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Sample records for acute lymphoblastic leukemias

  1. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    Jeha S, Pui CH. Clinical manifestations and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. ...

  2. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Yang, Jun J; Hunger, Stephen P;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. METHODS: A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was...

  3. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    2016-04-26

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  4. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    2016-04-07

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  6. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  7. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  8. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  9. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    ... of WBC) are produced, a child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood leukemia, affecting about 75% of kids with this cancer of the blood cells. Kids ... (AML) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Cancer ...

  10. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. Leukemia Stem Cells and Human Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Bernt, Kathrin M.; Armstrong, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Leukemias and other cancers have been proposed to contain a subpopulation of cells that display characteristics of stem cells, and which maintain tumor growth. That most anti-cancer therapy is directed against the bulk of the tumor, and possibly spares the cancer stem cells, may lie at the heart of treatment failures with conventional modalities. Leukemia stem cells are fairly well described for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but their existence and relevance for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (...

  12. DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASSIFICATION OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Sabina Chiaretti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a disseminated malignancy of B- or T-lymphoblasts which imposes a rapid and accurate diagnostic process to support an optimal risk-oriented therapy and thus increase the curability rate. The need for a precise diagnostic algorithm is underlined by the awareness that both ALL therapy and related success rates may vary greatly in function of ALL subset, from standard chemotherapy in patients with standard-risk ALL, to allotransplantation (SCT and targeted therapy in high-risk patients and cases expressing suitable biological targets, respectively. This review offers a glimpse on how best identify ALL and the most relevant ALL subsets.

  13. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury

  14. Novel Therapies for Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Fullmer, Amber; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias

    2009-01-01

    The outcome of salvage therapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor. Salvage therapy mimics regimens with activity in newly diagnosed ALL. Novel strategies under investigation as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy improve the treatment of relapsed disease. For some ALL subsets, specific therapies are indicated. The addition of targeted therapy in Philadelphia chromosome–positive ALL has improved responses in relapsed patients without resistance to availabl...

  15. MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE IN ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) offers a way to precisely assess early treatment response and detect relapse. Established methods to study MRD are flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of antigen-receptor genes, and PCR amplification of fusion transcripts. The strong correlation between MRD levels and risk of relapse in childhood ALL is well established; studies in...

  16. Pathogenesis and prognostication in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Zuckerman, Tsila; Rowe, Jacob M.

    2014-01-01

    The process of lymphoid maturation is tightly controlled by the hierarchical activation of transcription factors and selection through functional signal transduction. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represents a group of B/T-precursor-stage lymphoid cell malignancies arising from genetic alterations that block lymphoid differentiation and drive aberrant cell proliferation and survival. With recent advances in next-generation sequencing, we are discovering new mutations affecting normal lym...

  17. Leukemia cutis with lymphoglandular bodies: a clue to acute lymphoblastic leukemia cutis

    Obiozor, Cynthia; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Fraga, Garth R.

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia cutis describes cutaneous lesions produced by infiltrates of leukemic cells. It usually manifests contemporaneously with the initial diagnosis of systemic leukemia, but may also precede or follow systemic leukemia. Most cases are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. Adult B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cutis is very rare. We report a 59-year-old woman with a history of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapsed with aleukemic lymphoblastic leukemia cutis. Lymphoglandular bodi...

  18. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    2015-07-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  19. Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the Nordic countries

    Oskarsson, Trausti; Söderhäll, Stefan; Arvidson, Johan;

    2016-01-01

    Relapse is the main reason for treatment failure in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Despite improvements in the up-front therapy, survival after relapse is still relatively poor, especially for high-risk relapses. The aims of this study were to assess outcomes following acute lymphoblastic...... leukemia relapse after common initial Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology protocol treatment; to validate currently used risk stratifications, and identify additional prognostic factors for overall survival. Altogether, 516 of 2735 patients (18.9%) relapsed between 1992 and 2011 and were...... development of novel approaches is urgently needed to increase survival in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia....

  20. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  2. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  3. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  4. Acute myelogenous leukemia switch lineage upon relapse to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa; Arreguin-Gonzalez, Farina; Rodriguez-Osorio, Carlos A; Sadowinski, Stanislaw; Pelayo, Rosana; Medina-Sanson, Aurora

    2009-01-01

    Acute leukemia, the most common form of cancer in children, accounts for approximately 30% of all childhood malignancies, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia being five times more frequent than acute myeloid leukemia. Lineage switch is the term that has been used to describe the phenomenon of acute leukemias that meet the standard French-American-British system criteria for a particular lineage (either lymphoid or myeloid) upon initial diagnosis, but meet the criteria for the opposite lineage a...

  5. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Ibrahim Bayram

    2014-01-01

    In children patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, according to the European bone marrow transplant handbook, the indications for stem cell transplantation, conditioning regimen, donor selection and information about sources of stem cells will be evaluated.

  6. Minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) offers a way to precisely assess early treatment response and detect relapse. Established methods to study MRD are flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of antigen-receptor genes, and PCR amplification of fusion transcripts. The strong correlation between MRD levels and risk of relapse in childhood ALL is well demonstrated; studies in adult patients also support its prognostic value. Hence, results of MRD studies can be used to select treatment intensity and duration, and to estimate the optimal timing for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Practical issues in the implementation of MRD assays in clinical studies include determining the most informative time point to study MRD and the levels of MRD that will trigger changes in treatment intensity, as well as the relative cost and informative power of different methodologies. The identification of new markers of leukemia and the use of increasingly refined assays should further facilitate routine monitoring of MRD and help to clarify the cellular and biologic features of leukemic cells that resist chemotherapy in vivo. PMID:19100372

  7. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. JAK kinase inhibitors for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Degryse, Sandrine; Cools, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have identified activating mutations in components of the interleukin-7 receptor complex (IL7R, JAK1, and JAK3). It will be of interest to investigate both JAK1 and JAK3 kinase inhibitors as targeted agents for these leukemias.

  9. Genetic abnormalities associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Yokota, Takafumi; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occurs with high frequency in childhood and is associated with high mortality in adults. Recent technical advances in next-generation sequencing have shed light on genetic abnormalities in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as the precursor to ALL pathogenesis. Based on these genetic abnormalities, ALL is now being reclassified into newly identified subtypes. Philadelphia chromosome-like B-lineage ALL is one of the new high-risk subtypes characterized by genetic alterations that activate various signaling pathways, including those involving cytokine receptors, tyrosine kinases, and epigenetic modifiers. Philadelphia chromosome-like ALL is essentially heterogeneous; however, deletion mutations in the IKZF1 gene encoding the transcription factor IKAROS underlie many cases as a key factor inducing aggressive phenotypes and poor treatment responses. Whole-genome sequencing studies of ALL patients and ethnically matched controls also identified inherited genetic variations in lymphoid neoplasm-related genes, which are likely to increase ALL susceptibility. These findings are directly relevant to clinical hematology, and further studies on this aspect could contribute to accurate diagnosis, effective monitoring of residual disease, and patient-oriented therapies. PMID:26991355

  10. Temsirolimus, Dexamethasone, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Pegaspargase in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    2015-07-09

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  11. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Philippe; Kastner; Susan; Chan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene.Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia.In particular,Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.Its role in T-cell leukemia,however,has been more controversial.While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell leukemias,loss of Ikaros appears to be rare in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).We review here the evidence linking Ikaros to T-ALL in mouse and human systems.

  12. Prognostic significance of cell surface phenotype in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Shiek Aejaz Aziz; Susheel Kumar Sharma; Iram Sabah; M Aleem Jan

    2015-01-01

    Context: To find out the phenotypic character of lymphoblasts of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients in our study cohort and their possible effect on the prognosis. Aims: To investigate the phenotype in ALL in our demographic population and to prognosticate various upfront current protocols employed in our hospital. Settings and Design: The study spanned over a period of 4 years with retrospective and prospective data of January 2008 through December 2011. Materials and Methods: 159 p...

  13. Pharmacokineties of vincristine monotherapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Groninger, E; Meeuwsen-de Boer, T; Koopmans, P; UGes, D; Sluiter, W; Veerman, A; Kamps, W

    2002-01-01

    We studied vincristine pharmacokinetics in 70 children newly diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, after a single dose of vincristine as monotherapy. Vincristine plasma concentrations were measured by HPLC analysis. A two-compartment, first-order pharmacokinetic model was fitted to the data b

  14. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  15. Etiology of common childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: the adrenal hypothesis

    Schmiegelow, K.; Vestergaard, T.; Nielsen, S.M.;

    2008-01-01

    The pattern of infections in the first years of life modulates our immune system, and a low incidence of infections has been linked to an increased risk of common childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We here present a new interpretation of these observations--the adrenal hypothesis...

  16. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    W.J.E. Tissing (Wim)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common form of cancer in children, with 110 – 120 newly diagnosed children in the Netherlands each year. ALL is a haematological malignancy of lymphoid precursor cells and can be divided into two sub-groups: B-cell precursor ALL and T-cell p

  17. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Schmiegelow, K.; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe;

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 1980...

  18. Vitamin D Protects Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells from Dexamethasone

    Antony, Reuben; Sheng, Xia; Ehsanipour, Ehsan A.; Ng, Emily; Pramanik, Rocky; Klemm, Lars; Ichihara, Brian; Mittelman, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked with increased cancer risk, and vitamin D has been shown to be cytotoxic to some cancer cells in vitro. In the present study we evaluated whether vitamin D would have antiproliferative or cytotoxic effects on human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Contrary to our hypotheses, calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, had no effect on leukemia cell proliferation. Calcitriol actually had a modest effect to impair dexamethasone cytotoxicity and induct...

  19. Rationale for an international consortium to study inherited genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Sherborne, Amy L.; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv; Bartram, Claus R.; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Petridou, Eleni; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Szalai, Csaba; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Healy, Jasmine; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo; Indaco, Stefania; El-Ghouroury, Eman A; Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Hongeng, Suradej; Pakakasama, Samart; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ugarte, Evelia L.; Leal, Valeria P.; Espinoza, Juan P.M.; Kamel, Azza M.; Ebid, Gamal T.A.; Radwan, Eman R.; Yalin, Serap; Yalin, Erdinc; Berkoz, Mehmet; Simpson, Jill; Roman, Eve; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hosking, Fay J.; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. To date most association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been based on the candidate gene approach and have evaluated a restricted number of polymorphisms. Such studies have served to highlight difficulties in conducting statistically and methodologically rigorous investigations into acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Recent genome-wide association studies of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have provided robust evidence that common variation at four genetic loci confers a modest increase in risk. The accumulated experience to date and relative lack of success of initial efforts to identify novel acute lymphoblastic leukemia predisposition loci emphasize the need for alternative study designs and methods. The International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Genetics Consortium includes 12 research groups in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas engaged in studying the genetics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The initial goal of this consortium is to identify and characterize low-penetrance susceptibility variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia through association-based analyses. Efforts to develop genome-wide association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in terms of both sample size and single nucleotide polymorphism coverage, and to increase the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms taken forward to large-scale replication should lead to the identification of additional novel risk variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ethnic differences in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well recognized and thus in assessing the interplay between inherited and non-genetic risk factors, analyses using different population cohorts with different incidence rates are likely to be highly informative. Given that the frequency of many acute lymphoblastic leukemia subgroups is small, identifying differential effects will realistically only be

  20. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Arising in CALR Mutated Essential Thrombocythemia

    Stephen E. Langabeer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in an existing myeloproliferative neoplasm is rare with historical cases unable to differentiate between concomitant malignancies or leukemic transformation. Molecular studies of coexisting JAK2 V617F-positive myeloproliferative neoplasms and mature B cell malignancies indicate distinct disease entities arising in myeloid and lymphoid committed hematopoietic progenitor cells, respectively. Mutations of CALR in essential thrombocythemia appear to be associated with a distinct phenotype and a lower risk of thrombosis yet their impact on disease progression is less well defined. The as yet undescribed scenario of pro-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia arising in CALR mutated essential thrombocythemia is presented. Intensive treatment for the leukemia allowed for expansion of the original CALR mutated clone. Whether CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms predispose to the acquisition of additional malignancies, particularly lymphoproliferative disorders, is not yet known.

  1. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Kastner, Philippe; Chan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene. Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia. In particular, Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Its role in T-cell leukemia, however, has been more controversial. While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell l...

  2. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  3. Esophageal strictures during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Kelly, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal stricture is a rare complication of paediatric cancer treatment that usually occurs after esophageal exposure to radiotherapy. We describe 4 cases of esophageal stricture during chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. All patients presented with refractory vomiting and were diagnosed with radiologic contrast studies. None of the patients had received radiotherapy. Esophageal candidiasis was seen in 2 patients but the remaining 2 patients had earlier systemic candidiasis. High-dose dexamethasone may predispose these children to both esophageal candidiasis and peptic esophagitis. The etiology of esophageal strictures during treatment for acute leukemia is likely to be multifactorial but systemic candidiasis may play a significant role.

  4. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  5. Pancytopenic Prodrome (pre-ALL) of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adults: Possible Pathogenesis

    Sohn, Sang Kyun; Suh, Jang Soo; Lee, Jaetae; Lee, Kyu Bo

    1998-01-01

    We report two cases of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with preleukemic phase of pancytopenia with a few abnormal lymphoid cells in bone marrow aspirates. The initial diagnosis of each case was suspicious aplastic anemia and hypoplastic anemia. Both cases progressed to overt acute lymphoblastic leukemia within 1 year. We suggest that initial pancytopenic phase (pre-ALL) may precede the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults and differential diagnosis from myelodyspl...

  6. New decision support tool for acute lymphoblastic leukemia classification

    Madhukar, Monica; Agaian, Sos; Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we build up a new decision support tool to improve treatment intensity choice in childhood ALL. The developed system includes different methods to accurately measure furthermore cell properties in microscope blood film images. The blood images are exposed to series of pre-processing steps which include color correlation, and contrast enhancement. By performing K-means clustering on the resultant images, the nuclei of the cells under consideration are obtained. Shape features and texture features are then extracted for classification. The system is further tested on the classification of spectra measured from the cell nuclei in blood samples in order to distinguish normal cells from those affected by Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. The results show that the proposed system robustly segments and classifies acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on complete microscopic blood images.

  7. Minimal Residual Disease Assessment in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Thörn, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, response to treatment in hematological malignancies is evaluated by light microscopy of bone marrow (BM) smears, but due to more effective therapies more sensitive methods are needed. Today, detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) using immunological and molecular techniques can be 100 times more sensitive than morphology. The main aim of this thesis was to compare and evaluate three currently available MRD methods in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL): (i) real-t...

  8. Estimation of physical development of children at acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    The problem of the work is data of 124 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Hodgkin's disease after combination treatment.The objective of the work is to detect physical stature of children after cancer therapy in children and comparison of their antropometrical data before and after therapy.The possibility of detection of combination therapy's influence on physical stature of children in remission was shown. (authors)

  9. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Are Egyptian children adherent to maintenance therapy?

    Elhamy Rifky Abdel Khalek; Laila M Sherif; Naglaa Mohamed Kamal; Gharib, Amal F.; H M Shawky

    2015-01-01

    Background, Aims, Settings and Design: Poor adherence to oral maintenance chemotherapy can cause relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A multicenter study for the evaluation of adherence to oral 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) maintenance chemotherapy for childhood ALL in Egypt to identify contributing factors and possible steps to promote adherence. Materials and Methods: The study included 129 children with ALL in complete remission receiving 6-MP single daily oral dose in the evening....

  10. Distribution of common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen in nonhematopoietic tissues

    1981-01-01

    The common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA), as defined by J-5 murine monoclonal antibodies, was detected on renal tubular and glomerular cells from fetal and adult donors by an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. CALLA could also be detected on epithelial cells of the fetal small intestine and on myoepithelial cells of adult breast but not on myoepithelial cells of the salivary gland. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of immunoprecipitated 125I-l...

  11. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Arising in CALR Mutated Essential Thrombocythemia

    Langabeer, Stephen E.; Karl Haslam; David O’Brien; Johanna Kelly; Claire Andrews; Ciara Ryan; Richard Flavin; Hayden, Patrick J.; Bacon, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in an existing myeloproliferative neoplasm is rare with historical cases unable to differentiate between concomitant malignancies or leukemic transformation. Molecular studies of coexisting JAK2 V617F-positive myeloproliferative neoplasms and mature B cell malignancies indicate distinct disease entities arising in myeloid and lymphoid committed hematopoietic progenitor cells, respectively. Mutations of CALR in essential thrombocythemia appear to...

  12. Effect of Taurine on Febrile Episodes in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Mina Islambulchilar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral taurine on the incidence of febrile episodes during chemotherapy in young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Forty young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the beginning of maintenance course of their chemotherapy, were eligible for this study. The study population was randomized in a double blind manner to receive either taurine or placebo (2 gram per day orally. Life quality and side effects including febrile episodes were assessed using questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s Chi square test. Results: Of total forty participants, 43.8% were female and 56.3 % were male. The mean age was 19.16±1.95 years (ranges: 16-23 years. The results indicated that the levels of white blood cells are significantly (P<0.05 increased in taurine treated group. There was no elevation in blasts count. A total of 70 febrile episodes were observed during study, febrile episodes were significantly (P<0.05 lower in taurine patients in comparison to the control ones. Conclusion: The overall incidence of febrile episodes and infectious complications in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving taurine was lower than placebo group. Taurine’s ability to increase leukocyte count may result in lower febrile episodes.

  13. Oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A review

    Kadalagere Lakshmana Girish Babu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia is a malignancy of the bone marrow and blood. It is the most common childhood cancer in India. Advances in the treatment regimens have greatly increased the chances of survival. Both the disease and its treatment change the oral environment. In some cases, oral manifestations are the presenting feature of the disease and it will be the dentist′s responsibility to identify the underlying disorder and guide the diagnosis of the patient. Hence, the aim of present article is to review the literature concerning the oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL.

  14. Radiation treatment of testicular relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Ten patients with testicular relapse among 128 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are reported. At the time of the initial diagnosis of leukemia all patients with later testicular relapse showed one or more risk factors as predictive for leukemic infiltration of the testicles. All patients except one, who underwent orchiectomy and died 11 weeks after surgical intervention, received radiation therapy with doses ranging from 12 to 20 Gy and chemotherapy. The local control was excellent. Average survival time from testicular relapse to death was 68 weeks in 8 of 9 patients treated by irradiation and chemotherapy. One patient is still alive without signs of disease after 6 years. (orig.)

  15. A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with an intracerebellar mass

    A 3-year-old boy, who had a complaint of hemorrhagic diathesis, was diagnosed as having acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Remission was induced by a combination of vincristine and prednisolone. Prophylactic intrathecal methotrexate and cranial irradiation were administered. Two years later, he was hospitalized for CNS leukemia and treated with multiple doses of intrathecal methotrexate. At the time, the results of CT scanning were normal. Six months later, though, he developed vomiting and lethargy. CT scanning showed a mass of an increased density in the right cerebellar hemisphere that displaced the fourth ventricle to the left and resulted in an obstructive hydrocephalus. Decompression was done by means of Ommaya reservoir setting. Soon his consciousness returned to normal, and CT scanning revealed no abnormal mass three weeks later. A month later, though, the CNS leukemia returned. He developed vomiting and a headache, and CT scanning showed a high-density mass in the right cerebellar hemisphere. The mass was diagnosed as hematoma. He died one month later. In this case, the previous mass showed evidence of a relatively uniform contrast enhancement, which is consistent with the intracerebral leukemic mass reported by Wendling. In Japan, this is the first report of an intracerebellar mass of acute lymphoblastic leukemia as perceived by CT scanning. (author)

  16. A Rare Case of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Presenting with Paraparesis and Multiple Osteolytic Lesions

    Verma, S P; Dubashi, B.; Basu, D; Dutta, T. K.; Kar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with bone involvement and multiple osteolytic lesions has been commonly reported in pediatric population. Various myeloid and lymphoid malignancies can rarely present with bony lesions. We are reporting an adult female patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who presented with paraparesis and multiple osteolytic lesions in skull initially giving false impression of multiple myeloma.

  17. The acute lymphoblastic leukemia of Down Syndrome - Genetics and pathogenesis.

    Izraeli, Shai

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down Syndrome (DS) are at markedly increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ALL is of B cell precursor (BCP) phenotype. T-ALL is only rarely diagnosed as well as infant leukemia. Gene expression profiling and cytogenetics suggest that DS-ALL is an heterogeneous disease. More than half of the leukemias are characterized by aberrant expression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor CRLF2 caused by genomic rearrangements. These rearrangements are often associated with somatic activating mutations in the receptors or in the downstream components of the JAK-STAT pathway. The activation of JAK-STAT pathway suggests that targeted therapy with JAK or downstream inhibitors may be effective for children with DS-ALL. The basis of the increased risk of BCP-ALL and in particular of the CRLF2 aberrations is presently unknown. Neither is it known which genes on the trisomic chromosome 21 are involved. PMID:26631987

  18. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2016-02-12

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Imitation of Mb. perthes through acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    A two year old boy was seen in the orthopedic clinics because of typical symptoms of Legg-Perthes disease, a scintigraphy with Technetium sup(99m) showed a distinct deficiency of nuclear activity in the femoral head which is characteristic of the early stage of Legg-Perthes disease. A routine blood count lead to the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The boy was treated according to the Austrian cooperative leukemia protocol and complete remission was achieved. No orthopedic treatment of the femur head necrosis was done, after eight weeks of treatment with multiagent chemotherapy the boy started to walk again and subsequently became free of all symptoms of Legg-Perthes disease. A scintigraphy done eight weeks after the initial scintigraphy showed that the deficiency of radionuclear activity of the femoral head was nearly vanished. This case illustrates the variability of bone involvement in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which often is the most prominent symptom at an early stage of the disease. (Author)

  20. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a child with fanconi's anaemia

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder with progressive bone marrow failure, associated congenital malformation and solid and haematological malignancies. Acute myeloid leukemia is the commonest haematological malignancy followed by myelodysplastic syndrome in children with FA. FA transformed into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a rare phenomenon and one of the rarest haematological malignancies associated with this disorder. We are reporting a 13 years old girl with FA and positive chromosomal breakage. She required regular blood product transfusion. She was planned for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) but the sibling-matched donor was found to have chromosomal breaks as well. Later on, her peripheral smear showed blast cell. Bone marrow showed pre-B ALL. She was started on chemotherapy but died shortly due to complications of the treatment. For this rare condition conservative management is indeed essential, however, safe and appropriate chemotherapy regimen is needed. (author)

  1. Technical relapsed testicular irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Testicular irradiation in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia presents difficulties in relation to daily positioning, dosimetry for dose homogenization of complex geometry and volume change during irradiation thereof. This can lead to significant deviations from the prescribed doses. In addition, the usual techniques often associated with unnecessary irradiation of pelvic simphysis, anus and perineum. This, in the case of pediatric patients, is of great importance, since doses in the vicinity of 20 Gy are associated with a deviation of bone growth, low testosterone levels around 24 Gy and high rates of generation of second tumors. To overcome these problems we propose a special restraint in prone and non-coplanar irradiation.

  2. Transplantations in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia--grounds for optimism?

    Goldstone, Anthony H

    2009-01-01

    The large MRC/ECOG Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Study establishes the value of sibling donor allogeneic transplantation in patients with standard risk, demonstrating superior outcome to conventional chemotherapy. The small but significant number of patients having matched unrelated donor transplantations on this study protocol appear to do well and might establish the value of such an approach for those without a sibling. Reduced-intensity conditioning might begin to address the transplantation-related mortality problems of the older patients. The youngest adults might not need to undergo transplantation at all. If they are now treated on pediatric chemotherapy protocols, their outcome appears to improve significantly. PMID:19778843

  3. Treatment of Relapsed/Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adults.

    Ronson, Aharon; Tvito, Ariella; Rowe, Jacob M

    2016-06-01

    Patients with relapsed and refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have a dismal prognosis with less than 10 % of patients surviving 5 years. Most such patients cannot be rescued with currently available therapies, whatever the initial treatment they receive. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel treatment options. Fortunately, over the past several years, an improved understanding of the biology of the disease has allowed the identification of rational molecular targets for therapeutic endeavors and the emergence of novel therapies has sparked great interest. This review will discuss the current treatment landscape for adult patients with relapsed and/or refractory ALL. PMID:27207612

  4. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2016-08-10

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia of childhood presenting as aplastic anemia: report of two cases

    Laura Villarreal-Martínez; José Carlos Jaime-Pérez; Marisol Rodríguez-Martínez; Oscar González-Llano; David Gómez-Almaguer

    2012-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common malignancy in pediatric patients; its diagnosis is usually easy to establish as malignant lymphoblasts invade the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Some acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients may initially present with pancytopenia and a hypoplastic bone marrow leading to the initial diagnosis of aplastic anemia. In most of these patients clinical improvement occurs, with normalization of the complete blood count within six months, although recov...

  6. Treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Ya-Li Hsiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a cancer that immature white blood cells continuously overproduce in the bone marrow. These cells crowd out normal cells in the bone marrow bringing damage and death. Methotrexate (MTX is a drug used in the treatment of various cancer and autoimmune diseases. In particular, for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, it had significant effect. MTX competitively inhibits dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, an enzyme that participates in the tetrahydrofolate synthesis so as to inhibit purine synthesis. In addition, its downstream metabolite methotrexate polyglutamates (MTX-PGs inhibit the thymidylate synthase (TS. Therefore, MTX can inhibit the synthesis of DNA. However, MTX has cytotoxicity and neurotoxin may cause multiple organ injury and is potentially lethal. Thus, the lower toxicity drugs are necessary to be developed. Recently, diseases treatments with Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM as complements are getting more and more attention. In this study, we attempted to discover the compounds with drug-like potential for ALL treatment from the components in TCM. We applied virtual screen and QSAR models based on structure-based and ligand-based studies to identify the potential TCM component compounds. Our results show that the TCM compounds adenosine triphosphate, manninotriose, raffinose, and stachyose could have potential to improve the side effects of MTX for ALL treatment.

  7. Fanconi Syndrome: A Rare Initial Presentation of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Sahu, Kamal Kant; Law, Arjun Datt; Jain, Nidhi; Khadwal, Alka; Suri, Vikas; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Subhash Chander

    2016-06-01

    A-14-year old boy, presented with a short history of excessive thirst and increased urine output. Clinical examination showed pallor, generalized lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. For evaluation of his polyuric state he underwent routine laboratory investigations, including renal function test, acid-base studies, urine analysis. Blood tests suggested hypokalemia, hypouricemia, hypocalcemia and hyperchloremia with normal liver and kidney function tests. The arterial blood gas analysis was suggestive of normal anion gap metabolic acidosis. Urine analysis was suggestive of hyperuricosuria, hypercalciuria and glycosuria with a positive urine anion gap. His hemogram showed pancytopenia with differential count showing 88% blasts. Bone marrow examination and flowcytometry confirmed the diagnosis of B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Hence this case was atypical and very interesting in the sense that the Fanconi syndrome is very rare to be an initial presenting feature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient was started on oral as well intravenous supplementation with potassium, bicarbonate, calcium and phosphorus. Simultaneously, as per the modified BFM -90 protocol (four drug based regimen-Prednisolone, vincristine, daunorubicin, cyclophosphamide along with l-asparaginase), he was started on induction protocol. By the end of 3rd week of induction therapy, his urine output started normalizing and finally settled at the end of induction therapy. At present he is in the maintenance phase of chemotherapy. PMID:27408343

  8. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adults.

    Speziali, Craig; Paulson, Kristjan; Seftel, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    The majority of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia will achieve a first complete remission (CR). However relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure. Outcomes after relapse remain poor, with long-term survival in the order of 10 %. Treatment decisions made at the time of first complete remission are thus critical to ensuring long-term survival. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) is effective at preventing relapse in many transplant recipients but is also associated with significant treatment related morbidity and mortality. Alternatively, ongoing systemic chemotherapy offers lower toxicity at the expense of increased relapse rates. Over the past decades, both the safety of transplant and the efficacy of non-transplant chemotherapy have improved. Emerging data show substantially improved outcomes for young adults treated with pediatric-inspired chemotherapy regimens that question the role of HCT in the upfront setting. In this review, we review the data supporting the role of allogeneic transplantation in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and we propose a therapeutic algorithm for upfront therapy of adults with ALL. PMID:26984203

  9. Acute Hepatitis A Induction of Precursor B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Causal Relationship?

    Senadhi, V.; Emuron, D.; R. Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Background Precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia accounts for 2% of all lymphoid neoplasms in the United States and occurs most frequently in childhood, but can also occur in adults with a median age of 39 years. It is more commonly seen in males and in Caucasians. Case Report We present a case of a 51-year-old Caucasian female with the development of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia after suffering acute hepatitis A 4 weeks prior to her diagnosis. She presented with mala...

  10. Environment-mediated drug resistance in Bcr/Abl-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Feldhahn, Niklas; Arutyunyan, Anna; Stoddart, Sonia; ZHANG Bin; Schmidhuber, Sabine; Yi, Sun-ju; Kim, Yong-Mi; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Although cure rates for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have increased, development of resistance to drugs and patient relapse are common. The environment in which the leukemia cells are present during the drug treatment is known to provide significant survival benefit. Here, we have modeled this process by culturing murine Bcr/Abl-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in the presence of stroma while treating them with a moderate dose of two unrelated drugs, the farnesyltransferase i...

  11. Prognostic relevance of RUNX1 mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Grossmann, Vera; Kern, Wolfgang; Harbich, Stefan; Alpermann, Tamara; Jeromin, Sabine; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Claudia; Haferlach, Torsten; Kohlmann, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The runt-related transcription factor 1, RUNX1, is crucial in the development of myeloid and lymphoid cell lineages and has been reported to be mutated in myeloid malignancies in approximately 30% of cases. In this study, the mutational status of RUNX1 was investigated in 128 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. We detected a mutation rate of 18.3% (13 of 71) in patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 3.8% (2 of 52) in patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and no muta...

  12. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and mumps.

    Kurekci, A Emin; Atay, A Avni; Demirkaya, Erkan; Sarici, S Umit; Ozcan, Okan

    2006-03-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura in childhood is characterized by a typical history of acute development of purpura and bruising in an otherwise healthy child. In children it usually follows a viral infection (eg, mumps, rubella) or immunization. We report for the first time a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed immune thrombocytopenic purpura due to mumps during the maintenance phase of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. PMID:16679943

  13. Prognostic significance of cell surface phenotype in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Shiek Aejaz Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: To find out the phenotypic character of lymphoblasts of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients in our study cohort and their possible effect on the prognosis. Aims: To investigate the phenotype in ALL in our demographic population and to prognosticate various upfront current protocols employed in our hospital. Settings and Design: The study spanned over a period of 4 years with retrospective and prospective data of January 2008 through December 2011. Materials and Methods: 159 patients of all age groups were enrolled for the study, of which flow cytometry was done in 144 patients. Statistical Analysis Used: Analysis was done using the variables on SPSS (statistical package for social sciences software on computer. Survival curves were estimated by method of Kaplan-Meir. Results: Majority of the patients were of B-cell (68.1% and 30.6% patients were of T-cell lineage. Of these, 80.6% patients were having cALLa positivity. Complete remission (CR was achieved in 59.1%, 16.4% relapsed, and 20.1% patients died. Conclusions: Phenotyping has become an important and integral part of diagnosis, classification, management and prognosticating in ALL. B-cell has been found to have a better survival over T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia. cALLa antigen positivity has good impact in achieving CR in only B-cell lineage, myeloid coexpression has no significant effect on the outcome. BFM (Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster based protocols though showed a higher CR and survival vis-a-vis UKALL-XII. However, patients enrolled in former group being of low risk category and lesser in numbers cannot be compared statistically with a fair degree of confidence.

  14. Philadelphia Chromosome-positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Lymphoid Blast Crisis.

    Kolenova, Alexandra; Maloney, Kelly W; Hunger, Stephen P

    2016-08-01

    The clinical characteristics of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in lymphoid blast crisis (BC) can resemble those of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph ALL). Because of this, there can be concern as to whether a patient with newly diagnosed Ph leukemia has Ph ALL or CML in lymphoid BC. This distinction has significant potential therapeutic implications because most children with Ph ALL are now treated with chemotherapy plus a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, whereas allogeneic stem cell transplant is usually recommended for any patient with CML that presents in or later develops BC. PMID:27164534

  15. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children with Down syndrome

    Buitenkamp, Trudy D; Izraeli, Shai; Zimmermann, Martin;

    2014-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of B-cell precursor (BCP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The prognostic factors and outcome of DS-ALL patients treated in contemporary protocols are uncertain. We studied 653 DS-ALL patients enrolled in 16 international trials from 1995......(9)/L (HR = 0.60, P = .005), and ETV6-RUNX1 (HR = 0.14, P = .006) for EFS and age (HR = 0.48, P < .001), ETV6-RUNX1 (HR = 0.1, P = .016) and high hyperdiploidy (HeH) (HR = 0.29, P = .04) for relapse-free survival. TRM was the major cause of death in ETV6-RUNX1 and HeH DS-ALLs. Thus, while relapse is the...

  16. Pharmacogenetics Influence Treatment Efficacy in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Devidsen, M.L.; Dalhoff, K.; Schmiegelow, K.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics covers the genetic variation affecting pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. and their influence on drug-response phenotypes. The genetic variation includes an estimated 15 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and is a key determinator for the interindividual differences...... treatment response. In the future, high-throughput, low-cost, genetic platforms will allow screening of hundreds or thousands of targeted SNPs to give a combined gene-dosage effect ( = individual SNP risk profile), which may allow pharmacogenetic-based individualization of treatment Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...... in treatment resistance and toxic side effects. As most childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment protocols include up to 13 different chemotherapeutic agents, the impact of individual SNPs has been difficult to evaluate. So far Focus has mainly been on the widely used glucocorticosteroids...

  17. Prediction of intellectual deficits in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Trautman, P.D.; Erickson, C.; Shaffer, D.; O' Connor, P.A.; Sitarz, A.; Correra, A.; Schonfeld, I.S.

    1988-06-01

    Possible predictors of reported lower cognitive functioning in irradiated children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were investigated. Thirty-four subjects, 5-14 years old, with ALL in continuous complete remission and without evidence of current or past central nervous system disease, were examined 9-110 months after diagnosis, using standard measures of intelligence and academic achievement. Subjects with a history of post-irradiation somnolence syndrome were significantly older at diagnosis than nonsomnolent subjects. Intelligence (IQ) was found to be unrelated to history of somnolence syndrome. IQ and achievement were unrelated to age at irradiation, irradiation-examination interval, and radiation dosages. The strongest predictor of IQ by far is parental social class. The importance of controlling for social class differences when searching for treatment effects on IQ and achievement is stressed.

  18. Brain damage after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    In 34 patients treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), central nervous system (CNS) damage was assessed by clinical evaluation and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty-seven of them had been off therapy from 5 to 109 months (median 64 months) while 7 had not completed the maintenance phase of their treatment. All the patients were disease-free when evaluated. None of the 3 patients who showed clinical CNS damage during the follow-up was symptomatic when submitted to MRI, while periventricular hyperintensity in T2-weighted images, suggestive of leukoencephalopathy, was present in 8 of the 34 patients. These subclinical abnormalities appear to be more frequent, transient in nature and treatment-related in patients evaluated shortly after the induction phase. Similar MRI findings seem, on the contrary, to be consequences of the disease on the CNS when appearing in long-term survivors. (orig.)

  19. Cerebral aspergillus infection in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia induction therapy

    Gaurav Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Angioinvasive pulmonary infection from filamentous fungi is not an uncommon occurrence in immunocompromised patients like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Rarely, these lesions can spread via the hematogenous route and involve multiple visceral organs. We report a case of a 14-year-old boy with ALL who developed angioinvasive pulmonary aspergillosis early in the course of induction therapy, which was followed by hematogenous dissemination and formation of multiple brain abscesses. The patient was treated with intravenous amphotericin B. There was no response to the therapy and the patient succumbed to disseminated infection. Postmortem lung biopsy confirmed angioinvasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Poor penetration of amphotericin B across the blood-brain barrier could be one of the contributory factors for poor response to antifungal therapy. We discuss the various antifungal agents with respect to their penetration in brain.

  20. Bacteremia due to Aeromonas hydrophila in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Aeromonas hydrophila (A. hydrophila) is a low virulent organism but may cause devastating fatal infections in immunocompromised host especially in liver cirrhosis. It is rarely reported to cause septicemia in a patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). The mortality rate of septicemia due to A. hydrophila is 29% to 73%. We report a case of 59-year-old female patient who was a known case of ALL, presented with the complaints of fever, lethargy and generalized weakness for one month. After taking blood samples for investigations, empirical antimicrobial therapy was started. She did not improve after 48 hours of therapy. Meanwhile blood culture revealed pure growth of A. hydrophila. After sensitivity report was available, ciprofloxacin was started. Patient became afebrile after 48 hours of treatment with ciprofloxacin. It is very vital to correctly identified and treat bacteremia due to A. hydrophila especially in the underlying leukemic patient. (author)

  1. Prediction of intellectual deficits in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Possible predictors of reported lower cognitive functioning in irradiated children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were investigated. Thirty-four subjects, 5-14 years old, with ALL in continuous complete remission and without evidence of current or past central nervous system disease, were examined 9-110 months after diagnosis, using standard measures of intelligence and academic achievement. Subjects with a history of post-irradiation somnolence syndrome were significantly older at diagnosis than nonsomnolent subjects. Intelligence (IQ) was found to be unrelated to history of somnolence syndrome. IQ and achievement were unrelated to age at irradiation, irradiation-examination interval, and radiation dosages. The strongest predictor of IQ by far is parental social class. The importance of controlling for social class differences when searching for treatment effects on IQ and achievement is stressed

  2. The controversy of varicella vaccination in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Caniza, Miguela A; Hunger, Stephen P; Schrauder, Andre;

    2012-01-01

    The available guidelines for varicella vaccination of susceptible children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have become increasingly conservative. However, vaccination of those who have remained in continuous complete remission for 1 year and are receiving chemotherapy is still considered ...

  3. Inhibition of glycolysis modulates prednisolone resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Hulleman, Esther; Kazemier, Karin M.; Holleman, Amy; VanderWeele, David J.; Rudin, Charles M.; Broekhuis, Mathilde J. C.; Evans, William E.; Pieters, Rob; Den Boer, Monique L.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment failure in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is related to cellular resistance to glucocorticoids (eg, prednisolone). Recently, we demonstrated that genes associated with glucose metabolism are differentially expressed between prednisolone-sensitive and prednisolone-resistant pr

  4. Outcome of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in South East of Iran (Zahedan)

    Mashhadi, Mohammad Ali; Koushyar, Mohhamad Mahdi; Mohammadi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a lymphoid malignancy, resulting from autonomous proliferation of monoclonal abnormal stem cell. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response rate and prognostic factor of adult patients suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who were treated with chemotherapy in south east of Iran and demographic methods were used for this study. Methods This study was conducted in Ali Ebne Abitaleb Hospital in south east of Iran (Zahedan) from 2003-2010...

  5. Osteoporosis resulting from acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a 7-year-old boy: a case report

    Salim, Hendra; Ariawati, Ketut; Suryawan, Wayan Bikin; Arimbawa, Made

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Osteoporosis in children is rare and usually secondary to an underlying disease process whose diagnosis may be difficult to detect. Etiological factors responsible for osteoporosis secondary to chronic illness include immobility, pubertal delay and other hormonal disturbances. Rarely, it can be a manifestation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Most of the reported bone fracture incidences associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia occur during the course of the chemotherapy, not...

  6. Central nervous system involvement in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: diagnosis by immunophenotyping

    Camila Silva Peres Cancela

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system is the most commonly affected extramedullary site in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Although morphologic evaluation of the cerebrospinal fluid has been traditionally used for diagnosing central nervous system involvement, it is a method of low sensitivity. The present study aimed at evaluating the use of immunophenotyping in the detection of blasts in the cerebrospinal fluid from children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  7. Acute parotitis during induction therapy including L-asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Sica, S; Pagano, L; Salutari, P; Di Mario, A; Rutella, S; Leone, G

    1994-02-01

    In a patient affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and subjected to therapy with Erwinia L-asparaginase, acute parotitis was observed. Microbiological studies excluded any infectious etiology. Regression of parotitis was spontaneous. This complication has not been previously reported and could be due to the same mechanism of pancreatic injury. The occurrence of acute parotitis needs to be promptly recognized in order to avoid the continuation of L-asparaginase. PMID:8148421

  8. High frequency of BTG1 deletions in acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children with down syndrome

    Lundin, Catarina; Hjorth, Lars; Behrendtz, Mikael;

    2012-01-01

    Previous cytogenetic studies of myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemias in children with Down syndrome (ML-DS and DS-ALL) have revealed significant differences in abnormality patterns between such cases and acute leukemias in general. Also, certain molecular genetic aberrations characterize DS...

  9. Nanoparticle targeted therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Satake, Noriko; Lee, Joyce; Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Sarangi, Susmita; Chang, Astra; McLaughlin, Bridget; Zhou, Ping; Kenney, Elaina; Kraynov, Liliya; Arnott, Sarah; McGee, Jeannine; Nolta, Jan; Lam, Kit

    2011-06-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a unique ligand-conjugated nanoparticle (NP) therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). LLP2A, discovered by Dr. Kit Lam, is a high-affinity and high-specificity peptidomimetic ligand against an activated α4β1 integrin. Our study using 11 fresh primary ALL samples (10 precursor B ALL and 1 T ALL) showed that childhood ALL cells expressed activated α4β1 integrin and bound to LLP2A. Normal hematopoietic cells such as activated lymphocytes and monocytes expressed activated α4β1 integrin; however, normal hematopoietic stem cells showed low expression of α4β1 integrin. Therefore, we believe that LLP2A can be used as a targeted therapy for childhood ALL. The Lam lab has developed novel telodendrimer-based nanoparticles (NPs) which can carry drugs efficiently. We have also developed a human leukemia mouse model using immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ null mice engrafted with primary childhood ALL cells from our patients. LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using primary leukemia cells and this mouse model. NPs will be loaded first with DiD near infra-red dye, and then with the chemotherapeutic agents daunorubicin or vincristine. Both drugs are mainstays of current chemotherapy for childhood ALL. Targeting properties of LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated by fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry, MTS assay, and mouse survival after treatment. We expect that LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be preferentially delivered and endocytosed to leukemia cells as an effective targeted therapy.

  10. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with Eosinophilia and Strongyloides Stercoralis Hyperinfection

    Yadollah Zahedpasha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in children. Bone pain is an important symptom that can be severe. Eosinophilia without any other abnormal laboratory findings is rare in ALL. Strongyloides stercoralis in ALL causes disseminated fatal disease.Case Presentation: This 9-year-old girl presented with bone pain in lumbar region. Bone pain was the only symptom. The patient didnt have organomegaly. The BM samples were studied by flow cytometry, which showed pre-B cell ALL. Larva of Strongyloides stercoralis was found in fecal examination. Plain chest x ray showed bilateral para-cardiac infiltration. Strongyloidiasis was treated before starting chemotherapy. After two days treatment with Mebendazol the patient developed cough, dyspnea, respiratory distress and fever. The treatment changed to Ivermectin for 2 days. Chemotherapy started five days after diagnosis of leukemia.Conclusion: The patient complained merely of bone pain in lumbar region without any other signs and symptoms. Peripheral blood smear showed eosinophilia without any other abnormality. Stool examination showed Strongyloides stercoralis larvae. We suggest that all patients diagnosed as ALL in tropical and subtropical regions should be evaluated for parasitic infection especially with Strongyloides stercoralis.

  12. Microenvironmental cues for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development.

    Passaro, Diana; Quang, Christine Tran; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    Intensive chemotherapy regimens have led to a substantial improvement in the cure rate of patients suffering from T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Despite this progress, about 15% and 50% of pediatric and adult cases, respectively, show resistance to treatment or relapse with dismal prognosis, calling for further therapeutic investigations. T-ALL is an heterogeneous disease, which presents intrinsic alterations leading to aberrant expression of transcription factors normally involved in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell development and mutations in genes implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and T-cell development. Gene expression profiling allowed the classification of T-ALL into defined molecular subgroups that mostly reflects the stage of their differentiation arrest. So far this knowledge has not translated into novel, targeted therapy. Recent evidence points to the importance of extrinsic signaling cues in controlling the ability of T-ALL to home, survive, and proliferate, thus offering the perspective of new therapeutic options. This review summarizes the present understanding of the interactions between hematopoietic cells and bone marrow/thymic niches during normal hematopoiesis, describes the main signaling pathways implicated in this dialog, and finally highlights how malignant T cells rely on specific niches to maintain their ability to sustain and propagate leukemia. PMID:27088913

  13. Molecular diagnosis of lymphoblastic leukemia

    Kalal Iravathy Goud; Seetha Dayakar; Prasad, S. V. S. S.; Koteshwar N Rao; Amina Shaik; S Vanjakshi

    2013-01-01

    The mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene at chromosome band 11q23 is commonly involved in reciprocal translocations that is detected in acute leukemia. The MLL gene, coomonly known as mixed lineage leukemia or myeloid lymphoid leukemia, has been independently identified and cloned from the 11q23 breakpoint of acute leukemia. We describe a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia whose cells had shown reciprocal translocation between short arm (p21) of chromosome 2 and long arm (q23) of chromoso...

  14. Primitive neuroectodermal tumor arising 8 years after chemotherapy and radiotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Case report

    We report a case of primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) arising 8 years after chemotherapy and radiotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A 15-year-old boy with a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the age of 7, underwent chemotherapy and 14 Gy of radiotherapy to the whole brain. He was admitted to our department due to the development of aphasia, right hemiparesis and generalized convulsive seizure. MRI showed an irregularly enhanced mass in the left frontal lobe. A gross total removal of the tumor was performed and histological examination showed it to be PNET. Postoperatively, the patient underwent 20 Gy of radiotherapy to the whole brain and 42 Gy of local radiotherapy. Follow-up MRI showed no evidence of recurrent tumor 4 months after the radiotherapy. This tumor was thought to be a secondary brain tumor arising in this survivor of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and it is a rare complication of successful leukemia treatment. (author)

  15. Tracheoesophageal fistula resulting from invasive aspergillosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    Tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) in adult patients is an uncommon complication in leukemia. We present here on a case of TEF in a 46-year-old woman with ALL. The patient was asymptomatic and TEF is resulted from aspergillus bronchitis during the chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

  16. Tracheoesophageal fistula resulting from invasive aspergillosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    Kang, Si Won [Daejeon St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    Tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) in adult patients is an uncommon complication in leukemia. We present here on a case of TEF in a 46-year-old woman with ALL. The patient was asymptomatic and TEF is resulted from aspergillus bronchitis during the chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

  17. Delayed Neurotoxicity Associated with Therapy for Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Cole, Peter D.; Kamen, Barton A.

    2006-01-01

    Most children diagnosed today with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) will be cured. However, treatment entails risk of neurotoxicity, causing deficits in neurocognitive function that can persist in the years after treatment is completed. Many of the components of leukemia therapy can contribute to adverse neurologic sequelae, including…

  18. The landscape of somatic mutations in infant MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemias

    Andersson, Anna K; Ma, Jing; Wang, Jianmin;

    2015-01-01

    Infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with MLL rearrangements (MLL-R) represents a distinct leukemia with a poor prognosis. To define its mutational landscape, we performed whole-genome, exome, RNA and targeted DNA sequencing on 65 infants (47 MLL-R and 18 non-MLL-R cases) and 20 older childr...

  19. Glioblastoma multiforme in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Case report and review of literature

    Shah Kirit

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available An 11-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had received prophylactic cranial irradiation (1800 cGy /10 fractions and intrathecal methotrexate. Five years later, he developed a glioblastoma multiforme in the right frontal region while the leukemia was in remission. It is possible that the glioma may have been induced by radiation and /or chemotherapy.

  20. Conservative Management of Pancreatic Pseudocysts in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Spraker, Holly L.; Spyridis, Georgios P.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Howard, Scott C.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment with asparaginase for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) can cause acute pancreatitis. Complication of pancreatitis by pancreatic pseudocyst formation can prolong the hospital stay, delay chemotherapy, and necessitate long-term parenteral nutrition. We report five children with ALL who developed acute pancreatitis complicated by pancreatic pseudocysts. They required modifications to their chemotherapy regimen and prolonged parenteral nutrition but no surgical intervention. All five ...

  1. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Transformation in Polycythemia Vera: A Rare Phenomenon.

    Gaweł, Władysław B; Helbig, Grzegorz; Boral, Kinga; Kyrcz-Krzemień, Sławomira

    2016-06-01

    Leukemic transformation in patients diagnosed with polycythemia vera (PV) is associated with poor prognosis and median survival not exceeding 3 months. To date only a few cases of post-PV acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have been reported. A 64-year-old female patient developed ALL 4 years after she had met PV criteria. At PV diagnosis a molecular study was positive for the JAK2V617F mutation. Due to high risk features (history of deep vein thrombosis) she was treated with hydroxyurea (HU) with moderate efficacy. She became anemic and thrombocytopenic with mild leukocytosis while still on HU. Blood and bone marrow smears revealed 40 and 100 % of blast cells, respectively. The immunophenotyping of blasts was consistent with a diagnosis of early precursor B cell ALL. She was found to be positive for the JAK2V617F mutation. Patient received an ALL induction regimen and achieved complete remission with negative minimal residual disease by flow cytometry. The post-chemotherapy study for the JAK2V617F mutation was positive. Patient has remained in remission for 4 months. A suitable donor searching was initiated. Post-PV ALL is an extremely rare phenomenon. Due to poor prognosis, an allogeneic stem cell transplantation should be considered in fit patients who achieved remission. PMID:27408357

  2. TREATMENT OF ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULTS WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Josep-Maria Ribera

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this review was to update and discuss the current concepts andthe results of the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adolescents and young adults(AYA. After a brief consideration of the epidemiologic and clinicobiologic characteristics of ALLin the AYA population, the main retrospective comparative studies stating the superiority ofpediatric over adult-based protocols were reviewed. The most important prospective studies inyoung adults using pediatric inspired or pediatric unmodified protocols were also reviewedemphasizing their feasibility at least up to the age of 40 yr and their promising results, with eventfreesurvival rates of 60-65% or greater. Results of trials from pediatric groups have shown that theunfavourable prognosis of adolescents is no more adequate. The majority of the older adolescentswith ALL can be cured with risk-adjusted and minimal residual disease-guided intensivechemotherapy, without stem cell transplantation. However, some specific subgroups, which aremore frequent in adolescents than in children (e.g., early pre-T, iAMP21, and BCR-ABL-like,deserve particular attention. In summary, the advances in treatment of ALL in adolescents havebeen translated to young adults, and that explains the significant improvement in survival of thesepatients in recent years.

  3. Radiation-induced hypopituitarism in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Mehrdad Mirouliaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy among children for whom radiotherapy and chemotherapy are used for treatment. When hypothalamus-pituitary axis is exposed to radiotherapy, children′s hormone level and quality of life are influenced. The aim of this study is to determine late effects of radiotherapy on hormonal level in these patients. Materials and Methods: In this study 27 children with ALL, who have been referred to Shahid Ramezanzadeh Radiation Oncology Center in Yazd-Iran and received 18-24 Gy whole brain radiation with Cobalt 60 or 9 MV linear accelerator, were assessed. These patient′s basic weight, height and hormonal levels were measured before radiotherapy and also after different periods of time. Results: GHD (growth hormone deficiency after clonidine stimulation test was observed in 44% ( n=12 and that in 50% of them ( n=6, less than 1 year, had been passed from their radiation therapy. None of these patients demonstrated hormone deficiency in other axes. Conclusions: This study showed that even application of a 18-24 Gy radiation dose might influence growth hormone levels; therefore, we recommend reduction of radiotherapy dose in such patients whenever possible.

  4. Outcome following late marrow relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Thirty-four children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed bone marrow relapse after treatment was electively stopped, received reinduction, consolidation, continuing therapy, and intrathecal (IT) methotrexate (MTX). Sixteen children who relapsed within six months of stopping treatment had a median second-remission duration of 26 weeks; all next relapses occurred in the bone marrow. In 18 children who relapsed later, the median duration of second remission was in excess of two years, but after a minimum of four years follow-up, 16 patients have so far relapsed again (six in the CNS). CNS relapse occurred as a next event in four of 17 children who received five IT MTX injections only and in two of 14 children who received additional regular IT MTX. Although children with late marrow relapses may achieve long second remissions, their long-term out-look is poor, and regular IT MTX does not afford adequate CNS prophylaxis. It remains to be seen whether more intensive chemotherapy, including high-dose chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation, will improve the prognosis in this group of patients

  5. MRI of aseptic osteonecrosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, localisation, and course of symptomatic aseptic osteonecrosis (AON) in children undergoing treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Methods: 72 MRI examinations obtained from 26 children with bone pain selected from a group of 121 children with ALL were evaluated retrospectively. The area of the AON was determined by computer assisted planimetry. Follow-up examinations after 2-5 years were considered. Results: 10/121 (8.3%) of the children had symptomatic AON, the number of lesions varied between 1 and 24 per child. 62/66 lesions were localized within the lower extremities. 58% of the AON were positioned in the epiphysis and 42% in the meta- and diaphysis. The mean area of AON was 7.6 cm2 with a range of 0.5 to 50 cm2. Follow-up examinations revealed a regression in 19 AON, no change in 43 and a progression in 4 lesions. AON within the epiphysis with joint involvement or lesions greater than 9 cm2 more frequently showed a progression of AON with final joint destruction. An elevated risk for AON was seen in children older than 10 years and in children with intensified chemotherapy due to high-risk ALL. Conclusion: AON is a common complication in ALL-children under chemotherapy. Most frequently, the course is benign but large AON with joint involvement have an elevated risk for progression of AON with final joint destruction. (orig.)

  6. Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in a Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Orhan Ayyıldız

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections are common and life-threatening among immunosupressive patients.Invasive pulmonar aspergilloz (IPA generally occurs when Aspergillus inhaled, but rarelywith the hematogen spread of dermal or gastrointestinal Aspergillus. We present here, IPA ina 58 year-old male patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. He was admitted to ourclinic with fatigue, weakness, pansitopenia, and with petechia. Supportive treatment,vincristine and prednisone was initiated. Chest roentgenogram was normal. Dyspnea andfever (39.5’C were seen after 1 month of therapy. Thorax high resolution computerizedtomography was obtained and cavitary lesion was seen in the left upper-anterior segment oflung. Sputum and blood culture were negative. In spite of the empiric use of Meropenem 3gr/d, Vancomycin 2 gr/d and fluconazole 200 mg/d, fever was not turned to normal andclinical symptoms were not healed. On the fifth days of therapy amphotericin-B was initiatedand the other antibiotics were stopped after 3 days. General symptoms were healed on the 8thdays. Radiologic findings were improved partially after 20 days. The patient clinically is welland remains in remission and radiologic findings were turn to near normal after 10 monthsof treatment. We aimed to emphasis about treatment of empirical Amphotericin-B incritically ill patient with ALL.

  7. BCL6 modulation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia response to chemotherapy.

    Slone, William L; Moses, Blake S; Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Piktel, Debbie; Gibson, Laura F

    2016-04-26

    The bone marrow niche has a significant impact on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell phenotype. Of clinical relevance is the frequency with which quiescent leukemic cells, in this niche, survive treatment and contribute to relapse. This study suggests that marrow microenvironment regulation of BCL6 in ALL is one factor that may be involved in the transition between proliferative and quiescent states of ALL cells. Utilizing ALL cell lines, and primary patient tumor cells we observed that tumor cell BCL6 protein abundance is decreased in the presence of primary human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and osteoblasts (HOB). Chemical inhibition, or shRNA knockdown, of BCL6 in ALL cells resulted in diminished ALL proliferation. As many chemotherapy regimens require tumor cell proliferation for optimal efficacy, we investigated the consequences of constitutive BCL6 expression in leukemic cells during co-culture with BMSC or HOB. Forced chronic expression of BCL6 during co-culture with BMSC or HOB sensitized the tumor to chemotherapy induced cell death. Combination treatment of caffeine, which increases BCL6 expression in ALL cells, with chemotherapy extended the event free survival of mice. These data suggest that BCL6 is one factor, modulated by microenvironment derived cues that may contribute to regulation of ALL therapeutic response. PMID:27015556

  8. [Transient hyperphosphatasemia observed in a boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Kikuchi, S; Fujikawa, S; Hara, K; Ohira, M; Kojima, C; Maekawa, M

    1997-08-01

    A detailed time course of alkaline phosphatase (ALP; EC3.1.3.1) activity of transient hyperphosphatasemia (TH) in a 9-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is described. The patient's serum ALP activity rose transiently to 49 times the upper limit of normal adult, without any evidences of hepatic and bone disease. The half-life of ALP activity was calculated about 10 days. We characterized ALP isoenzymes by usual electrophoresis using cellulose acetate membrane (Titan III iso-vis) and polyacrylamide disc gel (AlkPhor), and isoelectric focusing using polyacrylamide slab gel. The former two methods showed typical two bands (fast-alpha 2 and alpha 2 beta bands) and the latter one method revealed more basic bands of liver and bone, suggesting the extensive sialylation. The patient complained fever and diarrhea. Enterococcus faecium was detected from his stool. Etiologically, two more patients in the same ward showed TH in the same period. It suggested TH would be occurred by infectious states. Awareness of such benign forms of hyperphosphatasemia not related to malignancy will aid the physician in the differential diagnosis of elevated ALP activity. PMID:9283233

  9. The evolution of clinical trials for infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants has a significantly inferior outcome in comparison with older children. Despite initial improvements in survival of infants with ALL since establishment of the first pediatric cooperative group ALL trials, the poor outcome has plateaued in recent years. Historically, infants were treated on risk-adapted childhood ALL protocols. These studies were pivotal in identifying the need for infant-specific protocols, delineating prognostic categories and the requirement for a more unified approach between study groups to overcome limitations in accrual because of low incidence. This subsequently led to the development of collaborative infant-specific studies. Landmark outcomes have included the elimination of cranial radiotherapy following the discovery of intrathecal and high-dose systemic therapy as a superior and effective treatment strategy for central nervous system disease prophylaxis, with improved neurodevelopmental outcome. Universal prospective identification of independent adverse prognostic factors, including presence of a mixed lineage leukemia rearrangement and young age, has established the basis for risk stratification within current trials. The infant-specific trials have defined limits to which conventional chemotherapeutic agents can be intensified to optimize the balance between treatment efficacy and toxicity. Despite variations in therapeutic intensity, there has been no recent improvement in survival due to the equilibrium between relapse and toxicity. Ultimately, to improve the outcome for infants with ALL, key areas still to be addressed include identification and adaptation of novel prognostic markers and innovative therapies, establishing the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first complete remission, treatment strategies for relapsed/refractory disease and monitoring and timely intervention of late effects in survivors. This would be best achieved through a single unified

  10. Tumefactive intracranial presentation of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Forester, Craig M. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Braunreiter, Chi L. [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Helen DeVos Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Yaish, Hasan; Afify, Zeinab [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hedlund, Gary L. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-11-15

    In children, leukemia is the most common malignancy, and approximately 75% of leukemias are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Central nervous system leukemia is found at diagnosis in fewer than 5% of children with ALL. Leukemic intracranial masses have been described with acute myeloid leukemia, but ALL presenting as a mass lesion is rare. We describe a unique case of an intracranial confirmed precursor B cell (pre-B) ALL mass in a 13-year-old girl that was diagnosed by brain CT, MRI and cerebral angiography, and confirmed by biopsy. This report details pertinent history and distinguishing imaging features of an intracranial ALL tumefaction. (orig.)

  11. Assessing Compliance With Mercaptopurine Treatment in Younger Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in First Remission | Division of Cancer Prevention

    This randomized phase III trial studies compliance to a mercaptopurine treatment intervention compared to standard of care in younger patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission. Assessing ways to help patients who have acute lymphoblastic leukemia to take their medications as prescribed may help them in taking their medications more consistently and may improve treatment outcomes. |

  12. Targeted Resequencing of 9p in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Yields Concordant Results with Array CGH and Reveals Novel Genomic Alterations

    Sarhadi, V.K.; Lahti, L.M.; Scheinin, I.; Tyybäkinoja, A.; Savola, S.; Usvasalo, A.; Räty, R.; Elonen, E.; Saarinen-Pihkala, U.M.; Knuutila, S.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic alterations of the short arm of chromosome 9 are frequent in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We performed targeted sequencing of 9p region in 35 adolescent and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients and sought to investigate the sensitivity of detecting copy number alterations in comparis

  13. Individualized leukemia cell-population profiles in common B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients

    Xian-Ming Mo; Hong Xu; Ting-Ting Zeng; Neng-Gang Jiang; Yong-Qian Jia; Jing-Tao Dong; Jian-Hua Yu; Wen-Tong Meng

    2013-01-01

    Immunophenotype is critical for diagnosing common B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (common ALL) and detecting minimal residual disease. We developed a protocol to explore the immunophenotypic profiles of common ALL based on the expression levels of the antigens associated with B lymphoid development, including IL-7R alpha (CD127), cytoplasmic CD79a (cCD79a), CD19, VpreB (CD179a), and sIgM, which are successive and essential for progression of B cells along their developmental pathway. Anal...

  14. LONGITUDINAL ANTHROPOMETRIC STUDY IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC-LEUKEMIA

    TAMMINGA, RYJ; KAMPS, WA; DRAYER, NM; HUMPHREY, GB

    1992-01-01

    In four groups of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, anthropometric variables were investigated every 3 months for 2 years. Group 1 (n = 7) was treated with a high-risk protocol, group 2 (n = 13) with a standard-risk protocol including cranial irradiation, group 3 (n = 13) with a standard-

  15. Anticancer activity of cryptotanshinone on acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Klauck, Sabine M; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Cryptotanshinone, a well-known diterpene quinone from a widely used traditional Chinese herb named Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been reported for its therapeutical potentials on diverse activities. In this study, pharmacological effects of cryptotanshinone on acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells were investigated. IC50 values of 5.0 and 4.8 were obtained in CEM/ADR5000 and CCRF-CEM. Microarray-based mRNA expression revealed that cryptotanshinone regulated genes associated with cell cycle, DNA damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS), NFκB signaling and cellular movement. The involvement of these pathways in the mode of action of cryptotanshinone was subsequently validated by additional independent in vitro studies. Cryptotanshinone stimulated ROS generation and induced DNA damage. It arrested cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle and induced apoptosis as measured by annexin V-FITC-conjugating fluorescence. The induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway by cryptotanshinone was proved by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased cleavage of caspase 3/7, caspase 9 and poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). DNA-binding motif analysis of the microarray-retrieved deregulated genes in the promoter region revealed NFκB as potential transcription factor involved in cryptotanshinone's mode of action. Molecular docking and Western blotting provided supportive evidence, suggesting that cryptotanshinone binds to IKK-β and inhibits the translocation of p65 from the cytosol to the nucleus. In addition, cryptotanshinone inhibited cellular movement as shown by a fibronectin-based cellular adhesion assay, indicating that this compound exerts anti-invasive features. In conclusion, cryptotanshinone exerts profound cytotoxicity, which is caused by multispecific modes of actions, including G2/M arrest, apoptosis and inhibition of cellular movement. The inhibitory activities of this compound may be explained by inhibition of NFκB, which orchestrates all these mechanisms. PMID

  16. Rituximab in B-Lineage Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Maury, Sébastien; Chevret, Sylvie; Thomas, Xavier; Heim, Dominik; Leguay, Thibaut; Huguet, Françoise; Chevallier, Patrice; Hunault, Mathilde; Boissel, Nicolas; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Hess, Urs; Vey, Norbert; Pignon, Jean-Michel; Braun, Thorsten; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Chalandon, Yves; Lhéritier, Véronique; Beldjord, Kheira; Béné, Marie C; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2016-09-15

    Background Treatment with rituximab has improved the outcome for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may also have the CD20 antigen, which is targeted by rituximab. Although single-group studies suggest that adding rituximab to chemotherapy could improve the outcome in such patients, this hypothesis has not been tested in a randomized trial. Methods We randomly assigned adults (18 to 59 years of age) with CD20-positive, Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative ALL to receive chemotherapy with or without rituximab, with event-free survival as the primary end point. Rituximab was given during all treatment phases, for a total of 16 to 18 infusions. Results From May 2006 through April 2014, a total of 209 patients were enrolled: 105 in the rituximab group and 104 in the control group. After a median follow-up of 30 months, event-free survival was longer in the rituximab group than in the control group (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45 to 0.98; P=0.04); the estimated 2-year event-free survival rates were 65% (95% CI, 56 to 75) and 52% (95% CI, 43 to 63), respectively. Treatment with rituximab remained associated with longer event-free survival in a multivariate analysis. The overall incidence rate of severe adverse events did not differ significantly between the two groups, but fewer allergic reactions to asparaginase were observed in the rituximab group. Conclusions Adding rituximab to the ALL chemotherapy protocol improved the outcome for younger adults with CD20-positive, Ph-negative ALL. (Funded by the Regional Clinical Research Office, Paris, and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00327678 .). PMID:27626518

  17. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Are Egyptian children adherent to maintenance therapy?

    Elhamy Rifky Abdel Khalek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background, Aims, Settings and Design: Poor adherence to oral maintenance chemotherapy can cause relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. A multicenter study for the evaluation of adherence to oral 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP maintenance chemotherapy for childhood ALL in Egypt to identify contributing factors and possible steps to promote adherence. Materials and Methods: The study included 129 children with ALL in complete remission receiving 6-MP single daily oral dose in the evening. Evaluation was done through specific questionnaires for the patients as well as serum 6-MP measurements. Results: Nonadherence was detected in around 56% by questionnaires and around 50% by serum 6-MP level measurement. There was a highly significant correlation between nonadherence as found by the questionnaire and 6-MP level (P - 0.001. Nonadherence was significantly associated with low socioeconomic standard, noneducation and low educational level and large family size by both methods. High cost to come for follow-up visits was significant by questionnaire but not by 6-MP measurement. Adolescent age, the higher number of siblings, lack of written instructions, long time spent per visit, were all associated with higher rates of nonadherence, although none reached statistical significance. Conclusions: Nonadherence is a real problem in pediatric patients. Specific questionnaires can be an excellent reliable method for the routine follow-up of these children, and drug level assay can be requested only for confirmation. This protocol is especially effective in developing countries where financial resources may be limited. Every effort should be made to uncover its true incidence, contributing factors, and best methods of intervention.

  18. Cytologic Phenotypes of B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia-

    Ramyar Asghar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a malignant disorder of lymphoid precursor cells, which could be classified according to morphological and cytochemical methods as well as immunophenotyping. Twenty patients with ALL, who had been referred to the Children's Medical Center Hospital, during the year 2007, were enrolled in this study in order to evaluate the morphologic and immunophenotypic profile of these patients. Cytologic analysis of blood and bone marrow samples revealed that the frequency of ALL-L1 was 70%, followed by ALL-L2 and ALL-L3. The onset age of the patients with ALL-L1 was significantly lower than the patients with L2/L3. Severe anemia was significantly detected more in L1 group. Flow cytometic study of bone marrow showed that 10 cases had Pre-B1 ALL and 7 cases had Pre-B2 ALL, while three cases had Pro-B ALL. Comparisons of the characteristics and clinical manifestations among these groups did not show any appreciable difference. There were an increase percentage of CD20+ cells and a decrease CD10+ cells in pre-B2 group in comparison with pre-B1 group. Fifteen patients were in standard risk and five were in high risk. Although standard risk patients were more common in the group of pre-B1, this was not significant. Our results confirm the previous reports indicating heterogeneity of ALL. Immunophenotyping is not the only diagnostic test of importance, while morphological assessment still can be used in the diagnosis and classification of the disease.

  19. Hemiparesis in an Adolescent With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Everything Is Not Always What it Seems.

    Andina, David; Lassaletta, Alvaro; Sevilla, Julian; Gutierrez, Silvia; Madero, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a common malignancy in childhood. Managing adverse events during treatment can result in very complex situations. A previously healthy adolescent diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed on day +55 of induction chemotherapy hemiparesis, dysesthesia, and facial palsy. Blood tests and brain imaging techniques were unremarkable. The patient was diagnosed with a conversion disorder, which completely resolved. Although rare in clinical practice, children and adolescents with cancer do not always have organic pathology explaining their symptoms. Psychiatric disorders such as those of the somatoform spectrum must be considered, particularly in patients with anxiety or depression. PMID:25072371

  20. Late cardiac effects of anthracycline containing therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Rathe, Mathias; Carlsen, Niels L T; Oxhøj, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    At present about 80% of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) will be cured following treatment with multi-drug chemotherapy. A major concern for this growing number of survivors is the risk of late effects of treatment. The aim of this study was to determine whether signs of cardiomyo......At present about 80% of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) will be cured following treatment with multi-drug chemotherapy. A major concern for this growing number of survivors is the risk of late effects of treatment. The aim of this study was to determine whether signs of...

  1. Prognostic Impact of WT-1 Gene Expression in Egyptian Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Hagag, Adel A; Badraia, Ibrahim M; Hassan, Samir M; Abd El-Lateef, Amal E

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer representing 23% of pediatric cancers. Wilms’ tumor -1 gene is a novel prognostic factor, minimal residual disease marker and therapeutic target in acute leukemia. Aim of the work The aim of this work was to study the impact of WT-1 gene expression in the prognosis of ALL. Patients and methods This study was conducted on 40 Egyptian children with newly diagnosed ALL who were subjected to full history taking, tho...

  2. Hereditary and acquired p53 gene mutations in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Felix, C A; Nau, M M; Takahashi, T.; Mitsudomi, T.; Chiba, I.; Poplack, D G; Reaman, G H; Cole, D E; Letterio, J J; Whang-Peng, J

    1992-01-01

    The p53 gene was examined in primary lymphoblasts of 25 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia by the RNase protection assay and by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis in 23 of 25 cases. p53 mutations were found to occur, but at a low frequency (4 of 25). While all four mutations were identified by single strand conformation polymorphism, the comparative sensitivity of RNase protection was 50% (2 of 4). Heterozygosity was retained at mutated codons in 3 of 4 cases. ...

  3. Individualized leukemia cell-population profiles in common B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients

    Jian-Hua Yu; Jing-Tao Dong; Yong-Qian Jia; Neng-Gang Jiang; Ting-Ting Zeng; Hong Xu; Xian-Ming Mo

    2013-01-01

    Immunophenotype is critical for diagnosing common B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (common ALL) and detecting minimal residual disease.We developed a protocol to explore the immunophenotypic profiles of common ALL based on the expression levels of the antigens associated with B lymphoid development,including IL-7Rα (CD127),cytoplasmic CD79a (cCD79a),CD19,VpreB (CD179a),and slgM,which are successive and essential for progression of B cells along their developmental pathway.Analysis of the immunophenotypes of 48 common ALL cases showed that the immunophenotypic patterns were highly heterogeneous,with the leukemic cell population differing from case to case.Through the comprehensive analysis of immunophenotypic patterns,the profiles of patient-specific composite leukemia cell populations could provide detailed information helpful for the diagnosis,therapeutic monitoring,and individualized therapies for common ALL.

  4. Rearrangements of the tal-1 locus as clonal markers for T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Jonsson, O G; Kitchens, R. L.; Baer, R J; Buchanan, G. R.; Smith, R G

    1991-01-01

    Normal and aberrant immune receptor gene assembly each produce site-specific DNA rearrangements in leukemic lymphoblasts. In either case, these rearrangements provide useful clonal markers for the leukemias in question. In the t(1;14)(p34;q11) translocation associated with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), the breakpoints on chromosome 1 interrupt the tal-1 gene. A site-specific deletion interrupts the same gene in an additional 26% of T-ALL. Thus, nearly one-third of these leukemi...

  5. Inter-Platform comparability of microarrays in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Mintz Michelle

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common pediatric malignancy and has been the poster-child for improved therapeutics in cancer, with life time disease-free survival (LTDFS rates improving from 80% today. There are numerous known genetic prognostic variables in ALL, which include T cell ALL, the hyperdiploid karyotype and the translocations: t(12;21[TEL-AML1], t(4;11[MLL-AF4], t(9;22[BCR-ABL], and t(1;19[E2A-PBX]. ALL has been studied at the molecular level through expression profiling resulting in un-validated expression correlates of these prognostic indices. To date, the great wealth of expression data, which has been generated in disparate institutions, representing an extremely large cohort of samples has not been combined to validate any of these analyses. The majority of this data has been generated on the Affymetrix platform, potentially making data integration and validation on independent sample sets a possibility. Unfortunately, because the array platform has been evolving over the past several years the arrays themselves have different probe sets, making direct comparisons difficult. To test the comparability between different array platforms, we have accumulated all Affymetrix ALL array data that is available in the public domain, as well as two sets of cDNA array data. In addition, we have supplemented this data pool by profiling additional diagnostic pediatric ALL samples in our lab. Lists of genes that are differentially expressed in the six major subclasses of ALL have previously been reported in the literature as possible predictors of the subclass. Results We validated the predictability of these gene lists on all of the independent datasets accumulated from various labs and generated on various array platforms, by blindly distinguishing the prognostic genetic variables of ALL. Cross-generation array validation was used successfully with high sensitivity and high specificity of gene predictors

  6. MicroRNA characterize genetic diversity and drug resistance in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    D. Schotte (Diana); R.X. de Menezes (Renee); F. Akbari Moqadam (Farhad); L.M. Khankahdani (Leila Mohammadi); E.A.M. Lange-Turenhout (Ellen); C. Chen (Caifu); R. Pieters (Rob); M.L. den Boer (Monique)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground MicroRNA regulate the activity of protein-coding genes including those involved in hematopoietic cancers. The aim of the current study was to explore which microRNA are unique for seven different subtypes of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Design and Methods Expression

  7. Inhibition of glycolysis modulates prednisolone resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Hulleman, Esther; Kazemier, Karin; Holleman, Amy; VanderWeele, David; Rudin, Charles; Broekhuis, Mathilde; Evans, William; Pieters, Rob; Boer, M.L.D.

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTreatment failure in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is related to cellular resistance to glucocorticoids (eg, prednisolone). Recently, we demonstrated that genes associated with glucose metabolism are differentially expressed between prednisolone-sensitive and prednisolone-resistant precursor B-lineage leukemic patients. Here, we show that prednisolone resistance is associated with increased glucose consumption and that inhibition of glycolysis sensitizes prednisolon...

  8. Physicians compliance during maintenance therapy in children with Down syndrome and acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Bohnstedt, C; Levinsen, M; Rosthøj, S;

    2013-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have an inferior prognosis compared with non-DS ALL patients. We reviewed methotrexate (MTX)/mercaptopurine (6MP) maintenance therapy data for children with DS treated according to the Nordic Society of Pediatric Hematology and...

  9. Clinical and genetic features of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome in the Nordic countries

    Lundin, Catarina; Forestier, Erik; Klarskov Andersen, Mette;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Although previous studies have shown that DS-ALL differs clinically and genetically from non-DS-ALL, much remains to be elucidated as regards genetic and prognostic factors in DS-ALL. METHODS...

  10. DNA methylation-based subtype prediction for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Nordlund, Jessica; Bäcklin, Christofer L; Zachariadis, Vasilios;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We present a method that utilizes DNA methylation profiling for prediction of the cytogenetic subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells from pediatric ALL patients. The primary aim of our study was to improve risk stratification of ALL patients into treatment groups using DNA...

  11. LAF4, an AF4-related gene, is fused to MLL in infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    von Bergh, ARM; Beverloo, HB; Rombout, P; van Wering, ER; van Weel, MH; Beverstock, GC; Kluin, PM; Slater, RM; Schuuring, E

    2002-01-01

    Infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with MLL gene rearrangements is characterized by a proB phenotype and a poor clinical outcome. We analyzed an infant proB ALL with t(2; 11)(p 15;p 14) and an MLL rearrangement on Southern blot analysis, Rapid amplification of cDNA ends-polymerase chain react

  12. Vincristine pharmacokinetics is related to clinical outcome in children with standard risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Loennerholm, Gudmar; Frost, Britt-Marie; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Behrendtz, Mikael; Castor, Anders; Forestier, Erik; Heyman, Mats; Uges, Donald R. A.; de Graaf, Siebold S. N.

    2008-01-01

    Vincristine is a key drug in the treatment of childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and many other childhood malignancies. Despite decades of wide clinical use, no data on the correlation between vincristine pharmacokinetics and long-term clinical outcome have been published. We he

  13. Genetic and metabolic determinants of methotrexate-induced mucositis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    den Hoed, M. A. H.; Lopez-Lopez, E.; te Winkel, M. L.; Tissing, W.; de Rooij, J. D. E.; Gutierrez-Camino, A.; Garcia-Orad, A.; den Boer, E.; Pieters, R.; Pluijm, S. M. F.; de Jonge, R.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an effective and toxic chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this prospective study, we aimed to identify metabolic and genetic determinants of MTX toxicity. One hundred and thirty-four Dutch pediatric ALL patients were treat

  14. Prediction of immunophenotype, treatment response, and relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia using DNA microarrays

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Juncker, Agnieszka; Schmiegelow, K.; Knudsen, Steen; Ryder, L.P.

    2004-01-01

    Gene expression profiling is a promising tool for classification of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia ( ALL). We analyzed the gene expression at the time of diagnosis for 45 Danish children with ALL. The prediction of 5-year event-free survival or relapse after treatment by NOPHO-ALL92 or 2000...

  15. An Initial Reintegration Treatment of Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL).

    Lurie, Michelle; Kaufman, Nadeen

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the cognitive, psychological, and social adjustment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients and assessed how their needs could best be met through reintegration programs focusing on learning/ educational needs. Findings from three case studies highlight the need for ALL patients to be provided with comprehensive programs…

  16. Study of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia After Induction Chemotherapy.

    Tang, Ji-Hong; Tian, Jian-Mei; Sheng, Mao; Hu, Shao-Yan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Li-Ya; Gu, Qing; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Increasing occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome has been reported in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the etiology of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is not clear. To study the possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment of this complication, we reported 11 cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after induction chemotherapy. After appropriate treatment, the clinical symptoms of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in most cases disappeared even though induction chemotherapy continued. During the 1-year follow-up, no recurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was observed. Although the clinical and imaging features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome may be diverse, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be recognized as a possible important complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia when neurologic symptoms appear. In line with previous reports, our study also indicated that posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was reversible when diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Thus, the occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be considered and investigated to optimize the early induction scheme of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. PMID:26060305

  17. Cytokines, growth, and environment factors in bone marrow plasma of acute lymphoblastic leukemia pediatric patients

    Kováč, M.; Vášková, M.; Petráčková, Denisa; Pelková, V.; Mejstříková, E.; Kalina, T.; Žaliová, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2014), s. 8-13. ISSN 1148-5493 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR9531 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia * bone marrow plasma * cytokine Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.960, year: 2014

  18. Analysis of relapse factors and risk assessment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    陈培翠

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the risk factors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia(ALL)recurrence in adult patients and establish a prognosis index(PI)calculation model in order to improve the prevention strategy of ALL in adults.Methods 104 adult ALL patients from Blood Diseases Hospital&Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences between August 2008 and November 2011

  19. Handwriting and fine motor problems after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Reinders-Messelink, H.A.; Schoemaker, M.M.; Goeken, L.N H; van den Briel, M.M.; Kamps, W.A; Simner, M L; Leedham, C G; Thomassen, A J W M

    1996-01-01

    Fine motor skills and handwriting performance were investigated in 17 children at least two years after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It was hypothesized that as a late effect of vincristine neuropathy, children would still have fine motor and/or handwriting problems. Gross and fine mo

  20. Fine motor and handwriting problems after treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    ReindersMesselink, HA; Schoemaker, MM; Hofte, M; Goeken, LNH; Kingma, A; vandenBriel, MM; Kamps, WA

    1996-01-01

    Motor skills were investigated in 18 children 2 years after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Cross and fine motor functioning were examined with the Movement Assessment Battery for Children. Handwriting as a specific fine motor skill was studied with a computerized writing task. We

  1. The role of ABC-transporters in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Plasschaert, Sabine Louise Anne

    2005-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a disease characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation and maturation arest of lymphoid progenitor cells in the bone marrow, resulting in an excesso f malignant cells. The disease has a peak incidence between the age of 2-5 years, and a low and steady rise from the

  2. The role of ABC-transporters in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Plasschaert, Sabine Louise Anne

    2005-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a disease characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation and maturation arest of lymphoid progenitor cells in the bone marrow, resulting in an excesso f malignant cells. The disease has a peak incidence between the age of 2-5 years, and a low and steady rise from the age of 40 ... Zie: Summary

  3. Filariasis in an infant with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a rare enigma

    Yadav, Yogesh Kumar; Sipayya, Varuna; KHANNA, Geetika; Gupta, Oneal

    2011-01-01

    Filariasis, a tropical parasitic infection, is a common public health problem in the Indian sub-continent. Occurrence of filariasis with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is unusual, particularly in infants, since filariasis has a long incubation period of about 1 year. Though, there are case reports of leishmaniasis, malaria and other vector borne diseases seen in association with leukemias, filariasis co-existing with ALL has not been documented to the best of our knowledge. We report an i...

  4. Imaging findings of recurrent acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and young adults, with emphasis on MRI

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common of all childhood malignancies. Current remission rates approach 80%. Recurrent disease can present in a wide variety of ways. MR imaging plays a crucial role in the detection of disease relapse. Because other disorders can mimic recurrence of leukemia, it is important for the radiologist to judge recurrence from non-recurrence accurately in order to avoid unnecessary testing and emotional stress on the patient and family. (orig.)

  5. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells that survive combination chemotherapy in vivo remain sensitive to allogeneic immune effects

    Jansson, Johan; Hsu, Yu-Chiao; Kuzin, Igor I.; Campbell, Andrew; Mullen, Craig A.

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is often performed for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) whose disease has relapsed after chemotherapy treatment. However, graft versus leukemia (GVL) effects in ALL are generally weak and the mechanisms of this weakness are unknown. These studies tested the hypothesis that ALL cells that have survived conventional chemotherapy in vivo acquire relative resistance to the allogeneic GVL effect. C57BL/6 mice were injected with mur...

  6. MicroRNA characterize genetic diversity and drug resistance in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Schotte, Diana; Menezes, Renee; Akbari Moqadam, Farhad; Khankahdani, Leila Mohammadi; Lange-Turenhout, Ellen; Chen, Caifu; Pieters, Rob; de Boer, Monique

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground MicroRNA regulate the activity of protein-coding genes including those involved in hematopoietic cancers. The aim of the current study was to explore which microRNA are unique for seven different subtypes of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Design and Methods Expression levels of 397 microRNA (including novel microRNA) were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in 81 cases of pediatric leukemia and 17 normal hematopoietic control cases. Res...

  7. Residential Proximity to Agricultural Pesticide Applications and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Rull, Rudolph P.; Gunier, Robert; Von Behren, Julie; Hertz, Andrew; Crouse, Vonda; Buffler, Patricia A.; Reynolds, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    Ambient exposure from residential proximity to applications of agricultural pesticides may contribute to the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using residential histories collected from the families of 213 ALL cases and 268 matched controls enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study, the authors assessed residential proximity within a half-mile (804.5 meters) of pesticide applications by linking address histories with reports of agricultural pesticide use...

  8. Glucocorticoid use in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: comparison of prednisone and dexamethasone

    Inaba, Hiroto; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (prednisone and dexamethasone) play an essential role in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) but their optimal doses and bioequivalence have not been established. Pre-clinical studies showed that dexamethasone has a longer half-life and better central nervous system (CNS) penetration. In prospective randomized trials, dexamethasone yielded better control of CNS leukemia. At a prednisone (mg)/dexamethasone (mg) dose ratio less than 7, dexamethasone treatment (6–...

  9. Unilateral hypopyon in a child as a first and sole presentation in relapsing acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Wadhwa Neeraj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular manifestations form a part of the spectrum of varied clinical presentations in leukemias. Most of the ophthalmic manifestations are related to central nervous system leukemia and bone marrow relapse. We report a case of acute unilateral hypopyon uveitis as an initial presenting feature of relapsing acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in a pediatric patient. Anterior chamber paracentesis was performed in a four-year-old male child presenting with unilateral treatment-resistant hypopyon after remission of ALL. Examination of aqueous humor aspirate revealed presence of malignant cells. Atypical hypopyon, even unilateral can be an indication of relapsing ALL in a child.

  10. Characterization of a pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient with simultaneous LYL1 and LMO2 rearrangements

    Homminga, Irene; Vuerhard, Maartje J.; Langerak, Anton W; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P. P.

    2012-01-01

    Translocation of the LYL1 oncogene are rare in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, whereas the homologous TAL1 gene is rearranged in approximately 20% of patients. Previous gene-expression studies have identified an immature T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia subgroup with high LYL1 expression in the absence of chromosomal aberrations. Molecular characterization of a t(7;19)(q34;p13) in a pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient led to the identification of a translocation betw...

  11. Pictorial essay: Acute neurological complications in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Seema A Kembhavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the commonest childhood malignancy with high cure rates due to recent advances in central nervous system (CNS prophylaxis. The disease per se, as well as the prophylactic therapy, predisposes the child to complications such as cerebrovascular events, infections, drug toxicities, etc. The purpose of this study is to highlight the pathophysiology and the imaging features (with appropriate examples of these complications and to propose a diagnostic algorithm based on MRI. Interpreting these scans in the light of clinical inputs very often helps the radiologist reach an appropriate diagnosis and help treatment and management.

  12. Myeloid Sarcoma Presenting with Leukemoid Reaction in a Child Treated for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Aylin Canbolat Ayhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Myeloid sarcoma is an extramedullary neoplasm of immature myeloid cells. Our study reports a presentation of myeloid sarcoma which presented with severe leukemoid reaction as a secondary malignancy in a patient who was treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia previously. The case emphasizes the difficulties in diagnosis of patients who do not have concomitant leukemia. Case Presentation. A 6-year-old girl who was treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia previously presented with fatigue, paleness, and hepatosplenomegaly. Peripheral blood smear and bone marrow aspirate examination did not demonstrate any blasts in spite of severe leukemoid reaction with a white cell count 158000/mm3. FDG/PET CT revealed slight uptake in cervical and supraclavicular lymph nodes. Excisional lymph node biopsy was performed from these lymph nodes and it showed myeloid sarcoma. Conclusion. Myeloid sarcoma can develop as a secondary malignancy in children who are treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It can be associated with severe leukemoid reaction and diagnosis may be difficult if there is not concomitant leukemia. PET/CT is helpful in such cases.

  13. No major cognitive impairment in young children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using chemotherapy only : A prospective longitudinal study

    Kingma, A; Van Dommelen, RI; Mooyaart, EL; Wilmink, JT; Deelman, BG; Kamps, WA

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To study. using serial neuropsychological assessment and evaluation of school achievement, persistent neuropsychological late effects in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at a young age with chemotherapy only. Patients and Methods: Twenty consecutive patients underwent

  14. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura following successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Tannir, N M; Kantarjian, H

    2001-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia is common in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) at diagnosis. It is a universal side effect of dose-intensive regimens employed in the treatment of adult ALL. In patients with ALL who achieve remission, thrombocytopenia frequently indicates relapse. We report three adult patients successfully treated for ALL who developed thrombocytopenia and were found to have immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (ITP). Possible pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the association of ALL and ITP are discussed. PMID:11342378

  15. Hypergranular precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a 16-year-old boy

    Tembhare Prashant

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Presence of cytoplasmic granules in the blasts is a well known feature of myeloid leukemia. ALL presenting with the numerous cytoplasmic granules in blasts is a rarity and may be misdiagnosed as acute myeloid leukemia. We describe a rare case of hypergranular precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in an adolescent male expressing CD10, CD19, CytoCD22, CD34, as well as CD13 and CD117. The blasts were cytochemically negative for myeloperoxidase (MPO, and acid phosphatase (ACP but were positive for non-specific esterase (NSE. In centers where immunophenotypic panel is usually decided on the basis of morphology with limited antibodies may result in an erroneous typing of such rare diseases. Hence it is important to be aware of this rare entity and to confirm the lineage of acute leukemia by using a comprehensive panel of antibodies for immunophenotypic analysis.

  16. The JAK2V617F activating mutation occurs in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, but not in acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Levine, Ross L.; Loriaux, Marc; Huntly, Brian J. P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Beran, Miroslav; Stoffregen, Eric; Berger, Roland; Clark, Jennifer J.; Willis, Stephanie G.; Nguyen, Kim T.; Flores, Nikki J.; Estey, Elihu; Gattermann, Norbert; Armstrong, Scott; Look, A. Thomas; Griffin, James D.; Bernard, Olivier A.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Gilliland, D. Gary; Druker, Brian; Deininger, Michael W. N.

    2005-01-01

    Activating mutations in tyrosine kinases have been identified in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic malignancies. Recently, we and others identified a single recurrent somatic activating mutation (JAK2V617F) in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) tyrosine kinase in the myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myeloid metaplasia with myelofibrosis. We used direct sequence analysis to determine if the JAK2V617F mutation was present in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML)/atypical chronic myelogenous leukemia (aCML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), T-cell ALL, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Analysis of 222 patients with AML identified JAK2V617F mutations in 4 patients with AML, 3 of whom had a preceding MPD. JAK2V617F mutations were identified in 9 (7.8%) of 116 CMML/a CML samples, and in 2 (4.2%) of 48 MDS samples. We did not identify the JAK2V617F disease allele in B-lineage ALL (n = 83), T-cell ALL (n = 93), or CLL (n = 45). These data indicate that the JAK2V617F allele is present in acute and chronic myeloid malignancies but not in lymphoid malignancies. PMID:16081687

  17. Frequency of chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus 6 in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Annie Gravel

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 is a ubiquitous pathogen infecting nearly 100% of the human population. Of these individuals, between 0.2% and 1% of them carry chromosomally-integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6. The biological consequences of chromosomal integration by HHV-6 remain unknown. OBJECTIVE: To determine and compare the frequency of ciHHV-6 in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia to healthy blood donors. METHODOLOGY: A total of 293 DNA samples from children with pre-B (n=255, pre-pre-B (n=4, pre-T (n=26 and undetermined (n=8 leukemia were analyzed for ciHHV-6 by quantitative TaqMan PCR (QPCR using HHV-6 specific primers and probe. As control, DNA samples from 288 healthy individuals were used. Primers and probe specific to the cellular GAPDH gene were used to estimate integrity and DNA content. RESULTS: Out of 293 DNA samples from the leukemic cohort, 287 contained amplifiable DNA. Of these, only 1 (0.35% contained ciHHV-6. Variant typing indicates that the ci-HHV-6 corresponds to variant A. None of the 288 DNA samples from healthy individuals contained ciHHV-6. CONCLUSION: The frequency of ciHHV-6 in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia is similar (p=0.5 to that of healthy individuals. These results suggest that acute lymphoblastic leukemia does not originate as a consequence to integration of HHV-6 within the chromosomes.

  18. Hypereosinophilia in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Two Cases with Review of Literature.

    Sahu, Kamal Kant; Malhotra, Pankaj; Khadwal, Alka; Sachdeva, Manupdesh Singh; Sharma, Prashant; Varma, Neelam; Varma, Subhash Chander

    2015-12-01

    Eosinophilia is rare in acute leukemia at presentation. Discrete reports and case studies in recent years have created significant interest in the field of "Acute leukemia with eosinophilia". We herein present two cases of eosinophilia in association with acute lymphoblastic leukemia with brief review of literature in this field. First case is about 21-year-old female who presented with mediastinal mass along with leukocytosis and hypereosinophilia. On evaluation, she was found to have T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. After ruling out benign causes of eosinophilia, she was treated with modified BFM-90 protocol. Her eosinophilia resolved after 4 weeks of induction therapy. Second case is about 32-year-old male who was diagnosed as a case of mixed phenotype leukemia (B cell/myeloid type) along with severe eosinophilia. His hypereosinophilia finally resolved by week 16 of modified BFM-90 protocol. Diagnosing ALL is challenging when eosinophilia is the initial presentation. These two cases emphasize on the importance of considering ALL amongst one of the etiological causes of eosinophilia as delay in diagnosis endangers patient's life at risk. Also eosinophilia per se is an independent poor risk factor, hence prompt diagnosis and early treatment is the key in all such cases. PMID:26306071

  19. Sweet′s Syndrome in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with t (9:22

    Khushboo Dewan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet′s syndrome (SS is a rare disease diagnosed in children and is characterized by fever, erythematous skin lesions, and dense infiltration of neutrophils in the upper dermis without evidence of leukocytoclastic vasculitis on histopathology. It may occur secondary to infection, malignancy or drug intake. A case of a 9-year-old boy diagnosed as acute precursor B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia with BCR-ABL1 mutation and treated with induction chemotherapy and imatinib mesylate (IM therapy is presented. After 8 weeks of consolidation chemotherapy, the patient developed painful and erythematous nodules where a biopsy showed dense neutrophilic infiltrate and edema in the papillary dermis consistent with SS. Whether SS is caused clinically by acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the presence of BCR-ABL1 mutation or due to IM therapy is discussed.

  20. Purification and characterization of fetal hematopoietic cells that express the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA)

    Hokland, P; Rosenthal, P; Griffin, J D;

    1983-01-01

    Fetal hematopoietic cells that express the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) were purified from both fetal liver and fetal bone marrow by immune rosetting with sheep erythrocytes coated with rabbit anti-mouse immunoglobulin and by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Dual...... antigen. Furthermore, using methanol-fixed cells, it could be shown that approximately 20% contained intracytoplasmic mu chains (cyto-mu) and that approximately 15% were positive for the terminal transferase enzyme (TdT) marker. The CALLA+ fetal cells thus closely resemble the childhood acute...... lymphoblastic leukemia cell with respect to surface marker phenotype. A population of CALLA- cells devoid of mature erythroid and myeloid surface markers was found to contain higher numbers of TdT+ cells but lower numbers of cyto-mu, B1, and Ia+ cells than the CALLA+ subset. In vitro analysis of normal...

  1. Treatment of refractory/relapsed adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia with bortezomib- based chemotherapy

    Zhao J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Junmei Zhao,* Chao Wang,* Yongping Song, Yuzhang Liu, Baijun FangHenan Key Lab of Experimental Haematology, Henan Institute of Haematology, Henan Tumor Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China  *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nine pretreated patients aged >19 years with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL were treated with a combination of bortezomib plus chemotherapy before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT. Eight (88.9% patients, including two Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL patients, achieved a complete remission. Furthermore, the evaluable patients have benefited from allo-HSCT after response to this reinduction treatment. We conclude that bortezomib-based chemotherapy was highly effective for adults with refractory/relapsed ALL before allo-HSCT. Therefore, this regimen deserves a larger series within prospective trials to confirm these results. Keywords: acute lymphoblastic leukemia, refractory, relapsed, bortezomib

  2. Two pairs of monozygotic twins with concordant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL): case report.

    Li, Xue; Sun, Nianzheng; Huang, Xiaoyang; Ju, Xiuli

    2014-07-01

    The occurrence of leukemia in twins is rare but has a crucial implication in the genetic research of leukemia. This report presents 2 pairs of monozygotic twins with precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-AF4 fusion genes were found in the twin sisters. This study is the first to report on infant ALL harboring the 46,XY, -4, +10, -13, del(14)(q24), -15, +2mar[4 cells] complex chromosome abnormality. Our report showed that the unified cytogenetic features in monozygotic twins and MLL-AF4 fusion gene may be necessary but insufficient for the clinical development and prognosis of identical twins with leukemia. PMID:24807006

  3. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and adolescents: prognostic factors and analysis of survival

    Daniel Willian Lustosa de Sousa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical and laboratory features of children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated at three referral centers in Ceará and evaluate prognostic factors for survival, including age, gender, presenting white blood cell count, immunophenotype, DNA index and early response to treatment.METHODS: Seventy-six under 19-year-old patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with the Grupo Brasileiro de Tratamento de Leucemia da Infância - acute lymphoblastic leukemia-93 and -99 protocols between September 2007 and December 2009 were analyzed. The diagnosis was based on cytological, immunophenotypic and cytogenetic criteria. Associations between variables, prognostic factors and response to treatment were analyzed using the chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Overall and event-free survival were estimated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and compared using the log-rank test. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify independent prognostic factors.RESULTS: The average age at diagnosis was 6.3 ± 0.5 years and males were predominant (65%. The most frequently observed clinical features were hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Central nervous system involvement and mediastinal enlargement occurred in 6.6% and 11.8%, respectively. B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia was more common (89.5% than T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A DNA index >1.16 was found in 19% of patients and was associated with favorable prognosis. On Day 8 of induction therapy, 95% of the patients had lymphoblast counts <1000/µL and white blood cell counts <5.0 Ã- 109/L. The remission induction rate was 95%, the induction mortality rate was 2.6% and overall survival was 72%.CONCLUSION: The prognostic factors identified are compatible with the literature. The 5-year overall and event-free survival rates were lower than those reported for developed countries. As shown by the multivariate analysis, age

  4. Purification and characterization of fetal hematopoietic cells that express the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA)

    1983-01-01

    Fetal hematopoietic cells that express the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) were purified from both fetal liver and fetal bone marrow by immune rosetting with sheep erythrocytes coated with rabbit anti-mouse immunoglobulin and by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Dual fluorescence techniques disclosed that these cells were heterogenous with respect to the expression of a series of differentiation and activation antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies. Thus, whereas all...

  5. Characterization of xenoantiserum produced against B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line

    Akagi,Tadaatsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Isao; Yoshimoto,Shizuo

    1982-01-01

    Antiserum was produced in white rabbit by intravenously injecting living cells of a B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) line (BALL-1). The reactivity of the antiserum against various lymphoid cell lines was examined by membrane immunofluorescence after appropriate absorption. Serum absorbed with non-T, non-B (NALL-1) and T-ALL (TALL-1) cells recognized B cell antigens distinct from Ia-like antigens on both normal and neoplastic B cells. After further absorption with tonsillar cells or n...

  6. Successful outcome of mucormycosis in two children on induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Anshul Gupta; Sandeep Jain; Charu Agrawal; Gauri Kapoor

    2013-01-01

    Zygomycetes are one of the less common causes of invasive fungal infections in patients with the hematological malignancies. We report two cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the pediatric age group, complicated by disseminated cutaneous mucormycosis during induction chemotherapy. In one of our cases, cutaneous mucormycosis progressed to osteomyelitis of the proximal ulna while in the other it disseminated to lungs and distant cutaneous site. Aggressive treatment, which included intraven...

  7. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Associated with Brucellosis in Two Patients with Fever and Pancytopenia

    Eser, Bulent; Altuntas, Fevzi; Soyuer, Isin; Er, Ozlem; Canoz, Ozlem; COSKUN, HASAN SENOL; Cetin, Mustafa; Unal, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Brucellosis is a disease involving the lymphoproliferative system, which may lead to changes in the hematological parameters; however, pancytopenia is a rare finding. However, malignant diseases in association with brucellosis are rarely the cause of pancytopenia. Herein, two cases with fever and pancytopenia, diagnosed as simultaneous acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brucellosis are presented. Anti-leukemic therapy and brucellosis treatment were administered simultaneously, and normal blood ...

  8. Cytogenetic Findings of Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Fars Province

    Akbar Safaei; Jahanbanoo Shahryari; Mohamad Reza Farzaneh; Narjes Tabibi; Marzieh Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the sixth most common malignancy in Iran. Cytogenetic analysis of leukemic blasts plays an important role in classification and prognosis in ALL patients. The purpose of this study was to define the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities of ALL patients in adults and children in Fars province, Iran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated karyotype results of bone marrow specimens in 168 Iranian patients with ALL (154 B-ALL and...

  9. Identification of Interconnected Markers for T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Emine Guven Maiorov; Ozlem Keskin; Ozden Hatirnaz Ng; Ugur Ozbek; Attila Gursoy

    2013-01-01

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation BioMed Research International Volume 2013, Article ID 210253, 20 pages http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/210253 Research Article Identification of Interconnected Markers for T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Emine Guven Maiorov,1 Ozlem Keskin,1 Ozden Hatirnaz Ng,2 Ugur Ozbek,2 and Attila Gursoy1 1 Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics and College of Engineering, Koc¸ University, Rumelifeneri Yolu, Sariyer, 34450 Istanbu...

  10. Dental Anomalies and Dental Age Assessment in Treated Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    L. Khojastepour; Zareifar, S; Ebrahimi, M

    2014-01-01

    Background This cross sectional study was performed to evaluate dental ages and incidence of dental anomalies in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Methods and materials A total of 25 ALL patient who passed at least 2 years of chemotherapy and 25 healthy sex and age matched children were evaluated. Dental age as well as dental anomalies in shape, size, number, and structure was recorded based on their panoramic radiographies which were taken for dental purposes. Results ...

  11. Clinical Analysis of Adverse Drug Reactions between Vincristine and Triazoles in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Yang, Lihua; Yu, Lihua; Chen, Xinxin; Hu, Yanqun; Wang, Bin(Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240, China)

    2015-01-01

    Background Vincristine (VCR) is a major chemotherapy drug for treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Triazole antifungal drugs (AFD) are the main agents for the prevention/treatment of invasive fungal infection (IFI), a common complication during the treatment of ALL. This study investigated the adverse drug reactions (ADRs) between VCR and AFD. Material/Methods A retrospective study was performed on 68 children with ALL (39 boys and 29 girls, median age: 5 years) who were...

  12. The molecular genetic makeup of acute lymphoblastic leukemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Abstract: Genomic profiling has transformed our understanding of the genetic basis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recent years have seen a shift from microarray analysis and candidate gene sequencing to next-generation sequencing. Together, these approaches have shown that many ALL subtypes are characterized by constellations of structural rearrangements, submicroscopic DNA copy number alterations, and sequence mutations, several of which have clear implications for risk stratification and targeted therapeutic intervention.

  13. Liposomal vincristine for relapsed or refractory Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a review of literature

    Pathak, Priyanka; Hess, Rosemary; Weiss, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies that arise from clonal proliferation of immature lymphoid cells in the bone marrow, peripheral blood and other organs. There are approximately 3000 new adult cases diagnosed every year in the United States with a 5-year overall survival ranging from 22% to 50%. Most adult patients with ALL who achieve a complete response will ultimately relapse and for this subset of patients the only hope of curative ther...

  14. Evaluation of an oral preventive protocol in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Costa Edja Maria Melo de Brito; Fernandes Maria Zélia; Quinderé Lêda Bezerra; Souza Lélia Batista de; Pinto Leão Pereira

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a preventive oral protocol in children receiving antineoplastic treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) before initiating a larger intervention study. During a seven month period, fourteen children from two to ten years old with a diagnosis of ALL were evaluated. Patients with ALL who received a 0.12% chlorhexidine mouth rinse (seven children) were compared to a control group of patients who were not given the same preventive tre...

  15. Management of Ontario children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia by the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute protocols.

    Desai, S J; Barr, R D; Andrew, M.; deVeber, L L; Pai, M K

    1989-01-01

    There is ample evidence of the value of intensive therapeutic strategies in the management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the commonest form of malignant disease in children. Such a program, devised at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI), Boston, and incorporating high-dose L-asparaginase, was adopted in 1984 by the Children's Hospital at Chedoke-McMaster, Hamilton, Ont., and the Children's Hospital of Western Ontario, London. We describe the experience of these institutions in th...

  16. Intrathecal radiogold prophylaxis and findings of the cerebrospinal fluid in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Intrathecal radiogold application represents an alternative to the prophylaxis of meningosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Its compatibility is good, there are rarely any clinical side effects. In addition to inconstant phagocytosis, changes of the protein value and its fractions could be identified in the cerebrospinal fluid. The cumulative rates of remission and survival are less marked in these groups of patients than in those who received a prophylactic skull irradiation. (author)

  17. Hypoglycemia associated with L-asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment: a case report

    Tanaka Ryuma; Osumi Tomoo; Miharu Masashi; Ishii Tomohiro; Hasegawa Tomonobu; Takahashi Takao; Shimada Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia repeatedly developed hypoglycemia during chemotherapy. Comparison of serum glucose trends between chemotherapy with and without L-asparaginase (L-Asp) demonstrated a strong association between L-Asp and hypoglycemia. Critical blood sampling during hypoglycemia indicated hyperinsulinism, suggesting that L-Asp induced hypoglycemia in the patient through inappropriate insulin secretion. Identification of hypoglycemia as an adverse effect will ...

  18. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2016-07-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  19. Clofarabine for the treatment of adult acute lymphoid leukemia: the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia intergroup.

    Huguet, Françoise; Leguay, Thibaut; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Rousselot, Philippe; Vey, Norbert; Pigneux, Arnaud; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2015-04-01

    Clofarabine, a second-generation purine analog displaying potent inhibition of DNA synthesis and favorable pharmacologic profile, is approved for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) after failure of at least two previous regimens in patients up to 21 years of age at diagnosis. Good neurologic tolerance, synergy with alkylating agents, management guidelines defined through pediatric ALL and adult acute myeloid leukemia, have also prompted its administration in more than 100 adults with Philadelphia chromosome-positive and negative B lineage and T lineage ALL, as single agent (40 mg/m(2)/ day for 5 days), or in combination. In a Group for Research on Adult Acute Lympho- blastic Leukemia (GRAALL) retrospective study of two regimens (clofarabine ± cyclophosphamide + / - etoposide (ENDEVOL) ± mitoxantrone ± asparaginase ± dexamethasone (VANDEVOL)), remission was achieved in 50% of 55 relapsed/refractory patients, and 17-35% could proceed to allogeneic stem cell. Clofarabine warrants further exploration in advanced ALL treatment and bridge-to-transplant. PMID:24996442

  20. T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia and parvovirus infection in a child with neurofibromastosis-1

    Pallavi Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis (NF-1 patients have an increased risk of developing malignancies most commonly rhabdomyosarcomas, optic gliomas, brain tumors and non-lymphocytic leukemias. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL has been infrequently reported in association with NF-1. We describe a rare association of NF-1, T-lineage ALL and parvovirus infection in a 12-year-old child. In addition, it is also to emphasize that a high index of suspicion should be kept for parvovirus B19 infection as a cause of bicytopenia/pancytopenia in ALL patients following induction chemotherapy.

  1. Trigeminal nerve involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: value of MR imaging

    Karadag, Demet; Karaguelle, Ayse Tuba; Erden, Ilhan; Erden, Ayse E-mail: erden@ada.net.tr

    2002-10-01

    A 30-year-old male with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with facial numbness. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia of the left trigeminal nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed no atypical cells. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated enlargement and enhancement of intracranial portions of the left trigeminal nerve. The abnormal MR imaging findings almost completely resolved after the chemotherapy. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is not only a useful procedure for the early diagnosis of cranial nerve invasion by leukemia but it might be helpful to follow the changes after the treatment.

  2. Successful Treatment of Fanconi Anemia and T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Terrie Flatt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is associated with an increased risk of malignancy. Patients are sensitive to the toxic effects of chemotherapy. We report the case of a patient with Fanconi anemia who developed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He experienced chemotherapy-related complications including prolonged neutropenia, grade IV vincristine neuropathy, and disseminated aspergillosis. He was successfully treated with modified dosing of cytarabine and intrathecal methotrexate followed by allogeneic bone marrow transplant. The aspergillosis was treated with systemic antifungal treatment and surgical resection. Now 30 months after bone marrow transplant the patient is without evidence of aspergillosis or leukemia.

  3. Testicular involvement in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Consequences of radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    Brauner, R.; Czernichow, P.; Rappaport, R.; Schaison, G.

    1986-06-05

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia has a higher mortality rate in boys as a result of possible testicular involvement; indeed, the testicle is the site of initial relapse in 6% of cases and is involved in 15% of all cases. Clinical diagnosis of testicular involvement is usually readily established. Treatment is delivery of 24 grays to both testicles and intensification of chemotherapy. In children who recover from their leukemia, this irradiation produces not only destruction of germ cells but also endocrine impairment which should be looked for and treated; replacement therapy with slow-action testosterone will be combined with the other hormonal treatments which pituitary deficiencies secondary to cranial irradiation may require.

  4. Testicular involvement in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Consequences of radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia has a higher mortality rate in boys as a result of possible testicular involvement; indeed, the testicle is the site of initial relapse in 6% of cases and is involved in 15% of all cases. Clinical diagnosis of testicular involvement is usually readily established. Treatment is delivery of 24 grays to both testicles and intensification of chemotherapy. In children who recover from their leukemia, this irradiation produces not only destruction of germ cells but also endocrine impairment which should be looked for and treated; replacement therapy with slow-action testosterone will be combined with the other hormonal treatments which pituitary deficiencies secondary to cranial irradiation may require

  5. Trigeminal nerve involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: value of MR imaging

    A 30-year-old male with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with facial numbness. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia of the left trigeminal nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed no atypical cells. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated enlargement and enhancement of intracranial portions of the left trigeminal nerve. The abnormal MR imaging findings almost completely resolved after the chemotherapy. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is not only a useful procedure for the early diagnosis of cranial nerve invasion by leukemia but it might be helpful to follow the changes after the treatment

  6. FACIAL PALSY AS FIRST PRESENTATION OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA: A CASE REPORT

    S. Inaloo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveFacial paralysis in children is very often idiopathic and isolated facial nerve palsy, resulting from leukemic infiltration is a rare occurrence. Here we present the case of a 14 year-old boy with acute lymphobastic leukemia, who first presented with isolated right side peripheral facial nerve paralysis and was initially diagnosed with Bell's palsy.ConclusionThe presence of Bell's palsy in young children requires a complete evaluation, keeping in mind the possibility of leptomeningeal disease.Key words: Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Facial nerve palsy, Children.

  7. TEL-AML1 transgenic zebrafish model of precursor B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Sabaawy, Hatem E.; Azuma, Mizuki; Embree, Lisa J.; Tsai, Huai-Jen; Matthew F Starost; Dennis D Hickstein

    2006-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a clonal disease that evolves through the accrual of genetic rearrangements and/or mutations within the dominant clone. The TEL-AML1 (ETV6-RUNX1) fusion in precursor-B (pre-B) ALL is the most common genetic rearrangement in childhood cancer; however, the cellular origin and the molecular pathogenesis of TEL-AML1-induced leukemia have not been identified. To study the origin of TEL-AML1-induced ALL, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing TEL-AML1 eit...

  8. Prethymic Cytoplasmic CD3 Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia: A Case Report

    Elisa Cannizzo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute undiffentiated leukemia (AUL is an acute leukemia with no more than one membrane marker of any given lineage. Blasts often express HLA-DR, CD34, and/or CD38 and may be positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT. The expression of CD34, HLA-DR, and CD38 has been shown in pro-T-ALL, although in this case, blasts should also express CD7 and cyCD3. However, some cases of T-ALL without CD3 in the cytoplasm and all TCR chain genes in germ line configuration are reported, features that fit well with a very early hematopoietic cell. We report a case of acute leukemia CD34+/−HLADR+CD7+CD38+cyCD3− in which a diagnosis of AUL was considered. However the blasts were also positive for CD99 and TCR delta gene rearrangement which was found on molecular studies. Therefore a differential diagnosis between AUL and an early cyCD3 negative T-ALL was debated.

  9. Evaluation of RT-PCR to Detect Translocations in Children Diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    H Galehdari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common subtype of childhood cancer. Chromosomal ab­normality, specially the replacement of chromosomal material is one of the main reasons in generating leukemia, wherein the kind of translocation play a key role in managing the remedy. The goal of the present study was to develop a reliable, rapid, and cost effective method to detect translocations, which are the main sources of leukemia."nMethods: Twenty seven samples were collected from leukemia affected individuals that were referred to the Shafa Hospital in Ahwaz from summer 2007 to spring2008. Total RNA was extracted from one milliliter whole blood, and then reversely tran­scribed using reverse transcriptase. Finally, multiplex RT-PCR was performed for each sample."nResults: Cell lines (K562, Jurkat E 6.1 that are harboring known translocations were used as positive control, with addi­tional internal control to prove false negative results. Translocations t (9; 22, t (12; 21, t (1; 19 and t (4; 11 were ob­served in patients that have been diagnosed with the ALL, respectively. No Translocation has been seen in individuals suf­fering lymphoma."nConclusion: Multiplex RT-PCR assay is an effective, sensitive, accurate, and cost-effective diagnostic tool, which can im­prove the ability to accurately and rapidly risk-stratify patients that were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  10. Oral manifestations leading to the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a young girl

    B A Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: oral complications may be leukemia′s first presentation. Aim: to present a case of a young girl with a swelling on the face that led to the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia is reported. Results: a 10-year old anemic girl was referred for evaluation and treatment of a swelling at the left-nasolabial region. Symptoms reported (tiredness, poor appetite, fever, lethargy, and musculoskeletal pain and clinical findings (enlargement at the presternal region and brownish stain in the lumbar region led to the suspicion of a hematopoietic malignancy. The diagnosis of lymphoblastic leukemia was attained after specific examination conducted by the pediatric oncologist and hematologist. Conclusion: dentists must be able to clearly recognize oral physiological characteristics, and, when identifying changes of normalcy, to fully investigate it requesting additional tests or referring the patient to specialized professionals.

  11. Duration of adrenal insufficiency during treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Vestergaard, Therese Risom; Juul, Anders; Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Lausen, Birgitte Frederiksen; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Kvist, Tine Kajsa; Andersen, Elisabeth Anne Wreford; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2011-01-01

    Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) recive high doses of glucocorticosteroid as part of their treatment. This may lead to suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, acute adrenal insufficiency, and ultimately to life-threatening conditions. This study explores the adrenal...... function in 96 children with ALL treated according to common protocols. After cessation of induction glucocorticosteroid therapy, they received hydrocortisone substitution therapy (10 mg/m/24 h) until an adrenocorticotropic hormone test (250 µg tetracosatide) showed a sufficient adrenal response [plasma (p...

  12. Incidence and risk factors for central nervous system relapse in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Camila Silva Peres Cancela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite all the advances in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, central nervous system relapse remains an important obstacle to curing these patients. This study analyzed the incidence of central nervous system relapse and the risk factors for its occurrence in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. METHODS: This study has a retrospective cohort design. The studied population comprised 199 children and adolescents with a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia followed up at Hospital das Clinicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (HC-UFMG between March 2001 and August 2009 and submitted to the Grupo Brasileiro de Tratamento de Leucemia da Infância - acute lymphoblastic leukemia (GBTLI-LLA-99 treatment protocol. RESULTS: The estimated probabilities of overall survival and event free survival at 5 years were 69.5% ( 3.6% and 58.8% ( 4.0%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of central nervous system (isolated or combined relapse was 11.0% at 8 years. The estimated rate of isolated central nervous system relapse at 8 years was 6.8%. In patients with a blood leukocyte count at diagnosis > 50 x 10(9/L, the estimated rate of isolated or combined central nervous system relapse was higher than in the group with a count 50 x 10(9/L at diagnosis seems to be a significant prognostic factor for a higher incidence of central nervous system relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  13. Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 define subgroups of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    La Starza, Roberta; Barba, Gianluca; Demeyer, Sofie; Pierini, Valentina; Di Giacomo, Danika; Gianfelici, Valentina; Schwab, Claire; Matteucci, Caterina; Vicente, Carmen; Cools, Jan; Messina, Monica; Crescenzi, Barbara; Chiaretti, Sabina; Foà, Robin; Basso, Giuseppe; Harrison, Christine J.; Mecucci, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 were detected in 23/200 cases of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Genomic studies identified two types of deletions: interstitial and terminal. Interstitial 5q deletions, found in five cases, were present in both adults and children with a female predominance (chi-square, P=0.012). Interestingly, these cases resembled immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia showing significant down-regulation of five out of the ten top differentially expressed genes in this leukemia group, including TCF7 which maps within the 5q31 common deleted region. Mutations of genes known to be associated with immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, i.e. WT1, ETV6, JAK1, JAK3, and RUNX1, were present, while CDKN2A/B deletions/mutations were never detected. All patients had relapsed/resistant disease and blasts showed an early differentiation arrest with expression of myeloid markers. Terminal 5q deletions, found in 18 of patients, were more prevalent in adults (chi-square, P=0.010) and defined a subgroup of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by 130 up- and 197 down-regulated genes. Down-regulated genes included TRIM41, ZFP62, MAPK9, MGAT1, and CNOT6, all mapping within the 1.4 Mb common deleted region at 5q35.3. Of interest, besides CNOT6 down-regulation, these cases also showed low BTG1 expression and a high incidence of CNOT3 mutations, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with terminal 5q deletions. In conclusion, interstitial and terminal 5q deletions are recurrent genomic losses identifying distinct subtypes of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27151989

  14. Unraveling Glucocorticoid Resistance In MLLrearranged Infant Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    J.A.P. Hagelstein (Jill)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In the Netherlands, approximately 650 children aged between 0 and 18 years are diagnosed with cancer every year, including ~120 patients suffering from leukemia. Leukemia (Greek for leukos - white, and haima for blood) is a type of cancer characterized by an abnormal in

  15. Intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 (iAMP21) detected by ETV6/RUNX1 FISH screening in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    Daniela Ribeiro Ney Garcia; Alejandro Mauricio Arancibia; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Marcelo Gerardin Poirot Land; Maria Luiza Macedo Silva

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome abnormalities that usually define high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia are the t(9;22)/ breakpoint cluster region protein-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1, hypodiploid with < 44 chromosomes and 11q23/ myeloid/lymphoid leukemia gene rearrangements. The spectrum of acute lymphoblastic leukemia genetic abnormalities is nevertheless rapidly expanding. Therefore, newly described chromosomal aberrations are likely to have an impact on clinical care in the near future. R...

  16. Inhibition of MerTK increases chemosensitivity and decreases oncogenic potential in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Brandao, L N; Winges, A; Christoph, S; Sather, S; Migdall-Wilson, J; Schlegel, J.; McGranahan, A; Gao, D.; Liang, X; DeRyckere, D; Graham, D K

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric leukemia survival rates have improved dramatically over the past decades. However, current treatment protocols are still largely ineffective in cases of relapsed leukemia and are associated with a significant rate of chronic health conditions. Thus, there is a continued need for new therapeutic options. Here, we show that mer receptor tyrosine kinase (MerTK) was abnormally expressed in approximately one half of pediatric T-cell leukemia patient samples and T-cell acute lymphoblastic...

  17. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC...

  18. Disseminated fusariosis and endogenous fungal endophthalmitis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia following platelet transfusion possibly due to transfusion-related immunomodulation

    Yong Ku

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report a case of disseminated fusariosis with endogenous endophthalmitis in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Transfusion-associated immune modulation secondary to platelet transfusion could play an important role in the pathophysiology of this case. Case Presentation A 9 year-old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated by pancytopenia and disseminated Intravascular coagulation was given platelet transfusion. He developed disseminated fusariosis and was referred to the ophthalmology team for right endogenous endophthalmitis. The infection was controlled with aggressive systemic and intravitreal antifungals. Conclusion Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are predisposed to endogenous fungal endophthalmitis. Transfusion-associated immune modulation may further increase host susceptibility to such opportunistic infections.

  19. ZFX Controls Propagation and Prevents Differentiation of Acute T-Lymphoblastic and Myeloid Leukemia

    Stuart P. Weisberg

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-propagating cells in acute leukemia maintain a stem/progenitor-like immature phenotype and proliferative capacity. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML and acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL originate from different lineages through distinct oncogenic events such as MLL fusions and Notch signaling, respectively. We found that Zfx, a transcription factor that controls hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal, controls the initiation and maintenance of AML caused by MLL-AF9 fusion and of T-ALL caused by Notch1 activation. In both leukemia types, Zfx prevents differentiation and activates gene sets characteristic of immature cells of the respective lineages. In addition, endogenous Zfx contributes to gene induction and transformation by Myc overexpression in myeloid progenitors. Key Zfx target genes include the mitochondrial enzymes Ptpmt1 and Idh2, whose overexpression partially rescues the propagation of Zfx-deficient AML. These results show that distinct leukemia types maintain their undifferentiated phenotype and self-renewal by exploiting a common stem-cell-related genetic regulator.

  20. Prevention of meningeal relapses in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    The paper describes modern methods of preventing meningeal leukemia which, in view of the noxiousness of skull radiotherapy, increasingly restrict the use of this method in a growing number of children.(author)

  1. Serial Ultrasound Monitoring for Early Recognition of Asparaginase Associated Pancreatitis in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Raja, Raheel Altaf; Schmiegelow, K.; Henriksen, Birthe Merete;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children and L-asparaginase is an essential component of the treatment. Cessation of L-asparaginase decreases event free survival. Acute pancreatitis is the toxicity that most commonly results in cessation of L-asparagina......BACKGROUND: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children and L-asparaginase is an essential component of the treatment. Cessation of L-asparaginase decreases event free survival. Acute pancreatitis is the toxicity that most commonly results in cessation of L...... protocol, with PEG-asparaginase of 2 or 6 week intervals, for 30 weeks had their pancreas monitored using serial ultrasound in order to detect early signs of inflammation. RESULTS: Nineteen of 31 eligible patients were included. Three of the included patients developed AAP. None of the patients, including...... the three patients that developed AAP, had signs of inflammatory edema or pancreas enzymes above three times the upper normal limit prior to AAP. CONCLUSION: We found no signs of inflammatory edema within the pancreas on ultrasound during treatment with PEG-asparginase in our cohort prior to...

  2. Unraveling Glucocorticoid Resistance In MLLrearranged Infant Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Hagelstein, Jill

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In the Netherlands, approximately 650 children aged between 0 and 18 years are diagnosed with cancer every year, including ~120 patients suffering from leukemia. Leukemia (Greek for leukos - white, and haima for blood) is a type of cancer characterized by an abnormal increase of immature (non-functional) white blood cells in the bone marrow. As a result, the production of all healthy, functional blood cells is impaired, leading to anemia (loss of functional red bl...

  3. Clinical and pharmacologic aspects of blinatumomab in the treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Portell CA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Craig A Portell, Candice M Wenzell, Anjali S Advani Leukemia Program, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adults remains a challenging disease to treat, and novel therapies are needed. Precursor-B ALL comprises 80% of cases, and the CD19 antigen is expressed in nearly all precursor-B ALL patients. Bispecific T-cell-engaging antibodies are novel bioengineered proteins. The bispecific T-cell-engaging antibody blinatumomab engages polyclonal T cells to CD19-expressing B cells. By binding to both CD3 and CD19, blinatumomab physically brings these T cells in close proximity to malignant B cells and potentiates T-cell-induced cytotoxic cell kill. Blinatumomab requires continuous intravenous infusion due to its short half-life, the need for continuous exposure for the drug to exert sufficient efficacy, and lessened toxicity. A phase II trial of B-cell ALL patients with persistent or relapsed minimal residual disease demonstrated an 80% rate of complete molecular remission. Cytokine-release syndrome and central nervous system events, such as seizures and encephalopathy, are reversible toxicities. Promising results in B-cell ALL with minimal residual disease have led to further evaluation of this drug in newly diagnosed and relapsed B-cell ALL. Keywords: blinatumomab, B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, CD19, BiTE antibodies

  4. Studies on the assessment of neurotoxicity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Muchi, H.; Satoh, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Karube, T.; Miyao, M.

    1987-03-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis caused a remarkable reduction in the incidence of CNS disease, however there has evolved a growing concern regarding the immediate or late toxicities to the developing CNS. Twenty-eight children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who survived for more than 2 years were examined for the assessment of neurotoxicity induced by CNS prophylaxis and its treatment. The patients were stratified into three groups: Stratum I, prophylaxis with methotrexate; Stratum II, prophylaxis with cranial irradiation with methotrexate; and Stratum III, with CNS leukemia. Once CNS disease developed the sequelae were frequent and severe, due to the elevated methotrexate levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. CNS prophylaxis with intermediate-dose methotrexate was less toxic to the developing CNS than prophylactic cranial irradiation, especially in children under 5 years of age. Electroencephalograms and evoked potentials are likely to find increasing application in defining the CNS sequelae of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and its treatment. Although the sample size was small, the findings delineate specific areas of neurotoxicity.

  5. Studies on the assessment of neurotoxicity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis caused a remarkable reduction in the incidence of CNS disease, however there has evolved a growing concern regarding the immediate or late toxicities to the developing CNS. Twenty-eight children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who survived for more than 2 years were examined for the assessment of neurotoxicity induced by CNS prophylaxis and its treatment. The patients were stratified into three groups: Stratum I, prophylaxis with methotrexate; Stratum II, prophylaxis with cranial irradiation with methotrexate; and Stratum III, with CNS leukemia. Once CNS disease developed the sequelae were frequent and severe, due to the elevated methotrexate levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. CNS prophylaxis with intermediate-dose methotrexate was less toxic to the developing CNS than prophylactic cranial irradiation, especially in children under 5 years of age. Electroencephalograms and evoked potentials are likely to find increasing application in defining the CNS sequelae of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and its treatment. Although the sample size was small, the findings delineate specific areas of neurotoxicity

  6. Hardware Segmentation on Digital Microscope Images for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Diagnosis Using Xilinx System Generator

    Prof. Kamal A. ElDahshan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation is considered the most critical step in image processing and helps to analyze, infer and make decisions especially in the medical field. Analyzing digital microscope images for earlier acute lymphoblastic leukemia diagnosis and treatment require sophisticated software and hardware systems. These systems must provide both highly accurate and extremely fast processing of large amounts of image data. In this work, the hardware segmentation framework for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL images based color histogram of Hue channel of HSV color space is proposed to segment each leukemia image into blasts and background using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA. The main purpose of this work is to implement image segmentation framework in a FPGA with minimum hardware resources and low execution time to be suitable enough for medical applications. Hardware framework of segmentation is designed using Xilinx System Generator (XSG as DSP design tool that enables the use of Simulink models, implemented in VHDL and synthesized for Xilinx SPARTAN-3E Starter kit (XC3S500E-FG320 FPGA.

  7. Imaging findings of the brain abnormalities in acute lymphoblastic leukemia of children during and after treatment

    We evaluated the imaging abnormalities of the brain observed during and after treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukemia. The study group consisted of 30 patients (male : female=19 : 11 ; mean age, 64 months) with acute childhood lymphoblastic leukemia during the previous ten-year period who had undergone prophylaxis of the central nervous system. Irrespective of the CNS symptoms, base-line study of the brain involving CT and follow-up CT or MRI was undertaken more than once. We retrospectively evaluated the imaging findings, methods of treatment, associated CNS symptoms, and the interval between diagnosis and the time at which brain abnormalities were revealed by imaging studies. In 15 (50% ; male : female=9 : 6 ; mean age, 77 months) of 30 patients, brain abnormalities that included brain atrophy (n=9), cerebral infarctions (n=4), intracranial hemorrhage (n=1), mineralizing microangiopathy (n=2), and periventricular leukomalacia (n=3) were seen on follow-up CT or MR images. In four of nine patients with brain atrophy, imaging abnormalities such as periventricular leukomalacia (n=2), infarction (n=1) and microangiopathy (n=1) were demonstrated. Fourteen of the 15 patients underwent similar treatment ; the one excluded had leukemic cells in the CSF. Six patients had CNS symptoms. In the 15 patients with abnormal brain imaging findings, the interval between diagnosis and the demonstration of brain abnormalities was between one month and four years. After the cessation of treatment, imaging abnormalities remained in all patients except one with brain atrophy. Various imaging abnormalities of the brain may be seen during and after the treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukemia and persist for a long time. In children with this condition, the assessment of brain abnormalities requires follow-up study of the brain

  8. Imaging findings of the brain abnormalities in acute lymphoblastic leukemia of children during and after treatment

    Lee, Kyung Joo; Lee, Seung Rho; Park, Dong Woo; Joo, Kyung Bin; Kim, Jang Wook; Hahm, Chang Kok; Kim, Ki Joong; Lee, Hahng [College of Medicine, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-09-01

    We evaluated the imaging abnormalities of the brain observed during and after treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukemia. The study group consisted of 30 patients (male : female=19 : 11 ; mean age, 64 months) with acute childhood lymphoblastic leukemia during the previous ten-year period who had undergone prophylaxis of the central nervous system. Irrespective of the CNS symptoms, base-line study of the brain involving CT and follow-up CT or MRI was undertaken more than once. We retrospectively evaluated the imaging findings, methods of treatment, associated CNS symptoms, and the interval between diagnosis and the time at which brain abnormalities were revealed by imaging studies. In 15 (50% ; male : female=9 : 6 ; mean age, 77 months) of 30 patients, brain abnormalities that included brain atrophy (n=9), cerebral infarctions (n=4), intracranial hemorrhage (n=1), mineralizing microangiopathy (n=2), and periventricular leukomalacia (n=3) were seen on follow-up CT or MR images. In four of nine patients with brain atrophy, imaging abnormalities such as periventricular leukomalacia (n=2), infarction (n=1) and microangiopathy (n=1) were demonstrated. Fourteen of the 15 patients underwent similar treatment ; the one excluded had leukemic cells in the CSF. Six patients had CNS symptoms. In the 15 patients with abnormal brain imaging findings, the interval between diagnosis and the demonstration of brain abnormalities was between one month and four years. After the cessation of treatment, imaging abnormalities remained in all patients except one with brain atrophy. Various imaging abnormalities of the brain may be seen during and after the treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukemia and persist for a long time. In children with this condition, the assessment of brain abnormalities requires follow-up study of the brain.

  9. A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with abnormal brain CT scan after cranial irradiation for central nervous system leukemia

    A 21-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with central neurologic symptoms immediately after the second irradiation (20 Gy to the brain and 10 Gy to the spinal cord) for central nervous system (CNS)-leukemia 3 years and 2 months after the first cranial irradiation with 20 Gy. White matter was depicted as diffusely high density area on CT; histology revealed necrosis of leukemic cells. In the present patient with repeated recurrent CNS-leukemia, leukemic cells seemed to have been damaged simultaneously after irradiation because of parenchymal widespread involvement of leukemic cells, resulting in brain edema, an increased intracranial pressure and parenchymal disturbance. This finding may have an important implication for the risk of cranial irradiation in the case of widespread involvement of leukemic cells. Re-evaluation of cranial irradiation in such cases is suggested. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. PEG-asparaginase allergy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the NOPHO ALL2008 protocol

    Henriksen, Louise Tram; Harila-Saari, Arja; Ruud, Ellen;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: L-Asparaginase is an effective drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The use of L-asparaginase may be limited by serious adverse events of which allergy is the most frequent. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical aspects of PEG......-asparaginase allergy in children treated according to the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) ALL2008 protocol. PROCEDURE: Children (1-17 years) enrolled in the NOPHO ALL2008 protocol between July 2008 and August 2011, who developed PEG-asparaginase allergy were identified through the NOPHO...

  11. VARIATIONS OF THE LEUKOCYTES AND LYMPHOCYTES IN THE CASE OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Mirela Cozma; Marioara Nicoleta Filimon

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to approximate the surviving period in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. For this study we took in to consideration 10 patients 0 to 20 years old, coming from rural or urban environments and their evolution has been studied for a period of 60 days from the primary presentation to the hospital. The diagnosis was made after a careful history and physical examination and was completed after a blood count insisting on the number of leukocytes and on the peri...

  12. OSTEOPOROSIS IN A SEVENTH YEAR OLD BOY WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA (Case Report)

    Salim, H.; I Ariawati; W Bikin-Suryawan; I Arimbawa

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis in children is rare and usually secondary to an underlying disease process whose diagnosis may be difficult to detect. It can be a manifestation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). About a-quarters of children with ALL will have signs and symptoms of osteoporosis. We report the case of a seventh-year-old boy with back pain. His antero-posterior pelvic radiograph showed the osteoporotic bone. The bone age study revealed six-year-old bone. Review of peripheral blood smear showed...

  13. Clofarabine-based combination chemotherapy for relapse and refractory childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Arakawa, Yuki; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Aoki, Takahiro; Kubota, Yasuo; Oyama, Ryo; Mori, Makiko; Hayashi, Mayumi; Hanada, Ryoji

    2014-11-01

    Clofarabine, one of the key treatment agents for refractory and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), achieves a remission rate of approximately 30% with single-agent clofarabine induction chemotherapy. However, a remission rate of approximately 50% was reported with a combination chemotherapy regimen consisting of clofarabine, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide. We treated two cases with refractory and relapsed ALL with combination chemotherapy including clofarabine; one was an induction failure but the other achieved remission. Both cases developed an infectious complication (NCI-CTCAE grade 3) and body pain with infusion. Prophylactic antibiotic and opioid infusions facilitated avoiding septic shock and pain. Further investigation of such cases is required. PMID:25501414

  14. Transcriptional regulatory networks downstream of TAL1/SCL in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Palomero, Teresa; Odom, Duncan T.; O'Neil, Jennifer; Ferrando, Adolfo A.; Margolin, Adam; Neuberg, Donna S.; Winter, Stuart S.; Larson, Richard S.; Li, Wei; Liu, X. Shirley; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Aberrant expression of 1 or more transcription factor oncogenes is a critical component of the molecular pathogenesis of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL); however, oncogenic transcriptional programs downstream of T-ALL oncogenes are mostly unknown. TAL1/SCL is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor oncogene aberrantly expressed in 60% of human T-ALLs. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) on chip to identify 71 direct transcriptional targets of TAL1/SCL. ...

  15. MYCN is a novel oncogenic target in pediatric T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Astolfi, Annalisa; Vendemini, Francesca; Urbini, Milena; Melchionda, Fraia; Masetti, Riccardo; Franzoni, Monica; Libri, Virginia; Serravalle, Salvatore; Togni, Marco; Paone, Giuseppina; Montemurro, Luca; Bressanin, Daniela; Chiarini, Francesca; Martelli, Alberto M.; Tonelli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    MYCN is an oncogene frequently overexpressed in pediatric solid tumors whereas few evidences suggest his involvement in the pathogenesis of haematologic malignancies. Here we show that MYCN is overexpressed in a relevant proportion (40 to 50%) of adult and pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALL). Focusing on pediatric T-ALL, MYCN-expressing samples were found almost exclusively in the TAL1-positive subgroup. Moreover, TAL1 knockdown in T-ALL cell lines resulted in a reduction o...

  16. Tal-1 induces T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia accelerated by casein kinase IIalpha.

    Kelliher, M. A.; Seldin, D C; Leder, P.

    1996-01-01

    Ectopic activation of the TAL-1 gene in T lymphocytes occurs in the majority of cases of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), yet experiments to date have failed to demonstrate a direct transforming capability for tal-1. The tal-1 gene product is a serine phosphoprotein and basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor known to regulate embryonic hematopoiesis. We have established a transgenic mouse model in which tal-1 mis-expression in the thymus results in the developmen...

  17. Mitochondrial DNA alterations of peripheral lymphocytes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients undergoing total body irradiation therapy

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations, including mtDNA copy number and mtDNA 4977 bp common deletion (CD), are key indicators of irradiation-induced damage. The relationship between total body irradiation (TBI) treatment and mtDNA alterations in vivo, however, has not been postulated yet. The aim of this study is to analyze mtDNA alterations in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients as well as to take them as predictors for radiatio...

  18. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia with multiple cytogenetic abnormalities secondary to treatment of Ewing's sarcoma

    Al-Homaidhi, A.M. [Department of Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital and The University of Toronto, 610 University Ave, Rm. 4-429, Toronto, Ont. M5G 2M9 (Canada); Patterson, B. [Department of Pathology, Princess Margaret Hospital and The University of Toronto, 610 University Ave, Rm. 4-429, Toronto, Ont. M5G 2M9 (Canada); Rubin, S. [Moncton Hospital, Moncton, New Brunswick (Canada); Lipton, J.H. [Department of Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital and The University of Toronto, 610 University Ave, Rm. 4-429, Toronto, Ont. M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    1999-06-01

    We report the case of a 22-year-old man with Ewing's sarcoma who attained a complete remission (CR) after combination radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Secondary acute lymphoblastic leukemia with multiple cytogenetic abnormalities involving chromosome 5 and 7 developed 16 years later. The patient underwent induction chemotherapy and entered a CR. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from a matched sibling was performed successfully and he is in complete remission of both ALL and Ewing's sarcoma. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. Haemostasis disturbances in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) - report of two cases

    The therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children may be accompanied by numerous treatment-related complications of various etiology and severity. Possible adverse effects include thromboembolic and haemorrhagic events, which occur mainly during the induction or consolidation therapy, since as they are associated with the administration of L-Asparaginase (L-Asp), steroids and central venous access insertion. The aim of this report is to present haemostatic disturbances which occurred in 2 children with All, treated according to the ALL IC BFM 2002 regimen, despite prophylactic measures during intensive chemotherapy. (authors)

  20. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia with multiple cytogenetic abnormalities secondary to treatment of Ewing's sarcoma

    We report the case of a 22-year-old man with Ewing's sarcoma who attained a complete remission (CR) after combination radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Secondary acute lymphoblastic leukemia with multiple cytogenetic abnormalities involving chromosome 5 and 7 developed 16 years later. The patient underwent induction chemotherapy and entered a CR. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from a matched sibling was performed successfully and he is in complete remission of both ALL and Ewing's sarcoma. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  1. Rationale for targeting the pre-B-cell receptor signaling pathway in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Müschen, Markus

    2015-06-11

    Inhibitors of B-cell receptor (BCR) and pre-BCR signaling were successfully introduced into patient care for various subtypes of mature B-cell lymphoma (e.g., ibrutinib, idelalisib). Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) typically originates from pre-B cells that critically depend on survival signals emanating from a functional pre-BCR. However, whether patients with ALL benefit from treatment with (pre-) BCR inhibitors has not been explored. Recent data suggest that the pre-BCR functions as tumor suppressor in the majority of cases of human ALL. However, a distinct subset of human ALL is selectively sensitive to pre-BCR antagonists. PMID:25878119

  2. A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated with spinal cord compression

    A 14-year-old boy developed spinal cord compression during remission of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Metrizamide myelography disclosed complete block at the level of the 8th thoracic vertebra. Subsequent metrizamide CT clearly showed the subarachnoid space compressed and stenosed from the 8th thoracic vertebra to the 2nd lumber verbetra, and an extradural mass compressing the spinal cord. The function in the lower extremities was almost completely recovered by radiation therapy with a total dose of 10 Gy from the 6th thoracic vertebra to the 4th lumbar vertebra. (Namekawa, K.)

  3. Targetable kinase-activating lesions in Ph-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Publication Abstract:  Philadelphia chromosome-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph-like ALL) is characterized by a gene-expression profile similar to that of BCR-ABL1-positive ALL, alterations of lymphoid transcription factor genes, and a poor outcome. The frequency and spectrum of genetic alterations in Ph-like ALL and its responsiveness to tyrosine kinase inhibition are undefined, especially in adolescents and adults. We performed genomic profiling of 1725 patients with precursor B-cell ALL and detailed genomic analysis of 154 patients with Ph-like ALL.

  4. Spectral karyotyping reveals a comprehensive karyotype in an adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Da, Wan Ming; Fan, Hui; Guo, Bo; Li, Su Xia; Lu, Xue Chun; Zhu, Hong Li

    2012-01-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities are frequently detected in patients with acute lymphoblastic leu-kemia (ALL). Comprehensive karyotype was related to poor prognosis frequently in ALL. We present a comprehensive karyotype in an adult ALL by spectral karyotyping (SKY) and R-banding. SKY not only confirmed the abnormalities previously seen by R-banding but also improved comprehensive karyotype analysis with the following result 47,XY,+9, ins(1;5)(q23;q23q34) t(6;7)(q23;p13). Our report demonstrated tha...

  5. Precursor T-Cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma with rare presentation in the urinary bladder

    Alexander Pham

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the 16th reported case of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL with involvement in the bladder. Our patient was a 22 yearold man with T-cell ALL with a mediastinal mass. He received hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, dexamethasone (HyperCVAD with mediastinal radiation. Prior to starting maintenance, he relapsed in the bladder and marrow. He received a nelarabine- based induction regimen and achieved remission. This was followed by an unrelated 11/12 HLA-matched myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplant. He is in complete remission for the past 409 days.

  6. Frequency of Chromosomally-Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6 in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Annie Gravel; Daniel Sinnett; Louis Flamand

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a ubiquitous pathogen infecting nearly 100% of the human population. Of these individuals, between 0.2% and 1% of them carry chromosomally-integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6). The biological consequences of chromosomal integration by HHV-6 remain unknown. Objective To determine and compare the frequency of ciHHV-6 in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia to healthy blood donors. Methodology A total of 293 DNA samples from children with pre-B (n = 255), ...

  7. Ophthalmic evaluation of long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Thirty-four long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) underwent comprehensive ophthalmic examinations to detect retinopathy or other ocular sequelae. Sixteen of the 34 patients received whole brain radiation (greater than or equal to 2400 rad). All 18 patients in the non-radiated group had normal eye examinations, while 4 of 16 in the radiated group had ocular abnormalities. None of the ocular abnormalities could be definitely attributed to radiation and all patients had normal visual acuity. No radiation retinopathy was found in either group

  8. PARC/CCL18 Is a Plasma CC Chemokine with Increased Levels in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Struyf, Sofie; Schutyser, Evemie; Gouwy, Mieke; Gijsbers, Klara; Proost, Paul; Benoit, Yves; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van Damme, Jo; Laureys, Geneviève

    2003-01-01

    Chemokines play an important role in leukocyte mobilization, hematopoiesis, and angiogenesis. Tissue-specific expression of particular chemokines also influences tumor growth and metastasis. Here, the CC chemokine pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine (PARC)/CCL18 was measured in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Surprisingly, PARC immunoreactivity was consistently detected in plasma from healthy donors. After purification to ho...

  9. Elevated common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen expression in pediatric immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Cornelius, A S; Campbell, D; Schwartz, E; Poncz, M

    1991-01-01

    Bone marrow examination is often performed in thrombocytopenic children to distinguish immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) from acute leukemia. We describe a patient with thrombocytopenia and 50% common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) positivity in his marrow who was subsequently shown to have ITP. CALLA (CD10) is a surface antigen found in early B-lymphocytes and is elevated in most cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This case prompted us to prospectively study the frequency of immature lymphocyte populations in children with ITP. Fourteen patients with acute ITP and five with other conditions were studied. The two groups were comparable with respect to age: ITP mean, 4.3 (range 0.3-15.5) years; control mean, 5.8 (0.6-13.8) years. The ITP group had a significantly higher percentage of CD10 positive bone marrow lymphocytes (p = 0.007). Five of the 10 patients younger than 4 years of age in the ITP group had CD10 levels of greater than 30%, which is in the leukemic range, whereas none of the control patients had a CD10 levels of greater than 17% (p = 0.003). There was good correlation between CD10 positivity and B4 positivity indicating that both of these markers arise from the same population of immature B-lymphocytes. None of the ITP patients who were older than 4 years had a CD10 level of greater than 30%. We conclude that it is common to have an increase in the proportion of immature lymphocytes in the marrow of young children with ITP. The cause of this increase in CD10 positive cells is unknown.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1827572

  10. Higher frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after in vitro gamma irradiation

    A Ramyar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in childhood, characterized by excess lymphoblasts, and immature white blood cells that are continuously multiplying and overproducing in the bone marrow. The aim of this investigation was to measure the sensitivity of lymphocytes against gamma irradiation in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and also find out the effect of such irradiations in causing chromosomal abnormalities.Methods: In this investigation performed between April 2010 and July 2011, at the Department of Genetics, Cancer Institute of Iran, we studied the effects of gamma irradiation on the lymphocytes of 20 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The lymphocytes of 30 healthy donors were used to establish as a normal response to gamma irradiation and seven age-matched ataxia telangiectasia patients were recruited as positive control. The chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed with the G2- and the G0-assay. We compared the mean number of chromosomal abnormalities such as chromosome and chromatid breakages, chromosome and chromatid gaps, and chromatid exchanges in one-hundred metaphases of patients and control groups.Results: The frequency of chromosomal aberrations was statistically higher among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia than the normal controls (P<0.01. In total, 65% of the patients were sensitive to gamma irradiation, but the remaining 35% were similar to the normal controls. Patients with ataxia telangiectasia showed the highest sensitivity to gamma irradiation (P=0.001.Conclusion: Our results showed that a high percentage of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were sensitive to irradiation, meaning that maximum care should be taken during their treatment to avoid unnecessary X-rays or radiotherapies.

  11. Successful outcome of mucormycosis in two children on induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Anshul Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Zygomycetes are one of the less common causes of invasive fungal infections in patients with the hematological malignancies. We report two cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the pediatric age group, complicated by disseminated cutaneous mucormycosis during induction chemotherapy. In one of our cases, cutaneous mucormycosis progressed to osteomyelitis of the proximal ulna while in the other it disseminated to lungs and distant cutaneous site. Aggressive treatment, which included intravenous administration of amphotericin B; radical surgical intervention in the form of serial wound debridement in the former and wedge pulmonary resection in the later, allowed successful salvage, and administration of planned anti-leukemia treatment in both of our cases. High index of suspicion, timely diagnosis, and appropriate treatment are key components of a successful outcome.

  12. Case report of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with multiple soft tissue mass

    Jang, Jung Yong; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    A 15-year-old patient, who had been diagnosed and treated as Burkitt cell type acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL-L3) already, visited our department. He complained of gingival enlargement and loosening teeth 1 month ago. The clinical examination revealed anterior open bite, gingival enlargement, and non tender swelling particularly in molar regions of both jaws. Deep periodontal pockets and severe mobility was shown on most of the teeth. The panoramic radiographs showed severe bone destruction and extrusion of the molars. The contrast enhanced CT showed multiple enhanced mass and bone marrow obliteration in both jaws. Chemotherapy was done the swelling was subsided at 1 month later. In conclusion, radiologic findings of leukemia with soft tissue mass, known as chloroma or granulocytic sarcoma, mimic those of lymphoma, so blood test may be needed for the final diagnosis.

  13. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia as second primary tumor in a patient with retinoblastoma.

    Ganguly, Anasua; Kaliki, Swathi; Mohammad, Faraz Ali; Mishra, Dilip K; Vanajakshi, S; Reddy, Vijay Anand

    2016-01-01

    Second primary tumor (SPT) is defined as a second tumor that presents either simultaneously or after the diagnosis of an index tumor. Second primary malignancies are the leading cause of death in patients with heritable retinoblastoma (RB). Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), as SPT in RB patients, is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, only five cases of ALL as SPT in patients with RB has been documented in the literature. Herein, we report a case of a 6-year-old girl with bilateral RB, who developed ALL during the course of treatment of RB. This case highlights the importance of reviewing blood investigations regularly to diagnose leukemia as SPT in RB and also the necessity for proper counseling and lifelong follow-up in these patients. PMID:27433042

  14. Refractory chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Horino, Satoshi; Rikiishi, Takeshi; Niizuma, Hidetaka; Abe, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yuko; Onuma, Masaei; Hoshi, Yoshiyuki; Sasahara, Yoji; Yoshinari, Miyako; Kazama, Takuro; Hayashi, Yutaka; Kumaki, Satoru; Tsuchiya, Shigeru

    2009-11-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) has been associated with several hematologic malignancies such as Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but it is rare in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Here, we report a 7-year-old girl with chronic ITP during early intensive phase of chemotherapy for ALL. She underwent splenectomy because thrombocytopenia had persisted even after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), steroids, vincristine, rituximab, and anti-D antibody. After splenectomy, her platelet count had recovered, and maintenance therapy could be resumed with a support of IVIG. To our knowledge, this is the first child case of chronic ITP during chemotherapy for ALL and splenectomy was effective in this patient. PMID:19816666

  15. Characterization of xenoantiserum produced against B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line

    Akagi,Tadaatsu

    1982-10-01

    Full Text Available Antiserum was produced in white rabbit by intravenously injecting living cells of a B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL line (BALL-1. The reactivity of the antiserum against various lymphoid cell lines was examined by membrane immunofluorescence after appropriate absorption. Serum absorbed with non-T, non-B (NALL-1 and T-ALL (TALL-1 cells recognized B cell antigens distinct from Ia-like antigens on both normal and neoplastic B cells. After further absorption with tonsillar cells or normal B cell line (KO-HL-3, it reacted only with BALL-1 cells and did not react with other leukemia/lymphoma and normal B cell lines. The serum absorbed with tonsillar cells reacted only with BALL-1 and some B cell lines. Thus we were able to obtain antisera with specificity to B cell antigen, B-ALL antigen, and B cell line antigen.

  16. Prognostic Significance of the Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Derived Sequence 1 (LYL1) GeneExpression in Egyptian Patients with AcuteMyeloid Leukemia

    Nadia El Menshawy; Doaa Shahin; Hayam Fathi Ghazi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Aberrant activation of transcription factor genes is the most frequent target of genetic alteration in lymphoid malignancies. The lymphoblastic leukemia-derived sequence 1 (LYL1) gene, which encodes a basic helix-loop helix, was first identified with human T-cell acute leukemia. Recent studies suggest its involvement in myeloid malignancies. We aimed to study the expression percent of oncogene LYL1 in primary and secondary high-risk myeloid leukemia and the impact on prognostic sig...

  17. Blinatumomab: Bridging the Gap in Adult Relapsed/Refractory B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Folan, Stephanie A; Rexwinkle, Amber; Autry, Jane; Bryan, Jeffrey C

    2016-08-01

    Adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse after frontline therapy have extremely poor outcomes despite advances in chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Blinatumomab is a first-in-class bispecific T-cell engager that links T cells to tumor cells leading to T-cell activation and tumor cell lysis. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration approved blinatumomab for treatment of relapsed or refractory Philadelphia chromosome-negative precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In a phase II trial, blinatumomab produced response rates of 43%, and 40% of patients achieving a complete remission proceeded to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Early use of blinatumomab was complicated with adverse effects, including cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. Management strategies, including dexamethasone premedication and 2-step dose escalation during the first cycle of blinatumomab, have decreased the incidence and severity of these adverse effects. Blinatumomab currently is being studied for other B-cell malignancies and has the potential to benefit many patients with CD19+ malignancies in the future. PMID:27521320

  18. Predicting the neurobehavioral side effects of dexamethasone in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Warris, Lidewij T; van den Akker, Erica L T; Aarsen, Femke K; Bierings, Marc B; van den Bos, Cor; Tissing, Wim J E; Sassen, Sebastiaan D T; Veening, Margreet A; Zwaan, Christian M; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2016-10-01

    Although dexamethasone is an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), it can induce a variety of serious neurobehavioral side effects. We hypothesized that these side effects are influenced by glucocorticoid sensitivity at the tissue level. We therefore prospectively studied whether we could predict the occurrence of these side effects using the very low-dose dexamethasone suppression test (DST) or by measuring trough levels of dexamethasone. Fifty pediatric patients (3-16 years of age) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were initially included during the maintenance phase (with dexamethasone) of the Dutch ALL treatment protocol. As a marker of glucocorticoid sensitivity, the salivary very low-dose DST was used. A post-dexamethasone cortisol level predictive values of the DST for psychosocial problems and sleeping problems were 50% and 30%, respectively. Dexamethasone levels were not associated with neurobehavioral side effects. We conclude that neither the very low-dose DST nor measuring dexamethasone trough levels can accurately predict dexamethasone-induced neurobehavioral side effects. However, patients with glucocorticoid hypersensitivity experienced significantly more symptoms associated with dexamethasone-induced depression. Future studies should elucidate further the mechanisms by which neurobehavioral side effects are influenced by glucocorticoid sensitivity. PMID:27448086

  19. Precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with bone marrow necrosis: a case report

    Khoshnaw Najmaddin SH

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bone marrow necrosis is a clinicopathological condition diagnosed most often at postmortem examination, but it is also seen during the course of malignancy and is not always associated with a poor prognosis. The morphological features of bone marrow necrosis are disruption of the normal marrow architecture and necrosis of myeloid tissue and medullary stroma. Non-malignant conditions associated with bone marrow necrosis are sickle cell anemia, infections, drugs (sulfasalazine, interferon α, all-trans retinoic acid, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and fludarabine, disseminated intravascular coagulation, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and acute graft versus host diseases. The malignant causes are leukemia, lymphoma and metastatic carcinomas. Herein we report the case of a patient with precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and bone marrow necrosis at initial presentation. Case presentation A 10-year-old Kurdish boy was presented with generalized bone pain and fever of 1 month’s duration which was associated with sweating, easy fatigability, nose bleeding, breathlessness and severe weight loss. On examination, we observed pallor, tachypnea, tachycardia, low blood pressure, fever, petechial hemorrhage, ecchymoses, tortuous dilated veins over the chest and upper part of abdomen, multiple small cervical lymph node enlargements, mildly enlarged spleen, palpable liver and gross abdominal distention. Blood analysis revealed pancytopenia and elevated lactate dehydrogenase and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Imaging results showed mediastinal widening on a planar chest X-ray and diffuse focal infiltration of the axial bone marrow on magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral vertebrae. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy examination showed extensive bone marrow necrosis. Immunophenotyping analysis of the bone marrow biopsy confirmed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, as CD3 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl

  20. A novel chromosomal abnormality t (9;14)(p24;q13) in B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Sureshkumar Raveendran; Santhi Sarojam; Geetha Narayanan; Hariharan Sreedharan

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a malignant disease of the bone marrow in which early lymphoid precursors proliferate and replace the normal hematopoietic cells of the marrow. We describe the clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic and cytogenetic findings in the case of a 26-year-old man with B-lymphoblastic leukemia. Surface marker analysis revealed that they are positive for CD markers CD10, CD19, CD13, CD34, CD45 and HLA-DR, but negative for CD20, CD33, CD117 and CD11C markers. Cytogeneti...

  1. Polymorphisms in the ABCB1 gene and effect on outcome and toxicity in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Gregers, J; Gréen, H; Christensen, I J;

    2015-01-01

    The membrane transporter P-glycoprotein, encoded by the ABCB1 gene, influences the pharmacokinetics of anti-cancer drugs. We hypothesized that variants of ABCB1 affect outcome and toxicity in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We studied 522 Danish children with ALL, 93% of all those e...

  2. A Unique Case of Relapsed B-Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma as an Isolated Omental Mass

    Kanchan Kantekure

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (B-ALL is a neoplasm of precursor cells committed to the B-cell lineage. Extramedullary involvement is frequent, with particular predilection for the central nervous system, lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and testis. We report an unusual case of B-ALL relapsing as an isolated omental mass along with bone marrow involvement.

  3. Palonosetron for the prevention of nausea and vomiting in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with high dose methotrexate

    Nadaraja, Sambavy; Mamoudou, Aissata Diop; Thomassen, Harald;

    2012-01-01

    High dose methotrexate (HD-MTX), used in the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), is moderately emetogenic. First generation 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists are effective prophylactic agents but require multiple administrations. Palonosetron has a half life of 36-42 hours and...

  4. Long-term results of NOPHO ALL-92 and ALL-2000 studies of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Schmiegelow, K; Forestier, E; Hellebostad, M; Donovan, Martin Heyman; Kristinsson, J; Söderhäll, S; Taskinen, M

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of 2668 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated in two successive Nordic clinical trials (Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) ALL-92 and ALL-2000) showed that 75% of all patients are cured by first-line therapy, and 83% are long-term survivors. ...

  5. Cure rates of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Lithuania and the benefit of joining international treatment protocol

    Vaitkevičienė, Goda; Matuzevičienė, Rėda; Stoškus, Mindaugas;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represents the largest group of pediatric malignancies with long-term survival rates of more than 80% achieved in developed countries. Epidemiological data and survival rates of childhood ALL in Lithuania were lacking. Therefore, the aim of...

  6. Human parvovirus B19 DNA is not detected in Guthrie cards from children who have developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Isa, Adiba; Priftakis, Peter; Broliden, Kristina;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been much speculation about the cause of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). It has been suggested, on the basis of findings in epidemiological studies, that ALL may be initiated by an in utero infection of the fetus. The human parvovirus B19 (B19) is etiologically...

  7. Bacillus cereus bacteremia and multiple brain abscesses during acute lymphoblastic leukemia induction therapy.

    Hansford, Jordan R; Phillips, Marianne; Cole, Catherine; Francis, Joshua; Blyth, Christopher C; Gottardo, Nicholas G

    2014-04-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious infections in immunosuppressed patients. This population may be susceptible to B. cereus pneumonia, bacteremia, cellulitis, and rarely cerebral abscess. Here we report an 8-year-old boy undergoing induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed multifocal B. cereus cerebral abscesses, highlighting the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscesses. A review of the literature over the past 25 years identified another 11 cases (3 children and 8 adults) of B. cereus cerebral abscess in patients undergoing cancer therapy. B. cereus cerebral abscesses were associated with a high mortality rate (42%) and significant morbidity. Notably, B. cereus bacteremia with concomitant cerebral abscess was associated with induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia in both children and adults (10 of 12 case reports). Our case report and review of the literature highlights the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscess(es). Therefore, early consideration for neuroimaging should be given for any neutropenic cancer patient identified with B. cereus bacteremia, in particular those with acute leukemia during induction therapy. PMID:23619116

  8. Thyroid-Like Follicular Carcinoma of the Kidney in a Young Patient with History of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    William W. Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid-like follicular carcinoma of the kidney (TLFCK is a rare histological variant of renal cell carcinoma not currently included in the World Health Organization classification of renal tumors. Only 24 previous cases of TLFCK have been reported to date. We report a case of TLFCK in a 19-year-old woman with history of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This patient is the youngest with TLFCK to be reported to date and the first with history of lymphoblastic leukemia. The development of TLFCK in a young patient with history of lymphoblastic leukemia is interesting and suggests that genes involved in leukemogenesis may also be important for TLFCK pathogenesis. Recognition of TLFCK is important to distinguish it from other conditions that show thyroid-like features, as a misdiagnosis can result in adverse patient care.

  9. A novel chromosomal abnormality t (9;14(p24;q13 in B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Sureshkumar Raveendran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a malignant disease of the bone marrow in which early lymphoid precursors proliferate and replace the normal hematopoietic cells of the marrow. We describe the clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic and cytogenetic findings in the case of a 26-year-old man with B-lymphoblastic leukemia. Surface marker analysis revealed that they are positive for CD markers CD10, CD19, CD13, CD34, CD45 and HLA-DR, but negative for CD20, CD33, CD117 and CD11C markers. Cytogenetic analysis established a novel translocation, t (9;14(p24;q13. Apart from this, spectral karyotyping revealed an additional translocation, t (6p; 14q. This is the first documented case of B-lymphoblastic leukemia with concurrent occurrence of both abnormalities. Further studies are needed to understand the role of this abnormality in carcinogenesis.

  10. Segmentation of White Blood Cell from Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Images Using Dual-Threshold Method

    Yan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a dual-threshold method based on a strategic combination of RGB and HSV color space for white blood cell (WBC segmentation. The proposed method consists of three main parts: preprocessing, threshold segmentation, and postprocessing. In the preprocessing part, we get two images for further processing: one contrast-stretched gray image and one H component image from transformed HSV color space. In the threshold segmentation part, a dual-threshold method is proposed for improving the conventional single-threshold approaches and a golden section search method is used for determining the optimal thresholds. For the postprocessing part, mathematical morphology and median filtering are utilized to denoise and remove incomplete WBCs. The proposed method was tested in segmenting the lymphoblasts on a public Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL image dataset. The results show that the performance of the proposed method is better than single-threshold approach independently performed in RGB and HSV color space and the overall single WBC segmentation accuracy reaches 97.85%, showing a good prospect in subsequent lymphoblast classification and ALL diagnosis.

  11. Relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the pancreas after bone marrow transplant

    Guang-Xian Wang; Jun-Lin Liao; Dong Zhang; Li Wen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the pancreas is rare. We report a case of a 12-year-old boy who experienced a relapse of ALL in the pancreas after a bone marrow transplant. Methods: Clinical data, including course of illness, laboratory results, and imaging studies are included. The patient presented with acute pancreatitis, suspected to be secondary to gallstones, with ampullary obstruction. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a distended gallbladder and intra- and extra-hepatic biliary dilatation with a cutoff at the pancreatic head, but with no evidence of gallstones. Results: Ultrasound-guided biopsy of the pancreas revealed ALL in the pancreas. Systematic chemotherapy was recommended, but was declined by the parents. The patient died one week later. Conclusion: Relapse of ALL in the pancreas is rare, but when a history of ALL is present, it should be considered in patients with pancreatic enlargement, obstructive jaundice, and pancreatitis.

  12. Mer receptor tyrosine kinase is a therapeutic target in pre–B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Linger, Rachel M. A.; Lee-Sherick, Alisa B.; DeRyckere, Deborah; Cohen, Rebecca A.; Jacobsen, Kristen M.; McGranahan, Amy; Brandão, Luis N.; Winges, Amanda; Sawczyn, Kelly K.; Liang, Xiayuan; Keating, Amy K.; Tan, Aik Choon; Earp, H. Shelton

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently treated with an intense regimen of chemotherapy yielding cure rates near 85%. However, alterations to treatment strategies using available drugs are unlikely to provide significant improvement in survival or decrease therapy-associated toxicities. Here, we report ectopic expression of the Mer receptor tyrosine kinase in pre–B-cell ALL (B-ALL) cell lines and pediatric patient samples. Inhibition of Mer in B-ALL cell lines decreased activation of AKT and MAPKs and led to transcriptional changes, including decreased expression of antiapoptotic PRKCB gene and increase in proapoptotic BAX and BBC3 genes. Further, Mer inhibition promoted chemosensitization, decreased colony-forming potential in clonogenic assays, and delayed disease onset in a mouse xenograft model of leukemia. Our results identify Mer as a potential therapeutic target in B-ALL and suggest that inhibitors of Mer may potentiate lymphoblast killing when used in combination with chemotherapy. This strategy could reduce minimal residual disease and/or allow for chemotherapy dose reduction, thereby leading to improved event-free survival and reduced therapy-associated toxicity for patients with B-ALL. Additionally, Mer is aberrantly expressed in numerous other malignancies suggesting that this approach may have broad applications. PMID:23861246

  13. Mer receptor tyrosine kinase is a therapeutic target in pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Linger, Rachel M A; Lee-Sherick, Alisa B; DeRyckere, Deborah; Cohen, Rebecca A; Jacobsen, Kristen M; McGranahan, Amy; Brandão, Luis N; Winges, Amanda; Sawczyn, Kelly K; Liang, Xiayuan; Keating, Amy K; Tan, Aik Choon; Earp, H Shelton; Graham, Douglas K

    2013-08-29

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently treated with an intense regimen of chemotherapy yielding cure rates near 85%. However, alterations to treatment strategies using available drugs are unlikely to provide significant improvement in survival or decrease therapy-associated toxicities. Here, we report ectopic expression of the Mer receptor tyrosine kinase in pre-B-cell ALL (B-ALL) cell lines and pediatric patient samples. Inhibition of Mer in B-ALL cell lines decreased activation of AKT and MAPKs and led to transcriptional changes, including decreased expression of antiapoptotic PRKCB gene and increase in proapoptotic BAX and BBC3 genes. Further, Mer inhibition promoted chemosensitization, decreased colony-forming potential in clonogenic assays, and delayed disease onset in a mouse xenograft model of leukemia. Our results identify Mer as a potential therapeutic target in B-ALL and suggest that inhibitors of Mer may potentiate lymphoblast killing when used in combination with chemotherapy. This strategy could reduce minimal residual disease and/or allow for chemotherapy dose reduction, thereby leading to improved event-free survival and reduced therapy-associated toxicity for patients with B-ALL. Additionally, Mer is aberrantly expressed in numerous other malignancies suggesting that this approach may have broad applications. PMID:23861246

  14. Treating relapsed or refractory Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia: liposome-encapsulated vincristine

    Davis T

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tyler Davis, Sherif S Farag Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA Abstract: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL remains a disease with poor outcomes in adults. While induction chemotherapy achieves a complete remission in almost 90% of patients, the majority will relapse and die of their disease. Relapsed ALL is associated with a high reinduction mortality and chemotherapy resistance, with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation offering the only therapy with curative potential. However, there is no efficacious and well tolerated standard regimen accepted as a “bridge” to allogeneic stem cell transplantation or as definitive treatment for patients who are not transplant candidates. Vincristine is an active drug in patients with ALL, but its dose intensity is limited by neurotoxicity, and its full potential as an anticancer drug is thus not realized. Encapsulation of vincristine into sphingomyelin and cholesterol nanoparticle liposomes facilitates dose-intensification and densification to enhanced target tissues with reduced potential for toxicity. Vincristine sulfate liposome injection (VSLI is associated with significant responses in clinically advanced ALL, and has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of relapsed and clinically advanced Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL. This review provides an overview of the preclinical and clinical studies leading to the approval of VSLI for the treatment of relapsed and refractory ALL, and suggests potential areas of future clinical development. Keywords: vincristine, lymphoblastic leukemia, liposome

  15. [Markers of metabolic syndrome and peptides regulating metabolism in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Skoczeń, Szymon; Tomasik, Przemysław; Balwierz, Walentyna; Surmiak, Marcin; Sztefko, Krystyna; Galicka-Latała, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    Along with the growing epidemic of overweight the risk of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality are increasing markedly. Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a condition clustering together several risk factors of those complications such as visceral obesity, glucose intolerance, arterial hypertension and dislipidemia. The risk of obesity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors is higher than in general population. We aimed to assess (1) the relationships between chosen adipokines and neuropeptides, chemotherapy, CRT, and body fatness and (2) evaluate adipokines and neuropeptides concentrations as a new markers of MS in children. We conducted cross-sectional evaluation of 82 ALL survivors (median age: 13.2 years; range: 4,8-26,2; median time from treatment: 3.2 years), including fasting laboratory testing: peptides (leptin, GLP-1, orexin, PYY, apelin), total cholesterol and its fractions, triglycerides; anthropometric measurements (weight, height), systolic and diastolic blood pressure. We estimated percentiles of body mass index and percentiles of blood pressure. Between 82 survivors overweight and diastolic hypertension was diagnosed in 31% of patients (35% in CRT group) and 15% respectively. At least one abnormality in lipids concentrations was found in 43%. Girls were more affected than boys. Statistically significant increased in leptin and apelin concentrations and decreased in soluble leptin receptor concentrations in the overweight group were observed compared to the non overweight subjects. Significant increase in orexin levels in females who had received CRT compared to those who had not received CRT was found. CRT is the main risk factor of elevated of body mass among survivors of childhood leukemia. Dyslipidemia and hypertension, along with increased adiposity indicate higher risk of MS development. Girls are more affected than boys. Leptin, orexin and apelin seem to be good markers of increased adiposity especially after CRT

  16. Potential for bispecific T-cell engagers: role of blinatumomab in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Le Jeune C

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Le Jeune, Xavier Thomas Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hematology Department, Lyon-Sud Hospital, Pierre Bénite, France Abstract: Patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and patients whose minimal residual disease persists during treatment have a poor leukemia-free survival. Despite improvements in front-line therapy, the outcome in these patients remains poor, especially after relapse. As there are no standard chemotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of patients with R/R B-precursor ALL, T-cell-based therapeutic approaches have recently come to the forefront in ALL therapy. Recently, monoclonal antibodies have been developed to target specific antigens expressed in B-lineage blast cells. In this setting, CD19 is of great interest as this antigen is expressed in B-lineage cells. Therefore, it has been selected as the target antigen for blinatumomab, a new bi-specific T-cell engager antibody. This sophisticated antibody binds sites for both CD19 and CD3, leading to T-cell proliferation and activation and B-cell apoptosis. Owing to its short serum half-life, blinatumomab has been administrated by continuous intravenous infusion with a favorable safety profile. The most significant toxicities were central nervous system events and the cytokine release syndrome. This new therapeutic approach using blinatumomab has been shown to be effective in patients with positive minimal residual disease and in patients with R/R B-precursor ALL leading to a recent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration after an accelerated review process. This review focuses on the profile of blinatumomab and its efficacy and safety. Keywords: B-cell lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia, relapsed/refractory, minimal residual disease, BiTE monoclonal antibodies, blinatumomab

  17. Post-induction residual leukemia in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia quantified by PCR correlates with in vitro prednisolone resistance

    Schmiegelow, K; Nyvold, C; Seyfarth, J;

    2001-01-01

    Most prognostic factors in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are informative for groups of patients, whereas new approaches are needed to predict the efficacy of chemotherapy for the individual patient. The residual leukemia following 4 weeks of induction therapy with prednisolone......, vincristine, doxorubicin and i.t. methotrexate and the in vitro resistance to prednisolone, vincristine, and doxorubicin were measured in 30 boys and 12 girls with B (n = 34) or T lineage (n = 8) ALL. The residual leukemia was quantified after 2 (MRD-D15, n = 29) and 4 weeks (MRD-PI, n = 42) of induction...... more pronounced when B cell precursor and T cell leukemia were analyzed separately (B cell precursor ALL: MRD-PI vs prednisolone LC50: n = 33, rs = 0.47, P = 0.006; T cell ALL: MRD-PI vs prednisolone resistance: n = 8, rs = 0.84, P = 0.009). After a median follow-up of 5.0 years (75% range 3...

  18. CYLD Regulates Noscapine Activity in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia via a Microtubule-Dependent Mechanism

    Yang, Yunfan; Ran, Jie; Sun, Lei; Sun, Xiaodong; Luo, Youguang; Yan, Bing; Tala; Liu, Min; Li, Dengwen; Zhang, Lei; Bao, Gang; Zhou, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Noscapine is an orally administrable drug used worldwide for cough suppression and has recently been demonstrated to disrupt microtubule dynamics and possess anticancer activity. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating noscapine activity remain poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that cylindromatosis (CYLD), a microtubule-associated tumor suppressor protein, modulates the activity of noscapine both in cell lines and in primary cells of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy reveal that CYLD increases the ability of noscapine to induce mitotic arrest and apoptosis. Examination of cellular microtubules as well as in vitro assembled microtubules shows that CYLD enhances the effect of noscapine on microtubule polymerization. Microtubule cosedimentation and fluorescence titration assays further reveal that CYLD interacts with microtubule outer surface and promotes noscapine binding to microtubules. These findings thus demonstrate CYLD as a critical regulator of noscapine activity and have important implications for ALL treatment. PMID:25897332

  19. Immunology of infusion reactions in the treatment of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Asselin, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    Infusion reactions are potentially dose-limiting adverse events associated with intravenous administration of several common agents used to treat patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. True clinical hypersensitivity reactions are antibody-mediated and can occur only after repeated exposure to an antigen. Conversely, anaphylactoid infusion reactions are nonantibody-mediated and often occur on the initial exposure to a drug. Cytokine-release syndrome comprises a subset of nonantibody-mediated infusion reactions associated with the use of monoclonal antibodies and immune therapies. Clinical symptoms of hypersensitivity reactions and nonantibody-mediated infusion reactions heavily overlap and can be difficult to distinguish in practice. Regardless of the underlying mechanism, any infusion reaction can negatively affect treatment efficacy and patient safety. These events require prompt response, and potentially, modification of subsequent therapy. PMID:27086555

  20. OSTEOPOROSIS IN A SEVENTH YEAR OLD BOY WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA (Case Report

    H Salim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis in children is rare and usually secondary to an underlying disease process whose diagnosis may be difficult to detect. It can be a manifestation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. About a-quarters of children with ALL will have signs and symptoms of osteoporosis. We report the case of a seventh-year-old boy with back pain. His antero-posterior pelvic radiograph showed the osteoporotic bone. The bone age study revealed six-year-old bone. Review of peripheral blood smear showed normochromic anemia with thrombocytopenia. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood revealed no dominant marker was seen, but the bone marrow aspiration confirms the diagnosis of ALL (L2.

  1. RBP2 Promotes Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia by Upregulating BCL2.

    Xiaoming Wang

    Full Text Available Despite recent increases in the cure rate of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, adult ALL remains a high-risk disease that exhibits a high relapse rate. In this study, we found that the histone demethylase retinoblastoma binding protein-2 (RBP2 was overexpressed in both on-going and relapse cases of adult ALL, which revealed that RBP2 overexpression was not only involved in the pathogenesis of ALL but that its overexpression might also be related to relapse of the disease. RBP2 knockdown induced apoptosis and attenuated leukemic cell viability. Our results demonstrated that BCL2 is a novel target of RBP2 and supported the notion of RBP2 being a regulator of BCL2 expression via directly binding to its promoter. As the role of RBP2 in regulating apoptosis was confirmed, RBP2 overexpression and activation of BCL2 might play important roles in ALL development and progression.

  2. Development of brain tumor at six years after the onset of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Kumazaki, Hisami; Hanada, Ryoji; Kikuti, Akira; Ichikawa, Masataka; Yamamoto, Keiko; Aihara, Toshinori; Ogawa, Yoshihiro [Saitama Children`s Medical Center, Iwatsuki (Japan)

    1996-06-01

    In October 1994, a 16-year-old boy was diagnosed as having a brain tumor in the left fronto-temporal region 5 years after completing treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The patient had been treated for ALL starting in 1988 when he was 10-year-old. He had received systemic chemotherapy and central nervous system prophylaxis, consisting of cranial irradiation (24 Gy) and intrathecal methotrexate. When the brain tumor was detected he was still in complete remission. The patient received only supportive therapy mainly for relief of increased intracranial pressure because the tumor was too large to resect in addition to being inappropriate for surgical treatment. He died in December 1994. On autopsy, pathological diagnosis of the brain tumor was anaplastic astrocytoma, which is a rare secondary malignancy though glioma is common. (author)

  3. Body composition and phase angle in Russian children in remission from acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Tseytlin, G. Ja; Khomyakova, I. A.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Konovalova, M. V.; Vashura, A. Yu; Tretyak, A. V.; Godina, E. Z.; Rudnev, S. G.

    2010-04-01

    Elevated degree of body fatness and changes in other body composition parameters are known to be common effects of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children. In order to study peculiarities of somatic growth and development in ALL survivors, we describe the results of BIA body composition analysis of 112 boys and 108 girls aged 5-18 years in remission from ALL (remission time range 1-13 years) compared to data from the same number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n=220). Detrimental effect on height in ALL boys was observed, whereas girls experienced additional weight gain compared to healthy subjects. In ALL patients, resistance, body fat, and percent body fat were significantly increased. The reactance, phase angle, absolute and relative values of skeletal muscle and body cell mass were significantly decreased. Principal component analysis revealed an early prevalence of adiposity traits in the somatic growth and development of ALL girls compared to healthy controls.

  4. Isolated cerebellar involvement in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Narendra Chaudhary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parieto-occipital region is the most commonly involved site in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES. Cerebellar involvement has been reported with the predominant involvement of posterior cerebral regions, but isolated cerebellar involvement in PRES has been reported only once in English literature. We report here a 7-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who had PRES with isolated cerebellar involvement during induction chemotherapy. He presented with sudden onset headache, vomiting and hypertension followed by seizures, unconsciousness, and involuntary movements. Computed tomography scan revealed bilateral cerebellar hypodensities. He improved within few hours and reversibility of the lesions was documented on magnetic resonance imaging after 2 weeks. Awareness of atypical patterns in distribution of imaging abnormalities is important to recognize PRES more accurately and to avoid unnecessary diagnostic procedures and treatment.

  5. A vascular necrosis of bone. A complication of agressive therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Vaidya, S.; Saika, S.; Sirohi, B.; Pai, S.; Advani, S. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Bombay (India). Dept. of Medical Oncology

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to report cases of avascular necrosis of bone (AVNB) arising as a complication of chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). X-rays and {sup 99m}technicium-MDP bone scans were performed on patients with symptoms of bone pain, whereby five patients out of 850 patients were detected to have avascular necrosis of the femoral head. All had received aggressive chemotherapy with steroids. Two patients were still on therapy for the primary disease. In these patients further chemotherapy was continued without steroids. The medium period from diagnosis of ALL to development of AVNB was 29 months. Three patients underwent corrective surgical procedures. To conclude, the data suggest that patients receiving combination chemotherapy, especially those with high cumulative doses, run a risk of developing AVNB. Awarness of this complication is important in order to have an early diagnosis so as to limit disability. (orig.)

  6. Deletion analysis of p16(INKa) and p15(INKb) in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Graf Einsiedel, Hagen; Taube, Tillmann; Hartmann, Reinhard; Wellmann, Sven; Seifert, Georg; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl

    2002-06-15

    This study aimed at determining the prevalence of INK4 deletions and their impact on outcome in 125 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at first relapse using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Patients were enrolled into relapse trials ALL-REZ BFM (ALL-Relapse Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster) 90 and 96. The prevalence of p16(INK4a) and p15(INK4b) homozygous deletions was 35% (44 of 125) and 30% (38 of 125), respectively. A highly significant association of both gene deletions was found with the 2 major adverse prognostic factors known for relapsed childhood ALL: T-cell immunophenotype and first remission duration. There was no correlation between INK4 deletions and probability of event-free survival. These findings argue against an independent prognostic role of INK4 deletions in relapsed childhood ALL. PMID:12036898

  7. Development of brain tumor at six years after the onset of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    In October 1994, a 16-year-old boy was diagnosed as having a brain tumor in the left fronto-temporal region 5 years after completing treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The patient had been treated for ALL starting in 1988 when he was 10-year-old. He had received systemic chemotherapy and central nervous system prophylaxis, consisting of cranial irradiation (24 Gy) and intrathecal methotrexate. When the brain tumor was detected he was still in complete remission. The patient received only supportive therapy mainly for relief of increased intracranial pressure because the tumor was too large to resect in addition to being inappropriate for surgical treatment. He died in December 1994. On autopsy, pathological diagnosis of the brain tumor was anaplastic astrocytoma, which is a rare secondary malignancy though glioma is common. (author)

  8. Population Analysis of Pharmacogenetic Polymorphisms Related to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Drug Treatment

    Marcela A. Chiabai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate in the Brazilian population, the genotypes and population frequencies of pharmacogenetic polymorphisms involved in the response to drugs used in treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, and to compare the data with data from the HapMap populations. There was significant differentiation between most population pairs, but few associations between genetic ancestry and SNPs in the Brazilian population were observed. AMOVA analysis comparing the Brazilian population to all other populations retrieved from HapMap pointed to a genetic proximity with the European population. These associations point to preclusion of the use of genetic ancestry as a proxy for predicting drug response. In this way, any study aiming to correlate genotype with drug response in the Brazilian population should be based on pharmacogenetic SNP genotypes.

  9. Risk group assignment differs for children and adults 1-45 yr with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated by the NOPHO ALL-2008 protocol

    Toft, Nina; Birgens, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia is poorer in adults than in children. Studies have indicated that young adults benefit from pediatric treatment, although no upper age limit has been defined....

  10. Cytometric evaluation of transferrin receptor 1 (CD71 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Anna Płoszyńska

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Transferrin receptor 1 (CD71 is a transmembrane glycoprotein responsible for cellular iron uptake. Higher expression of CD71 has been identified as a negative prognostic marker for numerous solid tumor types and for some lymphomas. The aim of this study was to evaluate CD71 expression on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells and to follow its possible clinical correlations. Sixty one patients, aged 1–17 years and diagnosed with ALL, were enrolled in the study. CD71 expression was analyzed on the bone marrow blastic cells by flow cytometry. CD71 expression on the  eukemic blasts was diversified; in most patients, all blastic cells showed expression of CD71, but levels of expression varied. CD71 expression was statistically higher on T-lineage leukemias. Within the B lineage ALL, a significant difference in CD71 expression existed between precursor B ALL and mature B-ALL, which showed higher CD71 expression. CD71 expression positively correlated with Hgb concentration at diagnosis. Initial risk group assessment and therapy response were not correlated with CD71 expression, although disease free and overall survival times tended to be shorter in patients with B-lineage leukemias with initial high CD71 expression.

  11. UTX inhibition as selective epigenetic therapy against TAL1-driven T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Benyoucef, Aissa; Palii, Carmen G; Wang, Chaochen; Porter, Christopher J; Chu, Alphonse; Dai, Fengtao; Tremblay, Véronique; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Singh, Kulwant; Huang, Suming; Pflumio, Francoise; Hébert, Josée; Couture, Jean-Francois; Perkins, Theodore J; Ge, Kai; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Brand, Marjorie

    2016-03-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a heterogeneous group of hematological tumors composed of distinct subtypes that vary in their genetic abnormalities, gene expression signatures, and prognoses. However, it remains unclear whether T-ALL subtypes differ at the functional level, and, as such, T-ALL treatments are uniformly applied across subtypes, leading to variable responses between patients. Here we reveal the existence of a subtype-specific epigenetic vulnerability in T-ALL by which a particular subgroup of T-ALL characterized by expression of the oncogenic transcription factor TAL1 is uniquely sensitive to variations in the dosage and activity of the histone 3 Lys27 (H3K27) demethylase UTX/KDM6A. Specifically, we identify UTX as a coactivator of TAL1 and show that it acts as a major regulator of the TAL1 leukemic gene expression program. Furthermore, we demonstrate that UTX, previously described as a tumor suppressor in T-ALL, is in fact a pro-oncogenic cofactor essential for leukemia maintenance in TAL1-positive (but not TAL1-negative) T-ALL. Exploiting this subtype-specific epigenetic vulnerability, we propose a novel therapeutic approach based on UTX inhibition through in vivo administration of an H3K27 demethylase inhibitor that efficiently kills TAL1-positive primary human leukemia. These findings provide the first opportunity to develop personalized epigenetic therapy for T-ALL patients. PMID:26944678

  12. Genomic Profiling of Adult and Pediatric B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Yuan-Fang Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomic landscapes of 92 adult and 111 pediatric patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL were investigated using next-generation sequencing and copy number alteration analysis. Recurrent gene mutations and fusions were tested in an additional 87 adult and 93 pediatric patients. Among the 29 newly identified in-frame gene fusions, those involving MEF2D and ZNF384 were clinically relevant and were demonstrated to perturb B-cell differentiation, with EP300-ZNF384 inducing leukemia in mice. Eight gene expression subgroups associated with characteristic genetic abnormalities were identified, including leukemia with MEF2D and ZNF384 fusions in two distinct clusters. In subgroup G4 which was characterized by ERG deletion, DUX4-IGH fusion was detected in most cases. This comprehensive dataset allowed us to compare the features of molecular pathogenesis between adult and pediatric B-ALL and to identify signatures possibly related to the inferior outcome of adults to that of children. We found that, besides the known discrepancies in frequencies of prognostic markers, adult patients had more cooperative mutations and greater enrichment for alterations of epigenetic modifiers and genes linked to B-cell development, suggesting difference in the target cells of transformation between adult and pediatric patients and may explain in part the disparity in their responses to treatment.

  13. [Ph1 positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia with DIC after operation of colon and lung cancer].

    Yashige, H; Fujii, H

    1989-07-01

    We reported a rare case of triple cancers with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) associated with disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) after the operations of colon cancer and primary lung cancer. A 78-year-old Japanese male, who had been operated upon for colon cancer (adenocarcinoma) on March 1981, metastatic brain tumor (adenocarcinoma) on December 1986, and primary lung cancer (squamous cell carcinoma) on February 1987, was admitted to our hospital because of severe general malaise on December 6 1987. On admission, he had mild hepatosplenomegaly and hemorrhage diathesis such as purpura. Serum LDH increased to 2,515 mU/ml. The white blood cell count was 6,210/microliters with 53% leukemia cells, and the platelet count was 12,000/microliters. A bone marrow was infiltrated with 96.0% leukemia cells. The leukemia cells stained positively for PAS and negatively for peroxidase. Immunological examination of leukemia cells showed that HLA-DR, TdT, B1 and J5 were positive and cytoplasmic Igmu and surface Ig were negative, indicating common ALL. The coagulation studies revealed that the activated partial thromboplastin time was prolonged to 42.0 seconds, FDP increased to 79.9 micrograms/ml, and antithrombin-III decreased to 62%. Chromosome analysis showed a 48, XY, +2, +21q-, t(9;22) karyotype. He was diagnosed as having Ph1 positive ALL associated with DIC. He was treated with vindesine, prednisolone, L-asparaginase, and adriamycin and complete remission (CR) was achieved after two months. But on August 1988, 8 months after CR, ALL and brain tumor relapsed and he died of pneumonia on September 19, 1988. PMID:2810793

  14. Dietary resveratrol does not delay engraftment, sensitize to vincristine, or inhibit growth of high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in NOD/SCID mice

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with translocation t(4;11) is a high-risk leukemia found in 60-85% of infants with ALL and is often refractory to conventional chemotherapeutics after relapse. Although resveratrol is able to kill high-risk leukemia in vitro, this agent has not been evaluated agai...

  15. Common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) is active neutral endopeptidase 24.11 ("enkephalinase"): direct evidence by cDNA transfection analysis.

    Shipp, M A; Vijayaraghavan, J.; Schmidt, E V; Masteller, E L; D'Adamio, L; Hersh, L.B.; Reinherz, E L

    1989-01-01

    The common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) is a 749-amino acid type II integral membrane protein expressed by most acute lymphoblastic leukemias, certain other lymphoid malignancies with an immature phenotype, and normal lymphoid progenitors. A computer search against the most recent GenBank release (no. 56) indicates that human CALLA cDNA encodes a protein nearly identical to the rat and rabbit neutral endopeptidase 24.11 ("enkephalinase;" EC 3.4.24.11). This zinc metalloendopep...

  16. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  17. Post chemotherapy blood and bone marrow regenerative changes in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia a prospective study

    Rashmi Kushwaha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: This study was done to assess the Serial peripheral blood and bone marrow changes in patients of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on chemotherapy. Aims: To assess the therapy related serial bone marrow changes in patients of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Settings and Design: Prospective study, carried out in Lymphoma- Leukemia Lab, Department of Pathology, K.G.M.U from March 2011 to March 2012. A total of 60 cases were studied Materials and Methods: History, complete hemogram, bone marrow examination at pretherapy (Day-0, intratherapy (Day-14, and end of induction chemotherapy (Day-28 were done. Peripheral blood smears were evaluated at regular interval to assess clearance of blast cells. Statistical analysis used: The statistical analysis was done using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences Version 15.0 statistical Analysis Software. The values were represented in Number (% and Mean ± SD. The following Statistical formulas were used: Mean, standard deviation, Chi square test, Paired "t" test, Student ′t′ test, Level of significance P Results: Incidence of ALL-L1 (46.7% and ALL-L2 (53.3% was equal. ALL-L2 patients had poor survival.Day 0 (D-0 bone marrow was hypercellular with flooding of marrow by leukemic cells. High levels of tumor load at D′0′ were associated with poor survival. 14 th day of Induction phase showed significant decrease in hemoglobin and TLC as compared to D ′0′ parameters. D28 showed marrow regeneration. Cellularity, Blast%, and Leukemic Index showed significant drop from day ′0′ to day 14 due to myelosupression, whereas regeneration reflected by increased cellularity as per day 28 marrow. Lymphocytosis (>20% at end of induction chemotherapy had better survival and longer remission.Risk of mortality was directly proportional to blast clearance and was a major independent prognostic factor for achievement of complete remission. Conclusions: A bone marrow examination at the end of induction

  18. Sulforaphane induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Koramit Suppipat

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common hematological cancer in children. Although risk-adaptive therapy, CNS-directed chemotherapy, and supportive care have improved the survival of ALL patients, disease relapse is still the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. Therefore, new drugs are needed as frontline treatments in high-risk disease and as salvage agents in relapsed ALL. In this study, we report that purified sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, has anti-leukemic properties in a broad range of ALL cell lines and primary lymphoblasts from pediatric T-ALL and pre-B ALL patients. The treatment of ALL leukemic cells with sulforaphane resulted in dose-dependent apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest, which was associated with the activation of caspases (3, 8, and 9, inactivation of PARP, p53-independent upregulation of p21(CIP1/WAF1, and inhibition of the Cdc2/Cyclin B1 complex. Interestingly, sulforaphane also inhibited the AKT and mTOR survival pathways in most of the tested cell lines by lowering the levels of both total and phosphorylated proteins. Finally, the administration of sulforaphane to the ALL xenograft models resulted in a reduction of tumor burden, particularly following oral administration, suggesting a potential role as an adjunctive agent to improve the therapeutic response in high-risk ALL patients with activated AKT signaling.

  19. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting as a breast lump: A report of two cases

    Syed Besina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra-medullary leukemic infiltration of the breast by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is very rare. We report two cases of ALL presenting as breast masses and diagnosed on fine-needle aspiration (FNA. Our first patient, a post-partum 30-year-old female, developed bilateral breast lumps in her last trimester of pregnancy and complained of easy fatigability. Our second patient, a 14-year-old girl, presented with a right-breast lump of 1-week duration. She had received treatment for ALL 1 year back and had been in complete remission for the last 1 year. FNA of the breast nodules done in both the cases revealed diffuse infiltration by lymphoblasts. Subsequent hematological investigations confirmed bone marrow involvement by ALL in the first case and extra-medullary relapse in the second case. Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC is an easy and cost effective method for the early diagnosis of metastatic leukemic infiltration, avoiding unnecessary excisional biopsies in such cases.

  20. Association of cytogenetics and immunophenotype in prognosis of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Literature Review

    Abdollah Banihashem

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common type of neoplastic disorder diagnosed in childhood. It is the cause of one third of all pediatric malignancies. ALL is characterized by the abnormal production and proliferation of immature lymphoblasts in bone marrow (BM. It seems that ALL occurs due to a genetic mutation in DNA structure producing white blood cell (WBC stem cells. Because ALL is a systemic disease, its primary management is based on chemotherapy. There are important risk factors responsible for the poor prognosis of  ALL in children less than 1 year old and greater than 10 years old, such as: high WBC, mature T cell ,mature B cell, central nervous system (CNS involvement, DNA index 10 at diagnosis, no remission at the end of induction therapy and Minimal residual disease at the end of consolidation therapy. Complications might appear during the treatment including tumor lysis syndrome, bleeding, renal failure, sepsis, seizure, thrombosis, etc. Some consequences might identify after a long-term follow-up such as learning impairment, growth retardation, and secondary malignancies. It is estimated that up to 90% of pediatric ALL cases are curable.

  1. The BCL2 rheostat in glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Ploner, C; Rainer, J; Niederegger, H; Eduardoff, M; Villunger, A; Geley, S; Kofler, R

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC)-induced apoptosis is essential in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and related malignancies. Pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the BCL2 family control many forms of apoptotic cell death, but the extent to which this survival ‘rheostat’ is involved in the beneficial effects of GC therapy is not understood. We performed systematic analyses of expression, GC regulation and function of BCL2 molecules in primary ALL lymphoblasts and a corresponding in vitro model. Affymetrix-based expression profiling revealed that the response included regulations of pro-apoptotic and, surprisingly, anti-apoptotic BCL2 family members, and varied among patients, but was dominated by induction of the BH3-only molecules BMF and BCL2L11/Bim and repression of PMAIP1/Noxa. Conditional lentiviral gene overexpression and knock-down by RNA interference in the CCRF-CEM model revealed that induction of Bim, and to a lesser extent that of BMF, was required and sufficient for apoptosis. Although anti-apoptotic BCL2 members were not regulated consistently by GC in the various systems, their overexpression delayed, whereas their knock-down accelerated, GC-induced cell death. Thus, the combined clinical and experimental data suggest that GCs induce both pro- and anti-apoptotic BCL2 family member-dependent pathways, with the outcome depending on cellular context and additional signals feeding into the BCL2 rheostat. PMID:18046449

  2. Promoter methylation and expression levels of selected hematopoietic genes in pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Musialik, Ewa; Bujko, Mateusz; Kober, Paulina; Agnieszka WYPYCH; Gawle-Krawczyk, Karolina; Matysiak, Michal; Siedlecki, Janusz Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    Background Precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-cell ALL) is the most common neoplasm in children and is characterized by genetic and epigenetic aberrations in hematopoietic transcription factor (TF) genes. This study evaluated promoter DNA methylation and aberrant expression levels of early- and late-acting hematopoietic TF genes homeobox A4 and A5 (HOXA4 and HOXA5), Meis homeobox 1 (MEIS1), T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 (TAL1), and interferon regulatory factors 4 and 8 (IR...

  3. Bacillus cereus septicemia in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A case report and review of the literature.

    Chou, Ya-Ling; Cheng, Shin-Nan; Hsieh, Kao-Hsian; Wang, Chih-Chien; Chen, Shyi-Jou; Lo, Wen-Tsung

    2013-08-01

    Bacillus cereus is an aerobic Gram-positive, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium that is responsible for foodborne illnesses. We report on a 15-year-old girl with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who fell into a somnolent state after presenting with a 12-hour history of fever, muscle soreness, myalgia in both calves, sore throat, and vomiting. Fulminant septicemic syndrome caused by B. cereus was finally identified. The aim of this work is the introduction of B. cereus as a differential diagnosis of sepsis in patients with acute leukemia in induction chemotherapy, to prevent delayed treatment. PMID:23927823

  4. Trends in management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Influence of insurance based healthcare and treatment compliance on the outcome of adolescents and adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Ravi Sankar Arigela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, we attempted to analyze the impact of insurance based health care system and treatment compliance on the outcome of adolescent and adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Materials and Methods: Patients who underwent treatment for ALL during the period 2003-2011 were enrolled into this retrospective study. Patients on supportive or palliative care only and patients with age <10 years were excluded. The hospital records and tumor registry records were studied. Patients were stratified into two groups, Group A (prior to the introduction of state health insurance [SHI], 2003-2007 and Group B (after the introduction of SHI, 2008-2011. Overall survival (OS was calculated using Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 420 patients with suspected or confirmed ALL visited our center during the study period and 179 patients (87 in Group A and 92 in Group B were considered for inclusion. The median age in years (range was 18 (10-57 and 18 (10-58 respectively in Groups A and B with males more than females. Median OS (95% CI was 9 (6.7-11.2 and 12 (7.3-16.7 months in the Groups A and B respectively (P = 0.265. Poor treatment compliance in both groups was high (36% in Group A and 41% in Group B, [P = 0.107] with lower default rates in Group B (P = 0.019. Patients with good compliance in the total study population and the individual study groups had significantly better OS. Conclusions: Insurance based health care has improved outcomes in the present study but not compliance to treatment. Significantly better OS was observed in patients with good compliance.

  5. Back pain and vertebral compression: an unusual presentation of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Hafiz, M G; Islam, A; Siddique, R

    2010-01-01

    Junayet, a nine years and six months old boy was admitted to the hospital because of back pain and vertebral compression fractures. The boy had been well until two months earlier, when he began to have back pain after falling on his back along with occasional fever. The pain was intermittent initially but gradually it became constant. One month before admission, he fell again and the back pain became deteriorated. He was mildly pale, liver was palpable, skin survey revealed normal, BCG scar mark was present. He had bone pain, cervical lymphadenopathy and a tender swelling on the lumbusacral region. Two weeks before admission, the hematological findings were suggestive of leukemia of lymphoblastic type. Biochemical values were normal except high level of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination was free of malignant cell. Skeletal survey showed diffuse osteopenia of the thoracic and lumber spine with multiple compression fracture of the vertebral bodies of D7, D8, D12 and L1, L3 and L5 with increased disc space. Radiograph of the chest also showed diffuse osteopenia of ribs. Magnetic resonance (MRI) showed uniform signal intensity in the marrow throughout the spine with compressed fracture of the same vertebrae. Bone marrow morphology study and the cytochemistry of the aspirated marrow were consistent with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL-L2). Then, he was started protocol based chemotherapy for induction of remission, consolidation, high dose methotrexate and maintenance therapy. Now, he is on regular follow up with repeated hematological and radiological examinations. Following six month of chemotherapy the boy was found with significant improvement of his physical, hematological and radiological abnormalities. PMID:20046187

  6. Ultrasound and MR Findings of Aleukemic Leukemia Cutis in a Patient with Complete Remission of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Case Report

    Kim, Min Sung; Jee, Won Hee; Kim, Sun Ki; Lee, So Yeon; Lim, Gye Yeon; Park, Gyeong Sin; Lee, Seok [Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Aleukemic leukemia cutis is an extremely rare condition characterized by the infiltration of leukemic cells in skin without blasts in the peripheral blood. Leukemia cutis is considered a grave prognostic sign, thus early diagnosis is important. Leukemia cutis usually occurs in patients with myeloid leukemia. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report regarding the radiological findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, which is probably due to the presence of the skin changes in most patients. We report the ultrasound and MR findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, even without the skin manifestation in patients with a history of complete remission of the acute lymphoblastic leukemia following an allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

  7. Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of prenylflavonoid artonin B in human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Chun-chung LEE; Chun-nan LIN; Guey-mei JOW

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the anticancer effects and molecular mechanism of artonin B on the human acute lymphoblastic leukemia CCRF-CEM cells compared with other prenylflavonoid compounds. Methods: The effects of four prenylflavonoids on the growth of CCRF-CEM and HaCa cells were studied by 3-(4,5)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis were detected through Hoechst 33258 staining. The effect of artonin B on the cell cycle of CCRF-CEM cells were studied by propidium iodide method. The change in mitochondrial membrane potential was detected by rohdamine 123 staining. The cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activity were checked by immunoassay kits, respectively. The expression of Bcl-2 family proteins was detected by Western blot. Results: Our data revealed that artonin B strongly induced human CCRF-CEM leukemia cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner by MTT assay, but not on normal epithelia cells (HaCa cells). Artonin B-induced cell death was considered to be apoptotic by observing the typical apoptotic morphological change by Hoechst 33258 staining. The induction of human CCRF-CEM leukemia cancer cell death was caused by an induction of apoptosis through mitochondrial membrane potential change, cytochrome c release, sub-G1 proportion increase, downregulation of Bcl-2 expression, upregulation of Bax and Bak expression and activation of caspase 3 pathways. Conclusion: These results clearly demonstrated that artonin B is able to inhibit proliferation by induction of hypoploid cells and cell apoptosis. Moreover, the anticancer effects of artonin B were related to mitochondrial pathway and caspase 3 activation in human CCRF-CEM leukemia cells.

  8. Comparative genomics reveals multistep pathogenesis of E2A-PBX1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Duque-Afonso, Jesús; Feng, Jue; Scherer, Florian; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Wong, Stephen H.K.; Wang, Zhong; Iwasaki, Masayuki; Cleary, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer; however, its genetic diversity limits investigation into the molecular pathogenesis of disease and development of therapeutic strategies. Here, we engineered mice that conditionally express the E2A-PBX1 fusion oncogene, which results from chromosomal translocation t(1;19) and is present in 5% to 7% of pediatric ALL cases. The incidence of leukemia in these mice varied from 5% to 50%, dependent on the Cre-driving promoter (Cd19, Mb1, or Mx1) used to induce E2A-PBX1 expression. Two distinct but highly similar subtypes of B cell precursor ALLs that differed by their pre–B cell receptor (pre-BCR) status were induced and displayed maturation arrest at the pro-B/large pre–B II stages of differentiation, similar to human E2A-PBX1 ALL. Somatic activation of E2A-PBX1 in B cell progenitors enhanced self-renewal and led to acquisition of multiple secondary genomic aberrations, including prominent spontaneous loss of Pax5. In preleukemic mice, conditional Pax5 deletion cooperated with E2A-PBX1 to expand progenitor B cell subpopulations, increasing penetrance and shortening leukemia latency. Recurrent secondary activating mutations were detected in key signaling pathways, most notably JAK/STAT, that leukemia cells require for proliferation. These data support conditional E2A-PBX1 mice as a model of human ALL and suggest targeting pre-BCR signaling and JAK kinases as potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26301816

  9. Gene Dose Effects of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 Polymorphisms on Outcome in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Borst, Louise; Buchard, Anders; Rosthoj, Susanne;

    2012-01-01

    Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) react very differently to chemotherapy. One explanation for this is inherited genetic variation. The glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzymes inactivate a number of chemotherapeutic drugs administered in childhood ALL therapy. Two multiplexing metho...... influence outcome in childhood ALL.......Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) react very differently to chemotherapy. One explanation for this is inherited genetic variation. The glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzymes inactivate a number of chemotherapeutic drugs administered in childhood ALL therapy. Two multiplexing methods...... were applied for genotyping the GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes (distinguishing between 0, 1, or 2 gene copies) and the GSTP1 313 A>G polymorphism, simultaneously. A total of 263 childhood ALL patients were genotyped. No gene dose effect on outcome was demonstrated with either GST polymorphisms. Grouping of GSTM...

  10. Challenges faced in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults

    Levine SR

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Selena R Levine,1 Jennifer L McNeer,2 Michael S Isakoff1 1Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center and University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Hartford, CT, 2Section of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: The survival rate for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL has dramatically improved over the last 50 years. However, for those in the adolescent and young adult (AYA age-group of 15–30 years with ALL, there has not been the same degree of improvement. Historically, pediatric and adult providers have utilized different treatment approaches based on clinical trials. However, studies that have compared the outcome of AYA patients with ALL treated on pediatric or adult clinical trials have generally shown substantially better outcomes for this patient population treated with the pediatric trials. Additionally, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been considered as part of intensified therapy for AYA patients with ALL. Herein, we review the outcomes with chemotherapy alone and with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and explore the challenges faced in determining the ideal therapy for the AYA population of patients. Keywords: adolescent young adult oncology, leukemia, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

  11. Novel management options for adult patients with progressive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: introduction.

    Wang, Eunice S

    2015-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous hematologic malignancy characterized by highly proliferative immature lymphoid cells in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. In adults, ALL accounts for approximately 20% of all adult leukemias. ALL carries a poor prognosis in adults. The 5-year overall survival is 24% in patients ages 40 to 59 years and 18% in patients ages 60 to 69 years. ALL can be grouped into different categories according to its cell lineage (B cell or T cell), the presence or absence of the Philadelphia chromosome, and various cytogenetic and molecular classifications. A main goal of treatment is to allow the patient to achieve a complete remission and to consolidate this remission with either a maintenance regimen or an allogeneic stem cell transplant. Although the overall rate of complete remission following frontline therapy for newly diagnosed ALL is high, the majority of patients experience a disease relapse. In general, the duration of initial complete remission impacts the patient’s prognosis and response to further therapies. Subsequent treatments must balance the goal of achieving a remission with the need for the patient to maintain or improve quality of life. Recently approved agents, such as blinatumomab and vincristine sulfate liposome injection, offer the promise of a second remission that can serve as a bridge to allogeneic stem cell transplant while still maintaining quality of life. A novel approach using adoptive cellular immunotherapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells is associated with extremely robust responses. PMID:26431322

  12. Targeting BCL-2 and ABL/LYN in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Leonard, Jessica T; Rowley, Joelle S J; Eide, Christopher A; Traer, Elie; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon; Loriaux, Marc; Spurgeon, Stephen E; Druker, Brian J; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Chang, Bill H

    2016-08-31

    Treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph(+)ALL) remains a challenge. Although the addition of targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) to standard cytotoxic therapy has greatly improved upfront treatment, treatment-related morbidity and mortality remain high. TKI monotherapy provides only temporary responses and renders patients susceptible to the development of TKI resistance. Thus, identifying agents that could enhance the activity of TKIs is urgently needed. Recently, a selective inhibitor of B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2), ABT-199 (venetoclax), has shown impressive activity against hematologic malignancies. We demonstrate that the combination of TKIs with venetoclax is highly synergistic in vitro, decreasing cell viability and inducing apoptosis in Ph(+)ALL. Furthermore, the multikinase inhibitors dasatinib and ponatinib appear to have the added advantage of inducing Lck/Yes novel tyrosine kinase (LYN)-mediated proapoptotic BCL-2-like protein 11 (BIM) expression and inhibiting up-regulation of antiapoptotic myeloid cell leukemia 1 (MCL-1), thereby potentially overcoming the development of venetoclax resistance. Evaluation of the dasatinib-venetoclax combination for the treatment of primary Ph(+)ALL patient samples in xenografted immunodeficient mice confirmed the tolerability of this drug combination and demonstrated its superior antileukemic efficacy compared to either agent alone. These data suggest that the combination of dasatinib and venetoclax has the potential to improve the treatment of Ph(+)ALL and should be further evaluated for patient care. PMID:27582059

  13. Elucidation and modulation of glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    This thesis deals with the elucidation of the synergistic effect of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone and the metabolic modulator 2-deoxyglucose on apoptosis induction in two in vitro model systems of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. 2-deoxyglucose accelerated the kinetics of, and increased the sensitivity to, glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis in two leukemia cell lines. In primary lymphocytes from healthy donors, in contrast, 2-deoxyglucose and dexamethasone did not act synergistically on apoptosis induction. To elucidate the molecular basis of the synergistic effect, glycolysis by means of glucose uptake, lactate production, ATP levels, glucose transporter and hexokinase expression and mitochondrial oxygen consumption was analyzed in treated vs. untreated cells. The study revealed a downregulation of gene expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1 and hexokinase 2 (HK2), release of HK2 from the outer mitochondrial membrane, as well as reduced glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, the analysis of the mitochondrial proteome by 2 dimensional differential gel electrophoresis after treatment with 2-deoxyglucose and dexamethasone revealed the regulation of several interesting candidate proteins involved in treatment related apoptosis. (author)

  14. Leydig cell function in boys following treatment for testicular relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Current practice for achieving local control of testicular relapse in males with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) includes the use of 2,400-rad testicular radiation. Although this therapy is known to cause germ cell depletion, it has been assumed that it does not alter testicular secretion of testosterone. To test this assumption, the authors measured gonadotropin and testosterone levels in seven boys with ALL who had been treated with radiation for clinically apparent testicular relapse. In four of seven boys, testicular relapse was bilateral with overt involvement of one testicle and microscopic involvement of the other. Three of these four boys demonstrated delayed sexual maturation, and in addition to elevated follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations, testosterone levels were low and luteinizing hormone levels were elevated compared with controls. These data indicate that boys with overt testicular leukemia who are treated with 2,400-rad testicular radiation are at risk for Leydig cell dysfunction. However, the relative contributions of radiation, prior chemotherapy, and leukemic infiltration to this dysfunction remain to be clarified

  15. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A single center experience with Berlin, Frankfurt, and Munster-95 protocol

    Venkatraman Radhakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a paucity of data on the outcome following the treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL from developing countries. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and thirty-eight consecutive patients with ALL <30 years of age diagnosed between January 2005 and December 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were treated modified Berlin, Frankfurt, and Munster 95 protocol. Event-free survival (EFS was calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and variables were compared using log-rank test. Results: The EFS was 63.4% at a median follow-up was 32.7 months. On univariate analysis National Cancer Institute (NCI risk stratification, sex, white blood cell count, day 8 blast clearance, and income were significantly associated with EFS. However, on multivariate analysis only female sex (P = 0.01 and day 8 blast clearance (P = 0.006 were significantly associated with EFS. Seventy-four of 238 (31% patients had recurrent leukemia. The common sites of relapse were bone marrow in 55/74 (75% patients and central nervous system in 11/74 (20% patients. Conclusion: Compared to western data, there was an increased proportion of NCI high-risk patients and T-cell immunophenotype in our study. There has been an improvement in outcome of patients with ALL at our center over the last 2 decades. Female sex and clearance of blast in peripheral blood by day 8 of induction was associated with better EFS.

  16. Growth in Children Treated for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Single Institution Report from North India.

    Kumar, Pankaj; Trehan, Amita; Bhalla, A K; Marwaha, R K; Bansal, Deepak

    2016-03-01

    Survivors of childhood leukemia are at risk of impaired growth and short stature as adults due to intensive combination chemotherapy and radiation injury. This study was undertaken to evaluate anthropometry in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Children treated for ALL and off treatment for a minimum period of 2 years were evaluated for height, weight and BMI. Z scores were calculated for height, weight and BMI: at induction, 6 months after starting treatment, at end of treatment and at 2 years after completion of therapy. Change in z scores were calculated and compared with CDC criteria and Agarwal standards for Indian children. Fifty two boys and 21 girls were analyzed. Height and weight z scores were seen to show a steep decrease during the initial intensive phase of therapy. The gain in height and weight continued to be slow during therapy and catch up occurred after cessation of therapy. On completion of therapy, patients were shorter, but not significantly so. Girls treatment (p = 0.032) and 2 years after completion of treatment (p = 0.00). BMI z score increased throughout the study period. Peak growth velocities were also late in the study subjects Anthropometric variables of height, weight and BMI are affected by ALL during therapy. Growth deceleration is maximum during the intensive phase of therapy. Catch up growth occurs but children remain smaller than their peers. PMID:26855505

  17. An Adult Patient with Systemic Mastocytosis and B-Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Theodoros Iliakis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mastocytosis is a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by clonal expansion of abnormal mast cells, ranging from the cutaneous forms of the disease to mast cell leukemia. In a significant proportion of patients, systemic mastocytosis (SM coexists with another hematologic malignancy, termed systemic mastocytosis with an associated hematologic nonmast cell lineage disorder (SM-AHNMD. Despite the pronounced predominance of concomitant myeloid neoplasms, the much more unusual coexistence of lymphoproliferative diseases has also been reported. Imatinib mesylate (IM has a role in the treatment of SM in the absence of the KITD816V mutation. In the setting of SM-AHNMD, eradicating the nonmast cell malignant clone greatly affects prognosis. We report a case of an adult patient with SM associated with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL. Three cases of concurrent adult ALL and mastocytosis have been reported in the literature, one concerning SM and two concerning cutaneous mastocytosis (CM, as well as six cases of concomitant CM and ALL in children.

  18. Neuropsychological sequelae of central nervous system prophylaxis in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    We assessed neuropsychologically 106 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who had all received cranial irradiation for the prevention of central nervous system (CNS) leukemia 1-13 years previously. Children were assessed for adverse late effects of their therapy, using age-appropriate Wechsler measures of overall intellectual ability and supplementary tests. Forty-five siblings near in age to the patients were tested as controls. The patients who had had the most intensive central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis were found to have a WISC-R Full Scale IQ 17 points lower than the sibling control group. Performance IQ was more affected than verbal IQ. The patients were more easily distracted and less able to concentrate. The severity of the aftereffects was related to younger age at the time of CNS prophylaxis and to a higher dose of cranial irradiation but not to time since CNS prophylaxis. CNS prophylaxis using a combination of cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate has lowered the incidence of CNS relapse in childhood ALL but is associated with considerable long-term morbidity in survivors

  19. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes Associated with Prognosis of B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Idalia Garza-Veloz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia type B (B-ALL is a neoplastic disorder with high mortality rates. The aim of this study was to validate the expression profile of 45 genes associated with signaling pathways involved in leukemia and to evaluate their association with the prognosis of B-ALL. Methods. 219 samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from 73 B-ALL patients were studied at diagnosis, four, and eight weeks after starting treatment. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results. Normalized delta Cq values of 23 genes showed differences between B-ALL and controls at diagnosis time (P values < 0.05. There were significant associations between B-ALL patients relapse/death and the expression levels of IL2RA, SORT1, DEFA1, and FLT3 genes at least in one of the times evaluated (P values < 0.05 and odds ratio ranges: 3.73–27. The association between FLT3 deregulation and relapse/death was a constant in the times studied and their overexpression significantly increased the odds of relapse/death in a range of 3.73 and 6.05 among study population (P values < 0.05. Conclusions. Overexpression of FLT3 and DEFA1 genes retained independent prognostic significance for B-ALL outcome, reflected as increased risks of relapse/death among the study population.

  20. The effect of acupressure on cancer-related fatigue among school-aged children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Bastani, Farideh; Khosravi, Maryam; Borimnejad, Leili; Arbabi, Negar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fatigue is the most common side effect of chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Acupressure is one of the most popular non-pharmacologic methods used to reduce fatigue in other settings. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of acupressure on reducing fatigue among children with ALL compared with a placebo treatment. Materials and Methods: In a single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of 120 hospitalized school-aged children...

  1. Successful combination treatment of clofarabine, cytarabine and gemtuzumab-ozogamicin in adult refractory B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Papayannidis, Cristina; Derenzini, Enrico; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Curti, Antonio; Paolini, Stefania; Cilloni, Daniela; Baccarani, Michele; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Despite relevant advances in survival rates of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), in adult patients the outcome is still dismal, due to a greater drug resistance, a poorer compliance with treatment, and less effective current therapies. The need for more active agents has identified a novel purine nucleoside analogue, clofarabine, which has been approved for the treatment of children with relapsed and refractory ALL, showing also promising clinical benefit in ph...

  2. The results of treatment of children with acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia using a modified BFM-87 procedure

    Efficiency of the treatment of children with acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia using modified BFM-87 procedure was studied. Intensive modified BFM-87 procedure was applied to 32 patients and considered of remission induction (8 days), remission consolidation (57 days), chemoradio prophylaxis of neuroleukosis, supporting therapy during remission. Efficiency of the used treatment program was proved (complete remission - 90% of patients, 5 year survival time - 47%)

  3. Evaluation of Bone Mineral Density in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL)

    A. Ghasemi; Banihashem, A; N Ghaemi; Elmi, S.; Esmaeili, H; R Erfani Sayyar; Sam Elmi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) are the most common childhood and adolescence malignancy respectively.Due to the increasing survival of these children, today late side effects of treatments are important. Therapies such as corticosteroids, cytotoxic and radiotherapy effect on bone density and put the child at risk of osteoporosis and pathological fractures.   Material and Methods: This 3-year cross sectional study was performed i...

  4. NF-κB in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Oncogenic Functions in Leukemic and in Microenvironmental Cells

    Fernandes, Mónica T.; dos Santos, Nuno R.; da Silva, Ricardo C.; Marinella N. Ghezzo

    2010-01-01

    Two main NF-κB signaling pathways, canonical and noncanonical, performing distinct functions in organisms have been characterized. Identification of mutations in genes encoding components of these NF-κB signaling pathways in lymphoid malignancies confirmed their key role in leukemogenesis. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignancy of thymocytes that despite significant therapeutic advances can still be fatal. Although mutations in NF-κB genes have not been report...

  5. Morphology and incidence of the "posttherapeutic lymphoid cell" in the bone marrow of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Schuurmans Stekhoven, J. H.; Langenhuysen, C. A.; Bakkeren, J. A.; Holland, R.; Höller, I.; De Vaan, G. A.; Schretlen, E. D.

    1986-01-01

    In the posttherapeutic bone marrow of a group of 30 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), small numbers of a particular lymphoid cell with a comparatively large size and large dark nucleus were found. This cell was called the "posttherapeutic lymphoid cell." This type of cell is easily distinguishable in the May-Grünwald-Giemsa-stained smears as well as in semi- and ultrathin Epon sections. Immunoelectron-microscopically it proved to be positive for common ALL. It is hypothesized ...

  6. Nuclear pockets and clefts in the lymphoid cell population of bone marrow and blood of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Schuurmans Stekhoven, J. H.; Holland, R.

    1986-01-01

    Ultrastructural investigation of the nuclei of the lymphoid cell population of bone marrow and blood of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia regularly shows the presence of two types of nuclear pockets and nuclear clefts. The incidences of these nuclear features decrease significantly during cytostatic therapy. The pockets consist of either a cytoplasmic segment enclosed by a nuclear heterochromatin bridge or a nuclear segment enclosed by an intranuclear cleft. One type of nuclear cleft...

  7. Methotrexate resistance in relation to treatment outcome in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Wojtuszkiewicz, Anna; Peters, Godefridus J; van Woerden, Nicole L;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Methotrexate (MTX) eradicates leukemic cells by disrupting de novo nucleotide biosynthesis and DNA replication, resulting in cell death. Since its introduction in 1947, MTX-containing chemotherapeutic regimens have proven instrumental in achieving curative effects in acute lymphoblastic...

  8. Graft-versus-leukemia effects associated with detectable Wilms tumor-1–specific T lymphocytes after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Rezvani, Katayoun; Yong, Agnes S.M.; Savani, Bipin N.; Mielke, Stephan; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Douek, Daniel C.; Barrett, A. John

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether the leukemia-associated Wilms tumor antigen (WT1) contributes to a graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (SCT) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), we studied CD8+ T-cell responses to WT1 in 10 human lymphocyte antigen (HLA)–A*0201–positive ALL patients during the early phase of immune recovery after SCT (days 30-120). Seven of 10 patients had detectable WT1 expression in their peripheral blood (PB) before SCT by quantitative rev...

  9. DNA methylation for subtype classification and prediction of treatment outcome in patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Milani, Lili; Lundmark, Anders; Kiialainen, Anna; Nordlund, Jessica; Flaegstad, Trond; Forestier, Erik; Heyman, Mats; Jonmundsson, Gudmundur; Kanerva, Jukka; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Söderhäll, Stefan; Gustafsson, Mats; Lönnerholm, Gudmar; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2010-01-01

    Despite improvements in the prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), subgroups of patients would benefit from alternative treatment approaches. Our aim was to identify genes with DNA methylation profiles that could identify such groups. We determined the methylation levels of 1320...... ALL and gene sets that discriminated between subtypes of ALL and between ALL and controls in pairwise classification analyses. We also identified 20 individual genes with DNA methylation levels that predicted relapse of leukemia. Thus, methylation analysis should be explored as a method to improve...

  10. Proposal for the standardization of flow cytometry protocols to detect minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Maura Rosane Valério Ikoma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Minimal residual disease is the most powerful predictor of outcome in acute leukemia and is useful in therapeutic stratification for acute lymphoblastic leukemia protocols. Nowadays, the most reliable methods for studying minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia are multiparametric flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction. Both provide similar results at a minimal residual disease level of 0.01% of normal cells, that is, detection of one leukemic cell in up to 10,000 normal nucleated cells. Currently, therapeutic protocols establish the minimal residual disease threshold value at the most informative time points according to the appropriate methodology employed. The expertise of the laboratory in a cancer center or a cooperative group could be the most important factor in determining which method should be used. In Brazil, multiparametric flow cytometry laboratories are available in most leukemia treatment centers, but multiparametric flow cytometry processes must be standardized for minimal residual disease investigations in order to offer reliable and reproducible results that ensure quality in the clinical application of the method. The Minimal Residual Disease Working Group of the Brazilian Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation (SBTMO was created with that aim. This paper presents recommendations for the detection of minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on the literature and expertise of the laboratories who participated in this consensus, including pre-analytical and analytical methods. This paper also recommends that both multiparametric flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction are complementary methods, and so more laboratories with expertise in immunoglobulin/T cell receptor (Ig/TCR gene assays are necessary in Brazil.

  11. Guillain-Barre syndrome in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Causal or coincidental

    Bharat Bhushan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS is rarely reported in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and may be difficult to differentiate from vincristine induced neuropathy. Only few case reports highlighted GBS with ALL. We report a 10-year-old male child who was a diagnosed case of ALL since 3 month on chemotherapy. At 3 rd week of chemotherapy, he developed rapidly progressive ascending motor quadriparesis over 2 days. Clinical and electrophysiology revealed acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN variant of GBS. He was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (2 g/kg without discontinuing chemotherapy. Complete recovery took 12 weeks despite immunotherapy, and it was corroborating to slow remission. We concluded that AMAN variant is usually present in B-cell type ALL, may be causal for GBS and it takes 6-16 weeks to complete recovery which may correspond to remission of ALL. However, it needs to be studied. We also present a meta-analysis of previously reported cases of GBS in ALL.

  12. Dronabinol has preferential antileukemic activity in acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia with lymphoid differentiation patterns

    Kampa-Schittenhelm, Kerstin Maria; Salitzky, Olaf; Akmut, Figen; Illing, Barbara; Kanz, Lothar; Salih, Helmut Rainer; Schittenhelm, Marcus Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been previously demonstrated in several cancer models, that Dronabinol (THC) may have anti-tumor activity – however, controversial data exists for acute leukemia. We have anecdotal evidence that THC may have contributed to disease control in a patient with acute undifferentiated leukemia. Methods To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the antileukemic efficacy of THC in several leukemia cell lines and native leukemia blasts cultured ex vivo. Expression analysis for the CB1/2 ...

  13. Prognostic factors in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a ten year study

    Oloomi yazdi Z.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common cancer in the pediatric population. With modern treatments, the chance of the complete recovery is nearly 100%. The most important prognostic factors are appropriate treatment protocol and determination of patient risk factors based on clinical, morphological, immunological and cytological characteristics. In this study we reviewed frequency of these factors, like as age, gender, the primary white blood cell number, sub- group on the base of FAB classification, immunophenotype and the clinical progress. Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed 877 pediatric patients with the diagnosis of ALL between the years of 1994 and 2004. In these patients the age, gender, primary WBC count, sub-group based on the FAB classification, immunophenotype and the clinical progress in 177 patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at Imam Khomeini Hospital between the years of 1994 to 2004 were determined. Results: Of these patients, 1.6% was younger than one year, 24.8% more than ten years old and 73.6% were between the ages of one and ten years; 63.8% were male. WBC counts were above 50,000/ul in 28.8% of the patients. FAB classifications included L1 in 80.2%, L2 in 17.5% and L3 in 2.3% of the patients. Immunophenotypes included pre-B cell in 63.8%, early pre-B cell in 23.1%, T cell in 12.3% and mature B cell in 0.8% of the patients. Marker CD10+ was detected in 88.1% of the B cell cases. In this study group, 74% of the patients recovered, 16.3% died and 16.5% relapsed.Conclusions: The prevalence of FAB-L1 and pre-B cell cases in this study is greater than a previous study, while the prevalence of FAB-L2 and early pre-B cell cases is less than that of the previous study.

  14. Long-term results of total body irradiation in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    The aim of this chart review of adult patients treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with total body irradiation (TBI) was to evaluate early and late toxicity and long-term outcome. A total of 110 adult patients (34 ± 12 years) with ALL underwent TBI (6 fractions of 2 Gy for a total of 12 Gy) as a part of the treatment regimen before transplantation. Treatment-related toxicity, mortality, and hematologic outcome are reported. Mean follow-up was 70 months. The 2- and 5-year leukemia-free survival rates were 78 and 72 %, respectively. In all, 29 % (32/110) patients suffered from medullary recurrence after a median time of 7 months. Gender was the only statistically significant prognostic factor in terms of overall survival in favor of female patients. Treatment-related mortality and overall survival after 2 and 5 years were 16 and 22 %, and 60 and 52.7 %, respectively. The most frequent late reaction wascGVHD of the skin (n = 33, 30 %). In addition, 15.5 % (17/110 patients) suffered pulmonary symptoms, and 6 patients developed lung fibrosis. Eyes were frequently affected by the radiation (31/110 = 28 %); 12 of 110 patients (11 %) presented with symptoms from osteoporosis, 5 of 110 patients (4.5 %) developed hypothyreosis and 2 patients diabetes mellitus. Of the male patients, 11 % reported erectile dysfunction or loss of libido, while 2 of 36 women reported menopausal syndrome at the mean time of 28 months after treatment with requirement for substitution. No women became pregnant after treatment. No acute or late cardiac toxicities were documented in our patients. No secondary malignancies were documented. Although hematologic outcome was in the upper range of that reported in the literature, treatment-related mortality (TRM) and medullary recurrences remain a challenge. Sophisticated radiation techniques allow for decreasing toxicity to certain organs and/or dose escalation to the bone marrow in highly selected patients in order to improve therapeutic

  15. PARC/CCL18 Is a Plasma CC Chemokine with Increased Levels in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Struyf, Sofie; Schutyser, Evemie; Gouwy, Mieke; Gijsbers, Klara; Proost, Paul; Benoit, Yves; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van Damme, Jo; Laureys, Geneviève

    2003-01-01

    Chemokines play an important role in leukocyte mobilization, hematopoiesis, and angiogenesis. Tissue-specific expression of particular chemokines also influences tumor growth and metastasis. Here, the CC chemokine pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine (PARC)/CCL18 was measured in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Surprisingly, PARC immunoreactivity was consistently detected in plasma from healthy donors. After purification to homogeneity, the presence of intact PARC (1–69) and processed PARC (1–68) in normal human plasma was confirmed by sequence and mass spectrometry analysis. Furthermore, PARC serum levels were significantly increased in children with T-ALL and prepreB-ALL compared to control serum samples, whereas serum levels in AML and preB-ALL patients were not significantly different from controls. In contrast, the hemofiltrate CC chemokine-1 (HCC-1)/CCL14 was not found to be a biomarker in any of these patients’ strata, whereas the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) was significantly decreased in AML and prepreB-ALL. Stimulated leukocytic cell lines or lymphoblasts from patients produced IL-8/CXCL8 or macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) but not PARC, not even after IL-4 or IL-10 treatment. However, PARC was produced by superantigen or IL-4 stimulated monocytes co-cultured with lymphocytes or lymphoblastic cells. Serum PARC levels thus constitute a novel leukemia marker, possibly reflecting tumor/host cell interactions in the circulation. PMID:14578205

  16. B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Associated with t(8;22)(p11.2q11.2): Role of Additional Cytogenetic Anomalies

    Louis DePalma; Shireen R. Khoury; Kate M. Serdy

    2013-01-01

    B lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) may be associated with recurrent cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities. We describe the fourth-known case of B-ALL associated with the t(8;22)(p11.2q11.2) – a translocation seen more frequently in T lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myelogenous leukemia. This patient’s leukemia involves a combination of additional cytogenetic anomalies not yet described in the literature, including del(11)(q13q23), add(9)(p22), and monosomy 7. Given the role in B cell differe...

  17. Severe hypercalcemia as a form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia presentation in children.

    Martins, Andreia Luís; Moniz, Marta; Nunes, Pedro Sampaio; Abadesso, Clara; Loureiro, Helena Cristina; Duarte, Ximo; Almeida, Helena Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia is a rare metabolic disorder in children and is potentially fatal. It has a wide differential diagnosis, including cancer. Here, we report the case of a previously healthy 3-year-old who was admitted to the emergency room with fatigue, hyporeactivity, fever and limping gait that had evolved over 5 days and that was progressively worsening. On examination the patient was unconscious (Glasgow coma score: 8). Laboratory tests indicated severe hypercalcemia (total calcium 21.39mg/dL, ionized calcium 2.93mmol/L) and microcytic anemia. Hyperhydration was initiated, and the child was transferred to the pediatric intensive care unit. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration with calcium-free solution was instituted, which brought progressive normalization of serum calcium and an improved state of consciousness. Zoledronate was administered, and metabolic and infectious causes and poisoning were excluded. The bone marrow smear revealed a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Hypercalcemia associated with malignancy in children is rare and occurs as a form of cancer presentation or recurrence. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration should be considered in situations where there is imminent risk to life. PMID:26761480

  18. Cranial irradiation in children with lymphoblastic acute leukemia: results and damages

    From 1973 to 1976, 81 children with lymphoblastic acute leukemia were treated with cranial prophylactic irradiation at the Istituto di Radioterapia ''L. Galvani'' del'Universita di Bologna. We divided the patients into 6 groups according to different characteristics. At the beginning of 1978 the survival rate was 82%; 60 patients (74%) were in complete continuous remission. We studied the encephalic post irradiation syndrome that is present in children over 2 years of age only when doses are higher than 2500 rad and in children under 2 years of age when doses exceed 2000 rad. This complication occurs frequently in the experience of other authors; however, it is absent under certain doses with which it is possible to obtain the same good results. We feel that among the different techniques and methods, the best radiological treatment is daily bilateral cranial irradiation for patients early in remission; we recommend doses of 2400 rad for children above 2 years of age and 1950 rad for those under 2 years

  19. CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INVOLVEMENT IN ADULT ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA: DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS, PROPHYLAXIS AND THERAPY

    Maria Ilaria Del Principe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, Central Nervous System (CNS involvement is associated with a very poor prognosis. The diagnostic assessment of this condition relies on the use of neuroradiology, conventional cytology (CC and flow cytometry (FCM. Among these approaches, which is the gold standard it is still a matter of debate. Neuroradiology and CC have a limited sensitivity with a higher rate of false negative results. FCM demonstrated a superior sensitivity over CC, particularly when low levels of CNS infiltrating cells are present. Although prospective studies of large series of patients are still awaited, a positive finding by FCM appears to anticipate an adverse outcome even if CC shows no infiltration. Current strategies for adult ALL CNS-directed prophylaxis or therapy involve systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Actually, early and frequent intrathecal injection of cytostatic combined with systemic chemotherapy is the most effective strategy to reduce the frequency of CNS involvement. In patients with CNS overt ALL, at diagnosis or upon relapse, allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation might be considered. This review will discuss risk factors, diagnostic techniques for identification of CNS infiltration and modalities of prophylaxis and therapy to manage it. 

  20. New and emerging prognostic and predictive genetic biomarkers in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Moorman, Anthony V

    2016-04-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease at the genetic level. Chromosomal abnormalities are used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers to provide subtype, outcome and drug response information. t(12;21)/ETV6-RUNX1and high hyper-diploidy are good-risk prognostic biomarkers whereasKMT2A(MLL) translocations, t(17;19)/TCF3-HLF, haploidy or low hypodiploidy are high-risk biomarkers. t(9;22)/BCR-ABL1patients require targeted treatment (imatinib/dasatinib), whereas iAMP21 patients achieve better outcomes when treated intensively. High-risk genetic biomarkers are four times more prevalent in adults compared to children. The application of genomic technologies to cases without an established abnormality (B-other) reveals copy number alterations which can be used either individually or in combination as prognostic biomarkers. Transcriptome sequencing studies have identified a network of fusion genes involving kinase genes -ABL1,ABL2,PDGFRB,CSF1R,CRLF2,JAK2andEPORIn vitroandin vivostudies along with emerging clinical observations indicate that patients with a kinase-activating aberration may respond to treatment with small molecular inhibitors like imatinib/dasatinib and ruxolitinib. Further work is required to determine the true frequency of these abnormalities across the age spectrum and the optimal way to incorporate such inhibitors into protocols. In conclusion, genetic biomarkers are playing an increasingly important role in the management of patients with ALL. PMID:27033238

  1. Mitochondrial DNA alterations of peripheral lymphocytes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients undergoing total body irradiation therapy

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations, including mtDNA copy number and mtDNA 4977 bp common deletion (CD), are key indicators of irradiation-induced damage. The relationship between total body irradiation (TBI) treatment and mtDNA alterations in vivo, however, has not been postulated yet. The aim of this study is to analyze mtDNA alterations in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients as well as to take them as predictors for radiation toxicity. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated from 26 ALL patients 24 hours after TBI preconditioning (4.5 and 9 Gy, respectively). Extracted DNA was analyzed by real-time PCR method. Average 2.31 times mtDNA and 0.53 fold CD levels were observed after 4.5 Gy exposure compared to their basal levels. 9 Gy TBI produced a greater response of both mtDNA and CD levels than 4.5 Gy. Significant inverse correlation was found between mtDNA content and CD level at 4.5 and 9 Gy (P = 0.037 and 0.048). Moreover, mtDNA content of lymphocytes without irradiation was found to be correlated to age. mtDNA and CD content may be considered as predictive factors to radiation toxicity

  2. Effect of methotrexate and doxorubicin cumulative doses on superoxide dismutase levels in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Khalida Fetriyani Ningsih

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in children. Chemotherapeutic drugs for ALL such as methotrexate (Mtx and doxorubicin produce reactive oxygen species (ROS, a type of free radical. The ROS can reduce levels of antioxidants in the body, including superoxide dismutase (SOD. Decreased SOD levels can cause DNA, lipid, and protein damage, which in turn may lead to adverse effects and treatment failure. Objective To determine the effect of Mtx and doxorubicin cumulative doses on SOD levels in children with ALL. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study in children with ALL who underwent chemotherapy in Dr. Sardjito Hospital in October 2011 who had completed the induction phase. Risk factors for decreased SOD levels were analyzed by Cox regression and hazard ratio, with a significant level of P <0.05. Results Of 40 patients enrolled, Mtx ≥ 3000 mg/m2 significantly decreased SOD levels (HR 9.959; 95%CI 2.819 to 35.183; P=0.001. However, doxorubicin ≥90 mg/m2 did not significantly decrease SOD levels (HR 0.59 95%CI 0.194 to 1.765; P=0.34. Conclusion Methotrexate is associated with decreased SOD levels in children with ALL. However, doxorubicin is not associated with decreased SOD levels in the same patient population.

  3. VARIATIONS OF THE LEUKOCYTES AND LYMPHOCYTES IN THE CASE OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Mirela Cozma

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to approximate the surviving period in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. For this study we took in to consideration 10 patients 0 to 20 years old, coming from rural or urban environments and their evolution has been studied for a period of 60 days from the primary presentation to the hospital. The diagnosis was made after a careful history and physical examination and was completed after a blood count insisting on the number of leukocytes and on the peripheral blood smear. The patients’ evolution was monitored through the hematological parameters of the peripheral blood smear and of the bone marrow. The main Para clinical investigations consisted in the white cells and lymphocytes count from the peripheral blood smear. We counted the absolute and relative number of lymphocytes from the peripheral blood smear of these patients and then we divided them into three groups by criteria of age. We took into consideration at every age group the causes of the primary presentation to the hospital.

  4. Frequent and simultaneous epigenetic inactivation of TP53 pathway genes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Amaia Vilas-Zornoza

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation is one of the most frequent alterations in patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL. Using methylation bead arrays we analyzed the methylation status of 807 genes implicated in cancer in a group of ALL samples at diagnosis (n = 48. We found that 154 genes were methylated in more than 10% of ALL samples. Interestingly, the expression of 13 genes implicated in the TP53 pathway was downregulated by hypermethylation. Direct or indirect activation of TP53 pathway with 5-aza-2'-deoxycitidine, Curcumin or Nutlin-3 induced an increase in apoptosis of ALL cells. The results obtained with the initial group of 48 patients was validated retrospectively in a second cohort of 200 newly diagnosed ALL patients. Methylation of at least 1 of the 13 genes implicated in the TP53 pathway was observed in 78% of the patients, which significantly correlated with a higher relapse (p = 0.001 and mortality (p<0.001 rate being an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival (DFS (p = 0.006 and overall survival (OS (p = 0.005 in the multivariate analysis. All these findings indicate that TP53 pathway is altered by epigenetic mechanisms in the majority of ALL patients and correlates with prognosis. Treatments with compounds that may reverse the epigenetic abnormalities or activate directly the p53 pathway represent a new therapeutic alternative for patients with ALL.

  5. Factors associated with IQ scores in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    To identify factors which might be associated with intellectual function following treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 50 long-term survivors were studied using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised. All patients were diagnosed between 1972 and 1974 and were treated on a single clinical trial protocol with identical induction and maintenance chemotherapy plus central nervous system prophylaxis that included cranial radiation. The mean full scale IQ score for the group was 95 (SEM 2.0), with mean verbal IQ of 94.4 and mean performance IQ of 96.9. Factors which were found to be closely associated with a lower IQ score included female sex (in both verbal IQ and full-scale IQ), longer duration of chemotherapy (in performance IQ), and younger age at the time of radiation (in both verbal IQ and full-scale IQ). The age at the time of radiation was found to be significantly correlated with discrepancy between verbal and performance IQ, with younger age being associated with verbal IQ scores higher than performance IQ scores. When analyses were performed within specific subgroups of patients defined by sex and age at the time of radiation, dose of cranial radiation, concomitant intrathecal methotrexate therapy, and duration of therapy were all found to be correlated with a lower level of intellectual function. These preliminary findings provide direction for future studies to help identify high-risk patients

  6. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults – from genomics to the clinics

    Kenderian SS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Saad Sirop Kenderian, Mark R Litzow Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adolescents and young adults (AYA represents a unique and challenging disease entity. Despite the recent improvement of survival in this population over the last decade, it is still lagging behind the excellent cure rates obtained in pediatric ALL. This special population of AYA receives care from pediatric as well as adult hematologists and can be treated on pediatric or adult protocols. There is a substantial difference in disease biology, response to chemotherapy, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation between pediatric and AYA patients. This review discusses current controversies in the management of AYA, outcomes following treatment with pediatric and adult protocols, and the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. It focuses on the unique clinical, biological, and socioeconomic characteristics of this population that might partly explain the inferior outcomes. This review also explores recent advances in genomic profiling and emerging treatments in ALL. Keywords: novel agents, monoclonal antibodies, stem cell transplantation, bone marrow transplantation, Philadelphia positive ALL, genomic profile

  7. Transcription-coupled genetic instability marks acute lymphoblastic leukemia structural variation hotspots

    Heinäniemi, Merja; Vuorenmaa, Tapio; Teppo, Susanna; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Bouvy-Liivrand, Maria; Mehtonen, Juha; Niskanen, Henri; Zachariadis, Vasilios; Laukkanen, Saara; Liuksiala, Thomas; Teittinen, Kaisa; Lohi, Olli

    2016-01-01

    Progression of malignancy to overt disease requires multiple genetic hits. Activation-induced deaminase (AID) can drive lymphomagenesis by generating off-target DNA breaks at loci that harbor highly active enhancers and display convergent transcription. The first active transcriptional profiles from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients acquired here reveal striking similarity at structural variation (SV) sites. Specific transcriptional features, namely convergent transcription and Pol2 stalling, were detected at breakpoints. The overlap was most prominent at SV with recognition motifs for the recombination activating genes (RAG). We present signal feature analysis to detect vulnerable regions and quantified from human cells how convergent transcription contributes to R-loop generation and RNA polymerase stalling. Wide stalling regions were characterized by high DNAse hypersensitivity and unusually broad H3K4me3 signal. Based on 1382 pre-B-ALL patients, the ETV6-RUNX1 fusion positive patients had over ten-fold elevation in RAG1 while high expression of AID marked pre-B-ALL lacking common cytogenetic changes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13087.001 PMID:27431763

  8. Isolated testicular relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia - Effective treatment with the modified CCG-112 protocol

    Shama Goyal

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The testes have been considered a sanctuary site for leukemic cells and testicular relapses used to account for a major proportion of the poor outcome of boys with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. With use of aggressive chemotherapy which includes intermediate or high dose methotrexate, the incidence of testicular relapses has declined. However once these patients have received cranial irradiation as a part of the front line protocol, high dose methotrexate needs to be avoided because of risk of developing leucoencephalopathy. AIM: To study the use of non cross resistant chemotherapeutic agents along with a regimen containing lower doses of methotrexate in patients of isolated testicular relapse (ITR. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis of 12 consecutive patients with ITR treated with modified version of the CCG-112 protocol which consists of intensive systemic chemotherapy, cranial chemoprophylaxis along with testicular irradiation. RESULTS: One patient died of regimen related toxicity. Two patients relapsed in the bone marrow during maintenance. Of the nine patients who completed treatment, eight are alive and in remission. One patient had a bone marrow relapse two months after completing treatment. The Kaplan Meier estimates give us an Event Free Survival (EFS of 66.7% at 10 yrs. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, though the incidence is very low, patients with ITR should be treated aggressively since they have an excellent chance of achieving a long term EFS.

  9. ORP4L is essential for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell survival.

    Zhong, Wenbin; Yi, Qing; Xu, Bing; Li, Shiqian; Wang, Tong; Liu, Fupei; Zhu, Biying; Hoffmann, Peter R; Ji, Guangju; Lei, Pingsheng; Li, Guoping; Li, Jiwei; Li, Jian; Olkkonen, Vesa M; Yan, Daoguang

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are reprogrammed in cancer to support cell survival. Here, we report that T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells are characterized by increased oxidative phosphorylation and robust ATP production. We demonstrate that ORP4L is expressed in T-ALL but not normal T-cells and its abundance is proportional to cellular ATP. ORP4L acts as an adaptor/scaffold assembling CD3ɛ, Gαq/11 and PLCβ3 into a complex that activates PLCβ3. PLCβ3 catalyzes IP3 production in T-ALL as opposed to PLCγ1 in normal T-cells. Up-regulation of ORP4L thus results in a switch in the enzyme responsible for IP3-induced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release and oxidative phosphorylation. ORP4L knockdown results in suboptimal bioenergetics, cell death and abrogation of T-ALL engraftment in vivo. In summary, we uncovered a signalling pathway operating specifically in T-ALL cells in which ORP4L mediates G protein-coupled ligand-induced PLCβ3 activation, resulting in an increase of mitochondrial respiration for cell survival. Targeting ORP4L might represent a promising approach for T-ALL treatment. PMID:27581363

  10. Mitochondrial DNA alterations of peripheral lymphocytes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients undergoing total body irradiation therapy

    Ji Fuyun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA alterations, including mtDNA copy number and mtDNA 4977 bp common deletion (CD, are key indicators of irradiation-induced damage. The relationship between total body irradiation (TBI treatment and mtDNA alterations in vivo, however, has not been postulated yet. The aim of this study is to analyze mtDNA alterations in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients as well as to take them as predictors for radiation toxicity. Methods Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated from 26 ALL patients 24 hours after TBI preconditioning (4.5 and 9 Gy, respectively. Extracted DNA was analyzed by real-time PCR method. Results Average 2.31 times mtDNA and 0.53 fold CD levels were observed after 4.5 Gy exposure compared to their basal levels. 9 Gy TBI produced a greater response of both mtDNA and CD levels than 4.5 Gy. Significant inverse correlation was found between mtDNA content and CD level at 4.5 and 9 Gy (P = 0.037 and 0.048. Moreover, mtDNA content of lymphocytes without irradiation was found to be correlated to age. Conclusions mtDNA and CD content may be considered as predictive factors to radiation toxicity.

  11. Serum Adiponectin and Resistin Levels in de Novo and Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Children Patients

    Hatim A El-Baz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adipose tissue secretes a large number of adipocytokines such as leptin, resistin, and adiponectin. Many of these hormones and cytokines are altered in obese individuals and may lead to disruption of the normal balance between cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The aim of our work was to investigate the disturbance of secretion of adiponectin and resistin in de novo and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in Egyptian children and determine whether adiponectin and resistin are implicated in increased risk relapse compared to healthy individuals.Methods: Measurements of adiponectin and resistin were performed at diagnosis, in 32 patients with de novo ALL aged 3 to 18 years (mean 9.8 y and 19 children with relapsed ALL aged 5 to 17 (mean 9.9 yr. 10 apparently healthy children with matched age and sex were used as controls.Results: Mean adiponectin levels were low (P < 0.05, whereas mean resistin levels were high (P<0.05 at diagnosis and relapsed ALL (compared to healthy controls. A significant decrease of adiponectin levels was observed in relapsed ALL compared to de novo ALL. In contrast resistin was significantly increased in relapsed ALL compared to de novo patients. Adiponectin in ALL subjects inversely correlated with resistin level (r = -0.51, P < 0.001.Conclusion: Low adiponectin and high resistin level at diagnosis suggest their implication in ALL pathogenesis and may serve as potential clinically significant diagnostic markers to detect leukemic relapse.

  12. Growth in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with and without prophylactic cranial irradiation

    Moell, C.; Garwicz, S.; Marky, L.; Melander, L.; Karlberg, J.

    1988-01-01

    Growth and weight gain were studied longitudinally over a period of four years in thirty-nine children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The children were divided into two groups according to treatment. Twenty-eight children were given prophylactic cranial irradiation and eleven children were treated without such irradiation. The duration of cytostatic treatment was three years in all cases. Average growth during the first two years was similar in the two groups, and the standard deviation scores (SDS) were below average. The rate of growth during the fourth year was significantly higher among those children who had not received cranial irradiation. After four years the average attained height had declined 0.5 SD for children treated with cranial irradiation and 0.2 SD for children without such treatment. Attained weight after four years had increased 0.4 SD more among those children who had not received irradiation. The results suggest that prophylactic cranial irradiation is responsible for the greater part of the prepubertal growth inhibition in these children. (authors).

  13. Growth in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with and without prophylactic cranial irradiation

    Growth and weight gain were studied longitudinally over a period of four years in thirty-nine children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The children were divided into two groups according to treatment. Twenty-eight children were given prophylactic cranial irradiation and eleven children were treated without such irradiation. The duration of cytostatic treatment was three years in all cases. Average growth during the first two years was similar in the two groups, and the standard deviation scores (SDS) were below average. The rate of growth during the fourth year was significantly higher among those children who had not received cranial irradiation. After four years the average attained height had declined 0.5 SD for children treated with cranial irradiation and 0.2 SD for children without such treatment. Attained weight after four years had increased 0.4 SD more among those children who had not received irradiation. The results suggest that prophylactic cranial irradiation is responsible for the greater part of the prepubertal growth inhibition in these children. (authors)

  14. Role of Chemotherapy and Allografting in the Treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Giaccone, Luisa; Audisio, Ernesta; Bruno, Benedetto; Maffini, Enrico; D'Ardia, Stefano; Caracciolo, Daniele; Ferrando, Federica; Butera, Sara; Brunello, Lucia; Frairia, Chiara; Aydin, Semra; Nicolino, Barbara; Festuccia, Moreno; Crisà, Elena; Bruna, Riccardo; Passera, Roberto; Boccadoro, Mario; Vitolo, Umberto; Busca, Alessandro; Falda, Michele; Marmont, Filippo

    2016-02-01

    We report the clinical outcomes of 83 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (median age, 46 years; range, 18-75 years) treated at our institution between 1999 and 2011. Treatment refers to clinical trials open for accrual at the time of diagnosis or to institutional guidelines. Upfront allografting was considered for younger high-risk patients. Seventy-eight of 83 (94%) patients achieved complete remission after induction, although 53% of them eventually relapsed. Forty of 70 patients younger than 61 years underwent allografting. The median follow-up was 7.4 years (range, 0.2-15.0 years). Overall, the 5-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) were 40% and 39%, respectively. In patients undergoing transplantation, OS and EFS at 5 years were both 53%, whereas in a nontransplantation setting, both OS and EFS were 35% at 5 years (P = .044 for both OS and EFS). By multivariate analysis, the independent predictors of OS and EFS were age and leukocytosis in the overall population and allografting in young patients. PMID:26711180

  15. The novel arylindolylmaleimide PDA-66 displays pronounced antiproliferative effects in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Prognosis of adult patients suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is still unsatisfactory. Targeted therapy via inhibition of deregulated signaling pathways appears to be a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of ALL. Herein, we evaluated the influence of a novel arylindolylmaleimide (PDA-66), a potential GSK3β inhibitor, on several ALL cell lines. ALL cell lines (SEM, RS4;11, Jurkat and MOLT4) were exposed to different concentrations of PDA-66. Subsequently, proliferation, metabolic activity, apoptosis and necrosis, cell cycle distribution and protein expression of Wnt and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways were analyzed at different time points. PDA-66 inhibited the proliferation of ALL cells significantly by reduction of metabolic activity. The 72 h IC50 values ranged between 0.41 to 1.28 μM PDA-66. Additionally, caspase activated induction of apoptosis could be detected in the analyzed cell lines. PDA-66 influenced the cell cycle distribution of ALL cell lines differently. While RS4;11 and MOLT4 cells were found to be arrested in G2 phase, SEM cells showed an increased cell cycle in G0/1 phase. PDA-66 displays significant antileukemic activity in ALL cells and classifies as candidate for further evaluation as a potential drug in targeted therapy of ALL

  16. Rhizobium etli asparaginase II: an alternative for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment.

    Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Evangelista-Martínez, Zahaed; Moreno-Enriquez, Angélica; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial L-asparaginase has been a universal component of therapies for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia since the 1970s. Two principal enzymes derived from Escherichia coli and Erwinia chrysanthemi are the only options clinically approved to date. We recently reported a study of recombinant L-asparaginase (AnsA) from Rhizobium etli and described an increasing type of AnsA family members. Sequence analysis revealed four conserved motifs with notable differences with respect to the conserved regions of amino acid sequences of type I and type II L-asparaginases, particularly in comparison with therapeutic enzymes from E. coli and E. chrysanthemi. These differences suggested a distinct immunological specificity. Here, we report an in silico analysis that revealed immunogenic determinants of AnsA. Also, we used an extensive approach to compare the crystal structures of E. coli and E. chrysantemi asparaginases with a computational model of AnsA and identified immunogenic epitopes. A three-dimensional model of AsnA revealed, as expected based on sequence dissimilarities, completely different folding and different immunogenic epitopes. This approach could be very useful in transcending the problem of immunogenicity in two major ways: by chemical modifications of epitopes to reduce drug immunogenicity, and by site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues to diminish immunogenicity without reduction of enzymatic activity. PMID:22895060

  17. Whole brain magnetization transfer histogram analysis of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving intrathecal methotrexate therapy

    Yamamoto, Akira [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: yakira@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Miki, Yukio [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: mikiy@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Adachi, Souichi [Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: sadachi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp (and others)

    2006-03-15

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the hypothesis that magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) histogram analysis of the whole brain could detect early and subtle brain changes nonapparent on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving methotrexate (MTX) therapy. Materials and methods: Subjects in this prospective study comprised 10 children with ALL (mean age, 6 years; range, 0-16 years). In addition to conventional MRI, magnetization transfer images were obtained before and after intrathecal and intravenous MTX therapy. MTR values were calculated and plotted as a histogram, and peak height and location were calculated. Differences in peak height and location between pre- and post-MTX therapy scans were statistically analyzed. Conventional MRI was evaluated for abnormal signal area in white matter. Results: MTR peak height was significantly lower on post-MTX therapy scans than on pre-MTX therapy scans (p = 0.002). No significant differences in peak location were identified between pre- and post-chemotherapy imaging. No abnormal signals were noted in white matter on either pre- or post-MTX therapy conventional MRI. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that MTR histogram analysis allows better detection of early and subtle brain changes in ALL patients who receive MTX therapy than conventional MRI.

  18. Health-related quality of life assessment in Indonesian childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Sutaryo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most studies on Health-related Quality of Life (HRQOL in children with cancer were conducted in developed countries. The aims of this study were to assess the HRQOL in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients in Indonesia and to assess the influence of demographic and medical characteristics on HRQOL. Methods After cultural linguistic validation, a cross-sectional study of HRQOL was conducted with childhood ALL patients and their guardians in various phases of treatment using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scale and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL™ 3.0 Cancer Module. Results Ninety-eight guardians and 55 patients participated. The internal consistency of both scales ranged from 0.57 to 0.92. HRQOL of Indonesian patients was comparable with those in developed countries. There were moderate to good correlations between self-reports and proxy-reports, however guardians tended to report worse HRQOL than patients. Children of the 2–5 year-group significantly had more problems in procedural anxiety, treatment anxiety and communication subscales than in older groups (p Conclusion Younger children had more problems in procedural anxiety, treatment anxiety and communication subscales. Therefore, special care during intervention procedures is needed to promote their normal development. Psychosocial support should be provided to children and their parents to facilitate their coping with disease and its treatment.

  19. Effect of Malnutrition at Diagnosis on Clinical Outcomes of Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Yazbeck, Nadine; Samia, Loma; Saab, Raya; Abboud, Miguel R; Solh, Hassan; Muwakkit, Samar

    2016-03-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common malignancy among children. Although studies have shown that malnutrition can negatively affect treatment outcome, results are controversial. This retrospective study aims at determining the prevalence of malnutrition and its association with treatment outcome among children with ALL treated at the Children's Cancer Institute in Lebanon. A total of 103 patients diagnosed with ALL between April 2002 and May 2010 were enrolled. Anthropometric data were collected from medical records upon diagnosis, at 3 and 6 months, and at the end of treatment. Body mass index was calculated for children 2 years of age and older, whereas weight-for-height ratio was used for patients below 2 years. Patients were considered underweight, stunted, or wasted if their Z-scores were death and relapse) was higher among malnourished children and more so among stunted children with an odds ratios=2.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.5-8.3 and odds ratio=2.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-11.5, respectively. Although there was a trend showing worse outcomes in malnourished children with ALL at diagnosis when compared with well-nourished children larger studies using additional tools like arm anthropometry need to be conducted to prove the association. PMID:26479995

  20. Psychological Impact of Chemotherapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on Patients and Their Parents.

    Sherief, Laila M; Kamal, Naglaa M; Abdalrahman, Hadel M; Youssef, Doaa M; Abd Alhady, Mohamed A; Ali, Adel S A; Abd Elbasset, Maha Aly; Hashim, Hiatham M

    2015-12-01

    To assess the self-esteem of pediatric patients on chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and psychological status of their parents.The psychological status of 178 children receiving chemotherapy for ALL and their parents was assessed using parenting stress index (PSI) to determine the degree of stress the parents are exposed to using parent's and child's domains. Self-esteem Scale was used to determine the psychological status of patients.The study revealed significant low level of self-esteem in 84.83% of patients. Their parents had significant psychological stress. PSI was significantly associated with parents' low sense of competence, negative attachment to their children, feeling of high restriction, high depression, poor relation to spouse, high social isolation variables of parent's domains. It was significantly associated with low distraction, negative parents' reinforcement, low acceptability, and high demanding variables of child's domains. Long duration of disease was the most detrimental factor among demographic data of the patients.Chemotherapy for ALL has a significant impact on the psychological status of both patients and their parents with high prevalence of low self-esteem in children and high degree of stress in their parents. PMID:26705211

  1. Identification of somatic and germline mutations using whole exome sequencing of congenital acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) diagnosed within the first month of life is classified as congenital ALL and has a significantly worse outcome than ALL diagnosed in older children. This suggests that congenital ALL is a biologically different disease, and thus may be caused by a distinct set of mutations. To understand the somatic and germline mutations contributing to congenital ALL, the protein-coding regions in the genome were captured and whole-exome sequencing was employed for the identification of single-nucleotide variants and small insertion and deletions in the germlines as well as the primary tumors of four patients with congenital ALL. Exome sequencing was performed on Illumina GAIIx or HiSeq 2000 (Illumina, San Diego, California). Reads were aligned to the human reference genome and the Genome Analysis Toolkit was used for variant calling. An in-house developed Ensembl-based variant annotator was used to richly annotate each variant. There were 1–3 somatic, protein-damaging mutations per ALL, including a novel mutation in Sonic Hedgehog. Additionally, there were many germline mutations in genes known to be associated with cancer predisposition, as well as genes involved in DNA repair. This study is the first to comprehensively characterize the germline and somatic mutational profile of all protein-coding genes patients with congenital ALL. These findings identify potentially important therapeutic targets, as well as insight into possible cancer predisposition genes

  2. Asymptomatic changes in white matter following CNS prophylaxis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) can present early white matter changes related to central nervous system prophylaxis. These changes are frequently reversible and have little neurological impact. Our aim is to assess the incidence of this finding and the influence of chemotherapy and radiotherapy on its development. We have reviewed the neuroradiological explorations performed between 3 and 7 months after meningeal prophylaxis in 32 children with ALL, 18 of whom presented standard risk and 14, high risk. In addition to intrathecal chemotherapy, the latter group underwent delayed cranial radiotherapy at the age of 3 years. All were neurologically asymptomatic at the time of the study. The CT study disclosed low attenuation of the periventricular white matter in 22% of cases (7/32), while 41% (9/22) present hyperintensity in MR (PD, T2-weighted and STIR images), there being very good agreement between the two techniques. This finding was more frequent and more widely extended among the cases of high-risk ALL (50%) than in those presenting standard risk (11%). Three patients exhibited the tendency to reverse this anomaly at one-year follow-up. We consider that cranial radiotherapy plays a major role in the development of asymptomatic changes in the white matter. The iatrogenic origin is probably potentiated by previous methotrexate administration. 15 refs

  3. Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression following induction chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Perdomo-Ramírez, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adrenal insufficiency has been reported in 46 % to 81.5 % of children receiving corticosteroids for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Methodology: To assess the frequency of such insufficiency, 40 patients under 18 years (mean: 8.5 years with new diagnosis of ALL were studied. Base-line cortisol and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH levels were measured, and they received 5-week therapy with prednisolone. After 3 days off-steroid therapy, a stimulation test with ACTH 1 μg was done. In patients with abnormal cortisol (<18 μg/dL new ACTH tests were done and cortisol levels were determined at days 7, 14 and 30 until cortisol post-stimulation levels were normal. Results: Three days after the last steroid dose 29/40 (72.5 % had adrenal insufficiency after ACTH stimulus. At day 30 no one had abnormal cortisol levels after ACTH stimulus. All patients with adrenal suppression were over 5 years (HR 4.69; CI95 %: 1.44-15.32; p = 0.011. Conclusion: Steroids used during ALL treatment may cause adrenal insufficiency. Patients over 5 years are at high risk of developing adrenal suppression. We suggest to follow-up those patients with stress episodes after induction chemotherapy as steroid supplementation may be indicated.

  4. Intracellular Signaling Pathways Involved in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Molecular Targets.

    Layton Tovar, Cristian Fabián; Mendieta Zerón, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disease characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of immature lymphoid cells. ALL is the most common hematologic malignancy in early childhood, and it reaches peak incidence between the ages of 2 and 3 years. The prognosis of ALL is associated with aberrant gene expression, in addition to the presence of numerical or structural chromosomal alterations, age, race, and immunophenotype. The Relapse rate with regard to pharmacological treatment rises in childhood; thus, the expression of biomarkers associated with the activation of cell signaling pathways is crucial to establish the disease prognosis. Intracellular pathways involved in ALL are diverse, including Janus kinase/Signal transducers and transcription activators (JAK-STAT), Phosphoinositide-3-kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT), Ras mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras-MAPK), Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), Nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-κB), and Hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF-1α), among others. In this review, we present several therapeutic targets, intracellular pathways, and molecular markers that are being studied extensively at present. PMID:27065575

  5. Factors associated with IQ scores in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Robison, L.L.; Nesbit, M.E. Jr.; Sather, H.N.; Meadows, A.T.; Ortega, J.A.; Hammond, G.D.

    To identify factors which might be associated with intellectual function following treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 50 long-term survivors were studied using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised. All patients were diagnosed between 1972 and 1974 and were treated on a single clinical trial protocol with identical induction and maintenance chemotherapy plus central nervous system prophylaxis that included cranial radiation. The mean full scale IQ score for the group was 95 (SEM 2.0), with mean verbal IQ of 94.4 and mean performance IQ of 96.9. Factors which were found to be closely associated with a lower IQ score included female sex (in both verbal IQ and full-scale IQ), longer duration of chemotherapy (in performance IQ), and younger age at the time of radiation (in both verbal IQ and full-scale IQ). The age at the time of radiation was found to be significantly correlated with discrepancy between verbal and performance IQ, with younger age being associated with verbal IQ scores higher than performance IQ scores. When analyses were performed within specific subgroups of patients defined by sex and age at the time of radiation, dose of cranial radiation, concomitant intrathecal methotrexate therapy, and duration of therapy were all found to be correlated with a lower level of intellectual function. These preliminary findings provide direction for future studies to help identify high-risk patients.

  6. Identification of somatic and germline mutations using whole exome sequencing of congenital acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Chang Vivian Y

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL diagnosed within the first month of life is classified as congenital ALL and has a significantly worse outcome than ALL diagnosed in older children. This suggests that congenital ALL is a biologically different disease, and thus may be caused by a distinct set of mutations. To understand the somatic and germline mutations contributing to congenital ALL, the protein-coding regions in the genome were captured and whole-exome sequencing was employed for the identification of single-nucleotide variants and small insertion and deletions in the germlines as well as the primary tumors of four patients with congenital ALL. Methods Exome sequencing was performed on Illumina GAIIx or HiSeq 2000 (Illumina, San Diego, California. Reads were aligned to the human reference genome and the Genome Analysis Toolkit was used for variant calling. An in-house developed Ensembl-based variant annotator was used to richly annotate each variant. Results There were 1–3 somatic, protein-damaging mutations per ALL, including a novel mutation in Sonic Hedgehog. Additionally, there were many germline mutations in genes known to be associated with cancer predisposition, as well as genes involved in DNA repair. Conclusion This study is the first to comprehensively characterize the germline and somatic mutational profile of all protein-coding genes patients with congenital ALL. These findings identify potentially important therapeutic targets, as well as insight into possible cancer predisposition genes.

  7. Deregulated WNT signaling in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    WNT signaling has been implicated in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cells and plays an important role during T-cell development in thymus. Here we investigated WNT pathway activation in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients. To evaluate the potential role of WNT signaling in T-cell leukomogenesis, we performed expression analysis of key components of WNT pathway. More than 85% of the childhood T-ALL patients showed upregulated β-catenin expression at the protein level compared with normal human thymocytes. The impact of this upregulation was reflected in high expression of known target genes (AXIN2, c-MYC, TCF1 and LEF). Especially AXIN2, the universal target gene of WNT pathway, was upregulated at both mRNA and protein levels in ∼40% of the patients. When β-CATENIN gene was silenced by small interfering RNA, the cancer cells showed higher rates of apoptosis. These results demonstrate that abnormal WNT signaling activation occurs in a significant fraction of human T-ALL cases independent of known T-ALL risk factors. We conclude that deregulated WNT signaling is a novel oncogenic event in childhood T-ALL

  8. RALLE pilot: response-guided therapy for marrow relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children.

    Saarinen-Pihkala, Ulla M; Parto, Katriina; Riikonen, Pekka; Lähteenmäki, Päivi M; Békàssy, Albert N; Glomstein, Anders; Möttönen, Merja

    2012-05-01

    Despite improved treatment results of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 20% to 30% have a relapse, and then the outcome is very poor. We studied 40 children with ALL marrow relapse piloting an ALL relapse protocol with well-known drugs and drug combinations by using a concept of response-guided design. We also measured response in logarithmic fashion. Our primary end points were achievement of M1 marrow status, minimal residual disease status below 10, and second remission. The remission induction rate was 90% with 10% induction mortality. After the A blocks (dexamethasone, vincristine, idarubicin and pegylated L-asparaginase), 85% had M1 status, 39% had minimal residual disease ≤1×10, and 66% had 2 to 3 log response. After B1 block (cyclo, VP-16) the figures were 92%, 58%, and 83%, respectively. Twenty-five of 40 patients received allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Three-year event-free survival of the whole cohort was 37%, and the relapse rate was 38%. Three-year event-free survival by risk group was 53% for late, 34% for early, and 21% for very early relapses. An ALL marrow relapse nonresponsive to steroids, vincristine, asparaginase, anthracyclines, and alkylating agents is uncommon, and these classic drugs can still be advocated for induction of ALL relapse. The problems lie in creating a consolidation capable of preventing particularly posttransplant relapses. PMID:22246158

  9. Current Strategies for the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Rocha, Juliana Maria Camargos; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; de Lima Souza, Marcelo Eduardo; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy; Murao, Mitiko; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Current treatment strategies for childhood ALL result in long-term remission for approximately 90% of patients. However, the therapeutic response is worse among those who relapse. Several risk stratification approaches based on clinical and biological aspects have been proposed to intensify treatment in patients with high risk of relapse and reduce toxicity on those with a greater probability of cure. The detection of residual leukemic cells (minimal residual disease, MRD) is the most important prognostic factor to identify high-risk patients, allowing redefinition of chemotherapy. In the last decades, several standardized research protocols evaluated MRD using immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and/or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction at different time points during treatment. Both methods are highly sensitive (10−3 a 10−5), but expensive, complex, and, because of that, require qualified staff and frequently are restricted to reference centers. The aim of this article was to review technical aspects of immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate MRD in ALL. PMID:27158437

  10. MicroRNA-205 downregulates mixed-lineage-AF4 oncogene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Dou L

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Liping Dou,1,* Jingxin Li,1,* Dehua Zheng,2,* Yonghui Li,1 Xiaoning Gao,1 Chengwang Xu,1 Li Gao,1 Lili Wang,1 Li Yu1 1Department of Hematology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Organ Transplant Center, Chinese PLA 309th Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Myeloid/lymphoid or mixed-lineage AF4 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (MLL-AF4 ALL is a pediatric leukemia that occurs rarely in adults. MLL-AF4 ALL is typically characterized by the presence of chromosomal translocation (t(4;11(q21;q23, leading to expression of MLL-AF4 fusion protein. Although MLL-AF4 fusion protein triggers a molecular pathogenesis and hematological presentations that are unique to leukemias, the precise role of this oncogene in leukemogenesis remains unclear. Previous studies have indicated that microRNAs (miRs might modulate the expression of MLL-AF4 ALL fusion protein, thereby suggesting the involvement of miR in progression or suppression of MLL-AF4 ALL. We have previously demonstrated that miR-205 negatively regulates transcription of an MLL-AF4 luciferase reporter. Here, we report that exogenous expression of miR-205 in MLL-AF4 human cell lines (RS4;11 and MV4-11 inversely regulates the expression of MLL-AF4 at both messenger RNA (mRNA and protein level. Furthermore, miR-205 significantly induced apoptosis in MLL-AF4 cells as evidenced by Annexin V staining using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS analysis. The proliferative capacity of leukemic cells was suppressed by miR-205. The addition of an miR-205 inhibitor was able to restore the observed effects. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that miR-205 may have potential value as a novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of MLL-AF4 ALL.Keywords: miR-205, MLL-AF4, leukemia, microRNA, oncogene expression, untranslated regions, proliferation

  11. A possible role for WNT5A hypermethylation in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Özden Hatırnaz Ng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: WNT5A is one of the most studied noncanonical WNT ligands and is shown to be deregulated in different tumor types. Our aim was to clarify whether hypermethylation might be the cause of low WNT5A mRNA levels and whether we could restore this downregulation by reversing the event. METHODS: The expression of WNT5A mRNA was studied in a large acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patient group (n=86 by quantitative real-time PCR. The methylation status was detected by methylation-specific PCR (MSPCR and bisulphate sequencing. In order to determine whether methylation has a direct effect on WNT5A expression, disease-representative cell lines were treated by 5’-aza-20-deoxycytidine. RESULTS: Here we designed a validation experiment of the WNT5A gene, which was previously examined and found to be differentially expressed by microarray study in 31 T-cell ALL patients. The expression levels were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR and the expression levels were significantly lower in T-cell ALL patients than in control thymic subsets (p=0.007. MSPCR revealed that 86% of the patients were hypermethylated in the WNT5A promoter region. Jurkat and RPMI cell lines were treated with 5’-aza-20-deoxycytidine and WNT5A mRNA expression was restored after treatment. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: According to our results, WNT5A hypermethylation does occur in ALL patients and it has a direct effect on mRNA expression. Our findings show that epigenetic changes of WNT signaling can play a role in ALL pathogenesis and reversing methylation might be useful as a possible treatment of leukemia.

  12. Serum Soluble Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Level in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Children

    Impaired migration of leucocytes is a characteristic feature of leukemia. Knowledge of the mechanisms of leukemic cells migration has expanded greatly in recent years. Leukocyte infiltrates are formed in surrounding tissues due to changes in chemokines and adhesion molecules concentrations. The present study included 45 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The mean of their ages was 6.10±4.39 years. They were 29 males and 16 females. They were chosen from those attending the Oncology Clinic and inpatient wards of the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. They were classified into 3 groups according to the disease activity: Group I: Comprised 15 newly diagnosed cases of ALL. Group II: Consisted of 15 cases of ALL during relapse period. Group III included 15 cases of ALL during complete remission. Also, 15 apparently healthy children with matched age and sex as a control group (group IV). All the studied cases were subjected to thorough clinical examination as well as the following investigations: complete blood picture, bone marrow biopsy and estimation of serum intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) by ELISA.The results of this study revealed that serum ICAM-l showed no significant changes in its value on comparing group I (newly diagnosed cases) and group II (cases during relapse). On the other hand, a significant higher level of sICAM-1 was observed on comparing groups I and II with group III (cases during remission) separately (P0.05).From this it was concluded that the levels of serum soluble intercellular circulating adhesion molecule ICAM-1 can be utilized for monitoring disease activity of ALL and its response to treatment, as well as for early detection of relapse.

  13. Retrospective review of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A single center experience

    Khalid Safoorah

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We reviewed the clinical details and treatment outcome of children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL to determine the significance of already established prognostic factors in our patients. Setting: A tertiary care hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Study Design: This is a retrospective study. Materials and Methods: Children diagnosed with ALL were evaluated over a period of 17 years (January 1, 1989 to December 31, 2006. Data was collected by reviewing the medical records of the patients and the prognostic factors analyzed by us include age, gender, white blood cell count, central nervous system and mediastinal involvement at presentation, morphology and immunophenotype of the blast cells, and response to induction therapy. Results: There were 46 patients diagnosed during the study period and on regular follow-up. Forty five (97.8% of these were in complete remission after 28 days of induction therapy. Thirty patients (65.2% were alive and doing well at the time of study. Of these 30 patients, 26 (86.6% remained relapse free while only four (13.3% had relapsed. The remaining 16 patients (34.7% did not survive including 11 (68.7% who had a relapse. Only significant variables in terms of prognosis were age and ALL phenotype with a P value 0.04 and 0.03 respectively. Conclusion: We found that ALL is a frequent childhood hematological malignancy in our setting and is more prevalent in males and children less than ten years of age. Age and leukemia phenotype emerged as the important prognostic factors in pediatric ALL in our patients.

  14. Immunocompetent cell functions in Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients on prolonged Imatinib maintenance treatment.

    Maggio, Roberta; Peragine, Nadia; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Vitale, Antonella; Elia, Loredana; Calabrese, Elisabetta; Della Starza, Irene; Intoppa, Stefania; Milani, Maria Laura; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin

    2011-04-01

    Imatinib mesylate (Imatinib) is a potent inhibitor of defined tyrosine kinases and is effectively used for the treatment of malignancies characterized by the constitutive activation of these tyrosine kinases, such as Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) leukemias and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Suppressive as well as stimulating effects of this drug on T lymphocytes or dendritic cells (DC), which play a major role in immune tumor surveillance, have been reported. For this reason, we questioned whether Imatinib could also affect the phenotypic and functional properties of these subpopulations in Ph(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients on prolonged Imatinib maintenance treatment. Circulating T lymphocytes and NK cells from Imatinib-treated Ph(+) ALL patients showed a subset distribution comparable to that of healthy donors. In addition, T-cell immunomodulant cytokine production (IFN-γ, TNF-α) and proliferative responses were not impaired. A normal monocyte-derived DC differentiation and apoptotic body loading capacity was also observed in the majority of Imatinib-treated patients. In contrast, an impairment in the DC intracellular production of IL-12 was recorded, although this was not observed when normal DC were exposed in vitro to Imatinib. Finally, in vivo Imatinib treatment did not affect the T-lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ production induced by leukemic apoptotic body-loaded DC, underling the potential capability of these cells to generate a specific immune response against tumoral antigens. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that immunotherapeutic approaches aimed at controlling residual disease in Ph(+) ALL patients in hematologic remission are not jeopardized by the long-term administration of Imatinib. PMID:21240485

  15. Current Concepts in Pediatric Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (Ph+ ALL

    KathrinM.Bernt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The t(9;22(q34;q11 or Philadelphia chromosome that creates a BCR-ABL1 fusion gene encoding for a chimeric BCR-ABL1 protein is present in 3-4% of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL, and about 25% of adult ALL cases. Prior to the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI, Ph+ ALL was associated with a very poor prognosis despite use of intensive chemotherapy and frequently hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT in first remission. The development of TKIs revolutionized the therapy of Ph+ ALL. Addition of the first generation ABL1 class TKI imatinib to intensive chemotherapy dramatically increased survival for children with Ph+ ALL and established that many patients can be cured without HSCT. In parallel, the mechanistic understanding of Ph+ ALL expanded exponentially through careful mapping of pathways downstream of BCR-ABL1, the discovery of mutations in master regulators of B-cell development such as IKZF1 (Ikaros, PAX5 and EBF, the recognition of the complex clonal architecture of Ph+ ALL, and the delineation of genomic, epigenetic and signaling abnormalities contributing to relapse and resistance. Still, many important basic and clinical questions remain unanswered. Current clinical trials are testing second generation TKIs in patients with newly diagnosed Ph+ ALL. Neither the optimal duration of therapy nor the optimal chemotherapy backbone are currently defined. The role of HSCT in first remission and post-transplant TKI therapy also require further study. In addition, it will be crucial to continue to dig deeper into understanding Ph+ ALL at a mechanistic level, and translate findings into complementary targeted approaches. Expanding targeted therapies holds great promise to decrease toxicity and improve survival in this high risk disease, which provides a paradigm for how targeted therapies can be incorporated into treatment of other high risk leukemias.

  16. Efficacy of Low Dose Clofarabine in Refractory Precursor T- Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Choi, Jaehyuk; Foss, Francine

    2007-01-01

    Refractory T-lymphoblastic leukemia in adults has a poor prognosis in patients who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, and relatively few new agents have demonstrated activity. Clofarabine is a novel nucleoside analog that has been associated with significant clinical activity in relapsed pediatric B-ALL. We used low dose clofarabine and induced a remission in a patient who relapsed in the skin and marrow after allogeneic transplant and was refractory to nelarabine and report ...

  17. Inhibitory Effects of Omacetaxine on Leukemic Stem Cells and BCR-ABL-Induced Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Mice

    Chen, Yaoyu; Hu, Yiguo; Michaels, Shawnya; Segal, David; Brown, Dennis; Li, Shaoguang

    2009-01-01

    Omacetaxine mepesuccinate (formerly homoharringtonine) is a molecule with a mechanism of action that is different from tyrosine kinase inhibitors and its activity in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) seems to be independent of BCR-ABL mutation status. Using BCR-ABL-expressing myelogenous and lymphoid cell lines and mouse models of CML and B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) induced by wild type BCR-ABL or T315I mutant-BCR-ABL, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of omacetaxine on CML and...

  18. Dicer Gene Expression as a Prognostic Factor in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in Fars Province

    Farzaneh, Mohamad Reza; Shahryari, Jahanbanoo; Safaei, Akbar; Valibeigi, Behnaz; Davani, Shahrbanou Karimi; Tabibi, Narjes

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Dicer is one of the main regulators of miRNA biogenesis, and deregulation of its expression has been indicated as a possible cause of miRNA alterations observed in various cancers. Our aim was to analyze the expression of the Dicer protein and its relationship with ALL and CLL. This cross-sectional study was performed from 2010 to 2012 in Shahid Faghihi Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. In this study, 30 patients with CLL, 21 patients with ALL, 10 child healthy donors, and 19 adult healthy donors were recruited. The patients’ samples were checked via flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and immunocytochemistry. The controls’ samples were also examined in the hematology ward. Total RNA was extracted from the bone marrow and peripheral blood samples of the patients and controls. Then, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to estimate the level of Dicer miRNA. The outcomes of the expression analysis of Dicer revealed statistically significant differences between the ALL patients/child healthy controls (mean±SD, 0.19±0.28 vs. 0.73±0.12; P<0.001) and the CLL patients/adult healthy controls (mean±SD, 0.24±0.25 vs. 0.41±0.28; P=0.033). This is the first piece of evidence showing that the expression of the Dicer gene greatly decreased in the patients with ALL in comparison to the child controls. The expression of the Dicer gene was also downregulated in the patients with CLL compared to the adult controls. Given the above findings, the expression of Dicer may play an important role in the progression and prognosis of these diseases.

  19. A fatal case of acute pulmonary embolism caused by right ventricular masses of acute lymphoblastic lymphoma-leukemia in a 13 year old girl

    Yu Mi Ko Ko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 13-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic lymphoma- leukemia, who presented with a cardiac metastasis in the right ventricle, resulting in a pulmonary embolism. At the time of her leukemia diagnosis, a cardiac mass was incidentally found. The differential diagnosis for this unusual cardiac mass included cardiac tumor, metastasis, vegetation, and thrombus. Empirical treatment was initiated, including anticoagulation and antibiotics. She underwent plasmapheresis and was administered oral prednisolone for her leukemia. Five days later, she experienced sudden hemodynamic collapse and required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation insertion and emergency surgery. These interventions proved futile, and the patient died. Pathology revealed that the cardiac mass comprised an aggregation of small, round, necrotic cells consistent with leukemia. This is the first known case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting as a right ventricular mass, with consequent fatal acute pulmonary embolism. A cardiac mass in a child with acute leukemia merits investigation to rule out every possible etiology, including vegetation, thrombus, and even a mass of leukemic cells, which could result in the fatal complication of pulmonary embolism.

  20. The metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Isfahan, Iran

    Nahid Reisi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood leukemia in Isfahan, Iran.
    • METHODS: During a 4-year period (2003 to 2007, 55 children (33 male and 22 female diagnosed with ALL at Unit of Hematology/ Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Isfahan University of Medical Science, were enrolled in this crosssectional study. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the modified version of Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III criteria. Insulin resistance was defined based on the homeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-IR.
    • RESULTS: The mean age of participates was 10.4 years (range 6-19 years and the mean interval since completion of chemotherapy was 35 months. Twenty percent (11/55 of survivors (10 male, 1 female met criteria for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Obesity was observed in one forth of patients and nearly 3/4 of obese patients had metabolic syndrome. High serum insulin levels were found in 16% of participants and in 63% of obese survivors. The mean insulin levels in survivors with metabolic syndrome was three-times more than those without (28.3 mu/l vs. 9.57 mu/l, p = 0.004. Insulin resistance was detected in 72.7% of survivors with metabolic syndrome and it was  ositively correlated with serum triglycerides (0.543, p < 0.001, systolic and diastolic BP (0.348, p = 0.01 and 0.368, p = 006 respectively, insulin levels (0.914, p < 0.001 and blood sugar (0.398, p = 003.
    • CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood leukemia in Iran is higher than developed countries. Nearly all of the obese patients had metabolic syndrome. Weight control and regular physical exercise are recommended to the survivors.
    • KEYWORDS: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, children.

  1. Inhibition of MerTK increases chemosensitivity and decreases oncogenic potential in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Brandao, L N; Winges, A; Christoph, S; Sather, S; Migdall-Wilson, J; Schlegel, J; McGranahan, A; Gao, D; Liang, X; Deryckere, D; Graham, D K

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric leukemia survival rates have improved dramatically over the past decades. However, current treatment protocols are still largely ineffective in cases of relapsed leukemia and are associated with a significant rate of chronic health conditions. Thus, there is a continued need for new therapeutic options. Here, we show that mer receptor tyrosine kinase (MerTK) was abnormally expressed in approximately one half of pediatric T-cell leukemia patient samples and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines. Stimulation of MerTK by the ligand Gas6 led to activation of the prosurvival proteins Erk 1/2 and Stat5, and MerTK-dependent activation of the STAT pathway in leukemia represents a novel finding. Furthermore, inhibition of MerTK expression increased the sensitivity of T-ALL cells to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and decreased the oncogenic potential of the Jurkat T-ALL cell line in a methylcellulose colony-forming assay. Lastly, inhibition of MerTK expression significantly increased median survival in a xenograft mouse model of leukemia (30.5 days vs 60 days, P<0.0001). These results suggest that inhibition of MerTK is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of leukemia and may allow for dose reduction of currently used chemotherapeutics resulting in decreased rates of therapy-associated toxicities. PMID:23353780

  2. Inhibition of MerTK increases chemosensitivity and decreases oncogenic potential in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Pediatric leukemia survival rates have improved dramatically over the past decades. However, current treatment protocols are still largely ineffective in cases of relapsed leukemia and are associated with a significant rate of chronic health conditions. Thus, there is a continued need for new therapeutic options. Here, we show that mer receptor tyrosine kinase (MerTK) was abnormally expressed in approximately one half of pediatric T-cell leukemia patient samples and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines. Stimulation of MerTK by the ligand Gas6 led to activation of the prosurvival proteins Erk 1/2 and Stat5, and MerTK-dependent activation of the STAT pathway in leukemia represents a novel finding. Furthermore, inhibition of MerTK expression increased the sensitivity of T-ALL cells to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and decreased the oncogenic potential of the Jurkat T-ALL cell line in a methylcellulose colony-forming assay. Lastly, inhibition of MerTK expression significantly increased median survival in a xenograft mouse model of leukemia (30.5 days vs 60 days, P<0.0001). These results suggest that inhibition of MerTK is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of leukemia and may allow for dose reduction of currently used chemotherapeutics resulting in decreased rates of therapy-associated toxicities

  3. Evaluation of Leptin and Resistin Levels in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This study was planned to estimate the serum concentration levels of leptin and resistin at diagnosis and after chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Assessment of the pro inflammatory adipocytokines; leptin and resistin were performed at diagnosis and after the entire period of therapy in 20 prepubertal children with ALL, aged 2.5 to 11 years (6.18 ± 2.56). Ten healthy children matched for age, sex, and body mass index served as controls for comparison with anthropometric and blood chemistry parameters. Complete clinical and physical examination were performed for each patient together with, blood picture, lipid profile and body mass index SD score .At diagnosis the mean leptin and resistin levels were high, 20.01±7.01 ng/ml versus 11.15±1.87 ng/ml in controls, (P<0.001) and 5.11±2.09 ng/ml versus 3.09±0.99 ng/ml in controls, (P<0.001) respectively. Whereas, mean levels of leptin and resistin were stabilized after chemotherapy at significantly lower levels (10.5±2.28 ng/ml and 3.26±1.36 ng/ml) respectively. Furthermore, Levels of leptin and resistin were correlated with body mass index SD score at diagnosis and at the end of the maintenance therapy. In addition, serum triglycerides and LDH of ALL patients at diagnosis were higher than those of the controls (P<0.001). Whereas, serum HDL-C of ALL patients was lower than that of the controls at the same point (P<0.001). No such statistical significant difference was detected at the end of maintenance therapy. From this, it can be speculated that acute leukemia-related inflammation and serum hyperlipidaemia may increase leptin and resistin. This increase in levels of leptin and resistin at diagnosis of ALL was progressively restored after therapy. This may represent a new novel non invasive bio marker indicating the responsiveness to chemotherapy in children with ALL.

  4. Antigen Expression on Blast Cells and Hematological Parameters at Presentation in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients

    Objective: To analyze the expression of various antigens on the leukemic blasts and to determine the hematological parameters, in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) patients at presentation. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: King Edward Medical University, Lahore and Hameed Latif Hospital, Lahore, from February 2013 to March 2014. Methodology: A total of 50 newly diagnosed and untreated patients of ALL were selected from Mayo Hospital and Hameed Latif Hospital. These patients included both genders and all age groups. Hemoglobin, total leukocyte count and platelet count were determined on hematology analyser-Sysmex-Kx-2I. Blast cell percentage was estimated on Giemsa stained blood smears. Immuno phenotyping was done on bone marrow samples by 5 colour flow cytometery on Beckman Counter Navious Flow cytometer. An acute leukemia panel of 23 antibodies was used. The data was entered and analyzed in SPSS version 22. Results: Of the 50 ALL patients, 36 (72 percentage) were B-ALL and 14 (28 percentage) T-ALL. There were 18 (36 percentage) children and 32 (64 percentage) adults. T-ALL included 22 percentage of the childhood and 31 percentage of the adult cases. Immuno phenotypic analysis showed that CD19, CD79a and CD20 were B-lineage specific markers whereas cCD3, CD3 and CD5 were T-lineage specific. CD10 was the most sensitive marker for B-ALL and CD7 was the most sensitive marker of T-ALL. TdT was expressed in 92 percentage B-ALL and 71 percentage T-ALL cases, CD34 in 58 percentage and 43 percentage cases and CD45 in 83 percentage and 100 percentage respectively. High leukocyte count (> 50 x 109/L) was present in 58 percentage cases. Hemoglobin was < 10 g/dl in 74 percentage patients and platelet count was below 20 x 109/Lin 12 percentage patients. Leukocyte count, hemoglobin, platelet count and blast cell percentage did not show a significant difference in the two ALL immuno types. Conclusion: The frequency of T-ALL is higher in childhood

  5. PROGNOSTIC IMPACT OF WT-1 GENE EXPRESSION IN EGYPTIAN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Adel Abd Elhaleim Hagag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common childhood cancer representing 23% of pediatric cancers. Wilms' tumor -1 gene has is a novel prognostic factor, minimal residual disease marker and therapeutic target in acute leukemia. Aim of the work: The aim of this work was to study the impact of WT-1 gene expression in prognosis of Egyptian children with ALL. Patients and methods: This study was conducted on 40 children with newly diagnosed ALL who were subjected to full history taking, thorough clinical examination and laboratory investigations including; complete blood count, LDH, BM aspiration, cytochemistry, immunophenotyping, assessment of WT-1 Gene by real time PCR in BM samples at time of diagnosis. Results: Positive WT-1 gene expression was found in 22 cases (55% and negative expression in 18 cases (45%. Positive WT-1 gene expression group (n=22 includes 14 males and 8 females with mean age at presentation of 5.261 ± 0.811 while negative WT-1 gene expression group (n=18 includes 12 males and 6 females with mean age at diagnosis of 9.669 ± 3.731 with significantly older age in negative WT-1 gene expression group but no significant differences between positive and negative WT-1 gene expression groups regarding sex and clinical presentations. There were no significant differences in platelets and WBCs counts, hemoglobin and LDH levels and number of peripheral blood and BM blast cells at diagnosis between positive and negative WT-1 gene expression groups but after induction therapy there were significantly lower BM blast cells in positive WT-1 gene expression group. There were no statistically significant differences between positive and negative WT-1 gene expression groups regarding immunophenotyping. There were significantly higher relapse and death rates and lower rates of CR, DFS and OAS in negativeWT-1 gene expression group.MRD at end of induction therapy was found in 14 cases out of 40 patients. There was

  6. Intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 (iAMP21 detected by ETV6/RUNX1 FISH screening in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    Daniela Ribeiro Ney Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome abnormalities that usually define high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia are the t(9;22/ breakpoint cluster region protein-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1, hypodiploid with < 44 chromosomes and 11q23/ myeloid/lymphoid leukemia gene rearrangements. The spectrum of acute lymphoblastic leukemia genetic abnormalities is nevertheless rapidly expanding. Therefore, newly described chromosomal aberrations are likely to have an impact on clinical care in the near future. Recently, the rare intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 started to be considered a high-risk chromosomal abnormality. It occurs in approximately 2-5% of pediatric patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This abnormality is associated with a poor outcome. Hence, an accurate detection of this abnormality is expected to become very important in the choice of appropriate therapy. In this work the clinical and molecular cytogenetic evaluation by fluorescence in situ hybridization of a child with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting the rare intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 is described.

  7. Osteonecrosis in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a magnetic resonance imaging study after treatment

    Ojala, A.; Lanning, F.; Paakko, E.; Lanning, B. [Oulu Univ. (Finland)

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out the prevalence of osteonecrosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in complete bone marrow remission at the end of the treatment. Finally, the study suggests that the intensification phase of the treatment protocols with intensive dexamethasone medication might be responsible for the development of osteonecrosis. (N.C.)

  8. Osteonecrosis in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a magnetic resonance imaging study after treatment

    The purpose of this study was to find out the prevalence of osteonecrosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in complete bone marrow remission at the end of the treatment. Finally, the study suggests that the intensification phase of the treatment protocols with intensive dexamethasone medication might be responsible for the development of osteonecrosis. (N.C.)

  9. PTEN microdeletions in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia are caused by illegitimate RAG-mediated recombination events.

    Mendes, Rui D; Sarmento, Leonor M; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Zuurbier, Linda; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica G C A M; Póvoa, Vanda; Smits, Willem K; Abecasis, Miguel; Yunes, J Andres; Sonneveld, Edwin; Horstmann, Martin A; Pieters, Rob; Barata, João T; Meijerink, Jules P P

    2014-07-24

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-inactivating mutations and/or deletions are an independent risk factor for relapse of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients treated on Dutch Childhood Oncology Group or German Cooperative Study Group for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia protocols. Some monoallelic mutated or PTEN wild-type patients lack PTEN protein, implying that additional PTEN inactivation mechanisms exist. We show that PTEN is inactivated by small deletions affecting a few exons in 8% of pediatric T-ALL patients. These microdeletions were clonal in 3% and subclonal in 5% of patients. Conserved deletion breakpoints are flanked by cryptic recombination signal sequences (cRSSs) and frequently have non-template-derived nucleotides inserted in between breakpoints, pointing to an illegitimate RAG recombination-driven activity. Identified cRSSs drive RAG-dependent recombination in a reporter system as efficiently as bona fide RSSs that flank gene segments of the T-cell receptor locus. Remarkably, equivalent microdeletions were detected in thymocytes of healthy individuals. Microdeletions strongly associate with the TALLMO subtype characterized by TAL1 or LMO2 rearrangements. Primary and secondary xenotransplantation of TAL1-rearranged leukemia allowed development of leukemic subclones with newly acquired PTEN microdeletions. Ongoing RAG activity may therefore actively contribute to the acquisition of preleukemic hits, clonal diversification, and disease progression. PMID:24904117

  10. Profile of blinatumomab and its potential in the treatment of relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Ribera JM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Josep-Maria Ribera, Albert Ferrer, Jordi Ribera, Eulàlia GenescàClinical Hematology Department, ICO-Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Josep Carreras Research Institute, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Badalona, SpainAbstract: The CD19 marker is expressed on the surface of normal and malignant immature or mature B-cells. On the other hand, immunotherapy involving T-cells is a promising modality of treatment for many neoplastic diseases including leukemias and lymphomas. The CD19/CD3-bispecific T-cell-engaging (BiTE® monoclonal antibody blinatumomab can transiently engage cytotoxic T-cells to CD19+ target B-cells inducing serial perforin-mediated lysis. In the first clinical trial, blinatumomab showed efficacy in non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas, but the most important trials have been conducted in relapsed/refractory (R/R acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and in ALL with minimal residual disease. Encouraging reports on the activity of blinatumomab in R/R Philadelphia chromosome-negative B-cell precursor ALL led to its approval by the US Food and Drug Administration on December 3, 2014 after an accelerated review process. This review focuses on the profile of blinatumomab and its activity in R/R ALL.Keywords: acute lymphoblastic leukemia, relapsed/refractory, BiTE® monoclonal antibodies, blinatumomab

  11. Karyotype in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Impact On Clinical Presentation and Duration of First Remission

    In this study we are aiming at investigating the correlation between karyotype and the clinico pathologic features of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia, duration of first remission and outcome of patients. Material and Methods: A total of 40 pediatric patients with the diagnosis of acute ]lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were included in this study. The patients were treated according to ALL P.NCI III/98 protocol used at the Pediatric Oncology Unit, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. Analyzing the patients with respect to their chromosomal pattern; the majority of patients (17/40, 42.5%) showed a pseudo diploid karyotype. Their mean age was 10.2±4.8 years, M/F ratio 2.4: I. Massive hepatosplenomegaly (HSM) was encountered in 64.7%. The mean total leucocyte count (TLC) was 66.53±5.2 cells per μl. Their mean first complete remission (CR]) was 11.05±2.3 months, EFS was 40% at 12 months and 17.78% at 24 months. Patients with normal karyotype came next, representing ]3/40 (32.5%). Their mean age was 8.4±1.8 years, M/F 0.8: I. Massive HSM was found in 62.5%. The mean TLC was 78.74±3.8 cells per μl. Their mean CR 1 was I I.62±1.2 months, EFS was 41.67% at 12 months and 33.33% at 24 months. The third group represented patients with hyper diploidy (8/40; 20%). Their mean age was 8. 8±3. I years, M/F 7: I. Massive HSM was found in 50%. The mean TLC was 45.16±3.1 cells per μl], their mean CR I was 18.] 0±3.4 months, EFS was 75% at 12 months and 62.5% at 24 months. The least group showed a hypo diploid pattern (5/40; 12.5%). Their mean age was] 3±2.6 years, all were males. Massive HSM was encountered in 100%. The mean TLC was 20.00±2.9 cells per Ill. Their mean CRI was 10±2.8 months. Egyptian patients with childhood ALL who have hyper diploid karyotype, specially those having >50 chromosomes carry a better prognosis than patients with other chromosomal abnormalities. Pseudo diploid karyotype is the most frequent among Egyptian ALL cases and this could

  12. The JAK2V617F activating mutation occurs in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, but not in acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Levine, Ross L; Loriaux, Marc; Huntly, Brian J.P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Beran, Miroslav; Stoffregen, Eric; Berger, Roland; Clark, Jennifer J; Willis, Stephanie G; Kim T. Nguyen; Flores, Nikki J.; Estey, Elihu; Gattermann, Norbert; Armstrong, Scott; Look, A. Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Activating mutations in tyrosine kinases have been identified in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic malignancies. Recently, we and others identified a single recurrent somatic activating mutation (JAK2V617F) in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) tyrosine kinase in the myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myeloid metaplasia with myelofibrosis. We used direct sequence analysis to determine if the JAK2V617F mutation was present in acute myeloid leukemia (A...

  13. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of acute leukemia (myeloid and lymphoblastic).

    Ishii, Kazusa; Barrett, Austin J

    2016-02-01

    There have been major advances in our understanding of the multiple interactions between malignant cells and the innate and adaptive immune system. While the attention of immunologists has hitherto focused on solid tumors, the specific immunobiology of acute leukemias is now becoming defined. These discoveries have pointed the way to immune interventions building on the established graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect from hematopoietic stem-cell transplant (HSCT) and extending immunotherapy beyond HSCT to individuals with acute leukemia with a diversity of immune manipulations early in the course of the leukemia. At present, clinical results are in their infancy. In the coming years larger studies will better define the place of immunotherapy in the management of acute leukemias and lead to treatment approaches that combine conventional chemotherapy, immunotherapy and HSCT to achieve durable cures. PMID:26834952

  14. Comparison between qualitative and real-time polymerase chain reaction to evaluate minimal residual disease in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Francisco Danilo Ferreira Paula

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Minimal residual disease is an important independent prognostic factor that can identify poor responders among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze minimal residual disease using immunoglobulin (Ig and T-cell receptor (TCR gene rearrangements by conventional polymerase chain reaction followed by homo-heteroduplex analysis and to compare this with real-time polymerase chain reaction at the end of the induction period in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Seventy-four patients diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled. Minimal residual disease was evaluated by qualitative polymerase chain reaction in 57 and by both tests in 44. The Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox methods and the log-rank test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Nine patients (15.8% were positive for minimal residual disease by qualitative polymerase chain reaction and 11 (25% by real-time polymerase chain reaction considering a cut-off point of 1 × 10−3 for precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 1 × 10−2 for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Using the qualitative method, the 3.5-year leukemia- free survival was significantly higher in children negative for minimal residual disease compared to those with positive results (84.1% ± 5.6% versus 41.7% ± 17.3%, respectively; p-value = 0.004. There was no significant association between leukemia-free survival and minimal residual disease by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Minimal residual disease by qualitative polymerase chain reaction was the only variable significantly correlated to leukemia-free survival. Conclusion: Given the difficulties in the implementation of minimal residual disease monitoring by real-time polymerase chain reaction in most treatment centers in Brazil, the qualitative polymerase chain reaction strategy may be a cost-effective alternative.

  15. Atypical Structural Connectome Organization and Cognitive Impairment in Young Survivors of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Kesler, Shelli R; Gugel, Meike; Huston-Warren, Emily; Watson, Christa

    2016-05-01

    Survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk for cognitive impairments that disrupt everyday functioning and decrease quality of life. The specific biological mechanisms underlying cognitive impairment following ALL remain largely unclear, but previous studies consistently demonstrate significant white matter pathology. We aimed to extend this literature by examining the organization of the white matter connectome in young patients with a history of ALL treated with chemotherapy only. We applied graph theoretical analysis to diffusion tensor imaging obtained from 31 survivors of ALL age 5-19 years and 39 matched healthy controls. Results indicated significantly lower small-worldness (p = 0.007) and network clustering coefficient (p = 0.019), as well as greater cognitive impairment (p = 0.027) in the ALL group. Regional analysis indicated that clustered connectivity in parietal, frontal, hippocampal, amygdalar, thalamic, and occipital regions was altered in the ALL group. Random forest analysis revealed a model of connectome and demographic variables that could automatically classify survivors of ALL as having cognitive impairment or not (accuracy = 0.89, p < 0.0001). These findings provide further evidence of brain injury in young survivors of ALL, even those without a history of central nervous system (CNS) disease or cranial radiation. Efficiency of local information processing, reorganization of hub connectivity, and cognitive reserve may contribute to cognitive outcome in these children. Certain connectome properties showed U-shaped relationships with cognitive impairment suggesting an optimal range of regional connectivity. PMID:26850738

  16. Different molecular mechanisms causing 9p21 deletions in acute lymphoblastic leukemia of childhood.

    Novara, Francesca; Beri, Silvana; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Malovini, Alberto; Ciccone, Roberto; Cometa, Angela Maria; Locatelli, Franco; Giorda, Roberto; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2009-10-01

    Deletion of chromosome 9p21 is a crucial event for the development of several cancers including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Double strand breaks (DSBs) triggering 9p21 deletions in ALL have been reported to occur at a few defined sites by illegitimate action of the V(D)J recombination activating protein complex. We have cloned 23 breakpoint junctions for a total of 46 breakpoints in 17 childhood ALL (9 B- and 8 T-lineages) showing different size deletions at one or both homologous chromosomes 9 to investigate which particular sequences make the region susceptible to interstitial deletion. We found that half of 9p21 deletion breakpoints were mediated by ectopic V(D)J recombination mechanisms whereas the remaining half were associated to repeated sequences, including some with potential for non-B DNA structure formation. Other mechanisms, such as microhomology-mediated repair, that are common in other cancers, play only a very minor role in ALL. Nucleotide insertions at breakpoint junctions and microinversions flanking the breakpoints have been detected at 20/23 and 2/23 breakpoint junctions, respectively, both in the presence of recombination signal sequence (RSS)-like sequences and of other unspecific sequences. The majority of breakpoints were unique except for two cases, both T-ALL, showing identical deletions. Four of the 46 breakpoints coincide with those reported in other cases, thus confirming the presence of recurrent deletion hotspots. Among the six cases with heterozygous 9p deletions, we found that the remaining CDKN2A and CDKN2B alleles were hypermethylated at CpG islands. PMID:19484265

  17. Regulation of cancer stem cell properties by CD9 in human B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Highlights: → We performed more detailed analysis of CD9 function for CSC properties in B-ALL. → Leukemogenic fusion/Src family proteins were markedly regulated in the CD9+ cells. → Proliferation of B-ALL cells was inhibited by anti-CD9 monoclonal antibody. → Knockdown of CD9 by RNAi remarkably reduced the leukemogenic potential. → CD9-knockdown affected the expression and phosphorylation of Src family and USP22. -- Abstract: Although the prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved considerably in recent years, some of the cases still exhibit therapy-resistant. We have previously reported that CD9 was expressed heterogeneously in B-ALL cell lines and CD9+ cells exhibited an asymmetric cell division with greater tumorigenic potential than CD9- cells. CD9+ cells were also serially transplantable in immunodeficient mice, indicating that CD9+ cell possess self-renewal capacity. In the current study, we performed more detailed analysis of CD9 function for the cancer stem cell (CSC) properties. In patient sample, CD9 was expressed in the most cases of B-ALL cells with significant correlation of CD34-expression. Gene expression analysis revealed that leukemogenic fusion proteins and Src family proteins were significantly regulated in the CD9+ population. Moreover, CD9+ cells exhibited drug-resistance, but proliferation of bulk cells was inhibited by anti-CD9 monoclonal antibody. Knockdown of CD9 remarkably reduced the leukemogenic potential. Furthermore, gene ablation of CD9 affected the expression and tyrosine-phosphorylation of Src family proteins and reduced the expression of histone-deubiquitinase USP22. Taken together, our results suggest that CD9 links to several signaling pathways and epigenetic modification for regulating the CSC properties of B-ALL.

  18. The combination effects of bendamustine with antimetabolites against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Goto, Shoko; Goto, Hiroaki; Yokosuka, Tomoko

    2016-05-01

    Bendamustine combined with other drugs is clinically efficacious for some adult lymphoid malignancies, but to date there are no reports of the use of such combinatorial approaches in pediatric patients. We investigated the in vitro activity of bendamustine combined with other antimetabolite drugs on B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) cell lines established from pediatric patients with refractory or relapsed ALL. We also developed a mathematically drown improved isobologram method to assess the data objectively. Three BCP-ALL cell lines; YCUB-2, YCUB-5, and YCUB-6, were simultaneously exposed to various concentrations of bendamustine and cladribine, cytarabine, fludarabine, or clofarabine. Cell growth inhibition was determined using the WST-8 assay. Combinatorial effects were estimated using our improved isobologram method with IC80 (drug concentration corresponding to 80 % of maximum inhibition). Bendamustine alone inhibited ALL cell growth with mean IC80 values of 11.30-18.90 μg/ml. Combinations of bendamustine with other drugs produced the following effects: (1) cladribine; synergistic-to-additive on all cell lines; (2) cytarabine; synergistic-to-additive on YCUB-5 and YCUB-6, and synergistic-to-antagonistic on YCUB-2; (3) fludarabine; additive-to-antagonistic on YCUB-5, and synergistic-to-antagonistic on YCUB-2 and YCUB-6; (4) clofarabine; additive-to-antagonistic on all cell lines. Flow cytometric analysis also showed the combination effects of bendamustine and cladribine. Bendamustine/cladribine or bendamustine/cytarabine may thus represent a promising combination for salvage treatment in childhood ALL. PMID:26886449

  19. microRNAs regulate TAL1 expression in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Correia, Nádia C; Melão, Alice; Póvoa, Vanda; Sarmento, Leonor; Gómez de Cedrón, Marta; Malumbres, Marcos; Enguita, Francisco J; Barata, João T

    2016-02-16

    The transcription factor TAL1 is a proto-oncogene whose aberrant expression in committed T-cell precursors is associated with the development of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). The mechanisms leading to aberrant activation of TAL1 in T-ALL patients who lack chromosomal rearrangements involving the TAL1 locus remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that TAL1 levels decrease during normal T-cell development at least in part due to miRNA-dependent silencing, in which case TAL1 over-expression in some T-ALL cases could be the consequence of deregulated miRNA expression. By performing computational prediction of miRNAs that bind to the human TAL1 mRNA we compiled a list of miRNAs that are candidates to regulate TAL1. Using a luciferase reporter system and mutagenesis assays we confirmed the miRNA-TAL1 mRNA interactions and selected candidate miRNAs: miR-101, miR-520d-5p, miR-140-5p, miR-448 and miR-485-5p. Over-expression of these microRNAs in different T-ALL cell lines consistently resulted in the down-regulation of TAL1 protein. In accordance, inhibition of miR-101 and miR-520d-5p promoted TAL1 protein expression. Importantly, we found that miR-101, miR-140-5p, miR-448 and miR-485-5p were down-regulated in T-ALL patient specimens and T-ALL cell lines. Our results show for the first time the existence of epigenetic regulation of TAL1 by specific miRNAs which may contribute, at least in part, to the ectopic expression of TAL1 in some T-ALL cases. PMID:26882564

  20. Molecular Detection of BCR/ ABL Fusion Gene in Saudi Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients

    Background: Molecular cytogenetics is becoming one of the most useful tools targeting some genes which are generally considered to lead to leukemic transformation (as well as for numerical abnormalities). A fraction of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases carry the translocation t(9;22) (q34;ql1.2) which juxtaposes the ABL proto-oncogene to the BCR gene generating a chimeric gene, BCR/ABL. This aberration is more frequent in adult ALL (20%-40%) than in pediatric ALL >)5%), and predicts poor clinical outcome. Aim of our Work: Is to study BCR/ A BL fusion gene in ALL cases using fluorescent in situ hybridization. Patients and Methods: Twenty newly diagnosed ALL patients, 16 adult and 4 paediatric cases, were included in the study, 11 cases (55%) were of precursor B phenotype, S cases (40%) belonged to T lineage, while one case was bi phenotypic expressing mainly precursor B cell markers tether with CD13, CD33, CD117, Detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene was done using interphase FISH technique and was confirmed molecularly using the RT-PCR technique. Results: BCR/ ABL fusion gene was negative in all the examined cases, yet abnormality involving 9q34, ABL gene, either by addition or deletion was detected in three cases (15%). Two of these cases were associated with BCR gene extra copies (three and four copies, respectively). Conclusion: This may reflect the frequency of association of ABL gene and BCR gene abnormality in our cases, and that absence of fusion gene BCR/ABL does not exclude their role in the leukomogenic process, yet a larger study is required to confirm and detect the prevalence of these gene disturbances in ALL and their association

  1. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in very young children. Diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of 43 cases

    Between 1974 and 1982, 43 children less than 2 years of age were treated in the hematology department of Hospital Saint-Louis for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Of the patients who presented before 18 months of age, 80% had a WBC greater than 100,000 microliter and/or a great tumor bulk. As a result of our experience, treatment regimens have been changed here from conventional chemotherapy to a very intensive program with a heavy induction (vincristine, daunorubicin, cyclophosphamide, prednisone, and L-asparaginase) and monthly reinductions with the same drugs plus ArA-C, without maintenance. Prophylaxis included CNS irradiation (16-24 Gy) after 12 months of age, plus intrathecal methotrexate. Complete remission (CR) occurred in 78% before 18 months and in 100% between 18 and 24 months of age at diagnosis. In this report the probability of a prolonged CR (33% at 2 years) was the same before and after 12 months of age. However, younger patients were more intensively treated. The prognosis for children less than 1 year of age who received very intensive chemotherapy has greatly improved, with a significantly higher probability of long CR (p less than 0.02). Presently, 10 of 43 children are in CR 27 months to 8 years after diagnosis. Of 18 patients aged less than 1 year at diagnosis, four are in CR. No relapse occurred after 23 months. None of these patients presented with important sequellae, with the exception of one child who suffered from severe bacterial meningitis. An aggressive chemotherapy program is indicated in patients less than 2 years of age. The feasibility of this mode of treatment in young patients is possible only with the help of specific supportive care

  2. Cytogenetic Findings of Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Fars Province

    Akbar Safaei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the sixth most common malignancy in Iran. Cytogenetic analysis of leukemic blasts plays an important role in classification and prognosis in ALL patients. The purpose of this study was to define the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities of ALL patients in adults and children in Fars province, Iran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated karyotype results of bone marrow specimens in 168 Iranian patients with ALL (154 B-ALL and 14 T-ALL in Fars Province using the conventional cytogenetic G-banding method. Results: The frequency of cytogenetic abnormalities, including numerical and/or structural changes, was 61.7% and 53.8% in the B-ALL and T-ALL patients, respectively. Hyperdiploidy was the most common (32% cytogenetic abnormality. Among structural abnormalities, the most common was t(9;22 in 11% of the patients. The children showed a higher incidence of hyperdiploidy and lower incidence of t(9;22 than adults (P<0.05. We found a lower incidence of recurrent abnormalities such as 11q23, t(1;19, and t(12;21 than those reported in previous studies. Conclusion: Normal karyotype was more frequent in our study. The frequencies of some cytogenetic abnormalities such as hyperdiploidy and t(9;22 in our study were comparable to those reported in the literature. The results of this study in Fars Province can be used as baseline information for treatment decision and research purposes in ALL patients. We recommend the use of advanced molecular techniques in the future to better elucidate cryptic cytogenetic abnormalities.

  3. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with conditioning regimens containing melphalan in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    A multicenter comparative study was carried out to investigate the efficacy and safety of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with conditioning regimens containing melphalan in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. One hundred twenty three patients at a variety of remission stages were eligible for study participation. Eighty-nine were transplanted with allogeneic grafts and 34 patients with autologous grafts (23 cases with bone marrow and 11 cases with peripheral blood stem cells). Conditioning regimens used were as follows: melphalan and busulfan for 40 patients, melphalan, busulfan and TBI for 44 patients, other regimens for 39 patients. To accelerate engraftment G-CSF (lenograstim) was administered as a 1-hour or 24-hour drip infusion daily at 5 μg/kg from day 5 until hematological recovery. The five year disease free survival (DFS) was 63% for 42 patients at CR1, 41% for 41 patients at CR2 and 33% for 40 patients at other stages. There was no significant difference in the DFS between allogeneic-transplantation and autologous-transplantation in all disease stages. In patients at remission stage for CR1 and CR2, the 5-year DFS by conditioning regimen was 63% for regimen with melphalan and busulfan, 54% for regimen with melphalan, busulfan and TBI and 54% for regimens with melphalan and TBI. There was no significant difference in the DFS between the groups. Serious complications such as renal failure were observed in 11%, veno-occlusive disease in 9%, and interstitial pneumonia in 9%. The most dominating cause of death was relapse in the disease (48% of deaths) which was most commonly observed in autologous transplantation. Contrary to that, treatment related toxic death was the most frequent cause of deaths in allogeneic-transplantation. (author)

  4. Long-term sequelae after chemotherapy and radiotherapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Background: Effective forms of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in childhood now result in survival rates of more than 70%. With improving cure rates increasing interest has been focused on adverse late effects caused by chemotherapy and cranial irradiation. Methods: We investigated 40 survivors, 22 males and 18 females with an average age of 15.8 years (6.6 to 28.1), all treated at the Children's Hospital of Innsbruck, Austria, after a follow-up of 9.2 years (4.6 - 20) on average in continuous complete remission. Our evaluation included cardiac status, growth, endocrinological function and a wide variety of other clinical and laboratory investigations. To identify cardiac dysfunction due to anthracyclines we performed Dobutamine-Stress-Echocardiography (DSE) using a graded dosage regimen (1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 μg/kg/min). We compared the DSE data with those obtained from 17 age-matched control subjects. Results: Conventional echocardiography revealed only 4 patients (11.4%) with abnormalities of left ventricular contractility (measured as left ventricular shortening fraction). In contrast DSE detected a 3-fold higher percentage of patients with cardiac dysfunction. There was no correlation between total cumulative anthracycline dose, age at time of diagnosis and length of follow-up with incidence of abnormalities. Primary hypothyroidism in 4 patients (10%) and a permanent linear growth retardation in 5 patients (12%, all of which had been irradiated) were the only endocrinological problems detected. No survivor showed hemato-immunological disturbances. Remarkably, transfusion- associated sequelae, liver or kidney dysfunction were not found. Conclusion: The high incidence of late cardiac effects requires continued monitoring of patients after ALL treatment. In this respect, DSE revealed to be a sensitive method. (author)

  5. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with conditioning regimens containing melphalan in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Matsuyama, Takaharu; Kato, Koji [Nagoya First Red Cross Hospital (Japan). Children' s Medical Center; Hanada, Ryoji [Saitama Children' s Medical Center, Iwatsuki (Japan)] [and others

    2002-07-01

    A multicenter comparative study was carried out to investigate the efficacy and safety of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with conditioning regimens containing melphalan in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. One hundred twenty three patients at a variety of remission stages were eligible for study participation. Eighty-nine were transplanted with allogeneic grafts and 34 patients with autologous grafts (23 cases with bone marrow and 11 cases with peripheral blood stem cells). Conditioning regimens used were as follows: melphalan and busulfan for 40 patients, melphalan, busulfan and TBI for 44 patients, other regimens for 39 patients. To accelerate engraftment G-CSF (lenograstim) was administered as a 1-hour or 24-hour drip infusion daily at 5 {mu}g/kg from day 5 until hematological recovery. The five year disease free survival (DFS) was 63% for 42 patients at CR1, 41% for 41 patients at CR2 and 33% for 40 patients at other stages. There was no significant difference in the DFS between allogeneic-transplantation and autologous-transplantation in all disease stages. In patients at remission stage for CR1 and CR2, the 5-year DFS by conditioning regimen was 63% for regimen with melphalan and busulfan, 54% for regimen with melphalan, busulfan and TBI and 54% for regimens with melphalan and TBI. There was no significant difference in the DFS between the groups. Serious complications such as renal failure were observed in 11%, veno-occlusive disease in 9%, and interstitial pneumonia in 9%. The most dominating cause of death was relapse in the disease (48% of deaths) which was most commonly observed in autologous transplantation. Contrary to that, treatment related toxic death was the most frequent cause of deaths in allogeneic-transplantation. (author)

  6. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in very young children. Diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of 43 cases

    Leverger, G.; Bancillon, A.; Schaison, G.; Alby, N.; Boiron, M.

    Between 1974 and 1982, 43 children less than 2 years of age were treated in the hematology department of Hospital Saint-Louis for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Of the patients who presented before 18 months of age, 80% had a WBC greater than 100,000 microliter and/or a great tumor bulk. As a result of our experience, treatment regimens have been changed here from conventional chemotherapy to a very intensive program with a heavy induction (vincristine, daunorubicin, cyclophosphamide, prednisone, and L-asparaginase) and monthly reinductions with the same drugs plus ArA-C, without maintenance. Prophylaxis included CNS irradiation (16-24 Gy) after 12 months of age, plus intrathecal methotrexate. Complete remission (CR) occurred in 78% before 18 months and in 100% between 18 and 24 months of age at diagnosis. In this report the probability of a prolonged CR (33% at 2 years) was the same before and after 12 months of age. However, younger patients were more intensively treated. The prognosis for children less than 1 year of age who received very intensive chemotherapy has greatly improved, with a significantly higher probability of long CR (p less than 0.02). Presently, 10 of 43 children are in CR 27 months to 8 years after diagnosis. Of 18 patients aged less than 1 year at diagnosis, four are in CR. No relapse occurred after 23 months. None of these patients presented with important sequellae, with the exception of one child who suffered from severe bacterial meningitis. An aggressive chemotherapy program is indicated in patients less than 2 years of age. The feasibility of this mode of treatment in young patients is possible only with the help of specific supportive care.

  7. Effect of glucocorticoid therapy on adrenal function in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Gita Widyapuri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Glucocorticoids play an important role in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, but can cause side effects such as suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. Suppression of the HPA axis causes adrenal insufficiency, disturbs the cortisol response to stress, and may be a cause of morbidity and mortality in children with ALL. Objective To evaluate adrenal function in children with ALLll after induction chemotherapy with high dose glucocorticoids. Methods The adrenal function of 20 children with ALL was evaluated using a standard dose (250 μg adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH test performed before and after a 6 week of treatment with glucocorticoids induction phase chemotherapy, which was followed by a week period tapering off. Adrenal insuffiency was defined as blood cortisol level of < 18 μg/dL Results Adrenal insufficiency was found in 14/20 subjects after the induction phase followed by a week period of tapering off. Median cortisol levels pre- and post-stimulation before induction phase were 14.72 (range 2.01 – 46.1 μg/dL and 29.29 (range 21.65 – 55.15 μg/dL, respectively. Median cortisol levels pre- and post-stimulation after induction phase were 5.87 (range 0.2 – 20.53 μg/dL and 10.49 (range 0.33 – 28.69 μg/dL, respectively. Clinical signs and symptoms did not differ between those with and without adrenal insufficiency. Conclusion Of 20 children with ALL, 14 develop adrenal insufficiency after a 6-week induction therapy with glucocorticoids and followed by a week period of tapering off. No specific clinical signs and symptoms are identified to be related to the adrenal insufficiency. [Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:15-21.].

  8. Genetics of glucocorticoid-associated osteonecrosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Karol, Seth E; Yang, Wenjian; Van Driest, Sara L; Chang, Tamara Y; Kaste, Sue; Bowton, Erica; Basford, Melissa; Bastarache, Lisa; Roden, Dan M; Denny, Joshua C; Larsen, Eric; Winick, Naomi; Carroll, William L; Cheng, Cheng; Pei, Deqing; Fernandez, Christian A; Liu, Chengcheng; Smith, Colton; Loh, Mignon L; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Hunger, Stephen P; Scheet, Paul; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Devidas, Meenakshi; Mattano, Leonard A; Relling, Mary V

    2015-10-01

    Glucocorticoids are important therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and their major adverse effect is osteonecrosis. Our goal was to identify genetic and nongenetic risk factors for osteonecrosis. We performed a genome-wide association study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a discovery cohort comprising 2285 children with ALL, treated on the Children's Oncology Group AALL0232 protocol (NCT00075725), adjusting for covariates. The minor allele at SNP rs10989692 (near the glutamate receptor GRIN3A locus) was associated with osteonecrosis (hazard ratio = 2.03; P = 3.59 × 10(-7)). The association was supported by 2 replication cohorts, including 361 children with ALL on St. Jude's Total XV protocol (NCT00137111) and 309 non-ALL patients from Vanderbilt University's BioVU repository treated with glucocorticoids (odds ratio [OR] = 1.87 and 2.26; P = .063 and .0074, respectively). In a meta-analysis, rs10989692 was also highest ranked (P = 2.68 × 10(-8)), and the glutamate pathway was the top ranked pathway (P = 9.8 × 10(-4)). Osteonecrosis-associated glutamate receptor variants were also associated with other vascular phenotypes including cerebral ischemia (OR = 1.64; P = 2.5 × 10(-3)), and arterial embolism and thrombosis (OR = 1.88; P = 4.2 × 10(-3)). In conclusion, osteonecrosis was associated with inherited variations near glutamate receptor genes. Further understanding this association may allow interventions to decrease osteonecrosis. These trials are registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00075725 and #NCT00137111. PMID:26265699

  9. Growth hormone deficiency predicts cardiovascular risk in young adults treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood.

    Link, Katarina; Moëll, Christian; Garwicz, Stanislaw; Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva; Björk, Jonas; Thilén, Ulf; Ahrén, Bo; Erfurth, Eva Marie

    2004-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy, and until recently prophylactic cranial radiotherapy (CRT) was important for achieving long-term survival. Hypothalamic-pituitary hormone insufficiency is a well-recognized consequence of CRT for childhood cancer. Another problem is increased cardiovascular risk, which has been shown in long-term survivors of other childhood cancers. In the only previously reported study on cardiovascular risk after childhood ALL, obesity and dyslipidemia were recorded in a small subgroup treated with CRT, compared with patients treated with chemotherapy. The mechanisms behind the increase in cardiovascular risk in survivors of childhood cancer are not clarified. The aim of the present study was to elucidate mechanisms of increased cardiovascular risk in former childhood ALL patients. A group of 44 ALL survivors (23 males, median age 25 yr, range 19-32 yr at the time of study) treated with CRT (median 24 Gy, 18-30 Gy) at a median age of 5 yr (1-18 yr) and chemotherapy were investigated for prevalence of GH deficiency and cardiovascular risk factors. Comparison was made with controls randomly selected from the general population and individually matched for sex, age, smoking habits, and residence. All patients and controls underwent a GHRH-arginine test, and patients with a peak GH 3.9 microg/liter or greater were further investigated with an additional insulin tolerance test. Significantly higher plasma levels of insulin (P = 0.002), blood glucose (P = 0.01), and serum levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein (Apo) B, triglycerides, fibrinogen, and leptin (all P childhood ALL patients, a significant increase in cardiovascular risk factors was recorded. We suggest that GH deficiency, induced by CRT, is a primary cause for this because strong correlations between the stimulated GH peak and several of the cardiovascular risk factors were observed. PMID:15472198

  10. Functional screening identifies CRLF2 in precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Yoda, Akinori; Yoda, Yuka; Chiaretti, Sabina; Bar-Natan, Michal; Mani, Kartik; Rodig, Scott J; West, Nathan; Xiao, Yun; Brown, Jennifer R; Mitsiades, Constantine; Sattler, Martin; Kutok, Jeffrey L; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Wadleigh, Martha; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Dal Cin, Paola; Bradner, James E; Griffin, James D; Anderson, Kenneth C; Stone, Richard M; Ritz, Jerome; Foà, Robin; Aster, Jon C; Frank, David A; Weinstock, David M

    2010-01-01

    The prognosis for adults with precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) remains poor, in part from a lack of therapeutic targets. We identified the type I cytokine receptor subunit CRLF2 in a functional screen for B-ALL-derived mRNA transcripts that can substitute for IL3 signaling. We demonstrate that CRLF2 is overexpressed in approximately 15% of adult and high-risk pediatric B-ALL that lack MLL, TCF3, TEL, and BCR/ABL rearrangements, but not in B-ALL with these rearrangements or other lymphoid malignancies. CRLF2 overexpression can result from translocation with the IGH locus or intrachromosomal deletion and is associated with poor outcome. CRLF2 overexpressing B-ALLs share a transcriptional signature that significantly overlaps with a BCR/ABL signature, and is enriched for genes involved in cytokine receptor and JAK-STAT signaling. In a subset of cases, CRLF2 harbors a Phe232Cys gain-of-function mutation that promotes constitutive dimerization and cytokine independent growth. A mutually exclusive subset harbors activating mutations in JAK2. In fact, all 22 B-ALLs with mutant JAK2 that we analyzed overexpress CRLF2, distinguishing CRLF2 as the key scaffold for mutant JAK2 signaling in B-ALL. Expression of WT CRLF2 with mutant JAK2 also promotes cytokine independent growth that, unlike CRLF2 Phe232Cys or ligand-induced signaling by WT CRLF2, is accompanied by JAK2 phosphorylation. Finally, cells dependent on CRLF2 signaling are sensitive to small molecule inhibitors of either JAKs or protein kinase C family kinases. Together, these findings implicate CRLF2 as an important factor in B-ALL with diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. PMID:20018760

  11. Hypertension, high-dose corticosteroids, and renal infiltration in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Andry Juliansen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Hypertension is a rarely recognized complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. The incidence of hypertension in ALL patients in Indonesia remains unknown, but the most common risk factors are corticosteroid use during induction-phase chemotherapy and renal leukemic infiltration. Objective To determine the incidence of hypertension in children with ALL, and to assess for associations of high-dose corticosteroids, renal infiltration, and hyperleukocytosis to hypertension. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving 100 children aged 2-18 years. Subjects were newly diagnosed ALL patients and those underwent induction-phase chemotherapy in the Pediatric Ward or Outpatient Clinic at Cipto Mangunkusumo or Dharmais Hospitals. Results Hypertension occurred in 6 (10% of 60 newly diagnosed ALL patients and 8 (20% of 40 patients who had received high-dose corticosteroids, but the difference was not statistically significant (OR=2.25; 95%CI 0.72 to 7.07; P=0.239. Hypertension was reported in 8 of 29 subjects who received dexamethasone, but in none of the subjects who received prednisone. However, the difference in these subgroups was also not statistically significant. Renal enlargement was found in 1 of 14 hypertensive patients, but it was not associated with hypertension (OR=0.80; 95%CI 0.52 to 1.24; P=0.417. Hyperleukocytosis was also not associated with hypertension (OR= 0.79; 95% CI 0.20 to 3.11; P=1.000. Conclusion The incidence of hypertension in ALL patients was 14%. Hypertension is not associated with renal infiltration or hyperleukocytosis. Furthermore, hypertension is not associated with corticosteroid dose, though is found only in subjects who receive dexamethasone. [Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:372-6.].

  12. Computer-aided diagnosis of leukoencephalopathy in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Glass, John O.; Li, Chin-Shang; Helton, Kathleen J.; Reddick, Wilburn E.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to use objective quantitative MR imaging methods to develop a computer-aided diagnosis tool to differentiate white matter (WM) hyperintensities as either leukoencephalopathy (LE) or normal maturational processes in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with intravenous high dose methotrexate. A combined imaging set consisting of T1, T2, PD, and FLAIR MR images and WM, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid a priori maps from a spatially normalized atlas were analyzed with a neural network segmentation based on a Kohonen Self-Organizing Map. Segmented regions were manually classified to identify the most hyperintense WM region and the normal appearing genu region. Signal intensity differences normalized to the genu within each examination were generated for two time points in 203 children. An unsupervised hierarchical clustering algorithm with the agglomeration method of McQuitty was used to divide data from the first examination into normal appearing or LE groups. A C-support vector machine (C-SVM) was then trained on the first examination data and used to classify the data from the second examination. The overall accuracy of the computer-aided detection tool was 83.5% (299/358) with sensitivity to normal WM of 86.9% (199/229) and specificity to LE of 77.5% (100/129) when compared to the readings of two expert observers. These results suggest that subtle therapy-induced leukoencephalopathy can be objectively and reproducibly detected in children treated for cancer using this computer-aided detection approach based on relative differences in quantitative signal intensity measures normalized within each examination.

  13. The Eleventh International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Workshop Report: Ponte di Legno, Italy, 6-7 May 2009

    Biondi, A; Baruchel, A; Hunger, S;

    2009-01-01

    An international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)working group was formed during the 27th annual meeting of the International Society of Pediatric Oncology in 1995. Since then, 10 workshops have been held to address many issues that help advance treatment outcome of childhood ALL but...... require international collaboration (Table 1). The group was fondly named after 'Ponte di Legno,' a place in Lombardy, Italy, because the first major workshop was held there. In celebration of the 10th anniversary of the first major meeting, the group returned to Ponte di Legno on 6 and 7 May 2009 for its...

  14. Mucormycosis Rhinosinusitis at Diagnosis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Diagnostics and Management Challenges in a Low-Middle-income Country.

    Mandegari, Elham; Fu, Ligia; Arambú, Carolina; Montoya, Sandra; Peña, Armando; Johnson, Kyle M; Perfect, John R; Caniza, Miguela A

    2015-04-01

    We present the case of an adolescent with mucor rhinosinusitis diagnosed concomitantly with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at a hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. We also discuss the challenges faced in the dual management of hematologic malignancies and invasive fungal disease in a low-middle-income country, such as access to diagnostics, immunosuppressants, imaging, and antifungals. Despite these shortcomings, the patient was successfully treated for both the diseases. Low-middle-income country hospitals can effectively treat invasive fungal diseases by providing adequate diagnostic and support services, which can improve the outcomes of pediatric cancer patients. PMID:24942033

  15. Haploidentical Bone Marrow Transplantation With Clofarabine and Busulfan Conditioning for a Child With Multiple Recurrent Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Aoki, Yuki; Miyawaki, Reiji; Imai, Kohsuke; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kajiwara, Michiko; Ishiwata, Yasuyoshi; Yasuhara, Masato; Morio, Tomohiro; Mizutani, Shuki; Tomizawa, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Outcome of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved over the years, but not for those with multiple recurrences because of high therapy resistance and heavily pretreated history that potentially cause physical damages. We describe the case of an 11-year-old boy with a third relapse of ALL and a history of 2 allogeneic bone marrow transplantations. He was successfully treated with clofarabine combination chemotherapy and achieved a fourth remission at 16 months following haploidentical bone marrow transplantation with conditioning regimen of clofarabine and busulfan. Clofarabine/busulfan conditioning might be a preferable option for children with multiple recurrent ALL, and warrants further investigation. PMID:26523380

  16. Core Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit Controlled by the TAL1 Complex in Human T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.; Staudt, Louis M.; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3 and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected auto-regulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1, and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MY...

  17. Upregulation of T-Cell-Specific Transcription Factor Expression in Pediatric T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-ALL)

    Müge Sayitoğlu; Yücel Erbilgin; Özden Hatırnaz; İnci Yıldız; Tiraje Celkan; Sema Anak; Ömer Devecioğlu; Gönül Aydoğan; Serap Karaman; Nazan Sarper; Çetin Timur; Ümit Üre; Uğur Özbek

    2012-01-01

    Objective: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is associated with recurrent chromosomal aberrations andabnormal ectopic gene expression during T-cell development. In order to gain insight into the pathogenesis of T-ALLthis study aimed to measure the level of expression of 7 T-cell oncogenes (LMO2, LYL1, TAL1, TLX1, TLX3, BMI1, andCALM-AF10) in pediatric T-ALL patients Material and Methods: LMO2, LYL1, TLX1, TLX3, BMI1, TAL1, and CALM-AF10 expression was measured usingquantitative real...

  18. Growth Inhibition and Apoptosis Due to Restoration of E2A Activity in T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells

    Park, Steven T.; Nolan, Garry P.; Sun, Xiao-Hong

    1999-01-01

    Two models have been proposed for the molecular mechanism by which the Tal1 oncogene causes T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). The activation model suggests that Tal1 as heterodimers with the E2A transcription factor activates the expression of oncogenes. The inhibition model postulates that Tal1 interferes with the tumor-suppressing function of E2A. In the Jurkat T cell line, originally derived from a patient with T-ALL, Tal1 is complexed with E2A proteins and the transcriptional a...

  19. The impact of CYP3A5*3 on risk and prognosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Borst, Louise; Wallerek, Sandra; Dalhoff, Kim Peder; Rasmussen, Kirsten K; Wesenberg, Finn; Skov Wehner, Peder; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2011-01-01

    Objectives:  Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in childhood; however, little is known of the molecular etiology and environmental exposures causing the disease. Cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) plays a crucial role in the catalytic oxidation of endogenous metabolites and...... of experiencing an event was almost eight times higher compared to those having at least one A allele (P = 0.045, hazard ratio = 7.749; 95% CI, 1.044-57.52). Conclusions:  This study shows that genetics may play a role in the risk of developing childhood ALL and indicates that improved treatment...

  20. The impact of CYP3A5*3 on risk and prognosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Borst, Louise; Wallerek, Sandra; Dalhoff, Kim; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Wesenberg, Finn; Wehner, Peder Skov; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in childhood; however, little is known of the molecular etiology and environmental exposures causing the disease. Cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) plays a crucial role in the catalytic oxidation of endogenous metabolites and toxic...... experiencing an event was almost eight times higher compared to those having at least one A allele (P = 0.045, hazard ratio = 7.749; 95% CI, 1.044-57.52). Conclusions: This study shows that genetics may play a role in the risk of developing childhood ALL and indicates that improved treatment stratification of...

  1. Technical relapsed testicular irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia; Tecnica de irradiacion para testiculos en recidiva de leucemia linfoblastica aguda

    Velazquez Miranda, S.; Delgado Gil, M. M.; Ortiz Siedel, M.; Munoz Carmona, D. M.; Gomez-Barcelona, J.

    2011-07-01

    Testicular irradiation in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia presents difficulties in relation to daily positioning, dosimetry for dose homogenization of complex geometry and volume change during irradiation thereof. This can lead to significant deviations from the prescribed doses. In addition, the usual techniques often associated with unnecessary irradiation of pelvic simphysis, anus and perineum. This, in the case of pediatric patients, is of great importance, since doses in the vicinity of 20 Gy are associated with a deviation of bone growth, low testosterone levels around 24 Gy and high rates of generation of second tumors. To overcome these problems we propose a special restraint in prone and non-coplanar irradiation.

  2. Hyperuricemia and tumor lysis syndrome in children with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Betül Sevinir; Metin Demirkaya; Birol Baytan; Adalet Meral Güneş

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine the incidence, clinical characteristics, and outcome of hyperuricemia and tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) in children with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).Materials and Methods: This retrospective study included data from 327 patients (113 NHL and 214 ALL).Results: Hyperuricemia occurred in 26.5% and 12.6% of the patients with NHL and ALL, respectively. The corresponding figures for TLS were 15.9% and 0.47% (p=0.001). All h...

  3. CT and MR imaging findings of appendiceal and hepatic mucormycosis in a patient with acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia

    Choi, Seo Youn; Lee, Min Hee; Lee, Hae Kyung; Yi, Boem Ha; Chin, Su Sie; Park, Seong Kyu; Chung, Jun Chul [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Fungal infections occur in severely immunocompromised patients having profound and prolonged neutropenia. Here, we report a case of a 41-year-old female who, at the conclusion of induction chemotherapy for acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia, developed angioinvasive mucormycosis involving the appendix and liver, which presented as abdominal pain. This case is the first to provide detailed computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of angioinvasive appendiceal and hepatic mucormycosis. The implications of these findings as well as the diagnosis and management of mucormycosis, is further discussed.

  4. Impact of cytogenetics on the outcome of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results of Southwest Oncology Group 9400 study

    Pullarkat, Vinod; Slovak, Marilyn L.; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Forman, Stephen J.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the prognostic impact of cytogenetics on the outcome of 200 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients 15 to 65 years of age enrolled in Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG)–9400 study. Evaluable cytogenetics or fluorescence in situ hybridization studies were available in 140 (70%) patients. Four karyotype categories (normal [n = 31, 22%], t(9;22)/BCR/ABL1 [n = 36, 26%], other unfavorable [−7, +8, or 11q23 rearrangement, n = 19, 13%], and miscellaneous [n = 54, 39%]) and the biologica...

  5. Flow Cytometric DNA index, G-band Karyotyping, and Comparative Genomic Hybridization in Detection of High Hyperdiploidy in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Nygaard, Ulrikka; Larsen, Jacob; Kristensen, Tim D; Wesenberg, Finn; Jonsson, Olafur G; Carlsen, Niels T; Forestier, Erik; Kirchhoff, Maria; Larsen, Jørgen K; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2006-01-01

    High hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children is related to a good outcome. Because these patients may be stratified to a low-intensity treatment, we have investigated the sensitivity of flow cytometry (FCM), G-band karyotyping (GBK), and high-resolution comparative genomic...... hybridization (HR-CGH) in detecting high hyperdiploid leukemic clones. Twenty-six girls and 34 boys with acute lymphoblastic leukemia diagnosed in 1998 to 1999 were analyzed by FCM, GBK, and HR-CGH. The correlations between DNA indices obtained by FCM, GBK, and HR-CGH were significant (rs=0.61 to 0.77; P<0...

  6. Flow Cytometric DNA index, G-band Karyotyping, and Comparative Genomic Hybridization in Detection of High Hyperdiploidy in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Nygaard, Ulrikka; Larsen, Jacob; Kristensen, Tim D;

    2006-01-01

    High hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children is related to a good outcome. Because these patients may be stratified to a low-intensity treatment, we have investigated the sensitivity of flow cytometry (FCM), G-band karyotyping (GBK), and high-resolution comparative genomic hybridiza......High hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children is related to a good outcome. Because these patients may be stratified to a low-intensity treatment, we have investigated the sensitivity of flow cytometry (FCM), G-band karyotyping (GBK), and high-resolution comparative genomic...

  7. High risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells with bcr-abl and INK4A/ARF mutations retain susceptibility to alloreactive T cells

    Young, Faith M.; Campbell, Andrew; Emo, Kris Lambert; Jansson, Johan; Wang, Pin-Yi; Jordan, Craig T.; Mullen, Craig A.

    2008-01-01

    INK4A/ARF mutations are acquired in bcr/abl+ lymphoid blast phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and bcr/abl+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Donor lymphocyte infusion and graft versus leukemia are generally ineffective in such ALL’s, while GVL is highly active against bcr/abl+ CML that does not have a lesion in the INK4A/ARF locus. The mechanisms for the ineffectiveness of GVL are not fully known and it is possible that intrinsic resistance of acute lymphoid leukemias to immune effec...

  8. Cerebral venous thrombosis in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma during induction chemotherapy with l-asparaginase: The GRAALL experience.

    Couturier, Marie-Anne; Huguet, Françoise; Chevallier, Patrice; Suarez, Felipe; Thomas, Xavier; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Cacheux, Victoria; Pignon, Jean-Michel; Bonmati, Caroline; Sanhes, Laurence; Bories, Pierre; Daguindau, Etienne; Dorvaux, Véronique; Reman, Oumedaly; Frayfer, Jamile; Orvain, Corentin; Lhéritier, Véronique; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé; Hunault-Berger, Mathilde; Tanguy-Schmidt, Aline

    2015-11-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) thrombotic events are a well-known complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) induction therapy, especially with treatments including l-asparaginase (l-ASP). Data on risk factors and clinical evolution is still lacking in adult patients. We report on the clinical evolution of 22 CNS venous thrombosis cases occurring in 708 adults treated for ALL or lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL) with the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-induction protocol, which included eight L-ASP (6,000 IU/m(2) ) infusions. The prevalence of CNS thrombosis was 3.1%. CNS thrombosis occurred after a median of 18 days (range: 11-31) when patients had received a median of three l-ASP injections (range: 2-7). Patients with CNS thrombosis exhibited a median antithrombin (AT) nadir of 47.5% (range: 36-67%) at Day 17 (range: D3-D28), and 95% of them exhibited AT levels lower than 60%. There were no evident increase in hereditary thrombotic risk factors prevalence, and thrombosis occurred despite heparin prophylaxis which was performed in 90% of patients. Acquired AT deficiency was frequently detected in patients with l-ASP-based therapy, and patients with CNS thrombosis received AT prophylaxis (45%) less frequently than patients without CNS thrombosis (83%), P = 0.0002). CNS thrombosis was lethal in 5% of patients, while 20% had persistent sequelae. One patient received all planned l-ASP infusions without recurrence of CNS thrombotic whereas l-ASP injections were discontinued in 20 patients during the management of thrombosis without a significant impact on overall survival (P = 0.4). PMID:26214580

  9. In vivo response to methotrexate forecasts outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and has a distinct gene expression profile.

    Michael J Sorich

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common cancer in children, and can now be cured in approximately 80% of patients. Nevertheless, drug resistance is the major cause of treatment failure in children with ALL. The drug methotrexate (MTX, which is widely used to treat many human cancers, is used in essentially all treatment protocols worldwide for newly diagnosed ALL. Although MTX has been extensively studied for many years, relatively little is known about mechanisms of de novo resistance in primary cancer cells, including leukemia cells. This lack of knowledge is due in part to the fact that existing in vitro methods are not sufficiently reliable to permit assessment of MTX resistance in primary ALL cells. Therefore, we measured the in vivo antileukemic effects of MTX and identified genes whose expression differed significantly in patients with a good versus poor response to MTX.We utilized measures of decreased circulating leukemia cells of 293 newly diagnosed children after initial "up-front" in vivo MTX treatment (1 g/m(2 to elucidate interpatient differences in the antileukemic effects of MTX. To identify genomic determinants of these effects, we performed a genome-wide assessment of gene expression in primary ALL cells from 161 of these newly diagnosed children (1-18 y. We identified 48 genes and two cDNA clones whose expression was significantly related to the reduction of circulating leukemia cells after initial in vivo treatment with MTX. This finding was validated in an independent cohort of children with ALL. Furthermore, this measure of initial MTX in vivo response and the associated gene expression pattern were predictive of long-term disease-free survival (p < 0.001, p = 0.02.Together, these data provide new insights into the genomic basis of MTX resistance and interpatient differences in MTX response, pointing to new strategies to overcome MTX resistance in childhood ALL.Total XV, Therapy for Newly Diagnosed

  10. An animal model to study toxicity of central nervous system therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Effects on behavior

    Central nervous system prophylactic therapy used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia can reduce intelligence quotient scores and impair memory and attention in children. Cranial irradiation, intrathecal methotrexate, and steroids are commonly utilized in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy. How they induce neurotoxicity is unknown. This study employs an animal model to explore the induction of neurotoxicity. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 17 and 18 days of age were administered 18 mg/kg prednisolone, 2 mg/kg methotrexate, and 1000 cGy cranial irradiation. Another 18-day-old group was administered 1000 cGy cranial irradiation but no drugs. Matching controls received saline and/or a sham exposure to radiation. All animals at 6 weeks and 4 months of age were tested for alterations in spontaneous behavior. A computer pattern recognition system automatically recorded and classified individual behavioral acts displayed during exploration of a novel environment. Measures of behavioral initiations, total time, and time structure were used to compare treated and control animals. A permanent sex-specific change in the time structure of behavior was induced by the prednisolone, methotrexate, and radiation treatment but not by radiation alone. Unlike hyperactivity, the effect consisted of abnormal clustering and dispersion of acts in a pattern indicative of disrupted development of sexually dimorphic behavior. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an animal model delineating the agent/agents responsible for the neurotoxicity of central nervous system prophylactic therapy

  11. Efficacy and effects of palifermin for the treatment of oral mucositis in patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Lucchese, Alessandra; Matarese, Giovanni; Ghislanzoni, Luis Huanca; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Manuelli, Maurizio; Gherlone, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    This randomized-controlled trial studied the efficacy of palifermin, administered as a dose during hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) therapy, as primary prophylaxis on pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in order to reduce oral mucositis (OM). Patients in the palifermin group were randomly assigned to receive palifermin, 60 μg/kg, intravenously as a single dose 3 days before and 0, +1, and +2 post autologous HSCT infusion. The patients in the control group received only a placebo treatment. OM-related assessments were the WHO oral-toxicity scale and the patient-reported outcomes. There was a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of OM grade 3 and 4 in the palifermin group compared to the control group. There was also a reduction in the degree of severity of OM in the palifermin group (1.65 grade respect to 2.33 in the control group). Palifermin could prevent the recurrence of severe OM and improve the quality of life in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). PMID:26428409

  12. ABT-199 mediated inhibition of BCL-2 as a novel therapeutic strategy in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Peirs, Sofie; Matthijssens, Filip; Goossens, Steven; Van de Walle, Inge; Ruggero, Katia; de Bock, Charles E; Degryse, Sandrine; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Briot, Delphine; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Lammens, Tim; De Moerloose, Barbara; Benoit, Yves; Poppe, Bruce; Meijerink, Jules P; Cools, Jan; Soulier, Jean; Rabbitts, Terence H; Taghon, Tom; Speleman, Frank; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter

    2014-12-11

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a high-risk subtype of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with gradually improved survival through introduction of intensified chemotherapy. However, therapy-resistant or refractory T-ALL remains a major clinical challenge. Here, we evaluated B-cell lymphoma (BCL)-2 inhibition by the BH3 mimetic ABT-199 as a new therapeutic strategy in human T-ALL. The T-ALL cell line LOUCY, which shows a transcriptional program related to immature T-ALL, exhibited high in vitro and in vivo sensitivity for ABT-199 in correspondence with high levels of BCL-2. In addition, ABT-199 showed synergistic therapeutic effects with different chemotherapeutic agents including doxorubicin, l-asparaginase, and dexamethasone. Furthermore, in vitro analysis of primary patient samples indicated that some immature, TLX3- or HOXA-positive primary T-ALLs are highly sensitive to BCL-2 inhibition, whereas TAL1 driven tumors mostly showed poor ABT-199 responses. Because BCL-2 shows high expression in early T-cell precursors and gradually decreases during normal T-cell differentiation, differences in ABT-199 sensitivity could partially be mediated by distinct stages of differentiation arrest between different molecular genetic subtypes of human T-ALL. In conclusion, our study highlights BCL-2 as an attractive molecular target in specific subtypes of human T-ALL that could be exploited by ABT-199. PMID:25301704

  13. Antibody responses to Hepatitis B and measles-mumps-rubella vaccines in children who received chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Simone Santana Viana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate viral vaccine antibody levels in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after chemotherapy and after vaccine booster doses. METHODS: Antibody levels against hepatitis B, rubella, measles and mumps vaccine antigens were evaluated in 33 children after completing chemotherapy (before and after vaccine booster doses and the results were compared to the data of 33 healthy children matched for gender, age and social class. RESULTS: After chemotherapy, 75.9%, 67.9%, 59.3% and 51.7% of the patients showed low antibody titers that would be unlikely to protect against exposure to measles, rubella, hepatitis B and mumps, respectively. After receiving a vaccine booster dose for these antigens the patients had high antibody levels consistent with potential protection against measles, mumps and hepatitis B, but not against rubella. CONCLUSION: Extra doses of measles-mumps-rubella plus hepatitis B vaccines are recommended in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients submitted to treatment after hematologic recovery. After this, viral vaccine antibody levels should be verified to define the individual's protective status.

  14. Next-generation-sequencing of recurrent childhood high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals mutations typically associated with high risk patients.

    Chen, Cai; Bartenhagen, Christoph; Gombert, Michael; Okpanyi, Vera; Binder, Vera; Röttgers, Silja; Bradtke, Jutta; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Harbott, Jochen; Ginzel, Sebastian; Thiele, Ralf; Husemann, Peter; Krell, Pina F I; Borkhardt, Arndt; Dugas, Martin; Hu, Jianda; Fischer, Ute

    2015-09-01

    20% of children suffering from high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia develop recurrent disease. The molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the genetic landscape of five patients at relapse, who developed recurrent disease without prior high-risk indication using whole-exome- and whole-genome-sequencing. Oncogenic mutations of RAS pathway genes (NRAS, KRAS, FLT3, n=4) and deactivating mutations of major epigenetic regulators (CREBBP, EP300, each n=2 and ARID4B, EZH2, MACROD2, MLL2, each n=1) were prominent in these cases and virtually absent in non-recurrent cases (n=6) or other pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases (n=18). In relapse nucleotide variations were detected in cell fate determining transcription factors (GLIS1, AKNA). Structural genomic alterations affected genes regulating B-cell development (IKZF1, PBX1, RUNX1). Eleven novel translocations involved the genes ART4, C12orf60, MACROD2, TBL1XR1, LRRN4, KIAA1467, and ELMO1/MIR1200. Typically, patients harbored only single structural variations, except for one patient who displayed massive rearrangements in the context of a germline tumor suppressor TP53 mutation and a Li-Fraumeni syndrome-like family history. Another patient harbored a germline mutation in the DNA repair factor ATM. In summary, the relapse patients of our cohort were characterized by somatic mutations affecting the RAS pathway, epigenetic and developmental programs and germline mutations in DNA repair pathways. PMID:26189108

  15. An animal model to study toxicity of central nervous system therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Effects on behavior

    Mullenix, P.J.; Kernan, W.J.; Tassinari, M.S.; Schunior, A.; Waber, D.P.; Howes, A.; Tarbell, N.J. (Forsyth Research Institute, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-10-15

    Central nervous system prophylactic therapy used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia can reduce intelligence quotient scores and impair memory and attention in children. Cranial irradiation, intrathecal methotrexate, and steroids are commonly utilized in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy. How they induce neurotoxicity is unknown. This study employs an animal model to explore the induction of neurotoxicity. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 17 and 18 days of age were administered 18 mg/kg prednisolone, 2 mg/kg methotrexate, and 1000 cGy cranial irradiation. Another 18-day-old group was administered 1000 cGy cranial irradiation but no drugs. Matching controls received saline and/or a sham exposure to radiation. All animals at 6 weeks and 4 months of age were tested for alterations in spontaneous behavior. A computer pattern recognition system automatically recorded and classified individual behavioral acts displayed during exploration of a novel environment. Measures of behavioral initiations, total time, and time structure were used to compare treated and control animals. A permanent sex-specific change in the time structure of behavior was induced by the prednisolone, methotrexate, and radiation treatment but not by radiation alone. Unlike hyperactivity, the effect consisted of abnormal clustering and dispersion of acts in a pattern indicative of disrupted development of sexually dimorphic behavior. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an animal model delineating the agent/agents responsible for the neurotoxicity of central nervous system prophylactic therapy.

  16. Fermented Brown Rice Extract Causes Apoptotic Death of Human Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells via Death Receptor Pathway.

    Horie, Yukiko; Nemoto, Hideyuki; Itoh, Mari; Kosaka, Hiroaki; Morita, Kyoji

    2016-04-01

    Mixture of brown rice and rice bran fermented with Aspergillus oryzae, designated as FBRA, has been reported to reveal anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory effects in rodents. Then, to test its potential anti-cancer activity, the aqueous extract was prepared from FBRA powder, and the effect of this extract on human acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells was directly examined. The exposure to FBRA extract reduced the cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The reduction of the cell viability was accompanied by the DNA fragmentation, and partially restored by treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor. Further studies showed that FBRA extract induced the cleavage of caspase-8, -9, and -3, and decreased Bcl-2 protein expression. Moreover, the expression of tBid, DR5, and Fas proteins was enhanced by FBRA extract, and the pretreatment with caspase-8 inhibitor, but not caspase-9 inhibitor, restored the reduction of the cell viability induced by FBRA extract. These findings suggested that FBRA extract could induce the apoptotic death of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells probably through mainly the death receptor-mediated pathway and supplementarily through the tBid-mediated mitochondrial pathway, proposing the possibility that FBRA was a potential functional food beneficial to patients with hematological cancer. PMID:26769704

  17. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia Leucemia linfoblástica do adulto

    Robin Foà

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the most recent advances in the diagnostic and prognostic work-up of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, and on their implications in the clinical management of the disease. Over the years, information obtained through extensive immunophenotyping, karyotyping, molecular genetics, multidrug resistance and, more recently, genomic profiling is progressively contributing to a better understanding of the biology of this complex disease, to the identification of subgroups of patients with different clinical outcomes, to a more precise monitoring of minimal residual disease, to the use of different therapeutic protocols based on prognostic indicators and, finally, to the design of innovative and specific treatment strategies. The next few years will tell us if this biologically-guided approach, which is progressively individualizing the management of adult ALL patients, will ultimately impact on the prognosis of a disease that has stagnated over many decade.Esta revisão focaliza os mais recentes avanços no diagnóstico e prognóstico da leucemia linfoblástica aguda do adulto e suas implicações no manuseio clínico desta doença. Com o passar dos anos, informações obtidas através de extensa pesquisa em imunofenotipagem, citogenética, genética molecular, resistência a múltiplas drogas e, mais recentemente, perfil genômico têm contribuído progressivamente para o melhor entendimento da biologia desta doença complexa, na identificação de sub grupos de pacientes com evolução clínica distintas, no mais preciso monitoramento da doença residual mínima, no uso de diferentes protocolos baseados em indicadores prognósticos e, mais recentemente, também no desenho de tratamentos inovativos e específicos. Os próximos anos nos dirão se abordagens baseadas guiadas biologicamente, que será uma individualização progressiva do manuseio dos pacientes adultos com LLA podem causar um impacto favorável em uma doen

  18. The prognostic significance of minimal residual disease in adult Egyptian patients with precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Background: Minimal residual disease (MRD) studies in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) give highly significant prognostic information superior to other standard criteria as Minimal residual disease; age, gender and total leucocytic count (TLC) in distinguishing patients at high and low risk of Flow cytometry relapse. Objectives: We aimed to determine the value of MRD monitoring by flow cytometry (FCM) in predicting outcome in adult Precursor ALL patients. Patients and methods: Bone marrow (BM) samples were analyzed by 4-color FCM collected at diagnosis and after induction therapy (MRD1) to correlate MRD positivity with disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: Study included 57 adult ALL patients (44 males and 13 females) with a median age of 22 years (18-49). DFS showed no significant difference with age, gender and initial TLC (p = 0.838, 0.888 and 0.743, respectively). Cumulative DFS at 2 years was 34% for B-lineage ALL (n: 35) and 57% for T-lineage ALL (n: 18) (p = 0.057). Cumulative DFS at 2 years was M.A. Samra et al. 136 7% for MRD1 positive (high risk, HR) versus 57% for MRD1 negative patients (Low risk, LR) (p < 0.001). Cumulative DFS at 2 years was 29% for HR patients (n: 26) versus 55% for LR (n: 27) according to GMALL classification (p = 0.064). Cumulative OS did not differ according to age, gender and TLC (p = 0.526, 0.594 and 0.513, respectively). Cumulative OS at 2 years was 36% for B ALL (n: 39) versus 77% for TALL (n: 18) (p = 0.016) and was 49% for Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) negative patients versus 0% for Ph-positive patients (p < 0.001). Regarding MRD1, OS at 2 years was 18% for MRD1 HR (n:17) versus 65% for MRD1 LR (n: 38) (p < 0.001). OS was 35% for high-risk patients (n: 30) and 62% for low-risk patients (n: 27) classified according to GMALL risk stratification (p = 0.017). Conclusion: MRD by FCM is a strong independent predictor of outcome in terms of DFS and OS and is a powerful informative parameter in

  19. PROGNOSTIC VALUE OF PROTEASE ACTIVATED RECEPTOR-1 IN EGYPTIAN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Adel Abd Elhaleim Hagag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute Lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a malignant disorder of lymphoid progenitor cells that proliferate and replace the normal hematopoietic cells of the bone marrow. Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1, is atypical member of this family of receptors that mediate cellular responses to thrombin and related proteases. PAR1 is expressed by a wide range of tumor cells and can promote tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. The aim of this work was to study the role of PAR-1 expression in newly diagnosed ALL patients. Patients and methods: This study was conducted on 44 children with newly diagnosed ALL who were admitted to Hematology Unit, Pediatric department, Tanta University Hospital including 24 males and 20 females with their age ranged from 4-17 years and their mean age value of 9.06±3.26 who were divided into two groups; PAR-1 positive group (18 patients and PAR-1 negative group (26 patients. All patients were subjected to complete history taking, thorough clinical examination, bone marrow aspiration and flow cytometric analysis for detection of PAR-1 expression by malignant cells. Results: PAR-1 was positive in 18 cases (41% and negative in 26 cases (59% of studied patients. This study showed no significant relation between PAR-1 expression and age, sex and most of the clinical data including hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and purpura while generalized lymphadenopathy was significantly higher in PAR-1 positive group. PAR-1 positive expression was associated with some bad prognostic laboratory parameters including higher hemoglobin, higher white blood cells, higher peripheral blood and bone marrow blast cells, higher serum LDH and lower platelets count. No significant association was detected between PAR-1 expression and immunophenotyping. There were significantly higher remission rates in PAR-1 negative group and significantly higher relapse and death rates in PAR-1 positive group. Conclusion: From this study, it could be concluded

  20. The Circadian Schedule for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Maintenance Therapy does not Influence Event-Free Survival in the NOPHO ALL92 Protocol

    Clemmensen, Kim K. B.; Christensen, Regitse H.; Shabaneh, Diana N.;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The event-free survival of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been reported to be superior when oral methotrexate (MTX) and 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) maintenance therapy (MT) is administered in the evening compared to the morning. PROCEDURE: In the ALL92 MT study we prospec...

  1. Outcome After First Relapse in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia : A Report Based on the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG) Relapse ALL 98 Protocol

    van den Berg, H.; de Groot-Kruseman, H. A.; Damen-Korbijn, C. M.; de Bont, E. S. J. M.; Schouten-van Meeteren, A. Y. N.; Hoogerbrugge, P. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. We report on the treatment of children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in first relapse. The protocol focused on: (1) Intensive chemotherapy preceding allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in early bone marrow relapse; (2) Rotational chemotherapy in late rela

  2. Outcome after first relapse in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a report based on the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG) relapse all 98 protocol

    Berg, H. van den; Groot-Kruseman, H.A. de; Damen-Korbijn, C.M.; Bont, E.S. de; Schouten-van Meeteren, A.Y.; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We report on the treatment of children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in first relapse. The protocol focused on: (1) Intensive chemotherapy preceding allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in early bone marrow relapse; (2) Rotational chemotherapy in late rela

  3. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia prophylaxis during maintenance therapy influences methotrexate/6-mercaptopurine dosing but not event-free survival for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Levinsen, Mette; Shabaneh, Diana; Bohnstedt, Cathrine;

    2012-01-01

    Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) is used in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) to prevent Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). We explored to which extent TMP/SMX influenced methotrexate (MTX)/6-mercaptopurine (6MP) dosage, myelosuppression, and event-free survival (EFS) during...

  4. Relapsed childhood high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia: presence of preleukemic ancestral clones and the secondary nature of microdeletions and RTK-RAS mutations

    Davidsson, J; Paulsson, K; Lindgren, D;

    2010-01-01

    Although childhood high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia is associated with a favorable outcome, 20% of patients still relapse. It is important to identify these patients already at diagnosis to ensure proper risk stratification. We have investigated 11 paired diagnostic and relapse samp...

  5. Identification and cloning of a prethymic precursor T lymphocyte from a population of common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA)-positive fetal bone marrow cells

    Hokland, P; Hokland, M; Daley, J;

    1987-01-01

    of T4 and T8 antigens and at the same time expression of the thymocyte-associated T6 antigens. Thus, given the fact that 10-20% of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALLs) are CALLA+, we have been able to identify a human prethymic T lymphocyte population that might be the normal counterpart of...

  6. NF-κB in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Oncogenic Functions in Leukemic and in Microenvironmental Cells

    Santos, Nuno R. dos, E-mail: nrsantos@ualg.pt; Ghezzo, Marinella N.; Silva, Ricardo C. da; Fernandes, Mónica T. [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre for Molecular and Structural Biomedicine (CBME), University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-11-05

    Two main NF-κB signaling pathways, canonical and noncanonical, performing distinct functions in organisms have been characterized. Identification of mutations in genes encoding components of these NF-κB signaling pathways in lymphoid malignancies confirmed their key role in leukemogenesis. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignancy of thymocytes that despite significant therapeutic advances can still be fatal. Although mutations in NF-κB genes have not been reported in T-ALL, NF-κB constitutive activation in human T-ALL and in acute T-cell leukemia mouse models has been observed. Although these studies revealed activation of members of both canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways in acute T-cell leukemia, only inhibition of canonical NF-κB signaling was shown to impair leukemic T cell growth. Besides playing an important pro-oncogenic role in leukemic T cells, NF-κB signaling also appears to modulate T-cell leukemogenesis through its action in microenvironmental stromal cells. This article reviews recent data on the role of these transcription factors in T-ALL and pinpoints further research crucial to determine the value of NF-κB inhibition as a means to treat T-ALL.

  7. Lymphoid Progenitor Cells from Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Are Functionally Deficient and Express High Levels of the Transcriptional Repressor Gfi-1

    Jessica Purizaca; Adriana Contreras-Quiroz; Elisa Dorantes-Acosta; Eduardo Vadillo; Lourdes Arriaga-Pizano; Silvestre Fuentes-Figueroa; Horacio Villagomez-Barragán; Patricia Flores-Guzmán; Antonio Alvarado-Moreno; Hector Mayani; Isaura Meza; Rosaura Hernandez; Sara Huerta-Yepez; Rosana Pelayo

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent malignancy of childhood. Substantial progress on understanding the cell hierarchy within ALL bone marrow (BM) has been recorded in the last few years, suggesting that both primitive cell fractions and committed lymphoid blasts with immature stem cell-like properties contain leukemia-initiating cells. Nevertheless, the biology of the early progenitors that initiate the lymphoid program remains elusive. The aim of the present study was to ...

  8. Prevalence of Prognostic Factors in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Admitted to Mofid Children’s Hospital from 1997-2000

    H Ashraftalesh

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute leukemia is the most common malignancy in children and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL accounts for 75% of acute leukemia cases. New treatment protocols have resulted in complete remission rates up to nearly 100% in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Today, one of the most important prognostic factors in acute lymphoblastic leukemia is intensity of the treatment. Risk stratification is accomplished based on clinical, morphological, immunophenotypic and cytogenetic findings. The aim of this study was to determine some prognostic factors in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: In this retrospective study information about age at onset of acute leukemia, sex, initial white blood cell count, FAB-subtype, immunophenotype, and clinical course of newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia were extracted from medical records of children admitted to pediatric oncology department of Mofid Children's Hospital from 1997 to 2000. Findings: There were 81 (58.3% male and 58 (41.7% female. 3.6% of patients were under 1 year old, 18.7% were above 10 years and 77.7% were 1-10 years old. Initial WBCs more than 50,000/ mm3 were observed in 24.5% of patients. 91.4% of patients showed FAB-subtype of L1, 7.9% of L2 and L3 was detected just in 0.7% of cases. Lymphoblasts were of B-cell lineage in 92.7% of patients, with pre-B cell in 74.8%, early pre-B cell in 17.1% and mature B cell in 0.8%. As a whole, complete remission was observed in 79.3% of the patients. 12.9% of patients had a relapse, second remission was achieved in 2.6% of relapsed cases. Conclusion: In this study, FAB-subtype L1 and pre-B cell immunophenotype was more common than previous studies. Other results were the same as reported in older studies.

  9. ZAP-70 as A Possible Prognostic Factor in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Background: Zeta-chain-associated protein (ZAP- 70) is a 70kD adaptor protein that acts quickly after T cell activation to propagate signal. The role of ZAP-70 in Tcell function is well established, and in the previous years, this molecule was considered to be T-cell specific. More recent data have documented a role of ZAP-70 in B cells. Interest in ZAP-70 has grown since it has been shown, through gene expression profiling, that it is expressed in a subset of cases of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL). Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of ZAP-70 in leukemic blasts of 50 newly diagnosed patients of B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and to assess the correlation between ZAP-70 expression and various prognostic factors and outcome. Patients and Methods: This study included 50 pediatric patients with newly diagnosed B-lineage ALL. They were 28 males (56%) and 22 females (44%) presented to the Pediatric Oncology Department, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, during the period from 2005 to 2007. The age range was 2 to 17 years with a mean of 8.58±5.8 years and median 8 years. All patients were subjected at presentation to a full clinical history and physical examination. Patients diagnosed with ALL were enrolled on St. Jude Total XV protocol: standard risk and low risk according to results of primary investigation. Immuno phenotyping was done using monoclonal antibodies which were analyzed on Coulter XL (Panel included CD1, CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7, CD8, CD10, CD19, CD22, Cytoplasmic m, anti k, anti l, CD13, CD33, anti classII MHC and TdT). Cases were considered ZAP-70 positive when exhibiting a ZAP/GAPDH (Glyceraldehyde- 3-phosphate dehydrogenase) ratio ³0.13. Results: The study revealed expression of ZAP-70 in 5/50 cases (10%). There was no statistically significant relation between ZAP-70 expression and the following: age, Total Leukocytic Count, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. There

  10. LMO2 expression reflects the different stages of blast maturation and genetic features in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and predicts clinical outcome

    Malumbres, Raquel; Fresquet, Vicente; Roman-Gomez, Jose; Bobadilla, Miriam; Robles, Eloy F.; Altobelli, Giovanna G.; Calasanz, M.ª José; Smeland, Erlend B.; Aznar, Maria Angela; Agirre, Xabier; Martin-Palanco, Vanesa; Prosper, Felipe; Lossos, Izidore S.; Martinez-Climent, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    Background LMO2 is highly expressed at the most immature stages of lymphopoiesis. In T-lymphocytes, aberrant LMO2 expression beyond those stages leads to T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, while in B cells LMO2 is also expressed in germinal center lymphocytes and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, where it predicts better clinical outcome. The implication of LMO2 in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia must still be explored. Design and Methods We measured LMO2 expression by real time RT-PCR in 247 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient samples with cytogenetic data (144 of them also with survival and immunophenotypical data) and in normal hematopoietic and lymphoid cells. Results B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases expressed variable levels of LMO2 depending on immunophenotypical and cytogenetic features. Thus, the most immature subtype, pro-B cells, displayed three-fold higher LMO2 expression than pre-B cells, common-CD10+ or mature subtypes. Additionally, cases with TEL-AML1 or MLL rearrangements exhibited two-fold higher LMO2 expression compared to cases with BCR-ABL rearrangements or hyperdyploid karyotype. Clinically, high LMO2 expression correlated with better overall survival in adult patients (5-year survival rate 64.8% (42.5%–87.1%) vs. 25.8% (10.9%–40.7%), P= 0.001) and constituted a favorable independent prognostic factor in B-ALL with normal karyotype: 5-year survival rate 80.3% (66.4%–94.2%) vs. 63.0% (46.1%–79.9%) (P= 0.043). Conclusions Our data indicate that LMO2 expression depends on the molecular features and the differentiation stage of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, assessment of LMO2 expression in adult patients with a normal karyotype, a group which lacks molecular prognostic factors, could be of clinical relevance. PMID:21459790

  11. MiR-146b negatively regulates migration and delays progression of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Correia, Nádia C; Fragoso, Rita; Carvalho, Tânia; Enguita, Francisco J; Barata, João T

    2016-01-01

    Previous results indicated that miR-146b-5p is downregulated by TAL1, a transcription factor critical for early hematopoiesis that is frequently overexpressed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) where it has an oncogenic role. Here, we confirmed that miR-146b-5p expression is lower in TAL1-positive patient samples than in other T-ALL cases. Furthermore, leukemia T-cells display decreased levels of miR-146b-5p as compared to normal T-cells, thymocytes and other hematopoietic progenitors. MiR-146b-5p silencing enhances the in vitro migration and invasion of T-ALL cells, associated with increased levels of filamentous actin and chemokinesis. In vivo, miR-146b overexpression in a TAL1-positive cell line extends mouse survival in a xenotransplant model of human T-ALL. In contrast, knockdown of miR-146b-5p results in leukemia acceleration and decreased mouse overall survival, paralleled by faster tumor infiltration of the central nervous system. Our results suggest that miR-146b-5p is a functionally relevant microRNA gene in the context of T-ALL, whose negative regulation by TAL1 and possibly other oncogenes contributes to disease progression by modulating leukemia cell motility and disease aggressiveness. PMID:27550837

  12. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells.

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). NK cell priming with activated pDCs resulted in TRAIL and CD69 up-regulation on NK cells and IFN-γ production. NK cell activation was dependent on IFN-α produced by pDCs, but was not reproduced by IFN-α alone. ALL killing was further enhanced by inhibition of KIR engagement. We showed that ALL lysis was mainly mediated by TRAIL engagement, while the release of cytolytic granules was involved when ALL expressed NK cell activating receptor ligands. Finally, adoptive transfers of activated-pDCs in ALL-bearing humanized mice delayed the leukemia onset and cure 30% of mice. Our data therefore demonstrate that TLR-9 activated pDCs are a powerful tool to overcome ALL resistance to NK cell-mediated killing and to reinforce the GvL effect of HSCT. These results open new therapeutic avenues to prevent relapse in children with ALL. PMID:26320191

  13. Placing of tunneled central venous catheters prior to induction chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Frydenberg, Morten;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tunneled central venous catheters (CVCs) are inevitable in children with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of CVC-related complications in children with ALL in relation to timing of catheter placement and type of catheter. PROCEDURE: All...

  14. Immune reconstitution during maintenance therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, relation to co-existing infection.

    El-Chennawi, Farha A; Al-Tonbary, Youssef A; Mossad, Youssef M; Ahmed, Mona A

    2008-08-01

    Immunosuppression is a major side effect of cancer chemotherapy. The process of immune reconstitution can be dissimilar according to the nature of the disease, type and doses of drugs, and age of the patients. Recently, several studies have examined immune reconstitution in children and young adults after intensive chemotherapy for solid tumours or stem cell transplantation. The aim of the present study is to evaluate immune reconstitution (cellular and humoral) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during the maintenance phase of therapy and to correlate between the complicating infections and the abnormalities in immune system during reconstitution. To achieve this goal, 36 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (24 females and 12 males) in the maintenance phase of therapy with 12 healthy children of matched age and sex served as a control group were recruited in this study. The patients were taken consecutively from the Hematology/Oncology Outpatient Clinic of Mansoura University Children's Hospital (MUCH). They were subjected to thorough history taking, clinical examination and laboratory investigations in the form of: complete blood count, serum creatinine, liver function tests and evaluation of the immune system by estimation of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19 and CD56 (cellular immunity) by flow cytometry and immunoglobulins A, M and G (humoral immunity) at the first and the third month of maintenance therapy. The results of the study documented presence and persistence of leucopenia and lymphopenia during maintenance therapy with decreased medians of CD3, CD4 and CD8 from the first to the third month of therapy and in comparison to the control group. The other markers CD19, CD56, IgA, IgM, IgG and CD4/CD8 ratio showed increasing median from the first to the third month of therapy. Also we detect a significant correlation between infection and CD19 and serum IgM at the first month and between infection and CD19, IgM and CD4/CD8 ratio at the third month of

  15. Fludarabine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone (FLAM) for the treatment of relapsed and refractory adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A phase study by the Polish Adult Leukemia Group (PALG).

    Giebel, Sebastian; Krawczyk-Kulis, Malgorzata; Adamczyk-Cioch, Maria; Jakubas, Beata; Palynyczko, Grazyna; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Dmoszynska, Anna; Skotnicki, Aleksander; Nowak, Katarzyna; Holowiecki, Jerzy

    2006-10-01

    Outcome of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who fail to achieve complete remission (CR) or who relapse soon after initial response is poor. The goal of this phase II study by the Polish Adult Leukemia Group (PALG) was to evaluate safety and efficacy of a new salvage regimen (FLAM) consisting of sequential fludarabine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone. Fifty patients were included with primary (n = 13) or secondary (n = 5) refractoriness, early ( or =40 years compared to the younger subgroup (33 vs 8%, p=0.03). Septic infections were the most frequent severe complication. At 3 years, the probability of disease-free survival for patients who achieved CR equaled 16%. Seven patients underwent allogeneic HCT. FLAM regimen is feasible for relapsed and refractory adults with ALL and could be recommended in particular for younger patients as a second-line treatment. However, as the remission duration is short, allogeneic HCT (alloHCT) should be considered as soon as possible. PMID:16832677

  16. Persistent complete molecular remission after nilotinib and graft-versus-leukemia effect in an acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient with cytogenetic relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    Farnsworth Paul

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report the successful treatment and sustained molecular remission using single agent nilotinib in a relapsed Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Compared to previously published studies, this is the first report where a patient did not receive additional chemotherapy after relapse, nor did she receive donor lymphocyte infusions. With nilotinib, the patient reverted back to normal blood counts and 100% donor reconstitution by single tandem repeat (STR chimerism analysis in the bone marrow and in peripheral blood, granulocytes, T and B-lymphocytes. This report also highlights the use of nilotinib in combination with extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP for concomitant graft-versus-host disease. Our data suggests that ECP, together with nilotinib, did not adversely affect the overall Graft-versus-leukemia (GVL effect.

  17. Prognostic Significance of the Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Derived Sequence 1 (LYL1 Gene Expression in Egyptian Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Nadia El Menshawy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aberrant activation of transcription factor genes is the most frequent target of genetic alteration in lymphoid malignancies. The lymphoblastic leukemia-derived sequence 1 (LYL1 gene, which encodes a basic helix-loop helix, was first identified with human T-cell acute leukemia. Recent studies suggest its involvement in myeloid malignancies. We aimed to study the expression percent of oncogene LYL1 in primary and secondary high-risk myeloid leukemia and the impact on prognostic significance in those patients. METHODS: Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of LYL1 oncogenes, our study was carried out on 39 myeloid leukemia patients including de novo cases, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS with transformation, and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML in accelerated and blast crisis, in addition to 10 healthy individuals as the reference control. RESULTS: LYL1 expression was increased at least 2 times compared to the controls. The highest expression of this transcription factor was observed in the MDS cases transformed to acute leukemia at 7.3±3.1, p=0.0011. LYL1 expression was found in 68.2%, 75%, and 77.8% of cases of acute myeloid leukemia, CML crisis, and MDS, respectively. Significant correlation of LYL1 overexpression with some subtypes of French-American-British classification was found. There was, for the first time, significant correlation between the blood count at diagnosis and LYL1 expression (p=0.023, 0.002, and 0.031 for white blood cells, hemoglobin, and platelets, respectively. The rate of complete remission was lower with very high levels of LYL1 expression and the risk of relapse increased with higher levels of LYL1 expression, suggesting an unfavorable prognosis for cases with enhanced expression. CONCLUSION: Overexpression of LYL1 is highly associated with acute myeloid leukemia and shows more expression in MDS with unfavorable prognosis in response to induction chemotherapy. These

  18. Changes of CSF-protein pattern in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during prophylactic CNS therapy (Berlin protocol)

    The cerebral spinal fluid (CSF)-protein profiles of ten children with previously untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were investigated by agarose gel electrophoresis. The profiles were determined at diagnosis and during the fifth to eighth week of treatment when preventive therapy for central nervous system (CNS) leukemia (skull irradiation, intrathecal methotrexate (ithMTX) was administered. The profiles were compared with those obtained from a control group of 67 children and those from 42 patients with acute aseptic meningitis. The data from the latter group demonstrated the CSF-protein pattern of partial blood-CSF barrier (B-CSF-B) breakdown. The children with ALL showed no or only minor signs of a B-CSF-B impairment at diagnosis and after four weeks of systemic treatment. However, CSF changes indicative of a lesion of the B-CSF-B increased in all children continuously during CNS prophylaxis. The protein profile at the end of combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy was very similar to that in patients with acute aseptic meningitis. These observations point to neurotoxic side effects on the CNS barrier system with the combination of cranial radiation and ithMTX. A striking finding was restricted heterogeneity of gamma-globulin, observed in the CSF of nine out of the ten children with ALL before or during treatment. The significance of this abnormality is unknown

  19. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    2016-04-08

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  20. Neuropsychological effects of irradiation and chemotherapy treatments upon children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case study of monozygotic twins

    Numerous attempts have been made to determine the effects of irradiation and chemotherapy upon cognitive functioning when used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). While many studies have demonstrated a deleterious effect, others have found no significant changes in neuropsychological functioning. The uncertainty regarding the cognitive effects of these treatments is exemplified via a presentation of monozygotic twins who were evaluated via neuropsychological tests. The children received similar induction-consolidation therapy which included intrathecal methotrexate and cranial irradiation. Neuropsychological tests yielded almost identical I.Q. patterns, however, subtle differences were noted between the children when abstract reasoning abilities, achievement tests scores, motor speed, grip strength, performance on complex tasks requiring haptic sensitivity, and fingertip sensitivity were observed. This discussion also summarizes the previous findings related to cognitive function after chemotherapy and radiation therapy and some of the confounding factors which have been noted

  1. Cost-effective multiplexing before capture allows screening of 25 000 clinically relevant SNPs in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Wesolowska, Agata; Dalgaard, M. D.; Borst, L.;

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variants, including single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are key determiners of interindividual differences in treatment efficacy and toxicity in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Although up to 13 chemotherapeutic agents are used in the treatment of this cancer, it remains a...... model disease for exploring the impact of genetic variation due to well-characterized cytogenetics, drug response pathways and precise monitoring of minimal residual disease. Here, we have selected clinically relevant genes and SNPs through literature screening, and on the basis of associations with key...... designed a cost-effective, high-throughput capture assay of â¼25â000 clinically relevant SNPs, and demonstrated that multiple samples can be tagged and pooled before genome capture in targeted enrichment with a sufficient sequencing depth for genotyping. This multiplexed, targeted sequencing method allows...

  2. Delayed reversible methotrexate-induced leucoencephalopathy in a four-year-old child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Amrita Roy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous/intrathecal methotrexate (MTX has been implicated as a major cause of treatment-related neurotoxicity particularly leukoencephalopathy in children with hematological malignancy. We report a 4-year-old boy who presented with apathy and aphasia for 1 day while on the maintenance-phase chemotherapy according to MCP 841 protocol. MRI of brain revealed bilateral symmetrical FLAIR hyperintensities in caudate and putaminal region with FLAIR hypersignal in subcortical U-fiber in left frontal lobe consistent with MTX-induced toxic leucoencephalopathy. There was spontaneous resolution of symptoms within 1 week of onset. So, in Pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with subtle neurological deficit, this diagnosis should be kept in mind and further treatment with MTX should be carefully decided.

  3. A longitudinal study of growth and growth hormone secretion in children during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Diminished growth rate during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is of the multifactorial etiology. Effects on GH secretion have been shown after discontinuation of treatment including prophylactic CNS irradiation. Seventeen children treated for ALL with three different CNS preventive schedules were followed longitudinally with repeated estimations of the spontaneous GH secretion during a 24-month period. No difference was found in GH secretion during this time between patients who had received no radiotherapy and those who had received 18 or 24 Gy as CNS prophylaxis. During dexamethasone treatment the GH secretion was completely suppressed, which can be a mediator for the diminished growth rate during the first 2 years of ALL treatment. We conclude that there is no clinical reason to perform GH analysis within the first 24 months of treatment for ALL

  4. Changes in T1 relaxation processes in the bone marrow following treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and T1 relaxation time measurements of the vertebral bone marrow were performed in 11 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at diagnosis. Nine of the children were re-examined after chemotherapeutic treatment. The results were compared with histological data from bone marrow biopsies obtained in close association to the MR examinations. Ten age matched children were examined as a control group. A 1.5 Tesla whole body scanner was used for the measurements. The pretreatment T1 relaxation times of the bone marrow were significantly prolonged, compared to the age matched controls. After chemotherapy the T1 relaxation times of the children with ALL decreased significantly towards or into the normal range. A significant correlation was found between the T1 relaxation time and the content of malignant blast cells in the bone marrow. (orig.)

  5. Brain damage after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A report on 34 patients with special regard to MRI findings

    Biti, G.P.; Magrini, S.M.; Villari, N.; Caramella, D.; Guazzelli, G.; Rosi, A.; Lippi, A.

    1989-01-01

    In 34 patients treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), central nervous system (CNS) damage was assessed by clinical evaluation and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty-seven of them had been off therapy from 5 to 109 months (median 64 months) while 7 had not completed the maintenance phase of their treatment. All the patients were disease-free when evaluated. None of the 3 patients who showed clinical CNS damage during the follow-up was symptomatic when submitted to MRI, while periventricular hyperintensity in T2-weighted images, suggestive of leukoencephalopathy, was present in 8 of the 34 patients. These subclinical abnormalities appear to be more frequent, transient in nature and treatment-related in patients evaluated shortly after the induction phase. Similar MRI findings seem, on the contrary, to be consequences of the disease on the CNS when appearing in long-term survivors. (orig.).

  6. A longitudinal study of growth and growth hormone secretion in children during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Marky, I.; Mellander, L.; Lannering, B.; Albertsson-Wikland, K. (Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    Diminished growth rate during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is of the multifactorial etiology. Effects on GH secretion have been shown after discontinuation of treatment including prophylactic CNS irradiation. Seventeen children treated for ALL with three different CNS preventive schedules were followed longitudinally with repeated estimations of the spontaneous GH secretion during a 24-month period. No difference was found in GH secretion during this time between patients who had received no radiotherapy and those who had received 18 or 24 Gy as CNS prophylaxis. During dexamethasone treatment the GH secretion was completely suppressed, which can be a mediator for the diminished growth rate during the first 2 years of ALL treatment. We conclude that there is no clinical reason to perform GH analysis within the first 24 months of treatment for ALL.

  7. Neuropsychological effects of irradiation and chemotherapy treatments upon children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case study of monozygotic twins

    Prince, M.T.; Souheaver, G.T.; Berry, D.H.

    Numerous attempts have been made to determine the effects of irradiation and chemotherapy upon cognitive functioning when used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). While many studies have demonstrated a deleterious effect, others have found no significant changes in neuropsychological functioning. The uncertainty regarding the cognitive effects of these treatments is exemplified via a presentation of monozygotic twins who were evaluated via neuropsychological tests. The children received similar induction-consolidation therapy which included intrathecal methotrexate and cranial irradiation. Neuropsychological tests yielded almost identical I.Q. patterns, however, subtle differences were noted between the children when abstract reasoning abilities, achievement tests scores, motor speed, grip strength, performance on complex tasks requiring haptic sensitivity, and fingertip sensitivity were observed. This discussion also summarizes the previous findings related to cognitive function after chemotherapy and radiation therapy and some of the confounding factors which have been noted.

  8. PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE AND TREATMENT IMPLICATIONS OF MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE STUDIES IN PHILADELPHIA-NEGATIVE ADULT ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Orietta Spinelli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is curable in about 40-50% of adult patients, however this is subject to ample variations owing to several host- and disease-related prognostic characteristics. Currently, the study of minimal residual disease (MRD following induction and early consolidation therapy stands out as the most sensitive individual prognostic marker to define the risk of relapse following the achievement of remission, and ultimately that of treatment failure or success. Because substantial therapeutic advancement is now being achieved using intensified pediatric-type regimens, MRD analysis is especially useful to orientate stem cell transplantation choices. These strategic innovations are progressively leading to greater than 50% cure rates. 

  9. Intrinsic and chemo-sensitizing activity of SMAC-mimetics on high-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Schirmer, M; Trentin, L; Queudeville, M; Seyfried, F; Demir, S; Tausch, E; Stilgenbauer, S; Eckhoff, S M; Meyer, L H; Debatin, K-M

    2016-01-01

    SMAC-mimetics represent a targeted therapy approach to overcome apoptosis resistance in many tumors. Here, we investigated the efficacy of the SMAC-mimetic BV6 in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL). In ALL cell lines, intrinsic apoptosis sensitivity was associated with rapid cIAP degradation, NF-κB activation, TNF-α secretion and induction of an autocrine TNF-α-dependent cell death loop. This pattern of responsiveness was also observed upon ex vivo analysis of 40 primograft BCP-ALL samples. Treatment with BV6 induced cell death in the majority of ALL primografts including leukemias with high-risk and poor-prognosis features. Inhibition of cell death by the TNF receptor fusion protein etanercept demonstrated that BV6 activity is dependent on TNF-α. In a preclinical NOD/SCID/huALL model of high-risk ALL, marked anti-leukemia effectivity and significantly prolonged survival were observed upon BV6 treatment. Interestingly, also in vivo, intrinsic SMAC-mimetic activity was mediated by TNF-α. Importantly, BV6 increased the effectivity of conventional induction therapy including vincristine, dexamethasone and asparaginase leading to prolonged remission induction. These data suggest SMAC-mimetics as an important addendum to efficient therapy of pediatric BCP-ALL. PMID:26775704

  10. Ezh2 Controls an Early Hematopoietic Program and Growth and Survival Signaling in Early T Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Etienne Danis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Early T cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL is an aggressive subtype of ALL distinguished by stem-cell-associated and myeloid transcriptional programs. Inactivating alterations of Polycomb repressive complex 2 components are frequent in human ETP-ALL, but their functional role is largely undefined. We have studied the involvement of Ezh2 in a murine model of NRASQ61K-driven leukemia that recapitulates phenotypic and transcriptional features of ETP-ALL. Homozygous inactivation of Ezh2 cooperated with oncogenic NRASQ61K to accelerate leukemia onset. Inactivation of Ezh2 accentuated expression of genes highly expressed in human ETP-ALL and in normal murine early thymic progenitors. Moreover, we found that Ezh2 contributes to the silencing of stem-cell- and early-progenitor-cell-associated genes. Loss of Ezh2 also resulted in increased activation of STAT3 by tyrosine 705 phosphorylation. Our data mechanistically link Ezh2 inactivation to stem-cell-associated transcriptional programs and increased growth/survival signaling, features that convey an adverse prognosis in patients.

  11. Autophagy collaborates with ubiquitination to downregulate oncoprotein E2A/Pbx1 in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) accounts for the most cancer incidences in children. We present here that autophagy is downregulated in pediatric B-ALL, suggesting a possible link between autophagy failure and pediatric B-ALL leukemogenesis. With a pediatric t(1;19) B-ALL xenograft mouse model, we show here that activation of autophagy by preventive administration of rapamycin improved the survival of leukemia animals by partial restoration of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, whereas treatment of the animals with rapamycin caused leukemia bone marrow cell-cycle arrest. Activation of autophagy in vitro or in vivo by rapamycin or starvation downregulated oncogenic fusion protein E2A/Pbx1. Furthermore, E2A/Pbx1 was found to be colocalized with autophagy marker LC3 in autolysosomes and with ubiquitin in response to autophagy stimuli, whereas autophagy or ubiquitination inhibitor blocked these colocalizations. Together, our data suggest a collaborative action between autophagy and ubiquitination in the degradation of E2A/Pbx1, thereby revealing a novel strategy for targeted preventive or treatment therapy on the pediatric ALL

  12. A novel 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugate induces apoptosis in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines

    Altenburg, Jeffrey D.; Harvey, Kevin A.; McCray, Sharon; Xu, Zhidong [Cellular Biochemistry Laboratory, Methodist Research Institute, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Siddiqui, Rafat A., E-mail: rsiddiqu@iuhealth.org [Cellular Biochemistry Laboratory, Methodist Research Institute, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Biology, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} 2,6-Diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugates (DIP-DHA) inhibits the proliferation of T-cell leukemic cell lines. {yields} DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. {yields} DIP-DHA significantly downregulated CXCR4 surface expression. -- Abstract: We have previously characterized the effects of 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide (DIP-DHA) conjugates and their analogs on the proliferation and progression of breast cancer cell lines. For this study, we investigated the effects of the DIP-DHA conjugate on 2 representative T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines: CEM and Jurkat. Treatment of both cell lines with DIP-DHA resulted in significantly greater inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis than that of parent compounds, 2,6-diisopropylphenol (DIP) or docosahexaenoate (DHA). Treatment of the cells with DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis in both cell lines was reversed in the presence of a caspase family inhibitor. Treatment with DIP-DHA reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. These observations suggest that the effects are driven by intrinsic apoptotic pathways. DIP-DHA treatment also downregulated surface CXCR4 expression, an important chemokine receptor involved in cancer metastasis that is highly expressed in both CEM and Jurkat cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the DIP-DHA conjugate exhibits significantly more potent effects on CEM and Jurkat cells than that of DIP or DHA alone. These conjugates have potential use for treatment of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  13. A novel 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugate induces apoptosis in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines

    Highlights: → 2,6-Diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugates (DIP-DHA) inhibits the proliferation of T-cell leukemic cell lines. → DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. → DIP-DHA significantly downregulated CXCR4 surface expression. -- Abstract: We have previously characterized the effects of 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide (DIP-DHA) conjugates and their analogs on the proliferation and progression of breast cancer cell lines. For this study, we investigated the effects of the DIP-DHA conjugate on 2 representative T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines: CEM and Jurkat. Treatment of both cell lines with DIP-DHA resulted in significantly greater inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis than that of parent compounds, 2,6-diisopropylphenol (DIP) or docosahexaenoate (DHA). Treatment of the cells with DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis in both cell lines was reversed in the presence of a caspase family inhibitor. Treatment with DIP-DHA reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. These observations suggest that the effects are driven by intrinsic apoptotic pathways. DIP-DHA treatment also downregulated surface CXCR4 expression, an important chemokine receptor involved in cancer metastasis that is highly expressed in both CEM and Jurkat cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the DIP-DHA conjugate exhibits significantly more potent effects on CEM and Jurkat cells than that of DIP or DHA alone. These conjugates have potential use for treatment of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  14. Type C virus particles produced in human T-cell lines derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a leukemic T-lymphoid malignancy.

    Oda,Takuzo

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Electron microscopy of four human T-cell lines revealed the production of type C virus particles in two T-cell lines: one derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the other from a leukemic T-lymphoid malignancy. Virus particles isolated from these cells had reverse transcriptase activity and the major internal structural protein of 30,000 daltons (p30. The indirect immunofluorescence test of these virus-producing cells with sera of patients with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL was negative. The data indicate that these retroviruses are different from adult T-cell leukemia virus (ATLV.

  15. Long-term results of total body irradiation in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Marnitz, Simone; Zich, Alexander; Budach, Volker; Jahn, Ulrich; Neumann, Oliver [Charite University Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Martus, Peter [University Tuebingen, Institute of Clinical Epidemiology and Applied Biostatistics, Tuebingen (Germany); Arnold, Renate [Charite University Medicine, Campus CVK, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this chart review of adult patients treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with total body irradiation (TBI) was to evaluate early and late toxicity and long-term outcome. A total of 110 adult patients (34 ± 12 years) with ALL underwent TBI (6 fractions of 2 Gy for a total of 12 Gy) as a part of the treatment regimen before transplantation. Treatment-related toxicity, mortality, and hematologic outcome are reported. Mean follow-up was 70 months. The 2- and 5-year leukemia-free survival rates were 78 and 72 %, respectively. In all, 29 % (32/110) patients suffered from medullary recurrence after a median time of 7 months. Gender was the only statistically significant prognostic factor in terms of overall survival in favor of female patients. Treatment-related mortality and overall survival after 2 and 5 years were 16 and 22 %, and 60 and 52.7 %, respectively. The most frequent late reaction wascGVHD of the skin (n = 33, 30 %). In addition, 15.5 % (17/110 patients) suffered pulmonary symptoms, and 6 patients developed lung fibrosis. Eyes were frequently affected by the radiation (31/110 = 28 %); 12 of 110 patients (11 %) presented with symptoms from osteoporosis, 5 of 110 patients (4.5 %) developed hypothyreosis and 2 patients diabetes mellitus. Of the male patients, 11 % reported erectile dysfunction or loss of libido, while 2 of 36 women reported menopausal syndrome at the mean time of 28 months after treatment with requirement for substitution. No women became pregnant after treatment. No acute or late cardiac toxicities were documented in our patients. No secondary malignancies were documented. Although hematologic outcome was in the upper range of that reported in the literature, treatment-related mortality (TRM) and medullary recurrences remain a challenge. Sophisticated radiation techniques allow for decreasing toxicity to certain organs and/or dose escalation to the bone marrow in highly selected patients in order to improve therapeutic

  16. Identification of residual leukemic cells by flow cytometry in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia: verification of leukemic state by flow-sorting and molecular/cytogenetic methods

    Obro, Nina F; Ryder, Lars P; Madsen, Hans O;

    2012-01-01

    Reduction in minimal residual disease, measured by real-time quantitative PCR or flow cytometry, predicts prognosis in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We explored whether cells reported as minimal residual disease by flow cytometry represent the malignant clone harboring...... immunophenotype and antigen modulation) that highlight important methodological pitfalls. These findings demonstrate that with sufficient experience, flow cytometry is reliable for minimal residual disease monitoring in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, although rare cases require supplementary PCR...

  17. FACIAL PALSY AS FIRST PRESENTATION OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA: A CASE REPORT

    S. Inaloo

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective Facial paralysis in children is very often idiopathic and isolated facial nervepalsy, resulting from leukemic infiltration is a rare occurrence. Here we present the case of a 14 year-old boy with acute lymphobastic leukemia, who first presented with isolated right side peripheral facial nerveparalysis and was initially diagnosed with Bell’s palsy.Conclusion The presence of Bell’s palsy in young children requires a complete evaluation, keeping in mind the possibility of leptomeningeal disease.

  18. Leukemoid reaction in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia following the

    Osman Yokuş

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of persistent neutrophilic leukocytosisabove 50,000 cells/μL for reasons other thanleukemia is defined as leukemoid reaction. Chronicmyelogenous leukemia (CML and chronic neutrophilicleukemia (CNL should be excluded, and underlyingdiseases or causes should be examined,in differential diagnosis. The most commonly observedcauses of leukemoid reactions are severeinfections, intoxications, malignancies, severe hemorrhage,or acute hemolysis [1]. J Clin Exp Invest2013; 4 (2: 258-259

  19. Oral idarubicin plus cytosine arabinoside in the treatment of acute non lymphoblastic leukemia in elderly patients.

    Pagano, L; Sica, S; Marra, R; Voso, M T; Storti, S; Di Mario, A; Leone, G

    1991-01-01

    Eighteen acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia patients greater than 60 yr., 12 at diagnosis and 6 in first relapse, were treated with the association of oral Idarubicin and subcutaneous Aracytin. One patient was not evaluable. Eight out of 17 patients achieved complete remission (47%), 4 patients died in induction and 5 proved resistant to treatments. Mucocutaneous and gastrointestinal toxicity was mild. The most frequent extra-hematological complications were infections. We observed an important hepatic toxicity in 1 case. PMID:1820991

  20. Poor adherence to dietary guidelines among adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Robien, Kim; Ness, Kirsten K.; Klesges, Lisa M.; Baker, K. Scott; Gurney, James G.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk of obesity and cardiovascular disease, conditions that healthy dietary patterns may help ameliorate or prevent. To evaluate the usual dietary intake of adult survivors of childhood ALL, food frequency questionnaire data were collected from 72 participants, and compared with the 2007 WCRF/AICR Cancer Prevention recommendations, the DASH diet, and the 2005 USDA Food Guide. Mean daily energ...

  1. FLT3 INTERNAL TANDEM DUPLICATION AND D835 MUTATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA AND ITS CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE

    Ghaleb Elyamany

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3 gene is a member of the class III receptor tyrosine kinase family, mutations of FLT3 were first described in 1997 and account for the most frequent molecular mutations in acute myeloid leukemia. No data currently exist regarding FLT3 mutations in Saudi acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients as no study has reported for FLT3 mutations in Saudi ALL patients. In this retrospective study, we have examined a cohort of 77 ALL patients, to determine the prevalence of FLT3 mutations and the possible prognostic relevance of these mutations in ALL patients and did correlations to other biologic factors, such as karyotype, molecular mutations, and leukocyte count. FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD mutations and point mutation in tyrosine kinase domain (D835 mutations were analyzed in ALL patients at diagnosis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. 2 cases (2.6%, 2/77 were positive for FLT3 mutations, one was found to have FLT3/ITD and other was found to have FLT3/D835. Our findings suggest that FLT3 mutations were not common in Saudi ALL and did not affect clinical outcome.

  2. The relevance of PTEN-AKT in relation to NOTCH1-directed treatment strategies in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Mendes, Rui D; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P P

    2016-09-01

    The tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) negatively regulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT signaling and is often inactivated by mutations (including deletions) in a variety of cancer types, including T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we review mutation-associated mechanisms that inactivate PTEN together with other molecular mechanisms that activate AKT and contribute to T-cell leukemogenesis. In addition, we discuss how Pten mutations in mouse models affect the efficacy of gamma-secretase inhibitors to block NOTCH1 signaling through activation of AKT. Based on these models and on observations in primary diagnostic samples from patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we speculate that PTEN-deficient cells employ an intrinsic homeostatic mechanism in which PI3K-AKT signaling is dampened over time. As a result of this reduced PI3K-AKT signaling, the level of AKT activation may be insufficient to compensate for NOTCH1 inhibition, resulting in responsiveness to gamma-secretase inhibitors. On the other hand, de novo acquired PTEN-inactivating events in NOTCH1-dependent leukemia could result in temporary, strong activation of PI3K-AKT signaling, increased glycolysis and glutaminolysis, and consequently gamma-secretase inhibitor resistance. Due to the central role of PTEN-AKT signaling and in the resistance to NOTCH1 inhibition, AKT inhibitors may be a promising addition to current treatment protocols for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27582570

  3. Chromosomal changes detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    ZHANG Lijun 张丽君; PARKHURST JB; KERN WF; SCOTT KV; NICCUM D; MULVIHILL JJ; LI Shibo 李师伯

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To investigate patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) for TEL/AML1 fusion, BCR/ABL fusion, MLL gene rearrangements, and numerical changes of chromosomes 4, 10, 17 and 21 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and to determine the relationship and the significance of those findings.Methods Fifty-one American patients (34 men and 17 women) were included in this study. Of them there were 41 patients with pro-B cell type ALL, 9 with B cell type ALL and 1 with T cell type ALL. Chromosome metaphases of each sample were prepared according to standard protocols. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed using commercially available DNA probes, including whole chromosome painting probes, locus specific probes, specific chromosome centromere probes and dual color/multiple color translocation fusion probes. The digital image analysis was carried out using Cytovision and Quips FISH programs.Results An overall incidence of chromosomal anomalies, including t (9;22), MLL gene rearrangements, t (12;21), and numerical chromosomal anomalies of chromosomes 4, 10, 17 and 21 was found in 33 patients (65%). Thirty-one of them were pediatric patients and two adults. The t (12;21) was the commonest chromosomal anomaly detected in this population; 14 out of the 45 pediatric patients (31%) were positive for TEL/AML1 fusion, among which three had an additional derivative 21 [t (12;21)], four had a deletion of 12p and two had an extra copy of chromosome 21. All 14 patients with positive TEL/AML1 fusion had ALL pre-B cell or B-cell lineage according to standard immunotyping. The percentage of cells with fusion signals ranged from 20% to 80%. All fourteen patients positive for TEL/AML1 gene fusion were mosaic. Three out of the 14 patients positive for the TEL/AML1 gene fusion were originally reported to be culture failures and none of the remaining eleven samples had been found to have chromosome 12 abnormalities by conventional cytogenetic techniques. All

  4. New genetics and diagnosis of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Christine Harrison

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 50 years, while significant advances have been made in the successful treatment of childhood leukaemia, similar progress has been made in understanding the genetics of the disease. In childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL, the incidences of individual chromosomal abnormalities are well established and cytogenetics provides a reliable tool for risk stratification for treatment. In spite of this role, a number of patients will relapse. Increasing numbers of additional genetic changes, including deletions and mutations, are being discovered. Their associations with established cytogenetic subgroups and with each other remain unclear. Whether they have a link to outcome is the most important factor in terms of refinement of risk factors in relation to clinical trials. For a number of newly identified abnormalities, appropriately modified therapy has significantly improved outcome. Alternatively, some of these aberrations are providing novel molecular markers for targeted therapy.

  5. Parvovirus B19 infection presenting as pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a transient and progressive course in two children.

    Yetgin, Sevgi; Cetin, Mualla; Aslan, Deniz; Ozyurek, Emel; Oyürek, Emel; Anlar, Banu; Uçkan, Duygu

    2004-10-01

    Parvovirus B19 is the causative agent of various forms of hematologic diseases such as aplastic crisis in patients with hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hypoplastic anemia, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. In addition, parvovirus B19 infection may precede or be associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The authors present two cases of parvovirus B19 infection and bone marrow infiltration with pre-B-cell lymphoblasts; one patients was diagnosed as having ALL, and the other patient, with neurologic findings, showed total resolution of the blastic morphology and phenotype. PMID:15454845

  6. The results of treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and leukocyte count over 50 x 109/1 according to the modified New York protocol. Preliminary report of Polish Leukemia-Lymphoma Study Group

    92 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and leukocyte count over 50 x 109/1 were treated according to the modified New York protocol. The modifications were based on elements of Dana Faber protocol. The 4 year DFS was 66%. (author)

  7. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    Vilma Carolina Bekker-Méndez; Enrique Miranda-Peralta; Juan Carlos Núñez-Enríquez; Irma Olarte-Carrillo; Francisco Xavier Guerra-Castillo; Ericka Nelly Pompa-Mera; Alicia Ocaña-Mondragón; Angélica Rangel-López; Roberto Bernáldez-Ríos; Aurora Medina-Sanson; Elva Jiménez-Hernández; Raquel Amador-Sánchez; José Gabriel Peñaloza-González; José de Diego Flores-Chapa; Arturo Fajardo-Gutiérrez

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangement...

  8. NOTCH1 signaling promotes human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia initiating cell regeneration in supportive niches.

    Wenxue Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leukemia initiating cells (LIC contribute to therapeutic resistance through acquisition of mutations in signaling pathways, such as NOTCH1, that promote self-renewal and survival within supportive niches. Activating mutations in NOTCH1 occur commonly in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL and have been implicated in therapeutic resistance. However, the cell type and context specific consequences of NOTCH1 activation, its role in human LIC regeneration, and sensitivity to NOTCH1 inhibition in hematopoietic microenvironments had not been elucidated. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established humanized bioluminescent T-ALL LIC mouse models transplanted with pediatric T-ALL samples that were sequenced for NOTCH1 and other common T-ALL mutations. In this study, CD34(+ cells from NOTCH1(Mutated T-ALL samples had higher leukemic engraftment and serial transplantation capacity than NOTCH1(Wild-type CD34(+ cells in hematopoietic niches, suggesting that self-renewing LIC were enriched within the NOTCH1(Mutated CD34(+ fraction. Humanized NOTCH1 monoclonal antibody treatment reduced LIC survival and self-renewal in NOTCH1(Mutated T-ALL LIC-engrafted mice and resulted in depletion of CD34(+CD2(+CD7(+ cells that harbor serial transplantation capacity. CONCLUSIONS: These results reveal a functional hierarchy within the LIC population based on NOTCH1 activation, which renders LIC susceptible to targeted NOTCH1 inhibition and highlights the utility of NOTCH1 antibody targeting as a key component of malignant stem cell eradication strategies.

  9. CD90 and CD110 correlate with cancer stem cell potentials in human T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Although cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been recently identified in myeloid leukemia, published data on lymphoid malignancy have been sparse. T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is characterized by the abnormal proliferation of T-cell precursors and is generally aggressive. As CD34 is the only positive-selection marker for CSCs in T-ALL, we performed extensive analysis of CD markers in T-ALL cell lines. We found that some of the tested lines consisted of heterogeneous populations of cells with various levels of surface marker expression. In particular, a small subpopulation of CD90 (Thy-1) and CD110 (c-Mpl) were shown to correlate with stem cell properties both in vitro and in transplantation experiments. As these markers are expressed on hematopoietic stem cells, our results suggest that stem cell-like population are enriched in CD90+/CD110+ fraction and they are useful positive-selection markers for the isolation of CSCs in some cases of T-ALL.

  10. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo. - Highlights: • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher glycolytic expression and function. • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher proliferation and lower cell death. • The divergent metabolic phenotypes selected in 5% and 20% oxygen are semi-permanent

  11. An adult patient who developed malignant fibrous histiocytoma 9 years after radiation therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Kato, Yasuhiro [National Hiroshima Hospital, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Ohno, Norioki; Horikawa, Yoko; Nishimura, Shin-ichiro; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Shimose, Shoji [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-12-01

    A 24-year-old Japanese man with a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which occurred during childhood, developed malignant fibrous histiocytoma of his left knee. His past history revealed that he had undergone leukemic blast cell invasion of the left knee and subsequent radiation therapy 9 years ago. The total radiation doses for the upper part of the left tibia and the lower part of the left femur were 60 Gy and 40 Gy, respectively. Neither distant metastasis nor a relapse of leukemia occurred. A curative resection of the left femur with a noninvasive margin was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy including high-dose methotrexate was given successfully before and after surgery; this was followed by relapse-free survival for 3 years. The nature of postirradiation malignant fibrous histiocytoma is highly aggressive. When a patient complains of persistent symptoms in a previously irradiated field, the possibility of this tumor must be taken into account. The importance of early diagnosis cannot be over-emphasized. (author)

  12. Application of the whole-transcriptome shotgun sequencing approach to the study of Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Although the pathogenesis of BCR–ABL1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is mainly related to the expression of the BCR–ABL1 fusion transcript, additional cooperating genetic lesions are supposed to be involved in its development and progression. Therefore, in an attempt to investigate the complex landscape of mutations, changes in expression profiles and alternative splicing (AS) events that can be observed in such disease, the leukemia transcriptome of a BCR–ABL1-positive ALL patient at diagnosis and at relapse was sequenced using a whole-transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-Seq) approach. A total of 13.9 and 15.8 million sequence reads was generated from de novo and relapsed samples, respectively, and aligned to the human genome reference sequence. This led to the identification of five validated missense mutations in genes involved in metabolic processes (DPEP1, TMEM46), transport (MVP), cell cycle regulation (ABL1) and catalytic activity (CTSZ), two of which resulted in acquired relapse variants. In all, 6390 and 4671 putative AS events were also detected, as well as expression levels for 18 315 and 18 795 genes, 28% of which were differentially expressed in the two disease phases. These data demonstrate that RNA-Seq is a suitable approach for identifying a wide spectrum of genetic alterations potentially involved in ALL

  13. Allergy and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a population-based and record-based study.

    Chang, Jeffrey S; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Tsai, Chia-Rung; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2012-12-01

    A deficit of normal immune stimulation in early childhood is a suspected risk factor for both childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and allergies. The present study utilized a population-based case-control design using medical claims data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan to evaluate the association between allergy and childhood leukemia. Eight hundred forty-six childhood ALL patients who were newly diagnosed during 2000 to 2008 and were older than 1 but less than 10 years of age were individually matched with 3,374 controls based on sex, birth date, and time of diagnosis (reference date for the controls). Conditional logistic regression was performed to assess the association between childhood ALL and allergies. An increased risk of ALL was observed with having an allergy less than 1 year before the case's ALL diagnosis (odds ratio (OR) = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.5, 2.0), more than 1 year before the case's diagnosis (OR = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.5), and before the age of 1 year (OR = 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.7). These results suggest that the pathogenesis of childhood ALL and allergy share a common biologic mechanism. PMID:23171876

  14. A case of multiple hepatic abscesses detected by CT scan in the patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    A 34 years old man admitted to a hospital on 21 Feb. 1983 and was diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A hematological complete remission was achieved by combination therapy of vincristine, prednisolone and L-asparaginase. However, he had complaining of high fever and right hypochondralgia since early in Apr. 1983, and it was revealed that elevation of right diaphragm on chest X-ray. Therefore, he was also given several antibiotics (CPZ, TOB, LMOX, PIPC, LCM, AMK, MINO and GM) for complication of probable liver abscess. Remittent fever was persisted in spite of as mentioned above various antibiotics. The multiple hepatic abscesses were found by CT scan of the mid-abdomen as the low density lesions, but bacterial cultures detected no any pathogens. His complaining of remittent fever and right hypochondralgia were improved by treated with Miconazole during about one month, and decreasing in size and number of multiple hepatic abscesses were found by CT scan. Though we could not determined clearly, but suspected that, multiple hepatic abscesses were due to fungus infection, by reason of therapeutic result. Regarding the complication of hepatic abscesses with leukemia, 5 cases have been reported in Japan, and one case out of 5 cases were detected by CT scan. We thought that CT scan were useful procedure for a early diagnosis of hepatic abscesses. In recently, the patient has continued of complete remission hematologically. (author)

  15. CD90 and CD110 correlate with cancer stem cell potentials in human T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Yamazaki, Hiroto; Nishida, Hiroko; Iwata, Satoshi [Division of Clinical Immunology, Advanced Clinical Research Center, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Dang, Nam H. [Department of Hematologic Malignancies, Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Morimoto, Chikao, E-mail: morimoto@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Clinical Immunology, Advanced Clinical Research Center, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan)

    2009-05-29

    Although cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been recently identified in myeloid leukemia, published data on lymphoid malignancy have been sparse. T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is characterized by the abnormal proliferation of T-cell precursors and is generally aggressive. As CD34 is the only positive-selection marker for CSCs in T-ALL, we performed extensive analysis of CD markers in T-ALL cell lines. We found that some of the tested lines consisted of heterogeneous populations of cells with various levels of surface marker expression. In particular, a small subpopulation of CD90 (Thy-1) and CD110 (c-Mpl) were shown to correlate with stem cell properties both in vitro and in transplantation experiments. As these markers are expressed on hematopoietic stem cells, our results suggest that stem cell-like population are enriched in CD90+/CD110+ fraction and they are useful positive-selection markers for the isolation of CSCs in some cases of T-ALL.

  16. Diagnosis of a T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia through digitalized cell analysis of the pleural effusion

    Peruzzi B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Benedetta Peruzzi,1 Ilaria Cutini,2 Anna Maria Grazia Gelli,1 Tommaso Rondelli,1 Marinella Statello,1 Sara Bencini,2 Francesco Mannelli,2 Roberto Caporale,1 Alberto Bosi,2 Alessandra Fanelli1 1General Laboratory Unit (Microscopy and Clinical Cytometry Unit, 2Hematology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero–Universitaria Careggi, Firenze, Italy Introduction: Pleural effusion as the first clinical manifestation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a relatively rare event. An early and accurate diagnosis of this clinical picture is very important for adequate patient management. Case presentation: We report the atypical onset of T-lineage ALL in a 31-year-old man. The patient was admitted to the emergency room due to lung failure; at that moment, the patient's initial blood count was normal; the chest X-ray radiography showed a massive pleural effusion and a thoracentesis was carried out. Routine investigations performed on the pleural fluid using a new technology system and digitalized cell analysis demonstrated infiltration by immature cells. Therefore, bone marrow aspirate and flow cytometry analyses were performed, leading to the diagnosis of T-lineage ALL. A cord blood transplantation procedure was performed at the first hematological remission following chemotherapy regimens. The patient died of septic shock. Conclusion: The case we reported underlines the usefulness of using automated instruments to identify abnormal lymphoid cells in body fluids. Keywords: pleural effusion, digital morphology, leukemia

  17. A facile, branched DNA assay to quantitatively measure glucocorticoid receptor auto-regulation in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Jason R. Schwartz; Purvaba J. Sarvaiya; Lily E. Leiva; Maria C. Velez; Tammuella C. Singleton; Lolie C. Yu; Wayne V. Vedeckis

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) steroid hormones are used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) because of their pro-apoptotic effects in hematopoietic cells.However,not all leukemia cells are sensitive to GC,and no assay to stratify patients is available.In the GC-sensitive T-cell ALL cell line CEM-C7,auto-up-regulation of RNA transcripts for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) correlates with increased apoptotic response.This study aimed to determine if a facile assay of GR transcript levels might be promising for stratifying ALL patients into hormone-sensitive and hormone-resistant populations.The GR transcript profiles of various lymphoid cell lines and 4 bone marrow samples from patients with T-cell ALL were analyzed using both an optimized branched DNA (bDNA) assay and a real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay.There were significant correlations between both assay platforms when measuring total GR (exon 5/6) transcripts in various cell lines and patient samples,but not for a probe set that detects a specific,low abundance GR transcript (exon 1A3).Our results suggest that the bDNA platform is reproducible and precise when measuring total GR transcripts and,with further development,may ultimately offer a simple clinical assay to aid in the prediction of GC-sensitivity in ALL patients.

  18. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration

    Sheard, Michael A., E-mail: msheard@chla.usc.edu [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Ghent, Matthew V., E-mail: mattghent@gmail.com [Department of Pathology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Health Sciences Campus, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Cabral, Daniel J., E-mail: dcabral14@gmail.com [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Lee, Joanne C., E-mail: joannebarnhart@gmail.com [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Khankaldyyan, Vazgen, E-mail: khangaldian@yahoo.com [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Ji, Lingyun, E-mail: lingyun.ji@med.usc.edu [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Wu, Samuel Q., E-mail: swu@chla.usc.edu [Medical Genetics, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Kang, Min H., E-mail: min.kang@ttuhsc.edu [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo. - Highlights: • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher glycolytic expression and function. • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher proliferation and lower cell death. • The divergent metabolic phenotypes selected in 5% and 20% oxygen are semi-permanent.

  19. Clofarabine Combined with Busulfan Provides Excellent Disease Control in Adult Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Kebriaei, P.; Basset, Roland; Ledesma, C.; Ciurea, S; Parmar, S.; Shpall, EJ; Hosing, C.; Khouri, Issa; Qazilbash, M; Popat, U; Alousi, A.; Nieto, Y; Jones, RB; Lima, M.; Champlin, RE

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the safety and early disease-control data obtained with intravenous busulfan (Bu) combined with clofarabine (Clo) in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Fifty-one patients with median age 36 years (range 20–64) received a matched sibling (n=24), syngeneic (n=2) or matched unrelated donor transplant (n=25) for ALL in first complete remission (n=30), second complete remission (n=13), or with active...

  20. Immediate treatment effects of high-dose methotrexate and cranial irradiation on neuropsychological functions of children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia at a regional cancer center

    Sundaramoorthy Chidambaram; Arun Seshachalam; Vidhubala Elangovan; Rejiv Rajendranath

    2014-01-01

    Context: Overall cure rates for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have improved; however, the neuropsychological sequelae of ALL treatment have not been adequately documented in India. Aims: The present study assesses the immediate effects of ALL treatment on neuropsychological functioning, at the Regional Cancer Center in Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Newly diagnosed with ALL patients (n = 24) (aged 6-15 years; 13M:11F) registered between March 2008 and February 200...

  1. Myeloablative allogeneic versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first remission: A prospective sibling donor versus no-donor comparison

    Cornelissen, Jan; Holt, Bronno; Verhoef, Gregor; Veer, Mars; Oers, Marinus; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Sonneveld, Pieter; Maertens, Johan; Marwijk Kooy, Marinus; Schaafsma, Martijn; Wijermans, Pierre; Biesma, Douwe; Wittebol, Shulamit; Voogt, Paul; Baars, Joke

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWhile commonly accepted in poor-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is still disputed in adult patients with standard-risk ALL. We evaluated outcome of patients with ALL in first complete remission (CR1), according to a sibling donor versus no-donor comparison. Eligible patients (433) were entered in 2 consecutive, prospective studies, of whom 288 (67%) were younger than 55 years, in CR1, and eligible t...

  2. Researchers Identify Genomic Alterations Associated with Drug-Targetable Kinase Activation in Ph-like Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most prevalent cancer among children and young adults, and standard treatments within this population generally result in favorable outcomes. By contrast, one particular subtype of this disease, Philadelphia chromosome-like ALL (Ph-like ALL), is associated with inferior outcomes. Ph-like ALL exhibits a gene expression profile similar to chromosome 9:22 translocation positive ALL, yet it lacks the characteristic BCR-ABL fusion protein.

  3. Efficacy of pamidronate in children with low bone mineral density during and after chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Ji Eun; Bae, Soon Hwan; Hah, Jeong Ok

    2013-01-01

    Background Reduced bone mineral density (BMD) is a significant sequelae in children receiving chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Reduced BMD is associated with an increased risk for fractures. Pamidronate, a second-generation bisphosphonate, has been used to treat osteoporosis in children. This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of pamidronate in children with low BMD during and after chemotherapy for ALL and NHL. Methods Between April 200...

  4. Adrenocortical function and reserve in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia; Czynnosc i rezerwa korowo-nadnerczowa u dzieci po leczeniu ostrej bialaczki limfoblastycznej

    Pawlaczyk, B.; Malecka, E.H.; Krause, W. [Instytut Pediatrii, Akademia Medyczna, Poznan (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    Serum cortisol and 17 OHS, 17 KS and DHA levels in 24-hour urine were determined in 30 children (22 girls and boys) 0.5 to 4 years after completion of therapy (radio- and chemotherapy) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Serum cortisol after Syncthen (adrenocortical reserve) was determined in 15 girls and 4 boys. The results show that therapy for ALL depresses glucocorticosteroid synthesis; however, it does not disturb the adrenal reserve or androgenesis. (author) 15 refs, 6 tabs

  5. Role of glutathione S-transferase M1, T1 and P1 gene polymorphisms in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia susceptibility in a Turkish population

    Mehmet Guven; Selin Unal; Duygu Erhan; Nihal Ozdemir; Safa Baris; Tiraje Celkan; Merve Bostancı; Bahadir Batar

    2015-01-01

    The variations between different individuals in the xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes' activity were shown to modify susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Polymorphisms associated with genes coding for the glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzyme were known to affect the metabolism of different carcinogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletion polymorphisms, and the GSTP1 Ile105Val single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on the...

  6. Beyond the 2008 World Health Organization classification: the role of the hematopathology laboratory in the diagnosis and management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    McGregor, Stephanie; McNeer, Jennifer; Gurbuxani, Sandeep

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is made by evaluating morphology and immunophenotype. However, appropriate risk stratification and decisions regarding the intensity of therapy are influenced by additional clinical and laboratory testing that reflect the biology of the disease. Recent years have seen tremendous progress in uncovering genetic lesions that influence the biology of ALL. In recognition of these advances, the 2008 WHO classification incorporated the category of ...

  7. Immature Reticulocyte Fraction and Absolute Neutrophil Count as Predictor of Hemopoietic Recovery in Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on Remission Induction Chemotherapy

    Shan E. Rauf; Saleem Ahmed Khan; Nadir Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) encompasses a group of lymphoid neoplasms that are more common in children and arise from B-and T-lineage lymphoid precursor cells. The immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF), a new routine parameter in hematology analyzers, can give an indication of hemopoietic recovery like absolute neutrophil count (ANC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate IRF in excess of 5% was considered as IRF recovery. Materials and Methods: In th...

  8. Andrographolide inhibits growth of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and upregulation of p38 MAPK pathways

    Yang T; Yao S; Zhang X; Guo Y

    2016-01-01

    Tingfang Yang,1 Shuluan Yao,2 Xianfeng Zhang,3 Yan Guo2 1Department of Pediatrics, Jining No 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jining Medical University Affiliated Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Psychiatry, Jining Psychiatric Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) as a pr...

  9. Recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage in treatment with dasatinib in a patient showing SMAD4 mutation with acute lymphoblastic leukemia Philadelphia positive and juvenile polyposis hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome

    Chiara Sartor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a patient affected by juvenile polyposis and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia linked to a SMAD4 mutation who developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia positive for the Philadelphia chromosome translocation and with a complex karyotype. During the treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib the patient presented recurrent severe gastrointestinal hemorrhages linked to the genetic background and aggravated by thrombocytopenia.

  10. Frequency of p190 and p210 BCR-ABL rearrangements and survival in Brazilian adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Ilana de França Azevedo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigated the occurrence of the p190 and p210 break point clusterregion-Abelson (BCR-ABL rearrangements in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and possible associations with clinical and laboratory characteristics and survival. Methods: Forty-one over 18-year-old patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia of both genders followed-up between January 2008 and May 2012 were included in this study. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical charts of the patients. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR using specific primers was employed to identify molecular rearrangements. Results: At diagnosis, the median age was 33 years, and there was a predominance of males (61%. The most common immunophenotype was B lineage (76%. BCR-ABL rearrangements was detected in 14 (34% patients with the following distribution: p190 (28%, p210 (50% and double positive (22%. Overall survival of patients with a mean/median of 331/246 days of follow up was 39%, respectively, negative BCR-ABL (44% and positive BCR-ABL (28%. Conclusion: These results confirm the high frequency of BCR-ABL rearrangements and the low survival rate of adult Brazilian patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  11. Improved outcome with pulses of vincristine and corticosteroids in continuation therapy of children with average risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and lymphoblastic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL): report of the EORTC randomized phase 3 trial 58951

    De Moerloose, Barbara; Suciu, Stefan; Bertrand, Yves; Mazingue, Françoise; Robert, Alain; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Yakouben, Karima; Ferster, Alice; Margueritte, Geneviève; Lutz, Patrick; Munzer, Martine; Sirvent, Nicolas; Norton, Lucilia; Boutard, Patrick; Plantaz, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer 58951 trial for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) addressed 3 randomized questions, including the evaluation of dexamethasone (DEX) versus prednisolone (PRED) in induction and, for average-risk patients, the evaluation of vincristine and corticosteroid pulses during continuation therapy. The corticosteroid used in the pulses was that assigned at induction. Overall, 411 patients were ran...

  12. Transfer of Genomics Information to Flow Cytometry: Expression of CD27 and CD44 Discriminates Subtypes of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Vášková, M.; Mejstříková, E.; Kalina, T.; Martinková, Patrícia; Omelka, M.; Trka, J.; Starý, J.; Hrušák, O.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 5 (2005), s. 876-878. ISSN 0887-6924 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : transfer * genomics * information * cytometry * expression * discriminates * subtypesacute * lymphoblastic * leukemia Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 6.612, year: 2005

  13. The association of reduced folate carrier 80G>A polymorphism to outcome in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia interacts with chromosome 21 copy number

    Gregers, Jannie; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Dalhoff, Kim; Lausen, Birgitte Frederiksen; Schroeder, Henrik; Rosthoej, Steen; Carlsen, Niels; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Peterson, Curt

    2010-01-01

    with chromosome 21 copy number in the leukemic clone. A total of 500 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to the common Nordic treatment protocols were included, and we found that the RFC AA variant was associated with a 50% better chance of staying in remission compared with GG......The reduced folate carrier (RFC) is involved in the transport of methotrexate (MTX) across the cell membrane. The RFC gene (SLC19A1) is located on chromosome 21, and we hypothesized that the RFC80 G>A polymorphism would affect outcome and toxicity in childhood leukemia and that this could interact...

  14. Type C virus particles produced in human T-cell lines derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a leukemic T-lymphoid malignancy.

    Oda, Takuzo; Watanabe,Sekiko; Nakamura,Takashi

    1983-01-01

    Electron microscopy of four human T-cell lines revealed the production of type C virus particles in two T-cell lines: one derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the other from a leukemic T-lymphoid malignancy. Virus particles isolated from these cells had reverse transcriptase activity and the major internal structural protein of 30,000 daltons (p30). The indirect immunofluorescence test of these virus-producing cells with sera of patients with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) was negative....

  15. Primary anaplastic astrocytoma of the brain after prophylactic cranial irradiation in a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Case report and review of the literature

    Imtiaz Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 6½-year-old boy had developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and was treated with systemic chemotherapy, intrathecal triple drug regimen and prophylactic cranial irradiation. After 10 years he developed anaplastic astrocytoma of the postero-superior cerebellum on the left side while leukemia was in remission. He was treated with surgical excision, followed by adjuvant three dimensional conformal radiotherapy and is on salvage chemotherapy with temozolamide. It is possible that the anaplastic astrocytoma may be a radiation induced malignancy.

  16. Vitamin E and N-Acetylcysteine as Antioxidant Adjuvant Therapy in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Youssef Al-Tonbary

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Although cancer therapies have experienced great success nowadays, yet the associated toxic response and free radicals formation have resulted in significant number of treatment-induced deaths rather than disease-induced fatalities. Complications of chemotherapy have forced physicians to study antioxidant use as adjunctive treatment in cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant role of vitamin E and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC in overcoming treatment-induced toxicity in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL during the intensive period of chemo-/radiotherapy, almost the first two months of treatment. Forty children newly diagnosed with ALL were enrolled in this study. Twenty children (group I have taken vitamin E and NAC supplementations with chemotherapy and the other twenty children (group II have not taken any adjuvant antioxidant therapy. They were evaluated clinically for the occurrence of complications and by the laboratory parameters (blood levels of glutathione peroxidase (Glu.PX antioxidant enzyme, malondialdehyde (MDA, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-, liver enzymes, and bone marrow picture. Results revealed reduced chemotherapy and radiotherapy toxicity as evidenced by decreasing level of MDA, increasing level of Glu.Px and decreased occurrence of toxic hepatitis, haematological complications, and need for blood and platelet transfusions in group I compared to group II. We can conclude that vitamin E and NAC have been shown to be effective as antioxidant adjuvant therapy in children with ALL to reduce chemo-/radiotherapy-related toxicities during the initial period of treatment.

  17. [Endocrinologic function following cranial irradiation in acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood].

    Lackner, H; Schwingshandl, J; Pakisch, B; Knoblauch, S; Mutz, I; Urban, C

    1991-01-01

    Endocrinological function was evaluated in 31 children after successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. All patients had received combination chemotherapy and 12-24Gy of cranial irradiation according to the German therapy protocols BFM-81, BFM-83 and BFM-86. Height, weight, bone age and pubertal development, as well as hypothalamic-pituitary function were measured. Long-term linear growth was unaffected in all patients. However, 9 patients showed subnormal serum growth hormone levels in response to pharmacological stimulation of the pituitary. All patients had normal levels of T3 and T4, but one patient showed an increased response of thyrotropin to thyrotropin releasing hormone. All prepubertal and postpubertal children demonstrated appropriate secretion of follicle-stimulation hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) after stimulation with LH-releasing hormone (LH-RH). 3 pubertal girls showed adequate oestradiol levels, but abnormally high levels of gonadotropins in response to LH-RH. Sexual development was normal in two of them, but the third had a late menarche and irregular menses. The significance of these findings is discussed in the context of recommendations possibly to further reduce or completely delete prophylactic cranial irradiation. PMID:1759459

  18. Acute Leukemia: Diagnosis, Management, and Potential for Cure

    Stewart, Keith; Keating, Armand

    1988-01-01

    Acute leukemia is an uncommon malignant disorder resulting from the clonal proliferation of hematopoietic precursors of the myeloid or lymphoid lineages. Of the two major subgroups, acute lymphoblastic leukemia is more common in children, while acute myelogenous leukemia predominates in adults. With modern chemotherapy 60%-70% of all children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia can be long-term survivors and are potentially cured. Although the prognosis in acute myelogenous leukemia is less fav...

  19. A televideo exercise and nutrition program for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in maintenance therapy: design and methods

    Gibson CA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cheryl A Gibson,1 Keith J August,2 Jerry L Greene,3 Stephen D Herrmann,4 Jaehoon Lee,5 Susan P Harvey,6 Kate Lambourne,3 Debra K Sullivan7 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General and Geriatric Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, KS, USA; 2Children's Mercy Hospital, MO, USA; 3Department of Health, Sport, and Exercise Sciences, University of Kansas, KS, USA; 4Children's Health Research Center, Sanford Research, SD, USA; 5Institute for Measurement, Methodology, Analysis and Policy, Texas Tech University, TX, USA; 6Center for Research on Learning, University of Kansas, KS, USA; 7Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, University of Kansas Medical Center, KS, USA Abstract: Changes in nutrient intake and decreased exercise resulting from cancer therapies as well as their side effects may be contributing factors in the increased body weight and differences in physical fitness observed in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. This article will describe the study protocol for an intervention program designed to improve the physical activity and nutrition behaviors of ALL survivors. Twenty-four children aged between 4 years and 12 years with ALL will be randomized to a 6-month technology-based exercise and nutrition program (TLC4ALLKids or to enhanced usual care (eUC. The participants randomized to the TLC4ALLKids will participate in weekly, 1-hour coaching sessions on nutrition and physical activity and 1-hour physical activity classes delivered by group video conferencing. Participants will be provided with iPad tablets loaded with video conferencing software and the Healthy Lifestyle Tracking calendar to track daily nutrition and physical activity goals and weight. Both groups will be provided with Fitbit™ Zip to monitor physical activity. To assess feasibility, participant recruitment (achievement of proposed sample size, attendance (per weekly online sessions/assessment sessions, and adherence (number of

  20. The clinical importance of myeloid antigen coexpression and TEL-AML1 mutation in patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Ayşen Türedi Yıldırım

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aim to investigate the relationship,if any, between clinical features, prognosis, and thecoexpressions and TEL-AML1 mutation in patients withacute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL.Methods: Eigthy-three patients with acute lymphoblasticleukemia were retrospectively examined. Age, gender,White blood cell count, hemoglobin level, platelet count,ALL subtypei (B or T ALL, risk groups, surface antigensdeteceted by flow cytometry, existence of TEL-AML1 mutations,response, remission and relapse status at 8., 15.ve 33. Days of treatment were recorded and analyzed.Results: 15 (18% out of 83 were identified with aberrantantigen expression. Of these patients, twelve (14.4%had myeloid antigen coexpression (CD13 and/or CD33,two with B cell ALL had CD2 and CD7 coexpressions respectively,one with T cell ALL had CD19 coexpression.No significant differences were found between patientswith and without myeloid antigen coexpression in terms ofhemoglobin levels, white blood cells and platelet counts,responses given on the 8th, 15th, and 30th days on the treatment,risk groups, and relapse (p>0.05. Myeloid antigencoexpression was found in 4 of 13 patients who were identifiedwith TEL-AML1 mutation. No significant relationshipwas found between this mutation and coexpressions. Norelapse and exitus were observed in four patients with coexpressionand TEL-AML1.Conclusion: The prognosis and clinical features showsno statistically significant relationship with the presence ofneither Myeloid antigen expression nor TEL-AML1 mutation.We believe, however, the future studies involving biggersample sizes will prove to be useful in terms of moreconvincing results. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4(1: 90-94Key words: Acute lenfoblastic leukemia, coexpression,TEL-AML1 mutation, prognosis