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Sample records for acute motor axonal

  1. Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy (Aman) With Motor Conduction Blocks In Childhood; Case Report.

    Yildirim, Serhan; Adviye, Rahşan; Gül, Hakan Levent; Türk Börü, Ülkü

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), characterized with decreased compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) and absence of demyelinating findings in electrophysiological studies, is a subtype of Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS). A 4 yr-old male patient presented with ascending weakness, dysarthria and dysphagia to İstanbul Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital Neurology outpatient for three days to in 2012. Dysphonia, restricted eye movements, flaccid tetraplegia and areflexia were found in neurological examination. There were motor conduction blocks in all peripheral nerves in electrophysiological studies.According to these findings the patient was diagnosed as Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP). Reduction of CMAP amplitudes in posterior tibial nerve, absence of CMAPs in median, ulnar and peroneal nerves and loss of motor conduction blocks were found in following electrophysiological studies. According to these findings, patient was diagnosed as AMAN. Motor conduction blocks may appear in early stage of AMAN and they disappear in later examinations. That's why electrophysiological studies must be repeated in patients with GBS. PMID:27057191

  2. [A case of acute motor sensory axonal polyneuropathy after Haemophilus influenzae infection].

    Oda, M; Udaka, F; Kubori, T; Oka, N; Kameyama, M

    2000-08-01

    A 47-year-old woman developed consciousness disturbance, and experienced hallucinations while traveling abroad, and then went into critical condition. She was placed in the critical care unit, and had flaccid tetraparesis requiring mechanical ventilation. Haemophilus influenzae was cultured from the sputum. The level of protein of the cerebrospinal fluid was elevated to 114 mg/dl, nerve conduction study showed findings of pure axonal damage, and the sural nerve biopsy revealed severe axonal degeneration. She improved gradually by plasma exchange. The diagnosis of acute motor sensory axonal polyneuropathy (AMSAN) based on autoimmune mechanism was made. We speculate that H. influenzae infection may have elicited AMSAN in this case. PMID:11218707

  3. Motor Axon Pathfinding

    Bonanomi, Dario; Pfaff, Samuel L

    2010-01-01

    Motor neurons are functionally related, but represent a diverse collection of cells that show strict preferences for specific axon pathways during embryonic development. In this article, we describe the ligands and receptors that guide motor axons as they extend toward their peripheral muscle targets. Motor neurons share similar guidance molecules with many other neuronal types, thus one challenge in the field of axon guidance has been to understand how the vast complexity of brain connection...

  4. Association between acute motor axonal neuropathy and septic shock due to Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Toscani, Lucia; Guarducci, Diletta; Matà, Sabrina; Furlan, Tiziana; Ballo, Piercarlo

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we describe a case of acute motoral axonal neuropathy (AMAN) following septic shock due to Acinetobacter baumannii. The aetiology of AMAN is still not fully clarified. An association with a potential infection by Campylobacter jejuni, resulting in stimulation of autoimmune response against gangliosides mediated by a phenomenon of molecular mimicry, is believed to play a major role. Since the lipopolysaccharide of A. baumannii has a structure that is similar to that of C. jejuni, we hypothesise that the infection by A. baumannii in our patient may have had a pathogenic role in the development of the neurological picture via a mechanism of molecular mimicry. PMID:26700086

  5. Miller Fisher syndrome/acute motor axonal neuronopathy overlap an atypical manifestation of malaria: a case report

    Khwaja Saifullah Zafar; P. S. Singh; Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Various types of neurological manifestations are described in P. falciparum/vivax malaria of which Guillian Barre syndrome and its variant like Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS) and Acute Motor Axonal Neuronopathy (AMAN). We are reporting such an unusual case who presented with five days history of fever and weakness of three days duration. On investigations it turned out to be acute MFS/AMAN overlap with peripheral blood showing mixed infection having heavy parasitaemia of P. falciparum and P. vi...

  6. Clinical pathological and genetic analysis of 2 cases of mitochondrial myopathy presented as acute motor axonal neuropathy

    Hou-min YIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The main clinical manifestations of mitochondrial myopathy are chronic limb weakness and muscular soreness. Subclinical peripheral nerve injury is also reported, but acute axonal neuropathy.like syndrome concurrent with lactic acidosis is rare. In this paper the clinical features of 2 patients presenting as acute lactic acidosis and sudden muscle weakness were analyzed. Pathological changes and genetic mutations were detected.  Methods Electromyography (EMG and muscle biopsy were performed. Modified Gomori trichrome (MGT and succinodehydrogenase (SDH staining were used to identify pathological changes. Changes of ultra microstructure of muscular tissue were observed under electron microscope. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA full length sequencing was performed using 24 pairs of partially overlapping primers.  Results EMG showed a coexistence of neurogenic and myogenic changes. Dramatic decrease of motor nerve amplitude and moderately reduced sensory nerve amplitude were observed but nerve conduction velocity was normal in both patients. Impressive ragged red fibers were seen on MGT staining. Electron microscope showed dramatic mitochondrial abnormalities in Case 1 and paracrystaline inclusions in Case 2. mtDNA sequencing showed 3243A > G mutation in Case 1 and 8344A > G mutation in Case 2. Conclusions Mitochondrial myopathy can present as metabolic crisis like acute lactic acidosis, dyspnea and acute motor axonal neuropathy.like syndrome. It is a life.threatening phenotype that needs more attention. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.06.007

  7. 急性运动轴索性神经病的研究进展%Research progress of acute motor axonal neuropathy

    张刚; 秦新月

    2014-01-01

    Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN) is one of the main subtypes of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), which presents with acute ascending flaccid paralysis like acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP). But AMAN can be different with AIDP in clinical manifestation, immunopathogenesis, electrophysiology, serum antibody, prognosis, et al. This review focused on the research progress of AMAN.%急性运动轴索性神经病(AMAN)是吉兰-巴雷综合征(GBS)的主要亚型之一,与GBS主要亚型急性炎症性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病(AIDP)在临床表现、免疫病理生理机制、神经电生理检查、血清学抗体等方面均有不同。本文就AMAN相关研究进展做一综述。

  8. MSC p43 required for axonal development in motor neurons

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Liu, Yang; Yin, Yanqing; Shao, Aiyun; Zhang, Bo; Kim, Sunghoon; Zhou, Jiawei

    2009-01-01

    Neuron connectivity and correct neural function largely depend on axonal integrity. Neurofilaments (NFs) constitute the main cytoskeletal network maintaining the structural integrity of neurons and exhibit dynamic changes during axonal and dendritic growth. However, the mechanisms underlying axonal development and maintenance remain poorly understood. Here, we identify that multisynthetase complex p43 (MSC p43) is essential for NF assembly and axon maintenance. The MSC p43 protein was predominantly expressed in central neurons and interacted with NF light subunit in vivo. Mice lacking MSC p43 exhibited axon degeneration in motor neurons, defective neuromuscular junctions, muscular atrophy, and motor dysfunction. Furthermore, MSC p43 depletion in mice caused disorganization of the axonal NF network. Mechanistically, MSC p43 is required for maintaining normal phosphorylation levels of NFs. Thus, MSC p43 is indispensable in maintaining axonal integrity. Its dysfunction may underlie the NF disorganization and axon degeneration associated with motor neuron degenerative diseases. PMID:19717447

  9. Localization of Axonal Motor Molecules Machinery in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Fulvio Florenzano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Axonal transport and neuronal survival depend critically on active transport and axon integrity both for supplying materials and communication to different domains of the cell body. All these actions are executed through cytoskeleton, transport and regulatory elements that appear to be disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases. Motor-driven transport both supplies and clears distal cellular portions with proteins and organelles. This transport is especially relevant in projection and motor neurons, which have long axons to reach the farthest nerve endings. Thus, any disturbance of axonal transport may have severe consequences for neuronal function and survival. A growing body of literature indicates the presence of alterations to the motor molecules machinery, not only in expression levels and phosphorylation, but also in their subcellular distribution within populations of neurons, which are selectively affected in the course of neurodegenerative diseases. The implications of this altered subcellular localization and how this affects axon survival and neuronal death still remain poorly understood, although several hypotheses have been suggested. Furthermore, cytoskeleton and transport element localization can be selectively disrupted in some disorders suggesting that specific loss of the axonal functionality could be a primary hallmark of the disorder. This can lead to axon degeneration and neuronal death either directly, through the functional absence of essential axonal proteins, or indirectly, through failures in communication among different cellular domains. This review compares the localization of cytoskeleton and transport elements in some neurodegenerative disorders to ask what aspects may be essential for axon survival and neuronal death.

  10. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  11. Axonal Dysfunction Precedes Motor Neuronal Death in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Yuta Iwai

    Full Text Available Wide-spread fasciculations are a characteristic feature in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, suggesting motor axonal hyperexcitability. Previous excitability studies have shown increased nodal persistent sodium conductances and decreased potassium currents in motor axons of ALS patients, both of the changes inducing hyperexcitability. Altered axonal excitability potentially contributes to motor neuron death in ALS, but the relationship of the extent of motor neuronal death and abnormal excitability has not been fully elucidated. We performed multiple nerve excitability measurements in the median nerve at the wrist of 140 ALS patients and analyzed the relationship of compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitude (index of motor neuronal loss and excitability indices, such as strength-duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, recovery cycle and current-threshold relationships. Compared to age-matched normal controls (n = 44, ALS patients (n = 140 had longer strength-duration time constant (SDTC: a measure of nodal persistent sodium current; p 5mV. Regression analyses showed that SDTC (R = -0.22 and depolarizing threshold electrotonus (R = -0.22 increased with CMAP decline. These findings suggest that motor nerve hyperexcitability occurs in the early stage of the disease, and precedes motor neuronal loss in ALS. Modulation of altered ion channel function could be a treatment option for ALS.

  12. Axonal Dysfunction Precedes Motor Neuronal Death in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Iwai, Yuta; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Misawa, Sonoko; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Watanabe, Keisuke; Amino, Hiroshi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Wide-spread fasciculations are a characteristic feature in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggesting motor axonal hyperexcitability. Previous excitability studies have shown increased nodal persistent sodium conductances and decreased potassium currents in motor axons of ALS patients, both of the changes inducing hyperexcitability. Altered axonal excitability potentially contributes to motor neuron death in ALS, but the relationship of the extent of motor neuronal death and abnormal excitability has not been fully elucidated. We performed multiple nerve excitability measurements in the median nerve at the wrist of 140 ALS patients and analyzed the relationship of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude (index of motor neuronal loss) and excitability indices, such as strength-duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, recovery cycle and current-threshold relationships. Compared to age-matched normal controls (n = 44), ALS patients (n = 140) had longer strength-duration time constant (SDTC: a measure of nodal persistent sodium current; p CMAP (> 5mV). Regression analyses showed that SDTC (R = -0.22) and depolarizing threshold electrotonus (R = -0.22) increased with CMAP decline. These findings suggest that motor nerve hyperexcitability occurs in the early stage of the disease, and precedes motor neuronal loss in ALS. Modulation of altered ion channel function could be a treatment option for ALS. PMID:27383069

  13. Adult motor axons preferentially reinnervate predegenerated muscle nerve

    M. Abdullah; O'Daly, A.; A Vyas; Rohde, C.; Brushart, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Preferential motor reinnervation (PMR) is the tendency for motor axons regenerating after repair of mixed nerve to reinnervate muscle nerve and/or muscle rather than cutaneous nerve or skin. PMR may occur in response to the peripheral nerve pathway alone in juvenile rats (Brushart, 1993; Redett et al., 2005), yet the ability to identify and respond to specific pathway markers is reportedly lost in adults (Uschold et al., 2007). The experiments reported here evaluate the relative roles of path...

  14. IH activity is increased in populations of slow versus fast motor axons of the rat.

    Chad eLorenz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Much is known about the electrophysiological variation in motoneuron somata across different motor units. However comparatively less is known about electrophysiological variation in motor axons and how this could impact function or electrodiagnosis in healthy or diseased states. We performed nerve excitability testing on two groups of motor axons in Sprague-Dawley rats that are known to differ significantly in their chronic daily activity patterns and in the relative proportion of motor unit types: one group innervating the soleus (slow motor axons and the other group innervating the tibialis anterior (fast motor axons muscles. We found that slow motor axons have significantly larger accommodation compared to fast motor axons upon application of a 100 ms hyperpolarizing conditioning stimulus that is 40% of axon threshold (Z = 3.24, p = 0.001 or 20% of axon threshold (Z = 2.67, p = 0.008. Slow motor axons had larger accommodation to hyperpolarizing currents in the current-threshold measurement (-80% Z = 3.07, p = 0.002; -90% Z = 2.98, p = 0.003. In addition, we found that slow motor axons have a significantly smaller rheobase than fast motor axons (Z = -1.99, p = 0.047 accompanied by a lower threshold in stimulus-response curves. The results provide evidence that slow motor axons have greater activity of the hyperpolarization-activated inwardly rectifying cation conductance (IH than fast motor axons. It is possible that this difference between fast and slow axons is caused by an adaptation to their chronic differences in daily activity patterns, and that this adaptation might have a functional effect on the motor unit. Moreover, these findings indicate that slow and fast motor axons may react differently to pathological conditions.

  15. Optically-Induced Neuronal Activity Is Sufficient to Promote Functional Motor Axon Regeneration In Vivo.

    Ward, Patricia J; Jones, Laura N; Mulligan, Amanda; Goolsby, William; Wilhelm, Jennifer C; English, Arthur W

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are common, and functional recovery is very poor. Beyond surgical repair of the nerve, there are currently no treatment options for these patients. In experimental models of nerve injury, interventions (such as exercise and electrical stimulation) that increase neuronal activity of the injured neurons effectively enhance axon regeneration. Here, we utilized optogenetics to determine whether increased activity alone is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration. In thy-1-ChR2/YFP transgenic mice in which a subset of motoneurons express the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2), we activated axons in the sciatic nerve using blue light immediately prior to transection and surgical repair of the sciatic nerve. At four weeks post-injury, direct muscle EMG responses evoked with both optical and electrical stimuli as well as the ratio of these optical/electrical evoked EMG responses were significantly greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, significantly more ChR2+ axons successfully re-innervated the gastrocnemius muscle in mice that received optical treatment. Sections of the gastrocnemius muscles were reacted with antibodies to Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2) to quantify the number of re-occupied motor endplates. The number of SV2+ endplates was greater in mice that received optical treatment. The number of retrogradely-labeled motoneurons following intramuscular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (conjugated to Alexa Fluor 555) was greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, the acute (1 hour), one-time optical treatment resulted in robust, long-lasting effects compared to untreated animals as well as untreated axons (ChR2-). We conclude that neuronal activation is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration, and this regenerative effect is specific to the activated neurons. PMID:27152611

  16. Optically-Induced Neuronal Activity Is Sufficient to Promote Functional Motor Axon Regeneration In Vivo.

    Patricia J Ward

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries are common, and functional recovery is very poor. Beyond surgical repair of the nerve, there are currently no treatment options for these patients. In experimental models of nerve injury, interventions (such as exercise and electrical stimulation that increase neuronal activity of the injured neurons effectively enhance axon regeneration. Here, we utilized optogenetics to determine whether increased activity alone is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration. In thy-1-ChR2/YFP transgenic mice in which a subset of motoneurons express the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2, we activated axons in the sciatic nerve using blue light immediately prior to transection and surgical repair of the sciatic nerve. At four weeks post-injury, direct muscle EMG responses evoked with both optical and electrical stimuli as well as the ratio of these optical/electrical evoked EMG responses were significantly greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, significantly more ChR2+ axons successfully re-innervated the gastrocnemius muscle in mice that received optical treatment. Sections of the gastrocnemius muscles were reacted with antibodies to Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2 to quantify the number of re-occupied motor endplates. The number of SV2+ endplates was greater in mice that received optical treatment. The number of retrogradely-labeled motoneurons following intramuscular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (conjugated to Alexa Fluor 555 was greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, the acute (1 hour, one-time optical treatment resulted in robust, long-lasting effects compared to untreated animals as well as untreated axons (ChR2-. We conclude that neuronal activation is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration, and this regenerative effect is specific to the activated neurons.

  17. Optically-Induced Neuronal Activity Is Sufficient to Promote Functional Motor Axon Regeneration In Vivo

    Ward, Patricia J.; Jones, Laura N.; Mulligan, Amanda; Goolsby, William; Wilhelm, Jennifer C.; English, Arthur W.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are common, and functional recovery is very poor. Beyond surgical repair of the nerve, there are currently no treatment options for these patients. In experimental models of nerve injury, interventions (such as exercise and electrical stimulation) that increase neuronal activity of the injured neurons effectively enhance axon regeneration. Here, we utilized optogenetics to determine whether increased activity alone is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration. In thy-1-ChR2/YFP transgenic mice in which a subset of motoneurons express the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2), we activated axons in the sciatic nerve using blue light immediately prior to transection and surgical repair of the sciatic nerve. At four weeks post-injury, direct muscle EMG responses evoked with both optical and electrical stimuli as well as the ratio of these optical/electrical evoked EMG responses were significantly greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, significantly more ChR2+ axons successfully re-innervated the gastrocnemius muscle in mice that received optical treatment. Sections of the gastrocnemius muscles were reacted with antibodies to Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2) to quantify the number of re-occupied motor endplates. The number of SV2+ endplates was greater in mice that received optical treatment. The number of retrogradely-labeled motoneurons following intramuscular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (conjugated to Alexa Fluor 555) was greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, the acute (1 hour), one-time optical treatment resulted in robust, long-lasting effects compared to untreated animals as well as untreated axons (ChR2-). We conclude that neuronal activation is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration, and this regenerative effect is specific to the activated neurons. PMID:27152611

  18. Excitability properties of motor axons in adults with cerebral palsy

    Cliff S. Klein

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Palsy (CP is a permanent disorder caused by a lesion to the developing brain that significantly impairs motor function. The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying motor impairment are not well understood. Specifically, few have addressed whether motoneuron or peripheral axon properties are altered in CP, even though disruption of descending inputs to the spinal cord may cause them to change. In the present study, we have compared nerve excitability properties in seven adults with CP and fourteen healthy controls using threshold tracking techniques by stimulating the median nerve at the wrist and recording the compound muscle action potential (CMAP over the abductor pollicis brevis. The excitability properties in the CP subjects were found to be abnormal. Early and late depolarizing and hyperpolarizing threshold electrotonus was significantly larger (i.e., fanning out, and resting current-threshold (I/V slope was smaller, in CP compared to control. In addition resting threshold and rheobase tended to be larger in CP. According to a modeling analysis of the data, an increase in leakage current under or through the myelin sheath, i.e., the Barrett-Barrett conductance (GBB, combined with a slight hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential, best explained the group differences in excitability properties. There was a trend for those with greater impairment in gross motor function to have more abnormal axon properties. The findings indicate plasticity of motor axon properties far removed from the site of the lesion. We suspect that this plasticity is caused by disruption of descending inputs to the motoneurons at an early age around the time of their injury.

  19. Mechanisms of hyperpolarization in regenerated mature motor axons in cat

    Moldovan, Mihai; Krarup, Christian

    2004-01-01

    We found persistent abnormalities in the recovery of membrane excitability in long-term regenerated motor nerve fibres in the cat as indicated in the companion paper. These abnormalities could partly be explained by membrane hyperpolarization. To further investigate this possibility, we compared...... the changes in excitability in control nerves and long-term regenerated cat nerves (3-5 years after tibial nerve crush) during manoeuvres known to alter axonal membrane Na(+)-K(+) pump function: polarization, cooling to 20 degrees C, reperfusion after 10 min ischaemia, and up to 60 s of repetitive stimulation...

  20. Acute exercise improves motor memory

    Skriver, Kasper Christen; Roig, Marc; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper;

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that a single bout of acute cardiovascular exercise improves motor skill learning through an optimization of long-term motor memory. Here we expand this previous finding, to explore potential exercise-related biomarkers and their association with measures of motor memory and...... hours and 7 days after practice. Plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine and lactate were analyzed at baseline, immediately after exercise or rest and during motor...... practice whereas lactate correlated with better retention 1 hour as well as 24 hours and 7 days after practice. Thus, improvements in motor skill acquisition and retention induced by acute cardiovascular exercise are associated with increased concentrations of biomarkers involved in memory and learning...

  1. Regeneration of motor axons in the rat sciatic nerve studied by labeling with axonally transported radioactive proteins

    Labeling regenerating axons with axonally transported radioactive proteins provides information about the location of the entire range of axons from the fastest growing ones to those which are trapped in the scar. This technique has been used to study the regeneration of motor axons in the rat sciatic nerve after a crush lesion. From 2 to 14 days after the crush the lumbar spinal cord was exposed by laminectomy and multiple injections of [3H]proline were made stereotactically in the ventral horn. Twenty-four hours later the nerves were removed and the distribution of radioactivity along the nerve was measured by liquid scintillation counting. There was a peak of radioactivity in the regenerating axons distal to the crush due to an accumulation of label in the tips of these axons. After a delay of 3.2 +- 0.2 (S.E.) days, this peak advanced down the nerve at a rate of 3.0 +- 0.1 (S.E.) mm/day. The leading edge of this peak, which marks the location of the endings of the most rapidly growing labeled fibers, moved down the nerve at a rate of 4.4 +- 0.2 mm/day after a delay of 2.1 +- 0.2 days; this is the same time course as that of the most rapidly regenerating sensory axons in the rat sciatic nerve, measured by the pinch test. Another peak of radioactivity at the crush site, presumed to represent the ends of unregenerated axons or misdirected sprouts, declined rapidly during the first week, and more slowly thereafter. (Auth.)

  2. Alterations in axonal transport motor proteins in sporadic and experimental Parkinson’s disease

    Chu, Yaping; Morfini, Gerardo A.; Langhamer, Lori B.; He, Yinzhen; Brady, Scott T.; KORDOWER, JEFFREY H.

    2012-01-01

    The progressive loss of the nigrostriatal pathway is a distinguishing feature of Parkinson’s disease. As terminal field loss seems to precede cell body loss, we tested whether alterations of axonal transport motor proteins would be early features in Parkinson’s disease. There was a decline in axonal transport motor proteins in sporadic Parkinson’s disease that preceded other well-known nigral cell-related pathology such as phenotypic downregulation of dopamine. Reductions in conventional kine...

  3. Neuropathological changes of rabbit spinal motor neurons induced by retrograde axonal aluminum-uptake

    To examine pathological changes of spinal motor neurons induced by subepineurial injection of 10-500 μ1 of 2% AlCl3 solution into a sciatic nerve of rabbits, histometric studies of chromatolytic neurons, spheroids/globules and degenerative neurons in the both lumbar anterior gray horn tissues was undertaken using routine and immunochemical staining methods. All these neuronal changes were reactive to the antineurofilament antibody (SM1). Except chromatolytic neurons, the appearance of spheroids/globules and degenerative neurons were significantly dose-responsive to the volume of injected 2% AlCl3 solution. In this acute experiments, it is suggested that Al may primarily cause a disturbance of neurofilament transport in proximal axons, consequently leading to neurofibrillary degeneration of neurons. (author)

  4. Fasciculation and guidance of spinal motor axons in the absence of FGFR2 signaling.

    Rosa-Eva Huettl

    Full Text Available During development, fibroblast growth factors (FGF are essential for early patterning events along the anterior-posterior axis, conferring positional identity to spinal motor neurons by activation of different Hox codes. In the periphery, signaling through one of four fibroblast growth factor receptors supports the development of the skeleton, as well as induction and maintenance of extremities. In previous studies, FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2 was found to interact with axon bound molecules involved in axon fasciculation and extension, thus rendering this receptor an interesting candidate for the promotion of proper peripheral innervation. However, while the involvement of FGFR2 in limb bud induction has been extensively studied, its role during axon elongation and formation of distinct nervous projections has not been addressed so far. We show here that motor neurons in the spinal cord express FGFR2 and other family members during the establishment of motor connections to the forelimb and axial musculature. Employing a conditional genetic approach to selectively ablate FGFR2 from motor neurons we found that the patterning of motor columns and the expression patterns of other FGF receptors and Sema3A in the motor columns of mutant embryos are not altered. In the absence of FGFR2 signaling, pathfinding of motor axons is intact, and also fasciculation, distal advancement of motor nerves and gross morphology and positioning of axonal projections are not altered. Our findings therefore show that FGFR2 is not required cell-autonomously in motor neurons during the formation of initial motor projections towards limb and axial musculature.

  5. Identifying motor and sensory myelinated axons in rabbit peripheral nerves by histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase activities

    Riley, Danny A.; Sanger, James R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Yousif, N. John; Bain, James L. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) histochemical staining of rabbit spinal nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia demonstrated that among the reactive myeliated axons, with minor exceptions, sensory axons were CA positive and CE negative whereas motor axons were CA negative and CE positive. The high specificity was achieved by adjusting reaction conditions to stain subpopulations of myelinated axons selectively while leaving 50 percent or so unstained. Fixation with glutaraldehyde appeared necessary for achieving selectivity. Following sciatic nerve transection, the reciprocal staining pattern persisted in damaged axons and their regenerating processes which formed neuromas within the proximal nerve stump. Within the neuromas, CA-stained sensory processes were elaborated earlier and in greater numbers than CE-stained regenerating motor processes. The present results indicate that histochemical axon typing can be exploited to reveal heterogeneous responses of motor and sensory axons to injury.

  6. Native chick laminin-4 containing the beta 2 chain (s-laminin) promotes motor axon growth

    1996-01-01

    After denervation of muscle, motor axons reinnervate original synaptic sites. A recombinant fragment of the synapse specific laminin beta 2 chain (s-laminin) was reported to inhibit motor axon growth. Consequently, a specific sequence (leucine-arginine-glutamate, LRE) of the laminin beta 2 chain was proposed to act as a stop signal and to mediate specific reinnervation at the neuromuscular junction (Porter, B.E., J. Weis, and J.R. Sanes. 1995. Neuron. 14:549-559). We demonstrate here that nat...

  7. The impact of motor axon misdirection and attrition on behavioral deficit following experimental nerve injuries.

    Jacob Daniel de Villiers Alant

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve transection and neuroma-in-continuity injuries are associated with permanent functional deficits, often despite successful end-organ reinnervation. Axonal misdirection with non-specific reinnervation, frustrated regeneration and axonal attrition are believed to be among the anatomical substrates that underlie the poor functional recovery associated with these devastating injuries. Yet, functional deficits associated with axonal misdirection in experimental neuroma-in-continuity injuries have not yet been studied. We hypothesized that experimental neuroma-in-continuity injuries would result in motor axon misdirection and attrition with proportional persistent functional deficits. The femoral nerve misdirection model was exploited to assess major motor pathway misdirection and axonal attrition over a spectrum of experimental nerve injuries, with neuroma-in-continuity injuries simulated by the combination of compression and traction forces in 42 male rats. Sciatic nerve injuries were employed in an additional 42 rats, to evaluate the contribution of axonal misdirection to locomotor deficits by a ladder rung task up to 12 weeks. Retrograde motor neuron labeling techniques were utilized to determine the degree of axonal misdirection and attrition. Characteristic histological neuroma-in-continuity features were demonstrated in the neuroma-in-continuity groups and poor functional recovery was seen despite successful nerve regeneration and muscle reinnervation. Good positive and negative correlations were observed respectively between axonal misdirection (p<.0001, r(2=.67, motor neuron counts (attrition (p<.0001, r(2=.69 and final functional deficits. We demonstrate prominent motor axon misdirection and attrition in neuroma-in-continuity and transection injuries of mixed motor nerves that contribute to the long-term functional deficits. Although widely accepted in theory, to our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence to

  8. Functional recovery of regenerating motor axons is delayed in mice heterozygously deficient for the myelin protein P(0) gene

    Rosberg, Mette Romer; Alvarez, Susana; Krarup, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    whether the regeneration capacity of early symptomatic P0+/- is impaired as compared to age matched WT. Right sciatic nerves were lesioned at the thigh in 7-8 months old mice. Tibial motor axons at ankle were investigated by conventional motor conduction studies and axon excitability studies using...

  9. Severe degeneration of peripheral motor axons after spinal cord injury: a European multicenter study in 345 patients.

    Meent, H. van de; Hosman, A.J.F.; Hendriks, J.; Zwarts, M.J.; Schubert, M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There are indications that perilesional and remote peripheral motor axons may degenerate after spinal cord injury (SCI). The authors investigated the magnitude and dependence on severity of SCI of this degeneration as well as whether motor axons so affected can recover. METHODS: The funct

  10. Motor axon loss is associated with hand dysfunction in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1a.

    Videler, A.J.; Dijk, J.P. van; Beelen, A.; Visser, M. de; Nollet, F.; Schaik, I.N. van

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Charcot Marie Tooth type 1a (CMT1a) is a primarily demyelinating neuropathy, characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness, atrophy, and sensory loss, and is most pronounced in both feet and hands. There is increasing evidence that muscle weakness is determined by motor axonal dysf

  11. Role of primary afferents in the developmental regulation of motor axon synapse numbers on Renshaw cells.

    Siembab, Valerie C; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Rotterman, Travis M; Shneider, Neil A; Alvarez, Francisco J

    2016-06-15

    Motor function in mammalian species depends on the maturation of spinal circuits formed by a large variety of interneurons that regulate motoneuron firing and motor output. Interneuron activity is in turn modulated by the organization of their synaptic inputs, but the principles governing the development of specific synaptic architectures unique to each premotor interneuron are unknown. For example, Renshaw cells receive, at least in the neonate, convergent inputs from sensory afferents (likely Ia) and motor axons, raising the question of whether they interact during Renshaw cell development. In other well-studied neurons, such as Purkinje cells, heterosynaptic competition between inputs from different sources shapes synaptic organization. To examine the possibility that sensory afferents modulate synaptic maturation on developing Renshaw cells, we used three animal models in which afferent inputs in the ventral horn are dramatically reduced (ER81(-/-) knockout), weakened (Egr3(-/-) knockout), or strengthened (mlcNT3(+/-) transgenic). We demonstrate that increasing the strength of sensory inputs on Renshaw cells prevents their deselection and reduces motor axon synaptic density, and, in contrast, absent or diminished sensory afferent inputs correlate with increased densities of motor axons synapses. No effects were observed on other glutamatergic inputs. We conclude that the early strength of Ia synapses influences their maintenance or weakening during later development and that heterosynaptic influences from sensory synapses during early development regulates the density and organization of motor inputs on mature Renshaw cells. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1892-1919, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26660356

  12. Motor axon synapses on renshaw cells contain higher levels of aspartate than glutamate.

    Dannette S Richards

    Full Text Available Motoneuron synapses on spinal cord interneurons known as Renshaw cells activate nicotinic, AMPA and NMDA receptors consistent with co-release of acetylcholine and excitatory amino acids (EAA. However, whether these synapses express vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs capable of accumulating glutamate into synaptic vesicles is controversial. An alternative possibility is that these synapses release other EAAs, like aspartate, not dependent on VGLUTs. To clarify the exact EAA concentrated at motor axon synapses we performed a quantitative postembedding colloidal gold immunoelectron analysis for aspartate and glutamate on motor axon synapses (identified by immunoreactivity to the vesicular acetylcholine transporter; VAChT contacting calbindin-immunoreactive (-IR Renshaw cell dendrites. The results show that 71% to 80% of motor axon synaptic boutons on Renshaw cells contained aspartate immunolabeling two standard deviations above average neuropil labeling. Moreover, VAChT-IR synapses on Renshaw cells contained, on average, aspartate immunolabeling at 2.5 to 2.8 times above the average neuropil level. In contrast, glutamate enrichment was lower; 21% to 44% of VAChT-IR synapses showed glutamate-IR two standard deviations above average neuropil labeling and average glutamate immunogold density was 1.7 to 2.0 times the neuropil level. The results were not influenced by antibody affinities because glutamate antibodies detected glutamate-enriched brain homogenates more efficiently than aspartate antibodies detecting aspartate-enriched brain homogenates. Furthermore, synaptic boutons with ultrastructural features of Type I excitatory synapses were always labeled by glutamate antibodies at higher density than motor axon synapses. We conclude that motor axon synapses co-express aspartate and glutamate, but aspartate is concentrated at higher levels than glutamate.

  13. ECEL1 mutation implicates impaired axonal arborization of motor nerves in the pathogenesis of distal arthrogryposis.

    Nagata, Kenichi; Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Tamada, Hiromi; Okuyama-Uchimura, Fumi; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Saido, Takaomi C

    2016-07-01

    The membrane-bound metalloprotease endothelin-converting enzyme-like 1 (ECEL1) has been newly identified as a causal gene of a specific type of distal arthrogryposis (DA). In contrast to most causal genes of DA, ECEL1 is predominantly expressed in neuronal cells, suggesting a unique neurogenic pathogenesis in a subset of DA patients with ECEL1 mutation. The present study analyzed developmental motor innervation and neuromuscular junction formation in limbs of the rodent homologue damage-induced neuronal endopeptidase (DINE)-deficient mouse. Whole-mount immunostaining was performed in DINE-deficient limbs expressing motoneuron-specific GFP to visualize motor innervation throughout the limb. Although DINE-deficient motor nerves displayed normal trajectory patterns from the spinal cord to skeletal muscles, they indicated impaired axonal arborization in skeletal muscles in the forelimbs and hindlimbs. Systematic examination of motor innervation in over 10 different hindlimb muscles provided evidence that DINE gene disruption leads to insufficient arborization of motor nerves after arriving at the skeletal muscle. Interestingly, the axonal arborization defect in foot muscles appeared more severe than in other hindlimb muscles, which was partially consistent with the proximal-distal phenotypic discordance observed in DA patients. Additionally, the number of innervated neuromuscular junction was significantly reduced in the severely affected DINE-deficient muscle. Furthermore, we generated a DINE knock-in (KI) mouse model with a pathogenic mutation, which was recently identified in DA patients. Axonal arborization defects were clearly detected in motor nerves of the DINE KI limb, which was identical to the DINE-deficient limb. Given that the encoded sequences, as well as ECEL1 and DINE expression profiles, are highly conserved between mouse and human, abnormal arborization of motor axons and subsequent failure of NMJ formation could be a primary cause of DA with ECEL1

  14. Slit and Netrin-1 guide cranial motor axon pathfinding via Rho-kinase, myosin light chain kinase and myosin II

    Drescher Uwe

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the developing hindbrain, cranial motor axon guidance depends on diffusible repellent factors produced by the floor plate. Our previous studies have suggested that candidate molecules for mediating this effect are Slits, Netrin-1 and Semaphorin3A (Sema3A. It is unknown to what extent these factors contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of motor axons, and the downstream signalling pathways are largely unclear. Results In this study, we have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify the components of floor plate chemorepulsion and their downstream signalling pathways. Using in vitro motor axon deflection assays, we demonstrate that Slits and Netrin-1, but not Sema3A, contribute to floor plate repulsion. We also find that the axon pathways of dorsally projecting branchiomotor neurons are disrupted in Netrin-1 mutant mice and in chick embryos expressing dominant-negative Unc5a receptors, indicating an in vivo role for Netrin-1. We further demonstrate that Slit and Netrin-1 signalling are mediated by Rho-kinase (ROCK and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK, which regulate myosin II activity, controlling actin retrograde flow in the growth cone. We show that MLCK, ROCK and myosin II are required for Slit and Netrin-1-mediated growth cone collapse of cranial motor axons. Inhibition of these molecules in explant cultures, or genetic manipulation of RhoA or myosin II function in vivo causes characteristic cranial motor axon pathfinding errors, including the inability to exit the midline, and loss of turning towards exit points. Conclusions Our findings suggest that both Slits and Netrin-1 contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of cranial motor axons. They further indicate that RhoA/ROCK, MLCK and myosin II are components of Slit and Netrin-1 signalling pathways, and suggest that these pathways are of key importance in cranial motor axon navigation.

  15. Comparison of the fastest regenerating motor and sensory myelinated axons in the same peripheral nerve

    Moldovan, Mihai; Sørensen, Jesper; Krarup, Christian

    Functional outcome after peripheral nerve regeneration is often poor, particularly involving nerve injuries far from their targets. Comparison of sensory and motor axon regeneration before target reinnervation is not possible in the clinical setting, and previous experimental studies addressing the...... question of differences in growth rates of different nerve fibre populations led to conflicting results. We developed an animal model to compare growth and maturation of the fastest growing sensory and motor fibres within the same mixed nerve after Wallerian degeneration. Regeneration of cat tibial nerve...... after crush (n = 13) and section (n = 7) was monitored for up to 140 days, using implanted cuff electrodes placed around the sciatic and tibial nerves and wire electrodes at plantar muscles. To distinguish between sensory and motor fibres, recordings were carried out from L6-S2 spinal roots using cuff...

  16. Knockdown of Ephrin-A5 Expression by 40% Does not Affect Motor Axon Growth or Migration into the Chick Hindlimb

    Robert S. Winning

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Bidirectional signaling between Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their cell-surface protein signals, the ephrins, comprises one mechanism for guiding motor axons to their proper targets. During projection of motor axons from the lateral motor column (LMC motor neurons of the spinal cord to the hindlimb muscles in chick embryos, ephrin-A5 has been shown to be expressed in the LMC motor axons until they reach the base of the limb bud and initiate sorting into their presumptive dorsal and ventral nerve trunks, at which point expression is extinguished. We tested the hypothesis that this dynamic pattern of ephrin-A5 expression in LMC motor axons is important for the growth and guidance of the axons to, and into, the hindlimb by knocking down endogenous ephrin-A5 expression in the motor neurons and their axons. No perturbation of LMC motor axon projections was observed in response to this treatment, suggesting that ephrin-A5 is not needed for LMC motor axon growth or guidance.

  17. Quantitative measurements and modeling of cargo–motor interactions during fast transport in the living axon

    The kinesins have long been known to drive microtubule-based transport of sub-cellular components, yet the mechanisms of their attachment to cargo remain a mystery. Several different cargo-receptors have been proposed based on their in vitro binding affinities to kinesin-1. Only two of these—phosphatidyl inositol, a negatively charged lipid, and the carboxyl terminus of the amyloid precursor protein (APP-C), a trans-membrane protein—have been reported to mediate motility in living systems. A major question is how these many different cargo, receptors and motors interact to produce the complex choreography of vesicular transport within living cells. Here we describe an experimental assay that identifies cargo–motor receptors by their ability to recruit active motors and drive transport of exogenous cargo towards the synapse in living axons. Cargo is engineered by derivatizing the surface of polystyrene fluorescent nanospheres (100 nm diameter) with charged residues or with synthetic peptides derived from candidate motor receptor proteins, all designed to display a terminal COOH group. After injection into the squid giant axon, particle movements are imaged by laser-scanning confocal time-lapse microscopy. In this report we compare the motility of negatively charged beads with APP-C beads in the presence of glycine-conjugated non-motile beads using new strategies to measure bead movements. The ensuing quantitative analysis of time-lapse digital sequences reveals detailed information about bead movements: instantaneous and maximum velocities, run lengths, pause frequencies and pause durations. These measurements provide parameters for a mathematical model that predicts the spatiotemporal evolution of distribution of the two different types of bead cargo in the axon. The results reveal that negatively charged beads differ from APP-C beads in velocity and dispersion, and predict that at long time points APP-C will achieve greater progress towards the presynaptic

  18. Signal transmission from motor axons to group Ia muscle spindle afferents: frequency responses and second-order non-linearities.

    Windhorst, U; Kokkoroyiannis, T; Laouris, Y; Meyer-Lohmann, J

    1994-03-01

    Spinal recurrent inhibition via Renshaw cells and proprioceptive feedback via skeletal muscle and muscle spindle afferents have been hypothesized to constitute a compound feedback system [Windhorst (1989) Afferent Control of Posture and Locomotion; Windhorst (1993) Robots and Biological Systems--Towards a New Bionics]. To assess their detailed functions, it is necessary to know their dynamic characteristics. Previously we have extensively described the properties of signal transmission from motor axons to Renshaw cells using random motor axon stimulation and data analysis methods based thereupon. Using the same methods, we here compare these properties, in the cat, with those between motor axons and group Ia muscle spindle afferents in terms of frequency responses and nonlinear features. The frequency responses depend on the mean rate (carrier rate) of activation of motor axons and on the strength of coupling between motor units and spindles. In general, they are those of a second-order low-pass system with a cut-off at fairly low frequencies. This contrasts with the dynamics of motor axon-Renshaw cell couplings which are those of a much broader band-pass with its peak in the range of c. 2-15 Hz [Christakos (1987) Neuroscience 23, 613-623]. The second-order non-linearities in motor unit-muscle spindle signal lines are much more diverse than those in motor axon-Renshaw cell couplings. Although the average strength of response declines with mean stimulus rate in both subsystems, there is no systematic relationship between the amount of non-linearity and the average response in the former, whilst there is in the latter. The qualitative appearance of motor unit-muscle spindle non-linearities was complicated as was the average response to motor unit twitches. Thus, whilst Renshaw cells appear to dynamically reflect motor output rather faithfully, muscle spindles seem to signal local muscle fibre length changes and their dynamics. This would be consistent with the

  19. Long-Standing Motor and Sensory Recovery following Acute Fibrin Sealant Based Neonatal Sciatic Nerve Repair

    Natalia Perussi Biscola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus lesion results in loss of motor and sensory function, being more harmful in the neonate. Therefore, this study evaluated neuroprotection and regeneration after neonatal peripheral nerve coaptation with fibrin sealant. Thus, P2 neonatal Lewis rats were divided into three groups: AX: sciatic nerve axotomy (SNA without treatment; AX+FS: SNA followed by end-to-end coaptation with fibrin sealant derived from snake venom; AX+CFS: SNA followed by end-to-end coaptation with commercial fibrin sealant. Results were analyzed 4, 8, and 12 weeks after lesion. Astrogliosis, microglial reaction, and synapse preservation were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, and ultrastructural changes at ventral spinal cord were also investigated. Sensory-motor recovery was behaviorally studied. Coaptation preserved synaptic covering on lesioned motoneurons and led to neuronal survival. Reactive gliosis and microglial reaction decreased in the same groups (AX+FS, AX+CFS at 4 weeks. Regarding axonal regeneration, coaptation allowed recovery of greater number of myelinated fibers, with improved morphometric parameters. Preservation of inhibitory synaptic terminals was accompanied by significant improvement in the motor as well as in the nociceptive recovery. Overall, the present data suggest that acute repair of neonatal peripheral nerves with fibrin sealant results in neuroprotection and regeneration of motor and sensory axons.

  20. Acute exercise and motor memory consolidation

    Thomas, Richard; Johnsen, Line Korsgaard; Geertsen, Svend Sparre;

    2016-01-01

    where low to moderate intensities may be more suitable. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of intensity in mediating the effects of acute cardiovascular exercise on motor skill learning. We investigated the effects of different exercise intensities on the retention (performance score) of...... a visuomotor accuracy tracking task. Thirty six healthy male subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups that performed either a single bout of aerobic exercise at 20 min post motor skill learning at 45% (EX45), 90% (EX90) maximal power output (Wmax) or rested (CON). Randomization was...... stratified to ensure that the groups were matched for relative peak oxygen consumption (ml O2/min/kg) and baseline score in the tracking task. Retention tests were carried out at 1 (R1) and 7 days (R7) post motor skill learning. At R1, changes in performance scores were greater for EX90 compared to CON (p<0...

  1. Fisiopatología del síndrome de Guillain Barré axonal Physiopathology of axonal acute Guillain Barré syndrome

    Juan Guillermo Montoya Ch.; Diana P. Martínez T.; Jaime Carrizosa Moog; Beatriz Aguirre L.

    2002-01-01

    Se describe la fisiopatología del síndrome de Guillain Barré axonal. Se consideran especialmente cinco aspectos: 1) Agentes etiológicos, específicamente el Campylobacter jejuni. 2) Susceptibilidad genética humana. 3) Mimetismo molecular entre lipopolisacáridos y lipoproteínas. 4) Mecanismo de acción de los anticuerpos antigangliósidos y 5) Hallazgos patológicos. The physiopathology of axonal acute Guillain Barré syndrome is described. Five aspects are considered, namely: 1) Etiologic agents e...

  2. The Relationship between Dyslipidemia and Acute Axonal Function in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Vivo

    Kwai, Natalie C. G.; Nigole, William; Poynten, Ann M.; Brown, Christopher; Krishnan, Arun V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common and debilitating complication of diabetes mellitus. Treatment largely consists of symptom alleviation and there is a need to identify therapeutic targets for prevention and treatment of DPN. The objective of this study was to utilise novel neurophysiological techniques to investigate axonal function in patients with type 2 diabetes and to prospectively determine their relationship to serum lipids in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Seventy-one patients with type 2 diabetes were consecutively recruited and tested. All patients underwent thorough clinical neurological assessments including nerve conduction studies, and median motor axonal excitability studies. Studies were also undertaken in age matched normal control subjects(n = 42). Biochemical studies, including serum lipid levels were obtained in all patients. Patient excitability data was compared to control data and linear regression analysis was performed to determine the relationship between serum triglycerides and low density lipoproteins and excitability parameters typically abnormal in type 2 diabetic patients. Results Patient mean age was 64.2±2.3 years, mean glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c%) was 7.8±0.3%, mean triglyceride concentration was 1.6±0.1 mmol/L and mean cholesterol concentration was 4.1±0.2mmol/L. Compared to age matched controls, median motor axonal excitability studies indicated axonal dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients as a whole (T2DM) and in a subgroup of the patients without DPN (T2DM-NN). These included reduced percentage threshold change during threshold electrotonus at 10–20ms depolarising currents (TEd10–20ms)(controls 68.4±0.8, T2DM63.9±0.8, T2DM-NN64.8±1.6%,Pdiabetic patients: TEd(10–20ms)(1.2(-1.4,3.8);P = 0.4) and superexcitability (2.4(-0.05, 4.8);P = 0.06). Conclusions These findings suggest that serum triglyceride levels are not related to axonal function in type 2 diabetic patients. Additional

  3. Inhibition of kinesin-5, a microtubule-based motor protein, as a strategy for enhancing regeneration of adult axons

    Lin, Shen; Liu, Mei; Son, Young-Jin; Himes, B. Timothy; Snow, Diane M.; Yu, Wenqian; Baas, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Developing neurons express a motor protein called kinesin-5 (also called kif11 or Eg5) which acts as a “brake” on the advance of the microtubule array during axonal growth. Pharmacological inhibition of kinesin-5 causes the developing axon to grow at a faster rate, retract less, and grow past cues that would other wise cause it to turn. Here we demonstrate that kinesin-5 is also expressed in adult neurons, albeit at lower levels than during development. We hypothesized that inhibiting kinesin...

  4. Progression of motor axon dysfunction and ectopic Nav1.8 expression in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1B.

    Rosberg, Mette R; Alvarez, Susana; Klein, Dennis; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Martini, Rudolf; Levinson, S Rock; Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2016-09-01

    Mice heterozygously deficient for the myelin protein P0 gene (P0+/-) develop a slowly progressing neuropathy modeling demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1B). The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term progression of motor dysfunction in P0+/- mice at 3, 7, 12 and 20months. By comparison with WT littermates, P0+/- showed a decreasing motor performance with age. This was associated with a progressive reduction in amplitude and increase in latency of the plantar compound muscle action potential (CMAP) evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve at ankle. This progressive functional impairment was in contrast to the mild demyelinating neuropathy of the tibial nerve revealed by histology. "Threshold-tracking" studies showed impaired motor axon excitability in P0+/- from 3months. With time, there was a progressive reduction in threshold deviations during both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing threshold electrotonus associated with increasing resting I/V slope and increasing strength-duration time constant. These depolarizing features in excitability in P0+/- as well as the reduced CMAP amplitude were absent in P0+/- NaV1.8 knockouts, and could be acutely reversed by selective pharmacologic block of NaV1.8 in P0+/-. Mathematical modeling indicated an association of altered passive cable properties with a depolarizing shift in resting membrane potential and increase in the persistent Na(+) current in P0+/-. Our data suggest that ectopic NaV1.8 expression precipitates depolarizing conduction failure in CMT1B, and that motor axon dysfunction in demyelinating neuropathy is pharmacologically reversible. PMID:27215377

  5. Mitochondrial fission is an acute and adaptive response in injured motor neurons.

    Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Tamada, Hiromi; Kato, Yukina; Yasuda, Katsura; Ishihara, Naotada; Nomura, Masatoshi; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Successful recovery from neuronal damage requires a huge energy supply, which is provided by mitochondria. However, the physiological relevance of mitochondrial dynamics in damaged neurons in vivo is poorly understood. To address this issue, we established unique bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic (BAC Tg) mice, which develop and function normally, but in which neuronal injury induces labelling of mitochondria with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expression of cre recombinase. GFP-labelled mitochondria in BAC Tg mice appear shorter in regenerating motor axons soon after nerve injury compared with mitochondria in non-injured axons, suggesting the importance of increased mitochondrial fission during the early phase of nerve regeneration. Crossing the BAC Tg mice with mice carrying a floxed dynamin-related protein 1 gene (Drp1), which is necessary for mitochondrial fission, ablates mitochondrial fission specifically in injured neurons. Injury-induced Drp1-deficient motor neurons show elongated or abnormally gigantic mitochondria, which have impaired membrane potential and axonal transport velocity during the early phase after injury, and eventually promote neuronal death. Our in vivo data suggest that acute and prominent mitochondrial fission during the early stage after nerve injury is an adaptive response and is involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial and neuronal integrity to prevent neurodegeneration. PMID:27319806

  6. Mitochondrial fission is an acute and adaptive response in injured motor neurons

    Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Tamada, Hiromi; Kato, Yukina; Yasuda, Katsura; Ishihara, Naotada; Nomura, Masatoshi; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Successful recovery from neuronal damage requires a huge energy supply, which is provided by mitochondria. However, the physiological relevance of mitochondrial dynamics in damaged neurons in vivo is poorly understood. To address this issue, we established unique bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic (BAC Tg) mice, which develop and function normally, but in which neuronal injury induces labelling of mitochondria with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expression of cre recombinase. GFP-labelled mitochondria in BAC Tg mice appear shorter in regenerating motor axons soon after nerve injury compared with mitochondria in non-injured axons, suggesting the importance of increased mitochondrial fission during the early phase of nerve regeneration. Crossing the BAC Tg mice with mice carrying a floxed dynamin-related protein 1 gene (Drp1), which is necessary for mitochondrial fission, ablates mitochondrial fission specifically in injured neurons. Injury-induced Drp1-deficient motor neurons show elongated or abnormally gigantic mitochondria, which have impaired membrane potential and axonal transport velocity during the early phase after injury, and eventually promote neuronal death. Our in vivo data suggest that acute and prominent mitochondrial fission during the early stage after nerve injury is an adaptive response and is involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial and neuronal integrity to prevent neurodegeneration. PMID:27319806

  7. Gamma-diketone axonopathy: analyses of cytoskeletal motors and highways in CNS myelinated axons.

    Zhang, Lihai; Gavin, Terrence; DeCaprio, Anthony P; LoPachin, Richard M

    2010-09-01

    2,5-Hexanedione (HD) intoxication is associated with axon atrophy that might be responsible for the characteristic gait abnormalities, hindlimb skeletal muscle weakness and other neurological deficits that accompany neurotoxicity. Although previous mechanistic research focused on neurofilament triplet proteins (NFL, NFM, NFH), other cytoskeletal targets are possible. Therefore, to identify potential non-NF protein targets, we characterized the effects of HD on protein-protein interactions in cosedimentation assays using microtubules and NFs prepared from spinal cord of rats intoxicated at different daily dose rates (175 and 400 mg/kg/day). Results indicate that HD did not alter the presence of alpha- or beta-tubulins in these preparations, nor were changes noted in the distribution of either anterograde (KIF1A, KIF3, KIF5) or retrograde (dynein) molecular motors. The cosedimentation of dynactin, a dynein-associated protein, also was not affected. Immunoblot analysis of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) in microtubule preparations revealed substantial reductions (45-80%) in MAP1A, MAP1B heavy chain, MAP2, and tau regardless of HD dose rate. MAP1B light chain content was not altered. Finally, HD intoxication did not influence native NF protein content in either preparation. As per previous research, microtubule and NF preparations were enriched in high-molecular weight NF species. However, these NF derivatives were common to both HD and control samples, suggesting a lack of pathognomonic relevance. These data indicate that, although motor proteins were not affected, HD selectively impaired MAP-microtubule binding, presumably through adduction of lysine residues that mediate such interactions. Given their critical role in cytoskeletal physiology, MAPs could represent a relevant target for the induction of gamma-diketone axonopathy. PMID:20554699

  8. γ-Diketone Axonopathy: Analyses of Cytoskeletal Motors and Highways in CNS Myelinated Axons

    Zhang, Lihai; Gavin, Terrence; DeCaprio, Anthony P.; LoPachin, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    2,5-Hexanedione (HD) intoxication is associated with axon atrophy that might be responsible for the characteristic gait abnormalities, hindlimb skeletal muscle weakness and other neurological deficits that accompany neurotoxicity. Although previous mechanistic research focused on neurofilament triplet proteins (NFL, NFM, NFH), other cytoskeletal targets are possible. Therefore, to identify potential non-NF protein targets, we characterized the effects of HD on protein-protein interactions in cosedimentation assays using microtubules and NFs prepared from spinal cord of rats intoxicated at different daily dose rates (175 and 400 mg/kg/day). Results indicate that HD did not alter the presence of α- or β-tubulins in these preparations, nor were changes noted in the distribution of either anterograde (KIF1A, KIF3, KIF5) or retrograde (dynein) molecular motors. The cosedimentation of dynactin, a dynein-associated protein, also was not affected. Immunoblot analysis of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) in microtubule preparations revealed substantial reductions (45–80%) in MAP1A, MAP1B heavy chain, MAP2, and tau regardless of HD dose rate. MAP1B light chain content was not altered. Finally, HD intoxication did not influence native NF protein content in either preparation. As per previous research, microtubule and NF preparations were enriched in high–molecular weight NF species. However, these NF derivatives were common to both HD and control samples, suggesting a lack of pathognomonic relevance. These data indicate that, although motor proteins were not affected, HD selectively impaired MAP-microtubule binding, presumably through adduction of lysine residues that mediate such interactions. Given their critical role in cytoskeletal physiology, MAPs could represent a relevant target for the induction of γ-diketone axonopathy. PMID:20554699

  9. Motor nerve inexcitability in Guillain-Barré syndrome. The spectrum of distal conduction block and axonal degeneration.

    Triggs, W J; Cros, D; Gominak, S C; Zuniga, G; Beric, A; Shahani, B T; Ropper, A H; Roongta, S M

    1992-10-01

    We studied 34 patients with the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) to clarify the clinical significance of inexcitable motor nerves and of low amplitude compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs). The patients were subdivided into two groups. Group 1 included eight patients who had electrically inexcitable motor nerves within 2 wks of the first symptom. (Two patients without extensive conduction studies had only one inexcitable motor nerve.) The outcome in this group at 1 yr varied from complete recovery (five patients) to severe motor sequelae (three patients). Group 2 included 26 patients who had two electrophysiological assessments, and in whom the serial changes in CMAP amplitudes were analysed and correlated to outcome. Fourteen of these 26 sets of serial studies were performed within 1 mth. Twelve of 26 patients in Group 2 showed decrease in the amplitude of CMAPs between serial studies; only six of these had a good outcome at 1 yr. Nine of 26 patients showed increase in CMAP amplitude between serial studies, of these eight had a good clinical outcome. Low-amplitude CMAPs or inexcitable motor nerves in the initial stages of GBS are due to distal pathology of the motor axons, either distal conduction block or axonal degeneration. The nature of these changes cannot be predicted by the results of the initial electrophysiological evaluation, including the presence or absence of active denervation. However, improvement of CMAP amplitude on sequential studies suggests a good outcome at 1 yr. We believe that, in the absence of a biological marker for GBS, individualization of an 'axonal variant' of the syndrome is not warranted at the present time. PMID:1422789

  10. Fisiopatología del síndrome de Guillain Barré axonal Physiopathology of axonal acute Guillain Barré syndrome

    Juan Guillermo Montoya Ch.

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Se describe la fisiopatología del síndrome de Guillain Barré axonal. Se consideran especialmente cinco aspectos: 1 Agentes etiológicos, específicamente el Campylobacter jejuni. 2 Susceptibilidad genética humana. 3 Mimetismo molecular entre lipopolisacáridos y lipoproteínas. 4 Mecanismo de acción de los anticuerpos antigangliósidos y 5 Hallazgos patológicos. The physiopathology of axonal acute Guillain Barré syndrome is described. Five aspects are considered, namely: 1 Etiologic agents emphasizing on Campylobacter jejuni. 2 Human genetic predisposition. 3 Molecular mimicry between lipopolysaccharides and gangliosides. 4 Mechanisms of action of antiganglioside antibodies and, 5 Pathologic findings.

  11. Targeted axonal import (TAxI) peptide delivers functional proteins into spinal cord motor neurons after peripheral administration.

    Sellers, Drew L; Bergen, Jamie M; Johnson, Russell N; Back, Heidi; Ravits, John M; Horner, Philip J; Pun, Suzie H

    2016-03-01

    A significant unmet need in treating neurodegenerative disease is effective methods for delivery of biologic drugs, such as peptides, proteins, or nucleic acids into the central nervous system (CNS). To date, there are no operative technologies for the delivery of macromolecular drugs to the CNS via peripheral administration routes. Using an in vivo phage-display screen, we identify a peptide, targeted axonal import (TAxI), that enriched recombinant bacteriophage accumulation and delivered protein cargo into spinal cord motor neurons after intramuscular injection. In animals with transected peripheral nerve roots, TAxI delivery into motor neurons after peripheral administration was inhibited, suggesting a retrograde axonal transport mechanism for delivery into the CNS. Notably, TAxI-Cre recombinase fusion proteins induced selective recombination and tdTomato-reporter expression in motor neurons after intramuscular injections. Furthermore, TAxI peptide was shown to label motor neurons in the human tissue. The demonstration of a nonviral-mediated delivery of functional proteins into the spinal cord establishes the clinical potential of this technology for minimally invasive administration of CNS-targeted therapeutics. PMID:26888285

  12. Adult rat motor neurons do not re-establish electrical coupling during axonal regeneration and muscle reinnervation.

    Morgana Favero

    Full Text Available Gap junctions (GJs between neurons are present in both the newborn and the adult nervous system, and although important roles have been suggested or demonstrated in a number of instances, in many other cases a full understanding of their physiological role is still missing. GJs are expressed in the rodent lumbar cord at birth and mediate both dye and electrical coupling between motor neurons. This expression has been proposed to mediate: (i fast synchronization of motoneuronal spike activity, in turn linked to the process of refinement of neuromuscular connections, and (ii slow synchronization of locomotor-like oscillatory activity. Soon after birth this coupling disappears. Since in the adult rat regeneration of motor fibers after peripheral nerve injury leads to a recapitulation of synaptic refinement at the target muscles, we tested whether GJs between motor neurons are transiently re-expressed. We found that in conditions of maximal responsiveness of lumbar motor neurons (such as no depression by anesthetics, decerebrate release of activity of subsets of motor neurons, use of temporal and spatial summation by antidromic and orthodromic stimulations, testing of large ensembles of motor neurons no firing is observed in ventral root axons in response to antidromic spike invasion of nearby counterparts. We conclude that junctional coupling between motor neurons is not required for the refinement of neuromuscular innervation in the adult.

  13. Na(v)1.8 channelopathy in mutant mice deficient for myelin protein zero is detrimental to motor axons

    Alvarez Herrero, Susana; Pinchenko, Volodymyr; Klein, Dennis;

    2011-01-01

    Myelin protein zero mutations were found to produce Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease phenotypes with various degrees of myelin impairment and axonal loss, ranging from the mild 'demyelinating' adult form to severe and early onset forms. Protein zero deficient homozygous mice ( ) show a severe and...... conventional nerve conduction studies, behavioural studies using rotor-rod measurements, and histological measures to assess membrane dysfunction and its progression in protein zero deficient homozygous mutants as compared with age-matched wild-type controls. The involvement of Na(V)1.8 was investigated by...... pharmacologic block using the subtype-selective Na(V)1.8 blocker A-803467 and chronically in Na(V)1.8 knock-outs. We found that in the context of dysmyelination, abnormal potassium ion currents and membrane depolarization, the ectopic Na(V)1.8 channels further impair the motor axon excitability in protein zero...

  14. Spatacsin and spastizin act in the same pathway required for proper spinal motor neuron axon outgrowth in zebrafish.

    Martin, Elodie; Yanicostas, Constantin; Rastetter, Agnès; Alavi Naini, Seyedeh Maryam; Maouedj, Alissia; Kabashi, Edor; Rivaud-Péchoux, Sophie; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Soussi-Yanicostas, Nadia

    2012-12-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are rare neurological conditions caused by degeneration of the long axons of the cerebrospinal tracts, leading to locomotor impairment and additional neurological symptoms. There are more than 40 different causative genes, 24 of which have been identified, including SPG11 and SPG15 mutated in complex clinical forms. Since the vast majority of the causative mutations lead to loss of function of the corresponding proteins, we made use of morpholino-oligonucleotide (MO)-mediated gene knock-down to generate zebrafish models of both SPG11 and SPG15 and determine how invalidation of the causative genes (zspg11 and zspg15) during development might contribute to the disease. Micro-injection of MOs targeting each gene caused locomotor impairment and abnormal branching of spinal cord motor neurons at the neuromuscular junction. More severe phenotypes with abnormal tail developments were also seen. Moreover, partial depletion of both proteins at sub-phenotypic levels resulted in the same phenotypes, suggesting for the first time, in vivo, a genetic interaction between these genes. In conclusion, the zebrafish orthologues of the SPG11 and SPG15 genes are important for proper development of the axons of spinal motor neurons and likely act in a common pathway to promote their proper path finding towards the neuromuscular junction. PMID:22801083

  15. Effects of Valproic Acid on Axonal Regeneration and Recovery of Motor Function after Peripheral Nerve Injury in the Rat

    Ting Rao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Valproic acid (VPA is used to be an effective anti-epileptic drug and mood stabilizer. It has recently been demonstrated that VPA could promote neurite outgrowth, activate the extracellular signal regulated kinase pathway, and increases bcl-2 and growth cone-associated protein 43 levels in spinal cord. In the present research we demonstrate the effect of VPA on peripheral nerve regeneration and recovery of motor function following sciatic nerve transaction in rats. Methods:   The rats in VPA group and control group were administered with valproic acid (300mg/kg and sodium chloride respectively after operation. Each animal was observed sciatic nerve index (SFI at 2-week intervals and studied electrophysiology at 4-week intervals for 12 weeks. Histological and morphometrical analyses were performed 12 weeks after operation. Using the digital image-analysis system, thickness of the myelin sheath was measured, and total numbers of regenerated axons were counted. Results:   There was a significant difference in SFI, electrophysiological index (motor-nerve conduct velocity, and morphometrical results (regenerated axon number and thickness of myelin sheath in nerve regeneration between the VPA group and controls (   P

  16. Dihydrotestosterone ameliorates degeneration in muscle, axons and motoneurons and improves motor function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis model mice.

    Young-Eun Yoo

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a lethal disease characterized by a progressive loss of motoneurons. The clinical symptoms include skeletal muscle weakness and atrophy, which impairs motor performance and eventually leads to respiratory failure. We tested whether dihydrotestosterone (DHT, which has both anabolic effects on muscle and neuroprotective effects on axons and motoneurons, can ameliorate clinical symptoms in ALS. A silastic tube containing DHT crystals was implanted subcutaneously in SOD1-G93A mice at early symptomatic age when decreases in body weight and grip-strength were observed as compared to wild-type mice. DHT-treated SOD1-G93A mice demonstrated ameliorated muscle atrophy and increased body weight, which was associated with stronger grip-strength. DHT treatment increased the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 in muscle, which can exert myotrophic as well as neurotrophic effects through retrograde transport. DHT treatment attenuated neuromuscular junction denervation, and axonal and motoneuron loss. DHT-treated SOD1-G93A mice demonstrated improvement in motor behavior as assessed by rota-rod and gait analyses, and an increased lifespan. Application of DHT is a relatively simple and non-invasive procedure, which may be translated into therapy to improve the quality of life for ALS patients.

  17. Segregation of Axial Motor and Sensory Pathways via Heterotypic Trans-Axonal Signaling

    Gallarda, Benjamin W.; Bonanomi, Dario; Müller, Daniel; Brown, Arthur; Alaynick, William A; Andrews, Shane E.; Lemke, Greg; Pfaff, Samuel L.; Marquardt, Till

    2008-01-01

    Execution of motor behaviors relies on circuitries effectively integrating immediate sensory feedback to efferent pathways controlling muscle activity. It remains unclear how, during neuromuscular circuit assembly, sensory and motor projections become incorporated into tightly coordinated, yet functionally separate pathways. We report that, within axial nerves, establishment of discrete afferent and efferent pathways depends on coordinate signaling between coextending sensory and motor projec...

  18. γ-Diketone Axonopathy: Analyses of Cytoskeletal Motors and Highways in CNS Myelinated Axons

    Zhang, Lihai; Gavin, Terrence; DeCaprio, Anthony P; LoPachin, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    2,5-Hexanedione (HD) intoxication is associated with axon atrophy that might be responsible for the characteristic gait abnormalities, hindlimb skeletal muscle weakness and other neurological deficits that accompany neurotoxicity. Although previous mechanistic research focused on neurofilament triplet proteins (NFL, NFM, NFH), other cytoskeletal targets are possible. Therefore, to identify potential non-NF protein targets, we characterized the effects of HD on protein-protein interactions in ...

  19. Optic nerve magnetisation transfer ratio after acute optic neuritis predicts axonal and visual outcomes.

    Yejun Wang

    Full Text Available Magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR can reveal the degree of proton exchange between free water and macromolecules and was suggested to be pathological informative. We aimed to investigate changes in optic nerve MTR over 12 months following acute optic neuritis (ON and to determine whether MTR measurements can predict clinical and paraclinical outcomes at 6 and 12 months. Thirty-seven patients with acute ON were studied within 2 weeks of presentation and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Assessments included optic nerve MTR, retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL thickness, multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP amplitude and latency and high (100% and low (2.5% contrast letter acuity. Eleven healthy controls were scanned twice four weeks apart for comparison with patients. Patient unaffected optic nerve MTR did not significantly differ from controls at any time-point. Compared to the unaffected nerve, affected optic nerve MTR was significantly reduced at 3 months (mean percentage interocular difference = -9.24%, p = 0.01, 6 months (mean = -12.48%, p<0.0001 and 12 months (mean = -7.61%, p = 0.003. Greater reduction in MTR at 3 months in patients was associated with subsequent loss of high contrast letter acuity at 6 (ρ = 0.60, p = 0.0003 and 12 (ρ = 0.44, p = 0.009 months, low contrast letter acuity at 6 (ρ = 0.35, p = 0.047 months, and RNFL thinning at 12 (ρ = 0.35, p = 0.044 months. Stratification of individual patient MTR time courses based on flux over 12 months (stable, putative remyelination and putative degeneration predicted RNFL thinning at 12 months (F(2,32 = 3.59, p = 0.02. In conclusion, these findings indicate that MTR flux after acute ON is predictive of axonal degeneration and visual disability outcomes.

  20. Lithium accelerates functional motor recovery by improving remyelination of regenerating axons following ventral root avulsion and reimplantation.

    Fang, Xin-Yu; Zhang, Wen-Ming; Zhang, Chao-Fan; Wong, Wai-Man; Li, Wen; Wu, Wutian; Lin, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Brachial plexus injury (BPI) often involves the complete or partial avulsion of one or more of the cervical nerve roots, which leads to permanent paralysis of the innervated muscles. Reimplantation surgery has been attempted as a clinical treatment for brachial plexus root avulsion but has failed to achieve complete functional recovery. Lithium is a mood stabilizer drug that is used to treat bipolar disorder; however, its effects on spinal cord or peripheral nerve injuries have also been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether lithium can improve functional motor recovery after ventral root avulsion and reimplantation in a rat model of BPI. The results showed that systemic treatment with a clinical dose of lithium promoted motor neuron outgrowth and increased the efficiency of motor unit regeneration through enhanced remyelination. An analysis of myelin-associated genes showed that the effects of lithium started during the early phase of remyelination and persisted through the late stage of the process. Efficient remyelination of the regenerated axons in the lithium-treated rats led to an earlier functional recovery. Therefore, we demonstrated that lithium might be a potential clinical treatment for BPI in combination with reimplantation surgery. PMID:27185485

  1. Frizzled3 controls axonal development in distinct populations of cranial and spinal motor neurons

    Hua, Zhong L.; Smallwood, Philip M.; Nathans, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    eLife digest For the nervous system to become wired up correctly, neurons within the developing embryo must project over long distances to form connections with remote targets. They do this by lengthening their axons—the ‘cables’ along which electrical signals flow—and some axons in adult humans can grow to be more than 1 metre long. This type of long-range pathfinding activity is particularly common for neurons that control movement, as many of these neurons must establish connections with m...

  2. Acute Autonomic, Sensory and Motor Neuropathy Associated with Meningoencephalitis

    Satoko Kinoshita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first case of acute autonomic, motor and sensory neuropathy (AASMN associated with meningoencephalitis. A 62-year-old man presented with fever, neck stiffness, and coma. Respiratory failure developed. Magnetic resonance images showed an abnormality in the medial temporal lobe. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed pleocytosis with a high protein level. Intensive care gradually improved the consciousness level, but paralysis of the four extremities persisted. Nerve conduction studies revealed demyelinating sensory and motor polyneuropathy. Severe orthostatic hypotension, urinary retention, and constipation were also present. Clinical autonomic tests suggested both sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction. After intravenous immunoglobulin therapy, motor and sensory symptoms resolved rapidly; dysautonomia resolved gradually over the next 2 months. The response to immunological therapy and the presence of antecedent infection suggest that AASMN is a postinfectious, immune-mediated, autonomic, sensory and motor nervous system dysfunction.

  3. Persistent abnormalities of membrane excitability in regenerated mature motor axons in cat

    Moldovan, Mihai; Krarup, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess by threshold tracking internodal and nodal membrane excitability during the maturation process after tibial nerve crush in cat. Various excitability indices (EI) were computed non-invasively by comparing the threshold of a submaximal compound motor potential...

  4. Multiple etiologies of axonal sensory motor polyneuropathy in a renal transplant recipient: a case report

    Etemadi Jalal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Neurological complications leading to morbidity and mortality are not frequent in renal transplant recipients. Here, we report a renal transplant recipient who presented with diminished strength in his limbs probably due to multiple etiologies of axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy, which resolved with intravenous immunoglobulin. Case presentation A 49-year-old Iranian male renal transplant recipient with previous history of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease presented with diminished strength in his limbs one month after surgery. Our patient was on cyclosporine A, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisone. Although a detected hypophosphatemia was corrected with supplemental phosphate, the loss of strength was still slowly progressive and diffuse muscular atrophy was remarkable in his trunk, upper limb and pelvic girdle. Meanwhile, his cranial nerves were intact. Post-transplant diabetes mellitus was diagnosed and insulin therapy was initiated. In addition, as a high serum cyclosporine level was detected, the dose of cyclosporine was reduced. Our patient was also put on intravenous ganciclovir due to positive serum cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin M antibody. Despite the reduction of oral cyclosporine dose along with medical therapy for the cytomegalovirus infection and diabetes mellitus, his muscular weakness and atrophy did not improve. One week after administration of intravenous immunoglobulin, a significant improvement was noted in his muscular weakness. Conclusion A remarkable response to intravenous immunoglobulin is compatible with an immunological basis for the present condition (post-transplant polyneuropathy. In cases of post-transplant polyneuropathy with a high clinical suspicion of immunological origin, administration of intravenous immunoglobulin may be recommended.

  5. Acute Autonomic, Sensory and Motor Neuropathy Associated with Meningoencephalitis

    Satoko Kinoshita; Kazuma Sugie; Hiroshi Kataoka; Miho Sugie; Makito Hirano; Satoshi Ueno

    2009-01-01

    We report the first case of acute autonomic, motor and sensory neuropathy (AASMN) associated with meningoencephalitis. A 62-year-old man presented with fever, neck stiffness, and coma. Respiratory failure developed. Magnetic resonance images showed an abnormality in the medial temporal lobe. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed pleocytosis with a high protein level. Intensive care gradually improved the consciousness level, but paralysis of the four extremities persisted. Nerve conduction st...

  6. Acute ethanol exposure inhibits silencing of cerebellar Golgi cell firing induced by granule cell axon input

    Paolo eBotta

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Golgi cells (GoCs are specialized interneurons that provide inhibitory input to granule cells in the cerebellar cortex. GoCs are pacemaker neurons that spontaneously fire action potentials, triggering spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in granule cells and also contributing to the generation tonic GABAA receptor-mediated currents in granule cells. In turn, granule cell axons provide feedback glutamatergic input to GoCs. It has been shown that high frequency stimulation of granule cell axons induces a transient pause in GoC firing in a type 2-metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2-dependent manner. Here, we investigated the effect ethanol on the pause of GoC firing induced by high frequency stimulation of granule cell axons. GoC electrophysiological recordings were performed in parasagittal cerebellar vermis slices from postnatal day 23 to 26 rats. Loose-patch cell-attached recordings revealed that ethanol (40 mM reversibly decreases the pause duration. An antagonist of mGluR2 reduced the pause duration but did not affect the effect of ethanol. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings showed that currents evoked by an mGluR2 agonist were not significantly affected by ethanol. Perforated-patch experiments in which hyperpolarizing and depolarizing currents were injected into GoCs demonstrated that there is an inverse relationship between spontaneous firing and pause duration. Slight inhibition of the Na+/K+ pump mimicked the effect of ethanol on pause duration. In conclusion, ethanol reduces the granule cell axon-mediated feedback mechanism by reducing the input responsiveness of GoCs. This would result in a transient increase of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition of granule cells, limiting information flow at the input stage of the cerebellar cortex.

  7. Acute axonal polyneuropathy with predominant proximal involvement: an uncommon neurological complication of bariatric surgery Polineuropatia axonal aguda com acometimento proximal predominante: manifestação neurológica incomum de cirurgia bariátrica

    Flavia Costa Nunes Machado; Berenice Cataldo Oliveira Valério; Roberto Naun Franco Morgulis; Karlo Faria Nunes; Sílvia Mazzali-Verst

    2006-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is frequently indicated in the treatment of morbid obesity. Previously unreported complications have been associated to this surgery; among them, neurological complications have gained attention. We report the case of a 25-year-old man submitted to gastric surgery for treatment of morbid obesity who developed, two months after surgery, acute proximal weakness in lower limbs. The electroneuromyography revealed axonal peripheral polyneuropathy with predominant proximal involve...

  8. Peripheral motor axons of SOD1(G127X) mutant mice are susceptible to activity-dependent degeneration

    Alvarez Herrero, Susana; Calin, A; Graffmo, K S; Moldovan, M; Krarup, C

    2013-01-01

    "threshold-tracking" showed that axons recovering from RS had changes in excitability suggestive of membrane hyperpolarization, which was smaller in the SOD1(G127X) than in WT. Our data provide proof-of-principle that SOD1(G127X) axons are less resistant to activity-induced changes in ion-concentrations. It...

  9. Axon damage and repair in multiple sclerosis.

    Perry, V.H.; Anthony, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that within long-standing multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions there is axonal loss but whether it is an early or late event has been more difficult to establish. The use of immunocytochemical methods that reveal axonal end-bulbs is a valuable approach to investigating acute axonal injury in human pathological material. The application of these techniques to multiple sclerosis tissue reveals evidence of axonal injury in acute lesions; the distribution of the end-bulbs in acute and...

  10. Rapid transient isoform-specific neuregulin1 transcription in motor neurons is regulated by neurotrophic factors and axon-target interactions.

    Wang, Jiajing; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Zakarian, Vaagn; Song, Fei; Loeb, Jeffrey A

    2015-09-01

    The neuregulins (NRGs) are a family of alternatively spliced factors that play important roles in nervous system development and disease. In motor neurons, NRG1 expression is regulated by activity and neurotrophic factors, however, little is known about what controls isoform-specific transcription. Here we show that NRG1 expression in the chick embryo increases in motor neurons that have extended their axons and that limb bud ablation before motor axon outgrowth prevents this induction, suggesting a trophic role from the developing limb. Consistently, NRG1 induction after limb bud ablation can be rescued by adding back the neurotrophic factors BDNF and GDNF. Mechanistically, BDNF induces a rapid and transient increase in type I and type III NRG1 mRNAs that peak at 4h in rat embryonic ventral spinal cord cultures. Blocking MAPK or PI3K signaling or blocking transcription with Actinomycin D blocks BDNF induced NRG1 gene induction. BDNF had no effect on mRNA degradation, suggesting that transcriptional activation rather than message stability is important. Furthermore, BDNF activates a reporter construct that includes 700bp upstream of the type I NRG1 start site. Protein synthesis is also required for type I NRG1 mRNA transcription as cycloheximide produced a super-induction of type I, but not type III NRG1 mRNA, possibly through a mechanism involving sustained activation of MAPK and PI3K. These results reveal the existence of highly responsive, transient transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that differentially modulate NRG1 isoform expression as a function of extracellular and intracellular signaling cascades and mediated by neurotrophic factors and axon-target interactions. PMID:25913151

  11. Fine motor and handwriting problems after treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    ReindersMesselink, HA; Schoemaker, MM; Hofte, M; Goeken, LNH; Kingma, A; vandenBriel, MM; Kamps, WA

    1996-01-01

    Motor skills were investigated in 18 children 2 years after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Cross and fine motor functioning were examined with the Movement Assessment Battery for Children. Handwriting as a specific fine motor skill was studied with a computerized writing task. We

  12. 2- and 6-O-sulfated proteoglycans have distinct and complementary roles in cranial axon guidance and motor neuron migration

    Maden, Charlotte H.; Davidson, Kathryn; Fantin, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The correct migration and axon extension of neurons in the developing nervous system is essential for the appropriate wiring and function of neural networks. Here, we report that O-sulfotransferases, a class of enzymes that modify heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), are essential to regulate neuronal migration and axon development. We show that the 6-O-sulfotransferases HS6ST1 and HS6ST2 are essential for cranial axon patterning, whilst the 2-O-sulfotransferase HS2ST (also known as HS2ST1) is important to regulate the migration of facial branchiomotor (FBM) neurons in the hindbrain. We have also investigated how HS2ST interacts with other signals in the hindbrain and show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling regulates FBM neuron migration in an HS2ST-dependent manner. PMID:27048738

  13. Transplantation of an Acutely Isolated Bone Marrow Fraction Repairs Demyelinated Adult Rat Spinal Cord Axons

    SASAKI, MASANORI; HONMOU, OSAMU; Akiyama, Yukinori; Uede,Teiji; Hashi,Kazuo; Kocsis, Jeffery D.

    2001-01-01

    The potential of bone marrow cells to differentiate into myelin-forming cells and to repair the demyelinated rat spinal cord in vivo was studied using cell transplantation techniques. The dorsal funiculus of the spinal cord was demyelinated by x-irradiation treatment, followed by microinjection of ethidium bromide. Suspensions of a bone marrow cell fraction acutely isolated from femoral bones in LacZ transgenic mice were prepared by centrifugation on a density gradient (Ficoll-Paque) to remov...

  14. α-Synuclein Pathology and Axonal Degeneration of the Peripheral Motor Nerves Innervating Pharyngeal Muscles in Parkinson’s Disease

    Mu, Liancai; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Chen, Jingming; SU, HUNGXI; Sanders, Ira; Adler, Charles H; Shill, Holly A.; John N Caviness; Samanta, Johan E.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by cardinal motor symptoms and central nervous system pathology. As current drug therapies can often stabilize these cardinal motor symptoms attention has shifted to the other motor and non-motor symptoms of PD which are resistant to drug therapy. Dysphagia in PD is perhaps the most important drug resistant symptom as it leads to aspiration and pneumonia, the leading cause of death. Here, we present direct evidenc...

  15. What drives progressive motor deficits in patients with acute pontine infarction?

    Jue-bao Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive motor deficits are relatively common in acute pontine infarction and frequently associated with increased functional disability. However, the factors that affect the progression of clinical motor weakness are largely unknown. Previous studies have suggested that pontine infarctions are caused mainly by basilar artery stenosis and penetrating artery disease. Recently, lower pons lesions in patients with acute pontine infarctions have been reported to be related to progressive motor deficits, and ensuing that damage to the corticospinal tracts may be responsible for the worsening of neurological symptoms. Here, we review studies on motor weakness progression in pontine infarction and discuss the mechanisms that may underlie the neurologic worsening.

  16. Focal release of neurotrophic factors by biodegradable microspheres enhance motor and sensory axonal regeneration in vitro and in vivo

    Santos, Daniel; GIUDETTI Guido; Micera, Silvestro; Navarro Acebes, Xavier; Valle Macia, Jaume del

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) promote nerve regeneration and neuronal survival after peripheral nerve injury. However, drawbacks related with administration and bioactivity during long periods limit their therapeutic application. In this study, PLGA microspheres (MPs) were used to locally release different NTFs and evaluate whether they accelerate axonal regeneration in comparison with free NTFs or controls. ELISA, SEM, UV/visible light microscopy, organotypic cultures of DRG explants and spina...

  17. Handwriting and fine motor problems after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Reinders-Messelink, H.A.; Schoemaker, M.M.; Goeken, L.N H; van den Briel, M.M.; Kamps, W.A; Simner, M L; Leedham, C G; Thomassen, A J W M

    1996-01-01

    Fine motor skills and handwriting performance were investigated in 17 children at least two years after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It was hypothesized that as a late effect of vincristine neuropathy, children would still have fine motor and/or handwriting problems. Gross and fine mo

  18. Effects of acute aerobic exercise on motor response inhibition: An ERP study using the stop-signal task

    Chien-Heng Chu

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Acute exercise has a selective and beneficial effect on cognitive function, specifically affecting the motor response inhibition aspect of executive function. Furthermore, acute exercise predominately impacts later stages of information processing during motor response inhibition, which may lead to an increase in attentional resource allocation and confer the ability to successfully withhold a response to achieve motor response inhibition.

  19. Effects of motor imagery combined with functional electrical stimulation on upper limb motor function of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Shou-feng LIU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effects of motor imagery (MI combined with the third generation functional electrical stimulation (FES on upper limb motor function in acute ischemic stroke patients with hemiplegia.  Methods Forty acute ischemic stroke patients, within 48 h of onset, were randomly divided into FES group (N = 20 and combination group (FES combined with motor imagery, N = 20. All patients received basic routine rehabilitation training, for example, good limb positioning, accepting braces, balance training and training in the activities of daily living (ADL. FES group received the third generation FES therapy and the combination group also received motor imagery for 2 weeks. All of the patients were assessed with Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA, Action Research Arm Test (ARAT and active range of motion (AROM of wrist dorsiflexion before and after 2 weeks of treatment.  Results After 2 weeks of treatment, the 2 groups had significantly higher FMA score, ARAT score and AROM of wrist dorsiflexion than that in pre-treatment (P = 0.000, for all. Besides, the FMA score (t = - 2.528, P = 0.016, ARAT score (t = - 2.562, P = 0.014 and AROM of wrist dorsiflexion (t = - 2.469, P = 0.018 in the combination group were significantly higher than that in the FES group. There were interactions of treatment methods with observation time points (P < 0.05, for all.  Conclusions Motor imagery combined with the third generation FES can effectively promote the recovery of upper limb motor function and motion range of wrist dorsiflexion in patients with acute ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.03.008

  20. Synergistic actions of olomoucine and bone morphogenetic protein-4 in axonal repair after acute spinal cord contusion

    Liang Chen; Jianjun Li; Liang Wu; Mingliang Yang; Feng Gao; Li Yuan

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether olomoucine acts synergistically with bone morphogenetic protein-4 in the treatment of spinal cord injury, we established a rat model of acute spinal cord contusion by impacting the spinal cord at the T8 vertebra. We injected a suspension of astrocytes derived from glial-restricted precursor cells exposed to bone morphogenetic protein-4 (GDAsBMP) into the spinal cord around the site of the injury, and/or olomoucine intraperitoneally. Olomoucine effectively inhibited astrocyte proliferation and the formation of scar tissue at the injury site, but did not prevent proliferation of GDAsBMP or inhibit their effects in reducing the spinal cord lesion cavity. Furthermore, while GDAsBMP and olomoucine independently resulted in small improve-ments in locomotor function in injured rats, combined administration of both treatments had a signiifcantly greater effect on the restoration of motor function. These data indicate that the combined use of olomoucine and GDAsBMP creates a better environment for nerve regeneration than the use of either treatment alone, and contributes to spinal cord repair after injury.

  1. Classification of motor imagery performance in acute stroke

    Tangwiriyasakul, Chayanin; Mocioiu, V.; Putten, van M.J.A.M.; Rutten, W.L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Effective motor imagery performance, seen as strong suppression of the sensorimotor rhythm, is the key element in motor imagery therapy. Therefore, optimization of methods to classify whether the subject is performing the imagery task is a prerequisite. An optimal classification method sh

  2. Motoneurons of the adult marmoset can grow axons and reform motor endplates through a peripheral nerve bridge joining the locally injured cervical spinal cord to the denervated biceps brachii muscle.

    Emery, E; Rhrich-Haddout, F; Kassar-Duchossoy, L; Lyoussi, B; Tadié, M; Horvat, J C

    2000-12-15

    Reconnection of the injured spinal cord (SC) of the marmoset with the denervated biceps brachii muscle (BB) was obtained by using a peripheral nerve (PN) bridge. In 13 adult males, a 45 mm segment of the peroneal nerve was removed: one end was implanted unilaterally into the cervical SC of the same animal (autograft), determining a local injury, although the other end was either directly inserted into the BB (Group A) or, alternatively, sutured to its transected motor nerve, the musculocutaneous nerve (Group B). From 2-4 months post-surgery, eight out of the 10 surviving animals responded by a contraction of the BB to electrical stimulations of the PN bridge. All ten were then processed for a morphological study. As documented by retrograde axonal tracing studies using horse radish peroxidase or Fast Blue (FB), a mean number of 314 (Group A) or 45 (Group B) spinal neurons, mainly located close to the site of injury and grafting, re-expressed a capacity to grow and extend axons into the PN bridge. Most of these regenerated axons were able to grow up to the BB and form or reform functional motor endplates. Many of the spinal neurons that were retrogradely labeled with FB simultaneously displayed immunoreactivity for choline acetyl-transferase and consequently were assumed to be motoneurons. Reinnervation and regeneration of the BB were documented by methods revealing axon terminals, endplates and myofibrillary ATPase activity. Our results indicate that motoneurons of the focally injured SC of a small-sized primate can, following the example of the adult rat, re-establish a lost motor function by extending new axons all the way through a PN bridge connected to a denervated skeletal muscle. PMID:11107167

  3. Effects of Valproic Acid on Axonal Regeneration and Recovery of Motor Function after Peripheral Nerve Injury in the Rat

    Ting Rao; Fei Wu; Danmou Xing; Zhengren Peng; Dong Ren; Wei Feng; Yan Chen; Zhiming Zhao; Huan Wang; Junweng Wang; Wusheng Kan; Qingsong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Background:   Valproic acid (VPA) is used to be an effective anti-epileptic drug and mood stabilizer. It has recently been demonstrated that VPA could promote neurite outgrowth, activate the extracellular signal regulated kinase pathway, and increases bcl-2 and growth cone-associated protein 43 levels in spinal cord. In the present research we demonstrate the effect of VPA on peripheral nerve regeneration and recovery of motor function following sciatic nerve transaction in rats. Methods:   T...

  4. Lower motor neuron paralysis with extensive cord atrophy in parainfectious acute transverse myelitis

    Sunil Pradhan; Ajit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    We describe a young patient of acute transverse myelitis (ATM) who developed true lower motor neuron (LMN) type flaccid paraplegia as a result of anterior horn cell damage in the region of cord inflammation that extended from conus upwards up to the D4 transverse level. We infer that flaccidity in acute phase of ATM is not always due to spinal shock and may represent true LMN paralysis particularly if the long segment myelits is severe and extending up to last spinal segment.

  5. The Effect of Acute Exercise on Consolidation and Retention of Motor Memory

    Skriver, Kasper Christen

    There is substantial evidence that a single bout of exercise can improve cognitive functions and retention of certain types of declarative memory. However, it is unclear if a similar effect can be demonstrated when coupling physical activity with the acquisition and retention of a motor skill...... as effectively as running. Our research suggests that norepinephrine, lactate and brain-derived neurotrophic factor might be involved in mediating the effect of exercise on motor memory. Overall, the results imply that exercise can be applied to facilitate long-term retention of motor memory........ Hence, the overall aim of the present thesis was to investigate the relationship between acute exercise and motor memory, with special interest in investigating if exercise performed after motor skill learning could improve skill retention. Study I was designed to assess if a single bout of exercise...

  6. Trigeminovascular fibers increase blood flow in cortical gray matter by axon reflex-like mechanisms during acute severe hypertension or seizures

    Sakas, D.E.; Moskowitz, M.A.; Kano, M.; Ogilvy, C.S. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA)); Wei, E.P.; Kontos, H.A. (Medical College of Virginia, Richmond (USA))

    1989-02-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured and compared in 10 symmetrical brain regions following unilateral trigeminal ganglionectomy, sham operation, or trigeminal root section (rhizotomy) in cats. Multiple determinations were obtained in anesthetized and paralyzed animals using radiolabeled microspheres during (i) normocapnia-normotension, (ii) hypercapnia, (iii) angiotensin-induced acute severe hypertension, or (iv) bicuculline-induced seizures. Flow was symmetrical in all brain regions at rest and during increases induced by hypercapnia in the three groups. During severe hypertension or seizures, marked elevations developed bilaterally. In ganglionectomized animals, increases due to hypertension or seizures were attenuated by 28-32% on the denervated side within cortical gray matter regions corresponding to the anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral arteries. Flow was symmetrical within all brain regions in sham-operated animals and in the rhizotomy group, despite comparable increases in regional cerebral blood flow induced by angiotensin. Hence, the trigeminal nerve mediates blood flow adaptations during severe hypertension and seizures. Furthermore, since trigeminal cell bodies and peripheral axons are destroyed or degenerate following ganglionectomy but not following rhizotomy, local axon reflex-like mechanisms mediate these increases in cerebral blood flow.

  7. Repetitive acute intermittent hypoxia increases growth/neurotrophic factor expression in non-respiratory motor neurons.

    Satriotomo, I; Nichols, N L; Dale, E A; Emery, A T; Dahlberg, J M; Mitchell, G S

    2016-05-13

    Repetitive acute intermittent hypoxia (rAIH) increases growth/trophic factor expression in respiratory motor neurons, thereby eliciting spinal respiratory motor plasticity and/or neuroprotection. Here we demonstrate that rAIH effects are not unique to respiratory motor neurons, but are also expressed in non-respiratory, spinal alpha motor neurons and upper motor neurons of the motor cortex. In specific, we used immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence to assess growth/trophic factor protein expression in spinal sections from rats exposed to AIH three times per week for 10weeks (3×wAIH). 3×wAIH increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its high-affinity receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), and phosphorylated TrkB (pTrkB) immunoreactivity in putative alpha motor neurons of spinal cervical 7 (C7) and lumbar 3 (L3) segments, as well as in upper motor neurons of the primary motor cortex (M1). 3×wAIH also increased immunoreactivity of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), the high-affinity VEGFA receptor (VEGFR-2) and an important VEGF gene regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). Thus, rAIH effects on growth/trophic factors are characteristic of non-respiratory as well as respiratory motor neurons. rAIH may be a useful tool in the treatment of disorders causing paralysis, such as spinal injury and motor neuron disease, as a pretreatment to enhance motor neuron survival during disease, or as preconditioning for cell-transplant therapies. PMID:26944605

  8. Motor performance during and following acute alcohol intoxication in healthy non-alcoholic subjects

    Poulsen, Mette Buch; Jakobsen, Johannes Klitgaard; Andersen, Henning;

    2007-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse has adverse effects on skeletal muscle, and reduced muscle strength is frequently seen in chronic alcoholics. In this study the acute effects of moderate alcohol intoxication on motor performance was evaluated in 19 non-alcoholic healthy subjects (10 women, 9 men). A...

  9. Acute axonal polyneuropathy with predominant proximal involvement: an uncommon neurological complication of bariatric surgery Polineuropatia axonal aguda com acometimento proximal predominante: manifestação neurológica incomum de cirurgia bariátrica

    Flavia Costa Nunes Machado

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery is frequently indicated in the treatment of morbid obesity. Previously unreported complications have been associated to this surgery; among them, neurological complications have gained attention. We report the case of a 25-year-old man submitted to gastric surgery for treatment of morbid obesity who developed, two months after surgery, acute proximal weakness in lower limbs. The electroneuromyography revealed axonal peripheral polyneuropathy with predominant proximal involvement. After treatment with immunoglobulin and vitamin supplementation, rapid clinical and neurophysiologic recovery was observed. We describe the clinical and electroneuromyographic features of this case, stressing the difficulty of initial diagnosis, particularly in the differential diagnosis with Guillain-Barré syndrome. We discuss the importance of nutritional follow-up and the eventual indication of routine vitamin supplementation in these patients.A cirurgia bariátrica é freqüentemente indicada no tratamento da obesidade mórbida. Complicações previamente não relatadas têm sido associadas a essa cirurgia; dentre estas, as complicações neurológicas têm recebido destaque. Relatamos o caso de um homem de 25 anos de idade submetido a cirurgia gástrica para tratamento de obesidade mórbida que desenvolveu, dois meses após a cirurgia, fraqueza de predomínio proximal nos membros inferiores, de instalação aguda. A eletroneuromiografia demonstrou polineuropatia periférica axonal nos membros inferiores, de predomínio proximal. Após tratamento com imunoglobulina e suplementação vitamínica, apresentou rápida melhora clínica e neurofisiológica. Descrevemos as características clínicas e eletroneuromiográficas desse caso, destacando a dificuldade diagnóstica inicial, particularmente com relação ao diagnóstico diferencial com síndrome de Guillain-Barré. Discutimos a importância de acompanhamento nutricional e a eventual indica

  10. Detecting acute neurotoxicity during platinum chemotherapy by neurophysiological assessment of motor nerve hyperexcitability

    Platinum-based drugs, such as cisplatin and oxaliplatin, are well-known for inducing chronic sensory neuropathies but their acute and motor neurotoxicities are less well characterised. Use was made of nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography (EMG) to assess motor nerve excitability in cancer patients during their first treatment cycle with platinum-based chemotherapy in this study. Twenty-nine adult cancer patients had a neurophysiological assessment either before oxaliplatin plus capecitabine, on days 2 to 4 or 14 to 20 after oxaliplatin plus capecitabine, or on days 2 to 4 after carboplatin plus paclitaxel or cisplatin, undertaken by a neurophysiologist who was blinded to patient and treatment details. Patients completed a symptom questionnaire at the end of the treatment cycle. Abnormal spontaneous high frequency motor fibre action potentials were detected in 100% of patients (n = 6) and 72% of muscles (n = 22) on days 2 to 4 post-oxaliplatin, and in 25% of patients (n = 8) and 13% of muscles (n = 32) on days 14 to 20 post-oxaliplatin, but in none of the patients (n = 14) or muscles (n = 56) tested prior to oxaliplatin or on days 2 to 4 after carboplatin plus paclitaxel or cisplatin. Repetitive compound motor action potentials were less sensitive and less specific than spontaneous high frequency motor fibre action potentials for detection of acute oxaliplatin-induced motor nerve hyperexcitability but were present in 71% of patients (n = 7) and 32% of muscles (n = 32) on days 2 to 4 after oxaliplatin treatment. Acute neurotoxicity symptoms, most commonly cold-induced paraesthesiae and jaw or throat tightness, were reported by all patients treated with oxaliplatin (n = 22) and none of those treated with carboplatin plus paclitaxel or cisplatin (n = 6). Abnormal spontaneous high frequency motor fibre activity is a sensitive and specific endpoint of acute oxaliplatin-induced motor nerve hyperexcitability, detectable on EMG on days 2 to 4 post

  11. Sorting of Dendritic and Axonal Vesicles at the Pre-axonal Exclusion Zone

    Ginny G. Farías

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Polarized sorting of newly synthesized proteins to the somatodendritic and axonal domains of neurons occurs by selective incorporation into distinct populations of vesicular transport carriers. An unresolved issue is how the vesicles themselves are sorted to their corresponding neuronal domains. Previous studies concluded that the axon initial segment (AIS is an actin-based filter that selectively prevents passage of somatodendritic vesicles into the axon. We find, however, that most somatodendritic vesicles fail to enter the axon at a more proximal region in the axon hillock, herein referred to as the pre-axonal exclusion zone (PAEZ. Forced coupling of a somatodendritic cargo protein to an axonally directed kinesin is sufficient to drive transport of whole somatodendritic vesicles through the PAEZ toward the distal axon. Based on these findings, we propose that polarized sorting of transport vesicles occurs at the PAEZ and depends on the ability of the vesicles to acquire an appropriately directed microtubule motor.

  12. An acute bout of aerobic exercise can protect immediate offline motor sequence gains.

    Rhee, Joohyun; Chen, Jing; Riechman, Steven M; Handa, Atul; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Wright, David L

    2016-07-01

    The present study examined the efficacy of a short bout of moderately intensive exercise to protect knowledge of a newly acquired motor sequence. Previous work revealed that sleep-dependent offline gains in motor sequence performance are reduced by practicing an alternative motor sequence in close temporal proximity to the original practice with the target motor sequence. In the present work, a brief bout of exercise was inserted at two different temporal locations between practice of a to-be-learned motor sequence and the interfering practice that occurred 2 h later. At issue was whether exposure to exercise could reduce the impact of practice with the interfering task which was expected to be manifest as reemergence of offline gain observed in the case in which the learner is not exposed to the interfering practice. Acute exercise did influence the interfering quality of practice with an alternative motor sequence resulting in the return of broad offline gain. However, this benefit was immediate, emerging on the initial test trial, only when exercise was experienced some time after the original period of motor sequence practice and just prior to practice with the interfering motor sequence. Thus, while exercise can contribute to post-practice consolidation, there appears to be a fragile interplay between spontaneous memory consolidation occurring after task practice and the consolidation processes induced via exercise. PMID:26115758

  13. Acute effects of dietary constituents on motor skill and cognitive performance in athletes.

    Baker, Lindsay B; Nuccio, Ryan P; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2014-12-01

    Performance in many sports is at least partially dependent on motor control, coordination, decision-making, and other cognitive tasks. This review summarizes available evidence about the ingestion of selected nutrients or isolated compounds (dietary constituents) and potential acute effects on motor skill and/or cognitive performance in athletes. Dietary constituents discussed include branched-chain amino acids, caffeine, carbohydrate, cocoa flavanols, Gingko biloba, ginseng, guarana, Rhodiola rosea, sage, L-theanine, theobromine, and tyrosine. Although this is not an exhaustive list, these are perhaps the most researched dietary constituents. Caffeine and carbohydrate have the greatest number of published reports supporting their ability to enhance acute motor skill and cognitive performance in athletes. At this time, there is insufficient published evidence to substantiate the use of any other dietary constituents to benefit sports-related motor skill or cognitive performance. The optimal dose and timing of caffeine and carbohydrate intake promoting enhanced motor skill and cognitive performance remain to be identified. Valid, reliable, and sensitive batteries of motor skills and cognitive tests should be developed for use in future efficacy studies. PMID:25400063

  14. Dendrite-derived supernumerary axons on adult axotomized motor neurons possess proteins that are essential for the initiation and propagation of action potentials and synaptic vesicle release

    Meehan, Claire Francesca; MacDermid, Victoria E; Montague, Steven J;

    2011-01-01

    . This study extends this definition to determine whether, more importantly, these processes possess the prerequisite molecular machinery to function as axons. Using a combination of intracellular labeling and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrate that the distribution of voltage-gated sodium channels on...... from the tips of distal dendrites represent a rearrangement of neuronal polarity whereby axotomized neurons can develop additional functional axons in vivo....

  15. Lower motor neuron paralysis with extensive cord atrophy in parainfectious acute transverse myelitis

    Sunil Pradhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a young patient of acute transverse myelitis (ATM who developed true lower motor neuron (LMN type flaccid paraplegia as a result of anterior horn cell damage in the region of cord inflammation that extended from conus upwards up to the D4 transverse level. We infer that flaccidity in acute phase of ATM is not always due to spinal shock and may represent true LMN paralysis particularly if the long segment myelits is severe and extending up to last spinal segment.

  16. Effect of Octreotide on Enteric Motor Neurons in Experimental Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    Zhou, Hui; Gao, Jun; Zou, Duowu; Wu, Wenbin; Li, Zhaoshen

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Amelioration of intestinal dysmotility and stasis during the early period of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) appears to be important to reduce the risks of secondary pancreatic infection. We aimed to characterize the association between the neuropathy of the enteric nervous system and gut dysfunction and to examine the effect of octreotide on motor innervation in the early stage of ANP. Methodology/Principal Findings The rats were randomly divided into eight groups: contr...

  17. The effects of acute citalopram dosing on gastric motor function and nutrient tolerance in healthy volunteers

    Janssen, Pieter; Oudenhove, Lukas Van; Casteels, Cindy; De Vos, Rita; Verbeke, Kristin; Tack, Jan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether endogenous serotonin release is involved in the regulation of gastric motility and food intake. AIM: To study the effect of acute administration of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram on gastric motor function in man. METHODS: Nineteen healthy volunteers underwent a gastric barostat, gastric emptying and/or a drinking test after dosing with either placebo or citalopram (20 mg intravenously). In the barostat protocol, a flacc...

  18. Acute aerobic exercise and information processing: energizing motor processes during a choice reaction time task.

    Audiffren, Michel; Tomporowski, Phillip D; Zagrodnik, James

    2008-11-01

    The immediate and short-term after effects of a bout of aerobic exercise on young adults' information processing were investigated. Seventeen participants performed an auditory two-choice reaction time (RT) task before, during, and after 40 min of ergometer cycling. In a separate session, the same sequence of testing was completed while seated on an ergometer without pedalling. Results indicate that exercise (1) improves the speed of reactions by energizing motor outputs; (2) interacts with the arousing effect of a loud auditory signal suggesting a direct link between arousal and activation; (3) gradually reduces RT and peaks between 15 and 20 min; (4) effects on RT disappear very quickly after exercise cessation; and (5) effects on motor processes cannot be explained by increases in body temperature caused by exercise. Taken together, these results support a selective influence of acute aerobic exercise on motor adjustment stage. PMID:18930445

  19. Isolation and analyses of axonal ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    Doron-Mandel, Ella; Alber, Stefanie; Oses, Juan A; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Burlingame, Alma L; Fainzilber, Mike; Twiss, Jeffery L; Lee, Seung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Cytoskeleton-dependent RNA transport and local translation in axons are gaining increased attention as key processes in the maintenance and functioning of neurons. Specific axonal transcripts have been found to play roles in many aspects of axonal physiology including axon guidance, axon survival, axon to soma communication, injury response and regeneration. This axonal transcriptome requires long-range transport that is achieved by motor proteins carrying transcripts as messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes along microtubules. Other than transport, the mRNP complex plays a major role in the generation, maintenance, and regulation of the axonal transcriptome. Identification of axonal RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and analyses of the dynamics of their mRNPs are of high interest to the field. Here, we describe methods for the study of interactions between RNA and proteins in axons. First, we describe a protocol for identifying binding proteins for an RNA of interest by using RNA affinity chromatography. Subsequently, we discuss immunoprecipitation (IP) methods allowing the dissection of protein-RNA and protein-protein interactions in mRNPs under various physiological conditions. PMID:26794529

  20. Promoting Motor Cortical Plasticity with Acute Aerobic Exercise: A Role for Cerebellar Circuits

    Mang, Cameron S.; Brown, Katlyn E.; Neva, Jason L.; Snow, Nicholas J.; Campbell, Kristin L.; Boyd, Lara A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute aerobic exercise facilitated long-term potentiation-like plasticity in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Here, we investigated the effect of acute aerobic exercise on cerebellar circuits, and their potential contribution to altered M1 plasticity in healthy individuals (age: 24.8 ± 4.1 years). In Experiment   1, acute aerobic exercise reduced cerebellar inhibition (CBI) (n = 10, p = 0.01), elicited by dual-coil paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation. In Experiment   2, we evaluated the facilitatory effects of aerobic exercise on responses to paired associative stimulation, delivered with a 25 ms (PAS25) or 21 ms (PAS21) interstimulus interval (n = 16 per group). Increased M1 excitability evoked by PAS25, but not PAS21, relies on trans-cerebellar sensory pathways. The magnitude of the aerobic exercise effect on PAS response was not significantly different between PAS protocols (interaction effect: p = 0.30); however, planned comparisons indicated that, relative to a period of rest, acute aerobic exercise enhanced the excitatory response to PAS25 (p = 0.02), but not PAS21 (p = 0.30). Thus, the results of these planned comparisons indirectly provide modest evidence that modulation of cerebellar circuits may contribute to exercise-induced increases in M1 plasticity. The findings have implications for developing aerobic exercise strategies to “prime” M1 plasticity for enhanced motor skill learning in applied settings.

  1. Effects of acute aerobic exercise on motor response inhibition: An ERP study using the stop-signal task

    Chien-Heng Chu; Alderman, Brandon L.; Gao-Xia Wei; Yu-Kai Chang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of acute exercise on motor response inhibition using both behavioral and electrophysiological approaches. Methods: The P3 and N1 event-related potential (ERP) components were recorded while performing a stop-signal task in 21 college students following a moderately intense acute exercise bout for 30 min and a sedentary control session that involved reading. Results: Acute exercise induced a shorter stop signal response time...

  2. Motor recover during the acute period of craniocerebral trauma using kinetotherapy.

    Franckeviciute, E V; Krisciunas, A J

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to assess the influences of age, gender, and the severity of brain trauma on recovery of motor function using kinetotherapy. The study included 131 patients (99 men and 32 women) investigated during the acute phase of trauma in the Department of Brain Trauma, Clinical Hospital, Kaunas Medical University. After stabilization, 80 patients were transferred to the neurorehabilitation clinic and 51 were transferred to other rehabilitation centers. Motor function in the patients was assessed using the Clinical Outcomes Variable Scale (COVS) at the beginning and end of the acute trauma period and during early rehabilitation, i.e., at the beginning, 25 days later, and on completion. During the acute trauma period, patients had impairments to the abilities to turn over, sit, maintain balance while sitting, to move horizontally and vertically, walk, and use mobility aids, along with reductions in walking duration and speed, and difficulty in wheelchair mobility and hand functions. Kinetotherapy yielded high or intermediate levels of efficacy in 90% of the patients. The efficacy of kinetotherapy was significantly greater in young patients than in elderly and old patients (p 0.05). PMID:18802769

  3. 2-Deoxyglucose autoradiography of single motor units: labelling of individual acutely active muscle fibers

    2-Deoxy-D-[1-14C]glucose (2DG) was given intravenously during repetitive stimulation of single motor units in adult cats and autoradiographs were made of frozen sections of the target muscles in order to evaluate methods designed to improve the spatial resolution of [14C]2DG autoradiography. With the modifications used, acutely active muscle fibers, independently identified by depletion of intrafiber glycogen, were associated with highly localized accumulations of silver grains over the depleted fibers. The results indicate that [14C]2DG autoradiography can successfully identify individual active muscle fibers and might in principle be used to obtain quantitative data about rates of glucose metabolism in single muscle fibers of defined histochemical type. The modifications may be applicable also to other tissues to give improved spatial resolution with [14C]-labeled metabolic markers. (Auth.)

  4. Comparison of acute effects of heroin and Kerack on sensory and motor activity of honey bees (Apis mellifera

    Majid Hassanpour-Ezatti

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Acute effects of heroin andKerack on the sensory and motor functions of honey bees were different. Findings of this research suggest that these differences originated from the activation of different neurotransmitter systems by caffeine together with activation of opioid receptors by heroin.

  5. Exploring psychotic symptoms: a comparison of motor related neuronal activation during and after acute psychosis

    Sheridan Rains Luke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delusions and hallucinations are classic positive symptoms of schizophrenia. A contemporary cognitive theory called the ‘forward output model’ suggests that the misattribution of self-generated actions may underlie some of these types of symptoms, such as delusions of control – the experience of self-generated action being controlled by an external agency. In order to examine the validity of this suggestion, we performed a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study examining neuronal activation associated with motor movement during acute psychosis. Methods We studied brain activation using fMRI during a motor task in 11 patients with schizophrenia and 9 healthy controls. The patient group was tested at two time points separated by 6–8 weeks. Results At initial testing, the patient group had a mean Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale score of 56.3, and showed significantly increased activation within the left inferior parietal lobe (IPL compared to controls. Patients reported significantly decreased positive symptoms at 6–8 week followup and IPL activation had returned to normal. Our results demonstrate that first-rank positive symptoms are associated with hyperactivation in the secondary somatosensory cortex (IPL. Conclusions These findings lend further credence to the theory that a dysfunction in the sensory feedback system located in the IPL, and which is thought to underlie our sense of agency, may contribute to the aetiology of delusions of control.

  6. Computing along the axon

    Chen Haiming; Tseren-Onolt Ishdorj; Gheorghe Pǎun

    2007-01-01

    A special form of spiking neural P systems, called axon P systems, corresponding to the activity of Ranvier nodes of neuron axon, is considered and a class of SN-like P systems where the computation is done along the axon is introduced and their language generative power is investigated.

  7. Axonal Protein Synthesis and the Regulation of Local Mitochondrial Function

    2009-01-01

    Axons and presynaptic nerve terminals of both invertebrate and mammalian SCG neurons contain a heterogeneous population of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs and a local cytosolic protein synthetic system. Nearly one quarter of the total protein synthesized in these structural/functional domains of the neuron is destined for mitochondria. Acute inhibition of axonal protein synthesis markedly reduces the functional activity of mitochondria. The blockade of axonal protein into mitochondria had...

  8. Axonal protein synthesis and the regulation of local mitochondrial function

    Kaplan, B.B.; Gioio, A.E.; Hillefors, M.; Aschrafi, A.

    2009-01-01

    Axons and presynaptic nerve terminals of both invertebrate and mammalian SCG neurons contain a heterogeneous population of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs and a local cytosolic protein synthetic system. Nearly one quarter of the total protein synthesized in these structural/functional domains of the neuron is destined for mitochondria. Acute inhibition of axonal protein synthesis markedly reduces the functional activity of mitochondria. The blockade of axonal protein into mitochondria had...

  9. Factors predicting optic nerve axonal degeneration after methanol-induced acute optic neuropathy: a 2-year prospective study in 54 patients

    Zakharov, S.; Nurieva, O.; Kotíková, K.; Urban, P.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Pelclová, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 147, č. 1 (2016), s. 251-261. ISSN 0026-9247 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : methanol optic neuropathy * visual evoked potentials * axonal degeneration Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.222, year: 2014

  10. Transcranial magnetic stimulation probes the excitability of the primary motor cortex: A framework to account for the facilitating effects of acute whole-body exercise on motor processes

    Karen Davranche

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of exercise on decision-making performance have been studied using a wide variety of cognitive tasks and exercise interventions. Although the current literature supports a beneficial influence of acute exercise on cognitive performance, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not yet been elucidated. We review studies that used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to probe the excitability of motor structures during whole-body exercise and present a framework to account for the facilitating effects of acute exercise on motor processes. Recent results suggest that, even in the absence of fatigue, the increase in corticospinal excitability classically reported during submaximal and exhausting exercises may be accompanied by a reduction in intracortical inhibition. We propose that reduced intracortical inhibition elicits an adaptive central mechanism that counteracts the progressive reduction in muscle responsiveness caused by peripheral fatigue. Such a reduction would render the motor cortex more sensitive to upstream influences, thus causing increased corticospinal excitability. Furthermore, reduction of intracortical inhibition may account for the more efficient descending drive and for the improvement of reaction time performance during exercise. The adaptive modulation in intracortical inhibition could be implemented through a general increase in reticular activation that would further account for enhanced sensory sensitivity.

  11. Intra-axonal myosin and actin in nerve regeneration.

    McQuarrie, Irvine G; Lund, Linda M

    2009-10-01

    A focused review of sciatic nerve regeneration in the rat model, based on research conducted by the authors, is presented. We examine structural proteins carried distally in the axon by energy-requiring motor enzymes, using protein chemistry and molecular biology techniques in combination with immunohistochemistry. Relevant findings from other laboratories are cited and discussed. The general conclusion is that relatively large amounts of actin and tubulin are required to construct a regenerating axon and that these materials mainly originate in the parent axon. The motor enzymes that carry these proteins forward as macromolecules include kinesin and dynein but probably also include myosin. PMID:19927086

  12. Synapse plasticity in motor, sensory, and limbo-prefrontal cortex areas as measured by degrading axon terminals in an environment model of gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus).

    Neufeld, Janina; Teuchert-Noodt, Gertraud; Grafen, Keren; Winter, York; Witte, A Veronica

    2009-01-01

    Still little is known about naturally occurring synaptogenesis in the adult neocortex and related impacts of epigenetic influences. We therefore investigated (pre)synaptic plasticity in various cortices of adult rodents, visualized by secondary lysosome accumulations (LA) in remodeling axon terminals. Twenty-two male gerbils from either enriched (ER) or impoverished rearing (IR) were used for quantification of silver-stained LA. ER-animals showed rather low LA densities in most primary fields, whereas barrel and secondary/associative cortices exhibited higher densities and layer-specific differences. In IR-animals, these differences were evened out or even inverted. Basic plastic capacities might be linked with remodeling of local intrinsic circuits in the context of cortical map adaptation in both IR- and ER-animals. Frequently described disturbances due to IR in multiple corticocortical and extracortical afferent systems, including the mesocortical dopamine projection, might have led to maladaptations in the plastic capacities of prefronto-limbic areas, as indicated by different LA densities in IR- compared with ER-animals. PMID:19809517

  13. Synapse Plasticity in Motor, Sensory, and Limbo-Prefrontal Cortex Areas as Measured by Degrading Axon Terminals in an Environment Model of Gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus

    Janina Neufeld

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Still little is known about naturally occurring synaptogenesis in the adult neocortex and related impacts of epigenetic influences. We therefore investigated (presynaptic plasticity in various cortices of adult rodents, visualized by secondary lysosome accumulations (LA in remodeling axon terminals. Twenty-two male gerbils from either enriched (ER or impoverished rearing (IR were used for quantification of silver-stained LA. ER-animals showed rather low LA densities in most primary fields, whereas barrel and secondary/associative cortices exhibited higher densities and layer-specific differences. In IR-animals, these differences were evened out or even inverted. Basic plastic capacities might be linked with remodeling of local intrinsic circuits in the context of cortical map adaptation in both IR- and ER-animals. Frequently described disturbances due to IR in multiple corticocortical and extracortical afferent systems, including the mesocortical dopamine projection, might have led to maladaptations in the plastic capacities of prefronto-limbic areas, as indicated by different LA densities in IR- compared with ER-animals.

  14. Abnormal Corticospinal Excitability in Traumatic Diffuse Axonal Brain Injury

    Bernabeu, Montse; Demirtas-Tatlidede, Asli; Opisso, Eloy; Lopez, Raquel; Tormos, Jose Mª; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the cortical motor excitability characteristics in diffuse axonal injury (DAI) due to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). A variety of excitatory and inhibitory transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigms were applied to primary motor cortices of 17 patients and 11 healthy controls. The parameters of testing included resting motor threshold (MT), motor evoked potential (MEP) area under the curve, input-output curves, MEP variability, and silent period (S...

  15. Comparison of electrophysiological findings in axonal and demyelinating Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    Samira Yadegari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Incidence and predominant subtype of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS differs geographically. Electrophysiology has an important role in early diagnosis and prediction of prognosis. This study is conducted to determine the frequent subtype of GBS in a large group of patients in Iran and compare nerve conduction studies in axonal and demyelinating forms of GBS.We retrospectively evaluated the medical records and electrodiagnostic study (EDS of 121 GBS patients who were managed in our hospital during 11 years. After regarding the exclusion criteria, patients classified as three groups: acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP, acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN, and acute motor sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN. The most frequent subtype and then electrophysiological characteristic based on the time of EDS and their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF profile were assessed.Among 70 patients finally included in the study, 67% were men. About 63%, 23%, and 14% had AIDP, AMAN, and AMSAN, respectively. AIDP patients represented a wider range of ages compared with other groups. Higher levels of CSF protein, abnormal late responses and sural sparing were more frequent in AIDP subtype. Five AMSAN patients also revealed sural sparing. Conduction block (CB was observed in one AMAN patient. Prolonged F-wave latency was observed only in AIDP cases. CB and inexcitable sensory nerves were more frequent after 2 weeks, but reduced F-wave persistency was more prominent in the early phase.AIDP was the most frequent subtype. Although the electrophysiology and CSF are important diagnostic tools, classification should not be made based on a distinct finding.

  16. Acute cannabis consumption and motor vehicle collision risk: systematic review of observational studies and meta-analysis

    Asbridge, Mark; Hayden, Jill A; Cartwright, Jennifer L

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the acute consumption of cannabis (cannabinoids) by drivers increases the risk of a motor vehicle collision. Design Systematic review of observational studies, with meta-analysis. Data sources We did electronic searches in 19 databases, unrestricted by year or language of publication. We also did manual searches of reference lists, conducted a search for unpublished studies, and reviewed the personal libraries of the research team. Review methods We included obs...

  17. The effects of acute levodopa withdrawal on motor performance and dopaminergic receptor sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Turjanski, N; Fernandez, W; Lees, A J

    1993-01-01

    The effects of acute levodopa withdrawal were studied in nine patients with levodopa related on-off oscillations. One patient withdrew from the study due to off period confusion and hallucinations. A marked deterioration in motor disability occurred in all patients following overnight withdrawal of levodopa and a further mild delayed deterioration was present over a mean withdrawal period of 44 hours. Patients with more severe disease were able to tolerate levodopa withdrawal for a shorter pe...

  18. Discharge behaviors of trapezius motor units during exposure to low and high levels of acute psychosocial stress

    Stephenson, Jennifer L.; Maluf, Katrina S

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of acute psychosocial stress on trapezius single motor unit discharge behaviors. Twenty-one healthy women performed feedback-controlled isometric contractions under conditions of low and high psychosocial stress in the same experimental session. Psychosocial stress was manipulated using a verbal math task combined with social evaluative threat which significantly increased perceived anxiety, heart rate, and blood pressure (P0.121, N=103) and derecruitment (...

  19. The influence of an acute bout of aerobic exercise on cortical contributions to motor preparation and execution

    Thacker, Jonathan S.; Middleton, Laura E; McIlroy, William E.; Staines, W. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Increasing evidence supports the use of physical activity for modifying brain activity and overall neurological health. Specifically, aerobic exercise appears to have a positive effect on cognitive function, which some have suggested to be a result of increasing levels of arousal. However, the role of aerobic exercise on movement‐related cortical activity is less clear. We tested the hypothesis that (1) an acute bout of exercise modulates excitability within motor areas and (2) trans...

  20. Neuropathological characterization of spinal motor neuron degeneration processes induced by acute and chronic excitotoxic stimulus in vivo.

    Ramírez-Jarquín, Uri Nimrod; Tapia, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    Motor neuron (MN) diseases are characterized by progressive cell degeneration, and excitotoxicity has been postulated as a causal factor. Using two experimental procedures for inducing excitotoxic spinal MN degeneration in vivo, by acute and chronic overactivation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleacetic acid (AMPA) receptors, we characterized the time course of the neuropathological changes. Electron transmission microscopy showed that acute AMPA perfusion by microdialysis caused MN swelling 1.5h after surgery and lysis with membrane rupture as early as 3h; no cleaved caspase 3 was detected by immunochemistry. Chronic AMPA infusion by osmotic minipumps induced a slow degeneration process along 5days, characterized by progressive changes: endoplasmic reticulum swelling, vacuolization of cytoplasm, vacuole fusion and cell membrane rupture. Quantification of these ultrastructural alterations showed that the increase of vacuolated area was at the expense of the nuclear area. Caspase 3 cleavage was observed since the first day of AMPA infusion. We conclude that acute AMPA-induced excitotoxicity induces MN loss by necrosis, while the progress of degeneration induced by chronic infusion is slow, starting with an early apoptotic process followed by necrosis. In both the acute and chronic procedures a correlation could be established between the loss of MN by necrosis, but not by caspase 3-linked apoptosis, and severe motor deficits and hindlimb paralysis. Our findings are relevant for understanding the mechanisms of neuron death in degenerative diseases and thus for the design of pharmacological therapeutic strategies. PMID:27320208

  1. Herpes zoster motor neuropathy in a patient with previous motor paresis secondary to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease.

    Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; de la Puente Bujidos, Carlos; de Blas Beorlegui, Gema; López San Román, Antonio; Peña Arrebola, Andrés

    2013-04-01

    Motor involvement in herpes zoster is very infrequent, occurring in 3%-5% of cases, and it is caused by extension of the inflammatory process to the anterior horn motor neurons, with the subsequent development of segmental motor paralysis. The authors report a 37-yr-old woman with history of paresis in both lower limbs secondary to spinal cord atrophy associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease and immunosuppression caused by chronic corticosteroid and azathioprine treatment of ulcerative colitis, who developed worsening of her baseline residual muscle strength in the right lower limb shortly after herpes zoster eruption. Electromyography revealed acute denervation in territories corresponding to L3-L4 and moderate widespread axonal polyneuropathy affecting both lower limbs. The patient recovered her baseline muscle strength after this event. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of herpes zoster motor neuropathy in a patient with a previous motor sequel. PMID:23221673

  2. Acute effects of dynamic exercises on the relationship between the motor unit firing rate and the recruitment threshold.

    Ye, Xin; Beck, Travis W; DeFreitas, Jason M; Wages, Nathan P

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the acute effects of concentric versus eccentric exercise on motor control strategies. Fifteen men performed six sets of 10 repetitions of maximal concentric exercises or eccentric isokinetic exercises with their dominant elbow flexors on separate experimental visits. Before and after the exercise, maximal strength testing and submaximal trapezoid isometric contractions (40% of the maximal force) were performed. Both exercise conditions caused significant strength loss in the elbow flexors, but the loss was greater following the eccentric exercise (t=2.401, P=.031). The surface electromyographic signals obtained from the submaximal trapezoid isometric contractions were decomposed into individual motor unit action potential trains. For each submaximal trapezoid isometric contraction, the relationship between the average motor unit firing rate and the recruitment threshold was examined using linear regression analysis. In contrast to the concentric exercise, which did not cause significant changes in the mean linear slope coefficient and y-intercept of the linear regression line, the eccentric exercise resulted in a lower mean linear slope and an increased mean y-intercept, thereby indicating that increasing the firing rates of low-threshold motor units may be more important than recruiting high-threshold motor units to compensate for eccentric exercise-induced strength loss. PMID:25514631

  3. Acute subdural hematoma and diffuse axonal injury in fatal road traffic accident victims: a clinico-pathological study of 15 patients Hematoma subdural agudo e lesão axonal difusa em vítimas fatais de acidente de trânsito: estudo clínico-patológico de 15 pacientes

    Sebastião Nataniel Silva Gusmão

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Although acute subdural hematoma (ASDH and diffuse axonal injury (DAI are commonly associated in victims of head injury due to road traffic accidents, there are only two clinico-pathological studies of this association. We report a clinical and pathological study of 15 patients with ASDH associated with DAI. METHOD: The patients were victims of road traffic accidents and were randomly chosen. The state of consciousness on hospital admission was evaluated by the Glasgow coma scale. For the identification of axons the histological sections of the brain were stained with anti-neurofilament proteins. RESULTS: Twelve of the 15 patients were admitted to hospital in a state of coma; in three patients, the level of consciousness was not evaluated, as they died before hospital admission. CONCLUSION: The poorer prognosis in patients with ASDH who lapse into coma immediately after sustaining a head injury, as described by several authors, can be explained by the almost constant association between ASDH and DAI in victims of fatal road traffic accidents.OBJETIVO: Embora o hematoma subdural agudo (HSDA e a lesão axonal difusa (LAD estejam frequentemente associados em vítimas de trauma crânio-encefálico causado por acidentes de trânsito, há somente dois estudos clínico-patológicos sobre esta associação. Relatamos o estudo clínico-patológico de 15 pacientes com HSDA associado com LAD. MÉTODO: Os pacientes, vítimas de acidentes de trânsito, foram selecionados aleatoriamente. O estado de consciência à admissão hospitalar foi avaliado pela escala de coma de Glasgow. Para a identificação dos axônios, os cortes histológicos do cérebro foram corados com antisoro anti-proteínas do neurofilamento. RESULTADOS: Doze dos 15 pacientes foram admitidos no hospital em estado de coma; em três pacientes, o nível de consciência não foi avaliado, pois eles faleceram antes da admissão hospitalar. CONCLUSÃO: O pior prognóstico em pacientes

  4. CD8+ T cells cause disability and axon loss in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Chandra Deb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that CD8+ T cells directly mediate motor disability and axon injury in the demyelinated central nervous system. We have previously observed that genetic deletion of the CD8+ T cell effector molecule perforin leads to preservation of motor function and preservation of spinal axons in chronically demyelinated mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine if CD8+ T cells are necessary and sufficient to directly injure demyelinated axons, we adoptively transferred purified perforin-competent CD8+ spinal cord-infiltrating T cells into profoundly demyelinated but functionally preserved perforin-deficient host mice. Transfer of CD8+ spinal cord-infiltrating T cells rapidly and irreversibly impaired motor function, disrupted spinal cord motor conduction, and reduced the number of medium- and large-caliber spinal axons. Likewise, immunodepletion of CD8+ T cells from chronically demyelinated wildtype mice preserved motor function and limited axon loss without altering other disease parameters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In multiple sclerosis patients, CD8+ T cells outnumber CD4+ T cells in active lesions and the number of CD8+ T cells correlates with the extent of ongoing axon injury and functional disability. Our findings suggest that CD8+ T cells may directly injure demyelinated axons and are therefore a viable therapeutic target to protect axons and motor function in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  5. Treadmill Training Promotes Axon Regeneration in Injured Peripheral Nerves

    Sabatier, Manning J.; Redmon, Natalie; Schwartz, Gail; English, Arthur W.

    2008-01-01

    Physical activity after spinal cord injury promotes improvements in motor function, but its effects following peripheral nerve injury are less clear. Although axons in peripheral nerves are known to regenerate better than those in the CNS, methods of accelerating regeneration are needed due to the slow overall rate of growth. Therefore we studied the effect of two weeks of treadmill locomotion on the growth of regenerating axons in peripheral nerves following injury. The common fibular nerves...

  6. Synaptic Democracy and Vesicular Transport in Axons

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Levien, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Synaptic democracy concerns the general problem of how regions of an axon or dendrite far from the cell body (soma) of a neuron can play an effective role in neuronal function. For example, stimulated synapses far from the soma are unlikely to influence the firing of a neuron unless some sort of active dendritic processing occurs. Analogously, the motor-driven transport of newly synthesized proteins from the soma to presynaptic targets along the axon tends to favor the delivery of resources to proximal synapses. Both of these phenomena reflect fundamental limitations of transport processes based on a localized source. In this Letter, we show that a more democratic distribution of proteins along an axon can be achieved by making the transport process less efficient. This involves two components: bidirectional or "stop-and-go" motor transport (which can be modeled in terms of advection-diffusion), and reversible interactions between motor-cargo complexes and synaptic targets. Both of these features have recently been observed experimentally. Our model suggests that, just as in human societies, there needs to be a balance between "efficiency" and "equality".

  7. Determinants of axonal regeneration

    Frisén, J

    1997-01-01

    Axons often regrow to their targets and lost functions may be restored after an injury in the peripheral nervous system. In contrast, axonal regeneration is generally very limited after injuries in the central nervous system, and functional impairment is usually permanent. The regenerative capacity depends on intrinsic neuronal factors as weil as the interaction of neurons with other cells. Glial cells may, in different situations, either support or inhibit axo...

  8. Primary sensory and motor cortex function in response to acute muscle pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Burns, E; Chipchase, L S; Schabrun, S M

    2016-09-01

    Acute muscle pain has both motor and sensory consequences, yet the effect of muscle pain on the primary sensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortices has yet to be systematically evaluated. Here we aimed to determine the strength of the evidence for (1) altered activation of S1/M1 during and after pain, (2) the temporal profile of any change in activation and (3) the relationship between S1/M1 activity and the symptoms of pain. In September 2015, five electronic databases were systematically searched for neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies investigating the effect of acute experimental muscle pain on S1/M1 in healthy volunteers. Demographic data, methodological characteristics and primary outcomes for each study were extracted for critical appraisal. Meta-analyses were performed where appropriate. Twenty-five studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. There was consistent evidence from fMRI for increased S1 activation in the contralateral hemisphere during pain, but insufficient evidence to determine the effect at M1. Meta-analyses of TMS and EEG data revealed moderate to strong evidence of reduced S1 and corticomotor excitability during and following the resolution of muscle pain. A comprehensive understanding of the temporal profile of altered activity in S1/M1, and the relationship to symptoms of pain, is hampered by differences in methodological design, pain modality and pain severity between studies. Overall, the findings of this review indicate reduced S1 and corticomotor activity during and after resolution of acute muscle pain, mechanisms that could plausibly underpin altered sensorimotor function in pain. WHAT DOES THIS REVIEW ADD?: We provide the first systematic evaluation of the primary sensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortex response to acute experimental muscle pain in healthy volunteers. We present evidence from a range of methodologies to provide a comprehensive understanding of the effect of pain on S1/M1. Through meta-analyses we evaluate the strength

  9. Acute exercise and motor memory consolidation: The role of exercise intensity and timing

    Thomas, Richard; Korsgaard Johnsen, Line; Geertsen, Svend Sparre;

    2015-01-01

    showed a higher level of retention at R7 compared to CON. In Experiment B, EX90+2h demonstrated a level of retention at R24 and R7 equivalent to CON. Discussion In line with recent findings, the results show that exercise can promote motor memory consolidation. The results of Experiment A demonstrate......Background A single bout of high intensity cycling (~90% VO2peak) immediately after motor skill training enhances motor memory consolidation. It is unclear how different parameters of exercise may influence this process and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesize that the...... retention tests were not related to measures of CSE at any time point indicating that further studies are necessary to understand the physiological mechanisms leading to improvements in motor memory relating to exercise....

  10. Fish oil diet associated with acute reperfusion related haemorrhage, and with reduced stroke-related sickness behaviours and motor impairment

    DavidWHowells

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is associated with motor impairment and increased incidence of affective disorders such as anxiety/clinical depression. In non-stroke populations, successful management of such disorders and symptoms has been reported following diet supplementation with long chain omega-3-polyunsaturated-fatty-acids (PUFA. However, the potential protective effects of PUFA supplementation on affective behaviours after experimentally induced stroke and sham surgery have not been examined previously. This study investigated the behavioural effects of PUFA supplementation over a six-week period following either middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham surgery in the hooded-Wistar rat. The PUFA diet supplied during the acclimation period prior to surgery was found to be associated with an increased risk of acute haemorrhage following the reperfusion component of the surgery. In surviving animals, PUFA supplementation did not influence infarct size as determined six weeks after surgery, but did decrease omega-6-fatty-acid levels, moderate sickness behaviours, acute motor impairment and longer-term locomotor hyperactivity and depression/anxiety-like behaviour.

  11. Modality-Specific Axonal Regeneration: Towards selective regenerative neural interfaces

    Mario I Romero

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces have been proposed as viable alternatives for the natural control of robotic prosthetic devices. However, sensory and motor axons at the neural interface are of mixed submodality types, which difficult the specific recording from motor axons and the eliciting of precise sensory modalities through selective stimulation. Here we evaluated the possibility of using type-specific neurotrophins to preferentially entice the regeneration of defined axonal populations from transected peripheral nerves into separate compartments. Segregation of mixed sensory fibers from dorsal root ganglion neurons was evaluated in vitro by compartmentalized diffusion delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, to preferentially entice the growth of TrkA+ nociceptive and TrkC+ proprioceptive subsets of sensory neurons, respectively. The average axon length in the NGF channel increased 2.5 fold compared to that in saline or NT-3, whereas the number of branches increased 3 fold in the NT-3 channels. These results were confirmed using a 3-D “Y”-shaped in vitro assay showing that the arm containing NGF was able to entice a 5-fold increase in axonal length of unbranched fibers. To address if such segregation can be enticed in vivo, a “Y”-shaped tubing was used to allow regeneration of the transected adult rat sciatic nerve into separate compartments filled with either NFG or NT-3. A significant increase in the number of CGRP+ pain fibers were attracted towards the sural nerve, while N-52+ large diameter axons were observed in the tibial and NT-3 compartments. This study demonstrates the guided enrichment of sensory axons in specific regenerative chambers, and supports the notion that neurotrophic factors can be used to segregate sensory and perhaps motor axons in separate peripheral interfaces.

  12. Motor response to acute dopaminergic challenge with apomorphine and levodopa in Parkinson's disease: implications for the pathogenesis of the on-off phenomenon.

    Colosimo, C.; MERELLO, M; Hughes, A J; Sieradzan, K; A. J. Lees

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate the contribution of postsynaptic changes to motor fluctuations, three groups of parkinsonian patients with differing responses to treatment were acutely challenged with two dopaminergic drugs-apomorphine and levodopa-having different mechanisms of action. METHODS--Forty two patients with Parkinson's disease (14 untreated, eight with a stable response to levodopa, and 20 with levodopa induced motor fluctuations) were challenged on two consecutive days with apomorphine a...

  13. Axonal PPARγ promotes neuronal regeneration after injury.

    Lezana, Juan Pablo; Dagan, Shachar Y; Robinson, Ari; Goldstein, Ronald S; Fainzilber, Mike; Bronfman, Francisca C; Bronfman, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    PPARγ is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor best known for its involvement in adipogenesis and glucose homeostasis. PPARγ activity has also been associated with neuroprotection in different neurological disorders, but the mechanisms involved in PPARγ effects in the nervous system are still unknown. Here we describe a new functional role for PPARγ in neuronal responses to injury. We found both PPAR transcripts and protein within sensory axons and observed an increase in PPARγ protein levels after sciatic nerve crush. This was correlated with increased retrograde transport of PPARγ after injury, increased association of PPARγ with the molecular motor dynein, and increased nuclear accumulation of PPARγ in cell bodies of sensory neurons. Furthermore, PPARγ antagonists attenuated the response of sensory neurons to sciatic nerve injury, and inhibited axonal growth of both sensory and cortical neurons in culture. Thus, axonal PPARγ is involved in neuronal injury responses required for axonal regeneration. Since PPARγ is a major molecular target of the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of drugs used in the treatment of type II diabetes, several pharmaceutical agents with acceptable safety profiles in humans are available. Our findings provide motivation and rationale for the evaluation of such agents for efficacy in central and peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26446277

  14. Motor axon excitability during Wallerian degeneration

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez, Susana; Krarup, Christian

    2008-01-01

    at ankle distal to axotomy were monitored by 'threshold-tracking'. The plantar compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were recorded under anesthesia in three animal models: 8-week-old wild-type mice, 8-week-old slow Wallerian degeneration mutant mice and 3-year-old cats. We found that the progressive...... decrease in CMAP following crush injury was associated with slowing of conduction and marked abnormalities in excitability: increased peak threshold deviations during both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing threshold electrotonus, enhanced superexcitability during the recovery cycle and increased rheobase...

  15. Axonal transport of ribonucleoprotein particles (vaults).

    Li, J Y; Volknandt, W; Dahlstrom, A; Herrmann, C; Blasi, J; Das, B; Zimmermann, H

    1999-01-01

    of synaptic vesicles and vault protein. Our data show that ribonucleoprotein-immunoreactive particles can be actively transported within axons in situ from the soma to the nerve terminal and back. The results suggest that the transport of vaults is driven by fast axonal transport motors like the SV2-containing vesicles and mitochondria. Vaults exhibit an anterograde and a retrograde transport component, similar to that observed for the vesicular organelles carrying SV2 and for mitochondria. Although the function of vaults is still unknown studies of the axonal transport of this organelle may reveal insights into the mechanisms of cellular transport of ribonucleoprotein particles in general. PMID:10391483

  16. Therapeutic effect of transplanting bone mesenchymal stem cells on the hind limbs’ motor function of rats with acute spinal cord injury

    Song, Qinghua; Xu, Rongmei; Zhang, Quanhai; Ma, Ming; Zhao, Xinping

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To research the therapeutic effect of the allograft of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on hind limbs’ motor function of rats that underwent acute injury to their spinal nerve. Design: 40 Wistar rat samples with the acute injury to the spinal cord were established and divided into the transplantation group and the control group, 20 for each group; One week after injury, BMSCs were slowly injected into the center of the injured spinal cord of the rats, and the physiological saline ...

  17. C. elegans: a new model organism for studies of axon regeneration

    Ghosh-Roy, Anindya; Chisholm, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    Axonal regeneration in C. elegans was first reported five years ago. Individual GFP-labeled axons can be severed using laser microsurgery and their regrowth followed in vivo. Several neuron types display robust regrowth after injury, including motor and sensory neurons. The small size and transparency of C. elegans make possible large-scale genetic and pharmacological screens for regeneration phenotypes.

  18. The influence of an acute bout of aerobic exercise on cortical contributions to motor preparation and execution.

    Thacker, Jonathan S; Middleton, Laura E; McIlroy, William E; Staines, W Richard

    2014-10-01

    Increasing evidence supports the use of physical activity for modifying brain activity and overall neurological health. Specifically, aerobic exercise appears to have a positive effect on cognitive function, which some have suggested to be a result of increasing levels of arousal. However, the role of aerobic exercise on movement-related cortical activity is less clear. We tested the hypothesis that (1) an acute bout of exercise modulates excitability within motor areas and (2) transient effects would be sustained as long as sympathetic drive remained elevated (indicated by heart rate). In experiment 1, participants performed unimanual self-paced wrist extension movements before and after a 20-min, moderate intensity aerobic exercise intervention on a recumbent cycle ergometer. After the cessation of exercise, Bereitschaftspotentials (BP), representative cortical markers for motor preparation, were recorded immediately postexercise (Post) and following a return to baseline heart rate (Post[Rest]). Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to measure the BP time-locked to onset of muscle activity and separated into three main components: early, late and reafferent potentials. In experiment 2, two additional time points postexercise were added to the original protocol following the Post[Rest] condition. Early BP but not late BP was influenced by aerobic exercise, evidenced by an earlier onset, indicative of a regionally selective effect across BP generators. Moreover, this effect was sustained for up to an hour following exercise cessation and this effect was following a return to baseline heart rate. These data demonstrate that acute aerobic exercise may alter and possibly enhance the cortical substrates required for the preparation of movement. PMID:25355852

  19. Neurochemical mechanism of the gastrointestinal interdigestive migrating motor complex in rats with acute inflammatory stomach ache

    Xiaoli Xu; Qin Li; Lv Zhou; Liqiang Ru

    2012-01-01

    The normal gastrointestinal interdigestive migrating motor complex cycle was interrupted, and paroxysmal contraction appeared after formaldehyde-induced stomach ache. Activities of nitric oxide synthase, acetylcholinesterase and vasoactive intestinal peptide neurons were significantly reduced, whereas activities of calcitonin gene-related peptide neurons were significantly increased in the pyloric sphincter muscular layer, myenteric nerve plexus and submucous nerve plexus. Electroacupuncture at Zusanli (ST36) suppressed paroxysmal contraction in rats with formaldehyde-induced stomach ache, and neurons in the enteric nervous system were normal. These results indicated that nitrergic neurons, cholinergic neurons, vasoactive intestinal peptide neurons and calcitonin gene-related peptide neurons in the enteric nervous system may be involved in changes to the gastrointestinal interdigestive migrating motor complex following stomach ache, and that electroacupuncture can regulate this process.

  20. Acute Exercise and Motor Memory Consolidation: The Role of Exercise Timing

    Christiansen, Lasse; Roig, Marc

    2016-01-01

    High intensity aerobic exercise amplifies offline gains in procedural memory acquired during motor practice. This effect seems to be evident when exercise is placed immediately after acquisition, during the first stages of memory consolidation, but the importance of temporal proximity of the exercise bout used to stimulate improvements in procedural memory is unknown. The effects of three different temporal placements of high intensity exercise were investigated following visuomotor skill acquisition on the retention of motor memory in 48 young (24.0 ± 2.5 yrs), healthy male subjects randomly assigned to one of four groups either performing a high intensity (90% Maximal Power Output) exercise bout at 20 min (EX90), 1 h (EX90+1), 2 h (EX90+2) after acquisition or rested (CON). Retention tests were performed at 1 d (R1) and 7 d (R7). At R1 changes in performance scores after acquisition were greater for EX90 than CON (p < 0.001) and EX90+2 (p = 0.001). At R7 changes in performance scores for EX90, EX90+1, and EX90+2 were higher than CON (p < 0.001, p = 0.008, and p = 0.008, resp.). Changes for EX90 at R7 were greater than EX90+2 (p = 0.049). Exercise-induced improvements in procedural memory diminish as the temporal proximity of exercise from acquisition is increased. Timing of exercise following motor practice is important for motor memory consolidation.

  1. Acute Exercise and Motor Memory Consolidation: The Role of Exercise Timing

    Richard Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High intensity aerobic exercise amplifies offline gains in procedural memory acquired during motor practice. This effect seems to be evident when exercise is placed immediately after acquisition, during the first stages of memory consolidation, but the importance of temporal proximity of the exercise bout used to stimulate improvements in procedural memory is unknown. The effects of three different temporal placements of high intensity exercise were investigated following visuomotor skill acquisition on the retention of motor memory in 48 young (24.0 ± 2.5 yrs, healthy male subjects randomly assigned to one of four groups either performing a high intensity (90% Maximal Power Output exercise bout at 20 min (EX90, 1 h (EX90+1, 2 h (EX90+2 after acquisition or rested (CON. Retention tests were performed at 1 d (R1 and 7 d (R7. At R1 changes in performance scores after acquisition were greater for EX90 than CON (p<0.001 and EX90+2 (p=0.001. At R7 changes in performance scores for EX90, EX90+1, and EX90+2 were higher than CON (p<0.001, p=0.008, and p=0.008, resp.. Changes for EX90 at R7 were greater than EX90+2 (p=0.049. Exercise-induced improvements in procedural memory diminish as the temporal proximity of exercise from acquisition is increased. Timing of exercise following motor practice is important for motor memory consolidation.

  2. Single-leg drop landing motor control strategies following acute ankle sprain injury.

    Doherty, C; Bleakley, C; Hertel, J; Caulfield, B; Ryan, J; Delahunt, E

    2015-08-01

    No research currently exists investigating the effect of acute injury on single-limb landing strategies. The aim of the current study was to analyze the coordination strategies of participants in the acute phase of lateral ankle sprain (LAS) injury. Thirty-seven participants with acute, first-time LAS and 19 uninjured participants completed a single-leg drop landing task on both limbs. Three-dimensional kinematic (angular displacement) and sagittal plane kinetic (moment-of-force) data were acquired for the joints of the lower extremity from 200 ms pre-initial contact (IC) to 200 ms post-IC. The peak magnitude of the vertical component of the ground reaction force (GRF) was also computed. Injured participants displayed a bilateral increase in hip flexion, with altered transverse plane kinematic profiles at the knee and ankle for both limbs (P < 0.05). This coincided with a reduction in the net-supporting flexor moment of the lower extremity (P < 0.05) and magnitude of the peak vertical GRF for the injured limb (21.82 ± 2.44 N/kg vs 24.09 ± 2.77 N/kg; P = 0.013) in injured participants compared to control participants. These results demonstrate that compensatory movement strategies are utilized by participants with acute LAS to successfully reduce the impact forces of landing. PMID:24975875

  3. An ex vivo laser-induced spinal cord injury model to assess mechanisms of axonal degeneration in real-time.

    Okada, Starlyn L M; Stivers, Nicole S; Stys, Peter K; Stirling, David P

    2014-01-01

    Injured CNS axons fail to regenerate and often retract away from the injury site. Axons spared from the initial injury may later undergo secondary axonal degeneration. Lack of growth cone formation, regeneration, and loss of additional myelinated axonal projections within the spinal cord greatly limits neurological recovery following injury. To assess how central myelinated axons of the spinal cord respond to injury, we developed an ex vivo living spinal cord model utilizing transgenic mice that express yellow fluorescent protein in axons and a focal and highly reproducible laser-induced spinal cord injury to document the fate of axons and myelin (lipophilic fluorescent dye Nile Red) over time using two-photon excitation time-lapse microscopy. Dynamic processes such as acute axonal injury, axonal retraction, and myelin degeneration are best studied in real-time. However, the non-focal nature of contusion-based injuries and movement artifacts encountered during in vivo spinal cord imaging make differentiating primary and secondary axonal injury responses using high resolution microscopy challenging. The ex vivo spinal cord model described here mimics several aspects of clinically relevant contusion/compression-induced axonal pathologies including axonal swelling, spheroid formation, axonal transection, and peri-axonal swelling providing a useful model to study these dynamic processes in real-time. Major advantages of this model are excellent spatiotemporal resolution that allows differentiation between the primary insult that directly injures axons and secondary injury mechanisms; controlled infusion of reagents directly to the perfusate bathing the cord; precise alterations of the environmental milieu (e.g., calcium, sodium ions, known contributors to axonal injury, but near impossible to manipulate in vivo); and murine models also offer an advantage as they provide an opportunity to visualize and manipulate genetically identified cell populations and subcellular

  4. PlexinA3 restricts spinal exit points and branching of trunk motor nerves in embryonic zebrafish

    Feldner, Julia; Reimer, Michell M.; Schweitzer, Jörn; Wendik, Björn; Meyer, Dirk; Becker, Thomas; Becker, Catherina G

    2007-01-01

    The pioneering primary motor axons in the zebrafish trunk are guided by multiple cues along their pathways. Plexins are receptor components for semaphorins that influence motor axon growth and path finding. We cloned plexinA3 in zebrafish and localized plexinA3 mRNA in primary motor neurons during axon outgrowth. Antisense morpholino knock-down led to substantial errors in motor axon growth. Errors comprised aberrant branching of primary motor nerves as well as additional exit points of axons...

  5. Early methylprednisolone impact treatment for sensory and motor function recovery in patients with acute spinal cord injury A self-control study

    Chao Zhuang; Liming Wang; Yan Xu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For the treatment of spinal cord injury, any pathological changes of the injured tissue should be primarily corrected or reversed. Any remaining fibrous function and neurons with intact structure should be retained, and the toxic substances caused by ischemia-hypoxia following spinal cord injury, should be eliminated to create a favorable environment that would promote neural functional recovery. OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to investigate the effects of the impact of early methylprednisolone-treatment on the sensory and motor function recovery in patients with acute spinal cord injury. DESIGN: A self-control observation. SETTING: Department of Spine Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-three patients with acute spinal cord injury were admitted to the Department of Spine Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, between October 2005 and September 2007. These patients were recruited for the present study. The patients comprised 33 males and 10 females, and all met with the inclusive criteria namely, the time between suffering from acute spinal cord injury and receiving treatment was less than or equal to eight hours. METHODS: According to the protocol determined by the State Second Conference of Acute Spinal Cord Injury of USA, all patients received the drop-wise administration of a 30-mg/kg dose of methylprednisolone (H200040339,500mg/bottle, Pharmacia N.V/S.A, Belgium) for 15 minutes within 8 hours post injury. After a 45-minute interval, methylprednisolone was administered at 5.4mg/kg/h for 23 hours. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prior to and post treatment, acupuncture sense and light touch scoring were performed at 28 dermatomic area key points, including occipital tuberosity and supraclavicular fossa. At the same time, motor scoring of key muscles among 10 pairs of sarcomeres was also performed.RESULTS: All 43 patients participated in the final

  6. Brain gangliosides in axon-myelin stability and axon regeneration

    Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2009-01-01

    Gangliosides, sialic acid-bearing glycosphingolipids, are expressed at high abundance and complexity in the brain. Altered ganglioside expression results in neural disorders, including seizures and axon degeneration. Brain gangliosides function, in part, by interacting with a ganglioside-binding lectin, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). MAG, on the innermost wrap of the myelin sheath, binds to gangliosides GD1a and GT1b on axons. MAG-ganglioside binding ensures optimal axon-myelin cell-ce...

  7. Spinal irradiation does not inhibit distal axonal sprouting

    In an attempt to determine the relative importance of the nerve cell body and of the axon in initiating and controlling axonal regeneration, nerve cell bodies were irradiated and the ability of the distal axon to sprout was examined. Mice were subjected to either 25 or 50 Gray (Gy) of x-irradiation localized to the lumbar spinal cord. After times varying from 1 day to 6 months after irradiation, a sublethal dose of botulinum toxin (BoTx) was injected into the calf muscles of one leg. The soleus muscle was examined histologically after times varying from 1 week to 6 months after injection, and BoTx-induced ultraterminal axonal sprouting was assessed by the number of motor endplates showing sprouts, the length of the sprouts, and the long term endplate morphology. Apart from some irradiated subgroups having slightly shorter sprout lengths, no significant differences were found between irradiated and nonirradiated groups. The results suggest either that the processes in the nerve cell body responsible for initiating and supporting axonal growth are resistant to large doses of irradiation, or that growth regulatory mechanisms in the distal axon are under local control

  8. Observation of activation status of motor-related cortex of patients with acute ischemic stroke through functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Ziqian Chen; Hui Xiao; Ping Ni; Gennian Qian; Shangwen Xu; Xizhang Yang; Youqiang Ye; Jinhua Chen; Biyun Zhang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: About more than three fourth of patients with stroke have motor dysfunction at different degrees, especially hand motor dysfunction. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides very reliable visible evidence for studying central mechanism of motor dysfunction after stroke, and has guiding and applicable value for clinical therapy.OBJECTIVE: To observe the activation of motor-related cortex of patients with acute ischemic stroke with functional magnetic resonance imaging, and analyze the relationship between brain function reconstruction and motor restoration after stroke.DESIGN: A contrast observation.SETTING: Medical Imaging Center, Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: Nine patients with acute ischemic stroke who suffered from motor dysfunction and received the treatment in the Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA between August and December 2005 were recruited, serving as experimental group. The involved patients including 5 male and 4 female, aged 16 to 87 years, all met the diagnostic criteria of cerebrovascular disease revised by The Fourth National Conference on Cerebrovascular Disease, mainly presenting paralysis in clinic, and underwent fMRI. Another 9 right handed persons matched in age and gender who simultaneously received healthy body examination were recruited, serving as control group. All the subjects were informed of the detected items.METHODS: ①Muscular strength of patients of the experimental group was evaluated according to Brunnstrom grading muscular strength (Grade Ⅰ -Ⅵ). ② Passive finger to finger motion was used as the mission (alternate style of quiescence, left hand motion and quiescence, right hand motion was repeated 3 times, serving as 1 sequence, 20 s per block and 20 s time interval. The whole process of scanning was 260 s), and subjects of 2 groups were given Bold-fMRI examination with GE1.5T double gradient 16-channel

  9. Radiological study of gastrointestinal motor activity after acute cisplatin in the rat. Temporal relationship with pica.

    Cabezos, Pablo Antonio; Vera, Gema; Castillo, Mónica; Fernández-Pujol, Ramón; Martín, María Isabel; Abalo, Raquel

    2008-08-18

    Nausea and vomiting are amongst the most severe dose-limiting side effects of chemotherapy. Emetogenic activity in rats can only be evaluated by indirect markers, such as pica (kaolin intake), or delay in gastric emptying. The aim of this work was to study, by radiological methods, the alterations in gastrointestinal motility induced by acute cisplatin in the rat, and to compare them with the development of pica. Rats received cisplatin (0-6 mg kg(-1)) at day 0. In the pica study, individual food ingestion and kaolin intake were measured each day (from day -3 to day 3). In the radiological study, conscious rats received an intragastric dose of medium contrast 0, 24 or 48 h after cisplatin injection, and serial X-rays were taken 0-24 h after contrast. Cisplatin dose-dependently induced both gastric stasis and stomach distension, showing a strict temporal relationship with the induction of both acute and delayed pica. Radiological methods, which are non-invasive and preserve animals' welfare, are useful to study the effect of emetogenic drugs in the different gastrointestinal regions and might speed up the search for new anti-emetics. PMID:18579450

  10. Microfluidic control of axonal guidance

    Gu, Ling; Black, Bryan; Ordonez, Simon; Mondal, Argha; Jain, Ankur; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2014-10-01

    The precision of axonal pathfinding and the accurate formation of functional neural circuitry are crucial for an organism during development as well as during adult central and peripheral nerve regeneration. While chemical cues are believed to be primarily responsible for axonal pathfinding, we hypothesize that forces due to localized fluid flow may directly affect neuronal guidance during early organ development. Here, we report direct evidence of fluid flow influencing axonal migration, producing turning angles of up to 90°. Microfluidic flow simulations indicate that an axon may experience significant bending force due to cross-flow, which may contribute to the observed axonal turning. This method of flow-based guidance was successfully used to fasciculate one advancing axon onto another, showcasing the potential of this technique to be used for the formation of in vitro neuronal circuits.

  11. Effectiveness of mirror therapy on lower extremity motor recovery, balance and mobility in patients with acute stroke: A randomized sham-controlled pilot trial

    Uthra Mohan; S Karthik babu; K Vijaya Kumar; Suresh, B. V.; Z K Misri; M Chakrapani

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of mirror therapy on lower extremity motor recovery, balance and mobility in patients with acute stroke. Design: A randomized, sham-controlled, assessor blinded, pilot trial. Setting: Inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit. Subjects: First time onset of stroke with mean post-stroke duration of 6.41 days, able to respond to verbal instructions, and Brunnstrom recovery stage 2 and above were enrolled. Intervention: Mirror therapy group performed 30 minutes...

  12. Inhibition of kinesin-5 improves regeneration of injured axons by a novel microtubule-based mechanism

    Peter W. Baas; Andrew J. Matamoros

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules have been identiifed as a powerful target for augmenting regeneration of injured adult axons in the central nervous system. Drugs that stabilize microtubules have shown some promise, but there are concerns that abnormally stabilizing microtubules may have only limited beneifts for regeneration, while at the same time may be detrimental to the normal work that microtubules perform for the axon. Kinesin-5 (also called kif11 or Eg5), a molecular motor protein best known for its crucial role in mitosis, acts as a brake on microtubule movements by other motor proteins in the axon. Drugs that inhibit kinesin-5, originally developed to treat cancer, result in greater mobility of microtubules in the axon and an overall shift in the forces on the microtubule array. As a result, the axon grows faster, retracts less, and more readily enters environments that are inhibitory to axonal regeneration. Thus, drugs that inhibit kinesin-5 offer a novel microtubule-based means to boost axonal regeneration without the concerns that ac-company abnormal stabilization of the microtubule array. Even so, inhibiting kinesin-5 is not without its own caveats, such as potential problems with navigation of the regenerating axon to its target, as well as morphological effects on dendrites that could affect learning and memory if the drugs reach the brain.

  13. Ultrastructural observation of effect of moderate hypothermia on axonal damage in an animal model of diffuse axonal injury

    孙晓川; 唐文渊; 郑履平

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of moderate hypothermia on responses of axonal cytoskeleton to axonal injury in the acute stage of injury. Methods: Of fifteen adult guinea pigs, twelve animals were subjected to stretch injury to the right optic nerves and divided into the normothermic group (n=6) in which the animal's core temperature was maintained at 36.0-37.5℃ and the hypothermia group (n=6) in which the core temperature was reduced to 32.0-32.5℃ after stretch injury. Remaining three animals sustained no injury to the right optic nerves and served as control group. Half of injured animals (n=3) of either normothermic group or hypothermic group were killed at either 2 hours or 4 hours after injury. The ultrastructural changes of axonal cytoskeleton of the right optic nerve fibers from the animals were examined under a transmission electron microscope and analyzed by quantitative analysis with a computer image analysis system. Results: At 2 hours after stretch injury, there was a significant reduction in the mean number of microtubules (P<0.001), and a significant increase in the mean intermicrotubule spacing (P<0.05 or P<0.01) in axons of all sizes in normothermic animals. The mean number of neurofilaments also decreased statistically (P<0.01) in large and medium subgroups of axons in the same experimental group at 2 hours. By 4 hours, the large subgroup of axons in normothermic animals still demonstrated a significant decline in the mean number of microtubules (P<0.01) and an increase in the mean intermicrotubule spacing (P<0.05), while the medium and small subgroups of axons displayed a significant increase in the mean number of neurofilaments (P<0.05) and reduction in the mean interneurofilament spacing (P<0.05). On the contrary, either the mean number of microtubules and the mean intermicrotubule spacing, or the mean number of neurofilaments and interneurofilament spacing in axons of all sizes in hypothermic stretch-injured animals was not

  14. The genetics of axonal transport and axonal transport disorders.

    Jason E Duncan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are specialized cells with a complex architecture that includes elaborate dendritic branches and a long, narrow axon that extends from the cell body to the synaptic terminal. The organized transport of essential biological materials throughout the neuron is required to support its growth, function, and viability. In this review, we focus on insights that have emerged from the genetic analysis of long-distance axonal transport between the cell body and the synaptic terminal. We also discuss recent genetic evidence that supports the hypothesis that disruptions in axonal transport may cause or dramatically contribute to neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. The comparison of the value of ct imaging and selected MRI sequences (including DWI) in the evaluation of axonal injuries

    Paszkowska, Emilia; Wasilewski, Grzegorz; Szalcunas-Olsztyn, Anna; Jancewicz, Patryk; Stefanowicz, Elżbieta

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Diffuse axonal injuries of the brain consist in the damage (overstretching or torsion) of white matter axons, as a result of the forces of energy waves, evoked in the moment of injury, together with its accelerating-retarding inertia effect. Patients with DAI are most frequently the casualties of high speed car accidents. Diffuse axonal injuries of the brain are one of the most common acute brain injuries, with lesions typically occurring in the periventricular white matte...

  16. Axonal tubulin and axonal microtubules: biochemical evidence for cold stability

    1984-01-01

    Nerve extracts containing tubulin labeled by axonal transport were analyzed by electrophoresis and differential extraction. We found that a substantial fraction of the tubulin in the axons of the retinal ganglion cell of guinea pigs is not solubilized by conventional methods for preparation of microtubules from whole brain. In two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis this cold-insoluble tubulin was biochemically distinct from tubulin obtained from whole brain microtubules prepared b...

  17. Microtubules Have Opposite Orientation in Axons and Dendrites of Drosophila Neurons

    Stone, Michelle C.; Roegiers, Fabrice; Rolls, Melissa M

    2008-01-01

    In vertebrate neurons, axons have a uniform arrangement of microtubules with plus ends distal to the cell body (plus-end-out), and dendrites have equal numbers of plus- and minus-end-out microtubules. To determine whether microtubule orientation is a conserved feature of axons and dendrites, we analyzed microtubule orientation in invertebrate neurons. Using microtubule plus end dynamics, we mapped microtubule orientation in Drosophila sensory neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons. As expec...

  18. Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons

    Yan, Yanping; Brown, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single neurofilament polymers. In the present study, we have tested this hypothesis by using a rapid perfusion technique to capture...

  19. Local translation and directional steering in axons

    Lin, Andrew C; Holt, Christine E.

    2007-01-01

    The assembly of functional neural circuits in the developing brain requires neurons to extend axons to the correct targets. This in turn requires the navigating tips of axons to respond appropriately to guidance cues present along the axonal pathway, despite being cellular ‘outposts' far from the soma. Work over the past few years has demonstrated a critical role for local translation within the axon in this process in vitro, making axon guidance another process that requires spatially locali...

  20. A developmental timing switch promotes axon outgrowth independent of known guidance receptors.

    Katherine Olsson-Carter

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To form functional neuronal connections, axon outgrowth and guidance must be tightly regulated across space as well as time. While a number of genes and pathways have been shown to control spatial features of axon development, very little is known about the in vivo mechanisms that direct the timing of axon initiation and elongation. The Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite specific motor neurons (HSNs extend a single axon ventrally and then anteriorly during the L4 larval stage. Here we show the lin-4 microRNA promotes HSN axon initiation after cell cycle withdrawal. Axons fail to form in lin-4 mutants, while they grow prematurely in lin-4-overexpressing animals. lin-4 is required to down-regulate two inhibitors of HSN differentiation--the transcriptional regulator LIN-14 and the "stemness" factor LIN-28--and it likely does so through a cell-autonomous mechanism. This developmental switch depends neither on the UNC-40/DCC and SAX-3/Robo receptors nor on the direction of axon growth, demonstrating that it acts independently of ventral guidance signals to control the timing of HSN axon elongation.

  1. Axon-somatic back-propagation in detailed models of spinal alpha motoneurons

    Pietro eBalbi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Antidromic action potentials following distal stimulation of motor axons occasionally fail to invade the soma of alpha motoneurons in spinal cord, due to their passing through regions of high non-uniformity.Morphologically detailed conductance-based models of cat spinal alpha motoneurons have been developed, with the aim to reproduce and clarify some aspects of the electrophysiological behavior of the antidromic axon-somatic spike propagation. Fourteen 3D morphologically detailed somata and dendrites of cat spinal alpha motoneurons have been imported from an open-access web-based database of neuronal morphologies, NeuroMorpho.org, and instantiated in neurocomputational models. An axon hillock, an axonal initial segment and a myelinated axon are added to each model.By sweeping the diameter of the axonal initial segment (AIS and the axon hillock, as well as the maximal conductances of sodium channels at the AIS and at the soma, the developed models are able to show the relationships between different geometric and electrophysiological configurations and the voltage attenuation of the antidromically travelling wave.In particular, a greater than usually admitted sodium conductance at AIS is necessary and sufficient to overcome the dramatic voltage attenuation occurring during antidromic spike propagation both at the myelinated axon-AIS and at the AIS-soma transitions.

  2. Distinct inhibition of acute cocaine-stimulated motor activity following microinjection of a group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist into the dorsal striatum of rats.

    Mao, L; Wang, J Q

    2000-09-01

    Group III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase through G-proteins. Activation of this group of mGluRs shows an inhibition of dopaminergic transmission in the forebrain. To define the role of striatal group III mGluRs in the regulation of basal and dopamine-stimulated motor behavior, the recently developed agonist and antagonist relatively selective for group III mGluRs were utilized to pharmacologically enhance and reduce group III mGluR glutamatergic tone in the dorsal striatum of chronically cannulated rats. Bilateral injections of a group III agonist, L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4), did not alter basal levels of motor activity at three doses surveyed (1, 10, and 100 nmol). Neither did intracaudate injection of a group III antagonist, alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG), at 10, 30, and 100 nmol. However, pretreatment with L-AP4 (10 and 100 nmol) dose dependently blocked hyperlocomotion induced by acute injection of cocaine (20 mg/kg, i.p.), amphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), or apomorphine (1 mg/kg, s.c.). The behavioral activity induced by cocaine was much more sensitive to L-AP4 than that induced by amphetamine and apomorphine. At 100 nmol, L-AP4 completely blocked cocaine effect whereas amphetamine- and apomorphine-stimulated behaviors were blocked only by 28% and 31%, respectively. The blocking effect of L-AP4 on cocaine action was reversed by pretreatment with MPPG. MPPG itself did not modify behavioral responses to cocaine, amphetamine, or apomorphine. These data indicate that the glutamatergic tone on the group III mGluRs is not active in the regulation of basal and acute dopamine-stimulated motor activity. However, enhanced group III mGluR glutamatergic transmission by an exogenous ligand is capable of suppressing behavioral responses to acute exposure of dopamine stimulants. PMID:11113488

  3. Slowing of the axonal transport of neurofilament proteins during development

    We examined age-dependent changes in neurofilament transport in motor axons of the rat sciatic nerve. SDS-PAGE and gel fluorography confirmed that the distribution of labeled neurofilament triplet protein coincides with the major slow component a (SCa) wave in these neurons. The velocity of neurofilament transport was calculated on the basis of the location of the 50th percentile of radioactivity in this wave 33 days after motor neurons were labeled by the intraspinal administration of [3H]leucine and [3H]lysine. Overall, the velocity fell from 1.95 mm/day at 3 weeks of age to 1.12 mm/day at 20 weeks. Between 3 and 10 weeks, it fell at a 6-fold higher rate (0.096 mm/day/week) than between 10 and 20 weeks (0.016 mm/day/week). We also found a marked change in the shape of the slow component wave during development. It appeared to consist of several overlapping peaks moving at slightly different velocities in animals 10 weeks of age or less as compared to a single slower moving peak at 20 weeks. We propose that the velocity of slow axonal transport reflects the level of maturation of the neuron, and that the presence of several overlapping peaks of transported radioactivity in the sciatic nerve of younger animals reflects the presence of several populations of motor axons at different stages of development. We also discuss the relationship between changes in the velocity of neurofilament transport and alterations in the composition of the cytoskeleton that occur as the axon grows in caliber during postnatal development

  4. [A clinical and pathological study of diffuse axonal injury].

    Nakazawa, S; Kobayashi, S; Yokota, H; Shimura, T

    1989-03-01

    There is increasing evidence from human and experimental studies that the most important factor governing the outcome in head injury is the severity of diffuse axonal injuries. The authors have experienced 18 cases of severe diffuse axonal injury which showed post-traumatic coma for more than 24 hours and CT findings resembling those of shearing injuries of the cerebral white matter such as have been presented by Zimmerman et al. (1978). The consciousness levels on admission were 6 or less on the Glasgow Coma Scale and all cases were shown clinically to have primary brain stem injury. The main type of head trauma resulted from road traffic accidents (83%). Skull fractures were found in only 5 cases (28%). These findings suggested that acceleration/deceleration injury produce in the patients severe diffuse axonal injury. Initial ICP was below 20 mmHg in 11 cases out of 13 (85%). Parenchymal small hemorrhagic lesions of initial CT were basal ganglia (7 cases), corpus callosum (4 cases), pons (4 cases), midbrain (3 cases) and thalamus (2 cases). Extraparenchymal hemorrhagic lesions included intraventricular hemorrhage (6 cases) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (6 cases). Two autopsied cases of severe diffuse axonal injury (acute case and chronic case) showed remarkable congestion and edema in the deep part of the frontal white matter. Microscopic examination revealed marked axonal degeneration including axonal retraction ball in the corpus callosum, in the internal capsule and in the white matter of the brain stem. Glasgow Outcome Scale of the 18 patients at 3 months after the trauma made us concerned that no patients indicated good recovery or even only moderate disability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2770962

  5. Effectiveness of mirror therapy on lower extremity motor recovery, balance and mobility in patients with acute stroke: A randomized sham-controlled pilot trial

    Uthra Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of mirror therapy on lower extremity motor recovery, balance and mobility in patients with acute stroke. Design: A randomized, sham-controlled, assessor blinded, pilot trial. Setting: Inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit. Subjects: First time onset of stroke with mean post-stroke duration of 6.41 days, able to respond to verbal instructions, and Brunnstrom recovery stage 2 and above were enrolled. Intervention: Mirror therapy group performed 30 minutes of functional synergy movements of non-paretic lower extremity, whereas control group underwent sham therapy with similar duration. In addition, both groups were administered with conventional stroke rehabilitation regime. Altogether 90 minutes therapy session per day, six days a week, for two weeks duration was administered to both groups. Outcome Measures: Lower extremity motor subscale of Fugl Meyer Assessment (FMA, Brunnel Balance Assessment (BBA and Functional Ambulation Categories (FAC. Results: Amongst the 22 patients included, equal number of patients participated in mirror group (N = 11 and control group (N = 11. Baseline variables were similar in both groups, except for Brunnstrom recovery stage. There was no statistical difference between groups, except for FAC. (FMA: P = 0.894; BBA: P = 0.358; FAC: P = 0.02. Significance was set at P < 0.05. Conclusion: Administration of mirror therapy early after stroke is not superior to conventional treatment in improving lower limb motor recovery and balance, except for improvement in mobility.

  6. Axon density and axon orientation dispersion in children born preterm

    Kelly, Claire E.; Thompson, Deanne K.; Chen, Jian; Leemans, Alexander; Adamson, Christopher L.; Inder, Terrie E.; Cheong, Jeanie L Y; Doyle, Lex W.; Anderson, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Very preterm birth (VPT, <32 weeks' gestation) is associated with altered white matter fractional anisotropy (FA), the biological basis of which is uncertain but may relate to changes in axon density and/or dispersion, which can be measured using Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density

  7. THE EXPRESSION OF BCL-2, BAX AND CASPASE-3 IN NEURON OF THE SPINAL CORD ANTERIOR HORN AFTER CAUDA EQUINA ACUTE COMPRESSION

    王栋; 王展; 李浩鹏; 贺西京

    2006-01-01

    Cauda equina syndrome(CES)is common inclinic,and acute CES are difficult to recover.So,it s very i mportant to i mprove the treat ment ofCES.The study of nerve was turned fromthe si m-ple nerve shift injury research to the neuron changeafter the axon injury.Peripheral nerve injury cancause their central neuron apoptosis was confir medby experi ment,but rare report was observed withthe motor neuron change after the cauda equina in-jury.The present studies want to set the acute CESani mal model and observe th...

  8. Outsourcing CREB translation to axons to survive

    Lin, Andrew C; Holt, Christine E.

    2008-01-01

    Nerve growth factor induces sensory neuron survival via retrograde signalling from the axon to the cell body. Local translation of the transcription factor CREB in the axon, followed by its transport to the nucleus, is involved in this process.

  9. Axonal degeneration affects muscle density in older men and women.

    Lauretani, Fulvio; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bartali, Benedetta; Di Iorio, Angelo; Giacomini, Vittoria; Corsi, Anna Maria; Guralnik, Jack M; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2006-08-01

    Using data from InCHIANTI, a prospective population-based survey of older persons, we examined the relationship of peroneal nerve conduction velocity (NCV, a measure of nerve myelination) and compound muscle action potential (CMAP, a measure of axonal degeneration) with calf muscle mass and density, two complementary measures of sarcopenia. NCV and CMAP were assessed by surface electroneurography of the right peroneal nerve conducted in 1162 participants, 515 men and 647 women, age 21-96 years, free of major neurological diseases. Cross-sectional muscle area and calf muscle density were measured using peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (pQCT). Both nerve and muscle parameters declined with age although in most cases the decline was not linear. In both sexes, CMAP, but not NCV, was independently and significantly associated with calf muscle density. These findings suggest that intrinsic changes in the muscle tissue are partially caused by a reduction in the number of motor axons. PMID:16085338

  10. A surviving intact branch stabilizes remaining axon architecture after injury as revealed by in vivo imaging in the mouse spinal cord.

    Lorenzana, Ariana O; Lee, Jae K; Mui, Matthew; Chang, Amy; Zheng, Binhai

    2015-05-20

    The complex morphology of axons presents a challenge in understanding axonal responses to injury and disease. By in vivo two-photon imaging of spinal dorsal column sensory axons, we systematically examined the effect of injury location relative to the main bifurcation point on axon degeneration and regeneration following highly localized laser injuries. Retrograde but not anterograde degeneration was strongly blocked at the bifurcation point at both the acute and subacute phases. Eliminating either the ascending or descending branch led to a poor regenerative response, while eliminating both led to a strong regenerative response. Thus, a surviving intact branch suppresses both retrograde degeneration and regeneration of the injured branch, thereby preserving the remaining axon architecture. Regenerating axons exhibited a dynamic pattern with alternating phases of regeneration and pruning over a chronic period. In vivo imaging continues to reveal new insights on axonal responses to injury in the mammalian spinal cord. PMID:25937174

  11. Plant-derived compounds: acute toxicity, synergism, and effects on insect enzyme activity and flight motor responses.

    Waliwitiya, Ranil

    2011-01-01

    Botanical extracts may contain compounds that have insecticidal properties that may be developed as inexpensive insecticides. In this thesis, I used a series of techniques to identify the acute toxicities and modes of action of plant-derived compounds against the Yellow Fever mosquito Aedes aegypti and the blowfly Phaenicia sericata. Initially I evaluated the acute toxicity of 16 phytochemicals on aquatic and terrestrial insects alone or with the synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO) to quantify...

  12. Synchronous and asynchronous electrically evoked motor activities during wind-up stimulation are differentially modulated following an acute spinal transection

    Frigon, Alain; Hurteau, Marie-France; Johnson, Michael D; Heckman, C.J.; Telonio, Alessandro; Thibaudier, Yann

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we used a novel technique to study reflex wind-up when the spinal cord is intact and following an acute spinal transection. Specifically, we evaluated reflex responses evoked by a series of 10 electrical pulses to the tibial or superficial peroneal nerves in 9 decerebrate adult cats, before and after an acute spinal transection. Electromyograms were recorded in four hindlimb muscles (lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, semitendinosus, and sartorius) to evaluate reflex amp...

  13. Acute myeloneuropathy: An uncommon presentation of Sjögren′s syndrome

    Rajesh Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren′s syndrome is associated with central and peripheral nervous system involvement. The peripheral neuropathy is usually a sensory predominant neuropathy or a cranial neuropathy. Myelopathy is usually of focal, subacute, chronic or relapsing type. Acute myeloneuropathy as the predominant manifestation has not been described in the literature. We describe a middle aged woman who presented with an acute onset motor quadriparesis and bladder dysfunction. She had dryness of eyes and mouth for 8 months. Nerve conduction studies revealed motor axonal neuropathy and magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord showed T2 hyperintensities involving entire cord. Mild perineural fibrosis, focal foamy changes in endoneurium and lymphocytic infiltration were seen in sural nerve biopsy specimen. Patient improved clinically after intravenous methylprednisolone therapy.

  14. Short-term peripheral nerve stimulation ameliorates axonal dysfunction after spinal cord injury.

    Lee, Michael; Kiernan, Matthew C; Macefield, Vaughan G; Lee, Bonne B; Lin, Cindy S-Y

    2015-05-01

    There is accumulating evidence that peripheral motor axons deteriorate following spinal cord injury (SCI). Secondary axonal dysfunction can exacerbate muscle atrophy, contribute to peripheral neuropathies and neuropathic pain, and lead to further functional impairment. In an attempt to ameliorate the adverse downstream effects that developed following SCI, we investigated the effects of a short-term peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) program on motor axonal excitability in 22 SCI patients. Axonal excitability studies were undertaken in the median and common peroneal nerves (CPN) bilaterally before and after a 6-wk unilateral PNS program. PNS was delivered percutaneously over the median nerve at the wrist and CPN around the fibular head, and the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) from the abductor pollicis brevis and tibialis anterior was recorded. Stimulus intensity was above motor threshold, and pulses (450 μs) were delivered at 100 Hz with a 2-s on/off cycle for 30 min 5 days/wk. SCI patients had consistently high thresholds with a reduced CMAP consistent with axonal loss; in some patients the peripheral nerves were completely inexcitable. Nerve excitability studies revealed profound changes in membrane potential, with a "fanned-in" appearance in threshold electrotonus, consistent with membrane depolarization, and significantly reduced superexcitability during the recovery cycle. These membrane dysfunctions were ameliorated after 6 wk of PNS, which produced a significant hyperpolarizing effect. The contralateral, nonstimulated nerves remained depolarized. Short-term PNS reversed axonal dysfunction following SCI, may provide an opportunity to prevent chronic changes in axonal and muscular function, and may improve rehabilitation outcomes. PMID:25787956

  15. Transforming Growth Factor-β Promotes Axonal Regeneration After Chronic Nerve Injury.

    Sulaiman, Wale A R

    2016-04-01

    When spinal cord injury (SCI) occurs, injured cells must survive and regenerate to close gaps caused by the injury and to create functional motor units. After peripheral nerve injury, Wallerian degeneration in the distal nerve stump creates a neurotrophic and growth-supportive environment for injured neurons and axons via Schwann cells and secreted cytokines/neurotrophins. In both SCI and peripheral nerve injury, injured motor and sensory neurons must regenerate axons, eventually reaching and reinnervating target tissue (SDC Figure 1, http://links.lww.com/BRS/B116). This process is often unsuccessful after SCI, and the highly complex anatomy of branching axons and nerves in the peripheral nervous system leads to slow recovery of function, even with careful and appropriate techniques. PMID:27015069

  16. Genetic dysfunction of MT-ATP6 causes axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Pitceathly, Robert D S

    2012-09-11

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited neuromuscular disorder, affecting 1 in 2,500 individuals. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are not generally considered within the differential diagnosis of patients with uncomplicated inherited neuropathy, despite the essential requirement of ATP for axonal function. We identified the mtDNA mutation m.9185T>C in MT-ATP6, encoding the ATP6 subunit of the mitochondrial ATP synthase (OXPHOS complex V), at homoplasmic levels in a family with mitochondrial disease in whom a severe motor axonal neuropathy was a striking feature. This led us to hypothesize that mutations in the 2 mtDNA complex V subunit encoding genes, MT-ATP6 and MT-ATP8, might be an unrecognized cause of isolated axonal CMT and distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN).

  17. Cellular and axonal plasticity in the lesioned spinal cord of adult zebrafish

    Kuscha, Veronika

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish, in contrast to mammals, are capable of functional regeneration after complete transection of the spinal cord. In this system I asked: (1) Which spinal cell types regenerate in the lesioned spinal cord? (2) To what extent do the dopaminergic and 5-HT systems regenerate and (3) do dopaminergic axons from the brain influence cellular regeneration in the spinal cord? (1) Lost motor neurons are replaced by newly born motor neurons that mature and are integrated into the spinal cir...

  18. Human intraretinal myelination: Axon diameters and axon/myelin thickness ratios

    FitzGibbon, Thomas; Nestorovski, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Human intraretinal myelination of ganglion cell axons occurs in about 1% of the population. We examined myelin thickness and axon diameter in human retinal specimens containing myelinated retinal ganglion cell axons. Materials and Methods: Two eyes containing myelinated patches were prepared for electron microscopy. Two areas were examined in one retina and five in the second retina. Measurements were compared to normal retinal and optic nerve samples and the rabbit retina, which normally contains myelinated axons. Measurements were made using a graphics tablet. Results: Mean axon diameter of myelinated axons at all locations were significantly larger than unmyelinated axons (P ≤ 0.01). Myelinated axons within the patches were significantly larger than axons within the optic nerve (P < 0.01). The relationship between axon diameter/fiber diameter (the G-ratio) seen in the retinal sites differed from that in the nerve. G-ratios were higher and myelin thickness was positively correlated to axon diameter (P < 0.01) in the retina but negatively correlated to axon diameter in the nerve (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Intraretinally myelinated axons are larger than non-myelinated axons from the same population and suggests that glial cells can induce diameter changes in retinal axons that are not normally myelinated. This effect is more dramatic on intraretinal axons compared with the normal transition zone as axons enter the optic nerve and these changes are abnormal. Whether intraretinal myelin alters axonal conduction velocity or blocks axonal conduction remains to be clarified and these issues may have different clinical outcomes. PMID:24212308

  19. Axonal degeneration stimulates the formation of NG2+ cells and oligodendrocytes in the mouse

    Nielsen, Helle Hvilsted; Ladeby, Rune; Drøjdahl, Nina;

    2006-01-01

    Proliferation of the adult NG2-expressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells has traditionally been viewed as a remyelination response ensuing from destruction of myelin and oligodendrocytes, and not to the axonal pathology that is also a characteristic of demyelinating disease. To better understand...... the response of the NG2+ cells to the different components of demyelinating pathology, we investigated the response of adult NG2+ cells to axonal degeneration in the absence of primary myelin or oligodendrocyte pathology. Axonal degeneration was induced in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult mice...... by transection of the entorhino-dentate perforant path projection. The acutely induced degeneration of axons and terminals resulted in a prompt response of NG2+ cells, consisting of morphological transformation, cellular proliferation, and upregulation of NG2 expression days 2-3 after surgery. This was followed...

  20. Can Motor Evoked Potentials Be an Objective Parameter to Assess Extremity Function at the Acute or Subacute Stroke Stage?

    Kim, Gi-Wook; Won, Yu Hui; Park, Sung-Hee; Seo, Jeong-Hwan; Ko, Myoung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude ratio measurements are sufficiently objective to assess functional activities of the extremities. We also delineated the distribution between the presence or absence of MEPs and the Medical Research Council (MRC) scale for muscle strength of the extremities. Methods We enrolled 183 patients with first-ever unilateral hemiplegia after stroke. The MEP parameters were amplitude ratio (amplitude of affected side/amplitude of ...

  1. Dimensions of individual alpha and gamma motor fibres in the ventral funiculus of the cat spinal cord.

    Fabricius, C.; Berthold, C H; Rydmark, M

    1994-01-01

    Using light and electron microscopy, axon diameter, myelin sheath thickness (measured as number of myelin lamellae) and internodal length of alpha and gamma motor axons of the L7 ventral root and spinal cord segment were investigated in serial cross-sections. The CNS internodes of the alpha motor fibres had, on average, an axon diameter of 8.6 microns, 105 myelin lamellae and a length of about 560 microns. The CNS internodes of the gamma motor fibres had, on average, an axon diameter of 3.4 m...

  2. Axonal lesion-induced microglial proliferation and microglial cluster formation in the mouse

    Dissing-Olesen, L; Ladeby, R; Nielsen, Helle Hvilsted; Toft-Hansen, H; Dalmau, I; Finsen, B

    2007-01-01

    Microglia are innate immune cells and form the first line of defense of the CNS. Proliferation is a key event in the activation of microglia in acute pathology, and has been extensively characterized in rats, but not in mice. In this study we investigated axonal-lesion-induced microglial prolifer......Microglia are innate immune cells and form the first line of defense of the CNS. Proliferation is a key event in the activation of microglia in acute pathology, and has been extensively characterized in rats, but not in mice. In this study we investigated axonal-lesion-induced microglial...... double staining showed that most activated, proliferating microglia occurred in multicellular clusters and co-expressed the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and the hematopoietic stem cell marker cluster of differentiation 34. In conclusion, this study extends observations of axonal lesion...

  3. Dysregulated axonal RNA translation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Yasuda, Kyota; Mili, Stavroula

    2016-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset motor neuron disease that has been associated with a diverse array of genetic changes. Prominent among these are mutations in RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) or repeat expansions that give rise to toxic RNA species. RBPs are additionally central components of pathologic aggregates that constitute a disease hallmark, suggesting that dysregulation of RNA metabolism underlies disease progression. In the context of neuronal physiology, transport of RNAs and localized RNA translation in axons are fundamental to neuronal survival and function. Several lines of evidence suggest that axonal RNA translation is a central process perturbed by various pathogenic events associated with ALS. Dysregulated translation of specific RNA groups could underlie feedback effects that connect and reinforce disease manifestations. Among such candidates are RNAs encoding proteins involved in the regulation of microtubule dynamics. Further understanding of axonally dysregulated RNA targets and of the feedback mechanisms they induce could provide useful therapeutic insights. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:589-603. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1352 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27038103

  4. Coordinating gene expression and axon assembly to control axon growth: potential role of GSK3 signaling

    Fengquan Zhou

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Axon growth requires coordinated regulation of gene expression in the neuronal soma, anterograde transport of synthesized raw materials along the axon, and assembly of cytoskeleton and membranes in the nerve growth cone. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3 signaling has recently been shown to play key roles in regulation of axonal transport and cytoskeletal assembly during axon growth. GSK3 signaling is also known to regulate gene expression via controlling the functions of many transcription factors, suggesting that GSK3 may be an important regulator of gene transcription supporting axon growth. Here we will review signaling pathways that control local axon assembly at the growth cone and gene expression in the soma during developmental or regenerative axon growth and discuss the potential involvement of GSK3 signaling in these processes, with a particular focus on how GSK3 signaling modulates the function of axon growth-associated transcription factors.

  5. Mitochondrial Transport and Docking in Axons

    Cai, Qian; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2009-01-01

    Proper transport and distribution of mitochondria in axons and at synapses are critical for the normal physiology of neurons. Mitochondria in axons display distinct motility patterns and undergo saltatory and bidirectional movement, where mitochondria frequently stop, start moving again, and change direction. While approximately one-third of axonal mitochondria are mobile in mature neurons, a large proportion remains stationary. Their net movement is significantly influenced by recruitment to...

  6. A regenerative microchannel neural interface for recording from and stimulating peripheral axons in vivo.

    FitzGerald, James J; Lago, Natalia; Benmerah, Samia; Serra, Jordi; Watling, Christopher P; Cameron, Ruth E; Tarte, Edward; Lacour, Stéphanie P; McMahon, Stephen B; Fawcett, James W

    2012-02-01

    Neural interfaces are implanted devices that couple the nervous system to electronic circuitry. They are intended for long term use to control assistive technologies such as muscle stimulators or prosthetics that compensate for loss of function due to injury. Here we present a novel design of interface for peripheral nerves. Recording from axons is complicated by the small size of extracellular potentials and the concentration of current flow at nodes of Ranvier. Confining axons to microchannels of ~100 µm diameter produces amplified potentials that are independent of node position. After implantation of microchannel arrays into rat sciatic nerve, axons regenerated through the channels forming 'mini-fascicles', each typically containing ~100 myelinated fibres and one or more blood vessels. Regenerated motor axons reconnected to distal muscles, as demonstrated by the recovery of an electromyogram and partial prevention of muscle atrophy. Efferent motor potentials and afferent signals evoked by muscle stretch or cutaneous stimulation were easily recorded from the mini-fascicles and were in the range of 35-170 µV. Individual motor units in distal musculature were activated from channels using stimulus currents in the microampere range. Microchannel interfaces are a potential solution for applications such as prosthetic limb control or enhancing recovery after nerve injury. PMID:22258138

  7. Wnt Signalling Promotes Actin Dynamics during Axon Remodelling through the Actin-Binding Protein Eps8.

    Eleanna Stamatakou

    Full Text Available Upon arrival at their synaptic targets, axons slow down their growth and extensively remodel before the assembly of presynaptic boutons. Wnt proteins are target-derived secreted factors that promote axonal remodelling and synaptic assembly. In the developing spinal cord, Wnts secreted by motor neurons promote axonal remodelling of NT-3 responsive dorsal root ganglia neurons. Axon remodelling induced by Wnts is characterised by growth cone pausing and enlargement, processes that depend on the re-organisation of microtubules. However, the contribution of the actin cytoskeleton has remained unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that Wnt3a regulates the actin cytoskeleton by rapidly inducing F-actin accumulation in growth cones from rodent DRG neurons through the scaffold protein Dishevelled-1 (Dvl1 and the serine-threonine kinase Gsk3β. Importantly, these changes in actin cytoskeleton occurs before enlargement of the growth cones is evident. Time-lapse imaging shows that Wnt3a increases lamellar protrusion and filopodia velocity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of actin assembly demonstrates that Wnt3a increases actin dynamics. Through a yeast-two hybrid screen, we identified the actin-binding protein Eps8 as a direct interactor of Dvl1, a scaffold protein crucial for the Wnt signalling pathway. Gain of function of Eps8 mimics Wnt-mediated axon remodelling, whereas Eps8 silencing blocks the axon remodelling activity of Wnt3a. Importantly, blockade of the Dvl1-Eps8 interaction completely abolishes Wnt3a-mediated axonal remodelling. These findings demonstrate a novel role for Wnt-Dvl1 signalling through Eps8 in the regulation of axonal remodeling.

  8. Selectivity of distal reinnervation of regenerating mixed motor and sensory nerve fibres across muscle grafts in rats.

    Rath, S; Green, C J

    1991-04-01

    This study investigated target specificity during axonal regeneration of a mixed motor and sensory nerve towards respective targets. The femoral nerves in rats were divided and allowed to grow across a 6 mm gap interposed with frozen and thawed muscle grafts towards their distal motor and sensory nerve stumps. Fourteen weeks later the number of motoneurons projecting axons into the motor and sensory branches were determined by retrograde axonal tracing using horse-radish peroxidase. There were significantly higher numbers of motoneurons (p = 0.0034) projecting into the motor nerve than the sensory nerve. Efferent axons of a mixed nerve selectivity grew into motor branches when allowed to regenerate across a 6 mm gap interposed with muscle grafts. It is possible that a deliberately created 'structured gap' during repair of mixed nerves could improve axonal matching by allowing expression of neurotropism. PMID:2025759

  9. AxonSeg: Open Source Software for Axon and Myelin Segmentation and Morphometric Analysis.

    Zaimi, Aldo; Duval, Tanguy; Gasecka, Alicja; Côté, Daniel; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Segmenting axon and myelin from microscopic images is relevant for studying the peripheral and central nervous system and for validating new MRI techniques that aim at quantifying tissue microstructure. While several software packages have been proposed, their interface is sometimes limited and/or they are designed to work with a specific modality (e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM) only). Here we introduce AxonSeg, which allows to perform automatic axon and myelin segmentation on histology images, and to extract relevant morphometric information, such as axon diameter distribution, axon density and the myelin g-ratio. AxonSeg includes a simple and intuitive MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI) and can easily be adapted to a variety of imaging modalities. The main steps of AxonSeg consist of: (i) image pre-processing; (ii) pre-segmentation of axons over a cropped image and discriminant analysis (DA) to select the best parameters based on axon shape and intensity information; (iii) automatic axon and myelin segmentation over the full image; and (iv) atlas-based statistics to extract morphometric information. Segmentation results from standard optical microscopy (OM), SEM and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy are presented, along with validation against manual segmentations. Being fully-automatic after a quick manual intervention on a cropped image, we believe AxonSeg will be useful to researchers interested in large throughput histology. AxonSeg is open source and freely available at: https://github.com/neuropoly/axonseg. PMID:27594833

  10. A Systematic Review of Experimental Strategies Aimed at Improving Motor Function after Acute and Chronic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Gomes-Osman, Joyce; Cortes, Mar; Guest, James; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2016-03-01

    While various approaches have been proposed in clinical trials aimed at improving motor function after spinal cord injury in humans, there is still limited information regarding the scope, methodological quality, and evidence associated with single-intervention and multi-intervention approaches. A systematic review performed using the PubMed search engine and the key words "spinal cord injury motor recovery" identified 1973 records, of which 39 were selected (18 from the search records and 21 from reference list inspection). Study phase ( clinicaltrials.org criteria) and methodological quality (Cochrane criteria) were assessed. Studies included proposed a broad range of single-intervention (encompassing cell therapies, pharmacology, electrical stimulation, rehabilitation) (encompassing cell therapies, pharmacology, electrical stimulation, rehabilitation) and multi-intervention approaches (that combined more than one strategy). The highest evidence level was for Phase III studies supporting the role of multi-intervention approaches that contained a rehabilitation component. Quality appraisal revealed that the percentage of selected studies classified with high risk of bias by Cochrane criteria was as follows: random sequence generation = 64%; allocation concealment = 77%; blinding of participants and personnel = 69%; blinding of outcome assessment = 64%; attrition = 44%; selective reporting = 44%. The current literature contains a high proportion of studies with a limited ability to measure efficacy in a valid manner because of low methodological strength in all items of the Cochrane risk of bias assessment. Recommendations to decrease bias are discussed and include increased methodological rigor in the study design and recruitment of study participants, and the use of electrophysiological and imaging measures that can assess functional integrity of the spinal cord (and may be sufficiently sensitive to detect changes that occur in response to

  11. Axonal regeneration through arterial grafts.

    Anderson, P. N.; Turmaine, M.

    1986-01-01

    The left common peroneal nerves of adult inbred mice were severed and allowed to regenerate through the lumina of Y-shaped tubes comprising grafts of abdominal aorta and its bifurcation. Very little regeneration took place within the grafts unless the distal nerve stump was inserted into one limb of the Y-tube. Using syngeneic grafts virtually all the axons regenerating through the lumen grew down the limb of the Y-tube containing the distal nerve. Using non-syngeneic grafts, however, a subst...

  12. Axonal interferon responses and alphaherpesvirus neuroinvasion

    Song, Ren

    Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at a peripheral epithelial surface and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS) that innervates this tissue. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to viral invasion of the PNS. PNS neurons are highly polarized cells with long axonal processes that connect to distant targets. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which include type I interferon (e.g. IFNbeta) and type II interferon (i.e. IFNgamma). IFNbeta can be produced by all types of cells, while IFNgamma is secreted by some specific types of immune cells. And both types of IFN induce antiviral responses in surrounding cells that express the IFN receptors. The fundamental question is how do PNS neurons respond to the inflammatory milieu experienced only by their axons. Axons must act as potential front-line barriers to prevent PNS infection and damage. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, I found that pretreating isolated axons with IFNbeta or IFNgamma significantly diminished the number of HSV-1 and PRV particles moving from axons to the cell bodies in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Furthermore, I found the responses in axons are activated differentially by the two types of IFNs. The response to IFNbeta is a rapid, axon-only response, while the response to IFNgamma involves long distance signaling to the PNS cell body. For example, exposing axons to IFNbeta induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFNgamma induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated IFNgamma-, but not IFNbeta-mediated antiviral effects. Proteomic analysis of IFNbeta- or IFNgamma-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore

  13. Neurofilament spacing, phosphorylation, and axon diameter in regenerating and uninjured lamprey axons.

    Pijak, D S; Hall, G F; Tenicki, P J; Boulos, A S; Lurie, D I; Selzer, M E

    1996-05-13

    It has been postulated that phosphorylation of the carboxy terminus sidearms of neurofilaments (NFs) increases axon diameter through repulsive electrostatic forces that increase sidearm extension and interfilament spacing. To evaluate this hypothesis, the relationships among NF phosphorylation, NF spacing, and axon diameter were examined in uninjured and spinal cord-transected larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus). In untransected animals, axon diameters in the spinal cord varied from 0.5 to 50 microns. Antibodies specific for highly phosphorylated NFs labeled only large axons (> 10 microns), whereas antibodies for lightly phosphorylated NFs labeled medium-sized and small axons more darkly than large axons. For most axons in untransected animals, diameter was inversely related to NF packing density, but the interfilament distances of the largest axons were only 1.5 times those of the smallest axons. In addition, the lightly phosphorylated NFs of the small axons in the dorsal columns were widely spaced, suggesting that phosphorylation of NFs does not rigidly determine their spacing and that NF spacing does not rigidly determine axon diameter. Regenerating neurites of giant reticulospinal axons (GRAs) have diameters only 5-10% of those of their parent axons. If axon caliber is controlled by NF phosphorylation via mutual electrostatic repulsion, then NFs in the slender regenerating neurites should be lightly phosphorylated and densely packed (similar to NFs in uninjured small caliber axons), whereas NFs in the parent GRAs should be highly phosphorylated and loosely packed. However, although linear density of NFs (the number of NFs per micrometer) in these slender regenerating neurites was twice that in their parent axons, they were highly phosphorylated. Following sectioning of these same axons close to the cell body, axon-like neurites regenerated ectopically from dendritic tips. These ectopically regenerating neurites had NF linear densities 2.5 times those of

  14. Cable energy function of cortical axons.

    Ju, Huiwen; Hines, Michael L; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of action potential (AP)-related metabolic cost is essential for understanding energetic constraints on brain connections and signaling processes. Most previous energy estimates of the AP were obtained using the Na(+)-counting method, which seriously limits accurate assessment of metabolic cost of ionic currents that underlie AP conduction along the axon. Here, we first derive a full cable energy function for cortical axons based on classic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuronal equations and then apply the cable energy function to precisely estimate the energy consumption of AP conduction along axons with different geometric shapes. Our analytical approach predicts an inhomogeneous distribution of metabolic cost along an axon with either uniformly or nonuniformly distributed ion channels. The results show that the Na(+)-counting method severely underestimates energy cost in the cable model by 20-70%. AP propagation along axons that differ in length may require over 15% more energy per unit of axon area than that required by a point model. However, actual energy cost can vary greatly depending on axonal branching complexity, ion channel density distributions, and AP conduction states. We also infer that the metabolic rate (i.e. energy consumption rate) of cortical axonal branches as a function of spatial volume exhibits a 3/4 power law relationship. PMID:27439954

  15. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in wat

  16. Cable energy function of cortical axons

    Ju, Huiwen; Hines, Michael L.; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of action potential (AP)-related metabolic cost is essential for understanding energetic constraints on brain connections and signaling processes. Most previous energy estimates of the AP were obtained using the Na+-counting method, which seriously limits accurate assessment of metabolic cost of ionic currents that underlie AP conduction along the axon. Here, we first derive a full cable energy function for cortical axons based on classic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuronal equations and then apply the cable energy function to precisely estimate the energy consumption of AP conduction along axons with different geometric shapes. Our analytical approach predicts an inhomogeneous distribution of metabolic cost along an axon with either uniformly or nonuniformly distributed ion channels. The results show that the Na+-counting method severely underestimates energy cost in the cable model by 20–70%. AP propagation along axons that differ in length may require over 15% more energy per unit of axon area than that required by a point model. However, actual energy cost can vary greatly depending on axonal branching complexity, ion channel density distributions, and AP conduction states. We also infer that the metabolic rate (i.e. energy consumption rate) of cortical axonal branches as a function of spatial volume exhibits a 3/4 power law relationship. PMID:27439954

  17. Neuronal Development: SAD Kinases Make Happy Axons

    Xing, Lei; Newbern, Jason M.; Snider, William D

    2013-01-01

    The polarity proteins LKB1 and SAD-A/B are key regulators of axon specification in the developing cerebral cortex. Recent studies now show that this mechanism cannot be generalized to other classes of neurons: instead, SAD-A/B functions downstream of neurotrophin signaling in sensory neurons to mediate a later stage of axon development — arborization in the target field.

  18. SNTF immunostaining reveals previously undetected axonal pathology in traumatic brain injury.

    Johnson, Victoria E; Stewart, William; Weber, Maura T; Cullen, D Kacy; Siman, Robert; Smith, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is a common feature of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and may also be a predominant pathology in mild TBI or "concussion". The rapid deformation of white matter at the instant of trauma can lead to mechanical failure and calcium-dependent proteolysis of the axonal cytoskeleton in association with axonal transport interruption. Recently, a proteolytic fragment of alpha-II spectrin, "SNTF", was detected in serum acutely following mild TBI in patients and was prognostic for poor clinical outcome. However, direct evidence that this fragment is a marker of DAI has yet to be demonstrated in either humans following TBI or in models of mild TBI. Here, we used immunohistochemistry (IHC) to examine for SNTF in brain tissue following both severe and mild TBI. Human severe TBI cases (survival <7d; n = 18) were compared to age-matched controls (n = 16) from the Glasgow TBI archive. We also examined brains from an established model of mild TBI at 6, 48 and 72 h post-injury versus shams. IHC specific for SNTF was compared to that of amyloid precursor protein (APP), the current standard for DAI diagnosis, and other known markers of axonal pathology including non-phosphorylated neurofilament-H (SMI-32), neurofilament-68 (NF-68) and compacted neurofilament-medium (RMO-14) using double and triple immunofluorescent labeling. Supporting its use as a biomarker of DAI, SNTF immunoreactive axons were observed at all time points following both human severe TBI and in the model of mild TBI. Interestingly, SNTF revealed a subpopulation of degenerating axons, undetected by the gold-standard marker of transport interruption, APP. While there was greater axonal co-localization between SNTF and APP after severe TBI in humans, a subset of SNTF positive axons displayed no APP accumulation. Notably, some co-localization was observed between SNTF and the less abundant neurofilament subtype markers. Other SNTF positive axons, however, did not co-localize with any

  19. Early events in axon/dendrite polarization.

    Cheng, Pei-lin; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-01-01

    Differentiation of axons and dendrites is a critical step in neuronal development. Here we review the evidence that axon/dendrite formation during neuronal polarization depends on the intrinsic cytoplasmic asymmetry inherited by the postmitotic neuron, the exposure of the neuron to extracellular chemical factors, and the action of anisotropic mechanical forces imposed by the environment. To better delineate the functions of early signals among a myriad of cellular components that were shown to influence axon/dendrite formation, we discuss their functions by distinguishing their roles as determinants, mediators, or modulators and consider selective degradation of these components as a potential mechanism for axon/dendrite polarization. Finally, we examine whether these early events of axon/dendrite formation involve local autocatalytic activation and long-range inhibition, as postulated by Alan Turing for the morphogenesis of patterned biological structure. PMID:22715881

  20. Dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons

    Robert Francis Niescier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons.

  1. Dynamics of Mitochondrial Transport in Axons.

    Niescier, Robert F; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Joo, Se Hun; Chang, Karen T; Min, Kyung-Tai

    2016-01-01

    The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons. PMID:27242435

  2. Peripheral neuropathy in the Twitcher mouse involves the activation of axonal caspase 3

    Ernesto R Bongarzone

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Infantile Krabbe disease results in the accumulation of lipid-raft-associated galactosylsphingosine (psychosine, demyelination, neurodegeneration and premature death. Recently, axonopathy has been depicted as a contributing factor in the progression of neurodegeneration in the Twitcher mouse, a bona fide mouse model of Krabbe disease. Analysis of the temporal-expression profile of MBP (myelin basic protein isoforms showed unexpected increases of the 14, 17 and 18.5 kDa isoforms in the sciatic nerve of 1-week-old Twitcher mice, suggesting an abnormal regulation of the myelination process during early postnatal life in this mutant. Our studies showed an elevated activation of the pro-apoptotic protease caspase 3 in sciatic nerves of 15- and 30-day-old Twitcher mice, in parallel with increasing demyelination. Interestingly, while active caspase 3 was clearly contained in peripheral axons at all ages, we found no evidence of caspase accumulation in the soma of corresponding mutant spinal cord motor neurons. Furthermore, active caspase 3 was found not only in unmyelinated axons, but also in myelinated axons of the mutant sciatic nerve. These results suggest that axonal caspase activation occurs before demyelination and following a dying-back pattern. Finally, we showed that psychosine was sufficient to activate caspase 3 in motor neuronal cells in vitro in the absence of myelinating glia. Taken together, these findings indicate that degenerating mechanisms actively and specifically mediate axonal dysfunction in Krabbe disease and support the idea that psychosine is a pathogenic sphingolipid sufficient to cause axonal defects independently of demyelination.

  3. Diagnosis of acute neuropathies

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Acute and subacute polyneuropathies present diagnostic challenges since many require prompt initiation of treatment in order to limit axonal degeneration and since an exact and detailed diagnosis is a prerequisite for making the correct choice of treatment. It is for instance of utmost importance...... to recognize whether the underlying pathological changes are due to demyelination or to axonal degeneration and electrodiagnostic tests can thus in most cases contribute considerably to the securing of an exact diagnosis. The specific and characteristic electrophysiological findings in the different...

  4. Organophosphates induce distal axonal damage, but not brain oedema, by inactivating neuropathy target esterase

    Single doses of organophosphorus compounds (OP) which covalently inhibit neuropathy target esterase (NTE) can induce lower-limb paralysis and distal damage in long nerve axons. Clinical signs of neuropathy are evident 3 weeks post-OP dose in humans, cats and chickens. By contrast, clinical neuropathy in mice following acute dosing with OPs or any other toxic compound has never been reported. Moreover, dosing mice with ethyloctylphosphonofluoridate (EOPF) - an extremely potent NTE inhibitor - causes a different (subacute) neurotoxicity with brain oedema. These observations have raised the possibility that mice are intrinsically resistant to neuropathies induced by acute toxic insult, but may incur brain oedema, rather than distal axonal damage, when NTE is inactivated. Here we provide the first report that hind-limb dysfunction and extensive axonal damage can occur in mice 3 weeks after acute dosing with a toxic compound, bromophenylacetylurea. Three weeks after acutely dosing mice with neuropathic OPs no clinical signs were observed, but distal lesions were present in the longest spinal sensory axons. Similar lesions were evident in undosed nestin-cre:NTEfl/fl mice in which NTE had been genetically-deleted from neural tissue. The extent of OP-induced axonal damage in mice was related to the duration of NTE inactivation and, as reported in chickens, was promoted by post-dosing with phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride. However, phenyldipentylphosphinate, another promoting compound in chickens, itself induced in mice lesions different from the neuropathic OP type. Finally, EOPF induced subacute neurotoxicity with brain oedema in both wild-type and nestin-cre:NTEfl/fl mice indicating that the molecular target for this effect is not neural NTE.

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum sorting and kinesin-1 command the targeting of axonal GABAB receptors.

    Viviana Valdés

    Full Text Available In neuronal cells the intracellular trafficking machinery controls the availability of neurotransmitter receptors at the plasma membrane, which is a critical determinant of synaptic strength. Metabotropic γ amino-butyric acid (GABA type B receptors (GABA(BRs are neurotransmitter receptors that modulate synaptic transmission by mediating the slow and prolonged responses to GABA. GABA(BRs are obligatory heteromers constituted by two subunits, GABA(BR1 and GABA(BR2. GABA(BR1a and GABA(BR1b are the most abundant subunit variants. GABA(BR1b is located in the somatodendritic domain whereas GABA(BR1a is additionally targeted to the axon. Sushi domains located at the N-terminus of GABA(BR1a constitute the only difference between both variants and are necessary and sufficient for axonal targeting. The precise targeting machinery and the organelles involved in sorting and transport have not been described. Here we demonstrate that GABA(BRs require the Golgi apparatus for plasma membrane delivery but that axonal sorting and targeting of GABA(BR1a operate in a pre-Golgi compartment. In the axon GABA(BR1a subunits are enriched in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and their dynamic behavior and colocalization with other secretory organelles like the ER-to-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC suggest that they employ a local secretory route. The transport of axonal GABA(BR1a is microtubule-dependent and kinesin-1, a molecular motor of the kinesin family, determines axonal localization. Considering that progression of GABA(BRs through the secretory pathway is regulated by an ER retention motif our data contribute to understand the role of the axonal ER in non-canonical sorting and targeting of neurotransmitter receptors.

  6. Primary neuron culture for nerve growth and axon guidance studies in zebrafish (Danio rerio.

    Zheyan Chen

    Full Text Available Zebrafish (Danio rerio is a widely used model organism in genetics and developmental biology research. Genetic screens have proven useful for studying embryonic development of the nervous system in vivo, but in vitro studies utilizing zebrafish have been limited. Here, we introduce a robust zebrafish primary neuron culture system for functional nerve growth and guidance assays. Distinct classes of central nervous system neurons from the spinal cord, hindbrain, forebrain, and retina from wild type zebrafish, and fluorescent motor neurons from transgenic reporter zebrafish lines, were dissociated and plated onto various biological and synthetic substrates to optimize conditions for axon outgrowth. Time-lapse microscopy revealed dynamically moving growth cones at the tips of extending axons. The mean rate of axon extension in vitro was 21.4±1.2 µm hr(-1 s.e.m. for spinal cord neurons, which corresponds to the typical ∼0.5 mm day(-1 growth rate of nerves in vivo. Fluorescence labeling and confocal microscopy demonstrated that bundled microtubules project along axons to the growth cone central domain, with filamentous actin enriched in the growth cone peripheral domain. Importantly, the growth cone surface membrane expresses receptors for chemotropic factors, as detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Live-cell functional assays of axon extension and directional guidance demonstrated mammalian brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF-dependent stimulation of outgrowth and growth cone chemoattraction, whereas mammalian myelin-associated glycoprotein inhibited outgrowth. High-resolution live-cell Ca(2+-imaging revealed local elevation of cytoplasmic Ca(2+ concentration in the growth cone induced by BDNF application. Moreover, BDNF-induced axon outgrowth, but not basal outgrowth, was blocked by treatments to suppress cytoplasmic Ca(2+ signals. Thus, this primary neuron culture model system may be useful for studies of neuronal development

  7. Protein 4.1B contributes to the organization of peripheral myelinated axons.

    Carmen Cifuentes-Diaz

    Full Text Available Neurons are characterized by extremely long axons. This exceptional cell shape is likely to depend on multiple factors including interactions between the cytoskeleton and membrane proteins. In many cell types, members of the protein 4.1 family play an important role in tethering the cortical actin-spectrin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. Protein 4.1B is localized in myelinated axons, enriched in paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions, and also all along the internodes, but not at nodes of Ranvier where are localized the voltage-dependent sodium channels responsible for action potential propagation. To shed light on the role of protein 4.1B in the general organization of myelinated peripheral axons, we studied 4.1B knockout mice. These mice displayed a mildly impaired gait and motility. Whereas nodes were unaffected, the distribution of Caspr/paranodin, which anchors 4.1B to the membrane, was disorganized in paranodal regions and its levels were decreased. In juxtaparanodes, the enrichment of Caspr2, which also interacts with 4.1B, and of the associated TAG-1 and Kv1.1, was absent in mutant mice, whereas their levels were unaltered. Ultrastructural abnormalities were observed both at paranodes and juxtaparanodes. Axon calibers were slightly diminished in phrenic nerves and preterminal motor axons were dysmorphic in skeletal muscle. βII spectrin enrichment was decreased along the axolemma. Electrophysiological recordings at 3 post-natal weeks showed the occurrence of spontaneous and evoked repetitive activity indicating neuronal hyperexcitability, without change in conduction velocity. Thus, our results show that in myelinated axons 4.1B contributes to the stabilization of membrane proteins at paranodes, to the clustering of juxtaparanodal proteins, and to the regulation of the internodal axon caliber.

  8. Imaging axonal degeneration and repair in pre-clinical animal models of multiple sclerosis

    Soumya S Yandamuri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a central nervous system (CNS disease characterized by chronic neuroinflammation, demyelination, and axonal damage. Infiltration of activated lymphocytes and myeloid cells are thought to be primarily responsible for white matter damage and axonopathy. Over time, this neurologic damage manifests clinically as debilitating motor and cognitive symptoms. Existing MS therapies focus on symptom relief and delay of disease progression through reduction of neuroinflammation. However, long-term strategies to remyelinate, protect, or regenerate axons have remained elusive, posing a challenge to treating progressive forms of MS. Preclinical mouse models and techniques such as immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and genomic and proteomic analysis have provided advances in our understanding of discrete time-points of pathology following disease induction. More recently, in vivo and in situ two-photon microscopy (2P has made it possible to visualize continuous real-time cellular behavior and structural changes occurring within the CNS during neuropathology. Research utilizing 2P imaging to study axonopathy in neuroinflammatory demyelinating disease has focused on five areas: (1 axonal morphologic changes (2 organelle transport and health, (3 relationship to inflammation, (4 neuronal excitotoxicity, and (5 regenerative therapies. 2P imaging may also be used to identify novel therapeutic targets via identification and clarification of dynamic cellular and molecular mechanisms of axonal regeneration and remyelination. Here, we review tools that have made 2P accessible for imaging neuropathologies and advances in our understanding of axonal degeneration and repair in preclinical models of demyelinating diseases.

  9. Serotonin spillover onto the axon initial segment of motoneurons induces central fatigue by inhibiting action potential initiation

    Cotel, Florence; Exley, Richard; Cragg, Stephanie;

    2013-01-01

    --as during motor exercise--activated 5-HT1A receptors that decreased motoneuronal excitability. Electrophysiological tests combined with pharmacology showed that focal activation of 5-HT1A receptors at the axon initial segment (AIS), but not on other motoneuronal compartments, inhibited the action potential...

  10. Catenin-dependent cadherin function drives divisional segregation of spinal motor neurons

    Bello, S. M.; Millo, H.; Rajebhosale, M.; Price, S. R.

    2012-01-01

    Motor neurons that control limb movements are organised as a neuronal nucleus in the developing ventral horn of the spinal cord called the lateral motor column. Neuronal migration segregates motor neurons into distinct lateral and medial divisions within the lateral motor column that project axons to dorsal or ventral limb targets respectively. This migratory phase is followed by an aggregation phase whereby motor neurons within a division that project to the same muscle cluster together. The...

  11. Mental Trauma Experienced by Caregivers of patients with Diffuse Axonal Injury or Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Syed Tajuddin Syed Hassan; Husna Jamaludin; Rosna Abd Raman; Haliza Mohd Riji; Khaw Wan Fei

    2013-01-01

    Context: As with care giving and rehabilitation in chronic illnesses, the concern with traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly with diffuse axonal injury (DAI), is that the caregivers are so overwhelmingly involved in caring and rehabilitation of the victim that in the process they become traumatized themselves. This review intends to shed light on the hidden and silent trauma sustained by the caregivers of severe brain injury survivors. Motor vehicle accident (MVA) is the highest contribu...

  12. Analysis of axonal transport and molecular chaperones during neurodegeneration in drosophila

    Sinadinos, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal dysfunction and cell death occurs during neurodegeneration. Animal models that express human disease genes and show neurodegenerative-like pathologies are widely used to study particular molecular systems in early neurodegenerative changes. Axonal transport (AT) is perturbed in several prevalent neurodegenerative diseases. The development of a Huntington’s Disease (HD) model in Drosophila melanogaster larvae is described, in which disease gene expression is directed to motor neurons ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: giant axonal neuropathy

    ... in giant axonal neuropathy: new insights into disease mechanisms. Muscle Nerve. 2012 Aug;46(2):246-56. ... with a qualified healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Contact Us Selection Criteria for Links ...

  14. Impaired Axonal Na(+) Current by Hindlimb Unloading: Implication for Disuse Neuromuscular Atrophy.

    Banzrai, Chimeglkham; Nodera, Hiroyuki; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Higashi, Saki; Okada, Ryo; Mori, Atsuko; Shimatani, Yoshimitsu; Osaki, Yusuke; Kaji, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the excitability changes in peripheral motor axons caused by hindlimb unloading (HLU), which is a model of disuse neuromuscular atrophy. HLU was performed in normal 8-week-old male mice by fixing the proximal tail by a clip connected to the top of the animal's cage for 3 weeks. Axonal excitability studies were performed by stimulating the sciatic nerve at the ankle and recording the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) from the foot. The amplitudes of the motor responses of the unloading group were 51% of the control amplitudes [2.2 ± 1.3 mV (HLU) vs. 4.3 ± 1.2 mV (Control), P = 0.03]. Multiple axonal excitability analysis showed that the unloading group had a smaller strength-duration time constant (SDTC) and late subexcitability (recovery cycle) than the controls [0.075 ± 0.01 (HLU) vs. 0.12 ± 0.01 (Control), P < 0.01; 5.4 ± 1.0 (HLU) vs. 10.0 ± 1.3 % (Control), P = 0.01, respectively]. Three weeks after releasing from HLU, the SDTC became comparable to the control range. Using a modeling study, the observed differences in the waveforms could be explained by reduced persistent Na(+) currents along with parameters related to current leakage. Quantification of RNA of a SCA1A gene coding a voltage-gated Na(+) channel tended to be decreased in the sciatic nerve in HLU. The present study suggested that axonal ion currents are altered in vivo by HLU. It is still undetermined whether the dysfunctional axonal ion currents have any pathogenicity on neuromuscular atrophy or are the results of neural plasticity by atrophy. PMID:26909041

  15. Influences of olfactory ensheathing cells transplantation on axonal regeneration in spinal cord of adult rats

    沈慧勇; 唐勇; 吴燕峰; 陈燕涛; 程志安

    2002-01-01

    To observe whether olfactory ensheathing cells could be used to promote axonal regeneration in a spontaneously nonregenerating system. Methods: After laminectomy at the lower thoracic level, the spinal cords of adult rats were exposed and completely transected at T10. A suspension of ensheathing cells was injected into the lesion site in 12 adult rats, and control D/F-12 (1∶1 mixture of DMEM and Hams F-12) was injected in 12 adult rats. Six weeks and ten weeks after cell transplantation, the rats were evaluated by climbing test and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) monitoring. The samples were procured and studied with histologicl and immunohistochemical methods. Results: At the 6th week after cell transplantation, all the rats in both the transplanted and control groups were paraplegic and the MEPs could not be recorded. At the 10th week after cell transplantation, of 7 rats in the control group, 2 rats had muscles contraction of the lower extremities, 2 rats had hips and/or knees active movement; and 5 rats MEPs could be recorded in the hind limbs in the transplanted group (n=7). None of the rats in the control group had functional improvement and no MEPs recorded (n=7). Numerous regenerating axons were observed through the transplantation and continued to regenerate into the denervated host tract. Cell labelling using anti-Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) and anti-Nerve Growth Factor Receptor (anti-NGFR) indicated that the regenerated axons were derived from the appropriate neuronal source and that donor cells migrated into the denervated host tract. But axonal degeneration existed and regenerating axons were not observed within the spinal cords of the adult rats with only D/F-12 injection. Conclusions: The axonal regeneration in the transected adult rat spinal cord is possible after ensheathing cells transplantation.

  16. Peripheral Nerve Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Assessment of Axon and Myelin Sheath Integrity.

    A Heckel

    Full Text Available To investigate the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI parameters as in-vivo biomarkers of axon and myelin sheath integrity of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel as validated by correlation with electrophysiology.MRI examinations at 3T including DTI were conducted on wrists in 30 healthy subjects. After manual segmentation of the median nerve quantitative analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA as well as axial, radial and mean diffusivity (AD, RD, and MD was carried out. Pairwise Pearson correlations with electrophysiological parameters comprising sensory nerve action potential (SNAP and compound muscle action potential (CMAP as markers of axon integrity, and distal motor latency (dml and sensory nerve conduction velocity (sNCV as markers of myelin sheath integrity were computed. The significance criterion was set at P=0.05, Bonferroni corrected for multiple comparisons.DTI parameters showed a distinct proximal-to-distal profile with FA, MD, and RD extrema coinciding in the center of the carpal tunnel. AD correlated with CMAP (r=0.50, p=0.04, Bonf. corr. but not with markers of myelin sheath integrity. RD correlated with sNCV (r=-0.53, p=0.02, Bonf. corr. but not with markers of axon integrity. FA correlated with dml (r=-0.63, p=0.002, Bonf. corr. and sNCV (r=0.68, p=0.001, Bonf. corr. but not with markers of axon integrity.AD reflects axon integrity, while RD (and FA reflect myelin sheath integrity as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. DTI parameters consistently indicate a slight decrease of structural integrity in the carpal tunnel as a physiological site of median nerve entrapment. DTI is particularly sensitive, since these findings are observed in healthy participants. Our results encourage future studies to evaluate the potential of DTI in differentiating axon from myelin sheath injury in patients with manifest peripheral neuropathies.

  17. Peripheral glia have a pivotal role in the initial response to axon degeneration of peripheral sensory neurons in zebrafish.

    Pope, Holly M; Voigt, Mark M

    2014-01-01

    Axon degeneration is a feature of many peripheral neuropathies. Understanding the organismal response to this degeneration may aid in identifying new therapeutic targets for treatment. Using a transgenic zebrafish line expressing a bacterial nitroreductase (Ntr)/mCherry fusion protein in the peripheral sensory neurons of the V, VII, IX, and X cranial nerves, we were able to induce and visualize the pathology of axon degeneration in vivo. Exposure of 4 days post fertilization Ntr larvae to the prodrug metronidazole (Met), which Ntr metabolizes into cytotoxic metabolites, resulted in dose-dependent cell death and axon degeneration. This was limited to the Ntr-expressing sensory neurons, as neighboring glia and motor axons were unaffected. Cell death was rapid, becoming apparent 3-4 hours after Met treatment, and was followed by phagocytosis of soma and axon debris by cells within the nerves and ganglia beginning at 4-5 hours of exposure. Although neutrophils appear to be activated in response to the degenerating neurons, they did not accumulate at the sites of degeneration. In contrast, macrophages were found to be attracted to the sites of the degenerating axons, where they phagocytosed debris. We demonstrated that peripheral glia are critical for both the phagocytosis and inflammatory response to degenerating neurons: mutants that lack all peripheral glia (foxD3-/-; Ntr) exhibit a much reduced reaction to axonal degeneration, resulting in a dramatic decrease in the clearance of debris, and impaired macrophage recruitment. Overall, these results show that this zebrafish model of peripheral sensory axon degeneration exhibits many aspects common to peripheral neuropathies and that peripheral glia play an important role in the initial response to this process. PMID:25058656

  18. Peripheral glia have a pivotal role in the initial response to axon degeneration of peripheral sensory neurons in zebrafish.

    Holly M Pope

    Full Text Available Axon degeneration is a feature of many peripheral neuropathies. Understanding the organismal response to this degeneration may aid in identifying new therapeutic targets for treatment. Using a transgenic zebrafish line expressing a bacterial nitroreductase (Ntr/mCherry fusion protein in the peripheral sensory neurons of the V, VII, IX, and X cranial nerves, we were able to induce and visualize the pathology of axon degeneration in vivo. Exposure of 4 days post fertilization Ntr larvae to the prodrug metronidazole (Met, which Ntr metabolizes into cytotoxic metabolites, resulted in dose-dependent cell death and axon degeneration. This was limited to the Ntr-expressing sensory neurons, as neighboring glia and motor axons were unaffected. Cell death was rapid, becoming apparent 3-4 hours after Met treatment, and was followed by phagocytosis of soma and axon debris by cells within the nerves and ganglia beginning at 4-5 hours of exposure. Although neutrophils appear to be activated in response to the degenerating neurons, they did not accumulate at the sites of degeneration. In contrast, macrophages were found to be attracted to the sites of the degenerating axons, where they phagocytosed debris. We demonstrated that peripheral glia are critical for both the phagocytosis and inflammatory response to degenerating neurons: mutants that lack all peripheral glia (foxD3-/-; Ntr exhibit a much reduced reaction to axonal degeneration, resulting in a dramatic decrease in the clearance of debris, and impaired macrophage recruitment. Overall, these results show that this zebrafish model of peripheral sensory axon degeneration exhibits many aspects common to peripheral neuropathies and that peripheral glia play an important role in the initial response to this process.

  19. Protein phosphorylation: Localization in regenerating optic axons

    A number of axonal proteins display changes in phosphorylation during goldfish optic nerve regeneration. (1) To determine whether the phosphorylation of these proteins was closely linked to their synthesis in the retinal ganglion cell body, cycloheximide was injected intraocularly into goldfish whose optic nerves had been regenerating for 3 weeks. Cycloheximide reduced the incorporation of [3H]proline and 32P orthophosphate into total nerve protein by 84% and 46%, respectively. Of the 20 individual proteins examined, 17 contained less than 15% of the [3H]proline label measured in corresponding controls, whereas 18 proteins contained 50% or more of the 32P label, suggesting that phosphorylation was largely independent of synthesis. (2) To determine whether the proteins were phosphorylated in the ganglion cell axons, axonal transport of proteins was blocked by intraocular injection of vincristine. Vincristine reduced [3H]proline labeling of total protein by 88% and 32P labeling by 49%. Among the individual proteins [3H]proline labeling was reduced by 90% or more in 18 cases but 32P labeling was reduced only by 50% or less. (3) When 32P was injected into the cranial cavity near the ends of the optic axons, all of the phosphoproteins were labeled more intensely in the optic tract than in the optic nerve. These results suggest that most of the major phosphoproteins that undergo changes in phosphorylation in the course of regeneration are phosphorylated in the optic axons

  20. How Schwann Cells Sort Axons: New Concepts.

    Feltri, M Laura; Poitelon, Yannick; Previtali, Stefano Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral nerves contain large myelinated and small unmyelinated (Remak) fibers that perform different functions. The choice to myelinate or not is dictated to Schwann cells by the axon itself, based on the amount of neuregulin I-type III exposed on its membrane. Peripheral axons are more important in determining the final myelination fate than central axons, and the implications for this difference in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes are discussed. Interestingly, this choice is reversible during pathology, accounting for the remarkable plasticity of Schwann cells, and contributing to the regenerative potential of the peripheral nervous system. Radial sorting is the process by which Schwann cells choose larger axons to myelinate during development. This crucial morphogenetic step is a prerequisite for myelination and for differentiation of Remak fibers, and is arrested in human diseases due to mutations in genes coding for extracellular matrix and linkage molecules. In this review we will summarize progresses made in the last years by a flurry of reverse genetic experiments in mice and fish. This work revealed novel molecules that control radial sorting, and contributed unexpected ideas to our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control radial sorting of axons. PMID:25686621

  1. Effects of p-xylene inhalation on axonal transport in the rat retinal ganglion cells

    Although the solvent xylene is suspected of producing nervous system dysfunction in animals and humans, little is known regarding the neurochemical consequences of xylene inhalation. The intent of this study was to determine the effect of intermittent, acute, and subchronic p-xylene exposure on the axonal transport of proteins and glycoproteins within the rat retinofugal tract. A number of different exposure regimens were tested ranging from 50 ppm for a single 6-hr exposure to 1600 ppm 6 hr/day, 5 days/week, for a total of 8 exposure days. Immediately following removal from the inhalation chambers rats were injected intraocularly with [35S]methionine and [3H]fucose (to label retinal proteins and glycoproteins, respectively) and the axonal transport of labeled macromolecules to axons (optic nerve and optic tract) and nerve endings (lateral geniculate body and superior colliculus) was examined 20 hr after precursor injection. Only relatively severe exposure regimens (i.e., 800 or 1600 ppm 6 hr/day, 5 days/week, for 1.5 weeks) produced significant reductions in axonal transport; there was a moderate reduction in the axonal transport of 35S-labeled proteins in the 800-ppm-treated group which was more widespread in the 1600 ppm-treated group. Transport of 3H-labeled glycoproteins was less affected. Assessment of retinal metabolism immediately after isotope injection indicated that the rate of precursor uptake was not reduced in either treatment group. Furthermore, rapid transport was still substantially reduced in animals exposed to 1600 ppm p-xylene and allowed a 13-day withdrawal period. These data indicate that p-xylene inhalation decreases rapid axonal transport supplied to the projections of the rat retinal ganglion cells immediately after cessation of inhalation exposure and that this decreased transport is still apparent 13 days after the last exposure

  2. Calpain activity promotes the sealing of severed giant axons

    Godell, Christopher M.; Smyers, Mark E.; Eddleman, Christopher S.; Ballinger, Martis L.; Fishman, Harvey M.; Bittner, George D.

    1997-01-01

    A barrier (seal) must form at the cut ends of a severed axon if a neuron is to survive and eventually regenerate. Following severance of crayfish medial giant axons in physiological saline, vesicles accumulate at the cut end and form a barrier (seal) to ion and dye diffusion. In contrast, squid giant axons do not seal, even though injury-induced vesicles form after axonal transection and accumulate at cut axonal ends. Neither axon seals in Ca2+-free salines. The addition of calpain to the bat...

  3. Short Stop provides an essential link between F-actin and microtubules during axon extension.

    Lee, Seungbok; Kolodziej, Peter A

    2002-03-01

    Coordination of F-actin and microtubule dynamics is important for cellular motility and morphogenesis, but little is known about underlying mechanisms. short stop (shot) encodes an evolutionarily conserved, neuronally expressed family of rod-like proteins required for sensory and motor axon extension in Drosophila melanogaster. We identify Shot isoforms that contain N-terminal F-actin and C-terminal microtubule-binding domains, and that crosslink F-actin and microtubules in cultured cells. The F-actin- and microtubule-binding domains of Shot are required in the same molecule for axon extension, though the length of the connecting rod domain can be dramatically reduced without affecting activity. Shot therefore functions as a cytoskeletal crosslinker in axon extension, rather than mediating independent interactions with F-actin and microtubules. A Ca(2+)-binding motif located adjacent to the microtubule-binding domain is also required for axon extension, suggesting that intracellular Ca(2+) release may regulate Shot activity. These results suggest that Shot coordinates regulated interactions between F-actin and microtubules that are crucial for neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:11874915

  4. Changes in the axonal conduction velocity of pyramidal tract neurons in the aged cat.

    Xi, M C; Liu, R H; Engelhardt, J K; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1999-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether age-dependent changes in axonal conduction velocity occur in pyramidal tract neurons. A total of 260 and 254 pyramidal tract neurons were recorded extracellularly in the motor cortex of adult control and aged cats, respectively. These cells were activated antidromically by electrical stimulation of the medullary pyramidal tract. Fast- and slow-conducting neurons were identified according to their axonal conduction velocity in both control and aged cats. While 51% of pyramidal tract neurons recorded in the control cats were fast conducting (conduction velocity greater than 20 m/s), only 26% of pyramidal tract neurons in the aged cats were fast conducting. There was a 43% decrease in the median conduction velocity for the entire population of pyramidal tract neurons in aged cats when compared with that of pyramidal tract neurons in the control cats (P cats. However, the regression slope was significantly reduced in aged cats. This reduction was due to the appearance of a group of pyramidal tract neurons with relatively shorter spike durations but slower axonal conduction velocities in the aged cat. Sample intracellular data confirmed the above results. These observations form the basis for the following conclusions: (i) there is a decrease in median conduction velocity of pyramidal tract neurons in aged cats; (ii) the reduction in the axonal conduction velocity of pyramidal tract neurons in aged cats is due, in part, to fibers that previously belonged to the fast-conducting group and now conduct at slower velocity. PMID:10392844

  5. Molecular Motor Proteins and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Manal Farg

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons in the brain, brainstem and spinal cord, which is characterized by motor dysfunction, muscle dystrophy and progressive paralysis. Both inherited and sporadic forms of ALS share common pathological features, however, the initial trigger of neurodegeneration remains unknown. Motor neurons are uniquely targeted by ubiquitously expressed proteins in ALS but the reason for this selectively vulnerability is unclear. However motor neurons have unique characteristics such as very long axons, large cell bodies and high energetic metabolism, therefore placing high demands on cellular transport processes. Defects in cellular trafficking are now widely reported in ALS, including dysfunction to the molecular motors dynein and kinesin. Abnormalities to dynein in particular are linked to ALS, and defects in dynein-mediated axonal transport processes have been reported as one of the earliest pathologies in transgenic SOD1 mice. Furthermore, dynein is very highly expressed in neurons and neurons are particularly sensitive to dynein dysfunction. Hence, unravelling cellular transport processes mediated by molecular motor proteins may help shed light on motor neuron loss in ALS.

  6. Microfluidic device for unidirectional axon growth

    Malishev, E.; Pimashkin, A.; Gladkov, A.; Pigareva, Y.; Bukatin, A.; Kazantsev, V.; Mukhina, I.; Dubina, M.

    2015-11-01

    In order to better understand the communication and connectivity development of neuron networks, we designed microfluidic devices with several chambers for growing dissociated neuronal cultures from mice fetal hippocampus (E18). The chambers were connected with microchannels providing unidirectional axonal growth between “Source” and “Target” neural sub-networks. Experiments were performed in a hippocampal cultures plated in a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip, aligned with a 60 microelectrode array (MEA). Axonal growth through microchannels was observed with brightfield, phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, and after 7 days in vitro electrical activity was recorded. Visual inspection and spike propagation analysis showed the predominant axonal growth in microchannels in a direction from “Source” to “Target”.

  7. Diverse modes of axon elaboration in the developing neocortex.

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of axonal arbors is a critical step in the establishment of precise neural circuits, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms of axonal elaboration in the neocortex. We used in vivo two-photon time-lapse microscopy to image axons in the neocortex of green fluorescent protein-transgenic mice over the first 3 wk of postnatal development. This period spans the elaboration of thalamocortical (TC and Cajal-Retzius (CR axons and cortical synaptogenesis. Layer 1 collaterals of TC and CR axons were imaged repeatedly over time scales ranging from minutes up to days, and their growth and pruning were analyzed. The structure and dynamics of TC and CR axons differed profoundly. Branches of TC axons terminated in small, bulbous growth cones, while CR axon branch tips had large growth cones with numerous long filopodia. TC axons grew rapidly in straight paths, with frequent interstitial branch additions, while CR axons grew more slowly along tortuous paths. For both types of axon, new branches appeared at interstitial sites along the axon shaft and did not involve growth cone splitting. Pruning occurred via retraction of small axon branches (tens of microns, at both CR and TC axons or degeneration of large portions of the arbor (hundreds of microns, for TC axons only. The balance between growth and retraction favored overall growth, but only by a slight margin. Given the identical layer 1 territory upon which CR and TC axons grow, the differences in their structure and dynamics likely reflect distinct intrinsic growth programs for axons of long projection neurons versus local interneurons.

  8. Automated Axon Counting in Rodent Optic Nerve Sections with AxonJ

    Zarei, Kasra; Scheetz, Todd E.; Christopher, Mark; Miller, Kathy; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Tandon, Anamika; Anderson, Michael G.; Fingert, John H.; Abràmoff, Michael David

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a publicly available tool, AxonJ, which quantifies the axons in optic nerve sections of rodents stained with paraphenylenediamine (PPD). In this study, we compare AxonJ’s performance to human experts on 100x and 40x images of optic nerve sections obtained from multiple strains of mice, including mice with defects relevant to glaucoma. AxonJ produced reliable axon counts with high sensitivity of 0.959 and high precision of 0.907, high repeatability of 0.95 when compared to a gold-standard of manual assessments and high correlation of 0.882 to the glaucoma damage staging of a previously published dataset. AxonJ allows analyses that are quantitative, consistent, fully-automated, parameter-free, and rapid on whole optic nerve sections at 40x. As a freely available ImageJ plugin that requires no highly specialized equipment to utilize, AxonJ represents a powerful new community resource augmenting studies of the optic nerve using mice. PMID:27226405

  9. Serotonin Promotes Development and Regeneration of Spinal Motor Neurons in Zebrafish

    Antón Barreiro-Iglesias

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to mammals, zebrafish regenerate spinal motor neurons. During regeneration, developmental signals are re-deployed. Here, we show that, during development, diffuse serotonin promotes spinal motor neuron generation from pMN progenitor cells, leaving interneuron numbers unchanged. Pharmacological manipulations and receptor knockdown indicate that serotonin acts at least in part via 5-HT1A receptors. In adults, serotonin is supplied to the spinal cord mainly (90% by descending axons from the brain. After a spinal lesion, serotonergic axons degenerate caudal to the lesion but sprout rostral to it. Toxin-mediated ablation of serotonergic axons also rostral to the lesion impaired regeneration of motor neurons only there. Conversely, intraperitoneal serotonin injections doubled numbers of new motor neurons and proliferating pMN-like progenitors caudal to the lesion. Regeneration of spinal-intrinsic serotonergic interneurons was unaltered by these manipulations. Hence, serotonin selectively promotes the development and adult regeneration of motor neurons in zebrafish.

  10. Human CFEOM1 mutations attenuate KIF21A autoinhibition and cause oculomotor axon stalling.

    Cheng, Long; Desai, Jigar; Miranda, Carlos J; Duncan, Jeremy S; Qiu, Weihong; Nugent, Alicia A; Kolpak, Adrianne L; Wu, Carrie C; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Delisle, Michelle M; Chan, Wai-Man; Wei, Yan; Propst, Friedrich; Reck-Peterson, Samara L; Fritzsch, Bernd; Engle, Elizabeth C

    2014-04-16

    The ocular motility disorder "Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles type 1" (CFEOM1) results from heterozygous mutations altering the motor and third coiled-coil stalk of the anterograde kinesin, KIF21A. We demonstrate that Kif21a knockin mice harboring the most common human mutation develop CFEOM. The developing axons of the oculomotor nerve's superior division stall in the proximal nerve; the growth cones enlarge, extend excessive filopodia, and assume random trajectories. Inferior division axons reach the orbit but branch ectopically. We establish a gain-of-function mechanism and find that human motor or stalk mutations attenuate Kif21a autoinhibition, providing in vivo evidence for mammalian kinesin autoregulation. We identify Map1b as a Kif21a-interacting protein and report that Map1b⁻/⁻ mice develop CFEOM. The interaction between Kif21a and Map1b is likely to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of CFEOM1 and highlights a selective vulnerability of the developing oculomotor nerve to perturbations of the axon cytoskeleton. PMID:24656932

  11. Lower motor neuron findings after upper motor neuron injury: Insights from postoperative supplementary motor area syndrome

    Jeffrey E Florman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertonia and hypereflexia are classically described responses to upper motor neuron injury. However, acute hypotonia and areflexia with motor deficit are hallmark findings after many central nervous system insults such as acute stroke and spinal shock. Historic theories to explain these contradictory findings have implicated a number of potential mechanisms mostly relying on the loss of descending corticospinal input as the underlying etiology. Unfortunately, these simple descriptions consistently fail to adequately explain the pathophysiology and connectivity leading to acute hyporeflexia and delayed hypereflexia that result from such insult. This article highlights the common observation of acute hyporeflexia after central nervous system insults and explores the underlying anatomy and physiology. Further, evidence for the underlying connectivity is presented and implicates the dominant role of supraspinal inhibitory influence originating in the supplementary motor area descending through the corticospinal tracts. Unlike traditional explanations, this theory more adequately explains the findings of postoperative supplementary motor area syndrome in which hyporeflexive motor deficit is observed acutely in the face of intact primary motor cortex connections to the spinal cord. Further, the proposed connectivity can be generalized to help explain other insults including stroke, atonic seizures, and spinal shock.

  12. Dimethyl Fumarate Ameliorates Lewis Rat Experimental Autoimmune Neuritis and Mediates Axonal Protection.

    Kalliopi Pitarokoili

    Full Text Available Dimethyl fumarate is an immunomodulatory and neuroprotective drug, approved recently for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. In view of the limited therapeutic options for human acute and chronic polyneuritis, we used the animal model of experimental autoimmune neuritis in the Lewis rat to study the effects of dimethyl fumarate on autoimmune inflammation and neuroprotection in the peripheral nervous system.Experimental autoimmune neuritis was induced by immunization with the neuritogenic peptide (amino acids 53-78 of P2 myelin protein. Preventive treatment with dimethyl fumarate given at 45 mg/kg twice daily by oral gavage significantly ameliorated clinical neuritis by reducing demyelination and axonal degeneration in the nerve conduction studies. Histology revealed a significantly lower degree of inflammatory infiltrates in the sciatic nerves. In addition, we detected a reduction of early signs of axonal degeneration through a reduction of amyloid precursor protein expressed in axons of the peripheral nerves. This reduction correlated with an increase of nuclear factor (erythroid derived 2-related factor 2 positive axons, supporting the neuroprotective potential of dimethyl fumarate. Furthermore, nuclear factor (erythroid derived 2-related factor 2 expression in Schwann cells was only rarely detected and there was no increase of Schwann cells death during EAN.We conclude that immunomodulatory and neuroprotective dimethyl fumarate may represent an innovative therapeutic option in human autoimmune neuropathies.

  13. Functions of axon guidance molecules in synapse formation

    Chen, Shih-Yu; Cheng, Hwai-Jong

    2009-01-01

    Axon guidance and synapse formation are important developmental events for establishing a functional neuronal circuitry. These two related cellular processes occur in a coordinated fashion but previous studies from multiple model organisms seemed to suggest that axon guidance and synapse formation are mediated by distinct molecular cues. Thus, axon guidance molecules are responsible for guiding the navigating axon toward its target area, while other adhesion or ligand-receptor molecules speci...

  14. Peripheral nerve: from the microscopic functional unit of the axon to the biomechanically loaded macroscopic structure.

    Topp, Kimberly S; Boyd, Benjamin S

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral nerves are composed of motor and sensory axons, associated ensheathing Schwann cells, and organized layers of connective tissues that are in continuity with the tissues of the central nervous system. Nerve fiber anatomy facilitates conduction of electrical impulses to convey information over a distance, and the length of these polarized cells necessitates regulated axonal transport of organelles and structural proteins for normal cell function. Nerve connective tissues serve a protective function as the limb is subjected to the stresses of myriad limb positions and postures. Thus, the tissues are uniquely arranged to control the local nerve fiber environment and modulate physical stresses. In this brief review, we describe the microscopic anatomy and physiology of peripheral nerve and the biomechanical properties that enable nerve to withstand the physical stresses of everyday life. PMID:22133662

  15. Morphometry of Axons in Optic Nerves of Siamese's Twins

    Xinzu Gu; Zhenping Zhang; Qi Lin; Jiongji Liang; Wenyu Lu; Xiulan Ye; A A Sadun

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To observe the development of optic nerve, we examined four optic nerves from Siameses Twins by absolute counts of axons.Methods: Mean axon diameter, mean axon density, totally axonal population and optic nerve area were noted for each optic nerve. The mean axon diameter and the mean axon density were compared between paraxial (inner sectors)and cortical (outer sectors)areas of the nerves.Results: More myelinated axons were seen in the inner sectors as compared to the outer sectors(average 11 axons/1 000 μm2 in inner sectors and 34 axons/l 000 μm2 in outer sectors( P=0. 036) . The myelinated fibers were also smaller(63 microns) in the outer sectors as compared to the inner sectors(72 microns) ( P = 0. 001 ). The average cross sectors area for the four 40 week stage optical nerves of Siamese Twins was 3.32 × 103 as compared to 1 million axons for 32-week-old normals.Conclusion: Our finding of fewer axonal number and small myelinated fibers in the Siamese Twins suggests hypoplasia. Myelination was more abnormal in the paraxial optic nerve than that in the peripheral sectors, suggesting anomalous development of optic nerve peripherally and delayed developnent centrally. Axonal density is higher in inner sectors than that in outer sectors, suggesting delayed development of the outer nerve sector.

  16. Electrokinetic confinement of axonal growth for dynamically configurable neural networks.

    Honegger, Thibault; Scott, Mark A; Yanik, Mehmet F; Voldman, Joel

    2013-02-21

    Axons in the developing nervous system are directed via guidance cues, whose expression varies both spatially and temporally, to create functional neural circuits. Existing methods to create patterns of neural connectivity in vitro use only static geometries, and are unable to dynamically alter the guidance cues imparted on the cells. We introduce the use of AC electrokinetics to dynamically control axonal growth in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. We find that the application of modest voltages at frequencies on the order of 10(5) Hz can cause developing axons to be stopped adjacent to the electrodes while axons away from the electric fields exhibit uninhibited growth. By switching electrodes on or off, we can reversibly inhibit or permit axon passage across the electrodes. Our models suggest that dielectrophoresis is the causative AC electrokinetic effect. We make use of our dynamic control over axon elongation to create an axon-diode via an axon-lock system that consists of a pair of electrode 'gates' that either permit or prevent axons from passing through. Finally, we developed a neural circuit consisting of three populations of neurons, separated by three axon-locks to demonstrate the assembly of a functional, engineered neural network. Action potential recordings demonstrate that the AC electrokinetic effect does not harm axons, and Ca(2+) imaging demonstrated the unidirectional nature of the synaptic connections. AC electrokinetic confinement of axonal growth has potential for creating configurable, directional neural networks. PMID:23314575

  17. Spatial temperature gradients guide axonal outgrowth

    Black, Bryan; Vishwakarma, Vivek; Dhakal, Kamal; Bhattarai, Samik; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Jain, Ankur; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2016-07-01

    Formation of neural networks during development and regeneration after injury depends on accuracy of axonal pathfinding, which is primarily believed to be influenced by chemical cues. Recently, there is growing evidence that physical cues can play crucial role in axonal guidance. However, detailed mechanism involved in such guidance cues is lacking. By using weakly-focused near-infrared continuous wave (CW) laser microbeam in the path of an advancing axon, we discovered that the beam acts as a repulsive guidance cue. Here, we report that this highly-effective at-a-distance guidance is the result of a temperature field produced by the near-infrared laser light absorption. Since light absorption by extracellular medium increases when the laser wavelength was red shifted, the threshold laser power for reliable guidance was significantly lower in the near-infrared as compared to the visible spectrum. The spatial temperature gradient caused by the near-infrared laser beam at-a-distance was found to activate temperature-sensitive membrane receptors, resulting in an influx of calcium. The repulsive guidance effect was significantly reduced when extracellular calcium was depleted or in the presence of TRPV1-antagonist. Further, direct heating using micro-heater confirmed that the axonal guidance is caused by shallow temperature-gradient, eliminating the role of any non-photothermal effects.

  18. Early cellular signaling responses to axonal injury

    Wang Ai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have used optic nerve injury as a model to study early signaling events in neuronal tissue following axonal injury. Optic nerve injury results in the selective death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. The time course of cell death takes place over a period of days with the earliest detection of RGC death at about 48 hr post injury. We hypothesized that in the period immediately following axonal injury, there are changes in the soma that signal surrounding glia and neurons and that start programmed cell death. In the current study, we investigated early changes in cellular signaling and gene expression that occur within the first 6 hrs post optic nerve injury. Results We found evidence of cell to cell signaling within 30 min of axonal injury. We detected differences in phosphoproteins and gene expression within the 6 hrs time period. Activation of TNFα and glutamate receptors, two pathways that can initiate cell death, begins in RGCs within 6 hrs following axonal injury. Differential gene expression at 6 hrs post injury included genes involved in cytokine, neurotrophic factor signaling (Socs3 and apoptosis (Bax. Conclusion We interpret our studies to indicate that both neurons and glia in the retina have been signaled within 30 min after optic nerve injury. The signals are probably initiated by the RGC soma. In addition, signals activating cellular death pathways occur within 6 hrs of injury, which likely lead to RGC degeneration.

  19. Chronic intermittent ethanol induced axon and myelin degeneration is attenuated by calpain inhibition.

    Samantaray, Supriti; Knaryan, Varduhi H; Patel, Kaushal S; Mulholland, Patrick J; Becker, Howard C; Banik, Naren L

    2015-10-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption causes multifaceted damage to the central nervous system (CNS), underlying mechanisms of which are gradually being unraveled. In our previous studies, activation of calpain, a calcium-activated neutral protease has been found to cause detrimental alterations in spinal motor neurons following ethanol (EtOH) exposure in vitro. However, it is not known whether calpain plays a pivotal role in chronic EtOH exposure-induced structural damage to CNS in vivo. To test the possible involvement of calpain in EtOH-associated neurodegenerative mechanisms the present investigation was conducted in a well-established mouse model of alcohol dependence - chronic intermittent EtOH (CIE) exposure and withdrawal. Our studies indicated significant loss of axonal proteins (neurofilament light and heavy, 50-60%), myelin proteins (myelin basic protein, 20-40% proteolipid protein, 25%) and enzyme (2', 3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, 21-55%) following CIE in multiple regions of brain including hippocampus, corpus callosum, cerebellum, and importantly in spinal cord. These CIE-induced deleterious effects escalated after withdrawal in each CNS region tested. Increased expression and activity of calpain along with enhanced ratio of active calpain to calpastatin (sole endogenous inhibitor) was observed after withdrawal compared to EtOH exposure. Pharmacological inhibition of calpain with calpeptin (25 μg/kg) prior to each EtOH vapor inhalation significantly attenuated damage to axons and myelin as demonstrated by immuno-profiles of axonal and myelin proteins, and Luxol Fast Blue staining. Calpain inhibition significantly protected the ultrastructural integrity of axons and myelin compared to control as confirmed by electron microscopy. Together, these findings confirm CIE exposure and withdrawal induced structural alterations in axons and myelin, predominantly after withdrawal and corroborate calpain inhibition as a potential protective strategy against

  20. Increased Cx32 expression in spinal cord TrkB oligodendrocytes following peripheral axon injury.

    Coulibaly, Aminata P; Isaacson, Lori G

    2016-08-01

    Following injury to motor axons in the periphery, retrograde influences from the injury site lead to glial cell plasticity in the vicinity of the injured neurons. Following the transection of peripherally located preganglionic axons of the cervical sympathetic trunk (CST), a population of oligodendrocyte (OL) lineage cells expressing full length TrkB, the cognate receptor for brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is significantly increased in number in the spinal cord. Such robust plasticity in OL lineage cells in the spinal cord following peripheral axon transection led to the hypothesis that the gap junction communication protein connexin 32 (Cx32), which is specific to OL lineage cells, was influenced by the injury. Following CST transection, Cx32 expression in the spinal cord intermediolateral cell column (IML), the location of the parent cell bodies, was significantly increased. The increased Cx32 expression was localized specifically to TrkB OLs in the IML, rather than other cell types in the OL cell lineage, with the population of Cx32/TrkB cells increased by 59%. Cx32 expression in association with OPCs was significantly decreased at one week following the injury. The results of this study provide evidence that peripheral axon injury can differentially affect the gap junction protein expression in OL lineage cells in the adult rat spinal cord. We conclude that the retrograde influences originating from the peripheral injury site elicit dramatic changes in the CNS expression of Cx32, which in turn may mediate the plasticity of OL lineage cells observed in the spinal cord following peripheral axon injury. PMID:27246301

  1. Cutaneous collateral axonal sprouting re-innervates the skin component and restores sensation of denervated Swine osteomyocutaneous alloflaps.

    Zuhaib Ibrahim

    Full Text Available Reconstructive transplantation such as extremity and face transplantation is a viable treatment option for select patients with devastating tissue loss. Sensorimotor recovery is a critical determinant of overall success of such transplants. Although motor function recovery has been extensively studied, mechanisms of sensory re-innervation are not well established. Recent clinical reports of face transplants confirm progressive sensory improvement even in cases where optimal repair of sensory nerves was not achieved. Two forms of sensory nerve regeneration are known. In regenerative sprouting, axonal outgrowth occurs from the transected nerve stump while in collateral sprouting, reinnervation of denervated tissue occurs through growth of uninjured axons into the denervated tissue. The latter mechanism may be more important in settings where transected sensory nerves cannot be re-apposed. In this study, denervated osteomyocutaneous alloflaps (hind- limb transplants from Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC-defined MGH miniature swine were performed to specifically evaluate collateral axonal sprouting for cutaneous sensory re-innervation. The skin component of the flap was externalized and serial skin sections extending from native skin to the grafted flap were biopsied. In order to visualize regenerating axonal structures in the dermis and epidermis, 50 um frozen sections were immunostained against axonal and Schwann cell markers. In all alloflaps, collateral axonal sprouts from adjacent recipient skin extended into the denervated skin component along the dermal-epidermal junction from the periphery towards the center. On day 100 post-transplant, regenerating sprouts reached 0.5 cm into the flap centripetally. Eight months following transplant, epidermal fibers were visualized 1.5 cm from the margin (rate of regeneration 0.06 mm per day. All animals had pinprick sensation in the periphery of the transplanted skin within 3 months post

  2. Alteration of neural action potential patterns by axonal stimulation: the importance of stimulus location

    Crago, Patrick E.; Makowski, Nathaniel S.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Stimulation of peripheral nerves is often superimposed on ongoing motor and sensory activity in the same axons, without a quantitative model of the net action potential train at the axon endpoint. Approach. We develop a model of action potential patterns elicited by superimposing constant frequency axonal stimulation on the action potentials arriving from a physiologically activated neural source. The model includes interactions due to collision block, resetting of the neural impulse generator, and the refractory period of the axon at the point of stimulation. Main results. Both the mean endpoint firing rate and the probability distribution of the action potential firing periods depend strongly on the relative firing rates of the two sources and the intersite conduction time between them. When the stimulus rate exceeds the neural rate, neural action potentials do not reach the endpoint and the rate of endpoint action potentials is the same as the stimulus rate, regardless of the intersite conduction time. However, when the stimulus rate is less than the neural rate, and the intersite conduction time is short, the two rates partially sum. Increases in stimulus rate produce non-monotonic increases in endpoint rate and continuously increasing block of neurally generated action potentials. Rate summation is reduced and more neural action potentials are blocked as the intersite conduction time increases. At long intersite conduction times, the endpoint rate simplifies to being the maximum of either the neural or the stimulus rate. Significance. This study highlights the potential of increasing the endpoint action potential rate and preserving neural information transmission by low rate stimulation with short intersite conduction times. Intersite conduction times can be decreased with proximal stimulation sites for muscles and distal stimulation sites for sensory endings. The model provides a basis for optimizing experiments and designing neuroprosthetic

  3. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Retrograde Motoneuronal Axonal Transport in an SBMA Mouse Model

    Halievski, Katherine; Kemp, Michael Q.; Breedlove, S. Marc; Miller, Kyle E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Defects in axonal transport are seen in motoneuronal diseases, but how that impairment comes about is not well understood. In spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a disorder linked to a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, the disease-causing AR disrupts axonal transport by acting in both a cell-autonomous fashion in the motoneurons themselves, and in a non-cell-autonomous fashion in muscle. The non-cell-autonomous mechanism is suggested by data from a unique “myogenic” transgenic (TG) mouse model in which an AR transgene expressed exclusively in skeletal muscle fibers triggers an androgen-dependent SBMA phenotype, including defects in retrograde transport. However, motoneurons in this TG model retain the endogenous AR gene, leaving open the possibility that impairments in transport in this model also depend on ARs in the motoneurons themselves. To test whether non-cell-autonomous mechanisms alone can perturb retrograde transport, we generated male TG mice in which the endogenous AR allele has the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) and, consequently, is nonfunctional. Males carrying the Tfm allele alone show no deficits in motor function or axonal transport, with or without testosterone treatment. However, when Tfm males carrying the myogenic transgene (Tfm/TG) are treated with testosterone, they develop impaired motor function and defects in retrograde transport, having fewer retrogradely labeled motoneurons and deficits in endosomal flux based on time-lapse video microscopy of living axons. These findings demonstrate that non-cell-autonomous disease mechanisms originating in muscle are sufficient to induce defects in retrograde transport in motoneurons. PMID:27517091

  4. Patterns of growth, axonal extension and axonal arborization of neuronal lineages in the developing Drosophila brain

    Larsen, Camilla; Shy, Diana; Spindler, Shana R; Fung, Siaumin; Pereanu, Wayne; Younossi -Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila central brain is composed of approximately 100 paired lineages, with most lineages comprising 100–150 neurons. Most lineages have a number of important characteristics in common. Typically, neurons of a lineage stay together as a coherent cluster and project their axons into a coherent bundle visible from late embryo to adult. Neurons born during the embryonic period form the primary axon tracts (PATs) that follow stereotyped pathways in the neuropile. Apoptotic cell death remo...

  5. Analysis of axonal regeneration in the central and peripheral nervous systems of the NG2-deficient mouse

    Lieberman Alexander R

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan NG2 blocks neurite outgrowth in vitro and has been proposed as a major inhibitor of axonal regeneration in the CNS. Although a substantial body of evidence underpins this hypothesis, it is challenged by recent findings including strong expression of NG2 in regenerating peripheral nerve. Results We studied axonal regeneration in the PNS and CNS of genetically engineered mice that do not express NG2, and in sex and age matched wild-type controls. In the CNS, we used anterograde tracing with BDA to study corticospinal tract (CST axons after spinal cord injury and transganglionic labelling with CT-HRP to trace ascending sensory dorsal column (DC axons after DC lesions and a conditioning lesion of the sciatic nerve. Injury to these fibre tracts resulted in no difference between knockout and wild-type mice in the ability of CST axons or DC axons to enter or cross the lesion site. Similarly, after dorsal root injury (with conditioning lesion, most regenerating dorsal root axons failed to grow across the dorsal root entry zone in both transgenic and wild-type mice. Following sciatic nerve injuries, functional recovery was assessed by analysis of the toe-spreading reflex and cutaneous sensitivity to Von Frey hairs. Anatomical correlates of regeneration were assessed by: retrograde labelling of regenerating dorsal root ganglion (DRG cells with DiAsp; immunostaining with PGP 9.5 to visualise sensory reinnervation of plantar hindpaws; electron microscopic analysis of regenerating axons in tibial and digital nerves; and by silver-cholinesterase histochemical study of motor end plate reinnervation. We also examined functional and anatomical correlates of regeneration after injury of the facial nerve by assessing the time taken for whisker movements and corneal reflexes to recover and by retrograde labelling of regenerated axons with Fluorogold and DiAsp. None of the anatomical or functional analyses

  6. White-matter astrocytes, axonal energy metabolism, and axonal degeneration in multiple sclerosis

    Cambron, Melissa; D'Haeseleer, Miguel; Laureys, Guy; Clinckers, Ralph; Debruyne, Jan; De Keyser, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a diffuse axonal degeneration occurring throughout the white matter of the central nervous system causes progressive neurologic disability. The underlying mechanism is unclear. This review describes a number of pathways by which dysfunctional astrocytes in MS might lead to axonal degeneration. White-matter astrocytes in MS show a reduced metabolism of adenosine triphosphate-generating phosphocreatine, which may impair the astrocytic sodium potassium pump and lead to a reduced sodium-dependent glutamate uptake. Astrocytes in MS white matter appear to be deficient in β2 adrenergic receptors, which are involved in stimulating glycogenolysis and suppressing inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2). Glutamate toxicity, reduced astrocytic glycogenolysis leading to reduced lactate and glutamine production, and enhanced nitric oxide (NO) levels may all impair axonal mitochondrial metabolism, leading to axonal degeneration. In addition, glutamate-mediated oligodendrocyte damage and impaired myelination caused by a decreased production of N-acetylaspartate by axonal mitochondria might also contribute to axonal loss. White-matter astrocytes may be considered as a potential target for neuroprotective MS therapies. PMID:22214904

  7. Acrylamide Retards the Slow Axonal Transport of Neurofilaments in Rat Cultured Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons and the Corresponding Mechanisms.

    An, Lihong; Li, Guozhen; Si, Jiliang; Zhang, Cuili; Han, Xiaoying; Wang, Shuo; Jiang, Lulu; Xie, Keqin

    2016-05-01

    Chronic acrylamide (ACR) exposure induces peripheral-central axonopathy in occupational workers and laboratory animals, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we first investigated the effects of ACR on slow axonal transport of neurofilaments in cultured rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons through live-cell imaging approach. Then for the underlying mechanisms exploration, the protein level of neurofilament subunits, motor proteins kinesin and dynein, and dynamitin subunit of dynactin in DRG neurons were assessed by western blotting and the concentrations of ATP was detected using ATP Assay Kit. The results showed that ACR treatment results in a dose-dependent decrease of slow axonal transport of neurofilaments. Furthermore, ACR intoxication significantly increases the protein levels of the three neurofilament subunits (NF-L, NF-M, NF-H), kinesin, dynein, and dynamitin subunit of dynactin in DRG neurons. In addition, ATP level decreased significantly in ACR-treated DRG neurons. Our findings indicate that ACR exposure retards slow axonal transport of NF-M, and suggest that the increase of neurofilament cargoes, motor proteins, dynamitin of dynactin, and the inadequate ATP supply contribute to the ACR-induced retardation of slow axonal transport. PMID:26721510

  8. AxonQuant: A Microfluidic Chamber Culture-Coupled Algorithm That Allows High-Throughput Quantification of Axonal Damage

    Yang Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Published methods for imaging and quantitatively analyzing morphological changes in neuronal axons have serious limitations because of their small sample sizes, and their time-consuming and nonobjective nature. Here we present an improved microfluidic chamber design suitable for fast and high-throughput imaging of neuronal axons. We developed the AxonQuant algorithm, which is suitable for automatic processing of axonal imaging data. This microfluidic chamber-coupled algorithm allows calculation of an ‘axonal continuity index' that quantitatively measures axonal health status in a manner independent of neuronal or axonal density. This method allows quantitative analysis of axonal morphology in an automatic and nonbiased manner. Our method will facilitate large-scale high-throughput screening for genes or therapeutic compounds for neurodegenerative diseases involving axonal damage. When combined with imaging technologies utilizing different gene markers, this method will provide new insights into the mechanistic basis for axon degeneration. Our microfluidic chamber culture-coupled AxonQuant algorithm will be widely useful for studying axonal biology and neurodegenerative disorders. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Mislocalization of neuronal mitochondria reveals regulation of Wallerian degeneration and NMNAT/WLDS-mediated axon protection independent of axonal mitochondria

    Kitay, Brandon M.; McCormack, Ryan; Wang, Yunfang; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Zhai, R. Grace

    2013-01-01

    Axon degeneration is a common and often early feature of neurodegeneration that correlates with the clinical manifestations and progression of neurological disease. Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylytransferase (NMNAT) is a neuroprotective factor that delays axon degeneration following injury and in models of neurodegenerative diseases suggesting a converging molecular pathway of axon self-destruction. The underlying mechanisms have been under intense investigation and recent reports suggest...

  10. Oxidative stress inhibits axonal transport: implications for neurodegenerative diseases

    Fang Cheng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS released by microglia and other inflammatory cells can cause axonal degeneration. A reduction in axonal transport has also been implicated as a cause of axonal dystrophies and neurodegeneration, but there is a paucity of experimental data concerning the effects of ROS on axonal transport. We used live cell imaging to examine the effects of hydrogen peroxide on the axonal transport of mitochondria and Golgi-derived vesicles in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Results Hydrogen peroxide rapidly inhibited axonal transport, hours before any detectable changes in mitochondrial morphology or signs of axonal degeneration. Mitochondrial transport was affected earlier and was more severely inhibited than the transport of Golgi-derived vesicles. Anterograde vesicle transport was more susceptible to peroxide inhibition than retrograde transport. Axonal transport partially recovered following removal of hydrogen peroxide and local application of hydrogen peroxide inhibited transport, suggesting that the effects were not simply a result of nerve cell death. Sodium azide, an ATP synthesis blocker, had similar effects on axonal transport, suggesting that ATP depletion may contribute to the transport inhibition due to hydrogen peroxide. Conclusions These results indicate that inhibition of axonal transport is an early consequence of exposure to ROS and may contribute to subsequent axonal degeneration.