WorldWideScience

Sample records for acute irradiation

  1. Technical relapsed testicular irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Testicular irradiation in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia presents difficulties in relation to daily positioning, dosimetry for dose homogenization of complex geometry and volume change during irradiation thereof. This can lead to significant deviations from the prescribed doses. In addition, the usual techniques often associated with unnecessary irradiation of pelvic simphysis, anus and perineum. This, in the case of pediatric patients, is of great importance, since doses in the vicinity of 20 Gy are associated with a deviation of bone growth, low testosterone levels around 24 Gy and high rates of generation of second tumors. To overcome these problems we propose a special restraint in prone and non-coplanar irradiation.

  2. Curcumin Protects Against the Acute Inflammatory Process in Irradiated Rats

    Nutraceuticals that provide medical or health benefits, including prevention and treatment of disease may be advantageous in inflammation and exposure to radiation. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of curcumin to modulate, counteract or prevent the inflammatory response induced in irradiated and non-irradiated rats using the carrageenan air-pouch model as an acute model. Diclofenac was used as a reference standard non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Results indicated that exposure of rats to a single dose of gamma-radiation (6 Gy) before induction of inflammation increased production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in serum. Blood glutathione (GSH) was shown to be reduced in irradiated animals. Curcumin suppressed the elevated levels of TNF-alpha, PGE2 and MDA and was able to restore blood GSH levels. Reduction in liver contents of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), selenium (Se) and iron (Fe) was recorded after irradiation of animals before induction of inflammation. Curcumin restored the hepatic concentrations of these trace elements. The present results suggest that irradiation of rats caused marked changes in the inflammatory response while curcumin suppressed the inflammatory response in both irradiated and control animals.

  3. Acute and delayed toxicities of total body irradiation

    Deeg, H.J.

    1983-12-01

    Total body irradiation is being used with increasing frequency for the treatment of lymphopoietic malignancies and in preparation for marrow transplantation. Acute toxicities include reversible gastroeneritis, mucositis, myelosuppression alopecia. As the success of treatment improves and more patients become long-term survivors, manifestations of delayed and chronic toxicity become evident. These include impairment of growth and development, gonadal failure and sterility, cataract formation and possibly secondary malignancies. The contribution of total body irradiation to the development of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis is still poorly understood. Some of these changes are reversible or correctable, whereas others are permanent. Nevertheless, until equally effective but less toxic regimens become available, total body irradiation appears to be the treatment of choice to prepare patients with leukemia for marrow transplantation.

  4. Acute and delayed toxicities of total body irradiation

    Total body irradiation is being used with increasing frequency for the treatment of lymphopoietic malignancies and in preparation for marrow transplantation. Acute toxicities include reversible gastroeneritis, mucositis, myelosuppression alopecia. As the success of treatment improves and more patients become long-term survivors, manifestations of delayed and chronic toxicity become evident. These include impairment of growth and development, gonadal failure and sterility, cataract formation and possibly secondary malignancies. The contribution of total body irradiation to the development of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis is still poorly understood. Some of these changes are reversible or correctable, whereas others are permanent. Nevertheless, until equally effective but less toxic regimens become available, total body irradiation appears to be the treatment of choice to prepare patients with leukemia for marrow transplantation

  5. MRI evaluation of rabbit bone marrow after acute irradiation

    Background: magnetic resonance imaging is a safe modality and useful in characterizing normal and abnormal bone marrow. magnetic resonance imaging also presents a more global view of bone marrow than biopsy; therefore , it may provide a better understanding of hematologic disorders. The purpose of this study was to monitor radiation-induced alterations of bone marrow in acute phase of irradiation (1-10 day after total body irradiation with conventional magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: twelve New Zealand adult male white rabbits (10 for total body irradiation and 2 as controls) were irradiated to 6 Gy gamma rays. magnetic resonance imaging was performed for each rabbit femoral marrow and marginal muscles around femur region (as internal control) using T1-weighted (W) and SPIR (TR/TE 631/15) techniques before and after (24h, 48h, 72h, 5d, 10d) post total body irradiation. Results: the results were expressed as MR signal ratio (mean MR signal of femur/mean MR signal of muscle). The bone marrow MR- signal intensity values were subsequently compared to the histologic values of bone marrow cellularity, edema and hemorrhage. Values of T1-signal intensity of bone marrow for 1 to 5 days after irradiation was smaller than those the values for before irradiation data (P< 0.006) SPIR-signal intensity values of bone marrow in 3, 5 and 10 days were less than values for before irradiation (P<0.001). Since signal intensity depends to edema and hemorrhage the high correlation between cellularity and T1-signal intensity (r=0.725, P= 0.018) or SPIR-SI (r= 0.814, P 0.004) was not found. Conclusion: This study indicated that radiation-induced modification of bone marrow-signal intensity is tightly linked to the parameters like decline of all hematopoietic cell lines, edema and hemorrhage. IT was concluded that magnetic resonance imaging can distinguish normal from irradiated bone marrow so that radiation-induced alterations in bone marrow could be assessed with

  6. The acute toxicity of ethanol extract from irradiated Temulawak (curcuma xanthorrizha roxb.) which have anticancer activity

    Pasteurization of herbs and herbal medicinal products have been carried out by several herbal industries, but information about the safety of irradiated herbal medicine is still a little, even the influence of gamma irradiation for pasteurization purpose on the toxicity of crude Temulawak has never been investigated. The ethanol extract of Curcuma xanthorrizha Roxb. has cytotoxic activity which potential as an anticancer. In this research, the acute toxicity tests were carried out to the ethanol extract from Curcuma xanthorrizha without irradiation and irradiated with doses of 5 and 10 kGy. The acute toxicity tests of ethanol extract were conducted in mice by observing the effect of extracts on animal behavior (pharmacologic profile) after a single dose of test material, the development of animal body weight and death every day for 14 days and observed several organ weights on day 14. Acute toxicity test results after administration of extracts on male and female mice a dose up to 7500 mg/kg body weight (BW) showed that no deaths and no significant toxic effect, so that the ethanol extract of Curcuma xanthorrizha without irradiation and irradiated with doses of 5 and 10 kGy can be declared safe. Thus LD50 from ethanol extract of Curcuma xanthorrizha without irradiation and irradiated (5 and 10 kGY) in mice was greater than 7500 mg/kg body weight. (author)

  7. Corticosteroids prevent acute lung dysfunction caused by thoracic irradiation in unanesthetized sheep

    We sought to determine the effect of corticosteroid therapy in a new acute model of oxidant lung injury, thoracic irradiation in awake sheep. Sheep were irradiated with 1,500 rads to the whole chest except for blocking the heart and adjacent ventral lung. Seven experimental sheep were given methylprednisolone (1 g intravenously every 6 h for four doses) and thoracic irradiation; control sheep received only irradiation. In irradiated control sheep, lung lymph flow increased from baseline (7.6 ml/h) to peak at 3 h (13.2), and lung lymph protein clearance increased from 5.1 to 9.7 ml/h. Mean pulmonary artery pressure increased in the irradiated control sheep from 19 to 32.4 cm H2O, whereas the lung lymph thromboxane concentration increased from 0.09 to 6.51 ng/ml at 3 h. Arterial oxygen tension in irradiated control sheep fell gradually from 86 mm Hg at baseline to 65 mm Hg at 8 h. Methylprednisolone administration significantly prevented the increase in lung lymph protein clearance, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and lung lymph thromboxane concentration. Methylprednisolone also prevented the fall in arterial oxygen tension after thoracic irradiation, but did not prevent a further decrease in lymphocytes in blood or lung lymph after radiation. We conclude that corticosteroid therapy prevents most of the acute physiologic changes caused by thoracic irradiation in awake sheep

  8. Radiation-induced and postirradiation changes in forest biogeocenosis after acute gamma-irradiation

    A study was made of the entomological destruction of pine tress in a pine/birch forest subjected to acute irradiation with doses ranging within the stand from 1 to 230 Gy. A sharp increase in number of xylogenous insects was noted in the exposed forest on the 4th year after irradiation. The degree of setting of xylophagous insects on tress was shown to depend upon the developmental class of a t tree and the absorbed dose

  9. Mitochondrial DNA alterations of peripheral lymphocytes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients undergoing total body irradiation therapy

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations, including mtDNA copy number and mtDNA 4977 bp common deletion (CD), are key indicators of irradiation-induced damage. The relationship between total body irradiation (TBI) treatment and mtDNA alterations in vivo, however, has not been postulated yet. The aim of this study is to analyze mtDNA alterations in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients as well as to take them as predictors for radiatio...

  10. Pathology of breast cancer in women irradiated for acute postpartum mastitis

    The gross and microscopic pathology of breast cancers in women irradiated for acute postpartum mastitis was compared to the breast cancers found in the sisters of the irradiated women. In considering the lesions in the two populations, the size, location, histologic type, histologic grade, inflammatory response, lymphatic and blood vascular invasion, nipple involvement, axillary lymph node metastases, and menopausal status at the time of diagnosis were statistically indistinguishable. The only parameter that was different in the two populations was the desmoplastic response to the malignant lesion. The control population had more marked fibrosis within the cancers compared with the irradiated women

  11. Graft irradiation in the treatment of acute rejection of renal transplants: a randomized study

    A randomized study of graft irradiation in the treatment of acute rejection of renal transplants was conducted from 1978 to 1981. Patients developing clinical signs of an acute graft rejection received customary antirejection treatment in the form of intravenous administration of high-dose (1 gm per day) of methylprednisolone. They were at the same time randomized to either receive therapeutic irradiation (175 rad every other day to a total of 525 rad) or sham irradiation. Neither the patient nor the Transplant Service surgeons knew at any time whether the radiation treatment had been given. Eighty-three rejection episodes occurring in 64 grafts were entered into the study. Acute rejection was reversed in 84.5% of grafts in the control and 75% in the treated group. The incidence of recurrent rejection was higher in the treated group (66 vs. 46%) and graft survival was lower (22% vs. 54%). The study failed to demonstrate a beneficial effect of graft irradiation in the treatment of acute renal allograft rejection, when used in conjunction with high dose steriods

  12. Graft irradiation in the treatment of acute rejection of renal transplants: a randomized study

    Pilepich, M.V.; Anderson, C.B.; Etheredge, E.E.; Sicard, G.A.; Melzer, J.S.; Blum, J.

    1982-05-01

    A randomized study of graft irradiation in the treatment of acute rejection of renal transplants was conducted from 1978 to 1981. Patients developing clinical signs of an acute graft rejection received customary antirejection treatment in the form of intravenous administration of high-dose (1 gm per day) of methylprednisolone. They were at the same time randomized to either receive therapeutic irradiation (175 rad every other day to a total of 525 rad) or sham irradiation. Neither the patient nor the Transplant Service surgeons knew at any time whether the radiation treatment had been given. Eighty-three rejection episodes occurring in 64 grafts were entered into the study. Acute rejection was reversed in 84.5% of grafts in the control and 75% in the treated group. The incidence of recurrent rejection was higher in the treated group (66 vs. 46%) and graft survival was lower (22% vs. 54%). The study failed to demonstrate a beneficial effect of graft irradiation in the treatment of acute renal allograft rejection, when used in conjunction with high dose steriods.

  13. Investigation of the bystander effect in MRC5 cells after acute and fractionated irradiation in vitro

    Shokouhozaman Soleymanifard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE has been defined as radiation responses observed in nonirradiated cells. It has been the focus of investigators worldwide due to the deleterious effects it induces in nonirradiated cells. The present study was performed to investigate whether acute or fractionated irradiation will evoke a differential bystander response in MRC5 cells. A normal human cell line (MRC5, and a human lung tumor cell line (QU-DB were exposed to 0, 1, 2, and 4Gy of single acute or fractionated irradiation of equal fractions with a gap of 6 h. The MRC5 cells were supplemented with the media of irradiated cells and their micronucleus frequency was determined. The micronucleus frequency after single and fractionated irradiation did not vary significantly in the MRC5 cells conditioned with autologous or QU-DB cell-irradiated media, except for 4Gy where the frequency of micronucleated cells was lower in those MRC5 cells cultured in the media of QU-DB-exposed with a single dose of 4Gy. Our study demonstrates that the radiation-induced bystander effect was almost similar after single acute and fractionated exposure in MRC5 cells.

  14. Preventive central nervous system irradiation in children with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    In this study of children with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia an attempt was made to prevent central nervous system relapse and to determine whether this therapy, coupled with multiagent chemotherapy, would be successful in prolonging durations of complete remission. Central nervous system relapses were prevented by irradiation, although patients who received this therapy did no better than those who did not receive irradiation. A small group of patients received irradiation to the liver and spleen, but this modality also failed to improve the duration of remission. Control of extramedullary leukemia, in this study, failed to improve remission duration because bone marrow relapse was not prevented or delayed. It is unlikely that focal therapy will have a significant impact in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia until longer marrow remissions are achieved

  15. The Cellular Differences between Acute and Chronic Neutron and Gamma-Ray Irradiation in Mice

    Data on the shortening of the life span in mice by radiation show that an acute dose of gamma-rays may be as much as four times as effective as an equal dose of the same radiation administered chronically. However, for neutrons, chronic and acute administrations are equally effective. An analysis of these effects shows that for gamma-rays a certain fraction of the radiation injury is reparable, and that the value of this fraction depends on the dose and the dose rate. With neutrons, none of the damage appears reparable. For acute irradiation, the RBE is about 2 for shortening of the life span, but for chronic, may be as high as 8. Chromosome aberrations have been scored in liver cells of mice when treated with both chronic and acute doses of both gamma-rays and thermal neutrons. In all cases the percentage of aberrent cells is proportional to the shortening of the life span produced by the treatment. Further, with neutrons, acute and chronic irradiation is equally effective in producing chromosome abberations. For gamma-rays, acute irradiation may produce as much as four times the chromosomal damage as does chronic irradiation. This shows that some chromosomes can heal themselves following small doses of gamma-rays, but there is no chromosome healing following any dose of neutrons. The RBE using chromosome aberrations as a criterion is the same as for life shortening. These results give a firm cellular basis for the known biological differences between gamma rays and neutrons, and in addition give strong support to the concept that natural and radiation-induced aging are caused by spontaneous and radiation-induced mutations, respectively, in the somatic cells of animals. (author)

  16. Tentative therapy of acute abdominal irradiations of pigs

    The anatomical and physiological considerations that make pig an interesting experimental model for radiobiological investigations are first reviewed. The anatomo- and physico-pathological bases of therapy acute abdominal exposure are stated, especially the kinetics and limits of intestinal recovery at various doses. A therapeutic procedure is given and the experimental results on reanimation (parenteral alimentation), re-nutrition (continuous enteral infusion) and intestine grafts are presented

  17. Effects of osteoblasts on recovery of hematopoiesis and angiogenesis in acute irradiation injured mice

    Objective: To explore the effects of osteoblasts on the recovery of hematopoiesis and angiogenesis in acute irradiation injury mice. Methods: The femurs of 18 male BALB/c mice were used to prepare the bone marrow osteoblasts, and the rest mice were divided into 3 groups as normal group, saline group and osteoblast group. The mice in normal group received no treatment, and the other two groups were received 6.0 Gy 60Co γ-ray irradiation. After irradiation each mouse of osteoblast group was administered with 2 × 106 osteoblasts through tail vein injection, and equal volume saline was given to each mouse of saline group by the same way. The following factors were measured at 7, 14, 21 d after irradiation, they were the counts of peripheral blood cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC), the percentage of CD34 + cells in BMMNC, the histology changes and micro vascular density (MVD) of bone marrow tissue. Results: The counts of peripheral blood cells, BMMNC and hematopoietic tissue area in osteoblast group were higher than those in saline group.The percentage of CD34 + cells in BMMNC and the MVD of bone marrow in osteoblast group were also higher than those in saline group at 7, 14, 21 d after irradiation (t=2.46-64.51, P<0.05). Conclusions: Osteoblasts could significantly promote the recovery of hematopoiesis and angiogenesis in mice after acute irradiation injury. (authors)

  18. Acute radiation syndrome, c.aused by single whole-body external irradiation

    The general characteristic of conceptions of the material substrate of various forms and types of radiation injuries from the moment of a wide use of radiation energy and radioactive substances up to the present time, the dependence of structural changes on the type of ionizing radiation, dose and forms of its effect, are presented. The pathological anatomy of particular manifestations of acute radiation disease in various systems of the organism is described. The attention is paid to the variant of radiation disease taking place during non-uniform general irradiation. Local and general morphological changes which develop in skin, hyperdermic fat and skeleton muscles simultaneously in the zone of massive local effect against the background of the general radiation injury, are described for the first time. Delayed alterations in blood vessels and interstitial tissue after the acute radiation disease are described as well as the pathomorphology and histochemistry of trophic disorders in the acute and delayed periods of acute radiation disease

  19. Clinical analysis of patients with acute radiation syndrome due to total body irradiation or total lymphatic irradiation

    Objective: To study the severity of iatrogenic acute radiation syndrome, treatment, hematopoietic recovery and related complications in patients subjected to total body irradiation (TBI) or total lymphatic irradiation (TLI) prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods: 100 tumor patients (91 with leukemia and 9 with other tumors), after receiving 500∼1000 cGy (in an average of 738.6 cGy) of TBI or TLI with super high dose chemotherapy as conditioning regimen during the process of hemopoietic stem cell transplantation, developed severe or even extremely severe, mainly bone marrow form acute radiation syndrome. Results: The patients' white blood cell count once dropped to (0∼0.15) x 109/L, platelet count fell to (1∼17) x 109/L, bone marrow was depleted with only a few non-hemopoietic cells and rare hemopoietic cells, and a high risk of complicating with infection and hemorrhage was observed. Treated with a variety of measures including protective isolation, supportive care, administration of growth factors such as GM-CSF or G-CSF, blood component transfusion and effective antibiotics, 92 cases restored their normal hemopoiesis, while 8 cases died of infection or hemorrhage. The clinical course of these patients indicated that a majority of the patients with severe and extremely severe, iatrogenic acute radiation syndrome involving bone marrow could restore their normal hemopoiesis, and hemopoietic stem cell transplantation played an important role in the treatment. Conclusion: Hemopoietic stem cell transplantation and administration of growth factors are very useful for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome

  20. Effect of Acute and Chronic Gamma Irradiation on in vitro Growth of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni is a perennial herb that belongs to the family of Asteraceae. It is a natural sweetener plant known as sweet leaf, which is estimated to be 300 times sweeter than cane sugar. In this study, micropropagation and in vitro mutagenesis of this natural herb was successfully conducted. It was found that shoot tips on MS medium supplemented with 1 mg/l Kinetin showed the highest shoot induction and multiplication after 3 weeks of culture. Radiosensitivity test was conducted to identify the LD50 for in vitro stevia shoots and to select effective doses to be used for the in vitro mutagenesis. Shoot tips were irradiated with acute and chronic gamma radiation at 0, 10.00, 20.00, 30.00, 40.00, 60.00, and 80.00 Gy. At 60 Gy and 80 Gy, the shoot tips demonstrated 0 % survival, all were killed. LD50 for stevia (the dose that killed 50 % of the irradiated explants) was at 29 Gy. In this study, LD 50 for the stevia (the dose that killed 50 % of the irradiated explants) was at 29 Gy for acute irradiation and was at 45 Gy for chronic irradiation. The effective doses were selected at 10, 20 and 30 Gy. These three selected doses were applied for the in vitro mutagenesis of the stevia shoots. (author)

  1. Acute irradiation and muscular fibrosis. Development and characteristics in the pig

    This study was performed in an experimental porcin model of acute local irradiation chosen to simulate human accidents. It enabled to determine the development and the physiopathological characteristics of the fibrous tissue which developed in skeletal muscle. In the first month after irradiation the strong inflammatory reaction initiating the radiation induced fibrosis was characterized by edema as visualized on NMR imaging and by acute phase reactant protein changes, associated with elevations of local and general temperatures in irradiated animals. At the margin of the irradiated tissue, atypical fibroblasts isolated among collagen bundles or bunched in nodullary reinforcement were seen associated with intense capillary neogenesis. Several months after irradiation normal skeletal muscle was replaced by atrophic fibrosis delimited by an inflammatory perifibrotic tissue. The muscular fibrosis was characterized by a high atypical fibroblasts density and by an inflammatory distribution pattern of collagen types I, III, IV, laminin, fibronectin and fibrinogen as visualized by immunohistochemical methods. Biochemical results showed an increase in collagen content and synthesis in fibrotic tissue whereas perifibrotic zone synthesized more non collagenous proteins compared with the normal muscle. The contributions of granulation tissue, cellular mediators and inhibition of muscular regeneration to maintain the atrophic character of the muscular radiation induced fibrosis are discussed

  2. Acute effects of whole body gamma irradiation on exocrine pancreatic secretion in the pig

    Reports on radiation damage to the pancreas deal essentially with long-term morphological changes with few data on pancreatic exocrine function. The aim of this work was to study the acute effects of whole body irradiation on volume and enzyme activities in the pancreatic juice. A whole body gamma irradiation (6 Gy) was investigated in pigs with continuous sampling of pancreatic juice before and after exposure via an indwelling catheter in the pancreatic duct. For each sample collected, total protein concentration and enzyme activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, lipase and amylase were determined. Pancreatic juice volume was monitored during all periods of collection. The volume of pancreatic juice secreted daily decreased one day after irradiation and remained lower than the control values over the experimental period. Total proteins secreted in the pancreatic juice and total activities of pancreatic enzymes were reduced similarly. On the other hand, only specific activities of elastase and lipase were affected by irradiation. Whole body gamma irradiation resulted in a rapid and marked decrease of exocrine pancreatic secretion, in terms of volume as well as secreted enzymes. This may contribute in part to the intestinal manifestations of the acute and/or late radiation syndrome. (author)

  3. Acute effects of irradiation on exocrine pancreatic secretion in the pig

    Monti, P.; Scanff, P.; Joubert, C.; Vergnet, M.; Grison, S. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1997-03-01

    Several reports on irradiation damages to the pancreas deal essentially with long-term morphologic changes but give few informations on pancreatic exocrine function. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to study the effects of a whole body gamma irradiation on the volume and enzyme activities of the pancreatic juice. The volume of pancreatic juice daily secreted decreased one day after irradiation (-40%, p < 0.01) and remained lower that the control value all over the experimental period (-65%, p < 0.01). Same response was observed for the total proteins secreted in the pancreatic juice but significant decrease was observed only the fourth and the fifth days after irradiation. Therefore, concentration of total protein secreted in the pancreatic juice was not altered all over the experimental period. Total activities of proteolytic enzymes, lipase and amylase led to decrease on day after irradiation and except for trypsin, the attenuated activity became significant from the third day after exposure. On the other hand, specific activities of the proteolytic enzymes and amylase did not show marked modifications after irradiation, whereas lipase specific activity was decreased. In conclusion, a whole body gamma irradiation resulted in a rapid and marked decrease of exocrine pancreatic secretion, in terms of volume as well as secreted enzymes. These modifications may, in part, contribute to the malabsorption of nutrients and these acute effects may be due to some modifications in the regulation of the exocrine pancreatic secretion

  4. Acute effects of irradiation on exocrine pancreatic secretion in the pig

    Several reports on irradiation damages to the pancreas deal essentially with long-term morphologic changes but give few informations on pancreatic exocrine function. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to study the effects of a whole body gamma irradiation on the volume and enzyme activities of the pancreatic juice. The volume of pancreatic juice daily secreted decreased one day after irradiation (-40%, p < 0.01) and remained lower that the control value all over the experimental period (-65%, p < 0.01). Same response was observed for the total proteins secreted in the pancreatic juice but significant decrease was observed only the fourth and the fifth days after irradiation. Therefore, concentration of total protein secreted in the pancreatic juice was not altered all over the experimental period. Total activities of proteolytic enzymes, lipase and amylase led to decrease on day after irradiation and except for trypsin, the attenuated activity became significant from the third day after exposure. On the other hand, specific activities of the proteolytic enzymes and amylase did not show marked modifications after irradiation, whereas lipase specific activity was decreased. In conclusion, a whole body gamma irradiation resulted in a rapid and marked decrease of exocrine pancreatic secretion, in terms of volume as well as secreted enzymes. These modifications may, in part, contribute to the malabsorption of nutrients and these acute effects may be due to some modifications in the regulation of the exocrine pancreatic secretion

  5. An Acute Transverse Myelitis Attack after Total Body Irradiation: A Rare Case

    Muzaffer Keklik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Total body irradiation (TBI combined with chemotherapy is widely used as a pretreatment regimen of bone marrow transplantation (BMT in hematologic disorders. Late complications related to TBI as part of the conditioning regimen for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been revealed. Acute transverse myelitis (ATM is a neurological syndrome characterized by disorder of motor, sensorial, and autonomic nerves, and tracts at medulla spinalis, which is resulted from involvement of spinal cord. In this paper, we presented an ATM attack developed after TBI in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL as it is a rarely seen case.

  6. Glioblastoma multiforme following prophylactic cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate in a child with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    Cases of radiation-induced glioma in humans are extremely rare. A 2-year-old boy with acute lymphocytic leukemia had received prophylactic cranial irradiation (2400 rad/2 1/2 weeks) and intrathecal methotrexate. Five years later he developed a glioblastoma multiforme on the left cerebral hemisphere while the leukemia was in remission. This is the first reported association of these disorders. It is possible that the glioma may have been induced by radiation and/or chemotherapy

  7. An Acute Transverse Myelitis Attack after Total Body Irradiation: A Rare Case

    Ali Unal; Bulent Eser; Mustafa Cetin; Cigdem Pala; Serife Cingoz; Celalettin Eroglu; Serdar Sivgin; Leylagul Kaynar; Afra Yildirim; Muzaffer Keklik

    2013-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) combined with chemotherapy is widely used as a pretreatment regimen of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in hematologic disorders. Late complications related to TBI as part of the conditioning regimen for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been revealed. Acute transverse myelitis (ATM) is a neurological syndrome characterized by disorder of motor, sensorial, and autonomic nerves, and tracts at medulla spinalis, which is resulted from involvement of spina...

  8. Antioxidant Capacities and Total Phenolic Contents Enhancement with Acute Gamma Irradiation in Curcuma alismatifolia (Zingiberaceae) Leaves

    Sima Taheri; Thohirah Lee Abdullah; Ehsan Karimi; Ehsan Oskoueian; Mahdi Ebrahimi

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted in order to assess the effect of various doses of acute gamma irradiation (0, 10, 15, and 20 Gy) on the improvement of bioactive compounds and their antioxidant properties of Curcuma alismatifolia var. Sweet pink. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC) analysis uncovered that various types of phenolic, flavonoid compounds, and fatty acids gradually altered in response to radiation doses. On the other hand, antioxidant act...

  9. Continuous, pulsed or single acute irradiation of a transplanted rodent tumour model

    Background: Recent advances in remote afterloading pulsed mode brachytherapy have provided a much needed tool for the radiation oncologist. It has the versatility of optimised physical dose distribution along with improved staff radiation protection and patient nursing. Purpose: This preliminary study was designed to explore the radiobiological equivalence between conventional continuous low dose rate tumour irradiation (CLDR) and the new technique of pulsed dose irradiation (PDR). Materials and methods: Subcutaneous isogenic sarcomas transplanted in female John's Strain Wistar rats were irradiated locally with acute, pulsed or continuous interstitial low dose-rate exposures at 9-11 mm mean diameter. Results: As expected, single acute doses (5-40 Gy) were more effective (P < 0.01) in achieving tumour growth delay (1.4 days/Gy) than CLDR exposure (4-51 Gy) over 24-48 h (0.93 days/Gy). However, PDR treatment (8 hourly fractions/day) at high dose-rate (8-48Gy) over 8-72 h was significantly (P = 0.01) more effective (1.66 days/Gy) than CLDR but not acute exposures. Conclusions: These data suggest that, clinically a significantly improved therapeutic ratio may also be achievable with pulsed high dose rate brachytherapy, and that further radiobiological studies with in-vivo tumour models are needed

  10. Growth in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with and without prophylactic cranial irradiation

    Moell, C.; Garwicz, S.; Marky, L.; Melander, L.; Karlberg, J.

    1988-01-01

    Growth and weight gain were studied longitudinally over a period of four years in thirty-nine children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The children were divided into two groups according to treatment. Twenty-eight children were given prophylactic cranial irradiation and eleven children were treated without such irradiation. The duration of cytostatic treatment was three years in all cases. Average growth during the first two years was similar in the two groups, and the standard deviation scores (SDS) were below average. The rate of growth during the fourth year was significantly higher among those children who had not received cranial irradiation. After four years the average attained height had declined 0.5 SD for children treated with cranial irradiation and 0.2 SD for children without such treatment. Attained weight after four years had increased 0.4 SD more among those children who had not received irradiation. The results suggest that prophylactic cranial irradiation is responsible for the greater part of the prepubertal growth inhibition in these children. (authors).

  11. Growth in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with and without prophylactic cranial irradiation

    Growth and weight gain were studied longitudinally over a period of four years in thirty-nine children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The children were divided into two groups according to treatment. Twenty-eight children were given prophylactic cranial irradiation and eleven children were treated without such irradiation. The duration of cytostatic treatment was three years in all cases. Average growth during the first two years was similar in the two groups, and the standard deviation scores (SDS) were below average. The rate of growth during the fourth year was significantly higher among those children who had not received cranial irradiation. After four years the average attained height had declined 0.5 SD for children treated with cranial irradiation and 0.2 SD for children without such treatment. Attained weight after four years had increased 0.4 SD more among those children who had not received irradiation. The results suggest that prophylactic cranial irradiation is responsible for the greater part of the prepubertal growth inhibition in these children. (authors)

  12. Acute and long-term effects of irradiation on pine (Pinus silvestris) stands post-Chernobyl

    Arkhipov, N.P.; Kuchma, N.D. (Department of Radiology and Land Restoration, Pripyat Research and Industrial Association, Chernobyl (Ukraine)); Askbrant, S. (National Radiation Protection Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)); Pasternak, P.S.; Musica, V.V. (Lyes Research and Industrial Association, Kharykov (Ukraine))

    1994-10-14

    The effect of ionizing irradiation on the viability of pine stands after the fallout from the damaged nuclear energy plant at Chernobyl (ChNPP) was shown within the territory of the 10-km zone. During the period 1986-1991, irradiated and damaged forest stands, so-called 'red forest', located in this area were systematically classified by observation. Mortality rate, re-establishment, development of tree canopies, reproduction anomalies and stand viability were shown to be dependent on absorbed irradiation dose, on the age of the stand and on forest composition. For pine stands in the acutely affected zone, doses of more than 60 Gy resulted in a massive mortality and no regeneration of pine trees since 1987. The injured trees had burned or had dried-up. The drying process was accelerated by a massive production of pathogenic insects invading the dying trees. Specifically, irradiation doses of 10-60 Gy, 1-10 Gy and 0.1-1 Gy caused high, medium and low injury to the forest stands, respectively. Doses of less than 0.1 Gy did not cause any visible damage to the trees. In 1987, repair processes were displayed by the tree canopies and practically the entire viability of the forest stands had recovered except for trees in the acute and highly affected zones. The young forest was reestablished in the same place as the perished trees and new pine saplings were planted on the reclaimed areas.

  13. Studies on acute toxicity and mutagenicity of 60Co irradiated pollens

    The acute toxicity test showed that the oral LD50 values were >21500 mg/kg for male and female mice, indicating that irradiated pollens belong to low toxicity grade or practically non-toxic. Mutagenicity were studied in three short-term tests. Ames test showed that irradiated pollens did not induce mutation towards strains TA99, TA97, TA100 and TA102. Micronucleus test in the bone marrow cells indicated that the percentage of polychromatic erythrocytes with micronuclei in exposed groups had no significant difference in comparison with the controlled ones. Chromosomal test for reproduction cells showed that the increase of chromosomal aberration rate was not observed. All the above results suggest that irradiated pollens are safe for human consumption

  14. Kidney and lung injury in irradiated rats protected from acute death by partial-body shielding

    Ninety-six CD-1 male rats were exposed to gamma-ray doses (0-25 Gy) in increments of 5 Gy. One femur, the surgically exteriorized GI tract, and the oral cavity were shielded during irradiation to protect against acute mortality from injury to the hematopoietic system, small intestine, and oral cavity. In addition, the thoraxes of half of the animals from each dose group were shielded. At approximately monthly intervals from 2 to 10 months after irradiation the hematocrit, plasma urea nitrogen (PUN), and 51Cr-EDTA clearance were measured. During the study 20 thorax-shielded and 19 thorax-irradiated animals died. All rats whose thoraxes received 25 Gy irradiation and three out of seven rats whose thoraxes received 20 Gy died 1 to 3 months postirradiation with massive pleural fluid accumulation. Shielding the thoraxes prevented this mode of death at these doses. Kidney injury was judged to be the primary cause of death of all thorax-shielded animals and 15- and 20-Gy thorax-irradiated animals. Animals with kidney damage had elevated PUN and reduced 51Cr-EDTA clearance and hematocrits. The relative merits of each of these end points in assessing radiation-induced kidney injury after total-body exposure are discussed

  15. Effects of acute and chronic gamma irradiation on the shoot apex and general morphology of Lupinus albus L

    Lupinus albus L. plants were grown from seeds and irradiated at various stages of development with acute or chronic gamma rays. All plants were greenhouse grown (pre- and post-irradiation) and allowed to proceed through their normal growth cycle. The purpose of these experiments was to establish a Plactochron Index for Lupinus albus L. and to determine the effects of acute and chronic irradiation on development at the macro and microscopic levels. A Plastochron Index was calculated and used as an indirect time scale to evaluate the effects of gamma rays from a common base line. Acute radiation treatment lasted for a period of a few days, whereas chronic treatment was initiated at the seedling stage and lasted for the entire growth season. Vegetative plants were used to study the effects of acute radiation exposure on apical meristem morphology, Plastochron Index, phyllatoxis and gross morphology

  16. Microwave thermographic measures after acute localized irradiation in pigs: acquisition and analysis methods

    The determination of the size and intensity of a radiolesion after an acute localized irradiation has not yet found an adequate solution by clinicians, in spite of using telethermography and vascular scintigraphy methods. By taking the pig as an experimental model, whose skin and muscle closely resemble those of man, we tested a new atraumatic investigation method i.e. microwave thermography, after acute localized irradiation on the thigh. From a qualitative point of view thermographic images enabled us to delimit thermal reaging areas and to follow inflammatory rises even in the absence of obvious erythematous reactions. Further quantitative studies demonstrated a dose-effect relationship (dose versus thermal reaction intensity) between 30 and 84 Gy. Comparison of superficial measurements using a thermistance on the one hand, and deep measurements with a 3gHz microwave probe on the other hand, enabled us to discriminate between low levels (30-40 Gy) of irradiation leading to self-healing lesions, and high level ones (64-84 Gy) which will induce a large necrotized area as well as a persistent ulcer

  17. Pediatric Craniospinal Axis Irradiation With Helical Tomotherapy: Patient Outcome and Lack of Acute Pulmonary Toxicity

    Purpose: To present the patient outcomes and risk of symptomatic acute radiation pneumonitis (ARP) in 18 pediatric patients treated with helical tomotherapy to their craniospinal axis for a variety of neoplasms. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 patients received craniospinal axis irradiation with helical tomotherapy. The median age was 12 years (range, 2.5-21). The follow-up range was 3-48 months (median, 16.5). Of the 18 patients, 15 received chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, or concomitant setting. Chemotherapy was tailored to the particular histologic diagnosis; 10 of 18 patients underwent surgical removal of the gross primary tumor. The patients were followed and evaluated for ARP starting at 3-6 months after completion of craniospinal axis irradiation. ARP was graded using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3. Results: At the last follow-up visit, 14, 2, and 2 patients were alive without disease, alive with disease, and dead of disease, respectively. The cause-specific survival rate was 89% (16 of 18), disease-free survival rate was 78% (14 of 18), and overall survival rate was 89% (16 of 18). No patient had treatment failure at the cribriform plate. No patient developed symptoms of ARP. Conclusion: Craniospinal axis irradiation using helical tomotherapy yielded encouraging patient outcomes and acute toxicity profiles. Although large volumes of the lung received low radiation doses, no patient developed symptoms of ARP during the follow-up period.

  18. Low Doses of Oxygen Ion Irradiation Cause Acute Damage to Hematopoietic Cells in Mice.

    Chang, Jianhui; Luo, Yi; Wang, Yingying; Pathak, Rupak; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Jones, Tamako; Mao, Xiao Wen; Nelson, Gregory; Boerma, Marjan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    One of the major health risks to astronauts is radiation on long-duration space missions. Space radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays consists primarily of 85% protons, 14% helium nuclei and 1% high-energy high-charge (HZE) particles, such as oxygen (16O), carbon, silicon, and iron ions. HZE particles exhibit dense linear tracks of ionization associated with clustered DNA damage and often high relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Therefore, new knowledge of risks from HZE particle exposures must be obtained. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of low doses of 16O irradiation on the hematopoietic system. Specifically, we exposed C57BL/6J mice to 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n) irradiation and examined the effects on peripheral blood (PB) cells, and bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) at two weeks after the exposure. The results showed that the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased in PB after exposure to 1.0 Gy, but not to 0.1 or 0.25 Gy. However, both the frequency and number of HPCs and HSCs were reduced in a radiation dose-dependent manner in comparison to un-irradiated controls. Furthermore, HPCs and HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant reduction in clonogenic function determined by the colony-forming and cobblestone area-forming cell assays. These acute adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), enhanced cell cycle entry of quiescent HSCs, and increased DNA damage. However, none of the 16O exposures induced apoptosis in HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces acute BM injury in a dose-dependent manner primarily via increasing ROS production, cell cycling, and DNA damage in HSCs. This finding may aid in developing novel strategies in the protection of the hematopoietic

  19. Low Doses of Oxygen Ion Irradiation Cause Acute Damage to Hematopoietic Cells in Mice.

    Jianhui Chang

    Full Text Available One of the major health risks to astronauts is radiation on long-duration space missions. Space radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays consists primarily of 85% protons, 14% helium nuclei and 1% high-energy high-charge (HZE particles, such as oxygen (16O, carbon, silicon, and iron ions. HZE particles exhibit dense linear tracks of ionization associated with clustered DNA damage and often high relative biological effectiveness (RBE. Therefore, new knowledge of risks from HZE particle exposures must be obtained. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of low doses of 16O irradiation on the hematopoietic system. Specifically, we exposed C57BL/6J mice to 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n irradiation and examined the effects on peripheral blood (PB cells, and bone marrow (BM hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs at two weeks after the exposure. The results showed that the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased in PB after exposure to 1.0 Gy, but not to 0.1 or 0.25 Gy. However, both the frequency and number of HPCs and HSCs were reduced in a radiation dose-dependent manner in comparison to un-irradiated controls. Furthermore, HPCs and HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant reduction in clonogenic function determined by the colony-forming and cobblestone area-forming cell assays. These acute adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, enhanced cell cycle entry of quiescent HSCs, and increased DNA damage. However, none of the 16O exposures induced apoptosis in HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces acute BM injury in a dose-dependent manner primarily via increasing ROS production, cell cycling, and DNA damage in HSCs. This finding may aid in developing novel strategies in the protection of the

  20. DNA damage focus analysis in blood samples of minipigs reveals acute partial body irradiation.

    Andreas Lamkowski

    Full Text Available Radiation accidents frequently involve acute high dose partial body irradiation leading to victims with radiation sickness and cutaneous radiation syndrome that implements radiation-induced cell death. Cells that are not lethally hit seek to repair ionizing radiation (IR induced damage, albeit at the expense of an increased risk of mutation and tumor formation due to misrepair of IR-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs. The response to DNA damage includes phosphorylation of histone H2AX in the vicinity of DSBs, creating foci in the nucleus whose enumeration can serve as a radiation biodosimeter. Here, we investigated γH2AX and DNA repair foci in peripheral blood lymphocytes of Göttingen minipigs that experienced acute partial body irradiation (PBI with 49 Gy (± 6% Co-60 γ-rays of the upper lumbar region. Blood samples taken 4, 24 and 168 hours post PBI were subjected to γ-H2AX, 53BP1 and MRE11 focus enumeration. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL of 49 Gy partial body irradiated minipigs were found to display 1-8 DNA damage foci/cell. These PBL values significantly deceed the high foci numbers observed in keratinocyte nuclei of the directly γ-irradiated minipig skin regions, indicating a limited resident time of PBL in the exposed tissue volume. Nonetheless, PBL samples obtained 4 h post IR in average contained 2.2% of cells displaying a pan-γH2AX signal, suggesting that these received a higher IR dose. Moreover, dispersion analysis indicated partial body irradiation for all 13 minipigs at 4 h post IR. While dose reconstruction using γH2AX DNA repair foci in lymphocytes after in vivo PBI represents a challenge, the DNA damage focus assay may serve as a rapid, first line indicator of radiation exposure. The occurrence of PBLs with pan-γH2AX staining and of cells with relatively high foci numbers that skew a Poisson distribution may be taken as indicator of acute high dose partial body irradiation, particularly when samples are available

  1. Plasmatic and thermographic consequences of local acute irradiation; a qualitative and quantitative analysis in the pig

    Acute phase reactant proteins associated with thermographic measurements and enzymatic activity assays in plasma were carried out on 39 pigs, following local exposure of the thigh to a collimated source of iridium 192 at doses ranging between 30 and 84 Gy (2 cm depth dose). The inflammatory response after irradiation, from day 1 to day 30 was accompanied by plasma protein changes associated with an elevation of local and general temperatures in irradiated animals. Degenerative processes in muscle led to an increase of plasmatic creatine kinase and lactate-dehydrogenase. Results were developed qualitatively (distribution pattern of proteins, thermographic measurements, enzymatic activities and clinical evolution of the lesions) and qualitatively (plasma level of creatine kinase versus applied radiation doses and pharmalogical treatments)

  2. Total body irradiation and syngeneic marrow transplantation in an inbred rat model of acute myelogenous leukemia

    While acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) occurs rarely in laboratory animals, over 20 model systems have been reported. One of these, AML of the inbred Wistar/Furth rat, has been shown to be pathophysiologically similar to human AML. Ten days after intravenous inoculation of 1.0 x 106 cells of a tissue culture grown clonal line, rats demonstrated peripheral blood leukemia, replacement of greater than 90% of the bone marrow with distinctive malignant myeloblasts and a syndrome of hypermuramidase (lysozyme) emia and muramidasuria. Total body irradiation (TBI) at 10 days after leukemia cell passage with a marrow lethal dose (950 rad, 140 rad/min, 137Cs source, 663 kV) followed by intravenous inoculation of 5.0 x 108/kg viable syngeneic bone marrow cells produced transient complete remissions. Repopulation with transplanted marrow was detected along with increasing numbers of recognizable W/Fu AML cells in peripheral blood, marrow, and central nervous system. The delayed leukemia relapse in irradiated transplanted rats compared to irradiated non-transplanted controls suggests an interaction between surviving W/Fu AML cells and transplanted marrow. This model may be of value in studies designing a therapeutic interaction against AML by donor marrow in the chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and total body irradiated patient

  3. Mitochondrial DNA alterations of peripheral lymphocytes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients undergoing total body irradiation therapy

    Ji Fuyun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA alterations, including mtDNA copy number and mtDNA 4977 bp common deletion (CD, are key indicators of irradiation-induced damage. The relationship between total body irradiation (TBI treatment and mtDNA alterations in vivo, however, has not been postulated yet. The aim of this study is to analyze mtDNA alterations in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients as well as to take them as predictors for radiation toxicity. Methods Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated from 26 ALL patients 24 hours after TBI preconditioning (4.5 and 9 Gy, respectively. Extracted DNA was analyzed by real-time PCR method. Results Average 2.31 times mtDNA and 0.53 fold CD levels were observed after 4.5 Gy exposure compared to their basal levels. 9 Gy TBI produced a greater response of both mtDNA and CD levels than 4.5 Gy. Significant inverse correlation was found between mtDNA content and CD level at 4.5 and 9 Gy (P = 0.037 and 0.048. Moreover, mtDNA content of lymphocytes without irradiation was found to be correlated to age. Conclusions mtDNA and CD content may be considered as predictive factors to radiation toxicity.

  4. The use of chromosomic anomalies for the estimation of an accidental acute irradiation dose in man

    The induction of chromosome abnormalities (dicentrics, rings and fragments) in human blood samples subjected to cobalt 60 gamma irradiation was studied for 11 doses varying from 25 to 1800 rads. The chromosome aberrations were counted in lymphocytes after 48 hours of in vitro culture. The results obtained from the observation of 6400 cells made it possible to establish dose-effect relationships for each types of abnormality (dicentrics, dicentrics and rings, and fragments). The dose-effect relationships were used to estimate doses received by 9 workers submitted to relatively homogeneous global acute irradiation and for which an evaluation of the average absorbed dose was possible. There is in general a good agreement between the estimation of the average absorbed dose based on chromosome damage and the physical dosimeter data. The study of the time-dependent evolution of the chromosome abnormalities in the lymphocytes of irradiated subjects shows that dosimetric estimations based on lymphocyte chromosome abnormalities in human blood are valid for several weeks after irradiation

  5. Mitochondrial DNA alterations of peripheral lymphocytes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients undergoing total body irradiation therapy

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations, including mtDNA copy number and mtDNA 4977 bp common deletion (CD), are key indicators of irradiation-induced damage. The relationship between total body irradiation (TBI) treatment and mtDNA alterations in vivo, however, has not been postulated yet. The aim of this study is to analyze mtDNA alterations in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients as well as to take them as predictors for radiation toxicity. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated from 26 ALL patients 24 hours after TBI preconditioning (4.5 and 9 Gy, respectively). Extracted DNA was analyzed by real-time PCR method. Average 2.31 times mtDNA and 0.53 fold CD levels were observed after 4.5 Gy exposure compared to their basal levels. 9 Gy TBI produced a greater response of both mtDNA and CD levels than 4.5 Gy. Significant inverse correlation was found between mtDNA content and CD level at 4.5 and 9 Gy (P = 0.037 and 0.048). Moreover, mtDNA content of lymphocytes without irradiation was found to be correlated to age. mtDNA and CD content may be considered as predictive factors to radiation toxicity

  6. Acute Radiation Syndrome Severity Score System in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    Ossetrova, Natalia I; Ney, Patrick H; Condliffe, Donald P; Krasnopolsky, Katya; Hieber, Kevin P

    2016-08-01

    Radiation accidents or terrorist attacks can result in serious consequences for the civilian population and for military personnel responding to such emergencies. The early medical management situation requires quantitative indications for early initiation of cytokine therapy in individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and effective triage tools for first responders in mass-casualty radiological incidents. Previously established animal (Mus musculus, Macaca mulatta) total-body irradiation (γ-exposure) models have evaluated a panel of radiation-responsive proteins that, together with peripheral blood cell counts, create a multiparametic dose-predictive algorithm with a threshold for detection of ~1 Gy from 1 to 7 d after exposure as well as demonstrate the acute radiation syndrome severity score systems created similar to the Medical Treatment Protocols for Radiation Accident Victims developed by Fliedner and colleagues. The authors present a further demonstration of the acute radiation sickness severity score system in a mouse (CD2F1, males) TBI model (1-14 Gy, Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min) based on multiple biodosimetric endpoints. This includes the acute radiation sickness severity Observational Grading System, survival rate, weight changes, temperature, peripheral blood cell counts and radiation-responsive protein expression profile: Flt-3 ligand, interleukin 6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, and serum amyloid A. Results show that use of the multiple-parameter severity score system facilitates identification of animals requiring enhanced monitoring after irradiation and that proteomics are a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposure, enhancing accuracy and discrimination index for acute radiation sickness response categories and early prediction of outcome. PMID:27356057

  7. Technical relapsed testicular irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia; Tecnica de irradiacion para testiculos en recidiva de leucemia linfoblastica aguda

    Velazquez Miranda, S.; Delgado Gil, M. M.; Ortiz Siedel, M.; Munoz Carmona, D. M.; Gomez-Barcelona, J.

    2011-07-01

    Testicular irradiation in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia presents difficulties in relation to daily positioning, dosimetry for dose homogenization of complex geometry and volume change during irradiation thereof. This can lead to significant deviations from the prescribed doses. In addition, the usual techniques often associated with unnecessary irradiation of pelvic simphysis, anus and perineum. This, in the case of pediatric patients, is of great importance, since doses in the vicinity of 20 Gy are associated with a deviation of bone growth, low testosterone levels around 24 Gy and high rates of generation of second tumors. To overcome these problems we propose a special restraint in prone and non-coplanar irradiation.

  8. Acute effects of gamma irradiation on vascular arterial tone; Effets aigus d`une irradiation gamma sur le tonus vasculaire arteriel

    Bourlier, V.; Diserbo, M.; Multon, E.; Verdetti, J.; Fatome, M.

    1995-12-31

    In rat aortic rings, we showed an increase in arterial tone during irradiation. This effect is acute reversible. This effect is only observed on pre-contracted rings and needs the integrity of vascular endothelium. The molecular mechanism of this effect is discussed. (author). 4 refs.

  9. Safety evaluation of the ethyl acetate extract on irradiated tea parasite: Acute toxicity study on mice

    Many studies of the pharmacological efficacy of tea parasite and the use of ionizing radiation for decontamination of microbes and extending shelf life have been reported, but there is no information on its safety, such as the acute toxicity. In this study, the acute toxicity of two ethyl acetate extracts from unirradiated and irradiated (irradiation dose of 10 kGy) tea parasites Scurrula atropurpurea on Swiss Webster mice have been examined. The observation was done after the treatment of a single oral dose of ethyl acetate extract in various dose groups, i.e.: control (0 g/kg of mice body weight), D1 (0.625 g/kg), D2 (1.25 g/kg), D3 (2.5 g/kg) D4 (5 g/kg), D5 (10 g/kg) by observing the effect on behavioral response (pharmacological profile), the body weight gains and mortality until the day 14th. At the last day, the observation of vital organs has also been done. The result showed that no acute toxicity was found in mice treated with a single oral dose of ethyl acetate extract from unirradiated tea parasite and irradiated tea parasite at the dose of 10 kGy. At the dose up to 10 g/kg (equivalent to 77.6 g of extract which administered to human), the normal body weight gains were observed in mice of all dose groups, no mice deaths in any of the dose groups, and no significant change (p > 0.05) in organ weights relative to the body weight i.e.: liver, spleen, kidneys, lung, heart, testes and seminal vesicle (for male), and ovaries and uterus (for female). The approximate lethal doses for male and female mice were determined to be higher than 10 g/kg of mice body weight. It is suggested that the treatment of ethyl acetate extract from unirradiated and irradiated tea parasites until dose up to 10 g/kg of mice body weight was still safe. (author)

  10. Higher frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after in vitro gamma irradiation

    A Ramyar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in childhood, characterized by excess lymphoblasts, and immature white blood cells that are continuously multiplying and overproducing in the bone marrow. The aim of this investigation was to measure the sensitivity of lymphocytes against gamma irradiation in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and also find out the effect of such irradiations in causing chromosomal abnormalities.Methods: In this investigation performed between April 2010 and July 2011, at the Department of Genetics, Cancer Institute of Iran, we studied the effects of gamma irradiation on the lymphocytes of 20 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The lymphocytes of 30 healthy donors were used to establish as a normal response to gamma irradiation and seven age-matched ataxia telangiectasia patients were recruited as positive control. The chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed with the G2- and the G0-assay. We compared the mean number of chromosomal abnormalities such as chromosome and chromatid breakages, chromosome and chromatid gaps, and chromatid exchanges in one-hundred metaphases of patients and control groups.Results: The frequency of chromosomal aberrations was statistically higher among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia than the normal controls (P<0.01. In total, 65% of the patients were sensitive to gamma irradiation, but the remaining 35% were similar to the normal controls. Patients with ataxia telangiectasia showed the highest sensitivity to gamma irradiation (P=0.001.Conclusion: Our results showed that a high percentage of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were sensitive to irradiation, meaning that maximum care should be taken during their treatment to avoid unnecessary X-rays or radiotherapies.

  11. Effects of acute γ-irradiation on community structure of the aquatic microbial microcosm

    To characterise indirect effects of ionising radiation on aquatic microbial communities, effects of acute γ-irradiation were investigated in a microcosm consisting of populations of green algae (Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp.) and a blue-green alga (Tolypothrix sp.) as producer; a ciliate protozoan (Cyclidium glaucoma), rotifers (Lecane sp. and Philodina sp.) and an oligochaete (Aeolosoma hemprichi) as consumer; and more than four species of bacteria as decomposers. Population changes in the constituent organisms were observed over 160 days after irradiation. Prokaryotic community structure was also examined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rDNA. Principle response curve analysis revealed that the populations of the microcosm as a whole were not significantly affected at 100 Gy while they were adversely affected at 500-5000 Gy in a dose-dependent manner. However, some effects on each population, including each bacterial population detected by DGGE, did not depend on radiation doses, and some populations in the irradiated microcosm were larger than those of the control. These unexpected results are regarded as indirect effects through interspecies interactions, and possible mechanisms are proposed originating from population changes in other organisms co-existing in the microcosm. For example, some indirect effects on consumers and decomposers likely arose from interspecies competition within each trophic level. It is also likely that prey-predator relationships between producers and consumers caused some indirect effects on producers.

  12. Cranial irradiation in children with lymphoblastic acute leukemia: results and damages

    From 1973 to 1976, 81 children with lymphoblastic acute leukemia were treated with cranial prophylactic irradiation at the Istituto di Radioterapia ''L. Galvani'' del'Universita di Bologna. We divided the patients into 6 groups according to different characteristics. At the beginning of 1978 the survival rate was 82%; 60 patients (74%) were in complete continuous remission. We studied the encephalic post irradiation syndrome that is present in children over 2 years of age only when doses are higher than 2500 rad and in children under 2 years of age when doses exceed 2000 rad. This complication occurs frequently in the experience of other authors; however, it is absent under certain doses with which it is possible to obtain the same good results. We feel that among the different techniques and methods, the best radiological treatment is daily bilateral cranial irradiation for patients early in remission; we recommend doses of 2400 rad for children above 2 years of age and 1950 rad for those under 2 years

  13. Effects of acute {gamma}-irradiation on community structure of the aquatic microbial microcosm

    Fuma, Shoichi, E-mail: fuma@nirs.go.j [Environmental Radiation Effects Research Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Takeda, Hiroshi [Environmental Radiation Effects Research Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Doi, Kazutaka; Kawaguchi, Isao [Regulatory Sciences Research Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shikano, Shuichi [Center for Northeast Asian Studies, Tohoku University, 41 Kawauchi, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8576 (Japan); Tanaka, Nobuyuki [Marine Environment Section, Water and Soil Environment Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Inamori, Yuhei [Faculty of Symbiotic Systems Science, Fukushima University, 1 Kanayagawa, Fukushima 960-1296 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    To characterise indirect effects of ionising radiation on aquatic microbial communities, effects of acute {gamma}-irradiation were investigated in a microcosm consisting of populations of green algae (Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp.) and a blue-green alga (Tolypothrix sp.) as producer; a ciliate protozoan (Cyclidium glaucoma), rotifers (Lecane sp. and Philodina sp.) and an oligochaete (Aeolosoma hemprichi) as consumer; and more than four species of bacteria as decomposers. Population changes in the constituent organisms were observed over 160 days after irradiation. Prokaryotic community structure was also examined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rDNA. Principle response curve analysis revealed that the populations of the microcosm as a whole were not significantly affected at 100 Gy while they were adversely affected at 500-5000 Gy in a dose-dependent manner. However, some effects on each population, including each bacterial population detected by DGGE, did not depend on radiation doses, and some populations in the irradiated microcosm were larger than those of the control. These unexpected results are regarded as indirect effects through interspecies interactions, and possible mechanisms are proposed originating from population changes in other organisms co-existing in the microcosm. For example, some indirect effects on consumers and decomposers likely arose from interspecies competition within each trophic level. It is also likely that prey-predator relationships between producers and consumers caused some indirect effects on producers.

  14. Hormonal changes in acute and chronic irradiation of experimental animals and men

    Male Wistar rats in sexual maturity received acute gamma irradiation (0.5 Gy, 1 Gy, 2 Gy, 4 Gy and 6 Gy; 1.26 Gy/min). The levels of the following hormones in the blood plasma were determined: testosterone, LH, FSH, TTH, T3, T4, ACTH, cortisol, aldosteron, prolactin and somatotropic hormones (STH). A strongly expressed disfunction was established in the gonadal, thyroid and suprarenal axes, which persisted up to day 40 of the investigation. Well expressed hypofunction occured in the gonadal and thyroid axes of the animals irradiated with higher doses. The blood plasma of 15 males and 253 females occupationally irradiated with maximum permissible doses was analysed for the content of the following hormones: testosterone, progesterone, estradiol, LH, FSH, cortisol and aldosteron. It was established a hypofunction of the peripheral hormones testosterone, progesteron and estradiol, and statistically reliable increase of the levels of the central sexual hormones LH and FSH. It is concluded that endocrine glands react early and distinctly on low and high radiation doses, which could be used as a immunological evaluation test for radiation injury

  15. Prospective neurodevelopmental studies of two children treated with total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation for acute leukemia in infancy

    Five-year neurodevelopmental studies of two infants with acute leukemia are presented. Both patients underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT) after conditioning with cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI). Neither patient was treated with intrathecal chemotherapy. Their outcome is remarkable for normal development of intelligence, language, perception, and motor coordination. These results suggest that TBI and BMT should be considered in future therapeutic studies of infants with acute leukemia, who are at great risk for failure of conventional therapy

  16. Effect of gamma irradiation on acute oral toxicity of ethanolic extract of red ginger (zingiber officinale)

    Red ginger is widely used in traditional medicine to treat various types of diseases. Evaluation of the toxic properties of red ginger is very important to know the negative harmful impact to human health. Therefore, before it is consumed by humans, it is needed to conduct acute oral toxicity of red ginger extract in mice. Thin rhizome of red ginger in poly ethylene plastic packaging was irradiated by gamma rays at a dose of 10 kGy with a dose rate of 10 kGy/h. The ethanol extract of unirradiated as well as irradiated red ginger was then tested for the acute oral toxicity using OECD Guideline test method. The results showed that throughout the 14 days of treatment there was a change in behavior pattern, clinical symptoms and body weight of control mice and treatment groups. Histopathological examination of kidneys, heart, liver, lungs and spleen of the dose less than 1250 mg/kg body weight showed normal condition and no significant side effects observation. While central venous damage and a reduced number of hepatocyte cells in male mice occurred in the test dose higher than 2000 mg/kg body weight, whereas in female mice it occurred in the test group dose higher than 1250 mg/kg bw. Based on renal histology of male and female mice at doses higher than 1250 mg/kg body weight, there were damage to Bowman's capsule, glomerulus, proximal vessel and distal vessels. LD50 of unirradiated and irradiated with 10 kGy of ethanol extract of red ginger were 1887 mg/kg body weight and 2639 mg/kg body weight, respectively, and it can be categorized as moderately toxic. Oral administration of ethanol extract of red ginger with dose of 1250 mg/kg body weight gave an effect in mice organs. From these results it can be concluded that oral administration of both unirradiated and irradiated with a dose 10 kGy of ethanol extract consider safe at a dose less than 1250 mg/kg body weigh. (author)

  17. A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with abnormal brain CT scan after cranial irradiation for central nervous system leukemia

    A 21-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with central neurologic symptoms immediately after the second irradiation (20 Gy to the brain and 10 Gy to the spinal cord) for central nervous system (CNS)-leukemia 3 years and 2 months after the first cranial irradiation with 20 Gy. White matter was depicted as diffusely high density area on CT; histology revealed necrosis of leukemic cells. In the present patient with repeated recurrent CNS-leukemia, leukemic cells seemed to have been damaged simultaneously after irradiation because of parenchymal widespread involvement of leukemic cells, resulting in brain edema, an increased intracranial pressure and parenchymal disturbance. This finding may have an important implication for the risk of cranial irradiation in the case of widespread involvement of leukemic cells. Re-evaluation of cranial irradiation in such cases is suggested. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Testicular function in boys after chemotherapy and/or testicular irradiation for acute leukemia and malignant lymphoma

    Testicular function was investigated by testicular biopsy, testicular volume, testosterone and LH-RH test in 16 prepubertal boys with 15 cases of acute leukemia and one case of malignant lymphoma after chemotherapy and/or testicular irradiation. One of 2 cases who had infiltrated in testes received irradiation at onset. With another 2 cases, testis was resected at testicular relapse and irradiated on opposite side. All continued complete remission for 1-9 years after cessation of chemotherapy. Basal levels of serum testosterone, FSH and LH were normal in 13 cases of unirradiated group recently but spermatogonia in testicular biopsy specimen decreased on cessation of chemotherapy in 8 cases. Primary gonadal dysfunction was detected in 3 cases of irradiated group. And so testicular irradiation induced damage of tubular system and Leydig cell function. It is necessary to follow up about sexual maturation. (author)

  19. An experimental model of acute encephalopathy after total body irradiation in the rat: effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761)

    To define the therapeutic effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) in an experimental model of acute encephalopathy following total body irradiation in rats. Ninety four-month-old rats received 4.5 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) at day 1 while 15 rats received sham irradiation. A behavioural study based on a conditioning test of negative reinforcement, the one-way avoidance test, was performed test, was performed after irradiation. Orally treatment was started one day (study A) or twenty two days (study B) after irradiation and repeated daily for twelve days. In the irradiated group, three subgroups were defined according to the treatment received: EGb 761 (50 mg/kg), EGb 761 (100 mg/kg), water. This work comprised two consecutive studies. In study A (45 rats) the one-way avoidance test was administered daily from day 7 to day 14. In study B (45 rats) the behavioural test was performed from day 28 to day 35. Study A (three groups of 15 rats): following TBI, irradiated rats treated with water demonstrated a significant delay in a learning the one-way avoidance test in comparison with sham-irradiated rats (P < 0.0002) or irradiated rats treated with EGb 761 (50 mg/kg; P < 0.007) or EGb 761 (100 mg/kg; P < 0.0002). The irradiated rats, treated with EGb 761 (50 or 100 mg/kg) did not differ from the sham-irradiated controls. Study B (three groups of 15 rats): the irradiated rats, treated with water of EGb 761 (50 or 100 mg/kg) did not differ from the sham-irradiated controls. (authors)

  20. A comparative study of central nervous system irradiation and intensive chemotherapy early in remission of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    A study was designed to determine whether a one-week course of intensive chemotherapy and 2400 rads craniospinal irradiation prolonged complete remission of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in children. Of 110 patients entered into the study, 104 (94%) attained complete remission, 94 of whom were available for the 2 randomizations. They were randomly assigned to receive or not receive one week of high-dosage intravenous chemotherapy and, 4 weeks later, were again randomized to receive or not receive 2400 rads cobalt-60 craniospinal irradiation. Patients randomized for no irradiation were to receive identical radiotherapy only if and when central nervous system (CNS) leukemia developed. The one week of intensive chemotherapy had no effect on the duration of remission or on the frequency or site of relapse, but irradiation had marked effect. Complete remission was terminated by CNS leukemia in only 2 of 45 children who received ''prophylactic'' craniospinal irradiation compared to 27 to 49 not irradiated. FIve of the 25 children who were given ''therapeutic'' irradiation for demonstrated CNS leukemia have already had recurrences despite continuous hematologic remission. Under the conditions of this study, the authors conclude that one week of intensive chemotherapy does not prolong remission, that 2400 rads craniospinal irradiation early in remission prevents or delays CNS leukemia and prolongs complete remission, and that once CNS leukemia develops, 2400 rads craniospinal irradiation is not sufficient to eradicate it

  1. Influence of preliminary chronic irradiation and treatment with. cap alpha. -tocopherol on the frequency of chromosome aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells induced by acute. gamma. -irradiation

    Aliev, A.A.; Akhundov, V.Yu.; Alekperov, U.K.; Gamzaeva, I.A.; Asadova, A.I.; Shekhtman, A.B.; Gabaj, N.S. (AN Azerbajdzhanskoj SSR, Baku. Inst. Botaniki)

    The incidence of chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells of femur did not exceed the spontaneous one in CBA mice exposed, during 70 days, to ..gamma..-radiation at dose-rates of 33.7-35.8 nA/kg and cumulative dose of 2.75 Gy. A single acute exposure of intact animals to a dose of 2.98 Gy increased significantly the mutation level. Preirradiation with small doses increased the resistance of hereditary structures to sublethal radiation doses. Exogenous ..cap alpha..-tocopherol (0.06 mg/20 g mass) protected the genetic apparatus of cells from total-body irradiation and was an additional factor decreasing the mutaton level after acute exposure of mice at the background of long-term irradiation with small doses.

  2. Experimental study on therapy of ultraviolet blood irradiation and oxygenation in acute soman intoxication in rabbits

    ZHANG Xian-qing; MU Shi-jie; ZHANG Xiao-di; CHEN Rui; XIA Ai-jun; LIANG Xin; HAI Chun-xu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the therapy effect of ultraviolet blood irradiation and oxygenation(UBIO) on blood AChe activity and lung injury due to acute soman intoxication in rabbits. Methods :Forty rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: normal control group, intoxication group, routine therapy group and UBIO therapy group. Blood AChe activity and artery blood gas were analyzed 2 h after intoxication. ACP and AKP activities in BALF were determined respectively. Results:Blood AChe activity in intoxication group was lower than that in normal control group (P<0. 05). BALF ACP and AKP activities in intoxication group were higher than that in normal control group. Blood AChe activities in UBIO therapy group increased and were higher than that in intoxication and routine therapy groups. Compared with intoxication group, BALF ACP and AKP activities were decreased (P<0.05) in UBIO therapy group,while artery blood pH, PaO2 and SaO2 increased (P<0.05). Conclusion: UBIO therapy can elevate blood AChe activity and alleviate lung injury induced by soman intoxication. So it may be a new way to treat acute soman intoxication.

  3. [Endocrinologic function following cranial irradiation in acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood].

    Lackner, H; Schwingshandl, J; Pakisch, B; Knoblauch, S; Mutz, I; Urban, C

    1991-01-01

    Endocrinological function was evaluated in 31 children after successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. All patients had received combination chemotherapy and 12-24Gy of cranial irradiation according to the German therapy protocols BFM-81, BFM-83 and BFM-86. Height, weight, bone age and pubertal development, as well as hypothalamic-pituitary function were measured. Long-term linear growth was unaffected in all patients. However, 9 patients showed subnormal serum growth hormone levels in response to pharmacological stimulation of the pituitary. All patients had normal levels of T3 and T4, but one patient showed an increased response of thyrotropin to thyrotropin releasing hormone. All prepubertal and postpubertal children demonstrated appropriate secretion of follicle-stimulation hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) after stimulation with LH-releasing hormone (LH-RH). 3 pubertal girls showed adequate oestradiol levels, but abnormally high levels of gonadotropins in response to LH-RH. Sexual development was normal in two of them, but the third had a late menarche and irregular menses. The significance of these findings is discussed in the context of recommendations possibly to further reduce or completely delete prophylactic cranial irradiation. PMID:1759459

  4. Antioxidant Capacities and Total Phenolic Contents Enhancement with Acute Gamma Irradiation in Curcuma alismatifolia (Zingiberaceae Leaves

    Sima Taheri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted in order to assess the effect of various doses of acute gamma irradiation (0, 10, 15, and 20 Gy on the improvement of bioactive compounds and their antioxidant properties of Curcuma alismatifolia var. Sweet pink. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and gas chromatography (GC analysis uncovered that various types of phenolic, flavonoid compounds, and fatty acids gradually altered in response to radiation doses. On the other hand, antioxidant activities determined by 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH, ferric reduction, antioxidant power (FRAP, and 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS radical scavenging assay showed a higher irradiation level significantly increased the antioxidant properties. This study revealed an efficient effect of varying levels of gamma radiation, based on the pharmaceutical demand to enhance the accumulation and distribution of bioactive compounds such as phenolic and flavonoid compounds, fatty acids, as well as their antioxidant activities in the leaves of C. alismatifolia var. Sweet pink.

  5. A Multiscale Computational Model of the Response of Swine Epidermis After Acute Irradiation

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure from Solar Particle Events can lead to very high skin dose for astronauts on exploration missions outside the protection of the Earth s magnetic field [1]. Assessing the detrimental effects to human skin under such adverse conditions could be predicted by conducting territorial experiments on animal models. In this study we apply a computational approach to simulate the experimental data of the radiation response of swine epidermis, which is closely similar to human epidermis [2]. Incorporating experimentally measured histological and cell kinetic parameters into a multiscale tissue modeling framework, we obtain results of population kinetics and proliferation index comparable to unirradiated and acutely irradiated swine experiments [3]. It is noted the basal cell doubling time is 10 to 16 days in the intact population, but drops to 13.6 hr in the regenerating populations surviving irradiation. This complex 30-fold variation is proposed to be attributed to the shortening of the G1 phase duration. We investigate this radiation induced effect by considering at the sub-cellular level the expression and signaling of TGF-beta, as it is recognized as a key regulatory factor of tissue formation and wound healing [4]. This integrated model will allow us to test the validity of various basic biological rules at the cellular level and sub-cellular mechanisms by qualitatively comparing simulation results with published research, and should lead to a fuller understanding of the pathophysiological effects of ionizing radiation on the skin.

  6. The Effect of Local Irradiation in Prevention and Reversal of Acute Rejection of Transplanted Kidney with High-dose Steroid Pulse

    From 1979 to 1984, 39 local allograft irradiations were given to 29 patients: 10 irradiations were administered for prevention and 29 for reversal of acute rejection of transplanted kidney. Three doses of 150 cGy every other day were combined with high-dose of methylprednisolone pulse (1 gm/day) for 3 days. For prevention of acute rejection, local irradiation was delivered on the days 1, 3, and 5 after the transplantation, and for reversal, irradiation started after the diagnosis of acute rejection. Eight out of 10 patients irradiated for prevention had acute allograft rejection, and, what is more, there was no surviving graft at 15 months after transplantation. Reversal of acute rejection was achieved in 71%. When the pre-irradiation level of serum creatinine was below 5.5 mg%, the reversal rate was 93%, but above 5.5 mg% the reversal rate was only 17% (p<0.01). Reirradiation after failure was not successful. Among 15 reversed patients, 7 (47%) had subsequent rejection (s). The functional graft survivals at 6 month, 1, 2, and 3 year were 70%, 65%, 54%, and 65%, respectively. Therapeutic irradiation resulted in better graft survival when serum creatinine was below 5.5 mg% (p<0.001) or when irradiation started within 15 days after the diagnosis of acute rejection (p<0.001)

  7. Post mastectomy linac IMRT irradiation of chest wall and regional nodes: dosimetry data and acute toxicities

    Conventional post-mastectomy radiation therapy is delivered with tangential fields for chest wall and separate fields for regional nodes. Although chest wall and regional nodes delineation has been discussed with RTOG contouring atlas, CT-based planning to treat chest wall and regional nodes as a whole target has not been widely accepted. We herein discuss the dosimetric characteristics of a linac IMRT technique for treating chest wall and regional nodes as a whole PTV after modified radical mastectomy, and observe acute toxicities following irradiation. Patients indicated for PMRT were eligible. Chest wall and supra/infraclavicular region +/−internal mammary nodes were contoured as a whole PTV on planning CT. A simplified linac IMRT plan was designed using either integrated full beams or two segments of half beams split at caudal edge of clavicle head. DVHs were used to evaluate plans. The acute toxicities were followed up regularly. Totally, 85 patients were enrolled. Of these, 45 had left-sided lesions, and 35 received IMN irradiation. Planning designs yielded 55 integrated and 30 segmented plans, with median number of beams of 8 (6–12). The integrated and segmented plans had similar conformity (1.41±0.14 vs. 1.47±0.15, p=0.053) and homogeneity indexes (0.13±0.01 vs. 0.14±0.02, p=0.069). The percent volume of PTV receiving >110% prescription dose was <5%. As compared to segmented plans, integrated plans typically increased V5 of ipsilateral lung (p=0.005), and heart (p=0.001) in patients with left-sided lesions. Similarly, integrated plans had higher spinal cord Dmax (p=0.009), ipsilateral humeral head (p<0.001), and contralateral lung Dmean (p=0.019). During follow-up, 36 (42%) were identified to have ≥ grade 2 radiation dermatitis (RD). Of these, 35 developed moist desquamation. The median time to onset of moist desquamation was 6 (4–7) weeks from start of RT. The sites of moist desquamation were most frequently occurred in anterior axillary fold

  8. Long-term results of total body irradiation in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    The aim of this chart review of adult patients treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with total body irradiation (TBI) was to evaluate early and late toxicity and long-term outcome. A total of 110 adult patients (34 ± 12 years) with ALL underwent TBI (6 fractions of 2 Gy for a total of 12 Gy) as a part of the treatment regimen before transplantation. Treatment-related toxicity, mortality, and hematologic outcome are reported. Mean follow-up was 70 months. The 2- and 5-year leukemia-free survival rates were 78 and 72 %, respectively. In all, 29 % (32/110) patients suffered from medullary recurrence after a median time of 7 months. Gender was the only statistically significant prognostic factor in terms of overall survival in favor of female patients. Treatment-related mortality and overall survival after 2 and 5 years were 16 and 22 %, and 60 and 52.7 %, respectively. The most frequent late reaction wascGVHD of the skin (n = 33, 30 %). In addition, 15.5 % (17/110 patients) suffered pulmonary symptoms, and 6 patients developed lung fibrosis. Eyes were frequently affected by the radiation (31/110 = 28 %); 12 of 110 patients (11 %) presented with symptoms from osteoporosis, 5 of 110 patients (4.5 %) developed hypothyreosis and 2 patients diabetes mellitus. Of the male patients, 11 % reported erectile dysfunction or loss of libido, while 2 of 36 women reported menopausal syndrome at the mean time of 28 months after treatment with requirement for substitution. No women became pregnant after treatment. No acute or late cardiac toxicities were documented in our patients. No secondary malignancies were documented. Although hematologic outcome was in the upper range of that reported in the literature, treatment-related mortality (TRM) and medullary recurrences remain a challenge. Sophisticated radiation techniques allow for decreasing toxicity to certain organs and/or dose escalation to the bone marrow in highly selected patients in order to improve therapeutic

  9. Proton Beam Craniospinal Irradiation Reduces Acute Toxicity for Adults With Medulloblastoma

    Brown, Aaron P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Barney, Christian L. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Grosshans, David R.; McAleer, Mary Frances [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Groot, John F. de; Puduvalli, Vinay K. [Department of Neuro-Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crawford, Cody N.; Khan, Meena [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Khatua, Soumen [Department of Pediatric Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gilbert, Mark R. [Department of Neuro-Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mahajan, Anita, E-mail: amahajan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Efficacy and acute toxicity of proton craniospinal irradiation (p-CSI) were compared with conventional photon CSI (x-CSI) for adults with medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Forty adult medulloblastoma patients treated with x-CSI (n=21) or p-CSI (n=19) at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center from 2003 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Median CSI and total doses were 30.6 and 54 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up was 57 months (range 4-103) for x-CSI patients and 26 months (range 11-63) for p-CSI. Results: p-CSI patients lost less weight than x-CSI patients (1.2% vs 5.8%; P=.004), and less p-CSI patients had >5% weight loss compared with x-CSI (16% vs 64%; P=.004). p-CSI patients experienced less grade 2 nausea and vomiting compared with x-CSI (26% vs 71%; P=.004). Patients treated with x-CSI were more likely to have medical management of esophagitis than p-CSI patients (57% vs 5%, P<.001). p-CSI patients had a smaller reduction in peripheral white blood cells, hemoglobin, and platelets compared with x-CSI (white blood cells 46% vs 55%, P=.04; hemoglobin 88% vs 97%, P=.009; platelets 48% vs 65%, P=.05). Mean vertebral doses were significantly associated with reductions in blood counts. Conclusions: This report is the first analysis of clinical outcomes for adult medulloblastoma patients treated with p-CSI. Patients treated with p-CSI experienced less treatment-related morbidity including fewer acute gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicities.

  10. Laser blood irradiation effect on electrophysiological characteristics of acute coronary syndrome patients

    Khotiaintsev, Sergei N.; Doger-Guerrero, E.; Glebova, L.; Svirid, V.; Sirenko, Yuri

    1996-11-01

    This paper treats electro-physiological effects of the low- level laser irradiation of blood (LBI). The data presented here are based on the observation of almost 200 patients suffering from the acute disruption of coronary blood circulation, unstable angina pectoris and myocardial infarction. Statistically significant changes of the electro-physiological characteristics were observed in the group of 65 patients, treated by the LBI. In particular, the significant 6 percent extension of the effective refractory period was observed. The electrical situation threshold has increased by 20.6 percent. The significant changes of some other important electro-physiological characteristics were within the range of 5-15 percent. In this paper, the data obtained on the LBI effectiveness are compared also with the results obtained on 94 patients who in addition to the standard anti-angina therapy were treated by the autohaemo- transfusion performed simultaneously with the UV-light irradiation of the transfused blood. The results obtained demonstrate the significant positive effect of the low energy LBI. The electrophysiological data obtained have good correlation with observed anti-arrhythmic effect of the LBI. This is proved by the data obtained on the electro- physiological characteristics of the cardiovascular system and by other clinical data on the experimental and control group of patients. In the course of this research the exact effect of the low level LBI was established. LBI led to the pronounced positive changes in electro-physiological characteristics of the cardiovascular system of the patients, it also led to the pronounced anti-arrhythmic effect.

  11. The role of total body irradiation in preparation for bone marrow transplantation in acute leukaemia. A review

    From extrapolation obtained from animal studies and radiation accidents, it is assumed that for man the LD 50 (30) will be between 300-500 rads total body irradiation (TBI) and the LD 100 at least 600 rads TBI. A dose of 1000 rads TBI is generally used in man for conditioning for bone marrow transplantation. In acute leukemia, total body irradiation is usually associated with cytoreductive chemotherapy. In Seattle 110 patients underwent bone marrow transplantation for acute leukemia in relapse. 15 patients became long term survivors. The main cause of failure were GVH, interstitial pneumonitis and leukemic relapse. New attempts are being made to improve the results: (1) better cytoreductive therapy preceding transplantation, (2) bone marrow transplantation during remission of the disease, (3) prevention of interstitial pneumonitis by modifications of the TBI technique

  12. Acute promyelocytic leukemia after whole brain irradiation of primary brain lymphomainan HIV-infected patient

    Boban A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The occurrence of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in HIV-infected patients has been reported in only five cases. Due to a very small number of reported HIV/APL patients who have been treated with different therapies with the variable outcome, the prognosis of APL in the setting of the HIV-infection is unclear. Here, we report a case of an HIV-patient who developed APL and upon treatment entered a complete remission. A 25-years old male patient was diagnosed with HIV-infection in 1996, but remained untreated. In 2004, the patient was diagnosed with primary central nervous system lymphoma. We treated the patient with antiretroviral therapy and whole-brain irradiation, resulting in complete remission of the lymphoma. In 2006, prompted by a sudden neutropenia, we carried out a set of diagnostic procedures, revealing APL. Induction therapy consisted of standard treatment with all-trans-retinoic-acid (ATRA and idarubicin. Subsequent cytological and molecular analysis of bone marrow demonstrated complete hematological and molecular remission. Due to the poor general condition, consolidation treatment with ATRA was given in March and April 2007. The last follow-up 14 months later, showed sustained molecular APL remission. In conclusion, we demonstrated that a complete molecular APL remission in an HIV-patient was achieved by using reduced-intensity treatment.

  13. Low dose-rate irradiation in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukaemia in first remission

    Thirty-six patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) in first remission received sibling bone marrow transplants following cyclophosphamide and a single dose of 1000 rad total body irradiation (TBI). The preparation programme for a patient undergoing a bone marrow transplant is described. The aim of the cyclophosphamide and TBI is to eradicate all active bone marrow present in the patient and to reduce the immune response of the patient to the graft, thus preventing rejection. The cobalt unit and treatment box used for the TBI is described together with details of the planning for TBI including test doses on the patient. The procedure on the day of the 8 hour TBI treatment is then given. The likely reactions following the TBI and the graft are described. Of these transplanted patients, 64% remain alive, well and disease-free, nine of them for more than one year and one surviving more than three years. These results are a significant improvement on the results of AML treated with chemotherapy and immunotherapy. (U.K.)

  14. Effects of acute gamma-irradiation on the aquatic microbial microcosm in comparison with chemicals

    Fuma, Shoichi, E-mail: fuma@nirs.go.j [Environmental Radiation Effects Research Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Kiriko; Yanagisawa, Kei [Environmental Radiation Effects Research Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Doi, Kazutaka; Kawaguchi, Isao [Regulatory Sciences Research Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tanaka, Nobuyuki [Environmental Chemistry Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Inamori, Yuhei [Faculty of Symbiotic Systems Science, Fukushima University, 1 Kanayagawa, Fukushima 960-1296 (Japan); Polikarpov, Gennady G. [The A.O. Kovalevsky Institute of Biology of Southern Seas, Sevastopol 99011 (Ukraine)

    2009-12-15

    Effects of acute gamma-irradiation were investigated in the aquatic microcosm consisting of green algae (Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp.) and a blue-green alga (Tolypothrix sp.) as producers; an oligochaete (Aeolosoma hemprichi), rotifers (Lecane sp. and Philodina sp.) and a ciliate protozoan (Cyclidium glaucoma) as consumers; and more than four species of bacteria as decomposers. At 100 Gy, populations were not affected in any taxa. At 500-5000 Gy, one or three taxa died out and populations of two or three taxa decreased over time, while that of Tolypothrix sp. increased. This Tolypothrix sp. increase was likely an indirect effect due to interspecies interactions. The principal response curve analysis revealed that the main trend of the effects was a dose-dependent population decrease. For a better understanding of radiation risks in aquatic microbial communities, effect doses of gamma-rays compared with copper, herbicides and detergents were evaluated using the radiochemoecological conceptual model and the effect index for microcosm.

  15. Acute effects of whole-body proton irradiation on the immune system of the mouse

    Kajioka, E. H.; Andres, M. L.; Li, J.; Mao, X. W.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Slater, J. M.; Gridley, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The acute effects of proton whole-body irradiation on the distribution and function of leukocyte populations in the spleen and blood were examined and compared to the effects of photons derived from a (60)Co gamma-ray source. Adult female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a single dose (3 Gy at 0.4 Gy/min) of protons at spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), protons at the distal entry (E) region, or gamma rays and killed humanely at six different times thereafter. Specific differences were noted in the results, thereby suggesting that the kinetics of the response may be variable. However, the lack of significant differences in most assays at most times suggests that the RBE for both entry and peak regions of the Bragg curve was essentially 1.0 under the conditions of this study. The greatest immunodepression was observed at 4 days postexposure. Flow cytometry and mitogenic stimulation analyses of the spleen and peripheral blood demonstrated that lymphocyte populations differ in radiosensitivity, with B (CD19(+)) cells being most sensitive, T (CD3(+)) cells being moderately sensitive, and natural killer (NK1.1(+)) cells being most resistant. B lymphocytes showed the most rapid recovery. Comparison of the T-lymphocyte subsets showed that CD4(+) T helper/inducer cells were more radiosensitive than the CD8(+) T cytotoxic/suppressor cells. These findings should have an impact on future studies designed to maximize protection of normal tissue during and after proton-radiation exposure.

  16. Effects of acute γ-irradiation on the aquatic microbial microcosm in comparison with chemicals

    Effects of acute γ-irradiation were investigated in the aquatic microcosm consisting of green algae (Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp.) and a blue-green alga (Tolypothrix sp.) as producers; an oligochaete (Aeolosoma hemprichi), rotifers (Lecane sp. and Philodina sp.) and a ciliate protozoan (Cyclidium glaucoma) as consumers; and more than four species of bacteria as decomposers. At 100 Gy, populations were not affected in any taxa. At 500-5000 Gy, one or three taxa died out and populations of two or three taxa decreased over time, while that of Tolypothrix sp. increased. This Tolypothrix sp. increase was likely an indirect effect due to interspecies interactions. The principal response curve analysis revealed that the main trend of the effects was a dose-dependent population decrease. For a better understanding of radiation risks in aquatic microbial communities, effect doses of γ-rays compared with copper, herbicides and detergents were evaluated using the radiochemoecological conceptual model and the effect index for microcosm.

  17. The acute effects of alpha and beta irradiation of mouse skin and the factors affecting the response

    Several problems regarding acute effects of alpha and beta irradiation were investigated in order to clarify protection problems of localised doses to the skin. A study into the acute biological effects of different energy beta emitters and the effects of energy and area on the response showed direct relationships between these criteria for a range of different acute responses with different time courses. Three different types of acute response were found and these are described as 'moist desquamation', 'acute ulceration' and 'acute epidermal necrosis'. An unexpected finding was that the lower energy beta emitter 170Tm was as efficient at inducing scab formation as the higher energy 90Sr sources for the same area of exposure. Experiments using 2x4 cm2 exposures to 224Cm alpha particles showed that the response to this poorly penetrating radiation was minimal after doses as high as 180 Gy measured at 10 μm into the skin. In comparison, large area exposure to 170Tm produced areas of prolonged scabbing after doses up to 100 Gy. However, the intensity of the reaction varied between strains. (author)

  18. Acute whole body UVA irradiation combined with nitrate ingestion enhances time trial performance in trained cyclists.

    Muggeridge, David J; Sculthorpe, Nicholas; Grace, Fergal M; Willis, Gareth; Thornhill, Laurence; Weller, Richard B; James, Philip E; Easton, Chris

    2015-08-01

    Dietary nitrate supplementation has been shown to increase nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, reduce blood pressure (BP) and enhance exercise performance. Acute exposure to ultraviolet (UV)-A light also increases NO bioavailability and reduces BP. We conducted a randomized, counterbalanced placebo-controlled trial to determine the effects of UV-A light alone and in combination with nitrate on the responses to sub-maximal steady-state exercise and time trial (TT) performance. Nine cyclists (VO2max 53.1 ± 4.4 ml/kg/min) completed five performance trials comprising 10 min submaximal steady-state cycling followed by a 16.1 km TT. Following a familiarization the final four trials were preceded, in random order, by either (1) Nitrate gels (NIT) + UV-A, (2) Placebo (PLA) + UV-A, (3) NIT + Sham light (SHAM) and (4) PLA + SHAM (control). The NIT gels (2 × 60 ml gels, ~8.1 mmol nitrate) or a low-nitrate PLA were ingested 2.5 h prior to the trial. The light exposure consisted of 20 J/cm(2) whole body irradiation with either UV-A or SHAM light. Plasma nitrite was measured pre- and post-irradiation and VO2 was measured continuously during steady-state exercise. Plasma nitrite was higher for NIT + SHAM (geometric mean (95% CI), 332 (292-377) nM; P = 0.029) and NIT + UV-A (456 (312-666) nM; P = 0.014) compared to PLA + SHAM (215 (167-277) nM). Differences between PLA + SHAM and PLA + UV-A (282 (248-356) nM) were small and non-significant. During steady-state exercise VO2 was reduced following NIT + UVA (P = 0.034) and tended to be lower in NIT + SHAM (P = 0.086) but not PLA + UV-A (P = 0.381) compared to PLA + SHAM. Performance in the TT was significantly faster following NIT + UV-A (mean ± SD 1447 ± 41 s P = 0.005; d = 0.47), but not PLA + UV-A (1450 ± 40 s; d = 0.41) or NIT + SHAM (1455 ± 47 s; d = 0.28) compared to PLA + SHAM (1469 ± 52 s). These findings demonstrate that exposure to UV-A light alone does not alter the physiological responses to exercise or improve

  19. New method for the estimation of the mutation rate in acute and chronic gamma-ray irradiation of growing plants

    In the case of irradiation of seeds of self-pollinated and disomic plant materials, the frequency of mutated plants appearing in the M2 generation divided by the Mendelian ratio is an index, as proposed by Gaul (1960), that enables the direct estimation of the mutation rate, representing the ratio of the number of mutated cells to the number of survived cells after treatment of mutagen. In the case of chronic irradiation of growing plants throughout the entire life cycle from germination to maturity, on the other hand, the mutations induced at the stage preceding the differentiation of the male and female organs appear at the M2 generation, the but mutations induced after this critical time are observed in the M2 plants in the heterozygous condition and are detected only at the M3 generation. Therefore, the mutation rate can not be correctly estimated only on the basis of the frequency of mutants either in the M2 or M3 generation. A new method for the estimation of the mutation rate by combining the data of the frequency of mutants and the M2 and M3 generation, which is comparable to Gaul's method for seed irradiation, is proposed. Application of this method to the data of acute and chronic gamma-ray irradiation of growing barley revealed that a much higher mutation rate was observed after irradiation at a higher daily exposure rate, when the plants were treated with the same accumulated dose

  20. Selective brain responses to acute and chronic low-dose X-ray irradiation in males and females

    Radiation exposure is known to have profound effects on the brain, leading to precursor cell dysfunction and debilitating cognitive declines [Nat. Med. 8 (2002) 955]. Although a plethora of data exist on the effects of high radiation doses, the effects of low-dose irradiation, such as ones received during repetitive diagnostic and therapeutic exposures, are still under-investigated [Am. J. Otolaryngol. 23 (2002) 215; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97 (2000) 889; Curr. Opin. Neurol. 16 (2003) 129]. Furthermore, most studies of the biological effects of ionizing radiation have been performed using a single acute dose, while clinically and environmentally relevant exposures occur predominantly under chronic/repetitive conditions. Here, we have used a mouse model to compare the effects of chronic/repetitive and acute low-dose radiation (LDR) exposure (0.5 Gy) to ionizing radiation on the brain in vivo. We examined the LDR effects on p42/44 MAPK (ERK1/ERK2), CaMKII, and AKT signaling-the interconnected pathways that have been previously shown to be crucial for neuronal survival upon irradiation. We report perturbations in ERK1/2, AKT, and CREB upon acute and chronic/repetitive low-dose exposure in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of mice. These studies were paralleled by the analysis of radiation effects on neurogenesis and cellular proliferation. Repetitive exposure had a much more pronounced effect on cellular signaling and neurogenesis than acute exposure. These results suggest that studies of single acute exposures might be limited in terms of their predictive value. We also present the first evidence of sex differences in radiation-induced signaling in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. We show the role of estrogens in brain radiation responses and discuss the implications of the observed changes

  1. Cranial irradiation in children with lymphoblastic acute leukemia: results and damages. [Incidence of asthenia, anorexia, somnolence, and lethergy as related to irradiation procedure

    Cecchetti, E.; Brandoli, V.

    1979-03-01

    From 1973 to 1976, 81 children with lymphoblastic acute leukemia were treated with cranial prophylactic irradiation at the Istituto di Radioterapia ''L. Galvani'' del'Universita di Bologna. We divided the patients into 6 groups according to different characteristics. At the beginning of 1978 the survival rate was 82%; 60 patients (74%) were in complete continuous remission. We studied the encephalic post irradiation syndrome that is present in children over 2 years of age only when doses are higher than 2500 rad and in children under 2 years of age when doses exceed 2000 rad. This complication occurs frequently in the experience of other authors; however, it is absent under certain doses with which it is possible to obtain the same good results. We feel that among the different techniques and methods, the best radiological treatment is daily bilateral cranial irradiation for patients early in remission; we recommend doses of 2400 rad for children above 2 years of age and 1950 rad for those under 2 years.

  2. Neuropsychological effects of irradiation and chemotherapy treatments upon children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case study of monozygotic twins

    Prince, M.T.; Souheaver, G.T.; Berry, D.H.

    Numerous attempts have been made to determine the effects of irradiation and chemotherapy upon cognitive functioning when used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). While many studies have demonstrated a deleterious effect, others have found no significant changes in neuropsychological functioning. The uncertainty regarding the cognitive effects of these treatments is exemplified via a presentation of monozygotic twins who were evaluated via neuropsychological tests. The children received similar induction-consolidation therapy which included intrathecal methotrexate and cranial irradiation. Neuropsychological tests yielded almost identical I.Q. patterns, however, subtle differences were noted between the children when abstract reasoning abilities, achievement tests scores, motor speed, grip strength, performance on complex tasks requiring haptic sensitivity, and fingertip sensitivity were observed. This discussion also summarizes the previous findings related to cognitive function after chemotherapy and radiation therapy and some of the confounding factors which have been noted.

  3. Neuropsychological effects of irradiation and chemotherapy treatments upon children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case study of monozygotic twins

    Numerous attempts have been made to determine the effects of irradiation and chemotherapy upon cognitive functioning when used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). While many studies have demonstrated a deleterious effect, others have found no significant changes in neuropsychological functioning. The uncertainty regarding the cognitive effects of these treatments is exemplified via a presentation of monozygotic twins who were evaluated via neuropsychological tests. The children received similar induction-consolidation therapy which included intrathecal methotrexate and cranial irradiation. Neuropsychological tests yielded almost identical I.Q. patterns, however, subtle differences were noted between the children when abstract reasoning abilities, achievement tests scores, motor speed, grip strength, performance on complex tasks requiring haptic sensitivity, and fingertip sensitivity were observed. This discussion also summarizes the previous findings related to cognitive function after chemotherapy and radiation therapy and some of the confounding factors which have been noted

  4. Acute and chronic gastric emptying disorders in rats after localized X-irradiation, and the therapy of these disorders

    After localized 300 kV X-irradiation of the rat stomach the stomach emptying time of a liquid and a solid test meal was examined with a non-invasive radiological method. In the acute period one to three weeks after irradiation with single doses between 10.7 and 21.3 Gy we observed a faster emptying of the liquid and a delayed emptying of the solid test meal. The faster emptying of the liquid test meal was treated successfully with atropin. In the chromic period we observed a delayed emptying of the liquid and of the solid test meal. These emptying disorders were treated partially successfully with the parasympathomimeticum carbachol and they were treated completeley successfully with the dopamine antagonist metoclopramide. (orig.)

  5. Comparison of acute adverse effect between hypofractionated and conventionally fractionated whole-breast irradiation in early breast cancer patients

    We have conducted a clinical trial to evaluate whether the hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (HF-WBI) is equally effective and safe with conventional fractionated whole-breast irradiation (CF-WBI) The HF-WBI consisted of 43.2 Gy/16 f to the whole breast with additional tumor bed boost of 8.1 Gy/3 f for positive or less than 5 mm surgical margins. From 1 of April 2006 to 31 of December 2009, 831 cases were registered and 848 breasts were treated. Grade 2 acute skin reactions were observed in 21 cases (4%) in HF-WBI and 40 cases (13%) in CF-WBI (p<0.001). In short-term results, we might conclude that HF-WBI has almost the same effectiveness and safety as CF-WBI. (author)

  6. Acute response of pig skin to irradiation with 12C-ions or 200 kV X-rays

    The acute response of pig skin to treatment with high energy carbon ions (plateau region) at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI, Darmstadt, Germany) was compared to changes after 200 kV X-irradiation. Carbon doses isoeffective to the X-ray doses were computed with a recently established model for calculation of the biological effect of heavy ions (1, 2). Clinical changes and physiological symptoms (blood flow, erythema, transepidermal water loss, skin hydration) were scored. The parameters analyzed were maximum and mean values of each symptom during days 24 to 70 post irradiation, and the quantal endpoints for the establishment of dose-effect curves were the median values of these. With exception of the maximum change in the red blood cell concentration (p12C-ions (plateau region) and may at least for epidermis be applied to treatment planning. (orig.)

  7. Effect of Pseudomonas contamination or antibiotic decontamination of the GI tract on acute radiation lethality after neutron or gamma irradiation

    The influence of antibiotic decontamination of Pseudomonas contamination of the GI tract prior to whole-body neutron or gamma irradiation was studied. It was observed that for fission neutron doses greater than 5.5 Gy, cyclotron-produced neutron doses greater than 6.7 Gy, and 137Cs gamma-ray doses greater than 14.4 Gy, the median survival time of untreated rats was relatively constant at 4.2 to 4.5 days, indicating death was due to intestinal injury. Within the dose range of 3.5 to 5.5 Gy of fission neutrons, 4.9 to 6.7 Gy of cyclotron-produced neutrons, and 9.6 to 14.4 Gy of gamma rays, median survival time of these animals was inversely related to dose and varied from 12 to 4.6 days. This change in survival time with dose reflects a transition in the mechanisms of acute radiation death from pure hematopoietic, to a combination of intestinal and hematopoietic, to pure intestinal death. Decontamination of the GI tract with antibiotics prior to irradiation increased median survival time 1 to 5 days in this transitional dose range. Contamination of the intestinal flora with Pseudomonas aeruginosa prior to irradiation reduced median survival time 1 to 5 days in the same radiation dose range. Pseudomonas-contaminated animals irradiated within this transitional dose range had maximum concentrations of total bacteria and Pseudomonas in their livers at the time of death. However, liver bacteria concentration was usually higher in gamma-irradiated animals, due to a smaller contribution of hematopoietic injury in neutron-irradiated animals. The effects of both decontamination of the GI tract and Pseudomonas contamination of the GI tract were negligible in the range of doses in which median survival time was dose independent, i.e., in the pure intestinal death dose range

  8. The effect of the number of fractions of cranial irradiation on growth in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Growth was documented over a period of 7 years in all long-term survivors treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) with the DAL-70- and BFM-70-protocol. Normal growth was documented in patients of the DAL-70-protocol during and after therapy. In contrast, in children treated with the BFM-70-protocol the mean height standard deviation score (SDS) decreased significantly from 1.21 SDS prior to therapy to 0.80 SDS at the end of therapy and remained unchanged thereafter. Prophylatic cranial irradiation was given in total doses of 15 to 30 Gy. Ten children of the DAL-70- and 20 children of the BFM-70-protocol received 24 Gy of cranial irradiation. No significant change in height-SDS was observed in any patients of the DAL-70- and in 8 patients of the BFM-70-group, who received 24 Gy of cranial irradiation on 16-26 fractions. Adult height in 7 girls and 6 boys was normal and 3.15 cm and 5.06 cm above target height. In the remaining 12 patients of the BFM-70-protocol the total dose of 24 Gy of cranial irradiation was applied in 11-14 fractions. Their height-SDS had fallen significantly from 1.24 SDS before to 0.66 SDS at the end of therapy. Adult height in 4 girls and 6 boys was also normal, but the height increase was comparatively smaller, -2.20 cm below target height in the girls and 1.91 cm above in the boys. We conclude, that the loss of height-SDS in patients with ALL receiving 24 Gy of cranial irradiation is most probably due to the number of fractions of irradiation and not to the total radiation dose or the type of chemotherapy

  9. Effect of Acute Gamma Irradiation on Curcuma alismatifolia Varieties and Detection of DNA Polymorphism through SSR Marker

    Sima Taheri; Thohirah Lee Abdullah; Zaiton Ahmad; Nur Ashikin Psyquay Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    The effects of eight different doses (0, 10, 20, 25, 35, 40, 60, and 100 Gy) of acute gamma irradiation on 44 (three varieties of Curcuma alismatifolia: Chiang Mai Red, Sweet Pink, Kimono Pink, and one Curcuma hybrid (Doi Tung 554) individual plants were investigated. Radiation sensitivity tests revealed that the LD50 values of the varieties were achieved at 21 Gy for Chiang Mai Red, 23 Gy for Sweet Pink, 25 Gy for Kimono Pink, and 28 Gy for Doi Tung 554. From the analysis of variance (ANOVA)...

  10. Long-term results of total body irradiation in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Marnitz, Simone; Zich, Alexander; Budach, Volker; Jahn, Ulrich; Neumann, Oliver [Charite University Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Martus, Peter [University Tuebingen, Institute of Clinical Epidemiology and Applied Biostatistics, Tuebingen (Germany); Arnold, Renate [Charite University Medicine, Campus CVK, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this chart review of adult patients treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with total body irradiation (TBI) was to evaluate early and late toxicity and long-term outcome. A total of 110 adult patients (34 ± 12 years) with ALL underwent TBI (6 fractions of 2 Gy for a total of 12 Gy) as a part of the treatment regimen before transplantation. Treatment-related toxicity, mortality, and hematologic outcome are reported. Mean follow-up was 70 months. The 2- and 5-year leukemia-free survival rates were 78 and 72 %, respectively. In all, 29 % (32/110) patients suffered from medullary recurrence after a median time of 7 months. Gender was the only statistically significant prognostic factor in terms of overall survival in favor of female patients. Treatment-related mortality and overall survival after 2 and 5 years were 16 and 22 %, and 60 and 52.7 %, respectively. The most frequent late reaction wascGVHD of the skin (n = 33, 30 %). In addition, 15.5 % (17/110 patients) suffered pulmonary symptoms, and 6 patients developed lung fibrosis. Eyes were frequently affected by the radiation (31/110 = 28 %); 12 of 110 patients (11 %) presented with symptoms from osteoporosis, 5 of 110 patients (4.5 %) developed hypothyreosis and 2 patients diabetes mellitus. Of the male patients, 11 % reported erectile dysfunction or loss of libido, while 2 of 36 women reported menopausal syndrome at the mean time of 28 months after treatment with requirement for substitution. No women became pregnant after treatment. No acute or late cardiac toxicities were documented in our patients. No secondary malignancies were documented. Although hematologic outcome was in the upper range of that reported in the literature, treatment-related mortality (TRM) and medullary recurrences remain a challenge. Sophisticated radiation techniques allow for decreasing toxicity to certain organs and/or dose escalation to the bone marrow in highly selected patients in order to improve therapeutic

  11. Acute central nervous system (CNS) toxicity of total body irradiation (TBI) measured using neuropsychological testing of attention functions

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate acute normal tissue damage of low irradiation doses to the healthy, adult central nervous system (CNS) using neuropsychological testing of attention functions. Methods and Materials: Neuropsychological testing (IQ, attention [modified Trail-Making Test A, Digit Symbol Test, D2 Test, Wiener Determination Machine]) was used to examine 40 patients (43 ± 10 years) before and immediately after the first fraction (1.2 Gy) of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) at the University of Heidelberg. The patients received antiemetic premedication. Test results are given as mean percentiles ± standard deviation, with 50 ± 34 being normal. Thirty-eight control patients (53 ± 15 years) were studied to quantify the influence of hospitalization, stress, and repeated testing. Results: The patients showed normal baseline test results (IQ = 101 ± 14, attention = 54 ± 28) and no decrease in test results after 1.2 Gy TBI. Attention functions improved (66 ± 25) corresponding to a practice effect of repeated testing that was seen in the control group, although alternate versions of the tests were used (IQ = 104 ± 10, attention before = 42 ± 29, attention after = 52 ± 31). Conclusion: Our data show no deterioration of neuropsychologic test results acutely after 1.2 Gy whole body exposure in adult patients without CNS disease receiving antiemetic medication

  12. An animal model of prophylactic cranial irradiation: Histologic effects at acute, early and delayed stages

    Mildenberger, M.; Beach, T.G.; McGeer, E.G.; Ludgate, C.M. (Cancer Control Agency of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada))

    1990-05-01

    Wistar rats (body wt. 200 g) were subjected to a fractionated course of radiation similar to that used in prophylactic brain irradiation for small cell carcinoma of the lung (2000 cGy in 5 fractions over 5 days with {sup 60}Co). Effects of this regimen were assessed by histologic examination of brain sections at 1 week, 1 month and 6 months post-irradiation. With conventional stains there were no apparent differences between control and irradiated brains at any of the post-irradiation intervals. Immunohistochemistry for neurotransmitter synthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase and glutamate decarboxylase, as well as histochemistry for acetylcholinesterase, failed to uncover any changes in the irradiated animals. Immunohistochemistry for glial fibrillary acidic protein, an astrocyte marker, also showed no differences in the irradiated groups. However, an antibody against a major histocompatibility complex, class II antigen (OX-6) revealed a microglial response in grey and white matter beginning at 1 month and increasing up to the 6 month post-irradiation interval. The neuroanatomical basis for this microglial response was suggested by the results of silver stains for nerve axons, which revealed axonal loss in striatal white matter bundles in a pattern implicating vascular insufficiency.

  13. An animal model of prophylactic cranial irradiation: Histologic effects at acute, early and delayed stages

    Wistar rats (body wt. 200 g) were subjected to a fractionated course of radiation similar to that used in prophylactic brain irradiation for small cell carcinoma of the lung (2000 cGy in 5 fractions over 5 days with 60Co). Effects of this regimen were assessed by histologic examination of brain sections at 1 week, 1 month and 6 months post-irradiation. With conventional stains there were no apparent differences between control and irradiated brains at any of the post-irradiation intervals. Immunohistochemistry for neurotransmitter synthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase and glutamate decarboxylase, as well as histochemistry for acetylcholinesterase, failed to uncover any changes in the irradiated animals. Immunohistochemistry for glial fibrillary acidic protein, an astrocyte marker, also showed no differences in the irradiated groups. However, an antibody against a major histocompatibility complex, class II antigen (OX-6) revealed a microglial response in grey and white matter beginning at 1 month and increasing up to the 6 month post-irradiation interval. The neuroanatomical basis for this microglial response was suggested by the results of silver stains for nerve axons, which revealed axonal loss in striatal white matter bundles in a pattern implicating vascular insufficiency

  14. Psychoactive-drug response is affected by acute low-level microwave irradiation

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of various psychoactive drugs were studied in rats exposed for 45 min in a circularly polarized, pulsed microwave field (2450 MHz; SAR 0.6 W/kg; 2-microseconds pulses, 500 pps). Apomorphine-induced hypothermia and stereotypy were enhanced by irradiation. Amphetamine-induced hyperthermia was attenuated while stereotypy was unaffected. Morphine-induced catalepsy and lethality were enhanced by irradiation at certain dosages of the drug. Since these drugs have different modes of action on central neural mechanisms and the effects of microwaves depend on the particular drug studied, these results show the complex nature of the effect of microwave irradiation on brain functions.

  15. Evaluation of acute and chronic toxicity of DSS and LAS surfactants undergoing the irradiation with electron beam

    Surfactants are synthetic organic compounds widely used in cosmetic, food, textile, dyers and paper production industries and in particular detergents and others cleaning products industries. The world consumption is nearly 8 million tons per year. One of the main environmental issues coming from the use of these compounds is their toxicity that compromises the biological treatment of effluents and the quality of receiving waters. The objective of this work was the application of ionizing radiation by electron beam in the degradation and reduction of acute and chronic toxicities of surfactants sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), dodecyl p-benzenesulfonate acid (LAS) and sodium dodecyl p-benzenesulfonate (LAS). This treatment technology has been studied as a pre-treatment for effluents containing toxic and non-biodegradable compounds, before the biological treatment. Two acute toxicity assays were employed, one with the micro-crustacean Daphnia similis and the other with the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri along with a chronic toxicity assay with the micro-crustacean Ceriodaphnia dubia (just for SDS and acid LAS) for the non-irradiated and irradiated samples and radiation doses 3.0 kGy, 6.0 kGy, 9.0 kGy and 12.0 kGy. Physical-chemical parameters were evaluated for the following up the degradation of the surfactant molecules. The reductions of acute toxicity varied between 72.49% and 90.98% for SDS, 18.22% and 78.98% for acid LAS and 82.66% and 94.26% for sodium LAS. For the chronic toxicity, the reduction percentages varied between 64.03% and 83.01% for SDS and 47.48% and 64.91% for acid LAS. When one considers the application of the electron beam as a pre-treatment of effluents containing high concentrations of surfactants, the toxicity is an essential parameter allowing the further biological treatment of these effluents. (author)

  16. Whole-body X-irradiation induces acute and transient expression of heme oxygenase-1 in rat liver

    Activation of the stress-inducible heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene by X-irradiation was investigated in rat liver. When male Wistar MS strain rats (8 weeks) received whole-body irradiation of 17.0 Gy, 7 h later the activity of heme oxygenase in the liver was significantly enhanced (2.5 times). The level of HO-1 mRNA expression was increased by 2.3 and 4.0 times 2 and 4 h after radiation, and then declined at 7 and 10 h to the level of 2.0 and 1.6 times of the control. When the X-ray dose was varied from 4.0 to 21.7 Gy, the transcription of the gene was enhanced at all doses and the level of activation was dose-dependent. Finally, western blotting of irradiated liver demonstrated a significant increase in the level of HO-1 induced by X-rays, peaking at 4 h. Thus, X-rays were confirmed to be stressors that induce acute HO-1 expression transiently in the liver. (author)

  17. High incidence of acute myeloid leukemia in SJL/J mice after X-irradiation and corticosteroids

    Resnitzky, P.; Estrov, Z.; Haran-Ghera, N.

    1985-01-01

    SJL/J mice which developed a high incidence of spontaneous reticulum cell neoplasms, developed a low rate incidence (20-25%) of myeloid leukemia (ML) after X-irradiation. The possible effect of adrenal steroid imbalance to radiation-induced ML in SJL/J mice was tested. Intact and thymectomized animals were exposed to a single dose of 300 r whole body irradiation and treated with either hydrocortisone acetate, prednisone, metyrapone and adrenocorticotropin as coleukemogenic agents. Hydrocortisone and prednisone exerted a marked coleukemogenic effect, increasing the ML incidence to a similar rate of about 50-70%, at a mean latent period of 300 days. Prominent leukemic infiltration were observed in the bone marrow, spleen, lymph nodes and liver of the leukemic animals. Results of cytological and histological studies, including cytochemistry and ultrastructure, were all consistent with the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Since AML is the type of human secondary leukemia which appears increasingly in patients treat with alkylating drugs and/or irradiation and corticosteroids for Hodgkin's disease or other neoplastic diseases, the experimental model of AML induced in SJL/J mice could be used for elucidation of mechanisms of leukemogenesis in secondary leukemia.

  18. Evaluation of late radiation-induced changes of the superficial microcirculation after acute β-irradiation. II. prognostic importance of the cutaneous doppler laser

    Objective. -The changes that occur in the tissular microcirculation after accidental acute irradiation account for some of the early effects of such irradiation, especially at the cutaneous level. The prognostic importance of the cutaneous laser doppler was tested in an experimental model of acute β-irradiation. Methods.-Ten pigs were given β-irradiation with a high single localized dose of 90Sr/90Y (32 or 64 Gy, 7 mg/cm2) delivered to the flank, and were evaluated 2, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days thereafter. Each individual was its own control. The local microcirculation was measured in the resting state and during thermal stimulation at 42 deg. C, using a Periflux cutaneous Doppler laser with p413 probes. Three periods of six minutes each were continuously recorded: period 1 (P1) represented basal resting cutaneous perfusion, with the slope p corresponding to the increase in perfusion when two minutes of thermal stimulation at 42 deg. C began; P2 to plateau perfusion during this stimulation; and P3 to perfusion on the return to equilibrium. Results. -After acute β-irradiation in the pig, all the cutaneous microcirculation parameters measured (P1, p, P2 and P3) had risen at day 2 in the irradiated area by a factor of 2 to 4, depending on the dose (p < 0.001), compared to the adjacent control area. On the other hand, as from day 7, the resting and the stimulated microcirculation varied little, except for a reduction of the slope p by a factor of 2 (p < 0.05) after the strongest radiation dose. Conclusion. -After acute irradiation, the increase in the resting cutaneous microcirculation may correspond to immediate but transitory capillary vasodilatation that accompanies the initial erythema in accidental irradiation. The absence of vascular response to thermal stimulation seems to be a good means of reaching an early diagnosis of delayed cutaneous radiation necrosis. (authors)

  19. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  20. A Phase 2 Trial of Once-Weekly Hypofractionated Breast Irradiation: First Report of Acute Toxicity, Feasibility, and Patient Satisfaction

    Purpose: To report on early results of a single-institution phase 2 trial of a 5-fraction, once-weekly radiation therapy regimen for patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and Materials: Patients who underwent BCS for American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 0, I, or II breast cancer with negative surgical margins were eligible to receive whole breast radiation therapy to a dose of 30 Gy in 5 weekly fractions of 6 Gy with or without an additional boost. Elective nodal irradiation was not permitted. There were no restrictions on breast size or the use of cytotoxic chemotherapy for otherwise eligible patients. Patients were assessed at baseline, treatment completion, and at first posttreatment follow-up to assess acute toxicity (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-BR23). Results: Between January and September 2011, 42 eligible patients underwent weekly hypofractionated breast irradiation immediately following BCS (69.0%) or at the conclusion of cytotoxic chemotherapy (31.0%). The rates of grade ≥2 radiation-induced dermatitis, pain, fatigue, and breast edema were 19.0%, 11.9%, 9.5%, and 2.4%, respectively. Only 1 grade 3 toxicity—pain requiring a course of narcotic analgesics—was observed. One patient developed a superficial cellulitis (grade 2), which resolved with the use of oral antibiotics. Patient-reported moderate-to-major breast symptoms (pain, swelling, and skin problems), all decreased from baseline through 1 month, whereas breast sensitivity remained stable over the study period. Conclusions: The tolerance of weekly hypofractionated breast irradiation compares well with recent reports of daily hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation schedules. The regimen appears feasible and cost-effective. Additional follow-up with continued accrual is needed to assess late toxicity, cosmesis, and disease-specific outcomes

  1. A Phase 2 Trial of Once-Weekly Hypofractionated Breast Irradiation: First Report of Acute Toxicity, Feasibility, and Patient Satisfaction

    Dragun, Anthony E., E-mail: aedrag01@louisville.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Quillo, Amy R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Riley, Elizabeth C. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Roberts, Teresa L.; Hunter, Allison M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Rai, Shesh N. [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Callender, Glenda G. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Jain, Dharamvir [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); McMasters, Kelly M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Spanos, William J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report on early results of a single-institution phase 2 trial of a 5-fraction, once-weekly radiation therapy regimen for patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and Materials: Patients who underwent BCS for American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 0, I, or II breast cancer with negative surgical margins were eligible to receive whole breast radiation therapy to a dose of 30 Gy in 5 weekly fractions of 6 Gy with or without an additional boost. Elective nodal irradiation was not permitted. There were no restrictions on breast size or the use of cytotoxic chemotherapy for otherwise eligible patients. Patients were assessed at baseline, treatment completion, and at first posttreatment follow-up to assess acute toxicity (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-BR23). Results: Between January and September 2011, 42 eligible patients underwent weekly hypofractionated breast irradiation immediately following BCS (69.0%) or at the conclusion of cytotoxic chemotherapy (31.0%). The rates of grade ≥2 radiation-induced dermatitis, pain, fatigue, and breast edema were 19.0%, 11.9%, 9.5%, and 2.4%, respectively. Only 1 grade 3 toxicity—pain requiring a course of narcotic analgesics—was observed. One patient developed a superficial cellulitis (grade 2), which resolved with the use of oral antibiotics. Patient-reported moderate-to-major breast symptoms (pain, swelling, and skin problems), all decreased from baseline through 1 month, whereas breast sensitivity remained stable over the study period. Conclusions: The tolerance of weekly hypofractionated breast irradiation compares well with recent reports of daily hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation schedules. The regimen appears feasible and cost-effective. Additional follow-up with continued accrual is needed to assess late toxicity, cosmesis, and disease-specific outcomes.

  2. Plants experiencing chronic internal exposure to ionizing radiation exhibit higher frequency of homologous recombination than acutely irradiated plants

    Kovalchuk, O.; Kovalchuk, I.; Hohn, B. [Friedrich Miescher Institute, P.O. Box 2543, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); Arkhipov, A. [Chernobyl Scientific and Technical Center of International Research, Shkolnaya Str. 6, 255620 Chernobyl (Ukraine); Barylyak, I.; Karachov, I. [Ukrainian Scientific Genetics Center, Popudrenko Str. 50, 253660 Kiev (Ukraine); Titov, V. [Ivano-Frankivsk State Medical Academy, Galitska Str.2, 284000 Ivano-Frankivsk (Ukraine)

    2000-04-03

    different chemical composition, but equal radioactivity, exhibited different levels of HR, dependent upon the absorbed dose of radiation. Remarkably, we observed a much higher frequency of HR in plants exposed to chronic irradiation when compared to acutely irradiated plants. Although acute application of 0.1-0.5 Gy did not lead to an increase of frequency of HR, the chronic exposure of the plants to several orders of magnitude lower dose of 200 {mu}Gy led to a 5-6-fold induction of the frequency of HR as compared to the control.

  3. Plants experiencing chronic internal exposure to ionizing radiation exhibit higher frequency of homologous recombination than acutely irradiated plants

    chemical composition, but equal radioactivity, exhibited different levels of HR, dependent upon the absorbed dose of radiation. Remarkably, we observed a much higher frequency of HR in plants exposed to chronic irradiation when compared to acutely irradiated plants. Although acute application of 0.1-0.5 Gy did not lead to an increase of frequency of HR, the chronic exposure of the plants to several orders of magnitude lower dose of 200 μGy led to a 5-6-fold induction of the frequency of HR as compared to the control

  4. Protective effect of adeturone on protein assimilation in the gastro-intestinal tract following acute X-irradiation

    The effect of adeturone and AET on the process of assimilation of food stuffs in the gastro-intestinal tract and possibilities for its protection from radiation injury were studied. Comparative assessment of the protective capabilities of adeturone and AET on the process of protein hydrolysis and absorption in the gastro-intestinal tract and the loss of serum proteins in the small intestines in acute X-irradiation revealed that the two radioprotectors adeturone and AET, being chemical agents, induce almost identical and transient changes in the absorption of protein hydrolysis products in the gastro-intestinal tract. These changes seem to have no aggravating effect on the course of radiation injury. In comparison with AET, adeturone exerts superior radioprotective effect on the processes studied, following exposure to a lethal X-ray dose of 800 r. (author)

  5. Association of 1800 cGy cranial irradiation with intellectual function in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Cranial radiation therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia has been associated with adverse neuropsychological effects, such as low intelligence. We evaluated 203 children for six years in a multi-centre European study. The patients were divided into two groups: 129 children treated with 1800 cGy of cranial radiation therapy and 74 children who received high-dose methotrexate but no radiation therapy. We found a significant decline in full scale intelligence quotient in the irradiated group that increased with the length of time from diagnosis. Younger age at diagnosis was associated with lower full scale intelligence quotient in the radiated group. Our results indicate that a radiation dose of 1800 cGy can have negative effects on neurocognitive function and we continue to question the benefit of low-dose cranial radiation therapy. (author)

  6. The effects of acute irradiation on a forest biogeocenosis: Experimental data, model and practical applications for accidental cases

    The effects of acute irradiations of a mixed pine and birch forest in spring and autumn with a high power point-type gamma radiation source (1180 TBq 137Cs) have been described. Radiation dose relationships for numerous response reactions of woody and herbaceous plants (growth and development of organs of woody plants, cytogenetical, physiological and biochemical changes in trees, reproductive potential of plants, damage and dying off of the forest as a biogeocenosis on the whole) have been calculated. Post-radiation recovery of the forest was investigated. Changes involving the secondary reactions related to radiation damage and death of the trees are presented. A model for radiation damage of forests has been designed. Examples are given on the usage of this model in the description of radiation effects in forests in the event of accidental releases of radionuclides into environment

  7. Effects of acute irradiation on survival of captive and free-ranging meadow voles

    Meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) were captured in a Manitoba old-field in May and November 1974 to determine if there were seasonal differences in combined effects of radiation-induced and natural mortality. Control groups were sham-irradiated and experimental animals were exposed to doses of 650 to 1000 R before being released at the point of capture. Approximately 30 days later the areas were retrapped and survival of the animals was determined. Voles born in the laboratory were also irradiated and survival for 30 days was determined. The LD50(30) for animals irradiated in May (767 R, 701-839) was not significantly different from that determined in the laboratory (844 R, 817-877), but animals irradiated in November had a significantly lower value (704 R, 635-798). These results support the suggestion that extrapolation from laboratory results may overestimate the radioresistance of free-ranging small mammals. The results were interpreted to indicate that the decrease in radioresistance was an indication of (and was caused by) the general level of stress on the population. The hypothesis that decreased radioresistance was associated with breeding was not supported

  8. Influence of acute irradiation on induction of chromosome aberrations in cultured cells of the fish Ameca splendens

    There is very little published information on the genetic and cytogenetic responses of fish to radiation. Since a large proportion of the low-level waste arising from the nuclear power industry is discharged to aquatic environments, this constitutes a significant deficiency in our knowledge. While it is not expected that fish populations are seriously at risk, confirmatory evidence would be useful and would also provide a basis for generalizations from the much greater body of information available for mammalian systems. A primary cell culture has been obtained from pooled embryonic tissue of the small tropical fish Ameca splendens. This material has two advantages from the point of view of cytogenetic studies: the diploid chromosome complement is 26, and the chromosomes are all fairly large and most have a well defined centromere. The spectrum of aberrations found in these cells after irradiation with 60Co γ rays is similar to that found in irradiated mammalian cells in culture, and an acute dose-response curve has been obtained. (author)

  9. Evaluation of accidental acute irradiated persons with respect to therapeutic measures

    Appropriate therapy of patients suffering radiation accident depends on the extent and type of the injury. Usually bone marrow syndromes are treated first. Therefore, it is very important to determine haemopoietic tissue damages as early as possible. 589 patients from 22 acute radiation accidents were examined from pathophysiology and radiation biology points of view. Various diagnostic and evaluation methods are presented and analyzed. (N.T.) 21 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  10. The effect of scheduling in children undergoing prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Costello, A.S.; Jones, R.D.; Barrett, A. (Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Beatson Oncology Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology)

    1991-09-01

    Control of central nervous system disease and overall survival have been analysed in a group of 829 children with leukaemia entered into the UKALL VIII trial to determine whether scheduling of the cranial irradiation is of prognostic significance. It is shown that short gaps in treatment do not influence prognosis and that current radiotherapy practice need not be modified. (author). 20 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Study of chromosome aberration repair after acute or fractionated X-irradiation in human peripheral lymphocytes

    Pure human peripheral blood has been subjected to a single irradiation with the dose of 125 and 250R and by fractions with the doses of 125+125 R in the following periods of the cell cycle: 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24, 30, 40 and 45 hrs. The following types of structural chromosome aberrations are counted on metaphase plates with a good chromosome scattering: dicentrics, rings, interstitial deletions, symmetric translocations, chromatide and chromosome fragments. The data on polycentrics and rings prove to be most characteristic: the frequency of these aberrations in the case of single irradiation for all periods of the ''presynthetic'' Gsub(I) period is stable varying in the range of 17-20% in the case of a 125 R dose and 66-73% in the case of a 250 R dose. Their frequency decreased for both doses of irradiation in later periods and reached 1% by the end of the synthetic period. The fractionated effect of two doses 125 R each gives the following values of polycentric and ring formation: second hour - 44,15%, fourth - 50,82%, sixth - 55,15% eighth -58,32% (maximum), twelfth - 55,48%. The descending tendency is preserved till the end of the presynthetic period and in the synthetic period. The statistic processing of results shows statistically authentic differences between fractionated and single irradiation in the output of polycentrics and rings, as well as other types of aberrations and breaks per cell. The data obtained permit to conclude that repair processes are undulatory and are characterized by maximum intensity in the first hours of presynthetic period which weakens to the 8th hour and then strengthens again almost to the end of the synthetic period

  12. An anatomo-pathological study of injury development in the pig following acute local irradiation

    The clinical and anatomo-pathological evolution of the injuries due to acute collimated exposure (192Ir) of pigs' thigh has been studied. After a first stage of superficial injuries -coagulation and ischemic necrosis- spreading on during the first three weeks, there followed a stage of fast extension of deep injuries, especially at the beginning of the third month following exposure. Together with the destructive injuries, a very large mutilating sclerosis developed from the fourth week; its particular characteristics -pseudosarcomatous aspect and anarchistic vascularization- did not allow to stop the evolution of tissular impairment

  13. Survival outcome following isolated central nervous system relapse treated with additional chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Purpose: An analysis of survival outcome following isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) and additional chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was conducted. Methods and Materials: Eighteen of 344 pediatric patients with ALL who attained initial complete remission on the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital 'Study XI' prospective protocol (1984-1988) developed a CNS relapse as first adverse event. Median interval to isolated CNS relapse was 7.5 months (range = 2-40 months) after achieving initial complete remission. At diagnosis, 14 of the 18 children were categorized as 'high risk' for subsequent leukemic relapse. Preventive cranial irradiation [PCI (18 Gy)] was delivered as planned to one of the 14 'high-risk' children. The other 13 'high-risk' patients experienced a CNS relapse during the first year of continuation therapy prior to week 52 of planned PCI. All four 'low-risk' patients experienced a CNS relapse beyond the first year of continuation therapy; none were scheduled to receive PCI. Following isolated CNS relapse, all 18 patients were treated on a prospective contingency of 'Study XI' trial consisting of intensified reinduction chemotherapy, weekly intrathecal methotrexate/hydrocortisone/Ara-C x 4-6 injections, craniospinal irradiation (cranium to 24.0 Gy and spine to 15.0 Gy at 1.5 Gy/fraction) and maintenance systemic therapy for a minimum of 1 year. Results: Ten of 18 patients remain in continuous complete secondary remission at 17 to 50 months post-CNS relapse. Second sites of relapse in the remaining eight children were as follows: CNS in four, bone marrow in three, and bilateral testicular in one patient. Each of these eight patients died of progressive leukemia. At a median follow-up of 40 months post-initial CNS relapse, the 3-year secondary Kaplan-Meier survival and event-free survival are 72% and 56%, respectively. Minimal long-term neurotoxicity was associated with

  14. Amelioration of acute oral mucositis by Keratinocyte growth factor: fractionated irradiation

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to quantify the protective efficacy of recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (rHuKGF) in oral mucosa. Methods and Materials: Mouse tongue mucosal ulceration was analyzed as the clinically relevant end point. Fractionated irradiation of the snout with 5 daily fractions of 3 Gy was followed by graded test doses, given to a test area of the lower tongue, on Day 7. rHuKGF was injected s.c. in daily doses of 5 mg/kg before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy, over the weekend break, or a combination. Moreover, single rHuKGF injections (5 or 15 mg/kg) were given on Day -1 or on Day 4. Results: In a single-dose control experiment, the ED50, i.e., the dose after which ulcer induction is expected in 50% of the mice, was 10.9 ± 0.7 Gy. Fractionated irradiation without keratinocyte growth factor rendered an ED50 for test irradiation of 5.6 ± 3.7 Gy. Keratinocyte growth factor increased the ED50 values to 7.8 ± 3.3 Gy (Days -3 to -1, p=0.01), 8.3 ± 1.6 Gy (Days -4 to -2, p=0.0008), 10.5 ± 1.4 Gy (Days 0 to +2, p=0.0002), 11.0 ± 0.5 Gy (Days 0 to +4, p=0.002), 10.6 ± 1.4 Gy (Days +4 to +6, p=0.0021), 10 ± 0.07 (Days -3 to +1, p=0.0001) or 11.0 ± 0.02 (Days +4 to +8, p=0.0001). This is equivalent to compensation of approximately 1.5 fractions of 3 Gy when rHuKGF is given before radiotherapy and 3-4 fractions in all other protocols by rHuKGF treatment. Single rHuKGF injections were similarly (5 mg/kg) or more (15 mg/kg) effective. Conclusions: In conclusion, these results indicate a marked increase in oral mucosal radiation tolerance by rHuKGF, which is most pronounced if the growth factor is applied during fractionated radiotherapy. The effect seems to be based on complex mechanisms, predominantly changes in both epithelial proliferation and differentiation processes

  15. Evaluation of protracted low dose rate irradiation from an acute dose survival curve

    A method of transformation from an acute survival curve to a protracted low dose rate survival curve based on the concept of the dose equivalent sublethal damage advanced by Oliver is introduced. The transformation was done by solving a differential equation which was formulated between the slope of both survival curves and which was able to be applied to the situation where the dose rate might change with time, e.g., in using short-life radioisotopes or the complexity of the recovery of sub-lethal damage. The effects of the short-life radioisotopes (radon seeds and radiogold grains) in radiotherapy model; our data are compared with the data obtained by Orton

  16. Apparent stimulation of vegetative growth by acute gamma-irradiation in crop plants

    Pot-grown plants were exposed to a wide range of radiation doses from a 5,000 Ci 60Co γ-source at a dose rate of about 1,800 rads/h at various developmental stages. In spring and winter wheat, spring barley, and spring oat radiation doses of 500 or 1,000 rads during the early vegetative stages caused a significant increase in the number of shoots. In potatoes, peas, and broad beans increases in dry weight were observed in plants irradiated in later stages of life cycle with doses of 500, 1,000 or 2,000 rads. As with cereals, increased vegetative growth was associated with severe reductions in reproductive yield. (MG)

  17. Influence of melanocytes in the ex-vivo reconstructed epidermal melanin unit following an acute UV irradiation

    Influence of melanocytes in skin pigmentation is well documented, however its photo-protective role has given rise to controversy. The role of melanocytes have been investigated on reconstructed epidermis with 100 % of keratinocytes or 95 % of keratinocytes and 5 % of melanocytes. In a first time, the effect of an acute UVB dose has been studied on both reconstructed epidermis, next we have investigated UVA and UVA+B effects on these epidermis. Following irradiation, the presence of melanocytes in reconstructed epidermis protects against apoptosis without protecting significantly against DNA damage formation (CPD, 6-4PP) and protects against UV-induced unbalance of the SOD/catalase ratio (antioxidants enzymes). On the contrary, the presence of melanocytes in reconstructed epidermis amplifies lipids and proteins oxidations but seems to protect against DNA oxidations. Melanocytes differ from keratinocytes by their melanin content and their more important concentration in polyunsaturated fatty acids. To evaluate what is the part of melanin and the part of polyunsaturated fatty acids in epidermal UV responses, reconstructed epidermis with keratinocytes have been supplemented with polyunsaturated fatty acid. This study indicates that polyunsaturated fatty acids are responsible for lipids and proteins oxidations and that melanin protect against DNA oxidation induced by lipid peroxidation. All these studies demonstrate that, model of reconstructed epidermis and epidermis in-vivo have the same behaviour following UV irradiation. In the last part, sunscreens and antioxidants have been tested on reconstructed epidermis and have demonstrated that model of reconstructed epidermis is suitable for photo-protective molecules screening. (author)

  18. Utility of cranial boost in addition to total body irradiation in the treatment of high risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) as part of a conditioning regimen before hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is an important component in the management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that has relapsed or has other certain high-risk features. Controversy exists, however, as to whether a cranial boost in addition to TBI is necessary to prevent central nervous system (CNS) recurrences in these high-risk cases. Previous national trials have included a cranial boost in the absence of data to justify its use. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess risk of CNS recurrence in ALL patients treated with TBI, to identify subsets of these high-risk patients at an increased or decreased risk of CNS recurrence after TBI, and to investigate whether regimens with higher doses of cranial irradiation further reduce the risk of CNS recurrence. Methods and Materials: Charts of 67 consecutively treated patients with ALL who received TBI before HSCT were reviewed. Data including patient demographics, clinical features at presentation, conditioning regimen, donor source, use of a cranial boost, remission stage at transplant, histologic subtype, cytogenetics, and extramedullary site of presentation were retrospectively collected and correlated with the risk of subsequent CNS recurrence. Results: At the time of analysis, 30 (45%) patients were alive with no evidence of disease, 8 (12%) were alive with recurrence of leukemia, 7 (10.5%) had recurrent ALL but with successful salvage, 7 (11%) died subsequent to recurrence, 14 (21%) died from complications related to HCST, and 1 patient was lost to follow-up (1.5%). Of the patients who recurred after HSCT, the relapses were hematologic in 13 (57%), CNS with or without simultaneous marrow involvement in 3 (13%), and other sites in 7 (30%). Forty-one (61%) patients did not receive an extracranial boost of irradiation with TBI. Two of these patients (4.9%) suffered CNS failures compared with 1 of 26 (3.8%) who received a

  19. Mutagenic effects of acute gamma irradiation on miniature roses: target theory approach

    Absorbed gamma-ray doses of 50, 100, and 200 Gy were used to produce mutations in miniature rose (Rosa hybrida) bushes of 'Blue Blood' (BB), 'Mountie' (MT), 'Dark Red Mountie' (DM), and 'Potluck' (PL) cultivars. The fairly good agreement achieved between measured and calculated doses from the extended gamma-ray source provided a high degree of confidence in reporting these doses. The relationship between plant height reduction (H) and absorbed dose (D) could be described as H = A - BD + CD2, in accordance with the prediction of the multi-hit target theory, where A, B, and C are constants. The mean spine number per 10 cm of stem, the mean petiole length, and the mean petal number were significantly (P less than or equal to 0.05 to 0.001) reduced in all cultivars depending on D. The total number of mutations was highest in PL. The irradiated plants remained fertile. The range in color increased substantially for all the cultivars. The number of flowers in an inflorescence decreased for PL, BB, and DM but not for MT

  20. Ultraviolet blood irradiation in acute exogeneus poisoming for the prevention and treatment of pneumonia

    Possibility of therapeutic application of UV irradiation (UVI) of blood and the mechanism of its medical effect has been studied in 111 patients with intoxication by psychotropic drugs and organic phosphorus insecticides with poisonings by cautering substances and by alcohol in patients with pneumonia. UVI has been carried out by means of MD-73M ''Izol'da'' device with the DRB-8 mercury lamp. The procedure permits to reduce lethality and cases of pneumonia development more than two times as well as to decrease periods of treatment. To achieve the best effect, the radiation energy should be not less than 100 J and not more than 15 J. Early application (in 1-2 days before poisoning or pneumonia development) of UVI in 100-150 J dose per a period of treatment is most effective. It is established that the mechanism of medical UVI effect in blood is mainly related to stimulation of a cell unit of immunity as well as to improvement of rheologic properties of blood and a qualitative composition of erythrocytes, that favours the strengthening of redox and desintoxication processes in an organism

  1. Hyperfractionated high-dose total body irradiation in bone marrow transplantation for Ph{sup 1}-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Kikuchi, Akira; Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Tetsuo [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science] [and others

    1998-12-01

    In two cases of Philadelphia-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph{sup 1} ALL), we performed allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (AlloBMT) with preconditioning regimen, including hyperfractionated high-dose total body irradiation (TBI) (13.5 Gy, in 9 fractions). Their disease statuses at BMT were hematological relapse in case 1 and molecular relapse in case 2. Bone marrow donors were unrelated in case 1, and HLA was a partially mismatched mother in case 2. Regimen-related toxicity was tolerable in both cases. Hematological recovery was rapid, and engraftment was obtained on day 14 in case 1 and on day 12 in case 2. BCR/ABL message in bone marrow disappeared on day 89 in case 1 and on day 19 in case 2 and throughout their subsequent clinical courses. Although short-term MTX and Cy-A continuous infusion were used for GVHD prophylaxis, grade IV GVHD was observed in case 1 and grade III in case 2. Both cases experienced hemorrhagic cystitis because of adenovirus type 11 infection. Although case 1 died of interstitial pneumonitis on day 442, case 2 has been free of disease through day 231. AlloBMT for Ph{sup 1} ALL with preconditioning regimen including hyperfractionated high-dose TBI is considered to be worth further investigation. (author)

  2. Effects of acute gamma irradiation, developmental stages and cultivar differences on growth and yield of wheat and sorghum plants

    Three cultivars of Triticum aestivum (Yecora, Chenab-70, and Pari) and of Sorghum vulgare (Pq. 7. dwarf, Ks. 12. medium dwarf, and Ts. 100. tall) were exposed to acute gamma rays (60Co) at three developmental stages, i.e. 1-leaf, ear emergence, and anthesis. Exposures ranged from 0.5-7 krad for wheat and 1-10 krad for sorghum. In wheat plants exposures of 0.5 and 1.25 krad had in general a stimulatory effect on height, tillering, ear number and grain yield per plant at the 1-leaf stage, but an adverse effect on the above characters at the ear emergence and anthesis stages of development. Among the three cultivars, Yecora and Pari were the most radiosensitive (LD100-2.5 krad) and Chenab-70 the most radioresistant (LD100 -5 krad). The three cultivars also differed in their ontogenetic sensitivity. In sorghum, cultivar Ts. 100. tall showed a large reduction in mean seedling height, tillering and ear number per plant at all exposures at the three stages of irradiation. A large reduction in seed set was found in Pq. 7. dwarf and Ks. 12. medium dwarf. Cultivar Pq. 7. dwarf was found to be the most radiosensitive for yield reduction (YD). (author)

  3. Degradation and acute toxicity removal of the antidepressant Fluoxetine (Prozac(®)) in aqueous systems by electron beam irradiation.

    Silva, Vanessa Honda Ogihara; Dos Santos Batista, Ana Paula; Silva Costa Teixeira, Antonio Carlos; Borrely, Sueli Ivone

    2016-06-01

    Electron beam irradiation (EBI) has been considered an advanced technology for the treatment of water and wastewater, whereas very few previous investigations reported its use for removing pharmaceutical pollutants. In this study, the degradation of fluoxetine (FLX), an antidepressant marketed as Prozac(®), was investigated by using EBI at FLX initial concentration of 19.4 ± 0.2 mg L(-1). More than 90 % FLX degradation was achieved at 0.5 kGy, with FLX below the detection limit (0.012 mg L(-1)) at doses higher than 2.5 kGy. The elucidation of organic byproducts performed using direct injection mass spectrometry, along with the results of ion chromatography, indicated hydroxylation of FLX molecules with release of fluoride and nitrate anions. Nevertheless, about 80 % of the total organic carbon concentration remained even for 7.5 kGy or higher doses. The decreases in acute toxicity achieved 86.8 and 9.6 % for Daphnia similis and Vibrio fischeri after EBI exposure at 5 kGy, respectively. These results suggest that EBI could be an alternative to eliminate FLX and to decrease residual toxicity from wastewater generated in pharmaceutical formulation facilities, although further investigation is needed for correlating the FLX degradation mechanism with the toxicity results. PMID:26961524

  4. Fetal liver cells transplantation in the treatment of extremely severe acute radiation injuries induced by large dose irradiation in leukemic patients

    Seven cases of extremely severe acute radiation injuries treated with fetal liver cells transplantation (FLT) are reported. Patients received 6-8 Gy whole body irradiation which was followed by an infusion of fetal liver cell suspension. Hematological reconstitution occurred in all patients and temporary chimera developed in 3 patients after FLT. There were no difference between the hematologic reconstitution in patients with or without chimera

  5. Role of total body irradiation as based on the comparison of preparation regimens for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for acute leukemia in first complete remission

    The role of total body irradiation (TBI) for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for acute leukemia in first complete remission was reevaluated in this study. From Japanese BMT Registry, data of 123 acute leukemia patients in first complete remission who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in 22 hospitals between 1988 and 1990 were available for the present comparative study of preparation regimens with or without total body irradiation. Two-year survivals were 77% and 51% in the TBI containing regimen group and in the non-TBI regimen group, respectively (p=0.0010). Corresponding two-year relapse rates were 16% and 37%, respectively (p=0.0197). Corresponding probabilities of developing interstitial pneumonitis were 21% and 24%, respectively (p=0.8127). The analysis of causes of death indicated that non-TBI regimen increased the incidence of septicemia and lethal organ failures, such as liver, heart, lung and other multiple sites. It was emphasized that an additional role of total body irradiation was to disperse the treatment-related toxicity in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for acute leukemia. (orig.)

  6. Effects of total body irradiation-based conditioning allogenic sem cell transplantation for pediatric acute leukemia: A single-institution study

    To evaluate the effects of total body irradiation (TBI), as a conditioning regimen prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT), in pediatric acute leukemia patients. From January 2001 to December 2011, 28 patients, aged less than 18 years, were treated with TBI-based conditioning for allo-SCT in our institution. Of the 28 patients, 21 patients were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, 75%) and 7 were diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 25%). TBI was completed 4 days or 1 day before stem cell infusion. Patients underwent radiation therapy with bilateral parallel opposing fields and 6-MV X-rays. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival outcomes. The 2-year event-free survival and overall survival rates were 66% and 56%, respectively (71.4% and 60.0% in AML patients vs. 64.3% and 52.4% in ALL patients, respectively). Treatment related mortality rate were 25%. Acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease was a major complication; other complications included endocrine dysfunction and pulmonary complications. Common complications from TBI were nausea (89%) and cataracts (7.1%). The efficacy and toxicity data in this study of TBI-based conditioning to pediatric acute leukemia patients were comparable with previous studies. However, clinicians need to focus on the acute and chronic complications related to allo-SCT.

  7. Effects of total body irradiation-based conditioning allogenic sem cell transplantation for pediatric acute leukemia: A single-institution study

    Park, Jong Moo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2014-09-15

    To evaluate the effects of total body irradiation (TBI), as a conditioning regimen prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT), in pediatric acute leukemia patients. From January 2001 to December 2011, 28 patients, aged less than 18 years, were treated with TBI-based conditioning for allo-SCT in our institution. Of the 28 patients, 21 patients were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, 75%) and 7 were diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 25%). TBI was completed 4 days or 1 day before stem cell infusion. Patients underwent radiation therapy with bilateral parallel opposing fields and 6-MV X-rays. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival outcomes. The 2-year event-free survival and overall survival rates were 66% and 56%, respectively (71.4% and 60.0% in AML patients vs. 64.3% and 52.4% in ALL patients, respectively). Treatment related mortality rate were 25%. Acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease was a major complication; other complications included endocrine dysfunction and pulmonary complications. Common complications from TBI were nausea (89%) and cataracts (7.1%). The efficacy and toxicity data in this study of TBI-based conditioning to pediatric acute leukemia patients were comparable with previous studies. However, clinicians need to focus on the acute and chronic complications related to allo-SCT.

  8. Interest of X-ray computed tomography and NMR tomography for the early diagnosis of acute localized irradiation. Experimental study in pigs

    Investigations were performed on 4 pigs, between 1 and 14 days after acute localized irradiation (with 192Ir) by X-ray computed tomography and NMR tomography. Areas irradiated with doses higher than 40 Gy could be visualized very early (on the 4th day) when no appearent lesions could be seen on histological samples according to classical pathology. Irradiated tissues at this high dose level are to necrose and surgery is the only practicable treatment. Therefore up to now that technique appears to be the only reliable one that could be used for an early and accurate assessment of the damages. Accordingly it should be suitable for pertinent surgical treatment. Further investigations are necessary to set more close relations between imaging, pathology and dose

  9. High-dose total-body irradiation and autologous marrow reconstitution in dogs: dose-rate-related acute toxicity and fractionation-dependent long-term survival

    Beagle dogs treated by total-body irradiation (TBI) were given autologous marrow grafts in order to avoid death from marrow toxicity. Acute and delayed non-marrow toxicities of high single-dose (27 dogs) and fractionated TBI (20 dogs) delivered at 0.05 or 0.1 Gy/min were compared. Fractionated TBI was given in increments of 2 Gy every 6 hr for three increments per day. Acute toxicity and early mortality (<1 month) at identical total irradiation doses were comparable for dogs given fractionated or single-dose TBI. With single-dose TBI, 14, 16, and 18 Gy, respectively, given at 0.05 Gy/min, 0/5, 5/5, and 2/2 dogs died from acute toxicity; with 10, 12, and 14 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 5/5 dogs died acutely. With fractionated TBI, 14 and 16 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 2/2 dogs died auctely. Early deaths were due to radiation enteritis with or without associated septicemia (29 dogs; less than or equal to Day 10). Three dogs given 10 Gy of TBI at 0.1 Gy/min died from bacterial pneumonia; one (Day 18) had been given fractionated and two (Days 14, 22) single-dose TBI. Fifteen dogs survived beyond 1 month; eight of these had single-dose TBI (10-14 Gy) and all died within 7 months of irradiation from a syndrome consisting of hepatic damage, pancreatic fibrosis, malnutrition, wasting, and anemia. Seven of the 15 had fractionated TBI, and only one (14 Gy) died on Day 33 from hepatic failure, whereas 6 (10-14 Gy) are alive and well 250 to 500 days after irradiation. In conclusion, fractionated TBI did not offer advantages over single-dose TBI with regard to acute toxicity and early mortality; rather, these were dependent upon the total dose of TBI. The total acutely tolerated dose was dependent upon the exposure rate; however, only dogs given fractionated TBI became healthy long-term survivors

  10. Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C., E-mail: jwong@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Rosenthal, Joseph [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Palmer, Joycelynne [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Stein, Anthony [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to

  11. Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days −10 to −6, etoposide (VP16) on Day −5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day −3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days −12 to −8 (800 μM min), TMI on Days −8 to −4, and VP16 on Day −3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible

  12. Image-Guided Total-Marrow Irradiation Using Helical Tomotherapy in Patients With Multiple Myeloma and Acute Leukemia Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Purpose: Total-body irradiation (TBI) has an important role in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but is associated with significant toxicities. Targeted TBI using helical tomotherapy results in reduced doses to normal organs, which predicts for reduced toxicities compared with standard TBI. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with multiple myeloma were treated in an autologous tandem transplantation Phase I trial with high-dose melphalan, followed 6 weeks later by total-marrow irradiation (TMI) to skeletal bone. Dose levels were 10, 12, 14, and 16 Gy at 2 Gy daily/twice daily. In a separate allogeneic HCT trial, 8 patients (5 with acute myelogenous leukemia, 1 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 1 with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 1 with multiple myeloma) were treated with TMI plus total lymphoid irradiation plus splenic radiotherapy to 12 Gy (1.5 Gy twice daily) combined with fludarabine/melphalan. Results: For the 13 patients in the tandem autologous HCT trial, median age was 54 years (range, 42-66 years). Median organ doses were 15-65% that of the gross target volume dose. Primarily Grades 1-2 acute toxicities were observed. Six patients reported no vomiting; 9 patients, no mucositis; 6 patients, no fatigue; and 8 patients, no diarrhea. For the 8 patients in the allogeneic HCT trial, median age was 52 years (range, 24-61 years). Grades 2-3 nausea, vomiting, mucositis, and diarrhea were observed. In both trials, no Grade 4 nonhematologic toxicity was observed, and all patients underwent successful engraftment. Conclusions: This study shows that TMI using helical tomotherapy is clinically feasible. The reduced acute toxicities observed compare favorably with those seen with standard TBI. Initial results are encouraging and warrant further evaluation as a method to dose escalate with acceptable toxicity or to offer TBI-containing regimens to patients unable to tolerate standard approaches

  13. Acute toxicity profile of craniospinal irradiation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy in children with medulloblastoma: A prospective analysis

    To report on the acute toxicity in children with medulloblastoma undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with daily intrafractionally modulated junctions. Newly diagnosed patients, aged 3–21, with standard-risk (SR) or high-risk (HR) medulloblastoma were eligible. A dose of 23.4 or 36.0Gy in daily fractions of 1.8Gy was prescribed to the craniospinal axis, followed by a boost to the primary tumor bed (54 or 55.8Gy) and metastases (39.6–55.8Gy), when indicated. Weekly, an intravenous bolus of vincristine was combined for patients with SR medulloblastoma and patients participating in the COG-ACNS-0332 study. Common toxicity criteria (CTC, version 2.0) focusing on skin, alopecia, voice changes, conjunctivitis, anorexia, dysphagia, gastro-intestinal symptoms, headache, fatigue and hematological changes were scored weekly during radiotherapy. From 2010 to 2014, data from 15 consecutive patients (SR, n = 7; HR, n = 8) were collected. Within 72 h from onset of treatment, vomiting (66 %) and headache (46 %) occurred. During week 3 of treatment, a peak incidence in constipation (33 %) and abdominal pain/cramping (40 %) was observed, but only in the subgroup of patients (n = 9) receiving vincristine (constipation: 56 vs 0 %, P = .04; pain/cramping: 67 vs 0 %, P = .03). At week 6, 73 % of the patients developed faint erythema of the cranial skin with dry desquamation (40 %) or moist desquamation confined to the skin folds of the auricle (33 %). No reaction of the skin overlying the spinal target volume was observed. Headache at onset and gastro-intestinal toxicity, especially in patients receiving weekly vincristine, were the major complaints of patients with medulloblastoma undergoing craniospinal irradiation with IMRT

  14. Exploitation of the speckle field statistics as an aid to diagnosis of the acute irradiation cutaneous syndrome: comparison of biophysical and biological results

    The objective of this research thesis is to demonstrate the possibility of using a non-invasive optical method for the in-vivo diagnosis and prognosis of the acute irradiation cutaneous syndrome. The author first describes the choice of an optical investigation method for application in dermatology. A conventional frequency analysis of the speckle field sampling is completed by a stochastic approach in order to extract parameters which characterize speckle patterns. An experimental protocol is then tested in order to better understand the parameter behaviour with respect to some physical properties of synthetic diffusing media. The author then reports the in-vivo application of this method to the acute irradiation cutaneous syndrome in the case of swine. Results obtained on several animals demonstrate the possibility of discrimination between irradiated areas of normal areas several weeks before the emergence of the first clinical signs. The author tries to understand the results obtained on a radiological burn comparing with histological results. A correlation appears between speckle parameters and histological analysis. Results are also compared with those obtained on other tested media

  15. Research on the use of microwave thermography in the case of an acute irradiation of pig; the interest of this experimental model for the diagnosis and assessment of an accidental irradiation of man. Final report for the period 1 March 1984 - 30 September 1989

    Thermography, x-ray tomography and NMR imaging, and scintigraphy have been used for the early diagnosis of an acute localized irradiation of a pig. The combination of these methods allows the evaluation of the radiation injury and its possible evolution. The methods could be applied to detect an accidental irradiation of man. 2 refs

  16. Helical tomotherapy targeting total bone marrow after total body irradiation for patients with relapsed acute leukemia undergoing an allogeneic stem cell transplant

    Background and purpose: To report our clinical experience in planning and delivering total marrow irradiation (TMI) after total body irradiation (TBI) in patients with relapsed acute leukemia undergoing an allogeneic stem-cell transplant (SCT). Materials and Methods: Patients received conventional TBI as 2 Gy BID/day for 3 days boosted the next day by TMI (2 Gy in a single fraction) and followed by cyclophosphamide (Cy) 60 mg/kg for 2 days. While TBI was delivered with linear accelerator, TMI was performed with helical tomotherapy (HT). Results: Fifteen patients were treated from July 2009 till May 2010, ten with acute myeloid leukemia, and five with acute lymphoid leukemia. At the time of radiotherapy eight patients were in relapse and seven in second or third complete remission (CR) after relapse. The donor was a matched sibling in 7 cases and an unrelated donor in 8 cases. Median organ-at-risk dose reduction with TMI ranged from 30% to 65% with the largest reduction (-50%-65%) achieved for brain, larynx, liver, lungs and kidneys. Target areas (bone marrow sites and spleen in selected cases) were irradiated with an optimal conformity and an excellent homogeneity. Follow-up is short ranging from 180 to 510 days (median 310 days). However, tolerance was not different from a conventional TBI-Cy. All patients treated with TBI/TMI reached CR after SCT. Three patients have died (2 for severe GvHD, 1 for infection) and 2 patients showed relapsed leukemia. Twelve patients are alive with ten survivors in clinical remission of disease. Conclusions: This study confirms the clinical feasibility of using HT to deliver TMI as selective dose boost modality after TBI. For patients with advanced leukemia targeted TMI after TBI may be a novel approach to increase radiation dose with low risk of severe toxicity.

  17. A comparison of busulphan versus total body irradiation combined with cyclophosphamide as conditioning for autograft or allograft bone marrow transplantation in patients with acute leukaemia

    We retrospectively compared the outcome in patients in the EBMT database transplanted for acute leukaemia from January 1987 to January 1994 who received busulphan and cyclophosphamide (BU/CY) as a pretransplant regimen versus those who received cyclophosphamide and total-body irradiation (CY-TBI). The patients were matched for type of transplant (autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) versus allogenic (BMT)), diagnosis (acute lymphoblast leukaemia (ALL) ora cute myeloid leukaemia (AML)), status (early first complete remission, CR-1) versus intermediate (second or later remission, first relapse)), age, FAB classification for AML, prevention of graft-versus-host disease and year of transplantation. BU/CY and CY/TBI as pretransplant regimens gave similar results in all situations, except ABMT for ALL intermediate stages with more than 2 years from diagnosis to transplantation, where a lower RI and a higher LFS were associated with CY/TBI. (author)

  18. Primary anaplastic astrocytoma of the brain after prophylactic cranial irradiation in a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Case report and review of the literature

    Imtiaz Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 6½-year-old boy had developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and was treated with systemic chemotherapy, intrathecal triple drug regimen and prophylactic cranial irradiation. After 10 years he developed anaplastic astrocytoma of the postero-superior cerebellum on the left side while leukemia was in remission. He was treated with surgical excision, followed by adjuvant three dimensional conformal radiotherapy and is on salvage chemotherapy with temozolamide. It is possible that the anaplastic astrocytoma may be a radiation induced malignancy.

  19. Fatal veno-occlusive disease of the liver after chemotherapy, whole-body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation for refractory acute leukaemia

    Rapid onset of liver failure with fatal outcome occured in a young woman after successful bone marrow transplantation undertaken for refractory acute leukaemia. Centrilobular necrosis was demonstrated at autopsy and was attributed to prior cytotoxic chemotherapy, possibly potentiated by the total-body irradiation that was used in preparation for the transplant. This association between liver damage and prolonged drug therapy, coupled with the short median survival currently achieved within these chemotherapy regimens, has initiated an evaluation of bone marrow transplantation in patients with leukaemia during the first complete remission, rather than at a later stage when cumulative drug toxicity to the liver may have taken place

  20. Comparison of intermediate-dose methotrexate with cranial irradiation for the post-induction treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia in children

    We compared two regimens with respect to their ability to prolong disease-free survival in 506 children and adolescents with acute lymphocytic leukemia. All responders to induction therapy were randomized to treatment with 2400 rad of cranial irradiation plus intrathecal methotrexate or to treatment with intermediate-dose methotrexate plus intrathecal methotrexate, as prophylaxis for involvement of the central nervous system and other sanctuary areas. Patients were then treated with a standard maintenance regimen. Complete responders were stratified into either standard-risk or increased-risk groups on the basis of age and white-cell count at presentation. Among patients with standard risk, hematologic relapses occurred in 9 of 117 given methotrexate and 24 of 120 given irradiation (P less than 0.01). The rate of central-nervous-system relapse was higher in the methotrexate group (23 of 117) than in the irradiation group (8 of 120) (P . 0.01). Among patients with increased risk, radiation offered greater protection to the central nervous system than methotrexate (P . 0.03); there was no difference in the rate of hematologic relapse. In both risk strata the frequency of testicular relapse was significantly lower in the methotrexate group (1 patient) than the radiation group (10 patients) (P . 0.01). Methotrexate offered better protection against systemic relapse in standard-risk patients and better protection against testicular relapse overall, but it offered less protection against relapses in the central nervous system than cranial irradiation

  1. Comparison of intermediate-dose methotrexate with cranial irradiation for the post-induction treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia in children

    The authors compared two regimens with respect to their ability to prolong disease-free survival in 506 children and adolescents with acute lymphocytic leukemia. All responders to induction therapy were randomized to treatment with 2400 rad of cranial irradiation plus intrathecal methotrexate or to treatment with intermediate-dose methotrexate plus intrathecal methotrexate, as prophylaxis for involvement of the central nervous system and other sanctuary areas. Complete responders were stratified into either standard-risk or increased-risk groups on the basis of age and white-cell count at presentation. Among patients with standard risk, hematologic relapses occurred in 9 of 117 given methotrexate and 24 of 120 given irradiation. The rate of central-nervous-system relapse was higher in the methotrexate group (23 of 117) than in the irradiation group. Among patients with increased risk, radiation offered greater protection to the central nervous system than methotrexate; there was no difference in the rate of hematologic relapse. Methotrexate offered better protection against systemic relapse in standard-risk patients and better protection against testicular relapse overall, but it offered less protection against relapses in the central nervous system than cranial irradiation

  2. Radiation-induced meningioma following prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Development at the same site of a previous craniotomy for resection of an arteriovenous malformation

    The causal relationship between cranial irradiation and the subsequent development of meningioma is well established. However, very few studies have reported the development of a meningioma at the site of a previous craniotomy, even in cases where the patient underwent cranial irradiation after resection of a brain tumor. We report a case of meningioma that developed at the same site where a craniotomy was performed for the resection of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) 9 years after radiotherapy. The patient had been diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic lymphoma at the age of 2 years, for which he received chemotherapy followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation. At the age of 11 years, the patient was hospitalized because of an intracerebral hematoma caused by a ruptured AVM. He underwent an uneventful resection of the AVM, and an artificial dura capable of inducing granulomatous reaction as a foreign body was used. At the age of 22 years, he presented with right arm numbness. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed a large well-defined mass in the left parietal region, where an AVM had been resected previously. The tumor was completely removed, and pathological examination had revealed that the tumor was a meningothelial meningioma without malignant features. The postoperative course was uneventful, and MRI performed 1 year after surgery revealed no signs of recurrence. In addition to irradiation, extrinsic etiological factors such as surgical trauma and chronic inflammation might have led to the development of a meningioma at the same site of the previous craniotomy. (author)

  3. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of influences of cranial irradiation on cerebral energy metabolism in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    The effect of cranial irradiation on the cerebrum was studied. Energy metabolism in the brain was assessed before and after cranial irradiation using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). The subjects were 3 pediatric patients with initial acute lymphotic leukemia (ALL), who underwent induction chemotherapy and central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis according to the ALL high risk 911 protocol of Children's Cancer and Leukemia Study Group. The patients underwent 31P-MRS within one week before and after prophylactic CNS irradiation with a total dose of 18 Gy (i.e., 0.5 Gy in two fractions, 1.0 Gy in two fractions, and 1.5 Gy in 10 fractions - 4 times a week in 3-4 weeks). All 3 patients showed a decrease in phosphocreatine and ATP levels, which are indicators of energy metabolism, and also in the intracellular pH level in the brain tissue. Cranial irradiation was thus suggested to induce hypoxia in the brain tissue. (S.Y.)

  4. Is high dose methotrexate without irradiation of the brain sufficiently effective in prevention of CNS disease in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

    We present 5-year results of treatment in 93 children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia using two therapeutic protocols containing multidrug chemotherapy including high dose methotrexate. We could ascertain different results in standard and high risk patients. In a group of 62 children with standard risk we observed improvement in complete remission rate being 98.9% after induction phase of therapy, only one patient died on septicemia. Relapse rate in this group was 21.2% and that 14. 7% in the bone marrow and 6.5% in CNS and no testicular relapse at all. In the group of 31 children with high risk leukemia all patients achieved complete remission. Only one of them died on acute pancreatitis due to toxicity. Overall relapse rate in this group was 28.9% with 12.8% of medullary relapse and 16.1 % of CNS relapse. The last one was significantly higher than in the previous study when brain irradiation was a part of therapeutic procedure. It seems that this treatment is effective mainly in the standard risk leukemia, however, in the high risk leukemias this procedure appears to be less effective in preventing CNS leukemia. In this group of patients irradiation of the brain need to be enclosed in the therapy. (authors)

  5. Does prophylactic treatment with proteolytic enzymes reduce acute toxicity of adjuvant pelvic irradiation? Results of a double-blind randomized trial

    Purpose: Does prophylactic treatment with proteolytic enzymes reduce acute toxicity of adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy? Material and methods: Fifty-six patients with an indication for adjuvant pelvic irradiation after curative surgery were double-blind randomized. All patients took 3x4 capsules study medication daily during radiotherapy. Twenty-eight patients in the enzyme group (EG) received capsules containing papain, trypsin and chymotrypsin, 28 in the placebo group (PG) received placebo capsules. All patients were irradiated with 5x1.8 Gy weekly to 50.4 Gy using four-field-box technique after CT-based planning. Primary objective was the grade of diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, fatigue and epitheliolysis during radiotherapy. Secondary objectives were the number of supportive medications and treatment interruptions due to acute toxicity. Results: None/mild diarrhea: 43% EG, 64% PG. Moderate/severe diarrhea: 57% EG, 36% PG (P=0.11). Mean duration: 11 days in EG, 10 days in PG. None/mild nausea: 93% EG, 93% PG. Moderate/severe nausea: 7% EG, 7% PG. None/mild vomiting: 100% EG, 97% PG. None/mild fatigue: 82% EG, 93% PG. Moderate/severe fatigue: 18% EG, 7% PG (P=0.23). None/mild epitheliolysis: 75% EG, 93% PG. Moderate/severe epitheliolysis: 25% EG, 7% PG (P=0.16). Treatment interruption (mean days): 2.44 in EG, 1.46 in PG. Number of supportive medication: 29 in EG, 19 in PG. Conclusions: The prophylactic use of proteolytic enzymes does not reduce acute toxicities, treatment interruptions and number of supportive medication and therefore does not improve tolerance of adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy

  6. Partial breast irradiation with interstitial high dose-rate brachytherapy: acute and late toxicities and cosmetic results

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation aims at decreasing the overall treatment time and reducing toxicity. The study we report is for early stage breast cancer and is a multicentre clinical investigation of partial breast irradiation achieved by interstitial high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with intraoperative placement of catheters. We have been able to conclude from the initial data that an interstitial perioperative brachytherapy implant is a feasible method of treatment with good tolerance and good cosmetic results. (author)

  7. Cell biological effects of total body irradiation on growth and differentiation of acute myelogenous leukemia cells compared to normal bone marrow

    Greenberger, J.S.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Botnick, L.E.; Sakakeeny, M.; Moloney, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation therapy is used as total body treatment in preparation of the acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patient for bone marrow transplantation. Many AML patients will have residual leukemia cells at the time of total body irradiation (TBI). In the present study, the effect of TBI on leukemic myeloid cells was compared to the effect on normal marrow granulocytic stem cells (CFUc) in vitro. Little difference from that of normal CFUc was found in the radiosensitivity of two mouse myeloid leukemia cell lines. The effect of TBI on growth of WEHI-3 or J774 cells in millipore diffusion chambers was stimulatory. These AML cell lines as well as others derived from Friend or Abelson virus infected in vitro long term mouse marrow cultures showed some morphologic differentiation by 7 days growth in diffusion chambers in irradiated heterologous rat hosts, but immature cells predominated by day 21. Thus, evidence in murine models of AML indicates that residual AML cells surviving chemotherapy will show no greater susceptibility to radiation killing compared to normal stem cells and will rapidly repopulate the irradiated host.

  8. Longitudinal growth in children with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Comparison between unirradiated and irradiated patients

    Marky, I.; Samuelsson, B.O.; Mellander, L.; Karlberg, J. (Gothenburg Univ. (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    Longitudinal growth was studied in children treated for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The aim of the study was to compare these children's growth velocity with findings in a previous study we performed on age-matched children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who received cranial irradiation. Nine children with NHL with an onset time of treatment between 4 and 9 years of age (mean 6.5 years) were studied with annual body measurements taken from the time of the diagnosis and thereafter annually during the following 4 years. None of the children received cranial irradiation. During the first treatment year a significantly low mean height velocity was observed (-1.4 standard deviation score (SDS)) for the NHL group. The consecutive two 1 year periods showed a normalization of the mean height velocity. For the group of children with ALL, there was a more prominent negative effect on height during the first 2 years of treatment than for the NHL group in the present study. After the cessation of therapy, the children with NHL showed a reduced catch-up growth compared with the children with ALL. The explanation offered is that cranial irradiation has a heavier impact on growth than chemotherapy during the first 2 years of treatment, but an intense chemotherapy during the maintenance period could have a considerable impact in blunting growth.

  9. Prospective study of treatment techniques to minimize the volume of pelvic small bowel with reduction of acute and late effects associated with pelvic irradiation

    The volume, distribution, and mobility of opacified pelvic small bowel (PSB) were determined by fluoroscopy and orthogonal radiographs in 150 consecutive patients undergoing pelvic irradiation. Various techniques including uteropexy, omental transposition, bladder distention, inclining the patient, and anterior abdominal wall compression in the supine and prone treatment position were studied for their effect on the volume and location of small bowel within the pelvis. Abdominal wall compression in the prone position combined with bladder distention was selected for further investigation because of its simplicity, reproducibility, patient comfort, and ability to displace the small bowel. Factors correlating with the volume of pelvic small bowel (PSB) included prior pelvic surgery, pelvic irradiation (XRT), and body mass index. After pelvic surgery, especially following abdominoperineal resection (APR), there was a greater volume of PSB which was also less mobile. The severity of acute gastrointestinal effects positively correlated with the volume of irradiated small bowel. Overall, 67% of patients experienced little or no diarrhea, 30% developed mild diarrhea, and no patient required treatment interruption. Late gastrointestinal effects correlated with the prior pelvic surgery and with the volume of small bowel receiving greater than 45 Gy. Small bowel obstruction was not observed in 75 patients who had no previous pelvic surgery. However, following pelvic surgery excluding APR, 2/50 patients and following APR, 3/25 patients developed small bowel obstruction

  10. Longitudinal growth in children with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Comparison between unirradiated and irradiated patients

    Longitudinal growth was studied in children treated for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The aim of the study was to compare these children's growth velocity with findings in a previous study we performed on age-matched children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who received cranial irradiation. Nine children with NHL with an onset time of treatment between 4 and 9 years of age (mean 6.5 years) were studied with annual body measurements taken from the time of the diagnosis and thereafter annually during the following 4 years. None of the children received cranial irradiation. During the first treatment year a significantly low mean height velocity was observed (-1.4 standard deviation score [SDS]) for the NHL group. The consecutive two 1 year periods showed a normalization of the mean height velocity. For the group of children with ALL, there was a more prominent negative effect on height during the first 2 years of treatment than for the NHL group in the present study. After the cessation of therapy, the children with NHL showed a reduced catch-up growth compared with the children with ALL. The explanation offered is that cranial irradiation has a heavier impact on growth than chemotherapy during the first 2 years of treatment, but an intense chemotherapy during the maintenance period could have a considerable impact in blunting growth

  11. Carbon Ion irradiation in the treatment of grossly incomplete or unresectable malignant peripheral nerve sheaths tumors: acute toxicity and preliminary outcome

    To report our early experience with carbon ion irradiation in the treatment of gross residual or unresectable malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). We retrospectively analysed 11 patients (pts) with MPNST, who have been treated with carbon ion irradiation (C12) at our institution between 2010 and 2013. All pts had measurable gross disease at the initiation of radiation treatment. Median age was 47 years (29-79). Tumors were mainly located in the pelvic/sacral (5 pts) and sinunasal/orbital region (5 pts). 5 pts presented already in recurrent situation, 3 pts had been previously irradiated, and in 3 pts MPNST were neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) associated. Median cumulative dose was 60 GyE. Treatment was carried out either as a combination of IMRT plus C12 boost (4 pts) or C12 only (7 pts). Median follow-up was 17 months (3-31 months). We observed 3 local progressions, translating into estimated 1- and 2-year local control rates of 65%. One patient developed distant failure, resulting in estimated 1- and 2-year PFS rates of 56%. Two patients have died, therefore the estimated 1- and 2-year OS rates are 75%. Acute radiation related toxicities were generally mild, no grade 3 side effects were observed. Severe late toxicity (grade 3) was scored in 2 patients (trismus, wound healing delays). Carbon ion irradiation yields very promising short term local control and overall survival rates with low morbidity in patients suffering from gross residual or unresectable malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and should be further investigated in a prospective trial

  12. Superoxide dismutase mimic, MnTE-2-PyP5+ ameliorates acute and chronic proctitis following focal proton irradiation of the rat rectum

    John O. Archambeau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation proctitis, an inflammation and damage to the lower part of colon, is a common adverse event of the radiotherapy of tumors in the abdominal and pelvic region (colon, prostate, cervical. Several Mn(III porphyrin-based superoxide dismutase mimics have been synthesized and successfully evaluated in preclinical models as radioprotectants. Here we report for the first time the remarkable rectal radioprotection of frequently explored Mn(III meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-ylporphyrin, MnTE-2-PyP5+. A batch prepared in compliance with good manufacturing practice (GMP, which has good safety/toxicity profile, was used for this study. MnTE-2-PyP5+ was given subcutaneously at 5 mg/kg, either 1 h before or 1 h after irradiation, with additional drug administered at weekly intervals thereafter. MnTE-2-PyP5+ ameliorated both acute and chronic radiation proctitis in male Sprague-Dawley rats irradiated with 20–30 Gy protons delivered to 2.5 cm span of rectum using spread-out Bragg peak of a proton treatment beam. Focal irradiation of the rectum produced acute proctitis, which healed, followed by chronic rectal dilation and symptomatic proctitis. MnTE-2-PyP5+ protected rectal mucosa from radiation-induced crypt loss measured 10 days post-irradiation. Significant effects were observed with both pre- and post-treatment regimens. However, only MnTE-2-PyP5+ pre-treatment, but not post-treatment, prevented the development of rectal dilation, indicating that proper dosing regimen is critical for radioprotection. The pre-treatment also prevented or delayed the development of chronic proctitis depending on the radiation dose. Further work aimed at developing MnTE-2-PyP5+ and similar drugs as adjunctive agents for radiotherapy of pelvic tumors is warranted. The present study substantiates the prospects of employing this and similar analogs in preserving normal tissue during cancer radiation as well as any other radiation exposure.

  13. Acute changes in canine small bowel muscle prostaglandin synthesis and function after x-irradiation with 9.38 Gy

    Abdominal radiotherapy is often limited by radiation-induced enteritis. Prostaglandin (PG) synthesis may play a role in the altered function of small bowel (SB) muscle and mucosa. Therefore, the authors have investigated the effects of X-radiation on PG synthesis, and other aspects of canine SB smooth muscle function. Canine SB received 9.38 Gy of 250 kVp X-radiation in situ. Electrodes were used to monitor spike burst and propagation of electrical activity in the SB muscle pre- and post-exposure. Animals were sacrificed prior to irradiation and at 1 and 4 days post-irradiation. Serum PG levels were assayed from mesenteric artery and vein samples, and SB muscle was removed for analysis of PG synthesis. SB muscle myoelectric activity decreased after irradiation until sacrifice (day 4). The PG synthesis in irradiated SB muscle at days 1 and 4 increased in PGE/sub 2/ and PGF/sub 2/α and in thromboxane A/sub 2/ metabolite, while the PGI/sub 2/ metabolite decreased. PG levels in venous blood indicate similar changes after passage through the intestine. Although causality is not established, radiation does induce changes in PG synthesis which correlate with changes in myoelectric activity (motility)

  14. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    2016-04-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Acute whole-body irradiation, even at moderate dose, induces alterations in blood-brain-barrier permeability

    Full text: A radiation-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown has been evoked, but clearly demonstrated only at high doses of ionizing radiations. By using two protocols, we have searched an impairment in BBB integrity induced by moderate doses. First, the effects of irradiation on the permeability of striatal BBB to [3H]AIBA and [14C]sucrose were investigated in rats by using brain microdialysis. 32 rats, irradiated at 4.5Gy were serially experimented from 0 to 24 hours, from 24 to 48 hours and at later delays after exposure. 32 sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Second, the entry of pyridostigmine (PYR would not be expected to cross the BBB) into the brain was investigated in mice subjected to (neutron-g) exposure at 0.7Gy or 4Gy. For each dose 120 animals were irradiated and 120 sham-irradiated mice were included. At different delays after exposure, 10 mice were injected with 0.9% NaCl (control) or PYR bromide (0.1 mg/kg). Mice were killed 10min after injection and striatum, cortex and hippocampus were quickly dissected. Penetration of the drug into the brain was examined by measurement of AChE activity. Concerning microdialysis protocol, no late modification of the permeability of BBB was observed. But, in the course of the initial syndrome, we observed a transient increase of the permeability to the two markers, between the third and the 17th hour after exposure. A secondary transient 'opening' of the BBB to [14C] sucrose was noticed about 28 hours following irradiation with no modification of the permeability to [3H]AIBA. Concerning the BBB permeability to PYR, by comparing irradiated-PYR mice to sham-PYR mice, a decrease of AChE activity in the three cerebral areas was noted 48 hours after exposure at 4 Gy ; at 0.7 Gy this decrease is noted in the striatum only. In conclusion, our experiments by using two animal models, two types of radiations, and different tracers show modifications of the BBB permeability after moderate doses whole

  16. Similar Survival for Patients Undergoing Reduced-Intensity Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Versus Myeloablative TBI as Conditioning for Allogeneic Transplant in Acute Leukemia

    Purpose: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the mainstay of treatment for adults with acute leukemia. Total body irradiation (TBI) remains an important part of the conditioning regimen for HCST. For those patients unable to tolerate myeloablative TBI (mTBI), reduced intensity TBI (riTBI) is commonly used. In this study we compared outcomes of patients undergoing mTBI with those of patients undergoing riTBI in our institution. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of all patients with acute leukemia who underwent TBI-based conditioning, using a prospectively acquired database of HSCT patients treated at our institution. Patient data including details of the transplantation procedure, disease status, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), response rates, toxicity, survival time, and time to progression were extracted. Patient outcomes for various radiation therapy regimens were examined. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Between June 1985 and July 2012, 226 patients with acute leukemia underwent TBI as conditioning for HSCT. Of those patients, 180 had full radiation therapy data available; 83 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 94 had acute myelogenous leukemia; 45 patients received riTBI, and 135 received mTBI. Median overall survival (OS) was 13.7 months. Median relapse-free survival (RFS) for all patients was 10.2 months. Controlling for age, sex, KPS, disease status, and diagnosis, there were no significant differences in OS or RFS between patients who underwent riTBI and those who underwent mTBI (P=.402, P=.499, respectively). Median length of hospital stay was shorter for patients who received riTBI than for those who received mTBI (16 days vs 23 days, respectively; P<.001), and intensive care unit admissions were less frequent following riTBI than mTBI (2.22% vs 12.69%, respectively, P=.043). Nonrelapse survival rates were also similar (P=.186). Conclusions: No differences in OS or RFS were seen between

  17. Similar Survival for Patients Undergoing Reduced-Intensity Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Versus Myeloablative TBI as Conditioning for Allogeneic Transplant in Acute Leukemia

    Mikell, John L., E-mail: jmikell@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Waller, Edmund K. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Switchenko, Jeffrey M. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Rangaraju, Sravanti; Ali, Zahir; Graiser, Michael [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Hall, William A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Langston, Amelia A. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khoury, H. Jean [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khan, Mohammad K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the mainstay of treatment for adults with acute leukemia. Total body irradiation (TBI) remains an important part of the conditioning regimen for HCST. For those patients unable to tolerate myeloablative TBI (mTBI), reduced intensity TBI (riTBI) is commonly used. In this study we compared outcomes of patients undergoing mTBI with those of patients undergoing riTBI in our institution. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of all patients with acute leukemia who underwent TBI-based conditioning, using a prospectively acquired database of HSCT patients treated at our institution. Patient data including details of the transplantation procedure, disease status, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), response rates, toxicity, survival time, and time to progression were extracted. Patient outcomes for various radiation therapy regimens were examined. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Between June 1985 and July 2012, 226 patients with acute leukemia underwent TBI as conditioning for HSCT. Of those patients, 180 had full radiation therapy data available; 83 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 94 had acute myelogenous leukemia; 45 patients received riTBI, and 135 received mTBI. Median overall survival (OS) was 13.7 months. Median relapse-free survival (RFS) for all patients was 10.2 months. Controlling for age, sex, KPS, disease status, and diagnosis, there were no significant differences in OS or RFS between patients who underwent riTBI and those who underwent mTBI (P=.402, P=.499, respectively). Median length of hospital stay was shorter for patients who received riTBI than for those who received mTBI (16 days vs 23 days, respectively; P<.001), and intensive care unit admissions were less frequent following riTBI than mTBI (2.22% vs 12.69%, respectively, P=.043). Nonrelapse survival rates were also similar (P=.186). Conclusions: No differences in OS or RFS were seen between

  18. Current status of total body irradiation in conditioning regimen for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Survey in the Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study (JACLS) Group

    We surveyed methods of total body irradiation (TB I) in conditioning regimens of stem cell transplantation (SCT) for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at participating institutions of the Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study (JACLS) ALL-97 protocol. We obtained information about TBI from 25 institutions. Total dose of 12 Gy fractionated by four to six in two to three days for TBI was conducted in 22 of 25 institutions. High-risk patients, such as patients with Philadelphia positive ALL, received over 12 Gy in five institutions. Beam direction and patient's positioning were horizontal and lateral respectively in 15 institutions. Shielding of lung and/or eyes and boost irradiation to central nervous system and/or testis were done in 24 and 11 institutions respectively, but in various ways. We have to keep in mind that a great variety of TBI have been undergone in each institution when we intend to interpret multi-institutional trials of treatment including SCT for patients with ALL. (author)

  19. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-07-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Impact of Cranial Irradiation Added to Intrathecal Conditioning in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Central Nervous System Involvement

    Purpose: Neither the prognostic importance nor the appropriate management of central nervous system (CNS) involvement is known for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We examined the impact of a CNS irradiation boost to standard intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC). Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2005, a total of 648 adult AML patients received a myeloablative HCT: 577 patients were CNS negative (CNS-), and 71 were CNS positive (CNS+). Of the 71 CNS+ patients, 52 received intrathecal chemotherapy alone (CNS+ITC), and 19 received ITC plus an irradiation boost (CNS+RT). Results: The CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT patients had 1- and 5-year relapse-free survivals (RFS) of 43% and 35%, 15% and 6%, and 37% and 32%, respectively. CNS+ITC patients had a statistically significant worse RFS compared with CNS- patients (hazard ratio [HR], 2.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-3.6; p < 0.0001). CNS+RT patients had improved relapse free survival over that of CNS+ITC patients (HR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8; p = 0.01). The 1- and 5-year overall survivals (OS) of patients with CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT, were 50% and 38%, 21% and 6%, and 53% and 42%, respectively. The survival of CNS+RT were significantly better than CNS+ITC patients (p = 0.004). After adjusting for known risk factors, CNS+RT patients had a trend toward lower relapse rates and reduced nonrelapse mortality. Conclusions: CNS+ AML is associated with a poor prognosis. The role of a cranial irradiation boost to intrathecal chemotherapy appears to mitigate the risk of CNS disease, and needs to be further investigated to define optimal treatment strategies.

  1. An experimental model of acute encephalopathy after total body irradiation in the rat: effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761); Effet de l'extrait de Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) chez le rat sur un modele experimental d'encephalopathie aigue apres irradiation corporelle totale

    Lamproglou, I.; Bok, B. [Hopital Bichat, 75 - Paris (France); Boisserie, G.; Mazeron, J.J.; Baillet, F. [Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Drieu, K. [IHB-IPSEN, 75 - Paris (France)

    2000-06-01

    To define the therapeutic effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) in an experimental model of acute encephalopathy following total body irradiation in rats. Ninety four-month-old rats received 4.5 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) at day 1 while 15 rats received sham irradiation. A behavioural study based on a conditioning test of negative reinforcement, the one-way avoidance test, was performed test, was performed after irradiation. Orally treatment was started one day (study A) or twenty two days (study B) after irradiation and repeated daily for twelve days. In the irradiated group, three subgroups were defined according to the treatment received: EGb 761 (50 mg/kg), EGb 761 (100 mg/kg), water. This work comprised two consecutive studies. In study A (45 rats) the one-way avoidance test was administered daily from day 7 to day 14. In study B (45 rats) the behavioural test was performed from day 28 to day 35. Study A (three groups of 15 rats): following TBI, irradiated rats treated with water demonstrated a significant delay in a learning the one-way avoidance test in comparison with sham-irradiated rats (P < 0.0002) or irradiated rats treated with EGb 761 (50 mg/kg; P < 0.007) or EGb 761 (100 mg/kg; P < 0.0002). The irradiated rats, treated with EGb 761 (50 or 100 mg/kg) did not differ from the sham-irradiated controls. Study B (three groups of 15 rats): the irradiated rats, treated with water of EGb 761 (50 or 100 mg/kg) did not differ from the sham-irradiated controls. (authors)

  2. In vitro germination and the effect of acute gamma irradiation on pollen of Pinus patula Schiede et Deppe

    In-vitro study revealed that the best medium for germinating P. patula pollen was 12,5% Sucrose with 0.001% Boron in 2% agar medium. After gamma irradiation the LD-50 based on pollen germination and germination energy index was 1.174 kr and 1.148 kr respectively. Pollen was viable on the 90th day when used after storing at 100C in desiccator. Gamma doses for haploid breeding and mutation breeding are suggested. ANOVA showed that differences between the different media used for germination and gamma-ray doses were highly significant. (orig.)

  3. Influence of melanocytes in the ex-vivo reconstructed epidermal melanin unit following an acute UV irradiation; Role des melanocytes dans l'unite epidermique de melanisation reconstruite ex-vivo apres une irradiation UV aigue

    Cario-Andre, M

    2000-11-15

    Influence of melanocytes in skin pigmentation is well documented, however its photo-protective role has given rise to controversy. The role of melanocytes have been investigated on reconstructed epidermis with 100 % of keratinocytes or 95 % of keratinocytes and 5 % of melanocytes. In a first time, the effect of an acute UVB dose has been studied on both reconstructed epidermis, next we have investigated UVA and UVA+B effects on these epidermis. Following irradiation, the presence of melanocytes in reconstructed epidermis protects against apoptosis without protecting significantly against DNA damage formation (CPD, 6-4PP) and protects against UV-induced unbalance of the SOD/catalase ratio (antioxidants enzymes). On the contrary, the presence of melanocytes in reconstructed epidermis amplifies lipids and proteins oxidations but seems to protect against DNA oxidations. Melanocytes differ from keratinocytes by their melanin content and their more important concentration in polyunsaturated fatty acids. To evaluate what is the part of melanin and the part of polyunsaturated fatty acids in epidermal UV responses, reconstructed epidermis with keratinocytes have been supplemented with polyunsaturated fatty acid. This study indicates that polyunsaturated fatty acids are responsible for lipids and proteins oxidations and that melanin protect against DNA oxidation induced by lipid peroxidation. All these studies demonstrate that, model of reconstructed epidermis and epidermis in-vivo have the same behaviour following UV irradiation. In the last part, sunscreens and antioxidants have been tested on reconstructed epidermis and have demonstrated that model of reconstructed epidermis is suitable for photo-protective molecules screening. (author)

  4. Oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer during postoperative irradiation. An alleviating effect on acute radiation mucositis

    To evaluate the effect of oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer on alleviating acute radiation mucositis. Eighteen patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy for tongue and oral floor cancer were evaluated. Radiotherapy was given in 2 Gy per fraction, 5 times a week for a total dose of 50 Gy in most patients. Radiation field included the tongue and oral floor. During radiotherapy, 8 patients were treated by dento-maxillofacial radiologists with special concern on oral hygiene (oral hygiene group) and the remaining 10 patients were treated with routine dental care (standard medication group). Mucositis were evaluated using JCOG grade and EORTC/RTOG score by radiotherapists or dento-maxillofacial radiologists at 10 Gy intervals. Oral hygiene plans comprised motivation to maintain oral hygiene and establishing the habits of oral self care 4 times per day. Once a week, oral hygiene and oral cleaning of patients were checked by dento-maxillofacial radiologists. Oral self care included mechanical tooth brushing and a chemical mouthwash. No patients with grade 3 and score 4 mucositis were noted in the oral hygiene group. Severe mucositis occurred less frequently in the oral hygiene group than in the standard medication group. Interruption of radiotherapy due to severe mucositis did not occur in the oral hygiene group. On the other hand, interruption of radiotherapy occurred in four patients in the standard medication group, and in three it was due to severe oral pain. Our results suggested that our method of oral hygiene was more effective for alleviating acute radiation mucositis than other methods so far reported. In addition, our method is considered to be useful in preventing rampant dental caries and severe periodontitis due to the xerostomia induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  5. Oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer during postoperative irradiation. An alleviating effect on acute radiation mucositis

    Katsura, Kouji; Masuko, Noriko; Hayashi, Takafumi [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry; Sugita, Tadashi; Sakai, Kunio; Tsuchida, Emiko; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Sasamoto, Ryuta

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer on alleviating acute radiation mucositis. Eighteen patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy for tongue and oral floor cancer were evaluated. Radiotherapy was given in 2 Gy per fraction, 5 times a week for a total dose of 50 Gy in most patients. Radiation field included the tongue and oral floor. During radiotherapy, 8 patients were treated by dento-maxillofacial radiologists with special concern on oral hygiene (oral hygiene group) and the remaining 10 patients were treated with routine dental care (standard medication group). Mucositis were evaluated using JCOG grade and EORTC/RTOG score by radiotherapists or dento-maxillofacial radiologists at 10 Gy intervals. Oral hygiene plans comprised motivation to maintain oral hygiene and establishing the habits of oral self care 4 times per day. Once a week, oral hygiene and oral cleaning of patients were checked by dento-maxillofacial radiologists. Oral self care included mechanical tooth brushing and a chemical mouthwash. No patients with grade 3 and score 4 mucositis were noted in the oral hygiene group. Severe mucositis occurred less frequently in the oral hygiene group than in the standard medication group. Interruption of radiotherapy due to severe mucositis did not occur in the oral hygiene group. On the other hand, interruption of radiotherapy occurred in four patients in the standard medication group, and in three it was due to severe oral pain. Our results suggested that our method of oral hygiene was more effective for alleviating acute radiation mucositis than other methods so far reported. In addition, our method is considered to be useful in preventing rampant dental caries and severe periodontitis due to the xerostomia induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  6. Increased viability and resilience of haemolymph cells in blue mussels following pre-treatment with acute high-dose gamma irradiation

    Jaeschke, B. [Stockholm University (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    In an initial experiment, blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) were exposed to a range of acute high doses of gamma radiation in the laboratory. Haemolymph was extracted and the haemocytes (blood cells) were scored for cell viability (% living cells) under a microscope, directly after irradiation (0.04, 0.4 or 4 Gy) and again after a subsequent treatment with hydrogen peroxide in vitro (final H{sub 2}O{sub 2} conc.: 0.2 μM). Cell viability in controls (0 Gy) was approximately 100% and no cell death was observable from radiation exposure alone. When treated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} a decrease in cell viability was seen across all treatments, however this decrease in viability was reduced with increasing radiation pre-treatment (0 Gy = 53%; 0.04 Gy = 66%; 0.4 Gy = 75%; 4 Gy = 83%). To investigate the mechanism for this therapeutic effect observed, the experiment was repeated. Using mussels from a different location, the same, but more extensive method of irradiation (0[control], 0.04, 0.4 Gy, 5 or 40 Gy) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment was used. Additional haemolymph sub-samples were taken for analysis of catalase concentration. In this second experiment, viability of cells from controls was only 62%, indicating the mussels were in a poorer condition than those of the previous experiment. The lowest level of radiation exposure (0.04 Gy) further decreased the viability (56%). However, at higher doses the viability was increased compared to control, which then gradually declined with increasing dose (0.4 Gy = 75%; 5 Gy = 72%; 40 Gy = 65%). Catalase analysis demonstrated a complimentary pattern of activity of the antioxidant in the haemolymph, directly correlating with radiation dose (0 Gy = 0.2 U; 0.04 Gy = 0.1 U; 0.4 Gy = 1.3 U; 5 Gy = 0.9 U; 40 Gy = 0.1 Gy). Treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decreased cell viability across all treatments, but no pattern between radiation treatments was discernable. The results indicate that an acute dose of radiation not only has negligible

  7. Total-body irradiation with high-LET particles: acute and chronic effects on the immune system

    Gridley, Daila S.; Pecaut, Michael J.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Although the immune system is highly susceptible to radiation-induced damage, consequences of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation remain unclear. This study evaluated the effects of 0.1 gray (Gy), 0.5 Gy, and 2.0 Gy iron ion (56Fe(26)) radiation on lymphoid cells and organs of C57BL/6 mice on days 4 and 113 after whole body exposure; a group irradiated with 2.0 Gy silicon ions (28Si) was euthanized on day 113. On day 4 after 56Fe irradiation, dose-dependent decreases were noted in spleen and thymus masses and all major leukocyte populations in blood and spleen. The CD19(+) B lymphocytes were most radiosensitive and NK1.1(+) natural killer (NK) cells were most resistant. CD3(+) T cells were moderately radiosensitive and a greater loss of CD3(+)/CD8(+) T(C) cells than CD3(+)/CD4(+) T(H) cells was noted. Basal DNA synthesis was elevated on day 4, but response to mitogens and secretion of interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were unaffected. Signs of anemia were noted. By day 113, high B cell numbers and low T(C) cell and monocyte percents were found in the 2.0 Gy 56Fe group; the 2.0 Gy 2)Si mice had low NK cells, decreased basal DNA synthesis, and a somewhat increased response to two mitogens. Collectively, the data show that lymphoid cells and tissues are markedly affected by high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation at relatively low doses, that some aberrations persist long after exposure, and that different consequences may be induced by various densely ionizing particles. Thus simultaneous exposure to multiple radiation sources could lead to a broader spectrum of immune dysfunction than currently anticipated.

  8. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A as early-phase and prognostic indicators of acute radiation exposure in nonhuman primate total-body irradiation model

    Terrorist radiological attacks or nuclear accidents could expose large numbers of people to ionizing radiation. In mass-casualty radiological incidents early medical-management requires triage tools for first-responders to quantitatively identify individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and for early initiation (i.e., within one day after radiation exposure) of cytokine therapy for treatment of bone marrow acute radiation syndrome. Herein, we present results from 30 rhesus macaques total-body irradiated (TBI) to a broad dose range of 1-8.5 Gy with 60Co γ-rays (0.55 Gy min-1) and demonstrate dose- and time-dependent changes in blood of C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CRP and SAA dose-response results are consistent with ∼1 Gy and ∼0.2 Gy thresholds for photon-exposure at 24 h after TBI, respectively. Highly significant elevations of CRP and SAA (p = 0.00017 and p = 0.0024, respectively) were found in animal plasma at 6 h after all TBI doses suggesting their potential use as early-phase biodosimeters. Results also show that the dynamics and content of CRP and SAA levels reflect the course and severity of the acute radiation sickness (ARS) and may function as prognostic indicators of ARS outcome. These results demonstrate proof-of-concept that these radiation-responsive proteins show promise as a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposures and may also contribute as diagnostic indices in the medical management of radiation accidents.

  9. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A as early-phase and prognostic indicators of acute radiation exposure in nonhuman primate total-body irradiation model

    Ossetrova, N.I., E-mail: ossetrova@afrri.usuhs.mil [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bldg. 42, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Sandgren, D.J.; Blakely, W.F. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bldg. 42, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Terrorist radiological attacks or nuclear accidents could expose large numbers of people to ionizing radiation. In mass-casualty radiological incidents early medical-management requires triage tools for first-responders to quantitatively identify individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and for early initiation (i.e., within one day after radiation exposure) of cytokine therapy for treatment of bone marrow acute radiation syndrome. Herein, we present results from 30 rhesus macaques total-body irradiated (TBI) to a broad dose range of 1-8.5 Gy with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays (0.55 Gy min{sup -1}) and demonstrate dose- and time-dependent changes in blood of C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CRP and SAA dose-response results are consistent with {approx}1 Gy and {approx}0.2 Gy thresholds for photon-exposure at 24 h after TBI, respectively. Highly significant elevations of CRP and SAA (p = 0.00017 and p = 0.0024, respectively) were found in animal plasma at 6 h after all TBI doses suggesting their potential use as early-phase biodosimeters. Results also show that the dynamics and content of CRP and SAA levels reflect the course and severity of the acute radiation sickness (ARS) and may function as prognostic indicators of ARS outcome. These results demonstrate proof-of-concept that these radiation-responsive proteins show promise as a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposures and may also contribute as diagnostic indices in the medical management of radiation accidents.

  10. Acute effects of low-level laser therapy irradiation on blood lactate and muscle fatigue perception in hospitalized patients with heart failure-a pilot study.

    Bublitz, Caroline; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz; Ramos, Rodrigo Santin; Assis, Livia; Sellera, Carlos Alberto Cyrillo; Trimer, Renata; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Arena, Ross; Guizilini, Solange

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate the acute effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on functional capacity, perceived exertion, and blood lactate in hospitalized patients with heart failure (HF). Patients diagnosed with systolic HF (left ventricular ejection fraction laser and active LLLT group (n = 10)-subjects who were submitted to active laser. The 6-min walk test (6MWT) was performed, and blood lactate was determined at rest (before LLLT application and 6MWT), immediately after the exercise test (time 0) and recovery (3, 6, and 30 min). A multi-diode LLLT cluster probe (DMC, São Carlos, Brazil) was used. Both groups increased 6MWT distance after active or placebo LLLT application compared to baseline values (p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, respectively); however, no difference was observed during intergroup comparison. The active LLLT group showed a significant reduction in the perceived exertion Borg (PEB) scale compared to the placebo LLLT group (p = 0.006). In addition, the group that received active LLLT showed no statistically significant difference for the blood lactate level through the times analyzed. The placebo LLLT group demonstrated a significant increase in blood lactate between the rest and recovery phase (p < 0.05). Acute effects of LLLT irradiation on skeletal musculature were not able to improve the functional capacity of hospitalized patients with HF, although it may favorably modulate blood lactate metabolism and reduce perceived muscle fatigue. PMID:27250713

  11. Computed tomography of the brain following prophylactic treatment with irradiation therapy and intraspinal metho-trexate in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    In 28 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) computed tomography (CT) was performed in order to demonstrate possible cerebral changes following treatment with prophylactic irradiation and intraspinal methotrexate (MTX). The time of CT-scan examination varied from 1 year and 1 month to 10 years and 1 month after diagnosis of ALL. The age of the children ranged from 3 years and 11 months to 14 years and 5 months. Six children had normal CT scans, 12 children had slight atrophylike changes, and nine had severe cerebral atrophy. Two patients in the latter group presented an enlarged ventricular system as well. In one patient intracerebral calcification was the only pathologic finding. The severe changes were seen in children of all age groups, but predominantly-in children with a short duration of their disease, severe symptoms, and frequent marrow relapse. Changes induced by steroid therapy may be reversible. No satisfactory explanation of the demonstrated cerebral pathologic findings can be given, except that they are the consequences of the combination of total therapy and severity of disease in the individual patient. Measurement of attenuation coefficients in grey and white matter shows increasing values with age during childhood. A combination of decreasing attenuation coefficients, especially in the white matter, and the finding of severe atrophy seems to be a bad prognostic sign. (orig.)

  12. Acute renal toxicity of 2 conditioning regimens in patients undergoing autologous peripheral blood stem-cell transplantation. Total body irradiation-cyclophosphamide versus ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide

    Objective was to compare renal toxicity of 2 conditioning regimens of total body irradiation/cyclophosphamide TBI-Cy and Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, Etoposide ICE. Between August 1996 and February 2004, patients treated with autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation in the Department of Medical and radiation Oncology, Gulhane Military Medical School, Ankara, Turkey with 2 different conditioning regimens was comparatively analyzed for acute renal toxicity in the early post-transplant period. Forty-even patients received ICE regimen with 12 g/m2; 1.2 g/m2 and 1.2 g/m2 divided to 6 consecutive days, whereas 21 patients received 12 Gy TBI 6 fractions twice daily in 3 consecutive days and 60 mg/m2/day cyclophosphamide for 2 days. Sixty-eight patients were evaluated in this study. There was no significant difference in baseline renal function between patients in the ICE and TBI-Cy groups. Eleven patients developed nephrotoxicity 23.4% in the ICE group while one patient 4.8% in the TBI-Cy group developed nephrotoxicity in ICEgroup required hemodialysis and subsequently 48.5% of them died. In contrast, one patient 4.8% died due to nephrotoxicity despite hemodialysis in the TBI-Cy arm. This study reveals that the TBI-Cy conditioning regimen seems no more nephrotoxic than an ICE regimen particularly in patients who had used cisplatin prior to transplantation. (author)

  13. A trial for the quantitative determination of the acute radiation-induced pancreatic islet cell death irradiated with 200 KVp x-ray and 30 MeV fast neutron beams

    Quantitative counting of acute islet cell death of the golden hamster pancreas was adopted for the determination of radiation injury as one of the model in the slowly growing tissues (or slowly renewing tissues), such as liver, salivary gland, pancreas, kidney etc. First mode and dose response relationship of x-ray induced rapid cell death (interphase death) in golden hamster pancreatic islet cell death was investigated after 10-350 Gy irradiation with the dose rate of 4.5 Gy/min. With a latent period of 2-3 hours, pycnotic cells began to appear after irradiation. Then they reached maximum at 4-5 hours, and at 6 hours later on, their nuclei lysed completely. From the disappearance rate of the nuclei, the mean life span of pycnotic cells was estimated to be approximately 2 hours or less. Thereafter these remnants of dead cells were scavenged from the islets within 16 hours after irradiation. The mode of cell death was almost identical irregardless of different irradiation doses. Therefore through the counting of both pycnotic nuclei and normal looking nuclei at 4-5 hours after irradiation, it was possible to determine the radiosensitivity of the islet cells. Cell death by x-ray was dose-dependent and stochastic throughout all dose range even in a surviving fraction of 10-4 order. Thus obtained radio-sensitivity of the islet cells was 62.5 Gy of Do and 3.2 of n number. Unfortunately, however, in neutron irradiated pancreas, quantitation of cell death was not possible unlike in x-rays. This is because the maximum neutron dose rate available was 0.5-0.6 Gy. Therefore initial aim for the study on comparative biological effect of x-ray and neutron through the acute pancreatic cell death was failed by the dose rate problem. (author)

  14. HIT`91 (prospective, co-operative study for the treatment of malignant brain tumors in childhood): accuracy and acute toxicity of the irradiation of the craniospinal axis

    Kortmann, R.D.; Timmermann, B.; Bamberg, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Kuehl, J. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Children`s Hospital; Willich, N. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Flentje, M. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Meisner, C. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Medical Information Processing

    1999-04-01

    Background: It was the aim of the quality control program of the randomized trial HIT `91 (intensive chemotherapy before irradiation versus maintenance chemotherapy after irradiation) to assess prospectively the quality of neuroaxis irradiation with respect to the protocol guidelines and to evaluate acute toxicity with respect to treatment arm. Patients, Materials and Methods: Data of 134 patients undergoing irradiation of the craniospinal axis were available. Positioning aids, shielding techniques, treatment machines, choice of energy, total dose and fractionation were evaluated. A total of 651 simulation and verification films were analyzed to assess the coverage of the clinical target volume (whole brain, posterior fossa, sacral nerve roots) and deviations of field alignment between simulation and verification of first treatment. Field matching between whole brain and adjacent cranial spinal fields was analyzed with respect to site and width of junction. Acute maximal side effects were evaluated according to a modified WHO score for neurotoxicity, infections, skin, mucosa and myelotoxicity. Results: In 91.3% of patients contemporary positioning aids and individualized shielding techniques were used to assure a reproducible treatment. In 98 patients (73.1%) linear accelerators and in 36 patients (26.8%) {sup 60}Cobalt machines were used. Single and total dose were administered according to the protocol guidelines in more than 90% of patients. In 20.2% of patients the cribriform plate, in 1.4% the middle cranial fossa and in 21.1% the posterior fossa and in 4.5% the 2nd sacral segment were incompletely encompassed by the treatment portals. Ninety-five percent of deviations of field alignment were less than 13.0 mm (whole brain) and 12 mm (cranial spinal field) with a random error between 4.9 and 7.6 mm (whole brain) and 6.9 mm and 9.9 mm (spinal canal), respectively. In 77.5% of patients the junctions between whole brain and cranial spinal fields were placed

  15. Total body irradiation correlates with chronic graft versus host disease and affects prognosis of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia receiving an HLA identical allogeneic bone marrow transplant

    Purpose: To investigate whether different procedure variables involved in the delivery of fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) impact on prognosis of patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-three consecutive patients with ALL receiving a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical allogeneic BMT between 1 August 1983 and 30 September 1995 were conditioned with the same protocol consisting of cyclophosphamide and fractionated TBI. The planned total dose of TBI was 12 Gy (2 Gy, twice a day for 3 days). Along the 12-year period, variations in delivering TBI schedule occurred with regard to used radiation source, instantaneous dose rate, technical setting, and actual total dose received by the patient. We tested these different TBI variables as well as factors related to patient, state of disease, and transplant-induced disease to investigate their influence on transplant-related mortality, leukemia relapse, and survival. Results: At median follow-up of 7 years (range 3-15 years) the probabilities of leukemia-free survival (LFS) and overall survival (OS) for the 93 patients were 60% and 41%, respectively. At univariate analysis, chronic graft versus host disease (cGvHd) (p = 0.0005), age (p = 0.01), and state of disease (p 0.03) were factors affecting LFS whereas chronic GvHd (p = 0.0005), acute GvHd (p = 0.03), age (p = 0.0001), and GvHd prophylaxis (p = 0.01) were factors affecting overall survival. The occurrence of chronic GvHd was correlated with actually delivered TBI dose (p = 0.04). Combined stratification of prognostic factors showed that patients who received the planned total dose of TBI (12 Gy) and were affected by chronic GvHd had higher probabilities of LFS (p = 0.01) and OS (p = n.s.) than patients receiving less than 12 Gy and/or without occurrence of chronic GvHd. Moreover, TBI dose had a significant impact on LFS in patients transplanted in first

  16. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2016-07-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  17. Long-term cerebral metabolite changes on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients cured of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with previous intrathecal methotrexate and cranial irradiation prophylaxis

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term brain metabolite changes on 1H-MRS in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients who had intrathecal methotrexate (ITMTX) and cranial irradiation (CRT) for central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis against CNS relapse. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven ALL patients (12 females, 25 males) with history of ITMTX and CRT for CNS prophylaxis were studied. Age ranges at the time of diagnosis and at magnetic resonance examination were 0.8-13 years and 12-27 years, respectively. The interval since diagnosis was 5.6-19 years. T2-weighted and gradient-recalled echo (GRE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) were performed to assess brain injury. Results: On MRI, 3 leukoencephalopathy (LEP) and 1 infarct were detected. Twenty-two patients had evidence of hemosiderin. On 1H-MRS no statistically significant difference in choline (Cho)/creatine (Cr) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/Cr was associated with LEP. A lower Cho/Cr (p=0.006) and NAA/Cr (p=0.078) was observed in brains with hemosiderin. Linear-regression analysis showed no statistically significant relationship between NAA/Cr or Cho/Cr with age at diagnosis, but there was a statistically significant decreasing trend of NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr with the interval since diagnosis. Conclusion: Long-term brain injury in ALL survivors after CNS prophylaxis with ITMTX and CRT was reflected by decreasing NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr with the interval since diagnosis. The lower Cho/Cr associated with hemosiderin but not LEP suggested a different pathophysiology for these brain lesions

  18. Dose-effect relationship for cataract induction after single-dose total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation for acute leukemia

    Purpose: To determine a dose-effect relationship for cataract induction, the tissue-specific parameter, α/β, and the rate of repair of sublethal damage, μ value, in the linear-quadratic formula have to be known. To obtain these parameters for the human eye lens, a large series of patients treated with different doses and dose rates is required. The data of patients with acute leukemia treated with single-dose total body irradiation (STBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) collected by the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation were analyzed. Methods and Materials: The data of 495 patients who underwent BMT for acute leukemia, who had STBI as part of their conditioning regimen, were analyzed using the linear-quadratic concept. The end point was the incidence of cataract formation after BMT. Of the analyzed patients, 175 were registered as having cataracts. Biologic effective doses (BEDs) for different sets of values for α/β and μ were calculated for each patient. With Cox regression analysis, using the overall chi-square test as the parameter evaluating the goodness of fit, α/β and μ values were found. Risk factors for cataract induction were the BED of the applied TBI regimen, allogeneic BMT, steroid therapy for >14 weeks, and heparin administration. To avoid the influence of steroid therapy and heparin on cataract induction, patients who received steroid or heparin treatment were excluded, leaving only the BED as a risk factor. Next, the most likely set of α/β and μ values was obtained. With this set, the cataract-free survival rates were calculated for specific BED intervals, according to the Kaplan-Meier method. From these calculations, cataract incidences were obtained as function of the BED at 120 months after STBI. Results: The use of BED instead of the TBI dose enabled the incidence of cataract formation to be predicted in a reasonably consistent way. With Cox regression analysis for all STBI data, a maximal chi-square value was

  19. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-06-20

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

  20. Effect of ultraviolet blood irradiation and oxygenation on nerve function and function of the red blood cell membrane pump in patients with acute cerebral infarction

    Jiaquan Wang; Chun Mao; Kaifu Ma; Shiqing Wang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultraviolet blood irradiation and oxygenation (UBIO) has obtained better clinical effect in treating acute cerebral infarction, but the mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of UBIO on the nerve function and activities of K+-Na+-ATPase and Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase activities on the red blood cell (RBC) membrane of patients with acute cerebral infarction.DESIGN: A randomized and controlled study.SETTING: Department of Neurology, Xiangfan Central Hospital.PARTICIPANTS: From January 2000 to December 2001, excluding those above 70 years old, 58 cases of 700 patients with acute cerebral infarction admitted in the Department of Neurology, Xiangfan Central Hospital, were recruited and divided into two groups according to the random number table: UBIO treated group (n=28), including 17 males and 11 females, aged 40-68 years; and control group (n=30), including 20males and 10 females, aged 44-69 years. All the patients agreed to participate in the therapeutic program and detected items. The general informations were comparable without obvious differences between the two groups (P > 0.05).METHODS: ① The patients in both groups received routine treatments, besides, those in the UBIO treated group were given UBIO treatment by using the XL-200 type therapeutic apparatus produced in Shijiazhuang, whose ultraviolet wave was set at 253.7 nm with the energy density of 0.568 J/m2 per second, UBIO treatment started from the second day after admission, once every other day, with a single course consisting of 5-7 treatments. ② In the UBIO treated group, the venous blood was sampled before and after the first, third and the completion of the treatment course respectively, the venous blood was taken at each corresponding time point in the control group. After centrifugation of the blood at 10 000 rounds per minute,the RBC membrane was separated and then the activities of K+-Na+-ATPase and Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase were detected by means of

  1. Clinical trials of CCLSG L874 and I874 protocols without cranial irradiation for standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood

    In the CCLSG-874 protocol for children with low-risk (LR) and intermediate-risk (IR) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), two regimens with or without cranial irradiation (CI) were compared with respect to their ability to prevent central nervous system (CNS) leukemia and to improve overall outcome of ALL. From 1987 to 1990, 82 and 109 evaluable patients were registered into L874 and I874 protocols for LR and IR patients, respectively. All responders to induction therapy were randomized to treatment with 18 Gy of CI plus intrathecal methotrexate (MTX it) or to treatment with high-dose MTX plus MTX it. Patients were then treated with standard maintenance regimens of L874 and I874. At a median follow-up of 39 months (range 14-58 months) there was no difference in the rate of hematologic relapse between the CI group and MTX group. The rate of CNS relapse in the MTX group seemed to be higher (3 of 39 in L874 and 2 of 54 in I874) than that in the CI group (1 of 43 in L874 and 0 of 55 in I874), but these data were not statistically significant. The rates of 4-year event-free survival (EFS) in L874 were 81.1±7.6% (mean±SE) and 75.2±7.9% (ns) for the CI and MTX group, respectively, and the rates of EFS in I874 were 70.0±13.6% and 70.0±9.0% (ns) for the CI and MTX group, respectively. These data suggest that MTX alone may be as effective as CI to prolong disease-free survival in LR and IR ALL although further continuous studies are needed. Analysis of serial CCLSG protocols for ALL from 1981 revealed that the rate of EFS of ALL allover including all risk groups has gradually been increasing from 44.2±3.6% for 811 protocol and 53.1±3.5% for 841 to 65.5±3.6% for the present 874 protocol. (author)

  2. Cataracts after total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation in patients with acute leukemia in complete remission: a study of the european group for blood and marrow transplantation

    Purpose: Advances in bone marrow transplantation (BMT) have consistently improved long-term survival. Therefore, evaluation of late complications such as cataracts is of paramount importance. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data of 2149 patients from the EBMT registry. A cohort of 1063 patients were evaluable for survival and ophthalmologic status after transplant for acute leukemia (AL) in first or second complete remission. Conditioning therapy included either single-dose total body irradiation (STBI) or fractionated TBI (FTBI) grouped in different dose rates (low: LDR ≤ 0.04 Gy/min; high: HDR > 0.04 Gy/min). Results: The overall 10-year estimated cataract incidence (ECI) was 50%. It was 60% in the STBI group, 43% in the FTBI group ≤ 6 fractions, and 7% in the FTBI group > 6 fractions (p -4). It was significantly lower (30%) in the LDR than in the HDR groups (59%; p -4). Patients receiving heparin for veno-occlusive disease prophylaxis had fewer cataracts than those who did not (10-year ECI: 33% vs. 53%, respectively; p = 0.04). The 10-year ECI was 65% in the allogeneic vs. 46% in the autologous BMT patients (p = 0.0018). Factors independently associated with an increased risk of cataract were an older age (> 23 years), higher dose rate (> 0.04 Gy/min), allogeneic BMT, and steroid administration (> 100 days). The use of FTBI was associated with a decreased risk of cataract. Heparin administration was a protective factor in patients receiving STBI. In terms of cataract surgery, the unfavorable factors for requiring surgery were: age > 23 yr, STBI, dose rate > 0.04 Gy/min, chronic graft-vs.-host disease (cGvHD), and absence of heparin administration. Among the patients who required cataract surgery (111 out of 257), secondary posterior capsular opacification was observed in 15.7%. Conclusion: High dose rate and STBI are the main risk factors for cataract development and the need for surgery, and the administration of heparin has a protective role in

  3. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes

  4. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    Moroni, Maria, E-mail: maria.moroni@usuhs.edu [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ngudiankama, Barbara F. [Laboratory of Viral Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Christensen, Christine [Division of Comparative Pathology, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Olsen, Cara H. [Biostatistics Consulting Center, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Owens, Rossitsa [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Lombardini, Eric D. [Veterinary Medicine Department, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangkok (Thailand); Holt, Rebecca K. [Veterinary Science Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Whitnall, Mark H. [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  5. Evaluation of acute and chronic toxicity of DSS and LAS surfactants undergoing the irradiation with electron beam; Avaliacao da toxicidade aguda e cronica dos surfactantes DSS e LAS submetidos a irradiacao com feixe de eletrons

    Romanelli, Maria Fernanda

    2004-07-01

    Surfactants are synthetic organic compounds widely used in cosmetic, food, textile, dyers and paper production industries and in particular detergents and others cleaning products industries. The world consumption is nearly 8 million tons per year. One of the main environmental issues coming from the use of these compounds is their toxicity that compromises the biological treatment of effluents and the quality of receiving waters. The objective of this work was the application of ionizing radiation by electron beam in the degradation and reduction of acute and chronic toxicities of surfactants sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), dodecyl p-benzenesulfonate acid (LAS) and sodium dodecyl p-benzenesulfonate (LAS). This treatment technology has been studied as a pre-treatment for effluents containing toxic and non-biodegradable compounds, before the biological treatment. Two acute toxicity assays were employed, one with the micro-crustacean Daphnia similis and the other with the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri along with a chronic toxicity assay with the micro-crustacean Ceriodaphnia dubia (just for SDS and acid LAS) for the non-irradiated and irradiated samples and radiation doses 3.0 kGy, 6.0 kGy, 9.0 kGy and 12.0 kGy. Physical-chemical parameters were evaluated for the following up the degradation of the surfactant molecules. The reductions of acute toxicity varied between 72.49% and 90.98% for SDS, 18.22% and 78.98% for acid LAS and 82.66% and 94.26% for sodium LAS. For the chronic toxicity, the reduction percentages varied between 64.03% and 83.01% for SDS and 47.48% and 64.91% for acid LAS. When one considers the application of the electron beam as a pre-treatment of effluents containing high concentrations of surfactants, the toxicity is an essential parameter allowing the further biological treatment of these effluents. (author)

  6. A prospective neurocognitive evaluation of children treated with additional chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation following isolated central nervous system relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Purpose: A prospective assessment of neurocognitive performance was conducted in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) following isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse to evaluate the impact of additional systemic/intrathecal (IT) chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation (CSI) upon long-term intellectual function. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one children with ALL manifesting an isolated CNS relapse between 1984 through 1989 underwent serial evaluations of intellectual function. Neurocognitive function was measured by the full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) as determined by the age-appropriate Wechsler Intelligence Scale and by achievement in reading, math, and spelling as assessed by the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT). Intelligence testing was initiated following isolated CNS relapse after clearance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology but prior to CSI and continued at annual intervals for a minimum of 4 years postmeningeal failure. Protocol treatment for isolated CNS relapse consisted of reinduction and maintenance systemic therapy, intrathecal (IT) triple-agent chemotherapy, and early CSI (cranium to 24 Gy and spine to 15 Gy at 1.5 Gy/fraction) as outlined on the institutional 'Total XI' trial. Results: All 21 children attained secondary CNS remission and underwent the planned additional systemic/IT chemotherapy and CSI. Fourteen of the 21 children remain in secondary continuous remission, while the remaining 7 experienced a second relapse and were removed from further neurocognitive assessment. For the eight female and six male long-term survivors, mean ages at original diagnosis and at CSI were 5.7 years (range = 0.6-16.2) and 7.0 years (range = 1.8-17.0), respectively. At a median follow-up interval of 4.6 years (ranges 1.7-6.8) post-CNS relapse, comparison of group mean initial to final FSIQs revealed no statistically significant difference between the two measures (94.5 vs. 95.9, respectively, n = 11, p = 0.52). None of the

  7. High-dose vincristine, fractionated total-body irradiation and cyclophosphamide as conditioning regimen in allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplantation for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in second remission: a 7-year Italian multicentre study

    We investigated the feasibility and efficacy of high-dose vincristine (4 mg/m2 over 4 d) combined with fractionated total body irradiation (F-TBI) (200 cGy x 2 over 3 d) and cyclophosphamide (60 mg/kg for 2 d) as a preparative regimen in allogeneic (AlloBMT) and autologous (ABMT) bone marrow transplantation for 75 consecutive children (median age at transplant 8.5 years) with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in second complete remission (CR). Median duration of first CR was 26 and 25 months in the AlloBMT and ABMT group, respectively. We conclude that the conditioning regimen with high-dose vincrostine combined with cyclophosphamide and F-TBI is feasible and promising although its therapeutic advantage should be tested in larger series of patients enrolled in randomized studies. (author)

  8. Feasibilities of combination of hyperbaric oxygenation, ultraviolet blood irradiation, hemisorption in treating patients with sepsis as a complication of acute inflammatory diseases of abdomen

    Consideration is given to correlation of efficiency of results of treating patients with sepsis during traditional intensive therapy and during complex treatment, including hemosorption, hyperbaric oxygenation, ultraviolet blood irradiation, based on studying clinical picture, biochemical and immunological indices. Increase of treatment efficiency when using mentioned therapeutic measures, particularly their different combinations, is shown. 69 refs

  9. Preliminary studies of radiation port in children receiving cranial irradiation for preventing central nervous system (CNS) disease of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    For preventing CNS leukemia in children with ALL, simple whole skull irradiation that included only retro-orbital spaces and not anterior part of the cribriform plate and first two cervical vertebrae had been given until March 1982 to patients who had remission after drug therapy. Since March 1982, however, such patients have received new modified cranial irradiation of Pinkel's method of preventive CNS therapy to include the cribriform plate. Pinkel's method usually includes first two cervical vertebrae in radiation port, but sometimes his method of radiation fails to reach the brain and the meninges on the anterior parts of the lamina cribrosa. In this study, a comparison of CNS-relapes ratio between these two methods of preventive CNS therapy was carried out. The frequency of CNS leukemia was remarkably high in patients given the simple whole skull irradiation. Of 18 patients, 7 developed CNS leukemia. Among these 7, 5 patients (71 %) had occurence of CNS-relapse within 1 year 7 months with the other one patient, making a total of 86 %, having CNS-relapse within 1 year 11 months. On the other hand, 17 of 39 patients who received new modified cranial irradiation were followed up for more than 1 year 9 months, and all patient had no CNS-relapse to date. This result showed that the irradiation of whole circulation areas of cerebrospinal fluid of the brain and the spine at first two cervical vertebra levels had great importance in preventing CNS-relapse after achievement of drug-induced remission. (author)

  10. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    2015-07-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  11. Longevity of irradiated burros

    During the course of external radiation exposures of burros to establish a dose-response curve for acute mortality after total irradiation, some of the animals at the three lowest exposures to gamma photons survived. These groups of 10, 9, and 10 burros were exposed to 320, 425, and 545 R, respectively. There were 10 unirradiated controls. In 1953, 20 burros were exposed to 375 R (gamma) in 25-R/week increments without acute mortality and were added to the life-span study. In 1957, 33 burros were exposed to mixed neutron-gamma radiation from nuclear weapons, and 14 controls were added. The total number of irradiated burros in the study was increased to 88 by the addition of 6 animals irradiated with 180 rads of neutron and gamma radiation (4:1) in a Godiva-type reactor in 1959. In this experiment two acute deaths occurred which were not included in the analysis. In the first 4 years after the single gamma exposures, there were deaths from pancytopenia and thrombocytopenia, obviously related to radiation-induced bone-marrow damage. After that period, however, deaths were from common equine diseases; no death has resulted from a malignant neoplasm. Of the original 112 burros, 15 survive (10 irradiated and 5 controls). Survival curves determined for unirradiated and neutron-gamma- and gamma-irradiated burros showed significant differences. The mean survival times were: controls, 28 years; gamma irradiation only, 26 years; and neutron-gamma irradiation, 23 years. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. Immediate treatment effects of high-dose methotrexate and cranial irradiation on neuropsychological functions of children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia at a regional cancer center

    Sundaramoorthy Chidambaram; Arun Seshachalam; Vidhubala Elangovan; Rejiv Rajendranath

    2014-01-01

    Context: Overall cure rates for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have improved; however, the neuropsychological sequelae of ALL treatment have not been adequately documented in India. Aims: The present study assesses the immediate effects of ALL treatment on neuropsychological functioning, at the Regional Cancer Center in Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Newly diagnosed with ALL patients (n = 24) (aged 6-15 years; 13M:11F) registered between March 2008 and February 200...

  13. Randomized clinical trial on seven-day-per-week continuous accelerated irradiation for patients with esophageal carcinoma:Preliminary report on tumor response and acute toxicity

    Su-Ping Sun; Ya-Zhou Liu; Tao Ye; Wen Zhang; Wen-Bin Shen; Jing-Lei Shi; Hai-Ting Xu; Wei-Dong Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Tumor response and normal tissue toxicity of seven-day-per-week continuous accelerated irradiation (CAIR) for patients with esophageal carcinoma were evaluated and compared to conventional irradiation (CR).METHODS: Sixty patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus were randomized into two groups:the CAIR group (30 patients) and the CR group (30 pa(RT) with 2 Gy/fraction per day at 7 d/wk with a total dose of 50-70 Gy (average dose 64.2 Gy). The overall time of irradiation was 3.6-5.0 wk (average 4.6 wk). RT in the CR group was 2 Gy/fraction per day at 5 d/wk with a total dose of 40-70 Gy (average dose 61.7 Gy).The overall time of irradiation was 4.0-7.0 wk (average 6.4wk).RESULTS: The data showed that the immediate tumor response to RT was better in the CAIR group than in the CR group. Efficiency rates (CR plus PR) were 82.8%(24/29) and 58.6% (17/29), respectively (P = 0.047). In both groups the incidences of esophagitis and tracheitis were insignificant (P = 0.376, 0.959), and no patient received toxicity that could not be tolerated.CONCLUSION: CAIR shortens overall treatment time and is well tolerated by patients. It may be superior to CR in enhancing the local response of tumor, but its remote effect for esophageal carcinoma awaits further follow-up.

  14. Flavonoid and Leaf Gas Exchange Responses of Centella asiatica to Acute Gamma Irradiation and Carbon Dioxide Enrichment under Controlled Environment Conditions

    Hawa Binti Jaafar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was couducted to investigate the effects of gamma irradiation and CO2 on flavonoid content and leaf gas exchange in C.asiatica. For flavonoid determination, the design was a split split plot based on Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD. For other parameters, the designs were split plots. Statistical tests revealed significant differences in flavonoid contents of Centella asiatica leaves between different growth stages and various CO2 treatments. CO2 400, G20 (400 = ambient CO2; G20 = Plants exposed to 20 Gy showed 82.90% higher total flavonoid content (TFC in the 5th week than CO2 400 as control at its best harvest time (4th week. Increasing the concentration of CO2 from 400 to 800 μmol/mol had significant effects on TFC and harvesting time. In fact, 800 μmol/mol resulted in 171.1% and 66.62% increases in TFC for control and irradiated plants, respectively. Moreover, increasing CO2 concentration reduced the harvesting time to three and four weeks for control and irradiated plants, respectively. Enhancing CO2 to 800 µmol/mol resulted in a 193.30% (CO2 800 increase in leaf biomass compared to 400 µmol/mol and 226.34% enhancement in irradiated plants (CO2 800, G20 [800 = Ambient CO2; G20 = Plants exposed to 20 Gy] than CO2 400, G20. In addition, the CO2 800, G20 had the highest amount of flavonoid*biomass in the 4th week. The results of this study indicated that all elevated CO2 treatments had higher PN than the ambient ones. The findings showed that when CO2 level increased from 400 to 800 µmol/mol, stomatal conductance, leaf intercellular CO2 and transpiration rate had the tendency to decrease. However, water use efficiency increased in response to elevated CO2 concentration. Returning to the findings of this study, it is now possible to state that the proposed method (combined CO2 and gamma irradiation has the potential to increase the product value by reducing the time to harvest, increasing the yield per unit area via

  15. Feasibility and acute toxicity of 3-dimensional conformal external-beam accelerated partial-breast irradiation for early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery in Chinese female patients

    LI Feng-yan; HE Zhen-yu; XUE Ming; CHEN Li-xin; WU San-gang; GUAN Xun-xing

    2011-01-01

    Background A growing number of studies worldwide have advocated the replacement of whole-breast irradiation with accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiation (APBI-3DCRr) for early-stage breast cancer. But APBI can be only used in selected population of patients with early-staged breast cancer. It is not replacing the whole breast radiotherapy. This study aimed to examine the feasibility and acute normal tissue toxicity of the APBI-3DCRT technique in Chinese female patients who generally have smaller breasts compared to their Western counterparts.Methods From May 2006 to December 2009, a total of 48 Chinese female patients (with early-stage breast cancer who met the inclusion criteria) received APBI-3DCRT after breast-conserving surgery at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center. The total dosage from APBI-3DCRT was 34 Gy, delivered in 3.4 Gy per fractions, twice per day at intervals of at least six hours. The radiation dose, volume of the target area and volume of irradiated normal tissues were calculated.Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) 3.0.Results Among the 48 patients, the planning target volume for evaluation (PTVE) was (90.42±9.26) cm3, the ipsilateral breast volume (IBV) was (421.74±28.53) cm3, and the ratio between the two was (20.74±5.86)%. Evaluation of the dosimetric characteristics of the PTVE revealed excellent dosimetric results in 14 patients and acceptable results in 34 patients. The dose delivered to the PTVE ranged from 93% to 110% of the prescribed dose. The average ratio of the volume of PTVE receiving 95% of the prescription dose (V95) was (99.26±0.37)%. The habituation index (HI) and the conformity index (CI) were 1.08±0.01 and 0.72±0.02, respectively, suggesting good homogeneity and conformity of the dose delivered to the target field. The radiation dose to normal tissues and organs was within the dose limitation.Subjects experienced mild acute

  16. Methylation changes in muscle and liver tissues of male and female mice exposed to acute and chronic low-dose X-ray-irradiation

    The biological and genetic effects of chronic low-dose radiation (LDR) exposure and its relationship to carcinogenesis have received a lot of attention in the recent years. For example, radiation-induced genome instability, which is thought to be a precursor of tumorogenesis, was shown to have a transgenerational nature. This indicates a possible involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in LDR-induced genome instability. Genomic DNA methylation is one of the most important epigenetic mechanisms. Existing data on radiation effects on DNA methylation patterns is limited, and no one has specifically studied the effects of the LDR. We report the first study of the effects of whole-body LDR exposure on global genome methylation in muscle and liver tissues of male and female mice. In parallel, we evaluated changes in promoter methylation and expression of the tumor suppressor gene p16INKa and DNA repair gene O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). We observed different patterns of radiation-induced global genome DNA methylation in the liver and muscle of exposed males and females. We also found sex and tissue-specific differences in p16INKa promoter methylation upon LDR exposure. In male liver tissue, p16INKa promoter methylation was more pronounced than in female tissue. In contrast, no significant radiation-induced changes in p16INKa promoter methylation were noted in the muscle tissue of exposed males and females. Radiation also did not significantly affect methylation status of MGMT promoter. We also observed substantial sex differences in acute and chronic radiation-induced expression of p16INKa and MGMT genes. Another important outcome of our study was the fact that chronic low-dose radiation exposure proved to be a more potent inducer of epigenetic effects than the acute exposure. This supports previous findings that chronic exposure leads to greater genome destabilization than acute exposure

  17. Methylation changes in muscle and liver tissues of male and female mice exposed to acute and chronic low-dose X-ray-irradiation.

    Kovalchuk, Olga; Burke, Paula; Besplug, Jill; Slovack, Mark; Filkowski, Jody; Pogribny, Igor

    2004-04-14

    The biological and genetic effects of chronic low-dose radiation (LDR) exposure and its relationship to carcinogenesis have received a lot of attention in the recent years. For example, radiation-induced genome instability, which is thought to be a precursor of tumorogenesis, was shown to have a transgenerational nature. This indicates a possible involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in LDR-induced genome instability. Genomic DNA methylation is one of the most important epigenetic mechanisms. Existing data on radiation effects on DNA methylation patterns is limited, and no one has specifically studied the effects of the LDR. We report the first study of the effects of whole-body LDR exposure on global genome methylation in muscle and liver tissues of male and female mice. In parallel, we evaluated changes in promoter methylation and expression of the tumor suppressor gene p16(INKa) and DNA repair gene O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). We observed different patterns of radiation-induced global genome DNA methylation in the liver and muscle of exposed males and females. We also found sex and tissue-specific differences in p16(INKa) promoter methylation upon LDR exposure. In male liver tissue, p16(INKa) promoter methylation was more pronounced than in female tissue. In contrast, no significant radiation-induced changes in p16(INKa) promoter methylation were noted in the muscle tissue of exposed males and females. Radiation also did not significantly affect methylation status of MGMT promoter. We also observed substantial sex differences in acute and chronic radiation-induced expression of p16(INKa) and MGMT genes. Another important outcome of our study was the fact that chronic low-dose radiation exposure proved to be a more potent inducer of epigenetic effects than the acute exposure. This supports previous findings that chronic exposure leads to greater genome destabilization than acute exposure. PMID:15063138

  18. Methylation changes in muscle and liver tissues of male and female mice exposed to acute and chronic low-dose X-ray-irradiation

    Kovalchuk, Olga; Burke, Paula; Besplug, Jill; Slovack, Mark; Filkowski, Jody; Pogribny, Igor

    2004-04-14

    The biological and genetic effects of chronic low-dose radiation (LDR) exposure and its relationship to carcinogenesis have received a lot of attention in the recent years. For example, radiation-induced genome instability, which is thought to be a precursor of tumorogenesis, was shown to have a transgenerational nature. This indicates a possible involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in LDR-induced genome instability. Genomic DNA methylation is one of the most important epigenetic mechanisms. Existing data on radiation effects on DNA methylation patterns is limited, and no one has specifically studied the effects of the LDR. We report the first study of the effects of whole-body LDR exposure on global genome methylation in muscle and liver tissues of male and female mice. In parallel, we evaluated changes in promoter methylation and expression of the tumor suppressor gene p16{sup INKa} and DNA repair gene O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). We observed different patterns of radiation-induced global genome DNA methylation in the liver and muscle of exposed males and females. We also found sex and tissue-specific differences in p16{sup INKa} promoter methylation upon LDR exposure. In male liver tissue, p16{sup INKa} promoter methylation was more pronounced than in female tissue. In contrast, no significant radiation-induced changes in p16{sup INKa} promoter methylation were noted in the muscle tissue of exposed males and females. Radiation also did not significantly affect methylation status of MGMT promoter. We also observed substantial sex differences in acute and chronic radiation-induced expression of p16{sup INKa} and MGMT genes. Another important outcome of our study was the fact that chronic low-dose radiation exposure proved to be a more potent inducer of epigenetic effects than the acute exposure. This supports previous findings that chronic exposure leads to greater genome destabilization than acute exposure.

  19. Whole pelvis megavoltage irradiation with single doses of 1000 rad to palliate advanced gynecologic cancers. [Incidence and severity of acute complications

    Boulware, R.J.; Caderao, J.B.; Delclos, L.; Wharton, J.T.; Peters, L.J.

    1979-03-01

    This study reviews the experiences at M.D. Anderson Hospital of treating advanced gynecologic malignacies for palliation with single doses of 1000 rad per fraction. When feasible, this treatment was repeated twice (for a total of 3 treatments between intervals of 3 to 4 weeks. The patients who received 3 treatments had the best palliation; 2 treatments were more effective than 1. The palliative response was good in cervix, vagina, and vulva, poor in endometrial and ovarian carcinoma. The follow-up was short in some cases, but the acute complications appear minimal.

  20. Determination of antibodies to antigens of thymus epithelial cells in liquidators and patients survived acute radiation sickness at remote times following irradiation

    A group of patients, suffering from sequelae of acute radiation sickness (ARS), and liquidators was studied 5 years after exposure to a complex of factors resulting from the Chernobyl A.P.S. disaster. Patients with ARS sequelae and liquidators showed a high level and incidence of autoantibodies to antigens of cytoplasm of thymus epitherlial reticulum cells and to Hassal's corpuscles. The antibodies were found to belong to lgM class; there was a correlation between the serum lgM titres and the rate of the indirect immunofluorescence reaction with autoantibodies to antigens of the cytoplasm of the thymus epithelial reticulum cells

  1. Treatment with a belly-board device significantly reduces the volume of small bowel irradiated and results in low acute toxicity in adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer: results of a prospective study

    Background and purpose: To determine whether treatment prone on a belly-board significantly reduces the volume of small bowel irradiated in women receiving adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer, and to prospectively study acute small bowel toxicity using an accepted recording instrument. Material and methods: Thirty-two gynecologic patients underwent simulation with CT scanning supine and prone. Small bowel was delineated on every CT slice, and treatment was prone on the belly-board using 3-5 fields-typically Anterior, Right and Left Lateral, plus or minus Lateral Boosts. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 Gy and all treatments were delivered in 1.8 Gy fractions. Concomitant Cisplatin was administered in 13 patients with cervical carcinoma. Comparison of small bowel dose-volumes was made between supine and prone, with each subject acting as their own matched pair. Acute small bowel toxicity was prospectively measured using the Common Toxicity Criteria: Version 2.0. Results: Treatment prone on the belly-board significantly reduced the volume of small bowel receiving ≥100; ≥95; ≥90; and ≥80% of the prescribed dose, but not ≥50%. This was found whether volume was defined in cubic centimeters or % of total small bowel volume. Of 29 evaluable subjects, 2 (7%) experienced 1 episode each of grade 3 diarrhoea. All other toxicity events were grade 2 or less and comprised diarrhoea (59%), abdominal pain or cramping (48%), nausea (38%), anorexia (17%), vomiting (10%). There were no Grade 4 events and no treatment days were lost due to toxicity. Conclusions: Treatment prone on a belly-board device results in significant small bowel sparing, during adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer. The absence of Grade 4 events or Treatment Days Lost compares favorably with the published literature

  2. Low Dose Total Body Irradiation Combined With Recombinant CD19-Ligand × Soluble TRAIL Fusion Protein is Highly Effective Against Radiation-resistant B-precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Mice

    Fatih M. Uckun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In high-risk remission B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL patients, relapse rates have remained high post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT even after the use of very intensive total body irradiation (TBI-based conditioning regimens, especially in patients with a high “minimal residual disease” (MRD burden. New agents capable of killing radiation-resistant BPL cells and selectively augmenting their radiation sensitivity are therefore urgently needed. We report preclinical proof-of-principle that the potency of radiation therapy against BPL can be augmented by combining radiation with recombinant human CD19-Ligand × soluble TRAIL (“CD19L–sTRAIL” fusion protein. CD19L–sTRAIL consistently killed radiation-resistant primary leukemia cells from BPL patients as well as BPL xenograft cells and their leukemia-initiating in vivo clonogenic fraction. Low dose total body irradiation (TBI combined with CD19L–sTRAIL was highly effective against (1 xenografted CD19+ radiochemotherapy-resistant human BPL in NOD/SCID (NS mice challenged with an otherwise invariably fatal dose of xenograft cells derived from relapsed BPL patients as well as (2 radiation-resistant advanced stage CD19+ murine BPL with lymphomatous features in CD22ΔE12xBCR-ABL double transgenic mice. We hypothesize that the incorporation of CD19L–sTRAIL into the pre-transplant TBI regimens of patients with very high-risk BPL will improve their survival outcome after HSCT.

  3. Acute Bronchitis

    ... of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your cough ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when people ...

  4. Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract; Syndrome aigu d'irradiation: les atteintes du systeme gastro-intestinal

    Griffiths, N.M.; Dublineau, I.; Lebrun, F.; Linard, C.; Monti, P.; Picard, C.; Scanff, P.; Aigueperse, J. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire

    2002-06-01

    Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract. Exposure to ionising radiation at medium to high doses results in the manifestation of mixed pathologies. Following the analysis of several radiation accidents it is clear that intestinal injury influences patient survival. However the appearance of the classically defined gastrointestinal syndrome is not always evident. Nevertheless injury to the gastrointestinal tract, in particular loss of barrier function, seems to play an important role in the development of Multiple Organ Failure such as reported in the recent accident at Tokai Mura. Ionising radiation overexposure results in changes in intestinal motility and nutrient, fluid and electrolyte absorption and secretion all which may contribute to the genesis of diarrhea. In addition to modified cellular transport properties for nutrients or electrolytes, important loss of epithelial cells is also a major contributing factor. Intestinal functions are controlled by many factors such as neurotransmitters, locally released mediators from endocrine cells or immunocompetent cells in addition to luminal agents. To date, treatment of radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury is mainly symptomatic. However treatments such as growth factors, anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as cellular transplantation remain to be validated in the radiation accident situation. (author)

  5. Effects of ionizing radiation on the hematopoietic niche and treatment of acute radiation syndrome by gene therapy in highly-irradiated monkeys

    The hematopoietic stem cell niche represents a complex radiosensitive compartment whose protection is required for recovery from radiation-induced myelosuppression. We initially studied RI effects on endothelial and mesenchymal progenitors by an evaluating radiosensitivity and cell death. Then, we have proposed a new gene therapy strategy based on local and short term secretion of Sonic hedgehog morphogen to favour vascular niche repair and to stimulate residual hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We investigated the hematopoietic response of 8-Gy gamma irradiated monkeys to a single intra-osseous injection of xenogeneic multipotent mesenchymal stem cells transduced with a Shh pIRES2 plasmid. Thrombocytopenia and neutropenia duration were significantly reduced in grafted animals and clonogenics normalized from day 42. Areas under the curve of PLTs and ANCs between day 0 and day 30 were significantly higher in treated animals than in controls. Grafting MatrigelTM colonized or not with ASC in immunocompromised mice demonstrated a notable pro-angiogenic activity for Shh-ASC. Long term follow up (180-300 days) confirmed a durable recovery in the four grafted monkeys. Globally this study suggests that grafting Shh-multipotent stem cells may represent a new strategy to cure radiation-induced niche damage. (author)

  6. Immediate treatment effects of high-dose methotrexate and cranial irradiation on neuropsychological functions of children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia at a regional cancer center

    Sundaramoorthy Chidambaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Overall cure rates for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL have improved; however, the neuropsychological sequelae of ALL treatment have not been adequately documented in India. Aims: The present study assesses the immediate effects of ALL treatment on neuropsychological functioning, at the Regional Cancer Center in Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Newly diagnosed with ALL patients (n = 24 (aged 6-15 years; 13M:11F registered between March 2008 and February 2009 were included. Patients who had received high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX and cranial radiotherapy (CRT as part of their treatment were enrolled for the study. Neurocognitive assessments were done to assess various functions such as performance intelligence, visuo-perception, visuo-spatial, perceptual organization, processing speed, planning, working memory, and immediate verbal memory (IVM (Malin′s intelligence scale; verbal fluency (ideation fluency test and verbal attention (vigilance test. Three assessments were done during induction (baseline, after re-induction phase (second and during the maintenance phase (third. Results: The patients performed significantly worse in the third assessment (mean duration from diagnosis 17.48 months on performance intelligence quotient (PIQ, visuo-perception, visuo-spatial, processing speed, planning, IVM, verbal attention, and verbal fluency (P 0.05. Significant difference was observed between age groups 6 and 10 (41.7% and 11-15 years (58.3% in perceptual organization, verbal fluency, and verbal attention (P 0.05. Conclusions: Combining HD MTX and CRT had an immediate effect on neuropsychological sequelae among the children with ALL, however, long-term evaluation is recommended to study the long-term effects.

  7. Acute effects of irradiation on cognition: changes in attention on a computerized continuous performance test during radiotherapy in pediatric patients with localized primary brain tumors

    Purpose: To assess sustained attention, impulsivity, and reaction time during radiotherapy (RT) for pediatric patients with localized primary brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Thirty-nine patients (median age 12.3 years, range 5.9-22.9) with primary brain tumors were evaluated prospectively using the computerized Conners' continuous performance test (CPT) before and during conformal RT (CRT). The data were modeled to assess the longitudinal changes in the CPT scores and the effects of clinical variables on these changes during the first 50 days after the initiation of CRT. Results: The CPT scores exhibited an increasing trend for errors of omission (inattentiveness), decreasing trend for errors of commission (impulsivity), and slower reaction times. However, none of the changes were statistically significant. The overall index, which is an algorithm-based weighted sum of the CPT scores, remained within the range of normal throughout treatment. Older patients (age >12 years) were more attentive (p<0.0005), less impulsive (p<0.07), and had faster reaction times (p<0.001) at baseline than the younger patients. The reaction time was significantly reduced during treatment for the older patients and lengthened significantly for the younger patients (p<0.04). Patients with a shunted hydrocephalus (p<0.02), seizure history (p<0.0006), and residual tumor (p<0.02) were significantly more impulsive. Nonshunted patients (p<0.0001), those with more extensive resection (p<0.0001), and patients with ependymoma (p<0.006) had slower initial reaction times. Conclusion: Children with brain tumors have problems with sustained attention and reaction time resulting from the tumor and therapeutic interventions before RT. The reaction time slowed during treatment for patients <12 years old. RT, as administered in the trial from which these data were derived, has limited acute effects on changes in the CPT scores measuring attention, impulsiveness, and reaction time

  8. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  9. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression Therapy in Treating Older Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Acute LED irradiation does not change the anaerobic capacity and time to exhaustion during a high-intensity running effort: a double-blind, crossover, and placebo-controlled study : Effects of LED irradiation on anaerobic capacity and performance in running.

    Malta, Elvis De Souza; De Poli, Rodrigo Araujo Bonetti; Brisola, Gabriel Motta Pinheiro; Milioni, Fabio; Miyagi, Willian Eiji; Machado, Fabiana Andrade; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of photobiomodulation therapy using cluster light-emitting diodes (LEDT; 104 diodes) (wavelength 660 and 850 nm; energy density 1.5 and 4.5 J/cm(2); energy 60 J at each point; total energy delivered 600 J) on alternative maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAODALT) and time to exhaustion, during a high-intensity running effort. Fifteen moderately active and healthy males (age 25.1 ± 4.4 years) underwent a graded exercise test and two supramaximal exhaustive efforts at 115 % of the intensity associated with maximal oxygen uptake performed after acute LEDT or placebo irradiation in a double-blind, crossover, and placebo-controlled study design. The MAODALT was assumed as the sum of both oxygen equivalents estimated from the glycolytic and phosphagen metabolism pathways during each supramaximal effort. For the statistical analysis, a paired t test was used to determine differences between the treatments. The significance level was assumed as 95 %. In addition, a qualitative analysis was used to determine the magnitude of differences between groups. No significant differences were found for the values of oxygen equivalents from each energetic metabolism (P ≥ 0.28), for MAODALT values between the LEDT and placebo conditions (P ≥ 0.27), or for time to exhaustion (P = 0.80), except for the respiratory exchange ratio (P = 0.01). The magnitude-based inference of effect size reported only a possibly negative effect of photobiomodulation on MAODALT when expressed in units relative to body mass and on the glycolysis pathway (26 %). In summary, LEDT after a high-intensity running effort did not alter the MAODALT, metabolic energy pathways, or high-intensity running performance. PMID:27384042

  11. Acute dose and low dose-rate irradiation of carcinoma cells expressing human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins - the significance of p53, Rb and G1 arrest status

    Purpose: The development of carcinomas in a number of sites including the cervix, vulva and anus have been associated with cellular infection by human papillomaviruses (HPV), including HPV 16 and HPV 18. The mechanism by which these viruses contribute to tumor development or progression seems in part to be related to the integration of the viral genome into the host cells DNA, and the binding of p53 protein by the HPV E6 oncoprotein as well as the binding of the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein and Rb-like proteins by the HPV E7 oncoprotein. These interactions lead to loss of p53 and Rb function including loss of the G1 cell cycle checkpoint. Although it is believed that both p53 and Rb play a role in the radiosensitivity of the cell, whether alteration in either protein enhances or diminishes cellular radiation response is not clear from the literature. Because HPV-associated tumors such as cervical cancer are often treated with acute dose and/or low dose-rate radiation, we set out to evaluate the radiation response of several carcinoma cell sublines expressing either oncogenic E6 or E7 to both types of radiation, and to determine if p53/Rb dependent G1 arrest is an important determinant of cell fate after irradiation. Materials and Methods: We have previously developed a series of RKO colorectal carcinoma cell sublines expressing both low-risk (HPV 11) and high-risk (HPV 16) E6 and E7 genes. p53-dependent G1 arrest is intact in RKO parental cells and cells expressing low-risk E6 proteins, while the G1 arrest is abrogated in cells expressing high-risk E6 or E7. Clonogenic survival was assessed after exposure to acute dose (1 Gy/min) and low dose-rate (0.25 Gy/hour) radiation. The radiobiologic parameters α, β and the surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) were determined. SDS-PAGE/immunoblotting was carried out to assess both p53 and p21WAF1/CIP1 levels after exposure to radiation. Flow cytometry was performed before and after exposure to low dose-rate radiation to confirm

  12. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    ... Acute Pancreatitis > Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  13. Low-dose total body irradiation and G-CSF without hematopoietic stem cell support in the treatment of relapsed or refractory acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), or AML in second or subsequent remission

    Purpose: Patients with relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), who are not eligible for bone marrow transplantation, have a poor prognosis when treated with chemotherapy alone. Total body irradiation (TBI) is an effective modality against AML when used in doses of 1000-1400 cGy with hematopoietic stem cell support. We undertook a phase I study of TBI with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support, without stem cell support in patients with AML either in relapse or second or subsequent remission. Methods and Materials: Patients with relapsed AML, or AML in second or subsequent remission were treated in a phase I study of TBI followed by G-CSF. The first dose level was 200 cGy. After the initial cohort of patients it was clear that patients with overt leukemia did not benefit from this treatment, and subsequent patients were required to be in remission at the time of TBI. Results: Eleven patients were treated, 4 in overt relapse, and 7 in remission. 200 cGy was used in all, and dose escalation was not possible due to prolonged thrombocytopenia in all patients but one. Neutrophil recovery was adequate in those patients who remained in remission after TBI. Patients with overt leukemia had transient reduction in blast counts, but rapid recurrence of their leukemia. Patients treated in remission had short remissions, with the exception of one patient who is in remission 32 months after treatment. Conclusion: There is some antileukemic effect of TBI even at 200 cGy, though this dose appears to be too low to help a significant number of patients. If TBI is to be escalated without stem cell support, then a thrombopoietic agent will need to be used

  14. Food irradiation

    Food irradiation is a promising technology in which food products are exposed to a controlled amount of radiant energy to eliminate disease-causing bacteria. The process can also control parasites and insects, reduce spoilage and inhibit ripening and sprouting. Food irradiation is endorsed by the most important health organisations (WHO, CDC, USDA, FDA, EFSA, etc.) and allowed in nearly 40 Countries. It is to remember that irradiation is not a substitute either for comprehensive food safety programs or for good food-handling practices. Irradiated foods must be labelled with either the statement treated with radiation or treated by irradiation and the international symbol for irradiation, the radura. Some consumer associations suppose negative aspects of irradiation, such as increase of the number of free radicals in food and decrease of antioxidant vitamins that neutralize them

  15. Bronchitis - acute

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute bronchitis is swelling and inflammation in the main passages ... present only for a short time. Causes When acute bronchitis occurs, it almost always comes after having a ...

  16. Bronchitis - acute

    Acute bronchitis is swelling and inflammation in the main passages that carry air to the lungs. The swelling narrows ... makes it harder to breathe. Another symptom of bronchitis is a cough. Acute means the symptoms have ...

  17. Acute Bronchitis

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  18. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingest...

  19. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion....

  20. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions: Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  1. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions : Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  2. Neoplasms in irradiated populations

    The paper describes the results of three prospective studies which have been ongoing for 25 years. The study populations include: (1) persons treated with x rays in infancy for alleged enlargement of the thymus gland; (2) persons treated in childhood with x rays and/or radium for lymphoid hyperplasia of the nasopharynx; and (3) women treated with x rays for acute postpartum mastitis. The studies have resulted in the quantification of risk for radiogenic thyroid and breast cancer for periods up to 40 years post irradiation

  3. Clinical trials of CCLSG L874 and I874 protocols without cranial irradiation for standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood; A study from the children's cancer and leukemia study group

    Koizumi, Shoichi (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Fujimoto, Takeo; Tsurusawa, Masahito (and others)

    1992-10-01

    In the CCLSG-874 protocol for children with low-risk (LR) and intermediate-risk (IR) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), two regimens with or without cranial irradiation (CI) were compared with respect to their ability to prevent central nervous system (CNS) leukemia and to improve overall outcome of ALL. From 1987 to 1990, 82 and 109 evaluable patients were registered into L874 and I874 protocols for LR and IR patients, respectively. All responders to induction therapy were randomized to treatment with 18 Gy of CI plus intrathecal methotrexate (MTX it) or to treatment with high-dose MTX plus MTX it. Patients were then treated with standard maintenance regimens of L874 and I874. At a median follow-up of 39 months (range 14-58 months) there was no difference in the rate of hematologic relapse between the CI group and MTX group. The rate of CNS relapse in the MTX group seemed to be higher (3 of 39 in L874 and 2 of 54 in I874) than that in the CI group (1 of 43 in L874 and 0 of 55 in I874), but these data were not statistically significant. The rates of 4-year event-free survival (EFS) in L874 were 81.1[+-]7.6% (mean[+-]SE) and 75.2[+-]7.9% (ns) for the CI and MTX group, respectively, and the rates of EFS in I874 were 70.0[+-]13.6% and 70.0[+-]9.0% (ns) for the CI and MTX group, respectively. These data suggest that MTX alone may be as effective as CI to prolong disease-free survival in LR and IR ALL although further continuous studies are needed. Analysis of serial CCLSG protocols for ALL from 1981 revealed that the rate of EFS of ALL allover including all risk groups has gradually been increasing from 44.2[+-]3.6% for 811 protocol and 53.1[+-]3.5% for 841 to 65.5[+-]3.6% for the present 874 protocol. (author).

  4. Pricking blood therapy combined with ultraviolet irradiation for treatment of acute herpes zoster%刺血疗法联合紫外线照射治疗带状疱疹

    欧阳颀; 魏智钧; 侯艳丽

    2009-01-01

    目的:评价刺血疗法联合紫外线照射治疗带状疱疹的临床疗效和安全性.方法:将130例患者随机分为观察组(65例)、对照组(65例).观察组采用刺血疗法联合紫外线照射,先用梅花针重叩病变局部,再拔罐,取罐后采用体表分野法对皮损区及脊椎旁相应的神经根区进行紫外线照射治疗;对照组采用阿昔洛韦等西药治疗,两组疗程均为7天,观察疗效及不良反应.结果:治疗7天后观察组痊愈率和总有效率分别为76.9%和90.8%,均显著优于对照组的38.5%、66.2%(均P<0.01),观察组后遗神经痛发生率为3.1%,明显低于对照组的12.3%(P<0.05);两组疼痛、皮损、睡眠积分较治疗前明显降低(均P<0.01),且组间比较观察组各项积分下降更为显著(P<0.01,P<0.05);痊愈患者中观察组带状疱疹止痛、止疱、结痂及痊愈时间均显著低于对照组(P<0.01,P<0.05).结论:刺血疗法联合紫外线照射治疗带状疱疹起效快,并且能有效缩短病程,降低后遗神经痛的发生率,是高效安全的治疗方案.%Objective To evaluate clinical therapeutic effect and the safety of pricking blood therapy combined with ultraviolet irradiation for treatment of acute herpes zoster. Methods One hundred and thirty cases were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group, 65 cases in each group. The observation group was treated with pricking blood therapy combined with ultraviolet irradiation. Firstly, the affected parts were heavily taped with a plum-blossom needle and then cupping. After the cup was removed, with the body surface-dividing field method, ultraviolet irradiation was given at the skin injury area and the nerve root area corresponding to para-spinal vertebra, and the control group was treated with Aciclovir and other western medicine. Seven days constituted one course. Their therapeutic effects and adverse reactions were observed. Results After treatment of 7 days, the cured rate of 76. 9% and

  5. Irradiated planets

    We present models for the spectra emitted by irradiated planets and discuss the numerical methods used in the modeling. In addition, we show results of simple 3D calculations that are designed as a first step toward detailed multi-dimensional models of irradiated planets

  6. Food irradiation

    The paper discusses the need for effective and efficient technologies in improving the food handling system. It defines the basic premises for the development of food handling. The application of food irradiation technology is briefly discussed. The paper points out key considerations for the adoption of food irradiation technology in the ASEAN region (author)

  7. Food irradiation

    The author reviews in outline the present status of industrial gamma irradiation plants for food and medical sterilization and in particular lists commercial irradiation plants currently operating in the U.K., considering briefly plant design, efficiency, costs and dose control. (UK)

  8. Irradiation damage

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  9. Irradiation damage

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  10. Food irradiation

    Food irradiation can have a number of beneficial effects, including prevention of sprouting; control of insects, parasites, pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, moulds and yeasts; and sterilization, which enables commodities to be stored for long periods. It is most unlikely that all these potential applications will prove commercially acceptable; the extend to which such acceptance is eventually achieved will be determined by practical and economic considerations. A review of the available scientific literature indicates that food irradiation is a thoroughly tested food technology. Safety studies have so far shown no deleterious effects. Irradiation will help to ensure a safer and more plentiful food supply by extending shelf-life and by inactivating pests and pathogens. As long as requirement for good manufacturing practice are implemented, food irradiation is safe and effective. Possible risks of food irradiation are not basically different from those resulting from misuse of other processing methods, such as canning, freezing and pasteurization. (author)

  11. Food irradiation

    Food treatment by means of ionizing energy, or irradiation, is an innovative method for its preservation. In order to treat important volumes of food, it is necessary to have industrial irradiation installations. The effect of radiations on food is analyzed in the present special work and a calculus scheme for an Irradiation Plant is proposed, discussing different aspects related to its project and design: ionizing radiation sources, adequate civil work, security and auxiliary systems to the installations, dosimetric methods and financing evaluation methods of the project. Finally, the conceptual design and calculus of an irradiation industrial plant of tubercles is made, based on the actual needs of a specific agricultural zone of our country. (Author)

  12. Fruits irradiation

    The objectives of this project in food irradiation are two-fold, to study the effect of irradiation in prolongation of useful storage life of fruits and to evaluate irradiation as a means of preserving fruits. However radiation is not intended to replace existing preservation processes but may be used in conjunction with current methods such as refrigeration, drying, fermentation etc. In fact radiation should combine with proper storage and packaging techniques in order to ensure maximum benefits. Ripening retardation of fruits by irradiation kinds of fruits: papaya, mango, rambutan, longan and durian. Changes in organoleptic properties of fruit flavor and taste, texture changes by taste panel estimation of significance level of results by statistical mathematical methods, chemical changes determination of climacteric peak in fruits by estimation of carbon dioxide evolution, vitamin C determination by Tillmann's method, carotenoid separation by thin layer chromatography, reducing sugars and acidity determination, volatile components of durian by gas-chromatography

  13. Food irradiation

    The preservation of food using irradiation may replace or be used in combination with traditional or conventional food preservation techniques. Studies have shown that the irradiation technique which uses less energy than other preservation methods is a potential way for reducing post harvest losses. However, economic feasibility among other constraints is the core factor to determine the success of the technique at commercial scale. The need and importance for considering this new technique in Malaysia are discussed here. (author)

  14. Argon laser irradiation of the otolithic organ

    Okuno, T.; Nomura, Y.; Young, Y.H.; Hara, M. (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-12-01

    An argon laser was used to irradiate the otolithic organs of guinea pigs and cynomolgus monkeys. After stapedectomy, the argon laser (1.5 W x 0.5 sec/shot) irradiated the utricle or saccule without touching the sensory organs. The stapes was replaced over the oval window after irradiation. The animals used for acute observation were killed immediately for morphologic studies; those used for long-term observation were kept alive for 2, 4, or 10 weeks. Acute observation revealed that sensory and supporting cells were elevated from the basement membrane only in the irradiated area. No rupture of the membranous labyrinth was observed. Long-term observation revealed that the otolith of the macula utriculi had disappeared in 2-week specimens. The entire macula utricili had disappeared in 10-week specimens. No morphologic changes were observed in cochlea, semicircular canals, or membranous labyrinth. The saccule showed similar changes.

  15. Food irradiation

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and The World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19 MeV, 1 kW) and industrial unit Electronika (10 MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permissions for irradiation for; spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables. (author)

  16. Health condition of children irradiated in utero

    Among the children exposed to ionizing radiation, the ones irradiated in utero constitute a group under special surveillance. The greatest sensitivity of the organism to the effects of radiative factors occurs in the neonatal period of development and the forthcoming life span with irradiation effects is the longest for these children. Children with acute exposure, with chronic exposure and control group were encompassed by this study - 1144 children altogether. 9 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Irradiation for conjunctival granulocytic sarcoma

    Fleckenstein, K.; Geinitz, H.; Grosu, A.; Molls, M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Goetze, K. [Dept. of Hematology and Oncology, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Werner, M. [Dept. of Pathology, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany)

    2003-03-01

    Case History and Findings: A 73-year-old woman with a history of myeloproliferative syndrome (MPS) presented with bilateral chemosis, redness and burning of the eyes. The ocular motility was severely impaired. Ophthalmological examination revealed markedly distended conjunctivas on both sides. Biopsy disclosed conjunctival granulocytic sarcoma as an initial symptom of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Diagnosis was confirmed by peripheral blood smear and bone marrow aspiration. Treatment and Outcome: The orbital tumor disappeared completely after local external beam irradiation with a total dose of 30 Gy and no further orbital recurrence occurred. With chemotherapy following irradiation transient hematological remission was achieved. 5 months after diagnosis the patient died of respiratory failure following atypical pneumonia as a consequence of her underlying disorder. Conclusion: Detection of orbital granulocytic sarcoma, even in the absence of typical leukemic symptoms is of practical importance, because treatment with irradiation can lead to stabilization or improvement in the patient's vision. (orig.)

  18. Irradiation for conjunctival granulocytic sarcoma

    Case History and Findings: A 73-year-old woman with a history of myeloproliferative syndrome (MPS) presented with bilateral chemosis, redness and burning of the eyes. The ocular motility was severely impaired. Ophthalmological examination revealed markedly distended conjunctivas on both sides. Biopsy disclosed conjunctival granulocytic sarcoma as an initial symptom of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Diagnosis was confirmed by peripheral blood smear and bone marrow aspiration. Treatment and Outcome: The orbital tumor disappeared completely after local external beam irradiation with a total dose of 30 Gy and no further orbital recurrence occurred. With chemotherapy following irradiation transient hematological remission was achieved. 5 months after diagnosis the patient died of respiratory failure following atypical pneumonia as a consequence of her underlying disorder. Conclusion: Detection of orbital granulocytic sarcoma, even in the absence of typical leukemic symptoms is of practical importance, because treatment with irradiation can lead to stabilization or improvement in the patient's vision. (orig.)

  19. Commercial irradiator

    Commercial irradiation, the treatment of products with gamma radiation principally using a Cobalt-60 source, had its beginnings in Europe and Australia 25 years ago. To date the most successful application of the process is the sterilization of medical products and, for a variety of reasons, gamma sterilization is now becoming dominant in this important field. Many other applications have been evaluated over the years and the most exciting is undoubtedly food irradiation for which there is a vast potential. The commercial feasibility of setting up and irradiation facility is a complex subject and the selection of Cobalt-60 gamma plant depends on a number of technical and economic considerations. The parameters which determine the design and capacity of the optimum plant include throughput, product size and dose requirements; a balance has to be struck between plant flexibility and overall economy. The Ansell irradiators are designed primarily for the sterilization of medical products although some experimental food irradiation has been done, particularly in Australia. (author)

  20. Acute Pericarditis

    ... Sugar Control Helps Fight Diabetic Eye Disease Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... cancer, or heart surgery, the fluid is blood. Causes Acute pericarditis usually results from infection or other ...

  1. Acute pancreatitis

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000287.htm Acute pancreatitis To use the sharing features on this page, ... fatty foods after the attack has improved. Outlook (Prognosis) Most cases go away in a week. However, ...

  2. Acute dyspnea

    Radiodiagnosis is applied to determine the causes of acute dyspnea. Acute dyspnea is shown to aggravate the course of pulmonary diseases (bronchial asthma, obstructive bronchitis, pulmonary edema, throboembolism of pulmonary arteries etc) and cardiovascular diseases (desiseas of myocardium). The main tasks of radiodiagnosis are to determine volume and state of the lungs, localization and type of pulmonary injuries, to verify heart disease and to reveal concomitant complications

  3. Bronchitis (acute)

    Wark, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Acute bronchitis, with transient inflammation of the trachea and major bronchi, affects over 40/1000 adults a year in the UK. The causes are usually considered to be infective, but only around half of people have identifiable pathogens.The role of smoking or environmental tobacco smoke inhalation in predisposing to acute bronchitis is unclear.A third of people may have longer-term symptoms or recurrence.

  4. Vinca irradiator

    The development programme of the VINCA radiosterilisation centre involves plans for an irradiator capable of working in several ways. Discontinuous operation. The irradiator is loaded for a certain period then runs automatically until the moment of unloading. This method is suitable as long as the treatment capacity is relatively small. Continuous operation with permanent batch loading and unloading carried out either manually or automatically (by means of equipment to be installed later). Otherwise the design of the apparatus is highly conventional. The source is a vertical panel submersible in a pool. The conveyor is of the 'bucket' type, with 4 tiers to each bucket. The batches pass successively through all possible irradiation positions. Transfert into and out of the cell take place through a maze, which also provides access to the cell when the sources are in storage at the bottom of the pool

  5. Comparative studies on chromosome aberrations in rhesus monkeys induced by 60Co γ ray irradiation under different irradiation conditions

    Rhesus monkeys were irradiated by 60Cr γ ray exposure under different conditions, and comparative studies on their chromosome aberrations have been made. The dose rate of single acute irradiation was 223 mGy/min, the dose rate of fractionated curmulative irradiation was 223 mGy/min, and the dose of 0.25 Gy was delivered once a week, the dose rate of chronic continuous irradiation was 0.26 mGy/min for 190 min, 5 days per week. The total coumulative dose for each group was 2.0 Gy. It was found that the types of chromosome aberrations were mainly dicentric aberrations and acentric fragments in single acute irradiation, and acentric fragments in both fractionated coumulative and chronic continuous irradiation groups. The frequencies of chromosome aberrations in these groups increase linearly with increasing dose. The degree of chromosome damage in single acute irradiation group was much greater than those in the other groups, but degree and characteristics of chromosome damage between fractionated cumulative and chronic continuous irradiation groups was not significantly different. Acentric fragments in lymphocyte chromosomes ceased to increase when the cumulated dose in fractionated cumulative or chronic continuous irradiation reached to more than 1.0 Gy. The frequencies of chromosome aberrations basically decreased to control level within a year following the termination of irradiation

  6. Food irradiation

    The colloquium has been held on the occasion of the commissioning of a new linear electron accelerator. The 17 papers presented by the experts give a survey of the present status of food irradiation and related aspects. Every paper has been analysed and prepared for retrieval from the database. (orig.)

  7. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  8. Determinants of skin sensitivity to solar irradiation

    Broekmans, W.; Vink, A.A.; Boelsma, E.; Klöpping-Ketelaars, W.A.A.; Tijburg, L.B.M.; Veer, van 't P.; Poppel, van G.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Acute effects of UV irradiation include UV-induced erythema. Sunlight plays an important role in the development of skin cancer. Several predictive factors of UV-induced erythema could also be predictive for skin cancer. Objective: Our objective was to quantitatively assess phenotypical

  9. A review of total body irradiation

    This review of total body irradiation discusses the optimization of the prescription, relevant radiobiological research, cytotoxic drugs and TBI, and the delivery of TBI and its complications, with particular reference to acute effects, neurological sequelae, endocrine effects, cataracts, and secondary malignancies. (U.K.)

  10. Effect of prednisone and irradiation on the rectum in dogs

    In an attempt to diminish the severity of the acute and late effects of irradiation to the rectum of dogs, oral prednisone was administered to 10 dogs for 1 week prior to, during, and for 1 month following a 3-week fractionated course of 60Co exposures to the pelvis. A control group of 10 dogs received irradiation alone. The dogs were observed clinically, serial rectal biopsies were done during and following the acute reaction, and the rectum was studied following sacrifice. Observations suggest that prednisone has no beneficial effect on the acute inflammatory reaction, and increases the severity of the late tissue damage