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Sample records for acute lung function

  1. Lung function evaluation in acute postradiation pneumonitis

    The aim of this study was pulmonary function evaluation in patients with radiation pneumonitis (rp). Study group included 18 patients with symptomatic rp (8 with breast cancer, 6 with Hodgkin's disease and 4 with lung cancer) treated at the Netherland s Cancer inst. In Amsterdam between 1988 and 1994. The lung function tests were performed at the time of rp presentation and monthly thereafter and consisted of a standard spirometry: forced expiratory volume in 1 sec. (FEV1), vital capacity (VC) and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) performed with the use of a single breath technique. The mean values of DLCO, VC, FEV1 and TLC at the time of rp presentation were 72.2%, 91.0% and 85.8% of predicted value (pv), respectively. The results of the a bone tests at the last examination (66.4%, 85.6%, 77.2% and 76.2% of pv), respectively, were lower than those registered at the time of rp presentation. The highest degree of functional deterioration included diffusion capacity; the mean of the lowest values of DLCO was 56.4% of pv. Usually the lowest value of DLCO accompanied the exacerbation of clinical symptoms. The results of this study demonstrated pulmonary function deterioration in patients with rp. (author)

  2. Lung function

    2005-01-01

    2005200 The effect of body position changes on lung function, lung CT imaging and pathology in an oleic acid induced acute lung injury model. JI Xin-ping (戢新平), et al. Dept Emergency, 1st Affili Hosp, China Med Univ, Shenyang 110001. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis, 2005;28(1) :33-36. Objective: To study the effect of body position changes on lung mechanics, oxygenation, CT images and pathology in an oleic acid-induced acute lung injury (ALl) model. Methods: The study groups con-

  3. The functional comorbidity index had high inter-rater reliability in patients with acute lung injury

    Fan Eddy; Gifford Jeneen M; Chandolu Satish; Colantuoni Elizabeth; Pronovost Peter J; Needham Dale M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The Functional Comorbidity Index (FCI) was recently developed to predict physical function in acute lung injury patients using comorbidity data. Our objectives were to determine: (1) the inter-rater reliability of the FCI collected using in-patient discharge summaries (primary objective); and (2) the accuracy and predictive validity of the FCI collected using hospital discharge summaries and admission records versus complete chart review (secondary objectives). Methods For...

  4. Sexual dimorphism in lung function responses to acute influenza A infection

    Larcombe, Alexander N.; Foong, Rachel E.; Bozanich, Elizabeth M.; Berry, Luke J.; Garratt, Luke W.; Gualano, Rosa C.; Jones, Jessica E.; Dousha, Lovisa F.; Zosky, Graeme R.; Sly, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Larcombe et al. (2011) Sexual dimorphism in lung function responses to acute influenza A infection. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(5), 334–342. Background  Males are generally more susceptible to respiratory infections; however, there are few data on the physiological responses to such infections in males and females. Objectives  To determine whether sexual dimorphism exists in the physiological/inflammatory responses of weanling and adult BALB/c mice to influenza. Methods  Weanling and adult mice of both sexes were inoculated with influenza A or appropriate control solution. Respiratory mechanics, responsiveness to methacholine (MCh), viral titre and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cellular inflammation/cytokines were measured 4 (acute) and 21 (resolution) days post‐inoculation. Results  Acute infection impaired lung function and induced hyperresponsiveness and cellular inflammation in both sexes at both ages. Males and females responded differently with female mice developing greater abnormalities in tissue damping and elastance and greater MCh responsiveness at both ages. BAL inflammation, cytokines and lung viral titres were similar between the sexes. At resolution, all parameters had returned to baseline levels in adults and weanling males; however, female weanlings had persisting hyperresponsiveness. Conclusions  We identified significant differences in the physiological responses of male and female mice to infection with influenza A, which occurred in the absence of variation in viral titre and cellular inflammation. PMID:21668688

  5. The functional comorbidity index had high inter-rater reliability in patients with acute lung injury

    Fan Eddy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Functional Comorbidity Index (FCI was recently developed to predict physical function in acute lung injury patients using comorbidity data. Our objectives were to determine: (1 the inter-rater reliability of the FCI collected using in-patient discharge summaries (primary objective; and (2 the accuracy and predictive validity of the FCI collected using hospital discharge summaries and admission records versus complete chart review (secondary objectives. Methods For reliability, we evaluated the FCI’s intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC among trained research staff performing data collection for 421 acute lung injury patients enrolled in a prospective cohort study. For validity and accuracy, we compared the detection of FCI comorbidities across three types of inpatient medical records, and the association of the respective FCI scores obtained with patients’ SF-36 physical function subscale (PFS scores at 1-year follow-up. Results Inter-rater reliability was near-perfect (ICC 0.91; 95% CI 0.89-0.94. Hospital admission records and discharge summaries (vs. complete chart review significantly underestimated the total FCI score. However, using multivariable linear regression, FCI scores collected using each of the three types of inpatient medical records had similar associations with PFS, suggesting similar predictive value. Conclusions Data collection using in-patient discharge summaries represents a reliable and valid method for collecting FCI comorbidity information.

  6. Overall and regional lung function in dogs exposed acutely to ozone

    Regional distribution of ventilation and overall function of the lungs were compared in anesthetized, paralyzed, mechanically ventilated dogs exposed to ozone. Three animals were exposed at each concentration (0. 0.13, 0.22, and 0.45 ppm ozone ) for 3 hr. There were no significant changes in pulmonary flow resistance, dynamic compliance, or flow rates derived from maximum forced expiratory maneuvers. The distribution of inspired gas was determined using air containing 13N and a positron camera to follow wash-in in each of 80 or more regions of the lung. The mean wash in time (T) and its standard deviation did not change in sham-treated dogs, but T increased by 40 to 100% in exposed animals. Dogs showing increases in T also had increased frequency dependence of compliance. The changes in 13N wash-in reflected less uniform distribution of ventilation, with the greatest disparity occurring between central and marginal regions. Altered regional mechanical function, in the absence of overall changes, suggested that the initial effect of ozone was on the small airways. The measurement may be a sensitive indicator of acute irritation in the lung periphery

  7. Lung function

    The term lung function is often restricted to the assessment of volume time curves measured at the mouth. Spirometry includes the assessment of lung volumes which can be mobilised with the corresponding flow-volume curves. In addition, lung volumes that can not be mobilised, such as the residual volume, or only partially as FRC and TLC can be measured by body plethysmography combined with the determination of the airway resistance. Body plethysmography allows the correct positioning of forced breathing manoeuvres on the volume-axis, e.g. before and after pharmacotherapy. Adding the CO single breath transfer factor (TLCO), which includes the measurement of the ventilated lung volume using He, enables a clear diagnosis of different obstructive, restrictive or mixed ventilatory defects with and without trapped air. Tests of reversibility and provocation, as well as the assessment of inspiratory mouth pressures (PImax, P0.1) help to classify the underlying disorder and to clarify treatment strategies. For further information and to complete the diagnostic of disturbances of the ventilation, diffusion and/or perfusion (capillar-)arterial bloodgases at rest and under physical strain sometimes amended by ergospirometry are recommended. Ideally, lung function measurements are amended by radiological and nuclear medicine techniques. (orig.)

  8. Lung Injury in Acute Pancreatitis

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Lara Bellacosa; Cristina Felicani

    2009-01-01

    Most knowledge has been accumulated on the mechanisms involved in the development of distant organ injuries during the course of severe acute pancreatitis. Among the various distant organ dysfunctions, both the development of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome represent serious complications. In the following paragraphs the pathophysiological mechanisms capable of determining lung injury during the course of acute pancreatitis will be reviewed. Pancreatic Enzymes and...

  9. Changes in respiratory elastance after deep inspirations reflect surface film functionality in mice with acute lung injury.

    Takahashi, Ayuko; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Majumdar, Arnab; Suki, Béla

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant reduces surface tension in the lung and prevents alveolar collapse. Following a deep inspiration (DI), respiratory elastance first drops then gradually increases due to surface film and tissue viscoelasticity. In acute lung injury (ALI), this increase is faster and governed by alveolar collapse due to increased surface tension. We hypothesized that the rate of increase in elastance reflects the deficiency of surfactant in the lung. To test this, mice were ventilated before (baseline) and after saline lavage obtained by injecting 0.8 ml and withdrawing 0.7 ml fluid (severe ALI) or injecting 0.1 ml (mild ALI). After two DIs, elastance was tracked for 10 min followed by a full lavage to assess surfactant proteins B (SP-B) and C (SP-C) content. Following 2 DIs, the increases in elastance during 10 min ventilation (ΔH) were 3.60 ± 0.61, 5.35 ± 1.04, and 8.33 ± 0.84 cmH2O/ml in baseline mice and mice with mild and severe ALI, respectively (P surface film functionality in lavage-induced ALI in mice. This method could prove useful in clinical situations such as diagnosing surfactant problems, monitoring recovery from lung injury or the effectiveness of surfactant therapy. PMID:26066828

  10. Cement dust exposure and acute lung function: A cross shift study

    Moen Bente E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have been carried out on acute effects of cement dust exposure. This study is conducted to investigate the associations between current "total" dust exposure and acute respiratory symptoms and respiratory function among cement factory workers. Methods A combined cross-sectional and cross-shift study was conducted in Dire Dawa cement factory in Ethiopia. 40 exposed production workers from the crusher and packing sections and 20 controls from the guards were included. Personal "total" dust was measured in the workers' breathing zone and peak expiratory flow (PEF was measured for all selected workers before and after the shift. When the day shift ended, the acute respiratory symptoms experienced were scored and recorded on a five-point Likert scale using a modified respiratory symptom score questionnaire. Results The highest geometric mean dust exposure was found in the crusher section (38.6 mg/m3 followed by the packing section (18.5 mg/m3 and the guards (0.4 mg/m3. The highest prevalence of respiratory symptoms for the high exposed workers was stuffy nose (85% followed by shortness of breath (47% and "sneezing" (45%. PEF decreased significantly across the shift in the high exposed group. Multiple linear regression showed a significant negative association between the percentage cross-shift change in PEF and total dust exposure. The number of years of work in high-exposure sections and current smoking were also associated with cross-shift decrease in PEF. Conclusions Total cement dust exposure was related to acute respiratory symptoms and acute ventilatory effects. Implementing measures to control dust and providing adequate personal respiratory protective equipment for the production workers are highly recommended.

  11. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury.

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N; Thorneloe, Kevin S; Bradshaw, Heather B; Matalon, Sadis; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2014-07-15

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  12. The acute impact of a hematopoietic allograft on lung function and inflammation: a prospective observational study

    Enocson Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No studies have investigated the immediate impact of receiving an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT on pulmonary inflammation or lung function. Methods Using a prospective study design, we quantified the changes in these outcome measures in eligible adult individuals in the first six months after receiving an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Results Between January 2007 and December 2008, 72 patients were eligible to participate in the cohort, and of these 68 (94% were included in the study. Compared to baseline, pulmonary inflammation as measured by exhaled nitric oxide increased after receiving a HSCT with the largest increment seen at three months (+6.0ppb, 95%CI: +0.4 to +11.5, and this was sustained at six months. Percent predicted forced expiratory volume in one second decreased over the same period, with the largest decrease observed at six weeks (−5.9%, 95% CI: -8.9 to −2.9, and this was also sustained over a six month period. Similar associations were observed for FVC. A larger increase in exhaled nitric oxide from baseline at six weeks and three months may be associated with decreased mortality (p=0.06, p=0.04 respectively. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that recipients of an allogeneic HSCT experience an increase in biomarkers of pulmonary inflammation and a decrease in lung function in the first six months after the procedure. If independently validated in other study populations, these observations could have potential as a prognostic biomarker for this patient group.

  13. Effect of oleic acid-induced acute lung injury and conventional mechanical ventilation on renal function in piglets

    LIU Ai-jun; LING Feng; LI Zhi-qiang; LI Xiao-feng; LIU Ying-long; DU Jie; HAN Ling

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal models that demonstrate changes of renal function in response to acute lung injury (ALl) and mechanical ventilation (MV) are few.The present study was performed to examine the effect of ALl induced by oleic acid (OA) in combination with conventional MV strategy on renal function in piglets.Methods Twelve Chinese mini-piglets were randomly divided into two groups:the OA group (n=6),animals were ventilated with a conventional MV strategy of 12 ml/kg and suffered an ALl induced by administration of OA,and the control group (n=6),animals were ventilated with a protective MV strategy of 6 ml/kg and received the same amount of sterile saline.Results Six hours after OA injection a severe lung injury and a mild-moderate degree of renal histopathological injury were seen,while no apparent histological abnormalities were observed in the control group.Although we observed an increase in the plasma concentrations of creatinine and urea after ALl,there was no significant difference compared with the control group.Plasma concentrations of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and cystatin C increased (5.6±1.3) and (7.4±1.5) times in the OA group compared to baseline values,and were significantly higher than the values in the control group.OA injection in combination with conventional MV strategy resulted in a dramatic aggravation of hemodynamic and blood gas exchange parameters,while these parameters remained stable during the experiment in the control group.The plasma expression of TNF-α and IL-6 in the OA group were significantly higher than that in the control group.Compared with high expression in the lung and renal tissue in the OA group,TNF-α and IL-6 were too low to be detected in the lung and renal tissue in the control group.Conclusions OA injection in combination with conventional MV strategy not only resulted in a severe lung injury but also an apparent renal injury.The potential mechanisms involved a cytokine response of TNF-α and

  14. Biomarkers in Acute Lung Injury

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Wendt, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and Acute Lung Injury (ALI) result in high permeability pulmonary edema causing hypoxic respiratory failure with high morbidity and mortality. As the population ages, the incidence of ALI is expected to rise. Over the last decade, several studies have identified biomarkers in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid providing important insights into the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of ALI. Several biomarkers have been validated in subjec...

  15. Lung function and radiation response

    Lung function, arterial oxygen and haemoglobin concentration were examined, before treatment with radical radiotherapy, in 141 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck cancer. Findings were considered to reflect physiological conditions present at the time of radiotherapy and were related to acute normal tissue reactions and tumour control. Although 53% of patients showed some impairment of lung function and 47% demonstrated a haemoglobin oxygen saturation below the normal range, oxygen partial pressure was below expected levels in fewer patients (27%) and total arterial oxygen content was below normal in only 12% of patients. No correlation was found between tests performed and severity of acute morbidity or with local tumour control. In patients with carcinoma of the bronchus, there was a trend for incomplete tumour control to be associated with a lower haemoglobin level, but this did not reach statistical significance. (author)

  16. Lung function and radiation response

    Hong, A.; Dische, S.; Saunders, M.I.; Crocombe, K. (Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom). Mount Vernon Centre for Cancer Treatment); Lockwood, P. (Harefield Hospital (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physiology)

    1991-12-01

    Lung function, arterial oxygen and haemoglobin concentration were examined, before treatment with radical radiotherapy, in 141 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck cancer. Findings were considered to reflect physiological conditions present at the time of radiotherapy and were related to acute normal tissue reactions and tumour control. Although 53% of patients showed some impairment of lung function and 47% demonstrated a haemoglobin oxygen saturation below the normal range, oxygen partial pressure was below expected levels in fewer patients (27%) and total arterial oxygen content was below normal in only 12% of patients. No correlation was found between tests performed and severity of acute morbidity or with local tumour control. In patients with carcinoma of the bronchus, there was a trend for incomplete tumour control to be associated with a lower haemoglobin level, but this did not reach statistical significance. (author).

  17. Nonrespiratory lung function

    The function of the lungs is primarily the function as a gas exchanger: the venous blood returning to the lungs is arterialized with oxygen in the lungs and the arterialized blood is sent back again to the peripheral tissues of the whole body to be utilized for metabolic oxygenation. Besides the gas exchanging function which we call ''respiratory lung function'' the lungs have functions that have little to do with gas exchange itself. We categorically call the latter function of the lungs as ''nonrespiratory lung function''. The lungs consist of the conductive airways, the gas exchanging units like the alveoli, and the interstitial space that surrounds the former two compartments. The interstitial space contains the blood and lymphatic capillaries, collagen and elastic fibers and cement substances. The conductive airways and the gas exchanging units are directly exposed to the atmosphere that contains various toxic and nontoxic gases, fume and biological or nonbiological particles. Because the conductive airways are equipped with defense mechanisms like mucociliary clearance or coughs to get rid of these toxic gases, particles or locally produced biological debris, we are usually free from being succumbed to ill effects of inhaled materials. By use of nuclear medicine techniques, we can now evaluate mucociliary clearance function, and other nonrespiratory lung functions as well in vivo

  18. Combined effect of low-dose nitric oxide gas inhalation with partial liquid ventilation on hemodynamics, pulmonary function, and gas exchange in acute lung injury of newborn piglets.

    Choi, Chang Won; Hwang, Jong Hee; Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Won Soon

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a randomized animal study to determine whether there is a cumulative effect on hemodynamics, pulmonary function, and gas exchange when low-dose nitric oxide (NO) is added to partial liquid ventilation (PLV) in acute lung injury. Eighteen newborn piglets were saline-lavaged repeatedly, and randomly divided into two groups: PLV with perfluorocarbon group (n=8) and lavage only (control) group (n=10). Perfluorodecalin (30 mL/kg) was instilled into the endotracheal tube for 30 min, fo...

  19. Transfusion related acute lung injury

    Sharma Ratti; Bhattacharya Prasun; Thakral Beenu; Saluja Karan; Marwaha Neelam

    2009-01-01

    Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse reaction to transfusion of plasma containing blood components. We describe a case of 10-year-old male child with aplastic anemia, platelet count of 7800/΅l, B positive blood group who developed fever (39.2΀C), difficulty in breathing and cyanosis within 2 hrs after transfusion of a random platelet concentrate. Despite the best resuscitative efforts, the child died within next 24 hrs. The prese...

  20. Lung function and radiation response.

    Hong, A; Dische, S; Saunders, M I; Lockwood, P; Crocombe, K

    1991-12-01

    This study investigated whether impaired respiratory function affected the response to radiotherapy. A prospective study was performed in which lung function, arterial oxygen and haemoglobin concentration were examined, before treatment with radical radiotherapy, in 141 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck cancer. The findings were considered to reflect the physiological conditions present at the time of radiotherapy and these were related to acute normal tissue reactions and tumour control. Although 53% of the patients showed some impairment of lung function and 47% demonstrated a haemoglobin oxygen saturation below the normal range, oxygen partial pressure was below expected levels in fewer patients (27%) and total arterial oxygen content was below normal in only 12% of patients. No correlation was found between the tests performed and the severity of acute morbidity or with local tumour control. In the patients with carcinoma of the bronchus, there was a trend for incomplete tumour control to be associated with a lower haemoglobin level, but this did not reach statistical significance. In patients selected for curative radiotherapy, lung function would not appear to be an important factor influencing the response of normal tissues or tumour to irradiation. PMID:1663411

  1. Pathogenesis of acute lung injury in severe acute pancreatitis

    SHI Lei; YUE Yuan; ZHANG Mei; PAN Cheng-en

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To study the pathogenesis of acute lung injury in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Methods:Rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, 6, 9 and 12 h after establishment of inducing model. Pancreas and lung tissues were obtained for pathological study, microvascular permeability and MPO examination. Gene expressions of TNF-α and ICAM-1 in pancreas and lung tissues were detected by RT-PCR. Results:After inducing SAP model, the injury degree of the pancreas and the lung increased gradually, accompanied with gradually increased MPO activity and microvascular permeability. Gene expressions of TNF-α and ICAM-1 in pancreas rose at 1 h and reached peak at 7 h. Relatively, their gene expressions in the lungs only rose slightly at 1 h and reached peak at 9-12 h gradually. Conclusion:There is an obvious time window between SAP and lung injury, when earlier protection is beneficial to prevent development of acute lung injury.

  2. Measurement of lung function in awake 2-4-year-old asthmatic children during methacholine challenge and acute asthma

    Klug, B; Bisgaard, H

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated three techniques for testing of lung function in young awake children. We compared measurements by the forced or impulse oscillation technique (IOS), the interrupter technique (IT), and transcutaneous measurements of oxygen (tcPo2) with concomitant measurements of specific...

  3. Transfusion related acute lung injury

    Sharma Ratti

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse reaction to transfusion of plasma containing blood components. We describe a case of 10-year-old male child with aplastic anemia, platelet count of 7800/΅l, B positive blood group who developed fever (39.2΀C, difficulty in breathing and cyanosis within 2 hrs after transfusion of a random platelet concentrate. Despite the best resuscitative efforts, the child died within next 24 hrs. The present case highlights the fact that TRALI should be kept as a differential diagnosis in all patients developing acute respiratory discomfort within 6 hrs of transfusion. Without a ′gold standard′ the diagnosis of TRALI relies on a high index of suspicion and on excluding other types of transfusion reactions. Notification to transfusion services is crucial to ensure that a proper investigation is carried out and at-risk donor and recipients can be identified, and risk reduction measures can be adopted.

  4. Disseminated tuberculosis presenting as acute lung injury

    Mary Grace

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis presenting as acute lung injury is distinctly uncommon, even in India where tuberculosis an endemic disease. Simultaneously, acute lung injury is a highly fatal complication of tuberculosis. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose tuberculosis in such cases. Failure to initiate early treatment can have disastrous consequences as exemplified in this case report. This case attempts to highlight the need to consider tuberculosis as one of the likely causative factors for acute lung injury and the importance of starting empirical antituberculous therapy in suspected cases early.

  5. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Pryhuber, Gloria S.; Chess, Patricia R.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Paul R. Knight; Notter, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by rapid-onset respiratory failure following a variety of direct and indirect insults to the parenchyma or vasculature of the lungs. Mortality from ALI/ARDS is substantial, and current therapy primarily emphasizes mechanical ventilation and judicial fluid management plus standard treatment of the initiating insult and any known underlying disease. Current pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS is not optimal, a...

  6. Disseminated tuberculosis presenting as acute lung injury

    Mary Grace; V K Shameer; Renjith Bharathan; Kavitha Chandrikakumari

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis presenting as acute lung injury is distinctly uncommon, even in India where tuberculosis an endemic disease. Simultaneously, acute lung injury is a highly fatal complication of tuberculosis. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose tuberculosis in such cases. Failure to initiate early treatment can have disastrous consequences as exemplified in this case report. This case attempts to highlight the need to consider tuberculosis as one of the likely causative factors for acu...

  7. Resolution of acute inflammation in the lung.

    Levy, Bruce D; Serhan, Charles N

    2014-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli, or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized proresolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung. PMID:24313723

  8. Non-invasive ventilation used as an adjunct to airway clearance treatments improves lung function during an acute exacerbation of cystic fibrosis: a randomised trial

    Tiffany J Dwyer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: During an acute exacerbation of cystic fibrosis, is non-invasive ventilation beneficial as an adjunct to the airway clearance regimen? Design: Randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Forty adults with moderate to severe cystic fibrosis lung disease and who were admitted to hospital for an acute exacerbation. Intervention: Comprehensive inpatient care (control group compared to the same care with the addition of non-invasive ventilation during airway clearance treatments from Day 2 of admission until discharge (experimental group. Outcome measures: Lung function and subjective symptom severity were measured daily. Fatigue was measured at admission and discharge on the Schwartz Fatigue Scale from 7 (no fatigue to 63 (worst fatigue points. Quality of life and exercise capacity were also measured at admission and discharge. Length of admission and time to next hospital admission were recorded. Results: Analysed as the primary outcome, the experimental group had a greater rate of improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 than the control group, but this was not statistically significant (MD 0.13% predicted per day, 95% CI –0.03 to 0.28. However, the experimental group had a significantly higher FEV1 at discharge than the control group (MD 4.2% predicted, 95% CI 0.1 to 8.3. The experimental group reported significantly lower levels of fatigue on the Schwartz fatigue scale at discharge than the control group (MD 6 points, 95% CI 1 to 11. There was no significant difference between the experimental and control groups in subjective symptom severity, quality of life, exercise capacity, length of hospital admission or time to next hospital admission. Conclusion: Among people hospitalised for an acute exacerbation of cystic fibrosis, the use of non-invasive ventilation as an adjunct to the airway clearance regimen significantly improves FEV1 and fatigue. Trial

  9. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI)

    TAJANA ZAH; JASNA MESARIC; VISNJA MAJERIC-KOGLER

    2009-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a complication following transfusion of blood products and is potentially a life-threatening adverse event of transfusion. The first case of fatal pulmonary edema following transfusion was reported in the 1950s. In recent time, TRALI has developed from an almost unknown transfusion reaction to the most common cause of transfusion related major morbidities and fatalities. A clinical definition of TRALI was established in 2004, based on acute res...

  10. Obstructive lung disease in acute medical patients.

    Seemungal, T.; Harrinarine, R.; Rios, M.; Abiraj, V.; Ali, A.; Lacki, N.; Mahabir, N.; Ramoutar, V.; King, C. P.; Bhowmik, A.; Wedzicha, J A

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the proportion of adult medical patients who have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), using the Global initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines (GOLD), and its relation to vascular disease. METHODS: This is a prospective cross-sectional study of adult patients admitted to acute medical wards. Interviewer administered questionnaire, anthropometric and spirometric measurements were done. RESULTS: Spirometry was performed in 720 acute admissio...

  11. What Are Lung Function Tests?

    ... Risks Links Related Topics Asthma COPD How the Lungs Work Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to ... mun-ary) function tests, measure how well your lungs work. These tests are used to look for the ...

  12. Lung function; Lungenfunktion

    Sorichter, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg, Abteilung Pneumologie, Freiburg (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    The term lung function is often restricted to the assessment of volume time curves measured at the mouth. Spirometry includes the assessment of lung volumes which can be mobilised with the corresponding flow-volume curves. In addition, lung volumes that can not be mobilised, such as the residual volume, or only partially as FRC and TLC can be measured by body plethysmography combined with the determination of the airway resistance. Body plethysmography allows the correct positioning of forced breathing manoeuvres on the volume-axis, e.g. before and after pharmacotherapy. Adding the CO single breath transfer factor (T{sub LCO}), which includes the measurement of the ventilated lung volume using He, enables a clear diagnosis of different obstructive, restrictive or mixed ventilatory defects with and without trapped air. Tests of reversibility and provocation, as well as the assessment of inspiratory mouth pressures (PI{sub max}, P{sub 0.1}) help to classify the underlying disorder and to clarify treatment strategies. For further information and to complete the diagnostic of disturbances of the ventilation, diffusion and/or perfusion (capillar-)arterial bloodgases at rest and under physical strain sometimes amended by ergospirometry are recommended. Ideally, lung function measurements are amended by radiological and nuclear medicine techniques. (orig.) [German] Unter dem Begriff Lungenfunktion wird die Bestimmung der Lungenvolumina am Mund verstanden. Dabei werden die mobilisierbaren Lungenvolumina mit den zugehoerigen Fluss-Volumen-Kurven mittels Spirometrie und Ganzkoerperplethysmographie (GKP) und die nicht (RV) und teilweise mobilisierbaren Lungenvolumina (FRC, TLC) einschliesslich der Atemwegswiderstaende bestimmt. Die GKP ermoeglicht zusaetzlich die korrekte (Volumenachsen-)Positionierung der forcierten Atemmanoever. Dieses erlaubt eine uebersichtlichere graphische Darstellung z. B. vor und nach der Applikation pharmakologisch wirksamer Substanzen. Wird die GKP

  13. Acute and subacute chemical-induced lung injuries: HRCT findings

    Lung injury caused by chemicals includes bronchitis, bronchiolitis, chemical pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease. Each chemical induces variable pathophysiology and the situation resembles to the drug induced lung disease. The HRCT features are variable and nonspecific, however HRCT may be useful in the evaluation of the lung injuries and so we should know about HRCT features of lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by chemicals

  14. Acute and subacute chemical-induced lung injuries: HRCT findings

    Akira, Masanori, E-mail: Akira@kch.hosp.go.jp [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, 1180 Nagasone-cho, Kita-ku, Sakai City, Osaka 591-8555 (Japan); Suganuma, Narufumi [Department of Environmental Medicine, Kochi Medical School (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Lung injury caused by chemicals includes bronchitis, bronchiolitis, chemical pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease. Each chemical induces variable pathophysiology and the situation resembles to the drug induced lung disease. The HRCT features are variable and nonspecific, however HRCT may be useful in the evaluation of the lung injuries and so we should know about HRCT features of lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by chemicals.

  15. Activity of the renin-angiotensin system in acute severe asthma and the effect of angiotensin II on lung function.

    Millar, E. A.; Angus, R. M.; Hulks, G.; Morton, J J; Connell, J M; Thomson, N C

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The activity of the renin-angiotensin system in asthma has not been studied previously and the effect of angiotensin II (AII) on bronchomotor tone in vivo is unknown. METHODS--Plasma levels of renin and AII levels were measured in 20 patients with acute severe asthma, nine with mild asthma, 10 with severe chronic asthma, and 16 normal volunteers. The effect of AII, given as an intravenous infusion, on bronchomotor tone was also investigated in eight mild asthmatic patients. RESULT...

  16. Lung Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) Response and Regulation During Acute and Chronic Lung Injury

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Beers, Michael F.;

    2013-01-01

    lung injury, with a sustained increment during chronic inflammation compared with acute inflammation. A quick upregulation of SP-D in serum in response to acute airway inflammation supports the notion that SP-D translocates from the airways into the vascular system, in favor of being synthesized......BACKGROUND: Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a collection that plays important roles in modulating host defense functions and maintaining phospholipid homeostasis in the lung. The aim of current study was to characterize comparatively the SP-D response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum in...... three murine models of lung injury, using a validated ELISA technology for estimation of SP-D levels. METHODS: Mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide, bleomycin, or Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) and sacrificed at different time points. RESULTS: In lipopolysaccharide-challenged mice, the level of SP-D in...

  17. Pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in acute lung injury

    Price, Laura C.; Mcauley, Danny F.; Marino, Philip S; Finney, Simon J; Griffiths, Mark J.; Wort, Stephen John

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome are characterized by protein rich alveolar edema, reduced lung compliance, and acute severe hypoxemia. A degree of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is also characteristic, higher levels of which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The increase in right ventricular (RV) afterload causes RV dysfunction and failure in some patients, with associated adverse effects on oxygen delivery. Although the introduction of lung p...

  18. Pros and cons of recruitment maneuvers in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Rocco, Patricia R M; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama

    2010-08-01

    In patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, a protective mechanical ventilation strategy characterized by low tidal volumes has been associated with reduced mortality. However, such a strategy may result in alveolar collapse, leading to cyclic opening and closing of atelectatic alveoli and distal airways. Thus, recruitment maneuvers (RMs) have been used to open up collapsed lungs, while adequate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels may counteract alveolar derecruitment during low tidal volume ventilation, improving respiratory function and minimizing ventilator-associated lung injury. Nevertheless, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the appropriateness of RMs. The most commonly used RM is conventional sustained inflation, associated with respiratory and cardiovascular side effects, which may be minimized by newly proposed strategies: prolonged or incremental PEEP elevation; pressure-controlled ventilation with fixed PEEP and increased driving pressure; pressure-controlled ventilation applied with escalating PEEP and constant driving pressure; and long and slow increase in pressure. The efficiency of RMs may be affected by different factors, including the nature and extent of lung injury, capability of increasing inspiratory transpulmonary pressures, patient positioning and cardiac preload. Current evidence suggests that RMs can be used before setting PEEP, after ventilator circuit disconnection or as a rescue maneuver to overcome severe hypoxemia; however, their routine use does not seem to be justified at present. The development of new lung recruitment strategies that have fewer hemodynamic and biological effects on the lungs, as well as randomized clinical trials analyzing the impact of RMs on morbidity and mortality of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome patients, are warranted. PMID:20658909

  19. Cell kinetics and acute lung injury

    In order to estimate whether acute lung injury is followed by a stereotype pattern of cell proliferation in the lungs, mice were treated with three cytostatic drugs: cyclophosphamide, busulfan, or 1,3-Bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU). The alveolar labeling index was measured following drug administration with a pulse of 3H-labeled thymidine and autoradiography. In cyclophosphamide treated animals, peak alveolar cell proliferation was seen 5 days after injection of the drug. In animals treated with busulfan or BCNU, proliferation was even more delayed (occurring 2 to 3 wks after administration). In contrast, with oleic acid, the highest alveolar cell labeling was found 2 days after intravenous administration. In animals exposed to a cytostatic drug, proliferation of type II alveolar cells was never a prominent feature; whereas, in animals treated with oleic acid there was an initial burst of type II cell proliferation. It was concluded that the patterns of pulmonary repair vary between chemical designed to interfere with DNA replication as compared to agents which produce acute lung damage such as oleic acid

  20. Human models of acute lung injury

    Alastair G. Proudfoot

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a syndrome that is characterised by acute inflammation and tissue injury that affects normal gas exchange in the lungs. Hallmarks of ALI include dysfunction of the alveolar-capillary membrane resulting in increased vascular permeability, an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung and a local pro-coagulant state. Patients with ALI present with severe hypoxaemia and radiological evidence of bilateral pulmonary oedema. The syndrome has a mortality rate of approximately 35% and usually requires invasive mechanical ventilation. ALI can follow direct pulmonary insults, such as pneumonia, or occur indirectly as a result of blood-borne insults, commonly severe bacterial sepsis. Although animal models of ALI have been developed, none of them fully recapitulate the human disease. The differences between the human syndrome and the phenotype observed in animal models might, in part, explain why interventions that are successful in models have failed to translate into novel therapies. Improved animal models and the development of human in vivo and ex vivo models are therefore required. In this article, we consider the clinical features of ALI, discuss the limitations of current animal models and highlight how emerging human models of ALI might help to answer outstanding questions about this syndrome.

  1. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts

    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R.L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated...

  2. Transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Dixit Ramakant; Sharma Sidharth; Parmez A

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is related to the transfusion of blood components. Typically, it is a clinical syndrome, characterized by the sudden onset of dyspnea, hypoxemia and bilateral non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. A 83-year-old female patient with a history of AML developed TRALI after receiving 6 units of platelets. TRALI symptoms was started 10 min later the transfusion. AML is a risky group for TRALI. While giving transfusion to the risky groups of TRALI one must be...

  3. Claudins: Gatekeepers of lung epithelial function.

    Schlingmann, Barbara; Molina, Samuel A; Koval, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The lung must maintain a proper barrier between airspaces and fluid filled tissues in order to maintain lung fluid balance. Central to maintaining lung fluid balance are epithelial cells which create a barrier to water and solutes. The barrier function of these cells is mainly provided by tight junction proteins known as claudins. Epithelial barrier function varies depending on the different needs within the segments of the respiratory tree. In the lower airways, fluid is required to maintain mucociliary clearance, whereas in the terminal alveolar airspaces a thin layer of surfactant enriched fluid lowers surface tension to prevent airspace collapse and is critical for gas exchange. As the epithelial cells within the segments of the respiratory tree differ, the composition of claudins found in these epithelial cells is also different. Among these differences is claudin-18 which is uniquely expressed by the alveolar epithelial cells. Other claudins, notably claudin-4 and claudin-7, are more ubiquitously expressed throughout the respiratory epithelium. Claudin-5 is expressed by both pulmonary epithelial and endothelial cells. Based on in vitro and in vivo model systems and histologic analysis of lungs from human patients, roles for specific claudins in maintaining barrier function and protecting the lung from the effects of acute injury and disease are being identified. One surprising finding is that claudin-18 and claudin-4 control lung cell phenotype and inflammation beyond simply maintaining a selective paracellular permeability barrier. This suggests claudins have more nuanced roles for the control of airway and alveolar physiology in the healthy and diseased lung. PMID:25951797

  4. Functional imaging in lung cancer

    Harders, Stefan Walbom; Balyasnikowa, S; Fischer, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer represents an increasingly frequent cancer diagnosis worldwide. An increasing awareness on smoking cessation as an important mean to reduce lung cancer incidence and mortality, an increasing number of therapy options and a steady focus on early diagnosis and adequate staging have resulted in a modestly improved survival. For early diagnosis and precise staging, imaging, especially positron emission tomography combined with CT (PET/CT), plays an important role. Other functional ima...

  5. Lipocalin-2 Test in Distinguishing Acute Lung Injury Cases from Septic Mice Without Acute Lung Injury

    Gao Zeng; Cong-wei Jia; Jie Liu; Shu-bin Guo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore whether the amount of lipocalin-2 in the biofluid could reflect the onset of sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Methods Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 10 mg/kg) injection or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was performed to induce severe sepsis and ALI in C57 BL/6 male mice randomly divided into 5 groups (n=10 in each group):group A (intraperitoneal LPS injection), group B (intravenous LPS injection via tail vein), group C (CLP with 25%of the cecum ligated), group D (CLP with 75%of the cecum ligated), and the control group (6 sham-operation controls plus 4 saline controls). All the mice received volume resuscitation. Measurements of pulmonary morphological and functional alterations were used to identify the presence of experimental ALI. The expressions of lipocalin-2 and interleukin (IL)-6 in serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung tissue were quantified at both protein and mRNA levels. The overall abilities of lipocalin-2 and IL-6 tests to diagnose sepsis-induced ALI were evaluated by generating receiver operator characteristic curves (ROC) and computing area under curve (AUC). Results In both group B and group D, most of the“main features”of experimental ALI were reproduced in mice, while group A and group C showed septic syndrome without definite evidence for the presence of ALI. Compared with septic mice without ALI (group A+group C), lipocalin-2 protein expression in septic mice with ALI (group B+group D) was significantly up-regulated in BALF (P Conclusions Lipocalin-2 expression is significantly up-regulated in septic ALI mice compared with those without ALI. Lipocalin-2 tests with a dual cutoff system could be an effective tool in distinguishing experimental ALI cases.

  6. KL-6 in acute lung injury: will it leave its mark?

    Shyamsundar, Murali; Danny F McAuley

    2008-01-01

    Studies have indicated that measuring biochemical measures of epithelial injury in plasma and alveolar fluid may be useful in predicting outcome in acute lung injury. The present commentary briefly reviews the evidence supporting the use of these biochemical biomarkers of epithelial injury in acute lung injury, and in particular KL-6, as well as their limitations. The article additionally proposes the need for physiological markers of epithelial function to complement current biochemical biom...

  7. Transfusion-related acute lung injury:A case report

    Emmanouil Petrou; Vasiliki Karali; Vasiliki Vartela

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury is the most common cause of serious morbidity and mortality associated with the transfusion of plasma-containing blood components. The syndrome can be confused with other causes of acute respiratory failure. Herein, we describe a 71-year-old man who was transfused with fresh frozen plasma due to prolonged INR, and died of what was considered as transfusion-related acute lung injury, despite treatment.

  8. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury -A Case Report

    Anamika,; Vasanth Nayak; Jose Chacko; G Parameswara

    2008-01-01

    Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare but life threatening complication of blood transfusion which is being increasingly recognized. It is caused by cross reaction between donor antibodies and host leucocytes or between donor leucocytes with host antibodies. TRALI usually presents as an Acute Lung Injury (ALI) resulting in pulmonary congestion and edema, often leading to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of TRALI in a patient who underwent laparoto...

  9. Acute Rejection and Humoral Sensitization in Lung Transplant Recipients

    Martinu, Tereza; Chen, Dong-Feng; Palmer, Scott M

    2009-01-01

    Despite the recent introduction of many improved immunosuppressive agents for use in transplantation, acute rejection affects up to 55% of lung transplant recipients within the first year after transplant. Acute lung allograft rejection is defined as perivascular or peribronchiolar mononuclear inflammation. Although histopathologic signs of rejection often resolve with treatment, the frequency and severity of acute rejections represent the most important risk factor for the subsequent develop...

  10. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  11. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far.......Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  12. Degradation of divers lung function

    Denison, David [Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Gardiner, John [National Hyperbaric Centre (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    This report summarises the findings of a study concerned that saturation diving may cause damage to the functioning of the lungs and investigating the volume of the lung that can be reached by re-breathed helium,and the ability of the alveolar membranes in the lungs to transfer carbon monoxide from alveolar gas to the blood stream. The background to saturation diving, the pulmonary function changes in commercial divers, and the measurement of the transfer factor for carbon monoxide (TFCO) in offshore divers is traced. Details of the study methodology, and the sampling and analysis are given. The questions of whether the findings are due to the subjects' occupation or to the remote technique, and whether any individual diver is at risk are posed. (uk)

  13. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI

    TAJANA ZAH

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI is a complication following transfusion of blood products and is potentially a life-threatening adverse event of transfusion. The first case of fatal pulmonary edema following transfusion was reported in the 1950s. In recent time, TRALI has developed from an almost unknown transfusion reaction to the most common cause of transfusion related major morbidities and fatalities. A clinical definition of TRALI was established in 2004, based on acute respiratory distress which has temporal association with transfusion of blood components. In 2008 a distinction between classic and delayed syndrome was proposed. However, pathophysiology of TRALI still remains controversial. A number of different models were proposed to explain the pathogenesis. The two, presently most accepted models, are not mutually exclusive. The first is the antibody mediated model and the second is the two-event model.In this review article the definition of TRALI, patient predisposition, treatment, prevention and reporting guidelines are examined. The current knowledge on the topic TRALI is summarized.

  14. Smoking and lung functions in sportsmen.

    De, A. K.; Tripathi, M M

    1988-01-01

    Ten smoker sportsmen and 17 non-smoker sportsmen and 41 smoker non-sportsmen were studied. Lung function was assessed by means of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1), the ratio of FEV1 to FVC (FEV1%) and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR). For the smokers, all the tests were conducted before smoking (BS) and 30 min after smoking (AS) two cigarettes consecutively to observe the acute effect of smoking. In the smoker sportsmen there was no significant differ...

  15. Lung injury in acute pancreatitis: mechanisms, prevention, and therapy.

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    Lung injury is the most pertinent manifestation of extra-abdominal organ dysfunction in pancreatitis. The propensity of this retroperitoneal inflammatory condition to engender a diffuse and life-threatening lung injury is significant. Approximately one third of patients will develop acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which account for 60% of all deaths within the first week. The variability in the clinical course of pancreatitis renders it a vexing entity and makes demonstration of the efficacy of any specific intervention difficult. The distinct pathologic entity of pancreatitis-associated lung injury is reviewed with a focus on etiology and potential therapeutic maneuvers.

  16. Epithelial cell apoptosis causes acute lung injury masquerading as emphysema.

    Mouded, Majd; Egea, Eduardo E; Brown, Matthew J; Hanlon, Shane M; Houghton, A McGarry; Tsai, Larry W; Ingenito, Edward P; Shapiro, Steven D

    2009-10-01

    Theories of emphysema traditionally revolved around proteolytic destruction of extracellular matrix. Models have recently been developed that show airspace enlargement with the induction of pulmonary cell apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which a model of epithelial cell apoptosis caused airspace enlargement. Mice were treated with either intratracheal microcystin (MC) to induce apoptosis, intratracheal porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE), or their respective vehicles. Mice from all groups were inflated and morphometry was measured at various time points. Physiology measurements were performed for airway resistance, tissue elastance, and lung volumes. The groups were further analyzed by air-saline quasistatic measurements, surfactant staining, and surfactant functional studies. Mice treated with MC showed evidence of reversible airspace enlargement. In contrast, PPE-treated mice showed irreversible airspace enlargement. The airspace enlargement in MC-treated mice was associated with an increase in elastic recoil due to an increase in alveolar surface tension. PPE-treated mice showed a loss of lung elastic recoil and normal alveolar surface tension, a pattern more consistent with human emphysema. Airspace enlargement that occurs with the MC model of pulmonary epithelial cell apoptosis displays physiology distinct from human emphysema. Reversibility, restrictive physiology due to changes in surface tension, and alveolar enlargement associated with heterogeneous alveolar collapse are most consistent with a mild acute lung injury. Inflation near total lung capacity gives the appearance of enlarged alveoli as neighboring collapsed alveoli exert tethering forces. PMID:19188661

  17. Transfusion related acute lung injury presenting with acute dyspnoea: a case report

    Haji Altaf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative period. Investigation results were non-specific and a diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury was made after excluding other possible causes of acute lung injury. She responded to symptomatic management with ventilatory and vasopressor support and recovered completely over the next 72 hours. Conclusion The diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury relies on excluding other causes of acute pulmonary edema following transfusion, such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. All plasma containing blood products have been implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury, with the majority being linked to whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, involving priming of the inflammatory machinery and then activation of this primed mechanism. Treatment is supportive, with prognosis being substantially better than for most other causes of acute lung injury.

  18. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approache...

  19. Adult Stem Cells for Acute Lung Injury: Remaining Questions & Concerns

    Zhu, Ying-Gang; Hao, Qi; Monsel, Antoine; Feng, Xiao-mei; Lee, Jae W.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. The pathophysiology of ALI involves complex interactions between the inciting event, such as pneumonia, sepsis or aspiration, and the host immune response resulting in lung protein permeability, impaired resolution of pulmonary edema, an intense inflammatory response in the injured alveolus and hypoxemia. In multiple pre-clinical studies, adult stem cells h...

  20. Myeloid tissue factor does not modulate lung inflammation or permeability during experimental acute lung injury

    Shaver, Ciara M.; Grove, Brandon S.; Clune, Jennifer K.; Nigel Mackman; Lorraine B. Ware; Bastarache, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a critical mediator of direct acute lung injury (ALI) with global TF deficiency resulting in increased airspace inflammation, alveolar-capillary permeability, and alveolar hemorrhage after intra-tracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the lung, TF is expressed diffusely on the lung epithelium and intensely on cells of the myeloid lineage. We recently reported that TF on the lung epithelium, but not on myeloid cells, was the major source of TF during intra-tracheal LPS-indu...

  1. Exhaled CO, a predictor of lung function?

    Fabricius, Peder; Scharling, Henrik; Løkke, Anders;

    2007-01-01

    whether CO could provide additional information to usual measures of smoking regarding prediction of present lung function and decline in lung function over an extended period of time. METHOD: Cigarette smokers from the Copenhagen City Heart Study with valid measures of lung function and exhaled CO; in...

  2. Role of Chemokines in the Pathogenesis of Acute Lung Injury

    Bhatia, Madhav; Zemans, Rachel L.; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is due to an uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response resulting from direct injury to the lung or indirect injury in the setting of a systemic process. Such insults lead to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which includes activation of leukocytes—alveolar macrophages and sequestered neutrophils—in the lung. Although systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a physiologic response to an insult, systemic leukocyte activation, if excessive, can lead ...

  3. Role of TNF-α in lung tight junction alteration in mouse model of acute lung inflammation

    Cuzzocrea Salvatore

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present study, we used tumor necrosis factor-R1 knock out mice (TNF-αR1KO to understand the roles of TNF-α on epithelial function in models of carrageenan-induced acute lung inflammation. In order to elucidate whether the observed anti-inflammatory status is related to the inhibition of TNF-α, we also investigated the effect of etanercept, a TNF-α soluble receptor construct, on lung TJ function. Pharmacological and genetic TNF-α inhibition significantly reduced the degree of (1 TNF-α production in pleural exudates and in the lung tissues, (2 the inflammatory cell infiltration in the pleural cavity as well as in the lung tissues (evaluated by MPO activity, (3 the alteration of ZO-1, Claudin-2, Claudin-4, Claudin-5 and β-catenin (immunohistochemistry and (4 apoptosis (TUNEL staining, Bax, Bcl-2 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that inhibition of TNF-α reduces the tight junction permeability in the lung tissues associated with acute lung inflammation, suggesting a possible role of TNF-α on lung barrier dysfunction.

  4. Pressure Controlled Ventilation to Induce Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    Koeppen, Michael; Eckle, Tobias; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2011-01-01

    Murine models are extensively used to investigate acute injuries of different organs systems (1-34). Acute lung injury (ALI), which occurs with prolonged mechanical ventilation, contributes to morbidity and mortality of critical illness, and studies on novel genetic or pharmacological targets are areas of intense investigation (1-3, 5, 8, 26, 30, 33-36). ALI is defined by the acute onset of the disease, which leads to non-cardiac pulmonary edema and subsequent impairment of pulmonary gas exch...

  5. Functional images of the lungs

    The objective of ''functional imaging'' is to portray, in a single image, the relative function of various regions of an organ, or system of organs. The basic data on which such images are based are obtained from serial quantitative images of the organ's function (functions) obtained at various times after administering one or more radioactive tracers. The studies are carried out using the scintillation camera and 133Xe gas for measuring ventilation and a particulate agent such as sup(99m)Tc-labelled albumin microspheres for measuring regional perfusion. To measure regional ventilation, the patient is first allowed to breathe and equilibrate throughout his lungs xenon from a spirometer; he is then allowed to breathe normally room air which washes the xenon from his lungs. During equilibrium and washout, serial quantized image frames are recorded. To measure regional perfusion, the patient is administered sup(99m)Tc microspheres intravenously and a single image frame is recorded. From the serial images of the 133Xe washout frames, after spatial averaging, a parameter proportional to the washout times is computed for each image cell element. These washout parameters are then used to construct a ''ventilation functional image''. The spatial resolution of the study is adequate to provide structural as well as regional function information in a single image. The functional image provides an easily interpretable image of regional function that would be difficult to interpret if presented to the physician in the form of a mass of numerical data, or as a time sequence of multiple serial images. The functional image contains, in one image, all the information from the time serial images representing the washout of the radioactive gas. The ventilation and perfusion images can be combined in a single image by using colour. Use of colour is quite effective in viewing multiple functions and their spatial relations in the same image. (author)

  6. NMDA Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    Yang Li

    Full Text Available Glutamate is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS. Large amount of glutamate can overstimulate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR, causing neuronal injury and death. Recently, NMDAR has been reported to be found in the lungs. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of memantine, a NMDAR channel blocker, on bleomycin-induced lung injury mice.C57BL/6 mice were intratracheally injected with bleomycin (BLM to induce lung injury. Mice were randomized to receive saline, memantine (Me, BLM, BLM plus Me. Lungs and BALF were harvested on day 3 or 7 for further evaluation.BLM caused leukocyte infiltration, pulmonary edema and increase in cytokines, and imposed significant oxidative stress (MDA as a marker in lungs. Memantine significantly mitigated the oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury caused by BLM. Moreover, activation of NMDAR enhances CD11b expression on neutrophils.Memantine mitigates oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury in BLM challenged mice.

  7. Glutamine Attenuates Acute Lung Injury Caused by Acid Aspiration

    Chih-Cheng Lai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate ventilator settings may cause overwhelming inflammatory responses associated with ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Here, we examined potential benefits of glutamine (GLN on a two-hit model for VILI after acid aspiration-induced lung injury in rats. Rats were intratracheally challenged with hydrochloric acid as a first hit to induce lung inflammation, then randomly received intravenous GLN or lactated Ringer’s solution (vehicle control thirty min before different ventilator strategies. Rats were then randomized to receive mechanical ventilation as a second hit with a high tidal volume (TV of 15 mL/kg and zero positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP or a low TV of 6 mL/kg with PEEP of 5 cm H2O. We evaluated lung oxygenation, inflammation, mechanics, and histology. After ventilator use for 4 h, high TV resulted in greater lung injury physiologic and biologic indices. Compared with vehicle treated rats, GLN administration attenuated lung injury, with improved oxygenation and static compliance, and decreased respiratory elastance, lung edema, extended lung destruction (lung injury scores and lung histology, neutrophil recruitment in the lung, and cytokine production. Thus, GLN administration improved the physiologic and biologic profiles of this experimental model of VILI based on the two-hit theory.

  8. Acute pulmonary rejection in heart and lung transplant recipients

    Acute pulmonary rejection occurs in up to 50% of patients undergoing heart and lung transplant procedures. These patients are also susceptible to volume overload and pneumonia. To evaluate the radiographic and high-resolution CT appearances of acute pulmonary rejection, we compared chest radiographs and high-resolution CT scans with the clinical findings and with histologic and lavage data from 91 serial transbronchial biopsies in 13 patients. The radiographic appearance of acute pulmonary rejection is characterized by prominent septal lines and pleural effusions. The authors conclude that in the appropriate clinical setting, the appearance of new pleural effusions and prominent septal lines is highly suggestive of acute pulmonary rejections

  9. Unevenness on aerosol inhalation lung images and lung function

    The unevenness or inhomogeneity of aerosol deposition patterns on radioaerosol inhalation lung images has been interpreted rather qualitatively in the clinical practice. We have reported our approach to quantitatively analyze the radioactive count distribution on radioaerosol inhalation lung images in relation to the actual lung function data. We have defined multiple indexes to express the shape and the unevenness of the count distribution of the lung images. To reduce as much as possible the number of indexes to be used in the regression functions, the method of selection of variables was introduced to the multiple regression analysis. Because some variables showed greater coefficients of simple correlation, while others did not, multicollinearity of variables had to be taken into consideration. For this reason, we chose a principal components regression analysis. The multiple regression function for each item of pulmonary function data thus established from analysis of 67 subjects appeared usable as a predictor of the actual lung function: for example, % VC (vital capacity) could be estimated by using four indexes out of the multiple ones with a coefficient of multiple correlation (R) of 0.753, and FEVsub(1.0) % (forced expiratory volume in one second divided by forced expiratory volume), by 7 indexes with R = 0.921. Pulmonary function data regarding lung volumes and lung mechanics were estimated more accurately with greater R's than those for lung diffusion, but even in the latter the prediction was still statistically significant at p less than 0.01. We believe the multiple regression functions thus obtained are useful for estimating not only the overall but also the regional function of the lungs. (author)

  10. Evolution of endotoxin induced acute lung injury in the rat.

    Domenici-Lombardo, L.; C. Adembri; Consalvo, M.; Forzini, R.; Meucci, M.; Romagnoli, P; Novelli, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    To clarify the evolution of acute lung injury induced by endotoxin, the progression of lung damage in 26 rats submitted to intratracheal instillation of 5 mg/kg body weight endotoxin was examined by blood gas analysis, computerized tomography, light and electron microscopy. Hypoxaemia, hypercapnia, acidosis and inhomogeneous bilateral infiltrates developed gradually within 48 hours. Monocytes appeared within blood capillaries and the instertitium by 12 hours after treatment, then migrated int...

  11. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury -A Case Report

    Anamika

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI is a rare but life threatening complication of blood transfusion which is being increasingly recognized. It is caused by cross reaction between donor antibodies and host leucocytes or between donor leucocytes with host antibodies. TRALI usually presents as an Acute Lung Injury (ALI resulting in pulmonary congestion and edema, often leading to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. We report a case of TRALI in a patient who underwent laparotomy for ruptured corpus luteal cyst requiring blood transfusion. She presented with acute pulmonary edema about an hour after commencing a blood transfusion .This was managed conservatively with oxygen, steroids and diuretics. Patient improved rapidly and later discharged without any residual complications.

  12. Neutrophils contain cholesterol crystals in transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)

    Van Ness, Michael; Jensen, Hanne; Adamson, Grete N; Kysar, Patricia E; Holland, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular components of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy.......Intracellular components of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy....

  13. Exhaled CO, a predictor of lung function?

    Fabricius, P; Scharling, H; Lokke, A;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Smoking is associated with an accelerated loss of lung function and inhalation accelerates the decline further. Exhaled CO reflects the exposure of smoke to the lungs. AIM: To investigate whether self-reported inhalation and type of cigarette influenced the level of exhaled CO and...... whether CO could provide additional information to usual measures of smoking regarding prediction of present lung function and decline in lung function over an extended period of time. METHOD: Cigarette smokers from the Copenhagen City Heart Study with valid measures of lung function and exhaled CO; in.......001). Increasing CO levels were correlated to a lower FEV(1)%pred and to an accelerated decline in lung function. However, in multiple linear regression analyses these correlations were not significant. CONCLUSION: Inhalation and type of cigarette affects exhaled CO levels. CO measures have no predictive value...

  14. Measuring dead-space in acute lung injury.

    Kallet, R H

    2012-11-01

    Several recent studies have advanced our understanding of dead-space ventilation in patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). They have demonstrated the utility of measuring physiologic dead-space-to-tidal volume ratio (VD/VT) and related variables in assessing outcomes as well as therapeutic interventions. These studies have included the evaluation of mortality risk, pulmonary perfusion, as well as the effectiveness of drug therapy, prone positioning, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration, and inspiratory pattern in improving gas exchange. In patients with ALI/ARDS managed with lung-protective ventilation a significant relationship between elevated VD/VT and increased mortality continues to be reported in both early and intermediate phases of ALI/ARDS. Some clinical evidence now supports the suggestion that elevated VD/VT in part reflects the severity of pulmonary vascular endothelial damage. Monitoring VD/VT also appears useful in assessing alveolar recruitment when titrating PEEP and may be a particularly expedient method for assessing the effectiveness of prone positioning. It also has revealed how subtle manipulations of inspiratory time and pattern can improve CO(2) excretion. Much of this has been accomplished using volumetric capnography. This allows for more sophisticated measurements of pulmonary gas exchange function including: alveolar VD/VT, the volume of CO(2) excretion and the slope of the alveolar plateau which reflects ventilation: perfusion heterogeneity. Many of these measurements now can be made non-invasively which should only increase the research and clinical utility of volumetric capnography in studying and managing patients with ALI/ARDS. PMID:22858884

  15. Lung pathology in case of acute radiation injury

    Results of pathomorphological studies of 27 patients exposed to total external γ- and β-radiation resulted from the Chernobyl accident and lost due to the acute radiation disease in the first weeks following radiation exposure are discussed. Dose range is 3.7-13.7 Gy. Two groups of pathological changes in lungs are revealed, those are: infection (bacterial, viral and fungous) ones caused by acute radiation disease and signs of respiratory distress-syndrome in adults

  16. A suspected case of transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Lulu Sherif; Srikantu, J.; Prithi Jain; Kishan Shetty; Brijesh Khandige

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare but serious complication of blood transfusion. We present a suspected case of TRALI in a 39-year-old female patient who underwent total abdominal hysterectomy under uneventful general anesthesia. The patient developed acute desaturation due to noncardiogenic pulmonary edema while receiving compatible blood transfusion on the second postoperative day. As her symptoms were refractory to supportive treatment, she was mechanically ventilated...

  17. Pattern Recognition Receptor–Dependent Mechanisms of Acute Lung Injury

    Xiang, Meng; Fan, Jie

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) that clinically manifests as acute respiratory distress syndrome is caused by an uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response resulting from clinical events including sepsis, major surgery and trauma. Innate immunity activation plays a central role in the development of ALI. Innate immunity is activated through families of related pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize conserved microbial motifs or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Toll-like...

  18. Transfusion of Human Platelets Treated with Mirasol Pathogen Reduction Technology Does Not Induce Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    Caudrillier, Axelle; Mallavia, Beñat; Rouse, Lindsay; Marschner, Susanne; Looney, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction technology (PRT) has been developed in an effort to make the blood supply safer, but there is controversy as to whether it may induce structural or functional changes to platelets that could lead to acute lung injury after transfusion. In this study, we used a commercial PRT system to treat human platelets that were then transfused into immunodeficient mice, and the development of acute lung injury was determined. P-selectin expression was higher in the Mirasol PRT-treated ...

  19. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia: a rare histopathological variant of chemotherapy-induced lung injury.

    Gupta, Arjun; Sen, Shiraj; Naina, Harris

    2016-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced lung injury is the most common chemotherapy-associated lung disease, and is linked with several histopathological patterns. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia (AFOP) is a relatively new and rare histological pattern of diffuse lung injury. We report the first known case of bleomycin-induced AFOP. A 36-year-old man with metastatic testicular cancer received three cycles of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin, before being transitioned to paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin. He subsequently presented with exertional dyspnoea, cough and pleuritic chest pain. CT of the chest demonstrated bilateral ground glass opacities with peribronchovascular distribution and pulmonary function tests demonstrated a restrictive pattern of lung disease with impaired diffusion. Transbronchial biopsy revealed intra-alveolar fibrin deposits with organising pneumonia, consisting of intraluminal loose connective tissue consistent with AFOP. The patient received high-dose corticosteroids with symptomatic and radiographic improvement. AFOP should be recognised as a histopathological variant of bleomycin-induced lung injury. PMID:27053543

  20. Transfusion-related acute lung injury in multiple traumatized patients

    Alijanpour, Ebrahim; Jabbari, Ali; Hoseini, Fahimeh; Tabasi, Shabnam

    2012-01-01

    Background: Many of the multiple traumatized patients who refer to the hospital need transfusion. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious clinical syndrome associated with the transfusion of plasma-containing blood components. In the article, we present a case of TRALI following transfusion of packed red blood cells

  1. Lung VITAL: Rationale, design, and baseline characteristics of an ancillary study evaluating the effects of vitamin D and/or marine omega-3 fatty acid supplements on acute exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease, asthma control, pneumonia and lung function in adults.

    Gold, Diane R; Litonjua, Augusto A; Carey, Vincent J; Manson, JoAnn E; Buring, Julie E; Lee, I-Min; Gordon, David; Walter, Joseph; Friedenberg, Georgina; Hankinson, John L; Copeland, Trisha; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory and observational research studies suggest that vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids may reduce risk for pneumonia, acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases including chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) or asthma, and decline of lung function, but prevention trials with adequate dosing, adequate power, and adequate time to follow-up are lacking. The ongoing Lung VITAL study is taking advantage of a large clinical trial-the VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL)-to conduct the first major evaluation of the influences of vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on pneumonia risk, respiratory exacerbation episodes, asthma control and lung function in adults. VITAL is a 5-yearU.S.-wide randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2×2 factorial trial of supplementation with vitamin D3 ([cholecalciferol], 2000IU/day) and marine omega-3 FA (Omacor® fish oil, eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA]+docosahexaenoic acid [DHA], 1g/day) for primary prevention of CVD and cancer among men and women, at baseline aged ≥50 and ≥55, respectively, with 5107 African Americans. In a subset of 1973 participants from 11 urban U.S. centers, lung function is measured before and two years after randomization. Yearly follow-up questionnaires assess incident pneumonia in the entire randomized population, and exacerbations of respiratory disease, asthma control and dyspnea in a subpopulation of 4314 randomized participants enriched, as shown in presentation of baseline characteristics, for respiratory disease, respiratory symptoms, and history of cigarette smoking. Self-reported pneumonia hospitalization will be confirmed by medical record review, and exacerbations will be confirmed by Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services data review. PMID:26784651

  2. Transfusion of Human Platelets Treated with Mirasol Pathogen Reduction Technology Does Not Induce Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    Caudrillier, Axelle; Mallavia, Beñat; Rouse, Lindsay; Marschner, Susanne; Looney, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction technology (PRT) has been developed in an effort to make the blood supply safer, but there is controversy as to whether it may induce structural or functional changes to platelets that could lead to acute lung injury after transfusion. In this study, we used a commercial PRT system to treat human platelets that were then transfused into immunodeficient mice, and the development of acute lung injury was determined. P-selectin expression was higher in the Mirasol PRT-treated platelets compared to control platelets on storage day 5, but not storage day 1. Transfusion of control vs. Mirasol PRT-treated platelets (day 5 of storage, 109 platelets per mouse) into NOD/SCID mice did not result in lung injury, however transfusion of storage day 5 platelets treated with thrombin receptor-activating peptide increased both extravascular lung water and lung vascular permeability. Transfusion of day 1 platelets did not produce lung injury in any group, and LPS priming 24 hours before transfusion had no effect on lung injury. In a model of transfusion-related acute lung injury, NOD/SCID mice were susceptible to acute lung injury when challenged with H-2Kd monoclonal antibody vs. isotype control antibody. Using lung intravital microscopy, we did not detect a difference in the dynamic retention of platelets in the lung circulation in control vs. Mirasol PRT-treated groups. In conclusion, Mirasol PRT produced an increase in P-selectin expression that is storage-dependent, but transfusion of human platelets treated with Mirasol PRT into immunodeficient mice did not result in greater platelet retention in the lungs or the development of acute lung injury. PMID:26176623

  3. Use of aerosols in lung function studies

    Since aerosol inhalation lung scintigraphy was introduced in 1965 following perfusion lung imaging, both imaging modalities have offered powerful tools not only for the study of respiratory lung function but also for the exploration of non-respiratory lung function studies. Visualization of the distribution of ventilation and perfusion in the lungs has made it possible to determine whether ventilation and perfusion are well matched or not, thus leading to the diagnosis of vascular diseases if perfusion is absent in the well ventilated lung regions, whereas airway diseases show matched ventilation and perfusion abnormalities. The reasons for the above principles have been physiologically clarified by perfusion and inhalation techniques using radioactive particulates, aerosols and radioactive gases. Regional ventilation always regulates regional perfusion; regional hypoventilation causes regional hypoxia which in turn causes hypoxic vasoconstriction and a consequent decrease in perfusion. Regional perfusion does not regulate regional ventilation except in the very early phase of perfusion changes when hypoperfusion can cause a transient bronchoconstriction and hypoventilation. This reaction disappears within 6 hours in dogs. Deposition patterns of inhaled aerosol in the lungs help differentiate the nature of the obstructive airways disease. Aerosol inhalation imaging can offer a unique technique for the study of mucociliary clearance function in the lungs. 'Radioaerosol inhalation lung cinescintigraphy' has made it possible to visualize the actual mucociliary clearance status in the lungs in vivo. Indexes to quantify the mucociliary clearance function have been proposed. Effects of pharmaceutical agents on mucociliary clearance function in the lungs can now be objectively evaluated by aerosol inhalation lung imaging and its quantification. The study of pulmonary epithelial permeability by inhalation of 99Tcm DTPA aerosol has also been mentioned. 26 refs, 8 figs, 3

  4. Liver cold preservation induce lung surfactant changes and acute lung injury in rat liver transplantation

    An Jiang; Chang Liu; Feng Liu; Yu-Long Song; Quan-Yuan Li; Liang Yu; Yi Lv

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between donor liver cold preservation, lung surfactant (LS) changes and acute lung injury (ALI) after liver transplantation. METHODS: Liver transplantation models were established using male Wistar rats. Donor livers were preserved in University of Wisconsin solution at 4  °C for different lengths of time. The effect of ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) on ALI was also detected. All samples were harvested after 3 h reperfusion. ...

  5. Post-operative acute exacerbation of pulmonary fibrosis in lung cancer patients undergoing lung resection

    YANO, MOTOKI; Sasaki, Hidefumi; MORIYAMA, SATORU; HIKOSAKA, YU; YOKOTA, KEISUKE; Kobayashi, Susumu; HARA, MASAKI; Fujii, Yoshitaka

    2011-01-01

    Acute exacerbation (AE) of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in lung cancer patients is a critical factor in post-operative mortality. The cause of AE development is unknown and AE may occur in patients without the diagnosis of IPF. We have conducted a retrospective study of consecutive patients who underwent lung cancer surgery since January 2004. Sixty-two patients with fibrous findings in preoperative high-resolution computed tomography were enrolled in the present study and clinicopatho...

  6. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts.

    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated and no immune- mediated TRALI. A common theme among the experimental TRALI models is the central importance of neutrophils in mediating the early immune response, and lung vascular injury. Central clinical symptoms are dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, cyanosis and pulmonary secretions, altogether with other hemodynamic alterations, such as hypotension and fever. Complementary to these clinical findings, long-term validated animal models for TRALI should allow the determination of the cellular targets for TRALI-inducing alloantibodies as well as delineation of the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms, and key molecular mediators of the pathology. Diagnostic criteria have been established and preventive measures have been implemented. These actions have contributed to the reduction in the overallnumber of fatalities. However, TRALI still remains a clinical problem. Any complication suspected of TRALI should immediately be reported. PMID:26312100

  7. Acute Aortic Dissection Extending Into the Lung.

    Makdisi, George; Said, Sameh M; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2015-07-01

    The radiologic manifestations of ruptured acute aortic dissection, Stanford type A aortic dissection, DeBakey type 1 can present in different radiographic scenarios with devastating outcomes. Here, we present a rare case of a 70-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with chest pain radiating to the back. A chest computed tomography scan showed a Stanford type A, DeBakey type 1, acute aortic dissection ruptured into the aortopulmonary window and stenosing the pulmonary trunk, both main pulmonary arteries, and dissecting the bronchovascular sheaths and flow into the pulmonary interstitium, causing pulmonary interstitial hemorrhage. The patient underwent emergent ascending aorta replacement with hemiarch replacement with circulatory arrest. The postoperative course was unremarkable. PMID:26140779

  8. Independent lung ventilation in a newborn with asymmetric acute lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus: a case report

    Di Nardo Matteo; Perrotta Daniela; Stoppa Francesca; Cecchetti Corrado; Marano Marco; Pirozzi Nicola

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Independent lung ventilation is a form of protective ventilation strategy used in adult asymmetric acute lung injury, where the application of conventional mechanical ventilation can produce ventilator-induced lung injury and ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Only a few experiences have been published on the use of independent lung ventilation in newborn patients. Case presentation We present a case of independent lung ventilation in a 16-day-old infant of 3.5 kg body weig...

  9. Lung cancer in patients with borderline lung functions

    Patients were studied with lung carcinoma and borderline functions (forced expired volume [FEV1] of less than 1500 ml or a dyspnoea score of 2[7] at presentation), who were treated with high dose irradiation. Patients were divided into those with suprahilar and hilar tumors. Lung perfusion was assessed in upper, middle and lower zones for each lung at presentation. The ipsi-lateral upper and middle zone were regarded as at risk from irradiation in patients with suprahilar tumors and the whole ipsi-lateral lung in patients with hilar tumors. Lung function was measured at presentation (18 patients) at 4-6 month follow-up (16 evaluable patients = group 1) and again at 10-12 month follow-up (10 evaluable patients = group 2). A worsening of the dyspnoea score (3 in gr. 1 and 2 in gr. 2) occurred only in patients with a >10 per cent decrease transfer factor at follow up and the perfusion in the lung zones regarded as at risk from irradiation at presentation (Spearman's rank correlation). There was no correlation between perfusion and changes in the FEV1. Patients in whom lung perfusion was less than 35 per cent in the zones at risk tended to have decreased transfer factor at follow-up. These findings indicate that worsening in the patients' dyspnoea score after irradiation is dependent on decreased transfer factor rather than FEV1 and that patients with borderline functions may be treated with irradiation if the perfusion in the zones at risk from radiation is less than 35 per cent. (author). 9 refs.; 5 tabs

  10. Transfusion related acute lung injury presenting with acute dyspnoea: a case report

    Haji Altaf; Sharma Shekhar; Vijaykumar DK; Paul Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative...

  11. Role of Ventilation in Cases of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome /Acute Lung injury

    Hemant M Shah; Shilpa B Sutariya; Parul M Bhatt; Nishil Shah; Shweta Gamit

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute lung injury (ALI) and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by refractory hypoxemia that develops secondary to high-permeability pulmonary edema. These syndromes are gaining more attention as a means of better comprehending the pathophysiology of ARDS and possiblyfor modifying ventilatory management. In this context a study was done to compare role of invasive and non-invasive ventilation in cases of ARDS/ALI. Methods: in this study patients of AR...

  12. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  13. Independent lung ventilation in a newborn with asymmetric acute lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus: a case report

    Di Nardo Matteo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Independent lung ventilation is a form of protective ventilation strategy used in adult asymmetric acute lung injury, where the application of conventional mechanical ventilation can produce ventilator-induced lung injury and ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Only a few experiences have been published on the use of independent lung ventilation in newborn patients. Case presentation We present a case of independent lung ventilation in a 16-day-old infant of 3.5 kg body weight who had an asymmetric lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis. We used independent lung ventilation applying conventional protective pressure controlled ventilation to the less-compromised lung, with a respiratory frequency proportional to the age of the patient, and a pressure controlled high-frequency ventilation to the atelectatic lung. This was done because a single tube conventional ventilation protective strategy would have exposed the less-compromised lung to a high mean airways pressure. The target of independent lung ventilation is to provide adequate gas exchange at a safe mean airways pressure level and to expand the atelectatic lung. Independent lung ventilation was accomplished for 24 hours. Daily chest radiograph and gas exchange were used to evaluate the efficacy of independent lung ventilation. Extubation was performed after 48 hours of conventional single-tube mechanical ventilation following independent lung ventilation. Conclusion This case report demonstrates the feasibility of independent lung ventilation with two separate tubes in neonates as a treatment of an asymmetric acute lung injury.

  14. Strategies to improve oxygenation in experimental acute lung injury

    Hartog, Arthur

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOne of the most important clinical syndromes, in which failure of oxygen uptake in the lung leads to severe hypoxia, is the so-called acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). ARDS is a complex of clinical signs and symptoms which occur following diverse pulmonary or systemic insults, including sepsis. shock, pneumonia. trauma, liquid aspiration. hematological disorders, smoke inhalation, and many others, In ARDS, the treatments available are still inadequate and morbidity, mort...

  15. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury: The Work of DAMPs*

    Land, Walter G.

    2013-01-01

    Current notions in immunology hold that not only pathogen-mediated tissue injury but any injury activates the innate immune system. In principle, this evolutionarily highly conserved, rapid first-line defense system responds to pathogen-induced injury with the creation of infectious inflammation, and non-pathogen-induced tissue injury with ‘sterile’ tissue inflammation. In this review, evidence has been collected in support of the notion that the transfusion-related acute lung injury induces ...

  16. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury Following Upper Extremity Replantation

    Celalettin Sever; Yalçın Külahçı; Cihan Şahin; Sinan Öksüz; Haluk Duman; Fuat Yüksel

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a common adverse effect of blood transfusion that is often underrecognised and underreported. We would like to report a case of TRALI after the replantation and transfusion of blood components in a male patient who had sustained a complete amputation of the right upper extremity. The level of amputation was just proximal to the humeral condyles. Replantation was performed 5 hours after the accident and 36 units of blood products were transfused...

  17. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: incidence and risk factors

    Toy, Pearl; Gajic, Ognjen; Bacchetti, Peter; Looney, Mark R.; Gropper, Michael A.; Hubmayr, Rolf; Lowell, Clifford A.; Norris, Philip J; Murphy, Edward L; Weiskopf, Richard B.; Wilson, Gregory; Koenigsberg, Monique; Lee, Deanna; Schuller, Randy; Wu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. To determine TRALI incidence by prospective, active surveillance and to identify risk factors by a case-control study, 2 academic medical centers enrolled 89 cases and 164 transfused controls. Recipient risk factors identified by multivariate analysis were higher IL-8 levels, liver surgery, chronic alcohol abuse, shock, higher peak airway pressure while being mechanically ventilated, current s...

  18. Transfusion-related acute lung injury; clinical perspectives.

    Kim, Jeongmin; Na, Sungwon

    2015-04-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was introduced in 1983 to describe a clinical syndrome seen within 6 h of a plasma-containing blood products transfusion. TRALI is a rare transfusion complication; however, the FDA has suggested that TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Understanding the pathogenesis of TRALI will facilitate adopting preventive strategies, such as deferring high plasma volume female product donors. This review outlines the clinical features, pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of TRALI. PMID:25844126

  19. Transfusion-related acute lung injury; clinical perspectives

    Kim, Jeongmin; Na, Sungwon

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was introduced in 1983 to describe a clinical syndrome seen within 6 h of a plasma-containing blood products transfusion. TRALI is a rare transfusion complication; however, the FDA has suggested that TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Understanding the pathogenesis of TRALI will facilitate adopting preventive strategies, such as deferring high plasma volume female product donors. This review outlines the clinical features...

  20. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: Incidence and risk factors

    Toy, P; Gajic, O; Bacchetti, P; Looney, MR; Gropper, MA; Hubmayr, R; Lowell, CA; Norris, PJ; Murphy, EL; Weiskopf, RB; Wilson, G; Koenigsberg, M; Lee, D.; Schuller, R.; Wu, P.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion- related mortality. To determine TRALI incidence by prospective, active surveillance and to identify risk factors by a case-control study, 2 academic medical centers enrolled 89 cases and 164 transfused controls. Recipient risk factors identified by multivariate analysis were higher IL-8 levels, liver surgery, chronic alcohol abuse, shock, higher peak airway pressure while being mechanically ventilated, current ...

  1. Acute lung injury during antithymocyte globulin therapy for aplastic anemia

    Goligher, Ewan Christopher; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine; Balter, Meyer; Gupta, Vikas; Joseph E Brandwein

    2009-01-01

    The case of a 33-year-old man with aplastic anemia who experienced recurrent episodes of hypoxemia and pulmonary infiltrates during infusions of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is described. With the use of high-dose corticosteroids, the patient’s original episodes resolved, and were subsequently prevented before additional administrations of ATG. Rare reports of an association between ATG and acute lung injury are found in the literature, but this is the first report of successful steroid-suppo...

  2. Crocin attenuates lipopolysacchride-induced acute lung injury in mice

    Jian WANG; Kuai, Jianke; Luo, Zhonghua; Wang, Wuping; Wang, Lei; Ke, Changkang; LI, XIAOFEI; Ni, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Crocin, a representative of carotenoid compounds, exerts a spectrum of activities including radical scavenger, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties. To investigate the protective effect of crocin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS (1 mg/kg). The mice received intragastric injection of crocin (50 mg/kg) 1 h before LPS administration. Pulmonary histological changes were evaluated by hematox...

  3. Bronchoalveolar Immunologic Profile of Acute Human Lung Transplant Allograft Rejection

    Gregson, Aric L.; Hoji, Aki; Saggar, Rajan; Ross, David J; Kubak, Bernard M; Jamieson, Beth D.; Weigt, S. Samuel; Lynch, Joseph P.; Ardehali, Abbas; Belperio, John A.; Yang, Otto O

    2008-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) offers a potential means to diagnose acute rejection and could provide insight into the immune mechanisms responsible for lung allograft rejection. Transbronchial biopsies from 29 bronchoscopic procedures were assessed for rejection. Concurrent BALF lymphocyte subsets were examined by flow cytometry, including CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and their activation status via CD38 expression, NK, NK-like T (NT), B, T regulatory (Treg) and invariant receptor NK-T cells (...

  4. Effects of acute and long-term bronchodilator treatment on regional lung function in asthma assessed with krypton-81m and technetium-99m-labelled macroaggregates.

    Sovijärvi, A R; Pöyhönen, L.; Kellomäki, L; Muittari, A

    1982-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of acute and long-term bronchodilator treatment on the distribution of ventilation and perfusion in 15 asthmatics using a gamma camera, krypton-81m (for ventilation) and technetium-99m macroaggregate (for perfusion). Individual peak expiratory flow (PEF) values before bronchodilation were slightly or moderately below the predicted values. The simultaneous ventilation images (analysed visually) showed areas of delayed ventilation in all patients (mean distributi...

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the lung.

    Biederer, J; Heussel, C P; Puderbach, M; Wielpuetz, M O

    2014-02-01

    Beyond being a substitute for X-ray, computed tomography, and scintigraphy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inherently combines morphologic and functional information more than any other technology. Lung perfusion: The most established method is first-pass contrast-enhanced imaging with bolus injection of gadolinium chelates and time-resolved gradient-echo (GRE) sequences covering the whole lung (1 volume/s). Images are evaluated visually or semiquantitatively, while absolute quantification remains challenging due to the nonlinear relation of T1-shortening and contrast material concentration. Noncontrast-enhanced perfusion imaging is still experimental, either based on arterial spin labeling or Fourier decomposition. The latter is used to separate high- and low-frequency oscillations of lung signal related to the effects of pulsatile blood flow. Lung ventilation: Using contrast-enhanced first-pass perfusion, lung ventilation deficits are indirectly identified by hypoxic vasoconstriction. More direct but still experimental approaches use either inhalation of pure oxygen, an aerosolized contrast agent, or hyperpolarized noble gases. Fourier decomposition MRI based on the low-frequency lung signal oscillation allows for visualization of ventilation without any contrast agent. Respiratory mechanics: Time-resolved series with high background signal such as GRE or steady-state free precession visualize the movement of chest wall, diaphragm, mediastinum, lung tissue, tracheal wall, and tumor. The assessment of volume changes allows drawing conclusions on regional ventilation. With this arsenal of functional imaging capabilities at high spatial and temporal resolution but without radiation burden, MRI will find its role in regional functional lung analysis and will therefore overcome the sensitivity of global lung function analysis for repeated short-term treatment monitoring. PMID:24481761

  6. Acute lung injury induced by whole gastric fluid: hepatic acute phase response contributes to increase lung antiprotease protection

    Ayala, Pedro; Meneses, Manuel; Olmos, Pablo; Montalva, Rebeca; Droguett, Karla; Ríos, Mariana; Borzone, Gisella

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastric contents aspiration in humans is a risk factor for severe respiratory failure with elevated mortality. Although aspiration-induced local lung inflammation has been studied in animal models, little is known about extrapulmonary effects of aspiration. We investigated whether a single orotracheal instillation of whole gastric fluid elicits a liver acute phase response and if this response contributes to enrich the alveolar spaces with proteins having antiprotease activity. Met...

  7. Platelets induce neutrophil extracellular traps in transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Caudrillier, Axelle; Kessenbrock, Kai; Gilliss, Brian M.; Nguyen, John X.; Marques, Marisa B.; Monestier, Marc; Toy, Pearl; Werb, Zena; Looney, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that platelets are major contributors to inflammatory processes through intimate associations with innate immune cells. Here, we report that activated platelets induce the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), which is the leading cause of death after transfusion therapy. NETs are composed of decondensed chromatin decorated with granular proteins that function to trap extracellular pathogens; their forma...

  8. ACUTE STROKE: FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME PREDICTORS

    Sujatha

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Ischemic strokes account for >80% of total stroke events. Biochemical modalities like serum uric acid, ESR, CRP, Serum Fibrinogen will be a low cost and useful way to predict functional outcome after ischemic stroke. The Barthel ADL index it is an ordinal scale helping us to measure performances in ADL-activities in daily living. The present study aims to study the Biochemical parameters Uric Acid, CRP, ESR and Fibrinogen in Ischemic Stroke patients and to assess functional outcome in these patients using Barthel Index at admission and at discharge. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was undertaken under the Department of Internal Medicine, Govt. Stanley Hospital, Chennai, in 75 patients above 18 yrs. of age presenting with symptoms suggestive of acute stroke at medical OPD/wards/ICU, proven by imaging as ischemic stroke after proper consent were subjected to detailed history taking, complete physical examination and the relevant laboratory investigations as per proforma. Subjects were grouped under mild/moderate/severe categories as per Barthel scoring. A prospective observational study design was chosen and descriptive statistics was done for all data and suitable statistical tests of comparison were done. RESULTS The groups contain subjects with the same basic demographic characteristics, age and gender. The duration of stay in hospital increases with Barthel score. There is an increasing trend of diabetes mellitus and hypertension with stroke severity assessed functionally as per Barthel scores. There is an increasing trend of raised CRP, ESR levels, Uric Acid and Fibrinogen levels with stroke severity. By assessing the functional outcome using Barthel index in ischemic stroke patients at admission and discharge, the average Barthel score in patients at the time of admission was 52.27 in comparison to significantly increased Barthel score at discharge (56 with a p-value of 0.0000 according to paired t-test. CONCLUSION CRP

  9. Relationship between lung function and metabolic syndrome.

    Wei-Liang Chen

    Full Text Available Although the link between impaired lung function and cardiovascular events and type 2 diabetes mellitus has been recognized, the association between impaired lung function and metabolic syndrome has not been comprehensively assessed in the United States (U.S. population. The aim of our study was to explore the association between impaired lung function and metabolic syndrome in a nationally representative sample of men and women. This cross-sectional population-based study included 8602 participants aged 20-65 years in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III. We examined the relationship between the different features of metabolic syndrome and lung function, including forced vital capacity (FVC and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1. After adjusting for potential confounders such as age, body mass index, inflammatory factors, medical condition, and smoking status, participants with more components of metabolic syndrome had lower predicted values of FVC and FEV1 (p for trend <0.001 for both. Impaired pulmonary function was also associated with individual components of metabolic syndrome, such as abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, and low high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol (p<0.05 for all parameters. These results from a nationally representative sample of US adults suggest that a greater number of features of metabolic syndrome is strongly associated with poorer FVC and FEV1. In clinical practice, more comprehensive management strategies to address subjects with metabolic syndrome and impaired lung function need to be developed and investigated.

  10. Lung oxidative response after acute coal dust exposure

    Coal dust exposure can induce an acute alveolar and interstitial inflammation that can lead to chronic pulmonary diseases. The objective of this study was to describe the acute and later effects of acute coal dust exposure in lung parenchyma and the involvement of reactive oxygen species in coal dust effects. Forty-eight male Wistar rats (200-250 mg) were separated into four groups: 48 h, 7 days, 30 days, and 60 days after coal dust instillation. Gross mineral coal dust (3 mg/0.5 mL saline) was administered directly in the lungs of the treatment group by intratracheal instillation. Control animals received only saline solution (0.5 mL). Lipid peroxidation was determined by the quantity of thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS), oxidative damage to protein was obtained by the determination of carbonyl groups, the total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP) was estimated by luminol chemoluminescence emission, catalase activity was measured by the rate of decrease in hydrogen peroxide, and superoxide dismutase activity was assayed by the inhibition of adrenaline autooxidation. Histological evaluation of coal dust-treated rats demonstrated an inflammatory infiltration after 48 h of the exposure. Initially, this was a cellular infiltration suggestive of lymphocyte infiltration with lymphoid hyperplasia that remained until 7 days after induction. This initial response was followed by a chronic inflammatory infiltration characterized by aggregates of macrophages 30 days after induction. This inflammatory response tended to resolve 60 days after induction, being similar to that of control animals. During both the acute and chronic phases of lung inflammation we observed a decrease in the TRAP in the lung of coal dust-exposed animals compared to that in control animals. We also observed an activation of superoxide dismutase 60 days after coal dust exposition. TBARS were increased 60 days after coal dust exposure and protein carbonyl groups increased at all

  11. Lung sonography and recruitment in patients with early acute respiratory distress syndrome: A pilot study

    Stefanidis, Konstantinos; Dimopoulos, Stavros; Tripodaki, Elli-Sophia; Vitzilaios, Konstantinos; Politis, Panagiotis; Piperopoulos, Ploutarchos; Nanas, Serafim

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Bedside lung sonography is a useful imaging tool to assess lung aeration in critically ill patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of lung sonography in estimating the nonaerated area changes in the dependent lung regions during a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) trial of patients with early acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods Ten patients (mean ± standard deviation (SD): age 64 ± 7 years, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation ...

  12. Using bosentan to treat paraquat poisoning-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    Zhongchen Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Paraquat poisoning is well known for causing multiple organ function failure (MODS and high mortality. Acute lung injury and advanced pulmonary fibrosis are the most serious complications. Bosentan is a dual endothelin receptor antagonist. It plays an important role in treating PF. There is no related literature on the use of bosentan therapy for paraquat poisoning. OBJECTIVE: To study the use of bosentan to treat acute lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis as induced by paraquat. METHOD: A total of 120 adult Wister male rats were randomly assigned to three groups: the paraquat poisoning group (rats were intragastrically administered with paraquat at 50 mg/kg body weight once at the beginning; the bosentan therapy group (rats were administered bosentan at 100 mg/kg body weight by intragastric administration half an hour after paraquat was administered, then the same dose was administered once a day; and a control group (rats were administered intragastric physiological saline. On the 3rd, 7th, 14th, and 21st days following paraquat exposure, rats were sacrificed, and samples of lung tissue and venous blood were collected. The levels of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, endothelin-1 (ET-1, and hydroxyproline (HYP in the plasma and lung homogenate were determined. Optical and electronic microscopes were used to examine pathological changes. RESULT: The TGF-β1, ET-1, and HYP of the paraquat poisoning group were significantly higher than in the control group, and they were significantly lower in the 21st day therapy group than in the paraquat poisoning group on the same day. Under the optical and electronic microscopes, lung tissue damage was observed to be more severe but was then reduced after bosentan was administered. CONCLUSION: Bosentan can reduce inflammation factor release. It has a therapeutic effect on acute lung injury as induced by paraquat.

  13. Differential effects of kidney-lung cross-talk during acute kidney injury and bacterial pneumonia

    Singbartl, Kai; Bishop, Jeffery; Wen, Xiaoyan; Murugan, Raghavan; Chandra, Saurabh; Filippi, Marie-Dominique; John A Kellum

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and acute lung injury (ALI) represent serious, complex clinical problems. The combination of AKI and ALI drastically decreases survival. However, detailed knowledge about the interactions between these two organs is scarce.

  14. Acute lung injury induces cardiovascular dysfunction

    Suda, Koichi; Tsuruta, Masashi; Eom, Jihyoun;

    2011-01-01

    -regulate the systemic expression of IL-6, but whether they can ameliorate the cardiovascular dysfunction related to ALI is uncertain. We sought to determine whether IL-6 contributes to the cardiovascular dysfunction related to ALI, and whether budesonide/formoterol ameliorates this process. Wild-type mice were...... pretreated for 3 hours with intratracheal budesonide, formoterol, or both, before LPS was sprayed into their tracheas. IL-6-deficient mice were similarly exposed to LPS. Four hours later, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum were collected, and endothelial and cardiac functions were measured, using...... these impairments (vasodilatory responses to acetylcholine, P = 0.005; cardiac output, P = 0.025). Pretreatment with the combination of budesonide and formoterol, but not either alone, ameliorated the vasodilatory responses to acetylcholine (P = 0.018) and cardiac output (P < 0.001). These drugs also...

  15. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury in children and adults

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF), defined as acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are critical conditions. AHRF results from a number of systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has...

  16. Effects of acute and long-term bronchodilator treatment on regional lung function in asthma assessed with krypton-81m and technetium-99m-labelled macroaggregates

    An investigation has been made of the effects of acute and long-term bronchodilator treatment on the distribution of ventilation and perfusion in 15 asthmatics using a gamma camera, krypton-81 m (for ventilation) and technetium-99m macroaggregate (for perfusion). Individual peak expiratory flow (PEF) values before bronchodilation were slightly or moderately below the predicted values. The simultaneous ventilation images (analysed visually) showed areas of delayed ventilation in all patients (mean distribution score on 3-point scale 2.1). After isoprenaline inhalation (240 μg) the mean PEF increased by 24%, but the distribution of ventilation remained virtually unchanged in all patients (mean score 2.0). Simultaneously defects in perfusion could be seen in all patients (mean score 1.5). After intensive treatment, when the mean PEF increased by a further 29%, the distribution scores of ventilation and perfusion fell to 0.8 and 0.9, respectively. The results indicate that, without intensive and long-term treatment, appreciable inequality of ventilation and perfusion are usual consequences of asthma; and suggest that although larger airways are dilated by isoprenaline inhalations residual bronchial obstruction may still remain in some smaller airways, maintaining uneven distribution. Perfusion disturbances seem to be secondary to changes in regional ventilation. (author)

  17. The clinical significance of lung hypoexpansion in acute childhood asthma

    Spottswood, Stephanie E. [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Box 980615, 23298-0615, Richmond, VA (United States); Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of the King' s Daughters, 601 Children' s Lane, Norfolk, VA 23507 (United States); Allison, Kelley Z.; Narla, Lakshmana D.; Lowry, Patricia A. [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Box 980615, 23298-0615, Richmond, VA (United States); Lopatina, Olga A.; Sethi, Narinder N. [School of Medicine, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, VA (United States); Nettleman, Mary D. [Department of Internal Medicine, B-427 Clinical Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Many children experiencing acute asthmatic episodes have chest radiographs, which may show lung hyperinflation, hypoinflation, or normal inflation. Lung hypoinflation may be a sign of respiratory fatigue and poor prognosis. To compare the clinical course in children with asthma according to the degree of lung inflation on chest radiographs. We conducted a retrospective study during a 24-month period (from July 1999 to July 2001) of children aged 0-17 years, who presented to a pediatric emergency department or outpatient clinic with an asthma exacerbation. Chest radiographs obtained at presentation were reviewed independently by three pediatric radiologists who were blinded to the admission status of the patient. The correlation between hypoinflation and hospital admission was assessed in three age groups: 0-2 years, 3-5 years, and 6-17 years. Hypoinflation on chest radiographs was significantly correlated with hospital admission for children aged 6-17 years (odds ratio 16.00, 95% confidence interval 1.89-135.43). The inter-reader agreement for interpretation of these radiographs was strong, with a kappa score of 0.76. Hypoinflation was not correlated with admission in younger children. Lung hypoinflation is associated with a greater likelihood of hospital admission in children aged 6 years or older. Therefore, hypoinflation was a poor prognostic sign and may warrant more aggressive therapy. (orig.)

  18. The clinical significance of lung hypoexpansion in acute childhood asthma

    Many children experiencing acute asthmatic episodes have chest radiographs, which may show lung hyperinflation, hypoinflation, or normal inflation. Lung hypoinflation may be a sign of respiratory fatigue and poor prognosis. To compare the clinical course in children with asthma according to the degree of lung inflation on chest radiographs. We conducted a retrospective study during a 24-month period (from July 1999 to July 2001) of children aged 0-17 years, who presented to a pediatric emergency department or outpatient clinic with an asthma exacerbation. Chest radiographs obtained at presentation were reviewed independently by three pediatric radiologists who were blinded to the admission status of the patient. The correlation between hypoinflation and hospital admission was assessed in three age groups: 0-2 years, 3-5 years, and 6-17 years. Hypoinflation on chest radiographs was significantly correlated with hospital admission for children aged 6-17 years (odds ratio 16.00, 95% confidence interval 1.89-135.43). The inter-reader agreement for interpretation of these radiographs was strong, with a kappa score of 0.76. Hypoinflation was not correlated with admission in younger children. Lung hypoinflation is associated with a greater likelihood of hospital admission in children aged 6 years or older. Therefore, hypoinflation was a poor prognostic sign and may warrant more aggressive therapy. (orig.)

  19. Simkania negevensis and acute cellular rejection in lung transplant recipients.

    Jamal, Alainna J; Resende, Mariangela R; Prochnow, Taisa; McGilvray, Ian; Pilewski, Joseph M; Crespo, Maria M; Singer, Lianne G; McCurry, Kenneth R; Kolls, Jay K; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liles, W Conrad; Husain, Shahid

    2015-08-01

    Simkania negevensis infection has been hypothesized to play a role in lung transplant rejection. The incidence of S. negevensis infection and its association with acute cellular rejection (ACR) were determined in a prospective cohort study of 78 lung transplant recipients (LTRs) in Toronto, Canada, and Pittsburgh, USA, from July 2007 to January 2010. Simkania negevensis testing was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The relationship between S. negevensis and ACR was examined using Cox proportional hazards models and generalized linear and latent mixed models. Cumulative incidence estimates for time-to-ACR in S. negevensis PCR-positive vs. PCR-negative LTRs were 52.7% vs. 31.1% at six months and 68.9% vs. 44.6% at one yr, respectively. Although not statistically significant, there was a trend toward a higher risk of ACR among S. negevensis PCR-positive vs. PCR-negative LTRs in all statistical models. PMID:26009941

  20. Lung function measurement in awake young children

    Bisgaard, H; Klug, B

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate methods applicable in a clinical setting for monitoring of changes in lung function in awake young children. Impedance measurements by the impulse oscillation technique (ZIOS), respiratory resistance measurements by the interrupter technique (Rint) and...... lung function was ZIOS > sRaw > Ptc,O2 > FEV1 > Rint. ZIOS was significantly more sensitive than all subsequent methods, and Ptc,O2 was significantly more sensitive than FEV1. ZIOS, sRaw and Rint, but not Ptc,O2 and FEV1, detected the subclinical increase in bronchial muscle tone in the children during...... methacholine in young children aged 4-6 yrs. This implies that ZIOS, Rint and Ptc,O2 provide convenient indices of changes in lung function. Their combined use will be useful for monitoring airway diseases of young children....

  1. Triptolide ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    Gao, Jianling; Zhan, Ying; Chen, Jun; Wang, Lina; Yang, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) is a serious clinical syndrome with a high rate of mortality. In this study, the effects of triptolide on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in rats were investigated. Methods Sixty-five male Sprague Dawley rats(approved by ethics committee of the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University) were randomly divided into five groups. The control group was injected with 2.5 mL saline/kg body weight via the tail vein and intraperitoneally with 1% dimethyl s...

  2. A suspected case of transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Lulu Sherif

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI is a rare but serious complication of blood transfusion. We present a suspected case of TRALI in a 39-year-old female patient who underwent total abdominal hysterectomy under uneventful general anesthesia. The patient developed acute desaturation due to noncardiogenic pulmonary edema while receiving compatible blood transfusion on the second postoperative day. As her symptoms were refractory to supportive treatment, she was mechanically ventilated for 3 days and successfully extubated on the fourth day. By exclusion, a clinical diagnosis of TRALI was made. The treatment for TRALI requires discontinuing transfusion and giving respiratory and cardiovascular support. Most cases show clinical improvement in first few hours and resolve completely within 96 h.

  3. [Protective effect of curcumin on oleic-induced acute lung injury in rats].

    Zhu, Rui-fang; Zhou, Min; He, Jian-lin; Ding, Fu-yun; Yu, Shu-qin; Xu, Guang-lin

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the effect of curcumine on acute lung injury induced by oleic acid in rat and the possible mechanism of action. The rats were divided into 6 groups randomly: normal group, control group, curcumine groups (5, 10, 20 mg x kg(-1)) and dexamethasone group (1 mg x kg(-1)). During the experiment, acute lung injury was induced by oleic acid in rat. The changes of dynamic lung compliance were recorded by anrise 2005 pulmonary function test apparatus, light microscope was used to examine histological changes and lung index as well as wet to dry weight ratio was calculated by weighting method. Lung vascular permeability and protein level in BALF were detected by ultraviolet spectrophotometry, and the concentrations of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 in BALF were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The result showed that the changes of pulmonary compliance were inhibited and pulmonary function was improved by curcumine. The OA-induced elevation of lung index was restrained, as well as wet to dry weight ratio, lung vascular permeability, protein level, TNF-alpha (250.4 +/- 21.6 vs. 172.53 +/- 14.88, 122.2 +/- 10.98, 108.69 +/- 3.39) ng x L(-1), IL-6 (763.6 +/- 88.33 vs. 207.41 +/- 15.55, 172.13 +/- 21.91, 142.92 +/- 4.32) ng x L(-1) in BALF in curcumine groups, IL-10 (98.90 +/- 2.99 vs. 208.44 +/- 16.30, 218.43 +/- 6.23, 252.70 +/- 20.58) ng x L(-1) in BALF was increased, respectively significantly. Light microscope findings shown that the impairment in curcumine groups was far less severe than that in model groups. Pretreatment of curcumine showed beneficial effect on acute lung injury induced by oleic acid in rats. The mediation of both proinflammatory factor and anti-inflammatory factor by curcumine may be involved in mechanism of action of curcumine effects. PMID:19066061

  4. 5-Hydroxytryptamine uptake in oxygen radical-mediated acute lung injury

    Pulmonary endothelial cell function (ECF) studies have been shown to be a sensitive indicator of chronic lung injury. We attempted to correlate changes in 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) uptake with an acute oxygen radical-mediated lung injury in dogs. Beta-d glucose/glucose oxidase was injected intravenously in an experimental group (n = 10), while the control group (n = 5) received saline. 5HT uptake, measured using a multiple indicator dilution technique before and 20 min after injection, was calculated for both the percent total uptake and the peak extraction ratio of 5HT during a single passage through the lung. The mean pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures (PAP, SAP), total pulmonary resistance (TPR), extravascular lung water (EVLW), and wet-to-dry weight ratios were also determined. The experimental group showed an acute rise in PAP and TPR and a fall in SAP after the injection, all returning to normal by 20 min; total 5HT uptake fell from 81 +/- 2.3% to 47 +/- 6.5% (p = 0.0002) as did the peak extraction ratio from 0.87 +/- 0.013 to 0.44 +/- 0.066 (p = 0.0001). No change in 5HT uptake was observed in the control group. EVLW did not change in either group, but wet-to-dry weight ratio was elevated in the experimental group (5.21 +/- 0.12 versus 4.73 +/- 0.06, p less than 0.01). ECF studies of 5HT uptake appear to be a sensitive indicator of acute lung injury in this large-animal, oxygen radical-induced injury model

  5. Preemptive mechanical ventilation can block progressive acute lung injury.

    Sadowitz, Benjamin; Jain, Sumeet; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Gatto, Louis A; Nieman, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unacceptable, approaching 45% in certain high-risk patient populations. Treating fulminant ARDS is currently relegated to supportive care measures only. Thus, the best treatment for ARDS may lie with preventing this syndrome from ever occurring. Clinical studies were examined to determine why ARDS has remained resistant to treatment over the past several decades. In addition, both basic science and clinical studies were examined to determine the impact that early, protective mechanical ventilation may have on preventing the development of ARDS in at-risk patients. Fulminant ARDS is highly resistant to both pharmacologic treatment and methods of mechanical ventilation. However, ARDS is a progressive disease with an early treatment window that can be exploited. In particular, protective mechanical ventilation initiated before the onset of lung injury can prevent the progression to ARDS. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is a novel mechanical ventilation strategy for delivering a protective breath that has been shown to block progressive acute lung injury (ALI) and prevent ALI from progressing to ARDS. ARDS mortality currently remains as high as 45% in some studies. As ARDS is a progressive disease, the key to treatment lies with preventing the disease from ever occurring while it remains subclinical. Early protective mechanical ventilation with APRV appears to offer substantial benefit in this regard and may be the prophylactic treatment of choice for preventing ARDS. PMID:26855896

  6. [Role of computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Franchi, Federico; Volterrani, Luca; Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Macarini, Luca

    2012-11-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a complex pulmonary pathology with high mortality rates, manifesting over a wide range of severity. Clinical diagnosis relies on the following 4 criteria stated by the American-European Consensus Conference: acute onset of impaired gas exchange, severe hypoxemia defined as a PaO2 to FiO2 ratio <300 (PaO2 in mmHg), bilateral diffuse infiltration on chest X-ray; pulmonary artery wedge pressure of ≤18 mmHg to rule out cardiogenic causes of pulmonary edema. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of CT in the diagnosis and management of this condition. PMID:23096732

  7. Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Pediatric Acute Lung Injury

    Michele YF Kong, Amit Gaggar, Yao Li, Margaret Winkler, J Edwin Blalock, JP Clancy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric Acute Lung Injury (ALI is associated with a high mortality and morbidity, and dysregulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs may play an important role in the pathogenesis and evolution of ALI. Here we examined MMP expression and activity in pediatric ALI compared with controls. MMP-8, -9, and to a lesser extent, MMP-2, -3, -11 and -12 were identified at higher levels in lung secretions of pediatric ALI patients compared with controls. Tissue Inhibitor of Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1, a natural inhibitor of MMPs was detected in most ALI samples, but MMP-9:TIMP-1 ratios were high relative to controls. In subjects who remained intubated for ≥10 days, MMP-9 activity decreased, with > 80% found in the latent form. In contrast, almost all MMP-8 detected at later disease course was constitutively active. Discriminating MMP-9:TIMP-1 ratios were found in those who had a prolonged ALI course. These results identify a specific repertoire of MMP isoforms in the lung secretions of pediatric ALI patients, and demonstrate inverse changes in MMPs -8 and -9 with protracted disease.

  8. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25008149

  9. Metabolomics and Its Application to Acute Lung Diseases.

    Stringer, Kathleen A; McKay, Ryan T; Karnovsky, Alla; Quémerais, Bernadette; Lacy, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly expanding field of systems biology that is gaining significant attention in many areas of biomedical research. Also known as metabonomics, it comprises the analysis of all small molecules or metabolites that are present within an organism or a specific compartment of the body. Metabolite detection and quantification provide a valuable addition to genomics and proteomics and give unique insights into metabolic changes that occur in tangent to alterations in gene and protein activity that are associated with disease. As a novel approach to understanding disease, metabolomics provides a "snapshot" in time of all metabolites present in a biological sample such as whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, and many other specimens that may be obtained from either patients or experimental models. In this article, we review the burgeoning field of metabolomics in its application to acute lung diseases, specifically pneumonia and acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS). We also discuss the potential applications of metabolomics for monitoring exposure to aerosolized environmental toxins. Recent reports have suggested that metabolomics analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) approaches may provide clinicians with the opportunity to identify new biomarkers that may predict progression to more severe disease, such as sepsis, which kills many patients each year. In addition, metabolomics may provide more detailed phenotyping of patient heterogeneity, which is needed to achieve the goal of precision medicine. However, although several experimental and clinical metabolomics studies have been conducted assessing the application of the science to acute lung diseases, only incremental progress has been made. Specifically, little is known about the metabolic phenotypes of these illnesses. These data are needed to substantiate metabolomics biomarker credentials so that clinicians can employ them for clinical decision-making and

  10. Metastasis-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Small Cell Carcinoma of the Lungs

    Hajime Tanaka

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic metastases are relatively common in advanced lung cancers (both small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma, but metastasis-induced acute pancreatitis is very unusual. Case report A 51-year-old woman with small cell carcinoma of the lung developed acute pancreatitis as the initial manifestation. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed multiple pancreatic metastases which were confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Conventional treatment did not improve her condition. However, aggressive chemotherapy resulted in a dramatic recovery from the acute pancreatitis and significant improvement in her general condition. Conclusion When cases of acute pancreatitis in patients with small cell lung carcinoma are encountered, we must consider the possibility of metastasis-induced acute pancreatitis and that, should pancreatic metastases be found in these patients, chemotherapy may provide substantial benefit.

  11. Role of gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in tissue remodeling following acute lung injury

    M. Corbel

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury is characterized by a severe disruption of alveolo-capillary structures and includes a variety of changes in lung cell populations. Evidence suggests the occurrence of rupture of the basement membranes and interstitial matrix remodeling during acute lung injury. The dynamic equilibrium of the extracellular matrix (ECM under physiological conditions is a consequence of the balance between the regulation of synthesis and degradation of ECM components. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs represent a group of enzymes involved in the degradation of most of the components of the ECM and therefore participate in tissue remodeling associated with pathological situations such as acute lung injury. MMP activity is regulated by proteolytic activation of the latent secreted proenzyme and by interaction with specific tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. This review details our knowledge of the involvement of MMPs, namely MMP-2 and MMP-9, in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  12. Short women with severe sepsis-related acute lung injury receive lung protective ventilation less frequently: an observational cohort study

    Han, SeungHye; Martin, Greg S.; Maloney, James P.; Shanholtz, Carl; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Murray, Stacey; Sevransky, Jonathan E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Lung protective ventilation (LPV) has been shown to improve survival and the duration of mechanical ventilation in acute lung injury (ALI) patients. Mortality of ALI may vary by gender, which could result from treatment variability. Whether gender is associated with the use of LPV is not known. Methods A total of 421 severe sepsis-related ALI subjects in the Consortium to Evaluate Lung Edema Genetics from seven teaching hospitals between 2002 and 2008 were included in our study. ...

  13. Hypervolemia induces and potentiates lung damage after recruitment maneuver in a model of sepsis-induced acute lung injury

    Silva, Pedro L; Cruz, Fernanda F.; Fujisaki, Livia C; Gisele P. Oliveira; Samary, Cynthia S; Ornellas, Debora S; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Rocha, Nazareth N.; Goldenberg, Regina; Garcia, Cristiane SNB; MARCELO M. MORALES; Vera L. Capelozzi; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia RM

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Recruitment maneuvers (RMs) seem to be more effective in extrapulmonary acute lung injury (ALI), caused mainly by sepsis, than in pulmonary ALI. Nevertheless, the maintenance of adequate volemic status is particularly challenging in sepsis. Since the interaction between volemic status and RMs is not well established, we investigated the effects of RMs on lung and distal organs in the presence of hypovolemia, normovolemia, and hypervolemia in a model of extrapulmonary lung injury ...

  14. Clinical review: The implications of experimental and clinical studies of recruitment maneuvers in acute lung injury

    Piacentini Gómez, Enrique; Villagrá, Ana; López Aguilar, Josefina; Blanch Torra, Lluís

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation can cause and perpetuate lung injury if alveolar overdistension, cyclic collapse, and reopening of alveolar units occur. The use of low tidal volume and limited airway pressure has improved survival in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The use of recruitment maneuvers has been proposed as an adjunct to mechanical ventilation to re-expand collapsed lung tissue. Many investigators have studied the benefits of recruitment maneuvers in ...

  15. The role of the acute phase protein PTX3 in the ventilator-induced lung injury

    JM Real; MM. Marques; GMGT Spilborghs; EM Negri; MM Matzuk; RP Moura; AA Camargo; Deheinzelin, D; AAM Dias

    2008-01-01

    The pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is an acute phase proinflammatory protein produced by fibroblasts and alveolar epithelial cells. We have previously demonstrated that PTX3 is a key modulator of inflammation. Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life saving therapeutic approach for patients with acute lung injury that, nevertheless could lead to an inflammatory response and tissue injury (ventilator-induced lung injury: VILI), representing a major cause of iatrogenic lung damage in intensive units. Our obje...

  16. Neutrophil Elastase Contributes to Acute Lung Injury Induced by Bilateral Nephrectomy

    Ishii, Tomoko; DOI, Kent; Okamoto, Koji; Imamura, Mitsuru; Dohi, Makoto; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Fujita, Toshiro; Noiri, Eisei

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious problem in critically ill patients of intensive care units. It has been reported previously that AKI can induce acute lung injury (ALI), as well as cause injuries to other remote organs, including the lungs. Patients with AKI complicated by ALI show remarkably high mortality. ALI is characterized by neutrophil infiltration into the lung. Neutrophil elastase (NE) is a key enzyme for tissue injury caused by activated neutrophils, such as occurs in ALI. The...

  17. Cigarette Smoke Disrupted Lung Endothelial Barrier Integrity and Increased Susceptibility to Acute Lung Injury via Histone Deacetylase 6.

    Borgas, Diana; Chambers, Eboni; Newton, Julie; Ko, Junsuk; Rivera, Stephanie; Rounds, Sharon; Lu, Qing

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiologic evidence indicates that cigarette smoke (CS) is associated with the development of acute lung injury (ALI). We have previously shown that brief CS exposure exacerbates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in vivo and endothelial barrier dysfunction in vitro. In this study, we found that CS also exacerbated Pseudomonas-induced ALI in mice. We demonstrated that lung microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) isolated from mice exposed to CS had a greater permeability or incomplete recovery after challenges by LPS and thrombin. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) 6 deacetylates proteins essential for maintenance of endothelial barrier function. We found that HDAC6 phosphorylation at serine-22 was increased in lung tissues of mice exposed to CS and in lung ECs exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Inhibition of HDAC6 attenuated CSE-induced increases in EC permeability and CS priming of ALI. Similar barrier protection was provided by the microtubule stabilizer taxol, which preserved α-tubulin acetylation. CSE decreased α-tubulin acetylation and caused microtubule depolymerization. In coordination with increased HDAC6 phosphorylation, CSE inhibited Akt and activated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β; these effects were ameliorated by the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine. Our results suggest that CS increases lung EC permeability, thereby enhancing susceptibility to ALI, likely through oxidative stress-induced Akt inactivation and subsequent GSK-3β activation. Activated GSK-3β may activate HDAC6 via phosphorylation of serine-22, leading to α-tubulin deacetylation and microtubule disassembly. Inhibition of HDAC6 may be a novel therapeutic option for ALI in cigarette smokers. PMID:26452072

  18. Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS): the mechanism, present strategies and future perspectives of therapies

    Luh, Shi-Ping; Chiang, Chi-huei

    2006-01-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), which manifests as non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, respiratory distress and hypoxemia, could be resulted from various processes that directly or indirectly injure the lung. Extensive investigations in experimental models and humans with ALI/ARDS have revealed many molecular mechanisms that offer therapeutic opportunities for cell or gene therapy. Herein the present strategies and future perspectives of the treatment for ALI/AR...

  19. Myeloid tissue factor does not modulate lung inflammation or permeability during experimental acute lung injury.

    Shaver, Ciara M; Grove, Brandon S; Clune, Jennifer K; Mackman, Nigel; Ware, Lorraine B; Bastarache, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a critical mediator of direct acute lung injury (ALI) with global TF deficiency resulting in increased airspace inflammation, alveolar-capillary permeability, and alveolar hemorrhage after intra-tracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the lung, TF is expressed diffusely on the lung epithelium and intensely on cells of the myeloid lineage. We recently reported that TF on the lung epithelium, but not on myeloid cells, was the major source of TF during intra-tracheal LPS-induced ALI. Because of a growing body of literature demonstrating important pathophysiologic differences between ALI caused by different etiologies, we hypothesized that TF on myeloid cells may have distinct contributions to airspace inflammation and permeability between direct and indirect causes of ALI. To test this, we compared mice lacking TF on myeloid cells (TF(∆mye), LysM.Cre(+/-)TF(flox/flox)) to littermate controls during direct (bacterial pneumonia, ventilator-induced ALI, bleomycin-induced ALI) and indirect ALI (systemic LPS, cecal ligation and puncture). ALI was quantified by weight loss, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammatory cell number, cytokine concentration, protein concentration, and BAL procoagulant activity. There was no significant contribution of TF on myeloid cells in multiple models of experimental ALI, leading to the conclusion that TF in myeloid cells is not a major contributor to experimental ALI. PMID:26924425

  20. VEGFA variants are associated with pre-school lung function, but not neonatal lung function

    Kreiner-Møller, E; Chawes, B L K; Vissing, N H;

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is implicated in airway remodelling and asthma development. We studied VEGFA gene variants and plasma levels and the development of lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma in childhood.......Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is implicated in airway remodelling and asthma development. We studied VEGFA gene variants and plasma levels and the development of lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma in childhood....

  1. Paraquat poisoning: an experimental model of dose-dependent acute lung injury due to surfactant dysfunction

    M.F.R. Silva

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the most characteristic feature of paraquat poisoning is lung damage, a prospective controlled study was performed on excised rat lungs in order to estimate the intensity of lesion after different doses. Twenty-five male, 2-3-month-old non-SPF Wistar rats, divided into 5 groups, received paraquat dichloride in a single intraperitoneal injection (0, 1, 5, 25, or 50 mg/kg body weight 24 h before the experiment. Static pressure-volume (PV curves were performed in air- and saline-filled lungs; an estimator of surface tension and tissue works was computed by integrating the area of both curves and reported as work/ml of volume displacement. Paraquat induced a dose-dependent increase of inspiratory surface tension work that reached a significant two-fold order of magnitude for 25 and 50 mg/kg body weight (P<0.05, ANOVA, sparing lung tissue. This kind of lesion was probably due to functional abnormalities of the surfactant system, as was shown by the increase in the hysteresis of the paraquat groups at the highest doses. Hence, paraquat poisoning provides a suitable model of acute lung injury with alveolar instability that can be easily used in experimental protocols of mechanical ventilation

  2. 11.1.Lung function

    1993-01-01

    930287 The investigation of the correlationsbetween LVEDP and pulmonary function pa-rameters.YAO Tianqiao (姚天樵),et al.BeijingAnzhen Hosp,Beijing,100029.Chin J Tuberc &Respir dis 1993;16(1):18—20.Left ventricular end diastolic pressure(LVEDP)in 24 patients with coronary,hyper-tension or rheumatic heart disease (mainly aor-tic valve pathologic change,exclude mitralstenosis),had unobvious clinical heart failure.Before left heart catheterization pulmonary

  3. Metastasis-induced acute pancreatitis in a patient with small cell carcinoma of the lung.

    Kim, K. H.; Kim, C D; Lee, S. J.; Lee, G.; Jeen, Y T; Lee, H.S.; Chun, H J; Song, C. W.; Um, S. H.; Lee, S. W.; Choi, J. H.; Ryu, H. S.; Hyun, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in cancer patients can be secondary to the malignant process itself or a complication of antineoplastic agent administration. However, acute pancreatitis caused by metastatic carcinoma of the pancreas is an uncommon condition with a poor prognosis. We report a case of a 63-year-old man with small cell carcinoma of the lung, who developed acute pancreatitis lately. Thirteen months earlier, he developed small cell carcinoma of the lung and received 6 cycles of chemotherapy. A...

  4. Inhaled nitric oxide exacerbated phorbol-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    Lin, Hen I; Chu, Shi Jye; Hsu, Kang; Wang, David

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we determined the effect of inhaled nitric oxide (NO) on the acute lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in isolated rat lung. Typical acute lung injury was induced successfully by PMA during 60 min of observation. PMA (2 microg/kg) elicited a significant increase in microvascular permeability, (measured using the capillary filtration coefficient Kfc), lung weight gain, lung weight/body weight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and protein concentration of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Pretreatment with inhaled NO (30 ppm) significantly exacerbated acute lung injury. All of the parameters reflective of lung injury increased significantly except PAP (P<0.05). Coadministration of Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (5 mM) attenuated the detrimental effect of inhaled NO in PMA-induced lung injury, except for PAP. In addition, L-NAME (5 mM) significantly attenuated PMA-induced acute lung injury except for PAP. These experimental data suggest that inhaled NO significantly exacerbated acute lung injury induced by PMA in rats. L-NAME attenuated the detrimental effect of inhaled NO. PMID:14643171

  5. Prenatal and postnatal genetic influence on lung function development

    Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unknown to what extent adult lung function genes affect lung function development from birth to childhood. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to study the association of candidate genetic variants with neonatal lung function and lung function development until age 7 years. METHODS: Lung...... function measurement by means of spirometry with the raised-volume thoracoabdominal compression technique and bronchial responsiveness to methacholine challenge were assessed in 411 high-risk newborns from the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood 2000 (COPSAC2000) cohort. Measures were......). CONCLUSION: Lung function genetic variants identified in adults were not associated with neonatal lung function or bronchial responsiveness but with the development of these lung function measures during early childhood, suggesting a window of opportunity for interventions targeting these genetic mechanisms....

  6. Melatonin reduces acute lung injury in endotoxemic rats

    SHANG You; XU San-peng; WU Yan; JIANG Yuan-xu; WU Zhou-yang; YUAN Shi-ying; YAO Shang-long

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment with melatonin significantly reduces lung injury induced by bleomycin, paraquat and ischemia reperfusion. In the present study, we investigated the possible protective roles of melatonin in pulmonary inflammation and lung injury during acute endotoxemia.Methods Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups: vehicle + saline group, melatonin + saline group, vehicle + lipopolysaccharide group, melatonin + lipopolysaccharide group. The rats were treated with melatonin (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection (I.p.)) or vehicle (1% ethanol saline), 30 minutes prior to lipopolysaccharide administration (6 mg/kg, intravenous injection). Four hours after lipopolysaccharide injection, samples of pulmonary tissue were collected. Blood gas analysis was carried out. Optical microscopy was performed to examine pathological changes in lungs and lung injury score was assessed. Wet/dry ratios (W/D), myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde concentrations and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels in lungs were measured. The pulmonary expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-KB) p65 was evaluated by Western blotting. Results PaO2 in the vehicle + lipopolysaccharide group decreased compared with that in the vehicle + saline group. This decrease was significantly reduced in the melatonin + lipopolysaccharide group. The lung tissues from the saline + lipopolysaccharide group were significantly damaged, which were less pronounced in the melatonin + lipopolysaccharide group. The W/D ratio increased significantly in the vehicle + lipopolysaccharide group (6.1±0.18) as compared with that in the vehicle + saline group (3.611±0.3) (P <0.01), which was significantly reduced in the melatonin + lipopolysaccharide group (4.8±0.25) (P <0.01). Myeloperoxidase activity and malondialdehyde levels increased significantly in the vehicle + lipopolysaccharide group compared with that in the vehicle + saline group, which

  7. Lung function changes in wildland firefighters working at prescribed burns.

    Adetona, Olorunfemi; Hall, Daniel, B.; Naeher, L,P.

    2011-10-01

    Although decline in lung function across workshift has been observed in wildland firefighters, measurements have been restricted to days when they worked at fires. Consequently, such results could have been confounded by normal circadian variation associated with lung function. We investigated the across-shift changes in lung function of wildland firefighters, and the effect of cumulative exposure on lung function during the burn season.

  8. Ligustrazine alleviates acute lung injury in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    Jian-Xin Zhang; Sheng-Chun Dang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Acute necrotizing pancreatitis leads to a systemic inlfammatory response characterized by widespread leukocyte activation and, as a consequence, distant lung injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ligustrazine, extracted from Ligusticum wallichii a traditional Chinese medicine, on lung injury in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). METHODS:A total of 192 rats were randomly divided into three groups: control (C group); ANP without treatment (P group); and ANP treated with ligustrazine (T group). Each group was further divided into 0.5, 2, 6 and 12 hours subgroups. All rats were anesthetized with an intraperitoneal injection of sodium pentobarbital. Sodium taurocholate was infused through the pancreatic membrane to induce ANP. For the T group, sodium taurocholate was infused as above, then 0.6%ligustrazine was administered via the femoral vein. The effects of ligustrazine on the severity of lung injury were assessed by lung wet/dry weight ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histopathological changes. Pulmonary blood lfow was determined by the radioactive microsphere technique (RMT). RESULTS:The blood lfow in the P group was signiifcantly lower than that of the C group, while the blood lfow in the T group was signiifcantly higher than that of the P group but showed no signiifcant difference from the C group. Compared with C group, the lung wet/dry ratios in both the P and T groups were signiifcantly increased, but there was no signiifcant difference between them. The MPO activity in the P group was greatly increased over that of the C group. In the T group, although the MPO activity was also higher than in the C group, it much less increased than in the P group. Moreover, the difference between P and T groups was signiifcant after 0.5 to 12 hours. After induction of the ANP model, the pancreas showed mild edema and congestion;the longer the time, the more severe this became. The pulmonary pathological changes were

  9. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury Following Upper Extremity Replantation

    Celalettin Sever

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI is a common adverse effect of blood transfusion that is often underrecognised and underreported. We would like to report a case of TRALI after the replantation and transfusion of blood components in a male patient who had sustained a complete amputation of the right upper extremity. The level of amputation was just proximal to the humeral condyles. Replantation was performed 5 hours after the accident and 36 units of blood products were transfused intraoperatively. Subsequently, during the early postoperative period, TRALI was revealed. In this case report, the circumstances of this injury and preventive measures are discussed to understand and recognise this condition in order to reduce the morbidity and mortality of TRALI. It is important to distinguish TRALI from other causes of pulmonary oedema because early diagnosis and management are associated with a favourable outcome.

  10. Acute Lung Injury Due To Carbon Monoxide Exposure

    Uzkeser M et al.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old woman, who was found unconscious in the bed by the morning, was brought to emergency department. Her carboxyhemoglobin level was 20.2%. The portable chest X-ray showed bilaterally alveolar and interstitial infiltration. Initial pO 2 /FIO 2 ratio was calculated as 119 mmHg. Acute lung injury due to carbon monoxide intoxication was considered. She was intubated and mechanical ventilation was applied. In the second day of hospitalization, a clear improvement was observed on the chest X-ray. She was discharged without any complication on the seventh day of hospitalization. Early diagnosis and treatment may prevent progression of ARDS and progression of permanent damage, and may lead to complete recovery.

  11. Biomarkers of acute lung injury: worth their salt?

    Proudfoot Alastair G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The validation of biomarkers has become a key goal of translational biomedical research. The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of biomarkers in the management of acute lung injury (ALI and related research. Biomarkers should be sensitive and specific indicators of clinically important processes and should change in a relevant timeframe to affect recruitment to trials or clinical management. We do not believe that they necessarily need to reflect pathogenic processes. We critically examined current strategies used to identify biomarkers and which, owing to expedience, have been dominated by reanalysis of blood derived markers from large multicenter Phase 3 studies. Combining new and existing validated biomarkers with physiological and other data may add predictive power and facilitate the development of important aids to research and therapy.

  12. Intravascular activation of complement and acute lung injury. Dependency on neutrophils and toxic oxygen metabolites.

    Till, G O; Johnson, K J; R. Kunkel; Ward, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    Intravascular activation of the complement system with cobra venom factor results in acute lung injury, which has been quantitated by increases in lung vascular permeability. Cobra venom factor preparations devoid of phospholipase A2 activity retain full lung-damaging capacity. The lung injury is associated with the preceding appearance of chemotactic activity in the serum coincident with the development of a profound neutropenia. The chemotactic activity is immunochemically related to human ...

  13. Modifications of lung clearance mechanisms by acute influenza A infection

    Four volunteers with naturally acquired, culture-proved influenza A infection inhaled a radiolabeled aerosol to permit investigation of lung mucociliary clearance mechanisms during and after symptomatic illness. Mucus transport in the trachea was undetectable when monitored with an external multidetector probe within 48 hours of the onset of the illness, but was found at a normal velocity by 1 week in three of the four subjects. In two volunteers who coughed 23 to 48 times during the 4.5-hour observation period, whole lung clearance was as fast within the first 48 hours of illness as during health 3 months later in spite of the absence of measurable tracheal mucus transport. Conversely, in spite of the return 1 week later of mucus transport at velocities expected in the trachea, whole lung clearance for the 4.5-hour period was slowed in two volunteers who coughed less than once an hour. The data offer evidence that cough is important in maintaining lung clearance for at least several days after symptomatic influenza A infection when other mechanisms that depend on ciliary function are severely deficient

  14. Studies of Regional Lung Function Using Radioisotopes

    Studies of the lung using radioactive tracers date from 1955. A review of this literature indicates that the techniques used are still being refined, with on the one hand increasing sophistication of handling of complex data, and on the other, increasing simplification of methodology to permit more general application. Major physiological advances have been made as a result of this body of work. The factors determining regional ventilation of the lung are now well understood, and the effects of loss of lung recoil, of encroachment on the lung volume and of such phenomena as acceleration and weightlessness, can be predicted on a rational basis. The factors affecting the distribution of pulmonary blood flow have also been greatly clarified by these studies. Clinically, the only major contribution to diagnosis has been the use of tagged aggregrated albumin with external counting to diagnose pulmonary embolism. However, many important observations have been made in such conditions as asthma, emphysema, mitral stenosis, and pneumonia. Recent studies of the early stages of chronic bronchitis give promise that technically simple methods may provide a very early indication of pulmonary function change in this important and common condition. (author)

  15. Obesity-induced adipokine imbalance impairs mouse pulmonary vascular endothelial function and primes the lung for injury

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Duong, Michelle; Wang, Nadan; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Benjamin T Suratt; Kallen, Caleb B.; Sun, Jianxin; Zhu, Ying; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but mechanisms mediating this association are unknown. While obesity is known to impair systemic blood vessel function, and predisposes to systemic vascular diseases, its effects on the pulmonary circulation are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the chronic low grade inflammation of obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and primes the lung for acute injury. The lung endothelium from obese m...

  16. Changes in lung parenchyma after acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): assessment with high-resolution computed tomography

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the appearance, extent, and distribution of parenchymal changes in the lung after acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as a function of disease severity and therapeutic procedures. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), clinical examination, and lung function tests were performed in 15 patients, 6-10 months after ARDS. The appearance and extent of parenchymal changes were compared with the severity of ARDS, as well as with clinical and therapeutic data. Lung parenchymal changes resembling those found in the presence of pulmonary fibrosis were observed in 13 of 15 patients (87%). The changes were significantly more frequent and more pronounced in the ventral than in the dorsal portions of the lung (p<0.01). A significant correlation was observed between the extent of lung alterations and the severity of ARDS (p<0.01), and the duration in which patients had received mechanical ventilation either with a peak inspiratory pressure greater than 30 mmHg (p<0.05), or with more than 70% oxygen (p<0.01). Acute respiratory distress syndrome frequently is followed by fibrotic changes in lung parenchyma. The predominantly ventral distribution of these changes indicates that they may be caused by the ventilation regimen and the oxygen therapy rather than by the ARDS. (orig.)

  17. [Continuously alternating prone and supine positioning in acute lung failure].

    Walz, M; Muhr, G

    1992-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure is still one the main problems in surgical intensive care. Unknown pathophysiological mechanisms permit only symptomatic therapy. Today ventilatory strategies by using PEEP und IRV are established to improve gas exchange and FRC by recruiting collapsed alveoli, decreasing intrapulmonary shunting and returning V/Q matching to normal. Furthermore different studies have shown the effects of supine and lateral decubitus posture in patients with acute respiratory failure. There are only rare reports on using the prone position, which doesn't require two-lung ventilation in difference to lateral position. We have studied 16 patients with acute respiratory failure by using continuous changing between prone and supine position under mechanical ventilation. All were male, aged 41.3 years in the middle and showed an average "Injury Severity Score" of 30 (13-50). 15 were trauma patients with blunt chest trauma in 11 cases. We have used prone position on threatening or manifest ARDS. In all patients we observed an increment of PaO2 during prone position on to 48 mmHg so that FiO2 could be reduced on an average of 0.2 within the first 48 h since changing patient's position. Posture changing depends on blood gas analysis, specifically on decreasing PaO2 after previous increment. Patients remained in prone and supine position at a mean of 6.3 (4.5-20) h and posture changing was proceeded over a period of 15.4 (7-32) days. No problems recording to blood pressure or mechanical ventilation appeared during prone position. 11 of 16 patients survived (68.8%), 5 died of cardiac (2) and multi organic failure (3) in connection with sepsis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1458988

  18. Lung and vascular function during chronic severe pulmonary ischemia

    Elizabeth M Wagner; Jenkins, John; Perino, Maria Grazia; Sukkar, Adlah; Mitzner, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Bronchial vascular angiogenesis takes place in a variety of lung inflammatory conditions such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease. However, it is unclear whether neovascularization is predominantly appropriate and preserves lung tissue or whether it contributes further to lung pathology through edema formation and inflammation. In the present study we examined airway and lung parenchymal function 14 days after left pulmonary artery ligation. I...

  19. Lymphatic function is required prenatally for lung inflation at birth

    Jakus, Zoltán; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Enis, David R.; Sen, Aslihan; Chia, Stephanie; Liu, Xi; Rawnsley, David R.; Yang, Yiqing; Hess, Paul R; Zou, Zhiying; Yang, Jisheng; Guttentag, Susan H.; Nelson, Celeste M.; Kahn, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Mammals must inflate their lungs and breathe within minutes of birth to survive. A key regulator of neonatal lung inflation is pulmonary surfactant, a lipoprotein complex which increases lung compliance by reducing alveolar surface tension (Morgan, 1971). Whether other developmental processes also alter lung mechanics in preparation for birth is unknown. We identify prenatal lymphatic function as an unexpected requirement for neonatal lung inflation and respiration. Mice lacking lymphatic ves...

  20. Activation of adherent vascular neutrophils in the lung during acute endotoxemia

    Laskin Jeffrey D

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophils constitute the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. Whereas these cells readily undergo apoptosis under homeostatic conditions, their survival is prolonged during inflammatory reactions and they become biochemically and functionally activated. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of acute endotoxemia on the response of a unique subpopulation of neutrophils tightly adhered to the lung vasculature. Methods Rats were treated with 5 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (i.v. to induce acute endotoxemia. Adherent neutrophils were isolated from the lung vasculature by collagenase digestion and sequential filtering. Agarose gel electrophoresis, RT-PCR, western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to evaluate neutrophil activity. Results Adherent vascular neutrophils isolated from endotoxemic animals exhibited decreased apoptosis when compared to cells from control animals. This was associated with a marked increase in expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, Mcl-1. Cells isolated 0.5–2 hours after endotoxin administration were more chemotactic than cells from control animals and expressed increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA and protein, demonstrating that they are functionally activated. Endotoxin treatment of the animals also induced p38 and p44/42 mitogen activated protein kinases in the adherent lung neutrophils, as well as nuclear binding activity of the transcription factors, NF-κB and cAMP response element binding protein. Conclusion These data demonstrate that adherent vascular lung neutrophils are highly responsive to endotoxin and that pathways regulating apoptosis and cellular activation are upregulated in these cells.

  1. Predicting Functional Recovery after Acute Ankle Sprain

    Sean R O'Connor; Bleakley, Chris M; Tully, Mark A; McDonough, Suzanne M

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION:Ankle sprains are among the most common acute musculoskeletal conditions presenting to primary care. Their clinical course is variable but there are limited recommendations on prognostic factors. Our primary aim was to identify clinical predictors of short and medium term functional recovery after ankle sprain.METHODS:A secondary analysis of data from adult participants (N = 85) with an acute ankle sprain, enrolled in a randomized controlled trial was undertaken. The predictive v...

  2. Acute pancreatitis in association with small cell lung carcinoma: potential pitfall in diagnosis and management.

    Allan, S. G.; Bundred, N; Eremin, O; Leonard, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Tumour metastases to the pancreas are a rare but recognized cause of acute pancreatitis, there is a 24-40% incidence of pancreatic involvement from small cell lung cancer in autopsy series but only a very few cases of tumour-induced acute pancreatitis have been described. Chemotherapy has been advocated as the primary therapy in patients with known oat cell carcinoma who develop acute pancreatitis. We describe 2 patients with acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis in association with disseminated sm...

  3. Simvastatin reduces endotoxin-induced acute lung injury by decreasing neutrophil recruitment and radical formation.

    Jochen Grommes

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI remains an unsolved problem in intensive care medicine. As simvastatin exerts protective effects in inflammatory diseases we explored its effects on development of ALI and due to the importance of neutrophils in ALI also on neutrophil effector functions. METHODS: C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to aerosolized LPS (500 µg/ml for 30 min. The count of alveolar, interstitial, and intravasal neutrophils were assessed 4 h later by flow cytometry. Lung permeability changes were assessed by FITC-dextran clearance and albumin content in the BAL fluid. In vitro, we analyzed the effect of simvastatin on neutrophil adhesion, degranulation, apoptosis, and formation of reactive oxygen species. To monitor effects of simvastatin on bacterial clearance we performed phagocytosis and bacterial killing studies in vitro as well as sepsis experiments in mice. RESULTS: Simvastatin treatment before and after onset of ALI reduces neutrophil influx into the lung as well as lung permeability indicating the protective role of simvastatin in ALI. Moreover, simvastatin reduces the formation of ROS species and adhesion of neutrophils without affecting apoptosis, bacterial phagocytosis and bacterial clearance. CONCLUSION: Simvastatin reduces recruitment and activation of neutrophils hereby protecting from LPS-induced ALI. Our results imply a potential role for statins in the management of ALI.

  4. Lung Neutrophilia in Myeloperoxidase Deficient Mice during the Course of Acute Pulmonary Inflammation

    Silvie Kremserova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammation accompanying diseases such as sepsis affects primarily lungs and induces their failure. This remains the most common cause of sepsis induced mortality. While neutrophils play a key role in pulmonary failure, the mechanisms remain incompletely characterized. We report that myeloperoxidase (MPO, abundant enzyme in neutrophil granules, modulates the course of acute pulmonary inflammatory responses induced by intranasal application of lipopolysaccharide. MPO deficient mice had significantly increased numbers of airway infiltrated neutrophils compared to wild-type mice during the whole course of lung inflammation. This was accompanied by higher levels of RANTES in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the MPO deficient mice. Other markers of lung injury and inflammation, which contribute to recruitment of neutrophils into the inflamed lungs, including total protein and other selected proinflammatory cytokines did not significantly differ in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the wild-type and the MPO deficient mice. Interestingly, MPO deficient neutrophils revealed a decreased rate of cell death characterized by phosphatidylserine surface expression. Collectively, the importance of MPO in regulation of pulmonary inflammation, independent of its putative microbicidal functions, can be potentially linked to MPO ability to modulate the life span of neutrophils and to affect accumulation of chemotactic factors at the inflammatory site.

  5. Lung Neutrophilia in Myeloperoxidase Deficient Mice during the Course of Acute Pulmonary Inflammation.

    Kremserova, Silvie; Perecko, Tomas; Soucek, Karel; Klinke, Anna; Baldus, Stephan; Eiserich, Jason P; Kubala, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation accompanying diseases such as sepsis affects primarily lungs and induces their failure. This remains the most common cause of sepsis induced mortality. While neutrophils play a key role in pulmonary failure, the mechanisms remain incompletely characterized. We report that myeloperoxidase (MPO), abundant enzyme in neutrophil granules, modulates the course of acute pulmonary inflammatory responses induced by intranasal application of lipopolysaccharide. MPO deficient mice had significantly increased numbers of airway infiltrated neutrophils compared to wild-type mice during the whole course of lung inflammation. This was accompanied by higher levels of RANTES in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the MPO deficient mice. Other markers of lung injury and inflammation, which contribute to recruitment of neutrophils into the inflamed lungs, including total protein and other selected proinflammatory cytokines did not significantly differ in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the wild-type and the MPO deficient mice. Interestingly, MPO deficient neutrophils revealed a decreased rate of cell death characterized by phosphatidylserine surface expression. Collectively, the importance of MPO in regulation of pulmonary inflammation, independent of its putative microbicidal functions, can be potentially linked to MPO ability to modulate the life span of neutrophils and to affect accumulation of chemotactic factors at the inflammatory site. PMID:26998194

  6. Endothelial Semaphorin 7A Promotes Inflammation in Seawater Aspiration-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    Minlong Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of seawater aspiration-induced acute lung injury (ALI. Although several studies have shown that Semaphorin 7A (SEMA7A promotes inflammation, there are limited reports regarding immunological function of SEMA7A in seawater aspiration-induced ALI. Therefore, we investigated the role of SEMA7A during seawater aspiration-induced ALI. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were underwent seawater instillation. Then, lung samples were collected at an indicated time for analysis. In addition, rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (RPMVECs were cultured and then stimulated with 25% seawater for indicated time point. After these treatments, cells samples were collected for analysis. In vivo, seawater instillation induced lung histopathologic changes, pro-inflammation cytokines release and increased expression of SEMA7A. In vitro, seawater stimulation led to pro-inflammation cytokine release, cytoskeleton remodeling and increased monolayer permeability in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α inhibited the seawater induced increase expression of SEMA7A. Meanwhile, knockdown of SEMA7A by specific siRNA inhibited the seawater induced aberrant inflammation, endothelial cytoskeleton remodeling and endothelial permeability. These results suggest that SEMA7A is critical in the development of lung inflammation and pulmonary edema in seawater aspiration-induced ALI, and may be a therapeutic target for this disease.

  7. Partial liquid ventilation improves lung function in ventilation-induced lung injury

    Vazquez de Anda, G.F.; Lachmann, R A; Verbrugge, Serge; Gommers, Diederik; Haitsma, J.J.; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2001-01-01

    textabstractDisturbances in lung function and lung mechanics are present after ventilation with high peak inspiratory pressures (PIP) and low levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Therefore, the authors investigated whether partial liquid ventilation can re-establish lung function after ventilation-induced lung injury. Adult rats were exposed to high PIP without PEEP for 20 min. Thereafter, the animals were randomly divided into five groups. The first group was killed immediately...

  8. Lung cancer tissue diagnosis in poor lung function: addressing the ongoing percutaneous lung biopsy FEV1 paradox using Heimlich valve.

    Abdullah, R; Tavare, A N; Creamer, A; Creer, D; Vancheeswaran, R; Hare, S S

    2016-08-01

    Many centres continue to decline percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB) in patients with poor lung function (particularly FEV1 pneumothorax. This practice limits access to novel lung cancer therapies and minimally invasive surgical techniques. Our retrospective single-centre analysis of 212 patients undergoing PLB, all performed prospectively and blinded to lung function, demonstrates that using ambulatory Heimlich valve chest drain (HVCD) to treat significant postbiopsy pneumothorax facilitates safe, diagnostic, early discharge lung biopsy irrespective of lung function with neither FEV1 pneumothorax outcomes. Incorporating ambulatory HVCD into standard PLB practice thereby elegantly bridges the gap that currently exists between tissue diagnosis in patients with poor lung function and the advanced therapeutic options available for this cohort. PMID:26980011

  9. β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase gene therapy upregulates tight junctions to rescue lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    Lin, X; Barravecchia, M; Kothari, P; Young, J L; Dean, D A

    2016-06-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are associated with diverse disorders and characterized by disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leakage of edema fluid into the lung, and substantial inflammation leading to acute respiratory failure. Gene therapy is a potentially powerful approach to treat ALI/ARDS through repair of alveolar epithelial function. Herein, we show that delivery of a plasmid expressing β1-subunit of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase) alone or in combination with epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) α1-subunit using electroporation not only protected from subsequent lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated lung injury, but also treated injured lungs. However, transfer of α1-subunit of ENaC (α1-ENaC) alone only provided protection benefit rather than treatment benefit although alveolar fluid clearance had been remarkably enhanced. Gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, but not α1-ENaC, not only enhanced expression of tight junction protein zona occludins-1 (ZO-1) and occludin both in cultured cells and in mouse lungs, but also reduced pre-existing increase of lung permeability in vivo. These results demonstrate that gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase upregulates tight junction formation and therefore treats lungs with existing injury, whereas delivery of α1-ENaC only maintains pre-existing tight junction but not for generation. This indicates that the restoration of epithelial/endothelial barrier function may provide better treatment of ALI/ARDS. PMID:26910760

  10. Acute or chronic transplant rejection - high resolution CT of the chest in lung transplant recipients

    Purpose: Aim of the study was to evaluate the postoperative changes in patients with single (SLTX) or double lung transplantation (DLTX) with HRCT and to correlate those findings with the clinical diagnosis. Material and methods: 29 patients with SLTX (n = 14) or DLTX (n = 15) were observed for more than 6 years after transplantation by HRCT (n = 82). CT examinations were performed in inspiration and expiration (n = 70) with a slice thickness of 1 mm and a feed of 10 mm. The image material was evaluated by 2 experienced radiologists in consensus. Criteria for acute rejection at HRCT were: ground glass opacities and focal air trapping in expiration. Criteria for chronic transplant rejection were: bronchial dilatation, bronchial wall thickening and thickening of interlobar septae. The clinical evaluation consisted of laboratory tests, lung function tests, and bronchoscopy including bronchial lavage in special cases. Results: 20/29 patients are still alive (mean 21 months). 5/9 patients died because of chronic transplantant rejection, 1 patient suffered from a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma localised at the right hilus. Severe threatening pneumonia occurred in 13 cases. 10/29 patients showed symptoms of acute rejection. Expiratory HRCT found a focal air trapping in all cases and extended ground glass opacities in 11/14 cases. Also a bronchial dilatation was observed in more than 50% (9/14). 12/29 patients suffered from chronic transplant rejection. HRCT showed bronchial dilatation in 26/27 investigations and severe ground glass opacities in 21/27 investigations. Thickening of the interlobal septa as well as centrilobular opacities were found in more than 50% of the examinations. Conclusion: High resolution CT of the chest in patients after lung transplantation is able to show numerous pathological alterations. Without clinical information a confident differentiation in acute or chronic transplant rejection or pneumonia can be difficult or impossible. (orig.)

  11. Transfusion-related Acute Lung Injury in the Critically Ill: Prospective Nested Case-Control Study

    Gajic, Ognjen; Rana, Rimki; Winters, Jeffrey L.; Yilmaz, Murat; Mendez, Jose L.; Rickman, Otis B.; O'Byrne, Megan M.; Evenson, Laura K; Malinchoc, Michael; DeGoey, Steven R.; Afessa, Bekele; Hubmayr, Rolf D.; Moore, S. Breanndan

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Acute lung injury (ALI) that develops 6 hours after transfusion (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Several transfusion characteristics have been postulated as risk factors for TRALI, but the evidence is limited to retrospective studies.

  12. Interleukin-22 ameliorates acute severe pancreatitis-associated lung injury in mice

    Qiao, Ying-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Xu, Chang-Qin; Zhang, Zheng; Xu, Hong-wei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential protective effect of exogenous recombinant interleukin-22 (rIL-22) on L-arginine-induced acute severe pancreatitis (SAP)-associated lung injury and the possible signaling pathway involved.

  13. Acute onset paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in a patient with small cell lung cancer

    Bhatia R

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A patient with small cell lung cancer presented with a rare presentation of an acute onset pancerebellar dysfunction. His clinical condition markedly improved following the surgical removal of the tumor and chemo- and radiotherapy.

  14. Inhibition of Pyk2 blocks lung inflammation and injury in a mouse model of acute lung injury

    Duan Yingli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2 is essential in neutrophil degranulation and chemotaxis in vitro. However, its effect on the process of lung inflammation and edema formation during LPS induced acute lung injury (ALI remains unknown. The goal of the present study was to determine the effect of inhibiting Pyk2 on LPS-induced acute lung inflammation and injury in vivo. Methods C57BL6 mice were given either 10 mg/kg LPS or saline intratracheally. Inhibition of Pyk2 was effected by intraperitoneal administration TAT-Pyk2-CT 1 h before challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage analysis of cell counts, lung histology and protein concentration in BAL were analyzed at 18 h after LPS treatment. KC and MIP-2 concentrations in BAL were measured by a mouse cytokine multiplex kit. The static lung compliance was determined by pressure-volume curve using a computer-controlled small animal ventilator. The extravasated Evans blue concentration in lung homogenate was determined spectrophotometrically. Results Intratracheal instillation of LPS induced significant neutrophil infiltration into the lung interstitium and alveolar space, which was attenuated by pre-treatment with TAT-Pyk2-CT. TAT-Pyk2-CT pretreatment also attenuated 1 myeloperoxidase content in lung tissues, 2 vascular leakage as measured by Evans blue dye extravasation in the lungs and the increase in protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage, and 3 the decrease in lung compliance. In each paradigm, treatment with control protein TAT-GFP had no blocking effect. By contrast, production of neutrophil chemokines MIP-2 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine in the bronchoalveolar lavage was not reduced by TAT-Pyk2-CT. Western blot analysis confirmed that tyrosine phosphorylation of Pyk2 in LPS-challenged lungs was reduced to control levels by TAT-Pyk2-CT pretreatment. Conclusions These results suggest that Pyk2 plays an important role in the development of acute lung injury in mice and

  15. Treatment of acute lung injury by targeting MG53-mediated cell membrane repair

    Jia, Yanlin; Chen, Ken; Lin, Peihui; Lieber, Gissela; Nishi, Miyuki; Yan, Rosalie; Wang, Zhen; Yao, Yonggang; LI Yu; Bryan A Whitson; Duann, Pu; Li, Haichang; Zhou, Xinyu; Zhu, Hua; Takeshima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Injury to lung epithelial cells has a role in multiple lung diseases. We previously identified mitsugumin 53 (MG53) as a component of the cell membrane repair machinery in striated muscle cells. Here we show that MG53 also has a physiological role in the lung and may be used as a treatment in animal models of acute lung injury. Mice lacking MG53 show increased susceptibility to ischemia-reperfusion and over-ventilation induced injury to the lung when compared with wild type mice. Extracellula...

  16. Prospective study on the clinical course and outcomes in transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Looney, MR; Roubinian, N; Gajic, O; Gropper, MA; Hubmayr, RD; Lowell, CA; Bacchetti, P.; Wilson, G.; Koenigsberg, M; Lee, DC; Wu, P; Grimes, B; Norris, PJ; Murphy, EL; Gandhi, MJ

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: Transfusion-related acute lung injury is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. A prospective study using electronic surveillance was conducted at two academic medical centers in the United States with the objective to define the clinical course and outcomes in transfusion-related acute lung injury cases. DESIGN:: Prospective case study with controls. SETTING:: University of California, San Francisco and Mayo Clinic, Rochester. PATIENTS:: We prospectively enrolled 89 ...

  17. Fatal transfusion related acute lung injury following coronary artery by-pass surgery: a case report

    Bawany, Fauzia Ahmad; Sharif, Hasanat

    2008-01-01

    Background Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a potentially fatal Acute Lung Injury following transfusion of blood components. Hypotheses implicate donor-derived anti-human leukocyte antigen or granulocyte antibodies reacting with recipients' leukocytes, releasing inflammatory mediators. Lack of agreement on underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms renders improving transfusion safety difficult and expensive. Case Presentation Literature search has not revealed any case of T...

  18. OPTICAL IMAGING OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY FROM HYPEROXIA AND SEPSIS

    Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Audi, Said H.; Maleki, Sepideh; Staniszewski, Kevin; EIS, ANNIE L.; Konduri, Girija G.; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic pulmonary disorders such as acute lung injury (ALI) in adults and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Bacterial infection and oxygen toxicity, which result in pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, contribute to impaired vascular growth and alveolar simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with BPD. Hyperoxia induces ALI, reduces cell proliferation, causes DNA damag...

  19. Increased T cell glucose uptake reflects acute rejection in lung grafts

    Chen, Delphine L.; Wang, Xingan; Yamamoto, Sumiharu; Carpenter, Danielle; Engle, Jacquelyn T.; Li, Wenjun; Lin, Xue; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Huang, Howard J.; Gelman, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    Although T cells are required for acute lung rejection, other graft-infiltrating cells such as neutrophils accumulate in allografts and are also high glucose utilizers. Positron emission tomography (PET) with the glucose probe [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) has been employed to image solid organ acute rejection, but the sources of glucose utilization remain undefined. Using a mouse model of orthotopic lung transplantation, we analyzed glucose probe uptake in the graft...

  20. Genetic variants associated with lung function

    Thyagarajan, Bharat; Wojczynski, Mary; Minster, Ryan L;

    2014-01-01

    with exceptional longevity have not been identified. METHOD: We conducted a genome wide association study (GWAS) to identify novel genetic variants associated with lung function in the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) (n = 3,899). Replication was performed using data from the CHARGE/SpiroMeta consortia....... The association between SNPs and FEV1 and FEV1/FVC was analyzed using a linear mixed effects model adjusted for age, age2, sex, height, field center, ancestry principal components and kinship structure to adjust for family relationships separately for ever smokers and never smokers. In the linkage...

  1. Ventilation-perfusion scan in the acutely ill patient with unilateral hyperlucent lung

    A patient with a unilateral hyperlucent lung with acute respiratory complaints is presented. A ventilation-perfusion scan was performed to rule out pulmonary embolism. The perfusion scan ( [/sup 99m/TC]MAA) showed peripheral perfusion defects in the hyperlucent lung. The ventilation study (133Xe) demonstrated peripheral ventilatory defects on the single breath image in the hyperlucent lung, the filling in of these on the equilibrium view, and diffusely delayed washout in the affected lung. These findings were suggestive of the Swyer-James syndrome and critical in excluding the numerous other causes of unilateral hyperlucent lung, which are discussed. The importance of the ventilation-perfusion study (and particularly the ventilation scan) in the patient with unilateral hyperlucent lung and acute respiratory symptoms is stressed. In addition, a discussion of the Swyer-James syndrome is included

  2. Lung tissue remodeling in the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Souza Alba Barros de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage, and evolves progressively with three phases: exsudative, fibroproliferative, and fibrotic. In the exudative phase, there are interstitial and alveolar edemas with hyaline membrane. The fibropro­liferative phase is characterized by exudate organization and fibroelastogenesis. There is proliferation of type II pneumocytes to cover the damaged epithelial surface, followed by differentiation into type I pneumocytes. The fibroproliferative phase starts early, and its severity is related to the patient?s prognosis. The alterations observed in the phenotype of the pulmonary parenchyma cells steer the tissue remodeling towards either progressive fibrosis or the restoration of normal alveolar architecture. The fibrotic phase is characterized by abnormal and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, mainly collagen. The dynamic control of collagen deposition and degradation is regulated by metalloproteinases and their tissular regulators. The deposition of proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix of ARDS patients needs better study. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling, in normal conditions or in several pulmonary diseases, such as ARDS, results from a complex mechanism that integrate the transcription of elements that destroy the matrix protein and produce activation/inhibition of several cellular types of lung tissue. This review article will analyze the ECM organization in ARDS, the different pulmonary parenchyma remodeling mechanisms, and the role of cytokines in the regulation of the different matrix components during the remodeling process.

  3. Transfusion related acute lung injury in a perinatal woman

    Deepthi Krishna G

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 26-year-old female who underwent emergency caesarean section at a private hospital and was referred to the Government Maternity Hospital (GMH, Tiruapti for bleeding per vaginum 4 hours after delivery. She had received one unit of whole blood transfusion outside. Later, whole blood, platelets (n= 1 unit and fresh frozen plasma (n= 2 units were transfused over a period of 6 hours at GMH, Tirupati. Two hours there after, she complained of sudden breathlessness with cough. On examination, bilateral basal crepitations and wheezing were noted. Fall in oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry, hypotension, tachypnoea and mild fever were also noted. Chest radiograph showed bilateral frontal opacities. Possibility of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI was considered. Supportive treatment included supplemental oxygen through oxygen mask followed by assisted mechanical ventilation and the patient improved. The present case highlights the importance of transfusion related adverse events so as to facilitate prompt recognition and appropriate treatment at the right time.

  4. Time-dependent changes of autophagy and apoptosis in lipopolysaccharide-induced rat acute lung injury

    Li Lin; Lijun Zhang; Liangzhu Yu; Lu Han; Wanli Ji; Hui Shen; Zhenwu Hu

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Abnormal lung cell death including autophagy and apoptosis is the central feature in acute lung injury (ALI). To identify the cellular mechanisms and the chronology by which different types of lung cell death are activated during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI, we decided to evaluate autophagy (by LC3-II and autophagosome) and apoptosis (by caspase-3) at different time points after LPS treatment in a rat model of LPS-induced ALI. Materials and Methods: Sprague-Dawley ra...

  5. Time profile of oxidative stress and neutrophil activation in ovine acute lung injury and sepsis

    Lange, Matthias; Szabo, Csaba; Traber, Daniel L.; Horvath, Eszter; Hamahata, Atsumori; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Traber, Lillian D.; Cox, Robert A.; Schmalstieg, Frank C.; Herndon, David N.; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2012-01-01

    The formation of oxidative stress in the lung and activation of neutrophils are major determinants in the development of respiratory failure following acute lung injury (ALI) and sepsis. However, the time changes of these pathogenic factors have not been sufficiently described. Twenty-four chronically instrumented sheep were subjected to cotton smoke inhalation injury and instillation of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa into both lungs. The sheep and were euthanized at 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 hours p...

  6. Regulation of alveolar procoagulant activity and permeability in direct acute lung injury by lung epithelial tissue factor.

    Shaver, Ciara M; Grove, Brandon S; Putz, Nathan D; Clune, Jennifer K; Lawson, William E; Carnahan, Robert H; Mackman, Nigel; Ware, Lorraine B; Bastarache, Julie A

    2015-11-01

    Tissue factor (TF) initiates the extrinsic coagulation cascade in response to tissue injury, leading to local fibrin deposition. Low levels of TF in mice are associated with increased severity of acute lung injury (ALI) after intratracheal LPS administration. However, the cellular sources of the TF required for protection from LPS-induced ALI remain unknown. In the current study, transgenic mice with cell-specific deletions of TF in the lung epithelium or myeloid cells were treated with intratracheal LPS to determine the cellular sources of TF important in direct ALI. Cell-specific deletion of TF in the lung epithelium reduced total lung TF expression to 39% of wild-type (WT) levels at baseline and to 29% of WT levels after intratracheal LPS. In contrast, there was no reduction of TF with myeloid cell TF deletion. Mice lacking myeloid cell TF did not differ from WT mice in coagulation, inflammation, permeability, or hemorrhage. However, mice lacking lung epithelial TF had increased tissue injury, impaired activation of coagulation in the airspace, disrupted alveolar permeability, and increased alveolar hemorrhage after intratracheal LPS. Deletion of epithelial TF did not affect alveolar permeability in an indirect model of ALI caused by systemic LPS infusion. These studies demonstrate that the lung epithelium is the primary source of TF in the lung, contributing 60-70% of total lung TF, and that lung epithelial, but not myeloid, TF may be protective in direct ALI. PMID:25884207

  7. Arginase 1: an unexpected mediator of pulmonary capillary barrier dysfunction in models of acute lung injury.

    Lucas, Rudolf; Czikora, Istvàn; Sridhar, Supriya; Zemskov, Evgeny A; Oseghale, Aluya; Circo, Sebastian; Cederbaum, Stephen D; Chakraborty, Trinad; Fulton, David J; Caldwell, Robert W; Romero, Maritza J

    2013-01-01

    The integrity of epithelial and endothelial barriers in the lower airspaces of the lungs has to be tightly regulated, in order to prevent leakage and to assure efficient gas exchange between the alveoli and capillaries. Both G(-) and G(+) bacterial toxins, such as lipopolysaccharide and pneumolysin, respectively, can be released in high concentrations within the pulmonary compartments upon antibiotic treatment of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or severe pneumonia. These toxins are able to impair endothelial barrier function, either directly, or indirectly, by induction of pro-inflammatory mediators and neutrophil sequestration. Toxin-induced endothelial hyperpermeability can involve myosin light chain phosphorylation and/or microtubule rearrangement. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was proposed to be a guardian of basal barrier function, since eNOS knock-out mice display an impaired expression of inter-endothelial junction proteins and as such an increased vascular permeability, as compared to wild type mice. The enzyme arginase, the activity of which can be regulated by the redox status of the cell, exists in two isoforms - arginase 1 (cytosolic) and arginase 2 (mitochondrial) - both of which can be expressed in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Upon activation, arginase competes with eNOS for the substrate l-arginine, as such impairing eNOS-dependent NO generation and promoting reactive oxygen species generation by the enzyme. This mini-review will discuss recent findings regarding the interaction between bacterial toxins and arginase during acute lung injury and will as such address the role of arginase in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:23966993

  8. Arginase 1: an unexpected mediator of pulmonary capillary barrier dysfunction in models of acute lung injury

    Rudolf eLucas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The integrity of epithelial and endothelial barriers in the lower airspaces of the lungs has to be tightly regulated, in order to prevent leakage and to assure efficient gas exchange between the alveoli and capillaries. Both G- and G+ bacterial toxins, such as LPS and pneumolysin, respectively, can be released in high concentrations within the pulmonary compartments upon antibiotic treatment of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS or severe pneumonia. These toxins are able to impair endothelial barrier function, either directly, or indirectly, by induction of pro-inflammatory mediators and neutrophil sequestration. Toxin-induced endothelial hyperpermeability can involve myosin light chain phosphorylation and/or microtubule rearrangement. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS was proposed to be a guardian of basal barrier function, since eNOS knock-out mice display an impaired expression of inter-endothelial junction proteins and as such an increased vascular permeability, as compared to wild type mice. The enzyme arginase, the activity of which can be regulated by the redox status of the cell, exists in two isoforms - arginase 1 (cytosolic and arginase 2 (mitochondrial - both of which can be expressed in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Upon activation, arginase competes with eNOS for the substrate L-arginine, as such impairing eNOS-dependent NO generation and promoting ROS generation by the enzyme. This mini-review will discuss recent findings regarding the interaction between bacterial toxins and arginase during acute lung injury and will as such address the role of arginase in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction.

  9. The role of airway macrophages in apoptotic cell clearance following acute and chronic lung inflammation.

    Grabiec, Aleksander M; Hussell, Tracy

    2016-07-01

    Acute and chronic inflammatory responses in the lung are associated with the accumulation of large quantities of immune and structural cells undergoing apoptosis, which need to be engulfed by phagocytes in a process called 'efferocytosis'. Apoptotic cell recognition and removal from the lung is mediated predominantly by airway macrophages, though immature dendritic cells and non-professional phagocytes, such as epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells, can also display this function. Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells from the airways is essential for successful resolution of inflammation and the return to lung homeostasis. Disruption of this process leads to secondary necrosis of accumulating apoptotic cells, release of necrotic cell debris and subsequent uncontrolled inflammatory activation of the innate immune system by the released 'damage associated molecular patterns' (DAMPS). To control the duration of the immune response and prevent autoimmune reactions, anti-inflammatory signalling cascades are initiated in the phagocyte upon apoptotic cell uptake, mediated by a range of receptors that recognise specific phospholipids or proteins externalised on, or secreted by, the apoptotic cell. However, prolonged activation of apoptotic cell recognition receptors, such as the family of receptor tyrosine kinases Tyro3, Axl and MerTK (TAM), may delay or prevent inflammatory responses to subsequent infections. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the mechanism controlling apoptotic cell recognition and removal from the lung in homeostasis and during inflammation, the contribution of defective efferocytosis to chronic inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and cystic fibrosis, and implications of the signals triggered by apoptotic cells in the susceptibility to pulmonary microbial infections. PMID:26957481

  10. Multiple Inhibitory Pathways Contribute to Lung CD8+ T Cell Impairment and Protect against Immunopathology during Acute Viral Respiratory Infection.

    Erickson, John J; Rogers, Meredith C; Tollefson, Sharon J; Boyd, Kelli L; Williams, John V

    2016-07-01

    Viruses are frequent causes of lower respiratory infection (LRI). Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) signaling contributes to pulmonary CD8(+) T cell (TCD8) functional impairment during acute viral LRI, but the role of TCD8 impairment in viral clearance and immunopathology is unclear. We now find that human metapneumovirus infection induces virus-specific lung TCD8 that fail to produce effector cytokines or degranulate late postinfection, with minimally increased function even in the absence of PD-1 signaling. Impaired lung TCD8 upregulated multiple inhibitory receptors, including PD-1, lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3), T cell Ig mucin 3, and 2B4. Moreover, coexpression of these receptors continued to increase even after viral clearance, with most virus-specific lung TCD8 expressing three or more inhibitory receptors on day 14 postinfection. Viral infection also increased expression of inhibitory ligands by both airway epithelial cells and APCs, further establishing an inhibitory environment. In vitro Ab blockade revealed that multiple inhibitory receptors contribute to TCD8 impairment induced by either human metapneumovirus or influenza virus infection. In vivo blockade of T cell Ig mucin 3 signaling failed to enhance TCD8 function or reduce viral titers. However, blockade of LAG-3 in PD-1-deficient mice restored TCD8 effector functions but increased lung pathology, indicating that LAG-3 mediates lung TCD8 impairment in vivo and contributes to protection from immunopathology during viral clearance. These results demonstrate that an orchestrated network of pathways modifies lung TCD8 functionality during viral LRI, with PD-1 and LAG-3 serving prominent roles. Lung TCD8 impairment may prevent immunopathology but also contributes to recurrent lung infections. PMID:27259857

  11. The Design of Future Pediatric Mechanical Ventilation Trials for Acute Lung Injury

    Robinder G Khemani; Newth, Christopher J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric practitioners face unique challenges when attempting to translate or adapt adult-derived evidence regarding ventilation practices for acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome into pediatric practice. Fortunately or unfortunately, there appears to be selective adoption of adult practices for pediatric mechanical ventilation, many of which pose considerable challenges or uncertainty when translated to pediatrics. These differences, combined with heterogeneous managemen...

  12. Early preventive treatment for severe acute pancreatitis combined with lung injury

    刘学民; 刘青光; 潘承恩

    2002-01-01

    @@ Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) can cause systematic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS),which leads to injury or failure of the internal organs and systems.1 Among them,acute respiratory distress syndrome(ARDS)is a severe or fatal complication.In this article,the early preventive treatment for SAP combined with lung injure is studied.

  13. Physiologic Basis for Improved Pulmonary Function after Lung Volume Reduction

    Fessler, Henry E.; Scharf, Steven M; Ingenito, Edward P.; McKenna, Robert J.; Sharafkhaneh, Amir

    2008-01-01

    It is not readily apparent how pulmonary function could be improved by resecting portions of the lung in patients with emphysema. In emphysema, elevation in residual volume relative to total lung capacity reduces forced expiratory volumes, increases inspiratory effort, and impairs inspiratory muscle mechanics. Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) better matches the size of the lungs to the size of the thorax containing them. This restores forced expiratory volumes and the mechanical advantage...

  14. Functional Lung Imaging during HFV in Preterm Rabbits

    Thurgood, Jordan; Hooper, Stuart; Siew, Melissa; Wallace, Megan; Dubsky, Stephen; Kitchen, Marcus; Jamison, R. Aidan; Carnibella, Richard; Fouras, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Although high frequency ventilation (HFV) is an effective mode of ventilation, there is limited information available in regard to lung dynamics during HFV. To improve the knowledge of lung function during HFV we have developed a novel lung imaging and analysis technique. The technique can determine complex lung motion information in vivo with a temporal resolution capable of observing HFV dynamics. Using high-speed synchrotron based phase contrast X-ray imaging and cross-correlation analysis...

  15. Genome Wide Association Identifies PPFIA1 as a Candidate Gene for Acute Lung Injury Risk Following Major Trauma

    Christie, Jason D.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Feng, Rui; O'Keefe, Grant E; Bradfield, Jonathan; Ware, Lorraine B.; Calfee, Carolyn S.; Matthay, Michael; Meyer, Nuala J.; Kim, Cecilia; Li, Mingyao; Akey, Joshua; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Sevransky, Jonathan; Lanken, Paul N

    2012-01-01

    Acute Lung Injury (ALI) is a syndrome with high associated mortality characterized by severe hypoxemia and pulmonary infiltrates in patients with critical illness. We conducted the first investigation to use the genome wide association (GWA) approach to identify putative risk variants for ALI. Genome wide genotyping was performed using the Illumina Human Quad 610 BeadChip. We performed a two-stage GWA study followed by a third stage of functional characterization. In the discovery phase (Phas...

  16. Neuregulin-1-Human Epidermal Receptor-2 Signaling Is a Central Regulator of Pulmonary Epithelial Permeability and Acute Lung Injury*

    Finigan, James H.; Faress, Jihane A.; Wilkinson, Emily; Mishra, Rangnath S.; Nethery, David E.; Wyler, David; Shatat, Mohammad; Ware, Lorraine B.; Matthay, Michael A.; Mason, Robert; Silver, Richard F.; Kern, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the loss of epithelial barrier function leading to alveolar flooding in acute lung injury (ALI) are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that the tyrosine kinase receptor human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) would be activated in an inflammatory setting and participate in ALI. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) exposure resulted in HER2 activation in human epithelial cells and markedly increased conductance across a monolayer of airway epithelial cells. Upon HER2 bloc...

  17. A case of transfusion-related acute lung injury induced by anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies in acute leukemia

    Jin, Sun Mi; Jang, Moon Ju; Huh, Ji Young; Park, Myoung Hee; Song, Eun Young; Oh, Doyeun

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a noncardiogenic pulmonary edema that occurs during or within 6 hours after transfusion. Risk factors for TRALI, which is relatively common in critically ill patients, include recent surgery, hematologic malignancy, and sepsis. Here, we report a case of TRALI induced by anti-human leukocyte antigen (anti-HLA) class II antibodies (HLA-DR) occurring after transfusion of platelet concentrates in a patient with acute leukemia. Although most patient...

  18. Lymphatic function is required prenatally for lung inflation at birth.

    Jakus, Zoltán; Gleghorn, Jason P; Enis, David R; Sen, Aslihan; Chia, Stephanie; Liu, Xi; Rawnsley, David R; Yang, Yiqing; Hess, Paul R; Zou, Zhiying; Yang, Jisheng; Guttentag, Susan H; Nelson, Celeste M; Kahn, Mark L

    2014-05-01

    Mammals must inflate their lungs and breathe within minutes of birth to survive. A key regulator of neonatal lung inflation is pulmonary surfactant, a lipoprotein complex which increases lung compliance by reducing alveolar surface tension (Morgan, 1971). Whether other developmental processes also alter lung mechanics in preparation for birth is unknown. We identify prenatal lymphatic function as an unexpected requirement for neonatal lung inflation and respiration. Mice lacking lymphatic vessels, due either to loss of the lymphangiogenic factor CCBE1 or VEGFR3 function, appear cyanotic and die shortly after birth due to failure of lung inflation. Failure of lung inflation is not due to reduced surfactant levels or altered development of the lung but is associated with an elevated wet/dry ratio consistent with edema. Embryonic studies reveal active lymphatic function in the late gestation lung, and significantly reduced total lung compliance in late gestation embryos that lack lymphatics. These findings reveal that lymphatic vascular function plays a previously unrecognized mechanical role in the developing lung that prepares it for inflation at birth. They explain respiratory failure in infants with congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia, and suggest that inadequate late gestation lymphatic function may also contribute to respiratory failure in premature infants. PMID:24733830

  19. Ultrafine particles in the airway aggravated experimental lung injury through impairment in Treg function.

    Li, Guanggang; Cao, Yinghua; Sun, Yue; Xu, Ruxiang; Zheng, Zhendong; Song, Haihan

    2016-09-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening condition characterized by rapid-onset alveolar-capillary damage mediated by pathogenic proinflammatory immune responses. Since exposure to airway particulate matter (PM) could significantly change the inflammatory status of the individual, we investigated whether PM instillation in the airway could alter the course of ALI, using a murine model with experimental lung injury induced by intratracheal LPS challenge. We found that PM-treated mice presented significantly aggravated lung injury, which was characterized by further reductions in body weight, increased protein concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and higher mortality rate, compared to control saline-treated mice. The PM-treated mice also presented elevated lung and systemic type 1 T helper cell (Th1) frequency as well as reduced lung regulatory T cell (Treg) frequency, which was associated with severity of lung injury. Further examinations revealed that the Treg function was impaired in PM-treated mice, characterized by significantly repressed transforming growth factor beta production. Adoptive transfer of functional Tregs from control mice to PM-treated mice significantly improved their prognosis after intratracheal LPS challenge. Together, these results demonstrated that first, PM in the airway aggravated lung injury; second, severity of lung injury was associated with T cell subset imbalance in PM-treated mice; and third, PM treatment induced quantitative as well as qualitative changes in the Tregs. PMID:27179778

  20. Late follow-up of lung function after whole lung irradiation for Wilms' tumour

    In this study eight patients with Wilms' tumours and lung metastases treated with whole lung irradiation (1200-1837 cGy) and chemotherapy were reassessed clinically, radiologically and with lung function tests 6-26 years after radiotherapy. One patient was breathless after mild exertion, four after strenuous exercise and three were asymptomatic. Clinically all had small chests and four of five females had underdeveloped breasts. A chest radiograph showed clear lung fields in all cases. Lung volumes, especially total lung capacity (TLC) and vital capacity (VC), were decreased when compared with predicted values for age and height. However, gas transfer per unit lung volume (KCO) was normal. This study suggests that pulmonary irradiation in childhood results primarily in underdevelopment of the thorax and that diffuse interstitial lung fibrosis is not a significant feature at this dose level. (author)

  1. Claudins and alveolar epithelial barrier function in the lung

    Frank, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium of the lung constitutes a unique interface with the outside environment. This thin barrier must maintain a surface for gas transfer while being continuously exposed to potentially hazardous environmental stimuli. Small differences in alveolar epithelial barrier properties could therefore have a large impact on disease susceptibility or outcome. Moreover, recent work has focused attention on the alveolar epithelium as central to several lung diseases, including acute lu...

  2. Spred-2 Deficiency Exacerbates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation in Mice

    Yang Xu; Toshihiro Ito; Soichiro Fushimi; Sakuma Takahashi; Junya Itakura; Ryojiro Kimura; Miwa Sato; Megumi Mino; Akihiko Yoshimura; Akihiro Matsukawa

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe and life-threatening acute lung injury (ALI) that is caused by noxious stimuli and pathogens. ALI is characterized by marked acute inflammation with elevated alveolar cytokine levels. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are involved in cytokine production, but the mechanisms that regulate these pathways remain poorly characterized. Here, we focused on the role of Sprouty-related EVH1-domain-containing protein (Spr...

  3. Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Volutrauma and Molecular Effects

    Carrasco Loza, R; Villamizar Rodríguez, G; Medel Fernández, N

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical condition secondary to a variety of insults leading to a severe acute respiratory failure and high mortality in critically ill patients. Patients with ARDS generally require mechanical ventilation, which is another important factor that may increase the ALI (acute lung injury) by a series of pathophysiological mechanisms, whose common element is the initial volutrauma in the alveolar units, and forming part of an entity known clinically...

  4. Suspected Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury Improving following Administration of Tranexamic Acid: A Case Report

    Stan Ryniak; Piotr Harbut; Anders Östlund; Andrzej Mysiak; Jan G. Jakobsson

    2014-01-01

    A 16-year-old woman with craniofacial injury developed severe acute respiratory failure under the primary reconstructive surgical procedure requiring several units of blood and plasma. A transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) was suspected and supportive treatment was initiated. Because of the severity of symptoms, acute extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was planned. During preparation for ECMO, a single intravenous dose, 1 g of tranexamic acid, was administered and a remarkab...

  5. Effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in rat lungs* **

    Torres, Ronaldo Lopes; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Laste, Gabriela; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Cardoso; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress, as quantified by measuring lipid peroxidation (LPO) and total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP), in rat lungs. Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: acute treatment, comprising rats receiving a single injection of methylprednisolone (50 mg/kg i.p.); acute control, comprising rats i.p. injected with saline; chronic treatment, comprising rats receiving methy...

  6. MicroRNA Regulation of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Pattarayan, Dhamotharan; Rajaguru, P; Sudhakar Gandhi, P S; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K

    2016-10-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe form of acute lung injury (ALI), is a very common condition associated with critically ill patients, which causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite decades of research, effective therapeutic strategies for clinical ALI/ARDS are not available. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding molecules have emerged as a major area of biomedical research as they post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression in diverse biological and pathological processes, including ALI/ARDS. In this context, this present review summarizes a large body of evidence implicating miRNAs and their target molecules in ALI/ARDS originating largely from studies using animal and cell culture model systems of ALI/ARDS. We have also focused on the involvement of miRNAs in macrophage polarization, which play a critical role in regulating the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. Finally, the possible future directions that might lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ALI/ARDS are also reviewed. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2097-2106, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26790856

  7. FOXF1 maintains endothelial barrier function and prevents edema after lung injury.

    Cai, Yuqi; Bolte, Craig; Le, Tien; Goda, Chinmayee; Xu, Yan; Kalin, Tanya V; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V

    2016-01-01

    Multiple signaling pathways, structural proteins, and transcription factors are involved in the regulation of endothelial barrier function. The forkhead protein FOXF1 is a key transcriptional regulator of embryonic lung development, and we used a conditional knockout approach to examine the role of FOXF1 in adult lung homeostasis, injury, and repair. Tamoxifen-regulated deletion of bothFoxf1alleles in endothelial cells of adult mice (Pdgfb-iCreER/Foxf1(-/-)) caused lung inflammation and edema, leading to respiratory insufficiency and death. Deletion of a singleFoxf1allele made heterozygousPdgfb-iCreER/Foxf1(+/-)mice more susceptible to acute lung injury. FOXF1 abundance was decreased in pulmonary endothelial cells of human patients with acute lung injury. Gene expression analysis of pulmonary endothelial cells with homozygous FOXF1 deletion indicated reduced expression of genes critical for maintenance and regulation of adherens junctions. FOXF1 knockdown in vitro and in vivo disrupted adherens junctions, enhanced lung endothelial permeability, and increased the abundance of the mRNA and protein for sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1), a key regulator of endothelial barrier function. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that FOXF1 directly bound to and induced the transcriptional activity of theS1pr1promoter. Pharmacological administration of S1P to injuredPdgfb-iCreER/Foxf1(+/-)mice restored endothelial barrier function, decreased lung edema, and improved survival. Thus, FOXF1 promotes normal lung homeostasis and repair, in part, by enhancing endothelial barrier function through activation of the S1P/S1PR1 signaling pathway. PMID:27095594

  8. The value of nitrogen washout/washin method in assessing alveolar recruitment volume in acute lung injury patients

    李洋

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the precision and feasibility of nitrogen washout/washin method in assessing lung recruitment of acute lung injury(ALI)patients.Methods Fifteen ALI patients underwent mechanical ventilation

  9. Optical and Functional Imaging in Lung Cancer

    K.H. van der Leest (Cor)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the second most common cancer in men and women, and is the leading cause of cancer related death. In industrialized countries the mortality rate of lung cancer is higher than the mortality rate of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer combined 1. When lung cancer is diagn

  10. EXPRESSION OF INTERCELLULAR ADHESION MOLECULE IN LUNG TISSUES OF EXPERIMENTAL ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND THE AFFECT OF RHUBARB ON IT

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To approach the relation and the possible mechanism between the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) mRNA and acute lung injury (ALI) and the mechanisms of rhubarb in the prevention and treatment of the lung injury.Methods. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was injected into the sublingual vein of male Wistar rats to perform ALI animal model. The rats were divided into 4 groups: LPS group, control group, rhubarb group and dexamethasone group. Macroscopic and histopathological examinations were performed and biological markers were measured for the lung specimens. The markers included lung wet/dry weight, the rate of neutrophils and protein content in the pulmonary alveolar lavage fluid, pulmonary vascular permeability and pulmonary alveolar permeability index. Molecular hybridization method was used to determine the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA.Results. In the lung tissues, the ICAM-1 mRNA expression was increased in the endothelial cells of pulmonary veins and capillaries, rhubarb and dexamethasone had the action of decreasing the expression. The light reflex value in the gray scale scanning showed that in the comparison between the LPS and the control group, the gray scale value of the lung tissues in ALI was significantly increased, thus the light reflex value was markedly decreased (P<0.01), demonstrating the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA was increased. In comparison with the LPS group, dexamethasone and rhubarb could decrease the gray scale value of the lung tissue significantly, thus the light reflex value was elevated (P<0.01, P<0.05); the corresponding pathologic changes of lung tissues and the biological markers of the lung injury were significantly decreased or ameliorated.Conclusions. The increase of the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA in the lung tissues of ALI plays the roles in ALI. The application of rhubarb and dexamethasone can decrease the expression and ameliorate the lung damage; its mechanism is possibly via the inhibition of ICAM

  11. EXPRESSION OF INTERCELLULAR ADHESION MOLECULE IN LUNG TISSUES OF EXPERIMENTAL ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND THE AFFECT OF RHUBARB ON IT

    李春盛; 桂培春; 何新华

    2000-01-01

    Objeaive. To approach the relation and the possible mechanism between the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) mRNA and acute lung injury (ALI) and the mechanisms of rhubarb in the prevention and treatment of the lung injury. Methods. Lipopolysaeeharide (LPS) was injected into the sublingual vein of male Wistar rats to perform ALI animal model. The rats were divided into 4 groups: LPS group, control group, rhubarb group and dexamethasoue group.Macroscopic and histopathological e~aminatiom were performed and biological markers were measured for the lung specimem. The markers included lung wet/dry weight, the rate of neutrophils and protein content in the pulmonary alveolar lavage fluid, pulmonary vascular permeability and pulmonary alveolar permeability index. Molecular hybridization method was used to determine the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA. Results. In the lung tissues, the ICAM-1 mRNA expression was increased in the endothelial cells of pulmonary veins and capillaries, rhubarb and dexamethasone had the action of decreasing the expression. The light reflex value in the gray scale scanning showed that in the comparison between the LPS and the control group, the gray scale value of the lung tissues in ALI was significantly increased, thus the light reflex value was markedly decreased (P < 0.01),demonstrating the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA was increased. In comparison with the LPS group, dexamethasoue and rhubarb emfld decrease the gray scale value of the lung tissue significantly, thus the light reflex value was elevated (P< 0.01, P < 0.05) ; the correslxmding pathologic changes of lung tissues and the biological markers of the lung injury were simifieantlv decreased or ameliorated. Conclusions. The increase of the expression d ICAM-1 mRNA in the lung tissues of ALI plays the roles in ALI.The application of rhubarb and dexamethasone can decrease the expression and ameliorate the lung damage; its mechanism is possibly via the inhibition of ICAM-1 m

  12. Protection of lung function by introducing single photon emission computed tomography lung perfusion image into radiotherapy plan of lung cancer

    YIN Yong; CHEN Jin-hu; LI Bao-sheng; LIU Tong-hai; LU jie; BAI Tong; DONG Xiao-ling; YU Jin-ming

    2009-01-01

    Background The lung functional status could be displayed on lung perfusion images. With the images, the radiotherapy plans of lung cancer could be guided to more optimized. This study aimed to assess quantitatively the impact of incorporating functional lung imaging into 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).Methods Ten patients with NSCLC who had undergone radiotherapy were included in this study. Before radiotherapy,each patient underwent CT simulation and lung perfusion imaging with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The SPECT images were registered with simulation planning CT and used to contour functional lung (lung-F) and non-functional lung (lung-NF). Two 3DCRT plans and two IMRT plans were designed and compared in each patient:two anatomic plans using simulation CT alone and two functional plans using SPECT-CT in addition to the simulation CT.Dosimetric parameters of the four types of plans were compared in terms of tumor coverage and avoidance of normal tissues. Total radiation dose was set at 66 Gy (2 Gy×33 fractions).Results In incorporating perfusion information in 3DCRT and IMRT planning, the reductions on average in the mean doses to the functional lung in the functional plan were 168 cGy and 89 cGy, respectively, compared with those in the anatomic plans. The median reductions in the percentage of volume irradiated with >5 Gy, >10 Gy, >20 Gy, >30 Gy and >40 Gy for functional lung in the functional plans were 6.50%, 10.21%, 14.02%, 22.30% and 23.46% in 3DCRT planning,respectively, and 3.05%, 15.52%, 14.16%, 4.87%, and 3.33% in IMRT planning, respectively. No greater degree of sparing of the functional lung was achieved in functional IMRT than in 3DCRT.Conclusion Function-guided 3DCRT and IMRT plannings both appear to be effective in preserving functional lung in NSCLC patients.

  13. Systematic phenotyping and correlation of biomarkers with lung function and histology in lung fibrosis.

    Fernandez, Isis E; Amarie, Oana V; Mutze, Kathrin; Königshoff, Melanie; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2016-05-15

    To date, phenotyping and disease course prediction in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) primarily relies on lung function measures. Blood biomarkers were recently proposed for diagnostic and outcome prediction in IPF, yet their correlation with lung function and histology remains unclear. Here, we comprehensively assessed biomarkers in liquid biopsies and correlated their abundance with lung function and histology during the onset, progression, and resolution of lung fibrosis, with the aim to more precisely evaluate disease progression in the preclinical model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Importantly, the strongest correlation of lung function with histological extent of fibrosis was observed at day 14, whereas lung function was unchanged at days 28 and 56, even when histological assessment showed marked fibrotic lesions. Although matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7), MMP-9, and PAI-1 were significantly elevated in broncheoalveolar lavage of fibrotic mice, only soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) was elevated in the peripheral blood of fibrotic mice and was strongly correlated with the extent of fibrosis. Importantly, tissue-bound ICAM-1 was also elevated in lung homogenates, with prominent staining in hyperplastic type II alveolar epithelial and endothelial cells. In summary, we show that lung function decline is not a prerequisite for histologically evident fibrosis, particularly during the onset or resolution thereof. Plasma levels of sICAM-1 strongly correlate with the extent of lung fibrosis, and may thus be considered for the assessment of intraindividual therapeutic studies in preclinical studies of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26993522

  14. Lung Function in African Infants: A Pilot Study

    Gray, DM; Willemse, L; Alberts, A.; Simpson, S.; Sly, PD; Hall, GL; Zar, HJ

    2013-01-01

    Background The burden of childhood respiratory illness is large in low and middle income countries (LMICs). Infant lung function (ILF) testing may provide useful information about lung growth and susceptibility to respiratory disease. However, ILF has not been widely available in LMICs settings where the greatest burden of childhood respiratory disease occurs. Aim To implement and evaluate a pilot study of ILF testing in a semi-rural setting in South Africa. Method Infant lung function testin...

  15. Lung structure and function relation in systemic sclerosis: Application of lung densitometry

    Highlights: • A quantitative CT parameter of lung parenchyma in systemic sclerosis is presented. • We examine the optimal percentage threshold for the percentile density. • The 85th percentile density threshold correlated significantly with lung function. • A lung structure–function relation is confirmed. • We report applicability of Perc85 in progression mapping of interstitial lung disease. - Abstract: Introduction: Interstitial lung disease occurs frequently in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Quantitative computed tomography (CT) densitometry using the percentile density method may provide a sensitive assessment of lung structure for monitoring parenchymal damage. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the optimal percentile density score in SSc by quantitative CT densitometry, against pulmonary function. Material and methods: We investigated 41 SSc patients by chest CT scan, spirometry and gas transfer tests. Lung volumes and the nth percentile density (between 1 and 99%) of the entire lungs were calculated from CT histograms. The nth percentile density is defined as the threshold value of densities expressed in Hounsfield units. A prerequisite for an optimal percentage was its correlation with baseline DLCO %predicted. Two patients showed distinct changes in lung function 2 years after baseline. We obtained CT scans from these patients and performed progression analysis. Results: Regression analysis for the relation between DLCO %predicted and the nth percentile density was optimal at 85% (Perc85). There was significant agreement between Perc85 and DLCO %predicted (R = −0.49, P = 0.001) and FVC %predicted (R = −0.64, P < 0.001). Two patients showed a marked change in Perc85 over a 2 year period, but the localization of change differed clearly. Conclusions: We identified Perc85 as optimal lung density parameter, which correlated significantly with DLCO and FVC, confirming a lung parenchymal structure–function relation in SSc. This provides

  16. Lung structure and function relation in systemic sclerosis: Application of lung densitometry

    Ninaber, Maarten K., E-mail: m.k.ninaber@lumc.nl [Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Stolk, Jan; Smit, Jasper; Le Roy, Ernest J. [Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Kroft, Lucia J.M. [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Els Bakker, M. [Division of Image Processing, Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Vries Bouwstra, Jeska K. de; Schouffoer, Anne A. [Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Staring, Marius; Stoel, Berend C. [Division of Image Processing, Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A quantitative CT parameter of lung parenchyma in systemic sclerosis is presented. • We examine the optimal percentage threshold for the percentile density. • The 85th percentile density threshold correlated significantly with lung function. • A lung structure–function relation is confirmed. • We report applicability of Perc85 in progression mapping of interstitial lung disease. - Abstract: Introduction: Interstitial lung disease occurs frequently in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Quantitative computed tomography (CT) densitometry using the percentile density method may provide a sensitive assessment of lung structure for monitoring parenchymal damage. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the optimal percentile density score in SSc by quantitative CT densitometry, against pulmonary function. Material and methods: We investigated 41 SSc patients by chest CT scan, spirometry and gas transfer tests. Lung volumes and the nth percentile density (between 1 and 99%) of the entire lungs were calculated from CT histograms. The nth percentile density is defined as the threshold value of densities expressed in Hounsfield units. A prerequisite for an optimal percentage was its correlation with baseline DLCO %predicted. Two patients showed distinct changes in lung function 2 years after baseline. We obtained CT scans from these patients and performed progression analysis. Results: Regression analysis for the relation between DLCO %predicted and the nth percentile density was optimal at 85% (Perc85). There was significant agreement between Perc85 and DLCO %predicted (R = −0.49, P = 0.001) and FVC %predicted (R = −0.64, P < 0.001). Two patients showed a marked change in Perc85 over a 2 year period, but the localization of change differed clearly. Conclusions: We identified Perc85 as optimal lung density parameter, which correlated significantly with DLCO and FVC, confirming a lung parenchymal structure–function relation in SSc. This provides

  17. NMDA Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    LI Yang; Liu, Yong; Peng, XiangPing; Liu, Wei; Zhao, FeiYan; Feng, Dandan; Han, Jianzhong; Huang, Yanhong; Luo, Siwei; Li, Lian; Yue, Shao Jie; Cheng, QingMei; Huang,Xiaoting; Luo, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Glutamate is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Large amount of glutamate can overstimulate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), causing neuronal injury and death. Recently, NMDAR has been reported to be found in the lungs. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of memantine, a NMDAR channel blocker, on bleomycin-induced lung injury mice. Methods C57BL/6 mice were intratracheally injected with bleomycin (BLM) to induce lung injury. Mice were ra...

  18. Interactive effects of hypoxia, carbon monoxide and acute lung injury on oxygen transport and aerobic capacity.

    Crocker, George H; Jones, James H

    2016-05-01

    This study determined how breathing hypoxic gas, reducing circulatory capacitance for O2 by breathing CO, and impairing pulmonary gas exchange by acutely injuring the lungs interact to limit cardiopulmonary O2 delivery, O2 extraction and maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max). Five goats ran on a treadmill at VO2max following oleic-acid induced acute lung injury that impaired pulmonary gas exchange, after partial recovery or with no acute lung injury. Goats breathed normoxic or hypoxic inspired gas fractions (FIO2 0.21 or 0.12) with and without small amounts of CO to maintain carboxyhemoglobin fractions (FHbCO) of 0.02 or 0.30. With the exception of elevated FHbCO with acute lung injury (P=0.08), all combinations of hypoxia, elevated FHbCO and acute lung injury attenuated the reduction in VO2max by 15-27% compared to the sum of each treatment's individual reduction in VO2max when administered separately. Simultaneous administration of two treatments attenuated the reduction in VO2max by attenuating the decrease in cardiopulmonary O2 delivery, not synergistically increasing O2 extraction. PMID:26845454

  19. Effect of Lung Recruitment Maneuver in Children with Acute Lung Injury

    Nemat Bilan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Acute lung injury (ALI is defined as PaO2/FiO2 less than 300 with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates, without pressure is the top of the left atrium. Early diagnosis and treatment of pediatric ALI and find new cases is very important. Accurate diagnosis and effective steps to treating these patients is essential in the outcome of ALI. This study was conducted to show the impact of recruitment in the treatment of ALI patients. Materials and Methods This clinical trial study was conducted in Pediatric Educational-Medical center of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (Tabriz, Iran and 42 patients with ALI were enrolled. All patients were underwent echocardiography. The patients were divided in 2 groups randomly (intervention and control groups consisted of 21 patients for each group. Patients were followed for 6 months to be evaluated in terms of clinical status and mortality. Results Difference on level of PaO2 in intervention group was -26±4 in comparison to the control group which was -4±4 (P

  20. Interaction between asthma and lung function growth in early life

    Bisgaard, Hans; Jensen, Signe Marie; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The causal direction between asthma and lung function deficit is unknown, but important for the focus of preventive measures and research into the origins of asthma.......The causal direction between asthma and lung function deficit is unknown, but important for the focus of preventive measures and research into the origins of asthma....

  1. Bowel Function in Acute Stroke Patients

    Yi, Jin Hwa; Chun, Min Ho; Kim, Bo Ryun; Han, Eun Young; Park, Ji Young

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate factors related to bowel function and colon motility in acute stroke patients. Method Fifty-one stroke patients (29 males, mean age 63.4±13.6 years, onset 13.4±4.8 days) were recruited and divided into two groups: constipation (n=25) and non-constipation (n=26) groups. We evaluated the amount of intake, voiding function, concomitant swallowing problem and colon transit time (CTT) using radio-opaque markers for ascending, descending and rectosigmoid colons. The Adapted...

  2. Traditional Chinese medicine, Qing Ying Tang, ameliorates the severity of acute lung injury induced by severe acute pancreatitis in rats via the upregulation of aquaporin-1

    GAO, ZHENMING; Xu, Junfeng; Sun, Deguang; ZHANG, Rixin; LIANG, RUI; Wang, Liming; Fan, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP-1) is expressed in lung endothelial cells and regulates water transport; thus, AQP-1 plays an important role in a number of edema-associated lung diseases. Qing Yin Tang (QYT), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been shown to effectively reduce the mortality rate of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The current study aimed to investigate the detailed mechanisms underlying the effects of QYT on ALI induced by SAP, particularly the effects on ...

  3. Partial ventilatory support modalities in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome-a systematic review.

    Sarah M McMullen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The efficacy of partial ventilatory support modes that allow spontaneous breathing in patients with acute lung injury (ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is unclear. The objective of this scoping review was to assess the effects of partial ventilatory support on mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, and both hospital and intensive care unit (ICU lengths of stay (LOS for patients with ALI and ARDS; the secondary objective was to describe physiologic effects on hemodynamics, respiratory system and other organ function. METHODS: MEDLINE (1966-2009, Cochrane, and EmBase (1980-2009 databases were searched using common ventilator modes as keywords and reference lists from retrieved manuscripts hand searched for additional studies. Two researchers independently reviewed and graded the studies using a modified Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine grading system. Studies in adult ALI/ARDS patients were included for primary objectives and pre-clinical studies for supporting evidence. RESULTS: Two randomized controlled trials (RCTs were identified, in addition to six prospective cohort studies, one retrospective cohort study, one case control study, 41 clinical physiologic studies and 28 pre-clinical studies. No study was powered to assess mortality, one RCT showed shorter ICU length of stay, and the other demonstrated more ventilator free days. Beneficial effects of preserved spontaneous breathing were mainly physiological effects demonstrated as improvement of gas exchange, hemodynamics and non-pulmonary organ perfusion and function. CONCLUSIONS: The use of partial ventilatory support modalities is often feasible in patients with ALI/ARDS, and may be associated with short-term physiological benefits without appreciable impact on clinically important outcomes.

  4. Effects of Lung Expansion Therapy on Lung Function in Patients with Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation

    Yen-Huey Chen; Ming-Chu Yeh; Han-Chung Hu; Chung-Shu Lee; Li-Fu Li; Ning-Hung Chen; Chung-Chi Huang; Kuo-Chin Kao

    2016-01-01

    Common complications in PMV include changes in the airway clearance mechanism, pulmonary function, and respiratory muscle strength, as well as chest radiological changes such as atelectasis. Lung expansion therapy which includes IPPB and PEEP prevents and treats pulmonary atelectasis and improves lung compliance. Our study presented that patients with PMV have improvements in lung volume and oxygenation after receiving IPPB therapy. The combination of IPPB and PEEP therapy also results in inc...

  5. Corticosteroids prevent acute lung dysfunction caused by thoracic irradiation in unanesthetized sheep

    We sought to determine the effect of corticosteroid therapy in a new acute model of oxidant lung injury, thoracic irradiation in awake sheep. Sheep were irradiated with 1,500 rads to the whole chest except for blocking the heart and adjacent ventral lung. Seven experimental sheep were given methylprednisolone (1 g intravenously every 6 h for four doses) and thoracic irradiation; control sheep received only irradiation. In irradiated control sheep, lung lymph flow increased from baseline (7.6 ml/h) to peak at 3 h (13.2), and lung lymph protein clearance increased from 5.1 to 9.7 ml/h. Mean pulmonary artery pressure increased in the irradiated control sheep from 19 to 32.4 cm H2O, whereas the lung lymph thromboxane concentration increased from 0.09 to 6.51 ng/ml at 3 h. Arterial oxygen tension in irradiated control sheep fell gradually from 86 mm Hg at baseline to 65 mm Hg at 8 h. Methylprednisolone administration significantly prevented the increase in lung lymph protein clearance, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and lung lymph thromboxane concentration. Methylprednisolone also prevented the fall in arterial oxygen tension after thoracic irradiation, but did not prevent a further decrease in lymphocytes in blood or lung lymph after radiation. We conclude that corticosteroid therapy prevents most of the acute physiologic changes caused by thoracic irradiation in awake sheep

  6. Renin-angiotensin system and its role in hyperoxic acute lung injury.

    Zhang, P X; Han, C H; Zhou, F J; Li, L; Zhang, H M; Liu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is essential to sustain life, but at a high partial pressure oxygen may cause toxicity to the human body. These injuries to the lung are known as hyperoxic acute lung injury [HALI]). To date, numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the pathogenesis of HALI, for which some hypotheses have been proposed. Accumulating evidence indicates that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of some lung diseases, including acute lung injury (ALI), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and HALI. In this review, we briefly introduce the classic RAS, local (tissue) RAS and intracellular RAS, and we summarize findings on the relationship between local/classic RAS and HALI. The importance--and ambiguity--of the results of these studies indicate a need for further investigations of the RAS and its role in the patho- genesis of HALI. PMID:27416692

  7. RGD-tagged helical rosette nanotubes aggravate acute lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation

    Suri SS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sarabjeet Singh Suri1, Steven Mills1, Gurpreet Kaur Aulakh1, Felaniaina Rakotondradany2, Hicham Fenniri2, Baljit Singh11Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon; 2National Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Chemistry, Edmonton, CanadaAbstract: Rosette nanotubes (RNT are a novel class of self-assembled biocompatible nanotubes that offer a built-in strategy for engineering structure and function through covalent tagging of synthetic self-assembling modules (G∧C motif. In this report, the G∧C motif was tagged with peptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Lys (RGDSK-G∧C and amino acid Lys (K-G∧C which, upon co-assembly, generate RNTs featuring RGDSK and K on their surface in predefined molar ratios. These hybrid RNTs, referred to as Kx/RGDSKy-RNT, where x and y refer to the molar ratios of K-G∧C and RGDSK–G∧C, were designed to target neutrophil integrins. A mouse model was used to investigate the effects of intravenous Kx/RGDSKy-RNT on acute lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced lung inflammation. Healthy male C57BL/6 mice were treated intranasally with Escherichia coli LPS 80 µg and/or intravenously with K90/RGDSK10-RNT. Here we provide the first evidence that intravenous administration of K90/RGDSK10-RNT aggravates the proinflammatory effect of LPS in the mouse. LPS and K90/RGDSK10-RNT treatment groups showed significantly increased infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at all time points compared with the saline control. The combined effect of LPS and K90/RGDSK10-RNT was more pronounced than LPS alone, as shown by a significant increase in the expression of interleukin-1ß, MCP-1, MIP-1, and KC-1 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissues. We conclude that K90/RGDSK10-RNT promotes acute lung inflammation, and when used along with LPS, leads to exaggerated immune response in the lung.Keywords: RGD peptide, helical rosette

  8. Fas and Fas Ligand Are Up-Regulated in Pulmonary Edema Fluid and Lung Tissue of Patients with Acute Lung Injury and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Albertine, Kurt H; Soulier, Matthew F.; Wang, Zhengming; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Hashimoto, Satoru; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Matthay, Michael A; Lorraine B. Ware

    2002-01-01

    Apoptosis mediated by Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) interaction has been implicated in human disease processes, including pulmonary disorders. However, the role of the Fas/FasL system in acute lung injury (ALI) and in the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is poorly defined. Accordingly, we investigated both the soluble and cellular expression of the Fas/FasL system in patients with ALI or ARDS. The major findings are summarized as follows. First, the soluble expression of the Fas/FasL system...

  9. The utility of clinical predictors of acute lung injury: towards prevention and earlier recognition

    Levitt, Joseph E.; Matthay, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Despite significant advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute lung injury, a lung-protective strategy of mechanical ventilation remains the only therapy with a proven survival advantage. Numerous pharmacologic therapies have failed to show benefit in multicenter clinical trials. The paradigm of early, goal-directed therapy of sepsis suggests greater clinical benefit may derive from initiating therapy prior to the onset of respiratory failure that requires mechanical ventil...

  10. Antiplatelet antibody may cause delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Torii Y; Shimizu T; Yokoi T; Sugimoto H; Katashiba Y; Ozasa R; Fujita S; Adachi Y; Maki M.; Nomura S

    2011-01-01

    Yoshitaro Torii1, Toshiki Shimizu1, Takashi Yokoi1, Hiroyuki Sugimoto1, Yuichi Katashiba1, Ryotaro Ozasa1, Shinya Fujita1, Yasushi Adachi2, Masahiko Maki3, Shosaku Nomura11The First Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, 2Department of Clinical Pathology, Toyooka Hospital, Hyogo, 3First Department of Pathology, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, JapanAbstract: A 61-year-old woman with lung cancer developed delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) syndro...

  11. Transfusion related acute lung injury with massive pulmonary secretion during cardiac surgery. A case report

    Teodori, Julien; Rampersad, Kamal; Teodori, Giovanni; Roopchand, Roland; Angelini, Gianni Davide

    2014-01-01

    A Indo-Caribbean patient undergoing cardiac surgery developed Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) with massive endobronchial secretion of clear fluid mimicking severe pulmonary edema. Hypoxemia and lung stiffness were so severe that didn’t allow closure of the sternum on completion of surgery. The patient was treated with invasive ventilation, high positive pressure and % FiO2 and aggressive endotracheal suction. After several hours, secretions reduced spontaneously and the patient ...

  12. Pulmonary vascular-bronchial interactions: acute reduction in pulmonary blood flow alters lung mechanics

    Schulze-Neick, I; Penny, D; Derrick, G; Dhillon, R; Rigby, M.; Kelleher, A.; Bush, A; Redington, A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Postoperative pulmonary hypertension in children after congenital heart surgery is a risk factor for death and is associated with severe acute changes in both pulmonary vascular resistance and lung mechanics.
OBJECTIVE—To examine the impact of changes in pulmonary blood flow on lung mechanics in preoperative children with congenital heart disease, in order to assess the cause-effect relation of pulmonary vascular-bronchial interactions.
DESIGN—Prospective, cross sectional study.
SE...

  13. Increased Extravascular Lung Water Reduces the Efficacy of Alveolar Recruitment Maneuver in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Alexey A. Smetkin; Kuzkov, Vsevolod V; Eugeny V. Suborov; Bjertnaes, Lars J; Kirov, Mikhail Y.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. In acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) the recruitment maneuver (RM) is used to reexpand atelectatic areas of the lungs aiming to improve arterial oxygenation. The goal of our paper was to evaluate the response to RM, as assessed by measurements of extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) in ARDS patients. Materials and Methods. Seventeen adult ARDS patients were enrolled into a prospective study. Patients received protective ventilation. The RM was performed by applying a ...

  14. Diffuse alveolar damage associated mortality in selected acute respiratory distress syndrome patients with open lung biopsy

    Kao, Kuo-Chin; Hu, Han-Chung; Chang, Chih-Hao; Hung, Chen-Yiu; Chiu, Li-Chung; Li, Shih-Hong; Lin, Shih-Wei; Chuang, Li-Pang; Wang, Chih-Wei; Li, Li-Fu; Chen, Ning-Hung; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Huang, Chung-Chi; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) is the pathological hallmark of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), however, the presence of DAD in the clinical criteria of ARDS patients by Berlin definition is little known. This study is designed to investigate the role of DAD in ARDS patients who underwent open lung biopsy. Methods We retrospectively reviewed all ARDS patients who met the Berlin definition and underwent open lung biopsy from January 1999 to January 2014 in a referred med...

  15. Transfusion-related acute lung injury following coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    Bitargil, M; Arslan, C; Başbuğ, H S; Göçer, H; Günerhan, Y; Bekov, Y Y

    2015-11-01

    Blood transfusion is sometimes a necessary procedure during or following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. However, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)/possible TRALI is a rare and fatal complication and characterized by acute hypoxemia and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema that occurs within 6 hours following a transfusion. Anti-leukocyte antibodies or, possibly, other bioactive substances cause inflammation and capillary endothelial destruction in susceptible recipients' lungs. Prompt diagnosis and mechanical ventilatory support are important. A successful treatment of two male patients following CABG surgery, compatible with TRALI/possible TRALI, is presented here. PMID:25575703

  16. Plasma gelsolin improves lung host defense against pneumonia by enhancing macrophage NOS3 function

    Yang, Zhiping; Chiou, Terry Ting-Yu; Stossel, Thomas P.; Kobzik, Lester

    2015-01-01

    Plasma gelsolin (pGSN) functions as part of the “extracellular actin-scavenging system,” but its potential to improve host defense against infection has not been studied. In a mouse model of primary pneumococcal pneumonia, recombinant human pGSN (rhu-pGSN) caused enhanced bacterial clearance, reduced acute inflammation, and improved survival. In vitro, rhu-pGSN rapidly improved lung macrophage uptake and killing of bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Francisella tularens...

  17. Perfusatory recovery of the grafted lung during convalescence from acute rejection.

    Yamamoto, H; Okada, M; Tobe, S; Tsuji, F; Ohbo, H; Yamashita, C

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether or not perfusatory recovery of the grafted lung occurs is the early stage of convalesce from acute rejection following a single lung transplantation. Eight adult mongrel dogs underwent an allotransplantation of the left lung with treatment of 10 mg/kg cyclosporine and 4 mg/kg azathioprine. Doppler flow probes were placed to the ascending aorta and the left pulmonary artery. Immunosuppressant therapy was discontinued to induce rejection after postoperative day 14. When the left pulmonary artery flow rate (l-PAFR) decreased to less than 20%, methylprednisolone (20 mg/kg) was administered for 3 days along with a resumption of cyclosporine and azathioprine. Pulmonary circulation and chest roentgenograms were evaluated every day through the rejection episode. An open lung biopsy was also performed in each dog to obtain specimens of the grafts and native lungs for histologic examination. When l-PAFR decreased to less than 20%, mild acute rejection was found in all dogs. l-PAFR increased significantly on the third day after methylprednisolone treatment. Thereafter, a histologic examination revealed minimal acute rejection in one dog and no abnormality in seven dogs. The perfusatory recovery of the grafted lung was thought to reflect the histological change in the course of convalescence. PMID:10664339

  18. 17β-estradiol protects the lung against acute injury: possible mediation by vasoactive intestinal polypeptide.

    Hamidi, Sayyed A; Dickman, Kathleen G; Berisha, Hasan; Said, Sami I

    2011-12-01

    Beyond their classical role as a class of female sex hormones, estrogens (e.g. 17β-estradiol) exert important biological actions, both protective and undesirable. We have investigated the ability of estradiol to protect the lung in three models of acute injury induced by 1) oxidant stress due to the herbicide paraquat; 2) excitotoxicity, caused by glutamate agonist N-methyl-d-aspartate; and 3) acute alveolar anoxia. We also assessed the role of estrogen receptors (ER) ERα and ERβ and the neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in mediating this protection. Isolated guinea pig or rat lungs were perfused in situ at constant flow and mechanically ventilated. The onset and severity of lung injury were monitored by increases in pulmonary arterial and airway pressures, wet/dry lung weight ratio, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein content. Estradiol was infused into the pulmonary circulation, beginning 10 min before induction of injury and continued for 60-90 min. Lung injury was marked by significant increases in the above measurements, with paraquat producing the most severe, and excitotoxicity the least severe, injury. Estradiol significantly attenuated the injury in each model. Both ER were constitutively expressed and immunohistochemically demonstrable in normal lung, and their selective agonists reduced anoxic injury, the only model in which they were tested. As it protected against injury, estradiol rapidly and significantly stimulated VIP mRNA expression in rat lung. Estradiol attenuated acute lung injury in three experimental models while stimulating VIP gene expression, a known mechanism of lung protection. The up-regulated VIP expression could have partially mediated the protection by estrogen. PMID:22009726

  19. Optical and Functional Imaging in Lung Cancer

    van der Leest, Cor

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the second most common cancer in men and women, and is the leading cause of cancer related death. In industrialized countries the mortality rate of lung cancer is higher than the mortality rate of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer combined 1. When lung cancer is diagnosed at an early stage patients are considered to have the best overall survival rate 2. Unfortunately, only a minority of patients is currently diagnosed at a curable stage of disease. The lack of...

  20. C-reactive protein enhances murine antibody-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    Kapur, Rick; Kim, Michael; Shanmugabhavananthan, Shanjeevan; Liu, Jonathan; Li, Yuan; Semple, John W

    2015-12-17

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a syndrome of respiratory distress triggered by blood transfusions and is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. TRALI has primarily been attributed to passive infusion of HLA and/or human neutrophil antigen antibodies present in transfused blood products, and predisposing factors such as inflammation are known to be important for TRALI initiation. Because the acute-phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) is highly upregulated during infections and inflammation and can also enhance antibody-mediated responses such as in vitro phagocytosis, respiratory burst, and in vivo thrombocytopenia, we investigated whether CRP affects murine antibody-mediated TRALI induced by the anti-major histocompatibility complex antibody 34-1-2s. We found that BALB/c mice injected with 34-1-2s or CRP alone were resistant to TRALI, however mice injected with 34-1-2s together with CRP had significantly enhanced lung damage and pulmonary edema. Mechanistically, 34-1-2s injection with CRP resulted in a significant synergistic increase in plasma levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and pulmonary neutrophil accumulation. Importantly, murine MIP-2 is the functional homolog of human interleukin-8, a known risk factor for human TRALI. These results suggest that elevated in vivo CRP levels, like those observed during infections, may significantly predispose recipients to antibody-mediated TRALI reactions and support the notion that modulating CRP levels is an effective therapeutic strategy to reduce TRALI severity. PMID:26453659

  1. Red blood cell transfusion and outcomes in patients with acute lung injury, sepsis and shock

    Parsons, Elizabeth C.; Hough, Catherine L.; Seymour, Christopher W; Cooke, Colin R.; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; Watkins, Timothy R

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we sought to determine the association between red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and outcomes in patients with acute lung injury (ALI), sepsis and shock. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of new-onset ALI patients enrolled in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (2000 to 2005) who had a documented ALI risk factor of sepsis or pneumonia and met shock criteria (mean arterial pressure (MAP) < 60 mmHg or vasopressor ...

  2. Effect of Prone Position on Regional Shunt, Aeration, and Perfusion in Experimental Acute Lung Injury

    Richter, Torsten; Bellani, Giacomo; Harris, R. Scott; Melo, Marcos F. Vidal; Winkler, Tilo; Venegas, Jose G.; Musch, Guido

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: The prone position is used to improve gas exchange in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, the regional mechanism by which the prone position improves gas exchange in acutely injured lungs is still incompletely defined. Methods: We used positron emission tomography imaging of [13N]nitrogen to assess the regional distribution of pulmonary shunt, aeration, perfusion, and ventilation in seven surfactant-depleted sheep in supine and prone positions. Results: In t...

  3. Recipient clinical risk factors predominate in possible transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Toy, PTCY; Bacchetti, P; Grimes, BA; Gajić, O; Murphy, EL; Winters, JL; Gropper, MA; Hubmayr, RD; Matthay, MA; Wilson, GA; Koenigsberg, M; Lee, DC; Hirschler, NV; Lowell, CA; Schuller, RM

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 AABB. Background: Possible transfusion-related acute lung injury (pTRALI) cases by definition have a clear temporal relationship to an alternative recipient risk factor for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We questioned whether transfusion factors are important for the development of pTRALI. Study Design and Methods: In this nested case-control study, we prospectively identified 145 consecutive patients with pTRALI and randomly selected 163 transfused controls over a 4-year ...

  4. A diagnosis overlooked: case report of a transfusion related acute lung injury

    Sema Ucak Basat; Sibel Ocak Serin; Berrin Aksakal; Ece Yigit

    2014-01-01

    Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rarely seen and transfusion complication that may develop as a result of transfusion of blood products which contains plasma. TRALI can be mortal if it is not diagnosed and treated promptly. The most important step in management of this complication is to provide the early differential diagnosis of this condition. Hence here in we report a case of TRALI where the patient was firstly misdiagnosed and hospitalized as septic shock and acute hear...

  5. Recipient clinical risk factors predominate in possible transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Toy, P; Bacchetti, P; Grimes, B; Gajic, O; Murphy, EL; Winters, JL; Gropper, MA; Hubmayr, RD; Matthay, MA; Wilson, G; Koenigsberg, M; Lee, DC; Hirschler, NV; Lowell, CA; Schuller, RM

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 AABB. Background: Possible transfusion-related acute lung injury (pTRALI) cases by definition have a clear temporal relationship to an alternative recipient risk factor for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We questioned whether transfusion factors are important for the development of pTRALI. Study Design and Methods: In this nested case-control study, we prospectively identified 145 consecutive patients with pTRALI and randomly selected 163 transfused controls over a 4-year ...

  6. Spectroscopic Approach to Capillary-Alveolar Membrane Damage Induced Acute Lung Injury

    Jing Wang

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute (or adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is often associated with a high mortality rate in the critical care population. The term acute lung injury (ALI, a primitive phase of ARDS, was introduced by the European and American consensus groups to provide early diagnoses of ARDS. The pathophysiological characterization of ALI/ARDS – an increased pulmonary capillary-alveolar membrane barrier permeability – is generally not included in current intensive care unit diagnosis criteria.

  7. Lung function changes and complications after lobectomy for lung cancer in septuagenarians

    Subotic Dragan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In septuagenarians, lobectomy is the preferable operation, with lower morbidity than for pneumonectomy. However, the 1-year impact of lobectomy on lung function has not been well studied in elderly patients. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study including 30 patients 70 years or older (study group, 25 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD under 70 years (control group 1, and 22 patients under 70 years with normal lung function (control group 2 operated for lung cancer in a 2-year period. The study and control groups were compared related to lung function changes after lobectomy, operative morbidity, and mortality. Results: Postoperative lung function changes in the elderly followed the similar trend as in patients with COPD. There were no significant differences between these two groups related to changes in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV 1 and vital capacity (VC. Unlike that, the pattern of the lung function changes in the elderly was significantly different compared with patients with normal lung function. The mean postoperative decrease in FEV 1 was 14.16% in the elderly, compared with a 29.23% decrease in patients with normal lung function ( P < 0.05. In the study and control groups, no patients died within the first 30 postoperative days. The operative morbidity in the elderly group was significantly lower than in patients with COPD (23.3% vs. 60%. Conclusions: The lung function changes after lobectomy in the elderly are similar to those in patients with COPD. The explanation for such a finding needs further investigation. Despite a high proportion of concomitant diseases, the age itself does not carry a prohibitively high risk of operative mortality and morbidity.

  8. The effect of irradiation on lung function and perfusion in patients with lung cancer

    Purpose: To prospectively study the changes in lung function in patients with lung carcinoma treated with relatively high doses of irradiation. Methods and Materials: Lung function was assessed prior to and at 6 and 12 months following radiation therapy by a clinical dyspnea score, formal pulmonary function tests (lung volume spirometry and diffusion capacity) as well as an ipsilateral hemithorax lung perfusion scan. Changes in dyspnea score were evaluated by the chi-square and the Fishers exact test. Changes in formal lung function tests were compared with the t-test for dependent data and correlations with the t-test for independent data. Fifty-one patients were entered into the study. There were 42 evaluable patients at 6 months after irradiation and 22 evaluable patients at 12 months after irradiation. Results: A worsening of dyspnea score from 1 to 2, which is clinically acceptable, occurred in 50% or more of patients. However, a dyspnea score of 3, which is a serious complication, developed in only 5% of patients. The diffusion capacity (DLCO) decreased by 14% at 6 months and 12% at 12 months) (p < 0.0001). The forced vital capacity and total lung capacity decreased between 6% and 8% at 6 month and 12 months, which was statistically significant. The forced expiratory volume in 1 s decreased between 2 and 3% at 6 month and 12 months, which was not statistically significant. The ipsilateral hemithorax perfusion decreased by 17 and 20% at 6 and 12 months (p < 0.0001). There was no correlation between the initial hemithorax perfusion, or its decrease at follow up and the decrease in DLCO. Conclusion: Lung irradiation results in some loss of lung function in patients with lung cancer with a projected survival of 6 months or more. The pretreatment DLCO assessment should be useful in predicting clinical tolerance to irradiation

  9. Relationship between radiation dose and lung function in patients with lung cancer receiving radiotherapy

    In patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radical radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. The dose is limited by consequential pneumonitis and lung fibrosis. Hence, a better understanding of the relationship between the dose-volume distributions and normal tissue side effects is needed. CT is a non-invasive method to monitor the development of fibrosis and pneumonitis, and spirometry is an established tool to measure lung function. NSCLC patients were included in a multicenter trial and treated with megavoltage conformal radiotherapy. In a subgroup comprising 16 patients, a total dose of 59-63 Gy with 1.8-1.9 Gy per fraction was given. Dose-volume histograms were calculated and corrected according to the linear-quadratic formula using alpha/beta=3 Gy. The patients underwent repetitive CT examinations (mean follow-up, 133 days) following radiotherapy, and pre and post treatment spirometry (mean follow-up, 240 days). A significant correlation was demonstrated between local lung dose and changes in CT numbers >30 days after treatment (p40 Gy Gy there was a sudden increase in CT numbers at 70-90 days. Somewhat unexpectedly, the highest mean lung doses were found in patients with the least reductions in lung function (peak expiratory flow; p<0.001). The correlation between CT numbers, radiation dose and time after treatment show that CT may be used to monitor development of lung fibrosis/pneumonitis after radiotherapy for lung cancer. Paradoxically, the patients with the highest mean lung doses experienced the minimum deterioration of lung function. This may be explained by reduction in the volume of existing tumour masses obstructing the airways, leading to relief of symptoms. This finding stresses the role of radiotherapy for lung cancer, especially where the treatment aim is palliative

  10. Neutrophils and their Fcγ receptors are essential in a mouse model of transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Looney, Mark R.; Su, Xiao; Van Ziffle, Jessica A.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Matthay, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the most common cause of transfusion-related mortality. To explore the pathogenesis of TRALI, we developed an in vivo mouse model based on the passive transfusion of an MHC class I (MHC I) mAb (H2Kd) to mice with the cognate antigen. Transfusion of the MHC I mAb to BALB/c mice produced acute lung injury with increased excess lung water, increased lung vascular and lung epithelial permeability to protein, and decreased alveolar fluid clearance. ...