WorldWideScience

Sample records for acute lymphocytic leukemia

  1. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  2. Cancer Statistics: Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)

    ... population data for older age groups are available. Statistics at a Glance Show More At a Glance ... acute lymphocytic leukemia in the United States. Survival Statistics Show More How Many People Survive 5 Years ...

  3. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  4. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    ... treatment for acute lymphocytic leukemia? What should you ask your doctor about acute lymphocytic leukemia? It is ... with your doctor. You should feel free to ask any question that’s on your mind, no matter ...

  5. Congenital acute lymphocytic leukemia associated with hyperleucocytic leukemia syndrome

    A two-month-old female infant had congenital acute lymphocytic leukemia 39 days after birth. Cranial CT showed many small high dense spots over the whole brain. The mechanism of occurrence of central neurologic symptoms and the association of hyperleucocytic leukemia are discussed with a review of the literature. (Namekawa, K.)

  6. What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    ... both ALL and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Japanese atomic bomb survivors had a greatly increased risk of developing ... cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. Most cases occur in Japan and the Caribbean area. This disease is not ...

  7. Acute lymphocytic Leukemia masquerading as acute osteomyelitis

    Two children each developed a focal destructive bone lesion accompanied by intermittent fever, swelling, tenderness and elevated ESR. Blood counts were normal; bone marrow aspiration showed acute leukemia. The bone lesions healed in both patients after anti-leukemic therapy. We suggest that the similar roentgenographic appearance of osteomyelitis, bone infarction and focal destructive lesions in leukemia probably reflects a common, basically ischemic process of bone. (orig.)

  8. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  9. What's New in Adult Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) in Adults Research?

    ... Learn About Cancer » Leukemia - Acute Lymphocytic (ALL) in Adults » Detailed Guide » What’s new in acute lymphocytic leukemia ... What`s New in Leukemia - Acute Lymphocytic (ALL) in Adults Research? TOPICS Document Topics GO » SEE A LIST » ...

  10. Diagnosis of large granular lymphocytic leukemia in a patient previously treated for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Sinem Civriz Bozdag; Sinem Namdaroglu; Omur Kayikci; Gülsah Kaygusuz; Itir Demiriz; Murat Cinarsoy; Emre Tekgunduz; Fevzi Altuntas

    2013-01-01

    Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia is a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by the clonal expansion of cytotoxic T or natural killer cells. We report on a patient diagnosed with T-cell LGL leukemia two years after the achievement of hematologic remission for acute myeloblastic leukemia.

  11. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    ... White blood cells help the body fight infections. Lymphocytes These are the main cells that make up ... B cells) and T lymphocytes (T cells). B lymphocytes: B lymphocytes protect the body from invading germs ...

  12. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    2016-06-14

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  13. FLT3 mutations in canine acute lymphocytic leukemia

    FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is a commonly mutated protein in a variety of human acute leukemias. Mutations leading to constitutively active FLT3, including internal tandem duplications of the juxtamembrane domain (ITD), result in continuous cellular proliferation, resistance to apoptotic cell death, and a poorer prognosis. A better understanding of the molecular consequences of FLT3 activation would allow improved therapeutic strategies in these patients. Canine lymphoproliferative diseases, including lymphoma and acute leukemias, share evolutionarily conserved chromosomal aberrations and exhibit conserved mutations within key oncogenes when compared to their human counterparts. A small percentage of canine acute lymphocytic leukemias (ALL) also exhibit FLT3 ITD mutations. We molecularly characterized FLT3 mutations in two dogs and one cell line, by DNA sequencing, gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time PCR, and sensitivity to the FLT3 inhibitor lestaurtinib via in vitro proliferation assays. FLT 3 and downstream mediators of FLT3 activation were assessed by Western blotting. The canine B-cell leukemia cell line, GL-1, and neoplastic cells from 2/7 dogs diagnosed cytologically with ALL were found to have FLT3 ITD mutations and FLT3 mRNA up-regulation. Lestaurtinib, a small molecule FLT3 inhibitor, significantly inhibited the growth of GL-1 cells, while not affecting the growth of two other canine lymphoid cell lines without the FLT3 mutation. Finally, western blots were used to confirm the conserved downstream mediators of FLT3 activating mutations. These results show that ALL and FLT3 biology is conserved between canine and human patients, supporting the notion that canine ALL, in conjunction with the GL-1 cell line, will be useful in the development of a relevant large animal model to aid in the study of human FLT3 mutant leukemias

  14. Cranial radiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Neuropsychologic sequelae

    A battery of neuropsychologic tests was administered ''blindly'' to 18 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had been randomly assigned to treatment regimens with or without cranial radiation. These children were all in complete continuous remission for more than 3 1/2 years and were no longer receiving therapy. The results indicated no substantial differences between groups as a function of radiation therapy. However, decreased neuropsychologic performance was found when the entire sample was compared with population norms. These data do not support the hypothesis that cranial radiation therapy is responsible for the neuropsychologic sequelae seen in these survivors of ALL. Post hoc multiple regression analysis indicated that parental education levels accounted for more of the neuropsychologic variability seen in these children than other factors such as age at diagnosis, type of therapy, or sex of child

  15. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  16. The JAK2V617F activating mutation occurs in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, but not in acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Levine, Ross L.; Loriaux, Marc; Huntly, Brian J. P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Beran, Miroslav; Stoffregen, Eric; Berger, Roland; Clark, Jennifer J.; Willis, Stephanie G.; Nguyen, Kim T.; Flores, Nikki J.; Estey, Elihu; Gattermann, Norbert; Armstrong, Scott; Look, A. Thomas; Griffin, James D.; Bernard, Olivier A.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Gilliland, D. Gary; Druker, Brian; Deininger, Michael W. N.

    2005-01-01

    Activating mutations in tyrosine kinases have been identified in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic malignancies. Recently, we and others identified a single recurrent somatic activating mutation (JAK2V617F) in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) tyrosine kinase in the myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myeloid metaplasia with myelofibrosis. We used direct sequence analysis to determine if the JAK2V617F mutation was present in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML)/atypical chronic myelogenous leukemia (aCML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), T-cell ALL, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Analysis of 222 patients with AML identified JAK2V617F mutations in 4 patients with AML, 3 of whom had a preceding MPD. JAK2V617F mutations were identified in 9 (7.8%) of 116 CMML/a CML samples, and in 2 (4.2%) of 48 MDS samples. We did not identify the JAK2V617F disease allele in B-lineage ALL (n = 83), T-cell ALL (n = 93), or CLL (n = 45). These data indicate that the JAK2V617F allele is present in acute and chronic myeloid malignancies but not in lymphoid malignancies. PMID:16081687

  17. Basal ganglia calcification on CT-scanning in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    Calcification occurring in the basal ganglia in children with acute hympocytic leukemia following therapy is uncommon and to the best of our knowledge has not been reported prior to therapy. Eleven cases of bilateral symmetrical calcification in the basal ganglia were noted in 2350 CT scans, two being in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia. In one of the two cases, calcification was present prior to therapy. (orig.)

  18. Gene rearrangement study for minimal residual disease monitoring in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    Juliana Godoy Assumpcao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To detect markers for minimal residual disease monitoring based on conventional polymerase chain reaction for immunoglobulin, T-cell receptor rearrangements and the Sil-Tal1 deletion in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia. METHODS Fifty-nine children with acute lymphocytic leukemia from three institutions in Minas Gerais, Brazil, were prospectively studied. Clonal rearrangements were detected by polymerase chain reaction followed by homo/heteroduplex clonality analysis in DNA samples from diagnostic bone marrow. Follow-up samples were collected on Days 14 and 28-35 of the induction phase. The Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox methods were used for survival analysis. RESULTS Immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor rearrangements were not detected in 5/55 children screened (9.0%. For precursor-B acute lymphocytic leukemia, the most frequent rearrangement was IgH (72.7%, then TCRG (61.4%, and TCRD and IgK (47.7%; for T-acute lymphocytic leukemia, TCRG (80.0%, and TCRD and Sil-Tal deletion (20.0% were the most common. Minimal residual disease was detected in 35% of the cases on Day 14 and in 22.5% on Day 28-35. Minimal residual disease on Day 28-35, T-acute lymphocytic leukemia, and leukocyte count above 50 x 109/L at diagnosis were bad prognostic factors for leukemia-free survival in univariate analysis. Relapse risk for minimal residual disease positive relative to minimal residual disease negative children was 8.5 times higher (95% confidence interval: 1.02-70.7. CONCLUSION Immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor rearrangement frequencies were similar to those reported before. Minimal residual disease is an independent prognostic factor for leukemia-free survival, even when based on a non-quantitative technique, but longer follow-ups are needed.

  19. Glioblastoma multiforme following prophylactic cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate in a child with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    Cases of radiation-induced glioma in humans are extremely rare. A 2-year-old boy with acute lymphocytic leukemia had received prophylactic cranial irradiation (2400 rad/2 1/2 weeks) and intrathecal methotrexate. Five years later he developed a glioblastoma multiforme on the left cerebral hemisphere while the leukemia was in remission. This is the first reported association of these disorders. It is possible that the glioma may have been induced by radiation and/or chemotherapy

  20. PHARMACOKINETICS OF VINCRISTINE IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH ACUTE LYMPHOCYTIC-LEUKEMIA

    CROM, WR; DEGRAAF, SSN; SYNOLD, T; UGES, DRA; BLOEMHOF, H; RIVERA, G; CHRISTENSEN, ML; MAHMOUD, H; EVANS, WE

    1994-01-01

    We studied the pharmacokinetics of vincristine in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia by means of a specific high-performance liquid chromatographic assay with ultraviolet and electrochemical detection and a limited sampling strategy. Our objectives were to characterize the disposition of vincr

  1. Hemorrhagic cerebellar anaplastic glioma appearing 12 years after prophylactic cranial radiotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia

    A radiation-induced cerebellar glioma is extremely rare, and the etiology of such a tumor is unknown. We report a rare case of hemorrhagic cerebellar anaplastic glioma occurring 12 years after prophylactic cranial radiotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia. We discuss the etiologies of the radiation-induced hemorrhagic cerebellar glioma as a secondary malignancy after radiotherapy. (author)

  2. Cranial radiotherapy predisposes to abdominal adiposity in survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    Advances in treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia increased the likelihood of developing late treatment-associated effects, such as abdominal adiposity, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in this population. Cranial radiotherapy is one of the factors that might be involved in this process. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cranial radiotherapy on adiposity indexes in survivors of acute lymphocytic leukemia. A comparative cross-sectional study of 56 acute lymphocytic leukemia survivors, chronological age between 15 and 24 years, assigned into two groups according to the exposure to cranial radiotherapy (25 irradiated and 31 non-irradiated), assessed according to body fat (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), computed tomography scan-derived abdominal adipose tissue, lipid profile, and insulin resistance. Cranial radiotherapy increased body fat and abdominal adipose tissue and altered lipid panel. Yet, lipids showed no clinical relevance so far. There were significantly more obese patients among those who received cranial radiotherapy (52% irradiated versus 22.6% non-irradiated), based on dual energy X-ray absorptiometry body fat measurements. Nonetheless, no association was observed between cranial radiotherapy and body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio or insulin resistance. Adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia showed an increase in body fat and an alteration of fat distribution, which were related to cranial radiotherapy. Fat compartment modifications possibly indicate a disease of adipose tissue, and cranial radiotherapy imports in this process

  3. CRUSTED SCABIES IN A PATIENT WITH ACUTE LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Mamatha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A 17 year s old male patient presented with diffuse, ill defined, hyperpigmented, scaly plaques on the body, for the past 15 days. Lesions were more over the groin and also on both elbows and wrists. Patient is a known case of acute lymphocytic leukaemia, diagnosed a t the age of 13 years and has been on treatment ever since. A KOH ( 10% mount of the scales showed the presence of sarcoptes scabiei and skin biopsy with haematoxylin and eosin showed fragments of mite in the excised skin.

  4. Serological analysis of cell surface antigens of null cell acute lymphocytic leukemia by mouse monoclonal antibodies.

    Ueda, R; Tanimoto, M; Takahashi, T.; Ogata, S; Nishida, K; Namikawa, R.; Nishizuka, Y; Ota, K.

    1982-01-01

    Nine antigens systems were defined. Two were related to HLA-A,B,C and to Ia-like antigens; the others could be grouped into three categories. (i) NL-22, NL-1: NL-22 antibody reacted with leukemia cells from 12 to 16 cases of null cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (null-ALL) but not with any other type of leukemia tested or with lymphoid cells of various origins. Among cultured cell lines tested, one (NALM-6) of three null-ALL cell lines was positive, the others were negative. Absorption analysi...

  5. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  6. miRNA expression profiles in chronic lymphocytic and acute lymphocytic leukemia

    D.L. Zanette

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small endogenous RNAs that play important regulatory roles by targeting mRNAs for cleavage or translational repression. miRNAs act in diverse biological processes including development, cell growth, apoptosis, and hematopoiesis, suggesting their association with cancer. We determined the miRNA expression profile of chronic and acute lymphocytic leukemias (CLL and ALL using the TaqMan® MicroRNA Assays Human Panel (Applied Biosystems. Pooled leukemia samples were compared to pooled CD19+ samples from healthy individuals (calibrator by the 2-DDCt method. Total RNA input was normalized based on the Ct values obtained for hsa-miR-30b. The five most highly expressed miRNAs were miR-128b, miR-204, miR-218, miR-331, and miR-181b-1 in ALL, and miR-331, miR-29a, miR-195, miR-34a, and miR-29c in CLL. To our knowledge, this is the first report associating miR-128b, miR-204 and miR-331 to hematological malignancies. The miR-17-92 cluster was also found to be up-regulated in ALL, as previously reported for some types of lymphomas. The differences observed in gene expression levels were validated for miR-331 and miR-128b in ALL and CD19+ samples. These miRNAs were up-regulated in ALL, in agreement with our initial results. A brief target analysis was performed for miR-331. One of its putative targets, SOCS1, promotes STAT activation, which is a known mediator of cell proliferation and survival, suggesting the possibility of an association between miR-331 and these processes. This initial screening provided information on miRNA differentially expressed in normal and malignant B-cells that could suggest the potential roles of these miRNAs in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis.

  7. Brown sequard syndrome secondary of soft tissue infection in a patient with acute lymphocyte leukemia

    A 42-year-old Latin American female with acute lymphocytic leukemia in second relapse developed a small ecthymic lesion around the entrance site of a left subclavian line. This was followed by development of left-sided hemiparesis with contralateral loss of pain and temperature sensation. CT of the neck revealed a diffuse inflammatory process with soft tissue involvement and several bubbles of air in the anterior paraspinal muscles and within the spinal canal in the epidural location. (orig.)

  8. Executive Function, Coping, and Behavior in Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia*

    Campbell, Laura K.; Scaduto, Mary; Van Slyke, Deborah; Niarhos, Frances; Whitlock, James A.; Compas, Bruce E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine the role of executive function in coping and behavioral outcomes in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) survivors. Methods We examined associations among several domains of executive function (working memory, behavioral inhibition, cognitive flexibility, and self-monitoring), coping, and emotional/behavioral problems in 30 children and adolescents ages 10- to 20-years old who completed treatment for ALL and 30 healthy controls matched on age and sex. Results We fou...

  9. Mitochondrial DNA alterations of peripheral lymphocytes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients undergoing total body irradiation therapy

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations, including mtDNA copy number and mtDNA 4977 bp common deletion (CD), are key indicators of irradiation-induced damage. The relationship between total body irradiation (TBI) treatment and mtDNA alterations in vivo, however, has not been postulated yet. The aim of this study is to analyze mtDNA alterations in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients as well as to take them as predictors for radiatio...

  10. A rare case of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL presenting with double Philadelphia chromosome: relapse or secondary leukemia?

    Mireille Guimarães Vaz de Campos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Philadelphia chromosome is observed in 5% of pediatric acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL and in 25% to 50% of adult ALL cases, and is associated with poor prognosis. Double Ph in a hyperdiploid karyotype is common in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, but rarely found in ALL. We report here the case of a girl diagnosed with ALL at 7 years of age. After treatment with the pediatric protocol BFM 83 for ALL, she stayed in continuous complete remission for nine years. At age 19, she was re-admitted with a white blood cell count of 6.8 x 10(9/L with 3% blasts, and a platelet count of 65 x 109/L. Bone marrow aspirate showed 92.6% lymphoid blast cells, and chromosome analysis after G-banding revealed the karyotype 51,XX,+?5,t(9;22(q34.1;q11.2,+16,+20,+21,+der(22t(9;22(q34.1;q11.2 [10]/46,XX[1]. FISH analysis for the BCR/ABL fusion showed 56% of interphase cells with two fusion signals, 30% with one, and 6% with three. Double Ph is rare in relapsed leukemia, and the possibility of secondary leukemia cannot be ruled out.

  11. EVALUATION OF SURFACE MARKERS IN CHILDHOOD ACUTE LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA BEFORE AND AFTER THERAPY

    A.Massoud

    1980-10-01

    Full Text Available In our study of surface markers of Iranian children affected by acute lymphocytic leukemia, the majority(80 %had non-T, non-B, or null cell leukemia. The null- cell l e ukemia had a better p r ogno s l s as was conf irmed by o t h ers. Twe l v e of our patie nts who had null cell l e ukem i a are a live and well 18 mont hs to 20 mont hs a f t e r initiat i on of the r a py. Three of t he patients who had l e s s than 27' null c e l l s in t he i nitial study died i n a pe r i od o f less than o ne year after d i agnosis. Af t e r therapy while on remission , there was a decrease i n the percentage o f nu l l c e l ls ( i n nul l c e l l l e ukemi a a nd an i ncre ase i n t h e p e r centage of T a nd B lymphocyt e s i n the pe r i phe r a l b lood which approachta o n the a ge and sex-matched norma l control s ubjects .

  12. Meningosis prophylaxis with intrathecal /sup 198/Au-colloid and methotrexate in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    Since 1972, telecobalt irradiation plus intrathecal methotrexate (ITMTX) has been successfully replaced in Jena by intrathecal colloidal radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) plus ITMTX for meningosis prophylaxis in leukemia. Seventy-three children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) were given 1.24-4.89 mCi (45.8-181 MBq) of colloidal 198Au IT after successful initiation of remission. During cytostatic therapy, the following relapses occurred: meningosis leucaemica, five patients (6.8%); bone-marrow relapse and the meningosis leucaemica, one patient; and bone-marrow relapse, 20 patients (27.4%). In 18 children, combination chemotherapy was terminated after two and a half or three years of treatment. After that time, one meningeal relapse and six bone-marrow relapses occurred. Within the first 24 hours after application of radioactive gold, headaches, vomiting, and fever occurred in less than 10% of the children. An apathy syndrome, leukecephalopathy, or severe infections, were not observed in a single case. Radioactive gold spreads in the subarachnoid space and is phagocytized by the arachnoidea. The tumoricide effect extends selectively over the space of distribution of the latent meningosis leucaemia. The cerebral parenchyma remains unaffected by radiation. Thus, radioactive gold may be preferable to telecobalt irradiation in preventing central nervous system leukemia

  13. The JAK2V617F activating mutation occurs in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, but not in acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Levine, Ross L; Loriaux, Marc; Huntly, Brian J.P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Beran, Miroslav; Stoffregen, Eric; Berger, Roland; Clark, Jennifer J; Willis, Stephanie G; Kim T. Nguyen; Flores, Nikki J.; Estey, Elihu; Gattermann, Norbert; Armstrong, Scott; Look, A. Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Activating mutations in tyrosine kinases have been identified in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic malignancies. Recently, we and others identified a single recurrent somatic activating mutation (JAK2V617F) in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) tyrosine kinase in the myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myeloid metaplasia with myelofibrosis. We used direct sequence analysis to determine if the JAK2V617F mutation was present in acute myeloid leukemia (A...

  14. Mitochondrial DNA alterations of peripheral lymphocytes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients undergoing total body irradiation therapy

    Ji Fuyun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA alterations, including mtDNA copy number and mtDNA 4977 bp common deletion (CD, are key indicators of irradiation-induced damage. The relationship between total body irradiation (TBI treatment and mtDNA alterations in vivo, however, has not been postulated yet. The aim of this study is to analyze mtDNA alterations in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients as well as to take them as predictors for radiation toxicity. Methods Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated from 26 ALL patients 24 hours after TBI preconditioning (4.5 and 9 Gy, respectively. Extracted DNA was analyzed by real-time PCR method. Results Average 2.31 times mtDNA and 0.53 fold CD levels were observed after 4.5 Gy exposure compared to their basal levels. 9 Gy TBI produced a greater response of both mtDNA and CD levels than 4.5 Gy. Significant inverse correlation was found between mtDNA content and CD level at 4.5 and 9 Gy (P = 0.037 and 0.048. Moreover, mtDNA content of lymphocytes without irradiation was found to be correlated to age. Conclusions mtDNA and CD content may be considered as predictive factors to radiation toxicity.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA alterations of peripheral lymphocytes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients undergoing total body irradiation therapy

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations, including mtDNA copy number and mtDNA 4977 bp common deletion (CD), are key indicators of irradiation-induced damage. The relationship between total body irradiation (TBI) treatment and mtDNA alterations in vivo, however, has not been postulated yet. The aim of this study is to analyze mtDNA alterations in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients as well as to take them as predictors for radiation toxicity. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated from 26 ALL patients 24 hours after TBI preconditioning (4.5 and 9 Gy, respectively). Extracted DNA was analyzed by real-time PCR method. Average 2.31 times mtDNA and 0.53 fold CD levels were observed after 4.5 Gy exposure compared to their basal levels. 9 Gy TBI produced a greater response of both mtDNA and CD levels than 4.5 Gy. Significant inverse correlation was found between mtDNA content and CD level at 4.5 and 9 Gy (P = 0.037 and 0.048). Moreover, mtDNA content of lymphocytes without irradiation was found to be correlated to age. mtDNA and CD content may be considered as predictive factors to radiation toxicity

  16. CONTENTS OF LYMPHOCYTE SUB-POPULATIONS IN THE CHILDREN WITH ACUTE LEUKEMIA AND LYMPHOMAS DEPENDENT ON INFECTIOUS COMPLICATION AND NEUTROPENIA

    M. V. Peshikova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the contents of some lymphocyte sub-populations in peripheral blood of the children with tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues, depending on infectious complication of cytostatic therapy and neutropenia. In all children undergoing cytostatic therapy for acute lympho-blastic leukemia and non-B cell non-Hodgkinґs lymphomas, we found significant decrease in the numbers of CD95 lymphocytes, absolute amounts of natural killer cells (CD16, CD56-lymphocytes and activated lymphocytes (СD11b, HLA-DR-cells, irrespective of neutrophile numbers in their blood and infectious complications. However, absolute number of CD25- lymphocytes was significantly decreased in the children with neutropenia. Relative contents of CD16, CD56, СD11b, HLA-DR, CD25-lymphocytes did not significantly differ from those in healthy children, or they were found to be significantly increased.

  17. CONTENTS OF LYMPHOCYTE SUB-POPULATIONS IN THE CHILDREN WITH ACUTE LEUKEMIA AND LYMPHOMAS DEPENDENT ON INFECTIOUS COMPLICATION AND NEUTROPENIA

    M. V. Peshikova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the contents of some lymphocyte sub-populations in peripheral blood of the children with tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues, depending on infectious complication of cytostatic therapy and neutropenia. In all children undergoing cytostatic therapy for acute lympho-blastic leukemia and non-B cell non-Hodgkinґs lymphomas, we found significant decrease in the numbers of CD95 lymphocytes, absolute amounts of natural killer cells (CD16, CD56-lymphocytes and activated lymphocytes (СD11b, HLA-DR-cells, irrespective of neutrophile numbers in their blood and infectious complications. However, absolute number of CD25- lymphocytes was significantly decreased in the children with neutropenia. Relative contents of CD16, CD56, СD11b, HLA-DR, CD25-lymphocytes did not significantly differ from those in healthy children, or they were found to be significantly increased.

  18. Graft-versus-leukemia effects associated with detectable Wilms tumor-1–specific T lymphocytes after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Rezvani, Katayoun; Yong, Agnes S.M.; Savani, Bipin N.; Mielke, Stephan; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Douek, Daniel C.; Barrett, A. John

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether the leukemia-associated Wilms tumor antigen (WT1) contributes to a graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (SCT) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), we studied CD8+ T-cell responses to WT1 in 10 human lymphocyte antigen (HLA)–A*0201–positive ALL patients during the early phase of immune recovery after SCT (days 30-120). Seven of 10 patients had detectable WT1 expression in their peripheral blood (PB) before SCT by quantitative rev...

  19. The development of cerebral CT changes during treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia in childhood

    Twenty-three children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) were examined with cranial CT at least twice with a minimal interval of 10 months. The first CT was performed at the time of diagnosis in 11 children and during therapy in 12; all but two were normal on the first CT examination. These two had slight enlargement of the ventricular system and subarachnoid space at the time of diagnosis. These findings were unchanged on the second CT examinations. Seven patients, all in remission from leukemia of the central nervous system manifested abnormal findings on later CTs. Low density areas in the periventricular white matter were seen in the brains of three, with increasing subcortical calcification in one of these cases. Five children had slight enlargement of the ventricular system and subarachnoid space, especially of the basal and Sylvian cisterns. Later CT examinations in five, plus brain autopsy in two cases, revealed unchanged or progressive conditions. The CT findings have been related to the treatment and some characteristics of the disease. The frequency of CT abnormalities was higher in patients who had received therapeutic irradiation and intraventricular methotrexate treatment. The possible reasons for the CT abnormalities are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Stages of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  1. VARIATIONS OF THE LEUKOCYTES AND LYMPHOCYTES IN THE CASE OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Mirela Cozma

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to approximate the surviving period in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. For this study we took in to consideration 10 patients 0 to 20 years old, coming from rural or urban environments and their evolution has been studied for a period of 60 days from the primary presentation to the hospital. The diagnosis was made after a careful history and physical examination and was completed after a blood count insisting on the number of leukocytes and on the peripheral blood smear. The patients’ evolution was monitored through the hematological parameters of the peripheral blood smear and of the bone marrow. The main Para clinical investigations consisted in the white cells and lymphocytes count from the peripheral blood smear. We counted the absolute and relative number of lymphocytes from the peripheral blood smear of these patients and then we divided them into three groups by criteria of age. We took into consideration at every age group the causes of the primary presentation to the hospital.

  2. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    ... Topic Normal bone marrow, blood, and lymphoid tissue What is chronic lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... body, including the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  3. Higher frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after in vitro gamma irradiation

    A Ramyar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in childhood, characterized by excess lymphoblasts, and immature white blood cells that are continuously multiplying and overproducing in the bone marrow. The aim of this investigation was to measure the sensitivity of lymphocytes against gamma irradiation in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and also find out the effect of such irradiations in causing chromosomal abnormalities.Methods: In this investigation performed between April 2010 and July 2011, at the Department of Genetics, Cancer Institute of Iran, we studied the effects of gamma irradiation on the lymphocytes of 20 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The lymphocytes of 30 healthy donors were used to establish as a normal response to gamma irradiation and seven age-matched ataxia telangiectasia patients were recruited as positive control. The chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed with the G2- and the G0-assay. We compared the mean number of chromosomal abnormalities such as chromosome and chromatid breakages, chromosome and chromatid gaps, and chromatid exchanges in one-hundred metaphases of patients and control groups.Results: The frequency of chromosomal aberrations was statistically higher among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia than the normal controls (P<0.01. In total, 65% of the patients were sensitive to gamma irradiation, but the remaining 35% were similar to the normal controls. Patients with ataxia telangiectasia showed the highest sensitivity to gamma irradiation (P=0.001.Conclusion: Our results showed that a high percentage of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were sensitive to irradiation, meaning that maximum care should be taken during their treatment to avoid unnecessary X-rays or radiotherapies.

  4. Dicer Gene Expression as a Prognostic Factor in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in Fars Province

    Farzaneh, Mohamad Reza; Shahryari, Jahanbanoo; Safaei, Akbar; Valibeigi, Behnaz; Davani, Shahrbanou Karimi; Tabibi, Narjes

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Dicer is one of the main regulators of miRNA biogenesis, and deregulation of its expression has been indicated as a possible cause of miRNA alterations observed in various cancers. Our aim was to analyze the expression of the Dicer protein and its relationship with ALL and CLL. This cross-sectional study was performed from 2010 to 2012 in Shahid Faghihi Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. In this study, 30 patients with CLL, 21 patients with ALL, 10 child healthy donors, and 19 adult healthy donors were recruited. The patients’ samples were checked via flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and immunocytochemistry. The controls’ samples were also examined in the hematology ward. Total RNA was extracted from the bone marrow and peripheral blood samples of the patients and controls. Then, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to estimate the level of Dicer miRNA. The outcomes of the expression analysis of Dicer revealed statistically significant differences between the ALL patients/child healthy controls (mean±SD, 0.19±0.28 vs. 0.73±0.12; P<0.001) and the CLL patients/adult healthy controls (mean±SD, 0.24±0.25 vs. 0.41±0.28; P=0.033). This is the first piece of evidence showing that the expression of the Dicer gene greatly decreased in the patients with ALL in comparison to the child controls. The expression of the Dicer gene was also downregulated in the patients with CLL compared to the adult controls. Given the above findings, the expression of Dicer may play an important role in the progression and prognosis of these diseases.

  5. A comparative study of central nervous system irradiation and intensive chemotherapy early in remission of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    A study was designed to determine whether a one-week course of intensive chemotherapy and 2400 rads craniospinal irradiation prolonged complete remission of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in children. Of 110 patients entered into the study, 104 (94%) attained complete remission, 94 of whom were available for the 2 randomizations. They were randomly assigned to receive or not receive one week of high-dosage intravenous chemotherapy and, 4 weeks later, were again randomized to receive or not receive 2400 rads cobalt-60 craniospinal irradiation. Patients randomized for no irradiation were to receive identical radiotherapy only if and when central nervous system (CNS) leukemia developed. The one week of intensive chemotherapy had no effect on the duration of remission or on the frequency or site of relapse, but irradiation had marked effect. Complete remission was terminated by CNS leukemia in only 2 of 45 children who received ''prophylactic'' craniospinal irradiation compared to 27 to 49 not irradiated. FIve of the 25 children who were given ''therapeutic'' irradiation for demonstrated CNS leukemia have already had recurrences despite continuous hematologic remission. Under the conditions of this study, the authors conclude that one week of intensive chemotherapy does not prolong remission, that 2400 rads craniospinal irradiation early in remission prevents or delays CNS leukemia and prolongs complete remission, and that once CNS leukemia develops, 2400 rads craniospinal irradiation is not sufficient to eradicate it

  6. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    2016-07-18

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  7. Decrease in cerebral metabolic rate of glucose after high-dose methotrexate in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    We measured changes in the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRGlu) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and positron emission tomography for the assessment of neurotoxicity in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia treated with high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) therapy. We studied 8 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (mean age: 9.6 years) treated with HD-MTX (200 mg/kg or 2,000 mg/M2) therapy. CMRGlu after HD-MTX therapy was most reduced (40%) in the patient who had central nervous system leukemia and was treated with the largest total doses of both intrathecal MTX (IT-MTX) and HD-MTX. CMRGlu in the whole brain after HD-MTX therapy was reduced by an average of 21% (P less than 0.05). The reductions of CMRGlu in 8 patients were correlated with total doses of both IT-MTX (r = 0.717; P less than 0.05) and systemic HD-MTX (r = 0.784; P less than 0.05). CMRGlu of the cerebral cortex, especially the frontal and occipital cortex, was reduced more noticeably than that of the basal ganglia and white matter. We suggest that the measurement of changes in rCMRGlu after HD-MTX therapy is useful for detecting accumulated MTX neurotoxicity

  8. Concanavalin A receptors on the surface membrane of lymphocytes from patients with acute leukemia.

    Ben-Bassat, H; Anor, E; Penchas, S; Shlomai, Z; Prokocimer, M; Or, R; Polliack, A

    1984-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) isolated from 23 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 24 with acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL) were studied for binding and mobility of Concanavalin A (Con A) receptors, using fluorescent Con A (F-Con-A). The cap forming ability of PBM from all patients was 18.7 (+/- 9.3%) and 18.9 (+/- 9.9%) for ANLL patients at the time of diagnosis or during relapse. During clinical complete remission the cap forming ability of the PBM did not change significantly. No correlation was observed between the percentage of blasts present in the peripheral blood at the time of examination and the extent of cap formation, for both types of leukemia. The pattern of F-Con-A binding to PBM in ANLL patients was different compared to that seen in ALL. In ANLL, the fluorescent stain was concentrated in a round body on the cell ("button form") after binding to the membrane, while the rest of the cell showed almost no fluorescence. The present results indicate that PBM cells from patients with acute leukemia are characterized by a high degree of Con-A receptor mobility. PMID:6471903

  9. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    2016-04-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Forced Expression of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6 Confers Resistance of Pro-B Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia to Gleevec Treatment▿ †

    Kuo, Tracy C.; Chavarria-Smith, Joseph E.; Huang, Dan; Schlissel, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    The gene encoding c-ABL, a nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase, is involved in a chromosomal translocation resulting in expression of a BCR-Abl fusion protein that causes most chronic myelogenous and some acute lymphocytic leukemias (CML and ALL) in humans. The Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) expresses an alternative form of c-Abl, v-Abl, that transforms murine pro-B cells, resulting in acute leukemia and providing an experimental model for human disease. Gleevec (STI571) inhibits the ...

  11. Kinetics of indium-111-labeled leukemic cells in patients with acute non-lymphocytic leukemia

    The kinetics of autologous leukemic cells labeled with In-111 oxine were studied in 5 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and one patient with acute premyelocytic leukemia (APL), and kinetics of OKM1 monoclonal antibody-treated leukemic cells were studied in one patient with acute monoblastic leukemia (AMoL). Recoveries of 33.7 +- 23.3%(range, 22.0 to 48.1%) were achieved at 10min after injection of In-111 oxine labeled leukemic cells in AML and APL patients. However, in a patient with AMoL recovery of 12.3% was only achieved at 10min after injection of OKM1-treated leukemic cells. Clearance of the activity from blood was rapid up to one in all patients. The clearance curve of the activity in 5 AML patients showed a hump or a plateau from one to 5hr after injection of labeled leukemic cells. In APL patient and AMoL patient, however, this hump or plateau was not noted. In AML and APL patients the activity over the spleen was higher than that of over the liver at from 30min to 3hr after and showed a plateau or gradual rising thereafter. In a patient with AMoL, the hepatic activity was higher than the splenic activity at 30min after, but thereafter the latter became higher than the former. Liver activity curves showed transient fall at 3hr after and then gradual uprising in all patients. In a patient with APL, high activity was noted over the kidneys. This rose to a maximum after 3hr and then decreased rapidly. Since In-111 oxine stays firmly attached to the cells in spite of the possibility of radiation damage in a long-term survey, it seems an ideal label for studying leukemic cell kinetics

  12. VARIATIONS OF THE LEUKOCYTES AND LYMPHOCYTES IN THE CASE OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Mirela Cozma; Marioara Nicoleta Filimon

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to approximate the surviving period in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. For this study we took in to consideration 10 patients 0 to 20 years old, coming from rural or urban environments and their evolution has been studied for a period of 60 days from the primary presentation to the hospital. The diagnosis was made after a careful history and physical examination and was completed after a blood count insisting on the number of leukocytes and on the peri...

  13. Computed tomographic diagnosis of methotrexate leukoencephalopathy, developed in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    The difference of Hounsfield units between the white and gray matter are highly reliable indexes for the numerical analysis of infant cranial CT. These indexes were evaluated in 239 healthy children at ages ranging from 1 to 15 years. CT findings of white matter changes due to methotrexate were evaluated numerically in 80 children with acute lymphatic leukemia. This analysis resulted in detection of transient, or preclinical, slight pathological changes in the white matter. This method was also considered to give objectivity to evaluation of the changes in CT. (Ueda, J.)

  14. Identification and cloning of a prethymic precursor T lymphocyte from a population of common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA)-positive fetal bone marrow cells

    Hokland, P; Hokland, M; Daley, J;

    1987-01-01

    of T4 and T8 antigens and at the same time expression of the thymocyte-associated T6 antigens. Thus, given the fact that 10-20% of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALLs) are CALLA+, we have been able to identify a human prethymic T lymphocyte population that might be the normal counterpart of...

  15. Radiation-induced intracranial osteosarcoma after radiation for acute lymphocytic leukemia associated with Li-Fraumeni syndrome

    A 28-year-old man presented with osteosarcoma of the occipital bone 16 years after 24 Gy of craniospinal irradiation for acute lymphocytic leukemia. The tumor had both intra- and extra-cranial components. However, the affected skull appeared to be normal on imaging because of permeative infiltration by the tumor. Subtotal resection was achieved and the tumor was verified histologically as an osteosarcoma. The residual tumor soon showed remarkable enlargement and disseminated to the spinal cord. Both of the enlarged and disseminated tumor masses were treated by surgical intervention and chemotherapy. However, the patient deteriorated due to the tumor regrowth and died 11 months after the initial diagnosis. This patient had previously developed a leukemia, a colon cancer, a rectal cancer and a hepatocellular carcinoma. His brother also died of leukemia. The patient had a heterozygous TP53 germ-line mutation of codon 248 in the exon 7. In conclusion, we consider the present tumor to be a rare example of radiation-induced skull osteosarcoma in a member of the cancer-prone family with TP53 germ-line mutation which is associated with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. (author)

  16. Minimal contribution of severe hypertriglyceridemia in L-asparaginase-associated pancreatitis developed in a child with acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    Goto, Yoshinori; Nishimura, Ryosei; Nohara, Atsushi; Mase, Shintaro; Fujiki, Toshihiro; Irabu, Hitoshi; Kuroda, Rie; Araki, Raita; Ikawa, Yasuhiro; Maeba, Hideaki; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-08-01

    A 10-year-old girl developed L-asparaginase (ASP)-associated pancreatitis during chemotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia. Her symptoms showed alleviation with continuous regional arterial infusion of protease inhibitor and systemic somatostatin analog therapy. She had intermittent and marked hypertriglyceridemia, an initial trigger for pancreatitis, probably as a side effect of ASP and steroids. However, we considered the pancreatitis to have developed mainly because of factors other than hypertriglyceridemia as lipoprotein analysis confirmed chylomicron levels to be nearly undetectable. Extremely large chylomicrons contribute directly to the onset of pancreatitis by causing blockage of small vessels. Although it is necessary to examine patients for dyslipidemia developing as a side effect of ASP, therapeutic intervention for hypertriglyceridemia is not considered to prevent the onset of ASP-associated pancreatitis. PMID:27599414

  17. [Chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    Aoki, Sadao

    2016-03-01

    Currently, several novel drugs are available for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in Western countries. Of these drugs, those that inhibit the B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway are the most promising. Ibrutinib inhibits BTK in the BCR pathway and can be administered orally. The results of several clinical trials suggest that ibrutinib is highly effective against relapsed/resistant (RR) and treatment-naïve CLL. Furthermore, ibrutinib shows equivalent efficacy on CLL with the 17p deletion. Idelalisib, which also blocks the BCR pathway, inhibits PIK3delta and induces CLL cell death. Clinical trials have shown outstanding efficacy of idelalisib against RR-CLL, especially when administered with antiCD20 antibodies. This drug is also effective against CLL with the 17p deletion. ABT-199 is another novel drug; it inhibits BCL2 signaling, not the BCR pathway, and can be administered orally. The efficacy of ABT-199 against RR-CLL has been demonstrated in a number of clinical trials. These drugs have only mild toxicity and can be used for patients in poor general condition. Unfortunately, none of these drugs have yet been approved in Japan. Rapid resolution of the 'drug lag' problem is necessary. PMID:27076234

  18. Biological and clinical meaning of myeloid antigen expression in the acute lymphocytic leukemia in children

    In 238 children presenting with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) authors studied the possible association between the myeloid antigens expression with determined biologic and clinic features at disease onset. The cellular immunophenotyping was performed by ultraimmunocytochemical method. From the total of diagnosed ALLs, the 21,8% were LLA-Mi+. There was a lymphadenopathies predominance (71,2%), splenomegaly (65,4%) and hepatomegaly (57,7%) in patients with LLA-Mi+ and very significant differences (p =0,003, p = 0,0068, and p = 0,000, respectively. There was also alight predominance of mediastinum adenopathies, CNS infiltration and hemorrahagic manifestations in patients with LLA-Mi+, no statistically significant. Results showed that in our patients the myeloid antigen expression on the lymphoid blasts influenced on appearance of determined presentation of morphologic and clinical features in children

  19. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  20. Cyclophosphamide, Alvocidib, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With High Risk B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    2015-11-10

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  1. Treatment Options by Stage (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  3. Deficiency of complement factor MBL in a patient required cardiac surgery after an acute myocardial infarction with underlining chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Lai, Lawrence T.; Lee, Daniel C.; Ko, Wilson; Shevde, Ketan; Zhang, Ming

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Mannan-binding lectin (MBL), the initial factor of the lectin pathway of complement, plays a role in cardiovascular diseases, i.e. inversely associated with risk of myocardial infarction (MI). In the present case, a patient with MBL deficiency underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) after an acute MI with underlining chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Post-operatively, the patient had a cerebral vascular accident and eventually expired. Analysis of ...

  4. Defining Molecular Phenotypes of Mesenchymal and hematopoietic Stem Cells derived from Peripheral blood of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia patients for regenerative stem cell therapy

    Pravin D. Potdar; Rambhadur P Subedi

    2011-01-01

    Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) is a clonal myeloid disorder affecting all age groups, characterized by accumulation of immature blast cells in bone marrow and in peripheral blood. Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation is a present treatment for cure of ALL patients, which is very expensive, invasive process and may have possibility of transplantation of malignant stem cells to patients. In the present study, we hypothesized to isolate large number of normal Mesenchymal & Hematopoietic stem...

  5. Southwest Oncology Group Study S0530: A Phase 2 Trial of Clofarabine and Cytarabine for Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Advani, Anjali S; Gundacker, Holly M.; Sala-Torra, Olga; Radich, Jerald P.; Lai, Raymond; Slovak, Marilyn L.; Lancet, Jeffrey E.; Coutre, Steve E.; Stuart, Robert K.; Mims, Martha P.; Stiff, Patrick J.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2010-01-01

    Clofarabine and cytarabine target different steps in DNA synthesis and replication, are synergistic in vivo, and have non-overlapping toxicities making this combination a potentially promising treatment for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Study goals were to: (1) evaluate the complete remission (CR) rate with Clo/Cy in patients with relapsed/refractory ALL; and (2) assess expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and nucleoside transporters in leukemic blasts. Associated with poo...

  6. Prognostic Significance of Lymphoid Enhancer-Binding Factor-1 Expression in Egyptian Adult B-Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients

    Aly, Rabab M.; Ansaf B. Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Lymphoid enhancer-binding factor-1 (LEF-1) is a key transcription factor of wingless-type (Wnt) signaling in various tumors and it is associated with a number of malignant diseases such as leukemia. We explored the expression profile of LEF-1 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and determined its specific prognostic significance in this disease. Materials and Methods: We studied LEF-1 expression in 56 newly diagnosed B-acute ALL adult patients using real-time quantitative polymer...

  7. A study of cranial computed tomography scan in acute lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in children

    A serial follow-up of cranial computed tomography (CT) scan was performed in total of 55 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in order to elucidate the early and late influences of the chemoradiotherapy to the cerebrum. Scoring system was applied in evaluation of the cerebral surface changes, namely atropy, counting 0 to 2 points for the widening of extracerebral space, surface sulici, Sylvian fissure, and rounding of the gyri respectively. Lateral vetricular measurement was also performed at the level of basal ganglia, calculating the anterior horn width/maximum cerebral width (C/B), and bicaudate width/maximum cerebral width (D/B). All the patients except for 3 in the remission (CR) group, and for 1 in the relapsed group (REL) had been treated with cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate as a prophylaxis of central nervous system leukemia. Analysis of CR patients showed mild to moderate degree of cerebral atropy early at the preprophylactic stage, with mean surface score of 3, C/B of 26.5 %, and D/B of 12.7 %. The main factor for this change may well be corticosteroid used at the time of initial remission induction. Serial follow-up of CT revealed that these changes improved even after the cranial irradiation phase in most cases. In the period from 12 to 36 months after diagnosis, 28 % of CR patient showed atrophic changes, and 13.3 % from 36 to 60 months, and 16.6 % from 60 months or later. No remarkable alterations were observed after the first 12 months in individual cases, indicating that the major changes in CT findings in these patient occur in quite early phase of the therapy, and persist with various degree of improvements during the long course of chemotherapy. In the relapsed group of patients, the atrophic changes of the cranial CT progressed as they repeated the relapse, either of marrow or CNS, including 5 cases of leukoencephalopathy. (author)

  8. Pharmacokinetics of dasatinib for Philadelphia-positive acute lymphocytic leukemia with acquired T315I mutation

    Takahashi Naoto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The BCR-ABL T315I kinase domain mutation is insensitive to dasatinib therapy for Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoid leukemia (Ph + ALL patients. Resistant T315I clone may be present prior to initiating dasatinib, which could expand under selective pressures during treatment. However, it is also possible that Ph + ALL patients newly acquire the T315I mutation during dasatinib therapy. Despite the potent inhibition of BCR-ABL kinase by dasatinib, little is known about the relationship between dasatinib pharmacokinetics and the emergence of kinase domain mutations in vivo. Methods To determine whether plasma dasatinib pharmacokinetics influences the emergence of BCR-ABL mutations, we measured plasma dasatinib levels in 11 Ph + ALL patients undergoing dasatinib monotherapy. Results Bone marrow relapse occurred in 5 of the 11 Ph + ALL patients (45%. Importantly, a T315I mutation was detected in 4 of the 5 relapsed patients, despite the absence of BCR-ABL mutations in any patient at baseline. The median plasma concentration at 2 hours (C2h, the median plasma maximum concentration (Cmax, and the median area under the observed plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 4 hours (AUC0-4 were all significantly lower in patients with T315I than those without the mutation (C2h, 22.3 ng/mL vs. 111.6 ng/mL, P = 0.0242; Cmax, 43.8 ng/mL vs. 112.4 ng/mL, P = 0.0242; AUC0-4, 108.3 ng·h/mL vs. 268.3 ng·h/mL, P = 0.0061, respectively. Conclusions These data indicate that the emergence of the T315I mutation among Ph + ALL patients treated with dasatinib is, in part, dependent on plasma dasatinib pharmacokinetics. Notably, these data also suggest that newly acquired BCR-ABL mutations may be inhibited by an increased exposure of dasatinib.

  9. Absolute lymphocyte count at the end of induction therapy is a prognostic factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Hirase, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Takahashi, Hironobu; Moriwaki, Kensuke; Saito, Atsuro; Kozaki, Aiko; Ishida, Toshiaki; Yanai, Tomoko; Kawasaki, Keiichiro; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Kubokawa, Ikuko; Mori, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Akira; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Nishio, Hisahide; Iijima, Kazumoto; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have reported that the absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) during induction therapy is predictive of treatment outcome in de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL); however, the significance of ALC on outcomes remains controversial. In the present study, we assessed the significance of ALC at day 29 (ALC-29), the end of induction therapy, on outcomes in our Japanese cohort. The outcomes of 141 patients aged ≤18 years with newly diagnosed ALL who were enrolled on the JACLS ALL-02 at our hospitals were analyzed in terms of ALC-29. Patients with ALC-29 ≥750/μL (n = 81) had a superior 5-year EFS (95.2 ± 2.7 vs 84.3 ± 4.8 %, P = 0.016) and OS (100 vs 87.0 ± 4.7 %, P = 0.0062). A multivariate analysis identified ALC-29 ≥750/μL as a significant predictor of improved EFS and OS after controlling for confounding factors. A multiple linear regression model revealed a significant inverse relationship between the percentage of blasts in bone marrow on day 15 and ALC-29 (P = 0.005). These results indicate that ALC is a simple prognostic factor in childhood ALL, and, thus, has the potential to refine current risk algorithms. PMID:26440971

  10. Chromosome abnormalities induced by anticancer drugs and radiation in cultured lymphocytes of children with acute leukemia in complete remission

    In an attempt to evaluate possible secondary carcinogenic and genetic effects of intensive chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the types and frequencies of chromosome abnormalities were investigated in cultured lymphocytes from 15 children with acute leukemia who had achieved therapeutically a complete remission. The controls were 14 healthy adults (group A). Of the 15 leukemic children, 12 had received only chemotherapy (group B), while the remaining 3 had received both chemotherapy and radiotherapy of central nervous system (group C). In addition, 2 brain tumor patients who had received cranial radiotherapy were studied (group D). A significantly higher incidence of chromosome abnormalities was observed in group B, C and D, as than in group A. The incidence of aberration was highest in group C, which was ascribed to the increased number of hypodiploid cells with chromosome-type structural rearrangements, probably due to the radiotherapy. In contrast, the chromosome aberrations shown in group B were mostly of chromatid type, though chromosome-type aberrations were also noted in some cases of this group. Comparing the aberration rates of groups C and D, it was suggested that cranial irradiation is less hazardous than spino-cranial irradiation. (J.P.N.)

  11. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    Ye Zixing; Wang Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To highlight the current understanding of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).Data sources We collected the relevant articles in PubMed (from 1985 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia","hybrid acute leukemia","biphenotypic acute leukemia",and "mixed lineage leukemia".We also collected the relevant studies in WanFang Data base (from 2000 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia" and "hybrid acute leukemia".Study selection We included all relevant studies concerning mixed phenotype acute leukemia in English and Chinese version,with no limitation of research design.The duplicated articles are excluded.Results MPAL is a rare subgroup of acute leukemia which expresses the myeloid and lymphoid markers simultaneously.The clinical manifestations of MPAL are similar to other acute leukemias.The World Health Organization classification and the European Group for Immunological classification of Leukaemias 1998 cdteria are most widely used.MPAL does not have a standard therapy regimen.Its treatment depends mostly on the patient's unique immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features,and also the experience of individual physician.The lack of effective treatment contributes to an undesirable prognosis.Conclusion Our understanding about MPAL is still limited.The diagnostic criteria have not been unified.The treatment of MPAL remains to be investigated.The prognostic factor is largely unclear yet.A better diagnostic cdteria and targeted therapeutics will improve the therapy effect and a subsequently better prognosis.

  12. Acute childhood leukemia: Nursing care

    Modern therapy for childhood acute leukemia has provided a dramatically improved prognosis over that of just 30 years ago. In the early 1960's survival rates for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were 4% and 3%, respectively. By the 1980's survival rates had risen to 72% for all and 25% to 40% for AML. Today, a diagnosis of all carries an 80% survival rate and as high as a 90% survival rate for some low-risk subtypes. Such high cure rates depend on intense and complex, multimodal therapeutic protocols. Therefore, nursing care of the child with acute leukemia must meet the demands of complicated medical therapies and balance those with the needs of a sick child and their concerned family. An understanding of disease process and principles of medical management guide appropriate and effective nursing interventions. Leukemia is a malignant disorder of the blood and blood- forming organs (bone marrow, lymph nodes and spleen). Most believe that acute leukemia results from a malignant transformation of a single early haematopoietic stem cell that is capable of indefinite self-renewal. These immature cells of blasts do not respond to normal physiologic stimuli for differentiation and gradually become the predominant cell in the bone marrow

  13. Cranial computer assisted tomography and electroencephalography in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia : a longitudinal study : Computertomografie van de schedel en electroencephalografisch onderzoek bij kinderen met een acute lymfatische leukemie. Een longitudinale studie

    K. Hählen (Karel)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThis longitudinal study was initiated in order to examine the nature and sequence of structural and functional cerebral abnormalities in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). For this purpose computer assisted tomography scans of the brain ( CT scans ) and electroencephalograms

  14. Testicular relapse of acute lymphocytic leukemia: Usefulness of color and power Doppler sonography

    To evaluate the usefulness of color and power Doppler sonography in detecting testicular relapse of leukemia. Both gray- scale and color (power) Doppler ultrasound (US) were performed in seven patients. Two additional patients examined by gray-scale US only were included. The patients were 4-14 years old (mean age, 9 years). Ten tests were confirmed to have leukemic relapse, eight by pathology and two by clinical evidence. Gray-scale US showed variable findings: heterogeneous hypoechogenicity (5) and homogeneous isoechogenicity (5). In all seven patients (8 tests) who underwent both color and power Doppler US, diffuse and marked hypervascularity was demonstrated. One case showed enlarged epididymis with heterogeneous echogenicity, which was the same character as the involved testis. Color and power Doppler US are useful methods in the identification of the testicular relapse of leukemia by demonstrating diffuse, marked hypervascularity in the proper clinical settings.

  15. Expression of MDM2 in an acute lymphocytic leukemia mice model induced by γ-radiation

    Objective: To investigate the role of the MDM2 in the process of carcinogenesis induced by γ-rays and its molecular mechanisms. Methods: Animal model of radiation-induced leukemia was established by γ-irradiation. According to the histological and morphological results, mice tissues were divided into three groups: cancerization group, incancerization group and control group. Expression of MDM2 protein and mRNA in thymus/bone marrow was detected with Western blot and in situ hybridization (ISH), respectively. The authors also examined the protein phosphorylation level of MDM2 protein by immunoprecipitation (IP). PCR-SSCP was performed to detect gene mutation. Results: A mice leukemia model was successfully established as verified by pathological findings and confirmed by transplantation test in nude mice. The protein expression in thymus/bone marrow in irradiation groups was significantly higher than that in controls (P2 was found to be hyper-phosphorylated in the cancerization group as compared with other groups. No gene mutation was detected by SSCP/silver-staining assay in the tumor samples. Conclusion: MDM2 may be involved in the development and progression of leukemia induced by γ-irradiation. The over-expression but not gene mutation may be responsible for malignant transformation induced by radiation. Phosphorylation is at least partly attributed to activation of MDM2

  16. Congenital acute megakaryocytic leukemia

    N B Mathur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital leukemia (CL is an extremely rare disorder in the newborn, significant proportion of which is of myeloid origin, primarily of M4 or M5 morphology. As compared to pediatric leukemia, CL is a more aggressive disease. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M7 or acute megakaryocytic leukemia is a rare type of AML with an incidence of 0.5 per million per year. Median age of presentation is 6 years, and children may present with a broad variety of symptoms including low-grade fever, diarrhea, easy bruising, failure to gain weight and life-threatening conditions.

  17. Vorinostat, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    2016-05-04

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  18. Curcumin and Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage 0-II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    2016-02-16

    Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  19. Defining Molecular Phenotypes of Mesenchymal and hematopoietic Stem Cells derived from Peripheral blood of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia patients for regenerative stem cell therapy

    Potdar, PD; Subedi, RP

    2011-01-01

    Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) is a clonal myeloid disorder affecting all age groups, characterized by accumulation of immature blast cells in bone marrow and in peripheral blood. Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation is a present treatment for cure of ALL patients, which is very expensive, invasive process and may have possibility of transplantation of malignant stem cells to patients. In the present study, we hypothesized to isolate large number of normal Mesenchymal & Hematopoietic stem cells from peripheral blood of ALL patients, which will be further characterized for their normal phenotypes by using specific molecular stem cell markers. This is the first study, which defines the existing phenotypes of isolated MSCs and HSCs from peripheral blood of ALL patients. We have established three cell lines in which two were Mesenchymal stem cells designated as MSCALL and MSCnsALL and one was suspension cell line designated as HSCALL. The HSCALL cell line was developed from the lymphocyte like cells secreted by MSCALL cells. Our study also showed that MSCALL from peripheral blood of ALL patient secreted hematopoietic stem cells in vitro culture. We have characterized all three-cell lines by 14 specific stem cell molecular markers. It was found that both MSC cell lines expressed CD105, CD13, and CD73 with mixed expression of CD34 and CD45 at early passage whereas, HSCALL cell line expressed prominent feature of hematopoietic stem cells such as CD34 and CD45 with mild expression of CD105 and CD13. All three-cell lines expressed LIF, OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, IL6, and DAPK. These cells mildly expressed COX2 and did not express BCR-ABL. Overall it was shown that isolated MSCs and HSCs can be use as a model system to study the mechanism of leukemia at stem cell level and their use in stem cell regeneration therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia. PMID:24693170

  20. Defining Molecular Phenotypes of Mesenchymal and hematopoietic Stem Cells derived from Peripheral blood of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia patients for regenerative stem cell therapy

    Pravin D. Potdar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL is a clonal myeloid disorder affecting all age groups, characterized by accumulation of immature blast cells in bone marrow and in peripheral blood. Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation is a present treatment for cure of ALL patients, which is very expensive, invasive process and may have possibility of transplantation of malignant stem cells to patients. In the present study, we hypothesized to isolate large number of normal Mesenchymal & Hematopoietic stem cells from peripheral blood of ALL patients, which will be further characterized for their normal phenotypes by using specific molecular stem cell markers. This is the first study, which defines the existing phenotypes of isolated MSCs and HSCs from peripheral blood of ALL patients. We have established three cell lines in which two were Mesenchymal stem cells designated as MSCALL and MSCnsALL and one was suspension cell line designated as HSCALL. The HSCALL cell line was developed from the lymphocyte like cells secreted by MSCALL cells. Our study also showed that MSCALL from peripheral blood of ALL patient secreted hematopoietic stem cells in vitro culture. We have characterized all three-cell lines by 14 specific stem cell molecular markers. It was found that both MSC cell lines expressed CD105, CD13, and CD73 with mixed expression of CD34 and CD45 at early passage whereas, HSCALL cell line expressed prominent feature of hematopoietic stem cells such as CD34 and CD45 with mild expression of CD105 and CD13. All three-cell lines expressed LIF, OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, IL6, and DAPK. These cells mildly expressed COX2 and did not express BCR-ABL. Overall it was shown that isolated MSCs and HSCs can be use as a model system to study the mechanism of leukemia at stem cell level and their use in stem cell regeneration therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia.

  1. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    Jeha S, Pui CH. Clinical manifestations and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. ...

  2. Phase 1 Study of Terameprocol (EM-1421) in Patients With Leukemia

    2016-02-20

    Leukemias; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL); Adult T Cell Leukemia (ATL); Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML-BP); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML)

  3. Ibrutinib or Idelalisib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    2016-04-08

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  4. E2A-Pbx1, the t(1;19) translocation protein of human pre-B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia, causes acute myeloid leukemia in mice

    Kamps, M P; Baltimore, D

    1993-01-01

    One-quarter of pediatric pre-B-cell leukemias contain the t(1;19) chromosomal translocation, which fuses 5' exons encoding the transactivation domain of the E2A transcription factor gene to 3' exons ecoding the putative DNA-binding region of the unusual homeobox gene, PBX1. To test the leukemic potential of this fused gene, a cDNA encoding its major protein product, p85E2A-Pbx1, was incorporated into a retrovirus construct and introduced into normal mouse marrow progenitors by infection. The ...

  5. Sweet Syndrome in a Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma: Curious Lymphocyte/Neutrophil Fluctuations

    Çiğdem Usul Afşar; Semra Paydaş; Meral Günaldı; Berna Bozkurt Duman; Vehbi Erçolak; Suzan Zorludemir; Arbil Açıkalın

    2013-01-01

    Sweet syndrome, also referred to as acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is characterized by tender, red inflammatory nodules or papules that occur in association with infection, malignancy, connective tissue disease, or following exposure to certain drugs. Here, we present Sweet syndrome in a case with small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SLL/CLL) which is a relatively rare co-occurrence. Conflict of interest:None declared.

  6. Sweet Syndrome in a Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma: Curious Lymphocyte/Neutrophil Fluctuations

    Çiğdem Usul Afşar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sweet syndrome, also referred to as acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is characterized by tender, red inflammatory nodules or papules that occur in association with infection, malignancy, connective tissue disease, or following exposure to certain drugs. Here, we present Sweet syndrome in a case with small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SLL/CLL which is a relatively rare co-occurrence.

  7. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Yang, Jun J; Hunger, Stephen P;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. METHODS: A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was...

  8. Do We Know What Causes Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    ... Topic Can chronic lymphocytic leukemia be prevented? Do we know what causes chronic lymphocytic leukemia? The exact ... genes -- the instructions for how our cells function. We look like our parents because they are the ...

  9. Fungal natural products targeting chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Bladt, Tanja Thorskov; Kildgaard, Sara; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen;

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in adults from the western world. No curative treatments of CLL are presently known so the treatment strategy today is primarily to prolong patient survival,1 why we have initiated new activities towards discovery of novel compounds....../compounds.2,3 This includes analysis of the spectroscopic data generated from LC-DAD-MS to reveal whether the active principles are either structurally known compounds or are likely to be novel compounds. This paper will illustrate our integrated discovery approaches and recent findings of anti-leukemia...

  10. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    AnnaMaria Nosari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Infectious complications have been known to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CLL patients who are predisposed to infections because of both the humoral immunodepression inherent to hematologic disease, which is related to stage and duration of CLL, and to further immunosuppression related to therapy. The majority of infections in CLL patients treated with alkilating agents is of bacterial origin. The immunodeficiency and natural infectious history of alkylator-resistant, corticosteroid-treated patients appears to have changed with the administration of purine analogs, which has been complicated by very severe and unusual infections and also more viral infections due to sustained reduction of CD4-positive T lymphocytes. The following introduction of monoclonal antibody therapies, in particular alemtuzumab, further increased the immunodepression, increasing also infections which appeared more often in patients with recurrent neutropenia due to chemotherapy cycles.

    Epidemiological data regarding fungal infections in lymphoproliferative disorders are scarce. Italian SEIFEM group in a retrospective multicentre study regarding CLL patients reported an incidence of mycoses 0.5%; however, chronic lymphoproliferative disorders emerged as second haematological underlying disease after acute leukemia in a French study on aspergillosis; in particular CLL with aspergillosis accounted for a third of these chronic lymphoproliferative diseases presenting mould infection.

  11. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    AnnaMaria Nosari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Infectious complications have been known to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CLL patients who are predisposed to infections because of both the humoral immunodepression inherent to hematologic disease, which is related to stage and duration of CLL, and to further immunosuppression related to therapy. The majority of infections in CLL patients treated with alkilating agents is of bacterial origin. The immunodeficiency and natural infectious history of alkylator-resistant, corticosteroid-treated patients appears to have changed with the administration of purine analogs, which has been complicated by very severe and unusual infections and also more viral infections due to sustained reduction of CD4-positive T lymphocytes. The following introduction of monoclonal antibody therapies, in particular alemtuzumab, further increased the immunodepression, increasing also infections which appeared more often in patients with recurrent neutropenia due to chemotherapy cycles. Epidemiological data regarding fungal infections in lymphoproliferative disorders are scarce. Italian SEIFEM group in a retrospective multicentre study regarding CLL patients reported an incidence of mycoses 0.5%; however, chronic lymphoproliferative disorders emerged as second haematological underlying disease after acute leukemia in a French study on aspergillosis; in particular CLL with aspergillosis accounted for a third of these chronic lymphoproliferative diseases presenting mould infection.

  12. Latent central nervous disorders observed in the acute lymphocytic leukemia children after treatment. Comparison between the evaluation of electroencephalogram and MRI

    For 8 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) which finished the treatment, the existence of the latent central nervous disorders was examined and was compared of MRI and brain wave. In the MRI, the T2-weighted image showed the large number of nodule abnormal high signal lesions in the cerebral white matter in 2 of 8 patients, and one of these patients was accompanied by the slight cerebrum atrophy. There was the diffuse high signal tendency of periventricular white matter and the slight expansion of ventriculus cerebri in one patient. In the brain wave, there was the abnormality of the basic pattern in 3 of 8 patients, and there was the slowing tendency in 2. There was no case which showed the paroxysm extraordinary wave. The patient who showed the abnormality by the MRI was all accompanied by the brain wave abnormality. The frequency of the latent central nervous disorders incidence in ALL treatment was high (3/8 on the brain wave, 5/8 on the MRI). The brain wave was supersensitively able to detect the failure than the MRI, if the finding of the basic pattern is evaluated in detail. (A.N.)

  13. Comparison of intermediate-dose methotrexate with cranial irradiation for the post-induction treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia in children

    We compared two regimens with respect to their ability to prolong disease-free survival in 506 children and adolescents with acute lymphocytic leukemia. All responders to induction therapy were randomized to treatment with 2400 rad of cranial irradiation plus intrathecal methotrexate or to treatment with intermediate-dose methotrexate plus intrathecal methotrexate, as prophylaxis for involvement of the central nervous system and other sanctuary areas. Patients were then treated with a standard maintenance regimen. Complete responders were stratified into either standard-risk or increased-risk groups on the basis of age and white-cell count at presentation. Among patients with standard risk, hematologic relapses occurred in 9 of 117 given methotrexate and 24 of 120 given irradiation (P less than 0.01). The rate of central-nervous-system relapse was higher in the methotrexate group (23 of 117) than in the irradiation group (8 of 120) (P . 0.01). Among patients with increased risk, radiation offered greater protection to the central nervous system than methotrexate (P . 0.03); there was no difference in the rate of hematologic relapse. In both risk strata the frequency of testicular relapse was significantly lower in the methotrexate group (1 patient) than the radiation group (10 patients) (P . 0.01). Methotrexate offered better protection against systemic relapse in standard-risk patients and better protection against testicular relapse overall, but it offered less protection against relapses in the central nervous system than cranial irradiation

  14. Comparison of intermediate-dose methotrexate with cranial irradiation for the post-induction treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia in children

    The authors compared two regimens with respect to their ability to prolong disease-free survival in 506 children and adolescents with acute lymphocytic leukemia. All responders to induction therapy were randomized to treatment with 2400 rad of cranial irradiation plus intrathecal methotrexate or to treatment with intermediate-dose methotrexate plus intrathecal methotrexate, as prophylaxis for involvement of the central nervous system and other sanctuary areas. Complete responders were stratified into either standard-risk or increased-risk groups on the basis of age and white-cell count at presentation. Among patients with standard risk, hematologic relapses occurred in 9 of 117 given methotrexate and 24 of 120 given irradiation. The rate of central-nervous-system relapse was higher in the methotrexate group (23 of 117) than in the irradiation group. Among patients with increased risk, radiation offered greater protection to the central nervous system than methotrexate; there was no difference in the rate of hematologic relapse. Methotrexate offered better protection against systemic relapse in standard-risk patients and better protection against testicular relapse overall, but it offered less protection against relapses in the central nervous system than cranial irradiation

  15. Intractable diffuse alopecia caused by multifactorial side-effects in treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia: connection to iatrogenic failure of estrogen secretion.

    Nomiyama, Tomoko; Arakawa, Akiko; Hattori, Sayoko; Konishi, Keisuke; Takenaka, Hideya; Katoh, Norito

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of infantile acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) may cause failure to thrive and hypogonadism due to hypopituitarism induced by chemotherapy and whole-brain radiotherapy. We report the case of a 22-year-old girl with a genetic predisposition to pattern hair loss who developed inveterate diffuse alopecia. The patient had onset of ALL at 8 years old and underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Diffuse alopecia gradually advanced over her whole body. Her vellus scalp hair gradually came out, and hair loss progressed again at 8 years, after BMT. She later developed iatrogenic failure of secretion of estrogen and was treated with estrogen substitution therapy for 14 months from the age of 20. There was a small increase in the volume of hair during therapy, but alopecia returned to the former level after the therapy was suspended. Histopathologic examinations of the scalp performed during estrogen substitution therapy and 2 years after suspension of the therapy showed a 60% decrease in the number of hair follicles and prominent development of vellus hair. We conclude that estrogen influenced hair growth in the context of a genetic predisposition for pattern hair loss in this case. PMID:22211668

  16. Retrotransposon insertion in the T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 (Tal1 gene is associated with severe renal disease and patchy alopecia in Hairpatches (Hpt mice.

    Vishnu Hosur

    Full Text Available "Hairpatches" (Hpt is a naturally occurring, autosomal semi-dominant mouse mutation. Hpt/Hpt homozygotes die in utero, while Hpt/+ heterozygotes exhibit progressive renal failure accompanied by patchy alopecia. This mutation is a model for the rare human disorder "glomerulonephritis with sparse hair and telangiectases" (OMIM 137940. Fine mapping localized the Hpt locus to a 6.7 Mb region of Chromosome 4 containing 62 known genes. Quantitative real time PCR revealed differential expression for only one gene in the interval, T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 (Tal1, which was highly upregulated in the kidney and skin of Hpt/+ mice. Southern blot analysis of Hpt mutant DNA indicated a new EcoRI site in the Tal1 gene. High throughput sequencing identified an endogenous retroviral class II intracisternal A particle insertion in Tal1 intron 4. Our data suggests that the IAP insertion in Tal1 underlies the histopathological changes in the kidney by three weeks of age, and that glomerulosclerosis is a consequence of an initial developmental defect, progressing in severity over time. The Hairpatches mouse model allows an investigation into the effects of Tal1, a transcription factor characterized by complex regulation patterns, and its effects on renal disease.

  17. Occurrence of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Pritish K Bhattacharyya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most common leukemia of adults in the western world and constitutes about 33% of all leukemia′s. The incidence of CLL increases with age and are more common in older population. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML on the contrary occurs in both young adults and elderly and is a chronic myeloproliferative disease that originates from abnormal pluripotent stem cells and results in involvement of multiple hematopoietic lineages, but predominantly myeloid and less commonly lymphoid. Association between CLL and myeloid malignancies (CML, acute myeloid leukemia and MDS, myelodysplastic syndrome is rare. In literature documenting CLL and CML in same patients, occur either simultaneously or CML is preceded by CLL.

  18. Methylation of Gene CHFR Promoter in Acute Leukemia Cells

    GONG Hui; LIU Wengli; ZHOU Jianfeng; XU Huizhen

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore whether gene CHFR was inactivated by methylation in leukemia cells, the expression of CHFR was examined before and after treatment with demethylation agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 leukemia cell lines by means of RT-PCR. The methylation of promoter in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 cells as well as 41 acute leukemia patients was analyzed by MS-PCR. The results showed that methylation of CHFR promoter was inactivated and could be reversed by treatment with a demethylating agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937. CHFR promoter methylation was detected in 39 % of acute leukemia patients. There was no difference in incidence of CHFR promoter methylation between acute myelocytic leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia. In conclusion, CHFR is frequently inactivated in acute leukemia and is a good candidate for the leukemia supper gene. By affecting mitotic checkpoint function, CHFR inactivation likely plays a key role in tumorigenesis in acute leukemia. Moreover, the methylation of gene CHFR appears to be a good index with which to predict the sensitivity of acute leukemia to microtubule inhibitors.

  19. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Jain, Nitin; O’Brien, Susan

    2013-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is essential for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cell survival. Many kinases in the BCR signaling pathway are currently being studied as potential therapeutic targets. These include Lyn, Syk, PI3 and Bruton tyrosine (BTK). Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) is a novel first-in-class selective inhibitor of BTK. Preclinical evidence suggests that ibrutinib inhibits CLL cell survival and proliferation. In addition, it also affects CLL cell migration and homing. Early clinic...

  20. Immunosuppression for 6-8 weeks after modified donor lymphocyte infusion reduced acute graft-versus-host disease without influencing graft-versus-leukemia effect in haploidentical transplant

    Yan Chenhua; Xu Lanping; Liu Daihong; Chen Huan; Wang Yu; Liu Kaiyan; Huang Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Background In haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT),the duration of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis after modified donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) was the only risk factor of DLI-associated grades 3-4 acute GVHD.However,the successful application of modified DLI depended not only on the reduction of severe GVHD,but also on the preservation of graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect.Therefore,this study was performed to compare the impact of prophylaxis for 6-8 weeks and prophylaxis for <6 weeks on GVL effect after modified DLI in haploidentical HSCT.Methods A total of 103 consecutive patients developing hematological relapse or minimal residual disease (MRD)-positive status after haploidentical HSCT and receiving modified DLI were investigated retrospectively.Fifty-two patients received prophylaxis for 6-8 weeks after modified DLI; the remaining 51 patients received prophylaxis for <6 weeks.Results First,compared with prophylaxis for <6 weeks,prophylaxis for 6-8 weeks reduced incidence of relapse in total patients (26.6% vs.69.0%,P <0.001).Besides,prophylaxis for 6-8 weeks also reduced incidence of relapse in 54 patients developing hematological relapse post-transplant (P=0.018) and in 49 patients developing MRD-positive status post-transplant (P <0.001).Second,prophylaxis for 6-8 weeks reduced incidence of acute GVHD (P <0.05),reduced the therapeutic application of immunosuppressive agents (P=0.019),but increased the incidence of chronic GVHD (P<0.05).Third,prophylaxis for 6-8 weeks improved overall survival and disease-free survival in total patients,as well as in patients developing hematological relapse post-transplant and in patients developing MRD-positive status post-transplant (P <0.05).Conclusions In haploidentical HSCT,prophylaxis for 6-8 weeks after modified DLI does not reduce GVL effect,but reduces the incidence of DLI-associated acute GVHD compared with prophylaxis for <6 weeks.This strategy will

  1. Hypothalamic-pituitary function of children with acute lymphocytic leukemia after three forms of central nervous system prophylaxis. A retrospective study.

    Voorhess, M L; Brecher, M L; Glicksman, A S; Jones, B; Harris, M; Krischer, J; Boyett, J; Forman, E; Freeman, A I

    1986-04-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary function of 93 children, who had received central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis as part of their therapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and who remained in continuous complete remission, was evaluated retrospectively. Treatment regimens included--Group I: 31 subjects, intrathecal methotrexate (IT MTX); Group II: 31 subjects, IT MTX plus 2400 rad cranial irradiation; and Group III: 31 subjects, IT MTX and intravenous intermediate-dose methotrexate. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and T4 levels were normal. All participants had normal adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion as assessed by plasma cortisol responses to insulin hypoglycemia. Urinary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) excretion of pubertal and postpubertal patients (N = 37) was appropriate, except for one subject from Group I who had an abnormally high output of gonadotropins, and one from Group II who had abnormally low levels. Growth hormone (GH) responses were subnormal after sequential arginine-insulin stimulation as follows--Group 1: 3 of 31 patients; Group II: 6 of 25 patients; and Group III: 2 of 29 patients. Nevertheless, all children had normal linear growth. It was concluded that the three forms of CNS prophylaxis evaluated had no long-term adverse effect on TSH and ACTH secretion. FSH-LH production appears to be normal, but final judgment must await follow-up studies because 60% of the patients were prepuberteral or still receiving chemotherapy. Eleven patients had subnormal GH responses after pharmacologic stimulation of the pituitary, but long-term linear growth was unaffected. PMID:3753892

  2. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) -- children

    ... Leung WH, Pounds S, Cao X, e t al. Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. Cancer . ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  3. Ibrutinib and Rituximab Compared With Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    2016-08-31

    Anemia; Fever, Sweat, and Hot Flashes; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Weight Change

  4. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic leukemia

    The Cancergram covers both acute and chronic leukemia in all of its forms (acute lymphocytic, acute monocytic, acute or sub-acute granulocytic, chronic granulocytic, chronic lymphocytic, chronic monocytic, plasma cell, stem cell, and hairy cell). Other neoplastic conditions of the reticuloendothelial system, lymphatic system, spleen, multiple myeloma, macroglobulinemia and other monoclonal gammopathies are excluded, and will be coveted by other Cancergrams now under development. This Cancergram includes abstracts concerning all clinical aspects of the disease, such as diagnosis and staging, supportive care, evaluation, and therapy. Animal models, tissue culture experiments, carcinogenesis and other pre-clinical studies are generally excluded, except for those considered to have direct clinical relevance

  6. Fungal natural products targeting chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Bladt, Tanja Thorskov; Kildgaard, Sara; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Gotfredsen, Charlotte Held; Duerr, C.; Seiffert, M.; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in adults from the western world. No curative treatments of CLL are presently known so the treatment strategy today is primarily to prolong patient survival,1 why we have initiated new activities towards discovery of novel compounds...... with potential tumor specificity. Our starting point is a diverse fungal collection of thousands of Penicillium and Aspergillus species. These fungi have proven to be a very rich source of various bioactive compounds and yet our dereplication investigations have demonstrated that there are still...... numerous unknown compounds to be identified within these species. Until now we have found that 11 out of 289 fungal extracts are active against CLL cells. Using our established chemotaxonomic discovery approach we have dereplicated and fractionated these extracts to track the activity into single fractions/compounds...

  7. The molecular basis of familial chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Crowther-Swanepoel, Dalemari; Houlston, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of the genetic basis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia is only just starting to be recognized. This perspective article by Drs. Crowther-Swanepoel and Houlston provides an up-to-date review the molecular epidemiology of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, with emphasis on the integration of biology and genomics. See related paper on page 647.

  8. The lymph node in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Dick, F R; Maca, R D

    1978-01-01

    Lymph nodes were examined from 41 cases of typical chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Degree of immaturity was graded as absent to minimal (Grade I), moderate (Grade II) and marked (Grade III). A moderate degree of immaturity was found in the lymph node in 14 of 41 cases even though the cells seen on the initial bone marrow and peripheral blood smears obtained from these patients were essentially all mature. The morphology of these nodes could be confused with poorly differentiated lymphocytic or mixed lymphocytic-histiocytic lymphoma in terms of the degree of immaturity present. A marked degree of immaturity present. A marked degree of immaturity was found in 5 cases; the morphology of these cases resembled histiocytic lymphoma. In the remaining 22 cases immaturity was essentially absent. The morphology of these cases was similar to that of diffuse well differentiated lymphocytic lymphoma. Our studies suggest that a moderate degree of immaturity in the lymph node of patients with CLL does not indicate that these patients will have a marked shortening of their survival. PMID:580071

  9. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  12. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  13. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  14. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  15. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  16. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  17. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    2016-04-07

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Polyradiculoneuritis revealing an acute monoblastic leukemia 5

    Wafa Allam; Hassan Errihani; Yahya Hsaini

    2010-01-01

    Acute polyradiculoneuritis has been frequently reported in association with malignant disorders, especially those of the lymphoid system. To date, there have been no reported cases of acute monoblastic leukemia associated with this polyradiculopathy. The authors tell us about a very rare case of leukemia presenting as acute monoblastic leukemia 5 (AML5) in a 28 years old patient from Morroco

  19. Leukemia Stem Cells and Human Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Bernt, Kathrin M.; Armstrong, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Leukemias and other cancers have been proposed to contain a subpopulation of cells that display characteristics of stem cells, and which maintain tumor growth. That most anti-cancer therapy is directed against the bulk of the tumor, and possibly spares the cancer stem cells, may lie at the heart of treatment failures with conventional modalities. Leukemia stem cells are fairly well described for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but their existence and relevance for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (...

  20. Acute leukemia in early childhood

    M. Emerenciano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia in early childhood is biologically and clinically distinct. The particular characteristics of this malignancy diagnosed during the first months of life have provided remarkable insights into the etiology of the disease. The pro-B, CD10 negative immunophenotype is typically found in infant acute leukemia, and the most common genetic alterations are the rearrangements of the MLL gene. In addition, the TEL/AML1 fusion gene is most frequently found in children older than 24 months. A molecular study on a Brazilian cohort (age range 0-23 months has detected TEL/AML1+ve (N = 9, E2A/PBX1+ve (N = 4, PML/RARA+ve (N = 4, and AML1/ETO+ve (N = 2 cases. Undoubtedly, the great majority of genetic events occurring in these patients arise prenatally. The environmental exposure to damaging agents that give rise to genetic changes prenatally may be accurately determined in infants since the window of exposure is limited and known. Several studies have shown maternal exposures that may give rise to leukemogenic changes. The Brazilian Collaborative Study Group of Infant Acute Leukemia has found that mothers exposed to dipyrone, pesticides and hormones had an increased chance to give birth to babies with infant acute leukemia [OR = 1.48 (95%CI = 1.05-2.07, OR = 2.27 (95%CI = 1.56-3.31 and OR = 9.08 (95%CI = 2.95-27.96], respectively. This review aims to summarize recent clues that have facilitated the elucidation of the biology of early childhood leukemias, with emphasis on infant acute leukemia in the Brazilian population.

  1. Initial therapy of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Eichhorst, Barbara; Cramer, Paula; Hallek, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Only chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients with active or symptomatic disease or with advanced Binet or Rai stages require therapy. Prognostic risk factor profile and comorbidity burden are most relevant for the choice of treatment. For physically fit patients, chemoimmunotherapy with fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab remains the current standard therapy. For unfit patients, treatment with an anti-CD20 antibody (obinutuzumab or rituximab or ofatumumab) plus milder chemotherapy (chlorambucil) may be applied. Patients with a del(17p) or TP53 mutation should be treated with the kinase inhibitors ibrutinib or a combination of idelalisib and rituximab. Clinical trials over the next several years will determine, whether kinase inhibitors, other small molecules, immunotherapeutics, or combinations thereof will further improve outcomes for patients with CLL. PMID:27040702

  2. [The genetic landscape of chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    Marosvári, Dóra; Alpár, Donát; Király, Attila Péter; Rajnai, Hajnalka; Reiniger, Lilla; Bödör, Csaba

    2016-06-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most frequent mature B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the Western countries. The recent next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies lead to an exponential increase in our knowledge of the pathogenesis and progression of CLL. Whole genome and exome sequencing studies revealed a remarkable inter- and intra-patient genetic heterogeneity with a significant therapy-induced clonal evolution in the majority of the patients. Driver mutations were identified in components of various signalling pathways and cellular processes with notable prognostic and therapeutic relevance. Interestingly, these studies revealed only a few genes mutated in at least 15-20% of the patients with a larger number of genes mutated in a smaller proportion of patients. This improved understanding of the genomic landscape of CLL has opened new avenues for a more precise patient stratification and rational application of novel, more effective targeted therapies. PMID:27275638

  3. Autoimmune Cytopenias in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Giovanni D'Arena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL may be complicated at any time by autoimmune phenomena.The most common ones are hematologic disorders, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP. Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA and autoimmune agranulocytosis (AG are, indeed, more rarely seen. However, they are probably underestimated due to the possible misleading presence of cytopenias secondary to leukemic bone marrow involvement or to chemotherapy cytotoxicity. The source of autoantibodies is still uncertain, despite the most convincing data are in favor of the involvement of resting normal B-cells. In general, excluding the specific treatment of underlying CLL, the managementof these complications is not different from that of idiopathic autoimmune cytopenias or of those associated to other causes. Among different therapeutic approaches, monoclonal antibody rituximab, given alone or in combination, has shown to be very effective.

  4. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. Acute appendicitis caused by acute myeloid leukemia

    Zhang, Shanxiang; Chen, Shaoxiong

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A case of appendiceal involvement by acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in an adult with recent history of AML transformed from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) was presented. Being aware of this rare presentation in particular in a patient with history of MDS and/or AML is important for prompt clinical diagnosis and management.

  6. Clinical Presentations of Acute Leukemia

    Objective: To document the clinical presentation and epidemiology of various types of acute leukemia with their respective referral source at a tertiary level centre in Peshawar. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pathology, Hayatabad Medical Complex (HMC), Peshawar, from January 2011 to May 2012. Methodology: A total of 618 bone marrow biopsy reports were reviewed. All biopsy reports labeled as acute leukemia were reviewed for age, gender, address, referring unit, diagnosis on bone marrow examination, presenting complaints, duration of illness and findings of clinical examination. Results: Ninety-two patients were diagnosed as suffering from acute leukemias (15%). ALL was most prevalent (46%), followed by AML (38%) and undifferentiated acute leukemia (16%). Males were affected more compared to females (60% vs. 40%). ALL and AML were predominant in pediatric (64%) and adults (77%) patients respectively. Patients from Afghanistan accounted for 33% of all cases followed by Peshawar (14%). Fever (77%), pallor (33%) and bleeding disorders (23%) were the main presenting complaints. Enlargement of liver, spleen and lymph nodes together was associated with ALL compared with AML (p = 0.004). Conclusion: ALL-L1 and AML-M4 were the most common sub-types. Fever, pallor and bleeding disorders were the main presenting complaints. Enlargement of liver, spleen and lymph nodes was more frequently associated with ALL compared to AML. (author)

  7. Genetically Engineered Lymphocyte Therapy in Treating Patients With B-Cell Leukemia or Lymphoma That is Resistant or Refractory to Chemotherapy

    2015-07-31

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  8. Prognostic significance of serum immunoglobulin pareprotein in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    杨舒

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the incidence of serum immunoglobulin (Ig) paraprotein in chronic lymphocytic leukemia(CLL) ,and to explore its clinical associated laboratory features and prognostic implication. Methods Serum protein electrophoresis and immunofixation

  9. p53 mutations in human lymphoid malignancies: Association with Burkitt lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Gaidano, G.; Ballerini, P.; Gong, J.Z.; Inghirami, G.; Knowles, D.M.; Dalla-Favera, R. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Neri, A, (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States) Centro Malattie del Sangue G. Marcora, Milan (Italy)); Newcomb, E.W. (New York Univ. School of Medicine, New York (United States)); Magrath, I.T. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1991-06-15

    The authors have investigated the frequency of p53 mutations in B- and T-cell human lymphoid malignancies, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the major subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. p53 exons 5-9 were studied by using genomic DNA from 197 primary tumors and 27 cell lines by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and by direst sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. Mutations were found associated with (i) Burkitt lymphoma (9/27 biopsoes; 17/27 cell lines) and its leukemic counterpart L{sub 3}-type B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (5/9), both of which also carry activated c-myc oncogenes, and (ii) B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (6/40) and, in particular, its stage of progression known as Richter's transformation (3/7). Mutations were not found at any significant frequency in other types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In many cases, only the mutated allele was detectable, implying loss of the normal allele. These results suggest that (1) significant differences in the frequency of p53 mutations are present among subtypes of neoplasms derived from the same tissue; (2) p53 may play a role in tumor progression in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia; (3) the presence of both p53 loss/inactivation and c-myc oncogene activation may be important in the pathogenesis of Burkitt lymphoma and its leukemia form L{sub 3}-type B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  10. CT60 single-nucleotide polymorphism as a surrogate marker for donor lymphocyte infusion outcome after allogeneic cell transplantation for acute leukemia.

    Metaxas, Y; Bertz, H; Spyridonidis, A; Spyroupoulou-Vlachou, M; Porzelius, C; Finke, J

    2012-03-01

    The benefit of survival at the expense of new GVHD after DLI for acute leukemia following human allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) remains a matter of controversy. The detection of biological markers predicting this outcome would be an enormous breakthrough. The purpose of this study was the analysis of CT60 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the CTLA-4 T-regulatory gene as a surrogate marker for DLI outcome in this difficult setting. Using Pyrosequencing, we genotyped the alleles of the CT60 SNP of 79 DLI donors and correlated them with the post-DLI outcome of their matching recipients. The presence of a donor 'AA' or 'AG' CT60 genotype vs a 'GG' genotype was an independent factor for remaining in complete chimerism/remission post-DLI (odds ratio (OR) 2.61 vs 0.42, respectively, P=0.05). Further, in cases with evident post-DLI allo-reactivity the importance of an 'AA' or 'AG' vs a 'GG' genotype gained significance for ongoing complete chimerism (OR 4.35 vs 0.32, P=0.03). Neither alterations in cumulative DLI dose nor any other clinical parameter significantly weakened the importance of CT60 SNP. Our results provide evidence for the necessity of genotyping CT60 SNP prior to DLI administration in patients with acute leukemia. PMID:21552305

  11. Rearrangement of the breakpoint cluster region in Philadelphia chromosome positive acute leukemia.

    Takahashi, Isao; Sekito,Noriko; Takeuchi, Makoto; Osada, Ken; Matsuzaki,Toshiro; Fukuda, Shunichi; Lai,Minyu; Uchida, Kozaburo; Kimura,Ikuro; Miyamoto,Kanji; Kitajima,Koichi; Sanada, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    The rearrangement of breakpoint cluster region (ber) was examined in leukemic cells obtained from 3 patients initially diagnosed as having Ph+ acute leukemia, 2 with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and one with acute mixed leukemia. DNA was digested with Bgl II and BamH I. The ber rearrangement was present in the case of acute mixed leukemia (Case 1), but was absent in the 2 cases of ALL (Cases 2 and 3). These results suggest that Case 1 represented a type of blast crisis of chronic myelocyt...

  12. Evolution of ibrutinib resistance in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)

    Komarova, Natalia L.; Burger, Jan A.; Wodarz, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Chronic ymphocytic leukemia is the most common leukemia, mostly arising in patients over the age of 50. The disease has been treated with chemo-immunotherapies with varying outcomes, depending on the genetic make-up of the tumor cells. Recently, a promising new tyrosine kinase inhibitor, ibrutinib, has been developed, which resulted in successful responses in clinical trials, even for the most aggressive chronic lymphocytic leukemia types. The crucial current questions include how long diseas...

  13. ALLOGENEIC TRANSPLANTATION FOR CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Patrizia Chiusolo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Even if Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL often has an indolent behavior with good responsiveness to cytoreductive treatment, about 20% of the patients, so called "poor-risk" patients, show an aggressive course and die within a few years despite early intensive therapies. Criteria for poor-risk disease according to the European Bone Marrow Transplantation (EBMT CLL Transplant Consensus are: purine analogue refractoriness, early relapse after purine analogue combination therapy, CLL with p53 lesion requiring treatment.

    Allogeneic transplant has potential curative role in CLL, however burden with very  high transplant related mortality (TRM rates of 38-50%:

    A major advance in reducing the short-term morbidity and mortality of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT has been the introduction of non-myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC regimens to allow engraftment of allogeneic stem cells. There is no doubt that the crucial therapeutic principle of allo-SCT in CLL is graft versus leukemia (GVL activity.

    The major complications of allogeneic SCT in CLL are: chronic graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD affecting quality of life, high graft rejection and infection rates rates correlated with preexisting immunosuppression. Disease relapse remains the major cause of failure after RIC allo-HCT in CLL patients.

    Sensitive minimal residual disease (MRD quantification has strong prognostic impact after transplant.

     

  14. Stromal control of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    Seke Etet PF

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Paul Faustin Seke Etet,1 Armel Herve Nwabo Kamdje,2 Jeremie Mbo Amvene,2 Yousef Aldebasi,3 Mohammed Farahna,1 Lorella Vecchio41Department of Basic Health Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Qassim University, Buraydah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Medicine, University of Ngaoundere, Ngaoundere, Cameroon; 3Department of Optometry, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Qassim University, Buraydah, Saudi Arabia; 4Laboratory of Cytometry, Institute of Molecular Genetics, CNR, University of Pavia, Pavia, ItalyAbstract: In the ongoing efforts to develop therapies against chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, stromal factors allowing malignant cells to escape spontaneous and chemotherapy-mediated apoptosis, giving way to relapses, have been abundantly investigated. Bone marrow adherent cell types, collectively referred to as stromal cells, appear to be key players in such escape, mainly because CLL malignant cells, which rapidly undergo spontaneous apoptosis when cultured in vitro, survive, migrate, and resist cytotoxic agents in co-culture with bone marrow stromal cells. CLL displays variable clinical courses according to well-defined prognostic factors induced on malignant B-cells (CLL cells or expressed by the transformed bone marrow stromal microenvironment. Particularly, a critical pathogenic role is played by proinflammatory factors, adhesion molecules, and signaling molecules involved in cell fate and stemness, such as Notch, Wnt, sonic Hedgehog, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, protein kinase B (Akt, and the B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 family of regulator proteins. As herein discussed, these molecules probably form a complex network favoring CLL cell survival, proliferation, and chemoresistance to anticancer therapy. Characterizing the sets of signaling pathways involved in the interactions between stromal cells and CLL cells may provide new tools for CLL clinical phenotyping and for re-sensitizing chemotherapy resistant cells

  15. MEAD方案治疗难治复发性成年人急性淋巴细胞白血病%Clinical study on MEAD regimens for relapsed or refractory adult patients with acute lymphocyte leukemia

    赵万红; 杨云; 张王刚; 曹星梅; 陈银霞; 何爱丽; 黄芳; 刘捷; 马肖容; 王剑利

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the clinic effect and safety of MEAD chemotherapy regimen for adult patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphocyte leukemia. Methods Between July 2006 and July 2009,twenty-two adult patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphocyte leukemia received MEAD regimen (mitoxantrone 6 mg/d dl-3 iv drip,cytarabine 100 mg/d dl-5 iv drip,etoposide 100 mg/d dl-5 iv drip,dexmethasone 10 mg/d dl-8 iv drip). Results The complete remission (CR) rate of adult patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphocyte leukemia was 31.8 %,the partial remission(PR) rate was 22.7 % and the overall response (OR) rate 54.5 %. The cumulitive CR rate was 50.0 %,and the PR rate 40.9 % after two times MEAD chemotherapy regimen. The main adverse effect was different level of myelosuppression,and other toxicity of vital organ was mild. Conclusion MEAD regimen is effective and can be tolerated for adult patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphocyte leukemia,and its side effect is mild.%目的 观察MEAD化疗方案治疗难治复发性成年人急性淋巴细胞白血病(ALL)的疗效和安全性.方法 对2006年6月至2009年6月收治的22例成年人难治复发性ALL患者,采用MEAD方案化疗,米托蒽醌6 mg/d静脉滴注,第1天至第3天;阿糖胞苷100 mg/d静脉滴注,第1天至第5天;依托泊苷100mg/d静脉滴注,第1天至第5天;地塞米松10mg/d静脉滴注,第1天至第8天.结果 成年人难治复发性ALL完全缓解率31.8%.部分缓解率22.7%,总有效率54.5%;两次MEAD方案化疗后,累积完全缓解率为50.0%,部分缓解率40.9%.主要不良反应为不同程度的骨髓抑制,重要脏器毒性反应轻微.结论 MEAD化疗方案对难治复发性成年人ALL有较好的疗效.患者不良反应轻微.

  16. Occupation and leukemia in Nordic countries

    Talibov, Madar; Kautiainen, Susanna; Martinsen, Jan Ivar;

    2012-01-01

    We studied occupational variation of the risk of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and other leukemia in Nordic countries.......We studied occupational variation of the risk of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and other leukemia in Nordic countries....

  17. Ibrutinib-induced lymphocytosis in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Herman, S E M; Niemann, C U; Farooqui, M;

    2014-01-01

    Ibrutinib and other targeted inhibitors of B-cell receptor signaling achieve impressive clinical results for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). A treatment-induced rise in absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) has emerged as a class effect of kinase inhibitors in CLL and warrants further...

  18. Acute myelogenous leukemia switch lineage upon relapse to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa; Arreguin-Gonzalez, Farina; Rodriguez-Osorio, Carlos A; Sadowinski, Stanislaw; Pelayo, Rosana; Medina-Sanson, Aurora

    2009-01-01

    Acute leukemia, the most common form of cancer in children, accounts for approximately 30% of all childhood malignancies, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia being five times more frequent than acute myeloid leukemia. Lineage switch is the term that has been used to describe the phenomenon of acute leukemias that meet the standard French-American-British system criteria for a particular lineage (either lymphoid or myeloid) upon initial diagnosis, but meet the criteria for the opposite lineage a...

  19. Targeted treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Masood A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Aisha Masood1, Taimur Sher2, Aneel Paulus2, Kena C Miller2, Kasyapa S Chitta3, Asher Chanan-Khan4 1The Tisch Cancer Institute, Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 2Department of Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, 3Department of Molecular Targets and Experimental Therapeutics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, New York, NY, 4Division of Hematology/Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA Abstract: The treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL has evolved over the last few decades. Recognition has increased of several key components of CLL biology currently manipulated for therapeutics. A milestone in the treatment of CLL was reached with the incorporation of immunotherapy with conventional chemotherapy. The fludarabine/cyclophosphamide/rituximab combination has demonstrated survival advantage for the first time in the treatment of CLL. Several other biological compounds are being explored with the hope of improving responses, impacting survival, and ultimately curing CLL. Important agents being tested are targeted on CLL surface molecules and their ligands, signal transduction protein and oncogenes. This review provides a brief summary of the recent advances made in preclinical and clinical investigation of selected promising therapeutic agents, which lead the target-directed therapeutic approach. Keywords: CLL, Akt inhibitors, Bcl-2 inhibitors, cyclin d kinase inhibitors, heat shock protein inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, monoclonal antibodies

  20. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Laboratory diagnosis of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and progression to acute leukemia in association with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: morphological features and immunophenotypic profile Diagnóstico laboratorial de leucemia mielomonocítica crônica agudizada em associação com leucemia linfocítica crônica: aspectos morfológicos e imunofenotípicos

    Iris Mattos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a clonal stem cell disorder that is characterized mainly by absolute peripheral monocytosis. This disease can present myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic characteristics. According to the classification established by the World Health Organization, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is inserted in a group of myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic disorders; its diagnosis requires the presence of persistent monocytosis and dysplasia involving one or more myeloid cell lineages. Furthermore, there should be an absence of the Philadelphia chromosome and the BCR/ABL fusion gene and less than 20% blasts in the blood or bone marrow. Phenotypically, the cells in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia can present myelomonocytic antigens, such as CD33 and CD13, overexpressions of CD56 and CD2 and variable expressions of HLA-DR, CD36, CD14, CD15, CD68 and CD64. The increase in the CD34 expression may be associated with a transformation into acute leukemia. Cytogenetic alterations are frequent in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, and molecular mutations such as NRAS have been identified. The present article reports on a case of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, diagnosed by morphologic and phenotypical findings that, despite having been suggestive of acute monocytic leukemia, were differentiated through a detailed analysis of cell morphology. Furthermore, typical cells of chronic lymphocytic leukemia were found, making this a rare finding.A Leucemia Mielomonocítica Crônica (LMMC é uma desordem clonal de células-tronco hematopoiéticas caracterizada principalmente por monocitose absoluta no sangue periférico. Esta doença pode apresentar características de síndromes mielodisplásicas e de doenças mieloproliferativas. De acordo com a classificação estabelecida pela OMS, a LMMC está inserida no grupo de neoplasias mieloproliferativas/mielodisplásicas e seu diagnóstico requer a presença de monocitose persistente no sangue

  2. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  3. Docosahexaenoic Acid Sensitizes Leukemia Lymphocytes to Barasertib and Everolimus by ROS-dependent Mechanism Without Affecting the Level of ROS and Viability of Normal Lymphocytes.

    Zhelev, Zhivko; Ivanova, Donika; Lazarova, Desislava; Aoki, Ichio; Bakalova, Rumiana; Saga, Tsuneo

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was: (i) to investigate the possibility of sensitizing leukemia lymphocytes to anticancer drugs using docosahexaenoic acid (DHA); (ii) to find combinations with synergistic cytotoxic effect on leukemia lymphocytes, without or with only very low cytotoxicity towards normal lymphocytes; (iii) and to clarify the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the induction of apoptosis and cytotoxicity by such combinations. The study covered 15 anticancer drugs, conventional and new-generation. Well-expressed synergistic cytotoxic effects were observed after treatment of leukemia lymphocytes (Jurkat) with DHA in combination with: barasertib, lonafarnib, everolimus, and palbociclib. We selected two synergistic combinations, DHA with everolimus or barasertib, and investigated their effects on viability of normal lymphocytes, as well as on the production of ROS and induction of apoptosis in both cell lines (leukemia and normal). At the selected concentrations, DHA, everolimus and barasertib (applied separately) were cytotoxic towards leukemia lymphocytes, but not normal lymphocytes. In leukemia cells, the cytotoxicity of combinations was accompanied by strong induction of apoptosis and production of ROS. In normal lymphocytes, drugs alone and in combination with DHA did not affect the level of ROS and did not induce apoptosis. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to report synergistic ROS-dependent cytotoxicity between DHA and new-generation anticancer drugs, such as everolimus and barasertib, that is cancer cell-specific (particularly for acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells Jurkat). These combinations are harmless to normal lymphocytes and do not induce abnormal production of ROS in these cells. The data suggest that DHA could be used as a supplementary component in anticancer chemotherapy, allowing therapeutic doses of everolimus and barasertib to be reduced, minimizing their side-effects. PMID:27069145

  4. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    ... of WBC) are produced, a child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood leukemia, affecting about 75% of kids with this cancer of the blood cells. Kids ... (AML) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Cancer ...

  5. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting as Acute Appendicitis

    Sherri Rauenzahn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Appendicitis in leukemic patients is uncommon but associated with increased mortality. Additionally, leukemic cell infiltration of the appendix is extremely rare. While appendectomy is the treatment of choice for these patients, diagnosis and management of leukemia have a greater impact on remission and survival. A 59-year-old Caucasian female was admitted to the surgical service with acute right lower quadrant pain, nausea, and anorexia. She was noted to have leukocytosis, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Abdominal imaging demonstrated appendicitis with retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymphadenopathy for which she underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. Peripheral smear, bone marrow biopsy, and surgical pathology of the appendix demonstrated acute myeloid leukemia (AML with nonsuppurative appendicitis. In the setting of AML, prior cases described the development of appendicitis with active chemotherapy. Of these cases, less than ten patients had leukemic infiltration of the appendix, leading to leukostasis and nonsuppurative appendicitis. Acute appendicitis with leukemic infiltration as the initial manifestation of AML has only been described in two other cases in the literature with an average associated morbidity of 32.6 days. The prompt management in this case of appendicitis and AML resulted in an overall survival of 185 days.

  7. Occurrence of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Bhattacharyya, Pritish K

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia of adults in the western world and constitutes about 33% of all leukemia′s. The incidence of CLL increases with age and are more common in older population. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) on the contrary occurs in both young adults and elderly and is a chronic myeloproliferative disease that originates from abnormal pluripotent stem cells and results in involvement of multiple hematopoietic lineages, but predominantly myeloid and ...

  8. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura following successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Tannir, N M; Kantarjian, H

    2001-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia is common in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) at diagnosis. It is a universal side effect of dose-intensive regimens employed in the treatment of adult ALL. In patients with ALL who achieve remission, thrombocytopenia frequently indicates relapse. We report three adult patients successfully treated for ALL who developed thrombocytopenia and were found to have immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (ITP). Possible pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the association of ALL and ITP are discussed. PMID:11342378

  9. Idarubicin-intensified BUCY2 conditioning regimen improved survival in high-risk acute myeloid, but not lymphocytic leukemia patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: A retrospective comparative study.

    Fang, Jun; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Huafang; Hong, Mei; Wu, Qiuling; Nie, Dimin; You, Yong; Zhong, Zhaodong; Li, Weiming; Hu, Yu; Xia, Linghui

    2016-07-01

    The intensity of conditioning regimen is highly correlated with outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). We have previously reported that idarubicin (IDA) intensified BUCY2 regimen could reduce relapse and improve survival for high-risk hematological malignancies undergoing allo-HSCT. However, there is no published study comparing the efficacy of IDA-BUCY2 regimen for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) versus acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). We further retrospectively compared therapeutic outcomes of intensified conditioning regimen on 140 high-risk AML and ALL patients in the data analyses. IDA 15mg/m(2)/d was administered by continuous infusion from day -11 to -9, followed by intravenous injection of busulfan (BU) (3.2mg/kg/d) from day -6 to -4, and intravenous injection of cyclophosphamide (CY) (1.8g/m(2)/d) from day -3 to -2 in IDA-BUCY2 regimen. For high-risk AML, cumulative probabilities of 3-year relapse rates in IDA-BUCY2 and traditional BUCY2 regimens were 16.9%, 43.3% (P=0.016). Cumulative probabilities of 3-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 69.2% vs 44.0% (P=0.024), and 66.9% vs 38.2% (P=0.01). However, two regimens showed no significant differences for high-risk ALL. Multivariate analysis also indicated that IDA intensified BUCY2 conditioning was the favorable variable to reduce relapse and elevate survival for high-risk AML patients. In conclusion, IDA-BUCY2 regimen reduces relapse and improves survival for high-risk AML undergoing allo-HSCT, but not presenting uniform therapeutic effects for high-risk ALL. PMID:27131062

  10. p53 mutations in human lymphoid malignancies: association with Burkitt lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Gaidano, G; Ballerini, P.; Gong, J. Z.; Inghirami, G.; Neri, A.; Newcomb, E W; Magrath, I. T.; Knowles, D M; Dalla-Favera, R

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the frequency of p53 mutations in B- and T-cell human lymphoid malignancies, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the major subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. p53 exons 5-9 were studied by using genomic DNA from 197 primary tumors and 27 cell lines by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. Mutations were found associated with (i) Burkitt lymphoma (9/27 biopsies; 17/27 cell l...

  11. Successful treatment with interferon of chicken pox in children with acute leukemia.

    Kim, Byung Soo

    1984-01-01

    Childhood leukemia, especially acute lymphocytic leukemia, can now be completely cured by a multimodality approach in one out of every two patients. Since prolonged maintenance therapy with anti-cancer agents for three years is required for complete cure, a significant problem during this course of treatment is death due to secondary infection. Those with childhood leukemia receiving anti-cancer chemotherapy who became secondarily injected with chicken pox can now be treated successfully with...

  12. Quantification of newly produced B and T lymphocytes in untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients

    Caimi Luigi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immune defects occurring in chronic lymphocytic leukemia are responsible for the frequent occurrence of infections and autoimmune phenomena, and may be involved in the initiation and maintenance of the malignant clone. Here, we evaluated the quantitative defects of newly produced B and T lymphocytes. Methods The output of B and T lymphocytes from the production and maturation sites was analyzed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients and healthy controls by quantifying kappa-deleting recombination excision circles (KRECs and T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs by a Real-Time PCR assay that simultaneously detects both targets. T-lymphocyte subsets were analyzed by six-color flow cytometric analysis. Data comparison was performed by two-sided Mann-Whitney test. Results KRECs level was reduced in untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients studied at the very early stage of the disease, whereas the release of TRECs+ cells was preserved. Furthermore, the observed increase of CD4+ lymphocytes could be ascribed to the accumulation of CD4+ cells with effector memory phenotype. Conclusions The decreased number of newly produced B lymphocytes in these patients is likely related to a homeostatic mechanism by which the immune system balances the abnormal B-cell expansion. This feature may precede the profound defect of humoral immunity characterizing the later stages of the disease.

  13. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  14. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    2016-04-26

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  15. Protein profiles distinguish stable and progressive chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Huang, Pauline Y; Mactier, Swetlana; Armacki, Natalie; Giles Best, O; Belov, Larissa; Kaufman, Kimberley L; Pascovici, Dana; Mulligan, Stephen P; Christopherson, Richard I

    2016-05-01

    Patients with a stable chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) double their blood lymphocyte count in >5 years, but may develop progressive disease with lymphocytes doubling in selected reaction monitoring) using extracts of purified CD19(+) CLL cells from patients (n = 50). Hierarchical clustering of these protein profiles showed two clusters of patients that correlated with progressive and stable CLL, providing signatures that should be useful for triaging patients. Some of the proteins in the progressive cluster have not been linked with CLL, for example, glutamate dehydrogenase 1 and transcription intermediary factor 1-beta. PMID:26422656

  16. Acute Leukemia: Diagnosis, Management, and Potential for Cure

    Stewart, Keith; Keating, Armand

    1988-01-01

    Acute leukemia is an uncommon malignant disorder resulting from the clonal proliferation of hematopoietic precursors of the myeloid or lymphoid lineages. Of the two major subgroups, acute lymphoblastic leukemia is more common in children, while acute myelogenous leukemia predominates in adults. With modern chemotherapy 60%-70% of all children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia can be long-term survivors and are potentially cured. Although the prognosis in acute myelogenous leukemia is less fav...

  17. Flavopiridol in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a concise review.

    Christian, Beth A; Grever, Michael R; Byrd, John C; Lin, Thomas S

    2009-01-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with high-risk cytogenetic features such as del(17p13) have limited treatment options and decreased overall survival. Dysfunction of p53 leads to resistance to fludarabine-based therapies. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKi) are a novel class of agents that induce apoptosis in CLL cells independent of p53 mutational status. The synthetic flavone flavopiridol demonstrated promising in vitro activity in CLL. In initial phase I studies using a continuous infusion dosing schedule in a variety of malignancies, no clinical activity was observed. Detailed pharmacokinetic modeling led to the development of a novel dosing schedule designed to achieve target drug concentrations in vivo. In phase I testing, this dosing schedule resulted in acute tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) as the dose-limiting toxicity. With the implementation of a standardized protocol to prevent severe TLS, flavopiridol was administered safely, and responses were observed in heavily pretreated, fludarabine-refractory patients, cytogenetically high-risk patients, and patients with bulky lymphadenopathy. In a pharmacokinetic analysis, flavopiridol area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) correlated with clinical response and cytokine release syndrome. Phase II studies are under way with encouraging preliminary results. Flavopiridol is currently under active investigation in combination with other agents and as a means to eradicate minimal residual disease in patients following cytoreductive chemotherapy. Several other investigational CDKi in preclinical and early clinical development are briefly discussed in this review. PMID:19778838

  18. Acute acalculous cholecystitis complicating chemotherapy for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Olfa Kassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a rare complication in the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukemia. Diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis remains difficult during neutropenic period. We present two acute myeloblastic leukemia patients that developed acute acalculous cholecystitis during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. They suffered from fever, vomiting and acute pain in the epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder. Surgical management was required in one patient and conservative treatment was attempted in the other patient. None treatment measures were effective and two patients died. Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a serious complication in neutropenic patients. Earlier diagnosis could have expedited the management of these patients.

  19. PEG10 Activation by Co-Stimulation of CXCR5 and CCR7 Essentially Contributes to Resistance to Apoptosis in CD19+CD34+ B Cells from Patients with B Cell Lineage Acute and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ChunsongHu; JeiXiong; LinjeiZhang; BaojunHuang; QiupingZhang; QunLi; MingzhenYang; YaouWu; QunWu; QianShen; QingpingGao; KejianZhang; ZhiminSun; JunyanLin; YouxinJin

    2004-01-01

    We investigated CD19+CD34+ and CD19+CD34 B cells from cord blood (CB) and typical patients with B cell lineage acute and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-ALL and B-CLL) in terms of expression and functions of CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19. CXCR5 and CCR7 were selectively frequent expressed on B-ALL, B-CLL and CB CD19+CD34+ B cells, but not on CD19+CD34- B cells. Instead of induction of impressive chemotactic responsiveness, CXCL13 and CCL19 together induced significant resistance to TNF-α-mediated apoptosis in B-ALL and B-CLL but not CB CD19+CD34+ B cells. B-ALL and B-CLL CD19+CD34+ B cells expressed elevatedlevel of Paternally Expressed Gene 10 (PEG10), and CXCL13 and CCL19 together significantly up-regulated PEG10 expression in the cells. We found that CXCL13 and CCL19 together by means of activation of CXCR5 and CCR7 up-regulated PEG10 expression and function, subsequent stabilized caspase-3 and caspase-8 in B-ALL and B-CLL CD19+CD34+ B cells, and rescued the cells from TNF-α-mediated apoptosis. We suggested that normal lymphocytes, especially naive B and T cells, utilized CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19 for migration, homing, maturation, and cell homeostasis as well as secondary lymphoid tissues organogenesis. Meanwhile certain malignant cells took advantages of CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19 for infiltration, resistance to apoptosis, and inappropriate proliferation. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  20. PEG10 Activation by Co-Stimulation of CXCR5 and CCR7 Essentially Contributes to Resistance to Apoptosis in CD19+CD34+ B Cells from Patients with B Cell Lineage Acute and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Chunsong Hu; Qian Shen; Qingping Gao; Kejian Zhang; Zhimin Sun; Junyan Liu; Youxin Jin; Jinquan Tan; Jei Xiong; Linjei zhang; Baojun Huang; Qiuping Zhang; Qun Li; Mingzhen Yang; Yaou Wu; Qun Wu

    2004-01-01

    We investigated CD19+CD34+ and CD19+CD34- B cells from cord blood (CB) and typical patients with B cell lineage acute and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-ALL and B-CLL) in terms of expression and functions of CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19. CXCR5 and CCR7 were selectively frequent expressed on B-ALL, B-CLL and CB CD19+CD34+ B cells, but not on CD19+CD34- B cells. Instead of induction of impressive chemotactic responsiveness, CXCL13 and CCL19 together induced significant resistance to TNF-α-mediated apoptosis in B-ALL and B-CLL but not CB CD19+CD34+ B cells. B-ALL and B-CLL CD19+CD34+ B cells expressed elevated level of Paternally Expressed Gene 10 (PEG10), and CXCL13 and CCL19 together significantly up-regulated PEG10 expression in the cells. We found that CXCL13 and CCL19 together by means of activation of CXCR5 and CCR7 up-regulated PEG10 expression and function, subsequent stabilized caspase-3 and caspase-8 in B-ALL and B-CLL CD19+CD34+ B cells, and rescued the cells from TNF-α-mediated apoptosis. We suggested that normal lymphocytes, especially na(I)ve B and T cells, utilized CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19 for migration, homing, maturation, and cell homeostasis as well as secondary lymphoid tissues organogenesis.Meanwhile certain malignant cells took advantages of CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19 for infiltration,resistance to apoptosis, and inappropriate proliferation.

  1. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  2. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2016-08-10

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Ommen, Hans Beier; Nederby, Line; Toft-Petersen, Marie;

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses how minimal residual disease (MRD) is detected and managed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. The most commonly used techniques to detect residual leukemia in patients in complete remission (CR) are quantitative PCR (qPCR) and multicolor flow cytometry (MFC). While q...

  4. Leukemia cutis with lymphoglandular bodies: a clue to acute lymphoblastic leukemia cutis

    Obiozor, Cynthia; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Fraga, Garth R.

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia cutis describes cutaneous lesions produced by infiltrates of leukemic cells. It usually manifests contemporaneously with the initial diagnosis of systemic leukemia, but may also precede or follow systemic leukemia. Most cases are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. Adult B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cutis is very rare. We report a 59-year-old woman with a history of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapsed with aleukemic lymphoblastic leukemia cutis. Lymphoglandular bodi...

  5. Hodgkin lymphoma transformation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma

    Krause, John R.; Drinkard, Lee C.; Keglovits, Latoya C.

    2013-01-01

    Transformation to a large cell lymphoma may occur during the course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) in approximately 5% of the cases. This is known as Richter's transformation. A much less frequent transformation to Hodgkin lymphoma may occur. We report a case of CLL/SLL in which a transformation to Hodgkin lymphoma occurred, and we review previously published reports of this transformation. Transformation to Hodgkin lymphoma in CLL/SLL has a poor outcome ...

  6. Problems and strategies for bone marrow transplantation in acute leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Santos, G W

    1988-01-01

    Certain marrow transplant protocols can now result in a 50-70% long disease-free survival and low relapse rates in acute leukemia (AL) in CR1, CR2, or CML following cytoreduction and HLA-identical marrow infusion. Two-thirds of deaths are due to acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or viral infection. The other deaths are due to toxicities of the cytoreductive treatment. Prevention of GVHD has been tried by treatment after the transplant or treating the marrow (lymphocyte depletion). Cyclosporine (CsA) or CsA plus methotrexate has reduced acute GVHD but not chronic GVHD. Marrow has been treated with monoclonal antibodies and lectins or elutriated to decrease numbers of T lymphocytes. Some studies have been effective, but the majority have shown an increased number of rejections or leukemic relapses. Apart from teratogenic effects, thalidomide has minimal toxicity. It effectively prevents and treats acute and chronic GVHD in rodent models. Clinical trials will soon begin. Mismatched related or matched unrelated donors have been employed in the clinic with limited success. Alternatively, autologous transplantation in acute leukemia has shown promising results. Possible solutions to remaining problems and strategies will be discussed. PMID:3052840

  7. Pentostatin and Lymphocyte Infusion in Preventing Graft Rejection in Patients Who Have Undergone Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    2016-02-29

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Graft Versus Host Disease; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  8. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2016-03-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  9. Rituximab for the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    M Gentile

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available M Gentile, E Vigna, C Mazzone, E Lucia, AG Recchia, L Morabito2, MG Bisconte, C Gentile, F Morabito1UOC di Ematologia, Azienda Ospedaliera di Cosenza, Italy; 2Servicio de Hematología y Hemoterapia, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife, SpainAbstract: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is a lymphoproliferative disorder that originates from antigen-experienced B lymphocytes that do not die and hence accumulate due to external survival signals or undergo apoptosis and are replenished by proliferating precursors. These neoplastic lymphocytes exhibit a characteristic immunophenotype of CD5+/CD19+/CD20+/HLA-DR+/CD23+/sIgdim. Thus, the CD20 antigen has been an appealing target for therapy. The introduction of the monoclonal antibody rituximab (anti-CD20 enabled an outstanding advance in CLL treatment. The introduction of this monoclonal antibody into chemotherapy regimens has dramatically improved complete response rates and progression-free survival in patients with both untreated and relapsed CLL. Although only preliminary data from phase III confirmatory trials have been reported, the FCR regimen, which combines fludarabine and cyclophosphamide with rituximab, is currently the most effective treatment regimen for CLL patients, and has also been demonstrated to significantly improve overall survival . The success of rituximab and the identification of other CLL lymphocyte surface antigens have spurred the development of a multitude of monoclonal antibodies targeting distinct proteins and epitopes in an attempt to target CLL cells more effectively.Keywords: rituximab, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chemotherapy

  10. Radioimmunotherapy for Treatment of Acute Leukemia.

    Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Eugène, Thomas; Guérard, François; Gaschet, Joëlle; Bailly, Clément; Mougin, Marie; Bourgeois, Mickaël; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chérel, Michel; Chevallier, Patrice

    2016-03-01

    Acute leukemias are characterized by accumulation of immature cells (blasts) and reduced production of healthy hematopoietic elements. According to the lineage origin, two major leukemias can be distinguished: acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). Although the survival rate for pediatric ALL is close to 90%, half of the young adults with AML or ALL and approximately 90% of older patients with AML or ALL still die of their disease, raising the need for innovative therapeutic approaches. As almost all leukemic blasts express specific surface antigens, targeted immunotherapy appears to be particularly promising. However, published results of immunotherapy alone are generally modest. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) brings additional therapeutic mechanisms using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed to tumor antigens, thus adding radiobiological cytotoxicity to immunologic cytotoxicity. Because of the high radiosensitivity of tumor cells and the diffuse widespread nature of the disease, making it rapidly accessible to circulating radiolabeled mAbs, acute leukemias represent relevant indications for RIT. With the development of recombinant and humanized mAbs, innovative radionuclides, and more efficient radiolabeling and pretargeting techniques, RIT has significantly improved over the last 10 years. Different approaches of α and β RIT targeting CD22, CD33, CD45, or CD66 antigens have already been evaluated or are currently being developed in the treatment of acute leukemia. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical studies demonstrating the potential of RIT in treatment of AML and ALL. PMID:26897718

  11. Chromosomal study for prognostic grouping in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    To determine the frequency of various cytogenetic aberrations in newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients, and their detection rate by cytogenetic and fluorescent In situ hybridization (FISH) technique separately. Analysis was made on 100 diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients. Cytogenetics and FISH technique were performed on blood or bone marrow samples. Nineteen out of 100 cases (19%) showed karyotype abnormalities; whereas 55 showed abnormalities using the CLL - specific FISH probes. The most frequent abnormality detected by standard cytogenetics was trisomy 12. The most common abnormality detected by FISH was a deletion of 13q14 (40 out of 55 cases; 72% of the abnormal). For prognostic grouping of CLL patients, FISH must always be requested which may even replace standard karyotyping. These chromosomal markers help in choosing the therapeutic options. (author)

  12. Lenalidomide in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Agostino Cortelezzi; Mariarita Sciumè; Gianluigi Reda

    2012-01-01

    The application of nucleoside analogue-based chemotherapy and immunotherapy with rituximab or alemtuzumab has increased both response rate and survival in patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL). However, because none of these therapies is curative, sequential therapeutic regimens are required. The majority of patients with relapsed or refractory CLL carry poor prognostic factors and show shorter overall survival and resistance to standard treatment. Numerous drugs have recently be...

  13. Aureobasidium pullulans infection in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Leonardo Rodrigues de Oliveira; Helio Moraes-Souza; Andre Luiz Maltos; Keila Cristina dos Santos; Rodrigo Juliano Molina; Cristina Hueb Barata

    2013-01-01

    Saprophytic fungi are being increasingly recognized as etiologic agents of mycoses in immunosuppressed patients. We report a case of subcutaneous infiltration by Aureobasidium pullulans, likely due to traumatic inoculation, in a neutropenic patient during chemotherapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The patient was treated with amphotericin B deoxycholate but was subsequently switched to itraconazole, which improved the lesion. This case highlights the importance of considering unusual fung...

  14. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Inception to Cure: Are We There?

    Lad, Deepesh P.; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Subhash

    2012-01-01

    There have been remarkable advances in our understanding of the biology and therapeutics of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. B cell receptor signaling and micro-environment in CLL biology have been the most modern areas of research. In CLL therapeutics, we have come a long way from alkylating agents to chemo-immunotherapy. Despite this there remain significant lacunae in the disease biology that has hindered our quest to achieve the ultimate in CLL: Cure. This review aims to summarize the past, ...

  15. Immunological aspects in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) development

    García-Muñoz, Ricardo; Galiacho, Verónica Roldan; Llorente, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is unique among B cell malignancies in that the malignant clones can be featured either somatically mutated or unmutated IGVH genes. CLL cells that express unmutated immunoglobulin variable domains likely underwent final development prior to their entry into the germinal center, whereas those that express mutated variable domains likely transited through the germinal center and then underwent final development. Regardless, the cellular origin of CLL remains ...

  16. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    2016-04-08

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  18. Therapeutic Autologous Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With High-Risk or Recurrent Myeloid Leukemia After Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    2011-07-12

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Do We Know What Causes Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    ... Topic Can acute myeloid leukemia be prevented? Do we know what causes acute myeloid leukemia? Some people ... genes – the instructions for how our cells function. We tend to look like our parents because they ...

  20. Ibrutinib Improves Survival in Patients with Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared ibrutinib (Imbruvica®) and ofatumumab (Arzerra®) for the treatment of relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL).

  1. Alterations of Lymphoid Enhancer Factor-1 Isoform Expression in Solid Tumors and Acute Leukemias

    Wenbing WANG; Carsten M(U)LLER-TIDOW; Ping JI; Bj(o)rn STEFFEN; Ralf METZGER; Paul M. SCHNEIDER; Hartmut HALFTER; Mark SCHRADER; Wolfgang E. BERDEL; Hubert SERVE

    2005-01-01

    Two major transcripts of lymphoid enhancer factor-1 (LEF-1) have been described. The long isoform with β-catenin binding domain functions as a transcriptional enhancer factor. The short isoform derives from an intronic promoter and exhibits dominant negative activity. Recently, alterations of LEF- 1isoforms distribution have been described in colon cancer. In the current study we employed a quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR method (TaqMan) to analyze expression of LEF-1 isoforms in a large cohort of human tumor (n=304) and tumor-free control samples (n=56). The highest expression level of LEF-1 was found in carcinoma samples whereas brain cancer samples expressed little. Expression of LEF1 was different in distinct cancer types. For example, the mRNA level of LEF-1 was lower in testicular tumor samples compared with tumor-free control samples. Besides epithelial cancers, significant LEF-1expression was also found in hematopoietic cells. In hematological malignancies, overall LEF-1 level was higher in lymphocytic leukemias compared with myeloid leukemias and normal hematopoiesis. However,acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia showed a significantly increased fraction of the oncogenic LEF-1 compared with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and chronic myeloid leukemia. Taken together,these data suggest that LEF-1 is abundantly expressed in human tumors and the ratio of the oncogenic and the dominant negative short isoform altered not only in carcinomas but also in leukemia.

  2. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2016-02-12

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Psychological Risk Factors in Acute Leukemia

    Gouva M.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Several theoretical models have been occasionally proposed to account for the involvement of psychological factors in cancer genesis. Family environment and relations as well as certain personality traits were correlated to cancer onset. However, little is known in the case of acute leukemia. The present study examined family environment, state-trait anxiety, hostility and the direction of hostility as well as alexithymia in 41 acute leukemia patients and their first degree relatives (70. In accordance with previous findings, the present results showed that family cohesion, conflict and organization as well as guilt, state anxiety and alexithymia were significant risk factors for the development of the disease.

  4. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-04-21

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Lymphocyte subpopulation in acute viral hepatitis.

    Datta, U; Sehgal, S.; Pal, S. R.; Dhall, K; Singh, S.; Datta, D. V.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of peripheral blood lymphocytes were performed in 41 patients with acute viral hepatitis, in grade III-IV coma; 16 patients were in the third trimester of pregnancy. There were significant reductions in absolute lymphocyte count and T cell number in patients who succumbed to the disease, when compared with those who survived. B cell counts were similar in the two groups and migration inhibition test with BCG antigen was normal. It is postulated that a decrease in the number of cells i...

  6. Drug screen in patient cells suggests quinacrine to be repositioned for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    To find drugs suitable for repositioning for use against leukemia, samples from patients with chronic lymphocytic, acute myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were tested in response to 1266 compounds from the LOPAC1280 library (Sigma). Twenty-five compounds were defined as hits with activity in all leukemia subgroups (<50% cell survival compared with control) at 10 μM drug concentration. Only one of these compounds, quinacrine, showed low activity in normal PBMCs and was therefore selected for further preclinical evaluation. Mining the NCI-60 and the NextBio databases demonstrated leukemia sensitivity and the ability of quinacrine to reverse myeloid leukemia gene expression. Mechanistic exploration was performed using the NextBio bioinformatic software using gene expression analysis of drug exposed acute myeloid leukemia cultures (HL-60) in the database. Analysis of gene enrichment and drug correlations revealed strong connections to ribosomal biogenesis nucleoli and translation initiation. The highest drug–drug correlation was to ellipticine, a known RNA polymerase I inhibitor. These results were validated by additional gene expression analysis performed in-house. Quinacrine induced early inhibition of protein synthesis supporting these predictions. The results suggest that quinacrine have repositioning potential for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia by targeting of ribosomal biogenesis

  7. Aureobasidium pullulans infection in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Leonardo Rodrigues de Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Saprophytic fungi are being increasingly recognized as etiologic agents of mycoses in immunosuppressed patients. We report a case of subcutaneous infiltration by Aureobasidium pullulans, likely due to traumatic inoculation, in a neutropenic patient during chemotherapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The patient was treated with amphotericin B deoxycholate but was subsequently switched to itraconazole, which improved the lesion. This case highlights the importance of considering unusual fungal infections in critically ill patients such as those who are immunosuppressed due to chemotherapy. Diagnostic techniques and effective antifungal therapy have improved the prognosis of these cases.

  8. Reverse Pseudohyperkalemia: An Important Clinical Entity in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Sahar Mansoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperkalemia is a potentially lethal electrolyte derangement commonly seen in patients with hematologic neoplasms with or without renal failure. Pseudohyperkalemia and reverse pseudohyperkalemia also can be seen in this patient population and early recognition and diagnosis of these conditions are vital. Here, we report a case of reverse pseudohyperkalemia in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and provide recommendations regarding diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for management of such patients. Further, we discuss the pathogenesis of this condition and its potential role as a surrogate of favorable prognostic features in patients with CLL.

  9. PARP1-Driven Apoptosis in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is considered a malignancy resulting from defects in apoptosis. For this reason, targeting apoptotic pathways in CLL may be valuable for its management. Poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP1) is the main member of a family of nuclear enzymes that act as DNA damage sensors. Through binding on DNA damaged structures, PARP1 recruits repair enzymes and serves as a survival factor, but if the damage is severe enough, its action may lead the cell to apoptosis thro...

  10. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    2015-07-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  11. Idelalisib for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma.

    Barrientos, Jacqueline C

    2016-09-01

    Idelalisib is a first-in-class selective oral PI3Kδ inhibitor for the treatment of patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma, a predominantly elderly population with high comorbidity. The drug promotes apoptosis in primary CLL cells ex vivo, independent of common prognostic markers and inhibits CLL cell homing, migration and adhesion to cells in the microenvironment. Idelalisib has shown efficacy with acceptable safety as monotherapy and combination therapy in relapsed/refractory CLL. Idelalisib has clinical activity in patients with CLL with del(17p). The development of other novel B-cell-targeted agents provides the opportunity to evaluate additional idelalisib treatment combinations for their potential to further improve outcomes in CLL/small lymphocytic lymphoma. PMID:27324214

  12. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  13. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Molecular Insights in MLL Rearranged Acute Leukemia

    R.W. Stam (Ronald)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants (<1 year of age) is characterized by a high incidence (~80%) of rearrangements of the MLL gene, resistance to several important chemotherapeutic drugs, and a poor treatment outcome. With overall survival rates for infant ALL not exceeding 50%

  15. Bilateral breast involvement in acute myeloid leukemia

    Hakeem A, Mandakini BT, Asif K, Firdaus, Shagufta RC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast involvement by leukemic infiltration is usually bilateral, but may be unilateral. Clinically patients can present with either single or multiple masses, or with diffuse breast engorgement, with or without nodularity. The affected patients are predominantly young adults. We present a case of an adolescent girl with acute myeloid leukemia having bilateral breast infiltration by leukemic cells.

  16. P-GLYCOPROTEIN QUANTITATION IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    Mali in Nikougoftar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Multi drug resistance(MDR is a major problem in the treatment of cancer and hemalological malignancies. This resistance is multi factorial and is the result of decreased intra cellular drug accumulation. This is partly due to the presence of a 170KD intra membranous protein termed P-glycoprotein(P-gp that is an energy-dependent efflux pump which has increased expression on drug-resistance cells. In this study we identified the presence of P-gp by staining with Fluorescent Iso Thio Cyanate (FITC conjugated anti P-gp in acute leukemia patients and flow cytometry in addition to performing immunophenotype analysis and French, American British (FAB classification. Results revealed that one fifth of leuke¬mic patients expressed P-gp and this phenotype was more prevalent in Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia(AUL and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML than in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia(ALL. Other findings showed a logical rela¬tionship between this phenotype and age groups. There was not any association between P-gp+ phenotype and FAB and Immunophenotyping sub classification, but there was a linear relationship between CD34 and CD7 expression and P-gp+ phenotype. The accumulation of P-gp molecule that was stated as Mean Fluores¬cence Intensity (MFI on the blasts1 membrane of AUL and AML patients showed marked increase in comparison to ALL. Furthermore MFI in P-gp+ relapsed patients was much more than P-gp+ pretreatment patients.

  17. Use of clofarabine for acute childhood leukemia

    A Pession

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A Pession, R Masetti, K Kleinschmidt, A MartoniPediatric Oncology and Hematology “Lalla Seràgnoli”, University of Bologna, ItalyAbstract: A second-generation of purine nucleoside analogs, starting with clofarabine, has been developed in the course of the search for new therapeutic agents for acute childhood leukemia, especially for refractory or relapsed disease. Clofarabine is a hybrid of fludarabine and cladribine, and has shown to have antileukemic activity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia as well as in myeloid disorders. As the only new antileukemic chemotherapeutic agent to enter clinical use in the last 10 years, clofarabine was approved as an orphan drug with the primary indication of use in pediatric patients. Toxicity has been tolerable in a heavily pretreated patient population, and clofarabine has been demonstrated to be safe, both as a single agent and in combination therapies. Liver dysfunction has been the most frequently observed adverse event, but this is generally reversible. Numerous Phase I and II trials have recently been conducted, and are still ongoing in an effort to find the optimal role for clofarabine in various treatment strategies. Concomitant use of clofarabine, cytarabine, and etoposide was confirmed to be safe and effective in two independent trials. Based on the promising results when used as a salvage regimen, clofarabine is now being investigated for its potential to become part of frontline protocols.Keywords: clofarabine, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia, pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

  18. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2013-09-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Targeted treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical potential of obinutuzumab

    Smolej L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lukáš Smolej 4th Department of Internal Medicine – Hematology, University Hospital Hradec Králové and Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Králové, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic Abstract: Introduction of targeted agents revolutionized the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL in the past decade. Addition of chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab to chemotherapy significantly improved efficacy including overall survival (OS in untreated fit patients; humanized anti-CD52 antibody alemtuzumab and fully human anti-CD20 antibody ofatumumab lead to improvement in refractory disease. Novel small molecule inhibitors such as ibrutinib and idelalisib demonstrated excellent activity and were very recently licensed in relapsed/refractory CLL. Obinutuzumab (GA101 is the newest monoclonal antibody approved for the treatment of CLL. This novel, glycoengineered, type II humanized anti-CD20 antibody is characterized by enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and direct induction of cell death compared to type I antibodies. Combination of obinutuzumab and chlorambucil yielded significantly better OS in comparison to chlorambucil monotherapy in untreated comorbid patients. These results led to approval of obinuzutumab for the treatment of CLL. Numerous clinical trials combining obinutuzumab with other cytotoxic drugs and novel small molecules are currently under way. This review focuses on the role of obinutuzumab in the treatment of CLL. Keywords: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, anti-CD20 antibodies, chlorambucil, rituximab, ofatumumab, obinutuzumab, overall survival

  20. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    2016-02-22

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  1. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Elzbieta Gocek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17(q22;q12 chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  2. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML

  3. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  4. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  5. A case of chronic lymphocytic leukemia with massive ascites

    Yonal, Ipek; Nazlıgul, Esra; Tas, Gulsum; Agan, Mehmet Ramazan; Yenerel, Mustafa Nuri; Nalcaci, Meliha

    2012-01-01

    An 81-year old woman with a history of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was admitted with night sweats and abdominal distension. A complete blood count showed hemoglobin 5 g/dL, white blood cell (WBC) count 28.5×109/L and platelets 38.4×109/L. Peripheral blood smear examination showed a large number of smudge cells and lymphocytosis composed of mature-looking lymphocytes with clumped nuclear chromatin. Computed tomography scan demonstrated enlarged cervical, axillary, paraaortic, retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes with concomitant omental thickening and ascites. Also, the liver and the spleen were enlarged in the presence of multiple ill-defined hypoechoic areas in the latter. Histopathological analysis of the cervical lymph node biopsy was consistent with CLL. Bone marrow examination showed diffuse infiltration of the marrow with small lymphocytes. Analysis of the ascitic fluid revealed an exudate with WBC 1220 cells/mL. Cytocentrifuge preparation of the ascitic fluid showed small mature lymphoid cells containing hyperchromatic nuclei with coarsely granular chromatin. On flow cytometric analysis of the ascitic fluid, expression of CD5, CD19, CD20, CD22, CD23, CD45 and HLA-DR was compatible with a diagnosis of CLL, in accordance with the results of the peripheral blood analysis. The patient was treated with chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisolone but died within one month after development of non-chylous ascites. PMID:23372915

  6. A case of chronic lymphocytic leukemia with massive ascites

    Meliha Nalcaci

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An 81-year old woman with a history of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL was admitted with night sweats and abdominal distension. A complete blood count showed hemoglobin 5 g/dL, white blood cell (WBC count 28.5x109/L and platelets 38.4x109/L. Peripheral blood smear examination showed a large number of smudge cells and lymphocytosis composed of mature-looking lymphocytes with clumped nuclear chromatin. Computed tomography scan demonstrated enlarged cervical, axillary, paraaortic, retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes with concomitant omental thickening and ascites. Also, the liver and the spleen were enlarged in the presence of multiple ill-defined hypoechoic areas in the latter. Histopathological analysis of the cervical lymph node biopsy was consistent with CLL. Bone marrow examination showed diffuse infiltration of the marrow with small lymphocytes. Analysis of the ascitic fluid revealed an exudate with WBC 1220 cells/mL. Cytocentrifuge preparation of the ascitic fluid showed small mature lymphoid cells containing hyperchromatic nuclei with coarsely gran- ular chromatin. On flow cytometric analysis of the ascitic fluid, expression of CD5, CD19, CD20, CD22, CD23, CD45 and HLA-DR was compatible with a diagnosis of CLL, in accordance with the results of the peripheral blood analysis. The patient was treated with chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisolone but died within one month after development of non-chylous ascites.

  7. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2015-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Successful treatment with interferon of chicken pox in children with acute leukemia.

    Kim,Byung Soo

    1984-02-01

    Full Text Available Childhood leukemia, especially acute lymphocytic leukemia, can now be completely cured by a multimodality approach in one out of every two patients. Since prolonged maintenance therapy with anti-cancer agents for three years is required for complete cure, a significant problem during this course of treatment is death due to secondary infection. Those with childhood leukemia receiving anti-cancer chemotherapy who became secondarily injected with chicken pox can now be treated successfully with interferon in the four cases reported here. Chicken pox was cured even while one of them was in relapse. Therefore, it can be said that a bright prospect, namely interferon, is on the horizon in the treatment of secondary viral diseases associated with acute leukemia.

  9. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed?

    ... at a sample of bone marrow cells. Blood chemistry and coagulation tests: Blood chemistry tests measure the amounts of certain chemicals in ... and strong magnets instead of x-rays. The energy from the radio waves is absorbed by the ...

  10. Adult Leukemias

    Moore, Lyall K.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past several years, advances have been made in the classification, diagnosis and therapy of the adult leukemias. The overall prognosis and quality of life have improved greatly, especially for patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemias. Some of the advances are described in this article. The importance of the clinical, laboratory and diagnostic tests for acute, chronic granulocytic and chronic lymphocytic leukemia are stressed. The therapy and prognosis for patients with the vari...

  11. 急性非淋巴细胞白血病化疗后血型变异2例%Two cases of the blood type variation after chemotherapy in patients with acute non-lymphocytic leukemia

    陆娟; 陈世兰

    2013-01-01

    Two patients after admission were diagnosed with acute myelocytic leukemia-M2a.After chemotherapy,the bone marrow of the two patients was in spontaneous remission.During the later treatment of chemotherapy,the patients' blood type changed.One patient's blood type was from O Rh(+) to B Rh(+),the other patient's blood type was from A Rh(+) to A Rh(-).Blood types of the two patients were both mutated.Then,they were transfused with the blood of the same types after variation,and no adverse reaction occurred.The reason why the blood type variation of the two patients with leukemia occurred after chemotherapy was the changes in cell membrane antigen caused by the effect of chemotherapy drugs.

  12. MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE IN ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) offers a way to precisely assess early treatment response and detect relapse. Established methods to study MRD are flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of antigen-receptor genes, and PCR amplification of fusion transcripts. The strong correlation between MRD levels and risk of relapse in childhood ALL is well established; studies in...

  13. Use of clofarabine for acute childhood leukemia

    Masetti, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    A Pession, R Masetti, K Kleinschmidt, A MartoniPediatric Oncology and Hematology “Lalla Seràgnoli”, University of Bologna, ItalyAbstract: A second-generation of purine nucleoside analogs, starting with clofarabine, has been developed in the course of the search for new therapeutic agents for acute childhood leukemia, especially for refractory or relapsed disease. Clofarabine is a hybrid of fludarabine and cladribine, and has shown to have antileukemic activity i...

  14. Systemic mastocytosis with associated acute myelogenous leukemia

    Zhrebker, Leah; Cooper, Barry; Krause, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is a condition associated with a clonal neoplastic proliferation of mast cells. Approximately 40% of patients with SM present with an associated clonal hematological non–mast cell lineage disorder. Patients presenting with SM–acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have the worst prognosis. We present a case of a 62-year-old woman who was diagnosed with SM-AML. After initial treatment with a standard regimen of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C)/idarubicin, her bone marrow showed re...

  15. Novel Therapies for Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Fullmer, Amber; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias

    2009-01-01

    The outcome of salvage therapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor. Salvage therapy mimics regimens with activity in newly diagnosed ALL. Novel strategies under investigation as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy improve the treatment of relapsed disease. For some ALL subsets, specific therapies are indicated. The addition of targeted therapy in Philadelphia chromosome–positive ALL has improved responses in relapsed patients without resistance to availabl...

  16. Pathogenesis and prognostication in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Zuckerman, Tsila; Rowe, Jacob M.

    2014-01-01

    The process of lymphoid maturation is tightly controlled by the hierarchical activation of transcription factors and selection through functional signal transduction. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represents a group of B/T-precursor-stage lymphoid cell malignancies arising from genetic alterations that block lymphoid differentiation and drive aberrant cell proliferation and survival. With recent advances in next-generation sequencing, we are discovering new mutations affecting normal lym...

  17. Cytogenetic studies of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Tarek Abd -Alla Atia

    2010-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) describes as a group of hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by expansion of undifferentiated myeloid progenitors. Acquired chromosomal anomaly particularly reciprocal translocations constitute one of the major events contribute to leukemogenesis. Patient and Methods: 45 untreated, newly diagnosed patients with de novo AML were enrolled in the present study and subjected to cytogenetic analysis. Four ml of heparinized peripheral blood were collected for...

  18. Frank hematuria as the presentation feature of acute leukemia

    Suriya Owais

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Muco-cutaneous bleeding is a common presenting feature of acute leukemias. Mucosal bleeding usually manifests as gum bleeding and/or epistaxis but may occur in any mucosal surface of the body. Hematuria as an isolated or main presenting feature of acute leukemia is rare. We describe two cases of acute leukemia, a 19 year old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a 52 year old male with acute myeloid leukemia, both presenting with gross hematuria. There was no demonstrable leukemic infiltration of the urinary tract on imaging studies. Hematuria in these patients was likely to be due to occult leukemic infiltration of the urinary system, aggravated by thrombocytopenia, as it subsided after starting chemotherapy. Our cases highlight that hematuria should be remembered as a rare presenting feature of acute leukemia.

  19. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients. PMID:23532815

  20. Practical approach to management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Smolej, Lukáš; Šimkovič, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Revolutionary progress has recently changed the landscape of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Powerful prognostic factors, especially p53 mutation and/or deletion and IGHV mutation status, have refined individual patient prognosis. Purine analogs and monoclonal antibodies paved the way from palliative treatment to chemoimmunotherapy capable of eradication of minimal residual disease and prolongation of survival. Obinutuzumab (GA-101) and ofatumumab have been recently approved for the treatment of comorbid patients. Bendamustine is available for first-line treatment of patients ineligible for fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR). High-dose glucocorticoids combined with rituximab represent a promising option for refractory CLL; ofatumumab is approved for fludarabine- and alemtuzumab-refractory patients. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is the only curative option but is feasible in a highly selected group of patients only. The novel small molecule inhibitors ibrutinib and idelalisib have been recently approved for relapsed/refractory CLL. This review provides practical advice for diagnosis, prognostication and treatment of CLL. PMID:27186193

  1. Novel Therapies for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: A Canadian Perspective.

    Owen, Carolyn; Assouline, Sarit; Kuruvilla, John; Uchida, Cassandra; Bellingham, Catherine; Sehn, Laurie

    2015-11-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common adult lymphoproliferative disorder in Western countries. The current standard of care for CLL is chemoimmunotherapy, typically with fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR). However, most patients with CLL are elderly with comorbidities and are unable to tolerate FCR. In order to choose the best treatment for each individual patient, physicians must balance efficacy with toxicity. In addition, most currently available treatments are ineffective in CLL patients with loss of TP53. Two groups of novel therapeutic agents-anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors-are attempting to address these issues, and 5 of these agents have progressed to phase 3 trials: obinutuzumab, idelalisib, ibrutinib, venetoclax (ABT-199), and duvelisib (IPI-145). We present the current evidence for these novel agents in the treatment of CLL, along with the perspectives of 4 Canadian oncology experts. PMID:26416145

  2. Recurrent deletions of IKZF1 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D.E.; Beuling, Eva; Marry M van den Heuvel-Eibrink; Obulkasim, Askar; Baruchel, André; Trka, Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Sonneveld, Edwin; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Pieters, Rob; Zimmermann, Martin; Zwaan, C. Michel; Fornerod, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    IKAROS family zinc finger 1/IKZF1 is a transcription factor important in lymphoid differentiation, and a known tumor suppressor in acute lymphoid leukemia. Recent studies suggest that IKZF1 is also involved in myeloid differentiation. To investigate whether IKZF1 deletions also play a role in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a panel of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia samples for deletions of the IKZF1 locus using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and for mutations...

  3. Systemic mastocytosis with acute myelomonocytic leukemia: a case report

    Kar, Rakhee; Rao, Seema; Pati, Hara Prasad

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow mastocytosis may be associated with many clonal non mast cell hematological neoplasms and its association with acute myeloid leukemia especially with t (8; 21) has been described. We describe an interesting case of coexistence of systemic mastocytosis with acute myelomonocytic leukemia in a young child. Diagnosis of acute myelomonocytic leukemia was based on bone marrow aspirate findings coupled with cytochemistry. Systemic mastocytosis was diagnosed on the basis of bone marrow bi...

  4. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)-Then and now.

    Rai, Kanti R; Jain, Preetesh

    2016-03-01

    The field of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has witnessed considerable change since the time clinical staging was introduced in clinical practice in 1975. Over the years, the prognostication in CLL has expanded with the addition in late 90s of mutational status of variable region of immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGHV), and chromosomal analyses using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). More recently, stereotypy of BCR (B cell receptor) and whole exome sequencing (WES) based discovery of specific mutations such as NOTCH1, TP53, SF3B1, XPO-1, BIRC3, ATM, and RPS15 further refined the current prognostication system in CLL. In therapy, the field of CLL has seen major changes from oral chlorambucil and steroids prior to 1980s, to chemo-immunotherapy (CIT) with fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, rituximab (FCR) to the orally administered targeted therapeutic agents inhibiting kinases in the B cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway such as Ibrutinib (BTK inhibitor) and Idelalisib (p110 PI3Kδ inhibitor) and novel anti-CD20 mAb's (monoclonal antibodies) such as obinutuzumab. This progress is continuing and other targeted therapeutics such as Bcl2 antagonists (Venetoclax or ABT-199) and finally chimeric antigen receptor against T cells (CART) are in the process of being developed. This review is an attempt to summarize the major benchmarks in the prognostication and in the therapy of CLL. The topic allocated to us by Dr Ayalew Tefferi and Dr Carlo Brugnara is very appropriate to reminisce what our understanding of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was in 1976 and how rapidly have the advances occurring in this field affected the patients with CLL. Am. J. Hematol. 91:330-340, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26690614

  5. Prognosis and complications of acute childhood leukemia after prophylactic treatment of the central nervous

    From 1970 through 1979, 22 children with acute childhood leukemia and in remimmion were treated with preventive central nervous system (CNS) irradiation and simultaneous intrathecal methotrexate. A minimum follow-up duration was five months. Of 22 cases, 20 were acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and 2 were acute myelocytic leukemia (ALL). Five-year cumulative survival rate and five-year relapse free survival rate of ALL case were 48% and 46% respectively. Nor neurological disorders after the prophylactic combined therapy were recognized clinically by the time when this follow-up was finished. Of 15 children with ALL who were followed by computed tomography of the brain, 5(33%) had abnormal findings. Dilatation of the ventricles were seen in 3 cases, and low density areas of the occipital regions in 2 cases. (author)

  6. Duplication and loss of chromosome 21 in two children with Down syndrome and acute leukemia

    Rogan, P.K.; Close, P.; Gannutz, L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., Hershey, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-06

    Acute leukemia in Down syndrome (DS) is often associated with additional changes in the number of structure of chromosome 21. We present two DS patients whose leukemic karyotypes were associated with changes in chromosome 21 ploidy. Patient 1 developed acute lymphocytic leukemia (type L1); disomy for chromosome 21 was evident in all blast cells examined. Loss of the paternal chromosome in the leukemic clone produced maternal uniparental disomy with isodisomy over a 25-cM interval. The second patient had acute monoblastic leukemia (type M5) with tetrasomy 21 in all leukemic cells. DNA polymorphism analysis showed duplicate paternal chromosomes in the constitutional genotype. The maternal chromosome was subsequently duplicated in the leukemic clone. The distinct inheritance patterns of chromosome 21 in the blast cells of these patients would appear to indicate that leukemogenesis occurred by different genetic mechanisms in each individual. 57 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Leukemia.

    Juliusson, Gunnar; Hough, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Leukemias are a group of life threatening malignant disorders of the blood and bone marrow. In the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population, the acute leukemias are most prevalent, with chronic myeloid leukemia being infrequently seen. Factors associated with more aggressive disease biology tend to increase in frequency with increasing age, whilst tolerability of treatment strategies decreases. There are also challenges regarding the effective delivery of therapy specific to the AYA group, consequences on the unique psychosocial needs of this age group, including compliance. This chapter reviews the current status of epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment strategies and outcomes of AYA leukemia, with a focus on acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27595359

  8. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Clinical significance of microRNAs in chronic and acute human leukemia.

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Moles, Ramona; Nicot, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) are epigenetic regulators that target specific cellular mRNA to modulate gene expression patterns and cellular signaling pathways. miRNAs are involved in a wide range of biological processes and are frequently deregulated in human cancers. Numerous miRNAs promote tumorigenesis and cancer progression by enhancing tumor growth, angiogenesis, invasion and immune evasion, while others have tumor suppressive effects (Hayes, et al., Trends Mol Med 20(8): 460-9, 2014; Stahlhut and Slack, Genome Med 5 (12): 111, 2013). The expression profile of cancer miRNAs can be used to predict patient prognosis and clinical response to treatment (Bouchie, Nat Biotechnol 31(7): 577, 2013). The majority of miRNAs are intracellular localized, however circulating miRNAs have been detected in various body fluids and represent new biomarkers of solid and hematologic cancers (Fabris and Calin, Mol Oncol 10(3):503-8, 2016; Allegra, et al., Int J Oncol 41(6): 1897-912, 2012). This review describes the clinical relevance of miRNAs, lncRNAs and snoRNAs in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment response in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). PMID:27179712

  10. Clofarabine and Melphalan Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplasia or Acute Leukemia in Remission

    2016-06-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Criteria and Classification of Hybrid Acute Leukemia in 72 Acute Leukemias Based Mainly on Flow Cytometric Analysis

    Aoki, Sadao; Nomoto, Nobuhiko; Maruyama, Souichi; Shinada, Shoji; Shibata, Akira

    1991-01-01

    Phenotypes of leukemic cells can be determined through dual staining with pairs of FITC-labeled and PE-labeled monoclonal antibodies using a laser flow cytometer. Hybrid acute leukemia (HAL) was diagnosed when leukemic cells expressed 2 or more lymphoid markers and at least on myeloid marker simultaneously. Based on this criteria, nineteen out of 72 cases with untreated acute leukemia were diagnosed as HAL, 15 of 29 (51%) patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 4 of 43 (9%) patients wi...

  12. Triple cancer: chronic lymphocytic leukemia with bladder and prostate carcinoma.

    Gajendra, Smeeta; Sharma, Rashi; Sahoo, Manas Kumar

    2015-08-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) is a common lymphoproliferative disorder with an increased risk of developing subsequent neoplasms of epithelial and mesenchymal origin. The decreased immunity and B-cell dysfunction in CLL probably accounts for this emergence of second malignancies. We report a case of synchronous bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and prostatic carcinoma with CLL. A 74-year-old male who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia 2 years before, presented with recurrent urinary tract infection. Peripheral blood smear revealed leukocytosis with absolute lymphocytosis (absolute lymphocyte count: 37870 cells/mm³). Flow cytometric immunophenotyping revealed 75% abnormal lymphoid cells which were positive for CD 19, CD5, CD23, CD22, CD200, CD20 (moderate) with lambda light chain restriction and negative for CD3, CD10, FMC7, CD38, CD138, IgM, CD103, CD123. F Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) showed increased metabolic activity of the left lateral wall of the urinary bladder extending to the left UV junction, adjacent part of trigone and bladder neck region along with multiple heterogeneous enhancing areas with increased FDG avidity within the prostate. Transurethral resection of the bladder tumour by cystoscopy was performed. Histopathology showed high grade, muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma. Due to presence of uptake in the prostate, transurethral resection of the prostate was done and histopathology revealed adenocarcinoma of prostate (prostate specific antigen- positive), Gleason grade III+III and Gleason score 6. A high index of suspicion is required to detect synchronous and metachronous malignancies. Ancillary studies such as immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and PET/CT are often essential for detection and an accurate diagnosis. PMID:26277675

  13. Stereotyped B-cell receptors in one-third of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Agathangelidis, Andreas; Darzentas, Nikos; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia;

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that grouping of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) into distinct subsets with stereotyped BCRs is functionally and prognostically relevant. However, several issues need revisiting, including the criteria for identification of BCR stereotypy and its actual frequency as...

  14. Acute nonlymphocytic leukemia following bladder instillations with thiotepa.

    Easton, D. J.; Poon, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    A case of therapy-related leukemia is described. Other cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia have been associated with the intramuscular administration of thiotepa (an alkylating agent), but this patient received only intravesical instillations of the drug. The interval between the start of chemotherapy and the onset of leukemia was 56 months.

  15. Nanoparticle targeted therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Satake, Noriko; Lee, Joyce; Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Sarangi, Susmita; Chang, Astra; McLaughlin, Bridget; Zhou, Ping; Kenney, Elaina; Kraynov, Liliya; Arnott, Sarah; McGee, Jeannine; Nolta, Jan; Lam, Kit

    2011-06-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a unique ligand-conjugated nanoparticle (NP) therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). LLP2A, discovered by Dr. Kit Lam, is a high-affinity and high-specificity peptidomimetic ligand against an activated α4β1 integrin. Our study using 11 fresh primary ALL samples (10 precursor B ALL and 1 T ALL) showed that childhood ALL cells expressed activated α4β1 integrin and bound to LLP2A. Normal hematopoietic cells such as activated lymphocytes and monocytes expressed activated α4β1 integrin; however, normal hematopoietic stem cells showed low expression of α4β1 integrin. Therefore, we believe that LLP2A can be used as a targeted therapy for childhood ALL. The Lam lab has developed novel telodendrimer-based nanoparticles (NPs) which can carry drugs efficiently. We have also developed a human leukemia mouse model using immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ null mice engrafted with primary childhood ALL cells from our patients. LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using primary leukemia cells and this mouse model. NPs will be loaded first with DiD near infra-red dye, and then with the chemotherapeutic agents daunorubicin or vincristine. Both drugs are mainstays of current chemotherapy for childhood ALL. Targeting properties of LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated by fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry, MTS assay, and mouse survival after treatment. We expect that LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be preferentially delivered and endocytosed to leukemia cells as an effective targeted therapy.

  16. The genetic signature of acute leukemia in infacy

    Chantrain, Christophe; Poirel, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    Infant leukemia is a rare malignant disease with clinical and biological features distinct from older children. It is characterized by a high incidence of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangement and a poor outcome despite intensive chemotherapy. Recent genetic studies argue in favor of a unique biology of infant acute leukemia. This review describes the specific genetic signature of infant leukemia. It discusses the important insights it provides into the understanding of leukemogenes...

  17. DNA repair initiated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia lymphocytes by 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide is inhibited by fludarabine and clofarabine.

    Yamauchi, Takahiro; Nowak, Billie J.; Michael J Keating; Plunkett, William

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) lymphocytes respond to DNA alkylation by excision repair, with the extent of repair increasing as the cells acquire resistance to alkylating agents. Because incorporation of nucleotide analogues into the repair patches elicits death signals in quiescent cells, the increased capacity for excision repair in alkylator-resistant cells could facilitate incorporation of nucleotide analogues. We hypothesized that the mechanism-based interaction of nucleosi...

  18. Retinoid Differentiation Therapy for Common Types of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Philip Hughes; Geoffrey Brown

    2012-01-01

    Many cancers arise in a tissue stem cell, and cell differentiation is impaired resulting in an accumulation of immature cells. The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in 1987 to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), pioneered a new approach to obtain remission in malignancies by restoring the terminal maturation of leukemia cells resulting in these cells having a limited lifespan. Differentiation therapy also offers the prospect o...

  19. Data quality in the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    Ostgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Severinsen, Marianne Tang;

    2013-01-01

    The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data.......The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data....

  20. Paranasal Manifestations of Early Stage Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Ceren Günel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most common adult leukemia. A few studies have been reported about the relationship between CLL and paranasal sinuses. We aimed to investigate the paranasal manifestations of CLL and to determine the expression of nuclear factor-ĸB (NF-kB and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α in the nasal mucosa in patients with CLL. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was a clinical trial that involved 40 patients. Group CLL (n=20 consisted of patients with early-stage CLL who were followed-up at the hematology clinic and who did not receive any treatment. The control group (n=20 consisted of patients who had undergone concha surgery because of nasal obstruction. Paranasal sinus computer tomography scans of all patients were taken, they were scored on the basis of the Lund–Mackay system, and sinusitis findings were recorded. The biopsy material taken from the inferior concha head of all patients was immunohistochemically stained with primary antibodies against NF-kB and TNF-α. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to NF-κB (p=0.716 and TNF-α staining scores (p=1.000. The Lund–Mackay scores were significantly higher in the CLL group than in the control group (p=0.004. Fourteen patients had sinusitis at different locations, while the most common diagnosis was maxillary sinusitis (n=8 in the CLL group. CONCLUSION: This study showed that patients with early-stage CLL tend to have rhinosinusitis. However, NF-kB and TNF-α may not have a role in the inflammatory process involving the paranasal sinuses in patients with CLL.

  1. T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia and parvovirus infection in a child with neurofibromastosis-1

    Pallavi Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis (NF-1 patients have an increased risk of developing malignancies most commonly rhabdomyosarcomas, optic gliomas, brain tumors and non-lymphocytic leukemias. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL has been infrequently reported in association with NF-1. We describe a rare association of NF-1, T-lineage ALL and parvovirus infection in a 12-year-old child. In addition, it is also to emphasize that a high index of suspicion should be kept for parvovirus B19 infection as a cause of bicytopenia/pancytopenia in ALL patients following induction chemotherapy.

  2. Skin changes in acute myelogenous leukemia

    Mittal R

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year old woman developed progressive, firm, mild to moderately itchy, erythematous, papular and nodular lesions, over cheeks, extensors of limbs, scalp and lower back without any accompanying systemic complaints except for severe backache. Initially clinical diagnosis was cutaneous sarcoidosis. However presence of myeloblasts, monoblasts, myelocytes and metamyelocytes in peripheral blood smear and typical histopathology of nodule with mixed cellular infiltrate more around blood vessels, sweat glands and hair follicles with admixture of larger polymorphonuclears (myeloblasts/myelocytes, eosinophils with double nuclei, and larger phagocytic cells confirmed the diagnosis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML.

  3. DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASSIFICATION OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Sabina Chiaretti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a disseminated malignancy of B- or T-lymphoblasts which imposes a rapid and accurate diagnostic process to support an optimal risk-oriented therapy and thus increase the curability rate. The need for a precise diagnostic algorithm is underlined by the awareness that both ALL therapy and related success rates may vary greatly in function of ALL subset, from standard chemotherapy in patients with standard-risk ALL, to allotransplantation (SCT and targeted therapy in high-risk patients and cases expressing suitable biological targets, respectively. This review offers a glimpse on how best identify ALL and the most relevant ALL subsets.

  4. Poor adherence to dietary guidelines among adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Robien, Kim; Ness, Kirsten K.; Klesges, Lisa M.; Baker, K. Scott; Gurney, James G.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk of obesity and cardiovascular disease, conditions that healthy dietary patterns may help ameliorate or prevent. To evaluate the usual dietary intake of adult survivors of childhood ALL, food frequency questionnaire data were collected from 72 participants, and compared with the 2007 WCRF/AICR Cancer Prevention recommendations, the DASH diet, and the 2005 USDA Food Guide. Mean daily energ...

  5. Transcription factor networks in B-cell differentiation link development to acute lymphoid leukemia

    Somasundaram, Rajesh; Prasad, Mahadesh A. J.; Ungerbäck, Jonas; Sigvardsson, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    B-lymphocyte development in the bone marrow is controlled by the coordinated action of transcription factors creating regulatory networks ensuring activation of the B-lymphoid program and silencing of alternative cell fates. This process is tightly connected to malignant transformation because B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells display a pronounced block in differentiation resulting in the expansion of immature progenitor cells. Over the last few years, high-resolution analysis of g...

  6. The Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib with chemoimmunotherapy in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Brown, Jennifer R; Barrientos, Jacqueline C.; Barr, Paul M.; Flinn, Ian W.; Burger, Jan A.; Tran, Anh; Clow, Fong; James, Danelle F; Graef, Thorsten; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Rai, Kanti; O’Brien, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib was well tolerated when administered with BR CIT in previously treated chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma.Ibrutinib added to CIT was associated with a high degree of clinical activity that compares favorably to historical reports of CIT alone.

  7. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    2016-04-26

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  8. Elevated common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen expression in pediatric immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Cornelius, A S; Campbell, D; Schwartz, E; Poncz, M

    1991-01-01

    Bone marrow examination is often performed in thrombocytopenic children to distinguish immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) from acute leukemia. We describe a patient with thrombocytopenia and 50% common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) positivity in his marrow who was subsequently shown to have ITP. CALLA (CD10) is a surface antigen found in early B-lymphocytes and is elevated in most cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This case prompted us to prospectively study the frequency of immature lymphocyte populations in children with ITP. Fourteen patients with acute ITP and five with other conditions were studied. The two groups were comparable with respect to age: ITP mean, 4.3 (range 0.3-15.5) years; control mean, 5.8 (0.6-13.8) years. The ITP group had a significantly higher percentage of CD10 positive bone marrow lymphocytes (p = 0.007). Five of the 10 patients younger than 4 years of age in the ITP group had CD10 levels of greater than 30%, which is in the leukemic range, whereas none of the control patients had a CD10 levels of greater than 17% (p = 0.003). There was good correlation between CD10 positivity and B4 positivity indicating that both of these markers arise from the same population of immature B-lymphocytes. None of the ITP patients who were older than 4 years had a CD10 level of greater than 30%. We conclude that it is common to have an increase in the proportion of immature lymphocytes in the marrow of young children with ITP. The cause of this increase in CD10 positive cells is unknown.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1827572

  9. AUTOIMMUNE CYTOPENIAS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA, FACTS AND MYTHS

    Pavankumar Tandra

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available CLL has been defined as presence of more than 5000 small mature appearing monoclonal B lymphocytes with a specific immunophenotype in peripheral blood. It is a well-known fact that CLL is associated with autoimmune cytopenias. CLL cells are CD5+ B lymphocytes, and usually are not the “guilty” cells which produce autoantibodies. T cell defect is another characteristic of CLL and the total number of T cells is increased, and there is inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is the most common autoimmune complication of CLL and has been reported in 10-25% of CLL patients. However, the stage-adjusted estimated rate of AIHA in CLL is about 5%. Conversely, CLL is three times more common in patients who present with AIHA. Direct agglutinin test (DAT is positive in 7-14% of CLL patients but AIHA may also occur in DAT negative patients. Autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT is the second most common complication of CLL and has been reported in 2-3% of patients. DAT is positive in AIT but presence of antiplatelet antibodies is neither diagnostic nor reliable. Autoimmune neutropenia (AIN and pure red cell aplasia (PRCA are very rare complications of CLL and like other autoimmune complications of CLL may occur at any clinical stage. It is believed that most case reports of AIN and PRCA in CLL actually belong to large granular lymphocytic leukemia (LGL. Non-hematologic autoimmune complications of CLL including cold agglutinin disease (CAD, paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP, acquired angioedema, and anti-myelin associated globulin are rare. Before starting any treatment, clinicians should distinguish between autoimmune cytopenias and massive bone marrow infiltration since autoimmune complications of CLL are not necessarily equal to advanced disease with poor prognosis. According to IWCLL guideline, steroids are the mainstay of treatment of simple autoimmunity. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg, cyclosporine, and rituximab are used in

  10. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis secondary to chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma.

    Nasr, Samih H; Shanafelt, Tait D; Hanson, Curtis A; Fidler, Mary E; Cornell, Lynn D; Sethi, Sanjeev; Chaffee, Kari G; Morris, Joseph; Leung, Nelson

    2015-06-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN) is an uncommon pathologic lesion encountered in 0.5% to 5.9% of renal biopsies. Drugs, sarcoidosis, and infections are responsible for most cases of GIN. Malignancy is not an established cause of GIN. Here, we report a series of 5 patients with GIN secondary to chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL). Patients were mostly elderly white males with an established history of CLL/SLL who presented with severe renal impairment (median peak serum creatinine, 7.3 mg/dL), leukocyturia, and mild proteinuria. One had nephromegaly. In 2 patients, the development and relapse of renal insufficiency closely paralleled the level of lymphocytosis. Kidney biopsy in all patients showed GIN concomitant with CLL/SLL leukemic interstitial infiltration. Granulomas were nonnecrotizing and epithelioid and were associated with giant cells. One biopsy showed granulomatous arteritis. One patient had a granulomatous reaction in lymph nodes and skin. Steroids with/without CLL/SLL-directed chemotherapy led to partial improvement of kidney function in all patients except 1 who had advanced cortical scarring on biopsy. In conclusion, we report an association between CLL/SLL and GIN. Patients typically present with severe renal failure due to both GIN and leukemic interstitial infiltration, which tends to respond to steroids with/without CLL/SLL-directed chemotherapy. The pathogenesis of GIN in this clinical setting is unknown but may represent a local hypersensitivity reaction to the CLL/SLL tumor cells. PMID:25795422