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Sample records for acute minor thoracic

  1. Acute Paraplegia due to Thoracic Hematomyelia

    Celik, Bahattin; Canbek, Ihsan; Karavelioğlu, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intraspinal intramedullary hemorrhage is a rare entity with the acute onset of neurologic symptoms. The etiology of idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia (ISH) is unknown, and there are few published case reports. Hematomyelia is mostly associated with trauma, but the other nontraumatic etiologies are vascular malformations, tumors, bleeding disorders, syphilis, syrinx, and myelitis. MRI is a good choice for early diagnosis. Hematomyelia usually causes acute spinal cord syndrome due to the compression and destruction of the spinal cord. A high-dose steroid treatment and surgical decompression and evacuation of hematoma are the urgent solution methods. We present idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia of a previously healthy 80-year-old male with a sudden onset of back pain and paraplegia.

  2. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    Michael Goodman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13% following blunt injury and 20 (87% after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury.

  3. Massive hematothorax after thoracic spinal manipulation for acute thoracolumbar pain

    Johannes Struewer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal manipulation usually represents a widely used and effective method for physicians in order to relieve acute patient pain and muscular dysbalance. Although life-threatening complications (e.g. pneumothorax, vertebral artery dissection, stroke after manual treatment are reported with regard to actual medical literature millions of patients undergo manual treatment to manage thoracolumbar pain each year. The authors present the case of a 17 year old male patient with a life-threatening hematothorax after thoracic high velocity spinal manipulation for acute thoracolumbar pain. The patient required emergency chest tube thoracostomy and afterwards thoracoscopic haemostasis for an intercostal venous lesion. A massive hematothorax after spinal manipulation represents an extremely rare but life-threatening complication. Physicians are encouraged to promote the benefits of manual/chiropratic therapy on the one hand but on the other hand are obliged to educate about potential serious dangers and adverse events.

  4. Aortography delays surgery of CT proven acute traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta; Case report

    Munoz, A.; Moreno, R.; Martin, V.; Iniguez, A.; Alvarez, J. (Hospital Universitario de San Carlos, Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Radiodiagnostico, Servicio de Cirurgia Vascular, Servicio de Exploracion Cardiopulmonar, and Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos)

    1991-09-01

    A case of acute traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta was diagnosed by dynamic CT. Angiographic confirmation was required, delaying surgical repair and contribution to the fatal outcome. If reliable findings of acute traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta are shown by CT, we question the usefulness of angiographic confirmation in such cases. (orig.).

  5. Stenotic and obstructive lesions in acute dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Shumacker, H B; Isch, J H; Jolly, W W

    1975-05-01

    The present study of 33 operatively treated patients, 88 per cent of whom survived the procedure, is concerned with an important problem associated with acute thoracic aortic dissection, the stenotic and obstructive lesions of the aorta and its branches. Their variety and nature are described, as are the additional operative procedures deemed necessary at the time of the operation, immediately thereafter, or later on. Much has been learned about these difficulties from clinical and autopsy observations and especially from careful arteriographic surveys. They seem to be generally well withstood following resectional and grafting procedures upon the affected segment of the thoracic aorta. Occasionally, additional operative manipulations may be necessary at the same time, for example, interpolation of grafts between the ascending aortic graft and a coronary when the origin of the latter is sheared off by the dissection, and distal arterial manipulations when the patient still has ischemic lower extremities immediately after the primary procedure. Later operations must sometimes be performed because of persistence of complaints such as intermittent claudication. It is extremely rare that immediate reoperation is advisable because of indications of intra-abdominal ischemia. Much more can be learned from careful pre- and postoperative arteriographic study. PMID:1130882

  6. Clinical significance of conventional rib series in patients with minor thoracic trauma

    Background: Conventional rib series (RS) represent a dedicated radiographic technique to visualize the bony parts of the chest wall. The method is commonly used to evaluate minor thoracic trauma, frequently in combination with chest radiographs (CRs). The aim of this study is to asses the clinical relevance of rib fractures diagnosed by RS in minor thoracic trauma. Methods: Retrospective study of 669 patients who received RS for the evaluation of minor thoracic trauma. 405 of the 669 patients received an additional CR. Radiological reports were classified into fracture versus no fracture. Patients were divided into four groups depending on the clinical follow-up. The findings of RS and CR were analyzed using the McNemar test. The statistical significance between the results of the radiographic examinations and the clinical follow-up was analyzed by the Chi-Square test and the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: We included 669 patients (61.4% men, 38.6% women, median age: 51 years, range: 13-92 years). Analyzing the reports of 669 patients who received RS, 157 (23.5%) patients were diagnosed with at least one fractured rib while no fracture was found in 512 (76.5%) patients. Considering the 157 patients with fractured ribs, 73 (46.8%) had a single fracture, 38 (24.4%) and two fractures and 45 (28.8%) had more than two fractures. When assessing the 405 CRs, we detected 69 (17%) fractures while the corresponding RS of the same patients revealed 87 (21.5%) fractures (p < 0.05). Concerning all patients with rib fractures, 63.1% received medical therapy, while 64.5% of those patients without a radiologically documented fracture also received therapy (p = 0.25). Conclusion: Our results suggest a limited clinical value of detected rib fractures based on RS. Despite being superior compared to CR in diagnosing rib fractures, the results from RS seem to have no significant influence on further clinical management and therapeutic measures. Minor thoracic trauma should be evaluated

  7. Clinical significance of conventional rib series in patients with minor thoracic trauma

    Hoffstetter, P.; Dornia, C. [Asklepios Medical Center, Bad Abbach (Germany). Radiology; University Medical Center Regensburg (Germany). Radiology; Wagner, M.; Niessen, C.; Dendl, L.M.; Stroszczynski, C.; Schreyer, A.G. [University Medical Center Regensburg (Germany). Radiology; Al Suwaidi, M.H. [Asklepios Medical Center, Bad Abbach (Germany). Rheumatology/Clinical Immmunology

    2014-09-15

    Background: Conventional rib series (RS) represent a dedicated radiographic technique to visualize the bony parts of the chest wall. The method is commonly used to evaluate minor thoracic trauma, frequently in combination with chest radiographs (CRs). The aim of this study is to asses the clinical relevance of rib fractures diagnosed by RS in minor thoracic trauma. Methods: Retrospective study of 669 patients who received RS for the evaluation of minor thoracic trauma. 405 of the 669 patients received an additional CR. Radiological reports were classified into fracture versus no fracture. Patients were divided into four groups depending on the clinical follow-up. The findings of RS and CR were analyzed using the McNemar test. The statistical significance between the results of the radiographic examinations and the clinical follow-up was analyzed by the Chi-Square test and the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: We included 669 patients (61.4% men, 38.6% women, median age: 51 years, range: 13-92 years). Analyzing the reports of 669 patients who received RS, 157 (23.5%) patients were diagnosed with at least one fractured rib while no fracture was found in 512 (76.5%) patients. Considering the 157 patients with fractured ribs, 73 (46.8%) had a single fracture, 38 (24.4%) and two fractures and 45 (28.8%) had more than two fractures. When assessing the 405 CRs, we detected 69 (17%) fractures while the corresponding RS of the same patients revealed 87 (21.5%) fractures (p < 0.05). Concerning all patients with rib fractures, 63.1% received medical therapy, while 64.5% of those patients without a radiologically documented fracture also received therapy (p = 0.25). Conclusion: Our results suggest a limited clinical value of detected rib fractures based on RS. Despite being superior compared to CR in diagnosing rib fractures, the results from RS seem to have no significant influence on further clinical management and therapeutic measures. Minor thoracic trauma should be evaluated

  8. Imaging of acute thoracic injury: the advent of MDCT screening.

    Mirvis, Stuart E

    2005-10-01

    Chest radiography remains the primary screening study for the assessment of victims of chest trauma, but computed tomography (CT), particularly multidetector CT (MDCT), has progressively changed the imaging approach to these patients. MDCT acquires thinner sections with greater speed, allowing higher quality axial images and nonaxial reformations than conventional or single-detector helical CT. The speed of MDCT, both in acquiring data and in reconstructing images, makes the performance of total body surveys in the blunt polytrauma patient practicable. In general, CT has been well documented to offer major advantages over chest radiography in both screening for thoracic injuries and in characterizing such injuries. This capacity has been enhanced by the application of multichannel data acquisition. The greater sensitivity of MDCT has been well demonstrated in diagnosing vascular and diaphragmatic injuries. This article reviews current concepts of diagnostic imaging in acute chest trauma from blunt force and penetrating mechanisms emphasizing the spectrum of diagnostic imaging findings for various injuries, based primarily on radiographic and CT appearances. The advantages of MDCT for selected injuries are emphasized. PMID:16274001

  9. Endovascular stent graft treatment of acute thoracic aortic transections due to blunt force trauma.

    Bjurlin, Marc A

    2012-02-01

    Endovascular stent graft treatment of acute thoracic aortic transections is an encouraging minimally invasive alternative to open surgical repair. Between 2006 and 2008, 16 patients with acute thoracic aortic transections underwent evaluation at our institution. Seven patients who were treated with an endovascular stent graft were reviewed. The mean Glasgow Coma Score was 13.0, probability of survival was .89, and median injury severity score was 32. The mean number of intensive care unit days was 7.7, mean number of ventilator support days was 5.4, and hospital length of stay was 10 days. Mean blood loss was 285 mL, and operative time was 143 minutes. Overall mortality was 14%. Procedure complications were a bleeding arteriotomy site and an endoleak. Endovascular treatment of traumatic thoracic aortic transections appears to demonstrate superior results with respect to mortality, blood loss, operative time, paraplegia, and procedure-related complications when compared with open surgical repair literature.

  10. Corticosteroids prevent acute lung dysfunction caused by thoracic irradiation in unanesthetized sheep

    We sought to determine the effect of corticosteroid therapy in a new acute model of oxidant lung injury, thoracic irradiation in awake sheep. Sheep were irradiated with 1,500 rads to the whole chest except for blocking the heart and adjacent ventral lung. Seven experimental sheep were given methylprednisolone (1 g intravenously every 6 h for four doses) and thoracic irradiation; control sheep received only irradiation. In irradiated control sheep, lung lymph flow increased from baseline (7.6 ml/h) to peak at 3 h (13.2), and lung lymph protein clearance increased from 5.1 to 9.7 ml/h. Mean pulmonary artery pressure increased in the irradiated control sheep from 19 to 32.4 cm H2O, whereas the lung lymph thromboxane concentration increased from 0.09 to 6.51 ng/ml at 3 h. Arterial oxygen tension in irradiated control sheep fell gradually from 86 mm Hg at baseline to 65 mm Hg at 8 h. Methylprednisolone administration significantly prevented the increase in lung lymph protein clearance, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and lung lymph thromboxane concentration. Methylprednisolone also prevented the fall in arterial oxygen tension after thoracic irradiation, but did not prevent a further decrease in lymphocytes in blood or lung lymph after radiation. We conclude that corticosteroid therapy prevents most of the acute physiologic changes caused by thoracic irradiation in awake sheep

  11. The Risk Factors and Outcomes of Acute Kidney Injury after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Jeon, Yun-Ho; Bae, Chi-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate the incidence, predictive factors, and impact of acute kidney injury (AKI) after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Methods A total of 53 patients who underwent 57 TEVAR operations between 2008 and 2015 were reviewed for the incidence of AKI as defined by the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage kidney disease risk) consensus criteria. The estimated glomerular filtration rate was determined in the perioperative period. Comorbidities and p...

  12. Thoracic emergencies.

    Worrell, Stephanie G; Demeester, Steven R

    2014-02-01

    This article discusses thoracic emergencies, including the anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, examination, diagnosis, technique, management, and treatment of acute upper airway obstruction, massive hemoptysis, spontaneous pneumothorax, and pulmonary empyema. PMID:24267505

  13. Serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases -1,-2,-3 and -9 in thoracic aortic diseases and acute myocardial ischemia

    Argiriadou Helena

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs constitute a family of zinc-dependent proteases (endopeptidases whose catalytic action is the degradation of the extracellular matrix components. In addition, they play the major role in the degradation of collagen and in the process of tissue remodeling. The present clinical study investigated blood serum levels of metalloproteinases- 1, -2, -3 and -9 in patients with acute and chronic aortic dissection, thoracic aortic aneurysm and acute myocardial ischemia compared to healthy individuals. Methods The blood serum levels of MMP-1, -2, -3 and -9 were calculated in 31 patients with acute aortic dissection, 18 patients with chronic aortic dissection, 18 patients with aortic aneurysm and in 13 patients with acute myocardial ischemia, as well as in 15 healthy individuals who served as the control group. Serum MMP levels were measured by using an ELISA technique. Results There were significantly higher levels of MMP-3 in patients with acute myocardial ischemia as compared to acute aortic dissection (17.33 ± 2.03 ng/ml versus 12.92 ± 1.01 ng/ml, p Conclusion Measurement of serum MMP levels in thoracic aortic disease and acute myocardial ischemia is a simple and relatively rapid laboratory test that could be used as a biochemical indicator of aortic disease or acute myocardial ischemia, when evaluated in combination with imaging techniques.

  14. [Diagnostic pathways and pitfalls in acute thoracic aortic dissection: practical recommendations and an awareness campaign].

    Sievers, H-H; Schmidtke, C

    2011-09-01

    Despite significant improvements in the surgical therapy of acute aortic dissection (AAD), mortality rates in the initial phase remain unacceptably high. Early diagnosis and therapy are essential to improving prognosis in these patients. A prerequisite of prompt and correct diagnosis is"thinking of it". Delayed or incorrect diagnosis can often have catastrophic results.The reported acute chest and back pain of a tearing, stabbing nature combined with the physiognomy of Marfan syndrome often arouse the clinical suspicion of AAD, prompting immediate imaging of the thoracic aorta and therapy. For less clear cases, additional hints drawn from the patient history and special findings from the medical examination are presented schematically in a diagnostic pathway. As an innovative form of diagnosis, preventive echocardiographic screening in high risk groups is discussed.To heighten awareness of AAD and the importance of its correct diagnosis, the poster campaign "Thinking of it can save lives" has been initiated. The poster depicts AAD schematically, indicates Marfan syndrome as a risk factor for AAD in young people and illustrates a CT scan as the most frequently performed imaging technique with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:21858545

  15. Role of contrast-enhanced helical CT in the evaluation of acute thoracic aortic injuries after blunt chest trauma

    Scaglione, M.; Pinto, A.; Pinto, F.; Romano, L.; Ragozzino, A. [Dept. of Emergency Radiology, Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Grassi, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Naples (Italy)

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the value of contrast-enhanced helical CT for detecting and managing acute thoracic aortic injury (ATAI). Between June 1995 and February 2000, 1419 consecutive chest CT examinations were performed in the setting of major blunt trauma. The following CT findings were considered indicative of ATAI: intimal flap; pseudoaneurysm; contour irregularity; lumen abnormality; and extravasation of contrast material. On the basis of these direct findings no further diagnostic investigations were performed. Isolated mediastinal hematoma on CT scans was considered an indirect sign of ATAI: In these cases, thoracic aortography was performed even if CT indicated normal aorta. Seventy-seven patients had abnormal CT scans: Among the 23 patients with direct CT signs, acute thoracic aortic injuries was confirmed at thoracotomy in 21. Two false-positive cases were observed. The 54 remaining patients had isolated mediastinal hematoma without aortic injuries at CT and corresponding negative angiograms. The 1342 patients with negative CT scans were included in the 8-month follow-up program and did not show any adverse sequela based on clinical and radiographic criteria. Contrast-enhanced helical CT has a critical role in the exclusion of thoracic aortic injuries in patient with major blunt chest trauma and prevents unnecessary thoracic aortography. Direct CT signs of ATAI do not require further diagnostic investigations to confirm the diagnosis: Isolated aortic bands or contour vessel abnormalities should be first considered as possible artifacts or related to non-traumatic etiologies especially when mediastinal hematoma is absent. In cases of isolated mediastinal hematoma other possible sources of bleeding should be considered before directing patients to thoracic aortography. (orig.)

  16. Role of contrast-enhanced helical CT in the evaluation of acute thoracic aortic injuries after blunt chest trauma

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the value of contrast-enhanced helical CT for detecting and managing acute thoracic aortic injury (ATAI). Between June 1995 and February 2000, 1419 consecutive chest CT examinations were performed in the setting of major blunt trauma. The following CT findings were considered indicative of ATAI: intimal flap; pseudoaneurysm; contour irregularity; lumen abnormality; and extravasation of contrast material. On the basis of these direct findings no further diagnostic investigations were performed. Isolated mediastinal hematoma on CT scans was considered an indirect sign of ATAI: In these cases, thoracic aortography was performed even if CT indicated normal aorta. Seventy-seven patients had abnormal CT scans: Among the 23 patients with direct CT signs, acute thoracic aortic injuries was confirmed at thoracotomy in 21. Two false-positive cases were observed. The 54 remaining patients had isolated mediastinal hematoma without aortic injuries at CT and corresponding negative angiograms. The 1342 patients with negative CT scans were included in the 8-month follow-up program and did not show any adverse sequela based on clinical and radiographic criteria. Contrast-enhanced helical CT has a critical role in the exclusion of thoracic aortic injuries in patient with major blunt chest trauma and prevents unnecessary thoracic aortography. Direct CT signs of ATAI do not require further diagnostic investigations to confirm the diagnosis: Isolated aortic bands or contour vessel abnormalities should be first considered as possible artifacts or related to non-traumatic etiologies especially when mediastinal hematoma is absent. In cases of isolated mediastinal hematoma other possible sources of bleeding should be considered before directing patients to thoracic aortography. (orig.)

  17. The utility of thoracic ultrasound in patients with acute eosinophilic pneumonia.

    Hee Yoon

    Full Text Available Thoracic ultrasound (TUS is an easy-to-use imaging modality that aids physicians in the differential diagnosis of respiratory diseases. However, no data exist on the TUS findings of acute eosinophilic pneumonia (AEP or their clinical utility in patients with AEP. Thus, we performed an observational study on TUS findings and their clinical utility for follow-up in patients with AEP. We prospectively screened patients who visited the emergency department for acute respiratory symptoms at the Armed Forces Capital Hospital in South Korea between February 2014 and July 2014. Of them, patients suspected to have AEP underwent an etiological investigation, including flexible bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and TUS, and we evaluated TUS findings and serial changes on TUS during the treatment course compared with those from chest radiographs. In total, 22 patients with AEP were identified. The TUS examinations revealed that all patients exhibited multiple diffuse bilateral B-lines and lung sliding, with (n = 5 or without pleural effusion, which was consistent with alveolar-interstitial syndrome. B-line numbers fell during the course of treatment, as the lines became thinner and fainter. A-lines were evident in 19 patients on day 7 of hospitalization, when B-lines had disappeared in 13 patients, and all pleural effusion had resolved. All patients exhibited complete ultrasonic resolution by day 14, along with clinicoradiological improvement. Chest radiographs of five patients taken on day 7 seemed to show complete resolution, but several abnormal B-lines were evident on TUS performed the same day. As a result, our data show common TUS findings of AEP and suggest that AEP may be included as a differential diagnosis when multiple diffuse bilateral B-lines with preserved lung sliding are identified on a TUS examination in patients with acute symptoms, and that TUS is a useful modality for evaluating the treatment response in patients with AEP.

  18. Sleep and Cognitive Abnormalities in Acute Minor Thalamic Infarction.

    Wu, Wei; Cui, Linyang; Fu, Ying; Tian, Qianqian; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xuan; Du, Ning; Chen, Ying; Qiu, Zhijun; Song, Yijun; Shi, Fu-Dong; Xue, Rong

    2016-08-01

    In order to characterize sleep and the cognitive patterns in patients with acute minor thalamic infarction (AMTI), we enrolled 27 patients with AMTI and 12 matched healthy individuals. Questionnaires about sleep and cognition as well as polysomnography (PSG) were performed on days 14 and 90 post-stroke. Compared to healthy controls, in patients with AMTI, hyposomnia was more prevalent; sleep architecture was disrupted as indicated by decreased sleep efficiency, increased sleep latency, and decreased non-rapid eye movement sleep stages 2 and 3; more sleep-related breathing disorders occurred; and cognitive functions were worse, especially memory. While sleep apnea and long-delay memory recovered to a large extent in the patients, other sleep and cognitive function deficit often persisted. Patients with AMTI are at an increased risk for hyposomnia, sleep structure disturbance, sleep apnea, and memory deficits. Although these abnormalities improved over time, the slow and incomplete improvement suggest that early management should be considered in these patients. PMID:27237578

  19. Unilateral microinjection of acrolein into thoracic spinal cord produces acute and chronic injury and functional deficits.

    Gianaris, Alexander; Liu, Nai-Kui; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Oakes, Eddie; Brenia, John; Gianaris, Thomas; Ruan, Yiwen; Deng, Ling-Xiao; Goetz, Maria; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Lu, Qing-Bo; Shi, Riyi; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-06-21

    Although lipid peroxidation has long been associated with spinal cord injury (SCI), the specific role of lipid peroxidation-derived byproducts such as acrolein in mediating damage remains to be fully understood. Acrolein, an α-β unsaturated aldehyde, is highly reactive with proteins, DNA, and phospholipids and is considered as a second toxic messenger that disseminates and augments initial free radical events. Previously, we showed that acrolein increased following traumatic SCI and injection of acrolein induced tissue damage. Here, we demonstrate that microinjection of acrolein into the thoracic spinal cord of adult rats resulted in dose-dependent tissue damage and functional deficits. At 24h (acute) after the microinjection, tissue damage, motoneuron loss, and spinal cord swelling were observed on sections stained with Cresyl Violet. Luxol fast blue staining further showed that acrolein injection resulted in dose-dependent demyelination. At 8weeks (chronic) after the microinjection, cord shrinkage, astrocyte activation, and macrophage infiltration were observed along with tissue damage, neuron loss, and demyelination. These pathological changes resulted in behavioral impairments as measured by both the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale and grid walking analysis. Electron microscopy further demonstrated that acrolein induced axonal degeneration, demyelination, and macrophage infiltration. These results, combined with our previous reports, strongly suggest that acrolein may play a critical causal role in the pathogenesis of SCI and that targeting acrolein could be an attractive strategy for repair after SCI. PMID:27058147

  20. The Risk Factors and Outcomes of Acute Kidney Injury after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Jeon, Yun-Ho; Bae, Chi-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate the incidence, predictive factors, and impact of acute kidney injury (AKI) after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Methods A total of 53 patients who underwent 57 TEVAR operations between 2008 and 2015 were reviewed for the incidence of AKI as defined by the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage kidney disease risk) consensus criteria. The estimated glomerular filtration rate was determined in the perioperative period. Comorbidities and postoperative outcomes were retrospectively reviewed. Results Underlying aortic pathologies included 21 degenerative aortic aneurysms, 20 blunt traumatic aortic injuries, six type B aortic dissections, five type B intramural hematomas, three endoleaks and two miscellaneous diseases. The mean age of the patients was 61.2±17.5 years (range, 15 to 85 years). AKI was identified in 13 (22.8%) of 57 patients. There was an association of preoperative stroke and postoperative paraparesis and paraplegia with AKI. The average intensive care unit (ICU) stay in patients with AKI was significantly longer than in patients without AKI (5.3 vs. 12.7 days, p=0.017). The 30-day mortality rate in patients with AKI was significantly higher than patients without AKI (23.1% vs. 4.5%, p=0.038); however, AKI did not impact long-term survival. Conclusion Preoperative stroke and postoperative paraparesis and paraplegia were identified as predictors for AKI. Patients with AKI experienced longer average ICU stays and greater 30-day mortality than those without AKI. Perioperative identification of high-risk patients, as well as nephroprotective strategies to reduce the incidence of AKI, should be considered as important aspects of a successful TEVAR procedure. PMID:26889441

  1. The clinical significance of adjacent rib involvement on MRI in patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Goo, Dong Erk; Suh, You Sung [Soonchunhyang Univ. Seoul Hospital/Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Won Kyung [Soonchunhyang Univ. Cheonan Hospital/Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of the presence of adjacent rib involvement in osteoporotic compression fractures. All the patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine on thoracic spine MRI that presented to our clinic between September 2003 and January 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All the vertebrae were divided into two groups: those that showed signal intensity change in the rib adjacent to the compression fracture and those that did not. We compared the results between the two groups to determine if there were differences in the degree of osteoporosis, the compression fracture level and the age of patients between the two groups. We calculated the degree of correlation between the MRI and the bone scan images of these patients. We also reviewed whether percutaneous vertebroplasty relieved symptoms or not. Signal intensity changes were found in the adjacent rib(s) in 12 of the 60 patients and in 14 of the 94 levels (the total number of levels). The MRI and bone scan showed significant correlation (p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the incidence of pain at the one month outpatient follow up between the two groups (p = 0.0215). The radiologist should comment on the presence or absence of adjacent rib involvement when reporting on the thoracic spine MRI of patients suffering from osteoporotic compression fractures in order to more accurately determine prognosis.

  2. Precision medical and surgical management for thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections based on the causative mutant gene.

    Milewicz, Dianna; Hostetler, Ellen; Wallace, Stephanie; Mellor-Crummey, Lauren; Gong, Limin; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    Almost one-quarter of patients presenting with thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) or acute aortic dissections (TAADs) have an underlying mutation in a specific gene. A subset of these patients will have systemic syndromic features, for example, skeletal features in patients with Marfan Syndrome. It is important to note that the majority of patients with thoracic aortic disease will not have these syndromic features but many will have a family history of the disease. The genes predisposing to these thoracic aortic diseases are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, and thirteen genes have been identified to date. As the clinical phenotype associated with each specific gene is defined, the data indicate that the underlying gene dictates associated syndromic features. More importantly, the underlying gene also dictates the aortic disease presentation, the risk for dissection at a given range of aortic diameters, the risk for additional vascular diseases and what specific vascular diseases occur associated with the gene. These results lead to the recommendation that the medical and surgical management of these patients be dictated by the underlying gene, and for patients with mutations in ACTA2, the specific mutation in the gene. PMID:26837258

  3. Fractures of the thoracic spine in patients with minor trauma: Comparison of diagnostic accuracy and dose of biplane radiography and MDCT

    Objectives: To investigate the accuracy of biplane radiography in the detection of fractures of the thoracic spine in patients with minor trauma using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as the reference and to compare the dose of both techniques. Methods: 107 consecutive trauma patients with suspected fractures of the thoracic spine on physical examination were included. All had undergone biplane radiography first, followed by a MDCT scan between October 2008 and October 2012. A fourfold table was used for the classification of the screening test results. Both the Chi-square test (χ2) and the mean dose-length product (DLP) were used to compare the diagnostic methods. Results: MDCT revealed 77 fractures in 65/107 patients (60.7%). Biplane radiography was true positive in 32/107 patients (29.9%), false positive in 19/107 patients (17.8%), true negative in 23/107 (21.5%) and false negative in 33/107 patients (30.8%), showing a sensitivity of 49.2%, a specificity of 54.7%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 62.7%, a negative predictive value (NPV) of 41.1%, and an accuracy of 51.4%. The presence of a fracture on biplane radiography was highly statistical significant, if this was simultaneously proven by MDCT (χ2 = 7.6; p = 0.01). None of the fractures missed on biplane radiography was unstable. The mean DLP on biplane radiography was 14.5 mGy cm (range 1.9–97.8) and on MDCT 374.6 mGy cm (range 80.2–871). Conclusions: The sensitivity and the specificity of biplane radiography in the diagnosis of fractures of the thoracic spine in patients with minor trauma are low. Considering the wide availability of MDCT that is usually necessary for taking significant therapeutic steps, the indication for biplane radiography should be very restrictive

  4. Acute gastric incarceration from thoracic herniation in pregnancy following laparoscopic antireflux surgery

    Brygger, Louise; Fristrup, Claus Wilki; Harbo, Frederik Severin Gråe;

    2013-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia is a rare complication in pregnancy which due to misdiagnosis or management delays may be life-threatening. We report a case of a woman in the third trimester of pregnancy who presented with sudden onset of severe epigastric and thoracic pain radiating to the back. Earlier in...

  5. Pleural effusion associated with acute and chronic pleuropneumonia and pleuritis secondary to thoracic wounds in horses: 43 cases (1982-1992).

    Collins, M B; Hodgson, D R; Hutchins, D R

    1994-12-15

    Case records of 43 horses with pleural effusion associated with acute pleuropneumonia, chronic pleuropneumonia, or pleuritis secondary to a penetrating thoracic wound were reviewed to determine the predisposing factors, diagnosis, and treatment of this condition. Acute pleuropneumonia was diagnosed in 36 horses, the majority of which were Thoroughbreds (89%). Of 22 (61%) horses that were in race training at the onset of illness, 11 (31%) had been recently transported a long distance and 4 (11%) had evidence of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage. Physical examination findings and hematologic data were nonspecific. The most consistent abnormality was hyperfibrino-genemia. Affected horses were treated with antibiotics, thoracic drainage, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and supportive care. Twenty-two (61%) horses were discharged from the hospital, with the mean duration of hospitalization for those discharged being 23 days. Nine (25%) horses were euthanatized and 5 (14%) died. Bacterial culturing of thoracic fluid resulted in growth in 30 of the 36 (83%) horses. The finding of anaerobic bacteria in thoracic fluid was not associated with a lower survival rate (62%) than the overall survival rate (61%). Four horses with chronic pleuropneumonia had a history of lethargy and inappetence for > 2 weeks. Actinobacillus equuli was isolated, either alone or in combination with other bacteria, from thoracic fluid of these 4 horses. Each horse was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics and made a rapid recovery. Three horses with acute pleuritis secondary to penetrating thoracic wounds also had nonspecific clinical signs, apart from the wound and a large volume of pleural effusion. Bacteriologic isolates from these horses differed slightly from those of horses with acute pleuropneumonia. PMID:7744650

  6. Bone marrow stromal cells elicit tissue sparing after acute but not delayed transplantation into the contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord.

    Tewarie, R.D.; Hurtado, A.; Ritfeld, G.J.; Rahiem, S.T.; Wendell, D.F.; Barroso, M.M.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Oudega, M.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplanted into the contused spinal cord may support repair by improving tissue sparing. We injected allogeneic BMSC into the moderately contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord at 15 min (acute) and at 3, 7, and 21 days (delayed) post-injury and quantified tissue s

  7. Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand oxygen guidelines for acute oxygen use in adults: ‘Swimming between the flags’*

    Beasley, Richard; Chien, Jimmy; Douglas, James; Eastlake, Leonie; Farah, Claude; King, Gregory; Moore, Rosemary; Pilcher, Janine; Richards, Michael; Smith, Sheree; Walters, Haydn

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand guidelines is to provide simple, practical evidence-based recommendations for the acute use of oxygen in adults in clinical practice. The intended users are all health professionals responsible for the administration and/or monitoring of oxygen therapy in the management of acute medical patients in the community and hospital settings (excluding perioperative and intensive care patients), those responsible for the training of suc...

  8. Psychosocial Aspects of Predictive Genetic Testing for Acute Intermittent Porphyria in Norwegian Minors

    Andersen, Janice; Sandberg, Sverre; Raaheim, Maalfrid; Gjengedal, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The Norwegian Porphyria Centre routinely offers genetic counselling and predictive genetic testing in families diagnosed with porphyria. The aim of this study was to investigate the subjective experiences of adolescents and young adults who were genetically tested for acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) as minors. What were the psychosocial consequences and how were these handled?

  9. Effect of Coenzyme Q10 on Acute Pulmonary Damage Following the Experimental Thoracic Trauma

    Murat Koyuncu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Pulmonary contusion negatively affects prognosis in the case of damages following a trauma. Objective of this experimental study performed in Turkey was to evaluate effects of coenzyme Q10 on primary and secondary damages of pulmonary contusion following experimental thoracic blunt trauma using biochemical and histopathological parameters. Material and Method: A total of 56 Wistar Albino female rats with a mean weight of 205±45 g were included in this study. Rats were randomly divided into seven groups with each group having eight rats. A trauma device which consisted of a fixed platform, and an aluminium tube was prepared. Rats were administered 2.45 J of chest impact energy in order to generate pulmonary contusion. Control and Study groups were named according to the sacrificed time. No process (trauma and/or medication was performed in the sham group, while only trauma was induced in the controls. On the other hand, after induced trauma, intraperitoneal Q10 (0. - 24. - 48. hours was administered to study group. Rats were sacrificed at the end of the after trauma 24, 48 and 72 hours, and their blood and lung tissue samples were analyzed. Results: No significant difference was found between sham and Study-72 groups in terms of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. On the histopathological examination, no significant difference was found between study and control groups. While no significant difference was found between the sham and study groups, significant difference was observed between sham and control groups. Discussion: Coenzyme Q10, an antioxidant agent, can be used as an antioxidant agent in order to reduce the secondary damage in blunt thoracic trauma.

  10. Prognostic value of trans-thoracic echocardiography in patients with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation: findings from the RAF study.

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Falocci, Nicola; Caso, Valeria; Becattini, Cecilia; Marcheselli, Simona; Rueckert, Christina; Pezzini, Alessandro; Poli, Loris; Padovani, Alessandro; Csiba, Laszló; Szabó, Lilla; Sohn, Sung-Il; Tassinari, Tiziana; Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H; Michel, Patrik; Cordier, Maria; Vanacker, Peter; Remillard, Suzette; Alberti, Andrea; Venti, Michele; Acciarresi, Monica; D'Amore, Cataldo; Mosconi, Maria Giulia; Scoditti, Umberto; Denti, Licia; Orlandi, Giovanni; Chiti, Alberto; Gialdini, Gino; Bovi, Paolo; Carletti, Monica; Rigatelli, Alberto; Putaala, Jukka; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Masotti, Luca; Lorenzini, Gianni; Tassi, Rossana; Guideri, Francesca; Martini, Giuseppe; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Vadikolias, Kostantinos; Liantinioti, Chrissoula; Corea, Francesco; Del Sette, Massimo; Ageno, Walter; De Lodovici, Maria Luisa; Bono, Giorgio; Baldi, Antonio; D'Anna, Sebastiano; Sacco, Simona; Carolei, Antonio; Tiseo, Cindy; Imberti, Davide; Zabzuni, Dorjan; Doronin, Boris; Volodina, Vera; Consoli, Domenico; Galati, Franco; Pieroni, Alessio; Toni, Danilo; Monaco, Serena; Baronello, Mario Maimone; Barlinn, Kristian; Pallesen, Lars-Peder; Kepplinger, Jessica; Bodechtel, Ulf; Gerber, Johannes; Deleu, Dirk; Melikyan, Gayane; Ibrahim, Faisal; Akhtar, Naveed; Lees, Kennedy R

    2016-02-01

    Anticoagulant therapy is recommended for the secondary prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). T he identification of patients at high risk for early recurrence, which are potential candidates to prompt anticoagulation, is crucial to justify the risk of bleeding associated with early anticoagulant treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate in patients with acute ischemic stroke and AF the association between findings at trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) and 90 days recurrence. In consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke and AF, TTE was performed within 7 days from hospital admission. Study outcomes were recurrent ischemic cerebrovascular events (stroke or TIA) and systemic embolism. 854 patients (mean age 76.3 ± 9.5 years) underwent a TTE evaluation; 63 patients (7.4%) had at least a study outcome event. Left atrial thrombosis was present in 11 patients (1.3%) among whom 1 had recurrent ischemic event. Left atrial enlargement was present in 548 patients (64.2%) among whom 51 (9.3%) had recurrent ischemic events. The recurrence rate in the 197 patients with severe left atrial enlargement was 11.7%. On multivariate analysis, the presence of atrial enlargement (OR 2.13; 95% CI 1.06-4.29, p = 0.033) and CHA2DS2-VASc score (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.04-1.45, p = 0.018, for each point increase) were correlated with ischemic recurrences. In patients with AF-associated acute stroke, left atrial enlargement is an independent marker of recurrent stroke and systemic embolism. The risk of recurrence is accounted for by severe atrial enlargement. TTE-detected left atrial thrombosis is relatively uncommon. PMID:26566907

  11. Observations on the mechanism of hypoxaemia in acute minor pulmonary embolism.

    Burton, G H; Seed, W A; Vernon, P.

    1984-01-01

    An automated computer analysis of ventilation-perfusion lung scans was used to derive graphical data from lung scans of 11 patients with acute minor pulmonary embolism, free of pre-existing cardiorespiratory disease, and with no evidence of intrapulmonary complication or pleural effusion. In each case the analysis showed the presence of areas of lung, remote from those affected by the pulmonary embolism, that had a pathological disturbance of ventilation-perfusion matching with relative overp...

  12. Relationship between acute kidney injury before thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair and in-hospital outcomes in patients with type B acute aortic dissection

    Hong-Mei REN; Xiao WANG; Chun-Yan HU; Bin QUE; Hui AI; Chun-Mei WANG; Li-Zhong SUN; Shao-Ping NIE

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acute kidney injury (AKI) frequently occurs after catheter-based interventional procedures and increases mortality. How-ever, the implications of AKI before thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) of type B acute aortic dissection (AAD) remain un-clear. This study evaluated the incidence, predictors, and in-hospital outcomes of AKI before TEVAR in patients with type B AAD. Meth-ods Between 2009 and 2013, 76 patients were retrospectively evaluated who received TEVAR for type B AAD within 36 h from symptom onset. The patients were classified into no-AKI vs. AKI groups, and the severity of AKI was further staged according to kidney disease:im-proving global outcomes criteria before TEVAR. Results The incidence of preoperative AKI was 36.8%. In-hospital complications was significantly higher in patients with preoperative AKI compared with no-AKI (50.0%vs. 4.2%, respectively;P<0.001), including acute renal failure (21.4%vs. 0, respectively;P<0.001), and they increased with severity of AKI (P<0.001). The maximum levels of body tem-perature and white blood cell count were significantly related to maximum serum creatinine level before TEVAR. Multivariate analysis showed that systolic blood pressure on admission (OR:1.023;95%CI:1.003–1.044;P=0.0238) and bilateral renal artery involvement (OR:19.076;95%CI:1.914–190.164;P=0.0120) were strong predictors of preoperative AKI. Conclusions Preoperative AKI frequently oc-curred in patients with type B AAD, and correlated with higher in-hospital complications and enhanced inflammatory reaction. Systolic blood pressure on admission and bilateral renal artery involvement were major risk factors for AKI before TEVAR.

  13. Role of early minimal-invasive spine fixation in acute thoracic and lumbar spine trauma

    Schmidt Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Polytraumatized patients following a severe trauma suffer from substantial disturbances of the immune system. Secondary organ dysfunction syndromes due to early hyperinflammation and late immunparalysis contribute to adverse outcome. Consequently the principle of damage control surgery / orthopedics developed in the last two decades to limit secondary iatrogenic insult in these patients. New percutaneous internal fixators provide implants for a damage control approach of spinal trauma in polytraumatized patients. The goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of minimal-invasive instrumentation in the setting of minor and major trauma and to discuss the potential benefits and drawbacks of this procedure. Materials and Methods: The present study is a prospective analysis of 76 consecutive patients (mean age 53.3 years with thoracolumbar spine fractures following major or minor trauma from August 2003 to January 2007 who were subjected to minimal-invasive dorsal instrumentation using CD Horizon ® Sextant TM Rod Insertion System and Longitude TM Rod Insertion System (Medtronic ® Sofamor Danek. Perioperative and postoperative outcome measures including e.g. local and systemic complications were assessed and discussed. Results: Forty-nine patients (64.5% suffered from minor trauma (Injury Severity Score < 16. Polytraumatized patients (n=27; 35.5% had associated chest (n=20 and traumatic brain injuries (n=22. For mono- and bisegmental dorsal instrumentation the Sextant TM was used in 60 patients, whereas in 16 longer ranging instrumentations the (prototype Longitude TM system was implanted. Operation time was substantially lower than in conventional approach at minimum 22.5 min for Sextant and 36.2 min for Longitude TM , respectively. Geriatric patients with high perioperative risk according to ASA classification benefited from the less invasive approach and lack of approach-related complications including no substantial blood loss

  14. A case of lung cancer associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome after thoracic radiotherapy

    A 73-year-old man presented with dyspnea, cough, fever, appetite loss and stridor due to bronchial stenosis. Fiber-optic bronchoscopy revealed an endobronchial lesion in the right main bronchus and biopsy specimens showed poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The clinical stage of lung cancer was IIIB (T4N2M0). The patient received 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 43 days to a field including the right hilum and mediastinum. The tumor decreased in size and stenosis of the bronchus disappeared. A week after completion of radiation the patient began to have high grade fever and dyspnea, and progressive hypoxia developed. A chest radiograph showed diffuse bilateral interstitial infiltrates. Despite mechanical ventilation with PEEP and the administration of steroids, he died of respiratory failure three weeks after completion of radiation. Necropsy specimens obtained from the left lung revealed massive deposition of fibrin in the alveolar airspaces associated with hyaline membranes and hyperplasia of type II cells indicating diffuse alveolar damage. The patient had mild pulmonary fibrosis on a CT scan taken before the start of radiotherapy. We conclude that care should be taken if the case has pulmonary fibrosis because radiation therapy can precipitate severe radiation pneumonitis and acute respiratory distress syndrome in such cases. (author)

  15. Disparities in smoking and acute respiratory illnesses among sexual minority young adults.

    Blosnich, John; Jarrett, Traci; Horn, Kimberly

    2010-10-01

    Morbidity and mortality from cigarette smoking remain major public health issues. Particularly, smoking has been associated with increased risk of acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs). Literature indicates that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (i.e., sexual minority) persons smoke more than the general population. Additionally, young adulthood is the second-most prevalent period of smoking uptake. Given this constellation of risk correlates, the authors examined whether sexual minority young adults experience increased odds of ARIs (i.e., strep throat, bronchitis, sinus infection, and asthma). Using cross-sectional data from the Spring 2006 National College Health Assessment, prevalence estimates of smoking were generated among young adult (age range, 18-24 years) lesbian/gay, bisexual, unsure, and heterosexual college students (n = 75,164). Nested logistic regression analyses were used to examine whether smoking status mediated the risk of ARIs among sexual orientation groups. Compared with heterosexual smokers, gay/lesbian smokers were more likely to have had strep throat, and bisexual smokers were more likely to have had sinus infection, asthma, and bronchitis. Whereas smoking mediated the risk of ARI, sexual minorities still showed higher odds of ARIs after adjustment for smoking. Sexual minority young adults may experience respiratory health disparities that may be linked to their higher smoking rates, and their higher rates of smoking lend urgency to the need for cessation interventions. Future studies are needed to explore whether chronic respiratory disease caused by smoking (i.e., lung cancer, COPD, emphysema) disproportionately affect sexual minority populations. PMID:20496074

  16. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair Following Axillo-femoral Bypass in a Patient with Stanford B Acute Aortic Dissection Accompanied by Abdominal Visceral Ischemia;Report of a Case].

    Nishimoto, Takayuki; Bonkohara, Yukihiro; Azuma, Takashi; Iijima, Masaki; Higashidate, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    A 60-year-old woman was transfer-red to the emergency department of our medical center with worsening chest and back pain. Computed tomography revealed Stanford type B aortic dissection. There was a false lumen from the distal arch to the abdominal aorta just above the celiac artery. Although she was at 1st treated conservatively, she abruptly developed acute renal failure and lower limb ischemia because of an enlarged false lumen, and emergency axillo-femoral bypass surgery was performed with an 8 mm tube graft. However, renal failure gradually worsened, which necessitated continuous hemodiafiltration was performed. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair was then performed, and her renal function recovered. PMID:27586321

  17. Tube thoracostomy complications in patients with acute blunt thoracic trauma due to road traffic accidents - a comparative study

    Objective: To determine the differences in the frequency and types of Tube thoracostomy complications (TICs) between two groups of patients (A and B)With blunt thoracic trauma (BIT), as a result of road traffic accidents (RTA). Study Design: Prospective, comparative study. Place and duration of Study: Dawadrrii General Hospital (DGH), a level II trauma center, Riyadh, from December 4, 2011 to December 3, 2012. Methodology: The problem of a high number and variety of TICs' resulting due to various technical aspects of tube thoracostomy (IT) are highlighted in this study. This is a prospective comparative study enrolling a total of 140 patients with BTT due to RTA, referred to this hospital with indwelling Tube thoracostomies (TIs) (group A) or undergoing TTs at this hospital (group B) by a single thoracic surgeon within 10-15 minutes of arrival. Patients' demographic and clinical details were recorded and confirmed with the referring physicians, if necessary. The two groups were matched for age, gender, indications for ITs and the number and types of accompanying injuries. Informed consent was obtained before the procedure. Results were analyzed using SPSS v 19. Statistical significance achieved was translated into p values at 95% confidence interval. Results: Of the J 19 patients, who satisfied the inclusion criteria, group A had 49 (41.2%) and group B, 70 (58.8%) patients. Males were in he majority in both groups. A total of 130 chest tubes were placed in 119 patients. Contralateral chest tubes were indicated in 3 patients in group A and 8 patients in group B (table I). The overall TTCs rate was 61.5% (80/130), with the majority in group A (88.7%; p= 0.0001). The number of technical, infective and miscellaneous TTC in group A and B were 47 (92.2%), 6 (85.7%), 18 (81.8%), and 4 (7.8%), 1(14.3%), and 4 (18.2%), respectively (table II). The majority of the chest tubes in group A were smaller than 28 Fr (p=0.0001; RR=2.98; 95% CI=2.17-4.10). Mortality due to TT in

  18. Anesthetic management of parturient with thoracic kyphoscoliosis, malaria and acute respiratory distress syndrome for urgent cesarean section

    Pandey, Ravindra Kr; Batra, Meenu M; Darlong, Vanlal; Garg, Rakesh; Punj, Jyotsna; Kumar, Sri

    2015-01-01

    The management of cesarean section in kyphoscoliotic patient is challenging. The respiratory changes and increased metabolic demands due to pregnancy may compromise the limited respiratory reserves in such patients. Presence of other comorbidities like malaria and respiratory tract infection will further compromise the effective oxygenation. We report a case of kyphoscoliosis along with malaria and acute respiratory distress syndrome for urgent cesarean section. PMID:26702219

  19. Lung texture in serial thoracic CT scans: correlation with radiologist-defined severity of acute changes following radiation therapy

    This study examines the correlation between the radiologist-defined severity of normal tissue damage following radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer treatment and a set of mathematical descriptors of computed tomography (CT) scan texture (‘texture features’). A pre-therapy CT scan and a post-therapy CT scan were retrospectively collected under IRB approval for each of the 25 patients who underwent definitive RT (median dose: 66 Gy). Sixty regions of interest (ROIs) were automatically identified in the non-cancerous lung tissue of each post-therapy scan. A radiologist compared post-therapy scan ROIs with pre-therapy scans and categorized each as containing no abnormality, mild abnormality, moderate abnormality, or severe abnormality. Twenty texture features that characterize gray-level intensity, region morphology, and gray-level distribution were calculated in post-therapy scan ROIs and compared with anatomically matched ROIs in the pre-therapy scan. Linear regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were used to compare the percent feature value change (ΔFV) between ROIs at each category of visible radiation damage. Most ROIs contained no (65%) or mild abnormality (30%). ROIs with moderate (3%) or severe (2%) abnormalities were observed in 9 patients. For 19 of 20 features, ΔFV was significantly different among severity levels. For 12 features, significant differences were observed at every level. Compared with regions with no abnormalities, ΔFV for these 12 features increased, on average, by 1.5%, 12%, and 30%, respectively, for mild, moderate, and severe abnormalitites. Area under the ROC curve was largest when comparing ΔFV in the highest severity level with the remaining three categories (mean AUC across features: 0.84). In conclusion, 19 features that characterized the severity of radiologic changes from pre-therapy scans were identified. These features may be used in future studies to quantify acute normal lung tissue damage

  20. Emergency Thoracic US: The Essentials.

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Sawatmongkorngul, Sorravit; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2016-01-01

    Acute thoracic symptoms are common among adults visiting emergency departments in the United States. Adults with these symptoms constitute a large burden on the overall resources used in the emergency department. The wide range of possible causes can make a definitive diagnosis challenging, even after clinical evaluation and initial laboratory testing. In addition to radiography and computed tomography, thoracic ultrasonography (US) is an alternative imaging modality that can be readily performed in real time at the patient's bedside to help diagnose many thoracic diseases manifesting acutely and in the trauma setting. Advantages of US include availability, relatively low cost, and lack of ionizing radiation. Emergency thoracic US consists of two main parts, lung and pleura US and focused cardiac US, which are closely related. Acoustic mismatches among aerated lungs, pleura, chest wall, and pathologic conditions produce artifacts useful for diagnosis of pneumothorax and pulmonary edema and help in detection of subpleural, pleural, and chest wall pathologic conditions such as pneumonia, pleural effusion, and fractures. Visual assessment of cardiac contractility and detection of right ventricular dilatation and pericardial effusion at focused cardiac US are critical in patients presenting with acute dyspnea and trauma. Additional US examinations of the inferior vena cava for noninvasive volume assessment and of the groin areas for detection of deep venous thrombosis are often performed at the same time. This multiorgan US approach can provide valuable information for emergency treatment of both traumatic and nontraumatic thoracic diseases involving the lungs, pleura, chest wall, heart, and vascular system. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27035835

  1. Kinin B1 receptors contributes to acute pain following minor surgery in humans

    Brahim Jaime S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinins play an important role in regulation of pain and hyperalgesia after tissue injury and inflammation by activating two types of G-protein-coupled receptors, the kinin B1 and B2 receptors. It is generally accepted that the B2 receptor is constitutively expressed, whereas the B1 receptor is induced in response to inflammation. However, little is known about the regulatory effects of kinin receptors on the onset of acute inflammation and inflammatory pain in humans. The present study investigated the changes in gene expression of kinin receptors and the levels of their endogenous ligands at an early time point following tissue injury and their relation to clinical pain, as well as the effect of COX-inhibition on their expression levels. Results Tissue injury resulted in a significant up-regulation in the gene expression of B1 and B2 receptors at 3 hours post-surgery, the onset of acute inflammatory pain. Interestingly, the up-regulation in the gene expression of B1 and B2 receptors was positively correlated to pain intensity only after ketorolac treatment, signifying an interaction between prostaglandins and kinins in the inflammatory pain process. Further, the gene expression of both B1 and B2 receptors were correlated. Following tissue injury, B1 ligands des-Arg9-BK and des-Arg10-KD were significantly lower at the third hour compared to the first 2 hours in both the placebo and the ketorolac treatment groups but did not differ significantly between groups. Tissue injury also resulted in the down-regulation of TRPV1 gene expression at 3 hours post-surgery with no significant effect by ketorolac treatment. Interestingly, the change in gene expression of TRPV1 was correlated to the change in gene expression of B1 receptor but not B2 receptor. Conclusions These results provide evidence at the transcriptional level in a clinical model of tissue injury that up-regulation of kinin receptors are involved in the development of the

  2. Minor changes on cranial MRI during treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Paeaekkoe, E. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Vainionpaeae, L. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Pyhtinen, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Lanning, M. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Univ. of Oulu (Finland)

    1996-04-01

    Cranial MRI was used to study treatment-related changes in children undergoing therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or lymphoma. Nineteen children (18 with ALL, 1 with lymphoma) underwent MRI at the beginning of treatment and at intervals during it, to a total of 105 imaging studies and a minimum of 3 per case. Nine patients had finished all therapy, all received consolidation treatment. No patient had central nervous system (CNS) leukaemia at diagnosis or developed a CNS relapse. Mild treatment-related white matter changes were observed in only 2 patients after consolidation therapy with three 5 g/m{sup 2} pulses of intravenous methotrexate. Transient enlargement of the ventricles and cortical sulci was observed in 13 patients, always temporally related to steroid treatment. These preliminary data suggest that treatment-related white matter changes are rare and no routine MRI follow-up is needed during treatment in asymptomatic children after a baseline assessment. (orig.)

  3. Minor changes on cranial MRI during treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Cranial MRI was used to study treatment-related changes in children undergoing therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or lymphoma. Nineteen children (18 with ALL, 1 with lymphoma) underwent MRI at the beginning of treatment and at intervals during it, to a total of 105 imaging studies and a minimum of 3 per case. Nine patients had finished all therapy, all received consolidation treatment. No patient had central nervous system (CNS) leukaemia at diagnosis or developed a CNS relapse. Mild treatment-related white matter changes were observed in only 2 patients after consolidation therapy with three 5 g/m2 pulses of intravenous methotrexate. Transient enlargement of the ventricles and cortical sulci was observed in 13 patients, always temporally related to steroid treatment. These preliminary data suggest that treatment-related white matter changes are rare and no routine MRI follow-up is needed during treatment in asymptomatic children after a baseline assessment. (orig.)

  4. Post tetanic thoracic vertebral change

    A case report of post tetanic vertebra disclosed multiple thoracic vertebra changes of compressed fracture involving T4, T5, T6 and T7 with partial collapse of T3, T8 and T9. The mechanism of fracture were reviewed. In ordinary compressed fracture produced by acute flexion however post tetanic fracture can be produced by following opisthotonus. Several authors believed to be due to both extensor and flexor muscle groups of violent tetanic convulsion with acute force to the weakest vertebra of T5 or T6 area

  5. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    ... With Its Intense Demands New Website from The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Puts the Power of Information ... Hotel Discount for STS Members Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. All rights reserved. Expanded Proprietary ...

  6. Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Arm after Minor Trauma in a Patient with Optimal Range of Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Case Report

    Paolo Titolo; Patrizia Milani; Bernardino Panero; Davide Ciclamini; Giulia Colzani; Stefano Artiaco

    2014-01-01

    Compartment syndrome of the arm is a rare event that can be subsequent to trauma or other pathological and physical conditions. At the arm the thin and elastic fascia may allow accumulation of blood more than in other districts, especially in patients undergoing anticoagulant therapy. We describe a rare case of an acute compartment syndrome of the arm after minor trauma with partial biceps brachii rupture in a patient with warfarin therapy and optimal value of INR. Prompt diagnosis and sur...

  7. Neurological deterioration in the acute phase of minor ischemic stroke is an independent predictor of poor outcomes at 1 year: results from the China National Stroke Registry (CNSR)

    JU Yi; ZHAO Xing-quan; WANG Chun-xue; WANG Yi-long; LIU Gai-fen; WANG Yong-jun

    2013-01-01

    Background The risk of clinical deterioration still exists in the acute phase despite the fact that patients with minor stroke may display less severe symptoms.The impact of this clinical deterioration on long-term outcomes is unknown.We characterized the clinical features of neurological deterioration (ND) in the acute phase of minor ischemic stroke (MIS) and investigated its impact on mid-and long-term outcomes.Methods This was a multi-centered,prospective clinical study involving patients with MIS (the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale,NIHSS <3) recruited from the China National Stroke Registry.Patients were included who had been hospitalized within 24 hours of stroke onset.Baseline characteristics,complication rates during hospitalization,etiology of stroke,as well as 3-,6-,and 12-month post-stroke outcomes were compared between patients with and without ND during the acute phase.Results A number of 368 (15.2%) out of 2424 patients included in the study exhibited ND in the acute phase.Compared to patients without ND,patients with ND had longer hospital stay,increased rate of baseline diabetes,and multiple complications.Multivariate Logistic regression indicated that ND in acute phase was an independent factor predictive of increased dependence (adjusted odds ratio =5.20,95% Cl,3.51-7.70,P <0.001) at 12-month post-stroke.Conclusions The risk of ND in the acute phase is high in patients with MIS.ND in the acute phase is an independent predictor for poor outcomes at 12 months post-stroke onset.

  8. Acute toxicity and environmental risk of teflubenzuron to Daphnia magna, Poecilia reticulata and Lemna minor in the absence and presence of sediment.

    Medeiros, Louise S; Souza, Jaqueline P; Winkaler, Elissandra U; Carraschi, Silvia P; Cruz, Claudinei; Souza-Júnior, Severino C; Machado-Neto, Joaquim G

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the acute toxicity of teflubenzuron (1-(3,5-dichloro-2,4-difluorophenyl)-3-(2,6-difluorobenzoyl)urea) (TFB) for Daphnia magna, Lemna minor and Poecilia reticulata, in the absence and presence of sediment; evaluate the effect of sediment on the TFB bioavailability; and to classify this insecticide according to its environmental poisoning risk for agricultural and aquaculture uses. The tests of TFB acute toxicity were conducted in static system in a completely randomized design with increasing TFB concentrations, and a control group. The TFB has been classified according to the estimated values of EC50 and LC50 by its acute toxicity and environmental risk. The sediment significantly reduced toxicity and bioavailability of TFB in water column. Therefore, the insecticide can be classified as being highly toxic to Daphnia magna, which means the agricultural and aquacultural uses of TFB pose a high risk of environmental toxicity to non-target organisms. However, it was practically non-toxic to L. minor and P. reticulata. PMID:23581694

  9. Thoracic spine pain

    Aleksey Ivanovich Isaikin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic spine pain, or thoracalgia, is one of the common reasons for seeking for medical advice. The epidemiology and semiotics of pain in the thoracic spine unlike in those in the cervical and lumbar spine have not been inadequately studied. The causes of thoracic spine pain are varied: diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and renal systems, injuries to the musculoskeletal structures of the cervical and thoracic portions, which require a thorough differential diagnosis. Facet, costotransverse, and costovertebral joint injuries and myofascial syndrome are the most common causes of musculoskeletal (nonspecific pain in the thoracic spine. True radicular pain is rarely encountered. Traditionally, treatment for thoracalgia includes a combination of non-drug and drug therapies. The cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor meloxicam (movalis may be the drug of choice in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

  10. Endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic diseases

    Davidović Lazar

    2013-01-01

    performed with explantation of stent-graft and open aortic in situ recontruction, followed by esophagectomy and the creation of cervical and gastrical stoma. Conclusion. Having in mind initial results of the 3 main vascular clinics in Belgrade, Serbia, economical situation in our country, as well as the published international results, endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic diseases is indicated in hemodinamicaly unstable patients with acute traumatic aneurysm, or in stabile patients older than 65, as well as in case of chronic diseases of the thoracic aorta in patients with significant comorbid conditions or in patients older than 65 years. Endovascular procedures on the thoracic aorta could be performed, hower, only in high-volume centers with experience in routine open surgery of thoracic aorta.

  11. Thoracic outlet anatomy (image)

    ... spinal vertebra to the rib. There may be pain in the neck and shoulders, and numbess in the last 3 fingers and inner forearm. Thoracic outlet syndrome is usually treated with physical therapy which helps ...

  12. Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery

    McFadden, P. Michael

    2000-01-01

    To reduce the risk, trauma, and expense of intrathoracic surgical treatments, minimally invasive procedures performed with the assistance of fiberoptic video technology have been developed for thoracic and bronchial surgeries. The surgical treatment of nearly every intrathoracic condition can benefit from a video-assisted approach performed through a few small incisions. Video-assisted thoracoscopic and rigid-bronchoscopic surgery have improved the results of thoracic procedures by decreasing...

  13. Determination of the etiological organism during acute exacerbations of COPD and efficacy of azithromycin, ampicillin-sulbactam, ciprofloxacin and cefaclor. Turkish Thoracic Society COPD Working Group.

    Umut, S; Tutluoglu, B; Aydin Tosun, G; Müsellim, B; Erk, M; Yildirim, N; Vahapoglu, H; Yilmaz, N; Arseven, O; Türker, H; Erelel, M; Ilvan, A; Göylüsün, V; Yilmaz Kuyucu, T; Koşar, F; Soysal, F; Gür, A; Unutmaz, S; Oztürk, S; Akman, M

    1999-06-01

    Acute exacerbations, most of which are due to lower respiratory tract infections, cause great morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and most of these are due to lower respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to determine the causative organism and the effects of azithromycin, ampicillin sulbactam (sultamicillin), ciprofloxacin and cefaclor monohydrate therapy in COPD. One hundred and six patients with COPD in acute exacerbation were randomized into four groups for empiric antibiotic treatment following lung function tests and sputum examination. The most common strains isolated from sputum were Haemophilus influenzae (30.8%), Streptoccocus pneumoniae (12%) and Moraxella catarrhalis (7.7%). Azithromycin, sultamicillin, ciprofloxacin and cefaclor monohydrate were found to be effective in treating COPD exacerbations. PMID:10435684

  14. Imaging of thoracic aortic dissection

    Acute thoracic aortic dissection has a high mortality rate if untreated, so the diagnosis must be rapidly made. Multiple imaging techniques are often used. This retrospective study from 1988 to 1993 assesses the usefulness in diagnosis of chest X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scanning, aortography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), trans-thoracic (TTE) and trans-oesophageal (TOE) echocardiography. Forty-two patients with a final clinical diagnosis of dissection were studied. The diagnosis was confirmed in 16 (13 at surgery and three at autopsy). Three died with dissection given as the only cause of death. Chest X-ray abnormalities were seen in all 19 patients with surgery or death from dissection, with a widened mediastinum and/or dilated aorta being present in 17. In the group of 16 patients with surgery or autopsy proof, CT scans found dissections in 9 out of 12 patients studied and correctly classified the type in only five. Aortography was preformed in five, with accurate depiction of dissection and type in all. TTE found dissections in three of eight patients imaged by this method. MRI and TOE were preformed each on two patients, with accurate depiction of dissection and type in each. Because of the relatively low sensitivity of CT scanning in defining aortic dissections Westmead Hospital is currently assessing the use of TOE as the prime imaging modality prior to surgical intervention. 17 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  15. Imaging of thoracic trauma

    Blunt trauma to the chest results from transfer of kinetic energy to the human body. It may cause a wide range of mostly life-threatening injuries, including fractures of the thoracic skeleton, disintegration of the pleural space, contusion or laceration of pulmonary parenchyma and damage to the mediastinal structures. For a systematic approach it may be helpful to follow an organ-based evaluation of thoracic trauma. However, it should be borne in mind that subtle injuries may be associated with serious complications. Trauma to the chest may affect different anatomic compartments at the same time, requiring and extending diagnostic approach. Conventional radiography plays a major role in diagnosting thoracic trauma, complemented by ultrasound examination of the pleura and abdomen. It is well documented that CT scanning represents a major technological improvement for assessment of thoracic trauma. With the advent of fast helical CT scanning this method becomes more applicable for severly traumatized patients and potentially replaces other time-consuming procedures. State-of-the-art imaging of both projection and cross-sectional techniques provides useful information for immediate and appropriate treatment mandatory in patients with thoracic trauma. (orig.)

  16. Thoracic endometriosis: a case report

    Priyank S Chatra

    2012-01-01

    Thoracic endometriosis is a rare form of extrapelvic endometriosis. These patients typically present with catamenial pneumothorax or hemoptysis. Adequate clinical history coupled with HRCT helps in early diagnosis and appropriate management of thoracic endometriosis.

  17. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  18. THORACIC SPINE FRACTURES

    戴力扬

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the unique characteristics and treatment of thoracic spine fractures.Methods. Severty-seven patients with thoracic spine fractures were retrospectively reviewed. Of these, therewere 37 compressior fractures, 34 fracture-dislocations, 3 burst fractures and 3 burst-dislocations. Twenty-six pa-tients had a complete lesion of the spinal cord, 14 sustained a neurologically incomplete injury, and 37 wereneurologically intact. Fifty-three patients were treated nonoperatively and 24 treated operatively.Results. All patients were followed up for 2 ~ 15 years. None of the 26 patients with a complete lesion recov-ered any significant function. Of 37 neurologically intact patients, 13 had local pain although all of them re-mained normal function. Two of 14 patients with incomplete paraplegia returned to normal, 7 recovered some func-tion and 5 did not recovered.Conclusions. E ecause of the unique anatomy and biomechanics of the thoracic spine, the classification common-ly applied to thoracolumbar fractures is not suitable for thoracic fractures. Fusion and instrumentation are indicat-ed when the fractures are unstable, while patients with incomplete lesion of the spinal cord may be the candidatesfor supplemented decompression.

  19. [Single Port Thoracic Surgery and Reduced Port Thoracic Surgery].

    Onodera, Ken; Noda, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    Single port thoracic surgery, reduced port surgery and needlescopic surgery attract attention as one of the minimally invasive surgery in thoracic surgery recently. Single port thoracic surgery was advocated by Rocco in 2004, it was reported usefulness of single port thoracic surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax. The surgical procedure as single (or reduced) port thoracic surgery is roughly divided into the following. One is operated with instruments inserted from the single extended incision, and the other is operated with instruments punctured without extending incision. It is not generally complicated procedures in single port thoracic surgery. Primary spontaneous pneumothorax and biopsy for lung and pleura are considered the surgical indication for single (or reduced) port surgery. It is revealed that single port surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax is less invasive than conventional surgery. Single port and reduced port thoracic surgery will spread furthermore in the future. PMID:27440029

  20. Percutaneous transfemoral placement of a new flexible stent-graft into the thoracic aorta followed by a percutaneous suture-mediated closure of the access site - initial experience

    To evaluate the transfemoral placement of a new, flexible stent-graft into the thoracic aorta and the suture-mediated closure of the femoral access. Patients and Methods: five patients were treated endovascularly with a stent-graft for an aneurysm (n = 3) or acute dissection (n = 2) of the thoracic aorta via a femoral 24 F sheath. The femoral access site was closed with two suture-mediated closure devices after placement of the stent-graft. Results: the aneurysm or the false lumen was excluded from perfusion by the placement of the stent-graft in all patients. Hemostasis at the femoral access site was successful in all patients with the percutaneous suture device. A minor stenosis of the femoral artery was found angiographically in four patients after suture-mediated closure. Besides a reversible renal failure due to the medically induced hypotension for the treatment of an acutely ruptured aneurysm, no complications resulted from the stent-graft placement or the percutaneous suture. Conclusion: the percutaneous transfemoral placement of stent-grafts in the thoracic aorta using a suture-mediated closure of the access site is technically feasible. Long-term results of the technique have to be awaited. (orig.)

  1. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings

    Objective: the aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. Methods: this was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. Results: the majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). Conclusions: it is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. (author)

  2. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Glaucia; Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Hospital Universitario Antonio Pedro (HUAP/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: the aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. Methods: this was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. Results: the majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). Conclusions: it is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. (author)

  3. High frequency oscillatory ventilation as the most appropriate treatment for life threatening thoracic trauma

    2012-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure is common in trauma patients and can be a threat to life in severe thoracic injury. We represent a case of severe respiratory failure after blunt thoracic injury with uncontrollable bleeding and massive air leak which was successfully managed with high frequency oscillatory ventilation. In our opinion high frequency oscillatory ventilation represent a safe and effective treatment of life threatening acute respiratory failure in trauma patients.

  4. Nonnegative minors of minor matrices

    Cardon, David A

    2011-01-01

    Using the relationship between totally nonnegative matrices and directed acyclic weighted planar networks, we show that $2\\times 2$ minors of minor matrices of totally nonnegative matrices are also nonnegative. We give a combinatorial interpretation for the minors of minor matrices in terms of the weights of families of paths in a network.

  5. Digital subtraction angiography of the thoracic aorta

    Grossman, L.B.; Buonocore, E.; Modic, M.T.; Meaney, T.F.

    1984-02-01

    Forty-three patients with acquired and congenital abnormalities of the thoracic aorta were studied using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) after an intravenous bolus injection of 40 ml of contrast material. Abnormalities studied included coarctation, pseudocoarctation, Marfan syndrome, cervical aorta, double aortic arch, aneurysm, dissection, and tumor. Twenty-four patients also had conventional angiography. DSA was accurate in 95% of cases; in the other 5%, involving patients with acute type I dissection, the coronary arteries could not be seen. The authors concluded that in 92% of their patients, DSA could have replaced the standard aortogram.

  6. Digital subtraction angiography of the thoracic aorta

    Forty-three patients with acquired and congenital abnormalities of the thoracic aorta were studied using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) after an intravenous bolus injection of 40 ml of contrast material. Abnormalities studied included coarctation, pseudocoarctation, Marfan syndrome, cervical aorta, double aortic arch, aneurysm, dissection, and tumor. Twenty-four patients also had conventional angiography. DSA was accurate in 95% of cases; in the other 5%, involving patients with acute type I dissection, the coronary arteries could not be seen. The authors concluded that in 92% of their patients, DSA could have replaced the standard aortogram

  7. Thoracic trauma in horses.

    Sprayberry, Kim A; Barrett, Elizabeth J

    2015-04-01

    Traumatic injuries involving the thorax can be superficial, necessitating only routine wound care, or they may extend to deeper tissue planes and disrupt structures immediately vital to respiratory and cardiac function. Diagnostic imaging, especially ultrasound, should be considered part of a comprehensive examination, both at admission and during follow-up. Horses generally respond well to diligent monitoring, intervention for complications, and appropriate medical or surgical care after sustaining traumatic wounds of the thorax. This article reviews the various types of thoracic injury and their management. PMID:25770070

  8. Cervical thoracic duct cyst: a case report

    Park, Sang Hyun; Han, Jong Kyu; Lee, Chi Kyu; Jo, Sung Sik; Kim, Hyung Hwan; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Yung [Chunan Hospital Soonchunhyang University, Chunan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    Thoracic duct cysts are uncommon lesions that most commonly occur in the abdominal and thoracic portion of the thoracic duct: the cervical portion is the rarest location. The main causes of thoracic duct cyst are surgical injuries such as neck dissection and blunt trauma. We report here on a rare case of spontaneous cervical thoracic duct cyst that was noted on ultrasonography and CT. The thoracic duct cyst was confirmed by fine needle aspiration and it was treated by sclerotherapy.

  9. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  10. Thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Ozoa, Glenn; Alves, Daniel; Fish, David E

    2011-08-01

    Of the many clinical entities involving the neck region, one of the most intriguing is thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). TOS is an array of disorders that involves injury to the neurovascular structures in the cervicobrachial region. A classification system based on etiology, symptoms, clinical presentation, and anatomy is supported by most physicians. The first type of TOS is vascular, involving compression of either the subclavian artery or vein. The second type is true neurogenic TOS, which involves injury to the brachial plexus. Finally, the third and most controversial type is referred to as disputed neurogenic TOS. This article aims to provide the reader some understanding of the pathophysiology, workup, and treatment of this fascinating clinical entity. PMID:21824588

  11. Giant thoracic schwannoma presenting with abrupt onset of abdominal pain: a case report

    Yang Isaac

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Giant intradural extramedullary schwannomas of the thoracic spine are not common. Schwannomas, that is, tumors derived from neoplastic Schwann cells, and neurofibromas represent the most common intradural extramedullary spinal lesions. We report the case of a patient with a giant thoracic schwannoma presenting unusually with acute abdominal pain and with delayed neurological impairment. Case presentation A 26-year-old Hispanic man with no previous medical problems presented with acute periumbilical pain. After extensive work-up including an exploratory laparotomy for appendectomy, magnetic resonance imaging scans of the lumbar and thoracic spine revealed a giant intradural extramedullary thoracic schwannoma within the spinal canal posterior to the T9, T10, and T11 vertebral bodies. Magnetic resonance imaging signal prolongation was noted in the spinal cord both rostral and caudal to the schwannoma. The patient underwent an urgent laminectomy from T8 to L1. After sacrificing the T10 root, the tumor was removed en bloc. Postoperatively, the patient improved significantly gaining antigravity strength in both lower extremities. Conclusion The T10 dermatome is represented by the umbilical region. This referred pain may represent a mechanism by which a giant thoracic schwannoma may present as acute abdominal pain. Acute, intense abdominal pain with delayed neurologic deficit is a rare presentation of a thoracic schwannoma but should be considered as a possible cause of abdominal pain presenting without clear etiology. Although these lesions may be delayed in their diagnosis, early diagnosis and treatment may lead to an improved clinical outcome.

  12. Non-intubated thoracic surgery—A survey from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Sorge, Roberto; Akopov, Andrej; Congregado, Miguel; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background A survey amongst the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) members has been performed to investigate the currents trends, rates of adoption as well as potential for future expansion of non-intubated thoracic surgery (NITS) performed under spontaneous ventilation. Methods A 14-question-based questionnaire has been e-mailed to ESTS members. To facilitate the completion of the questionnaire, questions entailed either quantitative or multiple-choice answers. Investigated issues included previous experience with NITS and number of procedures performed, preferred types of anesthesia protocols (i.e., thoracic epidural anesthesia, intercostal or paravertebral blocks, laryngeal mask, use of additional sedation), type of procedures, ideal candidates for NITS, main advantages and technical disadvantages. Non-univocal answer to multiple-choice questions was permitted. Results Out of 105 responders, 62 reported an experience with NITS. The preferred types of anesthesia were intercostal blocks with (59%) or without (50%) sedation, followed by laryngeal mask with sedation (43%) and thoracic epidural anesthesia with sedation (20%). The most frequently performed procedures included thoracoscopic management of recurrent pleural effusion (98%), pleural decortication for empyema thoracis and lung biopsy for interstitial lung disease (26% each); pericardial window and mediastinal biopsy (20% each). More complex procedures such as lobectomy, lung volume reduction surgery and thymectomy have been performed by a minority of responders (2% each). Poor-risk patients due to co-morbidities (70%) and patients with poor pulmonary function (43%) were considered the ideal candidates. Main advantages included faster, recovery (67%), reduced morbidity (59%) and shorter hospital stay with decreased costs (43% each). Reported technical disadvantages included coughing (59%) and poor maneuverability due to diaphragmatic and lung movements (56%). Overall, 69% of responders indicated

  13. Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection.

    Goldfinger, Judith Z; Halperin, Jonathan L; Marin, Michael L; Stewart, Allan S; Eagle, Kim A; Fuster, Valentin

    2014-10-21

    Aortic dissection is the most devastating complication of thoracic aortic disease. In the more than 250 years since thoracic aortic dissection was first described, much has been learned about diseases of the thoracic aorta. In this review, we describe normal thoracic aortic size; risk factors for dissection, including genetic and inflammatory conditions; the underpinnings of genetic diseases associated with aneurysm and dissection, including Marfan syndrome and the role of transforming growth factor beta signaling; data on the role for medical therapies in aneurysmal disease, including beta-blockers, angiotensin receptor blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; prophylactic surgery for aneurysm; surgical techniques for the aortic root; and surgical and endovascular management of aneurysm and dissection for different aortic segments. PMID:25323262

  14. Idiopathic Thoracic Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    Aycan, Abdurrahman; Ozdemir, Seymen; Gonullu, Edip; Bozkına, Cemal

    2016-01-01

    A 33-year-old male patient experienced temporary sensory loss and weakness in the right lower extremity one month prior to admission. The patient was admitted to a private clinic with a three-day history of acute onset of sensory loss and weakness in both lower extremities and was treated and followed up with a prediagnosis of transverse myelitis and the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS). The patient was subsequently transferred to our clinic and the neurologic examination revealed paraplegia in both lower extremities, positive bilateral Babinski signs, and hypesthesia below the T10 dermatome with saddle anesthesia. The patient had urinary incontinence and thoracic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an image of a mass compressing the medulla. PMID:27088028

  15. Idiopathic Thoracic Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    Abdurrahman Aycan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old male patient experienced temporary sensory loss and weakness in the right lower extremity one month prior to admission. The patient was admitted to a private clinic with a three-day history of acute onset of sensory loss and weakness in both lower extremities and was treated and followed up with a prediagnosis of transverse myelitis and the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. The patient was subsequently transferred to our clinic and the neurologic examination revealed paraplegia in both lower extremities, positive bilateral Babinski signs, and hypesthesia below the T10 dermatome with saddle anesthesia. The patient had urinary incontinence and thoracic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed an image of a mass compressing the medulla.

  16. Idiopathic Thoracic Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma.

    Aycan, Abdurrahman; Ozdemir, Seymen; Arslan, Harun; Gonullu, Edip; Bozkına, Cemal

    2016-01-01

    A 33-year-old male patient experienced temporary sensory loss and weakness in the right lower extremity one month prior to admission. The patient was admitted to a private clinic with a three-day history of acute onset of sensory loss and weakness in both lower extremities and was treated and followed up with a prediagnosis of transverse myelitis and the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS). The patient was subsequently transferred to our clinic and the neurologic examination revealed paraplegia in both lower extremities, positive bilateral Babinski signs, and hypesthesia below the T10 dermatome with saddle anesthesia. The patient had urinary incontinence and thoracic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an image of a mass compressing the medulla. PMID:27088028

  17. Minority scholarships

    The American Geological Institute sponsors undergraduate and graduate geoscience scholarships for members of ethnic minority groups. U.S. citizens who are majoring in geology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, planetary geology, or Earth science education, and who are Black, Hispanic or Native American are eligible. Undergraduate awards can be as large as $10,000 a year; graduate awards, $4000 a year. Application deadline is February 1, 1990. Contact AGI Minority Participation Program Scholarships, American Geological Institute, 4220 King Street, Alexandria, VA 22302-1507; tel. 703-379-2480.

  18. Thoracic complications of rheumatoid disease

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a relatively common multisystem disease associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Thoracic disease, both pleural and pulmonary, is a frequent extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis and responsible for approximately 20% of rheumatoid-associated mortality. Rheumatoid disease and its associated therapies can affect all compartments of the lung inciting a range of stereotyped pathological responses and it is not infrequent for multiple disease entities to co-exist. In some instances, development of pulmonary complications may precede typical rheumatological presentation of the disease and be the first indication of an underlying connective tissue disease. The spectrum of thoracic disease related to rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed

  19. Thoracic Wall Reconstruction after Tumor Resection

    HARATI, KAMRAN; Kolbenschlag, Jonas; Behr, Björn; Goertz, Ole; Hirsch, Tobias; Kapalschinski, Nicolai; Ring, Andrej; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Daigeler, Adrien

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical treatment of malignant thoracic wall tumors represents a formidable challenge. In particular, locally advanced tumors that have already infiltrated critical anatomic structures are associated with a high surgical morbidity and can result in full-thickness defects of the thoracic wall. Plastic surgery can reduce this surgical morbidity by reconstructing the thoracic wall through various tissue transfer techniques. Sufficient soft-tissue reconstruction of the thoracic w...

  20. [A case of thoracic actinomycosis].

    Denisova, O A; Cherniavskaia, G M; Beloborodova, É I; Topol'nitskiĭ, E B; Iakimenko, Iu V; Chernogoriuk, G É; Beloborodova, E V; Strezh, Iu A; Vil'danova, L R

    2014-01-01

    A case of thoracic actinomycosis manifest as round shadow in the lung is described. Diagnosis was based on the presence of actinomycetes in a transthoracic lung biopsy sample. Treatment for 3 months resulted in recovery. No relapse was documented during 1 year follow-up period. PMID:25265662

  1. Thoracic trauma in newborn foals

    In a report describing life ending fractures (255 horses) from the Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center, Kentucky (1993 and 1994), 32 foals had rib fractures. The purpose of our study was to examine the incidence of rib fractures in newborn foals on a Thoroughbred studfarm by physical and radiographic examination, to determine factors which may contribute to the problem and to document any clinical consequences. All foals (263) included were examined within 3 days of birth. The thoracic cage was palpated externally for abnormalities and all foals were placed in dorsal recumbency to evaluate thoracic cage symmetry. Radiographs were used to diagnose foals with thoraciccage asymmetry (TCA) and rib fracture (RF). A diagnosis of costochondral dislocation (CD) was made when no radiographic evidence of fracture was present but there was severe TCA, Fifty-five foals (20.1%) had TCA (9 RF), One to 5 ribs were fractured on 9 of 40 radiographic studies. No consequences of the thoracic trauma was detected clinically, radiographically or ultrasonographically in this group of foals or at a 2- and 4-week follow-up examination. The percentage of foals with a history of abnormal parturition was higher in the TCA foals (15%) compared to the normal foals (6.8%). There weremore primiparous dams in the TCA group than in the normal foal group. Fillies (56.6%) had a higher incidence of birth trauma than colts (43.4%), Thisstudy demonstrates that thoracic trauma is often present in newborn foals and may not always be of clinical significance. Dystocia foals and foals from primiparous mares should be considered high risk for thoracic trauma

  2. Computed tomography of the thoracic canal

    Under the adequate CT condition, thoracic canal was studied in twelve normal cases, nine cases of cervical myelopathy with developmental cervical canal stenosis and four cases of thoracic myelopathy with ossification of thoracic yellow ligament. The results were as follows. 1) The adequate condition for delineation of thoracic canal seemed to be nearly 400 EMI units in window width and 150 in level. Scanning angle was permitted within about 100. Bony thoracic canal was well scanned at the center of vertebral body. 2) The configulation of the normal thoracic canal was oval at Th1, Th2 levels and round at Th3-Th10 and large oval at Th11, Th12. The sagittal diameter was almost fixed at each level and the transverse diameter was large at upper and lower levels and small at middle levels. 3) Thoracic canal was narrowed in the cases of cervical myelopathy with developmental cervical canal stenosis especially in sagittal diameter, but not narrowed in transverse diameter. Three of four cases who had myelopathy with ossification of thoracic yellow ligament had narrow canals. 4) There was a good relation between sagittal diameter of cervical canal and thoracic canal. 5) There was a good relation between sagittal diameter of thoracic canal measured by conventional radiographs (Hattori's method) and CT scans. The author thinks that Hattori's method is useful to diagnose the thoracic canal stenosis. (author)

  3. Participation in Research Involving Novel Sampling and Study Designs to Identify Acute HIV-1 Infection among Minority Men Who Have Sex with Men

    Rodriguez, Kristina; Castor, Delivette; Mah, Timothy; Cook, Stephanie; Auguiste, Lex M.; Halkitis, Perry N.; Markowitz, Marty

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 infection disproportionally affects African American and Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) and their inclusion in biomedical and behavioral research is critical to understanding and addressing HIV vulnerability. Using focus groups, we sought to understand the perceptions related to participating in biomedical research of acute/recent HIV-1 infection (AHI) using complex sampling and data collection methods to reach this hidden group at highest risk of acquiring and transmitting HIV....

  4. Minority Games

    New branches of scientific disciplines often have a few paradigmatic models that serve as a testing ground for theories and a starting point for new inquiries. In the late 1990s, one of these models found fertile ground in the growing field of econophysics: the Minority Game (MG), a model for speculative markets that combined conceptual simplicity with interesting emergent behaviour and challenging mathematics. The two basic ingredients were the minority mechanism (a large number of players have to choose one of two alternatives in each round, and the minority wins) and limited rationality (each player has a small set of decision rules, and chooses the more successful ones). Combining these, one observes a phase transition between a crowded and an inefficient market phase, fat-tailed price distributions at the transition, and many other nontrivial effects. Now, seven years after the first paper, three of the key players-Damien Challet, Matteo Marsili and Yi-Cheng Zhang-have published a monograph that summarizes the current state of the science. The book consists of two parts: a 100-page overview of the various aspects of the MG, and reprints of many essential papers. The first chapters of Part I give a well-written description of the motivation and the history behind the MG, and then go into the phenomenology and the mathematical treatment of the model. The authors emphasize the 'physics' underlying the behaviour and give coherent, intuitive explanations that are difficult to extract from the original papers. The mathematics is outlined, but calculations are not carried out in great detail (maybe they could have been included in an appendix). Chapter 4 then discusses how and why the MG is a model for speculative markets, how it can be modified to give a closer fit to observed market statistics (in particular, reproducing the 'stylized facts' of fat-tailed distributions and volatility clustering), and what conclusions one can draw from the behaviour of the MG when

  5. The Thoracic Shape of Hominoids

    Lap Ki Chan

    2014-01-01

    In hominoids, the broad thorax has been assumed to contribute to their dorsal scapular position. However, the dorsoventral diameter of their cranial thorax was found in one study to be longer in hominoids. There are insufficient data on thoracic shape to explain the relationship between broad thorax and dorsal scapular position. The current study presents data on multilevel cross-sectional shape and volume distribution in a range of primates. Biplanar radiographs of intact fluid-preserved cad...

  6. Diagnosis of the posttraumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta in plain film and angiography

    In the diagnosis of acute and chronic posttraumatic false aneurysms of the thoracic aorta the importance of imaging methods can't be overemphasized, especially, since clinical signs often are of no help. The findings in plain films and angiography in 17 patients with posttraumatic aortic rupture are described and discussed. The importance of angiography is stressed. (orig.)

  7. Nanotechnology applications in thoracic surgery.

    Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging, rapidly evolving field with the potential to significantly impact care across the full spectrum of cancer therapy. Of note, several recent nanotechnological advances show particular promise to improve outcomes for thoracic surgical patients. A variety of nanotechnologies are described that offer possible solutions to existing challenges encountered in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Nanotechnology-based imaging platforms have the ability to improve the surgical care of patients with thoracic malignancies through technological advances in intraoperative tumour localization, lymph node mapping and accuracy of tumour resection. Moreover, nanotechnology is poised to revolutionize adjuvant lung cancer therapy. Common chemotherapeutic drugs, such as paclitaxel, docetaxel and doxorubicin, are being formulated using various nanotechnologies to improve drug delivery, whereas nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging technologies can monitor the tumour microenvironment and facilitate molecularly targeted lung cancer therapy. Although early nanotechnology-based delivery systems show promise, the next frontier in lung cancer therapy is the development of 'theranostic' multifunctional NPs capable of integrating diagnosis, drug monitoring, tumour targeting and controlled drug release into various unifying platforms. This article provides an overview of key existing and emerging nanotechnology platforms that may find clinical application in thoracic surgery in the near future. PMID:26843431

  8. Mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst with isolated thoracic symptoms: a case report

    Drescher Robert

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts represent a rare complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Case presentation A 55-year-old man with a history of chronic pancreatitis was admitted with intermittent dyspnea, dysphagia and weight loss. Chest X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large paracardial pancreatic pseudocyst causing cardiac and esophageal compression. Conclusion Mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts are a rare complication of chronic pancreatitis. These pseudocysts may lead to isolated thoracic symptoms. For accurate diagnostic and therapy planning, a multimodal imaging approach is necessary.

  9. FOXE3 mutations predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Medina-Martinez, Olga; Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S.; Reynolds, Corey L.; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Kwartler, Callie S.; Zhu, Lawrence Yang; Peters, Andrew M.; Duan, Xue-Yan; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Dong, Xiurong; Leal, Suzanne M.; Majesky, Mark W.; Swindell, Eric C.; Jamrich, Milan; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The ascending thoracic aorta is designed to withstand biomechanical forces from pulsatile blood. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAADs) occur as a result of genetically triggered defects in aortic structure and a dysfunctional response to these forces. Here, we describe mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXE3 that predispose mutation-bearing individuals to TAAD. We performed exome sequencing of a large family with multiple members with TAADs and identified a rare variant in FOXE3 with an altered amino acid in the DNA-binding domain (p.Asp153His) that segregated with disease in this family. Additional pathogenic FOXE3 variants were identified in unrelated TAAD families. In mice, Foxe3 deficiency reduced smooth muscle cell (SMC) density and impaired SMC differentiation in the ascending aorta. Foxe3 expression was induced in aortic SMCs after transverse aortic constriction, and Foxe3 deficiency increased SMC apoptosis and ascending aortic rupture with increased aortic pressure. These phenotypes were rescued by inhibiting p53 activity, either by administration of a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), or by crossing Foxe3–/– mice with p53–/– mice. Our data demonstrate that FOXE3 mutations lead to a reduced number of aortic SMCs during development and increased SMC apoptosis in the ascending aorta in response to increased biomechanical forces, thus defining an additional molecular pathway that leads to familial thoracic aortic disease. PMID:26854927

  10. Idiopathic Thoracic Epidural Lipomatosis with Chest Pain

    Lee, Sang-Beom; Park, Hyung-Ki; Chang, Jae-Chil; Jin, So-Young

    2011-01-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) is an overgrowth of the normally encapsulated adipose tissue in the epidural space around the spinal cord in the thoracic and lumbar spine causing compression of the neural components. Idiopathic SEL in non-obese patients is exceptional. Idiopathic SEL can result in thoracic myelopathy and lumbar radiculopathy. A thoracic radiculopathy due to idiopathic SEL has not been reported yet. We report a case of idiopathic SEL with intractable chest pain and paresthes...

  11. Traumatic injury of the thoracic duct.

    Guzman, A E; Rossi, L; Witte, C L; Smyth, S

    2002-03-01

    Injuries to the thoracic duct are infrequent but may become life-threatening when chylous leakage persists. This report describes 6 patients with such injuries in whom the leakage resolved spontaneously in one, was corrected using microsurgical lymphatic repair or lymphatic-venous anastomosis in two, successfully treated either by ligation of the thoracic duct or insertion of a peritoneovenous shunt in two, and was eventually controlled after bilateral pleurodesis and thoracic duct ligation by insertion of a peritoneo-venous shunt in one. Conventional lymphography is superior to lymphoscintigraphy and is usually required to document disruption of the thoracic duct. PMID:11939572

  12. Percutaneous thoracic intervertebral disc nucleoplasty: technical notes from 3 patients with painful thoracic disc herniations

    Chua Hai Liang, N.; Gultuna, I.; Riezebos, P.; Beems, T.; Vissers, K.C.P.

    2011-01-01

    Symptomatic thoracic disc herniation is an uncommon condition and early surgical approaches were associated with significant morbidity and even mortality. We are the first to describe the technique of percutaneous thoracic nucleoplasty in three patients with severe radicular pain due to thoracic dis

  13. A Smart Solution for Solving Acute Angulations during Frozen Elephant Trunk Implantation.

    Czerny, Martin; Grabenwöger, Martin; von Segesser, Ludwig

    2016-03-01

    Acute angulations of native thoracic aortic segments affect treatment strategies for acute and chronic thoracic aortic pathology. These angulations might present an issue not only in segments where thoracic endovascular aortic repair is planned but also in segments where open repair is intended. Consequently, clinical scenarios arise where there is need for adapting strategies in frozen elephant trunk implantation. In this conceptual report, we do describe a technical modification to solve this issue. PMID:26166290

  14. Warm fresh whole blood and thoracic traumain iraq and afghanistan

    Ryan J Keneally

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thoracic trauma occurred in 10% of the patients seen at US military treatment facilities in Iraq and Afghanistan and 52% of those patients were transfused. Among those transfused, 281 patients received warm fresh whole blood. A previous report documented improved survival with warm fresh whole blood in patients injured in combat without stratification by injury pattern. A later report described an increase in acute lung injuries after its administration. Survivorship and warm fresh whole blood have never been analyzed in a subpopulation at highest risk for lung injuries, such as patients with thoracic trauma. There may be a heterogeneous relationship between whole blood and survival based on likelihood of a concomitant pulmonary injury. In this report, the relationship between warm fresh whole blood and survivorship was analyzed among patients at highest risk for concomitant pulmonary injuries. Materials and Methods: Patients with thoracic trauma who received a transfusion were identified in the Joint Theater Trauma Registry. Gross mortality rates were compared between whole blood recipients and patients transfused with component therapy only. The association between each blood component and mortality was determined in a regression model. The overall mortality risk was compared between warm fresh whole blood recipients and non-recipients. Results: Patients transfused with warm fresh whole blood in addition to component therapy had a higher mortality rate than patients transfused only separated blood components (21.3% vs. 12.8%, P < 0.001. When controlling for covariates, transfusion of warm fresh whole blood in addition to component therapy was not associated with increased mortality risk compared with the transfusion of component therapy only (OR 1.247 [95% CI 0.760-2.048], P = 0.382. Conclusion: Patients with combat related thoracic trauma transfused with warm fresh whole blood were not at increased risk for mortality compared to

  15. Pneumothorax in severe thoracic traumas

    The authors reviewed CT scans and supine chest X-ray of 47 patients affected by severe thoracic trauma, examined in 1985-86. The sensibility of the two methodologies in the assessment of pneumothorax was compared. CT detected 25 pneumothorax, whereas supine chest X-ray allowed a diagnosis in 18 cases only. In 8 of the latter (44.4%) the diagnosis was made possible by the presence of indirect signs of pneumothorax only - the most frequent being the deep sulcus sign. The characterization of pneumothorax is important especially in the patients who need to be treated with mechanical ventilation therapy, or who are to undergo surgery in total anaesthesia

  16. Electrocardiographic changes by thoracic irradiation

    A study on radiation induced electrocardiographic changes concomitant and after thoracic irradiation was conducted on 50 histopathologically proved cases of cancer including carcinoma of the breast, carcinoma of the oesophague (middle 1/3) and Hodgkin's disease (above diaphragm). All cases were treated by tele Co60 therapy. No cardiac abnormality was noticed after 2000 rads in 2 weeks. Eighteen percent of the carcinoma of the oesophagus and 20 percent of carcinoma of the breast (left side) depicted ECG changes after 4400 rads in 4.5 weeks. None of the case of carcinoma of the breast (Rt. side) showed any change in electro-cardiogram post-therapy. All these findings persisted in subsequent follow ups of 6 months. All those patients except one showing ECG changes also found to have sinus tachycardia. Thus there is a considerable risk of radiation induced heart disease in cancer patients after incidental thoracic irradiation by radiation doses of the order of 4400 rads in 4 weeks or more. Even though the efficacy of radiation therapy can not be compromised in an attempt to protect the heart, the regular ECG examination after 4000 rads in such cases is recommended. (author). 2 tables, 3 figures, 9 refs

  17. The Thoracic Shape of Hominoids

    Lap Ki Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In hominoids, the broad thorax has been assumed to contribute to their dorsal scapular position. However, the dorsoventral diameter of their cranial thorax was found in one study to be longer in hominoids. There are insufficient data on thoracic shape to explain the relationship between broad thorax and dorsal scapular position. The current study presents data on multilevel cross-sectional shape and volume distribution in a range of primates. Biplanar radiographs of intact fluid-preserved cadavers were taken to measure the cross-sectional shape of ten equally spaced levels through the sternum (called decisternal levels and the relative volume of the nine intervening thoracic segments. It was found that the cranial thorax of hominoids is larger and broader (except in the first two decisternal levels than that of other primates. The cranial thorax of hominoids has a longer dorsoventral diameter because the increase in dorsoventral diameter caused by the increase in the volume of the cranial thorax overcompensates for the decrease caused by the broadening of the cranial thorax. The larger and broader cranial thorax in hominoids can be explained as a locomotor adaptation for scapular gliding and as a respiratory adaptation for reducing the effects of orthograde posture on ventilation-perfusion inequality.

  18. The thoracic shape of hominoids.

    Chan, Lap Ki

    2014-01-01

    In hominoids, the broad thorax has been assumed to contribute to their dorsal scapular position. However, the dorsoventral diameter of their cranial thorax was found in one study to be longer in hominoids. There are insufficient data on thoracic shape to explain the relationship between broad thorax and dorsal scapular position. The current study presents data on multilevel cross-sectional shape and volume distribution in a range of primates. Biplanar radiographs of intact fluid-preserved cadavers were taken to measure the cross-sectional shape of ten equally spaced levels through the sternum (called decisternal levels) and the relative volume of the nine intervening thoracic segments. It was found that the cranial thorax of hominoids is larger and broader (except in the first two decisternal levels) than that of other primates. The cranial thorax of hominoids has a longer dorsoventral diameter because the increase in dorsoventral diameter caused by the increase in the volume of the cranial thorax overcompensates for the decrease caused by the broadening of the cranial thorax. The larger and broader cranial thorax in hominoids can be explained as a locomotor adaptation for scapular gliding and as a respiratory adaptation for reducing the effects of orthograde posture on ventilation-perfusion inequality. PMID:24818026

  19. Cross-sectional imaging of thoracic and abdominal complications of cerebrospinal fluid shunt catheters.

    Bolster, Ferdia; Fardanesh, Reza; Morgan, Tara; Katz, Douglas S; Daly, Barry

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to review the imaging findings of distal (thoracic and abdominal) complications related to ventriculo-peritoneal (VP), ventriculo-pleural (VPL), and ventriculo-atrial (VA) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt catheter placement. Institution review board-approved single-center study of patients with thoracic and abdominal CSF catheter-related complications on cross-sectional imaging examinations over a 14-year period was performed. Clinical presentation, patient demographics, prior medical history, and subsequent surgical treatment were recorded. The presence or absence of CSF catheter-related infection and/or acute hydrocephalus on cross-sectional imaging was also recorded. There were 81 distal CSF catheter-related complications identified on 47 thoracic or abdominal imaging examinations in 30 patients (age 5-80 years, mean 39.3 years), most often on CT (CT = 42, MRI = 1, US = 4). Complications included 38 intraperitoneal and 11 extraperitoneal fluid collections. Extraperitoneal collections included nine abdominal wall subcutaneous (SC) pseudocysts associated with shunt migration and obesity, an intrapleural pseudocyst, and a breast pseudocyst. There were also two large VPL-related pleural effusions, a fractured catheter in the SC tissues, and a large VA shunt thrombus within the right atrium. Ten patients (33.3 %) had culture-positive infection from CSF or shunt catheter samples. Ten patients (33.3 %) had features of temporally related acute or worsening hydrocephalus on neuroimaging. In four of these patients, the detection of thoracic and abdominal complications on CT preceded and predicted the findings of acute hydrocephalus on cranial imaging. Thoracic and abdominal complications of CSF shunts, as can be identified on CT,  include shunt infection and/or obstruction, may be both multiple and recurrent, and may be predictive of concurrent acute intracranial problems. PMID:26610766

  20. MRI findings in thoracic outlet syndrome

    Aralasmak, Ayse; Sharifov, Rasul; Kilicarslan, Rukiye; Alkan, Alpay [Bezmialem Vakif University, Department of Radiology, Fatih/Istanbul (Turkey); Cevikol, Can; Karaali, Kamil; Senol, Utku [Akdeniz University, Department of Radiology, Antalya (Turkey)

    2012-11-15

    We discuss MRI findings in patients with thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). A total of 100 neurovascular bundles were evaluated in the interscalene triangle (IS), costoclavicular (CC), and retropectoralis minor (RPM) spaces. To exclude neurogenic abnormality, MRIs of the cervical spine and brachial plexus (BPL) were obtained in neutral. To exclude compression on neurovascular bundles, sagittal T1W images were obtained vertical to the longitudinal axis of BPL from spinal cord to the medial part of the humerus, in abduction and neutral. To exclude vascular TOS, MR angiography (MRA) and venography (MRV) of the subclavian artery (SA) and vein (SV) in abduction were obtained. If there is compression on the vessels, MRA and MRV of the subclavian vessels were repeated in neutral. Seventy-one neurovascular bundles were found to be abnormal: 16 arterial-venous-neurogenic, 20 neurogenic, 1 arterial, 15 venous, 8 arterial-venous, 3 arterial-neurogenic, and 8 venous-neurogenic TOS. Overall, neurogenic TOS was noted in 69%, venous TOS in 66%, and arterial TOS in 39%. The neurovascular bundle was most commonly compressed in the CC, mostly secondary to position, and very rarely compressed in the RPM. The cause of TOS was congenital bone variations in 36%, congenital fibromuscular anomalies in 11%, and position in 53%. In 5%, there was unilateral brachial plexitis in addition to compression of the neurovascular bundle. Severe cervical spondylosis was noted in 14%, contributing to TOS symptoms. For evaluation of patients with TOS, visualization of the brachial plexus and cervical spine and dynamic evaluation of neurovascular bundles in the cervicothoracobrachial region are mandatory. (orig.)

  1. [Thoracic nocardiosis - a clinical report].

    Vale, Artur; Guerra, Miguel; Martins, Daniel; Lameiras, Angelina; Miranda, José; Vouga, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Nocardia genus microorganisms are ubiquitous, Gram positive aerobic bacterias, responsible for disease mainly in immunocompromised hosts, with cellular immune response commitment. Inhalation is the main form of transmition and pulmonary disease is the most frequent presentation. Dissemination may occur by contiguity and also via hematogenous. The clinical and imaging presentation is not specific, and diagnosis is obtained after identification of Nocardia bacteria in biological samples. Since there are no reliable studies that indicate the best therapeutic option, treatment should be individualized and based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Surgical drainage should also be considered in all patients. The authors present a clinical case of a patient with thoracic nocardiosis, and make a short literature review on the theme. PMID:25596394

  2. 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) and prognostic factors for cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer. Methods: Between July 1998 and July 2001, 33 patients with cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer were treated with 3D CRT(2 Gy per day, 5 sessions a week to a total dose of 66-68 Gy over 6-7 weeks). Acute toxicities and survival rates were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier method and prognostic factors were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard model. Results: The 1-, 2-, 3-year local control rates were 87.9%, 75.8%, 45.5% respectively. The 1-, 2-, 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 72.7%, 60.6%, 30.3% and 78.8%, 66.8%, 44.2% respectively. GradeI- II acute esophagitis and bronchitis were the most common radiation side effects. Multivariate analysis revealed that the depth of primary tumor invasion, regional lymph node metastasis and tumor length were independent prognostic factors (P<0.05). Conclusions: 3D CRT can be considered as an effective and feasible approach to cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer treatment. The depth of primary tumor invasion, regional lymph node status and tumor length are important prognostic indicators for cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer. (authors)

  3. Analysis of Thoracic Impact Responses and Injury Prediction by using FE Thoracic Model

    Číhalová, Lenka

    2009-01-01

    The previously developed thoracic finite element model [8, 9] was used to investigate the human thoracic dynamic responses associated with the frontal, lateral and oblique loading and to predict injuries of the thorax associated with the frontal loading. The thoracic model was developed [8, 9] to improve the human articulated rigid body model ROBBY (the model of an average adult male) [13, 14], which was previously developed at the University of West Bohemia in cooperation with ESI Group (Eng...

  4. Management of a Left Internal Thoracic Artery Graft Injury during Left Thoracotomy for Thoracic Surgery.

    Oates, Matthew; Yadav, Sumit; Saxena, Pankaj

    2016-07-01

    There have been some recent reports on the surgical treatment of lung cancer in patients following previous coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Use of internal thoracic artery graft is a gold standard in cardiac surgery with superior long-term patency. Left internal thoracic artery graft is usually patent during left lung resection in patients who present to the surgeon with an operable lung cancer. We have presented our institutional experience with left-sided thoracic surgery in patients who have had previous coronary artery surgery with a patent internal thoracic artery graft. PMID:26907619

  5. An aberrant right lateral branch from right internal thoracic artery

    Salve VM; Ratnaprabha C

    2010-01-01

    The internal thoracic artery is the largest artery of the thoracic wall. The internal thoracic artery is often mobilized for coronary artery bypass grafting. During routine dissection (MBBS Batch 2009-2010) of a middle aged male cadaver at Dr. Pinnamaneni Siddhartha Institute of Medical Sciences & Research Foundation, Gannavaram, (INDIA); an aberrant right lateral branch from right internal thoracic artery was found. It arose from right internal thoracic artery behind right first rib. It ran ...

  6. Thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis in a horse.

    Toribio, R E; Kohn, C W; Lawrence, A E; Hardy, J; Hutt, J A

    1999-05-01

    A 5-year-old Quarter Horse mare was examined because of lethargy, fever, and weight loss of 1 month's duration. Thoracic auscultation revealed decreased lung sounds cranioventrally. Thoracic ultrasonography revealed bilateral anechoic areas with hyperechoic strands, consistent with pleural effusion and fibrin tags. A large amount of free fluid was evident during abdominal ultrasonography. Abnormalities included anemia, hyperproteinemia, hyperglobulinemia, hyperfibrinogenemia, and hypoalbuminemia. Thoracic radiography revealed alveolar infiltrates in the cranial and caudoventral lung fields. A cavitary mass, consistent with an abscess, could be seen caudodorsal to the crura of the diaphragm. Ultrasonographic evaluation of this area revealed a hypoechoic mass with septations. Bilateral thoracocentesis was performed. Bacterial culture of the pleural fluid did not yield growth, but Blastomyces dermatitidis was isolated from pleural fluid, abdominal fluid, and an aspirate of the abscess. The mare was euthanatized, and a diagnosis of thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis was confirmed at necropsy. PMID:10319179

  7. May 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society notes

    Robbins RA

    2013-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on Wednesday, 5/15/2013 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, thoracic surgery, and radiology communities. Dr. George Parides will have served his 2 year tenure as Arizona Thoracic Society President by July, 2013. However, he will be unable to attend the June meeting and for this reason Presidential elections were held. Dr. Lewis Wes...

  8. Emergency Thoracotomy- Isolated Internal Thoracic Artery Injury

    Islam S; Shah J; Narayn Singh V

    2014-01-01

    Aim: A tension haemothorax is an uncommon injury after penetrating chest trauma. Presentation of a Case: We present a case in which a 55 year old man sustained multiple thoracic stab wounds. He had emergency right antero-lateral thoracotomy and laparotomy. A massive haemothorax secondary to complete disruption of right internal mammary artery and a laceration to middle lobe of right lung was noticed. Conclusion: Penetrating thoracic injury with isolated internal mammary injury is a very rare ...

  9. Spontaneous thoracic air-leakage syndrome in patients following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Causes, CT-follow up and patient outcome

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the acute and follow-up imaging features, clinical constellation and outcome of patients with thoracic air-leakage syndrome following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Methods: Patients with evidence of thoracic air-leakage, i.e. spontaneous pneumomediastinum, spontaneous pneumothorax or interstitial emphysema after allo-HCT were retrospectively identified by a chart review. Acute and follow-up morphology, duration and patient outcome were analyzed on CT (HRCT or MSCT with HR-reconstructions). Correlation was made with histological results of transbronchial biopsy. Results: The 6 patients included (3 male and 3 female, 14-64 years old) with thoracic air-leakage after allo-HCT all had histologically proven bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) or bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP). Thoracic air-leakage consisted of spontaneous pneumomediastinum associated with active invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in 4/6 and spontaneous pneumothorax or interstitial emphysema each in 1/6 patients. Duration of thoracic air-leakage was 7-135 days. Of the patients with spontaneous pneumomediastinum, 3/4 died of IPA. One patient survived until complete regression of spontaneous pneumomediastinum. One patient died 7 days after spontaneous pneumothorax and one survived developing chronic interstitial emphysema. Conclusion: In all cases, thoracic air-leakage was associated to BO or BOOP. In the majority of cases with additional IPA, thoracic air-leakage is more indicative for severity of pulmonary disease than a life-threatening entity itself

  10. Spontaneous thoracic air-leakage syndrome in patients following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Causes, CT-follow up and patient outcome

    Vogel, Monika [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)]. E-mail: monika.vogel@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Brodoefel, Harald [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Bethge, Wolfgang [Department of Internal Medicine-Oncology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Ottfried-Mueller-Str. 5, 72070 Tuebingen (Germany); Faul, Christoph [Department of Internal Medicine-Oncology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Ottfried-Mueller-Str. 5, 72070 Tuebingen (Germany); Hartmann, Joerg [Department of Internal Medicine-Oncology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Ottfried-Mueller-Str. 5, 72070 Tuebingen (Germany); Schimmel, Heiko [Department of Pathology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Liebermeisterstrasse 8, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Wehrmann, Manfred [Department of Pathology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Liebermeisterstrasse 8, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Claussen, Claus D. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Horger, Marius [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the acute and follow-up imaging features, clinical constellation and outcome of patients with thoracic air-leakage syndrome following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Methods: Patients with evidence of thoracic air-leakage, i.e. spontaneous pneumomediastinum, spontaneous pneumothorax or interstitial emphysema after allo-HCT were retrospectively identified by a chart review. Acute and follow-up morphology, duration and patient outcome were analyzed on CT (HRCT or MSCT with HR-reconstructions). Correlation was made with histological results of transbronchial biopsy. Results: The 6 patients included (3 male and 3 female, 14-64 years old) with thoracic air-leakage after allo-HCT all had histologically proven bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) or bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP). Thoracic air-leakage consisted of spontaneous pneumomediastinum associated with active invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in 4/6 and spontaneous pneumothorax or interstitial emphysema each in 1/6 patients. Duration of thoracic air-leakage was 7-135 days. Of the patients with spontaneous pneumomediastinum, 3/4 died of IPA. One patient survived until complete regression of spontaneous pneumomediastinum. One patient died 7 days after spontaneous pneumothorax and one survived developing chronic interstitial emphysema. Conclusion: In all cases, thoracic air-leakage was associated to BO or BOOP. In the majority of cases with additional IPA, thoracic air-leakage is more indicative for severity of pulmonary disease than a life-threatening entity itself.

  11. Thoracic radiographic findings in dogs infected with Rickettsia rickettsii

    Sixteen beagle dogs were injected intradermally with Rickettsia rickettsii. The dogs were divided into four groups (n = 4): 1) infected, non-treated control; 2) infected, treated with doxycycline; 3) infected, treated with doxycycline and an anti-inflammatory dose of corticosteroid; and 4) infected, treated with doxycycline and an immunosuppressive dose of corticosteroid. Thoracic radiographs were made and ocular fluorescein angiography was performed on days 6, 10, 17 post-inoculation. A mild interstitial lung opacity was noted in 4/16 dogs on day 6, 5/16 on day 10 and 3/16 on day 17 post-inoculation. Increased retinal vascular permeability was noted in 8/16 dogs on day 6, 3/16 on day 10 and 1/16 on day 17 post-inoculation. Correlation between the presence of radiographic and retinal lesions was not significant (p = 0.08). Eleven, naturally infected, dogs with thoracic radiographs and a final diagnosis of RMSF were also evaluated. Four of the 11 dogs had an unstructured interstitial pattern. Dogs with acute, experimentally-infected or naturally-occurring RMSF may have subtle pulmonary changes characterized by an unstructured interstitial pattern

  12. Endovascular stent-graft management of thoracic aortic diseases

    Dake, Michael D. E-mail: mddake@stanford.edu

    2001-07-01

    The traditional standard therapy for descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is open operative repair with graft replacement of the diseased aortic segment. Despite important advances in surgical techniques, anesthetic management, and post-operative care over the last 30 years, the mortality and morbidity of surgery remains considerable, especially in patients at high risk for thoracotomy because of coexisting severe cardiopulmonary abnormalities or other medical diseases. The advent of endovascular stent-graft technology provides an alternative to open surgery for selected patients with TAA. The initial experience suggests that stent-graft therapy potentially may reduce the operative risk, hospital stay and procedural expenses of TAA repair. These potential benefits are especially attractive for patients at high risk for open TAA repair. Current results of endovascular TAA therapy document operative mortalities of between 0 and 4%, aneurysm thrombosis in 90 and 100% of cases, and paraplegia as a complication in 0 and 1.6% of patients. The early success of stent-graft repair of TAA has fostered the application of these devices for the management of a wide variety of thoracic aortic pathologies, including acute and chronic dissection, intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, traumatic injuries, and other diseases. The results of prospective controlled trials that compare the outcomes of stent-graft therapy with those of surgical treatment in patients with specific types of aortic disease are anxiously awaited before recommendations regarding the general use of these new devices can be made with confidence.

  13. Endovascular Repair of Localized Pathological Lesions of the Descending Thoracic Aorta: Midterm Results

    The endoluminal stent-graft represents an attractive and a less invasive technique for treatment of various diseases of the descending thoracic aorta. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Talent endovascular stent-graft for the treatment of various localized diseases of the descending thoracic aorta. Over a 3-year period, Talent thoracic endografts were placed in 40 patients with a high surgical risk, presenting a localized lesion of the descending thoracic aorta: degenerative aneurysm (n = 13), acute traumatic rupture (n = 11), acute Stanford type B aortic dissection (n = 6), false aneurysm (n = 7), and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (n = 3). Fifteen patients (37.5%) were treated as emergencies. The feasibility of endovascular treatment and sizing of the aorta and stent-grafts were determined preoperatively by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and intraoperative angiography. Immediate and mid-term technical and clinical success was assessed by clinical and MRA follow-up. Endovascular treatment was completed successfully in all 40 patients, with no conversion to open repair or intraoperative mortality. The mean operative time was 37.5 ± 7 min. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 10% (n = 4), all in emergency cases, for causes not related to the endograft. The primary technical success was 92.5%. The mean follow-up period was 15 ± 5 months. The survival rate was 95% (n = 35). Diminution of the aneurismal size was observed in 47.5% (n = 19). We conclude that endovascular treatment of the various localized diseases of the descending thoracic aorta is a promising, feasible, alternative technique to open surgery in well-selected patients

  14. Exposure to 100% Oxygen Abolishes the Impairment of Fracture Healing after Thoracic Trauma.

    Kemmler, Julia; Bindl, Ronny; McCook, Oscar; Wagner, Florian; Gröger, Michael; Wagner, Katja; Scheuerle, Angelika; Radermacher, Peter; Ignatius, Anita

    2015-01-01

    In polytrauma patients a thoracic trauma is one of the most critical injuries and an important trigger of post-traumatic inflammation. About 50% of patients with thoracic trauma are additionally affected by bone fractures. The risk for fracture malunion is considerably increased in such patients, the pathomechanisms being poorly understood. Thoracic trauma causes regional alveolar hypoxia and, subsequently, hypoxemia, which in turn triggers local and systemic inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to unravel the role of oxygen in impaired bone regeneration after thoracic trauma. We hypothesized that short-term breathing of 100% oxygen in the early post-traumatic phase ameliorates inflammation and improves bone regeneration. Mice underwent a femur osteotomy alone or combined with blunt chest trauma 100% oxygen was administered immediately after trauma for two separate 3 hour intervals. Arterial blood gas tensions, microcirculatory perfusion and oxygenation were assessed at 3, 9 and 24 hours after injury. Inflammatory cytokines and markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress were measured in plasma, lung and fracture hematoma. Bone healing was assessed on day 7, 14 and 21. Thoracic trauma induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation and impaired bone healing. Short-term exposure to 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase significantly attenuated systemic and local inflammatory responses and improved fracture healing without provoking toxic side effects, suggesting that hyperoxia could induce anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative effects after severe injury. These results suggest that breathing of 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase might reduce the risk of poorly healing fractures in severely injured patients. PMID:26147725

  15. Exposure to 100% Oxygen Abolishes the Impairment of Fracture Healing after Thoracic Trauma.

    Julia Kemmler

    Full Text Available In polytrauma patients a thoracic trauma is one of the most critical injuries and an important trigger of post-traumatic inflammation. About 50% of patients with thoracic trauma are additionally affected by bone fractures. The risk for fracture malunion is considerably increased in such patients, the pathomechanisms being poorly understood. Thoracic trauma causes regional alveolar hypoxia and, subsequently, hypoxemia, which in turn triggers local and systemic inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to unravel the role of oxygen in impaired bone regeneration after thoracic trauma. We hypothesized that short-term breathing of 100% oxygen in the early post-traumatic phase ameliorates inflammation and improves bone regeneration. Mice underwent a femur osteotomy alone or combined with blunt chest trauma 100% oxygen was administered immediately after trauma for two separate 3 hour intervals. Arterial blood gas tensions, microcirculatory perfusion and oxygenation were assessed at 3, 9 and 24 hours after injury. Inflammatory cytokines and markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress were measured in plasma, lung and fracture hematoma. Bone healing was assessed on day 7, 14 and 21. Thoracic trauma induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation and impaired bone healing. Short-term exposure to 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase significantly attenuated systemic and local inflammatory responses and improved fracture healing without provoking toxic side effects, suggesting that hyperoxia could induce anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative effects after severe injury. These results suggest that breathing of 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase might reduce the risk of poorly healing fractures in severely injured patients.

  16. Thoracic CT in the ED: a study of thoracic computed tomography utilisation.

    Williams, E

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the use of thoracic Computed Tomography (CT) in the Emergency Department of a Dublin Academic Teaching Hospital over a six month period. Data was retrieved using the hospital\\'s computerised information system. There were 202 referrals in total for thoracic CT from the Emergency Department during this time period. The most common indication for thoracic CT referral was for the investigation of pulmonary embolism with 127 (63%) referrals. There were 40 (25%) referrals for suspected malignancy and lung disease, whilst 8 (4%) of the referrals were for investigation of thoracic aortic dissection, 8 (4%) for infection, and 6 (3%) were for investigation of thoracic injury. Only 8 (4%) of all referrals were for investigation of injury as a result of chest trauma.

  17. Modern CT diagnosis of acute thoracic and abdominal trauma

    Purpose. To evaluate a modified algorithm in the diagnostic management of polytraumatized patients by using whole body multislice CT (MSCT) as primary diagnostic tool.Material and methods. Between June 1999 and October 2000 532 polytraumatized patients were referred to the emergency department. 336 polytraumatized patients were primarily evaluated using whole body MSCT according to the ''Innsbruck Emergency Algorithm''. MSCT is performed immediately after cardiovascular stabilization of the patient. During the initial stabilization period free intraabdominal fluid is excluded or demonstrated by abdominal ultrasound. Time-consuming conventional radiographs are omitted with exception of an optional chest X-ray. In patients with suspected or obvious arterial injuries or fractures the multislice-CT-dataset is used to perform 2D and 3D reconstructions in order to optimize visualization of additional skeletal and vascular injuries.Results. By means of whole body MSCT it was possible to detect all injuries. The diagnostic advantage of whole body MSCT as compared to conventional X-ray was analyzed in 111 consecutive polytraumatized patients with an injury severity score (ISS) of 34.77. The early use of MSCT shortened the time for diagnostic work-up substantially (approximately 50%).Conclusion. Whole body multislice-CT used as primary diagnostic tool in the management of polytraumatized patients allows for a fast, accurate and comprehensive diagnostic work-up. (orig.)

  18. Minority Women's Health

    ... migrant issues Access to health care Language barriers Human trafficking Taking care of your health Immunizations and screenings Sharing family health history Health before pregnancy More... Government in action on minority women's health Minority partnerships ...

  19. Penetrating injuries to the thoracic great vessels.

    Demetriades, D

    1997-01-01

    Penetrating injuries to the thoracic great vessels have been diagnosed with increased frequency because of the escalating use of automatic weapons. The overall incidence is 5.3% of gunshot wounds and 2% of stab wounds to the chest. Most of these patients reach the hospital dead or in severe shock. The overall mortality of thoracic aortic injuries is higher than 90% and in subclavian vascular injuries higher than 65%. In the prehospital phase, the "scoop and run" policy offers the best chances of survival and no attempts should be made for any form of stabilization. Investigations should be reserved only for fairly stable patients. Angiography, color flow Doppler, and transesophageal echocardiography may be useful in selected cases. Patients in cardiac arrest or imminent cardiac arrest may benefit from an emergency room thoracotomy. The surgical approach to specific thoracic great vessels is described. PMID:9271743

  20. Emergency Thoracotomy- Isolated Internal Thoracic Artery Injury

    Islam S

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A tension haemothorax is an uncommon injury after penetrating chest trauma. Presentation of a Case: We present a case in which a 55 year old man sustained multiple thoracic stab wounds. He had emergency right antero-lateral thoracotomy and laparotomy. A massive haemothorax secondary to complete disruption of right internal mammary artery and a laceration to middle lobe of right lung was noticed. Conclusion: Penetrating thoracic injury with isolated internal mammary injury is a very rare cause of massive haemothorax and associated with high mortality. Emergent thoracotomy can be life-saving for these patients. Introduction: Anterior thoracic penetrating injuries may result in life-threatening complications. One of these is massive tension haemothorax with pericardial tamponade as a result of stab wounds to the internal mammary artery.

  1. Failures and complications of thoracic drainage

    Đorđević Ivana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Thoracic drainage is a surgical procedure for introducing a drain into the pleural space to drain its contents. Using this method, the pleura is discharged and set to the physiological state which enables the reexpansion of the lungs. The aim of the study was to prove that the use of modern principles and protocols of thoracic drainage significantly reduces the occurrence of failures and complications, rendering the treatment more efficient. Methods. The study included 967 patients treated by thoracic drainage within the period from January 1, 1989 to June 1, 2000. The studied patients were divided into 2 groups: group A of 463 patients treated in the period from January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1994 in whom 386 pleural drainage (83.36% were performed, and group B of 602 patients treated form January 1, 1995 to June 1, 2000 in whom 581 pleural drainage (96.51% were performed. The patients of the group A were drained using the classical standards of thoracic drainage by the general surgeons. The patients of the group B, however, were drained using the modern standards of thoracic drainage by the thoracic surgeons, and the general surgeons trained for this kind of the surgery. Results. The study showed that better results were achieved in the treatment of the patients from the group B. The total incidence of the failures and complications of thoracic drainage decreased from 36.52% (group A to 12.73% (group B. The mean length of hospitalization of the patients without complications in the group A was 19.5 days versus 10 days in the group B. The mean length of the treatment of the patients with failures and complications of the drainage in the group A was 33.5 days versus 17.5 days in the group B. Conclusion. The shorter length of hospitalization and the lower morbidity of the studied patients were considered to be the result of the correct treatment using modern principles of thoracic drainage, a suitable surgical technique, and a

  2. Thoracic Actinomycosis: A Rare Occurrence.

    Jehangir, Waqas; Vaidya, Bhumesh; Enakuaa, Souad; Raoof, Nazar; Middleton, John R; Yousif, Abdalla

    2016-03-21

    Actinomyces israelii is a branching anaerobic bacilli microorganism that can be identified as normal flora throughout various portions of the human alimentary canal. It is crucial to establish a diagnosis as treatment will vary depending on the clinical form of the disease. We report a case of a 78-year-old man who initially presented with an acute onset of respiratory distress displayed contrast leakage on computed tomography from the site of a previously inserted esophageal stent for an unsuccessful surgical repair of an esophageal rupture. In addition to the contrast leakage, the presence of a bronchopulmonary fistula imaging prompted the need for further investigation. Our patient was empirically treated with antibiotics and obtained blood cultures, which returned positive A. israelii. PMID:27103971

  3. Retrograde replacement of the thoracic aorta.

    Cooley, D A

    1995-01-01

    A technique is described for replacement of the entire thoracic aorta. In this "pull-through" technique, which utilizes hypothermic circulatory arrest, the graft is implanted in a retrograde fashion, thus providing protection for the spinal cord and brain and avoiding injury to the vagus and phrenic nerves.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Thoracic Aortic Dissections

    Sax, Steven L.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent noninvasive method for evaluating thoracic aortic dissections. A variety of magnetic resonance scans of aortic dissections are shown, documenting the ability of magnetic resonance to image the true lumen, the false channel, and the intimal septum. Detail is provided on magnetic resonance imaging techniques and findings. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:262-70)

  5. Operativ behandling af thoracic outlet syndrome

    Birkeland, Peter; Stiasny, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    We present three cases with longstanding true neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome. All patients had aching pain in the shoulder, arm and ulnar border of the hand. On examination, we found atrophy of the hand muscles. Electromyography revealed signs of compromised function of the inferior trunk of...

  6. April 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The April 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 4/23/2014 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 15 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. It was announced that there will be a wine tasting with the California, New Mexico and Colorado Thoracic Societies at the American Thoracic Society International Meeting. The tasting will be led by Peter Wagner and is scheduled for the Cobalt Room in the Hilton San Diego Bayfront on Tuesday, May 20, from 4-8 PM. Guideline development was again discussed. The consensus was to await publication of the IDSA Cocci Guidelines and respond appropriately. George Parides, Arizona Chapter Representative, gave a presentation on Hill Day. Representatives of the Arizona, New Mexico and Washington Thoracic Societies met with their Congressional delegations, including Rep. David Schweikert, to discuss the Cigar Bill, NIH funding, and the Medicare Sustainable Growth ...

  7. An unusual cause of thoracic mass.

    Wilson, D.C.; Redmond, A. O.

    1990-01-01

    A previously well 10 year old boy presented with scoliosis, a mass in the chest wall, and a pleural effusion. Chest radiography showed the triad of chronic consolidation, pleural effusion, and rib periostitis. Investigations confirmed thoracic actinomycosis. Tissue spread was evaluated by computed tomography. It was successfully treated with benzylpenicillin, which was later replaced by clindamycin.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy

    ... pancreas , dental abnormalities, and an eye disease called retinal dystrophy that can lead to vision loss. Related Information ... mutations as a common cause of asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (Jeune syndrome) without major polydactyly, renal or retinal involvement. J Med Genet. 2013 May;50(5): ...

  9. Acquired intrathoracic kidney in thoracic kyphosis

    Two cases of acquired intrathoracic kidney associated with thoracic kyphosis are reported, with emphasis on the radiographic manifestations. A search of the scientific literature disclosed that the acquired type of this abnormality is rare. The importance of recognizing this entity from a differential diagnostic standpoint is underscored. (author)

  10. Monitoring and improving care in thoracic surgery

    R.C. Numan

    2016-01-01

    Quality of Care (QoC) plays a central role in the way healthcare is delivered. In the world of thoracic surgery for lung cancer, surgeons are faced with complex and sometimes high-risk surgical resections on an aging patient population with an increasing incidence of frail physical health. This incr

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in an alpaca cria

    Simpson, Katharine M.; Streeter, Robert N.; Genova, Suzanne G.

    2011-01-01

    A 7-hour-old alpaca was presented for lethargy and depression. The cria responded favorably to initial treatment but developed acute-onset dyspnea 48 hours later. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was diagnosed by thoracic imaging and blood gas analysis. The cria was successfully treated with corticosteroids and discharged from the hospital.

  12. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine.

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G

    2015-07-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2-4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7-10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7-10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed - hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in the

  13. An unusual cause of spinal cord ischemia after thoracic endovascular repair.

    Koleilat, Issam; Moore, Erin; Hanover, Tod; Eidt, John

    2016-04-01

    A 59-year-old left-handed man presented with chest pain and hypertension and was found to have an acute descending aortic dissection on imaging. After thoracic endovascular repair of the dissection, he developed left arm weakness and ischemia. Despite carotid-subclavian transposition, the patient was found to have persistent left triceps weakness as well as bilateral leg paresis. An urgent spinal drain was placed that improved his lower extremity deficit but did not greatly change his arm symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed previously undiagnosed severe multilevel spinal stenosis requiring operative decompression. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the contribution of cervical spinal stenosis to post-thoracic endovascular repair spinal ischemia. PMID:25564598

  14. ONE CASE REPORT OF ANGINA TONSILLARIS INDUCED MEDIASTINAL ABSCESS AND THORACIC EMPYEMA

    LI Qing-yun; WANG Xi; WAN Huan-ying; DENG Wei-wu

    2009-01-01

    A 27-year-old female patient with mediastinal abscess and thoracic empyema developed from angina tonsillaris was studied clinically on the manifestations, computed tomography (CT) scan, and the treatment process. The patient was admitted to hospital with a history of fever, sore throat, and chest and neck pain. CT showed air and air-fluid levels within mediastinal dense fatty planes that extended from the thoracic inlet to the sub-carinal region and left pleural empyema. She was cured by mediastinal drainage and extensive debridement of the necrotic tissue under operation and broad spectrum antibiotics treatment. Angina tonsillaris induced acute mediastitis and mediastinal abscess is a relatively rare inflammatory pathology but actually a fatal situation for its high mortality rate. CT scanning is extremely useful for early diagnosis and surgical treatment planning. The main treatment is aggressive and adequate surgical drainage of the abscess and intravenous effective antibiotic treatment.

  15. Computed tomography of the thoracic canal. Experimental and clinical studies

    Nakamura, S. (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-05-01

    Under the adequate CT condition, thoracic canal was studied in twelve normal cases, nine cases of cervical myelopathy with developmental cervical canal stenosis and four cases of thoracic myelopathy with ossification of thoracic yellow ligament. The results were as follows. 1) The adequate condition for delineation of thoracic canal seemed to be nearly 400 EMI units in window width and 150 in level. Scanning angle was permitted within about 10/sup 0/. Bony thoracic canal was well scanned at the center of vertebral body. 2) The configulation of the normal thoracic canal was oval at Th/sub 1/, Th/sub 2/ levels and round at Th/sub 3/-Th/sub 10/ and large oval at Th/sub 11/, Th/sub 12/. The sagittal diameter was almost fixed at each level and the transverse diameter was large at upper and lower levels and small at middle levels. 3) Thoracic canal was narrowed in the cases of cervical myelopathy with developmental cervical canal stenosis especially in sagittal diameter, but not narrowed in transverse diameter. Three of four cases who had myelopathy with ossification of thoracic yellow ligament had narrow canals. 4) There was a good relation between sagittal diameter of cervical canal and thoracic canal. 5) There was a good relation between sagittal diameter of thoracic canal measured by conventional radiographs (Hattori's method) and CT scans. The author thinks that Hattori's method is useful to diagnose the thoracic canal stenosis.

  16. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain.

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars. PMID:26309385

  17. Operative management of a non-traumatic cervico-thoracic spondylolisthesis: a case report

    Zwingenberger Stefan; Leimert Mario; Valladares Roberto D; Betz Volker M; Seifert Jens

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction In contrast to spondylolisthesis of the lumbar spine, non-traumatic cervico-thoracic spondylolisthesis is a very rare lesion. Even minor changes in the displacement of the vertebrae or the cord can lead to cervical myelopathy and paralysis. Since only a few cases have been well-documented, there is currently no clear preference between operative techniques. Case presentation We describe the case of a 63-year-old Caucasian man with a 13 mm spondylolisthesis between C7 and...

  18. The European educational platform on thoracic surgery.

    Massard, Gilbert; Rocco, Gaetano; Venuta, Federico

    2014-05-01

    As the largest scientific organisation world-wide exclusively dedicated to general thoracic surgery (GTS), the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) recognized that one of its priorities is education. The educational platform designed ESTS addresses not only trainees, but also confirmed thoracic surgeons. The two main aims are (I) to prepare trainees to graduation and to the certification by the European Board of Thoracic Surgery and (II) to offer opportunities for continuous medical education in the perspective of life-long learning and continuous professional development to certified thoracic surgeons. It is likely that recertification will become an obligation during the coming decade. At its inception, the platform differentiated two different events. A 6-day course emphasizing on theoretic knowledge was created in Antalya in 2007. The same year, a 2-day school oriented to practical issues with hands-on in the animal lab was launched in Antalya. These two teaching tracks need further development. In the knowledge track, we intend to organize highly specialized 2-day courses to deepen insight into theoretical questions. The skill track will be implemented by specialized courses for high technology such as tracheal surgery, ECMO, robotics or chest wall reconstruction. In order to promote tomorrows' leadership, we created an academic competence track giving an insight into medical communication, methodology and management. We also had to respond to an increasing demand from the Russian speaking countries, where colleagues may face problems to attend western meetings, and where the language bareer may be a major impediment. We initiated a Russian school with three events yearly in 2012. Contemporary teaching must be completed with an e-learning platform, which is currently under development. The school activities are organized by the educational committee, which is headed by the ESTS Director of Education, assisted by coordinators of the teaching tracks and

  19. Model Minority Stereotype Reconsidered.

    Kobayashi, Futoshi

    This paper explores the origin and historical background of the "model minority" stereotype. It includes evidence illustrating problems resulting from the artificial grouping of Asian Americans as one ethnic group and the stereotype's influence on young Asian Americans. In the 1960s, the U.S. media began to portray the model minority through…

  20. Thoracic Endometriosis Syndrome: A Veritable Pandora's Box.

    Nair, Sobha S; Nayar, Jayashree

    2016-04-01

    Thoracic endometriosis syndrome is a rare disorder characterised by the presence of functioning endometrial tissue in pleura, lung parenchyma, airways, and/or encompasses mainly four clinical entities-catamenial pneumothorax, catamenial haemothorax, catamenial haemoptysis and lung nodules. The cases were studied retrospectively by reviewing the records at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, for duration of five years i.e., form March 2010-2014 and analysed for the clinical presentation and management of thoracic endometriosis syndrome. Catamenial breathlessness was the main symptom. Pneumothorax and pleural effusion were the findings on investigations. Histopathology report of endometriosis was present in three cases (50%). Conditions with excess oestrogen like endometriosis, fibroid, adenomyosis were diagnosed in these patients by pelvic scan. After the initial supportive treatment with hormones, pleurodesis, hysterectomy and lung decortication were the treatment modalities. Two cases that had multiple recurrences were diagnosed as disseminated TES. They underwent combined treatment of surgery and hormones. PMID:27190904

  1. Comminuted fracture of the thoracic spine.

    Cashman, J P

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Road deaths fell initially after the introduction of the penalty points but despite this, the rate of spinal injuries remained unchanged. AIMS: We report a patient with a dramatic spinal injury, though without neurological deficit. We discuss the classification, management and economic impact of these injuries. METHODS: We describe the management of a patient with a comminuted thoracic spinal fracture without neurological injury. We conducted a literature review with regard to the availability of literature of the management of these injuries. RESULTS: This 17-year-old female was managed surgically and had a good functional outcome. There is no clear consensus in the published literature on the management of these injuries. CONCLUSIONS: Comminuted thoracic spinal factures are potentially devastating. Such a patient presents challenges in determining the appropriate treatment.

  2. Incidental Cardiac Findings on Thoracic Imaging.

    Kok, Hong Kuan

    2013-02-07

    The cardiac structures are well seen on nongated thoracic computed tomography studies in the investigation and follow-up of cardiopulmonary disease. A wide variety of findings can be incidentally picked up on careful evaluation of the pericardium, cardiac chambers, valves, and great vessels. Some of these findings may represent benign variants, whereas others may have more profound clinical importance. Furthermore, the expansion of interventional and surgical practice has led to the development and placement of new cardiac stents, implantable pacemaker devices, and prosthetic valves with which the practicing radiologist should be familiar. We present a collection of common incidental cardiac findings that can be readily identified on thoracic computed tomography studies and briefly discuss their clinical relevance.

  3. Recurrent perimedullary arteriovenous fistula at thoracic level

    HAI Jian; CHEN Zuo-quan; DENG Dong-feng; PAN Qing-gang; LING Feng

    2006-01-01

    @@ Perimedullary arteriovenous fistula (PMAVF, type Ⅳ spinal cord arteriovenous malformation,SCAVM) is a direct arteriovenous shunt without abnormal vascular connection between the feeding artery and draining vein. Most patients with PMAVF present with a progressive myelopathy caused by venous hypertension, resulting in disabling deficits and incurable complete transverse myelopathy.1'2The lesion is usually located on the surface of the spinal cord or under the pia mater at the level of the conus medullaris or cauda equina, thoracic PMAVF is rarely encountered. Most PMAVFs are fed by the anterior spinal artery (ASA), posterior spinal artery (PSA), or both.1-5 Multiple arterial feeders from the ASA can make the treatment of the disease difficult.6From August 2004 to February 2005, we treated a patient with a recurrent PMAVF (type Ⅳb) at the thoracic level with multiple blood supply.

  4. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome: CT and MRI features

    Thoracic endometriosis is considered to be rare, but is the most frequent form of extra-abdominopelvic endometriosis. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome affects women of reproductive age. Diagnosis is mainly based on clinical findings, which can include catamenial pneumothorax and haemothorax, non-catamenial endometriosis-related pneumothorax, catamenial haemoptysis, lung nodules, and isolated catamenial chest pain. Symptoms are typically cyclical and recurrent, with a right-sided predominance. Computed tomography (CT) is the first-line imaging method, but is poorly specific; therefore, its main role is to rule out other pulmonary diseases. However, in women with a typical clinical history, some key CT findings may help to confirm this often under-diagnosed syndrome. MRI can also assist with the diagnosis, by showing signal changes typical of haemorrhage within diaphragmatic or pleural lesions

  5. Endoscopic thoracic laminoforaminoplasty for the treatment of thoracic radiculopathy: report of 12 cases

    Scott M.W. Haufe, Ryan A. Baker, Morgan L. Pyne

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinal stenosis of the thoracic spine is less common than that of the cervical and lumbar regions. Due to the close proximity to thoracic and abdominal organs, surgical operations can be difficult and carry a greater risk of complications. The most efficacious intervention for thoracic stenosis, whether central or foraminal, refractory to conservative management is uncertain. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic laminoforaminoplasty (ELFP in the treatment of thoracic radiculopathy. Methods: Twelve patients with radicular pain involving the lower thoracic levels (at or below T6 were treated with ELFP. Results: Seven of twelve patients showed marked improvement in pain scores. Average follow-up scores were 2.9 and 12.08 on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS and Oswestry Disability Index, respectively. The significance was 0.005 between the pre and post surgical data. One patient with moderate symptoms, two with severe symptoms, and two with crippling symptoms did not report significant improvement on VAS or Oswestry. No complications were encountered. Conclusions: Endoscopic laminoforaminoplasty offers an alternative to fusion or conventional laminotomy with similar success rates. Patients additionally benefit from a decrease risk of complications, short hospital stay, and faster recovery.

  6. Monitoring and improving care in thoracic surgery

    Numan, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Quality of Care (QoC) plays a central role in the way healthcare is delivered. In the world of thoracic surgery for lung cancer, surgeons are faced with complex and sometimes high-risk surgical resections on an aging patient population with an increasing incidence of frail physical health. This increasing complexity demands a multidisciplinary approach rearranging pre-, peri- and postoperative care in a way safety, efficiency and high quality are guaranteed. The safety and quality of healthca...

  7. November 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Robbins RA

    2015-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. There were 3 case presentations: 1. Dr. Gerald Schwartzberg presented a case of a 56-year-old man with a history of diabetes, alcoholism ...

  8. September 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society notes

    Robbins RA

    2014-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The September 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 9/24/14 at the Kiewit Auditorium on the University of Arizona Medical Center campus in Tucson beginning at 5:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 21 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Four cases were presented: 1. Mohammad Dalabih presented a 22 year old hypoxic ...

  9. Endoscopic approaches to the thoracic spine

    Rosenthal, D

    2000-01-01

    Endoscopic surgery of the thoracic spine has up to now been considered as an experimental procedure. Reports published in recent years have shown that the results achieved with this technique are as good as, or for some indications superior to, those reported for classic open approaches. A review of the indications, limitations, advantages and disadvantages is presented. Although there is still resistance to acknowledging the effectiveness of this procedure, experience has shown that the resu...

  10. Nonintubated Videothoracoscopic Operations in Thoracic Oncology

    Mineo, Tommaso C.; Federico Tacconi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite general anesthesia with one-lung ventilation represents the standard to perform thoracic surgery operations, there is an increasing interest toward alternative methods, such as the use of local or neuroaxial analgesia alone in fully alert or mildly sedated patients. These can be applied to perform a series of videothoracoscopic procedures. Material and Methods: We reviewed our own institutional experience with this kind of surgery, as well as the most relevant literature f...

  11. Deaths and necropsies in a thoracic unit.

    Boldy, D A; Jones, C.; Matthews, H.; Edwards, C.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is concern about the decrease in the number of requests for necropsies, so a study was undertaken to assess current clinical practice. METHOD: A prospective study was made of all deaths occurring under the care of five chest physicians and three thoracic surgeons at East Birmingham Hospital from 1 April to 30 June 1989. RESULTS: A necropsy was sought in 34 of 58 deaths (59%) and was performed in 22 instances (38%). Major unexpected findings which would have affected clinical...

  12. Conduits for Coronary Bypass: Internal Thoracic Artery

    Barner, Hendrick B.

    2012-01-01

    This second report in the series on coronary artery bypass presents the authors experience and personal views on the internal thoracic artery (ITA) which date to 1966. There has been a very gradual evolution in the acceptance of this conduit which was initially compared with the saphenous vein and viewed as an improbable alternative to it. As is common with concepts and techniques which are 'outside the box' there was skepticism and criticism of this new conduit which was more difficult and t...

  13. A comparative study of oral tapentadol with thoracic epidural analgesia versus intravenous tramadol and paracetamol combination for postoperative analgesia in off pump CABG

    Himanshu A. Shah

    2013-12-01

    Conclusions: Our study concludes that Tapentadol with Thoracic epidural is very much effective as a multimodal analgesia approach in controlling acute postoperative pain after CABG. Tapentadol is quite a newer drug so its usefulness for other patients and different surgeries is still to be debated. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(6.000: 723-727

  14. September 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society notes

    Robbins RA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The September 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 9/24/14 at the Kiewit Auditorium on the University of Arizona Medical Center campus in Tucson beginning at 5:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 21 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Four cases were presented: 1. Mohammad Dalabih presented a 22 year old hypoxic man with a history of asthma and abdominal pain. A bubble echocardiogram showed bubbles in the left ventricle within 3 heartbeats. Thoracic CT scan showed a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (AVMs. The patient underwent coil embolization and improved. Dr. Dalabih reviewed the diagnosis and management of pulmonary AVMs (1. 2. Aarthi Ganesh presented a 70 year old woman complaining of dyspnea on exertion. A chest x-ray showed complete opacification of the right hemithorax and a thoracic CT scan showed a large right pleural effusion ...

  15. The European general thoracic surgery database project.

    Falcoz, Pierre Emmanuel; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    The European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Database is a free registry created by ESTS in 2001. The current online version was launched in 2007. It runs currently on a Dendrite platform with extensive data security and frequent backups. The main features are a specialty-specific, procedure-specific, prospectively maintained, periodically audited and web-based electronic database, designed for quality control and performance monitoring, which allows for the collection of all general thoracic procedures. Data collection is the "backbone" of the ESTS database. It includes many risk factors, processes of care and outcomes, which are specially designed for quality control and performance audit. The user can download and export their own data and use them for internal analyses and quality control audits. The ESTS database represents the gold standard of clinical data collection for European General Thoracic Surgery. Over the past years, the ESTS database has achieved many accomplishments. In particular, the database hit two major milestones: it now includes more than 235 participating centers and 70,000 surgical procedures. The ESTS database is a snapshot of surgical practice that aims at improving patient care. In other words, data capture should become integral to routine patient care, with the final objective of improving quality of care within Europe. PMID:24868445

  16. Anterior approaches to the upper thoracic spine

    The upper thoracic spine region is difficult to access from an anterior approach because of the surrounding bones (ribs, sternum and scapulae) and organs (heart, lung and great vessels). The outcomes of 37 consecutive cases with lesions in the upper thoracic spine region (T1-4) were reviewed to study surgical approaches to the upper thoracic spine. We used anterior approaches in 13 cases. A full sternotomy was performed in 6 cases (5 cases ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL), 1 case herniated disc), a high thoracotomy was performed in 6 cases (3 cases herniated disc, 2 cases spinal cord tumor, 1 case TB spine), and a partial resection of a unilateral sternoclavicular joint was performed in 1 case. A sternotomy is thought to be useful for OPLL in the T1-3 region, whereas a high thoracotomy is recommended for unilateral anterior lesions and lesions extending below the T3/4 level. Reconstructive CT sagittal images can supply useful anatomical informations for selecting a surgical approach. (author)

  17. October 2012 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Robbins RA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on 10/24/2012 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 23 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, infectious disease, pathology, and radiology communities. An announcement was made that the Colorado Thoracic Society has accepted an invitation to partner with the Arizona and New Mexico Thoracic Societies in the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. Discussions continue to be held regarding a combined Arizona Thoracic Society meeting with Tucson either in Casa Grande or electronically. Six cases were presented: Dr. Tim Kuberski, chief of Infectious Disease at Maricopa Medical Center, presented a 48 year old female who had been ill for 2 weeks. A CT of the chest revealed a left lower lobe nodule and a CT of the abdomen showed hydronephrosis and a pelvic mass. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA was elevated. All turned out to be coccidioidomycosis on biopsy. CEA decreased …

  18. Nerve stimulator-guided thoracic paravertebral block for gynecomastia surgery

    Ashok Jadon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB is gaining popularity for female breast surgeries due to various advantages like less nausea and vomiting and better post-operative pain relief, which helps in early ambulation and discharge from the hospital. Use of nerve stimulator during this block has further enhanced its success and safety profile. Male breast surgery is usually done either under general anaesthesia or local infiltrative anaesthesia combining with intravenous sedation. We postulated that the advantages of TPVB could be helpful for early mobilization and discharge of minor breast surgery in male patients. However, to our knowledge, there is no such report suggestive of TPVB for exclusive male breast surgery. We used nerve stimulator-guided TPVB for gynecomastia surgery in two patients where general anaesthesia was not feasible. Both patients had successful block and showed good post-operative recovery and were discharged on the same day. They had long post-operative pain relief without any block-related complication. A case report of two such cases of gynecomastia surgery (male breast surgery done under TPVB is presented.

  19. Idiopathic chylopericardium treated by percutaneous thoracic duct embolization after failed surgical thoracic duct ligation

    Chylopericardium rarely occurs in pediatric patients, but when it does it is most often a result of lymphatic injury during cardiothoracic surgery. Primary idiopathic chylopericardium is especially rare, with few cases in the pediatric literature. We report a 10-year-old boy who presented with primary idiopathic chylopericardium after unsuccessful initial treatment with surgical lymphatic ligation and creation of a pericardial window. Following readmission to the hospital for a right-side chylothorax resulting from the effluent from the pericardial window, he had successful treatment by interventional radiology with percutaneous thoracic duct embolization. This case illustrates the utility of thoracic duct embolization as a less-invasive alternative to surgical thoracic duct ligation, or as a salvage procedure when surgical ligation fails. (orig.)

  20. Idiopathic chylopericardium treated by percutaneous thoracic duct embolization after failed surgical thoracic duct ligation

    Courtney, Malachi; Ayyagari, Raj R. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, 789 Howard Avenue, P.O. Box 208042, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Chylopericardium rarely occurs in pediatric patients, but when it does it is most often a result of lymphatic injury during cardiothoracic surgery. Primary idiopathic chylopericardium is especially rare, with few cases in the pediatric literature. We report a 10-year-old boy who presented with primary idiopathic chylopericardium after unsuccessful initial treatment with surgical lymphatic ligation and creation of a pericardial window. Following readmission to the hospital for a right-side chylothorax resulting from the effluent from the pericardial window, he had successful treatment by interventional radiology with percutaneous thoracic duct embolization. This case illustrates the utility of thoracic duct embolization as a less-invasive alternative to surgical thoracic duct ligation, or as a salvage procedure when surgical ligation fails. (orig.)

  1. Thoracic fistulas of the pancreas and their complications in childhood

    Fritsch, R.; Schirg, E.; Buerger, D.

    1981-08-01

    The article reports on two thoracic fistulas of the pancreas in infants. Anamnesis revealed that recurring abdominal pain had occured in those children for years; at the time of their admission to hospital there was considerable dyspnoea with thoracic pain depending on the respiration. Fistulas of the pancreas with thoracic connection were identified as the cause. The article goes into the details of genesis, differential diagnosis and course of the disease.

  2. Thoracic electrical bioimpedance theory and clinical possibilities in perioperative medicine

    2008-01-01

    This article is a short review of thoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB) theory and clinical capabilities. Cardiac output measurement is used primarily to guide therapy in complex, critically ill patients. Thoracic electrical bioimpedance is one of several noninvasive techniques that have been investigated to measure cardiac output and other hemodynamic parameters. Opinions in current literature continue to be conflicting as to the utility of thoracic electrical bioimpedance to that purpose. ...

  3. Thoracic Endometriosis Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Azizad-Pinto, Parisa; Clarke, David

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic endometriosis syndrome is the presence of endometrial tissue in or around the lung. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome consists of four distinct clinical entities: catamenial pneumothorax, catamenial hemothorax, hemoptysis, and pulmonary nodules. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome is a rare and complex condition, and diagnosis is often delayed or missed by clinicians, which can result in recurrent hospitalizations and other complications. Current treatments include hormone therapy and, whe...

  4. A rare case: Congenital thoracic ectopic kidney with diaphragmatic eventration.

    Arslan, Harun; Aydogan, Cengiz; Orcen, Cihan; GonIllu, Edip

    2016-03-01

    Thoracic ectopic kidney is a rare developmental anomaly that is the least frequent one among all forms of ectopic kidneys. The condition is generally asymptomatic. If a kidney image is missing on one side in renalor pelvic region in sonographic examination, the possibility of thoracic ectopic kidney should be taken into consideration. For final diagnosis, chest radiography and thorax computerised tomography should be obtained. We herein report a rare case of intra-thoracic kidney accompanied by diaphragm eventration. PMID:26968290

  5. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    ... are the possible causes of minor rectal bleeding? Hemorrhoids Anal fissures Proctitis (inflammation of the rectum) Polyps ... can be cured if detected early. What are hemorrhoids? Hemorrhoids (also called piles) are swollen blood vessels ...

  6. Minority Women's Health: Latinas

    ... left navigation Minority Women's Health African-Americans Latinas Asian-Americans Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders American Indians/ ... Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin. Latinos may be any race. This ...

  7. Debranching Solutions in Endografting for Complex Thoracic Aortic Dissections

    Onur Selcuk Goksel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventional surgical repair of thoracic aortic dissections is a challenge due to mortality and morbidity risks. Objectives: We analyzed our experience in hybrid aortic arch repair for complex dissections of the aortic arch. Methods: Between 2009 and 2013, 18 patients (the mean age of 67 ± 8 years-old underwent hybrid aortic arch repair. The procedural strategy was determined on the individual patient. Results: Thirteen patients had type I repair using trifurcation and another patient with bifurcation graft. Two patients had type II repair with replacement of the ascending aorta. Two patients received extra-anatomic bypass grafting to left carotid artery allowing covering of zone 1. Stent graft deployment rate was 100%. No patients experienced stroke. One patient with total debranching of the aortic arch following an acute dissection of the proximal arch expired 3 months after TEVAR due to heart failure. There were no early to midterm endoleaks. The median follow-up was 20 ± 8 months with patency rate of 100%. Conclusion: Various debranching solutions for different complex scenarios of the aortic arch serve as less invasive procedures than conventional open surgery enabling safe and effective treatment of this highly selected subgroup of patients with complex aortic pathologies.

  8. Debranching Solutions in Endografting for Complex Thoracic Aortic Dissections

    Conventional surgical repair of thoracic aortic dissections is a challenge due to mortality and morbidity risks. We analyzed our experience in hybrid aortic arch repair for complex dissections of the aortic arch. Between 2009 and 2013, 18 patients (the mean age of 67 ± 8 years-old) underwent hybrid aortic arch repair. The procedural strategy was determined on the individual patient. Thirteen patients had type I repair using trifurcation and another patient with bifurcation graft. Two patients had type II repair with replacement of the ascending aorta. Two patients received extra-anatomic bypass grafting to left carotid artery allowing covering of zone 1. Stent graft deployment rate was 100%. No patients experienced stroke. One patient with total debranching of the aortic arch following an acute dissection of the proximal arch expired 3 months after TEVAR due to heart failure. There were no early to midterm endoleaks. The median follow-up was 20 ± 8 months with patency rate of 100%. Various debranching solutions for different complex scenarios of the aortic arch serve as less invasive procedures than conventional open surgery enabling safe and effective treatment of this highly selected subgroup of patients with complex aortic pathologies

  9. Debranching Solutions in Endografting for Complex Thoracic Aortic Dissections

    Goksel, Onur Selcuk, E-mail: onurgokseljet@gmail.com [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey); Guven, Koray [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Karatepe, Celalettin [Mustafa Kemal Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey); Gok, Emre [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey); Acunas, Bulent [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Cinar, Bayer [Medical Park Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Alpagut, Ufuk [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-08-15

    Conventional surgical repair of thoracic aortic dissections is a challenge due to mortality and morbidity risks. We analyzed our experience in hybrid aortic arch repair for complex dissections of the aortic arch. Between 2009 and 2013, 18 patients (the mean age of 67 ± 8 years-old) underwent hybrid aortic arch repair. The procedural strategy was determined on the individual patient. Thirteen patients had type I repair using trifurcation and another patient with bifurcation graft. Two patients had type II repair with replacement of the ascending aorta. Two patients received extra-anatomic bypass grafting to left carotid artery allowing covering of zone 1. Stent graft deployment rate was 100%. No patients experienced stroke. One patient with total debranching of the aortic arch following an acute dissection of the proximal arch expired 3 months after TEVAR due to heart failure. There were no early to midterm endoleaks. The median follow-up was 20 ± 8 months with patency rate of 100%. Various debranching solutions for different complex scenarios of the aortic arch serve as less invasive procedures than conventional open surgery enabling safe and effective treatment of this highly selected subgroup of patients with complex aortic pathologies.

  10. Nonintubated Videothoracoscopic Operations in Thoracic Oncology

    Tommaso C Mineo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite general anesthesia with one-lung ventilation represents the standard to perform thoracic surgery operations, there is an increasing interest toward alternative methods, such as the use of local or neuroaxial analgesia alone in fully alert or mildly sedated patients. These can be applied to perform a series of videothoracoscopic procedures. Material and Methods: We reviewed our own institutional experience with this kind of surgery, as well as the most relevant literature findings available on this topic at the usual search websites (PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE. We focused on more recent advances regarding indications, expected advantages, possible pitfalls and implications for future research. Results: Such an operative modality can be safely and successfully adopted to manage a series of common malignant and non-malignant diseases. In thoracic oncology, it is mainly employed to treat malignant pleural effusion, to remove of pulmonary lesions of any origin, and to perform mediastinal biopsies. Furthermore, even complex procedures such anatomic lung resections and thymectomy are now being performed in this way. When taking into the account just intermediate to major surgeries, reported conversion rates to general anesthesia range between 2.8 and 9%. Despite the lack of randomized controlled trial, there is a general perception that non-intubated videothoracoscopic operation may translate into a lower morbidity rate, better hematosis, and preserved perioperative immunosurveillance. No sufficient data is available as far as long-term outcomes are concerned. Conclusions: Non-intubated videthoracoscopic operations may be as effective as the equivalent procedures performed with general anesthesia, while providing advantages in terms of cost and postoperative morbidity. This surgical practice should thus be included in the armamentarium of modern era thoracic surgeons, and appropriately designed studies should be undertaken to better

  11. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Following Breast Implant Rupture

    Raakhi Mistry, MBChB

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We present a patient with bilateral breast implant rupture who developed severe locoregional silicone granulomatous lymphadenopathy. Poly Implant Prothese silicone implants had been used for bilateral breast augmentation 5 years prior. Extracapsular implant rupture and bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy indicated explantation, capsulectomy, and selective lymph node excision. Histology demonstrated silicone lymphadenopathy with no evidence of malignancy. Over the subsequent 12 months, she developed progressive locoregional lymphadenopathy involving bilateral cervical, axillary, and internal mammary groups, resulting in bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome. We report the unusual presentation, progression, and the ultimate surgical management of this patient.

  12. Computerized tomography of the thoracic organs

    Gabuniya, R.I.; Kolesnikova, E.K.; Tumanov, L.B. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Onkologicheskij Nauchnyj Tsentr)

    CT potentialities were studied in 146 patients with pulmonary and mediastinal tumors. Among them 82 had primary lung cancer, 39 with metastases and 25 patients with different mediastinal tumors. CT findings were correlated with routine X-ray findings. A CT higher resolution, a possibility to differentiate the tissue nature of some tumors on the basis of densitometry has been shown. A possibility of a wide use of CT in the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases is limited to the difficulties of differential diagnosis. But CT is indicated for the examination of areas that are inaccessible for X-ray studies (osseous-diaphragmatic sinuses, boundary parts of the thoracic and abdominal cavities).

  13. Video-Assisted Thoracic Sympathectomy for Hyperhidrosis.

    Milanez de Campos, Jose Ribas; Kauffman, Paulo; Gomes, Oswaldo; Wolosker, Nelson

    2016-08-01

    By the 1980s, endoscopy was in use by some groups in sympathetic denervation of the upper limbs with vascular indications. Low morbidity, cosmetic results, reduction in the incidence of Horner syndrome, and the shortened time in hospital made video-assisted thoracic sympathectomy (VATS) better accepted by those undergoing treatment for hyperhidrosis. Over the last 25 years, this surgical procedure has become routine in the treatment of hyperhidrosis, leading to a significant increase in the number of papers on the subject in the literature. PMID:27427529

  14. Dynamic thoracoplasty for asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy.

    Kaddoura, I L; Obeid, M Y; Mroueh, S M; Nasser, A A

    2001-11-01

    The life-saving procedures to expand the chests of infants born with Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy provide a static solution incapable of responding to the growth demands of thriving patients. We describe an instrument that provided a dynamic solution for an infant, where an initial methyl methacrylate midsternotomy spacer placed at 4 months of age was followed at 11 months with recurrence of his difficulties. At 8 months after the second operation the patient was stable and thriving with no recurrence of symptoms. The instrument modifications, limitations, and possible complications are described. PMID:11722089

  15. December 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Robbins, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A breakfast meeting of the Arizona Thoracic Society and the Tucson winter lung series was held on Saturday, 12/14/2013 at Kiewit Auditorium on the University of Arizona Medical Center Campus beginning at 8:30 AM. There were 31 in attendance. A lecture was presented by Joe G. N. "Skip" Garcia, MD, the senior vice president for health sciences at the University of Arizona. The title of Garcia’s talk was “Personalizing Medicine in Cardiopul...

  16. Teaching minority children hygiene

    Rheinländer, Thilde; Samuelsen, Helle; Dalsgaard, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    the learning of hygiene of pre-school ethnic minority children in rural Vietnam. Design. Eight months of ethnographic field studies were conducted among four ethnic minority groups living in highland and lowland communities in northern Vietnam. Data included participant observation in four kindergartens and 20...... homes of pre-school children, together with 67 semi-structured interviews with caregivers and five kindergarten staff. Thematic analysis was applied and concepts of social learning provided inputs to the analysis. Findings. This study showed that poor living conditions with lack of basic sanitation...... as potentially important institutions for improving child hygiene education, essential and well-functioning hygiene infrastructures were lacking. Also, hygiene teaching relied on theoretical and non-practice-based learning styles, which did not facilitate hygiene behaviour change in small children. Minority...

  17. Autonomy and minority rights

    Barten, Ulrike

    2008-01-01

    Autonomy is an often detested and an often sought after concept. It is detested by those, who must give up some power and it is sought after by those who receive new powers. The question in international law and the international community is often, how much autonomy the state is willing to give to...... a specific group. The question never posed is, if there is a point and in that case at what point the group can actually talk about being autonomous. Is there a minimum in the number of special rights and procedures that has to be reached in order for the package of rights to qualify as ‘granting...... autonomy'? I will look at this in connection with minority rights, as minority rights accord special rights and procedures to a specific group. For example, minorities have sometimes far reaching competences in the educational field: setting up and running their own schools and to a certain degree also...

  18. Pathology of the thoracic wall: congenital and acquired

    Garcia-Pena, Pilar; Barber, Ignasi [Hospital Materno-Infantil, Pediatric Radiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    This review aims to cover the main congenital and acquired lesions that arise in the thoracic wall of infants and children. Imaging often plays an essential role in the evaluation of symptomatic and asymptomatic thoracic wall abnormalities. The use of appropriate imaging modalities for each condition will be addressed, as well as the range of benign and malignant conditions that can occur. (orig.)

  19. Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery in Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    Calvin SH Ng

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The proven safety and efficacy of minimal access video-assisted thoracic surgery has changed the way that spontaneous pneumothorax is managed. This review presents some of the experiences of the decade, discusses the controversies and reviews the current video-assisted thoracic surgical management of spontaneous pneumothorax.

  20. Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery in Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    Calvin SH Ng; Song Wan; Tak Wai Lee; Innes YP Wan; Arifi, Ahmed A.; Anthony PC Yim

    2002-01-01

    The proven safety and efficacy of minimal access video-assisted thoracic surgery has changed the way that spontaneous pneumothorax is managed. This review presents some of the experiences of the decade, discusses the controversies and reviews the current video-assisted thoracic surgical management of spontaneous pneumothorax.

  1. Radiation ulcer of the thoracic wall and its surgical treatment

    Examples of successful application of the method of plastic closure of antirior thoracic wall radiation defects are presented. Radiation ulcers were observed as a delayed radiation effects of radiotherapy against breast cancer and thymus gland tumor. Efficiency of the application of the given method in surgical treatment of patients with radiation ulcers of the thoracic wall is shown

  2. Depth of the thoracic epidural space in children.

    Masir, F.; Driessen, J.J.; Thies, K.C.; Wijnen, M.H.W.A.; Egmond, J. van

    2006-01-01

    Thoracic epidural anaesthesia in anaesthetized children requires a meticulous technique and may have an increased success rate when the distance between skin and epidural space is known. The objective of this observational study was to measure the skin to epidural distance (SED) during thoracic epid

  3. Anomalous azygos vein: a potential danger during endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    Sieunarine, K; May, J; White, G H; Harris, J P

    1997-08-01

    A report of a patient with an azygos lobe and an associated anomalous azygos vein covering the upper thoracic sympathetic chain. This anomaly poses a significant risk during the procedure of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy. A chest X-ray is useful in detecting this anomaly and alerting the surgeon to potential problems. PMID:9287933

  4. January 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Robbins RA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The January Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 1/22/2014 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 11 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. A discussion was held how to encourage attendance of young physicians to the Arizona Thoracic Society. A short presentation was made by Rick Robbins on the SWJPCC reiterating the material published in the yearly report from the editor (1. Three cases were presented: Dr. Tom Colby from the Pathology at the Mayo Clinic Arizona presented the first case. The patient was a 62 year old with polycythemia vera and shortness of breath. CT scan showed diffuse ground glass densities. The right ventricle and the pulmonary artery were slightly enlarged. A VATS lung biopsy was performed. The biopsy showed an increase in megakarocytes, immature red blood cells and immature white cell precursors consistent with extramedullary hematopoiesis. There was …

  5. Thoracic Ganglioneuromas Resulting in Nonimmune Hydrops Fetalis

    Paul Singh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction - Most often, ganglioneuromas affect older pediatric and adult patients. They are typically slow growing tumors that remain clinically silent until they become large enough to cause symptoms by compression of adjacent structures. Case - We report a case of a 22-year-old Hispanic gravida 2 para 1 female patient who was found to have massive hydrops fetalis at 20 completed gestational weeks. Fetal echocardiography revealed a narrowed distal ductal arch and proximal descending aorta. Cesarean delivery was undertaken at 29 completed gestational weeks for refractory labor and nonreassuring fetal status. The neonate expired at 47 minutes of life despite aggressive resuscitation. At autopsy, multiple thoracic masses were found adjacent to a compressed proximal descending aorta. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the diagnosis of a ganglioneuroma, a rare type of neural crest tumor. Discussion - A variety of intrathoracic masses have previously been reported to cause hydrops fetalis including teratomas, fibrosarcomas, and lymphangiomas. To our knowledge, this case is the first description of hydrops fetalis caused by ganglioneuromas. We propose that multiple thoracic ganglioneuromas led to biventricular distal outflow tract obstruction and hydrops fetalis.

  6. SEBACEOUS CYSTS MINOR SURGERY

    I Gusti Ayu Agung Laksemi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Minor surgery is small surgery or localized example cut ulcers and boils, cyst excision, and suturing. Somethings that need to be considered in the preparation of the surgery is minor tools, operating rooms and operating tables, lighting, maintenance of tools and equipment, sterilization and desinfection equipment, preparation of patients and anesthesia. In general cysts is walled chamber that consist of fluid, cells and the remaining cells. Cysts are formed not due to inflammation although then be inflamed. Lining of the cysts wall is composed of fibrous tissue and usually coated epithelial cells or endothelial. Cysts formed by dilated glands and closed channels, glands, blood vessels, lymph channels or layers of the epidermis. Contents of the cysts wall consists of the results is serum, lymph, sweat sebum, epithelial cells, the stratum corneum, and hair. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  7. Minorities in Iran

    Elling, Rasmus Christian

    Contrary to the popular understanding of Iran as a Persian nation, half of the country's population consists of minorities, among whom there has been significant ethnic mobilization at crucial stages in Iranian history. One such stage is now: suppressed minority demands, identity claims, and...... debates on diversity have entered public discourse and politics. In 2005–2007, Iran was rocked by the most widespread ethnic unrest experienced in that country since the revolution. The same period was also marked by the re-emergence of nationalism. This interdisciplinary book takes a long-overdue step...

  8. Pedicle screw placement in the thoracic spine: a randomized comparison study of computer-assisted navigation and conventional techniques

    WU Han; GAO Zhong-li; WANG Jin-cheng; LI Ying-pu; XIA Peng; JIANG Rui

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of computer-assisted pedicle screw installation and its clinical benefit as compared with conventional pedicle screw installation techniques. Methods: Total 176 thoracic pedicle screws placed in 42 thoracic fracture patients were involved in the study randomly, 20 patients under conventional fluoroscopic control (84 screws) and 22 patients had screw insertion under three dimensional (3D) computer-assisted navigation (92 screws). The 2 groups were compared for accuracy of screw placement, time for screw insertion by postoperative thincut CT scans and statistical analysis by x2 test. The cortical perforations were then graded by 2-mm increments: Grade Ⅰ (good, no cortical perforation), Grade Ⅱ (screw outside the pedicle 2 mm).Results: In computer assisted group, 88 (95.65%) were Grade Ⅰ (good), 4 (4.35%) were Grade Ⅱ (2 mm) violations. In conventional group, there were 14 cortical violations (16.67%), 70 (83.33%) were Grade Ⅰ (good),11 (13.1%) were Grade Ⅱ (2 mm) violations (P<0.001). The number (19.57%) of upper thoracic pedicle screws ( T1-T4 ) inserted under 3D computer-assisted navigation was significantly higher than that (3.57%) by conventional fluoroscopic control (P<0.001).Average screw insertion time in conventional group was (4.56 ±1.03) min and (2.54 ± 0.63) min in computer assisted group (P<0.001). In the conventional group, one patient had pleura injury and one had a minor dura violation.Conclusions: This study provides further evidence that 3D computer-assisted navigation placement of pedicle screws can increase accuracy, reduce surgical time, and be performed safely and effectively at all levels of the thoracic spine, particularly upper thoracic spine.

  9. The Year Ahead: Minorities.

    Jaschik, Scott

    1987-01-01

    The college outlook is grim for blacks 25 years after James Meredith became the first black to enroll at the University of Mississippi. Both Hispanics and Asian-Americans are misunderstood by college officials, and too little attention has been focused on community colleges, the institutions that serve the most minority students. (MLW)

  10. RELEASE OF MINORS

    Edgar Laurenţiu DUMBRAVĂ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The sanctioning of minors provided in a whole new Criminal Code is kinder to those applying to one category of criminal penalties, namely educational measures. This change occurred after finding the need to recover and straightening of juvenile offenders with their age-specific means and without coming into contact with major people that could adversely affect behavior.

  11. RELEASE OF MINORS

    Edgar Laurenţiu DUMBRAVĂ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The sanctioning of minors provided in a whole new Criminal Code is kinder to those applying to one category of criminal penalties, namely educational measures. This change occurred after finding the need to recover and straightening of juvenile offenders with their age-specific means and without coming into contact with major people that could adversely affect behavior.

  12. RELEASE OF MINORS

    Edgar Laurenţiu DUMBRAVĂ

    2015-01-01

    The sanctioning of minors provided in a whole new Criminal Code is kinder to those applying to one category of criminal penalties, namely educational measures. This change occurred after finding the need to recover and straightening of juvenile offenders with their age-specific means and without coming into contact with major people that could adversely affect behavior.

  13. Is there a benefit in receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy for elderly patients with inoperable thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma?

    Peng Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The benefit of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT in elderly patients with inoperable esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is controversial. This study aimed to assess the efficiency and safety of CCRT in elderly thoracic esophageal cancer patients. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between January 2002 and December 2011, 128 patients aged 65 years or older treated with CCRT or radiotherapy (RT alone for inoperable thoracic esophageal SCC were analyzed retrospectively (RT alone, n = 55; CCRT, n = 73. RESULTS: No treatment-related deaths occurred and no patients experienced any acute grade 4 non-hematologic toxicities. Patients treated with CCRT developed more severe acute toxicities than patients who received RT alone. The 3-year overall survival (OS rate was 36.1% for CCRT compared with 28.5% following RT alone (p = 0.008. Multivariate analysis identified T stage and treatment modality as independent prognostic factors for survival. Further analysis revealed that survival was significantly better in the CCRT group than in the RT alone group for patients ≤ 72 years. Nevertheless, the CCRT group had a similar OS to the RT group for patients > 72 years. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that elderly patients with inoperable thoracic esophageal SCC could benefit from CCRT, without major toxicities. However, for patients older than 72 years, CCRT is not superior to RT alone in terms of survival benefit.

  14. Thoracic size-selective sampling of fibres: performance of four types of thoracic sampler in laboratory tests.

    Jones, A D; Aitken, R J; Fabriès, J F; Kauffer, E; Liden, G; Maynard, A; Riediger, G; Sahle, W

    2005-08-01

    The counting of fibres on membrane filters could be facilitated by using size-selective samplers to exclude coarse particulate and fibres that impede fibre counting. Furthermore, the use of thoracic size selection would also remove the present requirement to discriminate fibres by diameter during counting. However, before thoracic samplers become acceptable for sampling fibres, their performance with fibres needs to be determined. This study examines the performance of four thoracic samplers: the GK2.69 cyclone, a Modified SIMPEDS cyclone, the CATHIA sampler (inertial separation) and the IOM thoracic sampler (porous foam pre-selector). The uniformity of sample deposit on the filter samples, which is important when counts are taken on random fields, was examined with two sizes of spherical particles (1 and 10 microm) and a glass fibre aerosol with fibres spanning the aerodynamic size range of the thoracic convention. Counts by optical microscopy examined fields on a set scanning pattern. Hotspots of deposition were detected for one of the thoracic samplers (Modified SIMPEDS with the 10 microm particles and the fibres). These hotspots were attributed to the inertial flow pattern near the port from the cyclone pre-separator. For the other three thoracic samplers, the distribution was similar to that on a cowled sampler, the current standard sampler for fibres. Aerodynamic selection was examined by comparing fibre concentration on thoracic samples with those measured on semi-isokinetic samples, using fibre size (and hence calculated aerodynamic diameter) and number data obtained by scanning electron microscope evaluation in four laboratories. The size-selection characteristics of three thoracic samplers (GK2.69, Modified SIMPEDS and CATHIA) appeared very similar to the thoracic convention; there was a slight oversampling (relative to the convention) for d(ae) < 7 microm, but that would not be disadvantageous for comparability with the cowled sampler. Only the IOM

  15. Motion correction in thoracic positron emission tomography

    Gigengack, Fabian; Dawood, Mohammad; Schäfers, Klaus P

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion leads to image degradation in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which impairs quantification. In this book, the authors present approaches to motion estimation and motion correction in thoracic PET. The approaches for motion estimation are based on dual gating and mass-preserving image registration (VAMPIRE) and mass-preserving optical flow (MPOF). With mass-preservation, image intensity modulations caused by highly non-rigid cardiac motion are accounted for. Within the image registration framework different data terms, different variants of regularization and parametric and non-parametric motion models are examined. Within the optical flow framework, different data terms and further non-quadratic penalization are also discussed. The approaches for motion correction particularly focus on pipelines in dual gated PET. A quantitative evaluation of the proposed approaches is performed on software phantom data with accompanied ground-truth motion information. Further, clinical appl...

  16. Evaluation of Registration Methods on Thoracic CT

    Murphy, K.; van Ginneken, B.; Reinhardt, J.;

    2011-01-01

    method and the evaluation is independent, using the same criteria for all participants. All results are published on the EMPIRE10 website (http://empire10.isi.uu.nl). The challenge remains ongoing and open to new participants. Full results from 24 algorithms have been published at the time of writing......EMPIRE10 (Evaluation of Methods for Pulmonary Image REgistration 2010) is a public platform for fair and meaningful comparison of registration algorithms which are applied to a database of intra-patient thoracic CT image pairs. Evaluation of non-rigid registration techniques is a non trivial task....... This article details the organisation of the challenge, the data and evaluation methods and the outcome of the initial launch with 20 algorithms. The gain in knowledge and future work are discussed....

  17. MR angiography: clinical applications in thoracic surgery

    MR angiography (MRA) is a promising completion of MR imaging in the preoperative assessment of pulmonary and mediastinal tumours. Scan acquisition was done by sequential FLASH 2D angiograms (TR = 30 ms, TE = 10 ms, FA = 30 ), one section per breathhold, section thickness 5 mm with 1 mm overlap between sequential sections. An automated control procedure allowed individual continuation of the examination. Postprocessing by a maximum-intensity-projection algorithm using angiograms of interest (AOI) resulted in 3D reconstructions illustrating vascular anatomy and avoiding superimposition. This technique was evaluated in a prospective study of 15 patients with malignant intrathoracic tumours. The results were validated by conventional angiographic procedures such as pulmonary angiography, digital subtraction angiography or cavography. Complementing spin-echo (SE) imaging, MRA provided diagnostic information about vessel displacement, stenosis and perfusion defects due to space-occupying lesions. Thus, MRA was helpful in planning thoracic surgery. (orig.)

  18. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement

    Slatore, Christopher G; Horeweg, Nanda; Jett, James R;

    2015-01-01

    development of registries that link demographic and nodule characteristics with patient-level outcomes. Methods to share data from registries are also necessary. CONCLUSIONS: This statement may help researchers to develop impactful and innovative research projects and enable funders to better judge research......BACKGROUND: Pulmonary nodules are frequently detected during diagnostic chest imaging and as a result of lung cancer screening. Current guidelines for their evaluation are largely based on low-quality evidence, and patients and clinicians could benefit from more research in this area. METHODS: In...... this research statement from the American Thoracic Society, a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates reviewed available evidence for pulmonary nodule evaluation, characterized six focus areas to direct future research efforts, and identified fundamental gaps in...

  19. Impedance plethysmographic observations in thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Nerurkar S

    1990-07-01

    Full Text Available Forty patients with symptoms of neuro-vascular compression in the upper extremities were subjected to impedance plethysmographic study using Parulkar′s method. Two patients recorded decreased blood flow (BFI in supine position and were diagnosed as having partial occlusion at subclavian level. Sixteen of the patients recorded decreased BFI on 90 degrees abduction and hyper-abduction. Twelve of these patients had radiological evidence of anomalous cervicle ribs. In remaining four patients extrinsic impression on the subclavian artery due to fibrous deposits was confirmed by arteriography. Remaining 22 patients recorded normal impedance plethysmograms. Impedance plethysmography thus provided a non-invasive modality for confirmation of vascular compression in thoracic outlet syndrome.

  20. Multifocal thoracic chordoma mimicking a paraganglioma

    Giovanni Conzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chordoma of thoracic vertebras is a very rare locally invasive neoplasm with low grade malignancy arising from embryonic notochordal remnants. Radical surgery remains the cornerstone of the treatment. We describe a case of multifocal T1-T2 chordoma, without bone and disc involvement, incidentally misdiagnosed as a paraganglioma, occurring in a 47-year-old male asymptomatic patient. Neoplasm was radically removed by an endocrine surgeon through a right extended cervicotomy. A preoperative reliable diagnosis of chordoma, as in the reported case, is often difficult. Radical surgery can provide a favorable outcome but, given the high rates of local recurrence of this neoplasm, a strict and careful follow-up is recommended. Although very rare, chordoma should be suggested in the differential diagnosis of the paravertebral cervical masses of unknown origin. Spine surgeon consultation and a FNB should be routinely included in the multidisciplinary preoperative work-up of these neoplasms.

  1. Multifocal thoracic chordoma mimicking a paraganglioma.

    Conzo, Giovanni; Gambardella, Claudio; Pasquali, Daniela; Ciancia, Giuseppe; Avenia, Nicola; Pietra, Cristina Della; Napolitano, Salvatore; Palazzo, Antonietta; Mauriello, Claudio; Parmeggiani, Domenico; Pettinato, Guido; Napolitano, Vincenzo; Santini, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Chordoma of thoracic vertebras is a very rare locally invasive neoplasm with low grade malignancy arising from embryonic notochordal remnants. Radical surgery remains the cornerstone of the treatment. We describe a case of multifocal T1-T2 chordoma, without bone and disc involvement, incidentally misdiagnosed as a paraganglioma, occurring in a 47-year-old male asymptomatic patient. Neoplasm was radically removed by an endocrine surgeon through a right extended cervicotomy. A preoperative reliable diagnosis of chordoma, as in the reported case, is often difficult. Radical surgery can provide a favorable outcome but, given the high rates of local recurrence of this neoplasm, a strict and careful follow-up is recommended. Although very rare, chordoma should be suggested in the differential diagnosis of the paravertebral cervical masses of unknown origin. Spine surgeon consultation and a FNB should be routinely included in the multidisciplinary preoperative work-up of these neoplasms. PMID:24125991

  2. Emergency Room Thoracotomy for Thoracic Trauma

    Muhammet Sayan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study we discussed that indication and effect on survival of emergency room thoracotomy in cardiac and respiratory arrest patients after penetrating or blunt chest trauma. Material and Method: Between March 2013 and September 2014, five emergency room thoracotomies were performed. The medical record of patients were analyzed retrospectively.Results:Emergency room thoracotomy was performed for 4 patients with penetrating and 1 patient with blunt chest trauma. 2 patients have died after the procedure. 1 patient died on the 10th day after surgery due to multi organ failure. 2 patients have survived and they discharged from the hospital without any sequelae. Discussion: Emergency room thoracotomy is a life-saving approach after thoracic trauma especially patients with penetrating trauma.

  3. Thoracic Computed Tomography Findings in Malignant Mesothelioma

    Omer Tamer Dogan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM is an uncommon neoplasm. MPM occurs more frequently in patients born or living in certain villages of Turkey.Objectives: We aimed to review radiological findings of MPM.Patients and Methods: We reviewed the CT findings in 219 biopsy-proven MPM patients admitted to our clinic between 1993 and 2008.Results: The most common CT findings included pleural thickening (n=197, 90% classified as diffuse (n=138, 63%, nodular (n=49, 22% and mass-type (n=16, 7%. Pleural effusion was found in 173 patients (79%, involvement of the interlobar fissures in 159 (73%, mediastinal pleural involvement in 170 (78%, volume contraction in 142 (65%, mediastinal shift in102 (47% and mediastinal lymphadenopathy in 54 (25%.Conclusion: MPM may present with diverse radiological features. Pleural thickening and pleural effusion were the most frequent radiological findings. Thoracic CT scans might be assessed more cautiously in patients with environmental exposure to asbestos.

  4. Clinical safety and efficacy of a next-generation stent-graft device for thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Eggebrecht, Holger; Schmermund, Axel; Voigtländer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair has significantly improved the treatment of patients with acute and chronic diseases of the descending thoracic aorta. Retrograde transarterial implantation of a membrane-covered stent graft aims at excluding the aortic pathology at risk for complications (e.g., aneurysm, dissection) from the circulation to prevent expansion and ultimately rupture. Today, several stent grafts from different manufacturers are approved by the respective authorities and thus commercially available. The Medtronic Talent® stent graft used to be one of the initially available devices and has been broadly used to become the world-wide market leader at its time. In 2005, it has been replaced by the second-generation Medtronic Valiant® device, which features several technical improvements. In this article, we evaluate a recent publication investigating the clinical performance of this second-generation stent graft device, and discuss the results in the view of the current literature and developments. PMID:23259442

  5. Role of volume rendered 3-D computed tomography in conservative management of trauma-related thoracic injuries.

    OʼLeary, Donal Peter

    2012-09-01

    Pneumatic nail guns are a tool used commonly in the construction industry and are widely available. Accidental injuries from nail guns are common, and several cases of suicide using a nail gun have been reported. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging, together with echocardiography, has been shown to be the gold standard for investigation of these cases. We present a case of a 55-year-old man who presented to the accident and emergency unit of a community hospital following an accidental pneumatic nail gun injury to his thorax. Volume-rendered CT of the thorax allowed an accurate assessment of the thoracic injuries sustained by this patient. As there was no evidence of any acute life-threatening injury, a sternotomy was avoided and the patient was observed closely until discharge. In conclusion, volume-rendered 3-dimensional CT can greatly help in the decision to avoid an unnecessary sternotomy in patients with a thoracic nail gun injury.

  6. Empowering minority voices

    Sabiescu, Amalia Georgiana; Paolini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Minority cultures have a history of voicelessness. If in the past lack of voice was conditioned by dominating majority groups and discriminating social structures, at present this needs to be seen in relation to the unequal distribution of tools and platforms that can enable expression, communication, and participation in the public sphere of discourse. The growing importance and ubiquity of information and communication technologies (ICTs) create new premises and open new possibilities for...

  7. Minors and Gambling Regulation

    Carran, M.

    2013-01-01

    Early initiation of gambling has been argued to be closely correlated with placing players at higher risk of developing problem gambling behaviour in the future. The vast majority of jurisdictions, including Great Britain, attempts to eliminate minors’ access to gambling by making it illegal and by requiring gambling providers to adopt strict age-verification procedures. Despite those measures minors continue to successfully access gambling. This paper demonstrates that British legal framewor...

  8. Magnetic resonance in prenatal diagnosis of thoracic anomalies

    The objective of this article is to communicate the experience in the evaluation of fetal anomalies thoracic by means of magnetic resonance. Between January, 2001 - March, 2007 16 fetus were evaluated by means of magnetic resonance with echographic diagnosis of thoracic anomalies. An equipment of 1.5 TESLA was used. The thoracic anatomy was valued in general. At the presence of discovering pulmonary mass, their size, volume and intensity of sign were determined. The echographic and magnetic resonance findings were checked against the perinatal results

  9. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic and abdominal malformations

    Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of fetal thoracic and abdominal malformations. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In cases of suspected pathologies based on fetal ultrasound MRI can be used for more detailed examinations and can be of assistance in the differential diagnostic process. Improved imaging of anatomical structures and of the composition of different tissues by the use of different MRI sequences. Fetal MRI has become a part of clinical routine in thoracic and abdominal malformations and is the basis for scientific research in this field. In cases of thoracic or abdominal malformations fetal MRI provides important information additional to ultrasound to improve diagnostic accuracy, prognostic evaluation and surgical planning. (orig.)

  10. Nearly Asymptomatic Eight-Month Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    Kumar, Arjun; Kumar, Krishan; Zeltser, Roman; Makaryus, Amgad N.

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection is a rare, but lethal, medical condition that is either misdiagnosed as a myocardial infarction or overlooked completely. Though thoracic aortic dissections are commonly diagnosed in patients exhibiting sharp chest pain, there are some notable cases where patients do not report the expected severity of pain. We report a unique case of a patient with a thoracic aortic dissection who was initially nearly asymptomatic for eight months, in order to heighten awareness, highlight diagnosis protocol, and improve prognosis for this commonly misdiagnosed, but fatal, condition. PMID:27257400

  11. Acute Tension Pneumothorax Following Cardiac Herniation after Pneumonectomy

    Daniel Steinmann; Eva Rohr; Andreas Kirschbaum

    2010-01-01

    A tension pneumothorax is one of the main causes of cardiac arrest in the initial postoperative period after thoracic surgery. Tension pneumothorax and cardiac herniation must be taken into account in hemodynamically unstable patients after pneumonectomy. We report an unusual case of successful treatment of acute tension pneumothorax following cardiac herniation and intrathoracic bleeding after pneumonectomy.

  12. Systematic review of dose-volume parameters in the prediction of esophagitis in thoracic radiotherapy

    Purpose: With dose escalation and increasing use of concurrent chemoradiotherapy, radiation esophagitis (RE) remains a common treatment-limiting acute side effect in the treatment of thoracic malignancies. The advent of 3DCT planning has enabled investigators to study esophageal dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters as predictors of RE. The purpose of this study was to assess published dosimetric parameters and toxicity data systematically in order to define reproducible predictors of RE, both for potential clinical use, and to provide recommendations for future research in the field. Materials and methods: We performed a systematic literature review of published studies addressing RE in the treatment of lung cancer and thymoma. Our search strategy included a variety of electronic medical databases, textbooks and bibliographies. Both prospective and retrospective clinical studies were included. Information relating to the relationship among measured dosimetric parameters, patient demographics, tumor characteristics, chemotherapy and RE was extracted and analyzed. Results: Eighteen published studies were suitable for analysis. Eleven of these assessed acute RE, while the remainder assessed both acute and chronic RE together. Heterogeneity of esophageal contouring practices, individual differences in information reporting and variability of RE outcome definitions were assessed. Well-described clinical and logistic modeling directly related V35Gy, V60Gy and SA55Gy to clinically significant RE. Conclusions: Several reproducible dosimetric parameters exist in the literature, and these may be potentially relevant in the prediction of RE in the radiotherapy of thoracic malignancies. Further clarification of the predictive relationship between such standardized dosimetric parameters and observed RE outcomes is essential to develop efficient radiation treatment planning in locally advanced NSCLC in the modern concurrent chemotherapy and image-guided IMRT era.

  13. Blunt thoracic trauma - an analysis of 264 patients in Rawalpindi, Pakistan

    Objective: To analyse the outcome in terms of morbidity and mortality in blunt thoracic trauma patients in tertiary care hospitals, Rawalpindi. Methods: The prospective study was conducted from March 2008 to February 2012 in surgical wards of public and private sector hospitals in Rawalpindi. A total of 221 patients were included from the Combined Military Hospital during 2008-10, and 43 patients from the Heart's International during 2011-12. The patients reported to emergency department within 48 hours of trauma. All patients were subjected to detailed history and respiratory system examination to ascertain fracture of ribs, flail segment and haemopneumothorax. The diagnosis of chest wall injuries, parenchymal pulmonary injuries and pleural involvement were made on the basis of chest radiographs and computed tomography scan of the chest. The lung contusion was assessed by the number of lobes involved. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 264 patients in the study, 211 (80%) were males and 54 (20%) females. The overall mean age was 44.8+-17.1 years. Over all morbidity was 222 (84.2%); morbidity (minor) was 128 (48.5%), and morbidity (major) was 94 (35.7%). Mortality was 26 (9.8%) and 16 (6%) cases had normal outcome. Conclusion: Early identification and aggressive management of blunt thoracic trauma is essential to reducing significant rates of morbidity and mortality. (author)

  14. A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated with spinal cord compression

    A 14-year-old boy developed spinal cord compression during remission of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Metrizamide myelography disclosed complete block at the level of the 8th thoracic vertebra. Subsequent metrizamide CT clearly showed the subarachnoid space compressed and stenosed from the 8th thoracic vertebra to the 2nd lumber verbetra, and an extradural mass compressing the spinal cord. The function in the lower extremities was almost completely recovered by radiation therapy with a total dose of 10 Gy from the 6th thoracic vertebra to the 4th lumbar vertebra. (Namekawa, K.)

  15. An extensive DeBakey type IIIb aortic dissection with massive right pleural effusion presenting as abdominal pain and acute anemia: particular case report

    Yu, Hui-Chun; Wang, Zhen-Qing; Hao, Yuan-Yuan; An, Feng-Ping; Hu, Yu-Chuan; Deng, Rui-Bing; Yu, Peng; Cui, Guang-Bin; Li, He

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 79-year-old male presented with sudden onset of abdominal pain and mild breathlessness, and complicated acute progressive anemia with haemoglobin which declined from 120 g/L to 70 g/L within five days. An urgent computed tomography angiography showed acute thoracic aortic dissection, DeBakey type IIIb, a dissecting aneurysm in the proximal descending thoracic aorta starting immediately after the origin of the left subclavian artery and extending distally below the re...

  16. Percutaneous transfemoral placement of a new flexible stent-graft into the thoracic aorta followed by a percutaneous suture-mediated closure of the access site - initial experience; Perkutane transfemorale implantation einer neuen, flexiblen thorakalen Aortenendoprothese unter Verwendung eines perkutanen Nahtsystems zum Gefaessverschluss - erste Erfahrungen

    Manke, C.; Lenhart, M.; Strotzer, M.; Feuerbach, S.; Link, J. [Klinikum der Univ. Regensburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Kobuch, R.; Merk, J.; Birnbaum, F. [Klinikum der Univ. Regensburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Herz-, Thorax- und herznahe Gefaesschirurgie

    2001-05-01

    To evaluate the transfemoral placement of a new, flexible stent-graft into the thoracic aorta and the suture-mediated closure of the femoral access. Patients and Methods: five patients were treated endovascularly with a stent-graft for an aneurysm (n = 3) or acute dissection (n = 2) of the thoracic aorta via a femoral 24 F sheath. The femoral access site was closed with two suture-mediated closure devices after placement of the stent-graft. Results: the aneurysm or the false lumen was excluded from perfusion by the placement of the stent-graft in all patients. Hemostasis at the femoral access site was successful in all patients with the percutaneous suture device. A minor stenosis of the femoral artery was found angiographically in four patients after suture-mediated closure. Besides a reversible renal failure due to the medically induced hypotension for the treatment of an acutely ruptured aneurysm, no complications resulted from the stent-graft placement or the percutaneous suture. Conclusion: the percutaneous transfemoral placement of stent-grafts in the thoracic aorta using a suture-mediated closure of the access site is technically feasible. Long-term results of the technique have to be awaited. (orig.) [German] Evaluation der transfemoralen Implantation einer neuen, flexiblen thorakalen Aortenprothese unter Verwendung eines perkutanen Nahtsystems zum Verschluss des femoralen Zugangs. Patienten und Methoden: fuenf Patienten wurden wegen Aneurysma (n = 3) oder akuter Dissektion (n = 2) der thorakalen Aorta endovaskulaer ueber eine perkutan eingebrachte 24F-Schleuse mit einem Stentgraft versogt. Der femorale Zugang wurde nach Plazierung der Endoprothese mit zwei perkutanen Nahtgeraeten verschlossen. Ergebnisse: bei allen Patienten fuehrte die Platzierung der Prothese zur Ausschaltung des Aneurysmas oder des falschen Lumens von der Perfusion. Mit der perkutanen Gefae paragraph naht konnte in allen Faellen ein Verschluss des femoralen Zugangs erreicht werden. In

  17. Robotic thoracic surgery: The state of the art

    Arvind Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Although the cumulative experience worldwide is still limited and evolving, Robotic Thoracic Surgery is an evolution over VATS. There is however a lot of concern among established high-volume VATS centers regarding the superiority of the robotic technique. We have over 7 years experience and believe that any new technology designed to make minimal invasive surgery easier and more comfortable for the surgeon is most likely to have better and safer outcomes in the long run. Our only concern is its cost effectiveness and we believe that if the cost factor is removed more and more surgeons will use the technology and it will increase the spectrum and the reach of minimally invasive thoracic surgery. This article reviews worldwide experience with robotic thoracic surgery and addresses the potential benefits and limitations of using the robotic platform for the performance of thoracic surgical procedures.

  18. Thoracic meningocele, non-associated with neurofibromatosis: a case report

    A case of thoracic meningocele, not associated with neurofibromatosis, in a 30 year-old woman is reported. The importance of imaging diagnostic methods in the differential diagnosis of posterior mediastinal masses is discussed. (author)

  19. Successful treatment of an infected thoracic endovascular stent graft.

    Sueda, Taijiro; Takahashi, Shinya; Katayama, Keijiro; Imai, Katsuhiko

    2016-05-01

    A 70-year-old man with a chronic type B aortic dissection was treated with two stent grafts deployed in the descending thoracic aorta. The patient was re-admitted to the hospital at 16 months after thoracic endovascular stent grafting because of a high fever. A blood culture showed sepsis due to a Staphylococcus species. A CT scan showed an increase in the size of the thrombosed false lumen. Complete excision of the infected descending aortic wall and infected stent graft were performed. The descending thoracic aorta was reconstructed using a rifampicin-bonded Dacron graft and omental wrapping. The combination of in situ graft replacement using a rifampicin-bonded graft and omental wrapping is considered an effective treatment for thoracic stent graft infection. PMID:24990657

  20. EFFICACY OF THE ENDOVASCULAR TREATMENT OF THE THORACIC AND ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSMS IN CARTAGENA, COLOMBIA

    Marzola-Peña Katy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aortic aneurysms (AA are a segmentary and permanent dilatation of the aorta that could end in a catastrophic outcome named acute aortic syndrome (AAS, which could curse with rupture and in most cases in death. The treatment of the AA pretends to prevent its rupture by means of resection and replacement of the aorta by a graft. In the last years, an endovascular management with protesis was done, excluding the circulation aneurysm. Objective: To describe the efficacy, in terms of survival and consequences prevention, of the treatment with stents in thoracic and abdominal AA in older than 50 years. Methods: An observational descriptive study was carried out, of a case series with diagnosis of AA who received endovascular treatment since January, 2012 to June, 2014 in the Clínica Madre Bernarda and Clínica San Juan de Dios in Cartagena, Colombia. Data was collected in a database with Excel™ and were analyzed with the statistical program EPIDAT 3.1. Results: In the period of study 26 patients were identified with diagnosis of thoracic and/or abdominal AA. 76.9% were men. The average age was 71 years with interquartile range between 55-77 years. The age group with highest frequency was 70-79 years with 11 cases (42.3%. The mortality associated to systemic complications after the intervention was 11%. The need of surgical reintervention to endoleak was 13.3% and sequels of paraplegia secondary to the intervention was not described. Conclusions: The endovascular treatment of thoracic and abdominal AA is an important therapeutic alternative. The results observed of the endovascular management of AA were similar to the published ones, as for complications and mortality. Rev.cienc. biomed. 2015;6(1:60-67 KEYWORDS Aortic aneurysm; Endovascular Procedures; Vascular Diseases; Vascular surgical procedures.

  1. Intercostal Neurinoma: A Rare Cause of Persistent Thoracic Pain

    Meyer, Christian; Rodepeter, Fiona; Bartsch, Detlef; Kirschbaum, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Persistent thoracic pain with no history of trauma demands diagnostic workup. In this case, the patient complained of right thoracic continuous belt-like pain, sometimes experienced as shooting pain, over several months. The symptoms were first treated conservatively with painkillers, which was rather ineffective. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of the thorax surprisingly showed an unclear piston-like enlargement near the seventh rib closely above the spinal canal. Video thoracoscopy was pe...

  2. Extraforaminal ligament attachments of the thoracic spinal nerves in humans

    Kraan, G.A.; Hoogland, P. V. J. M.; Wuisman, P. I. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    An anatomical study of the extraforaminal attachments of the thoracic spinal nerves was performed using human spinal columns. The objectives of the study are to identify and describe the existence of ligamentous structures at each thoracic level that attach spinal nerves to structures at the extraforaminal region. During the last 120 years, several mechanisms have been described to protect the spinal nerve against traction. All the described structures were located inside the spinal canal pro...

  3. Thoracic oncology multidisciplinary teams: Between the promises and challenges

    Jazieh Abdul-Rahman; Al Hadab Abdulrahman; Howington John

    2008-01-01

    The thoracic oncology multidisciplinary teams are playing an increasing role in the management of thoracic malignancies. These teams have a great potential to improve the patient care and the health care system, however, they are faced by many challenges. To realize the full potential of these teams, a better understanding of their functions, roles, benefits and challenges from all involved including teams members and leadership is crucial.

  4. Thoracic oncology multidisciplinary teams: Between the promises and challenges

    Jazieh Abdul-Rahman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The thoracic oncology multidisciplinary teams are playing an increasing role in the management of thoracic malignancies. These teams have a great potential to improve the patient care and the health care system, however, they are faced by many challenges. To realize the full potential of these teams, a better understanding of their functions, roles, benefits and challenges from all involved including teams members and leadership is crucial.

  5. Single-Port Thoracic Surgery: A New Direction

    Ng, Calvin S.H.

    2014-01-01

    Single-port video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has slowly established itself as an alternate surgical approach for the treatment of an increasingly wide range of thoracic conditions. The potential benefits of fewer surgical incisions, better cosmesis, and less postoperative pain and paraesthesia have led to the technique’s popularity worldwide. The limited single small incision through which the surgeon has to operate poses challenges that are slowly being addressed by improvements in ins...

  6. Thoracic ossification of ligamentum flavum caused by skeletal fluorosis

    Wang, Wenbao; Kong, Linghua; Zhao, Heyuan; Dong, Ronghua; Li, Jianjiang; Jia, Zhanhua; Ji, Ning; Deng, Shucai; Sun, Zhiming; Zhou, Jing

    2006-01-01

    Thoracic ossification of ligamentum flavum (OLF) caused by skeletal fluorosis is rare. Only six patients had been reported in the English literature. This study reports findings from the first clinical series of this disease. This was a retrospective study of patients with thoracic OLF due to skeletal fluorosis who underwent surgical management at the authors’ hospital between 1993 and 2003. Diagnosis of skeletal fluorosis was made based on the epidemic history, clinical symptoms, radiographi...

  7. Generation of Comprehensive Thoracic Oncology Database - Tool for Translational Research

    Surati, Mosmi; Robinson, Matthew; Nandi, Suvobroto; Faoro, Leonardo; Demchuk, Carley; Kanteti, Rajani; Ferguson, Benjamin; Gangadhar, Tara; Hensing, Thomas; Hasina, Rifat; Husain, Aliya; Ferguson, Mark; Karrison, Theodore; Salgia, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    The Thoracic Oncology Program Database Project was created to serve as a comprehensive, verified, and accessible repository for well-annotated cancer specimens and clinical data to be available to researchers within the Thoracic Oncology Research Program. This database also captures a large volume of genomic and proteomic data obtained from various tumor tissue studies. A team of clinical and basic science researchers, a biostatistician, and a bioinformatics expert was convened to design the ...

  8. Gastrointestinal histamine after thoracic irradiation in the mouse.

    Man, W K; Michalowski, A.; Li, S. K.; Barr, J.; Burgin, J.; Baron, J. H.; Spencer, J

    1986-01-01

    Thoracic irradiation induced duodenal lesions in mice as an indirect effect. We studied the influence of partial thoracic irradiation on endogenous histamine stores in the alimentary canal. Mice subjected to lower mediastinal irradiation had significantly higher (+19%) median gastric histamine, but lower (-44%) distal duodenal histamine than controls. They also had significantly lower proximal (-39%) and distal (-44%) duodenal histamine than mice who received upper mediastinal irradiation. Tw...

  9. Effect of Massage on Pain Management for Thoracic Surgery Patients

    Dion, Liza; Rodgers, Nancy; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Cordes, Mary Ellen; Bauer, Brent; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cha, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Integrative therapies such as massage have gained support as interventions that improve the overall patient experience during hospitalization. Thoracic surgery patients undergo long procedures and commonly have postoperative back, neck, and shoulder pain. Purpose: Given the promising effects of massage therapy for alleviation of pain, we studied the effectiveness and feasibility of massage therapy delivered in the postoperative thoracic surgery setting. Methods: Patients who recei...

  10. [Thoracic duct valves in man and albino rat].

    Petrenko, V M; Kruglov, S V

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the number, structure and position of valves along the whole length of thoracic duct in man and albino rat. The study was performed using the material obtained from 30 human corpses of men and women aged 17 to 60 years with no history of cardiovascular pathology and from 60 outbred albino rats of both sexes aged 5 to 12 months. Material was fixed in 10% neutral formalin. Anterior wall of thoracic duct was longitudinally dissected. Thoracic duct of 30 rats was stained with gallocyanin-chrome alum, in the remaining animals it was studied after its injection with blue Gerota's mass. In most cases, the valves consisted of two semilunar cusps. Thoracic duct was found to contain on the average 14.7+/-0.2 valves in man and 11.9+/-0.2 valves in rat. Most of all valves were found in the upper (anterior) 1/3 of the thoracic duct, least--in its middle part. This seems to be determined by anatomo-topographic features of the different parts of thoracic duct. PMID:15839250

  11. Simultaneous endovascular stent and renal stent placement for acute type B aortic dissection with malperfusion of kidney

    Dagdelen, Sinan; Aydın, Ebuzer; Karabulut, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection frequently causes life-threatening organ ischemia. The optimal therapy for acute type-B aortic dissection is still controversial. Surgery for acute dissection with organ malperfusion is known to carry a high morbidity and mortality; however endovascular treatment is becoming an alternative form of treatment. We report a clinical case of emergency percutaneous thoracal aorta endovascular stenting and renal artery stenting in a patient who had renal malperfusion and acut...

  12. Quantitative normal thoracic anatomy at CT.

    Matsumoto, Monica M S; Udupa, Jayaram K; Tong, Yubing; Saboury, Babak; Torigian, Drew A

    2016-07-01

    Automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodologies for a body region require detailed understanding of the morphology, architecture, and geographical layout of the organs within the body region. The aim of this paper was to quantitatively characterize the normal anatomy of the thoracic region for AAR. Contrast-enhanced chest CT images from 41 normal male subjects, each with 11 segmented objects, were considered in this study. The individual objects were quantitatively characterized in terms of their linear size, surface area, volume, shape, CT attenuation properties, inter-object distances, size and shape correlations, size-to-distance correlations, and distance-to-distance correlations. A heat map visualization approach was used for intuitively portraying the associations between parameters. Numerous new observations about object geography and relationships were made. Some objects, such as the pericardial region, vary far less than others in size across subjects. Distance relationships are more consistent when involving an object such as trachea and bronchi than other objects. Considering the inter-object distance, some objects have a more prominent correlation, such as trachea and bronchi, right and left lungs, arterial system, and esophagus. The proposed method provides new, objective, and usable knowledge about anatomy whose utility in building body-wide models toward AAR has been demonstrated in other studies. PMID:27065241

  13. August 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Robbins RA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The August 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 8/27/14 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 30 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep and radiology communities. A presentation was given by Julie Reid of the American Lung Association in Arizona on their Lung Force initiative. This is an initiative to make women more aware that lung cancer is the number 1 cause of cancer deaths in women. There will be a fund raising Lung Force Walk on November 15, 2014 in Phoenix. More information can be found at http://www.lungforce.org/walk-events or http://www.lung.org/associations/states/arizona/local-offices/phoenix/ or contact Julie Reid at JReid@Lung Arizona.org or (602 258-7505. A discussion was instigated by Dr. Parides on whether there is an increased risk of clinical Valley Fever in patients previously treated who begin therapy with biological therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. The ...

  14. December 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Richard A. Robbins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A breakfast meeting of the Arizona Thoracic Society and the Tucson winter lung series was held on Saturday, 12/14/2013 at Kiewit Auditorium on the University of Arizona Medical Center Campus beginning at 8:30 AM. There were 31 in attendance. A lecture was presented by Joe G. N. "Skip" Garcia, MD, the senior vice president for health sciences at the University of Arizona. The title of Garcia’s talk was “Personalizing Medicine in Cardiopulmonary Disorders: The Post ACA Landscape”. Garcia began with reiterating that the Affordable Care Act (ACA, Obamacare is fact and could pose a threat to academic medical centers. However, he views the ACA as an opportunity to develop personalized medicine which grew from the human genome project. Examples cited included the genetic variability among patients in determining the dose of warfarin and bronchodilator response to beta agonists in asthma (1,2. Garcia’s laboratory has studied predominately 6 diseases including the …

  15. June 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Robbins RA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The June 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 6/25/14 at the Bio5 building on the University of Arizona Medical Center campus in Tucson beginning at 5:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 33 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Four cases were presented: Eric Chase presented a 68 year old incarcerated man shortness of breath, chest pain and productive cough. The patient was a poor historian. He was supposed to be receiving morphine for back pain but this had been held. He also had a 45 pound weight loss over the past year. His PMH was positive for COPD, hypertension, congestive heart failure, chronic back pain and hepatitis C. Past surgical history included a back operation and some sort of chest operation. On physical examination he was tachypneic, tachycardic and multiple scars over his neck ...

  16. September 2012 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Robbins RA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on 9/26//2012 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 18 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology, and radiology communities.A discussion was held on Pending Premium Cigar Legislation HR. 1639 and S.1461, the "Traditional Cigar Manufacturing and Small Business Jobs Preservation Act of 2011”. This bill would exempt "premium cigars" from FDA oversight. The definition of premium cigars is so broad that candy flavored cigars, cigarillos and blunts would be exempted from FDA regulation. Teenage cigar smoking is increasing and this legislation may result in a further increase. The Arizona Thoracic Society is opposed to this bill. Dr. Robbins is to put a link on the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care website linking to the ATS website. This will enable members to contact their Congressmen opposing this legislation. A discussion was also held on a proposed combined Tucson/Phoenix …

  17. November 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Robbins RA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. There were 3 case presentations: 1. Dr. Gerald Schwartzberg presented a case of a 56-year-old man with a history of diabetes, alcoholism and tobacco abuse who has a history of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI with a residual thin-walled cavity in his right upper lobe (RUL. After quitting drinking and smoking and years of being asymptomatic, he presented with hemoptysis. Chest x-ray showed increasing density in the RUL. CT scan showed an intracavitary density in his previous cavity presumably a fungus ball. Sputum cultures are pending. Discussion followed on management of fungus balls. Bronchoscopy was recommended to view the bronchial anatomy to exclude other diagnosis as well ...

  18. November 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Robbins RA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The November Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 11/20/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 26 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, nursing, radiology, and infectious disease communities. As per the last meeting a separate area for upcoming meetings has been created in the upper left hand corner of the home page on the SWJPCC website. A short presentation was made by Timothy Kuberski MD, Chief of Infectious Disease at Maricopa Medical Center, entitled “Clinical Evidence for Coccidioidomycosis as an Etiology for Sarcoidosis”. Isaac Yourison, a medical student at the University of Arizona, will be working with Dr. Kuberski on his scholarly project. Mr. Yourison hypothesizes that certain patients diagnosed with sarcoidosis in Arizona really have coccidioidomycosis. It would be predicted that because of the immunosuppression, usually due to steroids, the sarcoidosis patients would eventually express the Coccidioides infection. The investigators will be …

  19. August 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society notes

    Robbins RA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. The August Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 8/28/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 23 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and pathology communities. A brief discussion was held about the audio-visual aids available. It was generally agreed that our current projector is inadequate. Judd Tillinghast will inquire about using a hospital overhead projector. If that is not possible, it was agreed to purchase a new projector. Plans for telecasting the meeting between Phoenix and Tucson continue. A trial of a link between Shea and the University in Tucson failed. Once the link is successfully established, it is hoped that the meeting can be telecasted. There were 6 cases presented: 1. Dr. Thomas Colby, pulmonary pathologist from Mayo Clinic Arizona, presented the case of a 10 year old boy with chronic dyspnea for > 4 yrs. He had growth retardation since age …

  20. March 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Robbins RA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The March 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, March 25, 2014 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, radiology and oncology communities. Dr. Richard Robbins made a presentation entitled "The History of Exhaled Nitric Oxide Measurement" focusing on the development of exhaled nitric oxide in the early 1990's. There were 3 case presentations: 1. Sandra Till, a third year pulmonary fellow at the Good Samaritan/VA program, presented an elderly man admitted to the Phoenix VA with an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. His CT findings showed with centrilobular emphysema, bronchial edema, and scattered ground glass opacities. It was felt that the CT findings most likely represented a bronchiolitis from his exacerbation of COPD. 2. Richard Robbins presented a 49 year old man with a ...

  1. May 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Robbins RA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The May 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, May 27, 2015 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 16 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. Ms. Georgann VanderJagt, RN, MSN gave an update on clinical trials at Dignity Health including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. To contact Ms. VanderJagt call her office at 602-406-3825, her cell at 602-615-2377 or by email at georgann.vaderjagt@digniftyhealth.org. Dr. Michael Smith, the surgical director for the lung transplant program at Dignity Health, gave an overview of their lung transplant program. They are currently the fifth busiest transplant program in the US. They have done 46 lung transplants so far this year. They are on a par with UCLA in number of transplants and survival has been at the National average. Average wait time ...

  2. [Intraoperative risk management during thoracic procedures].

    Tsuzaki, Koichi

    2009-05-01

    Risk management in clinical practice is an impor part of medical audit. Although, medical audit consists of monitoring, data collection, peer review and establishing standards, these four steps should be regarded as a series of cyclical process. As a general rule, this concept should be applied to any field of clinical medicine and will contribute to the development of sound quality control scheme. Several complications are known to occur in thoracic anesthesia, especially in one-lung ventilation. For example, malposition of double-lumen endotracheal tube, severe hypoxia and higher airway pressure are relatively common problems, and it would be better for us to prepare for these adverse events beforehand. Auscultation, fiber-optic visualization and proper ventilatory management (eg. lower tidal volume with dependent lung PEEP, alveolar recruitment maneuver, application of CPAP to non-dependent lung) are the recommended technique required to correct these abnormalities. When life-threatening hypoxia is imminent, we should convert to two-lung ventilation without any delay. In this regard, verbal communication between surgical teams should be kept on even ground, each playing key roles in the management of such a critical situation. PMID:19462793

  3. June 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Robbins RA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on Wednesday, 6/26/2013 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 16 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. Rick Robbins, editor of the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care, announced that the journal had begun using digital object identifiers (DOI through the CrossRef service. In addition, the content of the journal will be stored in the CLOCKSS Archive. The Mayo Clinic in Rochester has asked to partner with the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care. The Arizona Thoracic Society endorsed this association. Rick Robbins is stepping down as the Arizona representative to the Council of Chapter (CCR Representatives. Dr. George Parides was unanimously elected CCR representative. Dr. Lewis Wesselius presented the case of an 80 year old Asian man with a history of the recent onset of cough, weight loss, headache and an abnormal chest x-ray. He

  4. September 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Robbins RA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The September Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 9/25/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and pathology communities. After a brief discussion, Gerry Swartzberg was selected as Arizona’s 2014 nominee for Clinician of the Year. There was 1 case presented: Dr. Thomas Colby, pulmonary pathologist from Mayo Clinic Arizona, presented the case of a 67 year old woman with multiple pulmonary nodules. The largest was 1.2 cm CT scan. She had a fine needle aspiration of one of the nodules. The pathology revealed spindle-shaped cells which were synaptophysin + (also known as the major synaptic vesicle protein p38. Synaptophysin marks neuroendocrine tissue and on this basis the patient was diagnosed with multiple carcinoid tumors. Aguayo et al. (1 described six patients with diffuse hyperplasia and dysplasia of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, multiple carcinoid tumorlets, and peribronchiolar fibrosis …

  5. January 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Wesselius LJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Dr. Jud Tillinghast was presented a plaque in recognition of being chosen by his colleagues as the Arizona Thoracic Society Physician of the Year In 2014. Dr. Rajeev Saggar made a presentation entitled "Pulmonary fibrosis-associated pulmonary hypertension: a unique phenotype". This presentation focused on new echocardiographic methods of assessing right ventricular (RV function and the pathophysiology of RV dysfunction. Dr. Saggar presented data from a paper he authored on parenteral treprostinil in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary artery hypertension which was published in Thorax (1. There were 2 case presentations, both from the Phoenix VA by Dr. Elijah Poulos: 1. A 65 year-old man presented with cough and chills. His past medical history included multiple myeloma treated with chemotherapy, radiation therapy to spine and bone marrow transplant. He had a prior vertebroplasty. His symptoms did not improve with doxycycline. Computerized tomography angiography was done and showed areas of ...

  6. A Procedure of Combination of Sequential Internal Thoracic Artery Grafting and Cooley's Technique for Complicated Case With Multi-vessel Disease,Left Ventricular Aneurysm and Mitral Regurgitation

    Meng-ya LIANG; Guang-xian CHEN; Zhong-kai WU; Xi ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Left ventricular aneurysm and ischemic mitral regurgitation are two of most common complications of acute myocardial infarction (AMI).Combination of both these two fatal complications is not rare and the management of these complicated cases is always a challenge to cardiac surgeon because of its relatively high mortality[1]. We reported a rare case of AMI in which a singlestage correction of mitral valve replacement with preservation of mitral apparatus, sequential left internal thoracic artery (ITA) grafting and Cooley's technique.

  7. Survey of Thoracic CT Protocols and Technical Parameters in Korean Hospitals: Changes before and after Establishment of Thoracic CT Guideline by Korean Society of Thoracic Radiology in 2008

    Kang, Ji-Won; Do, Kyung Hyun; Han, Kichang; Chae, Eun-Jin; Yang, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Choong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the thoracic CT scan protocols and technical parameters obtained from hospitals in Korea, one group during May 2007 (n = 100) and the other group during January 2012 (n = 173), before and after the establishment of the thoracic CT Guideline in 2008. Each group was also divided into two subgroups according to the health care delivery level, i.e. the “A” subgroup from primary and the “B” subgroup from secondary and tertiary care hospitals. When comparing the data fro...

  8. Acute Bronchitis

    ... of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your cough ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when people ...

  9. [Endovascular repair for an acute traumatic aortic transection: a case report].

    Sanioğlu, Soner; Sahin, Sinan; Aydoğan, Hakki; Barutça, Hakan; Eren, Ergin

    2012-03-01

    A thirty-eight-year-old male patient who suffered from 10th and 11th thoracal vertebrae fractures, paraplegia and acute traumatic aortic transection because of accidental fall was referred to our hospital. Open surgical repair carried a very high risk due to severe coexisting injuries. Transection was treated with 30x100 mm Valiant thoracic endograft, which was deployed just distal to the ostium of the left carotid artery. The patient was transferred to the neurosurgery clinic for treatment of paraplegia after an uneventful recovery. Endovascular repair of acute transection confers substantial advantages in mortality and morbidity compared to surgical repair. However, the long-term durability of thoracic endografts remains unknown. If the long-term results are as satisfactory as the promising mid-term results, this technique may become the gold standard approach for the treatment of acute transection. PMID:22792827

  10. Pathogenic FBN1 variants in familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    Regalado, E S; Guo, D C; Santos-Cortez, R L P; Hostetler, E; Bensend, T A; Pannu, H; Estrera, A; Safi, H; Mitchell, A L; Evans, J P; Leal, S M; Bamshad, M; Shendure, J; Nickerson, D A; Milewicz, D M

    2016-06-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) due to mutations in FBN1 is a known cause of thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAAD) associated with pleiotropic manifestations. Genetic predisposition to TAAD can also be inherited in families in the absence of syndromic features, termed familial TAAD (FTAAD), and several causative genes have been identified to date. FBN1 mutations can also be identified in FTAAD families, but the frequency of these mutations has not been established. We performed exome sequencing of 183 FTAAD families and identified pathogenic FBN1 variants in five (2.7%) of these families. We also identified eight additional FBN1 rare variants that could not be unequivocally classified as disease-causing in six families. FBN1 sequencing should be considered in individuals with FTAAD even without significant systemic features of MFS. PMID:26621581

  11. Endovascular graft exclusion in treating thoracic aortic dissection: a report of 25 cases

    Objective: To evaluate the usefulness and efficacy of endovascular graft exclusion (EVGE) in treating thoracic aortic dissection (TAD). Methods: Twenty-five cases of TAD, including 24 cases of Standford B and 1 case of A, were treated by EVGE. The clinical outcome and morphological changes of the lesions were analyzed during a 2-20 months' follow-up. Results: Procedures were technically successful in all 25 cases, while a total of 28 stent-grafts were deployed (3 cases with 2 stent-grafts in each). Complete disappearance of the false lumen or remarkable decrease of the endoleak was noted on the angiograms after stent placement. No severe procedure-related complication was observed, and thrombosis of the false lumen was noted during the follow-up. Conclusion: EVGE is effective and reliable in treating TAD, especially for patients with sub-acute or chronic courses

  12. Combination of traumatic thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm and myocardial contusion leading to left ventricular aneurysm

    The combination of thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm and left ventricular aneurysm resulting from a single traumatic incident is an exceedingly rare occurrence. We present a case of a 10-year-old girl who sustained significant blunt trauma to the chest after being involved in a rollover motor vehicle accident. The child underwent immediate repair of a transected aortic arch. An inferior wall left ventricular aneurysm developed 3 weeks later, and the patient underwent successful repair of the left ventricular aneurysm and a damaged mitral valve. The use of fast multidetector row CT, cardiac MRI, and echocardiography have improved our ability to diagnose these types of injuries and accurately image their anatomic relationships in the acute and perioperative settings. (orig.)

  13. Investigation of pulsatile flowfield in healthy thoracic aorta models.

    Wen, Chih-Yung; Yang, An-Shik; Tseng, Li-Yu; Chai, Jyh-Wen

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Complex hemodynamics plays a critical role in the development of aortic dissection and atherosclerosis, as well as many other diseases. Since fundamental fluid mechanics are important for the understanding of the blood flow in the cardiovascular circulatory system of the human body aspects, a joint experimental and numerical study was conducted in this study to determine the distributions of wall shear stress and pressure and oscillatory WSS index, and to examine their correlation with the aortic disorders, especially dissection. Experimentally, the Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PC-MRI) method was used to acquire the true geometry of a normal human thoracic aorta, which was readily converted into a transparent thoracic aorta model by the rapid prototyping (RP) technique. The thoracic aorta model was then used in the in vitro experiments and computations. Simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code ACE+((R)) to determine flow characteristics of the three-dimensional, pulsatile, incompressible, and Newtonian fluid in the thoracic aorta model. The unsteady boundary conditions at the inlet and the outlet of the aortic flow were specified from the measured flowrate and pressure results during in vitro experiments. For the code validation, the predicted axial velocity reasonably agrees with the PC-MRI experimental data in the oblique sagittal plane of the thoracic aorta model. The thorough analyses of the thoracic aorta flow, WSSs, WSS index (OSI), and wall pressures are presented. The predicted locations of the maxima of WSS and the wall pressure can be then correlated with that of the thoracic aorta dissection, and thereby may lead to a useful biological significance. The numerical results also suggest that the effects of low WSS and high OSI tend to cause wall thickening occurred along the inferior wall of the aortic arch and the

  14. Thoracic injury: a review of 276 cases

    Moosa Zargar; Ali Khaji; Mojgan Karbakhsh Davari

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Chest injury, one of the most important aspects of trauma, directly accounts for 25% of all traumarelated deaths and plays a major contributing role in another 25% of trauma deaths. This paper aimed to explore the spectrum and outcome of thoracic injuries seen in a multi centric study of trauma patients.Methods: A total of 276 consecutive trauma patients in 6 general hospitals were analyzed. The feature of injury,injury severity score (ISS), clinical treatment and mortality were recorded in a prospective manner and analyzed retrospectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent predictors of mortality following the chest trauma.Results: There were 246 males ( 89.1%) and 30 females (10.9% ) ranging from 3 to 80 years with a mean age of (34 ± 17) years. Road traffic accident was the main cause of injury, especially for pedestrians, followed by stab wound (89 cases, 32.1% ) and falling injuries (32 cases,11.6% ), respectively. Haemothorax or pneumothorax (50.4%) and rib fracture (38.6%) were the most common types of chest injury. Extremity fracture was the most common associated injury with the rate of 37% ( 85/230), followed by head injury (25.2% ) and abdominal trauma (19.6%). These injuries contributed significantly to the morbidity and mortality of trauma patients.Conclusions: According to the results, most patients with chest injury can be treated conservatively with close observation and tube thoracostomy. The presence of blunt trauma, head injury and abdominal injury independently adversely affect mortality after chest trauma. It is necessary to investigate the causes and patterns of injuries resulting from stab wound for effective prevention.

  15. Thoracic radiotherapy and breath control: current prospects

    Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) is adversely affected by setup error and organ motion. In thoracic 3D CRT, breathing accounts for most of intra-fraction movements, thus impairing treatment quality. Breath control clearly exhibits dosimetric improvement compared to free breathing, leading to various techniques for gated treatments. We review benefits of different breath control methods -i.e. breath-holding or beam gating, with spirometric, isometric or X-ray respiration sensor- and argument the choice of expiration versus inspiration, with consideration to dosimetric concerns. All steps of 3D-CRT can be improved with breath control. Contouring of organs at risk (OAR) and target are easier and more accurate on breath controlled CT-scans. Inter- and intra-fraction target immobilisation allows smaller margins with better coverage. Lung outcome predictors (NTCP, Mean Dose, LV20, LV30) are improved with breath-control. In addition, inspiration breath control facilitates beam arrangement since it widens the distance between OAR and target, and leaves less lung normal tissue within the high dose region. Last, lung density, as of CT scan, is more accurate, improving dosimetry. Our institutions choice is to use spirometry driven, patient controlled high-inspiration breath-hold; this technique gives excellent immobilization results, with high reproducibility, yet it is easy to implement and costs little extra treatment time. Breath control, whatever technique is employed, proves superior to free breathing treatment when using 3D-CRT. Breath control should then be used whenever possible, and is probably mandatory for IMRT. (authors)

  16. A Practical Guide to Clinical Management of Thoracic Aortic Disease.

    Bradley, Timothy J; Alvarez, Nanette A M; Horne, S Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    Physicians and surgeons faced with patients with thoracic aortic disease (TAD) need to determine the underlying diagnosis to facilitate decisions regarding appropriate investigations as well as which other specialists to involve, when to start medical therapy, when to refer for surgery, and how to plan follow-up and family screening. Increased understanding of conditions predisposing to thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) provides the opportunity for more personalized care. However, given advances in the genetics of TAD, clinicians are now faced with an expanded and often confusing list of associated differential diagnoses. We present a practical guide to managing patients with TAD based on current knowledge and guidelines. Important "flags" on history taking and "tips" to diagnosis on physical examination along with what investigations to order and what referrals to request are discussed. Need for medical therapy, indications for surgical repair, and planning long-term follow-up of TAD are determined by age, the underlying TAD diagnosis, previous vascular history in the patient or other family members (or both), aortic dimensions and growth rate, and any coexisting cardiovascular disease. Although medications may slow the progression of TAA, effective aortic surveillance and timely elective surgical repair remain the mainstays of prevention of acute aortic complications. Emergent repair of acute aortic dissection carries a far worse prognosis. Taking a practical approach to the management of TAD allows for standardized assessment and implementation of current best practice clinical guidelines. Ongoing discovery of new genes, better medical therapies, and innovative surgical techniques necessitate constantly adapting knowledge and integrating it into everyday clinical practice. PMID:26724515

  17. Impact of Nonvascular Thoracic MR Imaging on the Clinical Decision Making of Thoracic Surgeons: A 2-year Prospective Study.

    Ackman, Jeanne B; Gaissert, Henning A; Lanuti, Michael; Digumarthy, Subba R; Shepard, Jo-Anne O; Halpern, Elkan F; Wright, Cameron D

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To determine the impact of nonvascular thoracic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging on the clinical decision making and diagnostic certainty of thoracic surgeons. Materials and Methods Seven thoracic surgeons at Massachusetts General Hospital, an academic quaternary referral hospital, participated in this 2-year, prospective, institution review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant pre- and post-MR imaging survey study after completing a one-time demographic survey. Between July 16, 2013, and July 13, 2015, each time a thoracic surgeon ordered a nonvascular thoracic MR imaging study via radiology order entry, he or she was sent a link to the pre-test survey that ascertained the clinical rationale for MR imaging, the clinical management plan if MR imaging was not an option, and pre-test diagnostic certainty. Upon completion of the MR imaging report, the surgeon was sent a link to the post-test survey assessing if/how MR imaging changed clinical management, the surgeon's comfort with the clinical management plan, and post-test diagnostic certainty. Data were analyzed with Student t, Wilcoxon, and McNemar tests. Results A total of 99 pre- and post-test surveys were completed. Most MR imaging studies (64 of 99 [65%]) were requested because of indeterminate computed tomographic findings. The use of MR imaging significantly reduced the number of planned surgical interventions (P management plan in 95% (94 of 99) of cases. Increased diagnostic certainty as a result of MR imaging was highly significant (P < .0001). In 21% (21 of 99) of cases, definitive MR imaging results warranted no further follow-up or clinical care. Conclusion In appropriate cases, assessment with nonvascular thoracic MR imaging substantially affects the clinical decision making and diagnostic certainty of thoracic surgeons. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. An earlier incorrect version of this article appeared online. This article was corrected on May 2, 2016

  18. Ethnic minority self-employment

    Clark, Ken

    2015-01-01

    In many countries, ethnic minority groups are over-represented in self-employment compared with the majority community. The kind of work done by minority entrepreneurs can therefore be an important driver of the economic well-being of their ethnic group. Furthermore, growing the self-employment sector is a policy objective for many governments, which see it as a source of innovation, economic growth, and employment. While self-employment might offer economic opportunities to minority groups, ...

  19. Entrepreneurship as ethnic minority liberation

    Trevor Jones; Monder Ram

    2013-01-01

    To what extent does ethnic minority entrepreneurship promote socio-economic advancement? An implicit narrative of ethnic minority enterprise as a catalyst for social mobility has held sway in academic and policy discourse. It is fuelled by a largely-US inspired literature that emphasises ‘ethnic resources’. We evaluate this question by drawing on recent theoretical developments that seek to embed ethnic minority entrepreneurship more clearly in the various contexts in which they are embedded....

  20. Endovascular treatment of thoracic aorta aneurysm and dissection

    Full text: The aim is to give up to date information about modern endovascular treatment of aortic pathology Dissection and aneurysms of the aorta are life threatening condition requiring in most of the cases prompt surgical or endovascular treatment because of the poor natural evolution. Purpose: to assess the immediate and 1-year outcome of endovascular treatment in broad spectrum of acute and subacute aortic syndrome during the last 3 years (November 2012 - August 2015) in City Clinic (Sofia, Bulgaria). We performed endovascular treatment of 47 patients (43 men, 4 women) at average age 54 y. with dissection (24) and aneurysms (23) of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta (in 5 emergent treatment was performed for aortic rupture). All patients were treated with minimal surgical femoral approach. In 4 (9%) of them initial carotid to carotid bypass was performed in order to provide a sufficient landing zone for the endograft implantation.the last 9 patients (19%) were treated without general anesthesia with either deep sedation or epidural anesthesia. Results: In all patients successful endograft implantation was achieved. Additional stent-graft or open cell stent was implanted in 4 cases in order to centralize the flow in the compressed true lumen. In 5 cases additional vascular plug or large coil was delivered in the left subclavian arteryostium in order to interrupt retrograde aneurysm or false lumen filling. Complications: 30 days mortality-2.2%, neurologic disorders (4.4%). one year survival- 45 (90.5%). 3 and 6 mo control CT scan showed no migration of the graft in 100%, full false lumen isolation in 19 out of 24 dissections (80%) and aneurysm free of expansion in 20 out of 23 (86%), patent carotid bay-pass graft in 4 of 4 (100%). This one center study showed excellent immediate and 1 year clinical and device results from endovascular repair of potentially fatal disease. Endovascular treatment is a method of choice for broad spectrum of aortic pathology

  1. The Askin tumour. Neuroactodermic tumour of the thoracic wall

    The Askin tumours is an extremely rare and malignant process in the thoracic pulmonary region during infancy and youth. The differential diagnosis has to be considered with other thoracic wall tumours that are more common in pediatrics like the undifferentiated neuroblastoma, the embionic rabdomiosarcoma, the Ewing sarcoma and the linfoma. A retrospective examination was carried out on 473 thoracic wall tumours from 1994 to 1997 at our centre, resulting in 4 patients with an anatomopathologically tested Askin tumour (ages from 13-21). All the cases were studied using simple radiography and CT. In two cases MRI was also used. The most common clinical manifestation was a palpable painful mass in the thoracic wall. In the simple radiograph the main finding was a large mass of extrapleural soft material, with costal destruction ( n=3) and a pleural effusion (n=2). In the CT study the mass was heterogeneous, with internal calcifications in one case. CT and MRI showed invasion in the mediastinum (n=1), medular channel (n=1) and phrenic and sulphrenic extension (n=1). The Askin tumour should be included in the differential diagnosis of thoracic wall masses in infant-youth ages. There are no specific morphological characteristics. Both CT and MRI are useful for the diagnosis, staging and follow up. (Author) 11 refs

  2. Endovascular aortic injury repair after thoracic pedicle screw placement.

    Pesenti, S; Bartoli, M A; Blondel, B; Peltier, E; Adetchessi, T; Fuentes, S

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to describe the management and prevention of thoracic aortic injuries caused by a malposition of pedicle screws in corrective surgery of major spine deformities. Positioning pedicle screws in thoracic vertebras by posterior approach exposes to the risk of injury of the elements placed ahead of the thoracic spine, as the descending thoracic aorta. This complication can result in a cataclysmic bleeding, needing urgent vascular care, but it can also be totally asymptomatic, resulting in the long run in a pseudoaneurysm, justifying the systematic removal of the hardware. We report the case of a 76-year-old woman who underwent spinal correction surgery for thoraco-lumbar degenerative kypho-scoliosis. Immediately after the surgery, a thoracic aortic injury caused by the left T7 pedicle screw was diagnosed. The patient underwent a two-step surgery. The first step was realized by vascular surgeons and aimed to secure the aortic wall by short endovascular aortic grafting. During the second step, spine surgeons removed the responsible screw by posterior approach. The patient was discharged in a rehabilitation center 7 days after the second surgery. When such a complication occurs, a co-management by vascular and spine surgeons is necessary to avoid major complications. Endovascular management of this kind of vascular injuries permits to avoid an open surgery that have a great rate of morbi-mortality in frail patients. Nowadays, technologies exist to prevent this kind of event and may improve the security when positioning pedicle screws. PMID:25023930

  3. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for penetrating thoracic trauma

    Jin Jian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: For penetrating thoracic trauma, there is no consensus on whether operative exploration or conservative treatment is better. In this study, we compared the clinical effect of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS and thoracotomy on the patients with penetrating thoracic trauma. Methods: From January 2000 to December 2010, 123 patients with penetrating thoracic trauma were treated in Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu University. Based on the inclusion criteria, 80 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned into VATS and thoracotomy group. Results: The operation time, amount of bleeding and drainage in VATS group were all lower than traditional operation (p < 0.05. Conclusion: The results indicate that VATS has the merits of shorter operation time, non-blind area, exact surgical path and less bleeding comparing with traditional operation.

  4. Solitary calvarial metastases : An unusual presentation of thoracic neuroblastoma

    Grover S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A primary thoracic origin occurs only in 20% of neuroblastomas, and their classical presentation is mediastinal or cord compression. Skeletal metastases of neuroblastomas are characteristically multiple, and calvarial deposits usually show simultaneous involvement of orbit. Solitary metastases in neuroblastoma, is an unusual entity and its presentation as a large calvarial mass, especially from a thoracic primary, is rare. Furthermore, calvarial metastases are relatively uncommon in children compared to adults. We discuss the clinical, radiographic, CT features, and differential diagnosis of a large calvarial mass with sunray spiculation in a child, which was due to a solitary metastases from an occult thoracic neuroblastoma. The possibility of neuroblastoma presenting in this unique fashion and the importance of considering a chemosensitive tumor such as neuroblastoma in the differential diagnosis of a solitary calvarial mass in a child is highlighted by our report.

  5. Current Evidence and Insights about Genetics in Thoracic Aorta Disease

    Gianluigi Bisleri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic aortic aneurysms have been historically considered to be caused by etiologic factors similar to those implied in abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, during the past decade, there has been increasing evidence that almost 20% of thoracic aortic aneurysms may be associated with a genetic disease, often within a syndromic or familial disorder. Moreover, the presence of congenital anomalies, such as bicuspid aortic valve, may have a unique common genetic underlying cause. Finally, also sporadic forms have been found to be potentially associated with genetic disorders, as highlighted by the analysis of rare variants and expression of specific microRNAs. We therefore sought to perform a comprehensive review of the role of genetic causes in the development of thoracic aortic aneurysms, by analyzing in detail the current evidence of genetic alterations in syndromes such as Marfan, Loeys-Dietz, and Ehler-Danlos, familial or sporadic forms, or forms associated with bicuspid aortic valve.

  6. Extrapleural Inner Thoracic Wall Lesions: Multidetector CT Findings

    The extrapleural space is external to the parietal pleura in the thorax. The structures within and adjacent to this region include the fat pad, endothoracic fascia, intercostal muscles, connective tissue, nerves, vessels, and ribs. Further, the space is divided into the inner and outer thoracic wall by the innermost intercostal muscle. Extrapleural lesions in the inner thoracic wall are classified as air-containing lesions, fat-containing lesions, and soft tissue-containing lesions according on their main component. Air-containing lesions include extrapleural air from direct chest trauma and extrapleural extension from pneumomediastinum. Prominent extrapleural fat is seen in decreased lung volume conditions, and can also be seen in normal individuals. Soft tissue-containing lesions include extrapleural extensions from a pleural or chest wall infection as well as tumors and extrapleural hematoma. We classify extrapleural lesions in the inner thoracic wall and illustrate their imaging findings

  7. Extrapleural Inner Thoracic Wall Lesions: Multidetector CT Findings

    Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shik [Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The extrapleural space is external to the parietal pleura in the thorax. The structures within and adjacent to this region include the fat pad, endothoracic fascia, intercostal muscles, connective tissue, nerves, vessels, and ribs. Further, the space is divided into the inner and outer thoracic wall by the innermost intercostal muscle. Extrapleural lesions in the inner thoracic wall are classified as air-containing lesions, fat-containing lesions, and soft tissue-containing lesions according on their main component. Air-containing lesions include extrapleural air from direct chest trauma and extrapleural extension from pneumomediastinum. Prominent extrapleural fat is seen in decreased lung volume conditions, and can also be seen in normal individuals. Soft tissue-containing lesions include extrapleural extensions from a pleural or chest wall infection as well as tumors and extrapleural hematoma. We classify extrapleural lesions in the inner thoracic wall and illustrate their imaging findings

  8. Thoracic electrical bioimpedance theory and clinical possibilities in perioperative medicine

    DEJAN STEVANOVIC

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is a short review of thoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB theory and clinical capabilities. Cardiac output measurement is used primarily to guide therapy in complex, critically ill patients. Thoracic electrical bioimpedance is one of several noninvasive techniques that have been investigated to measure cardiac output and other hemodynamic parameters. Opinions in current literature continue to be conflicting as to the utility of thoracic electrical bioimpedance to that purpose. There is a limited number of good designed studies but they imply TEB is an accurate and reliable noninvasive method for determining cardiac output/cardiac index and it would be valuable for patients and circumstances in which intracardiac pressures and mixed venous blood samples are not necessary.

  9. Deadly dozen: dealing with the 12 types of thoracic injuries.

    Cipolle, Mark; Rhodes, Michael; Tinkoff, Glen

    2012-09-01

    Although most thoracic trauma may be treated non-operatively, major thoracic trauma accounts for 25% of trauma deaths. Except for provision of a definitive airway and/or relief of a tension pneumothorax with a needle decompression, the vast majority of thoracic trauma is best served with "load and go," high-flow oxygen, placement of an IV line and administration of crystalloid solutions as the clinical scenario would indicate. Understanding the mechanism of injury is helpful in establishing both prehospital and in-hospital management priorities. Patients who sustain a single penetrating wound to the chest have the best survivability after a resuscitative thoracotomy. Practicing chest assessment skills is vital to being a good prehospital provider. Ultrasound, NIRS tissue oxygenation and telemedicine will likely become more commonly employed as prehospital monitoring options. PEEP, or "over bagging," may exacerbate a simple or open pneumothorax, converting it to a tension pneumothorax. PMID:23342703

  10. Prospective Evaluation of Thoracic Ultrasound in the Detection of Pneumothorax

    Schwarz, K. W.; Hamilton, D. R.; Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Billica, R. D.; Williams, D. R.; Diebel, L. N.; Sargysan, A. E.; Dulchavsky, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumothorax (PTX) occurs commonly in trauma patients and is confirmed by examination and radiography. Thoracic ultrasound (VIS) has been suggested as an alternative method for rapidly diagnosing PTX when X-ray is unavailable as in rural, military, or space flight settings; however, its accuracy and specificity are not known. Methods: We evaluated the accuracy of thoracic U/S detection of PTX compared to radiography in stable, emergency patients with a high suspicion of PTX at a Level-l trauma center over a 6-month period. Following University and NASA Institutional Review Board approval, informed consent was obtained from patients with penetrating or blunt chest trauma, or with a history consistent with PTX. Whenever possible, the presence or absence of the " lung sliding" sign or the "comet tail" artifact were determined by U/S in both hemithoraces by residents instructed in thoracic U/S before standard radiologic verification of PTX. Results were recorded on data sheets for comparison to standard radiography. Results: Thoracic VIS had a 94% sensitivity; two PTX could not be reliably diagnosed due to subcutaneous air; the true negative rate was 100%. In one patient, the VIS exam was positive while X ray did not confirm PTX; a follow-up film 1 hour later demonstrated a small PTX. The average time for bilateral thoracic VIS examination was 2 to 3 minutes. Conclusions: Thoracic ultrasound reliably diagnoses pneumothorax. Presence of the "lung sliding" sign conclusively excludes pneumothorax. Expansion of the FAST examination to include the thorax should be investigated.

  11. Strategies to treat thoracic aortitis and infected aortic grafts.

    Kahlberg, A; Melissano, G; Tshomba, Y; Leopardi, M; Chiesa, R

    2015-04-01

    Infectious thoracic aortitis is a rare disease, especially since the incidence of syphilis and tuberculosis has dropped in western countries. However, the risk to develop an infectious aortitis and subsequent mycotic aneurysm formation is still present, particularly in case of associated endocarditis, sepsis, and in immunosuppressive disorders. Moreover, the number of surgical and endovascular thoracic aortic repairs is continuously increasing, and infective graft complications are observed more frequently. Several etiopathogenetic factors may play a role in thoracic aortic and prosthetic infections, including hematogenous seeding, local bacterial translocation, and iatrogenous contamination. Also, fistulization of the esophagus or the bronchial tree is commonly associated with these diseases, and it represents a critical event requiring a multidisciplinary management. Knowledge on underlying micro-organisms, antibiotic efficacy, risk factors, and prevention strategies has a key role in the management of this spectrum of infectious diseases involving the thoracic aorta. When the diagnosis of a mycotic aneurysm or a prosthetic graft infection is established, treatment is demanding, often including a number of surgical options. Patients are usually severely compromised by sepsis, and in most cases they are considered unfit for surgery for general clinical conditions or local concerns. Thus, results of different therapeutic strategies for infectious diseases of the thoracic aorta are still burdened with very high morbidity and mortality. In this manuscript, we review the literature regarding the main issues related to thoracic infectious aortitis and aortic graft infections, and we report our personal series of patients surgically treated at our institution for these conditions from 1993 to 2014. PMID:25608572

  12. Three dimensional model for surgical planning in resection of thoracic tumors

    Min P. Kim

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Three-dimensional printed model provide better visualization of complex thoracic tumors, aid in counseling the patient about the surgical procedure and assisted in surgical resection of thoracic malignancy.

  13. Palmar hyperhidrosis - CT guided chemical percutaneous thoracic sympathectomy

    Palmar hyperhidrosis or excessive sweating of the hands causes, to those affected, emotional and physical disturbance and impediment in professional and social life. The cause is unknown. Sweat glands are innervated by the sympathic chain of the autonomous nervous system. The center of sympathic regulation of the upper extremities is located between the segments of D.2-D.9 of the spinal cord. Accepted treatment consists of surgery aimed to excise the third thoracic sympathic ganglion. CT guided chemical percutaneous thoracic sympathectomy presents an alternative, which in the event of failure does not prevent ensuing surgery. The preliminary experience with this procedure in 50 patients is presented and discussed. (orig./GDG)

  14. Thoracic outlet syndrome after corrective surgery for pectus excavatum.

    Donders, H P; Geelen, J A

    1988-02-01

    Two patients are described who developed a thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) after undergoing Ravitch's operation for the correction of pectus excavatum. In one case the syndrome developed a few days after surgery, whereas in the second patient it manifested more gradually. A third patient presented with latent TOS and pectus excavatum. It is recommended that prior to the correction of pectus excavatum, the patient should be examined to detect signs of neurovascular compression due to latent thoracic outlet syndrome. After surgery the possibility of this complication should be kept in mind to avoid permanent lesions of the cervicobrachial plexus. PMID:3352940

  15. Retrospective assessment of thoracic radiographic findings in metastatic canine hemangiosarcoma

    Twenty-one dogs with histopathologically confirmed hemangiosarcoma were evaluated by thoracic radiography for metastatic disease. All dogs had histopathologic examinations of the lungs within two weeks of thoracic radiography. Fourteen dogs had histopathologic evidence of pulmonary hemangiosarcoma; metastatic disease was detected radiographically in eleven of these dogs. The most common radiographic pattern was that of poorly defined small coalescing nodules (8 dogs); other radiographic patterns included well-circumscribed nodules (3 dogs) and alveolar infiltrates secondary to hemorrhage (2 dogs). Differential diagnoses for diffuse, poorly defined, coalescing pulmonary opacities should include hemangiosarcoma in addition to edema, lymphoma, systemic mycoses, fibrosis, allergy, toxicosis, and carcinomas

  16. Thoracic manifestations of Kaposi's sarcoma in AIDS: radiological findings

    The radiological findings of 189 cases of Kaposi's sarcoma occurring in patients with AIDS were studied. There was also made pathological correlations in these patients. Interstitial reticular infiltrations were frequently detected on thoracic examination showing paracardiac confluent areas. There was also lymphadenopathy, gross nodules and pleural fluid accumulation. Although there was no detection of any pathognomonic aspect, the interstitial reticular infiltration finding together with the paracardiac confluent areas and associated with gross nodules, is highly indicative to thoracic involvement by the disease. (author). 32 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  17. AIDS related thoracic lymphoma: evaluation by computed tomography

    The authors reviewed five cases of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related lymphoma to describe the thoracic findings on computed tomography. The patients were followed at Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Hospital Universitario Antonio Pedro and Hospital da Lagoa, from November, 1989 to March 1998. Epidemiological, clinical and pathological data from these patients were quiet variable and pulmonary nodules and masses, hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and thoracic wall masses were observed. AIDS related lymphomas involving the chest are pleomorphic and most commonly extranodal. (author)

  18. Changes in proprioception and pain in patients with neck pain after upper thoracic manipulation

    Yang, Jinmo; Lee, Byoungkwon; Kim, Changbeom

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to conduct cervical stability training and upper thoracic manipulation for patients with chronic neck pain and then investigate the changes of cervical proprioception and pain. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 30 workers with mechanical neck pain, who were randomly divided into an upper thoracic manipulation group and a cervical stability training group. Upper thoracic manipulation after cervical stability training was conducted for the upper thorac...

  19. Operative management of a non-traumatic cervico-thoracic spondylolisthesis: a case report

    Zwingenberger Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In contrast to spondylolisthesis of the lumbar spine, non-traumatic cervico-thoracic spondylolisthesis is a very rare lesion. Even minor changes in the displacement of the vertebrae or the cord can lead to cervical myelopathy and paralysis. Since only a few cases have been well-documented, there is currently no clear preference between operative techniques. Case presentation We describe the case of a 63-year-old Caucasian man with a 13 mm spondylolisthesis between C7 and T1. Within a few months, a progressive cervical myelopathy developed as he began to suffer pain and loss of function of his digits and was no longer able to walk unassisted. In an interdisciplinary collaboration between neurological and orthopedic surgeons, a ventral-dorsal-ventral approach was performed on one vertebral section. The ventral removal of the intervertebral disc was followed by laminectomy and dorsal instrumentation. A new application technique was established by inserting bicortical screws into the transverse processes of T2 and T3. The structure was subsequently stabilized by the ventral insertion of a Harms basket. The procedure was successful as it halted progression of the myelopathy. The patient demonstrated improved sensitivity and recovered the ability to walk unassisted. He has now been able to walk unassisted for two years postoperatively. Conclusion This paper describes a successful treatment for a very rare case of cervico-thoracic spondylolisthesis. The technique of inserting bicortical screws into the transverse processes is a fast, safe and successful method that does not require the use of intraoperative radiographs for placement of the bicortical screws into the transverse processes.

  20. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    ... Acute Pancreatitis > Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  1. Pediatric Stinger Syndrome: Acute Brachial Plexopathy After Minor Trauma.

    Quong, Whitney L; Hynes, Sally L; Arneja, Jugpal S

    2015-11-01

    The "stinger" or "burner" is a form of transient brachial plexopathy termed for its characteristic knife-like pain extending from the neck to the fingertips. Muscle weakness and paresthesia are oftentimes associated symptoms and are similarly temporary. Commonly observed in athletes of contact sports, the stinger results from high force trauma causing either traction/direct compression to the brachial plexus or extension/compression of the cervical nerve roots. We describe a pediatric case of a stinger in a 14-year-old boy, which was caused by a relatively low force trauma accident. Our management strategy and recommendations are discussed. PMID:26893985

  2. Plasma cellular osteomyelitis of the thoracic spine - a case report

    The authors report the case of a young patient suffering from plasmacellular osteomyelitis of the thoracic spine, an unusual localisation of this type of chronic osteomyelitis. They discuss the role of imaging diagnostic modalities in this disease, focussing on MRI. (orig.)

  3. [Pulmological aspects of diagnosis of thoracic pain (author's transl)].

    Meier-Sydow, J

    1980-05-16

    A number of medical disciplines are involved in the diagnosis and therapy of thoracic pain. The origin may be somatic or visceral. Individual diseases are discussed in particular such as myalgia epidemica, intercostal neuralgia, herpes zoster, pleuritis and pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, pneumothorax, mediastinal emphysema, mediastinitis, pulmonary hypertension and the hyperventilation syndrome. Differential diagnosis is also referred to. PMID:6771586

  4. Physiological interaction of heart and lung in thoracic irradiation

    Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; van der Veen, Sonja; Bartelds, Beatrijs; de Boer, Rudolf A; Dickinson, Michael G; de Jong, Johan R; Faber, Hette; Niemantsverdriet, Maarten; Brandenburg, Sytze; Berger, Rolf M.F.; Langendijk, Johannes A; Coppes, Robert P; van Luijk, Peter

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The risk of early radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) limits the dose and efficacy of radiation therapy of thoracic tumors. In addition to lung dose, coirradiation of the heart is a known risk factor in the development RILT. The aim of this study was to identify the underlying physi

  5. [Unusual fatal thoracic injury due to glass splinters].

    Korman, V; Soral, A

    1976-05-01

    The authors report on a case of unusual lethal penetrating puncture-incised thoracic wound in a male aged 33 following an incidental fall into the glass panel of a glass-panelled door. The glass splinters of the bre. The case as well as the pertinent literatury data and to the diagnostic problems pertaining to the determination of the injurious mechanism. PMID:1013734

  6. A Rare Case: Gastric Cancer; Involving Primery Thoracal Vertebral Metastases

    Harun Arslan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Primery bone metastases rarely occur in gastric cancer. Bone metastases indicate that the prognosis is bad. In that article we present a case that is diagnosed as a gastric cancer with primary bone metasteses that caused pathologic thoracal vertebral fracture seenby computer ised tomography.

  7. A Rare Case: Gastric Cancer; Involving Primery Thoracal Vertebral Metastases

    Harun Arslan

    2013-01-01

    Primery bone metastases rarely occur in gastric cancer. Bone metastases indicate that the prognosis is bad. In that article we present a case that is diagnosed as a gastric cancer with primary bone metasteses that caused pathologic thoracal vertebral fracture seenby computer ised tomography.

  8. Xanthorrhizol induces endothelium-independent relaxation of rat thoracic aorta.

    Campos, M G; Oropeza, M V; Villanueva, T; Aguilar, M I; Delgado, G; Ponce, H A

    2000-06-01

    Xanthorrhizol, a bisabolene isolated from the medicinal plant Iostephane heterophylla, was assayed on rat thoracic aorta rings to elucidate its effect and likely mechanism of action, by measuring changes of isometric tension. Xanthorrhizol (1, 3, 10, 30 and 100 microg/mL) significantly inhibited precontractions induced by KCI-; (60mM), noradrenaline (10(-6) M) or CaCl2 (1.0 mM). Increasing concentrations of external calcium antagonized the inhibitory effect on KCl-induced contractions. The vasorelaxing effect of xanthorrhizol was not affected by indomethacin (10 microM) or L-NAME (100 microM) in intact rat thoracic aorta rings precontracted by noradrenaline, which suggested that the effect was not mediated through either endothelium-derived prostacyclin (PGI2) or nitric oxide release from endothelial cells. Endothelium removal did not affect the relaxation induced by xanthorrhizol on rat thoracic aorta rings, discarding the participation of any substance released by the endothelium. Xanthorrhizol inhibitory effect was greater on KCI- and CaCl2-induced contractions than on those induced by noradrenaline. Xanthorrhizol inhibitory effect in rat thoracic aorta is likely explained for interference with calcium availability by inhibiting calcium influx through both voltage- and receptor-operated channels. PMID:10983876

  9. Clinical application of thoracic paravertebral anesthetic block in breast surgeries

    Sara Socorro Faria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Optimum treatment for postoperative pain has been of fundamental importance in surgical patient care. Among the analgesic techniques aimed at this group of patients, thoracic paravertebral block combined with general anesthesia stands out for the good results and favorable risk-benefit ratio. Many local anesthetics and other adjuvant drugs are being investigated for use in this technique, in order to improve the quality of analgesia and reduce adverse effects. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the effectiveness and safety of paravertebral block compared to other analgesic and anesthetic regimens in women undergoing breast cancer surgeries. METHODS: Integrative literature review from 1966 to 2012, using specific terms in computerized databases of articles investigating the clinical characteristics, adverse effects, and beneficial effects of thoracic paravertebral block. RESULTS: On the selected date, 16 randomized studies that met the selection criteria established for this literature review were identified. Thoracic paravertebral block showed a significant reduction of postoperative pain, as well as decreased pain during arm movement after surgery. CONCLUSION: Thoracic paravertebral block reduced postoperative analgesic requirement compared to placebo group, markedly within the first 24 h. The use of this technique could ensure postoperative analgesia of clinical relevance. Further studies with larger populations are necessary, as paravertebral block seems to be promising for preemptive analgesia in breast cancer surgery.

  10. Hereditary Influence in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection.

    Isselbacher, Eric M; Lino Cardenas, Christian Lacks; Lindsay, Mark E

    2016-06-14

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening condition in that it places patients at risk for aortic dissection or rupture. However, our modern understanding of the pathogenesis of thoracic aortic aneurysm is quite limited. A genetic predisposition to thoracic aortic aneurysm has been established, and gene discovery in affected families has identified several major categories of gene alterations. The first involves mutations in genes encoding various components of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling cascade (FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, TGFB3, SMAD2, SMAD3 and SKI), and these conditions are known collectively as the TGF-β vasculopathies. The second set of genes encode components of the smooth muscle contractile apparatus (ACTA2, MYH11, MYLK, and PRKG1), a group called the smooth muscle contraction vasculopathies. Mechanistic hypotheses based on these discoveries have shaped rational therapies, some of which are under clinical evaluation. This review discusses published data on genes involved in thoracic aortic aneurysm and attempts to explain divergent hypotheses of aneurysm origin. PMID:27297344

  11. A Rare Case of Mediastinal Cyst: Thoracic Duct Cyst

    Duygu Mergan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic duct cysts are very rarely observed cysts of the mediastinum. These cysts, which can become established in the costovertebral sulcus or the visceral compartment, have generally been reported at the level of the 10th and 11th vertebrae; however, they can be observed at any location along the ductus [1]. A 37-year-old male patient complained of chest pain for the last 3 months that especially increased after meals. He complained of shortness of breath while walking or going up the stairs, for the last month. The lung graphy showed an increased darkening at a 5x6cm smooth (clean-cut, regular, orderly bordered shadow just behind the heart shadow. The patient%u2019s computed thorax tomography showed a retrocardiac-paravertebral, middle line positioned, 8.5x7x6 cm proportioned, regular bordered, thin walled, homogenous cystic bulk at the subcarinal level. The patient, who could not be relieved with medical treatment, was taken to surgery. The lesion was reached by right posterolateral thoracotomy, and drainage of lymph-containing cystic fluid and excision of the cyst walls were performed by incising the thoracic duct cyst with a mediastinal pleura incision. Mass ligation was then performed to the thoracic duct. We wanted to present our thoracic duct cyst case in this article due to the currently limited number of actual cases reported in the literature.

  12. Spontaneous herniation of the thoracic spinal cord : a case report

    Spontaneous herniation of the spinal cord is a rare disease entity in which spinal cord substance is herniated through a previously uninjured and/or untouched dural. It is a cause of myelopathy that is treatable but difficult to diagnose. We report the CT and MR findings of a case of spontaneous thoracic spinal cord through a dural defect

  13. Pharmacokinetic optimization of immunosuppressive therapy in thoracic transplantation: part I.

    Monchaud, Caroline; Marquet, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    International audience Although immunosuppressive treatments and therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) have significantly contributed to the increased success of thoracic transplantation, there is currently no consensus on the best immunosuppressive strategies. Maintenance therapy typically consists of a triple-drug regimen including corticosteroids, a calcineurin inhibitor (ciclosporin or tacrolimus) and either a purine synthesis antagonist (mycophenolate mofetil or azathioprine) or a mammali...

  14. Canine hypertrophic osteopathy associated with extra-thoracic lesions

    Headley Selwyn Arlington; Ribeiro Eduardo Alcântara; Santos Gustavo José Von G. dos; Bettini Carlos Maia; Mattos Júnior Ewaldo

    2005-01-01

    Canine hypertrophic osteopathy is described in a dog that presented extra-thoracic lesions, mainly in the liver. Hepatic lesions were characterized by necrosis, hemorrhage, severe hydropic degeneration of centrolobular hepatocytes, proliferation of epithelial cells of bile ducts, and mild biliary stasis. The disease syndrome was diagnosed based on clinical signs, radiological evaluation, and inspection of macerated bones.

  15. Surgical treatment for thoracic hydatidosis: review of 1230 cases

    WU Ming-bai; ZHANG Li-wei; ZHU Hui; QIAN Zhong-xi

    2005-01-01

    @@ Hydatid disease, a serious health problem, is endemic in many sheep and cattle raising areas. Though many kinds of medicines were used experimentally, operation is the only effective treatment for thoracic hydatidosis. The surgical treatments of 1230 patients with the disease in our division between June 1957 and December 2002 are discussed below.

  16. Calorimetric assay of minor actinides

    Rudy, C.; Bracken, D.; Cremers, T.; Foster, L.A.; Ensslin, N.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reviews the principles of calorimetric assay and evaluates its potential application to the minor actinides (U-232-4, Am-241, Am- 243, Cm-245, Np-237). We conclude that calorimetry and high- resolution gamma-ray isotopic analysis can be used for the assay of minor actinides by adapting existing methodologies for Pu/Am-241 mixtures. In some cases, mixtures of special nuclear materials and minor actinides may require the development of new methodologies that involve a combination of destructive and nondestructive assay techniques.

  17. Calorimetric assay of minor actinides

    This paper reviews the principles of calorimetric assay and evaluates its potential application to the minor actinides (U-232-4, Am-241, Am- 243, Cm-245, Np-237). We conclude that calorimetry and high- resolution gamma-ray isotopic analysis can be used for the assay of minor actinides by adapting existing methodologies for Pu/Am-241 mixtures. In some cases, mixtures of special nuclear materials and minor actinides may require the development of new methodologies that involve a combination of destructive and nondestructive assay techniques

  18. Application of video-assisted thoracic surgery in the standard operation for thoracic tumors

    To evaluate the short-term outcomes of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) for thoracic tumors. The data of 1,790 consecutive patients were retrospectively reviewed. These patients underwent VATS pulmonary resections, VATS esophagectomies, and VATS resections of mediastinal tumors or biopsies at the Cancer Institute & Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences between January 2009 and January 2012. There were 33 patients converted to open thoracotomy (OT, 1.84%). The overall morbidity and mortality rate was 2.79% (50/1790) and 0.28% (5/1790), respectively. The overall hospitalization and chest tube duration were shorter in the VATS lobectomy group (n=949) than in the open thoracotomy (OT) lobectomy group (n=753). There were no significant differences in morbidity rate, mortality rate and operation time between the two groups. In the esophageal cancer patients, no significant difference was found in the number of nodal dissection, chest tube duration, morbidity rate, mortality rate, and hospital length of stay between the VATS esophagectomy group (n=81) and open esophagectomy group (n=81). However, the operation time was longer in the VATS esophagectomy group. In the thymoma patients, there was no significant difference in the chest tube duration, morbidity rate, mortality rate, and hospital length of stay between the VATS thymectomy group (n=41) and open thymectomy group (n=41). However, the operation time was longer in the VATS group. The median tumor size in the VATS thymectomy group was comparable with that in the OT group. In early-stage (I/II) non-small cell lung cancer patients who underwent lobectomies, VATS is comparable with the OT approach with similar short-term outcomes. In patients with resectable esophageal cancer, VATS esophagectomy is comparable with OT esophagectomy with similar morbidity and mortality. VATS thymectomy for Masaoka stage I and II thymoma is feasible and safe, and tumor size is not contraindicated. Longer follow-ups are needed

  19. Bronchitis - acute

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute bronchitis is swelling and inflammation in the main passages ... present only for a short time. Causes When acute bronchitis occurs, it almost always comes after having a ...

  20. Bronchitis - acute

    Acute bronchitis is swelling and inflammation in the main passages that carry air to the lungs. The swelling narrows ... makes it harder to breathe. Another symptom of bronchitis is a cough. Acute means the symptoms have ...

  1. Acute Bronchitis

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  2. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingest...

  3. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion....

  4. Management of Thoracic Empyema: Review of 112 Cases

    Ommolbanin Abed

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To review our experience in treatment of patients with thoracic empyema at a teaching hospital chart of patients were retrospectively reviewed over a 72-month period. A total of 112 patients (94 men, 18 women, mean age: 39, range: 6-89 years underwent therapeutic procedures for thoracic empyema between 2001-2006. The causes of empyema included parapneumonic empyema (60.7%, thoracic trauma (20.5%, surgical procedures (7.1% and seeding from an extra-pulmonary source (11.7%. Multiloculated empyemas were documented in 45 patients (40%. Insertion of chest tube was the first procedure in 103 patients (92%. Nineteen patients (17% were treated by thoracotomy, ten patients (8.9% had fibrinolytic therapy, eight patients (7.2% underwent video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS and sixteen patients (14.3% had subsequent radiologic-guided drainage. Thoracotomy-Decortication was successful in 90% of patients undergoing surgery and the least successful intervention was tube thoracostomy alone. Twelve of 112 patients (10.7% died in the hospital including one patient in the thoracotomy group. Long-term follow-up was available in 67 patients including all of patients requiring surgery and fibrinolytic therapy. Thirty four patients (50% obtained complete functional recovery. Simple drainage as the first procedure for the treatment of thoracic empyema has a high failure rate. Selection of a therapeutic option should be based on age, underlying disease, stage of the empyema, state of the loculation, local expertise and availability. Surgical procedures such as VATS or thoracotomy are recommended as the first procedure in elderly patients and advanced empyema.

  5. Acute idiopathic pericarditis: current immunological theories

    Caforio AL

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Alida LP Caforio,1 Renzo Marcolongo,2 Antonio Brucato,3 Luca Cantarini,4 Massimo Imazio,5 Sabino Iliceto11Division of Cardiology, Department of Cardiology, Thoracic and Vascular Sciences, University of Padua, Padua; 2Haematology and Clinical Immunology, Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Padua, 3Internal Medicine, Ospedali Riuniti, Bergamo, 4Rheumatology Unit, Policlinico Le Scotte, University of Siena, Siena, 5Department of Cardiology, Maria Vittoria Hospital, Torino, ItalyAbstract: Idiopathic recurrent acute pericarditis (IRAP is a rare disease of suspected immune-mediated pathogenesis. It represents a diagnosis of exclusion. It is necessary to rule out infectious and noninfectious causes of pericardial inflammation, including systemic autoimmune and immune-related disorders, eg, Sjögren’s disease, systemic lupus erythematosus. Since pericarditis may precede diagnosis of these disorders, IRAP diagnosis is often made after a long follow-up. According to the two main pathogenetic theories IRAP may represent an organ-specific autoimmune disease or an autoinflammatory disease (AInfD. The main evidence for autoimmunity in IRAP is provided by the detection of serum antiheart and antiintercalated-disk autoantibodies, and the response to anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive therapy. The findings of familial forms and of proinflammatory cytokines in the pericardial fluid in IRAP would be in keeping with both organ-specific autoimmune disease and AInfD. In fact, AInfD are genetic disorders characterized by primary dysfunction of the innate immune system, due to mutations of genes involved in the regulation of the inflammatory response, in the absence of antigen specific T cells or autoantibodies. In AInfD there are active disease phases with raised non-cardiac specific inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein, as well as symptom-free intervals with possible C-reactive protein normalization. A minority of IRAP patients (6% carry a

  6. Astrographic Positions of Minor Planets

    Naskrecki, W.; Swierkowska, S.

    The paper presents the photographic position of minor planets taken in the years 1986/1987 at the Astronomical Observatory of A. Mickiewicz University, Poznan, with an astrograph of the F=1500 mm, d=300 mm.

  7. Isodose-based methodology for minimizing the morbidity and mortality of thoracic hypofractionated radiotherapy

    Background and purpose: Help identify and define potential normal tissue dose constraints to minimize the mortality and morbidity of hypofractionated lung radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A method to generate isodose-based constraints and visually evaluate treatment plans, based on the published peer reviewed literature and the linear quadratic model, is presented. The radiobiological analysis assumes that the linear quadratic model is valid up to 28 Gy per fraction, the α/β ratio is 2 for the spinal cord and brachial plexus, 4 for pneumonitis, 4 or 10 for acute skin reactions depending on treatment length, and 3 for late complications in other normal tissues. A review of the literature was necessary to identify possible endpoints and normal tissue constraints for thoracic hypofractionated lung radiotherapy. Results: Preliminary normal tissue constraints to reduce mortality and morbidity were defined for organs at risk based upon hypofractionated lung radiotherapy publications. A modified dose nomenclature was introduced to facilitate the comparison of hypofractionated doses. Potential side effects from hypofractionated lung radiotherapy such as aortic dissection, neuropathy, and fatal organ perforation rarely seen in conventional treatments were identified. The isodose-based method for treatment plan analysis and normal tissue dose constraint simplification was illustrated. Conclusions: The radiobiological analysis based on the LQ method, biologically equivalent dose nomenclature, and isodose-based method proposed in this study simplifies normal tissue dose constraints and treatment plan evaluation. This may also be applied to extrathoracic hypofractionated radiotherapy. Prospective validation of these preliminary thoracic normal tissue dose constraints for hypofractionated lung radiotherapy is necessary.

  8. [Arterial complications of thoracic outlet syndrome and pseudarthrosis of the clavicle: three patients].

    Garnier, D; Chevalier, J; Ducasse, E; Modine, T; Espagne, P; Puppinck, P

    2003-04-01

    During a 3-year period, three patients developed arterial complications related to congenital or post-traumatic old pseudarthrosis of the clavicle. Arterial complications of pseudarthrosis of the clavicle presenting as a thoracic outlet syndrome are very rare. Symptoms are variable and occur late. Without treatment, the prognosis is poor with spontaneous development of gangrene. Arterial morphology investigations should be undertaken in patients with pseudarthrosis of the clavicle or isolated arterial symptoms involving the upper limb whose radial pulse disappears during postural tests. Duplex Doppler of the subclavian artery is an excellent screening exam but selective arteriography is the gold standard. It shows proximal arterial lesions (embolytic stenosis of the subclavian artery with post-stenotic dilatation), as well as distal embolic complications. Both static and postural tests must be performed to unmask subclavian restriction by the clavicle, proving its causal effect in the arterial complications. There are four clinical varieties: chronic thrombosis of the subclavian artery, distal arterial micro emboli, acute thrombosis of proximal arteries of the upper limb, and subclavian aneurysm. These lesions are thought to be due to chronic constriction and repeated arterial microtrauma. Congenital or post-traumatic pseudarthrosis, hypertrophic callus, arterial restriction by a screw in a clavicular plate, usually explain the arterial lesions. Bone tumors and Paget's disease are potential but exceptional clavicular etiologies. Surgical treatment is always necessary. Clavicular resection is usually needed in case of pseudarthrosis; there is no functional handicap. Plate fixation and autologous grafting, or open reduction and internal fixation are other valid surgical treatments; The embolytic lesions must be treated to prevent recurrence of distal embolization: graft resection and thromboendarteriectomy have been described. Neurological and venous decompression

  9. Properties of minor actinide nitrides

    The present status of the research on properties of minor actinide nitrides for the development of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle based on nitride fuel and pyrochemical reprocessing is described. Some thermal stabilities of Am-based nitrides such as AmN and (Am, Zr)N were mainly investigated. Stabilization effect of ZrN was cleary confirmed for the vaporization and hydrolytic behaviors. New experimental equipments for measuring thermal properties of minor actinide nitrides were also introduced. (author)

  10. Pediatric minor traumatic brain injury.

    Gordon, Kevin E

    2006-12-01

    The literature surrounding minor traumatic brain injury is complex, methodologically challenging, and controversial. Although we lack a consistent standardized definition, the annual rate is likely in excess of 200 per 100,000 children. The proportion of children with minor traumatic brain injury who will require neurosurgery is certainly return to play is currently recommended. The recurrence risk for subsequent concussions is elevated, but there is limited documentation of the effectiveness of preventative efforts. Much remains to be learned. PMID:17178354

  11. Legal Rights for Criminal Minors

    2000-01-01

    IN a theft case cracked in Guiyang City, Guizhou Province, the seven juvenile delinquents involved were mainly junior middle school students around 13 to 14 years old. What are the legal rights they can enjoy when brought to trial? It is clearly defined in the Law of the People's Republic of China for the Protection of Minors enforced on September 4, 1991. Minors refers to citizens below the age of 18.

  12. Minorities, social capital and voting

    Bevelander, Pieter; Pendakur, Ravi

    2007-01-01

    It is widely held that voter turnout among immigrants and ethnic minorities is lower than among the native born. The goal of our paper is to explore the determinants of voting, comparing immigrant, minority and majority citizens in Canada. We use the 2002 wave of the Equality Security Community Survey to explore the relationship between personal characteristics (age, sex, education, and household type) work characteristics, social capital attributes (trust in government, belonging, civic awar...

  13. Coupled GUE-minor Processes

    Adler, Mark; van Moerbeke, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with two GUE-matrices, coupled together through some inequalities between the spectra of the first few (small) principal minors. The main results of the paper is to show that the spectra of the principal minors of these coupled matrices behave statistically as the domino tilings of finitely overlapping Aztec diamonds when their sizes get very large, with horizontal and vertical dominos being equally likely. This extends naturally a result of Johansson and Nordenstam in [17], ...

  14. Radiographic evaluation of obesity-caused oppression of the thoracic cavity in beagles

    Thoracic radiographs of fifteen beagles with mild-to-moderate obesity revealed that oppression of the thoracic cavity increased with increasing degree of obesity. Oppression of the thoracic cavity was evaluated based on the length, depth, width and area of the thoracic cavity. To obtain thoracic radiographs at the terminal inspiration and expiration phases, thoracic fluororadiographs were recorded with a digital video camera. Bodyweight and the depth of the back fat layer at the seventh lumbar vertebra (DB, measured by ultrasonography) were used as indicators of the degree of obesity. The length of the thoracic cavity tended to become shorter and the depth and width of the thoracic cavity tended to increase as bodyweight increased and as DB increased. On the other hand, the area of the thoracic cavity was not clearly related to bodyweight or DB. These results suggest that oppression of the thoracic cavity due to the cranial shift of the diaphragm is compensated for by increases in the depth and width of the thoracic cavity in beagles with mild-to-moderate obesity

  15. Thoracic vasculitis presenting as surgical problems.

    Jansen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We present four patients with vasculitis manifesting with unusual clinical or pathological features, generating surgical problems. Two cases presented with pulmonary hypertension, with investigations and radiological evidence prompting clinical suspicion of pulmonary thrombo-embolic disease. First case, with an antecedant history of Wegener\\'s granulomatosis (WG), demonstrated following "embolectomy", WG involving the large pulmonary elastic arteries. The second case of inoperable "pulmonary thrombo-embolic disease" was subsequently found at limited post mortem to have giant cell arteritis, which affected widespread small peripheral pulmonary arterial vessels. The other two cases were of aortitis occurring in the background of immune-mediated disease, which had been treated with aggressive immunosuppression regimens. The first of these was a case of Cogan\\'s syndrome complicated by descending aortitis, a rarely reported phenomenon, with co-existent acute endocarditis of the aortic valve leaflets. Most cases of endocarditis in this context occur secondary to and in continuity with ascending aortitis. That this case, and a case of ascending aortitis occurring in the context of relapsing polychondritis occurred in the face of aggressive immunosuppression with an apparent clinical response, underscores the need to not accept a clinical picture at face value. This has implications for clinical management, particularly in the follow-up of surgical prosthetic devices such as grafts which may be used in these cases. All four cases emphasise the continued importance of histology and the post-mortem examination in elucidating previously undetected or unsuspected disease.

  16. [Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta].

    Glock, Y; Roux, D; Soula, P; Cerene, A; Fournial, G

    1996-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 50 postraumatic aortic rupture (1968-1996, 39 males, mean age: 34.5). Group A is composed of 35 patients with an acute aortic rupture and a prompt diagnosis. Group B includes 13 patients with a chronic rupture. All patients from group A had a severe politraumatism with abdominal, cranial, extremities or hip fractures. Mediastinal thickening with or without hemothorax indicated an angiography or a transesophageal echocardiography lately. In group A, 36 patients have been operated on urgently (12-24 hours); cardiopulmonary bypass was performed on 20 patients; an aorto-aortical bypass was done in 27 cases and a direct suture in the remaining 9. In group B, cardiopulmonary bypass was performed on 9 patients; a aorto-aortical bypass was done in 11 cases and a direct suture in 2. Overall hospital mortality was 16%; 19% in group A and 7.6% in group B. Ischemic paraplejia appeared in 5 patients (10%), all from group A. No false aneurysm developed after 4.5 years of follow-up (3-135 months) in the 38 survivors. The usefulness of transesophageal echocardiography, the importance of medular protection and the utility of several interventionist radiologic techniques are discussed. PMID:9053930

  17. Thoracic posterior longitudinal ligament ossification in a fixed population; longitudinal radiological observations

    All lateral chest radiographs of 34 persons with posterior longitudinal ligament ossification (PLLO) in the thoracic spine were reviewed for date of its onset and its progress. These observations spanned as long as 18 years. Upper mid-thoracic PLLO first appeared under the age of 40, then increased in extent in the vertical axis until the age of 50. Lower thoracic PLLO occurred later than upper mid-thoracic PLLO. In the lower thoracic and lumbar regions, degeneration of the vertebrae and discs apparently were focal factors which triggered the development of thoracic PLLO. PLLO apparently developed in a different way in the upper and mid-thoracic regions, where the vertebrae and discs were unremarkable at the time of its initial appearance, and degenerative abnormalities did not predispose to it. (author)

  18. Comparison of British Thoracic Society and American Thoracic Society reintroduction guidelines for anti-tuberculous therapy induced liver injury

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of British Thoracic Society and American Thoracic Society guidelines for re-introduction of anti-tuberculous therapy after drug-induced liver injury, and to assess the ease of administration of each guideline on a scale of 1-10. Methods: The randomised prospective interventional study was conducted at the Department of Medicine and Pulmonology, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, from December 2011 to November 2013. Patients with anti-tuberculous therapy drug-induced liver injury were selected. Hepatotoxic anti-tuberculous therapy was stopped and modified anti-tuberculous therapy was started. Patients were followed weekly till clinical and biochemical parameters got stabilised. After stabilisation, the patients were randomised to one of the two groups to receive re-introduction of anti-tuberculous therapy under the guidelines of British Thoracic Society (Group I) or those of American Thoracic Society (Group II). Means of the groups were analysed by Student's t test and proportions were compared by chi-square test. Multivariate analysis was done for age, body mass index and serum albumin for recurrence of drug-induced liver injury after the re-introduction. P value <0.05 was taken as significant. Results: Of the total 325 patients, 163(50.15%) were in Group I, while 162(49.84%) were in Group II. The frequency of recurrence of drug-induced liver injury in Group I was 16 (9.8%) and in Group II it was 18 (11.1%). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p<0.7). Age was positively related with drug-induced liver injury, while body mass index and serum albumin were negatively associated. Conclusion: There was no significant difference between the two major guidelines though the American Thoracic Society guideline was easier to follow. (author)

  19. Technical Note: Thoracic duct embolization for treatment of chylothorax: A novel guidance technique for puncture using combined MRI and fluoroscopy

    Alampath Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic duct embolization (TDE is an established radiological interventional procedure for thoracic duct injuries. Traditionally, it is done under fluoroscopic guidance after opacifying the thoracic duct with bipedal lymphangiography. We describe our experience in usinga heavily T2W sequence for guiding thoracic duct puncture and direct injection of glue through the puncture needle without cannulating the duct.

  20. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions: Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  1. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions : Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  2. A Review of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome and the Possible Role of Botulinum Toxin in the Treatment of This Syndrome

    Andrew Travlos

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to discuss the classification, diagnosis, pathophysiology and management of Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS is a complex entity that is characterized by different neurovascular signs and symptoms involving the upper limb. TOS is defined as upper extremity symptoms due to compression of the neurovascular bundle in the area of the neck just above the first rib. Compression is thought to occur at one or more of the three anatomical compartments: the interscalene triangle, the costoclavicular space and the retropectoralis minor spaces. The clinical presentation can include both neurogenic and vascular symptoms. TOS can be difficult to diagnose because there is no standardized objective test that can be used and the clinician must rely on history and several positive findings on physical exam. The medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve conduction may be a sensitive way to detect pathology in the lower trunks of the brachial plexus which is promising for future research. Treatment options continue to be conservative and surgical. However, for those who have failed physical therapy there is research to suggest that botulinum toxin may help with symptom relief. However, given that there has been conflicting evidence, further research is required using randomized controlled trials.

  3. Minority workers or minority human beings? A European dilemma

    Skutnabb-Kangas, Tove; Phillipson, Robert

    1996-07-01

    "European" identities may be politonymic, toponymic, ethnomyic or linguonymic (Bromley 1984). Each dimension may affect whether migrant minorities are treated as "European", and influence their schooling, integration and rights. Treatment and terminology vary in different states and periods of migration. However, the position for immigrated minorities is that they are still largely seen as workers rather than human beings with equal rights. Lack of success in schools is blamed on the migrants themselves rather than the educational system. This construction of migrants as being deficient is parallel to educational practice which falls within a UN definition of linguistic genocide, and contributes to mis-education. If current efforts in international bodies to codify educational linguistic human rights were to lead to greater support for minorities, this could assist in a redefinition of national identities and a reduction of racism and conflict.

  4. Lower Body Positive Pressure Application with an Antigravity Suit in Acute Carotid Occlusion

    Karine Berthet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The challenge in acute stroke is still to reperfuse as early as possible the ischemic territory. Since fibrinolytic therapies have a limited window with potential risk of bleeding, having a nonpharmacologic mean to recruit vessels in area surrounding necrosis might be useful. We propose here to use antigravity suit inflated at “venous” pressure levels to shift blood towards thoracic and brain territories. We report two cases of spectacular clinical recovery after acute carotid occlusion.

  5. Lower Body Positive Pressure Application with an Antigravity Suit in Acute Carotid Occlusion

    Didier Payen; Anne Claire Lukaszewicz; Marie-Germaine Bousser; Karine Berthet

    2010-01-01

    The challenge in acute stroke is still to reperfuse as early as possible the ischemic territory. Since fibrinolytic therapies have a limited window with potential risk of bleeding, having a nonpharmacologic mean to recruit vessels in area surrounding necrosis might be useful. We propose here to use antigravity suit inflated at “venous” pressure levels to shift blood towards thoracic and brain territories. We report two cases of spectacular clinical recovery after acute carotid occlusion.

  6. Lower body positive pressure application with an antigravity suit in acute carotid occlusion.

    Berthet, Karine; Lukaszewicz, Anne Claire; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Payen, Didier

    2010-01-01

    The challenge in acute stroke is still to reperfuse as early as possible the ischemic territory. Since fibrinolytic therapies have a limited window with potential risk of bleeding, having a nonpharmacologic mean to recruit vessels in area surrounding necrosis might be useful. We propose here to use antigravity suit inflated at "venous" pressure levels to shift blood towards thoracic and brain territories. We report two cases of spectacular clinical recovery after acute carotid occlusion. PMID:20798842

  7. Minors and Sexting: Legal Implications.

    Lorang, Melissa R; McNiel, Dale E; Binder, Renée L

    2016-03-01

    Sexting is the sending or forwarding of sexually explicit photographs or videos of the sender or someone known to the sender via cell phone. It has become common practice among young people, as cell phones are being given to adolescents at ever younger ages. Youths often send messages without giving appropriate thought to the content of the images. In studies on the subject, rates of minors who have sent sexual images range from 4 to 25 percent, depending on the age of the youths surveyed, the content of the messages and other factors. Because transferring and viewing sexually explicit material when the subject is a minor can be considered child pornography, there can be serious legal consequences. Several states have enacted legislation to help differentiate between child pornography and sexting by minors. The trend reflected in statutes has been that minors involved in sexting without other exacerbating circumstances should be charged with a less serious offense. There is no clear national consensus on how sexting by minors is adjudicated, and therefore we compared several statutes. Case examples are used to illustrate the range of legal outcomes, from felony charges to no charges. Two sexting episodes that were followed by suicide are described. We also address the role of the forensic mental health professional. PMID:26944746

  8. Dictionary of Minor Planet Names

    Schmadel, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    The quantity of numbered minor planets has now well exceeded a quarter million. The new sixth edition of the Dictionary of Minor Planet Names, which is the IAU’s official reference work for the field, now covers more than 17,000 named minor planets. In addition to being of practical value for identification purposes, the Dictionary of Minor Planet Names provides authoritative information on the basis of the rich and colorful variety of ingenious names, from heavenly goddesses to artists, from scientists to Nobel laureates, from historical or political figures to ordinary women and men, from mountains to buildings, as well as a variety of compound terms and curiosities. This sixth edition of the Dictionary of Minor Planet Names has grown by more than 7,000 entries compared to the fifth edition and by more than 2,000 compared to the fifth edition, including its two addenda published in 2006 and 2009. In addition, there are many  corrections, revisions and updates to the entries published in earlier editions....

  9. Local complications of hydatid disease involving thoracic cavity: Imaging findings

    Turgut, A.T. [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ahmettuncayturgut@yahoo.com; Altinok, T. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey); Topcu, S. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kocaeli University, Izmit (Turkey); Kosar, U. [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Hydatid disease, a worldwide zoonosis, is caused by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. Although it can involve almost every organ of the body, lung involvement follows in frequency the hepatic infestation in adults and is the predominating site in children. Radiologically, hydatidosis usually demonstrates typical findings, but many patients are at risk of developing various complications of hydatid disease with atypical imaging findings and these are rarely described in the literature. In this pictorial review, the imaging features of local complications of hydatid disease involving the thorax including intrapulmonary or pleural rupture, infection of the ruptured cysts, reactions of the adjacent tissues, thoracic wall invasion and iatrogenic involvement of pleura are described. Additionally, imaging characteristics of transdiaphragmatic thoracic involvement of hepatic hydatid disease are presented. To prevent the development of subsequent catastrophic results, all radiologists need to be aware of the atypical imaging appearances of complications of pulmonary hydatid disease.

  10. Photodynamic Therapy in Non-Gastrointestinal Thoracic Malignancies

    Biniam Kidane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy has a role in the management of early and late thoracic malignancies. It can be used to facilitate minimally-invasive treatment of early endobronchial tumours and also to palliate obstructive and bleeding effects of advanced endobronchial tumours. Photodynamic therapy has been used as a means of downsizing tumours to allow for resection, as well as reducing the extent of resection necessary. It has also been used successfully for minimally-invasive management of local recurrences, which is especially valuable for patients who are not eligible for radiation therapy. Photodynamic therapy has also shown promising results in mesothelioma and pleural-based metastatic disease. As new generation photosensitizers are being developed and tested and methodological issues continue to be addressed, the role of photodynamic therapy in thoracic malignancies continues to evolve.

  11. Photodynamic Therapy in Non-Gastrointestinal Thoracic Malignancies.

    Kidane, Biniam; Hirpara, Dhruvin; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy has a role in the management of early and late thoracic malignancies. It can be used to facilitate minimally-invasive treatment of early endobronchial tumours and also to palliate obstructive and bleeding effects of advanced endobronchial tumours. Photodynamic therapy has been used as a means of downsizing tumours to allow for resection, as well as reducing the extent of resection necessary. It has also been used successfully for minimally-invasive management of local recurrences, which is especially valuable for patients who are not eligible for radiation therapy. Photodynamic therapy has also shown promising results in mesothelioma and pleural-based metastatic disease. As new generation photosensitizers are being developed and tested and methodological issues continue to be addressed, the role of photodynamic therapy in thoracic malignancies continues to evolve. PMID:26805818

  12. Thoracic Endometriosis Syndrome: A Veritable Pandora’s Box

    Nayar, Jayashree

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic endometriosis syndrome is a rare disorder characterised by the presence of functioning endometrial tissue in pleura, lung parenchyma, airways, and/or encompasses mainly four clinical entities–catamenial pneumothorax, catamenial haemothorax, catamenial haemoptysis and lung nodules. The cases were studied retrospectively by reviewing the records at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, for duration of five years i.e., form March 2010-2014 and analysed for the clinical presentation and management of thoracic endometriosis syndrome. Catamenial breathlessness was the main symptom. Pneumothorax and pleural effusion were the findings on investigations. Histopathology report of endometriosis was present in three cases (50%). Conditions with excess oestrogen like endometriosis, fibroid, adenomyosis were diagnosed in these patients by pelvic scan. After the initial supportive treatment with hormones, pleurodesis, hysterectomy and lung decortication were the treatment modalities. Two cases that had multiple recurrences were diagnosed as disseminated TES. They underwent combined treatment of surgery and hormones. PMID:27190904

  13. [Prevention and treatment of intraoperative complications of thoracic surgery].

    Lampl, L

    2015-05-01

    In order to achieve a minimal complication rate there is a need for a comprehensive strategy. This means in the first line preventive steps which include patient positioning, suitable approaches and access, an appropriately qualified surgical team as well as a carefully planned dissection and preparation. Furthermore, a supply of additional instrumentation, such as thrombectomy catheters, special vascular clamps and even extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and a heart-lung machine (HLM) in cases of centrally located lesions should be on stand-by. Control instruments, such as a bronchoscope and esophagoscope should not be forgotten. In selected cases a preoperative embolization (vascular malformation) or cream swallow (thoracic duct injury) can be helpful. Special interventions to overcome complications arising are described for the chest wall, lung parenchyma, pulmonary vessels, great vessels, bronchial arteries, trachea and bronchi, esophagus, thoracic duct, heart, vertebral column and sternum corresponding to the topography. PMID:25691227

  14. High-resolusion MR imaging for the thoracic inlet

    Sakai, Eiro (Kakogawa National Hospital, Hyogo (Japan)); Yamasaki, Katsuto; Nakamura, Toru; Endo, Masahiro; Kimura, Kazuhiko; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Itouji, Eiichiro; Adachi, Shuji; Kohno, Michio

    1994-01-01

    Patients with malignant diseases which suspected invasion to the thoracic inlet or supraclavicular region were examined by high resolution MR imaging (HR-MR). To immobilize examinees with stability by suppressing motion artifact due to respiration or other movements, a high molecular polyester shell was manufactured on an experimental basis. Imaging was taken with a matrix of 512 and a slice thickness of 3 or 5 mm. On HR-MR, muscles, blood vessels and lymph nodes were individually visualized in detail. The branches of the brachial plexus were definitely identified. In conclusion, our shell was simple to process and facilitated immobilization of a surface coil. The surface coil was immobilized so firmly that imaging even with a matrix of 512 produced clear images with little artifact. HR-MR technique produces images of high resolution after simple preparation, therefore, it is useful for evaluation of thoracic inlet tumors. (author).

  15. Local complications of hydatid disease involving thoracic cavity: Imaging findings

    Hydatid disease, a worldwide zoonosis, is caused by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. Although it can involve almost every organ of the body, lung involvement follows in frequency the hepatic infestation in adults and is the predominating site in children. Radiologically, hydatidosis usually demonstrates typical findings, but many patients are at risk of developing various complications of hydatid disease with atypical imaging findings and these are rarely described in the literature. In this pictorial review, the imaging features of local complications of hydatid disease involving the thorax including intrapulmonary or pleural rupture, infection of the ruptured cysts, reactions of the adjacent tissues, thoracic wall invasion and iatrogenic involvement of pleura are described. Additionally, imaging characteristics of transdiaphragmatic thoracic involvement of hepatic hydatid disease are presented. To prevent the development of subsequent catastrophic results, all radiologists need to be aware of the atypical imaging appearances of complications of pulmonary hydatid disease.

  16. Intraoperative fluorescence diagnosis for removal of cervical and thoracic ependymoma

    A. M. Zaytcev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of successful intraoperative fluorescence diagnosis (IOFD for removal of cervical and thoracic ependymoma performed in P.A. Herzen MCRI is reported. For FD we used the Alasens (Research Institute of Organic Semi-Finished Products and Dyes. The drug solution was given per os at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight 2.5 h before surgery. IOFD was per-formed 3 h after intake of photosensitizer. For fluorescence diagnosis there was average in-tensity of fluorescence in tumor and no fluorescence in normal spinal tissues. The extent of surgery was determined according to results of IOFD. The control MRI of cervical and supeior thoracic spine with contrast enhancement and follow-up confirmed definitive removal of tumor and showed no postoperative complications.

  17. Anesthetic management for thoracic surgery in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    Blazquez, E; Narváez, D; Fernandez-Lopez, A; Garcia-Aparicio, L

    2016-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a chromosomopathy associated to molecular mutations or microdeletions of chromosome 16. It has an incidence of 1:125,000-700,000 live births. RTS patients present craniofacial and thoracic anomalies that lead to a probable difficult-to-manage airway and ventilation. They also present mental retardation and comorbidity, such as congenital cardiac defects, pulmonary structural anomalies and recurrent respiratory infections, which increase the risk of aspiration pneumonia. Cardiac arrhythmias have been reported after the use of certain drugs such as succinylcholine and atropine, in a higher incidence than in general population. There is an increased risk of postoperative apnea-hypopnea in these patients. We report the anesthetic management in a RTS patient undergoing emergent thoracic surgery due to oesophageal perforation and mediastinitis. Lung isolation was achieved with a bronchial blocker guided with a fiberoptic bronchoscope and one-lung ventilation was performed successfully. PMID:27062171

  18. Bilateral Internal Thoracic Artery Configuration for Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Boodhwani, Munir; Hanet, Claude; de Kerchove, Laurent; Navarra, Emiliano; Astarci, Parla; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2016-01-01

    Background— Bilateral internal thoracic arteries (BITA) have demonstrated superior patency and improved survival in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. However, the optimal configuration for BITA utilization and its effect on long-term outcome remains uncertain. Methods and Results— We randomly assigned 304 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting using BITA to either in situ or Y grafting configurations. The primary end point was 3-year angiographic patency. Secondary end points included major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (ie, death from any cause, stroke, myocardial infarction, or repeat revascularization) at 7 years. More coronary targets were able to be revascularized using internal thoracic arteries in patients randomized to Y grafting versus in situ group (3.2±0.8 versus 2.4±0.5 arteries/patient; PURL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01666366. PMID:27406988

  19. A STUDY ON THORACIC VERTEBRAL SYNOSTOSIS & ITS CLINICAL IMPORTANCE

    Md. Khaleel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral anomalies are of interest not only to anatomist, but also to orthopedician, neurologist & neurosurgeons. Various vertebral anomalies of anatomic interest have been reported namely; occipitalisation, sacralisation, lumbarisation, absence of posterior elements of vertebral arch & vertebral s ynostosis. The fusion of vertebral column is rare anomalies usually congenital in origin. The fusion of thoracic vertebrae can present many clinical sign including congenital scoliosis. A study on 594 dry adult human vertebrae of unknown age & sex collected from the department of anatomy and phase I students of KBNIMS, Kalaburagi, Karnataka. The study was done over a period of 6 months (July to December 2014 during routine osteology classes for 1 year MBBS, we found the fusion of typical thoracic vertebrae between T 3 & T 4 . The cause could be failure of re - segmentation of somitomeres or acquired.

  20. Effects of thoracic paravertebral block with bupivacaine versus combined thoracic epidural block with bupivacaine and morphine on pain and pulmonary function after cholecystectomy

    Bigler, D; Dirkes, W; Hansen, R; Rosenberg, J; Kehlet, H

    1989-01-01

    Twenty patients undergoing elective cholecystectomy via a subcostal incision were randomized in a double-blind study to either thoracic paravertebral blockade with bupivacaine 0.5% (15 ml followed by 5 ml/h) or thoracic epidural blockade with bupivacaine 7 ml 0.5% + morphine 2 mg followed by 5 ml...

  1. Image segmentation and registration algorithm to collect thoracic skeleton semilandmarks for characterization of age and sex-based thoracic morphology variation.

    Weaver, Ashley A; Nguyen, Callistus M; Schoell, Samantha L; Maldjian, Joseph A; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-12-01

    Thoracic anthropometry variations with age and sex have been reported and likely relate to thoracic injury risk and outcome. The objective of this study was to collect a large volume of homologous semilandmark data from the thoracic skeleton for the purpose of quantifying thoracic morphology variations for males and females of ages 0-100 years. A semi-automated image segmentation and registration algorithm was applied to collect homologous thoracic skeleton semilandmarks from 343 normal computed tomography (CT) scans. Rigid, affine, and symmetric diffeomorphic transformations were used to register semilandmarks from an atlas to homologous locations in the subject-specific coordinate system. Homologous semilandmarks were successfully collected from 92% (7077) of the ribs and 100% (187) of the sternums included in the study. Between 2700 and 11,000 semilandmarks were collected from each rib and sternum and over 55 million total semilandmarks were collected from all subjects. The extensive landmark data collected more fully characterizes thoracic skeleton morphology across ages and sexes. Characterization of thoracic morphology with age and sex may help explain variations in thoracic injury risk and has important implications for vulnerable populations such as pediatrics and the elderly. PMID:26496701

  2. Dictionary of minor planet names

    Schmadel, Lutz D

    1997-01-01

    Until recently, minor planet name citations were scattered in the astronomical literature, and the origin of many names remained obscure In 1988 the IAU Commission 20 established a study group to elucidate the meanings of asteroid names Later on the author continued in collecting and indexing all new relevant data This book contains the names, and their meanings, of all - as yet 5252 - named minor planets It informs about the discoverers as well as the circumstances of the discovery of all 7041 minor planets that were numbered up to June 1996 In addition to being of practical value for identification purposes, the collection provides a most interesting historical insight into the work of those astronomers who over two centuries vested their affinities in a rich and colourful variety of ingenious names, from heavenly goddesses to more prosaic constructions This third, revised and enlarged edition comprises about 40% more information than was provided with the first one of 1992

  3. Preserving Terminal Distances using Minors

    Krauthgamer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the following notion of compressing an undirected graph G with edge-lengths and terminal vertices $R\\subseteq V(G)$. A distance-preserving minor is a minor G' (of G) with possibly different edge-lengths, such that $R\\subseteq V(G')$ and the shortest-path distance between every pair of terminals is exactly the same in G and in G'. What is the smallest f*(k) such that every graph G with k=|R| terminals admits a distance-preserving minor G' with at most f*(k) vertices? Simple analysis shows that $f*(k)\\leq O(k^4)$. Our main result proves that $f*(k)\\geq \\Omega(k^2)$, significantly improving over the trivial $f*(k)\\geq k$. Our lower bound holds even for planar graphs G, in contrast to graphs G of constant treewidth, for which we prove that O(k) vertices suffice.

  4. Medicolegal Corner: When minimally invasive thoracic surgery leads to paraplegia

    Nancy E Epstein

    2014-01-01

    A patient with mild cervical myelopathy due to multilevel ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) initially underwent a cervical C3-T1 laminectomy with C2-T2 fusion utilizing lateral mass screws. The patient′s new postoperative right upper extremity paresis largely resolved within several postoperative months. However, approximately 6 months later, the patient developed increased paraparesis attributed to thoracic OPLL and Ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL) at the T2...

  5. Evolution of Endovascular Treatment for Complex Thoracic Aortic Disease

    Roselli, Eric E.

    2008-01-01

    In a relatively short period of time, transcatheter and endovascular approaches to treat thoracic aortic and structural heart disease have exploded onto the scene. New device frontiers already being forged in the experimental stages include expanded indications and variations of fenestrated and branch stentgrafting to treat thoracoabdominal and arch disease, endovascular ascending and aortic root repair, and all of the cardiac valves. A fundamental concept to optimize durability of endovascul...

  6. Thoracic radiographic features of anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity in fourteen dogs

    Thoracic radiographs and clinical records from 14 dogs with confirmed anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity were reviewed. Twelve of the 14 dogs were presented with a chief complaint of respiratory distress, and 12 had elevated prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times consistent with a coagulopathy secondary to a clotting factor deficiency. Thoracic radiographs of the 14 dogs were reviewed and abnomalities included increased mediastinal soft tissue opacity with extra and intrathoracic tracheal narrowing (4/14), increased mediastinal soft tissue opacity without tracheal narrowing (8/14), variable degrees of pleural effusion (13/14) and generalized, patchy interstitial/alveolar pulmonary infiltrates (8/14). Radiographic evidence of cardiomegaly and pulmonary artery abnormalities consistent with concurrent heartworm infestation were detected in one dog. In four dogs, dramatic tracheal narrowing was identified on the lateral thoracic radiograph caused by either mediastinal hemorrhage compressing the trachea or submucosal hemorrhage within the tracheal lumen. The trachea was displaced in a ventral direction in two dogs, and extra and intrathoracic luminal diameter narrowing was evident cranially in all four dogs. Two of these four dogs had soft tissue opacity within the dorsal trachea that extended from the larynx to the intrathoracic trachea. Twelve of the 14 dogs survived with standard treatment protocols utilizing injectable and oral vitamin K1. One dog died from pancreatitis and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. The other dog died soon after presentation due to severe, disseminated hemorrhage. Follow-up thoracic radiographs were made in four dogs that survived and showed resolution of the mediastinal, pleural and pulmonary changes within one to five days after the initiation of vitamin K1 therapy

  7. Calibration of high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers.

    Lee, Taekhee; Thorpe, Andrew; Cauda, Emanuele; Harper, Martin

    2016-06-01

    High flow rate respirable size selective samplers, GK4.126 and FSP10 cyclones, were calibrated for thoracic-size selective sampling in two different laboratories. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) utilized monodisperse ammonium fluorescein particles and scanning electron microscopy to determine the aerodynamic particle size of the monodisperse aerosol. Fluorescein intensity was measured to determine sampling efficiencies of the cyclones. The Health Safety and Laboratory (HSL) utilized a real time particle sizing instrument (Aerodynamic Particle Sizer) and polydisperse glass sphere particles and particle size distributions between the cyclone and reference sampler were compared. Sampling efficiency of the cyclones were compared to the thoracic convention defined by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH)/Comité Européen de Normalisation (CEN)/International Standards Organization (ISO). The GK4.126 cyclone showed minimum bias compared to the thoracic convention at flow rates of 3.5 l min(-1) (NIOSH) and 2.7-3.3 l min(-1) (HSL) and the difference may be from the use of different test systems. In order to collect the most dust and reduce the limit of detection, HSL suggested using the upper end in range (3.3 l min(-1)). A flow rate of 3.4 l min(-1) would be a reasonable compromise, pending confirmation in other laboratories. The FSP10 cyclone showed minimum bias at the flow rate of 4.0 l min(-1) in the NIOSH laboratory test. The high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers might be used for higher sample mass collection in order to meet analytical limits of quantification. PMID:26891196

  8. The human thoracic duct is functionally innervated by adrenergic nerves

    Telinius, Niklas; Baandrup, Ulrik; Rumessen, Jüri;

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels from animals have been shown to be innervated. While morphological studies have confirmed human lymphatic vessels are innervated, functional studies supporting this are lacking. The present study demonstrates a functional innervation of the human thoracic duct (TD) that is......, acetylcholine, and methacholine was demonstrated by exogenous application to human TD ring segments. Norepinephrine provided the most consistent responses, whereas responses to the other agonists varied. We conclude that the human TD is functionally innervated with both cholinergic and adrenergic components...

  9. Thoracic Imaging Findings of Collagen Vascular Diseases: A CT Study

    Karam, Mehrdad Bakhshayesh; Peivareh, Hamideh; Mosadegh, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Background Collagen vascular diseases (CVDs) are well known causes of pulmonary involvement, leading to significant morbidity. The purpose of this study was to identify several thoracic computed tomographic findings of CVDs. Materials and Methods The study included 56 patients (15 males and 41 females) with histopathologically and clinically proven CVDs who were identified retrospectively. The presence, extent and distribution of various CT findings were evaluated by a radiologist. Results Lu...

  10. Nerve stimulator-guided thoracic paravertebral block for gynecomastia surgery

    Ashok Jadon

    2012-01-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) is gaining popularity for female breast surgeries due to various advantages like less nausea and vomiting and better post-operative pain relief, which helps in early ambulation and discharge from the hospital. Use of nerve stimulator during this block has further enhanced its success and safety profile. Male breast surgery is usually done either under general anaesthesia or local infiltrative anaesthesia combining with intravenous sedation. We postulated th...

  11. Thoracic neoplasms: imaging requirements for diagnosis and staging

    This article reviews the pathophysiology of thoracic neoplams and discusses current imaging recommendations for diagnosis and staging of these tumors. Particular emphasis is given to primary lung cancers, which comprise a variety of tumors of differing histologic type and behavior. The development of cost-effective diagnostic/staging sequences with continually changing imaging technology continues to be a challenging goal. The authors' recommendations are based on the TNM system and data from the current literature employing the experience from their institution

  12. Clinical Practice Guidelines for postoperative period of thoracic surgery.

    Frank Carlos Alvarez Li; Daniel Olivera Fajardo; Félix Molina Díaz

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for postoperative period of thoracic surgery. It is the period between the suture of the surgical wound and the total rehabilitation of the patient, which usually occurs in the Intensive Care Unit. This document includes a review and update of the main aspects such as classification, postoperative treatment, stressing the actions to face any complication. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  13. Thoracic aorta pseudoaneurysm with hemopericardium: unusual presentation of warfarin overdose

    Liao Chiung-Ying; Chen Ying-Cheng; Tien Ya-Chih; Chang Chia-Chu

    2011-01-01

    Abstract There have been few case reports which discuss a relationship between warfarin overdose and aortic pseudoaneurysm leakage. We report the case of a female receiving warfarin who presented with dsypnea. Her international normalized ratio was > 10. Chest radiograph revealed cardiomegaly, and chest computed tomography (CT) showed a bulging pouch-like lesion below the aortic arch greater than 6x6 cm in size and a fluid collection suggesting blood in the pericardium. Thoracic endovascular ...

  14. Bilateral Thoracic Ganglion Cyst : A Rare Case Report

    Kazanci, Burak; Tehli, Ozkan; Türkoglu, Erhan; Guclu, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Ganglion cysts usually arise from the tissues around the facet joints. It is usually associated with degenerative cahanges in facet joints. Bilateral thoracic ganglion cysts are very rare and there is no previous case that located in bilateral intervertebral foramen compressing the L1 nerve root associated with severe radiculopathy. We report a 53 years old woman who presented with bilateral groin pain and severe numbness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral cystic mass in the inter...

  15. Lung Physiology and Obesity: Anesthetic Implications for Thoracic Procedures

    Alessia Pedoto

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a worldwide health problem affecting 34% of the American population. As a result, more patients requiring anesthesia for thoracic surgery will be overweight or obese. Changes in static and dynamic respiratory mechanics, upper airway anatomy, as well as multiple preoperative comorbidities and altered drug metabolism, characterize obese patients and affect the anesthetic plan at multiple levels. During the preoperative evaluation, patients should be assessed to identify who is at ris...

  16. Home Mechanical Ventilation: A Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    McKim, Douglas A.; Jeremy Road; Monica Avendano; Steve Abdool; Fabien Côté; Nigel Duguid; Janet Fraser; François Maltais; Morrison, Debra L.; Colleen O’Connell; Petrof, Basil J.; Karen Rimmer; Robert Skomro; Canadian Thoracic Society Home Mechanical Ventilation Committee

    2011-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are surviving episodes of prolonged mechanical ventilation or benefitting from the recent availability of user-friendly noninvasive ventilators. Although many publications pertaining to specific aspects of home mechanical ventilation (HMV) exist, very few comprehensive guidelines that bring together all of the current literature on patients at risk for or using mechanical ventilatory support are available. The Canadian Thoracic Society HMV Guideline Committee ha...

  17. Bowel obstruction due to diaphragmatic injury after penetrating thoracic trauma

    KARASU, Sezgin; Tokat, Arif Osman; Barlas, Aziz Mutlu; Urhan, Mustafa Kemal

    2013-01-01

    Diaphragmatic injuries due to penetrating traumas to the thorax progress insidiously. Proper diagnosis might only be performed after months. Delayed diagnosis increases morbidity and mortality. Herein, we present a case of diaphragm injury due to penetrating thoracic trauma that was diagnosed 2 years later. The case was referred to emergency service with bowel obstruction symptoms and after the examinations, first laparotomy and then thoracotomy were performed. The trace of the injury tract s...

  18. The role of diagnostic VATS in penetrating thoracic injuries

    Guasti Guido

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Penetrating chest injuries account for 1–13% of thoracic trauma hospital admissions and most of these are managed with a conservative approach. Nevertheless, 18–30% of cases managed only with tube thoracostomy have residual clotted blood, considered the major risk factor for the development of fibrothorax and empyema. In addition, 4–23% of chest injury patients present persistent pneumothorax and 15–59% present an injury to the diaphragm, which is missed in 30% of cases. In order to make a correct diagnosis, reduce the number of missed injuries, chronic sequelae and late mortality we propose performing surgical exploration of all patients with a penetrating injury of the pleural cavity. Methods 1270 patients who sustained thoracic trauma were admitted to our hospital between 1994 and 2004. Of these, 16 patients had penetrating injuries: thirteen were surgically explored by means of Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS, and 3 with thoracotomy due to hemodynamic instability or suspected lesion of the heart or great vessels. Results In the 13 patients who underwent VATS, 5 injuries to the diaphragm, 3 lesions to an intercostal artery, and 1 lesion to the diaphragmatic artery were detected. In 12 of these patients a laceration of the pulmonary parenchyma was also present. A conversion to thoracotomy was necessary due to a broad laceration of the diaphragm and due to hemostasis of an intercostal artery. In all but one case, which was later converted, diagnostic imaging missed the diagnosis of laceration of the diaphragm. There was no intra- or postoperative mortality, and average hospital stay was five days. Conclusion VATS is a safe and effective way to diagnose and manage penetrating thoracic injuries, and its extensive use leads to a reduction in the number of missed, potentially fatal lesions as well as in chronic sequelae.

  19. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis

  20. Happiness and Sexual Minority Status.

    Thomeer, Mieke Beth; Reczek, Corinne

    2016-10-01

    We used logistic regression on nationally representative data (General Social Survey, N = 10,668 and N = 6680) to examine how sexual minority status related to happiness. We considered two central dimensions of sexual minority status-sexual behavior and sexual identity. We distinguished between same-sex, both-sex, and different-sex-oriented participants. Because individuals transition between sexual behavior categories over the life course (e.g., from both-sex partners to only same-sex partners) and changes in sexual minority status have theoretical associations with well-being, we also tested the associations of transitions with happiness. Results showed that identifying as bisexual, gay, or lesbian, having both male and female partners since age 18, or transitioning to only different-sex partners was negatively related to happiness. Those with only same-sex partners since age 18 or in the past 5 years had similar levels of happiness as those with only different-sex partners since age 18. Additional tests showed that the majority of these happiness differences became non-significant when economic and social resources were included, indicating that the lower happiness was a product of structural and societal forces. Our findings clearly and robustly underscored the importance of taking a multi-faceted approach to understanding sexuality and well-being, demonstrating that not all sexual minority groups experience disadvantaged happiness. Our study calls for more attention to positive aspects of well-being such as happiness in examinations of sexual minorities and suggests that positive psychology and other happiness subfields should consider the role of sexual minority status in shaping happiness. PMID:27102605

  1. Morphology of the thoracic limb bones in the giant anteater

    Fabrício Singaretti de Oliveira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The giant anteater has a grayish-brown pelage with white and black tones, its skull is elongated, cylindrical, and there are no teeth. Its tail is long, with thick and long bristles, resembling a flag. This is an endangered species, due to the constant degradation of its habitat, in addition to deaths caused by fires and roadkills. Thus, this paper aimed to describe the morphology of the thoracic limb bones in Myrmecophaga tridactyla, focusing on its main bone accidents. We used two specimens of giant anteater collected on highways in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, after death due to being run over. The scapula, humerus, radius, ulna, and the hand bones showed particular characteristics adapted to the species’ lifestyle and habits. In general, the scapula resembles that in human beings and the humerus is similar to that in armadillo, the radius and ulna exhibit articular surfaces which enable a wide range of rotational movements in the forearm, the carpal bones are also similar in number and shape to those in human beings, and the fingers are well developed in the giant anteater, having long, strong and sharp claws, especially in the third finger. Thus, the anatomical description of the thoracic limb bones in the giant anteater showed to be important, providing a deeper understanding both of the functional aspects of the thoracic limb and the comparative anatomy of wild animals.

  2. Thoracic radiography and oxidative stress indices in heartworm affected dogs

    P. K. Rath

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the pathomorphological changes through thoracic radiography and status of oxidative stress parameters in heartworm affected dogs in Odisha. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 dogs with clinically established diagnosis of dirofilariasis by wet blood smear and modified Knott’s test and equal numbers of dogs as control were included in this study. The present study was conducted in heartworm affected dogs to see the pathomorphological changes through thoracic radiography. Similarly, the evaluation was undertaken for observing any alterations in oxidative stress status in affected as well as non-affected, but healthy control dogs by adopting standard procedure. Results: Thoracic radiography revealed cardiac enlargement, round heart appearance suggestive of right ventricular hypertrophy, tortuous pulmonary artery and darkening of lungs. Alterations in oxidative stress indices showed a significant rise of lipid peroxidase activity, non-significant rise of superoxide dismutase and a significant although reverse trend for catalase levels in affected dogs in comparison to Dirofilaria negative control but apparently healthy dogs. Conclusions: Radiographic changes, as well as alterations in oxidative stress parameters, may not be diagnostic for heartworm infection, but useful for detecting heartworm disease, assessing severity and evaluating cardiopulmonary parenchyma changes and gives a fair idea about the degree of severity of the disease. It aids as contributing factors in disease pathogenesis.

  3. Bovine aortic arch: A novel association with thoracic aortic dilation

    Aim: To investigate whether there is a link between bovine arch and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Materials and methods: Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of the thorax of 191 patients with dilated thoracic aortas and 391 consecutive, unselected patients as controls were retrospectively reviewed. Bovine arch was considered present if either a shared origin of the left common carotid and innominate arteries or an origin of the left common carotid from the innominate artery was identified. A chi-square test was used to evaluate the significance of differences between subgroups. Results: A trend towards increased prevalence of bovine arch was seen in patients with dilated aortas (26.2%) compared to controls (20.5%, p = 0.12). The association was statistically significant in patients over 70 years old (31.9%, p = 0.019) and when dilation involved the aortic arch (47.6%, p = 0.003). Conclusions: An association between bovine arch and aortic dilation is seen in older patients, and when dilation involves the aortic arch. Bovine arch should be considered a potential risk factor for thoracic aortic aneurysm.

  4. Post-surgical thoracic pseudomeningocele causing spinal cord compression.

    Macki, Mohamed; Lo, Sheng-fu L; Bydon, Mohamad; Kaloostian, Paul; Bydon, Ali

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomeningoceles are extradural cerebrospinal fluid collections categorized into three groups: traumatic, congenital, and iatrogenic. Iatrogenic pseudomeningoceles occur after durotomy, usually after cervical or lumbar spine surgery. Although many remain asymptomatic, pseudomeningoceles can compress or herniate the spinal cord and nerve roots. We present a 57-year-old woman who had a thoracic laminectomy and discectomy. Two weeks after surgery, she presented with lower extremity weakness and gait difficulty. Physical examination revealed hyperreflexia and a T11 sensory level. MRI revealed a pseudomeningocele compressing the thoracic spinal cord. The patient underwent surgical drainage of the cyst. On follow-up, she had complete resolution of her symptoms, and MRI did not show a residual lesion. To our knowledge, this is the second documented post-operative pseudomeningocele causing symptomatic spinal cord compression of the thoracic spine. In this article, a review of the literature is presented, including four reported patients with post-traumatic pseudomeningocele causing myelopathic symptoms and 20 patients with iatrogenic pseudomeningocele that resulted in neurological decline due to herniation or compression of neural tissue. Treatment options for these lesions include conservative management, epidural blood patch, lumbar subarachnoid drainage, and lumbo-peritoneal shunt placement. Surgical repair, usually by primary dural closure, remains the definitive treatment modality for iatrogenic symptomatic pseudomeningoceles. PMID:24210805

  5. Use of bronchofiberscopy in management of severe thoracic trauma

    LIU Chao-pu; GAO Jin-mou; HU Ping; LI Chang-hua; HE Ping; WANG Xiao-li; XIAO Xia

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the diagnostic and therapeutic effect ofbronchofiberscopy in the management of severe thoracic trauma.Methods:Aretrospective study was conducted on 207 consecutive patients with severe thoracic trauma enrolled in our hospital between January 2008 and June 2012.During the period,488 bronchofiberscopies and lavages were done.The bronchofiberscope was inserted through tracheal incision (282),nasal cavity (149) and oral cavity (57).Intensive SaO2 monitoring as well as blood gas analysis were performed pre-,intra-and postoperatively.Simultaneously oxygen therapy or ventilatory support was given.Sputum culture was done intraoperatively.Results:Diagnosis in 207 cases was confirmed by bronchofiberscopy.The result of sputum culture was positive in 78 cases.Lavage was performed on 156 cases.SaO2 significantly increased after bronchofiberscopies as well as lavages and PaO2 obviously improved 2 h after surgery (both P<0.05).Heart rate and respiratory rate decreased.There was no bronchofiberscopy-related death.Conclusion:Bronchofiberscopy plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of severe thoracic trauma,which can not only timely diagnose bronchial injury and collect deep tracheal sputum for bacterial culture but also effectively remove foreign body,secretion,blood and sputum crust in the airway,manage obstructive atelectasis and pneumonia,and significantly improve respiratory function and treatment outcome.

  6. Posteriorly migrated thoracic disc herniation: a case report

    Miyakoshi Naohisa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Posterior epidural migration of thoracic disc herniation is extremely rare but may occur in the same manner as in the lumbar spine. Case presentation A 53-year-old Japanese man experienced sudden onset of incomplete paraplegia after lifting a heavy object. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a posterior epidural mass compressing the spinal cord at the T9-T10 level. The patient underwent emergency surgery consisting of laminectomy at T9-T10 with right medial facetectomy, removal of the mass lesion, and posterior instrumented fusion. Histological examination of the mass lesion yielded findings consistent with sequestered disc material. His symptoms resolved, and he was able to resume walking without a cane 4 weeks after surgery. Conclusions Pre-operative diagnosis of posterior epidural migration of herniated thoracic disc based on magnetic resonance imaging alone may be overlooked, given the rarity of this pathology. However, this entity should be considered among the differential diagnoses for an enhancing posterior thoracic extradural mass.

  7. Depth of the thoracic epidural space in children.

    Masir, F; Driessen, J J; Thies, K C; Wijnen, M H; van Egmond, J

    2006-01-01

    Thoracic epidural anaesthesia in anaesthetized children requires a meticulous technique and may have an increased success rate when the distance between skin and epidural space is known. The objective of this observational study was to measure the skin to epidural distance (SED) during thoracic epidural puncture in 61 children. The epidural puncture was performed using the loss of resistance technique with saline 0.9%. The distance from the needle tip to the point where the needle emerged from the skin was measured. The post-operative analgesia parameters were also measured. Skin to epidural distance correlated significantly with the age and weight of the children. The equation for the relation between SED (cm) and age was 2.15 + (0.01 x months) and for SED vs weight was 1.95 + (0.045 x kg). Despite considerable variability among individuals, the observed correlation of SED with both age and weight shows that this parameter may be helpful to guide thoracic epidural puncture in anaesthetized children. PMID:17067139

  8. Thoracic aortic aneurysm in a buck associated with caseous lymphadenitis

    R.R. Pinheiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the clinical, bacteriological and pathological findings of a thoracic aortic aneurysm in a four-year-old Anglo-Nubian goat buck, related to a framework of visceral caseous lymphadenitis. General clinical examination showed heart rate of 75 beats per minute, respiratory rate of 20 movements per minute and ruminal movements of four movements per minute. Superficial lymph nodes were normal upon palpation. Rectal temperature was slightly high (40.5°C. Blood test showed an intense leukocytosis (54,000/µL, characterized by strong neutrophil shift to the left. At necropsy, a large blood clot was detected in the thoracic cavity. The thickening of the myocardium and dilatation of the aorta in the thoracic portion, presenting a saculiform format was also observed. A large number of abscesses were disseminated in the media and intima layers of aorta. The aorta lumen obstruction by arterial plaques consisting of inflammatory infiltrate, predominantly neutrophilic was also detected. Abscesses were found spread in turbinate, rumen, reticulum, kidneys, liver, spleen, testicles and aorta wall. The microbiological exam of exudate confirmed Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis as the causal agent.

  9. THORACIC EPIDURAL ANAESTHESIA AND ANALGESIA IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING ESOPHAGOPLASTY

    Laura Magdalena Nicolescu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Epidural anesthesia and analgesia is widely used to manage major abdominal surgery, but its effects in managing patients submitted to esophagoplasty are still debated. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of thoracic epidural anaesthesia on postoperative respiratory function, digestive complications and postoperative stress in patients with esophagoplasty. Twenty-six patients were admitted in a prospective study. The patients were divided into two groups: fourteen were in group A, and received general anaesthesia for esophagoplasty, and twelve were in group B, and received general anaesthesia combined with epidural thoracic anaesthesia and postoperative epidural thoracic analgesia for the same surgery procedure. When compare the two groups, the outcomes were better in group B: the rate of postoperative pneumonia was lowered from 35,7% to 16,7%, the postoperative mecanical ventilation under six hours was increased from 21,43% to 100%, the incidence of adult respiratory detrease syndrome was decreased from 28,5% to 8,3%, the digestive recovery after four days was increased from 57,1% to 75%. The cortizolemia was also lowered at six hours from 52mg% to 23mg%, and at 24 hours, from 22 to 11mg%. Identically, the sanguine lactate at four hours decreased from 6 to 3 mEq%. In conclusion, this study suggest that patients undergoing esophagoplasty will receive substantial benefit from combined general and epidural anesthesia with continuing postoperative epidural analgesia.

  10. Bussing of Ethnic Minority Children

    Jacobsen, Gro Hellesdatter

    2015-01-01

    This article concerns the rights and duties of ethnic minority children in education in Denmark. More specifically, it discusses the policy of compulsory bussing of ethnic minority children based on language screenings that was legalized by the Danish Parliament in 2005. The policy concerns the......, namely the right to free choice of school and the right – or duty? – to obtain more-equal opportunities in education. The policy creates a dilemma between these two rights and furthermore between a right and a duty to obtain better education results. The article discusses whether the bussing policy may...

  11. Radiographic evaluation of the influence of age and smoking on thoracic and regional pulmonary dimensions

    Beeckman, P.; Vanclooster, R.; Demedts, M.; Clarysse, I.

    1983-01-01

    Chest roentgenograms were taken at full inspiration (TLC) and expiration (RV) in healthy, nonsmoking and smoking, young and old subjects in the upright posture. Linear distances (D) were measured in apicodiaphragmatic and transverse thoracic directions and extensions ((Dsub(TLC)-Dsub(RV))/Dsub(TLC) and (Dsub(TLC)-Dsub(RV))/Dsub(RV)) and volumes were calculated. In the apico-diaphragmatic direction a subdivision was made into an apico-fissural (A-F) distance and a fissuro-diaphragmatic (F-D) distance by means of the minor fissure. Overall volumes at TLC were identical in the four groups but differences were present in distances, extensions and volumes above and below the fissure. Aging caused mainly an increase in D(A-F) and a decrease in D(F-D) at TLC as well as at RV, indicating hyperinflation and airtrapping of the upper zone and hypoinflation and flattening of the lower zone. Smoking caused an increase in D(F-D) at RV, indicating airtrapping in the lower zone. In both groups E(F-Dsub(R)) was reduced, but in old subjects this was due to a decrease in regional TLC and in young smokers to an increase in regional RV. In old, smoking subjects a combination of the effects of aging and smoking was present.

  12. Tobacco Use among Sexual Minorities

    Bryant, Lawrence O.; Bowman, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    This chapter addresses tobacco use among sexual minorities. It examines research on the prevalence of tobacco use in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community and discusses why tobacco use within this group continues to significantly exceed that of the general population.

  13. Children of ethnic minority backgrounds

    Johansen, Stine Liv

    2010-01-01

    Children of ethnic minority background balance their everyday life between a cultural background rooted in their ethnic origin and a daily life in day care, schools and with peers that is founded in a majority culture. This means, among other things, that they often will have access to different ...

  14. Why Minority Donors Are Needed

    ... Español Search Register with your state as an Organ Donor Home Why Donate Becoming a Donor About Donation & ... Why Donate RELATED INFORMATION Minority Focused Grantee Publications Organ Donation Process Enrolling as a Donor Trying to Save a Life Testing for Brain ...

  15. Morphology and dimensions of the thoracic cord by computer-assisted metrizamide myelography.

    Gellad, F; Rao, K C; Joseph, P M; Vigorito, R D

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) measurements of the thoracic spine and its contents were obtained in 33 patients undergoing metrizamide myelography for various spinal disorders. Twenty-eight of these patients had symptoms referable to the cervical or lumbar region and form the basis of this study. Five patients had symptoms referable to the thoracic spine. Sagittal and coronal CT measurements of the thoracic cord and subarachnoid space were obtained in all cases. In addition, macroscopic measurements of the thoracic cord were obtained from 10 autopsies for correlation with the CT findings. The technical aspects of the measurements are discussed; the normal morphology of the thoracic cord and thecal sac is presented; and the metrizamide CT pattern associated with pathologic lesions involving the thoracic cord is analyzed. PMID:6410813

  16. Post-operative care to promote recovery for thoracic surgical patients: a nursing perspective

    Yeung, Wilfred Wai Kit

    2016-01-01

    The change in patient population leads to an inevitable transformation among the healthcare system. Over the past decades, thoracic surgical technique has been evolving from conventional open thoracotomy to minimally invasive video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Thoracic nursing team of Prince of Wales Hospital (PWH) grows together with the evolution and aims at providing holistic and quality care to patients require thoracic operation. In order to enhance patient post-operative recov...

  17. Plastic surgical procedures for the closure of radiation ulcers of the thoracic and pelvic regions

    Radiation ulcers of the thoracic and pelvic regions are usually very painful and also have an unpleasant odour. Two hundred and twelve patients with ulcerations on the neck, in the axilla, on the thoracic wall, in the inguinal region, over the sacrum and in the genital area were treated with local rotation flaps, following deep and extensive excisions. Myocutaneous flaps (latissimus dorsi, gracilis) were the method of choice in cases of very deep defects of the thoracic wall and the pelvic region. (author)

  18. Exposure to 100% Oxygen Abolishes the Impairment of Fracture Healing after Thoracic Trauma

    Julia Kemmler; Ronny Bindl; Oscar McCook; Florian Wagner; Michael Gröger; Katja Wagner; Angelika Scheuerle; Peter Radermacher; Anita Ignatius

    2015-01-01

    In polytrauma patients a thoracic trauma is one of the most critical injuries and an important trigger of post-traumatic inflammation. About 50% of patients with thoracic trauma are additionally affected by bone fractures. The risk for fracture malunion is considerably increased in such patients, the pathomechanisms being poorly understood. Thoracic trauma causes regional alveolar hypoxia and, subsequently, hypoxemia, which in turn triggers local and systemic inflammation. Therefore, we aimed...

  19. Successful reversal of recurrent spinal cord ischemia following endovascular repair of a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm

    Appoo, J J; Gregory, H D; Toeg, H D; Prusinkiewicz, C A; Kent, W D T; Ferland, A; Ha, D V

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in technique, spinal cord ischemia remains one of the most dreaded complications of thoracic aortic surgery. Recently, it has been suggested that thoracic endovascular aortic repair may decrease the risk of paraplegia. We present a case of delayed paraplegia following thoracic endovascular aortic repair that was successfully reversed on 3 separate occasions in the same patient. This highlights the importance of vigilant clinical assessments, efficient multidisciplinary...

  20. Normal range of thoracic kyphosis in 13 to 18 years old healthy schoolboys in Kermanshah (2008)

    Farid Najafi; Kourosh Veisi; Loghman Karimi; Mohammad Bagher Shamsi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Increased thoracic kyphosis more than normal ranges are assessed as abnormal. But normal ranges of thoracic kyphosis in deferent age groups have not been identified in our country yet. The aim of present study was investigation of normal ranges of thoracic kyphosis to use as a diagnosis tool in school aged children in Kermanshah, Western-Iran.Methods: A descriptive research designed and ethical approval was obtained. 582 student boys 13 - 18 years old were cluster sampled randomly...

  1. Phytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles to Lemna minor L

    Gubbins, Eva J. [Department of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Batty, Lesley C., E-mail: l.c.batty@bham.ac.uk [Department of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lead, Jamie R. [Department of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    The use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in commercial products has increased significantly in recent years. Although there has been some attempt to determine the toxic effects of AgNPs, there is little information on aquatic plants which have a vital role in ecosystems. This study reports the use of Lemna minor L. clone St to investigate the phytotoxicity of AgNPs under modified OECD test conditions. AgNPs were synthesised, characterised and subsequently presented to the L. minor. Results showed that inhibition of plant growth was evident after exposure to small ({approx}20 nm) and larger ({approx}100 nm) AgNPs at low concentrations (5 {mu}g L{sup -1}) and this effect became more acute with a longer exposure time. There was a linear dose-response relationship after 14 d exposure. Using predicted environmental concentrations for wastewaters it was found that AgNPs may pose a significant potential risk to the environment. - Highlights: > Silver nanoparticles are toxic to Lemna minor at concentrations of 5 {mu}g L{sup -1}. > The effect of silver nanoparticles varies with size and concentration. > Standard toxicity tests are not appropriate for application to NPs. > Silver nanoparticles pose a potential environmental risk based on modelled environmental concentrations. - Silver nanoparticles are toxic to Lemna minor at low concentrations and constitute a significant environmental risk.

  2. Minor Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack: Research and Practice.

    Yakhkind, Aleksandra; McTaggart, Ryan A; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; Siket, Matthew S; Silver, Brian; Yaghi, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    A majority of patients with ischemic stroke present with mild deficits for which aggressive management is not often pursued. Comprehensive work-up and appropriate intervention for minor strokes and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) point toward better patient outcomes, lower costs, and fewer cases of disability. Imaging is a key modality to guide treatment and predict stroke recurrence. Patients with large vessel occlusions have been found to suffer worse outcomes and could benefit from intervention. Whether intravenous thrombolytic therapy decreases disability in minor stroke patients and whether acute endovascular intervention improves functional outcomes in patients with minor stroke and known large vessel occlusion remain controversial. Studies are ongoing to determine ideal antiplatelet therapy for stroke and TIA, while ongoing statin therapy, surgical management for patients with carotid stenosis, and anticoagulation for patients with atrial fibrillation have all been proven to decrease the rate of stroke recurrence and improve outcomes. This review summarizes the current evidence and discusses the standard of care for patients with minor stroke and TIA. PMID:27375548

  3. Minor Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack: Research and Practice

    Aleksandra eYakhind

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A majority of patients with ischemic stroke present with mild deficits for which aggressive management is less often pursued. Comprehensive work-up and appropriate intervention for minor strokes and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs point towards better patient outcomes, lower costs and fewer cases of disability with. Imaging is a key modality to guide treatment and predict stroke recurrence. Patients with large vessel occlusions have been found to suffer worse outcomes and could benefit from intervention. Whether intravenous thrombolytic therapy decreases disability in minor stroke patients and whether acute endovascular intervention improves functional outcomes in patients with minor stroke and known large vessel occlusion remain controversial. Studies are ongoing to determine ideal antiplatelet therapy for stroke and TIA, while ongoing statin therapy, surgical management for patients with carotid stenosis, and anticoagulation for patients with atrial fibrillation have all proven to be beneficial for stroke recurrence and outcomes. This review summarizes the current evidence and discusses the standard of care for minor stroke and TIA.

  4. TEVAR for Flash Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm to Pulmonary Artery Fistula.

    Bornak, Arash; Baqai, Atif; Li, Xiaoyi; Rey, Jorge; Tashiro, Jun; Velazquez, Omaida C

    2016-01-01

    Enlarging aneurysms in the thoracic aorta frequently remain asymptomatic. Fistulization of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) to adjacent structures or the presence of a patent ductus arteriosus and TAA may lead to irreversible cardiopulmonary sequelae. This article reports on a large aneurysm of the thoracic aorta with communication to the pulmonary artery causing pulmonary edema and cardiorespiratory failure. The communication was ultimately closed after thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair allowing rapid symptom resolution. Early diagnosis and closure of such communication in the presence of TAA are critical for prevention of permanent cardiopulmonary damage. PMID:26522587

  5. Predicted Versus Measured Thoracic Gas Volume For The Bod Pod® Air Displacement Plethysmography System

    Blaney, Phil A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a significant difference between measured values of thoracic gas volume (MTGV) and predicted values of thoracic gas volume (PTGV) using the Bod Pod®. One hundred and thirteen college freshmen, both males and females, were tested using the Bod Pod® by first measuring thoracic gas volume with the Bod Pod® technique, then by using pre-determined values based on height, weight, and age that predict thoracic gas volume. Results of a paire...

  6. From Diagnosis to Treatment: Clinical Applications of Nanotechnology in Thoracic Surgery.

    Digesu, Christopher S; Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-05-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging field with potential as an adjunct to cancer therapy, particularly thoracic surgery. Therapy can be delivered to tumors in a more targeted fashion, with less systemic toxicity. Nanoparticles may aid in diagnosis, preoperative characterization, and intraoperative localization of thoracic tumors and their lymphatics. Focused research into nanotechnology's ability to deliver both diagnostics and therapeutics has led to the development of nanotheranostics, which promises to improve the treatment of thoracic malignancies through enhanced tumor targeting, controlled drug delivery, and therapeutic monitoring. This article reviews nanoplatforms, their unique properties, and the potential for clinical application in thoracic surgery. PMID:27112260

  7. Supraclavicular scalenectomy for thoracic outlet syndrome--functional outcomes assessed using the DASH scoring system.

    Glynn, Ronan W

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate supraclavicular scalenectomy ± cervical rib excision for thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS), employing Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scoring for functional assessment post-decompression.

  8. Spinal granulocytic sarcoma (chloroma presenting as acute cord compression in a nonleukemic patient

    Kalayci Murat

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of a previously healthy 24-year-old man diagnosed with extradural thoracic granulocytic sarcoma with no evidence of bone marrow or other hematological involvement is described. The tumor was removed totally by microsurgery. The histopathological examination was consistent with granulocytic sarcoma. Granulocytic sarcomas are most commonly found in the context of an acute myelogenous leukemia or in chronic myelogenous leukemia. They rarely have been reported in otherwise healthy patients without any evidence of systemic disease. A review of the literature revealed only 14 more nonleukaemic cases with granulocytic sarcoma causing thoracic spinal cord compression.

  9. Thoracic sonography for pneumothorax: The clinical evaluation of an operational space medicine spin-off

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Nicolaou, Savvas; Rowan, Kevin; Liu, David; Cunningham, Johan; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Hamilton, Douglas; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2005-05-01

    The recent interest in the use of ultrasound (US) to detect pneumothoraces after acute trauma in North America was initially driven by an operational space medicine concern. Astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are at risk for pneumothoraces, and US is the only potential medical imaging available. Pneumothoraces are common following trauma, and are a preventable cause of death, as most are treatable with relatively simple interventions. While pneumothoraces are optimally diagnosed clinically, they are more often inapparent even on supine chest radiographs (CXR) with recent series reporting a greater than 50% rate of occult pneumothoraces. In the course of basic scientific investigations in a conventional and parabolic flight laboratory, investigators familiarized themselves with the sonographic features of both pneumothoraces and normal pulmonary ventilation. By examining the visceral-parietal pleural interface (VPPI) with US, investigators became confident in diagnosing pneumothoraces. This knowledge was subsequently translated into practice at an American and a Canadian trauma center. The sonographic examination was found to be more accurate and sensitive than CXR (US 96% and 100% versus US 74% and 36%) in specific circumstances. Initial studies have also suggested that detecting the US features of pleural pulmonary ventilation in the left lung field may offer the ability to exclude serious endotracheal tube malpositions such as right mainstem and esophageal intubations. Applied thoracic US is an example of a clinically useful space medicine spin-off that is improving health care on earth.

  10. Effect of raised thoracic pressure and volume on 99mTc-DTPA clearance in humans

    Nolop, K.B.; Maxwell, D.L.; Royston, D.; Hughes, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Although positive airway pressure is often used to treat acute pulmonary edema, the effects on epithelial solute flux are not well known. We measured independently the effect of 1) positive pressure and 2) voluntary hyperinflation on the clearance of inhaled technetium-99m-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA) in six nonsmokers and six smokers. Lung volumes were monitored by inductance plethysmography. Each subject was studied in four situations: 1) low end-expiratory volume (LO-), 2) low volume plus 9 cmH2O continuous positive airway pressure (LO+), 3) high end-expiratory volume (HI-), and 4) high volume plus continuous positive airway pressure (HI+). The clearance half time of 99mTc-DTPA for the nonsmokers decreased from 64.8 +/- 7.0 min (mean +/- SE) at LO- to 23.2 +/- 5.3 min at HI- (P less than 0.05). Positive pressure had no synergistic effect. The mean clearance half time for the smokers was faster than nonsmokers at base line but unaffected by similar changes in thoracic volume and pressure. We conclude that, in nonsmokers, positive airway pressure increases /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA clearance primarily through an increase in lung volume and that smokers are immune to these effects.

  11. Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis: spectrum of thoracic imaging findings in the adult patient

    Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare disease characterized by alveolar capillary haemorrhage resulting in deposition and accumulation of haemosiderin in the lungs. Although its precise pathophysiology remains unclear, several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the aetiology of the disorder, including autoimmune, environmental, allergic, and genetic theories. IPH is typically diagnosed in childhood, usually before the age of 10 years; however, this entity may be encountered in older patients given the greater awareness of the diagnosis, availability and utilization of advanced imaging techniques, and improved treatment and survival. The classic presentation of IPH consists of the triad of haemoptysis, iron-deficiency anaemia, and pulmonary opacities on chest radiography. The diagnosis is usually confirmed via bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), at which time haemosiderin-laden macrophages referred to as siderophages, considered pathognomonic for IPH, may be identified. However, lung biopsy may ultimately be necessary to exclude other disease processes. For children with IPH, the disease course is severe and the prognosis is poor. However, adults generally have a longer disease course with milder symptoms and the prognosis is more favourable. Specific imaging features, although non-specific in isolation, may be identified on thoracic imaging studies, principally chest radiography and CT, depending on the phase of disease (acute or chronic). Recognition of these findings is important to guide appropriate clinical management

  12. Dual-source computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain: feasibility and image quality

    Schertler, Thomas; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Seifert, Burkhardt [University of Zurich, Department of Biostatistics, Zurich (Switzerland); Flohr, Thomas G. [Computed Tomography CTE PA, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and image quality of dual-source computed tomography angiography (DSCTA) in patients with acute chest pain for the assessment of the lung, thoracic aorta, and for pulmonary and coronary arteries. Sixty consecutive patients (32 female, 28 male, mean age 58.1{+-}16.3 years) with acute chest pain underwent contrast-enhanced electrocardiography-gated DSCTA without prior beta-blocker administration. Vessel attenuation of different thoracic vascular territories was measured, and image quality was semi-quantitatively analyzed by two independent readers. Image quality of the thoracic aorta was diagnostic in all 60 patients, image quality of pulmonary arteries was diagnostic in 59, and image quality of coronary arteries was diagnostic in 58 patients. Pairwise intraindividual comparisons of attenuation values were small and ranged between 1{+-}6 HU comparing right and left coronary artery and 56{+-}9 HU comparing the pulmonary trunk and left ventricle. Mean attenuation was 291{+-}65 HU in the ascending aorta, 334{+-}93 HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 285{+-}66 HU and 268{+-}67 HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. DSCTA is feasible and provides diagnostic image quality of the thoracic aorta, pulmonary and coronary arteries in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.)

  13. Small Minors in Dense Graphs

    Fiorini, Samuel; Theis, Dirk Oliver; Wood, David R

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental result in structural graph theory states that every graph with large average degree contains a large complete graph as a minor. We prove this result with the extra property that the minor is small with respect to the order of the whole graph. More precisely, we describe functions $f$ and $g$ such that every graph with $n$ vertices and average degree at least $f(t)$ contains a $K_t$-model with at most $g(t)\\cdot\\log n$ vertices. The logarithmic dependence on $n$ is best possible. For $t\\leq 4$, we determine the least value of $f(t)$; in particular $f(3)=2+\\eps$ and $f(4)=4+\\eps$. For $t\\leq4$, we establish similar results for graphs embedded on surfaces, where the size of the $K_t$-model is bounded.

  14. Minority language dubbing for children

    O'Connell, Eithne

    2000-01-01

    This thesis is an exercise in descriptive translation studies (DTS) which sets out to investigate the much neglected area of screen translation for children. The corpus selected for investigation is a collection of six original television programmes from the German Janoschs Traumstunde animation series and the corresponding Irish dubbed versions. The aim of this research is to investigate the relative influence of the various constraints imposed on the target texts by a) the major/minority la...

  15. [Early discharge following major thoracic surgery: identification of related factors].

    de Lima, Nuno Fevereiro Ferreira; Carvalho, André Luís de Aquino

    2003-01-01

    There is a direct relation between hospital costs and hospital length of stay after the operation. In the other hand, reduced stay increases the productivity of the public hospitals with high service demanding. The objective of this study was to identify factors determining the decrease in hospital stay after major thoracic surgery. A two-phase retrospective study was conducted on analysis of medical records. In the first phase, data on length of hospital stay and related factors were collected from a consecutive series of 169 patients divided into group I (n=81)--patients operated on between June 1990 and 1995, and group II (n=88)--1996 through May 2000. In the second phase, data were collected from a consecutive series of 20 patients (group III) starting backwards from March 2002, for analysis and comparison with a internet survey sent to 21 thoracic surgeons. Intensive care unit was avoided for most patients in the immediate post operative period. The mean hospital stay decreased from 7.6 days (median 7) in group I to 5.1 days (median 4) in group II (p<0.001). The more frequent utilization of epidural analgesia and less traumatic thoracotomy in group II reached statistic significance (p<0.001). In group III, the mean hospital stay was 4.2 days (median 4), and there was a more effective use of epidural analgesia (75%) and muscle-sparing thoracotomy (90%). Eight thoracic surgeons answered the survey: the mean hospital stay varied from 5 to 9 days and all patients were sent to intensive care or similar units. Only two surgeons utilize muscle-sparing thoracotomy. This study confirms that pain control and less traumatic surgical approach are important for faster functional recovery of the patients. It suggests that the IC units may be used only for selected patients. PMID:14685631

  16. Physiological Interaction of Heart and Lung in Thoracic Irradiation

    Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Veen, Sonja van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Bartelds, Beatrijs [Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Beatrix Children Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Boer, Rudolf A. de [Department of Cardiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Dickinson, Michael G. [Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Beatrix Children Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Jong, Johan R. de [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Faber, Hette; Niemantsverdriet, Maarten [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Berger, Rolf M.F. [Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Beatrix Children Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Luijk, Peter van, E-mail: p.van.luijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-12-01

    Introduction: The risk of early radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) limits the dose and efficacy of radiation therapy of thoracic tumors. In addition to lung dose, coirradiation of the heart is a known risk factor in the development RILT. The aim of this study was to identify the underlying physiology of the interaction between lung and heart in thoracic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Rat hearts, lungs, or both were irradiated to 20 Gy using high-precision proton beams. Cardiopulmonary performance was assessed using breathing rate measurements and F{sup 18}-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET) scans biweekly and left- and right-sided cardiac hemodynamic measurements and histopathology analysis at 8 weeks postirradiation. Results: Two to 12 weeks after heart irradiation, a pronounced defect in the uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the left ventricle (LV) was observed. At 8 weeks postirradiation, this coincided with LV perivascular fibrosis, an increase in LV end-diastolic pressure, and pulmonary edema in the shielded lungs. Lung irradiation alone not only increased pulmonary artery pressure and perivascular edema but also induced an increased LV relaxation time. Combined irradiation of lung and heart induced pronounced increases in LV end-diastolic pressure and relaxation time, in addition to an increase in right ventricle end-diastolic pressure, indicative of biventricular diastolic dysfunction. Moreover, enhanced pulmonary edema, inflammation and fibrosis were also observed. Conclusions: Both lung and heart irradiation cause cardiac and pulmonary toxicity via different mechanisms. Thus, when combined, the loss of cardiopulmonary performance is intensified further, explaining the deleterious effects of heart and lung coirradiation. Our findings show for the first time the physiological mechanism underlying the development of a multiorgan complication, RILT. Reduction of dose to either of these organs offers new opportunities to

  17. Thoracic radiographic features of silicosis in 19 horses.

    Berry, C R; O'Brien, T R; Madigan, J E; Hager, D A

    1991-01-01

    Clinical records and thoracic radiographs of 19 horses with a confirmed pathologic diagnosis of silicosis were reviewed. These horses had histories of varying degrees of chronic weight loss, exercise intolerance, and respiratory distress. At the time of presentation, two horses were asymptomatic. Ten horses were geldings and nine were female. The mean age of the 19 horses was 10.7 +/- 5.5 years. Fourteen horses were identified as being from the Monterey-Carmel Peninsula of midcoastal California. An abnormal, structured interstitial pulmonary pattern was identified on thoracic radiographs in each horse. The interstitial pulmonary changes were classified as miliary (13 horses), reticulonodular (4), or linear interstitial (2), and were best visualized dorsally and caudodorsally. In addition to the abnormal interstitial pulmonary pattern, areas of pulmonary consolidation were evident caudodorsally in seven horses. Other thoracic radiographic features included: hilar lymphadenopathy (4 horses), pleural effusion/thickening (4), cranial mediastinal lymphadenopathy (2), hyperinflation (1), and a discrete pulmonary mass (1). Necropsy findings in eight horses and results of lung biopsies in an additional five horses showed a diffuse, multifocal, granulomatous pneumonia with areas of pulmonary fibrosis. Cellular infiltrates included predominantly macrophages with intracellular and/or extracellular crystalline material, occasional lymphocytes, and giant cells. Similar cellular changes were also identified, during necropsy, in the hilar and tracheobronchial lymph nodes in each of the eight horses, although gross enlargement of the lymph nodes was present in only six horses. The radiographic and pathologic findings of these 19 horses are consistent with chronic or the accelerated forms of silicosis that are recognized in humans. PMID:1941758

  18. Evaluation of various deformable image registration algorithms for thoracic images

    We evaluated the accuracy of one commercially available and three publicly available deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for thoracic four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) images. Five patients with esophagus cancer were studied. Datasets of the five patients were provided by DIR-lab (dir-lab.com) and consisted of thoracic 4D CT images and a coordinate list of anatomical landmarks that had been manually identified. Expert landmark correspondence was used for evaluating DIR spatial accuracy. First, the manually measured displacement vector field (mDVF) was obtained from the coordinate list of anatomical landmarks. Then the automatically calculated displacement vector field (aDVF) was calculated by using the following four DIR algorithms: B-spine implemented in Velocity AI (Velocity Medical, Atlanta, GA, USA), free-form deformation (FFD), Horn–Schunk optical flow (OF) and Demons in DIRART of MATLAB software. Registration error is defined as the difference between mDVF and aDVF. The mean 3D registration errors were 2.7 ± 0.8 mm for B-spline, 3.6 ± 1.0 mm for FFD, 2.4 ± 0.9 mm for OF and 2.4 ± 1.2 mm for Demons. The results showed that reasonable accuracy was achieved in B-spline, OF and Demons, and that these algorithms have the potential to be used for 4D dose calculation, automatic image segmentation and 4D CT ventilation imaging in patients with thoracic cancer. However, for all algorithms, the accuracy might be improved by using the optimized parameter setting. Furthermore, for B-spline in Velocity AI, the 3D registration error was small with displacements of less than ∼10 mm, indicating that this software may be useful in this range of displacements

  19. Physiological Interaction of Heart and Lung in Thoracic Irradiation

    Introduction: The risk of early radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) limits the dose and efficacy of radiation therapy of thoracic tumors. In addition to lung dose, coirradiation of the heart is a known risk factor in the development RILT. The aim of this study was to identify the underlying physiology of the interaction between lung and heart in thoracic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Rat hearts, lungs, or both were irradiated to 20 Gy using high-precision proton beams. Cardiopulmonary performance was assessed using breathing rate measurements and F18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG-PET) scans biweekly and left- and right-sided cardiac hemodynamic measurements and histopathology analysis at 8 weeks postirradiation. Results: Two to 12 weeks after heart irradiation, a pronounced defect in the uptake of 18F-FDG in the left ventricle (LV) was observed. At 8 weeks postirradiation, this coincided with LV perivascular fibrosis, an increase in LV end-diastolic pressure, and pulmonary edema in the shielded lungs. Lung irradiation alone not only increased pulmonary artery pressure and perivascular edema but also induced an increased LV relaxation time. Combined irradiation of lung and heart induced pronounced increases in LV end-diastolic pressure and relaxation time, in addition to an increase in right ventricle end-diastolic pressure, indicative of biventricular diastolic dysfunction. Moreover, enhanced pulmonary edema, inflammation and fibrosis were also observed. Conclusions: Both lung and heart irradiation cause cardiac and pulmonary toxicity via different mechanisms. Thus, when combined, the loss of cardiopulmonary performance is intensified further, explaining the deleterious effects of heart and lung coirradiation. Our findings show for the first time the physiological mechanism underlying the development of a multiorgan complication, RILT. Reduction of dose to either of these organs offers new opportunities to improve radiation

  20. Thoracic radiographic features of silicosis in 19 horses

    Clinical records and thoracic radiographs of 19 horses with a confirmed pathologic diagnosis of silicosis were reviewed. These horses had histories of varying degrees of chronic weight loss, exercise intolerance, and respiratory distress. At the time of presentation, two horses were asymptomatic. Ten horses were geldings and nine were female. The mean age of the 19 horses was 10.7 +/- 5.5 years. Fourteen horses were identified as being from the Monterey-Carmel Peninsula of midcoastal California. An abnormal, structured interstitial pulmonary pattern was identified on thoracic radiographs in each horse. The interstitial pulmonary changes were classified as miliary (13 horses), reticulonodular (4), or linear interstitial (2), and were best visualized dorsally and caudodorsally. In addition to the abnormal interstitial pulmonary pattern, areas of pulmonary consolidation were evident caudodorsally in seven horses. Other thoracic radiographic features included: hilar lymphadenopathy (4 horses), pleural effusion/thickening (4), cranial mediastinal lymphadenopathy (2), hyperinflation (1), and a discrete pulmonary mass (1). Necropsy findings in eight horses and results of lung biopsies in an additional five horses showed a diffuse, multifocal, granulomatous pneumonia with areas of pulmonary fibrosis. Cellular infiltrates included predominantly macrophages with intracellular and/or extracellular crystalline material, occasional lymphocytes, and giant cells. Similar cellular changes were also identified, during necropsy, in the hilar and tracheobronchial lymph nodes in each of the eight horses, although gross enlargement of the lymph nodes was present in only six horses. The radiographic and pathologic findings of these 19 horses are consistent with chronic or the accelerated forms of silicosis that are recognized in humans

  1. Lower thoracic rib stress fractures in baseball pitchers.

    Gerrie, Brayden J; Harris, Joshua D; Lintner, David M; McCulloch, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    Stress fractures of the first rib on the dominant throwing side are well-described in baseball pitchers; however, lower thoracic rib fractures are not commonly recognized. While common in other sports such as rowing, there is scant literature on these injuries in baseball. Intercostal muscle strains are commonly diagnosed in baseball pitchers and have a nearly identical presentation but also a highly variable healing time. The diagnosis of a rib stress fracture can predict a more protracted recovery. This case series presents two collegiate baseball pitchers on one team during the same season who were originally diagnosed with intercostal muscle strains, which following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were found to have actually sustained lower thoracic rib stress fractures. The first sustained a stress fracture of the posterior aspect of the right 8th rib on the dominant arm side, while the second presented with a left-sided 10th rib stress fracture on the nondominant arm side. In both cases, MRI was used to visualize the fractures as plain radiographs are insensitive and commonly negative early in patient presentation. Patients were treated with activity modification, and symptomatic management for 4-6 weeks with a graduated return to throwing and competition by 8-10 weeks. The repetitive high stresses incurred by pitching may cause either dominant or nondominant rib stress fractures and this should be included in the differential diagnosis of thoracic injuries in throwers. It is especially important that athletic trainers and team physicians consider this diagnosis, as rib fractures may have a protracted course and delayed return to play. Additionally, using the appropriate imaging techniques to establish an accurate diagnosis can help inform return-to-play decisions, which have important practical applications in baseball, such as roster management and eligibility. PMID:26559562

  2. Magnetic resonance angiography in the diagnosis of thoracic venous obstruction.

    Chang, Y C; Su, C T; Yang, P C; Wang, T C; Chiu, L C; Hsu, J C

    1998-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the diagnostic value of orthogonal magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and to compare the results of MRA with those of digital subtraction venography (DSV) in thoracic venous diseases. Ten normal volunteers were evaluated using two-dimensional time-of-flight MRA in three orthogonal planes to determine the image quality of each venous segment. Twelve consecutive patients suspected of having thoracic venous disease were studied with both MRA and DSV. In the normal subjects, the plane perpendicular to the target vein provided the most consistent visualization. Using three orthogonal MRA images, a diagnostic-quality image was obtained in 175 (83%) of 210 venous segments in normal volunteers. In patients with thoracic venous obstructive disease, MRA was more effective than DSV in detecting total (84 vs 54), patent (56 vs 36), stenotic (13 vs 10), and obstructive (15 vs 8) venous segments, poststenotic or postobstructive veins (15 vs 10), thrombosis of the internal jugular vein (7 vs 2), intraluminal thrombus (5 vs 3), and azygos veins (12 vs 2). Using venous segments visible on DVS (n = 54) as the standard, the sensitivity and specificity of MRA were 94% and 100%, respectively, in detecting venous patency, and 100% and 98% in detecting complete venous obstruction. In the shoulder region, the sensitivity and specificity of MRA were 93% and 100%, respectively, in detecting venous patency, and 100% and 97% in detecting venous obstruction. We conclude that MRA with three orthogonal planes can provide relatively complete and reliable venous mapping, without the need for contrast medium. PMID:9481063

  3. Young ethnic minorities in education

    Mørck, Line Lerche

    2007-01-01

    In Danish as well as in international comparative educational research, there is a tendency to foreground lack of skills or lack of achievement in discussions about learning among ethnic minorities[1]. Empirically, this kind of research (see for example Ragnvid, 2005, about the PISA-Copenhagen re......In Danish as well as in international comparative educational research, there is a tendency to foreground lack of skills or lack of achievement in discussions about learning among ethnic minorities[1]. Empirically, this kind of research (see for example Ragnvid, 2005, about the PISA......-Copenhagen results) is based on statistics and test scores - and it often lacks a basis in a theoretical understanding of how learning comes about. Theoretical and qualitative examples of recent educational research about ethnic minorities are often poststructuralist analyses of discourses and social categories...... chapter I do a critical psychological case analysis[2] of how these differences in possibilities (related to ethnicity, religion, gender, and class) are intertwined with possibilities for learning, and I consider how we may expand possibilities for learning and for transcending marginalisation. I apply...

  4. Role of early minimal-invasive spine fixation in acute thoracic and lumbar spine trauma

    Schmidt Oliver; Strasser Sergej; Kaufmann Victoria; Strasser Ewald; Gahr Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Polytraumatized patients following a severe trauma suffer from substantial disturbances of the immune system. Secondary organ dysfunction syndromes due to early hyperinflammation and late immunparalysis contribute to adverse outcome. Consequently the principle of damage control surgery / orthopedics developed in the last two decades to limit secondary iatrogenic insult in these patients. New percutaneous internal fixators provide implants for a damage control approach of spinal trauma in poly...

  5. Non-traumatic thoracic emergencies: CT diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism: the first 10 years

    Ghaye, Benoit; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [Department of Radiology, Hospital Calmette, University Center of Lille, Blvd Jules Leclerq, 59037 Lille Cedex (France)

    2002-08-01

    Over the past 10 years, spiral CT angiography of the pulmonary arteries has reached a high accuracy in the evaluation of pulmonary embolism. Major advantages of CT compared with ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy and pulmonary angiography is direct visualization of clots in the pulmonary arteries, and to provide alternative findings or diagnosis. The recent introduction of multislice CT has improved the evaluation of peripheral pulmonary arteries, enabling high-resolution CT examinations over the entire thorax in a short breathhold. The examination techniques, imaging findings, pitfalls, and results of CT in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism are reviewed in comparison with other diagnostic tests. (orig.)

  6. Congenital pseudarthrosis of the clavicle causing thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Watson, Hannah Isabella; Hopper, Graeme Philip; Kovacs, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A 7-year-old girl presented with an asymptomatic right supraclavicular swelling. Radiographs were interpreted as showing a non-union of her clavicle. No treatment was given at this time. However, she represented 12 years later with right upper limb pain and altered sensation. Examination revealed a positive Allen's test on the right. Repeat radiographs demonstrated a pseudarthrosis of the clavicle, associated with a secondary complication of thoracic outlet syndrome with vascular and neurological complications present. Non-operative management failed to relieve her symptoms. Operative intervention successfully treated her symptoms. PMID:23975919

  7. Spinal CT scan, 1. Cervical and thoracic spines

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi (Aichi Medical Univ. (Japan))

    1982-01-01

    Methods of CT of the cervical and thoracic spines were explained, and normal CT pictures of them were described. Spinal CT was evaluated in comparison with other methods in various spinal diseases. Plain CT revealed stenosis due to spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament and hernia of intervertebral disc. CT took an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors with calcification and destruction of the bone. CT scan in combination with other methods was also useful for the diagnosis of spinal injuries, congenital anomalies and infections.

  8. Yellow nail syndrome following thoracic surgery: A new association?

    Banta D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An 80-year-old man presented with the characteristic triad of yellow nail syndrome (chronic respiratory disorders, primary lymphedema and yellow nails in association with coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Treatment with mechanical pleurodesis and vitamin E resulted in near complete resolution of the yellow nails, pleural effusions, and lower extremity edema. The etiology of the yellow nail syndrome has been described as an anatomical or functional lymphatic abnormality. Several conditions have previously been described as associated with this disease. This is the first report of the association of this syndrome with thoracic surgery.

  9. Cervico thoracic junction spinal tuberculosis presenting as radiculopathy.

    Gopalakrishnan D

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of cervico thoracic junctional area spinal tuberculosis presenting as painful radiculitis of the upper extremity is reported. The predominant symptom of radicular pain and muscle weakness in the hand, along with a claw deformity, led to considerable delay in diagnosis. The presence of advanced bone destruction with severe instability was demonstrated on the MRI scan done later. Surgical management by radical anterior debridement and fusion, along with chemotherapy, led to resolution of the upper extremity symptoms. The brachial plexus radiculopathy secondary to tuberculosis has not been reported. The absence of myelopathic signs even in the presence of advanced bone destruction, thecal compression and instability is uncommon in adults.

  10. Segmentation of small pulmonary nodules on thoracic CT images

    This paper presents a segmentation algorithm of small pulmonary nodules (SPNs) on thoracic CT images for follow-up and differential diagnosis. The proposed method consists of the following two steps: a rough segmentation of an SPN by use of both a variable threshold and a template-matching method, a fine segmentation of the SPN by use of both a watershed method and a distance-transformation method. We quantitatively evaluated the performance of our algorithm using a coincidence rate (the region obtained from computerized segmentation/the region decided by the radiologist). (author)

  11. Giant Thoracic Aneurysm Following Valve Replacement for Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Tran, Cao; Ul Haq, Ehtesham; Nguyen, Ngoc; Omar, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is a common congenital anomaly associated with aortopathy, which can cause aortic root dilatation, necessitating regular screening if the aortic root is > 4.0 cm. Despite the low absolute incidence of aortic complications associated with bicuspid aortic valve in the general population, the consequences of such complications for an individual patient can be devastating. Herein we propose a balanced algorithm that incorporates recommendations from the three major guidelines for follow-up imaging of the aortic root and ascending thoracic aorta in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve, maintaining the current recommendations with regard to surgical thresholds. PMID:26827748

  12. Thoracic disc herniations: evolution in the approach and indications

    Between 1960 and 1 June 1985, 21 patients were operated for thoracic disc herniations. The advent of new operative techniques (with transverso-arthropediculectomy) has brought about new indications in the management of such disorders. These new indications are important because such protrusions may be abruptly complicate by compression of blood vessels, which may produce abrupt and irreversible neurological deficit. The progress in the radiological examinations allows a more precise study of the topography and density of the hernia. Furthermore, the use of a surgical microscope and microsurgical techniques allows a surgical treatment without preoperative medullary angiography. (Author)

  13. Salmonella spondylodiscitis of the thoracic vertebrae mimicking spine tuberculosis.

    Muhamad Effendi, Ferdhany; Ibrahim, Mohd Ikraam; Mohd Miswan, Mohd Fairudz

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Salmonella infection involving the thoracic spine is very rare. It commonly presents with non-specific chronic back pain and can occur with no gastrointestinal manifestation. Blood test results and imaging findings are often indistinguishable from more common chronic spine infections such as spine tuberculosis. Culture studies remain the key to establishing a definitive diagnosis and subsequently successful treatment. We report a case in which a patient presented with symptoms and signs suggestive of spine tuberculosis, yet the culture examination revealed otherwise. PMID:27381996

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    Tang, Yik; Fan, Yi; Cheng, Stephen; Chow, Kwok

    2011-11-01

    Thoracic Aortic Dissection (TAD) is a cardiovascular disease with high mortality. An aortic dissection is formed when blood infiltrates the layers of the vascular wall, and a new artificial channel, the false lumen, is created. The expansion of the blood vessel due to the weakened wall enhances the risk of rupture. Computational fluid dynamics analysis is performed to study the hemodynamics of this pathological condition. Both idealized geometry and realistic patient configurations from computed tomography (CT) images are investigated. Physiological boundary conditions from in vivo measurements are employed. Flow configuration and biomechanical forces are studied. Quantitative analysis allows clinicians to assess the risk of rupture in making decision regarding surgical intervention.

  15. Morphology of the thoracic limb bones in the giant anteater

    Fabrício Singaretti de Oliveira; Arlei José Birck; Matheus Camargos de Britto Rosa; Karen Caetany Moreira; Gregório Corrêa Guimarães; Daniel Arrais Biihrer; Imara Guimarães Lima; Camila Souza de Oliveira Guimarães

    2013-01-01

    The giant anteater has a grayish-brown pelage with white and black tones, its skull is elongated, cylindrical, and there are no teeth. Its tail is long, with thick and long bristles, resembling a flag. This is an endangered species, due to the constant degradation of its habitat, in addition to deaths caused by fires and roadkills. Thus, this paper aimed to describe the morphology of the thoracic limb bones in Myrmecophaga tridactyla, focusing on its main bone accidents. We used two specimens...

  16. Pain-related Impairment of Daily Activities After Thoracic Surgery

    Ringsted, Thomas K; Wildgaard, Kim; Kreiner, Svend; Kehlet, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: Persistent postoperative pain is an acknowledged entity that reduces daily activities. Evaluation of the post-thoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS) is often measured using traditional pain scales without in-depth questions on pain impairment. Thus, the purpose was to create a procedure...... questions were redundant. The remaining 13 questions from low to intensive activity described functional impairment following persistent pain from thoracotomy and video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). No evidence for differential item functioning for gender, age or differences between open or VATS, were...

  17. Thoracic intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement: a rare clinical entity.

    Faheem, Mohd; Zeeshan, Qazi; Ojha, Balkrishna; Agrawal, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy presented with a 1-year history of low backache, followed by paraparesis and urinary incontinence. MRI of the thoracic spine revealed an intramedullary, intensely contrast-enhancing lesion extending from T11 to L1 vertebral level, consistent with astrocytoma, ependymoma or haemangioblastoma. A diagnosis of intramedullary chordoma was made on tissue biopsy and immunohistochemical study. This is the second report of an intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement in English literature. After 6 months of follow-up, patient showed good clinical outcome in terms of improvement in power in lower limbs and backache. PMID:27469385

  18. Laparoscopic ligation of the thoracic duct in management of chylothorax.

    Icaza, Orlando J; Andrews, Kris; Kuhnke, Mark

    2002-04-01

    Laparoscopic ligation of the cisterna chyli at the level of the aortic hiatus was performed in a 69-year-old woman with post-lobectomy chylothorax refractory to 3 weeks of conservative therapy and one repeat thoracotomy with attempted ligation of a leaking lymphatic channel. This laparoscopic procedure was successful, and resolution of the chylothorax was achieved. We feel that this technique offers surgeons a valid, minimally invasive treatment option for a persistent chylothorax in which conservative management or more direct thoracic procedures have failed to control the chyle leak. PMID:12019574

  19. Acute pancreatitis

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000287.htm Acute pancreatitis To use the sharing features on this page, ... fatty foods after the attack has improved. Outlook (Prognosis) Most cases go away in a week. However, ...

  20. Acute Pericarditis

    ... Sugar Control Helps Fight Diabetic Eye Disease Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... cancer, or heart surgery, the fluid is blood. Causes Acute pericarditis usually results from infection or other ...

  1. Acute dyspnea

    Radiodiagnosis is applied to determine the causes of acute dyspnea. Acute dyspnea is shown to aggravate the course of pulmonary diseases (bronchial asthma, obstructive bronchitis, pulmonary edema, throboembolism of pulmonary arteries etc) and cardiovascular diseases (desiseas of myocardium). The main tasks of radiodiagnosis are to determine volume and state of the lungs, localization and type of pulmonary injuries, to verify heart disease and to reveal concomitant complications

  2. Bronchitis (acute)

    Wark, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Acute bronchitis, with transient inflammation of the trachea and major bronchi, affects over 40/1000 adults a year in the UK. The causes are usually considered to be infective, but only around half of people have identifiable pathogens.The role of smoking or environmental tobacco smoke inhalation in predisposing to acute bronchitis is unclear.A third of people may have longer-term symptoms or recurrence.

  3. Video-assisted thoracic surgery reduces early postoperative stress. A single-institutional prospective randomized study

    Asteriou, Christos; Lazopoulos, Achilleas; Rallis, Thomas; Gogakos, Apostolos S; Paliouras, Dimitrios; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Tsavlis, Drosos; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Kioumis, Ioannis; Organtzis, John; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Barbetakis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    study confirmed that minimally invasive thoracic surgery, by means of VATS, significantly reduces the acute-phase response and surgical stress, while enables better postoperative oxygenation. PMID:26834478

  4. A Quest for Equality: Minorities in Turkey

    2007-01-01

    This report was prepared and published as part of a project entitled ‘Combating discrimination and promoting minority rights in Turkey’, carried out in partnership with Minority Rights Group International (MRG) and the Diyarbakır Bar Association.

  5. CRIMINALITY AT MINORS WITH MENTAL DEFICIENCY

    Zoran Kitkanj

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present, from penological aspect, the involvement and structure of recidivism at minors with mental deficiency within the whole area of juvenile criminality in Macedonia. The research covers 62 subjects who pay the penalty in juvenile penitentiary or institutional measure directing to correctional institution for minors. Of the total number of minors who hold one of the above-mentioned sanctions, minors with lower average IQ are presented with 56.4%. The shown invo...

  6. Takeovers and incidental protection of minority shareholders.

    Mukwiri, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    One of the features of takeover law is the protection of minority shareholders. This article examines the extent at which the protection of minority shareholders is an objective of EU law, comparing certain provisions in the Takeover Directive with their equivalent in English law. The arguments advanced in this article are threefold. First, English law offers better protection to minority shareholders than accorded under EU law. Second, that the protection accorded to minority shareholder...

  7. Minority shareholder protection in takeovers: private actions.

    Lee, J. C. H.

    2004-01-01

    Traditionally, minority shareholders are said not to have the right, or the standing, to initiate proceedings against the controllers of the company, because in the eyes of the law the minority shareholders are said not to be the appropriate persons to bring such proceedings, except in the situation of first, fraud on the minority shareholders, and second, controllers' illegal, or arguable, ultra virus act. Such an approach substantially deprives the minority shareholders' of opportunity to h...

  8. Everolimus with reduced calcineurin inhibitor in thoracic transplant recipients with renal dysfunction: a multicenter, randomized trial

    Gullestad, Lars; Iversen, Martin; Mortensen, Svend-Aage; Eiskjaer, Hans; Riise, Gerdt C; Mared, Lena; Bjørtuft, Oystein; Ekmehag, Björn; Jansson, Kjell; Simonsen, Svein; Gude, Einar; Rundqvist, Bengt; Fagertun, Hans E; Solbu, Dag; Bergh, Claes-Håkan

    2010-01-01

    The proliferation signal inhibitor everolimus offers the potential to reduce calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) exposure and alleviate CNI-related nephrotoxicity. Randomized trials in maintenance thoracic transplant patients are lacking.......The proliferation signal inhibitor everolimus offers the potential to reduce calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) exposure and alleviate CNI-related nephrotoxicity. Randomized trials in maintenance thoracic transplant patients are lacking....

  9. Different Approaches to Ultrasound-guided Thoracic Paravertebral Block An Illustrated Review

    Krediet, Annelot C.; Moayeri, Nizar; van Geffen, Geert-Jan; Bruhn, Joergen; Renes, Steven; Bigeleisen, Paul E.; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    2015-01-01

    Given the fast development and increasing clinical relevance of ultrasound guidance for thoracic paravertebral blockade, this review article strives (1) to provide comprehensive information on thoracic paravertebral space anatomy, tailored to the needs of a regional anesthesia practitioner, (2) to i

  10. Pulmonary actinomycosis with thoracic soft tissue mass: a rare onset form

    Zarca-diaz de la Espina, Miguel A.; Lopez-Menendez, Carlos; Ruiz-Martinez, Rafael; Molino-Trinidad, Ceferino

    2001-03-01

    Actinomycosis is unusual, and rare especially when the lung and the thoracic wall are involved. It is more frequent in immunocompromised patient. US, CT, or MRI are imaging methods of diagnosis with high sensibility to recognise the disease and are able to the management. We point out a rare case in a normal teenager with thoracic abscess.

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of post-mortem MRI for thoracic abnormalities in fetuses and children

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging (PMMR) specifically for non-cardiac thoracic pathology in fetuses and children, compared with conventional autopsy. Institutional ethics approval and parental consent was obtained. A total of 400 unselected fetuses and children underwent PMMR before conventional autopsy, reported blinded to the other dataset. Of 400 non-cardiac thoracic abnormalities, 113 (28 %) were found at autopsy. Overall sensitivity and specificity (95 % confidence interval) of PMMR for any thoracic pathology was poor at 39.6 % (31.0, 48.9) and 85.5 % (80.7, 89.2) respectively, with positive predictive value (PPV) 53.7 % (42.9, 64.0) and negative predictive value (NPV) 77.0 % (71.8, 81.4). Overall agreement was 71.8 % (67.1, 76.2). PMMR was most sensitive at detecting anatomical abnormalities, including pleural effusions and lung or thoracic hypoplasia, but particularly poor at detecting infection. PMMR currently has relatively poor diagnostic detection rates for the commonest intra-thoracic pathologies identified at autopsy in fetuses and children, including respiratory tract infection and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage. The reasonable NPV suggests that normal thoracic appearances at PMMR exclude the majority of important thoracic lesions at autopsy, and so could be useful in the context of minimally invasive autopsy for detecting non-cardiac thoracic abnormalities. (orig.)

  12. Posterior transdural discectomy : a new approach for the removal of a central thoracic disc herniation

    Coppes, Maarten H; Bakker, Nicolaas A; Metzemaekers, Jan D M; Groen, Rob J M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal surgical approach for thoracic disc herniation remains a matter of debate, especially for central disc herniation. In this paper, we present a new technique to remove central thoracic disc herniation, the posterior transdural approach, and report a series of 13 cases operated

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of post-mortem MRI for thoracic abnormalities in fetuses and children

    Arthurs, Owen J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Thayyil, Sudhin; Addison, Shea [Imperial College London, Perinatal Neurology and Neonatology, London (United Kingdom); Olsen, Oystein E. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Wade, Angie [UCL Institute of Child Health, Paediatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, London (United Kingdom); Jones, Rod; Norman, Wendy; Taylor, Andrew M. [UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Cardiorespiratory Division, London (United Kingdom); Scott, Rosemary J. [University College London Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Robertson, Nicola J. [UCL Institute for Women' s Health, Academic Neonatology, London (United Kingdom); Chitty, Lyn S. [UCL Institute of Child Health, Genetics and Genomic Medicine, London (United Kingdom); UCLH NHS Foundation Trusts, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Owens, Catherine M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Cardiorespiratory Division, London (United Kingdom); Collaboration: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Autopsy Study (MaRIAS) Collaborative Group

    2014-11-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging (PMMR) specifically for non-cardiac thoracic pathology in fetuses and children, compared with conventional autopsy. Institutional ethics approval and parental consent was obtained. A total of 400 unselected fetuses and children underwent PMMR before conventional autopsy, reported blinded to the other dataset. Of 400 non-cardiac thoracic abnormalities, 113 (28 %) were found at autopsy. Overall sensitivity and specificity (95 % confidence interval) of PMMR for any thoracic pathology was poor at 39.6 % (31.0, 48.9) and 85.5 % (80.7, 89.2) respectively, with positive predictive value (PPV) 53.7 % (42.9, 64.0) and negative predictive value (NPV) 77.0 % (71.8, 81.4). Overall agreement was 71.8 % (67.1, 76.2). PMMR was most sensitive at detecting anatomical abnormalities, including pleural effusions and lung or thoracic hypoplasia, but particularly poor at detecting infection. PMMR currently has relatively poor diagnostic detection rates for the commonest intra-thoracic pathologies identified at autopsy in fetuses and children, including respiratory tract infection and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage. The reasonable NPV suggests that normal thoracic appearances at PMMR exclude the majority of important thoracic lesions at autopsy, and so could be useful in the context of minimally invasive autopsy for detecting non-cardiac thoracic abnormalities. (orig.)

  14. Characterization of upper thoracic spinal neurons responding to esophageal distension in diabetic rats

    Qin, Chao; Ghorbani, Marie L M; Wu, Mingyuan;

    2008-01-01

    control. Four to eleven weeks after injections, extracellular potentials of single thoracic (T3) spinal neurons were recorded in pentobarbital anesthetized, paralyzed, and ventilated rats. Esophageal distensions (ED, 0.2, 0.4 ml, 20 s) were produced by water inflation of a latex balloon in the thoracic...

  15. Endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms: a review

    Open surgical repair is considered the traditional treatment for patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA). In view of the persistent perioperative mobidity and mortality, endovascular stent-graft placement as a minimally invasive and potentially safer treatment for aneurysm of the descending aorta was introduced in 1992. Since then, progress has been made and several institutions have substantiated the safety and effectiveness of stent grafts in the repair of descending TAAs or type-B aortic dissections. Currently, both custom-designed, home-made, and commercially available stent grafts are used. Prior to placement of the endoprosthesis, three major prerequisites must be considered: the localization and morphology of the aneurysm; the distal vascular access of sufficient size; and a limited tortuosity of the abdominal and thoracic aorta. Although short-term results are encouraging, severe complications, including paraplegia, cerebral strokes, and aortic rupture, have been encountered. The long-term durability of currently available stent-graft systems is nonexistent and material fatigue are of major concern to both surgeons and radiologists. Nevertheless, endovascular stent-graft placement could become the procedure of choice in a substantial number of patients with descending TAA. (orig.)

  16. Automated lung segmentation algorithm for CAD system of thoracic CT

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To design and test the accuracy and efficiency of our lung segmentation algorithm on thoracic CT image in computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system, especially on the segmentation between left and right lungs. Methods: We put forward the base frame of our lung segmentation firstly. Then, using optimal thresholding and mathematical morphologic methods, we acquired the rough image of lung segmentation. Finally, we presented a fast self-fit segmentation refinement algorithm, adapting to the unsuccessful left-right lung segmentation of thredsholding. Then our algorithm was used to CT scan images of 30 patients and the results were compared with those made by experts. Results: Experiments on clinical 2-D pulmonary images showed the results of our algorithm were very close to the expert's manual outlines, and it was very effective for the separation of left and right lungs with a successful segmentation ratio 94.8%. Conclusion: It is a practicable fast lung segmentation algorithm for CAD system on thoracic CT image.

  17. Systematic survey of opinion regarding the thoracic surgery residency.

    Wilcox, B R; Stritter, F T; Anderson, R P; Gay, W A; Kaiser, G C; Orringer, M B; Rainer, W G; Replogle, R L

    1993-05-01

    To summarize this rather wide-ranging study, let us review the high points. The future practice of thoracic surgery will be increasingly affected by governmental factors and will have even greater technological dimensions. To do this work, we must continue to attract high-caliber individuals, and this is best accomplished by the early and continuing involvement in the educational process of strong role models from our field. These future surgeons must be motivated to do good work and should have high ethical standards as well as maturity and high intelligence. Experienced, involved faculty leading the residents through a broad program that offers graduated assumption of clinical and leadership responsibilities will facilitate the development of mature clinical judgment. Residents must be taught the clinical skills necessary to do all thoracic operations, leaving subspecialization to postresidency fellowships. The educational program should be humane in its demands and collegial in its application. It should incorporate experiences beyond the operating room, including the opportunity to read, think, and interact with local mentors and colleagues from around the country. The requirements of certification should not be so rigid as to preclude the development of different pathways to the same end. Likewise, although the accreditation process must protect the resident from exploitation, it must not be so restrictive that it does not allow for educational innovation and justifiable differences among programs. These are the thoughtful opinions of our colleagues. They deserve serious consideration. PMID:8494460

  18. Interventional bronchoscopy in the management of thoracic malignancy.

    Hardavella, Georgia; George, Jeremy

    2015-09-01

    Interventional bronchoscopy is a rapidly expanding field in respiratory medicine offering minimally invasive therapeutic and palliative procedures for all types of lung neoplasms. This field has progressed over the last couple of decades with the application of new technology. The HERMES European curriculum recommendations include interventional bronchoscopy skills in the modules of thoracic tumours and bronchoscopy [1]. However, interventional bronchoscopy is not available in all training centres and consequently, not all trainees will obtain experience unless they rotate to centres specifically offering such training. In this review, we give an overview of interventional bronchoscopic procedures used for the treatment and palliation of thoracic malignancy. These can be applied either with flexible or rigid bronchoscopy or a combination of both depending on the anatomical location of the tumour, the complexity of the case, bleeding risk, the operator's expertise and preference as well as local availability. Specialised anaesthetic support and appropriately trained endoscopy staff are essential, allowing a multimodality approach to meet the high complexity of these cases. PMID:26632425

  19. Interventional bronchoscopy in the management of thoracic malignancy

    Georgia Hardavella

    2015-09-01

    Interventional bronchoscopy is a rapidly expanding field in respiratory medicine offering minimally invasive therapeutic and palliative procedures for all types of lung neoplasms. This field has progressed over the last couple of decades with the application of new technology. The HERMES European curriculum recommendations include interventional bronchoscopy skills in the modules of thoracic tumours and bronchoscopy [1]. However, interventional bronchoscopy is not available in all training centres and consequently, not all trainees will obtain experience unless they rotate to centres specifically offering such training. In this review, we give an overview of interventional bronchoscopic procedures used for the treatment and palliation of thoracic malignancy. These can be applied either with flexible or rigid bronchoscopy or a combination of both depending on the anatomical location of the tumour, the complexity of the case, bleeding risk, the operator’s expertise and preference as well as local availability. Specialised anaesthetic support and appropriately trained endoscopy staff are essential, allowing a multimodality approach to meet the high complexity of these cases.

  20. Surgical approach of endovascular exclusion for thoracic aortic dissection

    Objective: To evaluate the surgical approach of endovascular exclusion for thoracic dissection. Methods: Thirty-seven cases of Stanford B type thoracic aortic dissection were undergone endovascular exclusion (EVE) and had been studied retrospectively. Preoperative evaluations for delivery arteries, including common femoral artery, iliac artery, and abdominal aorta, were carried out by using duplex ultrasonography (US), computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Factors such as arterial calibers, stenosis, tortuosity, sclerotic plaque and media dissection were taken into account. Choices of surgical approach were decided after comprehensive consideration of these factors. If the common femoral artery inner diameter was wider than 8 mm, without severe iliac artery stenosis or tortuosity; the common femoral artery should be selected as the delivery artery. In case of severe arterial stenosis and tortuosities, then the common iliac arteries were exposed by retroperitoneal approach and graft was delivered through this artery. Results: Mural sclerotic plaques were more sensitive to be revealed by US, conversely with CTA and MRA in showing stenosis and tortuosity directly and clearly. Utilizing this preoperative evaluating system, all the grafts passed successfully and favourably through the arteries, without any delivery artery associated complications. Conclusions: Using US, CTA and MRA in combination was necessary for preoperative evaluation of the delivery artery. In those with poor femoral artery condition, exposing common iliac artery decidedly is necessary to ensure the procedure favorably and to avoid delivery artery associated complications

  1. Tumoral calcinosis presenting as a deformity of the thoracic spine.

    Kalani, M Yashar S; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Little, Andrew S; Kakarla, Udaya K; Theodore, Nicholas

    2011-12-01

    The authors describe a rare case of tumoral calcinosis (TC) of the thoracic spine in a 13-year-old boy with thoracic scoliosis. The patient presented with a 2-year history of back pain. He had no personal or family history of bone disease, deformity, or malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heterogeneously enhancing mass involving the T-7 vertebral body and the left pedicle. Computed tomography findings suggested that the mass was calcified and that this had resulted in scalloping of the vertebral body. The lesion was resected completely by using a left T-7 costotransversectomy and corpectomy. The deformity was corrected with placement of a vertebral body cage and pedicle screw fixation from T-5 to T-9. Pathological analysis of the mass demonstrated dystrophic calcification with marked hypercellularity and immunostaining consistent with TC. This represents the third reported case of vertebral TC in the pediatric population. Pediatric neurosurgeons should be familiar with lesions such as TC, which may be encountered in the elderly and in hemodialysis-dependent populations, and may not always require aggressive resection. PMID:22132916

  2. Thoracic applications of dual-source CT technology

    Among the various imaging modalities available, CT has remained over time the core imaging technique for the evaluation of respiratory disorders. The recent advent of dual-source CT offers innovative approaches to investigate thoracic diseases, based on the use of one or two tubes as well as single or dual energy to scan the entire thorax. Two major options can be used in clinical practice with promising results. Dual source, single-energy scanning allows scanning of the entire thorax with ultra-high temporal resolution which opens the field of integrated cardiothoracic imaging without ECG gating as well as optimized evaluation of pediatric and adult patients with limited ability to cooperate. Dual-source, dual-energy acquisitions represent another very innovative means of investigating respiratory disorders, adding tissue characterization and functional analysis to morphological evaluation. The purpose of this review article is to provide results on preliminary experiences with the above-mentioned scanning conditions with dual-source CT and to envisage potential forthcoming applications in the field of thoracic imaging

  3. Thoracic wall defects: surgical management of 205 consecutive patients

    Pairolero, P.C.; Arnold, P.G.

    1986-07-01

    In this article, we review our experience during the past 9 years with 205 consecutive thoracic wall reconstructions. The 100 female and 105 male patients ranged in age from 12 to 85 years (mean, 53.4 years). One hundred fourteen patients had thoracic wall tumors, 56 had radiation necrosis, 56 had infected median sternotomy wounds, and 8 had costochondritis. Twenty-nine of these patients had combinations of the aforementioned conditions. One hundred seventy-eight patients underwent skeletal resection. A mean of 5.4 ribs were resected in 142 patients. Total or partial sternectomies were performed in 60. Skeletal defects were closed with prosthetic material in 66 patients and with autogenous ribs in 12. One hundred sixty-eight patients underwent 244 muscle flap procedures: 149 pectoralis major, 56 latissimus dorsi, 14 rectus abdominis, 13 serratus anterior, 8 external oblique, 2 trapezius, and 2 advancement of diaphragm. The omentum was transposed in 20 patients. The mean number of operations per patient was 1.9 (range, 1 to 8). The mean duration of hospitalization was 16.5 days. One perioperative death occurred (at 29 days). Four patients required tracheostomy. During a mean follow-up of 32.4 months, there were 49 late deaths, predominantly due to malignant disease. All 204 patients who were alive 30 days after operation had excellent surgical results at last follow-up examination or at the time of death due to causes unrelated to the reconstructive procedure.

  4. [TOS (thoracic outlet syndrome)--a challenge to conservative treatment].

    Lindgren, K A

    1997-10-01

    Functional impairment and pain in the upper extremities may indicate a functional deficit in the thoracic outlet. Static work posture, trauma and whiplash injury may be predisposing factors. The younger generation who often spend long hours in front of a computer are in danger of becoming a future risk group. The primary care physician should be familiar with the syndrome which can be identified by careful clinical examination. Timely intervention can prevent much of the disabling symptomatology. Treatment is primarily conservative and should be aimed at the restoration of functional capacity. As in other disorders, the individual constellation of symptoms is dependent on circumstantial factors, an aspect meriting particular attention in treatment and follow-up. Optimisation of ergonomic conditions is important feature of treatment, and long-term follow-up is necessary. Transient exacerbation is not an indication for surgical treatment. If cervical and thoracic outlet function has normalised but the patient still has symptoms, then the differential diagnosis should be reconsidered. Examination and treatment of patients with pain in the upper extremities requires the collaboration of the physician and physical and occupational therapists. Treatment can be delivered in the primary care setting. PMID:9411397

  5. Thoracic applications of dual-source CT technology

    Boroto, Kahimano [Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, University Center of Lille, Boulevard Jules Leclercq, 59037 Lille Cedex (France); Remy-Jardin, Martine [Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, University Center of Lille, Boulevard Jules Leclercq, 59037 Lille Cedex (France)], E-mail: mremy-jardin@chru-lille.fr; Flohr, Thomas [Department of Research and Development, Siemens Medical Solutions, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Pansini, Vittorio; Tacelli, Nunzia [Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, University Center of Lille, Boulevard Jules Leclercq, 59037 Lille Cedex (France); Schmidt, Bernhard [Department of Research and Development, Siemens Medical Solutions, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Gorgos, Andrei; Remy, Jacques [Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, University Center of Lille, Boulevard Jules Leclercq, 59037 Lille Cedex (France)

    2008-12-15

    Among the various imaging modalities available, CT has remained over time the core imaging technique for the evaluation of respiratory disorders. The recent advent of dual-source CT offers innovative approaches to investigate thoracic diseases, based on the use of one or two tubes as well as single or dual energy to scan the entire thorax. Two major options can be used in clinical practice with promising results. Dual source, single-energy scanning allows scanning of the entire thorax with ultra-high temporal resolution which opens the field of integrated cardiothoracic imaging without ECG gating as well as optimized evaluation of pediatric and adult patients with limited ability to cooperate. Dual-source, dual-energy acquisitions represent another very innovative means of investigating respiratory disorders, adding tissue characterization and functional analysis to morphological evaluation. The purpose of this review article is to provide results on preliminary experiences with the above-mentioned scanning conditions with dual-source CT and to envisage potential forthcoming applications in the field of thoracic imaging.

  6. 14 CFR 152.419 - Minority business.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minority business. 152.419 Section 152.419... AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Nondiscrimination in Airport Aid Program § 152.419 Minority business. Each person subject to this subpart is required to comply with the Minority Business Enterprise Regulations of...

  7. Ethnic Minorities in America: Past, Present, Future.

    Casey, Marion Therese

    This paper investigates the nature of ethnic prejudice and examines the treatment of four ethnic minorities in the United States--American Indians, blacks, Chinese Americans, and Mexican Americans. The hypothesis is that, despite inequality, ethnic minorities in the United States enjoy a better lot than ethnic minorities elsewhere. Two forms of…

  8. Parasites in the thoracic ganglion of Pachygrapsus marmoratus (Brachyura: Grapsidae from the coast of Portugal

    Kuris A.M.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined 149 marbled shore crabs, Pachygrapsus marmoratus, from the coast of Portugal for parasites. In particular, we focused our effort on the crab thoracic ganglion. The thoracic ganglion is the largest concentration of nervous tissue in a crab and thus, parasites associated with this organ are well situated to influence host behavior. We found metacercariae of two microphallid trematode species in the thoracic ganglion. We also found a microsporan and an apicomplexan associated with the thoracic ganglion. Other parasites not associated with the thoracic ganglion included gregarine trophozoites which were present in the digestive diverticulae in some of the crabs and the entoniscid isopod, Grapsion cavolini.Metacercariae of one of the trematodes (probably Microphallus pachygrapsi (Deblock and Prevot, may influence the mortality of its host.

  9. [A case report of emergency surgical repair of traumatic transection of thoracic descending aorta].

    Noguchi, K; Sudo, K; Kodama, J; Unno, T; Hayashi, N; Tadokoro, M; Kokubo, J; Ikeda, K; Mizuno, A; Tanaka, H

    1991-10-01

    The injury to the thoracic aorta caused by blunt chest trauma is often fatal. This case is 22-year-old male suffering from transection of the thoracic descending aorta caused by traffic accident. He was transported to our emergency room by an ambulance 15 minutes after the accident. Hundred fifty minutes after arrival to the hospital, we were rush to bring him to the operation theater suspecting serious injury of the thoracic organs in association with left hemothorax. The left standard thoracotomy disclosed the injury of the thoracic descending aorta. Simple cross clamp was applied to the thoracic descending aorta distal to the left subclavian artery for 20 minutes. Completely transected aorta was reapproximated using monofilament 3-0 polypropylene sutures with running manner. He tolerated the procedure well without any complication. His postoperative course was uneventful. He was followed up at the orthopedic department for associated hip fracture thereafter. PMID:1942696

  10. Partial removal of the pulmonary artery in video-assisted thoracic surgery for non-small cell lung cancer

    Xu, Keping; Zhang, Zhi; Zhao, Jianqiang; Huang, Jianfeng; Yin, Rong; Xu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Lobectomy with partial removal of the pulmonary artery in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) currently remains a challenge for thoracic surgeons. We were interested in introducing pulmonary vessel blocking techniques in open thoracic surgery into video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) procedures. In this study, we reported a surgical technique simultaneously blocking the pulmonary artery and the pulmonary vein for partial removal of the pulmonary artery under VATS. Seven patients with non...

  11. Minor arcs for Goldbach's problem

    Helfgott, H. A.

    2012-01-01

    The ternary Goldbach conjecture states that every odd number n>=7 is the sum of three primes. The estimation of sums of the form \\sum_{p\\leq x} e(\\alpha p), \\alpha = a/q + O(1/q^2), has been a central part of the main approach to the conjecture since (Vinogradov, 1937). Previous work required q or x to be too large to make a proof of the conjecture for all n feasible. The present paper gives new bounds on minor arcs and the tails of major arcs. This is part of the author's proof of the ternar...

  12. Migrant and Ethnic Minority Health

    Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Agyemang, Charles; Stronks, Karien;

    2015-01-01

    health related to migration and ethnicity. Thereto we will first define the concepts of migration and ethnicity, briefly review the various groups of migrants and ethnic minorities in Europe, and introduce a conceptual model that specifies the link and causal pathways between ethnicity and health. Then...... we use the example of ethnic inequalities in cardiovascular disease and diabetes to illustrate the conceptual model. The second issue concerns the potential contribution from the health-care system to minimize the ethnic inequalities in health. As a public health sector, we should do all we can to...

  13. AGI doubles minority geoscience scholarships

    The American Geological Institute, Alexandria, Va., has had a significant increase in funds available for minority geoscience scholarships for the 1990-1991 academic year. The number of scholarships awarded this year has more than doubled from a total of 36 in 1989-90 to 80 available for 1990-1991.The increase is due largely to a grant from the National Science Foundation. Total value of the awards, which will be given to undergraduate and graduate geoscience students, will be $221,000. For 1989--990 the total value was $36,750.

  14. PIE analysis for minor actinide

    Minor actinide (MA) is generated in nuclear fuel during the operation of power reactor. For fuel design, reactivity decrease due to it should be considered. Out of reactors, MA plays key role to define the property of spent fuel (SF) such as α-radioactivity, neutron emission rate, and criticality of SF. In order to evaluate the calculation codes and libraries for predicting the amount of MA, comparison between calculation results and experimentally obtained data has been conducted. In this report, we will present the status of PIE data of MA taken by post irradiation examinations (PIE) and several calculation results. (author)

  15. [Acute mediastinitis except in a context of cardiac surgery].

    Doddoli, C; Trousse, D; Avaro, J-P; Djourno, X-B; Giudicelli, R; Fuentes, P; Thomas, P

    2010-02-01

    Acute mediastinitis is a life-threatening complication (20 to 40 % of mortality) secondary to oropharyngeal abscesses, neck infections or oesophageal leak spreading into the mediastium. Early diagnosis and optimal therapeutic approach are crucial for patient survival. CT scanning of the cervical and thoracic area is a useful tool for diagnosis and follow-up. Treatment is based on broad-spectrum antibiotherapy, adequate surgery, mediastinal drainage, and treatment of possible organ failure. There is no surgical standardized attitude. Mini-invasive approach could be satisfactory when prompt diagnosis is established and the thoracic drainage is effective. Repeated postoperative CT scanning and close clinical and laboratory monitoring could make an additional thoracotomy a second-line procedure. PMID:20207299

  16. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  17. Minor arcs for Goldbach's problem

    Helfgott, H A

    2012-01-01

    The ternary Goldbach conjecture states that every odd number $n\\geq 7$ is the sum of three primes. The estimation of sums of the form $\\sum_{p\\leq x} e(\\alpha p)$, $\\alpha = a/q + O(1/q^2)$, has been a central part of the main approach to the conjecture since (Vinogradov, 1937). Previous work required $q$ or $x$ to be too large to make a proof of the conjecture for all $n$ feasible. The present paper gives new bounds on minor arcs and the tails of major arcs. For $q\\geq 4\\cdot 10^6$, these bounds are of the strength needed to solve the ternary Goldbach conjecture. Only the range $q\\in \\lbrack 10^5, 4\\cdot 10^6\\rbrack$ remains to be checked, possibly by brute force, before the conjecture is proven for all $n$. The new bounds are due to several qualitative improvements. In particular, this paper presents a general method for reducing the cost of Vaughan's identity, as well as a way to exploit the tails of minor arcs in the context of the large sieve.

  18. Automatic learning-based beam angle selection for thoracic IMRT

    Amit, Guy; Marshall, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Purdie, Thomas G., E-mail: tom.purdie@rmp.uhn.ca; Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Levinshtein, Alex [Department of Computer Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Hope, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Patricia [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Pekar, Vladimir [Philips Healthcare, Markham, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The treatment of thoracic cancer using external beam radiation requires an optimal selection of the radiation beam directions to ensure effective coverage of the target volume and to avoid unnecessary treatment of normal healthy tissues. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning is a lengthy process, which requires the planner to iterate between choosing beam angles, specifying dose–volume objectives and executing IMRT optimization. In thorax treatment planning, where there are no class solutions for beam placement, beam angle selection is performed manually, based on the planner’s clinical experience. The purpose of this work is to propose and study a computationally efficient framework that utilizes machine learning to automatically select treatment beam angles. Such a framework may be helpful for reducing the overall planning workload. Methods: The authors introduce an automated beam selection method, based on learning the relationships between beam angles and anatomical features. Using a large set of clinically approved IMRT plans, a random forest regression algorithm is trained to map a multitude of anatomical features into an individual beam score. An optimization scheme is then built to select and adjust the beam angles, considering the learned interbeam dependencies. The validity and quality of the automatically selected beams evaluated using the manually selected beams from the corresponding clinical plans as the ground truth. Results: The analysis included 149 clinically approved thoracic IMRT plans. For a randomly selected test subset of 27 plans, IMRT plans were generated using automatically selected beams and compared to the clinical plans. The comparison of the predicted and the clinical beam angles demonstrated a good average correspondence between the two (angular distance 16.8° ± 10°, correlation 0.75 ± 0.2). The dose distributions of the semiautomatic and clinical plans were equivalent in terms of primary target volume

  19. Thoracic fat volume is independently associated with coronary vasomotion

    Dunet, Vincent; Allenbach, Gilles; Prior, John O. [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Lausanne (Switzerland); Feihl, Francois; Dabiri, Amin; Waeber, Bernard [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiopathology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Heinzer, Raphael [Lausanne University Hospital, Center for Investigation and Research in Sleep, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2016-02-15

    Thoracic fat has been associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). As endothelium-dependent vasoreactivity is a surrogate of cardiovascular events and is impaired early in atherosclerosis, we aimed at assessing the possible relationship between thoracic fat volume (TFV) and endothelium-dependent coronary vasomotion. Fifty healthy volunteers without known CAD or major cardiovascular risk factors (CRFs) prospectively underwent a {sup 82}Rb cardiac PET/CT to quantify myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest, and MBF response to cold pressor testing (CPT-MBF) and adenosine (i.e., stress-MBF). TFV was measured by a 2D volumetric CT method and common laboratory blood tests (glucose and insulin levels, HOMA-IR, cholesterol, triglyceride, hsCRP) were performed. Relationships between CPT-MBF, TFV and other CRFs were assessed using non-parametric Spearman rank correlation testing and multivariate linear regression analysis. All of the 50 participants (58 ± 10y) had normal stress-MBF (2.7 ± 0.6 mL/min/g; 95 % CI: 2.6-2.9) and myocardial flow reserve (2.8 ± 0.8; 95 % CI: 2.6-3.0) excluding underlying CAD. Univariate analysis revealed a significant inverse relation between absolute CPT-MBF and sex (ρ = -0.47, p = 0.0006), triglyceride (ρ = -0.32, p = 0.024) and insulin levels (ρ = -0.43, p = 0.0024), HOMA-IR (ρ = -0.39, p = 0.007), BMI (ρ = -0.51, p = 0.0002) and TFV (ρ = -0.52, p = 0.0001). MBF response to adenosine was also correlated with TFV (ρ = -0.32, p = 0.026). On multivariate analysis, TFV emerged as the only significant predictor of MBF response to CPT (p = 0.014). TFV is significantly correlated with endothelium-dependent and -independent coronary vasomotion. High TF burden might negatively influence MBF response to CPT and to adenosine stress, even in persons without CAD, suggesting a link between thoracic fat and future cardiovascular events. (orig.)

  20. Automatic learning-based beam angle selection for thoracic IMRT

    Purpose: The treatment of thoracic cancer using external beam radiation requires an optimal selection of the radiation beam directions to ensure effective coverage of the target volume and to avoid unnecessary treatment of normal healthy tissues. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning is a lengthy process, which requires the planner to iterate between choosing beam angles, specifying dose–volume objectives and executing IMRT optimization. In thorax treatment planning, where there are no class solutions for beam placement, beam angle selection is performed manually, based on the planner’s clinical experience. The purpose of this work is to propose and study a computationally efficient framework that utilizes machine learning to automatically select treatment beam angles. Such a framework may be helpful for reducing the overall planning workload. Methods: The authors introduce an automated beam selection method, based on learning the relationships between beam angles and anatomical features. Using a large set of clinically approved IMRT plans, a random forest regression algorithm is trained to map a multitude of anatomical features into an individual beam score. An optimization scheme is then built to select and adjust the beam angles, considering the learned interbeam dependencies. The validity and quality of the automatically selected beams evaluated using the manually selected beams from the corresponding clinical plans as the ground truth. Results: The analysis included 149 clinically approved thoracic IMRT plans. For a randomly selected test subset of 27 plans, IMRT plans were generated using automatically selected beams and compared to the clinical plans. The comparison of the predicted and the clinical beam angles demonstrated a good average correspondence between the two (angular distance 16.8° ± 10°, correlation 0.75 ± 0.2). The dose distributions of the semiautomatic and clinical plans were equivalent in terms of primary target volume

  1. Intrinsic response of thoracic propriospinal neurons to axotomy

    Stelzner Dennis J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central nervous system axons lack a robust regenerative response following spinal cord injury (SCI and regeneration is usually abortive. Supraspinal pathways, which are the most commonly studied for their regenerative potential, demonstrate a limited regenerative ability. On the other hand, propriospinal (PS neurons, with axons intrinsic to the spinal cord, have shown a greater regenerative response than their supraspinal counterparts, but remain relatively understudied in regards to spinal cord injury. Results Utilizing laser microdissection, gene-microarray, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry, we focused on the intrinsic post-axotomy response of specifically labelled thoracic propriospinal neurons at periods from 3-days to 1-month following T9 spinal cord injury. We found a strong and early (3-days post injury, p.i upregulation in the expression of genes involved in the immune/inflammatory response that returned towards normal by 1-week p.i. In addition, several regeneration associated and cell survival/neuroprotective genes were significantly up-regulated at the earliest p.i. period studied. Significant upregulation of several growth factor receptor genes (GFRa1, Ret, Lifr also occurred only during the initial period examined. The expression of a number of pro-apoptotic genes up-regulated at 3-days p.i. suggest that changes in gene expression after this period may have resulted from analyzing surviving TPS neurons after the cell death of the remainder of the axotomized TPS neuronal population. Conclusions Taken collectively these data demonstrate that thoracic propriospinal (TPS neurons mount a very dynamic response following low thoracic axotomy that includes a strong regenerative response, but also results in the cell death of many axotomized TPS neurons in the first week after spinal cord injury. These data also suggest that the immune/inflammatory response may have an important role in mediating the early strong

  2. Anatomical Disregard as a Risk Factor in Thoracic Surgery.

    Arribalzaga, Eduardo B.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The anatomy plays a significant role in medical education, allowing a progressive appropriate professional development. Because of different factors adverse events (AE occur, where patient’s safety is achieved by surgical knowledge, prevention and elimination of risk factors. Absence or incorrect knowledge of the anatomical basis at the beginning of the graduate studies specialization are factors that alter the surgical patient’s safety, risking his life. The safety checklist in surgery is used to reduce avoidable risks for the patient in the operating room.Objectives: 1. Analyze the anatomic disregard as a risk factor in surgical anatomical processes of the thorax. 2. Evaluate actions to provide greater safety for the patient with thoracic surgical pathology. 3. Evaluate the importance of implementing register systems to improve the quality of care and patient’s safety with thoracic surgical pathology.Retrospective statistical analysis of anatomic disregard as a risk factor contributing to adverse events (AEs in anatomical and surgical procedures of the thorax was performed in the General Surgery Service of the Hospital Aeronáutico Central of Buenos Aires Air (HAC, from October 2009 to April 2011; and a case of anatomical disregard and its clinical-surgical implications was reported, in General Surgery Service of Hospital de Clínicas of Buenos Aires.In the General Surgery Service of HAC, 21 patients (17.64% had AE all (100% preventable. 100% were due to human factors, corresponding to 12 (57.14%, because of ignorance of anatomical region and the rest by other factors: absence of checklist in 7 (58.33% of which 5 (71.43% correspond to the first 9 months of the studied period and 2 (28.57% in the next 9 months. A case of anatomical disregard was reported in the surgical practice of General Surgery Service of Hospital de Clínicas, Buenos Aires where it was because of complications that endangered the patient’s life.The registration

  3. American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society Classification of the Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias: Advances in Knowledge since 2002.

    Sverzellati, Nicola; Lynch, David A; Hansell, David M; Johkoh, Takeshi; King, Talmadge E; Travis, William D

    2015-01-01

    In the updated American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society classification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs), the major entities have been preserved and grouped into (a) "chronic fibrosing IIPs" (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia), (b) "smoking-related IIPs" (respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease and desquamative interstitial pneumonia), (c) "acute or subacute IIPs" (cryptogenic organizing pneumonia and acute interstitial pneumonia), and (d) "rare IIPs" (lymphoid interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis). Furthermore, it has been acknowledged that a final diagnosis is not always achievable, and the category "unclassifiable IIP" has been proposed. The diagnostic interpretation of the IIPs is often challenging because other diseases with a known etiology (most notably, connective tissue disease and hypersensitivity pneumonitis) may show similar morphologic patterns. Indeed, more emphasis has been given to the integration of clinical, computed tomographic (CT), and pathologic findings for multidisciplinary diagnosis. Typical CT-based morphologic patterns are associated with the IIPs, and radiologists play an important role in diagnosis and characterization. Optimal CT quality and a systematic approach are both pivotal for evaluation of IIP. Interobserver variation for the various patterns encountered in the IIPs is an issue. It is important for radiologists to understand the longitudinal behavior of IIPs at serial CT examinations, especially for providing a framework for cases that are unclassifiable or in which a histologic diagnosis cannot be obtained. PMID:26452110

  4. Survival and prognostic factors after moderately hypofractionated palliative thoracic radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    Survival and prognostic variables in patients with advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) requiring thoracic palliative radiotherapy using a moderately hypofractionated regime (13-15 x 3 Gy) were evaluated. From March 2006 to April 2012, 120 patients with a physician estimated prognosis of 6-12 months were treated with this regime using CT-based 3D conformal radiotherapy. We collected data on patient characteristics, comorbidities, toxicity, and treatment parameters. Radiotherapy was completed as prescribed in 114 patients (95.0 %, premature termination 5.0 %). Acute grade 3 toxicity was seen in 6.4 % of patients. The median survival of all patients was 5.8 months. Nonmetastatic patients survived significantly longer than patients with metastatic disease (median 11.7 months vs 4.7 months, p = 0.0001) and 18.6 % of nonmetastatic patients survived longer than 2 years. In 12.7 % radiotherapy started less than 30 days before death and 14.2 % of patients received radiotherapy within 14 days before death. In the multivariate analysis, good general condition, nonmetastatic disease, and a stable or improved general condition at the end of radiotherapy were significant. The treatment parameters, age, and comorbidities were not statistically significant. Our data confirm considerable effectiveness of 13 x 3 Gy with conformal radiotherapy for patients with locally confined NSCLC not fit for radical treatment and raise doubt for this regimen in metastatic patients and ECOG ≥ 2 when burden, acute toxicity, and resources are considered. (orig.)

  5. Resection of Posterior Mediastinal Tumors by Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery.

    Ali, Taimur Asif; Fatimi, Saulat Hasnain; Naeem, Syed Saad

    2015-07-01

    This case report illustrates successful Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS) performed on a 45-year-old woman and 52-year-old man presenting with a mass in left and right paravertebral space on the CT scan respectively. VATS has many benefits over traditional open operation (thoracotomy), resulting in less pain and shorten recovery time. However, VATS has higher equipment cost but when an experienced surgeon performs the surgery, better outcomes are achieved. VATS is not common in Pakistan's surgical setup as it is an expensive method of eradicating mediastinal pathologies and not every patient undergoes VATS. The primary objective of presenting these cases is to promote the use of VATS specifically for removal of posterior mediastinal tumors and improve the surgical outcomes. PMID:26208561

  6. SCIWORA at Thoracic Level in an Adult: A Case Report

    Seniz Akcay Yalbuzdag

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Although SCIWORA has been reported more prevalent in children, few case reports published SCIWORA in adults. Twenty seven year old man transferred to our rehabilitation unit with paraplegia arose after fall from height of 8 and concurrent blunt trauma to thoracic region. The neurological level was of T11 American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS C. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings of both brain, and spine didn%u2019t prove any significant abnormalities except the protrusion of intervertebral discs at the levels of T8-9, and T9-10. Urodynamic study findings were compatible with flaccid neurogenic bladder. He enrolled in the neurological rehabilitation program. After neurological rehabilitation program partial improvement observed in his functional status. The diagnosis of SCIWORA without any abnormality in the spine with MRI may be challenging. Therefore the diagnosis might retard until the termination of spinal shock.

  7. Mycotic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta presenting as pneumonia

    Mengozzi, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Sartoni Galloni, S. [Dept. of Radiology, San Salvatore Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Giovannini, G. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Bronzetti, G. [Dept. of Paediatric Cardiology, Sant' Orsola-Malpighi University Medical Centre, Bologna (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    Mycotic aneurysms of the thoracic aorta rarely occur in children. We report an unusual case of a mycotic aneurysm of the descending aorta in a 4-year-old boy presenting with respiratory tract infection, which was rapidly complicated by atelectasis of the left lung. The patient's mycotic aortic aneurysm was diagnosed by contrast-enhanced spiral CT, whereas conventional chest radiographs did not detect its presence. An unsuspected mild aortic coarctation was also diagnosed at the time of admission. This case demonstrates that an aortic aneurysm may clinically and radiologically manifest itself with respiratory tract infection and atelectasis and that contrast-enhanced spiral CT is a fast and powerful tool for establishing the diagnosis. (orig.)

  8. CT quantification of pleuropulmonary lesions in severe thoracic trauma

    Purpose: Computed quantification of the extent of pleuropulmonary trauma by CT and comparison with conventional chest X-ray - Impact on therapy and correlation with mechanical ventilation support and clinical outcome. Method: In a prospective trial, 50 patients with clinically suspicious blunt chest trauma were evaluated using CT and conventional chest X-ray. The computed quantification of ventilated lung provided by CT volumetry was correlated with the consecutive artificial respiration parameters and the clinical outcome. Results: We found a high correlation between CT volumetry and artificial ventilation concerning maximal pressures and inspiratory oxygen concentration (FiO2, Goris-Score) (r=0.89, Pearson). The graduation of thoracic trauma correlated highly with the duration of mechanical ventilation (r=0.98, Pearson). Especially with regard to atelectases and lung contusions CT is superior compared to conventional chest X-ray; only 32% and 43%, respectively, were identified by conventional chest X-ray. (orig./AJ)

  9. Advances in Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery, Thoracoscopy.

    Case, Joseph Brad

    2016-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is an evolving modality in the treatment and management of a variety of pathologies affecting dogs and cats. Representative disease processes include pericardial effusion, pericardial neoplasia, cranial mediastinal neoplasia, vascular ring anomaly, pulmonary neoplasia, pulmonary blebs and bullae, spontaneous pneumothorax, and chylothorax. Several descriptive and small case reports have been published on the use of VATS in veterinary medicine. More recently, larger case series and experimental studies have revealed potential benefits and limitations not documented previously. Significant technological advances over the past 5 years have made possible a host of new applications in VATS. This article focuses on updates and cutting-edge applications in VATS. PMID:26410560

  10. Thoracic aorta pseudoaneurysm with hemopericardium: unusual presentation of warfarin overdose

    Liao Chiung-Ying

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There have been few case reports which discuss a relationship between warfarin overdose and aortic pseudoaneurysm leakage. We report the case of a female receiving warfarin who presented with dsypnea. Her international normalized ratio was > 10. Chest radiograph revealed cardiomegaly, and chest computed tomography (CT showed a bulging pouch-like lesion below the aortic arch greater than 6x6 cm in size and a fluid collection suggesting blood in the pericardium. Thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR was successfully performed by a cardiovascular surgeon. Aortic pseudoaneurysm formation and leakage may be considered as a rare complication in patients receiving warfarin therapy. Further study regarding warfarin use and the incidence of pseudoaneurysm leakage is needed.

  11. Mycotic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta presenting as pneumonia

    Mycotic aneurysms of the thoracic aorta rarely occur in children. We report an unusual case of a mycotic aneurysm of the descending aorta in a 4-year-old boy presenting with respiratory tract infection, which was rapidly complicated by atelectasis of the left lung. The patient's mycotic aortic aneurysm was diagnosed by contrast-enhanced spiral CT, whereas conventional chest radiographs did not detect its presence. An unsuspected mild aortic coarctation was also diagnosed at the time of admission. This case demonstrates that an aortic aneurysm may clinically and radiologically manifest itself with respiratory tract infection and atelectasis and that contrast-enhanced spiral CT is a fast and powerful tool for establishing the diagnosis. (orig.)

  12. Cybersex with minors: forensic implications.

    Jaffe, M E; Sharma, K K

    2001-11-01

    This paper is designed to assist forensic psychiatrists/psychologists who evaluate adults who commit sexual crimes against children on the Internet. The typical offender is an adult male who logs onto the Internet and enters a chat room in which children congregate. Unbeknownst to the offender, undercover police officers are posing as minors in the chat rooms. The undercover officer (pretend kid) and offender engage in increasingly explicit, sexual conversation; the offender may transmit erotic photographs to the undercover officer and/or arrange to meet at a motel in order to have sexual intercourse. The authors will discuss the relevant legal, clinical, and ethical aspects of examining these offenders, and describe specific cases that the author (2) evaluated. PMID:11714151

  13. Medicolegal Corner: When minimally invasive thoracic surgery leads to paraplegia.

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    A patient with mild cervical myelopathy due to multilevel ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) initially underwent a cervical C3-T1 laminectomy with C2-T2 fusion utilizing lateral mass screws. The patient's new postoperative right upper extremity paresis largely resolved within several postoperative months. However, approximately 6 months later, the patient developed increased paraparesis attributed to thoracic OPLL and Ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL) at the T2-T5 and T10-T11 levels. The patient underwent simultaneous minimally invasive (MIS) unilateral MetRx approaches to both regions. Postoperatively, the patient was paraplegic and never recovered function. Multiple mistakes led to permanent paraplegia due to MIS MetRx decompressions for T2-T5 and T10-11 OPLL/OYL in this patient. First, both thoracic procedures should have been performed "open" utilizing a full laminectomy rather than MIS; adequate visualization would have likely averted inadvertent cord injury, and the resultant CSF leak. Second, the surgeon should have used an operating microscope. Third, the operation should have been monitored with somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP), motor evoked potentials (MEP), and EMG (electromyography). Fourth, preoperatively the patient should have received a 1-gram dose of Solumedrol for cord "protection". Fifth, applying Gelfoam as part of the CSF leak repair is contraindicated (e.g. due to swelling in confined spaces- see insert). Sixth, if the patient had not stopped Excedrin prior to the surgery, the surgery should have been delayed to avoid the increased perioperative risk of bleeding/hematoma. PMID:24843811

  14. Medicolegal Corner: When minimally invasive thoracic surgery leads to paraplegia

    Nancy E Epstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient with mild cervical myelopathy due to multilevel ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL initially underwent a cervical C3-T1 laminectomy with C2-T2 fusion utilizing lateral mass screws. The patient′s new postoperative right upper extremity paresis largely resolved within several postoperative months. However, approximately 6 months later, the patient developed increased paraparesis attributed to thoracic OPLL and Ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL at the T2-T5 and T10-T11 levels. The patient underwent simultaneous minimally invasive (MIS unilateral MetRx approaches to both regions. Postoperatively, the patient was paraplegic and never recovered function. Multiple mistakes led to permanent paraplegia due to MIS MetRx decompressions for T2-T5 and T10-11 OPLL/OYL in this patient. First, both thoracic procedures should have been performed "open" utilizing a full laminectomy rather than MIS; adequate visualization would have likely averted inadvertent cord injury, and the resultant CSF leak. Second, the surgeon should have used an operating microscope. Third, the operation should have been monitored with somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP, motor evoked potentials (MEP, and EMG (electromyography. Fourth, preoperatively the patient should have received a 1-gram dose of Solumedrol for cord "protection". Fifth, applying Gelfoam as part of the CSF leak repair is contraindicated (e.g. due to swelling in confined spaces- see insert. Sixth, if the patient had not stopped Excedrin prior to the surgery, the surgery should have been delayed to avoid the increased perioperative risk of bleeding/hematoma.

  15. Preoperative diagnosis of lymph node metastasis in thoracic esophageal cancer

    From 1994 to 1995, to evaluate the utility of preoperative CT, EUS (endoscopic ultrasonography) and US in the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis in thoracic esophageal cancer, 94 patients with thoracic esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy were studied clinicopathologically. The sensitivity of EUS diagnosis of upper mediastinal lymph node metastasis (85%), left-sided paragastrin lymph node metastasis (73-77%), and especially lower paraesophageal lymph node metastasis (100%) were good. But due to their low-grade specificity in EUS diagnosis, their overall accuracy was not very good. On the other hand, the overall accuracy of the CT diagnosis of lymph node metastasis was fine. However, sensitivity, the most important clinical factor in the CT diagnosis of lymph node metastasis was considerably inferior to EUS. The assessment of the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis around the tracheal bifurcation and the pulmonary hilum and the left para-cardial lesion by CT or EUS was poor. It was concluded that lymph node metastasis of these area must be the pitfall in preoperative diagnosis. The average diameter of the lymph nodes and the proportion of cancerous tissue in the lymph nodes diagnosed as metastatic lymph nodes by CT was larger than that of the false negative lymph nodes. However, the lymph nodes diagnosed as true positives by EUS showed no such tendency. This must be the reason the sensitivity of the EUS diagnosis and specificity of the CT diagnosis were favorable, but the specificity of the EUS diagnosis and especially the sensitivity of the CT diagnosis were not as good. (author)

  16. Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement Guide Plate Produced by Three-Dimensional (3-D) Laser Printing.

    Chen, Hongliang; Guo, Kaijing; Yang, Huilin; Wu, Dongying; Yuan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of an individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate produced by 3-D laser printing. MATERIAL AND METHODS Thoracic pedicle samples of 3 adult cadavers were randomly assigned for 3-D CT scans. The 3-D thoracic models were established by using medical Mimics software, and a screw path was designed with scanned data. Then the individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate models, matched to the backside of thoracic vertebral plates, were produced with a 3-D laser printer. Screws were placed with assistance of a guide plate. Then, the placement was assessed. RESULTS With the data provided by CT scans, 27 individualized guide plates were produced by 3-D printing. There was no significant difference in sex and relevant parameters of left and right sides among individuals (P>0.05). Screws were placed with assistance of guide plates, and all screws were in the correct positions without penetration of pedicles, under direct observation and anatomic evaluation post-operatively. CONCLUSIONS A thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate can be produced by 3-D printing. With a high accuracy in placement and convenient operation, it provides a new method for accurate placement of thoracic pedicle screws. PMID:27194139

  17. Unusual chest wall pain caused by thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher.

    Kato, Kinshi; Yabuki, Shoji; Otani, Koji; Nikaido, Takuya; Otoshi, Ken-Ichi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Shin-Ichi; Konno, Shin-Ichi

    2016-06-01

    Symptomatic thoracic disc herniation is clinically rare. There are few cases of disc herniation of the thoracic spine in top athletes described in the literature. We herein present a rare case of chest wall pain due to thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher. A 30-year-old, left-handed pitcher complained of left-sided chest wall pain in the region of his lower ribs during a game. Neurological examination revealed hypoesthesia of the left side of the chest at the level of the lower thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine showed a left-sided paramedian disc herniation at the T9-T10 level. The player was initially prescribed rest, administration of pregabalin (150 mg twice a day), and subsequent physical rehabilitation. He was able to resume full training and pitching without medication 6 months after the onset. A follow-up MRI of the thoracic spine showed a reduction in the size of the herniated disc compared to the initial findings. Though relatively rare, thoracic disc herniation should be considered in cases of chest wall pain in athletes. PMID:26983590

  18. Teaching practices of thoracic epidural catheterizations in different grade of anesthesia residents

    Ali Alagoz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In this study, we aimed to clarify the importance of residency grade and other factors which influence the success of thoracic epidural catheterization in thoracotomy patients. METHODS: After the ethical committee approval, data were recorded retrospectively from the charts of 415 patients. All patients had given written informed consent. The thoracic epidural catheterization attempts were divided into two groups as second-third year (Group I and fourth year (Group II according to residency grade. We retrospectively collected demographic data, characteristics of thoracic epidural catheterization attempts, and all difficulties and complications during thoracic epidural catheterization. RESULTS: Overall success rate of thoracic epidural catheterization was similar between the groups. Levels of catheter placement, number and duration of thoracic epidural catheterization attempts were not different between the groups (p > 0.05. Change of needle insertion level was statistically higher in Group II (p = 0.008, whereas paresthesia was significantly higher in Group I (p = 0.007. Dural puncture and postdural puncture headache rates were higher in Group I. Higher body mass index and level of the insertion site were significant factors for thoracic epidural catheterization failure and postoperative complication rate and those were independence from residents' experience (p < 0.001, 0.005. CONCLUSION: Body mass index and level of insertion site were significant on thoracic epidural catheterization failure and postoperative complication rate. We think that residents' grade is not a significant factor in terms overall success rate of thoracic epidural catheterization, but it is important for outcome of these procedures.

  19. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: assessment and palliative management of dyspnea crisis.

    Mularski, Richard A; Reinke, Lynn F; Carrieri-Kohlman, Virginia; Fischer, Mark D; Campbell, Margaret L; Rocker, Graeme; Schneidman, Ann; Jacobs, Susan S; Arnold, Robert; Benditt, Joshua O; Booth, Sara; Byock, Ira; Chan, Garrett K; Curtis, J Randall; Donesky, Doranne; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Heffner, John; Klein, Russell; Limberg, Trina M; Manning, Harold L; Morrison, R Sean; Ries, Andrew L; Schmidt, Gregory A; Selecky, Paul A; Truog, Robert D; Wang, Angela C C; White, Douglas B

    2013-10-01

    In 2009, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) funded an assembly project, Palliative Management of Dyspnea Crisis, to focus on identification, management, and optimal resource utilization for effective palliation of acute episodes of dyspnea. We conducted a comprehensive search of the medical literature and evaluated available evidence from systematic evidence-based reviews (SEBRs) using a modified AMSTAR approach and then summarized the palliative management knowledge base for participants to use in discourse at a 2009 ATS workshop. We used an informal consensus process to develop a working definition of this novel entity and established an Ad Hoc Committee on Palliative Management of Dyspnea Crisis to further develop an official ATS document on the topic. The Ad Hoc Committee members defined dyspnea crisis as "sustained and severe resting breathing discomfort that occurs in patients with advanced, often life-limiting illness and overwhelms the patient and caregivers' ability to achieve symptom relief." Dyspnea crisis can occur suddenly and is characteristically without a reversible etiology. The workshop participants focused on dyspnea crisis management for patients in whom the goals of care are focused on palliation and for whom endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are not consistent with articulated preferences. However, approaches to dyspnea crisis may also be appropriate for patients electing life-sustaining treatment. The Ad Hoc Committee developed a Workshop Report concerning assessment of dyspnea crisis; ethical and professional considerations; efficient utilization, communication, and care coordination; clinical management of dyspnea crisis; development of patient education and provider aid products; and enhancing implementation with audit and quality improvement. PMID:24161068

  20. Internal thoracic impedance - a useful method for expedient detection and convenient monitoring of pleural effusion.

    Gideon Charach

    Full Text Available Measurement of internal thoracic impedance (ITI is sensitive and accurate in detecting acute pulmonary edema even at its preclinical stage. We evaluated the suitability of the highly sensitive and noninvasive RS-207 monitor for detecting pleural effusion and for demonstrating increased ITI during its resolution. This prospective controlled study was performed in a single department of internal medicine of a university-affiliated hospital between 2012-2013. One-hundred patients aged 25–96 years were included, of whom 50 had bilateral or right pleural effusion of any etiology (study group and 50 had no pleural effusion (controls. ITI, the main component of which is lung impedance, was continuously measured by the RS-207 monitor. The predictive value of ITI monitoring was determined by 8 measurements taken every 8 hours. Pleural effusion was diagnosed according to well-accepted clinical and roentgenological criteria. During treatment, the ITI of the study group increased from 32.9±4.2 ohm to 42.8±3.8 ohm (p<0.0001 compared to non-significant changes in the control group (59.6±6.6 ohm, p = 0.24. Prominent changes were observed in the respiratory rate of the study group: there was a decrease from 31.2±4.0 to 19.5±2.4 ohm (35.2% compared to no change for the controls, and a mean increase from 83.6± 5.3%-92.5±1.6% (13.2% in O2 saturation compared to 94.2±1.7% for the controls. Determination of ITI for the detection and monitoring of treatment of patients with pleural effusion enables earlier diagnosis and more effective therapy, and can prevent hospitalization and serious complications, such as respiratory distress, and the need for mechanical ventilation.The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01601444.

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Thoracic External Beam Radiotherapy After Airway Stenting in Malignant Airway Obstruction

    Purpose: We retrospectively evaluated the outcome and toxicity of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after airway stents were placed in patients treated for malignant airway obstruction. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2009, we performed airway stenting followed by EBRT in 43 patients for symptomatic primary lung cancer (n = 31) or other thoracic malignancies (n = 12). The median time interval between stent placement and first irradiation was 14 days. A median total dose of 50 Gy was delivered. Sixty-seven percent of the patients had reduced performance status (Karnofsky performance score, ≤70). Results: EBRT had to be stopped prematurely in 16 patients (37%), at a median total dose of 17 Gy, for various reasons. In this group of patients, the survival was poor, with a median overall survival (OS) of only 21 days. Twenty-seven patients (63%) completed radiotherapy as planned, with a median OS of 8.4 months. Fourteen of 43 patients (33%) developed at least one Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event of grade 3 to 5. The most common event was a malignant restenosis of the stent leading to asphyxia (n = 7), followed by fistula formation (n = 4), necrosis (n = 3), mediastinitis with abscess (n = 1), secondary nonmalignant airway stenosis (n = 1), and hemoptysis (n = 1). With the exception of one event, all events were associated with a local progression of the tumor. Conclusions: Although the long-term prognosis for patients with malignant airway obstruction is poor, airway stenting combined with EBRT offers a possible therapeutic option, achieving fast relief of acute respiratory distress with an associated antitumor effect, resulting in a potential survival benefit. However, due to local advanced tumor growth, increased rates of adverse events are to be expected, necessitating careful monitoring.

  2. Canadian Thoracic Society recommendations for management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – 2007 update

    O’Donnell, Denis E; Aaron, Shawn; Bourbeau, Jean; Hernandez, Paul; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Balter, Meyer; Ford, Gordon; Gervais, Andre; Goldstein, Roger; Hodder, Rick; Kaplan, Alan; Keenan, Sean; Lacasse, Yves; Maltais, Francois; Road, Jeremy; Rocker, Graeme; Sin, Don; Sinuff, Tasmin; Voduc, Nha

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major respiratory illness in Canada that is both preventable and treatable. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of this complex condition continues to grow and our ability to offer effective treatment to those who suffer from it has improved considerably. The purpose of the present educational initiative of the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) is to provide up to date information on new developments in the field so that patients with this condition will receive optimal care that is firmly based on scientific evidence. Since the previous CTS management recommendations were published in 2003, a wealth of new scientific information has become available. The implications of this new knowledge with respect to optimal clinical care have been carefully considered by the CTS Panel and the conclusions are presented in the current document. Highlights of this update include new epidemiological information on mortality and prevalence of COPD, which charts its emergence as a major health problem for women; a new section on common comorbidities in COPD; an increased emphasis on the meaningful benefits of combined pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies; and a new discussion on the prevention of acute exacerbations. A revised stratification system for severity of airway obstruction is proposed, together with other suggestions on how best to clinically evaluate individual patients with this complex disease. The results of the largest randomized clinical trial ever undertaken in COPD have recently been published, enabling the Panel to make evidence-based recommendations on the role of modern pharmacotherapy. The Panel hopes that these new practice guidelines, which reflect a rigorous analysis of the recent literature, will assist caregivers in the diagnosis and management of this common condition. PMID:17885691

  3. State of the Art Compendium: Canadian Thoracic Society Recommendations for Management of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Denis E O’Donnell

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a common cause of disability and death in Canada. Moreover, morbidity and mortality from COPD continue to rise, and the economic burden is enormous. The main goal of the Canadian Thoracic Society’s evidence-based guidelines is to optimize early diagnosis, prevention and management of COPD in Canada. The main message of the guidelines is that COPD is a preventable and treatable disease. Targeted spirometry is strongly recommended to expedite early diagnosis in smokers and former smokers who develop respiratory symptoms, and who are at risk for COPD. Smoking cessation remains the single most effective intervention to reduce the risk of COPD and to slow its progression. Education, especially self-management plans, are key interventions in COPD. Therapy should be escalated on an individual basis in accordance with the increasing severity of symptoms and disability. Long-acting anticholinergics and beta-2-agonist inhalers should be prescribed for patients who remain symptomatic despite short-acting bronchodilator therapy. Inhaled steroids should not be used as first line therapy in COPD, but have a role in preventing exacerbations in patients with more advanced disease who suffer recurrent exacerbations. Acute exacerbations of COPD cause significant morbidity and mortality and should be treated promptly with bronchodilators and a short course of oral steroids; antibiotics should be prescribed for purulent exacerbations. Patients with advanced COPD and respiratory failure require a comprehensive management plan that incorporates structured end-of-life care. Management strategies, consisting of combined modern pharmacotherapy and nonpharmacotherapeutic interventions (eg, pulmonary rehabilitation and exercise training can effectively improve symptoms, activity levels and quality of life, even in patients with severe COPD.

  4. SU-E-QI-16: Reproducibility of Computed Tomography Quantitative Structural Features Using the FDA Thoracic Phantom Image Database

    Purpose: To assess the reproducibility of quantitative structural features using images from the computed tomography thoracic FDA phantom database under different scanning conditions. Methods: Development of quantitative image features to describe lesion shape and size, beyond conventional RECIST measures, is an evolving area of research in need of benchmarking standards. Gavrielides et al. (2010) scanned a FDA-developed thoracic phantom with nodules of various Hounsfield units (HU) values, shapes and sizes close to vascular structures using several scanners and varying scanning conditions/parameters; these images are in the public domain. We tested six structural features, namely, Convexity, Perimeter, Major Axis, Minor Axis, Extent Mean and Eccentricity, to characterize lung nodules. Convexity measures lesion irregularity referenced to a convex surface. Previously, we showed it to have prognostic value in lung adenocarcinoma. The above metrics and RECIST measures were evaluated on three spiculated (8mm/-300HU, 12mm/+30HU and 15mm/+30HU) and two non-spiculated (8mm/+100HU and 10mm/+100HU) nodules (from layout 2) imaged at three different mAs values: 25, 100 and 200 mAs; on a Phillips scanner (16-slice Mx8000-IDT; 3mm slice thickness). The nodules were segmented semi-automatically using a commercial software tool; the same HU range was used for all nodules. Results: Analysis showed convexity having the lowest maximum coefficient of variation (MCV): 1.1% and 0.6% for spiculated and non-spiculated nodules, respectively, much lower compared to RECIST Major and Minor axes whose MCV were 10.1% and 13.4% for spiculated, and 1.9% and 2.3% for non-spiculated nodules, respectively, across the various mAs. MCVs were consistently larger for speculated nodules. In general, the dependence of structural features on mAs (noise) was low. Conclusion: The FDA phantom CT database may be used for benchmarking of structural features for various scanners and scanning conditions; we used

  5. Isolated long thoracic nerve paralysis - a rare complication of anterior spinal surgery: a case report

    Ameri Ebrahim

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated long thoracic nerve injury causes paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle. Patients with serratus anterior palsy may present with periscapular pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation and scapular winging. Case presentation We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who sustained isolated long thoracic nerve palsy during anterior spinal surgery which caused external compressive force on the nerve. Conclusion During positioning of patients into the lateral decubitus position, the course of the long thoracic nerve must be attended to carefully and the nerve should be protected from any external pressure.

  6. CT-Guided Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in the Treatment of an Upper Thoracic Compression Fracture

    Seong, Ju Yong [Busan Wooridul Spine Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Sung; Jung, Byung Joo; Lee, Sang Ho [Wooridul Spine Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Ho Yeong [Dongrae Wooridul Spine Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) has been used to relieve pain and to prevent further collapse of the vertebral body in patients with an osteoporotic compression fracture. The most commonly affected site for the use of PVP is the thoracolumbar junction. There are few reports that have described on the usefulness of PVP in the treatment of a high thoracic compression fracture. We report a case of an upper thoracic compression fracture that was treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided PVP. It was possible to obtain easy access to the narrow thoracic pedicle and it was also possible to monitor continuously the proper volume of polymethylmethacrylate employed, under CT guidance

  7. Visible minorities` educational choices in Canada

    Bolbocean, Corneliu

    2009-01-01

    Paper investigates educational choices of visible minorities in Canada, educational attainment and choices over fields of study. Using 2001 Canada Census data and multinomial logistic regression, research finds that choices over level of education and field of study significantly differ among visible minorities. The choices of visible minorities’ males and females differentiate substantially; insights into visible minorities` culture and role of education might explain those differences. Math...

  8. Bounds of Eigenvalues of -Minor Free Graphs

    Fang Kun-Fu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectral radius of a graph is the largest eigenvalue of its adjacency matrix. Let be the smallest eigenvalue of . In this paper, we have described the -minor free graphs and showed that (A let be a simple graph with order . If has no -minor, then . (B Let be a simple connected graph with order . If has no -minor, then , where equality holds if and only if is isomorphic to .

  9. European minority languages: endangered or revived?

    Gorter, D.

    2007-01-01

    A diagnosis is offered of language learning factors that contribute to the revival of European minority languages. In this paper four frameworks will be discussed. The theory of Reversing Language Shift (Fishman 1991, 2001). The "family-home-neighborhoodcommunity-nexus” is the central stage for language learning in the GIDS-scale of degrees of „disruption‟ of minority language communities. The Euromosaic study (Nelde, Strubell and Williams 1996), is a comparative study of minority language gr...

  10. Transient acute renal failure and functional hemispheric depression after cerebral arteriography in diabetic patients

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Lund, P; Praestholm, J

    1981-01-01

    Cerebral angiography was carried out in two diabetic patients in the evaluation of minor vascular ischemic episodes. A transient acute renal failure following cerebral angiography was accompanied by a transient comatose episode with severe unilateral neurological deficits. A functional depression...

  11. Minority Serving Institutions Reporting System Database

    Social Security Administration — The database will be used to track SSA's contributions to Minority Serving Institutions such as Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), Tribal Colleges...

  12. Compositions constrained by graph Laplacian minors

    Braun, Benjamin; Harrison, Ashley; McKim, Jessica; Noll, Jenna; Taylor, Clifford

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by examples of symmetrically constrained compositions, super convex partitions, and super convex compositions, we initiate the study of partitions and compositions constrained by graph Laplacian minors. We provide a complete description of the multivariate generating functions for such compositions in the case of trees. We answer a question due to Corteel, Savage, and Wilf regarding super convex compositions, which we describe as compositions constrained by Laplacian minors for cycles; we extend this solution to the study of compositions constrained by Laplacian minors of leafed cycles. Connections are established and conjectured between compositions constrained by Laplacian minors of leafed cycles of prime length and algebraic/combinatorial properties of reflexive simplices.

  13. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction.

    Platz, Thomas; Gillner, Annett; Borgwaldt, Nicole; Kroll, Sylvia; Roschka, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI) using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL). Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™). Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™) indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard. PMID:27610382

  14. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction

    Thomas Platz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL. Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™. Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™ indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard.

  15. The morphologic changes of remote-organs after acute cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats and the protective effects of rofecoxib

    YUJuan; QIULi-Ying; ZHOUYu; CHENChong-Hong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe the pathomorphologic changes of major organs in thoracic-abdominal cavity induced by acute cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury (CIRI and explore the protective effects of rofecoxib. METHODS: The model of local cerebral ischemia-2h/reperfusion -24h was induced by reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in SD rats.

  16. Acute pancreatitis

    Al Mofleh Ibrahim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The past few years have witnessed a tremendous progress in our knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and classification of acute pancreatitis. The role of ischemia, lysosomal enzymes, oxygen free radicals, polymorphnuclear cells-byproducts and inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of pancreatic necrosis and multiple organ failure has been emphasized. Furthermore, the recent knowledge about agents infecting pancreatic necrosis, routes of infection, bacteriological examination of fine needle aspirate and appropriate antibiotics have changed the concept of acute pancreatitis. New diagnostic tests such as rapid urinary trypsinogen-2 test and inflammatory mediators including polymorphnuclear elastase, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 contribute to early diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and initiation of an appropriate therapy.

  17. Immediate breast reconstruction using the free lumbar artery perforator flap and lateral thoracic vein interposition graft for recipient lateral thoracic artery anastomosis

    Toshihiko Satake

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The lumbar artery perforator (LAP flap, which contains excess skin and fat tissue, love handles, that extends from the lower back to upper buttock, may provide an alternate tissue source for autologous breast reconstruction. However, LAP flap use during this procedure frequently requires vessel interposition grafts to correct the short flap pedicle length and mismatched recipient vessel calibre. A 46-year-old patient underwent a right nipple-sparing mastectomy using a lateral approach for ductal carcinoma in situ and immediate LAP flap breast reconstruction. The lateral thoracic vessel served as the recipient vessel, and a lateral thoracic vein interposition graft from the distal remnant was performed to adjust the arterial length and size discrepancy between the recipient lateral thoracic artery and pedicle artery. This procedure facilitates microsurgical anastomosis and medialisation of LAP flap to make a natural decollete line and create a cleavage for the reconstructed breast.

  18. CT-guided thoracal sympathicolysis for the treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease and chronic thoracal pain syndromes in 6 patients

    Purpose: Retrospective evaluation of the safety and effectivity of CT-guided percutaneous thoracal sympathicolysis (CT-TSL) in the treatment of patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) of the upper limb and chronic thoracal pain syndromes. Comparison of our own experience with literature reports. Material and Methods: Between 6/96 and 12/99, 4 patients with PAOD of the upper limb and two with chronic thoracal pain syndromes caused by herpes zoster were treated by unilateral CT-TSL. Results: 18, 21 and 32 months after the intervention 3 out of 4 patients treated for PAOD reported subjective improvements, and one remained unchanged. Two patients treated for pain syndromes showed no long-term benefit of the procedure. There were no serious complications. Conclusion: The CT-TSL is an alternative method in the treatment of PAOD in patients who are unsuitable for treatment by revascularization. (orig.)

  19. Correlation between thoracic radiographic changes and remission/survival duration in 270 dogs with lymphosarcoma

    A retrospective study was undertaken wherein the medical records and thoracic radiographs of 270 dogs with lymphosarcoma were reviewed to determine the type and frequency of thoracic radiographic changes. Statistical evaluation of the relationship between radiographic, clinical and immunologic factors and the primary remission duration and survival times was performed using univariate and multivariate analysis. One hundred ninety-two dogs (71%) had some type of thoracic radiographic abnormality, including 80 dogs (29.6%) with pulmonary infiltrates and 164 dogs (64.4%) with thoracic lymphadenomegaly. Only T-cell phenotype (p = 0.0056 for survival, p = 0.0045 for remission) and the presence of cranial mediastinal lymphadenomegaly (p = 0.0005 for survival, p = 0.0129 for remission) were identified as having a significant negative correlation to both primary remission and survival duration by multivariate analysis

  20. Congenital pseudarthrosis of the clavicle and thoracic outlet syndrome in adolescence.

    Sales de Gauzy, J; Baunin, C; Puget, C; Fajadet, P; Cahuzac, J P

    1999-10-01

    A 15-year-old girl with thoracic outlet syndrome associated with congenital pseudarthrosis of the clavicle was examined. The indication for treatment of congenital pseudarthrosis of the clavicle is discussed. PMID:10513368