in the chronic inflammatory response within the nasal polyps. Importantly, however, future studies are needed to demonstrate the necessity and sufficiency of these potential drivers of disease in CRSwNP. In addition to the development of new tools and models to aid mechanistic studies, the field of CRSwNP research also needs the type of robust epidemiologic data that has served the asthma community so well. Given the high prevalence, costs and morbidity, there is a great need for continued research into CRS that could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to improve treatment for patients who suffer from this disease. PMID:25482020

  13. The Microbiological Context of HIV Resistance: Vaginal Microbiota and Mucosal Inflammation at the Viral Point of Entry

    Schellenberg, John J.; Plummer, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    Immune activation is increasingly recognized as a critical element of HIV infection and pathogenesis, causing expansion of virus founder populations at the mucosal port of entry and eventual exhaustion of cellular immune effectors. HIV susceptibility is well known to be influenced by concurrent sexually transmitted infections; however, the role of commensal vaginal microbiota is poorly characterized. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a risk factor for HIV acquisition in studies worldwide; however, ...

  14. Inside the mucosal immune system.

    Jerry R McGhee

    Full Text Available An intricate network of innate and immune cells and their derived mediators function in unison to protect us from toxic elements and infectious microbial diseases that are encountered in our environment. This vast network operates efficiently by use of a single cell epithelium in, for example, the gastrointestinal (GI and upper respiratory (UR tracts, fortified by adjoining cells and lymphoid tissues that protect its integrity. Perturbations certainly occur, sometimes resulting in inflammatory diseases or infections that can be debilitating and life threatening. For example, allergies in the eyes, skin, nose, and the UR or digestive tracts are common. Likewise, genetic background and environmental microbial encounters can lead to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs. This mucosal immune system (MIS in both health and disease is currently under intense investigation worldwide by scientists with diverse expertise and interests. Despite this activity, there are numerous questions remaining that will require detailed answers in order to use the MIS to our advantage. In this issue of PLOS Biology, a research article describes a multi-scale in vivo systems approach to determine precisely how the gut epithelium responds to an inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, given by the intravenous route. This article reveals a previously unknown pathway in which several cell types and their secreted mediators work in unison to prevent epithelial cell death in the mouse small intestine. The results of this interesting study illustrate how in vivo systems biology approaches can be used to unravel the complex mechanisms used to protect the host from its environment.

  15. Gastric mucosal resistance to acute injury in experimental portal hypertension

    Calatayud, Sara; Ramírez, M Carmen; Sanz, M Jesús; Moreno, Lucrecia; Hernández, Carlos; Bosch, Jaume; Piqué, Jose M; Esplugues, Juan V.

    2001-01-01

    The gastric mucosa of portal hypertensive rats exhibits important microvascular changes and a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent hyperemia. This study analyses whether portal hypertensive mucosa exhibits changes in its ability to withstand aggression.Portal hypertension was induced by partial portal vein ligation (PPVL) or common bile duct ligation (CBDL) and gastric damage was induced by oral administration of ethanol or aspirin. Experiments were performed in conscious or anaesthetized rats and som...

  16. [Immunoglobulin for prevention of radiogenic mucositis].

    Mose, S; Adamietz, I A; Thilmann, C; Saran, F; Heyd, R; Knecht, R; Böttcher, H D

    1995-07-01

    Among various therapies administered during radiation-induced mucositis, treatment with immunoglobulin has proven clinically successful. In this study the efficacy of prophylactic applications of immunoglobulin was investigated from January 1992 through August 1993. Forty-two patients with histologically-proven head and neck cancer were given postoperative radiation treatment. In cases with macroscopic tumor residues or inoperability, combined radio-chemotherapy was given. This included 51.3 Gy at 1.9 Gy 5x/week, boosted to 10-26 Gy at 2 Gy 5x/week and carboplatin 60 mg/m2 at days 1-5 and 29-33. Panthenol (4x10 ml/day) and nystatin (4 x 1 ml/day) were given to 20 patients as prophylactic treatment for mucositis. Twenty-two subsequent patients also received intramuscular 800 mg (5 ml) human immunoglobulin (1x/week). According to the Seegenschmiedt/Sauer classification the extent of mucositis was determined 3x/week. Comparison of the distribution of maximal mucositis revealed a slightly more severe mucosal reaction in the control group (n.s.). Analysis of the mean degree of mucositis in both groups demonstrated statistically significant differences (p = 0.031) related to the whole collective and patients receiving concomitant chemotherapy while no effect of immunoglobulin was found in patients treated by radiation alone. In the immunoglobulin-treated-group, the time from the beginning of therapy to the first interruption was prolonged 5 days (37.5 +/- 13.1 vs. 42.7 +/- 13.3 days), but this difference was not significant. Although prophylactic application of immunoglobulin seemed to lower the degree of radiation-induced mucositis, this effect was less significant when compared to the immunoglobulin given in a therapeutic manner. PMID:7672999

  17. Establishment of a Single Dose Radiation Model of Oral Mucositis in Mice

    Oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy to the head and neck area, is a common acute complication and is considered as the most severe symptom for cancer patients in the early stages of treatment. This study was proposed to establish the oral mucositis mouse model induced by a single dose of radiation for the facility of testing therapeutic candidates which can be used for the oral mucositis treatments. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five BALB/c mice were divided into four groups: control, 16 Gy, 18 Gy, and 20 Gy. Oral mucositis was induced by a single dose of radiation to the head and neck using 6 MV x-Ray from linear accelerator. After irradiation, body weight and physical abnormalities were checked daily. Tongue tissues from all groups were taken on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 14, respectively and H and E staining was conducted to examine morphological changes. Results: Body weight dramatically decreased after day 5 in all irradiated mice. In the 16 Gy treatment group, body weight was recovered on day 14. The histology data showed that the thickness of the epithelial cell layer was decreased by the accumulated time after radiation treatment, up to day 9. Severe ulceration was revealed on day 9. Conclusion: A single dose of 16 Gy is sufficient dose to induce oral mucositis in Balb/C mice. Significant changes were observed in the Balb/C mice on days 7 and 9 after radiation. It is suggested that this mouse model might be a useful standard tool for studying oral mucositis induced by radiation

  18. Establishment of a Single Dose Radiation Model of Oral Mucositis in Mice

    Ryu, Seung Hee; Moon, Soo Young; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do; Song, Si Yeol; Park, Jin Hong; Noh, Young Ju; Lee, Sang Wook [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy to the head and neck area, is a common acute complication and is considered as the most severe symptom for cancer patients in the early stages of treatment. This study was proposed to establish the oral mucositis mouse model induced by a single dose of radiation for the facility of testing therapeutic candidates which can be used for the oral mucositis treatments. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five BALB/c mice were divided into four groups: control, 16 Gy, 18 Gy, and 20 Gy. Oral mucositis was induced by a single dose of radiation to the head and neck using 6 MV x-Ray from linear accelerator. After irradiation, body weight and physical abnormalities were checked daily. Tongue tissues from all groups were taken on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 14, respectively and H and E staining was conducted to examine morphological changes. Results: Body weight dramatically decreased after day 5 in all irradiated mice. In the 16 Gy treatment group, body weight was recovered on day 14. The histology data showed that the thickness of the epithelial cell layer was decreased by the accumulated time after radiation treatment, up to day 9. Severe ulceration was revealed on day 9. Conclusion: A single dose of 16 Gy is sufficient dose to induce oral mucositis in Balb/C mice. Significant changes were observed in the Balb/C mice on days 7 and 9 after radiation. It is suggested that this mouse model might be a useful standard tool for studying oral mucositis induced by radiation.

  19. Probiotics the Good Neighbor: Guarding the Gut Mucosal Barrier

    R. K. Rao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The disruption of gut barrier function plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of not only gastrointestinal diseases, but also the diseases of liver and other organs. Mucosal protective factors that preserve the gut barrier integrity are beneficial in the prevention and treatment of such diseases. Probiotics is a group of helpful bacteria that protect the gastrointestinal mucosa from a variety of insults. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of probiotic-mediated protection of gut barrier function is an important area of investigation. Approach: Several studies had addressed the role of probiotics in the protection of gut barrier integrity. In a recent study, we investigated the role of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and two soluble proteins, p40 and p75, in the protection of gut barrier function in Caco-2 cell monolayer, a model of the intestinal epithelium. Results: Studies demonstrated that live or dead Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG prevents oxidative stress-induced disruption of tight junctions and barrier function in Caco-2 cell monolayers. The isolated soluble proteins of this probiotic, p40 and p75, also prevent hydrogen peroxide-induced tight junction disruption. This protective effect of probiotic proteins was mediated by the activation of ERK1/2 and protein kinase C isoforms, PKCβI and PKCε. Conclusion: Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG prevent oxidative stress-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions and barrier function, suggesting that preservation of epithelial barrier function is one of the mechanisms involved in the mucosal protective role of probiotics in the gut.

  20. Prospective Evaluation to Establish a Dose Response for Clinical Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Head-and-Neck Conformal Radiotherapy

    Purpose: We conducted a clinical study to correlate oral cavity dose with clinical mucositis, perform in vivo dosimetry, and determine the feasibility of obtaining buccal mucosal cell samples in patients undergoing head-and-neck radiation therapy. The main objective is to establish a quantitative dose response for clinical oral mucositis. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively studied. Four points were chosen in separate quadrants of the oral cavity. Calculated dose distributions were generated by using AcQPlan and Eclipse treatment planning systems. MOSFET dosimeters were used to measure dose at each sampled point. Each patient underwent buccal sampling for future RNA analysis before and after the first radiation treatment at the four selected points. Clinical and functional mucositis were assessed weekly according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3. Results: Maximum and average doses for sampled sites ranged from 7.4-62.3 and 3.0-54.3 Gy, respectively. A cumulative point dose of 39.1 Gy resulted in mucositis for 3 weeks or longer. Mild severity (Grade ≤ 1) and short duration (≤1 week) of mucositis were found at cumulative point doses less than 32 Gy. Polymerase chain reaction consistently was able to detect basal levels of two known radiation responsive genes. Conclusions: In our sample, cumulative doses to the oral cavity of less than 32 Gy were associated with minimal acute mucositis. A dose greater than 39 Gy was associated with longer duration of mucositis. Our technique for sampling buccal mucosa yielded sufficient cells for RNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction

  1. Recent progress in melasma pathogenesis.

    Lee, Ai-Young

    2015-11-01

    Melasma is a common skin pigmentation condition. Given therapeutic difficulty as one of the biggest concerns, understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of melasma becomes essential. UV irradiation, female sex hormones, and inflammatory processes are addressed as triggering factors with genetic predisposition. The mechanism of UV-induced melanogenesis has been extensively investigated as a model system to study melasma pathogenesis. Hitherto, treatment modalities for melasma are similar to other hyperpigmentation disorders. However, individual triggering factors induce a separate pigmentation disease, whose pathogenic mechanisms and clinical phenotypes are different from the ones encountered in melasma. Fortunately, there have been ongoing updates on melasma pathogenesis with regard to major triggering factors. Presence of certain factors working independently of UV exposure and role of dermal factors and microRNAs are being identified as novel discoveries about melasma pathogenesis. In this review, the melasma pathogenesis is reviewed in association with updated and new findings. PMID:26230865

  2. Acute genital ulcers

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on...

  3. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    Chaveli-López, Begonya; Bagán-Sebastián, José V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the bool...

  4. The role of Smad7 in oral mucositis

    Bian, Li; Han, Gangwen; Zhao, Carolyn W.; Garl, Pamela J.; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis, a severe oral ulceration, is a common toxic effect of radio- or chemoradio-therapy and a limiting factor to using the maximum dose of radiation for effective cancer treatment. Among cancer patients, at least 40% and up to 70%, of individuals treated with standard chemotherapy regimens or upper-body radiation, develop oral mucositis. To date, there is no FDA approved drug to treat oral mucositis in cancer patients. The key challenges for oral mucositis treatment are to repair a...

  5. Plasma Cell Mucositis of Oro- and Hypopharynx: A Case Report

    Mark Puvanendran; Anja Lieder; Wolfgang Issing

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To raise awareness of plasma cell mucositis as a rare differential diagnosis for oral mucosal ulceration and its macroscopic similarity to malignancy. Method. We report a patient who presented with oral features suggestive of malignancy. A biopsy revealed plasma cell mucositis. Results. The patient successfully had a full excision of one lesion and a spontaneous resolution of the other. Conclusion. With the increasing incidence of oral mucosal pathology, physicians should be aware ...

  6. S_3神经根电刺激改善急性完全性脊髓损伤后肠黏膜屏障功能%Role of electrical stimulation of S_3 nerve root in improvement of intestinal mucosal barrier function after acute complete spinal cord injury in rabbits

    白春宏; 安洪; 王莎莉; 蒋电明; 范伟; 聂海

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨S_3神经根电刺激对急性完全性脊髓损伤后肠黏膜屏障功能障碍的作用. 方法 建立兔脊髓损伤性截瘫模型,以截瘫后行S_3神经根电刺激为实验组,不做刺激截瘫兔为对照组,正常白兔为正常组.无菌条件下,采集门静脉血进行内毒素定量测定和细菌培养,采集肝、脾、肠系膜淋巴结作细菌培养并进行菌种鉴定.取实验组和对照组各动物的肝、脾、肠系膜淋巴结、小肠进行病理切片HE染色检查,取小肠进行电镜检查. 结果 对照组肠黏膜屏障及其他器官破坏严重,血清内毒素水平较实验组和正常组明显增高,肠道菌群移位发生率较高;实验组电刺激S_3神经根使失神经肠道蠕动增强,排出的肠内容物明显增加,同时肠黏膜破坏较轻,其他脏器损伤也较对照组轻,血清内毒素水平较对照组明显减轻并且与正常组差异无统计学意义,细菌移位率明显下降. 结论 急性脊髓损伤后电刺激S_3神经根能较好地促进肠道蠕动,促进肠内容物的排出,良好地改善肠黏膜屏障功能,进而减轻内毒素血症和肠道细菌移位;有利于减少SIRS和MODS的产生.%Objective To investigate the effect of electrical stimulation of S_3 nerve root on improvement of intestinal mucosal barrier function in rabbits with acute complete spinal cord injury. Methods Model of paraplegia was built by injuring spinal cord in rabbits. Then, the rabbits with electrical stimulation of S_3 nerve root were set as experimental group and those without set as control group. Normal rabbits were set as normal group. Under aseptic condition, portal vein blood was collected for quantitative determination of endotoxin and bacterial culture ; and liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes were collected for bacterial culture and strain identification. Liver, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes and small intestines were collected from experimental group and control group for

  7. Mucosal Vaccination and Therapy with Genetically Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Wells, J.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have proved to be effective mucosal delivery vehicles that overcome the problem of delivering functional proteins to the mucosal tissues. By the intranasal route, both live and killed LAB vaccine strains have been shown to elicit mucosal and systemic immune responses that

  8. Epidemiology, Genetic Recombination, and Pathogenesis of Coronaviruses.

    Su, Shuo; Wong, Gary; Shi, Weifeng; Liu, Jun; Lai, Alexander C K; Zhou, Jiyong; Liu, Wenjun; Bi, Yuhai; Gao, George F

    2016-06-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) were first described in the 1960s for patients with the common cold. Since then, more HCoVs have been discovered, including those that cause severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), two pathogens that, upon infection, can cause fatal respiratory disease in humans. It was recently discovered that dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia harbor three different HCoV species, including a dominant MERS HCoV lineage that was responsible for the outbreaks in the Middle East and South Korea during 2015. In this review we aim to compare and contrast the different HCoVs with regard to epidemiology and pathogenesis, in addition to the virus evolution and recombination events which have, on occasion, resulted in outbreaks amongst humans. PMID:27012512

  9. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo.

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal Ha; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-03-16

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment. PMID:25789295

  10. Management of mucositis in oral irradiation

    Mucositis significantly affects quality of life and tolerance of treatment in oral irradiation. Effective management of this complication is therefore very important. However, there is a scarcity of up-to-date oral care protocols, with most centres using ritualized regimens. The literature on oral rinses in radiation mucositis is at best inconclusive and at worst confusing. In this study, patients undergoing radical radiotherapy treatment (55-60 Gy in 4 weeks) to more than 50% of the oral cavity and oropharynx were randomized to a research based oral care protocol with either saline 0.9% or hydrogen peroxide 3.5 volumes (HP) as rinses. The results of this study show that, on average, the group receiving saline rinses appeared to do better on some outcomes than the group receiving HP. This suggests that frequent mechanical cleansing of the mouth may be more important than the antiseptic properties of a mouthwash. Antiseptic mouthwashes may be contra-indicated in radiation mucositis. In order to determine best practice in mucositis management, multicentre, multidisciplinary trials should be conducted. (Author)

  11. Mucosal biofilm detection in chronic otitis media

    Wessman, Marcus; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Eickhardt-Sørensen, Steffen Robert; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Homøe, Preben

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine middle ear biopsies from Greenlandic patients with chronic otitis media (COM) for the presence of mucosal biofilms and the bacteria within the biofilms. Thirty-five middle ear biopsies were obtained from 32 Greenlandic COM patients admitted to ear surg...

  12. Topical morphine for oral mucositis in children

    Nielsen, Bettina Nygaard; Aagaard, Gitte; Henneberg, Steen W;

    2012-01-01

    Systemic opioids for painful chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in children often result in unsatisfactory pain relief and a high frequency of side effects. Opioids applied topically can produce analgesia by binding to opioid receptors on peripheral terminals of sensory neurons. These receptors...

  13. Role of ammonia in the pathogenesis of brain edema.

    Fujiwara,Masachika

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of hyperammonemia in the pathogenesis of cerebral edema was investigated using mongrel dogs to develop a treatment for cerebral edema in acute hepatic failure. Intravenous infusion of ammonium acetate alone into dogs did not induce brain edema, although blood ammonia reached unphysiologically high levels. However, ammonium acetate infusion during mannitol-induced reversible (osmotic opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB effectively induced cytotoxic brain edema. Pretreatment with a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA; valine, leucine and isoleucine solution prevented an increase in intracranial pressure (ICP and brain water content, and caused a decrease in brain ammonia content and an increase in brain BCAA and glutamic acid. The results suggest that ammonia plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cerebral edema during acute hepatic failure and that BCAAs accelerate ammonia detoxification in the brain.

  14. Management of radiation therapy-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Part II: supportive treatments

    Wei Cheong Ngeow

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal mucositis is the acute inflammatory and ulcerative reaction of the oral mucosa following radiation therapy to the head and neck region. It is such a common problem that nearly all head and neck cancer patients develop some degree of mucositis. This complication is usually transient in nature but it also represents an important clinical problem as it is a painful, debilitating, dose-dependent side effect for which there is no widely acceptable prophylaxis or effective treatment. As several authoritative groups have recently either undertaken systematic reviews or issued guidelines on the management of mucositis, it is the aim of this review instead, to provide an overview of all the remedies and pharmaceutical agents available, as well as highlighting to researchers the gaps that need to be filled.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of rosacea pathogenesis

    Davydova A.M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents possible molecular mechanisms for rosacea pathogenesis from current domestic and foreign clinical observations and laboratory research: regulation and expression defects of antimicrobial peptides, vascular endothelial growth factor, the effect of serine proteases, oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species and ferritin on the occurrence and course of rosacea. New developments in molecular biology and genetics are advanced for researching the interaction of multiple factors involved in rosacea pathogenesis, as well as providing the bases for potentially new therapies.

  16. Inflammation in the Pathogenesis of Lyme Neuroborreliosis

    Ramesh, Geeta; Didier, Peter J.; England, John D.; Santana-Gould, Lenay; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A.; Martin, Dale S.; Jacobs, Mary B.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2016-01-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, affects both peripheral and central nervous systems. We assessed a causal role for inflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis pathogenesis by evaluating the induced inflammatory changes in the central nervous system, spinal nerves, and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rhesus macaques that were inoculated intrathecally with live B. burgdorferi and either treated with dexamethasone or meloxicam (anti-inflammatory drugs) or left untreated. ELISA of cerebrospinal fluid showed significantly elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8, chemokine ligand 2, and CXCL13 and pleocytosis in all infected animals, except dexamethasone-treated animals. Cerebrospinal fluid and central nervous system tissues of infected animals were culture positive for B. burgdorferi regardless of treatment. B. burgdorferi antigen was detected in the DRG and dorsal roots by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. Histopathology revealed leptomeningitis, vasculitis, and focal inflammation in the central nervous system; necrotizing focal myelitis in the cervical spinal cord; radiculitis; neuritis and demyelination in the spinal roots; and inflammation with neurodegeneration in the DRG that was concomitant with significant neuronal and satellite glial cell apoptosis. These changes were absent in the dexamethasone-treated animals. Electromyography revealed persistent abnormalities in F-wave chronodispersion in nerve roots of a few infected animals; which were absent in dexamethasone-treated animals. These results suggest that inflammation has a causal role in the pathogenesis of acute Lyme neuroborreliosis. PMID:25892509

  17. Induction of mucosal and systemic antibody responses against the HIV coreceptor CCR5 upon intramuscular immunization and aerosol delivery of a Virus-like Particle based vaccine

    Hunter, Z; Smyth, HD; Durfee, P; Chackerian, B

    2009-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) can be exploited as platforms to increase the immunogenicity of poorly immunogenic antigens, including self-proteins. We have developed VLP-based vaccines that target two domains of the HIV coreceptor CCR5 that are involved in HIV binding. These vaccines induce anti-CCR5 antibodies that bind to native CCR5 and inhibit SIV infection in vitro. Given the role of mucosal surfaces in HIV transmission and replication, we also asked whether an aerosolized, VLP-based pulmonary vaccine targeting CCR5 could induce a robust mucosal response in addition to a systemic response. In rats, both intramuscular and pulmonary immunization induced high titer IgG and IgA against the vaccine in the serum, but only aerosol vaccination induced IgA antibodies at local mucosal sites. An intramuscular prime followed by an aerosol boost resulted in strong serum and mucosal antibody responses. These results show that VLP-based vaccines targeting CCR5 induce high-titer systemic antibodies, and can elicit both local and systemic mucosal response when administered via an aerosol. Vaccination against a self-molecule that is critically involved during HIV transmission and pathogenesis is an alternative to targeting the virus itself. More generally, our results provide a general method for inducing broad systemic and mucosal antibody responses using VLP-based immunogens. PMID:19849995

  18. Strategies of mucosal immunotherapy for allergic diseases

    Yi-Ling Ye; Ya-Hui Chuang; Bor-Luen Chiang

    2011-01-01

    Incidences of allergic disease have recently increased worldwide.Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) has long been a controversial treatment for allergic diseases.Although beneficial effects on clinically relevant outcomes have been demonstrated in clinical trials by subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT),there remains a risk of severe and sometimes fatal anaphylaxis.Mucosal immunotherapy is one advantageous choice because of its non-injection routes of administration and lower side-effect profile.This study reviews recent progress in mucosal immunotherapy for allergic diseases.Administration routes,antigen quality and quantity,and adjuvants used are major considerations in this field.Also,direct uses of unique probiotics,or specific cytokines,have been discussed.Furthermore,some researchers have reported new therapeutic ideas that combine two or more strategies.The most important strategy for development of mucosal therapies for allergic diseases is the improvement of antigen formulation,which includes continuous searching for efficient adjuvants,collecting more information about dominant T-cell epitopes of allergens,and having the proper combination of each.In clinics,when compared to other mucosal routes,sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is a preferred choice for therapeutic administration,although local and systemic side effects have been reported.Additionally,not every allergen has the same beneficial effect.Further studies are needed to determine the benefits of mucosal immunotherapy for different allergic diseases after comparison of the different administration routes in children and adults.Data collected from large,well-designed,double-blind,placebo-controlled,and randomized trials,with post-treatment follow-up,can provide robust substantiation of current evidence.

  19. HVEM is a TNF Receptor with Multiple Regulatory Roles in the Mucosal Immune System.

    Shui, Jr-Wen; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2014-04-01

    The herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), and therefore it is also known as TNFRSF14 or CD270 (1,2). In recent years, we have focused on understanding HVEM function in the mucosa of the intestine, particularly on the role of HVEM in colitis pathogenesis, host defense and regulation of the microbiota (2,3,4). HVEM is an unusual TNF receptor because of its high expression levels in the gut epithelium, its capacity to bind ligands that are not members of the TNF super family, including immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily members BTLA and CD160, and its bi-directional functionality, acting as a signaling receptor or as a ligand for the receptor BTLA. Clinically, Hvem recently was reported as an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) risk gene as a result of genome wide association studies (5,6). This suggests HVEM could have a regulatory role influencing the regulation of epithelial barrier, host defense and the microbiota. Consistent with this, using mouse models, we have revealed how HVEM is involved in colitis pathogenesis, mucosal host defense and epithelial immunity (3,7). Although further studies are needed, our results provide the fundamental basis for understanding why Hvem is an IBD risk gene, and they confirm that HVEM is a mucosal gatekeeper with multiple regulatory functions in the mucosa. PMID:24851095

  20. Current concepts of the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Shanahan, F

    2012-02-03

    Although the cause of inflammatory bowel disease is not known, the pathogenesis involves an immune-mediated tissue damage that is the result of an interaction among genetic predisposing factors, exogenous triggers and endogenous modifying influences. Multiple genes are involved and operate at the level of the immune response and at the target organ. Exogenous triggers include the enteric microflora which might stimulate the mucosal immune system in genetically predisposed individuals. Endogenous modifying factors such as the psychoneuroendocrine system have regulatory effects on the immune system and the inflammatory response, and may influence the course of the disease. While autoimmune phenomena do occur, particularly in ulcerative colitis, there is no evidence that they are directly responsible for the tissue damage. It appears more likely, particularly in Crohn\\'s disease, that tissue injury may occur as an indirect or "bystander" effect of mucosal T-cell hyperactivation, perhaps in response to a normal enteric microbial antigen. Most of the immunologic and histologic features of Crohn\\'s disease can be explained by the effects of T-cell derived and other cytokines on the epithelium, the local immune system, the microvasculature, and the recruitment of auxiliary effector cells such as neutrophils.

  1. Pathogenesis of and unifying hypothesis for idiopathic pouchitis.

    Coffey, J Calvin

    2009-04-01

    Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is the procedure of choice in the surgical management of refractory ulcerative colitis. Pouchitis affects up to 60% of patients following ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis. It overlaps significantly with ulcerative colitis such that improvements in our understanding of one will impact considerably on the other. The symptoms are distressing and impinge significantly on patients\\' quality of life. Despite 30 years of scientific and clinical investigation, the pathogenesis of pouchitis is unknown; however, recent advances in molecular and cell biology make a synergistic hypothesis possible. This hypothesis links interaction between epithelial metaplasia, changes in luminal bacteria (in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria), and altered mucosal immunity. Specifically, colonic metaplasia supports colonization by sulfate-reducing bacteria that produce hydrogen sulfide. This causes mucosal depletion and subsequent inflammation. Although in most cases antibiotics lead to bacterial clearance and symptom resolution, immunogenetic subpopulations can develop a chronic refractory variant of pouchitis. The aims of this paper are to discuss proposed pathogenic mechanisms and to describe a novel mechanism that combines many hypotheses and explains several aspects of pouchitis. The implications for the management of both pouchitis and ulcerative colitis are discussed.

  2. Pathogenesis of and unifying hypothesis for idiopathic pouchitis.

    Coffey, J Calvin

    2012-02-01

    Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is the procedure of choice in the surgical management of refractory ulcerative colitis. Pouchitis affects up to 60% of patients following ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis. It overlaps significantly with ulcerative colitis such that improvements in our understanding of one will impact considerably on the other. The symptoms are distressing and impinge significantly on patients\\' quality of life. Despite 30 years of scientific and clinical investigation, the pathogenesis of pouchitis is unknown; however, recent advances in molecular and cell biology make a synergistic hypothesis possible. This hypothesis links interaction between epithelial metaplasia, changes in luminal bacteria (in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria), and altered mucosal immunity. Specifically, colonic metaplasia supports colonization by sulfate-reducing bacteria that produce hydrogen sulfide. This causes mucosal depletion and subsequent inflammation. Although in most cases antibiotics lead to bacterial clearance and symptom resolution, immunogenetic subpopulations can develop a chronic refractory variant of pouchitis. The aims of this paper are to discuss proposed pathogenic mechanisms and to describe a novel mechanism that combines many hypotheses and explains several aspects of pouchitis. The implications for the management of both pouchitis and ulcerative colitis are discussed.

  3. Radio and chemioinduced oral mucositis treatment: comparison between conventional drug protocol and treatments with low intensity lasers

    In this clinical study verified the effects of low intensity laser in the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis radio and/or chemical induced. Thirty one patients with head and neck cancer were selected before being submitted to cancer exclusive radiotherapy or radio and associated chemotherapy. The patients were distributed into three randomly groups as follows: group 1- (control) conventional medicine treatment; group 2 - conventional medicine treatment and daily laser therapy as soon as grade two oral mucositis appeared; group 3 - conventional medicine treatment and daily laser therapy to be initiated immediately before radiotherapy sessions.The irradiation parameters were: wavelength of 660nm, potency of 100mW, continuous mode, punctual application, 2J energy on thirty pre-determined 30 points, with 20s of exposure per point. The control group received medical treatment which consisted in using a set of preventive and therapeutic approach for acute radiation-induced adverse effects. Results were evaluated observing occurrence and grade of oral mucositis, score of pain, loss of body mass, use of nasogastric sound line, internment and interruption of oncologic treatment due to oral mucositis. The results showed that the preventive protocol as used was the most effective in prevention and treatment of oral mucositis and that its daily application contributed in relieving the painful symptomatology so collaborating to maintain and/or bettering the life quality of oncologic patients. (author)

  4. Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a key role in the development of radiotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis

    Mucositis is a toxic side effect of anti-cancer treatments and is a major focus in cancer research. Pro-inflammatory cytokines have previously been implicated in the pathophysiology of chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis. However, whether they play a key role in the development of radiotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterise the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the gastrointestinal tract using a rat model of fractionated radiotherapy-induced toxicity. Thirty six female Dark Agouti rats were randomly assigned into groups and received 2.5 Gys abdominal radiotherapy three times a week over six weeks. Real time PCR was conducted to determine the relative change in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF in the jejunum and colon. Protein expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF in the intestinal epithelium was investigated using qualitative immunohistochemistry. Radiotherapy-induced sub-acute damage was associated with significantly upregulated IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF mRNA levels in the jejunum and colon. The majority of pro-inflammatory cytokine protein expression in the jejunum and colon exhibited minimal change following fractionated radiotherapy. Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a key role in radiotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis in the sub-acute onset setting

  5. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata, E-mail: mukhopadhyay.debabrata@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Guggenheim 1321C, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-02-24

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  6. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed

  7. Pathogenesis and new therapeutic targets

    Mertens, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury and its pronounced form, acute respiratory distress syndrome, are life-threatening diseases with 190,000 patients and 74,500 deaths per year in the United States. Until now there have been no therapeutic approaches to lower morbidity and mortality, except for ventilation with small tidal volumes. This partially results from a lack of understanding of the underlying mechanism of ventilator induced acute lung injury on the alveolar and alveolar capillary level. In addition, ph...

  8. Probiotics as Antifungals in Mucosal Candidiasis.

    Matsubara, Victor H; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia P A; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Candidais an opportunistic pathogen that causes mucosal and deep systemic candidiasis. The emergence of drug resistance and the side effects of currently available antifungals have restricted their use as long-term prophylactic agents for candidal infections. Given this scenario, probiotics have been suggested as a useful alternative for the management of candidiasis. We analyzed the available data on the efficacy of probiotics in candidal colonization of host surfaces. A number of well-controlled studies indicate that probiotics, particularly lactobacilli, suppressCandidagrowth and biofilm development in vitro.A few clinical trials have also shown the beneficial effects of probiotics in reducing oral, vaginal, and enteric colonization byCandida; alleviation of clinical signs and symptoms; and, in some cases, reducing the incidence of invasive fungal infection in critically ill patients. Probiotics may serve in the future as a worthy ally in the battle against chronic mucosal candidal infections. PMID:26826375

  9. Oral presentation of an oesophageal mucosal tear

    Uppal, S; De P, R

    1999-01-01

    Tears of the oesophageal wall following sudden forceful vomiting are well documented in literature. In Boerhaave's syndrome there is transmural rupture associated with complications including pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, surgical emphysema and shock. In Mallory-Weiss syndrome mucosal tears are associated with haematemesis and shock. In neither of these conditions has intraluminal obstruction been described as an aetiological factor. We present a case with similar pathophysiology where oes...

  10. Cough-induced Tracheobronchial Mucosal Bleeding.

    Hira, Harmanjit Singh

    2011-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with moderate hemoptysis. It was preceded by a severe bout of cough. Flexible bronchoscopy showed diffuse tracheobronchial mucosal petechiae and bleeding. The patient was not suffering with any coagulopathies. He did not receive antiplatelet drugs. Hemoptysis resolved with cough suppressant. Subsequent bronchoscopy revealed the complete resolution of petechiae. The mechanism of bleeding after the bout of coughing is discussed. PMID:23169019