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Sample records for acute leukemia risk

  1. Psychological Risk Factors in Acute Leukemia

    Gouva M.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Several theoretical models have been occasionally proposed to account for the involvement of psychological factors in cancer genesis. Family environment and relations as well as certain personality traits were correlated to cancer onset. However, little is known in the case of acute leukemia. The present study examined family environment, state-trait anxiety, hostility and the direction of hostility as well as alexithymia in 41 acute leukemia patients and their first degree relatives (70. In accordance with previous findings, the present results showed that family cohesion, conflict and organization as well as guilt, state anxiety and alexithymia were significant risk factors for the development of the disease.

  2. What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    ... both ALL and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Japanese atomic bomb survivors had a greatly increased risk of developing ... cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. Most cases occur in Japan and the Caribbean area. This disease is not ...

  3. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML. PMID:26113060

  4. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    2016-04-07

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  6. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  7. Dasatinib in high-risk core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: a French Acute Myeloid Leukemia Intergroup trial

    Boissel, Nicolas; Renneville, Aline; Leguay, Thibaut; Lefebvre, Pascale Cornillet; Recher, Christian; Lecerf, Thibaud; Delabesse, Eric; Berthon, Céline; Blanchet, Odile; Prebet, Thomas; Pautas, Cécile; Chevallier, Patrice; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Girault, Stéphane; Bonmati, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia is a favorable acute myeloid leukemia subset cytogenetically defined by t(8;21) or inv(16)/t(16;16) rearrangements, disrupting RUNX1 (previously CBFA/AML1) or CBFB transcription factor functions. The receptor tyrosine kinase KIT is expressed in the vast majority of these acute myeloid leukemias and frequent activating KIT gene mutations have been associated with a higher risk of relapse. This phase II study aimed to evaluate dasatinib as maintenance ...

  8. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. Association of asthma with the risk of acute leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    ZHOU, MIN-HANG; Yang, Qing-Ming

    2015-01-01

    An increasing incidence of hematological malignancies has been observed in children and adults worldwide over the last few decades. Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disease. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the potential association between a history of asthma and the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). A literature search was performed through PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews...

  10. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    2016-06-14

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  11. Analysis of relapse factors and risk assessment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    陈培翠

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the risk factors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia(ALL)recurrence in adult patients and establish a prognosis index(PI)calculation model in order to improve the prevention strategy of ALL in adults.Methods 104 adult ALL patients from Blood Diseases Hospital&Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences between August 2008 and November 2011

  12. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2016-02-12

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    Ye Zixing; Wang Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To highlight the current understanding of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).Data sources We collected the relevant articles in PubMed (from 1985 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia","hybrid acute leukemia","biphenotypic acute leukemia",and "mixed lineage leukemia".We also collected the relevant studies in WanFang Data base (from 2000 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia" and "hybrid acute leukemia".Study selection We included all relevant studies concerning mixed phenotype acute leukemia in English and Chinese version,with no limitation of research design.The duplicated articles are excluded.Results MPAL is a rare subgroup of acute leukemia which expresses the myeloid and lymphoid markers simultaneously.The clinical manifestations of MPAL are similar to other acute leukemias.The World Health Organization classification and the European Group for Immunological classification of Leukaemias 1998 cdteria are most widely used.MPAL does not have a standard therapy regimen.Its treatment depends mostly on the patient's unique immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features,and also the experience of individual physician.The lack of effective treatment contributes to an undesirable prognosis.Conclusion Our understanding about MPAL is still limited.The diagnostic criteria have not been unified.The treatment of MPAL remains to be investigated.The prognostic factor is largely unclear yet.A better diagnostic cdteria and targeted therapeutics will improve the therapy effect and a subsequently better prognosis.

  14. BAALC is an important predictor of refractoriness to chemotherapy and poor survival in intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML)

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We have analyzed brain and acute leukemia, cytoplasmic (BAALC) gene expression and other genetic markers (ERG, EVI1, MN1, PRAME, WT1, FLT3, and NPM1 mutations) in 127 intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients: 98 cytogenetically normal and 29 with intermediate-risk cytogenetic alterations. High versus low BAALC expressers showed a higher refractoriness to induction treatment (31% vs 10%; p?=?.005), lower complete remission rate after salvage therapy (82% vs 9...

  15. Dasatinib in high-risk core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: a French Acute Myeloid Leukemia Intergroup trial

    Boissel, Nicolas; Renneville, Aline; Leguay, Thibaut; Lefebvre, Pascale Cornillet; Recher, Christian; Lecerf, Thibaud; Delabesse, Eric; Berthon, Céline; Blanchet, Odile; Prebet, Thomas; Pautas, Cécile; Chevallier, Patrice; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Girault, Stéphane; Bonmati, Caroline; Guièze, Romain; Himberlin, Chantal; Randriamalala, Edouard; Preudhomme, Claude; Jourdan, Eric; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia is a favorable acute myeloid leukemia subset cytogenetically defined by t(8;21) or inv(16)/t(16;16) rearrangements, disrupting RUNX1 (previously CBFA/AML1) or CBFB transcription factor functions. The receptor tyrosine kinase KIT is expressed in the vast majority of these acute myeloid leukemias and frequent activating KIT gene mutations have been associated with a higher risk of relapse. This phase II study aimed to evaluate dasatinib as maintenance therapy in patients with core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first hematologic complete remission, but at higher risk of relapse due to molecular disease persistence or recurrence. A total of 26 patients aged 18–60 years old previously included in the CBF-2006 trial were eligible to receive dasatinib 140 mg daily if they had a poor initial molecular response (n=18) or a molecular recurrence (n=8). The tolerance of dasatinib as maintenance therapy was satisfactory. The 2-year disease-free survival in this high-risk population of patients was 25.7%. All but one patient with molecular recurrence presented subsequent hematologic relapse. Patients with slow initial molecular response had a similar disease-free survival when treated with dasatinib (40.2% at 2 years) or without any maintenance (50.0% at 2 years). The disappearance of KIT gene mutations at relapse suggests that clonal devolution may in part explain the absence of efficacy observed with single-agent dasatinib in these patients (n. EudraCT: 2006-006555-12). PMID:25715404

  16. Congenital acute megakaryocytic leukemia

    N B Mathur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital leukemia (CL is an extremely rare disorder in the newborn, significant proportion of which is of myeloid origin, primarily of M4 or M5 morphology. As compared to pediatric leukemia, CL is a more aggressive disease. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M7 or acute megakaryocytic leukemia is a rare type of AML with an incidence of 0.5 per million per year. Median age of presentation is 6 years, and children may present with a broad variety of symptoms including low-grade fever, diarrhea, easy bruising, failure to gain weight and life-threatening conditions.

  17. What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    ... exposure (such as being a survivor of an atomic bomb blast or nuclear reactor accident) increases the risk of developing AML. Japanese atomic bomb survivors had a greatly increased risk of developing ...

  18. Acute childhood leukemia: Nursing care

    Modern therapy for childhood acute leukemia has provided a dramatically improved prognosis over that of just 30 years ago. In the early 1960's survival rates for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were 4% and 3%, respectively. By the 1980's survival rates had risen to 72% for all and 25% to 40% for AML. Today, a diagnosis of all carries an 80% survival rate and as high as a 90% survival rate for some low-risk subtypes. Such high cure rates depend on intense and complex, multimodal therapeutic protocols. Therefore, nursing care of the child with acute leukemia must meet the demands of complicated medical therapies and balance those with the needs of a sick child and their concerned family. An understanding of disease process and principles of medical management guide appropriate and effective nursing interventions. Leukemia is a malignant disorder of the blood and blood- forming organs (bone marrow, lymph nodes and spleen). Most believe that acute leukemia results from a malignant transformation of a single early haematopoietic stem cell that is capable of indefinite self-renewal. These immature cells of blasts do not respond to normal physiologic stimuli for differentiation and gradually become the predominant cell in the bone marrow

  19. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    Jeha S, Pui CH. Clinical manifestations and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. ...

  20. Association between MTHFR polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk: a meta-analysis.

    Yu-Tao Qin

    Full Text Available Previous observational studies investigating the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk (AML have yielded inconsistent results. The aim of this study is to derive a more precise estimation of the association between MTHFR (C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk. PubMed and Embase databases were systematically searched to identify relevant studies from their inception to August 2013. Odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were the metric of choice. Thirteen studies were selected for C677T polymorphism (1838 cases and 5318 controls and 9 studies (1335 patients and 4295 controls for A1298C polymorphism. Overall, pooled results showed that C677T polymorphism was not significant associated with AML risk(OR, 0.98-1.04; 95% CI, 0.86-0.92 to 1.09-1.25. Similar results were observed for the A1298C polymorphism and in subgroup analysis. All comparisons revealed no substantial heterogeneity nor did we detect evidence of publication bias. In summary, this meta-analysis provides evidence that MTHFR polymorphisms were not associated with AML risk. Further investigations are needed to offer better insight into the role of these polymorphisms in AML carcinogenesis.

  1. Dietary resveratrol does not delay engraftment, sensitize to vincristine, or inhibit growth of high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in NOD/SCID mice

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with translocation t(4;11) is a high-risk leukemia found in 60-85% of infants with ALL and is often refractory to conventional chemotherapeutics after relapse. Although resveratrol is able to kill high-risk leukemia in vitro, this agent has not been evaluated agai...

  2. Risk of acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS): a population-based study of 17 315 patients

    Roeker, LE; Larson, DR; Kyle, RA; Kumar, S; Dispenzieri, A; Rajkumar, SV

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an increased risk of acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in persons with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). We used a large population-based cohort of individuals systematically screened for the presence or absence of MGUS. MGUS status was then linked to the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and MDS. A total of 17 315 patients age 50 and older (605 MGUS and...

  3. Clinical impact of leukemic blast heterogeneity at diagnosis in cytogenetic intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia

    Hoffmann, Marianne Hutchings; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Boegsted, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    Individual cellular heterogeneity within the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) bone marrow samples can be observed by multi parametric flow cytometry analysis (MFC) indicating that immunophenotypic screening for leukemic blast subsets may have prognostic impact.......Individual cellular heterogeneity within the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) bone marrow samples can be observed by multi parametric flow cytometry analysis (MFC) indicating that immunophenotypic screening for leukemic blast subsets may have prognostic impact....

  4. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    2016-04-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Incidence and risk factors for central nervous system relapse in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Camila Silva Peres Cancela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite all the advances in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, central nervous system relapse remains an important obstacle to curing these patients. This study analyzed the incidence of central nervous system relapse and the risk factors for its occurrence in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. METHODS: This study has a retrospective cohort design. The studied population comprised 199 children and adolescents with a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia followed up at Hospital das Clinicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (HC-UFMG between March 2001 and August 2009 and submitted to the Grupo Brasileiro de Tratamento de Leucemia da Infância - acute lymphoblastic leukemia (GBTLI-LLA-99 treatment protocol. RESULTS: The estimated probabilities of overall survival and event free survival at 5 years were 69.5% ( 3.6% and 58.8% ( 4.0%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of central nervous system (isolated or combined relapse was 11.0% at 8 years. The estimated rate of isolated central nervous system relapse at 8 years was 6.8%. In patients with a blood leukocyte count at diagnosis > 50 x 10(9/L, the estimated rate of isolated or combined central nervous system relapse was higher than in the group with a count 50 x 10(9/L at diagnosis seems to be a significant prognostic factor for a higher incidence of central nervous system relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  6. Prognostic factors in acute promyelocytic leukemia: strategies to define high-risk patients.

    Testa, Ugo; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    All trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has revolutionized the therapy of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Treatment of this leukemia with ATRA in combination with chemotherapy has resulted in complete remission rates >90 % and long-term remission rates above 80 %. Furthermore, the combination of ATRA and arsenic trioxide (ATO) was shown to be safe and effective in frontline treatment and, for patients with low and intermediate risk disease, possibly superior to the standard ATRA and anthracycline-based regimen. However, in spite of this tremendous progress, APL still remains associated with a high incidence of early death due to the frequent occurrence of an abrupt bleeding diathesis. This hemorrhagic syndrome more frequently develops in high-risk APL patients, currently defined as those exhibiting >10 × 10(9)/L WBC at presentation. In addition to high WBC count, other molecular and immunophenotypic features have been associated with high-risk APL. Among them, the expression in APL blasts of the stem/progenitor cell antigen CD34, the neural adhesion molecule (CD56), and the T cell antigen CD2 help to identify a subset of patients at higher risk of relapse and often the expression of these markers is associated with high WBC count. At the molecular level, the short PML/RARA isoform and FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations have been associated with increased relapse risk. These observations indicate that extended immunophenotypic and molecular characterization of APL at diagnosis including evaluation of CD2, CD56, and CD34 antigens and of FLT3 mutations may help to better design risk-adapted treatment in this disease. PMID:26920716

  7. Prelabor cesarean delivery and early-onset acute childhood leukemia risk.

    Thomopoulos, Thomas P; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Dessypris, Nick; Chrousos, George; Karalexi, Maria A; Karavasilis, Theodoros G; Baka, Margarita; Hatzipantelis, Emmanuel; Kourti, Maria; Polychronopoulou, Sophia; Sidi, Vasiliki; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Moschovi, Maria; Loutradis, Dimitrios; Petridou, Eleni Th

    2016-03-01

    The long-term impact of cesarean delivery (CD) on the health of the offspring is being explored methodically. We sought to investigate the effect of birth by (a) prelabor and (b) during-labor CD on the risk of early-onset (≤3 years) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), specifically of its prevailing precursor B (B-ALL) subtype. A total of 1099 incident cases of ALL (957 B-ALL), 131 of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and their 1 : 1 age-matched and sex-matched controls, derived from the Nationwide Registry for Childhood Hematological Malignancies (1996-2013), were analyzed using multivariate regression models. A null association was found between prelabor and/or during labor CD and either ALL (B-ALL) or AML in the 0-14 age range. By contrast, birth by CD increased significantly the risk of early-onset ALL [odds ratioCD (ORCD)=1.57, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-2.24] mainly on account of prelabor CD (ORprelaborCD=1.66, 95% CI: 1.13-2.43). The respective figures were even higher for the early-onset precursor B-ALL (ORCD=1.66, 95% CI: 1.15-2.40 and ORprelaborCD=1.79, 95% CI: 1.21-2.66), whereas no association emerged for early-onset AML. Prelabor CD, which deprives exposure of the fetus/infant to the presumably beneficial effect of stress hormones released in both vaginal labor and during labor CD, was associated exclusively with an increased risk of early-onset ALL, particularly the precursor B-ALL subtype. If confirmed, these adverse long-term outcomes of CD may point to re-evaluation of prelabor CD practices and prompt scientific discussion on the best ways to simulate the effects of vaginal delivery, such as a precesarean induction of labor. PMID:25793919

  8. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Yang, Jun J; Hunger, Stephen P;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. METHODS: A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was...

  9. Hierarchy in gene expression is predictive of risk, progression, and outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    Cancer progresses with a change in the structure of the gene network in normal cells. We define a measure of organizational hierarchy in gene networks of affected cells in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. With a retrospective cohort analysis based on the gene expression profiles of 116 AML patients, we find that the likelihood of future cancer relapse and the level of clinical risk are directly correlated with the level of organization in the cancer related gene network. We also explore the variation of the level of organization in the gene network with cancer progression. We find that this variation is non-monotonic, which implies the fitness landscape in the evolution of AML cancer cells is non-trivial. We further find that the hierarchy in gene expression at the time of diagnosis may be a useful biomarker in AML prognosis. (paper)

  10. Veliparib and Topotecan With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, High-Risk Myelodysplasia, or Aggressive Myeloproliferative Disorders

    2016-04-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative, BCR-ABL1 Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  11. Quantitative assessments of indoor air pollution and the risk of childhood acute leukemia in Shanghai

    We investigated the association between indoor air pollutants and childhood acute leukemia (AL). A total of 105 newly diagnosed cases and 105 1:1 gender-, age-, and hospital-matched controls were included. Measurements of indoor pollutants (including nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and 17 types of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)) were taken with diffusive samplers for 64 pairs of cases and controls. Higher concentrations of NO2 and almost half of VOCs were observed in the cases than in the controls and were associated with the increased risk of childhood AL. The use of synthetic materials for wall decoration and furniture in bedroom was related to the risk of childhood AL. Renovating the house in the last 5 years, changing furniture in the last 5 years, closing the doors and windows overnight in the winter and/or summer, paternal smoking history and outdoor pollutants affected VOC concentrations. Our results support the association between childhood AL and indoor air pollution. - Highlights: • We firstly assessed the effects of indoor air pollution on childhood AL in China. • Indoor air pollutants were assessed by questionnaire and quantitative measurements. • NO2 and 17 types of VOCs were measured in bedrooms of both cases and controls. • Higher concentrations of indoor air pollutants increased the risk of childhood AL. • Indoor behavioral factors and outdoor pollution might affect indoor air pollution. - Higher concentrations of indoor air pollutants were related to an elevated risk of childhood AL

  12. Growth hormone deficiency predicts cardiovascular risk in young adults treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood.

    Link, Katarina; Moëll, Christian; Garwicz, Stanislaw; Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva; Björk, Jonas; Thilén, Ulf; Ahrén, Bo; Erfurth, Eva Marie

    2004-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy, and until recently prophylactic cranial radiotherapy (CRT) was important for achieving long-term survival. Hypothalamic-pituitary hormone insufficiency is a well-recognized consequence of CRT for childhood cancer. Another problem is increased cardiovascular risk, which has been shown in long-term survivors of other childhood cancers. In the only previously reported study on cardiovascular risk after childhood ALL, obesity and dyslipidemia were recorded in a small subgroup treated with CRT, compared with patients treated with chemotherapy. The mechanisms behind the increase in cardiovascular risk in survivors of childhood cancer are not clarified. The aim of the present study was to elucidate mechanisms of increased cardiovascular risk in former childhood ALL patients. A group of 44 ALL survivors (23 males, median age 25 yr, range 19-32 yr at the time of study) treated with CRT (median 24 Gy, 18-30 Gy) at a median age of 5 yr (1-18 yr) and chemotherapy were investigated for prevalence of GH deficiency and cardiovascular risk factors. Comparison was made with controls randomly selected from the general population and individually matched for sex, age, smoking habits, and residence. All patients and controls underwent a GHRH-arginine test, and patients with a peak GH 3.9 microg/liter or greater were further investigated with an additional insulin tolerance test. Significantly higher plasma levels of insulin (P = 0.002), blood glucose (P = 0.01), and serum levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein (Apo) B, triglycerides, fibrinogen, and leptin (all P childhood ALL patients, a significant increase in cardiovascular risk factors was recorded. We suggest that GH deficiency, induced by CRT, is a primary cause for this because strong correlations between the stimulated GH peak and several of the cardiovascular risk factors were observed. PMID:15472198

  13. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2016-07-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  14. Vincristine pharmacokinetics is related to clinical outcome in children with standard risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Loennerholm, Gudmar; Frost, Britt-Marie; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Behrendtz, Mikael; Castor, Anders; Forestier, Erik; Heyman, Mats; Uges, Donald R. A.; de Graaf, Siebold S. N.

    2008-01-01

    Vincristine is a key drug in the treatment of childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and many other childhood malignancies. Despite decades of wide clinical use, no data on the correlation between vincristine pharmacokinetics and long-term clinical outcome have been published. We he

  15. Impact of registration on clinical trials on infection risk in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    Dix, David; Aplenc, Richard; Bowes, Lynette; Cellot, Sonia; Ethier, Marie-Chantal; Feusner, Jim; Gillmeister, Biljana; Johnston, Donna L; Lewis, Victor; Michon, Bruno; Mitchell, David; Portwine, Carol; Price, Victoria; Silva, Mariana; Stobart, Kent; Yanofsky, Rochelle; Zelcer, Shayna; Beyene, Joseph; Sung, Lillian

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the impact of enrollment on therapeutic clinical trials on adverse event rates. Primary objective was to describe the impact of clinical trial registration on sterile site microbiologically documented infection for children with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted a multicenter cohort study that included children aged ≤18 years with de novo AML. Primary outcome was microbiologically documented sterile site infection. Infection rates were compared between those registered and not registered on clinical trials. Five hundred seventy-four children with AML were included of which 198 (34.5%) were registered on a therapeutic clinical trial. Overall, 400 (69.7%) had at least one sterile site microbiologically documented infection. In multiple regression, registration on clinical trials was independently associated with a higher risk of microbiologically documented sterile site infection [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.53; p = 0.040] and viridans group streptococcal infection (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.08-1.98; p = 0.015). Registration on trials was not associated with Gram-negative or invasive fungal infections. Children with newly diagnosed AML enrolled on clinical trials have a higher risk of microbiologically documented sterile site infection. This information may impact on supportive care practices in pediatric AML. PMID:26515793

  16. Clinical effect of increasing doses of lenalidomide in high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with chromosome 5 abnormalities

    Möllgård, Lars; Saft, Leonie; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach;

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with chromosome 5 abnormalities and high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes or acute myeloid leukemia have a poor outcome. We hypothesized that increasing doses of lenalidomide may benefit this group of patients by inhibiting the tumor clone, as assessed by fluorescence in situ...... hybridization for del(5q31). DESIGN AND METHODS: Twenty-eight patients at diagnosis or with relapsed disease and not eligible for standard therapy (16 with acute myeloid leukemia, 12 with intermediate-risk 2 or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome) were enrolled in this prospective phase II multicenter trial and...... 16 weeks of trial responded to treatment. Using the International Working Group criteria for acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome the overall response rate in treated patients with acute myeloid leukemia was 20% (3/15), while that for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome was 36% (4...

  17. CLAG-based induction therapy in previously untreated high risk acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    Seiter, Karen; Ahmed, Nasir; Shaikh, Azfar; Baskind, Paul; Liu, Delong

    2016-07-01

    The CLAG regimen is highly active in patients with relapsed and/or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We administered CLAG-based chemotherapy to 20 previously untreated AML patients who were poor candidates for standard induction therapy. Responding patients received further CLAG as post-remission therapy followed by additional therapy that was tailored to their AML subtype. Patients were considered poor candidates for standard therapy due to either cardiac disease, prior chemotherapy for another malignancy, prior myeloproliferative disease, or myelodysplastic syndrome that had progressed after hypomethylator therapy. Overall, thirteen patients had a complete response (CR) to the first cycle of therapy (65%), one patient had a CR without platelet recovery, and 3 patients had a partial response (PR). Two of the patients with PR converted to CR after further therapy. The median duration of response has not been reached; the mean duration of response is 36.8 months (95% CI 28.8-44.8 months). Median overall survival (including deaths from all causes) is 29.0 months (95% CI 18.0-46.0 months). Patients with de novo AML had a CR rate of 90.9% and a median overall survival of 38.5 months. CLAG-based therapy is a well-tolerated, efficacious induction strategy in previously-untreated patients with high risk AML. CLAG-based regimens should be studied in a broader group of newly diagnosed AML patients. PMID:27151544

  18. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes That Have Relapsed or Not Responded to Treatment

    2013-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) -- children

    ... Leung WH, Pounds S, Cao X, e t al. Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. Cancer . ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  20. Treatment of poor-risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia with a combination of 5-azacytidine and valproic acid

    Kuendgen, Andrea; Bug, Gesine; Ottmann, Oliver G; Haase, Detlef; Schanz, Julie; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Nachtkamp, Kathrin; Neukirchen, Judith; Dienst, Ariane; Haas, Rainer; GERMING, Ulrich; Gattermann, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    5-azacytidine (AZA) has become standard treatment for patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Response rate is about 50% and response duration is limited. Histone deactylase (HDAC) inhibitors are attractive partners for epigenetic combination therapy. We treated 24 patients with AZA (100 mg/m2, 5 days) plus valproate (VPA; continuous dosing, trough serum level 80–110 μg/ml). According to WHO classification, 5 patients had MDS, 2 had MDS/MPD, and 17 had acute myeloid leukemia...

  1. The impact of CYP3A5*3 on risk and prognosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Borst, Louise; Wallerek, Sandra; Dalhoff, Kim Peder; Rasmussen, Kirsten K; Wesenberg, Finn; Skov Wehner, Peder; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2011-01-01

    Objectives:  Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in childhood; however, little is known of the molecular etiology and environmental exposures causing the disease. Cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) plays a crucial role in the catalytic oxidation of endogenous metabolites and...... of experiencing an event was almost eight times higher compared to those having at least one A allele (P = 0.045, hazard ratio = 7.749; 95% CI, 1.044-57.52). Conclusions:  This study shows that genetics may play a role in the risk of developing childhood ALL and indicates that improved treatment...

  2. The impact of CYP3A5*3 on risk and prognosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Borst, Louise; Wallerek, Sandra; Dalhoff, Kim; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Wesenberg, Finn; Wehner, Peder Skov; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in childhood; however, little is known of the molecular etiology and environmental exposures causing the disease. Cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) plays a crucial role in the catalytic oxidation of endogenous metabolites and toxic...... experiencing an event was almost eight times higher compared to those having at least one A allele (P = 0.045, hazard ratio = 7.749; 95% CI, 1.044-57.52). Conclusions: This study shows that genetics may play a role in the risk of developing childhood ALL and indicates that improved treatment stratification of...

  3. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  4. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  5. Potentially functional polymorphism in IL-23 receptor and risk of acute myeloid leukemia in a Chinese population.

    Xifeng Qian

    Full Text Available The interleukin-23 (IL-23 and its receptor (IL-23R mediate the direct antitumor activities in human hematologic malignancies including pediatric acute leukemia. Two potentially functional genetic variants (IL-23R rs1884444 T>G and rs6682925 T>C have been found to contribute to solid cancer susceptibility. In this study, we conducted a case-control study including 545 acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients and 1,146 cancer-free controls in a Chinese population to assess the association between these two SNPs and the risk of AML. We found that IL-23R rs1884444 TG/GG and rs6682925 TC/CC variant genotypes were associated with significantly increased risk of AML [rs1884444: adjusted odds ratio (OR = 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.01-1.62; rs6682925: adjusted OR = 1.30, 95%CI = 1.01-1.67], compared to their corresponding wild-type homozygotes, respectively. These findings indicated that genetic variants in IL-23R may contribute to AML risk in our Chinese population.

  6. Intrinsic and chemo-sensitizing activity of SMAC-mimetics on high-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Schirmer, M; Trentin, L; Queudeville, M; Seyfried, F; Demir, S; Tausch, E; Stilgenbauer, S; Eckhoff, S M; Meyer, L H; Debatin, K-M

    2016-01-01

    SMAC-mimetics represent a targeted therapy approach to overcome apoptosis resistance in many tumors. Here, we investigated the efficacy of the SMAC-mimetic BV6 in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL). In ALL cell lines, intrinsic apoptosis sensitivity was associated with rapid cIAP degradation, NF-κB activation, TNF-α secretion and induction of an autocrine TNF-α-dependent cell death loop. This pattern of responsiveness was also observed upon ex vivo analysis of 40 primograft BCP-ALL samples. Treatment with BV6 induced cell death in the majority of ALL primografts including leukemias with high-risk and poor-prognosis features. Inhibition of cell death by the TNF receptor fusion protein etanercept demonstrated that BV6 activity is dependent on TNF-α. In a preclinical NOD/SCID/huALL model of high-risk ALL, marked anti-leukemia effectivity and significantly prolonged survival were observed upon BV6 treatment. Interestingly, also in vivo, intrinsic SMAC-mimetic activity was mediated by TNF-α. Importantly, BV6 increased the effectivity of conventional induction therapy including vincristine, dexamethasone and asparaginase leading to prolonged remission induction. These data suggest SMAC-mimetics as an important addendum to efficient therapy of pediatric BCP-ALL. PMID:26775704

  7. High-Risk Microgranular Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia with a Five-Way Complex Translocation Involving PML-RARA

    Benjamin Powers; Diane Persons; Deepthi Rao; Janet Woodroof; Lin, Tara L.

    2015-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is classically characterized by chromosomal translocation (15;17), resulting in the PML-RARA fusion protein leading to disease. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old man who presented with signs and symptoms of acute leukemia with concern for APL. Therapy was immediately initiated with all-trans retinoic acid. The morphology of his leukemic blasts was consistent with the hypogranular variant of APL. Subsequent FISH and cytogenetic analysis revealed a uniq...

  8. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  11. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  12. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  13. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  14. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  15. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  16. Acute lymphocytic Leukemia masquerading as acute osteomyelitis

    Two children each developed a focal destructive bone lesion accompanied by intermittent fever, swelling, tenderness and elevated ESR. Blood counts were normal; bone marrow aspiration showed acute leukemia. The bone lesions healed in both patients after anti-leukemic therapy. We suggest that the similar roentgenographic appearance of osteomyelitis, bone infarction and focal destructive lesions in leukemia probably reflects a common, basically ischemic process of bone. (orig.)

  17. Cured meat, vegetables, and bean-curd foods in relation to childhood acute leukemia risk: A population based case-control study

    Su Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consumption of cured/smoked meat and fish leads to the formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds in the acidic stomach. This study investigated whether consumed cured/smoked meat and fish, the major dietary resource for exposure to nitrites and nitrosamines, is associated with childhood acute leukemia. Methods A population-based case-control study of Han Chinese between 2 and 20 years old was conducted in southern Taiwan. 145 acute leukemia cases and 370 age- and sex-matched controls were recruited between 1997 and 2005. Dietary data were obtained from a questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression models were used in data analyses. Results Consumption of cured/smoked meat and fish more than once a week was associated with an increased risk of acute leukemia (OR = 1.74; 95% CI: 1.15–2.64. Conversely, higher intake of vegetables (OR = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.37–0.83 and bean-curd (OR = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.34–0.89 was associated with a reduced risk. No statistically significant association was observed between leukemia risk and the consumption of pickled vegetables, fruits, and tea. Conclusion Dietary exposure to cured/smoked meat and fish may be associated with leukemia risk through their contents of nitrites and nitrosamines among children and adolescents, and intake of vegetables and soy-bean curd may be protective.

  18. Next-generation-sequencing of recurrent childhood high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals mutations typically associated with high risk patients.

    Chen, Cai; Bartenhagen, Christoph; Gombert, Michael; Okpanyi, Vera; Binder, Vera; Röttgers, Silja; Bradtke, Jutta; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Harbott, Jochen; Ginzel, Sebastian; Thiele, Ralf; Husemann, Peter; Krell, Pina F I; Borkhardt, Arndt; Dugas, Martin; Hu, Jianda; Fischer, Ute

    2015-09-01

    20% of children suffering from high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia develop recurrent disease. The molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the genetic landscape of five patients at relapse, who developed recurrent disease without prior high-risk indication using whole-exome- and whole-genome-sequencing. Oncogenic mutations of RAS pathway genes (NRAS, KRAS, FLT3, n=4) and deactivating mutations of major epigenetic regulators (CREBBP, EP300, each n=2 and ARID4B, EZH2, MACROD2, MLL2, each n=1) were prominent in these cases and virtually absent in non-recurrent cases (n=6) or other pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases (n=18). In relapse nucleotide variations were detected in cell fate determining transcription factors (GLIS1, AKNA). Structural genomic alterations affected genes regulating B-cell development (IKZF1, PBX1, RUNX1). Eleven novel translocations involved the genes ART4, C12orf60, MACROD2, TBL1XR1, LRRN4, KIAA1467, and ELMO1/MIR1200. Typically, patients harbored only single structural variations, except for one patient who displayed massive rearrangements in the context of a germline tumor suppressor TP53 mutation and a Li-Fraumeni syndrome-like family history. Another patient harbored a germline mutation in the DNA repair factor ATM. In summary, the relapse patients of our cohort were characterized by somatic mutations affecting the RAS pathway, epigenetic and developmental programs and germline mutations in DNA repair pathways. PMID:26189108

  19. Acute myeloid leukemia in the era of precision medicine:recent advances in diagnostic classification and risk stratification

    Rina Kansal

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a genetically heterogeneous myeloid malignancy that occurs more commonly in adults, and has an increasing incidence, most likely due to increasing age. Precise diagnostic classification of AML requires clinical and pathologic information, the latter including morphologic, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic and molecular genetic analysis. Risk stratification in AML requires cytogenetics evaluation as the most important predictor, with genetic mutations providing additional necessary information. AML with normal cytogenetics comprises about 40%-50% of all AML, and has been intensively investigated. The currently used 2008 World Health Organization classification of hematopoietic neoplasms has been proposed to be updated in 2016, also to include an update on the classification of AML, due to the continuously increasing application of genomic techniques that have led to major advances in our knowledge of the pathogenesis of AML. The purpose of this review is to describe some of these recent major advances in the diagnostic classification and risk stratification of AML.

  20. Polyradiculoneuritis revealing an acute monoblastic leukemia 5

    Wafa Allam; Hassan Errihani; Yahya Hsaini

    2010-01-01

    Acute polyradiculoneuritis has been frequently reported in association with malignant disorders, especially those of the lymphoid system. To date, there have been no reported cases of acute monoblastic leukemia associated with this polyradiculopathy. The authors tell us about a very rare case of leukemia presenting as acute monoblastic leukemia 5 (AML5) in a 28 years old patient from Morroco

  1. CXXC5 (Retinoid-Inducible Nuclear Factor, RINF) is a Potential Therapeutic Target in High-Risk Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Astori, Audrey; Fredly, Hanne; Aloysius, Thomas Aquinas; Bullinger, Lars; Mas, Véronique Mansat-De; de la Grange, Pierre; Delhommeau, François; Hagen, Karen Marie; Récher, Christian; Dusanter-Fourt, Isabelle; Knappskog, Stian; Lillehaug, Johan Richard; Pendino, Frédéric; Bruserudg, Øystein

    2013-01-01

    The retinoid-responsive gene CXXC5 localizes to the 5q31.2 chromosomal region and encodes a retinoid-inducible nuclear factor (RINF) that seems important during normal myelopoiesis. We investigated CXXC5/RINF expression in primary human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells derived from 594 patients, and a wide variation in CXXC5/RINF mRNA levels was observed both in the immature leukemic myeloblasts and in immature acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, patients with low-risk cytogene...

  2. Leukemia Stem Cells and Human Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Bernt, Kathrin M.; Armstrong, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Leukemias and other cancers have been proposed to contain a subpopulation of cells that display characteristics of stem cells, and which maintain tumor growth. That most anti-cancer therapy is directed against the bulk of the tumor, and possibly spares the cancer stem cells, may lie at the heart of treatment failures with conventional modalities. Leukemia stem cells are fairly well described for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but their existence and relevance for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (...

  3. Clinical effect of increasing doses of lenalidomide in high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with chromosome 5 abnormalities

    Möllgård, Lars; Saft, Leonie; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chromosome 5 abnormalities and high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes or acute myeloid leukemia have a poor outcome. We hypothesized that increasing doses of lenalidomide may benefit this group of patients by inhibiting the tumor clone, as assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization...

  4. Allergy and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a population-based and record-based study.

    Chang, Jeffrey S; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Tsai, Chia-Rung; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2012-12-01

    A deficit of normal immune stimulation in early childhood is a suspected risk factor for both childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and allergies. The present study utilized a population-based case-control design using medical claims data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan to evaluate the association between allergy and childhood leukemia. Eight hundred forty-six childhood ALL patients who were newly diagnosed during 2000 to 2008 and were older than 1 but less than 10 years of age were individually matched with 3,374 controls based on sex, birth date, and time of diagnosis (reference date for the controls). Conditional logistic regression was performed to assess the association between childhood ALL and allergies. An increased risk of ALL was observed with having an allergy less than 1 year before the case's ALL diagnosis (odds ratio (OR) = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.5, 2.0), more than 1 year before the case's diagnosis (OR = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.5), and before the age of 1 year (OR = 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.7). These results suggest that the pathogenesis of childhood ALL and allergy share a common biologic mechanism. PMID:23171876

  5. A high BMI is a risk factor in younger patients with de novo acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Crysandt, Martina; Kramer, Michael; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bornhäuser, Martin; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Serve, Hubert; Röllig, Christoph; Kaifie, Andrea; Jost, Edgar; Brummendorf, Tim H; Wilop, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Overweight and obese patients have an increased risk to develop several malignancies and, additionally, body mass index (BMI) impacts on outcome in several solid tumors. However, little is known for AML. We analyzed a cohort of 3526 patients with AML treated in three prospective multicenter trials within the German Study Alliance Leukemia. In multivariate analyses, we identified BMI as an independent risk factor for both DFS (HR 1.014, P = 0.0217) and OS (HR 1.015, P AML younger than 65 yr with intermediate risk and adverse cytogenetics. Overweight with a BMI ≥25 kg/m² best discriminated the worse outcome and led to an absolute reduction in long-term survival of 5-7% in the group of all younger patients (3-yr OS 39.9% vs. 47.3%; 10-yr OS 28.7% vs. 33.8%, P = 0.0002). Additionally, response to induction therapy was significantly reduced in these patients (76.9% vs. 82.8%, P AML, overweight and obesity are risk factors for impaired response to induction therapy, DFS and OS. This effect is, in part but not fully, explained by dose reduction such as dose-capping at a body surface area of 2 m². PMID:26277604

  6. Acute leukemia in early childhood

    M. Emerenciano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia in early childhood is biologically and clinically distinct. The particular characteristics of this malignancy diagnosed during the first months of life have provided remarkable insights into the etiology of the disease. The pro-B, CD10 negative immunophenotype is typically found in infant acute leukemia, and the most common genetic alterations are the rearrangements of the MLL gene. In addition, the TEL/AML1 fusion gene is most frequently found in children older than 24 months. A molecular study on a Brazilian cohort (age range 0-23 months has detected TEL/AML1+ve (N = 9, E2A/PBX1+ve (N = 4, PML/RARA+ve (N = 4, and AML1/ETO+ve (N = 2 cases. Undoubtedly, the great majority of genetic events occurring in these patients arise prenatally. The environmental exposure to damaging agents that give rise to genetic changes prenatally may be accurately determined in infants since the window of exposure is limited and known. Several studies have shown maternal exposures that may give rise to leukemogenic changes. The Brazilian Collaborative Study Group of Infant Acute Leukemia has found that mothers exposed to dipyrone, pesticides and hormones had an increased chance to give birth to babies with infant acute leukemia [OR = 1.48 (95%CI = 1.05-2.07, OR = 2.27 (95%CI = 1.56-3.31 and OR = 9.08 (95%CI = 2.95-27.96], respectively. This review aims to summarize recent clues that have facilitated the elucidation of the biology of early childhood leukemias, with emphasis on infant acute leukemia in the Brazilian population.

  7. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Acute appendicitis caused by acute myeloid leukemia

    Zhang, Shanxiang; Chen, Shaoxiong

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A case of appendiceal involvement by acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in an adult with recent history of AML transformed from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) was presented. Being aware of this rare presentation in particular in a patient with history of MDS and/or AML is important for prompt clinical diagnosis and management.

  9. Clinical Presentations of Acute Leukemia

    Objective: To document the clinical presentation and epidemiology of various types of acute leukemia with their respective referral source at a tertiary level centre in Peshawar. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pathology, Hayatabad Medical Complex (HMC), Peshawar, from January 2011 to May 2012. Methodology: A total of 618 bone marrow biopsy reports were reviewed. All biopsy reports labeled as acute leukemia were reviewed for age, gender, address, referring unit, diagnosis on bone marrow examination, presenting complaints, duration of illness and findings of clinical examination. Results: Ninety-two patients were diagnosed as suffering from acute leukemias (15%). ALL was most prevalent (46%), followed by AML (38%) and undifferentiated acute leukemia (16%). Males were affected more compared to females (60% vs. 40%). ALL and AML were predominant in pediatric (64%) and adults (77%) patients respectively. Patients from Afghanistan accounted for 33% of all cases followed by Peshawar (14%). Fever (77%), pallor (33%) and bleeding disorders (23%) were the main presenting complaints. Enlargement of liver, spleen and lymph nodes together was associated with ALL compared with AML (p = 0.004). Conclusion: ALL-L1 and AML-M4 were the most common sub-types. Fever, pallor and bleeding disorders were the main presenting complaints. Enlargement of liver, spleen and lymph nodes was more frequently associated with ALL compared to AML. (author)

  10. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  11. Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the Nordic countries

    Oskarsson, Trausti; Söderhäll, Stefan; Arvidson, Johan;

    2016-01-01

    Relapse is the main reason for treatment failure in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Despite improvements in the up-front therapy, survival after relapse is still relatively poor, especially for high-risk relapses. The aims of this study were to assess outcomes following acute lymphoblastic...... leukemia relapse after common initial Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology protocol treatment; to validate currently used risk stratifications, and identify additional prognostic factors for overall survival. Altogether, 516 of 2735 patients (18.9%) relapsed between 1992 and 2011 and were...... development of novel approaches is urgently needed to increase survival in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia....

  12. The prognostic impact of FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutations in patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia and intermediate-risk cytogenetics

    How, J; Sykes, J.; Minden, M D; Gupta, V.; Yee, K W L; Schimmer, A D; Schuh, A C; Kamel-Reid, S; Brandwein, J M

    2013-01-01

    Internal tandem duplication of the fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 gene (FLT3-ITD) and nucleophosmin-1 (NPM1) mutations have prognostic importance in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with intermediate-risk karyotype at diagnosis, but less is known about their utility to predict outcomes at relapse. We retrospectively analysed outcomes of 70 patients with relapsed, intermediate-risk karyotype AML who received a uniform reinduction regimen, with respect to FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutation status and ...

  13. MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE IN ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) offers a way to precisely assess early treatment response and detect relapse. Established methods to study MRD are flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of antigen-receptor genes, and PCR amplification of fusion transcripts. The strong correlation between MRD levels and risk of relapse in childhood ALL is well established; studies in...

  14. Utility of cranial boost in addition to total body irradiation in the treatment of high risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) as part of a conditioning regimen before hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is an important component in the management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that has relapsed or has other certain high-risk features. Controversy exists, however, as to whether a cranial boost in addition to TBI is necessary to prevent central nervous system (CNS) recurrences in these high-risk cases. Previous national trials have included a cranial boost in the absence of data to justify its use. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess risk of CNS recurrence in ALL patients treated with TBI, to identify subsets of these high-risk patients at an increased or decreased risk of CNS recurrence after TBI, and to investigate whether regimens with higher doses of cranial irradiation further reduce the risk of CNS recurrence. Methods and Materials: Charts of 67 consecutively treated patients with ALL who received TBI before HSCT were reviewed. Data including patient demographics, clinical features at presentation, conditioning regimen, donor source, use of a cranial boost, remission stage at transplant, histologic subtype, cytogenetics, and extramedullary site of presentation were retrospectively collected and correlated with the risk of subsequent CNS recurrence. Results: At the time of analysis, 30 (45%) patients were alive with no evidence of disease, 8 (12%) were alive with recurrence of leukemia, 7 (10.5%) had recurrent ALL but with successful salvage, 7 (11%) died subsequent to recurrence, 14 (21%) died from complications related to HCST, and 1 patient was lost to follow-up (1.5%). Of the patients who recurred after HSCT, the relapses were hematologic in 13 (57%), CNS with or without simultaneous marrow involvement in 3 (13%), and other sites in 7 (30%). Forty-one (61%) patients did not receive an extracranial boost of irradiation with TBI. Two of these patients (4.9%) suffered CNS failures compared with 1 of 26 (3.8%) who received a

  15. Treatment results of the Tokai-POSG 8610HR pilot protocol for children with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    We reported the treatment results of Tokai-POSG 8610HR pilot protocol for children with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). From Oct. 1986 to Jan. 1991, 43 eligible children were enrolled, who had one or more following high-risk factors: age≥10 years old, initial white blood cell count (WBC) of 50,000/μl or more, and extramedullary leukemia. All patients received induction therapy consisting of vincristine, dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide and daunorubicin, followed by central nervous system prophylaxis by 24 Gy cranial irradiation, consolidation therapy and cyclic maintenance by multidrugs for 3 years after diagnosis. Complete remission was achieved in 39 patients. The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) rate was 72.6±7.1%. The only factor of an adverse association with EFS was a initial WBC of 10,000/μl or more (p=0.002) in the 24 patients who were 10 years old or over. The factors related to a negative survival were male gender (p=0.031) and an initial WBC of 10,000/μl or more (p=0.0012) in 43 patients. The major toxicities of the therapy were pancreatitis and allergic reaction due toL-ASP administration, and growth hormone deficiency due to cranial irradiation. Tokai 8610HR pilot protocol was a promising regimen, but further intensive chemotherapy was needed for improvement or the prognosis of the older patients with high initial WBC greater than 10,000/μl. (author)

  16. Treatment results of the Tokai-POSG 8610HR pilot protocol for children with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Hongo, Teruaki; Inoue, Noriko [Hamamatsu Medical Univ., Shizuoka (Japan); Horibe, Keizo [and others

    1997-10-01

    We reported the treatment results of Tokai-POSG 8610HR pilot protocol for children with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). From Oct. 1986 to Jan. 1991, 43 eligible children were enrolled, who had one or more following high-risk factors: age{>=}10 years old, initial white blood cell count (WBC) of 50,000/{mu}l or more, and extramedullary leukemia. All patients received induction therapy consisting of vincristine, dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide and daunorubicin, followed by central nervous system prophylaxis by 24 Gy cranial irradiation, consolidation therapy and cyclic maintenance by multidrugs for 3 years after diagnosis. Complete remission was achieved in 39 patients. The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) rate was 72.6{+-}7.1%. The only factor of an adverse association with EFS was a initial WBC of 10,000/{mu}l or more (p=0.002) in the 24 patients who were 10 years old or over. The factors related to a negative survival were male gender (p=0.031) and an initial WBC of 10,000/{mu}l or more (p=0.0012) in 43 patients. The major toxicities of the therapy were pancreatitis and allergic reaction due to{sub L}-ASP administration, and growth hormone deficiency due to cranial irradiation. Tokai 8610HR pilot protocol was a promising regimen, but further intensive chemotherapy was needed for improvement or the prognosis of the older patients with high initial WBC greater than 10,000/{mu}l. (author)

  17. DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASSIFICATION OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Sabina Chiaretti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a disseminated malignancy of B- or T-lymphoblasts which imposes a rapid and accurate diagnostic process to support an optimal risk-oriented therapy and thus increase the curability rate. The need for a precise diagnostic algorithm is underlined by the awareness that both ALL therapy and related success rates may vary greatly in function of ALL subset, from standard chemotherapy in patients with standard-risk ALL, to allotransplantation (SCT and targeted therapy in high-risk patients and cases expressing suitable biological targets, respectively. This review offers a glimpse on how best identify ALL and the most relevant ALL subsets.

  18. Acute myelogenous leukemia switch lineage upon relapse to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa; Arreguin-Gonzalez, Farina; Rodriguez-Osorio, Carlos A; Sadowinski, Stanislaw; Pelayo, Rosana; Medina-Sanson, Aurora

    2009-01-01

    Acute leukemia, the most common form of cancer in children, accounts for approximately 30% of all childhood malignancies, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia being five times more frequent than acute myeloid leukemia. Lineage switch is the term that has been used to describe the phenomenon of acute leukemias that meet the standard French-American-British system criteria for a particular lineage (either lymphoid or myeloid) upon initial diagnosis, but meet the criteria for the opposite lineage a...

  19. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Polymorphisms and Risk of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Evidence from an updated meta-analysis including 35 studies

    Wang Haigang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR variants, C677T and A1298C, have been reported to be associated with decreased risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. However, results derived from individually underpowered studies are conflicting. We carried out an updated meta-analysis on the association between MTHFR polymorphisms and ALL risk. Methods Relevant publications were searched through PUBMED and EMBASE databases. The associations between MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and the risk of ALL were evaluated by odds ratios (ORs. The heterogeneity and publication bias were estimated. Meta-regression analysis was performed to evaluate the potential sources of heterogeneity. Results C677T polymorphism was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (allele contrast: ORRE = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.83-0.99. Subgroup analysis showed MTHFR C677T variant was associated with decreased susceptibility to ALL in children and Caucasians. Meta-regression showed the logOR for the association between T allele and ALL increased as sex ratio (M/F in the case group increased (P = 0.01. Regarding A1298C polymorphism, no significant association was observed (allele contrast: ORRE = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.91-1.11. There was no publication bias for C677T or A1298C polymorphism. Conclusions The present meta-analysis suggests that the C677T polymorphism, not A1298C, in MTHFR gene is associated with a decreased risk of ALL, particularly among children and Caucasians subjects. Our findings suggest that the influence of the C677T polymorphism on ALL susceptibility is modified by sex ratio in cases (M/F. Since folate intake may be a possible confounding factor, including this factor in future prospective studies is warranted. Further meta-analysis studies should be at least stratified for folate levels and gender to give more powerful and informative results.

  20. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  1. Genomic profiling of thousands of candidate polymorphisms predicts risk of relapse in 778 Danish and German childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients

    Wesolowska, Agata; Borst, L.; Dalgaard, Marlene Danner;

    2015-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survival approaches 90%. New strategies are needed to identify the 10–15% who evade cure. We applied targeted, sequencing-based genotyping of 25 000 to 34 000 preselected potentially clinically relevant singlenucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify host...... genome profiles associated with relapse risk in 352 patients from the Nordic ALL92/2000 protocols and 426 patients from the German Berlin–Frankfurt–Munster (BFM) ALL2000 protocol. Patients were enrolled between 1992 and 2008 (median follow-up: 7.6 years). Eleven cross-validated SNPs were significantly...... associated with risk of relapse across protocols. SNP and biologic pathway level analyses associated relapse risk with leukemia aggressiveness, glucocorticosteroid pharmacology/response and drug transport/metabolism pathways. Classification and regression tree analysis identified three distinct risk groups...

  2. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    ... of WBC) are produced, a child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood leukemia, affecting about 75% of kids with this cancer of the blood cells. Kids ... (AML) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Cancer ...

  3. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, Julian; Burmeister, T;

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia...... patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All...... patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79...

  4. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury

  5. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting as Acute Appendicitis

    Sherri Rauenzahn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Appendicitis in leukemic patients is uncommon but associated with increased mortality. Additionally, leukemic cell infiltration of the appendix is extremely rare. While appendectomy is the treatment of choice for these patients, diagnosis and management of leukemia have a greater impact on remission and survival. A 59-year-old Caucasian female was admitted to the surgical service with acute right lower quadrant pain, nausea, and anorexia. She was noted to have leukocytosis, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Abdominal imaging demonstrated appendicitis with retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymphadenopathy for which she underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. Peripheral smear, bone marrow biopsy, and surgical pathology of the appendix demonstrated acute myeloid leukemia (AML with nonsuppurative appendicitis. In the setting of AML, prior cases described the development of appendicitis with active chemotherapy. Of these cases, less than ten patients had leukemic infiltration of the appendix, leading to leukostasis and nonsuppurative appendicitis. Acute appendicitis with leukemic infiltration as the initial manifestation of AML has only been described in two other cases in the literature with an average associated morbidity of 32.6 days. The prompt management in this case of appendicitis and AML resulted in an overall survival of 185 days.

  6. Congenital acute lymphocytic leukemia associated with hyperleucocytic leukemia syndrome

    A two-month-old female infant had congenital acute lymphocytic leukemia 39 days after birth. Cranial CT showed many small high dense spots over the whole brain. The mechanism of occurrence of central neurologic symptoms and the association of hyperleucocytic leukemia are discussed with a review of the literature. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Focus on Novel Therapeutic Strategies

    Lin, Tara L.; M. Yair Levy

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcomes. Cytogenetic analysis reveals which patients may have favorable risk disease, but 5-year survival in this category is only approximately 60%, with intermediate and poor risk groups faring far worse. Advances in our understanding of the biology of leukemia pathogenesis and prognosis have not been matched with clinical improvements. Unsatisfactory outcomes persist for the majority of patients with AML, parti...

  8. Rationale for an international consortium to study inherited genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Sherborne, Amy L.; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv; Bartram, Claus R.; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Petridou, Eleni; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Szalai, Csaba; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Healy, Jasmine; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo; Indaco, Stefania; El-Ghouroury, Eman A; Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Hongeng, Suradej; Pakakasama, Samart; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ugarte, Evelia L.; Leal, Valeria P.; Espinoza, Juan P.M.; Kamel, Azza M.; Ebid, Gamal T.A.; Radwan, Eman R.; Yalin, Serap; Yalin, Erdinc; Berkoz, Mehmet; Simpson, Jill; Roman, Eve; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hosking, Fay J.; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. To date most association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been based on the candidate gene approach and have evaluated a restricted number of polymorphisms. Such studies have served to highlight difficulties in conducting statistically and methodologically rigorous investigations into acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Recent genome-wide association studies of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have provided robust evidence that common variation at four genetic loci confers a modest increase in risk. The accumulated experience to date and relative lack of success of initial efforts to identify novel acute lymphoblastic leukemia predisposition loci emphasize the need for alternative study designs and methods. The International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Genetics Consortium includes 12 research groups in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas engaged in studying the genetics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The initial goal of this consortium is to identify and characterize low-penetrance susceptibility variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia through association-based analyses. Efforts to develop genome-wide association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in terms of both sample size and single nucleotide polymorphism coverage, and to increase the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms taken forward to large-scale replication should lead to the identification of additional novel risk variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ethnic differences in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well recognized and thus in assessing the interplay between inherited and non-genetic risk factors, analyses using different population cohorts with different incidence rates are likely to be highly informative. Given that the frequency of many acute lymphoblastic leukemia subgroups is small, identifying differential effects will realistically only be

  9. Comparative pharmacogenetic analysis of risk polymorphisms in Caucasian and Vietnamese children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: prediction of therapeutic outcome?

    Vu Hoang, Phuong Thu; Ambroise, Jérôme; Dekairelle, Anne-France; Durant, Jean-François; Butoescu, Valentina; Dang Chi, Vu Luan; Huynh, Nghia; Nguyen, Tan Binh; Robert, Annie; Vermylen, Christiane; Gala, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Aims Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common of all paediatric cancers. Aside from predisposing to ALL, polymorphisms could also be associated with poor outcome. Indeed, genetic variations involved in drug metabolism could, at least partially, be responsible for heterogeneous responses to standardized leukemia treatments, hence requiring more personalized therapy. The aims of this study were to (a) to determine the prevalence of seven common genetic polymorphisms including those that affect the folate and/or thiopurine metabolic pathways, i.e. cyclin D1 (CCND1-G870A), γ-glutamyl hydrolase (GGH-C452T), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR-C677T and MTHFR-A1298C), thymidylate synthase promoter (TYMS-TSER), thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT*3A and TPMT*3C) and inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPA-C94A), in Caucasian (n = 94, age < 20) and Vietnamese (n = 141, age < 16 years) childhood ALL and (b) to assess the impact of a multilocus genetic risk score (MGRS) on relapse-free survival (RFS) using a Cox proportional-hazards regression model. Results The prevalence of MTHFR-677TT genotype was significantly higher in Caucasians (P = 0.008), in contrast to the prevalence of TYMS-TSER*3R/3R and ITPA-94AA/AC genotypes which were significantly higher in Vietnamese (P < 0.001 and P = 0.02, respectively). Compared with children with a low MGRS (≤3), those with a high MGRS (≥4) were 2.06 (95% CI = 1.01, 4.22; P = 0.04) times more likely to relapse. Adding MGRS into a multivariate Cox regression model with race/ethnicity and four clinical variables improved the predictive accuracy of the model (AUC from 0.682 to 0.709 at 24 months). Conclusion Including MGRS into a clinical model improved the predictive accuracy of short and medium term prognosis, hence confirming the association between well determined pharmacogenotypes and outcome of paediatric ALL. Whether variants on other genes associated with folate metabolism can substantially improve the

  10. Methotrexate/6-mercaptopurine maintenance therapy influences the risk of a second malignant neoplasm after childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results from the NOPHO ALL-92 study

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Al-Modhwahi, Ibrahim; Andersen, Mette Klarskov;

    2009-01-01

    Among 1614 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with the Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) ALL-92 protocol, 20 patients developed a second malignant neoplasm (SMN) with a cumulative risk of 1.6% at 12 years from the diagnosis of ALL. Nine of the 16...... = .07) were related to increased risk of SMN. Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) methylates 6MP and its metabolites, and thus reduces cellular levels of cytotoxic 6-thioguanine nucleotides. Of 524 patients who had erythrocyte TPMT activity measured, the median TPMT activity in 9 patients developing an...

  11. Results of a randomized international study of high-risk central nervous system B non-Hodgkin lymphoma and B acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and adolescents

    Cairo, Mitchell S; Gerrard, Mary; Sposto, Richard; Auperin, Anne; Pinkerton, C. Ross; Michon, Jean; Weston, Claire; Perkins, Sherrie L.; Raphael, Martine; McCarthy, Keith; Patte, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    The prognosis for higher risk childhood B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma has improved over the past 20 years but the optimal intensity of treatment has yet to be determined. Children 21 years old or younger with newly diagnosed B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma/B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-NHL/B-ALL) with higher risk factors (bone marrow [BM] with or without CNS involvement) were randomized to standard intensity French-American-British/Lymphoma Malignancy B (FAB/LMB) therapy or reduced intensi...

  12. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  13. Protracted Administration of L-Asparaginase in Maintenance Phase Is the Risk Factor for Hyperglycemia in Older Patients with Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Hideki Yoshida

    Full Text Available Although L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia is well known adverse event, it is not studied whether the profile of this adverse event is affected by intensification of L-asparaginase administration. Here, we analyzed the profile of L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia in a 1,176 patients with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to the Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study ALL-02 protocol using protracted L-asparaginase administration in maintenance phase. We determined that a total of 75 L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia events occurred in 69 patients. Although 17 events (17/1176, 1.4% developed in induction phase, which was lower incidence than those (10-15% in previous reports, 45 events developed during the maintenance phase with protracted L-asparaginase administration. Multivariate analysis showed that older age at onset (≥ 10 years was a sole independent risk factor for L-asparaginase-related hyperglycemia (P<0.01, especially in maintenance phase. Contrary to the previous reports, obesity was not associated with L-asparaginase-related hyperglycemia. These findings suggest that protracted administration of L-asparaginase is the risk factor for hyperglycemia when treating adolescent and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

  14. Genetic risk factors for the development of osteonecrosis in children under age 10 treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Karol, Seth E; Mattano, Leonard A; Yang, Wenjian; Maloney, Kelly W; Smith, Colton; Liu, ChengCheng; Ramsey, Laura B; Fernandez, Christian A; Chang, Tamara Y; Neale, Geoffrey; Cheng, Cheng; Mardis, Elaine; Fulton, Robert; Scheet, Paul; San Lucas, F Anthony; Larsen, Eric C; Loh, Mignon L; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Hunger, Stephen P; Devidas, Meenakshi; Relling, Mary V

    2016-02-01

    Osteonecrosis is a dose-limiting toxicity in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Prior studies on the genetics of osteonecrosis have focused on patients ≥10 years of age, leaving the genetic risk factors for the larger group of children protocol AALL0331 (NCT00103285, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00103285), with results tested for replication in 817 children protocol AALL0232 (NCT00075725, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00075725). The top replicated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were near bone morphogenic protein 7 [BMP7: rs75161997, P = 5.34 × 10(-8) (odds ratio [OR] 15.0) and P = .0498 (OR 8.44) in the discovery and replication cohorts, respectively] and PROX1-antisense RNA1 (PROX1-AS1: rs1891059, P = 2.28 × 10(-7) [OR 6.48] and P = .0077 [OR 3.78] for the discovery and replication cohorts, respectively). The top replicated nonsynonymous SNP, rs34144324, was in a glutamate receptor gene (GRID2, P = 8.65 × 10(-6) [OR 3.46] and P = .0136 [OR 10.8] in the discovery and replication cohorts, respectively). In a meta-analysis, the BMP7 and PROX1-AS1 variants (rs75161997 and rs1891059, respectively) met the significance threshold of <5 × 10(-8). Top replicated SNPs were enriched in enhancers active in mesenchymal stem cells, and analysis of annotated genes demonstrated enrichment in glutamate receptor and adipogenesis pathways. These data may provide new insights into the pathophysiology of osteonecrosis. PMID:26590194

  15. Risk stratification of T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia patients based on gene expression, mutations and copy number variation.

    Mirji, Gauri; Bhat, Jaydeep; Kode, Jyoti; Banavali, Shripad; Sengar, Manju; Khadke, Prashant; Sait, Osama; Chiplunkar, Shubhada

    2016-06-01

    Gene expression, copy number variations (CNV), mutations and survival were studied to delineate TCRγδ+T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) as a distinct subgroup from TCRαβ+T-ALL. Gene Ontology analysis showed that differential regulation of genes involved in pathways for leukemogenesis, apoptosis, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and antigen processing/presentation may offer a survival benefit to TCRγδ+T-ALL patients. Genes involved in disease biology and having equal expression in both the subgroups, were further analysed for mutations and CNV using droplet digital PCR. TCRγδ+T-ALL patients exhibited differential level of mutations for NOTCH1 and IKZF3; however BRAF mutations were detected at equal levels in both the subgroups. Although TCRγδ+T-ALL patients with these mutations demonstrated improved disease-free survival (DFS) as compared TCRαβ+T-ALL patients, it was not statistically significant. Patients with homozygous deletion of CDKN2A/CDKN2B showed poor DFS in each subgroup. TCRγδ+T-ALL patients with wild type/heterozygous deletion of CDKN2A/CDKN2B possess significantly better DFS over TCRαβ+T-ALL patients (p=0.017 and 0.045, respectively). Thus, the present study has for the first time demonstrated TCRγδ clonality and CDKN2A/CDKN2B CNV together as potential prognostic markers in management of T-ALL. Further understanding the functional significance of differentially regulated genes in T-ALL patients would aid in designing risk based treatment strategies in subset specific manner. PMID:27070758

  16. Is there an increased risk of metabolic syndrome among childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors? A developing country experience.

    Mohapatra, Sonali; Bansal, Deepak; Bhalla, A K; Verma Attri, Savita; Sachdeva, Naresh; Trehan, Amita; Marwaha, R K

    2016-03-01

    Data on metabolic syndrome (MS) in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) from developing countries are lacking. The purpose of this single-center, uncontrolled, observational study was to assess the frequency of MS in our survivors. The survivors of ALL ≤15 years at diagnosis, who had completed therapy ≥2 years earlier, were enrolled. Anthropometric measurements (weight, height, waist circumference), biochemistry (glucose, insulin, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein [HDL], thyroid function tests, C-reactive protein [CRP], magnesium), measurement of blood pressure, and Tanner staging were performed. MS was defined by International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the National Cholesterol Education Program Third Adult Treatment Panel guidelines (NCEP ATP III) criteria, modified by Cook et al. (Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2003;157:821-827) and Ford et al. (Diabetes Care. 2005;28:878-881). The median age of 76 survivors was 11.9 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 9.6-13.5). Twenty-four (32%) survivors were obese or overweight. The prevalence of insulin resistance (17%), hypertension (7%), hypertriglyceridemia (20%), and low HDL (37%) was comparable to the prevalence in children/adolescents in historical population-based studies from India. The prevalence of MS ranged from 1.3% to 5.2%, as per different defining criteria. Cranial radiotherapy, age at diagnosis, sex, or socioeconomic status were not risk factors for MS. The prevalence of MS in survivors of childhood ALL, at a median duration of 3 years from completion of chemotherapy, was comparable to the reference population. The prevalence of being obese or overweight was, however, greater than historical controls. PMID:26984439

  17. Treatment of poor-risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia with a combination of 5-azacytidine and valproic acid.

    Kuendgen, Andrea; Bug, Gesine; Ottmann, Oliver G; Haase, Detlef; Schanz, Julie; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Nachtkamp, Kathrin; Neukirchen, Judith; Dienst, Ariane; Haas, Rainer; Germing, Ulrich; Gattermann, Norbert

    2011-08-01

    5-azacytidine (AZA) has become standard treatment for patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Response rate is about 50% and response duration is limited. Histone deactylase (HDAC) inhibitors are attractive partners for epigenetic combination therapy. We treated 24 patients with AZA (100 mg/m(2), 5 days) plus valproate (VPA; continuous dosing, trough serum level 80-110 μg/ml). According to WHO classification, 5 patients had MDS, 2 had MDS/MPD, and 17 had acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Seven patients (29%) had previously received intensive chemotherapy, and five had previous HDAC inhibitor treatment. The overall response rate was 37% in the entire cohort but significantly higher (57%) in previously untreated patients, especially those with MDS (64%). Seven (29%) patients achieved CR (29%) and two PR (8%), respectively. Hematological CR was accompanied by complete cytogenetic remission according to conventional cytogenetics in all evaluable cases. Some patients also showed complete remission according to FISH on bone marrow mononuclear cells and CD34(+) peripheral blood cells, as well as by follow-up of somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations. Four additional patients achieved at least marrow remissions. Factors influencing response were AML (vs. MDS), marrow blast count, pretreatment, transfusion dependency, concomitant medication with hydroxyurea, and valproic acid (VPA) serum level. This trial is the first to assess the combination of AZA plus VPA without additional ATRA. A comparatively good CR rate, relatively short time to response, and the influence of VPA serum levels on response suggest that VPA provided substantial additional benefit. However, the importance of HDAC inhibitors in epigenetic combination therapy can only be proven by randomized trials. PMID:22704349

  18. Pre-chemotherapy risk factors for invasive fungal diseases: prospective analysis of 1,192 patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (SEIFEM 2010-a multicenter study)

    Caira, Morena; Candoni, Anna; Verga, Luisa; Busca, Alessandro; Delia, Mario; Nosari, Annamaria; Caramatti, Cecilia; Castagnola, Carlo; Cattaneo, Chiara; Fanci, Rosa; Chierichini, Anna; Melillo, Lorella; Mitra, Maria Enza; Picardi, Marco; Potenza, Leonardo; Salutari, Prassede; Vianelli, Nicola; Facchini, Luca; Cesarini, Monica; De Paolis, Maria Rosaria; Di Blasi, Roberta; Farina, Francesca; Venditti, Adriano; Ferrari, Antonella; Garzia, Mariagrazia; Gasbarrino, Cristina; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Lessi, Federica; Manna, Annunziata; Martino, Bruno; Nadali, Gianpaolo; Offidani, Massimo; Paris, Laura; Pavone, Vincenzo; Rossi, Giuseppe; Spadea, Antonio; Specchia, Giorgina; Trecarichi, Enrico Maria; Vacca, Adriana; Cesaro, Simone; Perriello, Vincenzo; Aversa, Franco; Tumbarello, Mario; Pagano, Livio

    2015-01-01

    Correct definition of the level of risk of invasive fungal infections is the first step in improving the targeting of preventive strategies. We investigated the potential relationship between pre-hospitalization exposure to sources of fungi and the development of invasive fungal infections in adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia after their first course of chemotherapy. From January 2010 to April 2012, all consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients in 33 Italian centers were prospectively registered. Upon first admission, information about possible pre-chemotherapy risk factors and environmental exposure was collected. We recorded data regarding comorbid conditions, employment, hygienic habits, working and living environment, personal habits, hobbies, and pets. All invasive fungal infections occurring within 30 days after the first course of chemotherapy were recorded. Of the 1,192 patients enrolled in this study, 881 received intensive chemotherapy and were included in the present analysis. Of these, 214 developed an invasive fungal infection, including 77 proven/probable cases (8.7%). Of these 77 cases, 54 were proven/probable invasive mold infections (6.1%) and 23 were proven yeast infections (2.6%). Upon univariate analysis, a significant association was found between invasive mold infections and age, performance status, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, smoking, cocaine use, job, hobbies, and a recent house renovation. Higher body weight resulted in a reduced risk of invasive mold infections. Multivariate analysis confirmed the role of performance status, job, body weight, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and house renovation. In conclusion, several hospital-independent variables could potentially influence the onset of invasive mold infections in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Investigation of these factors upon first admission may help to define a patient’s risk category and improve targeted prophylactic

  19. Pre-chemotherapy risk factors for invasive fungal diseases: prospective analysis of 1,192 patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (SEIFEM 2010-a multicenter study).

    Caira, Morena; Candoni, Anna; Verga, Luisa; Busca, Alessandro; Delia, Mario; Nosari, Annamaria; Caramatti, Cecilia; Castagnola, Carlo; Cattaneo, Chiara; Fanci, Rosa; Chierichini, Anna; Melillo, Lorella; Mitra, Maria Enza; Picardi, Marco; Potenza, Leonardo; Salutari, Prassede; Vianelli, Nicola; Facchini, Luca; Cesarini, Monica; De Paolis, Maria Rosaria; Di Blasi, Roberta; Farina, Francesca; Venditti, Adriano; Ferrari, Antonella; Garzia, Mariagrazia; Gasbarrino, Cristina; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Lessi, Federica; Manna, Annunziata; Martino, Bruno; Nadali, Gianpaolo; Offidani, Massimo; Paris, Laura; Pavone, Vincenzo; Rossi, Giuseppe; Spadea, Antonio; Specchia, Giorgina; Trecarichi, Enrico Maria; Vacca, Adriana; Cesaro, Simone; Perriello, Vincenzo; Aversa, Franco; Tumbarello, Mario; Pagano, Livio

    2015-02-01

    Correct definition of the level of risk of invasive fungal infections is the first step in improving the targeting of preventive strategies. We investigated the potential relationship between pre-hospitalization exposure to sources of fungi and the development of invasive fungal infections in adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia after their first course of chemotherapy. From January 2010 to April 2012, all consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients in 33 Italian centers were prospectively registered. Upon first admission, information about possible pre-chemotherapy risk factors and environmental exposure was collected. We recorded data regarding comorbid conditions, employment, hygienic habits, working and living environment, personal habits, hobbies, and pets. All invasive fungal infections occurring within 30 days after the first course of chemotherapy were recorded. Of the 1,192 patients enrolled in this study, 881 received intensive chemotherapy and were included in the present analysis. Of these, 214 developed an invasive fungal infection, including 77 proven/probable cases (8.7%). Of these 77 cases, 54 were proven/probable invasive mold infections (6.1%) and 23 were proven yeast infections (2.6%). Upon univariate analysis, a significant association was found between invasive mold infections and age, performance status, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, smoking, cocaine use, job, hobbies, and a recent house renovation. Higher body weight resulted in a reduced risk of invasive mold infections. Multivariate analysis confirmed the role of performance status, job, body weight, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and house renovation. In conclusion, several hospital-independent variables could potentially influence the onset of invasive mold infections in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Investigation of these factors upon first admission may help to define a patient's risk category and improve targeted prophylactic

  20. Acute Leukemia: Diagnosis, Management, and Potential for Cure

    Stewart, Keith; Keating, Armand

    1988-01-01

    Acute leukemia is an uncommon malignant disorder resulting from the clonal proliferation of hematopoietic precursors of the myeloid or lymphoid lineages. Of the two major subgroups, acute lymphoblastic leukemia is more common in children, while acute myelogenous leukemia predominates in adults. With modern chemotherapy 60%-70% of all children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia can be long-term survivors and are potentially cured. Although the prognosis in acute myelogenous leukemia is less fav...

  1. Acute acalculous cholecystitis complicating chemotherapy for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Olfa Kassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a rare complication in the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukemia. Diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis remains difficult during neutropenic period. We present two acute myeloblastic leukemia patients that developed acute acalculous cholecystitis during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. They suffered from fever, vomiting and acute pain in the epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder. Surgical management was required in one patient and conservative treatment was attempted in the other patient. None treatment measures were effective and two patients died. Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a serious complication in neutropenic patients. Earlier diagnosis could have expedited the management of these patients.

  2. Vitamin D Protects Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells from Dexamethasone

    Antony, Reuben; Sheng, Xia; Ehsanipour, Ehsan A.; Ng, Emily; Pramanik, Rocky; Klemm, Lars; Ichihara, Brian; Mittelman, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked with increased cancer risk, and vitamin D has been shown to be cytotoxic to some cancer cells in vitro. In the present study we evaluated whether vitamin D would have antiproliferative or cytotoxic effects on human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Contrary to our hypotheses, calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, had no effect on leukemia cell proliferation. Calcitriol actually had a modest effect to impair dexamethasone cytotoxicity and induct...

  3. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  4. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2016-08-10

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Ommen, Hans Beier; Nederby, Line; Toft-Petersen, Marie;

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses how minimal residual disease (MRD) is detected and managed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. The most commonly used techniques to detect residual leukemia in patients in complete remission (CR) are quantitative PCR (qPCR) and multicolor flow cytometry (MFC). While q...

  6. Leukemia cutis with lymphoglandular bodies: a clue to acute lymphoblastic leukemia cutis

    Obiozor, Cynthia; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Fraga, Garth R.

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia cutis describes cutaneous lesions produced by infiltrates of leukemic cells. It usually manifests contemporaneously with the initial diagnosis of systemic leukemia, but may also precede or follow systemic leukemia. Most cases are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. Adult B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cutis is very rare. We report a 59-year-old woman with a history of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapsed with aleukemic lymphoblastic leukemia cutis. Lymphoglandular bodi...

  7. Improved outcome for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after risk-adjusted intensive therapy: a single institution experience

    Because of need for more comprehensive information on the least toxic and most effective forms of therapy for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), we reviewed our experience in the treatment of children with ALL at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSHRC) and King Fahd National Center for Children's Cancer and Research (KFNCCCR) over a period of 18 years with a focus on patient characteristics and outcome. During the period of 1981 to 1988, records of children with ALL were retrospectively reviewed with respect to clinical presentation, laboratory findings, risk factors, stratification, therapy and outcome. The protocols used in treatment included 4 local protocols (KFSH 81, 84, 87 and 90) and subsequently. Children's Cancer Group (CCG) protocols and these were grouped as Era (1981-1992) and Era 2 (1993-1998). Of 509 children with ALL treated during this period, 316 were treated using local protocols and 193 using CCG protocols. Drugs used in Era 1 included a 4-drug induction using etoposid (VP-16) instead of L-asparaginase. Consolidation was based on high dose methotexate (MTX) 1g/m2 and maintenance was based on oral mercaptopurine (6-MP) and MTX with periodic pulses using intravenous teniposide (VM-26), Ara-C, L-asparaginase, adriamycin, prednisone, VP-16 cyclophosphamide .International protocols were introduced in Era 2, which was also marked by intensification of early treatment, a wider selection of cytoreductive agents, and the alternating use of non-cross-resistant pairs of drugs using the post-remission period. The end of induction remission rate improved from 90% in Era 1 to 95% in Era 2, which was of borderline statistical significance (P=0.49). The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) improved from 30.6% in Era 1 to 64.2% in Era 2 (P<.001). Improvement in outcome was achieved without any significant increase in morbidity or mortality, due to improvement in both systemic therapy and supportive care. The most important

  8. Phase 2 clinical trial of 5-azacitidine, valproic acid, and all-trans retinoic acid in patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome

    Raffoux, Emmanuel; Cras, Audrey; Recher, Christian; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; de Labarthe, Adrienne; Turlure, Pascal; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Reman, Oumedaly; Gardin, Claude; Victor, Maud; Maury, Sébastien; Rousselot, Philippe; Malfuson, Jean-Valère; Maarek, Odile; Daniel, Marie-Thérèse

    2010-01-01

    In this Phase 2 study, we evaluated the efficacy of combination of 5-azacitidine (AZA), valproic acid (VPA), and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Treatment consisted of six cycles of AZA and VPA for 7 days, followed by ATRA for 21 days. Sixty-five patients were enrolled (median age, 72 years; 55 AML including 13 relapsed/refractory patients, 10 MDS; 30 unfavorable karyotypes). Best responses included 14 C...

  9. Cancer Statistics: Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)

    ... population data for older age groups are available. Statistics at a Glance Show More At a Glance ... acute lymphocytic leukemia in the United States. Survival Statistics Show More How Many People Survive 5 Years ...

  10. High risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells with bcr-abl and INK4A/ARF mutations retain susceptibility to alloreactive T cells

    Young, Faith M.; Campbell, Andrew; Emo, Kris Lambert; Jansson, Johan; Wang, Pin-Yi; Jordan, Craig T.; Mullen, Craig A.

    2008-01-01

    INK4A/ARF mutations are acquired in bcr/abl+ lymphoid blast phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and bcr/abl+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Donor lymphocyte infusion and graft versus leukemia are generally ineffective in such ALL’s, while GVL is highly active against bcr/abl+ CML that does not have a lesion in the INK4A/ARF locus. The mechanisms for the ineffectiveness of GVL are not fully known and it is possible that intrinsic resistance of acute lymphoid leukemias to immune effec...

  11. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2016-03-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  12. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression Therapy in Treating Older Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Radioimmunotherapy for Treatment of Acute Leukemia.

    Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Eugène, Thomas; Guérard, François; Gaschet, Joëlle; Bailly, Clément; Mougin, Marie; Bourgeois, Mickaël; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chérel, Michel; Chevallier, Patrice

    2016-03-01

    Acute leukemias are characterized by accumulation of immature cells (blasts) and reduced production of healthy hematopoietic elements. According to the lineage origin, two major leukemias can be distinguished: acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). Although the survival rate for pediatric ALL is close to 90%, half of the young adults with AML or ALL and approximately 90% of older patients with AML or ALL still die of their disease, raising the need for innovative therapeutic approaches. As almost all leukemic blasts express specific surface antigens, targeted immunotherapy appears to be particularly promising. However, published results of immunotherapy alone are generally modest. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) brings additional therapeutic mechanisms using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed to tumor antigens, thus adding radiobiological cytotoxicity to immunologic cytotoxicity. Because of the high radiosensitivity of tumor cells and the diffuse widespread nature of the disease, making it rapidly accessible to circulating radiolabeled mAbs, acute leukemias represent relevant indications for RIT. With the development of recombinant and humanized mAbs, innovative radionuclides, and more efficient radiolabeling and pretargeting techniques, RIT has significantly improved over the last 10 years. Different approaches of α and β RIT targeting CD22, CD33, CD45, or CD66 antigens have already been evaluated or are currently being developed in the treatment of acute leukemia. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical studies demonstrating the potential of RIT in treatment of AML and ALL. PMID:26897718

  14. Associations between genetic variants in folate and drug metabolizing pathways and relapse risk in pediatric acute lymphoid leukemia on CCG-1952

    Marijana Vujkovic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation in drug detoxification pathways may influence outcomes in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. We evaluated relapse risk and 24 variants in 17 genes in 714 patients in CCG-1961. Three TPMT and 1 MTR variant were associated with increased risks of relapse (rs4712327, OR 3.3, 95%CI 1.2–8.6; rs2842947, OR 2.7, 95%CI 1.1–6.8; rs2842935, OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.1–5.0; rs10925235, OR 4.9, 95%CI 1.1–25.1. One variant in SLC19A1 showed a protective effect (rs4819128, OR 0.5, 95%CI 0.3–0.9. Our study provides data that relapse risk in pediatric ALL is associated with germline variations in TPMT, MTR and SLC19A1.

  15. The degree of myelosuppression during maintenance therapy of adolescents with B-lineage intermediate risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia predicts risk of relapse

    Schmiegelow, K; Donovan, Martin Heyman; Sherson, Maiken Gustafsson;

    2010-01-01

    maintenance therapy. Red blood cell MTX levels were significantly related to the dose of MTX among adolescents who stayed in remission (rS=0.38, P=0.02), which was not the case for those who developed a relapse (rS=0.15, P=0.60). Thus, compliance to maintenance therapy may influence the risk of relapse for......Drug doses, blood levels of drug metabolites and myelotoxicity during 6-mercaptopurine/methotrexate (MTX) maintenance therapy were registered for 59 adolescents (10 years) and 176 non-adolescents (<10 years) with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and a white blood cell count (WBC......) <50 × 109/l at diagnosis. Event-free survival was lower for adolescents than non-adolescents (pEFS12y:0.71 vs 0.83, P=0.04). For adolescents staying in remission, the mean WBC during maintenance therapy (mWBC) was related to age (rS=0.36, P=0.02), which became nonsignificant for those who relapsed (r...

  16. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  18. Clofarabine in combination with a standard remission induction regimen (cytosine arabinoside and idarubicin) in patients with previously untreated intermediate and bad-risk acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (HR-MDS): phase I results of an ongoing phase I/II study of the leukemia groups of EORTC and GIMEMA (EORTC GIMEMA 06061/AML-14A trial)

    Willemze, R.; Suciu, S.; Muus, P.; Halkes, C.J.; Meloni, G.; Meert, L.; Karrasch, M.; Rapion, J.; Vignetti, M.; Amadori, S.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Marie, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of clofarabine combined with the EORTC-GIMEMA 3 + 10 induction regimen (idarubicin + cytosine arabinoside) in adults with untreated acute myelogenous leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. In this phase I trial, 25 patients (medi

  19. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  20. Etiology of common childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: the adrenal hypothesis

    Schmiegelow, K.; Vestergaard, T.; Nielsen, S.M.;

    2008-01-01

    The pattern of infections in the first years of life modulates our immune system, and a low incidence of infections has been linked to an increased risk of common childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We here present a new interpretation of these observations--the adrenal hypothesis...

  1. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Schmiegelow, K.; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe;

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 1980...

  2. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    2016-04-08

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  3. Risk group assignment differs for children and adults 1-45 yr with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated by the NOPHO ALL-2008 protocol

    Toft, Nina; Birgens, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia is poorer in adults than in children. Studies have indicated that young adults benefit from pediatric treatment, although no upper age limit has been defined....

  4. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    ... treatment for acute lymphocytic leukemia? What should you ask your doctor about acute lymphocytic leukemia? It is ... with your doctor. You should feel free to ask any question that’s on your mind, no matter ...

  5. Do We Know What Causes Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    ... Topic Can acute myeloid leukemia be prevented? Do we know what causes acute myeloid leukemia? Some people ... genes – the instructions for how our cells function. We tend to look like our parents because they ...

  6. Associations between genetic variants in folate and drug metabolizing pathways and relapse risk in pediatric acute lymphoid leukemia on CCG-1952

    Marijana Vujkovic; Aaron Kershenbaum; Lisa Wray; Thomas McWilliams; Shannon Cannon; Meenakshi Devidas; Linda Stork; Richard Aplenc

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation in drug detoxification pathways may influence outcomes in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We evaluated relapse risk and 24 variants in 17 genes in 714 patients in CCG-1961. Three TPMT and 1 MTR variant were associated with increased risks of relapse (rs4712327, OR 3.3, 95%CI 1.2–8.6; rs2842947, OR 2.7, 95%CI 1.1–6.8; rs2842935, OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.1–5.0; rs10925235, OR 4.9, 95%CI 1.1–25.1). One variant in SLC19A1 showed a protective effect (rs4819128, OR 0.5, 95%CI...

  7. Minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) offers a way to precisely assess early treatment response and detect relapse. Established methods to study MRD are flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of antigen-receptor genes, and PCR amplification of fusion transcripts. The strong correlation between MRD levels and risk of relapse in childhood ALL is well demonstrated; studies in adult patients also support its prognostic value. Hence, results of MRD studies can be used to select treatment intensity and duration, and to estimate the optimal timing for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Practical issues in the implementation of MRD assays in clinical studies include determining the most informative time point to study MRD and the levels of MRD that will trigger changes in treatment intensity, as well as the relative cost and informative power of different methodologies. The identification of new markers of leukemia and the use of increasingly refined assays should further facilitate routine monitoring of MRD and help to clarify the cellular and biologic features of leukemic cells that resist chemotherapy in vivo. PMID:19100372

  8. Risk assessment of relapse by lineage-specific monitoring of chimerism in children undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Preuner, Sandra; Peters, Christina; Pötschger, Ulrike; Daxberger, Helga; Fritsch, Gerhard; Geyeregger, Rene; Schrauder, André; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Bader, Peter; Ebell, Wolfram; Eckert, Cornelia; Lang, Peter; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Schrum, Johanna; Kremens, Bernhard; Ehlert, Karoline; Albert, Michael H.; Meisel, Roland; Lawitschka, Anita; Mann, Georg; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Güngör, Tayfun; Holter, Wolfgang; Strahm, Brigitte; Gruhn, Bernd; Schulz, Ansgar; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Lion, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is required as rescue therapy in about 20% of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the relapse rates are considerable, and relapse confers a poor outcome. Early assessment of the risk of relapse is therefore of paramount importance for the development of appropriate measures. We used the EuroChimerism approach to investigate the potential impact of lineage-specific chimerism testing for relapse-risk analysis in 162 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a multicenter study based on standardized transplantation protocols. Within a median observation time of 4.5 years, relapses have occurred in 41/162 patients at a median of 0.6 years after transplantation (range, 0.13–5.7 years). Prospective screening at defined consecutive time points revealed that reappearance of recipient-derived cells within the CD34+ and CD8+ cell subsets display the most significant association with the occurrence of relapses with hazard ratios of 5.2 (P=0.003) and 2.8 (P=0.008), respectively. The appearance of recipient cells after a period of pure donor chimerism in the CD34+ and CD8+ leukocyte subsets revealed dynamics indicative of a significantly elevated risk of relapse or imminent disease recurrence. Assessment of chimerism within these lineages can therefore provide complementary information for further diagnostic and, potentially, therapeutic purposes aiming at the prevention of overt relapse. This study was registered at clinical.trials.gov with the number NC01423747. PMID:26869631

  9. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-04-21

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Arising in CALR Mutated Essential Thrombocythemia

    Stephen E. Langabeer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in an existing myeloproliferative neoplasm is rare with historical cases unable to differentiate between concomitant malignancies or leukemic transformation. Molecular studies of coexisting JAK2 V617F-positive myeloproliferative neoplasms and mature B cell malignancies indicate distinct disease entities arising in myeloid and lymphoid committed hematopoietic progenitor cells, respectively. Mutations of CALR in essential thrombocythemia appear to be associated with a distinct phenotype and a lower risk of thrombosis yet their impact on disease progression is less well defined. The as yet undescribed scenario of pro-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia arising in CALR mutated essential thrombocythemia is presented. Intensive treatment for the leukemia allowed for expansion of the original CALR mutated clone. Whether CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms predispose to the acquisition of additional malignancies, particularly lymphoproliferative disorders, is not yet known.

  11. 急性髓性白血病的年龄相关危险因素特征及化疗剂量敏感性研究的评价%Assessment of the Age-Related Risk Profile and Chemotherapy Dose Response in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    杜欣; 郭荣

    2009-01-01

    @@ 1 文献来源 Buchner T, Berdel WE, Haferlach C, et al, Age-related risk profile and chemotherapy dose response in acute myeloid leukemia: A study by the German Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cooperative Group [J]. J Clin Oncol, 2009,27(1):61-69.

  12. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    2015-07-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  13. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  14. Radiation treatment of testicular relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Ten patients with testicular relapse among 128 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are reported. At the time of the initial diagnosis of leukemia all patients with later testicular relapse showed one or more risk factors as predictive for leukemic infiltration of the testicles. All patients except one, who underwent orchiectomy and died 11 weeks after surgical intervention, received radiation therapy with doses ranging from 12 to 20 Gy and chemotherapy. The local control was excellent. Average survival time from testicular relapse to death was 68 weeks in 8 of 9 patients treated by irradiation and chemotherapy. One patient is still alive without signs of disease after 6 years. (orig.)

  15. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. The acute lymphoblastic leukemia of Down Syndrome - Genetics and pathogenesis.

    Izraeli, Shai

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down Syndrome (DS) are at markedly increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ALL is of B cell precursor (BCP) phenotype. T-ALL is only rarely diagnosed as well as infant leukemia. Gene expression profiling and cytogenetics suggest that DS-ALL is an heterogeneous disease. More than half of the leukemias are characterized by aberrant expression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor CRLF2 caused by genomic rearrangements. These rearrangements are often associated with somatic activating mutations in the receptors or in the downstream components of the JAK-STAT pathway. The activation of JAK-STAT pathway suggests that targeted therapy with JAK or downstream inhibitors may be effective for children with DS-ALL. The basis of the increased risk of BCP-ALL and in particular of the CRLF2 aberrations is presently unknown. Neither is it known which genes on the trisomic chromosome 21 are involved. PMID:26631987

  17. Molecular Insights in MLL Rearranged Acute Leukemia

    R.W. Stam (Ronald)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants (<1 year of age) is characterized by a high incidence (~80%) of rearrangements of the MLL gene, resistance to several important chemotherapeutic drugs, and a poor treatment outcome. With overall survival rates for infant ALL not exceeding 50%

  18. Bilateral breast involvement in acute myeloid leukemia

    Hakeem A, Mandakini BT, Asif K, Firdaus, Shagufta RC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast involvement by leukemic infiltration is usually bilateral, but may be unilateral. Clinically patients can present with either single or multiple masses, or with diffuse breast engorgement, with or without nodularity. The affected patients are predominantly young adults. We present a case of an adolescent girl with acute myeloid leukemia having bilateral breast infiltration by leukemic cells.

  19. P-GLYCOPROTEIN QUANTITATION IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    Mali in Nikougoftar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Multi drug resistance(MDR is a major problem in the treatment of cancer and hemalological malignancies. This resistance is multi factorial and is the result of decreased intra cellular drug accumulation. This is partly due to the presence of a 170KD intra membranous protein termed P-glycoprotein(P-gp that is an energy-dependent efflux pump which has increased expression on drug-resistance cells. In this study we identified the presence of P-gp by staining with Fluorescent Iso Thio Cyanate (FITC conjugated anti P-gp in acute leukemia patients and flow cytometry in addition to performing immunophenotype analysis and French, American British (FAB classification. Results revealed that one fifth of leuke¬mic patients expressed P-gp and this phenotype was more prevalent in Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia(AUL and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML than in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia(ALL. Other findings showed a logical rela¬tionship between this phenotype and age groups. There was not any association between P-gp+ phenotype and FAB and Immunophenotyping sub classification, but there was a linear relationship between CD34 and CD7 expression and P-gp+ phenotype. The accumulation of P-gp molecule that was stated as Mean Fluores¬cence Intensity (MFI on the blasts1 membrane of AUL and AML patients showed marked increase in comparison to ALL. Furthermore MFI in P-gp+ relapsed patients was much more than P-gp+ pretreatment patients.

  20. Use of clofarabine for acute childhood leukemia

    A Pession

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A Pession, R Masetti, K Kleinschmidt, A MartoniPediatric Oncology and Hematology “Lalla Seràgnoli”, University of Bologna, ItalyAbstract: A second-generation of purine nucleoside analogs, starting with clofarabine, has been developed in the course of the search for new therapeutic agents for acute childhood leukemia, especially for refractory or relapsed disease. Clofarabine is a hybrid of fludarabine and cladribine, and has shown to have antileukemic activity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia as well as in myeloid disorders. As the only new antileukemic chemotherapeutic agent to enter clinical use in the last 10 years, clofarabine was approved as an orphan drug with the primary indication of use in pediatric patients. Toxicity has been tolerable in a heavily pretreated patient population, and clofarabine has been demonstrated to be safe, both as a single agent and in combination therapies. Liver dysfunction has been the most frequently observed adverse event, but this is generally reversible. Numerous Phase I and II trials have recently been conducted, and are still ongoing in an effort to find the optimal role for clofarabine in various treatment strategies. Concomitant use of clofarabine, cytarabine, and etoposide was confirmed to be safe and effective in two independent trials. Based on the promising results when used as a salvage regimen, clofarabine is now being investigated for its potential to become part of frontline protocols.Keywords: clofarabine, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia, pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

  1. Loci on 7p12.2, 10q21.2 and 14q11.2 are associated with risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Papaemmanuil, Elli; Hosking, Fay J; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Price, Amy; Olver, Bianca; Sheridan, Eammon; Kinsey, Sally E; Lightfoot, Tracy; Roman, Eve; Irving, Julie A E; Allan, James M.; Tomlinson, Ian P; Taylor, Malcolm; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    To identify risk variants for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) we conducted a genome-wide association study of 2 case-control series, analyzing the genotypes of 291,423 tagging SNP genotypes in a total of 907 ALL cases and 2,398 controls. We identified risk loci for ALL at 7p12.2 (IKZF1, rs4132601; OR = 1.69, P = 1.20 x 10-19), 10q21.2 (ARIDB5, rs7089424; OR = 1.65, P = 6.69 x 10-19) and 14q11.2 (CEBPE, rs2239633; OR = 1.34, P = 2.88 x 10-7). The 10q21.2 (ARIDB5) risk association appears to be selective for the subset of B-cell precursor ALL with hyperdiploidy. These data show that common low-penetrance susceptibility alleles contribute to the risk of developing childhood ALL and provide novel insight into disease causation of this hematological cancer; notably all 3 risk variants map to genes involved in transcriptional regulation and differentiation of B-cell progenitors. PMID:19684604

  2. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    Bekker-Méndez Vilma

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR, and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level. Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3; acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million, followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million, and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million. The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million. For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million. The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8% were

  3. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2013-09-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Clinical and In Vitro Studies on Impact of High-Dose Etoposide Pharmacokinetics Prior Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on the Risk of Post-Transplant Leukemia Relapse.

    Sobiak, Joanna; Kazimierczak, Urszula; Kowalczyk, Dariusz W; Chrzanowska, Maria; Styczyński, Jan; Wysocki, Mariusz; Szpecht, Dawid; Wachowiak, Jacek

    2015-10-01

    The impact of etoposide (VP-16) plasma concentrations on the day of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) on leukemia-free survival in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was studied. In addition, the in vitro effects of VP-16 on the lymphocytes proliferation, cytotoxic activity and on Th1/Th2 cytokine responses were assessed. In 31 children undergoing allo-HSCT, VP-16 plasma concentrations were determined up to 120 h after the infusion using the HPLC-UV method. For mentioned in vitro studies, VP-16 plasma concentrations observed on allo-HSCT day were used. In 84 % of children, VP-16 plasma concentrations (0.1-1.5 μg/mL) were quantifiable 72 h after the end of the drug infusion, i.e. when allo-HSCT should be performed. In 20 (65 %) children allo-HSCT was performed 4 days after the end of the drug infusion, and VP-16 was still detectable (0.1-0.9 μg/mL) in plasma of 12 (39 %) of them. Post-transplant ALL relapse occurred in four children, in all of them VP-16 was detectable in plasma (0.1-0.8 μg/mL) on allo-HSCT day, while there was no relapse in children with undetectable VP-16. In in vitro studies, VP-16 demonstrated impact on the proliferation activity of stimulated lymphocytes depending on its concentration and exposition time. The presence of VP-16 in plasma on allo-HSCT day may demonstrate an adverse effect on graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) reaction and increase the risk of post-transplant ALL relapse. Therefore, if 72 h after VP-16 administration its plasma concentration is still above 0.1 μg/mL then the postponement of transplantation for next 24 h should be considered to protect GvL effector cells from transplant material. PMID:26040247

  5. AUTOLOGOUS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR HIGH-RISK ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA: NON-RANDOMIZED STUDY WITH A MAXIMUM FOLLOW-UP OF MORE THAN 22 YEARS

    Grzegorz Helbig

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT for high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Material and methods. Overall, 128 high-risk ALL patients at a median age of 26 years (range 18-56 years at diagnosis received AHSCT between 1991-2008. Induction treatment was anthracycline-based in all patients. Conditioning regimen consisted of CAV (cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, etoposide in 125 patients whereas 3 subjects received cyclophosphamide and TBI (total body irridation. Bone marrow was stored for 72 hours in 4oC and re-infused 24 hours after conditioning completion. Bone marrow was a source of stem cells in 119 patients, peripheral blood in 2 and 7 subjects received both bone marrow and peripheral blood. Results. With a median follow-up after AHSCT of 1.6 years (range 0.1-22.3 years, the probability of leukemia-free survival (LFS for the whole group at 10 years was 27% and 23% at 20 years. Transplant-related mortality at 100 days after AHSCT was 3.2%.. There was a strong tendency for better LFS for MRD-negative patients if compared with patients who had positive or unknown MRD status at AHSCT (32% vs 23% and 25%, respectively; p=0.06. There was no difference in LFS between B- and T-lineage ALL as well as between patients transplanted in first complete remission (CR1 and CR2. LFS at 10 years for patients with detectable BCR-ABL at transplant was 20% and this was comparable with subjects with negative and missing BCR-ABL status (26% and 28%; p=0.97. Conclusions. The results of AHSCT for high-risk ALL remains unsatisfactory with low probability of long-term LFS.

  6. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    2016-02-22

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Elzbieta Gocek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17(q22;q12 chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  8. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML

  9. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  10. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  11. The prognostic impact of FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutations in patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia and intermediate-risk cytogenetics.

    How, J; Sykes, J; Minden, M D; Gupta, V; Yee, K W L; Schimmer, A D; Schuh, A C; Kamel-Reid, S; Brandwein, J M

    2013-01-01

    Internal tandem duplication of the fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 gene (FLT3-ITD) and nucleophosmin-1 (NPM1) mutations have prognostic importance in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with intermediate-risk karyotype at diagnosis, but less is known about their utility to predict outcomes at relapse. We retrospectively analysed outcomes of 70 patients with relapsed, intermediate-risk karyotype AML who received a uniform reinduction regimen, with respect to FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutation status and first complete remission (CR1) duration. CR1 duration, but not molecular status, was significantly correlated with CR2 rate. On univariate analysis, patients with mutated FLT3-ITD (FLT3+) had significantly worse overall survival (OS) compared with those with neither an NPM1 nor FLT3-ITD mutation (NPM1-/FLT3-). On multivariate analysis, shorter CR1 duration was significantly correlated with inferior OS at relapse (P12 months. In intermediate-risk karyotype AML patients receiving reinduction, CR1 duration remains the most important predictor of OS at relapse; FLT3-ITD and NPM1 status are not independent predictors of survival. PMID:23708641

  12. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2015-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Genetic abnormalities associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Yokota, Takafumi; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occurs with high frequency in childhood and is associated with high mortality in adults. Recent technical advances in next-generation sequencing have shed light on genetic abnormalities in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as the precursor to ALL pathogenesis. Based on these genetic abnormalities, ALL is now being reclassified into newly identified subtypes. Philadelphia chromosome-like B-lineage ALL is one of the new high-risk subtypes characterized by genetic alterations that activate various signaling pathways, including those involving cytokine receptors, tyrosine kinases, and epigenetic modifiers. Philadelphia chromosome-like ALL is essentially heterogeneous; however, deletion mutations in the IKZF1 gene encoding the transcription factor IKAROS underlie many cases as a key factor inducing aggressive phenotypes and poor treatment responses. Whole-genome sequencing studies of ALL patients and ethnically matched controls also identified inherited genetic variations in lymphoid neoplasm-related genes, which are likely to increase ALL susceptibility. These findings are directly relevant to clinical hematology, and further studies on this aspect could contribute to accurate diagnosis, effective monitoring of residual disease, and patient-oriented therapies. PMID:26991355

  14. Delayed Neurotoxicity Associated with Therapy for Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Cole, Peter D.; Kamen, Barton A.

    2006-01-01

    Most children diagnosed today with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) will be cured. However, treatment entails risk of neurotoxicity, causing deficits in neurocognitive function that can persist in the years after treatment is completed. Many of the components of leukemia therapy can contribute to adverse neurologic sequelae, including…

  15. Use of clofarabine for acute childhood leukemia

    Masetti, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    A Pession, R Masetti, K Kleinschmidt, A MartoniPediatric Oncology and Hematology “Lalla Seràgnoli”, University of Bologna, ItalyAbstract: A second-generation of purine nucleoside analogs, starting with clofarabine, has been developed in the course of the search for new therapeutic agents for acute childhood leukemia, especially for refractory or relapsed disease. Clofarabine is a hybrid of fludarabine and cladribine, and has shown to have antileukemic activity i...

  16. Systemic mastocytosis with associated acute myelogenous leukemia

    Zhrebker, Leah; Cooper, Barry; Krause, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is a condition associated with a clonal neoplastic proliferation of mast cells. Approximately 40% of patients with SM present with an associated clonal hematological non–mast cell lineage disorder. Patients presenting with SM–acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have the worst prognosis. We present a case of a 62-year-old woman who was diagnosed with SM-AML. After initial treatment with a standard regimen of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C)/idarubicin, her bone marrow showed re...

  17. Novel Therapies for Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Fullmer, Amber; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias

    2009-01-01

    The outcome of salvage therapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor. Salvage therapy mimics regimens with activity in newly diagnosed ALL. Novel strategies under investigation as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy improve the treatment of relapsed disease. For some ALL subsets, specific therapies are indicated. The addition of targeted therapy in Philadelphia chromosome–positive ALL has improved responses in relapsed patients without resistance to availabl...

  18. Pathogenesis and prognostication in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Zuckerman, Tsila; Rowe, Jacob M.

    2014-01-01

    The process of lymphoid maturation is tightly controlled by the hierarchical activation of transcription factors and selection through functional signal transduction. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represents a group of B/T-precursor-stage lymphoid cell malignancies arising from genetic alterations that block lymphoid differentiation and drive aberrant cell proliferation and survival. With recent advances in next-generation sequencing, we are discovering new mutations affecting normal lym...

  19. Cytogenetic studies of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Tarek Abd -Alla Atia

    2010-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) describes as a group of hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by expansion of undifferentiated myeloid progenitors. Acquired chromosomal anomaly particularly reciprocal translocations constitute one of the major events contribute to leukemogenesis. Patient and Methods: 45 untreated, newly diagnosed patients with de novo AML were enrolled in the present study and subjected to cytogenetic analysis. Four ml of heparinized peripheral blood were collected for...

  20. Frank hematuria as the presentation feature of acute leukemia

    Suriya Owais

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Muco-cutaneous bleeding is a common presenting feature of acute leukemias. Mucosal bleeding usually manifests as gum bleeding and/or epistaxis but may occur in any mucosal surface of the body. Hematuria as an isolated or main presenting feature of acute leukemia is rare. We describe two cases of acute leukemia, a 19 year old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a 52 year old male with acute myeloid leukemia, both presenting with gross hematuria. There was no demonstrable leukemic infiltration of the urinary tract on imaging studies. Hematuria in these patients was likely to be due to occult leukemic infiltration of the urinary system, aggravated by thrombocytopenia, as it subsided after starting chemotherapy. Our cases highlight that hematuria should be remembered as a rare presenting feature of acute leukemia.

  1. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients. PMID:23532815

  2. CEBPA single mutation can be a possible favorable prognostic indicator in NPM1 and FLT3-ITD wild-type acute myeloid leukemia patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk.

    Park, Sang Hyuk; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Cho, Young-Uk; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Chan-Jeoung

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of CEBPA single mutation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk. CEBPA single and double mutations were detected in 11 (9.7%) and 17 (15.1%) of 113 NPM1 wild-type patients, but no CEBPA mutations were detected in a group of 44 NPM1 mutated patients. Among patients with NPM1/FLT3-ITD wild-type, those with CEBPA double mutations (P=0.013 and 0.007 for overall survival and relapse-free survival, respectively) or a single mutation (P=0.039 and 0.020 for overall survival and relapse-free survival, respectively) demonstrated a favorable prognosis compared with CEBPA wild-type patients. Subsequent multivariate analysis confirmed the favorable prognostic impact of CEBPA single and double mutations. Despite the low statistical power of this study due to the small number of patients, our preliminary data suggest that CEBPA single mutation may be associated with favorable clinical outcomes in NPM1/FLT3-ITD wild-type AML patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk. PMID:24054719

  3. Phase 2 clinical trial of 5-azacitidine, valproic acid, and all-trans retinoic acid in patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome

    Raffoux, Emmanuel; Cras, Audrey; Recher, Christian; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; de Labarthe, Adrienne; Turlure, Pascal; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Reman, Oumedaly; Gardin, Claude; Victor, Maud; Maury, Sébastien; Rousselot, Philippe; Malfuson, Jean-Valère; Maarek, Odile; Daniel, Marie-Thérèse; Fenaux, Pierre; Degos, Laurent; Chomienne, Christine; Chevret, Sylvie; Dombret, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    In this Phase 2 study, we evaluated the efficacy of combination of 5-azacitidine (AZA), valproic acid (VPA), and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Treatment consisted of six cycles of AZA and VPA for 7 days, followed by ATRA for 21 days. Sixty-five patients were enrolled (median age, 72 years; 55 AML including 13 relapsed/refractory patients, 10 MDS; 30 unfavorable karyotypes). Best responses included 14 CR and 3 PR (26%), 75% of the responders and 36% of the non-responders achieving an erythroid response. Median overall survival (OS) was 12.4 months. Untreated patients had a longer OS than relapsed/refractory patients. In patients who fulfilled the 6 planned cycles, OS did not appear to depend on CR/PR achievement, suggesting that stable disease while on-treatment would be a surrogate for survival with this approach. During therapy, early platelet response and demethylation of the FZD9, ALOX12, HPN, and CALCA genes were associated with clinical response. Finally, there was no evidence for the restoration of an ATRA-induced differentiation during therapy. Epigenetic modulation deserves prospective comparisons to conventional care in patients with high-risk AML, at least in those presenting previously untreated disease and low blast count. PMID:21293051

  4. Recurrent deletions of IKZF1 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D.E.; Beuling, Eva; Marry M van den Heuvel-Eibrink; Obulkasim, Askar; Baruchel, André; Trka, Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Sonneveld, Edwin; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Pieters, Rob; Zimmermann, Martin; Zwaan, C. Michel; Fornerod, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    IKAROS family zinc finger 1/IKZF1 is a transcription factor important in lymphoid differentiation, and a known tumor suppressor in acute lymphoid leukemia. Recent studies suggest that IKZF1 is also involved in myeloid differentiation. To investigate whether IKZF1 deletions also play a role in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a panel of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia samples for deletions of the IKZF1 locus using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and for mutations...

  5. Systemic mastocytosis with acute myelomonocytic leukemia: a case report

    Kar, Rakhee; Rao, Seema; Pati, Hara Prasad

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow mastocytosis may be associated with many clonal non mast cell hematological neoplasms and its association with acute myeloid leukemia especially with t (8; 21) has been described. We describe an interesting case of coexistence of systemic mastocytosis with acute myelomonocytic leukemia in a young child. Diagnosis of acute myelomonocytic leukemia was based on bone marrow aspirate findings coupled with cytochemistry. Systemic mastocytosis was diagnosed on the basis of bone marrow bi...

  6. Improved outcome with pulses of vincristine and corticosteroids in continuation therapy of children with average risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and lymphoblastic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL): report of the EORTC randomized phase 3 trial 58951

    De Moerloose, Barbara; Suciu, Stefan; Bertrand, Yves; Mazingue, Françoise; Robert, Alain; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Yakouben, Karima; Ferster, Alice; Margueritte, Geneviève; Lutz, Patrick; Munzer, Martine; Sirvent, Nicolas; Norton, Lucilia; Boutard, Patrick; Plantaz, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer 58951 trial for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) addressed 3 randomized questions, including the evaluation of dexamethasone (DEX) versus prednisolone (PRED) in induction and, for average-risk patients, the evaluation of vincristine and corticosteroid pulses during continuation therapy. The corticosteroid used in the pulses was that assigned at induction. Overall, 411 patients were ran...

  7. Prognostic impact of day 15 blast clearance in risk-adapted remission induction chemotherapy for younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia: long-term results of the multicenter prospective LAM-2001 trial by the GOELAMS study group

    Bertoli, Sarah; Bories, Pierre; Béné, Marie C.; Daliphard, Sylvie; Lioure, Bruno; Pigneux, Arnaud; Vey, Norbert; Delaunay, Jacques; Leymarie, Vincent; Luquet, Isabelle; Blanchet, Odile; Cornillet-Lefebvre, Pascale; Hunault, Mathilde; Bouscary, Didier; Fegueux, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Early response to chemotherapy has a major prognostic impact in acute myeloid leukemia patients treated with a double induction strategy. Less is known about patients treated with standard-dose cytarabine and anthracycline. We designed a risk-adapted remission induction regimen in which a second course of intermediate-dose cytarabine was delivered after standard “7+3” only if patients had 5% or more bone marrow blasts 15 days after chemotherapy initiation (d15-blasts). Of 823 included patient...

  8. Leukemia.

    Juliusson, Gunnar; Hough, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Leukemias are a group of life threatening malignant disorders of the blood and bone marrow. In the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population, the acute leukemias are most prevalent, with chronic myeloid leukemia being infrequently seen. Factors associated with more aggressive disease biology tend to increase in frequency with increasing age, whilst tolerability of treatment strategies decreases. There are also challenges regarding the effective delivery of therapy specific to the AYA group, consequences on the unique psychosocial needs of this age group, including compliance. This chapter reviews the current status of epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment strategies and outcomes of AYA leukemia, with a focus on acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27595359

  9. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Methylation of Gene CHFR Promoter in Acute Leukemia Cells

    GONG Hui; LIU Wengli; ZHOU Jianfeng; XU Huizhen

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore whether gene CHFR was inactivated by methylation in leukemia cells, the expression of CHFR was examined before and after treatment with demethylation agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 leukemia cell lines by means of RT-PCR. The methylation of promoter in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 cells as well as 41 acute leukemia patients was analyzed by MS-PCR. The results showed that methylation of CHFR promoter was inactivated and could be reversed by treatment with a demethylating agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937. CHFR promoter methylation was detected in 39 % of acute leukemia patients. There was no difference in incidence of CHFR promoter methylation between acute myelocytic leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia. In conclusion, CHFR is frequently inactivated in acute leukemia and is a good candidate for the leukemia supper gene. By affecting mitotic checkpoint function, CHFR inactivation likely plays a key role in tumorigenesis in acute leukemia. Moreover, the methylation of gene CHFR appears to be a good index with which to predict the sensitivity of acute leukemia to microtubule inhibitors.

  11. Clofarabine and Melphalan Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplasia or Acute Leukemia in Remission

    2016-06-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Criteria and Classification of Hybrid Acute Leukemia in 72 Acute Leukemias Based Mainly on Flow Cytometric Analysis

    Aoki, Sadao; Nomoto, Nobuhiko; Maruyama, Souichi; Shinada, Shoji; Shibata, Akira

    1991-01-01

    Phenotypes of leukemic cells can be determined through dual staining with pairs of FITC-labeled and PE-labeled monoclonal antibodies using a laser flow cytometer. Hybrid acute leukemia (HAL) was diagnosed when leukemic cells expressed 2 or more lymphoid markers and at least on myeloid marker simultaneously. Based on this criteria, nineteen out of 72 cases with untreated acute leukemia were diagnosed as HAL, 15 of 29 (51%) patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 4 of 43 (9%) patients wi...

  13. Minimal residual disease-based risk stratification in Chinese childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia by flow cytometry and plasma DNA quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    Suk Hang Cheng

    Full Text Available Minimal residual disease, or MRD, is an important prognostic indicator in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In ALL-IC-BFM 2002 study, we employed a standardized method of flow cytometry MRD monitoring for multiple centers internationally using uniformed gating, and determined the relevant MRD-based risk stratification strategies in our local patient cohort. We also evaluated a novel method of PCR MRD quantitation using peripheral blood plasma. For the bone marrow flow MRD study, patients could be stratified into 3 risk groups according to MRD level using a single time-point at day-15 (Model I (I-A: 10%, or using two time-points at day-15 and day-33 (Model II (II-A: day-15<10% and day-33<0.01%, II-B: day-15 ≥ 10% or day-33 ≥ 0.01% but not both, II-C: day-15 ≥ 10% and day-33 ≥ 0.01%, which showed significantly superior prediction of relapse (p = .00047 and <0.0001 respectively. Importantly, patients with good outcome (frequency: 56.0%, event-free survival: 90.1% could be more accurately predicted by Model II. In peripheral blood plasma PCR MRD investigation, patients with day-15-MRD ≥ 10(-4 were at a significantly higher risk of relapse (p = 0.0117. By multivariate analysis, MRD results from both methods could independently predict patients' prognosis, with 20-35-fold increase in risk of relapse for flow MRD I-C and II-C respectively, and 5.8-fold for patients having plasma MRD of ≥ 10(-4. We confirmed that MRD detection by flow cytometry is useful for prognostic evaluation in our Chinese cohort of childhood ALL after treatment. Moreover, peripheral blood plasma DNA MRD can be an alternative where bone marrow specimen is unavailable and as a less invasive method, which allows close monitoring.

  14. Acute nonlymphocytic leukemia following bladder instillations with thiotepa.

    Easton, D. J.; Poon, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    A case of therapy-related leukemia is described. Other cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia have been associated with the intramuscular administration of thiotepa (an alkylating agent), but this patient received only intravesical instillations of the drug. The interval between the start of chemotherapy and the onset of leukemia was 56 months.

  15. Clinical trials of CCLSG L874 and I874 protocols without cranial irradiation for standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood

    In the CCLSG-874 protocol for children with low-risk (LR) and intermediate-risk (IR) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), two regimens with or without cranial irradiation (CI) were compared with respect to their ability to prevent central nervous system (CNS) leukemia and to improve overall outcome of ALL. From 1987 to 1990, 82 and 109 evaluable patients were registered into L874 and I874 protocols for LR and IR patients, respectively. All responders to induction therapy were randomized to treatment with 18 Gy of CI plus intrathecal methotrexate (MTX it) or to treatment with high-dose MTX plus MTX it. Patients were then treated with standard maintenance regimens of L874 and I874. At a median follow-up of 39 months (range 14-58 months) there was no difference in the rate of hematologic relapse between the CI group and MTX group. The rate of CNS relapse in the MTX group seemed to be higher (3 of 39 in L874 and 2 of 54 in I874) than that in the CI group (1 of 43 in L874 and 0 of 55 in I874), but these data were not statistically significant. The rates of 4-year event-free survival (EFS) in L874 were 81.1±7.6% (mean±SE) and 75.2±7.9% (ns) for the CI and MTX group, respectively, and the rates of EFS in I874 were 70.0±13.6% and 70.0±9.0% (ns) for the CI and MTX group, respectively. These data suggest that MTX alone may be as effective as CI to prolong disease-free survival in LR and IR ALL although further continuous studies are needed. Analysis of serial CCLSG protocols for ALL from 1981 revealed that the rate of EFS of ALL allover including all risk groups has gradually been increasing from 44.2±3.6% for 811 protocol and 53.1±3.5% for 841 to 65.5±3.6% for the present 874 protocol. (author)

  16. Diagnosis of large granular lymphocytic leukemia in a patient previously treated for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Sinem Civriz Bozdag; Sinem Namdaroglu; Omur Kayikci; Gülsah Kaygusuz; Itir Demiriz; Murat Cinarsoy; Emre Tekgunduz; Fevzi Altuntas

    2013-01-01

    Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia is a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by the clonal expansion of cytotoxic T or natural killer cells. We report on a patient diagnosed with T-cell LGL leukemia two years after the achievement of hematologic remission for acute myeloblastic leukemia.

  17. Occupation and leukemia in Nordic countries

    Talibov, Madar; Kautiainen, Susanna; Martinsen, Jan Ivar;

    2012-01-01

    We studied occupational variation of the risk of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and other leukemia in Nordic countries.......We studied occupational variation of the risk of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and other leukemia in Nordic countries....

  18. Quantification of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Clonotypes in Leukapheresed Peripheral Blood Progenitor Cells Predicts Relapse Risk after Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Mannis, Gabriel N; Martin, Thomas G; Damon, Lloyd E; Andreadis, Charalambos; Olin, Rebecca L; Kong, Katherine A; Faham, Malek; Hwang, Jimmy; Ai, Weiyun Z; Gaensler, Karin M L; Sayre, Peter H; Wolf, Jeffrey L; Logan, Aaron C

    2016-06-01

    Since the incorporation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors into the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the notion that all patients with "high-risk" ALL uniformly require allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has received increasing scrutiny. Although multiple studies have shown superiority of alloHCT over autologous (auto) hematopoietic cell transplantation for high-risk patients, these findings may be explained, in part, by contamination of the peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) leukapheresis product by residual leukemic cells in patients undergoing autoHCT. We retrospectively evaluated minimal residual disease (MRD) using next-generation sequencing (NGS) in the PBPC leukapheresis product of 32 ALL patients who underwent autoHCT. Twenty-eight patients (88%) had diagnostic samples with quantifiable immunoreceptor rearrangements to follow for MRD. Twelve (38%) patients had Ph+ B-ALL, 12 (38%) had Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph-) B-ALL, and 4 (14%) had T cell ALL. With a median follow-up of 41 months (range, 3 to 217), median relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival for the entire cohort were 3.2 and 4.2 years, respectively; at 5 years after transplantation, 42% of patients remain alive and relapse free. Using MRD detection at a threshold of ≥ 1 × 10(-6), median RFS for patients with detectable MRD was 6.5 months and was not reached for patients without detectable disease (P = .0005). In multivariate analysis, the only factor significantly associated with relapse was the presence of MRD ≥1 × 10(-6) (odds ratio, 23.8; confidence interval, 1.8 to 312.9; P = .0158). Our findings suggest that NGS for MRD detection can predict long-term RFS in patients undergoing autoHCT for high-risk ALL. PMID:26899561

  19. The genetic signature of acute leukemia in infacy

    Chantrain, Christophe; Poirel, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    Infant leukemia is a rare malignant disease with clinical and biological features distinct from older children. It is characterized by a high incidence of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangement and a poor outcome despite intensive chemotherapy. Recent genetic studies argue in favor of a unique biology of infant acute leukemia. This review describes the specific genetic signature of infant leukemia. It discusses the important insights it provides into the understanding of leukemogenes...

  20. Clinical trials of CCLSG L874 and I874 protocols without cranial irradiation for standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood; A study from the children's cancer and leukemia study group

    Koizumi, Shoichi (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Fujimoto, Takeo; Tsurusawa, Masahito (and others)

    1992-10-01

    In the CCLSG-874 protocol for children with low-risk (LR) and intermediate-risk (IR) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), two regimens with or without cranial irradiation (CI) were compared with respect to their ability to prevent central nervous system (CNS) leukemia and to improve overall outcome of ALL. From 1987 to 1990, 82 and 109 evaluable patients were registered into L874 and I874 protocols for LR and IR patients, respectively. All responders to induction therapy were randomized to treatment with 18 Gy of CI plus intrathecal methotrexate (MTX it) or to treatment with high-dose MTX plus MTX it. Patients were then treated with standard maintenance regimens of L874 and I874. At a median follow-up of 39 months (range 14-58 months) there was no difference in the rate of hematologic relapse between the CI group and MTX group. The rate of CNS relapse in the MTX group seemed to be higher (3 of 39 in L874 and 2 of 54 in I874) than that in the CI group (1 of 43 in L874 and 0 of 55 in I874), but these data were not statistically significant. The rates of 4-year event-free survival (EFS) in L874 were 81.1[+-]7.6% (mean[+-]SE) and 75.2[+-]7.9% (ns) for the CI and MTX group, respectively, and the rates of EFS in I874 were 70.0[+-]13.6% and 70.0[+-]9.0% (ns) for the CI and MTX group, respectively. These data suggest that MTX alone may be as effective as CI to prolong disease-free survival in LR and IR ALL although further continuous studies are needed. Analysis of serial CCLSG protocols for ALL from 1981 revealed that the rate of EFS of ALL allover including all risk groups has gradually been increasing from 44.2[+-]3.6% for 811 protocol and 53.1[+-]3.5% for 841 to 65.5[+-]3.6% for the present 874 protocol. (author).

  1. Perinatal Risk Factors for Childhood Leukemia

    Naumburg, Estelle

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to assess the association between certain perinatal factors and the risk of childhood lymphatic and myeloid leukemia and infant leukemia. The five studies presented were all conducted in Sweden as population-based case-control studies. All cases were born and diagnosed between 1973-89 with leukemia up to the age of 16 years. A control was individually matched to each case. As Down’s syndrome entails a major risk for childhood leukemia, chil...

  2. Retinoid Differentiation Therapy for Common Types of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Philip Hughes; Geoffrey Brown

    2012-01-01

    Many cancers arise in a tissue stem cell, and cell differentiation is impaired resulting in an accumulation of immature cells. The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in 1987 to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), pioneered a new approach to obtain remission in malignancies by restoring the terminal maturation of leukemia cells resulting in these cells having a limited lifespan. Differentiation therapy also offers the prospect o...

  3. Data quality in the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    Ostgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Severinsen, Marianne Tang;

    2013-01-01

    The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data.......The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data....

  4. Skin changes in acute myelogenous leukemia

    Mittal R

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year old woman developed progressive, firm, mild to moderately itchy, erythematous, papular and nodular lesions, over cheeks, extensors of limbs, scalp and lower back without any accompanying systemic complaints except for severe backache. Initially clinical diagnosis was cutaneous sarcoidosis. However presence of myeloblasts, monoblasts, myelocytes and metamyelocytes in peripheral blood smear and typical histopathology of nodule with mixed cellular infiltrate more around blood vessels, sweat glands and hair follicles with admixture of larger polymorphonuclears (myeloblasts/myelocytes, eosinophils with double nuclei, and larger phagocytic cells confirmed the diagnosis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML.

  5. S-1 induced secondary acute erythroid leukemia with a chromosome inv(12)(p13;q13)

    Kensuke Matsumoto; Akira Kitanaka; Makiko Uemura; Fusako Waki; Tetsuya Fukumoto; Hiroaki Ohnishi; Yoshitsugu Kubota; Toshihiko Ishida

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy by S-1 following gastrectomy is considered standard treatment in Japan. Analysis of follow-up data have proved the efficacy of S-1 administration,and that hematological adverse events were relatively rare. PPyrimidine anti-metabolites, including S-1, have shown relatively lower risks for secondary hematological malignancies in comparison to alkylating agents and topoisomerase-Ⅱ inhibitors. We here report a case of therapy-related leukemia after S-1 administration. A patient who had received S-1as the sole adjuvant chemotherapy was diagnosed with acute erythroid leukemia. To the best of our knowledge, our patient represents the first report of S-1 induced acute leukemia.

  6. Expression of surface-associated 82kDa-proMMP-9 in primary acute leukemia blast cells inversely correlates with patients' risk.

    Schmohl, Joerg; Santovito, Donato; Guenther, Thomas; Sutanto, Wishnu; Kroell, Tanja; Salih, Helmut; Pitsch, Thomas; Egea, Virginia; Weber, Christian; Schmetzer, Helga; Ries, Christian

    2016-05-01

    With its ability to degrade extracellular matrix proteins and activate growth factors and cytokines, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 is an important regulator of cell function. Previously, we reported that myeloid leukemic cells express a unique 82kDa-proMMP-9 variant on their cell surface that is not affected by its natural inhibitor. In this study, we generated monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize 82kDa-proMMP-9. Flow cytometry analysis using these antibodies revealed significant surface expression of 82kDa-proMMP-9 in monocytes, but minimal amounts in T and B cells isolated from peripheral blood of nine healthy donors and 22 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In all AML patients, blasts expressed 82kDa-proMMP-9 at levels of 4%-46%, with significantly higher levels in patients with a better risk defined according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines (ρ = -0.748, p < 0.001) and favorable phenotype according to the French-American-British classification (p = 0.02) compared with patients with adverse prognoses. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis confirmed the diagnostic accuracy of 82kDa-proMMP-9 measurement in AML blasts (area under the curve: 0.893 [0.739-1.000], p = 0.019). It led us to define a cutoff value of 11.5% for identifying patients with lower NCCN risk (p = 0.005) and with a tendency toward a higher probability of response to anthracycline-based therapy (p = 0.109) and increased event-free survival (p = 0.24). Thus, 82kDa-proMMP-9 expression on blasts may represent a novel independent marker of prognosis in patients with AML. PMID:26845021

  7. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    2016-04-26

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  8. Prognostic Significance of the Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Derived Sequence 1 (LYL1) GeneExpression in Egyptian Patients with AcuteMyeloid Leukemia

    Nadia El Menshawy; Doaa Shahin; Hayam Fathi Ghazi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Aberrant activation of transcription factor genes is the most frequent target of genetic alteration in lymphoid malignancies. The lymphoblastic leukemia-derived sequence 1 (LYL1) gene, which encodes a basic helix-loop helix, was first identified with human T-cell acute leukemia. Recent studies suggest its involvement in myeloid malignancies. We aimed to study the expression percent of oncogene LYL1 in primary and secondary high-risk myeloid leukemia and the impact on prognostic sig...

  9. Haploidentical Transplantation in Children with Acute Leukemia: The Unresolved Issues

    Sarita Rani Jaiswal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT remains a curative option for children with high risk and advanced acute leukemia. Yet availability of matched family donor limits its use and although matched unrelated donor or mismatched umbilical cord blood (UCB are viable options, they fail to meet the global need. Haploidentical family donor is almost universally available and is emerging as the alternate donor of choice in adult patients. However, the same is not true in the case of children. The studies of haploidentical HSCT in children are largely limited to T cell depleted grafts with not so encouraging results in advanced leukemia. At the same time, emerging data from UCBT are challenging the existing paradigm of less stringent HLA match requirements as perceived in the past. The use of posttransplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCY has yielded encouraging results in adults, but data in children is sorely lacking. Our experience of using PTCY based haploidentical HSCT in children shows inadequacy of this approach in younger children compared to excellent outcome in older children. In this context, we discuss the current status of haploidentical HSCT in children with acute leukemia in a global perspective and dwell on its future prospects.

  10. Management of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Intensive Care Setting.

    Cowan, Andrew J; Altemeier, William A; Johnston, Christine; Gernsheimer, Terry; Becker, Pamela S

    2015-10-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are newly diagnosed or relapsed and those who are receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy are predisposed to conditions such as sepsis due to bacterial and fungal infections, coagulopathies, hemorrhage, metabolic abnormalities, and respiratory and renal failure. These conditions are common reasons for patients with AML to be managed in the intensive care unit (ICU). For patients with AML in the ICU, providers need to be aware of common problems and how to manage them. Understanding the pathophysiology of complications and the recent advances in risk stratification as well as newer therapy for AML are relevant to the critical care provider. PMID:24756309

  11. Transplantations in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia--grounds for optimism?

    Goldstone, Anthony H

    2009-01-01

    The large MRC/ECOG Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Study establishes the value of sibling donor allogeneic transplantation in patients with standard risk, demonstrating superior outcome to conventional chemotherapy. The small but significant number of patients having matched unrelated donor transplantations on this study protocol appear to do well and might establish the value of such an approach for those without a sibling. Reduced-intensity conditioning might begin to address the transplantation-related mortality problems of the older patients. The youngest adults might not need to undergo transplantation at all. If they are now treated on pediatric chemotherapy protocols, their outcome appears to improve significantly. PMID:19778843

  12. How Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia Classified?

    ... also form the basis for treating these leukemias. Markers on the leukemia cells If the leukemia cells ... no signs or symptoms of the disease. A molecular complete remission means there is no evidence of ...

  13. Nonadherence to Oral Mercaptopurine and Risk of Relapse in Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    Bhatia, Smita; Landier, Wendy; Shangguan, Muyun; Hageman, Lindsey; Schaible, Alexandra N.; Carter, Andrea R.; Hanby, Cara L.; Leisenring, Wendy; Yasui, Yutaka; Kornegay, Nancy M.; Mascarenhas, Leo; Ritchey, A. Kim; Casillas, Jacqueline N.; Dickens, David S.; Meza, Jane; Carroll, William L.; Relling, Mary V.; Wong, F. Lennie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Systemic exposure to mercaptopurine (MP) is critical for durable remissions in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Nonadherence to oral MP could increase relapse risk and also contribute to inferior outcome in Hispanics. This study identified determinants of adherence and described impact of adherence on relapse, both overall and by ethnicity. Patients and Methods A total of 327 children with ALL (169 Hispanic; 158 non-Hispanic white) participated. Medication event-monitoring system caps recorded date and time of MP bottle openings. Adherence rate, calculated monthly, was defined as ratio of days of MP bottle opening to days when MP was prescribed. Results After 53,394 person-days of monitoring, adherence declined from 94.7% (month 1) to 90.2% (month 6; P < .001). Mean adherence over 6 months was significantly lower among Hispanics (88.4% v 94.8%; P < .001), patients age ≥ 12 years (85.8% v 93.1%; P < .001), and patients from single-mother households (80.6% v 93.1%; P = .001). A progressive increase in relapse was observed with decreasing adherence (reference: adherence ≥ 95%; 94.9% to 90%: hazard ratio [HR], 4.1; 95% CI,1.2 to 13.5; P = .02; 89.9% to 85%: HR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.0 to 15.5; P = .04; < 85%: HR. 5.7; 95% CI, 1.9 to 16.8; P = .002). Cumulative incidence of relapse (± standard deviation) was higher among Hispanics (16.5% ± 4.0% v 6.3% ± 2.2%; P = .02). Association between Hispanic ethnicity and relapse (HR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.1 to 6.1; P = .02) became nonsignificant (HR, 1.8; 95% CI, 0.6 to 5.2; P = .26) after adjusting for adherence and socioeconomic status. At adherence rates ≥ 90%, Hispanics continued to demonstrate higher relapse, whereas at rates < 90%, relapse risk was comparable to that of non-Hispanic whites. Conclusion Lower adherence to oral MP increases relapse risk. Ethnic difference in relapse risk differs by level of adherence—an observation currently under investigation. PMID:22564992

  14. No association between cytochrome P450 2D6 gene polymorphism and risk of acute leukemia: evidence based on a meta-analysis

    RUAN Xiao-lan; LI Sheng; ZENG Xian-tao; XIA Ling-hui; HU Yu

    2013-01-01

    Background Many studies indicated the human cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) gene polymorphism was associated with acute leukemia (AL) susceptibility,however,the results were inconsistent.So we performed this meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between CYP2D6*3 or CYP2D6*4 polymorphism and AL susceptibility.Methods We searched PubMed database up to February 20,2013,and finally yielded 9 case-control studies including 1343 cases and 1843 controls which tested the association between CYP2D6*3 or *4 polymorphism and AL.After data extraction,we conducted a meta-analysis using the Comprehensive Meta Analysis software.Results Overall,no significant association between CYP2D6*3 or *4 polymorphism and AL risk was found in this metaanalysis (+ vs.-:OR=1.13,95% CI=0.79-1.63; +/+ vs.-/-:OR=1.73,95% C/=0.99-3.02;-/+ vs.-/-:OR=1.03,95% C/=0.68-1.56; (-/+ and +/+) vs.-/-:OR=1.08,95% C/=0.72-1.63; +/+ vs.(-/+ and-/-):OR=1.76,95% C/=0.98-3.17).Similar results were also been found in stratified subgroup analysis.There was no publication bias.Conclusion CYP2D6*3 or *4 polymorphism might not be associated with AL susceptibility.However,the results need to be further confirmed by well-designed and high quality randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes.

  15. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, unlike acute erythroid leukemia, predicts an unfavorable outcome after allogeneic HSCT.

    Ishiyama, Ken; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Eto, Tetsuya; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Uchida, Naoyuki; Kanamori, Heiwa; Fukuda, Takahiro; Miyamura, Koichi; Inoue, Yoshiko; Taguchi, Jun; Mori, Takehiko; Iwato, Koji; Morishima, Yasuo; Nagamura-Inoue, Tokiko; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Takami, Akiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Acute erythroid leukemia (FAB-M6) and acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (FAB-M7) exhibit closely related properties in cells regarding morphology and the gene expression profile. Although allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is considered the mainstay of the treatment for both subtypes of leukemia due to their refractoriness to chemotherapy and high rates of relapse, it remains unclear whether allo-HSCT is curative in such cases due to their scarcity. We retrospectively examined the impact of allo-HSCT in 382 patients with M6 and 108 patients with M7 using nationwide HSCT data and found the overall survival (OS) and relapse rates of the M6 patients to be significantly better than those of the M7 patients after adjusting for confounding factors and statistically comparable with those of the patients with M0/M1/M2/M4/M5 disease. Consequently, the factors of age, gender, performance status, karyotype, disease status at HSCT and development of graft-vs.-host disease predicted the OS for the M6 patients, while the performance status and disease status at HSCT were predictive of the OS for the M7 patients. These findings substantiate the importance of distinguishing between M6 and M7 in the HSCT setting and suggest that unknown mechanisms influence the HSCT outcomes of these closely related subtypes of leukemia. PMID:27244257

  16. Intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 (iAMP21) detected by ETV6/RUNX1 FISH screening in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    Daniela Ribeiro Ney Garcia; Alejandro Mauricio Arancibia; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Marcelo Gerardin Poirot Land; Maria Luiza Macedo Silva

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome abnormalities that usually define high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia are the t(9;22)/ breakpoint cluster region protein-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1, hypodiploid with < 44 chromosomes and 11q23/ myeloid/lymphoid leukemia gene rearrangements. The spectrum of acute lymphoblastic leukemia genetic abnormalities is nevertheless rapidly expanding. Therefore, newly described chromosomal aberrations are likely to have an impact on clinical care in the near future. R...

  17. Age Difference in Immunophenotype of Acute Leukemia

    Kazunori Nakase

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the immunophenotype of 880 cases with acute leukemia and analyzed their age difference in relation to the morphological subtype and the karyotype. We divided the patients into 3 age groups: child (0-15 years, adult (16-59 years and elderly (60 years and older group. The diagnoses based on the French-American-British (FAB criteria and the immunophenotype as follows: 453 patients as acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 366 as precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL (24 CD10- cases and 342 CD10+ cases, 10 B-cell ALL and 51 T-cell ALL. In AML, there were no significant age differences in the frequency of FAB subtypes. Karyotypically, the frequencies of t(8;21 and 11q23 decreased with age and that of 5/7/8 abnormality increased with age. As for the immunophenotype in each FAB subtype, CD11b in M2 (0% and CD34 in M3 (0% were less commonly expressed in the child group than in the other age groups. Whereas Both CD11b (100% and CD34 (60% in M4 were more predominantly expressed in the child group than in the other age groups. Lymphoid antigen, CD19 showed a higher frequency (38.5% in the child M2 than did other age M2 groups, reflecting the distribution pattern of t(8;21 among the 3 age groups. Additionally, the child group more frequently expressed this antigen (33.3% than the older groups among CD7+ AML. In ALL, the frequency of CD10+ precursor B ALL was more common in the child group (84% than in the adult group. On the other hand, B-cell ALL showed a lower frequency (0.7% in the child group and T-cell ALL did a higher frequency (18.3% in the adult group than any other age groups, respectively. Although the frequency of t(9;22 increased with age in CD10+ precursor-B ALL, myeloid antigen (CD13/CD33 expression evenly distributed among the 3 age groups. Our results suggest that phenotypic heterogeneity gradually emerged with age irrespective of the pattern of karyotype.

  18. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  19. Tipifarnib in the treatment of newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia

    Judith E Karp

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Judith E Karp1, Jeffrey E Lancet21Division of Hematologic Malignancies, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; 2H. Lee Moffitt Comprehensive Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida, USAAbstract: Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs represent a new class of signal transduction inhibitors that block the processing of cellular polypeptides that have cysteine terminal residues and, by so doing, interdict multiple pathways involved in proliferation and survival of diverse malignant cell types. Tipifarnib is an orally bioavailable, nonpeptidomimetic methylquinolone FTI that has exhibited clinical activity in patients with myeloid malignancies including elderly adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML who are not candidates for traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, patients with high-risk myelodysplasia, myeloproliferative disorders, and imatinib-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia. Because of its relatively low toxicity profile, tipifarnib provides an important alternative to traditional cytotoxic approaches for elderly patients who are not likely to tolerate or even benefit from aggressive chemotherapy. In this review, we will focus on the clinical development of tipifarnib for treatment of newly diagnosed AML, both as induction therapy for elderly adults with poor-risk AML and as maintenance therapy following achievement of first complete remission following induction and consolidation therapies for poor-risk AML. As with all other malignancies, the optimal approach is likely to lie in rational combinations of tipifarnib with cytotoxic, biologic and/or immunomodulatory agents with non-cross-resistant mechanisms of action. Gene expression profi ling has identified networks of differentially expressed genes and gene combinations capable of predicting response to single agent tipifarnib. The clinical and correlative laboratory trials in progress and under development will provide the critical foundations for

  20. Increased leukemia risk in Chernobyl cleanup workers

    A new study found a significantly elevated risk for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among workers who were engaged in recovery and clean-up activities following the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986.

  1. Role of autophagy in acute myeloid leukemia therapy

    Su-Ping Zhang; Yu-Na Niu; Na Yuan; Ai-Hong Zhang; Dan Chao; Qiu-Ping Xu; Li-Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Despite its dual role in determining cell fate in a wide array of solid cancer cell lines,autophagy has been robustly shown to suppress or kill acute myeloid leukemia cells via degradation of the oncogenic fusion protein that drives leukemogenesis.However,autophagy also induces the demise of acute leukemia cells that do not express the known fusion protein,though the molecular mechanism remains elusive.Nevertheless,since it can induce cooperation with apoptosis and differentiation in response to autophagic signals,autophagy can be manipulated for a better therapy on acute myeloid leukemia.

  2. Cranial computerized tomography in children suffering from acute leukemia

    Cranial computerized (axial) tomography permits a more complete neurologic supervision of children with acute leukemia and a better knowledge of the frequency and varieties of cerebral complications in leukemia. Endocranial complications in acute leukemia are essentially infiltrative, hemorrhagic, infectious or iatrogenic. Cranial computerized tomography can demonstrate cerebral changes in meningeal leukemia, hemorrhages, calcifications, brain atrophy or leukencephalopathy. The preliminary results of cranial computerized tomography in childhood leukemia suggest that the iatrogenic main lesion of the brain due to combined radiation-chemotherapy is atrophy whereas that of the intrathecal cytostatic therapy is demyelination. Accurate diagnostics and control of possible cerebral complications in therapy of leukemia is essentially for appropriate therapeutic management. For that cranial computerized tomography is the best method to a effective supervision of the brain. (author)

  3. Prethymic Cytoplasmic CD3 Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia: A Case Report

    Elisa Cannizzo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute undiffentiated leukemia (AUL is an acute leukemia with no more than one membrane marker of any given lineage. Blasts often express HLA-DR, CD34, and/or CD38 and may be positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT. The expression of CD34, HLA-DR, and CD38 has been shown in pro-T-ALL, although in this case, blasts should also express CD7 and cyCD3. However, some cases of T-ALL without CD3 in the cytoplasm and all TCR chain genes in germ line configuration are reported, features that fit well with a very early hematopoietic cell. We report a case of acute leukemia CD34+/−HLADR+CD7+CD38+cyCD3− in which a diagnosis of AUL was considered. However the blasts were also positive for CD99 and TCR delta gene rearrangement which was found on molecular studies. Therefore a differential diagnosis between AUL and an early cyCD3 negative T-ALL was debated.

  4. Genomics-based Approach and Prognostic Stratification Significance of Gene Mutations in Intermediate-risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Bian-Hong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: NGS represents a pioneering and helpful approach to prognostic risk stratification of IR-AML patients. Further large-scale studies for comprehensive molecular analysis are needed to provide guidance and a theoretical basis for IR-AML prognostic stratification and clinical management.

  5. ERYTHEMA NODOSUM REVEALING ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Chebbi Wafa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Erythema nodosum (EN is the most common type of panniculitis. It may be idiopathic or secondary to various etiologies. However, the occurrence of erythema nodosum in malignant hemopathy had rarely been reported. Case report: A 42 year-old woman presented with a four week history of recurrent multiple painful erythematous nodules developed on the lower limbs associated with arthralgia of the ankles and fever. The clinical features of skin lesions with contusiform color evolution allowed establishing the diagnosis of EN. No underlying cause was found. The skin lesions were improved with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. Three months later, the patient consulted for recurrence of EN associated with fever, inflammatory polyarthralgia and hepatosplenomegaly. The peripheral blood count revealed pancytopenia. A bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia type 2. Initiation of chemotherapy was followed by the complete disappearance of skin lesions of EN. Conclusion: Paraneoplastic erythema nodosum is a rare entity. In the literature, a few cases of association with leukemia have been reported. Exploration for solid neoplasms or hemopathy in case of recurrent EN or resistance to conventional treatment should be systematic

  6. Mixed Phenotypic Acute Leukemia Presenting as Mediastinal Mass-2 Cases.

    Vardhan, Rig; Kotwal, Jyoti; Ganguli, Prosenjit; Ahmed, Rehan; Sharma, Ajay; Singh, Jasjit

    2016-06-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia symbolizes a very small subset of acute leukemia that simply cannot be allocated as lymphoid or myeloid lineage. The 2008 World Health Organisation classification established stringent standard for diagnosis of mixed phenotype acute leukemia, accentuating myeloperoxidase for myeloid lineage, cytoplasmic CD3 for T lineage and CD19 with other B markers for B lineage obligation. Mixed phenotype leukemia is rare and 3-5 % of acute leukmias of all age groups, is associated with poor outcome with overall survival of 18 months. We wish to present two cases of mixed phenotypic acute leukemia who presented with mediastinal masses, were suspected to be T cell lymphoma/leukemia clinically and radiologically. In one case, tissue diagnosis was given as lymphoma for which treatment was given. These cases show that patients diagnosed as lymphoma on histopathology can be cases of mixed phenotype acute leukemia and varying specific treatment protocols and follow up are required. Awareness of these entities will help in proper diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27408360

  7. High syndecan-1 levels in acute myeloid leukemia are associated with bleeding, thrombocytopathy, endothelial cell damage, and leukocytosis

    Larsen, Anne Mette Vestskov; Leinøe, Eva Birgitte; Johansson, Pär I;

    2013-01-01

    The risk of hemorrhage is influenced by multiple factors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We investigated whether hemorrhage in AML patients was associated with endothelial perturbation, potentially caused by thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction and leukocytosis. Biomarkers of endothelial pertu...

  8. Molecular mechanisms in differentiation-induction in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Nigten, Jeannet

    2007-01-01

    Leukemia is a hematological malignancy that is characterized by the clonal expansion of immature hematopoietic cells, which have escaped from the tightly coordinated cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis controls. In general, leukemia is characterized by a variety of mutations in pathways that are required for normal hematopoiesis. This thesis describes target genes of the mutated transcription factor PML-RAR , which is expressed in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells. APL...

  9. Residential Proximity to Agricultural Pesticide Applications and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Rull, Rudolph P.; Gunier, Robert; Von Behren, Julie; Hertz, Andrew; Crouse, Vonda; Buffler, Patricia A.; Reynolds, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    Ambient exposure from residential proximity to applications of agricultural pesticides may contribute to the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using residential histories collected from the families of 213 ALL cases and 268 matched controls enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study, the authors assessed residential proximity within a half-mile (804.5 meters) of pesticide applications by linking address histories with reports of agricultural pesticide use...

  10. Integration of genetic and clinical risk factors improves prognostication in relapsed childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Irving, Julie A E; Enshaei, Amir; Parker, Catriona A; Sutton, Rosemary; Kuiper, Roland P; Erhorn, Amy; Minto, Lynne; Venn, Nicola C; Law, Tamara; Yu, Jiangyan; Schwab, Claire; Davies, Rosanna; Matheson, Elizabeth; Davies, Alysia; Sonneveld, Edwin; den Boer, Monique L; Love, Sharon B; Harrison, Christine J; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Revesz, Tamas; Saha, Vaskar; Moorman, Anthony V

    2016-08-18

    Somatic genetic abnormalities are initiators and drivers of disease and have proven clinical utility at initial diagnosis. However, the genetic landscape and its clinical utility at relapse are less well understood and have not been studied comprehensively. We analyzed cytogenetic data from 427 children with relapsed B-cell precursor ALL treated on the international trial, ALLR3. Also we screened 238 patients with a marrow relapse for selected copy number alterations (CNAs) and mutations. Cytogenetic risk groups were predictive of outcome postrelapse and survival rates at 5 years for patients with good, intermediate-, and high-risk cytogenetics were 68%, 47%, and 26%, respectively (P www.clinicaltrials.org as #ISCRTN45724312. PMID:27229005

  11. MOLECULAR PATHOGENESIS OF SECONDARY ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Neil Osheroff

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Balanced chromosomal translocations that generate chimeric oncoproteins are considered to be initiating lesions in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. The most frequent is the t(15;17(q22;q21, which fuses the PML and RARA genes, giving rise to acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. An increasing proportion of APL cases are therapy-related (t-APL, which develop following exposure to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapeutic agents that target DNA topoisomerase II (topoII, particularly mitoxantrone and epirubicin. To gain insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of the t(15;17 we mapped the translocation breakpoints in a series of t-APLs, which revealed significant clustering according the nature of the drug exposure. Remarkably, in approximately half of t-APL cases arising following mitoxantrone treatment for breast carcinoma or multiple sclerosis, the chromosome 15 breakpoint fell within an 8-bp “hotspot” region in PML intron 6, which was confirmed to be a preferential site of topoII-mediated DNA cleavage induced by mitoxantrone.  Chromosome 15 breakpoints falling outside the “hotspot”, and the corresponding RARA breakpoints were also shown to be functional topoII cleavage sites. The observation that particular regions of the PML and RARA loci are susceptible to topoII-mediated DNA damage induced by epirubicin and mitoxantrone may underlie the propensity of these agents to cause APL.

     

  12. Late cardiac effects of anthracycline containing therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Rathe, Mathias; Carlsen, Niels L T; Oxhøj, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    At present about 80% of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) will be cured following treatment with multi-drug chemotherapy. A major concern for this growing number of survivors is the risk of late effects of treatment. The aim of this study was to determine whether signs of cardiomyo......At present about 80% of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) will be cured following treatment with multi-drug chemotherapy. A major concern for this growing number of survivors is the risk of late effects of treatment. The aim of this study was to determine whether signs of...

  13. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  14. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    2015-02-24

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. JAK kinase inhibitors for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Degryse, Sandrine; Cools, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have identified activating mutations in components of the interleukin-7 receptor complex (IL7R, JAK1, and JAK3). It will be of interest to investigate both JAK1 and JAK3 kinase inhibitors as targeted agents for these leukemias.

  16. Serum metabonomics of acute leukemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Shamsi, Tahir; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-ur

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a critical neoplasm of white blood cells. In order to differentiate between the metabolic alterations associated with two subtypes of acute leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the serum of ALL and AML patients and compared with two controls (healthy and aplastic anemia) using 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Thirty-seven putative metabolites were identified using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The use of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA models gave results with 84.38% and 90.63% classification rate, respectively. The metabolites responsible for classification are mainly lipids, lactate and glucose. Compared with controls, ALL and AML patients showed serum metabonomic differences involving aberrant metabolism pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipoprotein changes, choline and fatty acid metabolisms. PMID:27480133

  17. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Ibrahim Bayram

    2014-01-01

    In children patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, according to the European bone marrow transplant handbook, the indications for stem cell transplantation, conditioning regimen, donor selection and information about sources of stem cells will be evaluated.

  18. 儿童高危急性淋巴细胞白血病治疗策略%Therapeutic strategies for childhood high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    卢新夭

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary treatments have resulted in 5-year event-free survival rates (EFS) of approximately 75% to 80% for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Relapses of ALL in children were more often in HR-ALL but also in very few non-HR-ALL. Thus current clinical study of ALL has focused on improving the outcome of a few subtypes of HR-ALL. Infants with ALL have a particularly high risk of treatment failure. Infant ALL Interfant-99 study found that MLL rearrangement, age younger than 6 months, poor response to a prednisone prophase and high WBC count were strong independent predictive factors for poor prognosis in infants with ALL. Treatments with hybrid protocol, including both lymphoid- and myeloid-directed treatment elements, also contain HD-MTX and high dose Ara-C ( HD-Ara-C) , will further improve the outcome for infant ALL. Children Philadelphia chromosome positive ALL ( Ph + ALL) was associated with a high relapse rate when treated with chemotherapy alone. The Children' s Oncology Group (COG) AALL0031 trial showed that the addition of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) imatinib to intensive chemotherapy resulted in 3-year EFS more than historical control treated with chemotherapy alone. These findings create a new paradigm for integrating molecularly targeted agents with intensified chemotherapy. Children with T-ALL have had a worse outcome than with the precursor B-cell ALL previously. With more intensified chemotherapy , outcomes for children T-ALL were improved, approaching those for the precursor B-cell ALL. Recently, COG decided to treat children with T-cell ALL with separate protocols different from those for the precursor B-cell ALL, and the protocols of BFM for children with T-ALL have been the same as those of the precursor B-cell ALL. Early precursor T-cell ALL, a novel subtype of T-cell ALL, was identified by gene expression profiling, flow cytometry, and single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses. ETP-ALL, identified in 13% of T-cell ALL

  19. Herbo-mineral ayurvedic treatment in a high risk acute promyelocytic leukemia patient with second relapse: 12 years follow up

    Balendu Prakash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 47 year old diabetic male patient was diagnosed and treated for high risk AML-M3 at Tata Memorial Hospital (BJ 17572, Mumbai in September 1995. His bone marrow aspiration cytology indicated 96% promyelocytes with abnormal forms, absence of lymphocytic series and myeloperoxide test 100% positive. Initially treated with ATRA, he achieved hematological remission on day 60, but cytogenetically the disease persisted. The patient received induction and consolidated chemotherapy with Daunorubicin and Cytarabine combination from 12.01.96 to 14.05.96, following which he achieved remission. However, his disease relapsed in February 97. The patient was given two cycles of chemotherapy with Idarubicine and Etoposide, after which he achieved remission. His disease again relapsed in December 97. The patient then refused more chemotherapy and volunteered for a pilot Ayurvedic study conducted by the Central Council for Research in Ayurveda and Siddha, New Delhi. The patient was treated with a proprietary Ayurvedic medicine Navajeevan, Kamadudha Rasa and Keharuba Pisti for one year. For the subsequent 5 years the patient received three months of intermittent Ayurvedic treatment every year. The patient achieved complete disease remission with the alternative treatment without any adverse side effects. The patient has so far completed 13 years of survival after the start of Ayurvedic therapy.

  20. Epigenetic regulators as promising therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia

    Gallipoli, Paolo; Giotopoulos, George; Huntly, Brian J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most prevalent acute leukemia in adults, is an aggressive hematological malignancy arising in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. With the exception of a few specific AML subtypes, the mainstays of treatment have not significantly changed over the last 20 years, and are still based on standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. As a result, clinical outcome remains poor for the majority of patients, with overall long-term survival in the region of 20?30%. Recent su...

  1. Advances in Management of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia with Arsenic Trioxide

    MA Jun

    2007-01-01

    @@ Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), with specific features in cell morphology, is classified as M3 by French-American-British (FAB).Among M3, 95% of patients show specific chromosome translocation t(15;17)q(22;21) with PML-RAR α fusion gene, and 5% of patients show other subtypes. According to the statistical analysis of 2 540 adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML)cases in Harbin Institute of Hematology & Oncology, APL accounted for 23%.

  2. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias

    Jakubowski Ann A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8% displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5% displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6% did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  4. Idarubicin-intensified BUCY2 conditioning regimen improved survival in high-risk acute myeloid, but not lymphocytic leukemia patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: A retrospective comparative study.

    Fang, Jun; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Huafang; Hong, Mei; Wu, Qiuling; Nie, Dimin; You, Yong; Zhong, Zhaodong; Li, Weiming; Hu, Yu; Xia, Linghui

    2016-07-01

    The intensity of conditioning regimen is highly correlated with outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). We have previously reported that idarubicin (IDA) intensified BUCY2 regimen could reduce relapse and improve survival for high-risk hematological malignancies undergoing allo-HSCT. However, there is no published study comparing the efficacy of IDA-BUCY2 regimen for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) versus acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). We further retrospectively compared therapeutic outcomes of intensified conditioning regimen on 140 high-risk AML and ALL patients in the data analyses. IDA 15mg/m(2)/d was administered by continuous infusion from day -11 to -9, followed by intravenous injection of busulfan (BU) (3.2mg/kg/d) from day -6 to -4, and intravenous injection of cyclophosphamide (CY) (1.8g/m(2)/d) from day -3 to -2 in IDA-BUCY2 regimen. For high-risk AML, cumulative probabilities of 3-year relapse rates in IDA-BUCY2 and traditional BUCY2 regimens were 16.9%, 43.3% (P=0.016). Cumulative probabilities of 3-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 69.2% vs 44.0% (P=0.024), and 66.9% vs 38.2% (P=0.01). However, two regimens showed no significant differences for high-risk ALL. Multivariate analysis also indicated that IDA intensified BUCY2 conditioning was the favorable variable to reduce relapse and elevate survival for high-risk AML patients. In conclusion, IDA-BUCY2 regimen reduces relapse and improves survival for high-risk AML undergoing allo-HSCT, but not presenting uniform therapeutic effects for high-risk ALL. PMID:27131062

  5. PML-RARα co-operates with Sox4 in acute myeloid leukemia development in mice

    Omidvar, Nader; Maunakea, Mei Lin; Jones, Letetia; Sevcikova, Sabina; Yin, Bin; Himmel, Karen L.; Tennant, Thelma R.; Le Beau, Michelle M; Largaespada, David A.; Kogan, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia is characterized by a chromosomal translocation involving the retinoic acid receptor alpha gene. To identify co-operating pathways to leukemogenesis, we crossed MRP8-PML/RARA transgenic mice with BXH-2 mice which harbor an endogenous murine leukemia virus that causes acute myeloid leukemia. Approximately half of the leukemias that arose in this cross showed features of acute promyelocytic leukemia. We identified 22 proviral insertion sites in acute promyelocytic-l...

  6. The JAK2V617F activating mutation occurs in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, but not in acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Levine, Ross L.; Loriaux, Marc; Huntly, Brian J. P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Beran, Miroslav; Stoffregen, Eric; Berger, Roland; Clark, Jennifer J.; Willis, Stephanie G.; Nguyen, Kim T.; Flores, Nikki J.; Estey, Elihu; Gattermann, Norbert; Armstrong, Scott; Look, A. Thomas; Griffin, James D.; Bernard, Olivier A.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Gilliland, D. Gary; Druker, Brian; Deininger, Michael W. N.

    2005-01-01

    Activating mutations in tyrosine kinases have been identified in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic malignancies. Recently, we and others identified a single recurrent somatic activating mutation (JAK2V617F) in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) tyrosine kinase in the myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myeloid metaplasia with myelofibrosis. We used direct sequence analysis to determine if the JAK2V617F mutation was present in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML)/atypical chronic myelogenous leukemia (aCML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), T-cell ALL, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Analysis of 222 patients with AML identified JAK2V617F mutations in 4 patients with AML, 3 of whom had a preceding MPD. JAK2V617F mutations were identified in 9 (7.8%) of 116 CMML/a CML samples, and in 2 (4.2%) of 48 MDS samples. We did not identify the JAK2V617F disease allele in B-lineage ALL (n = 83), T-cell ALL (n = 93), or CLL (n = 45). These data indicate that the JAK2V617F allele is present in acute and chronic myeloid malignancies but not in lymphoid malignancies. PMID:16081687

  7. Parental Tobacco Smoking and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium.

    Metayer, Catherine; Petridou, Eleni; Aranguré, Juan Manuel Mejía; Roman, Eve; Schüz, Joachim; Magnani, Corrado; Mora, Ana Maria; Mueller, Beth A; de Oliveira, Maria S Pombo; Dockerty, John D; McCauley, Kathryn; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hatzipantelis, Emmanouel; Rudant, Jérémie; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Kaatsch, Peter; Miligi, Lucia; Wesseling, Catharina; Doody, David R; Moschovi, Maria; Orsi, Laurent; Mattioli, Stefano; Selvin, Steve; Kang, Alice Y; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2016-08-15

    The association between tobacco smoke and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is well established in adults but not in children. Individual-level data on parental cigarette smoking were obtained from 12 case-control studies from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC, 1974-2012), including 1,330 AML cases diagnosed at age controls. We conducted pooled analyses of CLIC studies, as well as meta-analyses of CLIC and non-CLIC studies. Overall, maternal smoking before, during, or after pregnancy was not associated with childhood AML; there was a suggestion, however, that smoking during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk in Hispanics (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 3.61) but not in other ethnic groups. By contrast, the odds ratios for paternal lifetime smoking were 1.34 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.62) and 1.18 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.51) in pooled and meta-analyses, respectively. Overall, increased risks from 1.2- to 1.3-fold were observed for pre- and postnatal smoking (P < 0.05), with higher risks reported for heavy smokers. Associations with paternal smoking varied by histological type. Our analyses suggest an association between paternal smoking and childhood AML. The association with maternal smoking appears limited to Hispanic children, raising questions about ethnic differences in tobacco-related exposures and biological mechanisms, as well as study-specific biases. PMID:27492895

  8. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Philippe; Kastner; Susan; Chan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene.Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia.In particular,Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.Its role in T-cell leukemia,however,has been more controversial.While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell leukemias,loss of Ikaros appears to be rare in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).We review here the evidence linking Ikaros to T-ALL in mouse and human systems.

  9. Morbidity associated to the transfusion support in pediatric patients with acute leukemia in the National Cancer Institute

    Acute leukemia represents the most common cancer in pediatrics. The current treatments made necessary a hematological support which increases the risks of complications, like fever, immunologic reaction, infections and, graft versus host disease. The objective of the present study was to determine the morbidity associated with transfusion support in pediatric patients with acute leukemia. In the pediatric population with diagnosis of acute leukemia in the INC during one and half year, the morbidity associated with transfusions was low and couldn't be related to the treatment given to the transfused products

  10. Risk of leukemia among survivors of testicular cancer: a population-based study of 42,722 patients

    Howard, R.; Gilbert, E.; Lynch, C.F.;

    2008-01-01

    , 95% confidence interval [CI] = 7.6-14.6; ERR = 1.6, 95%CI = 1.0-2.2). Statistically significantly elevated risks were observed for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (EAR = 7.2, 95%CI = 4.7-10.2) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (EAR = 1.3, 95%CI = 0.4-2.8). In multivariate analyses, AML risk was higher...... among patients whose initial management included chemotherapy compared to those receiving radiotherapy alone (p = 0.1). Excess cumulative leukemia risk was approximately 0.23% by 30 years after testicular cancer diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Although ERR of leukemia following testicular cancer is large, EAR...

  11. Association of CYP3A5FNx013 polymorphism with development of acute leukemia

    D Nageswara Rao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : CYP3A5 was observed to be an important genetic contributor to inter individual differences in CYP3A-dependent drug metabolism in acute leukemic patients. Loss of CYP3A5 expression was mainly conferred by a single nucleotide polymorphism at 6986A>G (CYP3A5FNx013. We investigated the association between CYP3A5FNx013 polymorphism and acute leukemia. Materials and Methods : Two hundred and eighty nine acute leukemia cases comprising of 145 acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL, 144 acute myeloid leukemia and 241 control samples were analyzed for CYP3A5FNx013 polymorphism using PCR-RFLP method. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS version (15.0 to detect the association between CYP3A5FNx013 polymorphism and acute leukemia. Results : The CYP3A5FNx013 polymorphism 3/3 genotype was significantly associated with acute leukemia development (χ2 - 133.53; df-2, P 0.000. When the data was analyzed with respect to clinical variables, mean WBC, blast % and LDH levels were increased in both ALL and AML cases with 3/3 genotype. The epidemiological variables did not contribute to the genotype risk to develop either AML or ALL. Conclusion : The results suggest that the CYP3A5FNx013 polymorphism might confer the risk to develop ALL or AML emphasizing the significance of effective phase I detoxification in carcinogenesis. Association of the polymorphism with clinical variables indicate that the 3/3 genotype might also contribute to poorer survival of the patients.

  12. PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF EXPRESSION OF SURVIVIN IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    王晓娟; 戴国仪; 曹利民; 王国华; 朱慧芬; 张悦; 沈关心

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of survivin gene and its significance in acute leukemia. Methods: The expression of surviving in 134 acute leukemia patients and 4 leukemia cell lines was detected by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Results: We detected survivin expression in 78 of 134 acute leukemia patients and all the cell lines but not in normal controls and anemia patients. Survivin gene expression correlated with a lower white blood cell count, which was 11×109/L and 48×109/L in the positive and negative group respectively (P<0.01 by the Mann-Whitney test). In 55 cases of FAB M1/M2/M3, it was associated with leukemic cell maturation(P<0.01 by the Fisher test). Survivin expression was strongly related to survival time of acute leukemia patients (P<0.05). Conclusion: These data suggest that survivin expression may be considered as a new unfavorable prognostic factor for acute leukemia due to its important role in apoptosis inhibition that influences disease outcome.

  13. A case of transfusion-related acute lung injury induced by anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies in acute leukemia

    Jin, Sun Mi; Jang, Moon Ju; Huh, Ji Young; Park, Myoung Hee; Song, Eun Young; Oh, Doyeun

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a noncardiogenic pulmonary edema that occurs during or within 6 hours after transfusion. Risk factors for TRALI, which is relatively common in critically ill patients, include recent surgery, hematologic malignancy, and sepsis. Here, we report a case of TRALI induced by anti-human leukocyte antigen (anti-HLA) class II antibodies (HLA-DR) occurring after transfusion of platelet concentrates in a patient with acute leukemia. Although most patient...

  14. Enhanced levels of the apoptotic BAX/BCL-2 ratio in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and high-risk features

    Maria Kaparou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that leukemia is characterized by an impaired balance between the proliferation of blood cells and their capacity to undergo apoptosis. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of key molecules related to apoptosis (BCL-2, BAX, FAS, FAS-L in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Measurement of BCL-2 and BAX mRNA was performed by quantitative real-time PCR, and membrane expression of FAS and FAS-L was assessed by flow cytometry in bone marrow mononuclear cells, both at diagnosis and at remission following induction chemotherapy. At diagnosis, increased levels of the apoptotic BAX/BCL-2 ratio were observed in children older than 10 years and with higher white blood cell counts. A DNA index < 1.16 was associated with increased BAX/BCL-2, both at diagnosis and at remission, and the del(9p chromosome abnormality with increased BAX/BCL-2 at remission. The expression of the apoptotic receptor FAS was significantly higher at remission compared to diagnosis, which might reflect enhanced sensitivity of the leukemic clone to apoptosis and response to treatment. Altogether, our results highlight the association of apoptosis-related genes with clinical and cytogenetic prognostic parameters in pediatric ALL. A better understanding of the mechanisms and regulation of apoptosis should enable the design of novel targeted therapies for these patients.

  15. Hypereosinophilia in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Two Cases with Review of Literature.

    Sahu, Kamal Kant; Malhotra, Pankaj; Khadwal, Alka; Sachdeva, Manupdesh Singh; Sharma, Prashant; Varma, Neelam; Varma, Subhash Chander

    2015-12-01

    Eosinophilia is rare in acute leukemia at presentation. Discrete reports and case studies in recent years have created significant interest in the field of "Acute leukemia with eosinophilia". We herein present two cases of eosinophilia in association with acute lymphoblastic leukemia with brief review of literature in this field. First case is about 21-year-old female who presented with mediastinal mass along with leukocytosis and hypereosinophilia. On evaluation, she was found to have T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. After ruling out benign causes of eosinophilia, she was treated with modified BFM-90 protocol. Her eosinophilia resolved after 4 weeks of induction therapy. Second case is about 32-year-old male who was diagnosed as a case of mixed phenotype leukemia (B cell/myeloid type) along with severe eosinophilia. His hypereosinophilia finally resolved by week 16 of modified BFM-90 protocol. Diagnosing ALL is challenging when eosinophilia is the initial presentation. These two cases emphasize on the importance of considering ALL amongst one of the etiological causes of eosinophilia as delay in diagnosis endangers patient's life at risk. Also eosinophilia per se is an independent poor risk factor, hence prompt diagnosis and early treatment is the key in all such cases. PMID:26306071

  16. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia.

    Munker, Reinhold; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Hai Lin; de Lima, Marcos; Khoury, Hanna J; Gale, Robert Peter; Maziarz, Richard T; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Weisdorf, Daniel; Saber, Wael

    2016-06-01

    Acute biphenotypic leukemias or mixed phenotype acute leukemias (MPAL) are rare and considered high risk. The optimal treatment and the role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) are unclear. Most prior case series include only modest numbers of patients who underwent transplantation. We analyzed the outcome of 95 carefully characterized alloHCT patients with MPAL reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1996 and 2012. The median age was 20 years (range, 1 to 68). Among the 95 patients, 78 were in first complete remission (CR1) and 17 were in second complete remission (CR2). Three-year overall survival (OS) of 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 57 to 76), leukemia-free survival of 56% (95% CI, 46 to 66), relapse incidence of 29% (95% CI, 20 to 38), and nonrelapse mortality of 15% (95% CI, 9 to 23) were encouraging. OS was best in younger patients (acute myelogenous leukemia or 359 acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases. MPAL patients had more acute and a trend for more chronic graft-versus-host disease. No difference was observed between patients who underwent transplantation in CR1 versus those who underwent transplantation in CR2. AlloHCT is a promising treatment option for pediatric and adult patients with MPAL with encouraging long-term survival. PMID:26903380

  17. End of induction minimal residual disease alone is not a useful determinant for risk stratified therapy in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Parekh, Chintan; Gaynon, Paul S; Abdel-Azim, Hisham

    2015-11-01

    The role of end of induction minimal residual disease (MRD) as determined by flow cytometry for treatment assignment in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is not well defined. We studied 33 children with newly diagnosed T-ALL. Thirty-two of 33 patients remain in continuous complete remission at a median of 4 years. Nineteen patients were MRD positive at the end of induction and all remain in remission with augmented Berlin Frankfurt Münster-based therapy. One patient underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant for rising MRD. Persistent end of induction MRD alone is not an indication to alter therapy in pediatric T-ALL. PMID:25976383

  18. Current management of newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Cicconi, L; Lo-Coco, F

    2016-08-01

    The management of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has considerably evolved during the past two decades. The advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and its inclusion in combinatorial regimens with anthracycline chemotherapy has provided cure rates exceeding 80%; however, this widely adopted approach also conveys significant toxicity including severe myelosuppression and rare occurrence of secondary leukemias. More recently, the advent of arsenic trioxide (ATO) and its use in association with ATRA with or without chemotherapy has further improved patient outcome by allowing to minimize the intensity of chemotherapy, thus reducing serious toxicity while maintaining high anti-leukemic efficacy. The advantage of ATRA-ATO over ATRA chemotherapy has been recently demonstrated in two large randomized trials and this option has now become the new standard of care in low-risk (i.e. non-hyperleukocytic) patients. In light of its rarity, abrupt onset and high risk of early death and due to specific treatment requirements, APL remains a challenging condition that needs to be managed in highly experienced centers. We review here the results of large clinical studies conducted in newly diagnosed APL as well as the recommendations for appropriate diagnosis, prevention and management of the main complications associated with modern treatment of the disease. PMID:27084953

  19. Molecular Therapeutic Approaches for Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Sarah K Tasian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Approximately two thirds of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are cured with intensive multi-agent chemotherapy. However, primary chemorefractory and relapsed AML remains a significant source of childhood cancer mortality, highlighting the need for new therapies. Further therapy intensification with traditional cytotoxic agents is not feasible given the potential for significant toxicity to normal tissues with conventional chemotherapy and the risk for long-term end-organ dysfunction. Significant emphasis has been placed upon the development of molecularly targeted therapeutic approaches for adults and children with high-risk subtypes of AML with the goal of improving remission induction and minimizing relapse. Several promising agents are currently in clinical testing or late preclinical development for AML, including monoclonal antibodies against leukemia cell surface proteins, kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, epigenetic agents, and chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cell immunotherapies. Many of these therapies have been specifically tested in children with relapsed/refractory AML via phase 1 and 2 trials with a smaller number of new agents under phase 3 evaluation for children with de novo AML. Although successful identification and implementation of new drugs for children with AML remains a formidable challenge, enthusiasm for novel molecular therapeutic approaches is great given the potential for significant clinical benefit for children who will otherwise fail standard therapy.

  20. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Clinical and genetic features of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome in the Nordic countries

    Lundin, Catarina; Forestier, Erik; Klarskov Andersen, Mette;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Although previous studies have shown that DS-ALL differs clinically and genetically from non-DS-ALL, much remains to be elucidated as regards genetic and prognostic factors in DS-ALL. METHODS...

  2. DNA methylation-based subtype prediction for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Nordlund, Jessica; Bäcklin, Christofer L; Zachariadis, Vasilios;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We present a method that utilizes DNA methylation profiling for prediction of the cytogenetic subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells from pediatric ALL patients. The primary aim of our study was to improve risk stratification of ALL patients into treatment groups using DNA...

  3. Breast cancer as second malignant neoplasm after acute myeloid leukemia: A rare occurrence

    Govind Babu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer survivors after successful treatment of hematological and lymphoid malignancies are at an increased risk for second malignant neoplasms. As the overall survival has increased in these cancers, solid tumors are emerging as a serious long-term complication. In this article, we describe such a rare occurrence, in literature, of breast cancer after the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

  4. Placing of tunneled central venous catheters prior to induction chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Frydenberg, Morten;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tunneled central venous catheters (CVCs) are inevitable in children with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of CVC-related complications in children with ALL in relation to timing of catheter placement and type of catheter. PROCEDURE: All...

  5. Bone marrow transplantation in severe aplastic anemia and acute or chronic leukemia

    In Essen 121 bone marrow transplantations were carried out. The indications were severe aplastic anemia, acute leukemia in relapse, acute leukemia in remission or chronic myeloid leukemia. The conditioning regimen consisted of cyclophosphamide or the combination of cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation. All patients were treated under strict gnotobiotic care. To mitigate the risk of CMV infections intravenous CMV-hyperimmunoglobulin and CMV-negative blood products have been applied routinely since two years. MTX was used as prophylaxis against GVH-disease. In case of severe aplastic anemia 13 patients (72%) are still alive with a median observation time of 24 months. In the prognostically unfavourable group of acute leukemia in relapse only one patient showed long term survival. In this patient leukemic relapse occurred six years after transplantation. The survival rate of AML patients grafted during the first remission is 55% with a median observation time of 40 months. For patients grafted in the first consecutive remission of ALL the survival rate is 42% with a maximal observation time of 29 months. Out of 37 patients grafted because of CML, eight were in an advanced stage of the disease. 13 patients are still alive, the maximal observation time is 37 months. The overall incidence of GVHD in patients at risk was 28% in aplastic anemia, 26% in AML, 9% in ALL and 63% in CML. In aplastic anemia no patient developed an interstitial pneumonia. In leukemia the risk of fatal interstitial pneumonia was 34%. (orig.)

  6. Clofarabine or Daunorubicin Hydrochloride and Cytarabine Followed By Decitabine or Observation in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2014-09-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with abnormal brain CT scan after cranial irradiation for central nervous system leukemia

    A 21-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with central neurologic symptoms immediately after the second irradiation (20 Gy to the brain and 10 Gy to the spinal cord) for central nervous system (CNS)-leukemia 3 years and 2 months after the first cranial irradiation with 20 Gy. White matter was depicted as diffusely high density area on CT; histology revealed necrosis of leukemic cells. In the present patient with repeated recurrent CNS-leukemia, leukemic cells seemed to have been damaged simultaneously after irradiation because of parenchymal widespread involvement of leukemic cells, resulting in brain edema, an increased intracranial pressure and parenchymal disturbance. This finding may have an important implication for the risk of cranial irradiation in the case of widespread involvement of leukemic cells. Re-evaluation of cranial irradiation in such cases is suggested. (Namekawa, K.)

  8. The Epigenetic Landscape of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Emma Conway O’Brien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a genetically heterogeneous disease. Certain cytogenetic and molecular genetic mutations are recognized to have an impact on prognosis, leading to their inclusion in some prognostic stratification systems. Recently, the advent of high-throughput whole genome or exome sequencing has led to the identification of several novel recurrent mutations in AML, a number of which have been found to involve genes concerned with epigenetic regulation. These genes include in particular DNMT3A, TET2, and IDH1/2, involved with regulation of DNA methylation, and EZH2 and ASXL-1, which are implicated in regulation of histones. However, the precise mechanisms linking these genes to AML pathogenesis have yet to be fully elucidated as has their respective prognostic relevance. As massively parallel DNA sequencing becomes increasingly accessible for patients, there is a need for clarification of the clinical implications of these mutations. This review examines the literature surrounding the biology of these epigenetic modifying genes with regard to leukemogenesis and their clinical and prognostic relevance in AML when mutated.

  9. Acute myeloid leukemia masquerading as hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Abu-Zeinah, Ghaith F; Weisman, Paul; Ganesh, Karuna; Katz, Seth S; Dogan, Ahmet; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K; Stein, Eytan M; Jarnagin, William; Mauro, Michael J; Harding, James J

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often diagnosed on the basis of high quality imaging without a biopsy in the cirrhotic liver. This is a case of a 64-year-old Caucasian man with no history of liver disease or cirrhosis that presented with fatigue, weight loss, and abdominal distension and was found to have a large, isolated liver mass with arterial enhancement and portal venous washout on triple-phase computed tomography (CT) suspicious for HCC. The patient was initially referred for a surgical evaluation. Meanwhile, he developed fevers, pancytopenia, and worsening back pain, and a subsequent spinal MRI revealed a heterogeneous bone marrow signal suspicious for metastatic disease. A bone marrow biopsy that followed was diffusely necrotic. A core biopsy of the patient's liver mass was then performed and was diagnostic of acute monocytic-monoblastic leukemia. Findings from peripheral flow cytometry and a repeat bone marrow biopsy were also consistent with this diagnosis, and induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and idarubicin was initiated. This case describes a rare presentation of myeloid sarcoma (MS) as an isolated, hypervascular liver mass that mimics HCC in its radiographic appearance. Due to the broad differential for a liver mass, a confirmatory biopsy should routinely be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284485

  10. Acute myeloid leukemia in the older patient.

    Godwin, John E; Smith, Scott E

    2003-10-15

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an extremely heterogeneous disorder. The biology of AML is incompletely understood, but much data indicates that older patients have a more biologically diverse and chemotherapy resistant form of AML that is quite different from that seen in the younger patients. Approximately 60% of AML cases are in patients greater than 60 years of age, so the predominant burden is in older patients. This problem will be magnified in the future, because the US population is both growing and aging. When one examines the treatment outcomes of older AML patients over the last three decades, there is little progress in long-term survival. Nine major published randomized placebo controlled trials of myeloid growth factors given during induction for AML have been conducted. All of these trials with one exception demonstrated no significant impact on the clinical outcomes of complete response (CR) rate, disease-free, and overall survival. However, the duration of neutropenia was consistently and uniformly reduced by the use of growth factor in all nine of these trials. Because of the favorable impact of the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) on resource use, antibiotic days, hospital days, etc., it can be more economical and beneficial to use CSFs in AML than to withhold use. The overall dismal outlook for the older AML patient can only be altered by clinical trials with new therapeutic agents. New cellular and molecularly targeted agents are entering clinical trials and bring hope for progress to this area of cancer therapy. PMID:14563517