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Sample records for acute insulin resistance

  1. Acute pain induces insulin resistance in humans

    Greisen, J.; Juhl, C.B.; Grøfte, Thorbjørn;

    2001-01-01

    Background: Painful trauma results in a disturbed metabolic state with impaired insulin sensitivity, which is related to the magnitude of the trauma. The authors explored whether pain per se influences hepatic and extrahepatic actions of insulin. Methods: Ten healthy male volunteers underwent two...... randomly sequenced hyperinsulinemic–euglycemic (insulin infusion rate, 0.6 mU · kg-1 · min-1 for 180 min) clamp studies 4 weeks apart. Self-controlled painful electrical stimulation was applied to the abdominal skin for 30 min, to a pain intensity of 8 on a visual analog scale of 0–10, just before...... the clamp procedure (study P). In the other study, no pain was inflicted (study C). Results: Pain reduced whole-body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake from 6.37 ± 1.87 mg · kg-1 · min-1 (mean ± SD) in study C to 4.97 ± 1.38 mg · kg-1 · min-1 in study P (P

  2. Lipoprotein Ratios as Surrogate Markers for Insulin Resistance in South Indians with Normoglycemic Nondiabetic Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Medha Rajappa; M. G. Sridhar; Balachander, J; Sethuraman, K. R.; Kalai Selvi Rajendiran

    2014-01-01

    Background. Insulin resistance has been associated with dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. Even though homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) is a well-known insulin resistance predictor, estimation of serum lipoprotein ratios has been recently suggested as a surrogate marker for insulin resistance. Here, we evaluated the relationship between lipoprotein ratios and insulin resistance in normoglycemic nondiabetic south Indians with acute coronary syndrome. Methods. ...

  3. Acute Aerobic Exercise and Plasma Levels of Orexin A, Insulin, Glucose, and Insulin Resistance in Males With Type 2 Diabetes

    Alizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The endocrine system disruptions are the main factors in metabolic disorders which are due to lifestyle changes, obesity, and aging. Insulin resistance is impaired glucose homeostasis in the presence of insulin and is related to many diseases such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, and type 2 diabetes Objectives This study aimed to investigate the effect of acute aerobic exercise on plasma levels of orexin A, insulin, glucose, and insulin resistance in males with type 2 diabetes. Patients and Methods Twenty subjects (mean age = 45.40 ± 5.42 years, mean weight = 80.91 ± 6.35 kg, body mass index = 25.41 ± 2.76 kg/m2 were randomly assigned into control and experimental groups, involving 10 people in each group. The exercise protocol consisted of one session of acute aerobic exercise on a treadmill at 60% maximal oxygen uptake and the same energy expenditure (300 kcal, which were determined by gas analyzers. Subjects were subjected to samplings before, immediately after, and 24 hours after the acute aerobic exercise. Results The analysis of findings in P ≤ 0.05 indicated that acute aerobic exercise caused a significant increase in plasma levels of orexin A and a significant decrease in plasma levels of glucose immediately after the aerobic activity, but insignificantly affected the plasma levels of insulin and insulin resistance. Conclusions It seems that in people with type 2 diabetes, acute aerobic exercise can decrease the plasma levels of glucose, possibly through increasing orexin A. In addition, negative energy balance is necessary to decrease the levels of insulin and insulin resistance during acute aerobic exercise.

  4. A simple way to identify insulin resistance in non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome patients with impaired fasting glucose

    Sayantan Ray; Ashit Kumar Bairagi; Santanu Guha; Satyabrata Ganguly; Debes Ray; Ashis Kumar Basu; Anirban Sinha

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective: The incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) is increasing in India. Recent data suggesting insulin resistance can predict cardiovascular disease independently of the other risk factors, such as hypertension, visceral obesity, or dyslipidemia, so a focus on the relation between acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and insulin resistance is relevant. Several studies addressing serum lipoprotein ratios as surrogates for insulin resistance have found promising results. We an...

  5. Study on the phenomenon of insulin resistance (IR) in patients with acute cerebral infarction

    Objective: To investigate the presence of insulin resistance (IR) in patients with cerebral infarction and the indication for insulin therapy. Methods: Fasting blood glucose (FPG) (with biochemistry), fasting serum insulin (FINS) and cortisol (with RIA) levels were measured in 50 patients with cerebral infarction and 80 controls. Insulin sensitivity index (ISI) was calculated and correlation with the score of neurologic impairment as well as the size of lesion was studied. Results: FPG, FINS and cortisol levels in the patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P<0.001 ) while the ISI was significantly lower (P <0.001 ) than that in the controls. Levels of there parameters were significantly higher in patients with moderate-severe lesions than those in patients with only mild lesion (P<0.001, P<0.01, P<0.05 respectively). ISI was negatively correlated to the size of infarction (r=-0.313, P<0.05) and also to the score of neurologic impairment (r=-0.317, P<0.05). The mortality and morbidity in the moderate severe group were naturally higher than those in the mild group. Conclusion: Insulin resistance does exist during the acute stage of cerebral infarction. Degree of hyperinsulinaemia and severity of the resistance are related to the course and prognosis of the disease process. Insulin therapy should be considered in those patients with hyperglycemia. (authors)

  6. Lipoprotein ratios as surrogate markers for insulin resistance in South indians with normoglycemic nondiabetic acute coronary syndrome.

    Rajappa, Medha; Sridhar, M G; Balachander, J; Sethuraman, K R; Rajendiran, Kalai Selvi

    2014-01-01

    Background. Insulin resistance has been associated with dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. Even though homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) is a well-known insulin resistance predictor, estimation of serum lipoprotein ratios has been recently suggested as a surrogate marker for insulin resistance. Here, we evaluated the relationship between lipoprotein ratios and insulin resistance in normoglycemic nondiabetic south Indians with acute coronary syndrome. Methods. 100 normoglycemic nondiabetic ACS patients and 140 controls were enrolled in the study. Levels of fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and lipid profile [total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)], lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels were measured and lipoprotein ratios were computed. HOMA-IR was used to calculate the insulin resistance. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) analysis was used to compare the power of these lipoprotein ratios to predict insulin resistance. Results. Lipoprotein ratios were significantly higher in normoglycemic nondiabetic ACS patients, as compared to healthy controls, and were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR by Spearman's rank correlation analysis. ROC curve showed that Lp(a)/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C ratios were the best surrogate predictors of insulin resistance in normoglycemic nondiabetic ACS. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that serum lipoprotein ratios significantly correlate with insulin resistance in normoglycemic nondiabetic ACS. Lp(a)/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C ratios could be used as surrogate markers of insulin resistance in atherosclerosis-prone south Indians with normoglycemic nondiabetic ACS. PMID:24959351

  7. Determinants of C-peptide levels and acute insulin resistance/sensitivity in nondiabetic STEMI role of Killip class

    Chiara Lazzeri

    2014-03-01

    According to our data, the development of acute insulin resistance in the early phase of STEMI can be viewed as an adaptive mechanism to stress (represented by acute myocardial ischemia, similar to other acute critical conditions, related to the severity of stress (that is to the hemodynamic impairment.

  8. Acute mTOR inhibition induces insulin resistance and alters substrate utilization in vivo

    Kleinert, Maximilian; Sylow, Lykke; Fazakerley, Daniel J;

    2014-01-01

    The effect of acute inhibition of both mTORC1 and mTORC2 on metabolism is unknown. A single injection of the mTOR kinase inhibitor, AZD8055, induced a transient, yet marked increase in fat oxidation and insulin resistance in mice, whereas the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin had no effect. AZD8055......, but not rapamycin reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into incubated muscles, despite normal GLUT4 translocation in muscle cells. AZD8055 inhibited glycolysis in MEF cells. Abrogation of mTORC2 activity by SIN1 deletion impaired glycolysis and AZD8055 had no effect in SIN1 KO MEFs. Re-expression of wildtype...

  9. Acute mTOR inhibition induces insulin resistance and alters substrate utilization in vivo

    Kleinert, Maximilian; Sylow, Lykke; Fazakerley, Daniel J.;

    2014-01-01

    The effect of acute inhibition of both mTORC1 and mTORC2 on metabolism is unknown. A single injection of the mTOR kinase inhibitor, AZD8055, induced a transient, yet marked increase in fat oxidation and insulin resistance in mice, whereas the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin had no effect. AZD8055......, but not rapamycin reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into incubated muscles, despite normal GLUT4 translocation in muscle cells. AZD8055 inhibited glycolysis in MEF cells. Abrogation of mTORC2 activity by SIN1 deletion impaired glycolysis and AZD8055 had no effect in SIN1 KO MEFs. Re-expression of wildtype...

  10. Preliminary study on the relationship between insulin resistance and stroke during acute stage

    Objective: To explore whether there are insulin resistance (IR) in the patients with stroke and the relationship between IR and the patients' condition and prognosis. Method: Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting serum insulin and cortisol levels were determined in 30 patients with cerebral infarction, 31 patients with cerebral hemorrhage and 28 normal adults. The insulin sensitivity index (ISI) was calculated and the result was analyzed by linear correlation with the score of neurologic impairment and the size of lesions. Results: The study showed that the levels of FPG, FINS and cortisol of the patients with stroke were significantly higher than those of the control group (p < 0.001); ISI in patient was significantly lower than that in control group (p < 0.001). There were als significant deference in FPG, FINS levels and ISI between the mild group and moderate as well as severe groups of stroke (p < 0.001, p < 0.01, p < 0.05). ISI was negatively also correlated with area of infarction and volume of haemorrhage (r = -0.372, r -0.406, p < 0.05). It was also negatively correlated with the score of neurologic impairment (r = -0.321, p < 0.05). The mortality rate and the disability rate in moderate and severe groups were higher than those in mild group. Conclusion: There were presence of IR in the patients with stroke. The insulin level and IR during acute stage were correlated with patients condition and prognosis. It was suggested that insulin should be used to treat the patients with presence of IR (high plasma glucose level and low ISI)

  11. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes Page Content On this page: ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas, ...

  12. Serum lipoprotein ratios as markers of insulin resistance: A study among non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome patients with impaired fasting glucose

    Ray, S.; Talukdar, A.; Sonthalia, N.; Saha, M.; Kundu, S.; D Khanra; Guha, S.; Basu, A. K.; Mukherjee, A.; Ray, D.; Ganguly, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Recent data suggest that insulin resistance can predict cardiovascular disease independently of the other risk factors, such as hypertension, visceral obesity or dyslipidaemia. However, the majority of available methods to evaluate insulin resistance are complicated to operate, expensive, and time consuming. This study was undertaken to assess whether serum lipoprotein ratios could predict insulin resistance in non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. ...

  13. A simple way to identify insulin resistance in non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome patients with impaired fasting glucose

    Sayantan Ray

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD is increasing in India. Recent data suggesting insulin resistance can predict cardiovascular disease independently of the other risk factors, such as hypertension, visceral obesity, or dyslipidemia, so a focus on the relation between acute coronary syndrome (ACS and insulin resistance is relevant. Several studies addressing serum lipoprotein ratios as surrogates for insulin resistance have found promising results. We analyzed the association of lipoprotein ratios with the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. Methods: One hundred non-diabetic patients with impaired fasting glucose admitted with a diagnosis of ACS were included in the study. Admission fasting glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. The HOMA-IR was used to calculate insulin resistance. The fasting serum total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C levels are used to calculate following lipid ratios: TC/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C. The areas under the curves (AUC of the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC were used to compare the power of these serum lipoprotein ratio markers. Results: Lipoprotein ratios were significantly higher in patients with HOMA Index >2 as compared to patients with Index <2. TG/HDL-C ratio and TC/HDL-C ratio were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR (P < 0.05 as obtained by Pearson′s correlation analysis (r = 0.4459, P = 0.0012; r = 0.4815, P = 0.0004; r = 0.3993; P = 0.0041, respectively. The area under the ROC curve of the TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratios for predicting insulin resistance was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67-0.93, 0.78 (95% CI, 0.65-0.91, respectively. Conclusion: A plasma TG/HDL-C ratio and TC/HDL-C ratio provide a simple means of identifying insulin resistant and can be used as the markers of insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases risk in adult non-diabetic patients.

  14. Glycosphingolipids and insulin resistance

    M. Langeveld; J.F.M.G. Aerts

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk for insulin resistance, a state characterized by impaired responsiveness of liver, muscle and adipose tissue to insulin. One class of lipids involved in the development of insulin resistance are the (glyco)sphingolipids. Ceramide, the most simple sphingol

  15. Insulin Resistance and Hyperinsulinemia

    Kim, Sun H.; Reaven, Gerald M

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Recently, it has been suggested that insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia can exist in isolation and have differential impacts on cardiovascular disease (CVD). To evaluate this suggestion, we assessed the degree of discordance between insulin sensitivity and insulin response in a healthy, nondiabetic population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Insulin sensitivity was quantified by determining the steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentration during an insulin suppression test in 4...

  16. Insulin Resistance of Puberty.

    Kelsey, Megan M; Zeitler, Philip S

    2016-07-01

    Puberty is a time of considerable metabolic and hormonal change. Notably, puberty is associated with a marked decrease in insulin sensitivity, on par with that seen during pregnancy. In otherwise healthy youth, there is a nadir in insulin sensitivity in mid-puberty, and then it recovers at puberty completion. However, there is evidence that insulin resistance (IR) does not resolve in youth who are obese going into puberty and may result in increased cardiometabolic risk. Little is known about the underlying pathophysiology of IR in puberty, and how it might contribute to increased disease risk (e.g., type 2 diabetes). In this review, we have outlined what is known about the IR in puberty in terms of pattern, potential underlying mechanisms and other mediating factors. We also outline other potentially related metabolic changes that occur during puberty, and effects of underlying insulin resistant states (e.g., obesity) on pubertal changes in insulin sensitivity. PMID:27179965

  17. Effect of hepatic glucose production on acute insulin resistance induced by lipid-infusion in awake rats

    Ling Li; Gang-Yi Yang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the influence of hepatic glucose production on acute insulin resistance induced by a lipid infusion in awake rats.METHODS: A hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp was established in awake chronically catheterized rats. Two groups of rats were studied either with a 4-h intraarterial infusion of lipid/heparin or saline. Insulin-mediated peripheral and hepatic glucose metabolism was assessed by hyperinsulinaemiceuglycaemic clamp combined with [3-3H]-glucose infusion.RESULTS: During hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp,there was a significant increase in plasma free fatty acid (FFA, from 741.9±50.6 to 2346.4±238.5 μmol/L, P<0.01) in lipid-infused group. The glucose infusion rates (GIR) in the lipid infusion rats, compared to control rats, were significantly reduced (200-240 min average: lipid infusion; 12.6±1.5 vs control; 34.0±1.6 mg/kg.min, P<0.01), declining to - 35%of the corresponding control values during the last time of the clamp (240 min: lipid infusion; 12.0±1.9 vs control;34.7±1.7 mg/kg.min, P<0.0001). At the end of clamp study,the hepatic glucose production (HGP) in control rats was significantly suppressed (88%) from 19.0±4.5 (basal) to 2.3±0.9 mg/kg.min (P<0.01). The suppressive effect of insulin on HGP was significantly blunted in the lipid-infused (P<0.05). The rate of glucose disappearance (GRd) was a slight decrease in the lipid-infused rats compared with controls during the clamp.CONCLUSION: These data suggest that lipid infusion could induces suppression of hepatic glucose production, impairs the abilities of insulin to suppress lipolysis and mediate glucose utilization in peripheral tissue. Therefore, we conclude that lipid-infusion induces an acute insulin resistance in vivo.

  18. Cinnamon intake alleviates the combined effects of dietary-induced insulin resistance and acute stress on brain mitochondria.

    Couturier, Karine; Hininger, Isabelle; Poulet, Laurent; Anderson, Richard A; Roussel, Anne-Marie; Canini, Frédéric; Batandier, Cécile

    2016-02-01

    Insulin resistance (IR), which is a leading cause of the metabolic syndrome, results in early brain function alterations which may alter brain mitochondrial functioning. Previously, we demonstrated that rats fed a control diet and submitted to an acute restraint stress exhibited a delayed mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. In this study, we evaluated the combined effects of dietary and emotional stressors as found in western way of life. We studied, in rats submitted or not to an acute stress, the effects of diet-induced IR on brain mitochondria, using a high fat/high fructose diet (HF(2)), as an IR inducer, with addition or not of cinnamon as an insulin sensitizer. We measured Ca(2+) retention capacity, respiration, ROS production, enzymatic activities and cell signaling activation. Under stress, HF(2) diet dramatically decreased the amount of Ca(2+) required to open the mPTP (13%) suggesting an adverse effect on mitochondrial survival. Cinnamon added to the diet corrected this negative effect and resulted in a partial recovery (30%). The effects related to cinnamon addition to the diet could be due to its antioxidant properties or to the observed modulation of PI3K-AKT-GSK3β and MAPK-P38 pathways or to a combination of both. These data suggest a protective effect of cinnamon on brain mitochondria against the negative impact of an HF(2) diet. Cinnamon could be beneficial to counteract deleterious dietary effects in stressed conditions. PMID:26878796

  19. Serum lipoprotein ratios as markers of insulin resistance: A study among non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome patients with impaired fasting glucose

    S Ray

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Recent data suggest that insulin resistance can predict cardiovascular disease independently of the other risk factors, such as hypertension, visceral obesity or dyslipidaemia. However, the majority of available methods to evaluate insulin resistance are complicated to operate, expensive, and time consuming. This study was undertaken to assess whether serum lipoprotein ratios could predict insulin resistance in non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome (ACS patients. Methods: Ninety non-diabetic patients with impaired fasting glucose admitted with a diagnosis of ACS were included in the study. At the time of admission fasting glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. The homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR was used for insulin resistance. The fasting serum total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels were checked, and then TC/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C ratios were calculated. The areas under the curves (AUC of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were used to compare the power of these serum lipoprotein ratios as markers. Results: Lipoprotein ratios were significantly higher in patients with HOMA-IR index > 2.5 as compared to patients with index <2.5 (P < 0.05. Both TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratios were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR (P<0.05. The area under the ROC curve of the TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratio for predicting insulin resistance was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67 to 0.93, 0.78 (95% CI, 0.65 to 0.91, respectively. Interpretation & conclusions: The findings of this study demonstrate that serum lipoprotein ratios can provide a simple means of identifying insulin resistance and can be used as markers of insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases risk in adult non-diabetic patients.

  20. Insulin Resistance and Hypertension

    张建华; 张春秀

    2002-01-01

    Summary: The insulin sensitivity in hypertensive patients with normal glucose tolerance (NGT),impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and the insulin resistance(IR) under the disorder of glucose metabolism and hypertension were studied. By glucose toler-ance test and insulin release test, insulin sensitivity index (ISI) and the ratio of area under glucosetolerance curve (AUCG) to area under insulin release curve (AUC1) were calculated and analyzed.The results showed that ISI was decreased to varying degrees in the patients with hypertension,the mildest in the group of NGT with hypertension, followed by the group of IGT without hyper-tension, the group of IGT with hypertension and DM (P=0). There was very significant differ-ence in the ratio of AUCG/AUC1 between the hypertensive patients with NGT and controls (P=0). It was concluded that a significant IR existed during the development of IGT both in hyperten-sion and nonhypertension. The increase of total insulin secretion (AUC1) was associated with non-hypertension simultaneously. IR of the hypertensive patients even existed in NGT and was wors-ened with the deterioration of glucose metabolism disorder, but the AUC1 in the HT groupchanged slightly. A relative deficiency of insulin secretion or dysfunction of β-cell of islet existed inIGT and DM of the hypertensive patients.

  1. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein activity is related to insulin resistance : impaired acute lowering by insulin in obese Type II diabetic patients

    Riemens, SC; van Tol, A; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    1998-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) have important functions in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. We determined the association of plasma CETP and PLTP activities (measured with exogenous' substrate assays) with insulin resistance, plasma trigl

  2. Molecular mechanism of insulin resistance

    Samir Bhattacharya; Debleena Dey; Sib Sankar Roy

    2007-03-01

    Free fatty acids are known to play a key role in promoting loss of insulin sensitivity, thereby causing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism involved is still unclear. In searching for the cause of the mechanism, it has been found that palmitate inhibits insulin receptor (IR) gene expression, leading to a reduced amount of IR protein in insulin target cells. PDK1-independent phosphorylation of PKCε causes this reduction in insulin receptor gene expression. One of the pathways through which fatty acid can induce insulin resistance in insulin target cells is suggested by these studies. We provide an overview of this important area, emphasizing the current status.

  3. Adipokines and Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    Yu Li; Lin Ding; Waseem Hassan; Daoud Abdelkader; Jing Shang

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Adipose tissue is now considered to be an active endocrine organ that secretes various adipokines such as adiponectin, leptin, resistin, tumour necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. Recent studies have shown that these factors might provide a molecular link between increased adiposity and impaired insulin sensitivity. Since hepatic insulin resistance plays the key role in the whole body insulin resistance, clarificatio...

  4. Insulin resistance and hepatitis C

    Manuel Romero-Gómez

    2006-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the major feature of the metabolic syndrome and depends on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. In chronic hepatitis C, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus are more often seen than in healthy controls or chronic hepatitis B patients.Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection promotes insulin resistance, mainly by increased TNF production together with enhancement of suppressor of cytokine (SOC-3); both events block PI3K and Akt phosphorylation. Two types of insulin resistance could be found in chronic hepatitis C patients: "viral" and "metabolic" insulin resistance. Insulin resistance in chronic hepatitis C is relevant because it promotes steatosis and fibrosis. The mechanisms by which insulin resistance promotes fibrosis progression include: (1) steatosis, (2) hyperleptinemia, (3) increased TNF production, (4) impaired expression of PPARy receptors. Lastly, insulin resistance has been found as a common denominator in patients difficult-to-treat like cirrhotics, overweight, HIV coinfected and Afro-American.Insulin resistance together with fibrosis and genotype has been found to be independently associated with impaired response rate to peginterferon plus ribavirin.Indeed, in genotype 1, the sustained response rate was twice (60%) in patients with HOMA ≤ 2 than patients with HOMA > 2. In experiments carried out on Huh-7cells transfected by full length HCVRNA, interferon alpha blocks HCV replication. However, when insulin (at doses of 128 μU/mL, similar that seen in the hyperinsulinemic state) was added to interferon, the ability to block HCV replication disappeared, and the PKR synthesis was abolished. In summary, hepatitis C promotes insulin resistance and insulin resistance induces interferon resistance,steatosis and fibrosis progression.

  5. Nutritional Modulation of Insulin Resistance

    Weickert, Martin O.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been proposed as the strongest single predictor for the development of Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM). Chronic oversupply of energy from food, together with inadequate physical activity, have been recognized as the most relevant factors leading to overweight, abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance, and finally T2DM. Conversely, energy reduced diets almost invariably to facilitate weight loss and reduce abdominal fat mass and insulin resistance. However, sustained weight loss i...

  6. Adipocyte lipolysis and insulin resistance.

    Morigny, Pauline; Houssier, Marianne; Mouisel, Etienne; Langin, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    Obesity-induced insulin resistance is a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Basal fat cell lipolysis (i.e., fat cell triacylglycerol breakdown into fatty acids and glycerol in the absence of stimulatory factors) is elevated during obesity and is closely associated with insulin resistance. Inhibition of adipocyte lipolysis may therefore be a promising therapeutic strategy for treating insulin resistance and preventing obesity-associated type 2 diabetes. In this review, we explore the relationship between adipose lipolysis and insulin sensitivity. After providing an overview of the components of fat cell lipolytic machinery, we describe the hypotheses that may support the causality between lipolysis and insulin resistance. Excessive circulating fatty acids may ectopically accumulate in insulin-sensitive tissues and impair insulin action. Increased basal lipolysis may also modify the secretory profile of adipose tissue, influencing whole body insulin sensitivity. Finally, excessive fatty acid release may also worsen adipose tissue inflammation, a well-known parameter contributing to insulin resistance. Partial genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of fat cell lipases in mice as well as short term clinical trials using antilipolytic drugs in humans support the benefit of fat cell lipolysis inhibition on systemic insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism, which occurs without an increase of fat mass. Modulation of fatty acid fluxes and, putatively, of fat cell secretory pattern may explain the amelioration of insulin sensitivity whereas changes in adipose tissue immune response do not seem involved. PMID:26542285

  7. Insulin and insulin signaling play a critical role in fat induction of insulin resistance in mouse

    Ning, Jie; Hong, Tao; Yang, Xuefeng; Mei, Shuang; Liu, Zhenqi; Liu, Hui-Yu; Cao, Wenhong

    2011-01-01

    The primary player that induces insulin resistance has not been established. Here, we studied whether or not fat can cause insulin resistance in the presence of insulin deficiency. Our results showed that high-fat diet (HFD) induced insulin resistance in C57BL/6 (B6) mice. The HFD-induced insulin resistance was prevented largely by the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced moderate insulin deficiency. The STZ-induced insulin deficiency prevented the HFD-induced ectopic fat accumulation and oxidative s...

  8. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... it for energy. Insulin's Role in Blood Glucose Control When blood glucose levels rise after a meal, ...

  9. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    ... use it for energy. Insulin's Role in Blood Glucose Control When blood glucose levels rise after a meal, ... also helps a person lose weight control blood glucose levels control blood pressure control cholesterol levels People in the ...

  10. Treatment of insulin resistance in uremia.

    Stefanović, V; Nesić, V; Stojimirović, B

    2003-02-01

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of uremia. As long as the hyperinsulinemia adequate to overcome the insulin resistance, glucose tolerance remains normal. In patients destined to develop type 2 diabetes, the beta cell compensatory response declines, and relative, or absolute, insulin deficiency develops. At this point glucose intolerance and eventually frank type 2 diabetes occur. Insulin resistance and concomitant hyperinsulinemia are present irrespective of the type of renal disease. Several studies have confirmed that hemodialysis (HD) treatment significantly improves insulin resistance. Both CAPD and CCPD are shown to improve insulin resistance in uremic patients. Comparing the effect of PD and HD treatment, it was found that the CCPD group has significantly higher insulin sensitivity than the HD group with the CAPD group similar to HD. Treatment of calcium and phosphate disturbances, including vitamin D therapy, significantly reduces insulin resistance in uremia. Treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) is an efficient way to increase hematocrit, to reverse cardiovascular problems and to improve insulin sensitivity. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors have been shown to improve insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia and glucose intolerance in uremic patients. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), the new insulin-sensitizing drugs, provide the proof that pharmacologic treatment of insulin resistance can be of enormous clinical benefit. The great potential of insulin resistance therapy illuminated by the TZDs will continue to catalyze research in this area directed toward the discovery of new insulin-sensitizing agents that work through other mechanisms. PMID:12653342

  11. Nutritional Modulation of Insulin Resistance

    Martin O. Weickert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance has been proposed as the strongest single predictor for the development of Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM. Chronic oversupply of energy from food, together with inadequate physical activity, have been recognized as the most relevant factors leading to overweight, abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance, and finally T2DM. Conversely, energy reduced diets almost invariably to facilitate weight loss and reduce abdominal fat mass and insulin resistance. However, sustained weight loss is generally difficult to achieve, and distinct metabolic characteristics in patients with T2DM further compromise success. Therefore, investigating the effects of modulating the macronutrient composition of isoenergetic diets is an interesting concept that may lead to additional important insights. Metabolic effects of various different dietary concepts and strategies have been claimed, but results from randomized controlled studies and particularly from longer-term-controlled interventions in humans are often lacking. However, some of these concepts are supported by recent research, at least in animal models and short-term studies in humans. This paper provides an update of the current literature regarding the role of nutrition in the modulation of insulin resistance, which includes the discussion of weight-loss-independent metabolic effects of commonly used dietary concepts.

  12. Rac1 signaling is required for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and is dysregulated in insulin-resistant murine and human skeletal muscle

    Sylow, Lykke; Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Kleinert, Maximilian;

    2013-01-01

    fed mice. In humans, insulin-stimulated PAK-activation was decreased in both acute insulin resistant (intralipid infusion) and in chronic insulin resistant states (obesity and diabetes). These findings show that Rac1 is a regulator of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and a novel candidate involved in...

  13. Insulin resistance: β-arrestin development

    Joseph T Rodgers; Pere Puigserver

    2009-01-01

    @@ Insulin resistance is simply the in-ability of insulin to elicit a physiologic response. While insulin resistance is most commonly associated with the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders such as type II diabetes and obesity, it is also a predisposing factor to a number of other diseases such as cancer and car-diovascular disease . There are just as many theories as to the cause of insulin resistance as there are insulin signal-ing molecules and it is very unclear as to which are the actual molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance in diseased states.

  14. Mitochondrial efficiency and insulin resistance.

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance, "a relative impairment in the ability of insulin to exert its effects on glucose, protein and lipid metabolism in target tissues," has many detrimental effects on metabolism and is strongly correlated to deposition of lipids in non-adipose tissues. Mitochondria are the main cellular sites devoted to ATP production and fatty acid oxidation. Therefore, a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the onset of skeletal muscle insulin resistance has been proposed and many studies have dealt with possible alteration in mitochondrial function in obesity and diabetes, both in humans and animal models. Data reporting evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in type two diabetes mellitus are numerous, even though the issue that this reduced mitochondrial function is causal in the development of the disease is not yet solved, also because a variety of parameters have been used in the studies carried out on this subject. By assessing the alterations in mitochondrial efficiency as well as the impact of this parameter on metabolic homeostasis of skeletal muscle cells, we have obtained results that allow us to suggest that an increase in mitochondrial efficiency precedes and therefore can contribute to the development of high-fat-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. PMID:25601841

  15. Differential impact of acute high-intensity exercise on circulating endothelial microparticles and insulin resistance between overweight/obese males and females.

    Cody Durrer

    Full Text Available An acute bout of exercise can improve endothelial function and insulin sensitivity when measured on the day following exercise. Our aim was to compare acute high-intensity continuous exercise (HICE to high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE on circulating endothelial microparticles (EMPs and insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese men and women.Inactive males (BMI = 30 ± 3, 25 ± 6 yr, n = 6 and females (BMI = 28 ± 2, 21 ± 3 yr, n = 7 participated in three experimental trials in a randomized counterbalanced crossover design: 1 No exercise control (Control; 2 HICE (20 min cycling @ just above ventilatory threshold; 3 HIIE (10 X 1-min @ ∼ 90% peak aerobic power. Exercise conditions were matched for external work and diet was controlled post-exercise. Fasting blood samples were obtained ∼ 18 hr after each condition. CD62E(+ and CD31(+/CD42b- EMPs were assessed by flow cytometry and insulin resistance (IR was estimated by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR.There was a significant sex X exercise interaction for CD62E(+ EMPs, CD31(+/CD42b- EMPs, and HOMA-IR (all P < 0.05. In males, both HICE and HIIE reduced EMPs compared to Control (P ≤ 0.05. In females, HICE increased CD62E(+ EMPs (P < 0.05 vs. Control whereas CD31(+/CD42b- EMPs were unaltered by either exercise type. There was a significant increase in HOMA-IR in males but a decrease in females following HIIE compared to Control (P<0.05.Overweight/obese males and females appear to respond differently to acute bouts of high-intensity exercise. A single session of HICE and HIIE reduced circulating EMPs measured on the morning following exercise in males but in females CD62E(+ EMPs were increased following HICE. Next day HOMA-IR paradoxically increased in males but was reduced in females following HIIE. Future research is needed to investigate mechanisms responsible for potential differential responses between males and females.

  16. Microvascular Recruitment in Insulin Resistance

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker

    hormone glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) in the microcirculation. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 analogs are drugs used for treatments of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes but the vascular effects of GLP-1 in vivo are elusive. Here it was shown that GLP-1 rapidly increased the microvascular recruitment...... the resonating sound from the microbubbles in the systemic circulation were recorded for determination of microvascular recruitment in designated muscle segments. Results showed that microvascular recruitment increased with insulin stimulation by ~30% in rats and ~40% in humans (study I). Furthermore......, it was observed that muscle contractions increased muscle perfusion rapidly by 3-4 fold and by 1-2 fold compared to basal and insulin, respectively, in both rat and human skeletal muscle (study I). The real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound method was applied to investigate the vaso-active effect of the incretin...

  17. Insulin Augmentation of Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion Is Impaired in Insulin-Resistant Humans

    Halperin, Florencia; Lopez, Ximena; Manning, Raquel; Kahn, C. Ronald; Kulkarni, Rohit Narayan; Goldfine, Allison Braunwald

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, the latter possibly caused by a defect in insulin signaling in β-cells. We hypothesized that insulin’s effect to potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) would be diminished in insulin-resistant persons. To evaluate the effect of insulin to modulate GSIS in insulin-resistant compared with insulin-sensitive subjects, 10 participants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), 11 with T2D, a...

  18. Insulin resistance and Alzheimer’s disease

    de la Monte, Suzanne M.

    2009-01-01

    Emerging data demonstrate pivotal roles for brain insulin resistance and insulin deficiency as mediators of cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration, particularly Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) regulate neuronal survival, energy metabolism, and plasticity, which are required for learning and memory. Hence, endogenous brain-specific impairments in insulin and IGF signaling account for the majority of AD-associated abnormalities. However, a second maj...

  19. Role of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Insulin Resistance

    Kim, Jeong-a; Wei, Yongzhong; Sowers, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Insulin resistance is characteristic of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and components of the cardiometabolic syndrome, including hypertension and dyslipidemia, that collectively contribute to a substantial risk for cardiovascular disease. Metabolic actions of insulin in classic insulin target tissues (eg, skeletal muscle, fat, and liver), as well as actions in nonclassic targets (eg, cardiovascular tissue), help to explain why insulin resistance and metabolic dysregulation are central in the patho...

  20. Pathogenesis of Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle

    Muhammad A. Abdul-Ghani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is manifested by decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and results from impaired insulin signaling and multiple post-receptor intracellular defects including impaired glucose transport, glucose phosphorylation, and reduced glucose oxidation and glycogen synthesis. Insulin resistance is a core defect in type 2 diabetes, it is also associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Recent studies have reported a mitochondrial defect in oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle in variety of insulin resistant states. In this review, we summarize the cellular and molecular defects that contribute to the development of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  1. SIRT2 regulates insulin sensitivity in insulin resistant neuronal cells.

    Arora, Amita; Dey, Chinmoy Sankar

    2016-06-10

    Insulin resistance in brain is well-associated with pathophysiology of deficits in whole-body energy metabolism, neurodegenerative diseases etc. Among the seven sirtuins, SIRT2 is the major deacetylase expressed in brain. Inhibition of SIRT2 confers neuroprotection in case of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). However, the role of this sirtuin in neuronal insulin resistance is not known. In this study, we report the role of SIRT2 in regulating insulin-sensitivity in neuronal cells in vitro. Using approaches like pharmacological inhibition of SIRT2, siRNA mediated SIRT2 knockdown and over-expression of wild-type and catalytically-mutated SIRT2, we observed that downregulation of SIRT2 ameliorated the reduced activity of AKT and increased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in insulin resistant neuro-2a cells. The data was supported by over expression of catalytically-inactive SIRT2 in insulin-resistant human SH-SY5Y neuronal cells. Data highlights a crucial role of SIRT2 in regulation of neuronal insulin sensitivity under insulin resistant condition. PMID:27163642

  2. Adipose Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, and Cardiovascular Disease

    Shah, Arti; Mehta, Nehal; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2008-01-01

    Adiposity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance are strongly implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. This article reviews the mechanisms of adipose inflammation, because these may represent therapeutic targets for insulin resistance and for prevention of metabolic and cardiovascular consequences of obesity. The initial insult in adipose inflammation and insulin resistance, mediated by macrophage recruitment and endogenous ligand ac...

  3. Antibody against the insulin receptor causes disappearance of insulin receptors in 3T3-L1 cells: a possible explanation of antibody-induced insulin resistance.

    Grunfeld, C.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a rabbit antibody induced against the rat insulin receptor (RAR) was tested using cultured 3T3-L1 fat cells. As previously seen with antibodies against the insulin receptor from patients with the type B syndrome of insulin resistance and acanthosis nigricans, RAR acutely mimicked the action of insulin by stimulating deoxyglucose uptake. After prolonged exposure of 3T3-L1 cells to RAR, insulinomimetic activity was lost and the cells became resistant to the action of insulin. This...

  4. Angiotensin and insulin resistance: conspiracy theory.

    Townsend, Raymond R

    2003-04-01

    Resistance to the metabolic effects of insulin is a contender for the short list of major cardiovascular risk factors. Since the elements of the syndrome of insulin resistance were first articulated together in 1988, numerous epidemiologic investigations and treatment endeavors have established a relationship between the metabolic disarray of impaired insulin action and cardiovascular disease. Angiotensin II, the primary effector of the renin-angiotensin system, has also achieved a place in the chronicles of cardiovascular risk factors. Conspiracy mechanisms by which angiotensin II and insulin resistance interact in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease are reviewed, with particular attention to recent developments in this engaging area of human research. PMID:12642009

  5. Insulin resistance, insulin sensitization and inflammation in polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Dhindsa G

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that 5-10% of women of reproductive age have polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS. While insulin resistance is not part of the diagnostic criteria for PCOS, its importance in the pathogenesis of PCOS cannot be denied. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance independent of total or fat-free body mass. Post-receptor defects in the action of insulin have been described in PCOS which are similar to those found in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Treatment with insulin sensitizers, metformin and thiazolidinediones, improve both metabolic and hormonal patterns and also improve ovulation in PCOS. Recent studies have shown that PCOS women have higher circulating levels of inflammatory mediators like C-reactive protein, tumour necrosis factor- , tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 . It is possible that the beneficial effect of insulin sensitizers in PCOS may be partly due to a decrease in inflammation.

  6. Insulin resistance and maximal oxygen uptake

    Seibaek, Marie; Vestergaard, Henrik; Burchardt, Hans;

    2003-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes, coronary atherosclerosis, and physical fitness all correlate with insulin resistance, but the relative importance of each component is unknown.......Type 2 diabetes, coronary atherosclerosis, and physical fitness all correlate with insulin resistance, but the relative importance of each component is unknown....

  7. Insulin resistance and diabetes in HIV infection.

    Das, Satyajit

    2011-09-01

    Insulin resistance is an important and under recognized consequence of HIV treatment. Different studies have yielded widely varying estimates of the prevalence of impaired glucose metabolism in people on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The risk increases further with hepatitis C co infection. Although Protease inhibitors (PIs) are the main drug class implicated in insulin resistance, some studies have shown an association of increased risk of diabetes with cumulative exposure of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). The effect of switching to other antiretrovirals has not been fully determined and the long-term consequences of insulin resistance in this population are not known. Treatment of established diabetes mellitus should generally follow existing guidelines. It is therefore reasonable to recommend general measures to increase insulin sensitivity in all patients infected with HIV, such as regular aerobic exercise and weight reduction for overweight persons. The present review article has the information of some recent patents regarding the insulin resistance in HIV infection. PMID:21824074

  8. LINK BETWEEN OXIDATIVE STRESS AND INSULIN RESISTANCE

    Lan-fang Li; Jian Li

    2007-01-01

    Many studies on oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and antioxidant treatment have shown that increased oxidative stress may accelerate the development of diabetic complications through the excessive glucose and free fatty acids metabolism in diabetic and insulin-resistant states. Many pathogenic mechanisms such as insulin receptor substrate phosphorylation are involved in insulin resistance induced by oxidative stress. And antioxidant treatments can show benefits in animal models of diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance. However, negative evidence from large clinical trials suggests that new and more powerful antioxidants need to be studied to demonstrate whether antioxidants can be effective in treating diabetic complications. Furthermore, it appears that oxidative stress is only one of the factors contributing to diabetic complications. Thus, antioxidant treatment would most likely be more effective if it were coupled with other treatments for diabetic complications.

  9. Selective insulin resistance in hepatocyte senescence

    Insulin resistance has been described in association with chronic liver disease for decades. Hepatocyte senescence has been demonstrated in chronic liver disease and as many as 80% of hepatocytes show a senescent phenotype in advanced liver disease. The aim of this study was to understand the role of hepatocyte senescence in the development of insulin resistance. Senescence was induced in HepG2 cells via oxidative stress. The insulin metabolic pathway was studied in control and senescent cells following insulin stimulation. GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in HepG2 cells and human liver tissue. Further, GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in three independent chronic liver disease cohorts. Signalling impairment distal to Akt in phosphorylation of AS160 and FoxO1 was evident in senescent HepG2 cells. Persistent nuclear localisation of FoxO1 was demonstrated in senescent cells despite insulin stimulation. Increased GLUT4 and decreased GLUT2 expressions were evident in senescent cells, human cirrhotic liver tissue and publically available liver disease datasets. Changes in GLUT expressions were associated with a poor clinical prognosis. In conclusion, selective insulin resistance is evident in senescent HepG2 cells and changes in GLUT expressions can be used as surrogate markers of hepatocyte senescence. - Highlights: • Senescent hepatocytes demonstrate selective insulin resistance. • GLUT changes act as markers of hepatocyte senescence and have prognostic value. • Study offers insight into long noticed intimacy of cirrhosis and insulin resistance

  10. Selective insulin resistance in hepatocyte senescence

    Aravinthan, Aloysious [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Challis, Benjamin [Institute of Metabolic Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Shannon, Nicholas [Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hoare, Matthew [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Heaney, Judith [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Foundation for Liver Research, Institute of Hepatology, London (United Kingdom); Alexander, Graeme J.M., E-mail: gja1000@doctors.org.uk [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    Insulin resistance has been described in association with chronic liver disease for decades. Hepatocyte senescence has been demonstrated in chronic liver disease and as many as 80% of hepatocytes show a senescent phenotype in advanced liver disease. The aim of this study was to understand the role of hepatocyte senescence in the development of insulin resistance. Senescence was induced in HepG2 cells via oxidative stress. The insulin metabolic pathway was studied in control and senescent cells following insulin stimulation. GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in HepG2 cells and human liver tissue. Further, GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in three independent chronic liver disease cohorts. Signalling impairment distal to Akt in phosphorylation of AS160 and FoxO1 was evident in senescent HepG2 cells. Persistent nuclear localisation of FoxO1 was demonstrated in senescent cells despite insulin stimulation. Increased GLUT4 and decreased GLUT2 expressions were evident in senescent cells, human cirrhotic liver tissue and publically available liver disease datasets. Changes in GLUT expressions were associated with a poor clinical prognosis. In conclusion, selective insulin resistance is evident in senescent HepG2 cells and changes in GLUT expressions can be used as surrogate markers of hepatocyte senescence. - Highlights: • Senescent hepatocytes demonstrate selective insulin resistance. • GLUT changes act as markers of hepatocyte senescence and have prognostic value. • Study offers insight into long noticed intimacy of cirrhosis and insulin resistance.

  11. [Insulin resistance - its causes and therapy possibilities].

    Pelikánová, Terezie

    2014-09-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is defined as a condition where normal plasma free insuconcentrations induce a reduced response of the body. In the narrower sense we understand IR as the impairment of insulin action in the target structure which may arise at any level of the insulin signalling cascade. In the clinical conditions we usually define it as the impairment of insulin action in glucose metabolism, although it is true that the impairment may concern different effects of insulin and different cell structures. The characteristic feature of IR linked to the metabolic syndrome or Type 2 diabetes is defective signalling which affects PI3-kinase branch of insulin signalling cascade. Other insulin actions depending on the signalling through the Ras complex and MAP-kinase, may not be affected. Due to compensatory hyperinsulinemia they may be even increased. The article summarizes some recent findings regarding the structure and regulation of insulin signalling cascade and analyses selected primary and secondary causes of IR which include genetic and epigenetic factors, the microRNA regulation role, metabolic, humoral and immunological factors. The detailed knowledge of the causes of IR opens possibilities of its rational treatment. This is currently based on the treatment of curable causes of IR, i.e. consistent compensation of diabetes, weight reduction, regimen arrangements (diet, physical activity), re-assessment of the need to use corticosteroids in therapy, treatment of coexisting conditions and possibly administration of metformin or pioglitazone.Key words: cytokines - insulin resistance - insulin signalling cascade. PMID:25294764

  12. A novel surrogate index for hepatic insulin resistance.

    Vangipurapu, J

    2011-03-01

    In epidemiological and genetic studies surrogate indices are needed to investigate insulin resistance in different insulin-sensitive tissues. Our objective was to develop a surrogate index for hepatic insulin resistance.

  13. Ghrelin- and GH-induced insulin resistance

    Vestergaard, Esben Thyssen; Krag, Morten B; Poulsen, Morten M;

    2013-01-01

    Supraphysiological levels of ghrelin and GH induce insulin resistance. Serum levels of retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) correlate inversely with insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. We aimed to determine whether ghrelin and GH affect RBP4 levels in human subjects....

  14. [The polycystic ovary syndrome and insulin resistance].

    Kreze, A; Hrnciar, J; Dobáková, M; Pekarová, E

    1997-10-01

    The insulin resistance syndrome and the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) appear to have some following coincidences: the existence of subclinical acanthosis nigricans in PCOS hyperinsulinemic women, correlation of insulin levels and free testosterone, insulin-like growth factor I binding protein (IGFIBP), and sex-hormone binding globulin. Insulin and IGFI act synergically with luteinizing hormone increasing the activity of cytochrome P450c17 and its enzymatic activity in the adrenals. The decrease in IGFI level and IGFI receptors in the ovarian granulosa cells reduce the steroids aromatisation. The increased expression of IGFI receptors in the theca cells favours the androgens' synthesis. Long-term insulin therapy results in an increase in ovary volume and the blood androgens levels. The deterioration of insulin resistance in PSOC women progresses also by the reduction of type I of skeletal muscle fibres which are sensitive to insulin, and the increase of type II fibres which are resistant to insulin in hyperandrogenemia. Testosterone deteriorates the skeletal as well as hepatic insulin sensitivity by both its facilitating effect on lipolysis and the increase of free fatty acids. Abdominal obesity seen in PCOS and insulin resistance is composed by adipocytes with glucocorticoid receptors, which after cortisol stimulation activate the lipoprotein lipase and fat accumulation. Gynoid obesity with the preferential aromatisation of steroids is not evolved because of the low estrogens and progesterone levels in PCOS. Low progesterone levels (with anticortisol effect) support the development of abdominal obesity. Ultimately, the early peak of insulin secretion (4-8 min) in PCOS is higher. This fact should testify a certain diabetic disposition. (Ref. 37.) PMID:9490171

  15. Mechanisms Linking Inflammation to Insulin Resistance

    Li Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is now widespread around the world. Obesity-associated chronic low-grade inflammation is responsible for the decrease of insulin sensitivity, which makes obesity a major risk factor for insulin resistance and related diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndromes. The state of low-grade inflammation is caused by overnutrition which leads to lipid accumulation in adipocytes. Obesity might increase the expression of some inflammatory cytokines and activate several signaling pathways, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance by interfering with insulin signaling and action. It has been suggested that specific factors and signaling pathways are often correlated with each other; therefore, both of the fluctuation of cytokines and the status of relevant signaling pathways should be considered during studies analyzing inflammation-related insulin resistance. In this paper, we discuss how these factors and signaling pathways contribute to insulin resistance and the therapeutic promise targeting inflammation in insulin resistance based on the latest experimental studies.

  16. Anthropometric indicators of insulin resistance.

    Vasques, Ana Carolina; Rosado, Lina; Rosado, Gilberto; Ribeiro, Rita de Cassia; Franceschini, Sylvia; Geloneze, Bruno

    2010-07-01

    Some studies have analyzed the efficacy of anthropometric indicators in predicting insulin resistance (IR), for they are more economic and accessible. In this study, the objective was to discuss the measures and anthropometric indices that have been associated with IR. A bibliographic review was done, based on Scielo, Science Direct and Pubmed. Among these studies, waist and sagittal abdominal diameter presented better predictive capacity for IR, with more consistent results. The waist-to-thigh, waist-to-size, neck-to-thigh ratios, the conicity and the sagittal index have showed positive results; nevertheless, more studies are necessary to consolidate them as predictors to IR. The obtained results, with the use of body mass index and of the waist-to-hip ratio, were inconsistent. In the Brazilian population, the realization of studies evaluating the performance of these indicators in predicting IR is suggested, since the results of the studies conducted in other populations are not always applicable to ours, due to ethnic differences resulting from the great miscegenation in the country. PMID:20694396

  17. Managing insulin resistance: role of liraglutide

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Sanjay Kalra1, Bharti Kalra1, Satish Kumar2, Amit Sharma11Department of Endocrinology, Bharti Hospital, Karnal, India; 2Department of Clinical Operations, Excel Life Sciences, Noida, IndiaAbstract: Diabetes mellitus is part of the insulin resistance syndrome, which includes hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity as its other components. Conversely, insulin resistance is a major pathophysiologic factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. It makes sense, therefore, to choose an anti-diabeti...

  18. Hypoadiponectinemia in Obesity: Association with Insulin Resistance

    Prakash, Jai; Mittal, Balraj; Awasthi, Shally; Agarwal, C.G.; Srivastava, Neena

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is risk factor for insulin resistance, diabetes, and other chronic diseases. Adiponectin, an adipose-specific protein with antiatherogenic and antiinflammatory effects, were found to be associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and insulin resistance. Our aim to identify possible relationships between circulating adiponectin and obesity as well as obesity related phenotypes. A total of 642, obese and non-obese individuals were included in this cross-sectional study. Hormone and glucos...

  19. Acute knockdown of the insulin receptor or its substrates Irs1 and 2 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes suppresses adiponectin production

    Groeneveld, Matthijs P; Brierley, Gemma V.; Rocha, Nuno M.; Kenneth Siddle; Semple, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of function of the insulin receptor (INSR) in humans produces severe insulin resistance. Unlike “common” insulin resistance, this is associated with elevated plasma levels of the insulin-sensitising, adipose-derived protein adiponectin. The underlying mechanism for this paradox is unclear, and it is at odds with the acute stimulation of adiponectin secretion reported on insulin treatment of cultured adipocytes. Given recent evidence for ligand-independent actions of the INSR, we used a l...

  20. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and insulin resistance in children

    Mikage; Arata; Junya; Nakajima; Shigeo; Nishimata; Tomomi; Nagata; Hisashi; Kawashima

    2014-01-01

    Various pathological conditions can cause fatty liver in children. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis(NASH) in children has been known since 1983. However, NASH diagnosed in childhood does not have a favorable outcome.The pathological characteristics of NASH are significantly different between children and adults. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD)/NASH is accompanied by insulin resistance, which plays a pivotal role in its pathophysiology in both children and adults. In NASH,a “two-hit” model involving triglyceride accumulation(first hit) and liver damage(second hit) has been accepted. Insulin resistance was found to correlate with changes in fat levels; however, it did not correlate with fibrosis or NAFLD activity score in children. Therefore,insulin resistance may be important in the first hit.Because there is obvious familial clustering in NASH,genetic predisposition as well as environmental factors including diet might be the second hit of NAFLD/NASH.

  1. Role of resistin in diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance

    Muse, Evan D.; Obici, Silvana; Bhanot, Sanjay; Monia, Brett P.; McKay, Robert A.; Rajala, Michael W.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Rossetti, Luciano

    2004-01-01

    Resistin is an adipose-derived hormone postulated to link adiposity to insulin resistance. To determine whether resistin plays a causative role in the development of diet-induced insulin resistance, we lowered circulating resistin levels in mice by use of a specific antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASO) directed against resistin mRNA and assessed in vivo insulin action by the insulin-clamp technique. After 3 weeks on a high-fat (HF) diet, mice displayed severe insulin resistance associated wit...

  2. Patients with psoriasis are insulin resistant

    Gyldenløve, Mette; Storgaard, Heidi; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2015-01-01

    differences between groups in plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon during the clamp. LIMITATIONS: The classic hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique does not allow assessment of endogenous glucose production. CONCLUSION: Patients with psoriasis were more insulin resistant compared with...... have used suboptimal methodology. The hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp remains the gold standard for quantifying whole-body insulin sensitivity. OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate if normal glucose-tolerant patients with psoriasis exhibit impaired insulin sensitivity. METHODS: Three......-hour hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps were performed in 16 patients with moderate to severe, untreated psoriasis and 16 matched control subjects. RESULTS: The 2 groups were similar with regard to age, gender, body mass index, body composition, physical activity, fasting plasma glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin...

  3. Importance of hepatitis C virus-associated insulin resistance:Therapeutic strategies for insulin sensitization

    Takumi; Kawaguchi; Michio; Sata

    2010-01-01

    Insulin resistance is one of the pathological features in patients with hepatitis C virus(HCV) infection.Generally,persistence of insulin resistance leads to an increase in the risk of life-threatening complications such as cardiovascular diseases.However,these complications are not major causes of death in patients with HCV-associated insulin resistance.Indeed,insulin resistance plays a crucial role in the development of various complications and events associated with HCV infection.Mounting evidence indic...

  4. Interleukin-10 Prevents Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance by Attenuating Macrophage and Cytokine Response in Skeletal Muscle

    Hong, Eun-Gyoung; Ko, Hwi Jin; Cho, You-Ree; Kim, Hyo-Jeong; Ma, Zhexi; Yu, Tim Y.; Friedline, Randall H; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn; Finberg, Robert; Matthew A Fischer; Granger, Erica L.; Norbury, Christopher C.; Hauschka, Stephen D.; Philbrick, William M.; Lee, Chun-Geun

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin resistance is a major characteristic of type 2 diabetes and is causally associated with obesity. Inflammation plays an important role in obesity-associated insulin resistance, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Interleukin (IL)-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine with lower circulating levels in obese subjects, and acute treatment with IL-10 prevents lipid-induced insulin resistance. We examined the role of IL-10 in glucose homeostasis using transgenic mice with m...

  5. Insulin resistance, steatosis and hepatitis C virus

    Mangia, Alessandra; Ripoli, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an increased occurrence of metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance (IR) and steatosis in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. IR is believed to represent one of the central clinical features of the “metabolic syndrome” and the major pathogenetic factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. In patients with chronic HCV hepatitis, IR may have several dangerous consequences such as accelerated progression of liver fibrosis, resistance to antiviral th...

  6. Advances in TCM Research of Insulin Resistance

    尚文斌; 程海波

    2001-01-01

    @@Insulin resistance (IR) refers to subnormal response to a certain amount of insulin and is the most characteristic phenomenon in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). It is also an element of the pathogenic mechanism shared with obesity, systemic hypertension, abnormal lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis. In recent years, studies on its treatment with traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) have gradually been carried out and the following is a report of them. Mechanisms of Diabetic IR in TCM Terms Action of insulin antagonizing hormones in peripheral tissues is one of the causes of diabetic IR. Cyclic nucleosides cAMP and cGMP, important intracellular messengers, are considered to be the second messenger of insulin, and cAMP is related to the amount of insulin receptors. Early in 1980s, some authors investigated the relationship among the symptoms of diabetes and such hormones and cAMP/cGMP ratio. Although they did not give due attention to IR, their studies provided evidences for differentiation of symptoms and signs in IR typing.

  7. Acrolein metabolites, diabetes and insulin resistance.

    Feroe, Aliya G; Attanasio, Roberta; Scinicariello, Franco

    2016-07-01

    Acrolein is a dietary and environmental pollutant that has been associated in vitro to dysregulate glucose transport. We investigated the association of urinary acrolein metabolites N-acetyl-S-(3-hydroxypropyl)-l-cysteine (3-HPMA) and N-acetyl-S-(carboxyethyl)-l-cysteine (CEMA) and their molar sum (∑acrolein) with diabetes using data from investigated 2027 adults who participated in the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). After excluding participants taking insulin or other diabetes medication we, further, investigated the association of the compounds with insulin resistance (n=850), as a categorical outcome expressed by the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR>2.6). As secondary analyses, we investigated the association of the compounds with HOMA-IR, HOMA-β, fasting insulin and fasting plasma glucose. The analyses were performed using urinary creatinine as independent variable in the models, and, as sensitivity analyses, the compounds were used as creatinine corrected variables. Diabetes as well as insulin resistance (defined as HOMA-IR>2.6) were positively associated with the 3-HPMA, CEMA and ∑Acrolein with evidence of a dose-response relationship (p<0.05). The highest 3rd and 4th quartiles of CEMA compared to the lowest quartile were significantly associated with higher HOMA-IR, HOMA-β and fasting insulin with a dose-response relationship. The highest 3rd quartile of 3-HPMA and ∑Acrolein were positively and significantly associated with HOMA-IR, HOMA-β and fasting insulin. These results suggest a need of further studies to fully understand the implications of acrolein with type 2 diabetes and insulin. PMID:26991531

  8. Adipokines mediate inflammation and insulin resistance

    Jeffrey E. Pessin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available For many years, adipose tissue was considered as an inert energy storage organ that accumulates and stores triacylglycerols during energy excess and releases fatty acids in times of systemic energy need. However, over the last two decades adipose tissue depots have been established as highly active endocrine and metabolically important organs that modulate energy expenditure and glucose homeostasis. In rodents, brown adipose tissue plays an essential role in non-shivering thermogenesis and in energy dissipation that can serve to protect against diet-induced obesity. White adipose tissue collectively referred too as either subcutaneous or visceral adipose tissue is responsible for the secretion of an array of signaling molecules, termed adipokines. These adipokines function as classic circulating hormones to communicate with other organs including brain, liver, muscle, the immune system and adipose tissue itself. The dysregulation of adipokines has been implicated in obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Recently, inflammatory responses in adipose tissue have been shown as a major mechanism to induce peripheral tissue insulin resistance. Although leptin and adiponectin regulate feeding behavior and energy expenditure, these adipokines are also involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses. Adipose tissue secrete various pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines to modulate inflammation and insulin resistance. In obese humans and rodent models, the expression of pro-inflammatory adipokines is enhanced to induce insulin resistance. Collectively, these findings have suggested that obesity-induced insulin resistance may result, at least in part, from an imbalance in the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines. Thus we will review the recent progress regarding the physiological and molecular functions of adipokines in the obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance with perspectives on future directions.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Resistance Development

    Vsevolod Arsen'evich Tkachuk

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance (IR is a phenomenon associated with an impaired ability of insulin to stimulate glucose uptake by target cells and to reduce the blood glucose level. A response increase in insulin secretion by the pancreas and hyperinsulinemia are compensatory reactions of the body. The development of IR leads to the inability of target cells to respond to insulin that results in developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and metabolic syndrome. For this reason, the metabolic syndrome is defined in practice as a combination of IR with one or more pathologies such as T2DM, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and some others. However, a combination of high blood glucose and insulin levels always serves as its physiological criterion.IR should be considered as a systemic failure of the endocrine regulation in the body. Physiological causes of IR are diverse. The main ones are nutritional overload and accumulation of certain lipids and their metabolites in cells, low physical activity, chronic inflammation and stress of various nature, including oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress (impairment of damaged protein degradation in the cell. Recent studies have demonstrated that these physiological mechanisms likely act through a single intracellular scenario. This is the impairment of signal transduction from the insulin receptor to its targets via the negative feedback mechanism in intracellular insulin-dependent signaling cascades.This review describes the physiological and intracellular mechanisms of insulin action and focuses on their abnormalities upon IR development. Finally, feasible trends in early molecular diagnosis and therapy of IR are discussed.

  10. Insulin resistance alters islet morphology in nondiabetic humans

    Mezza, Teresa; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Sorice, Gian Pio;

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by poor glucose uptake in metabolic tissues and manifests when insulin secretion fails to cope with worsening insulin resistance. In addition to its effects on skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue metabolism, it is evident that insulin resistance also affects...... pancreatic β-cells. To directly examine the alterations that occur in islet morphology as part of an adaptive mechanism to insulin resistance, we evaluated pancreas samples obtained during pancreatoduodenectomy from nondiabetic subjects who were insulin-resistant or insulin-sensitive. We also compared...... insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and incretin levels between the two groups. We report an increased islet size and an elevated number of β- and α-cells that resulted in an altered β-cell-to-α-cell area in the insulin- resistant group. Our data in this series of studies suggest that neogenesis from...

  11. A new antihypertensive drug ameliorates insulin resistance

    Yan-xia LIU

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR)is defined as decreased sensitivity and/or responsiveness to insulin that promote glucose disposal.A growing body of clinical and epidemiologic evidence indicates that essential hypertension and IR often coexist[1].Approximately 50 percent of patients with hypertension can be considered to have IR and hyperinsulinemia[1].This inextricable linkage between hypertension and IR has been identified to increase the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD)and new onset of type Ⅱ diabetes that is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in this clinical syndrome[2].However,the driving force linking IR and hypertension remains to be fully elucidated.

  12. Relationship between adiponectin, obesity and insulin resistance

    Guilherme Ardenghi Balsan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: the conditions of obesity and overweight pose a major risk for a number of comorbidities, including clinical syndromes resulting from atherosclerotic disease. Recent studies strongly indicate that adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ that secretes bioactive factors such as adipokines. Adiponectin appears to have a regulatory role in the mechanism of insulin resistance and in the development of atherosclerosis. This systematic review aims to evaluate the anti-atherogenic effects of adiponectin and its properties to improve and mimic metabolic and vascular actions of insulin and its influence on endothelial function. Methods: a qualitative, exploratory and literature review was performed in the PubMed, Portal Capes and Scielo databases using as key-words "adiponectin", "obesity", "insulin resistance", "anti-inflammatory", "therapeutic strategies" and "future prospects". Results: evidence suggests that adiponectin has anti-atherogenic properties with anti-inflammatory effects on the vascular wall. Moreover, it modifies the vascular intracellular signaling and has indirect antioxidant effects on the human myocardium. On the other hand, there are studies suggesting that increased levels of adiponectin are paradoxically associated with a worse prognosis in heart failure syndrome, although the mechanisms are not clear. Conclusion: it is not clear whether adiponectin levels have any clinical significance for risk stratification in cardiovascular disease or if they simply reflect the activation of complex underlying mechanisms. Changes in lifestyle and some drug treatments for hypertension and coronary heart disease have shown significant effect to increase adiponectin levels, and simultaneously decrease in insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction.

  13. South Asian diets and insulin resistance.

    Misra, Anoop; Khurana, Lokesh; Isharwal, Sumit; Bhardwaj, Swati

    2009-02-01

    A role of dietary nutrients in relation to insulin resistance has been suggested but conclusive evidence in human beings is lacking. Asian Indians and South Asians are prone to develop insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. In the present paper, data pertaining to nutrient intake, insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Indians and South Asians have been reviewed. In these populations, several dietary imbalances have been reported: low intake of MUFA, n-3 PUFA and fibre, and high intake of fats, saturated fats, carbohydrates and trans-fatty acids (mostly related to the widespread use of Vanaspati, a hydrogenated oil). Some data suggest that these nutrient imbalances are associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and subclinical inflammation in South Asians. Specifically, in children and young individuals, a high intake of n-6 PUFA is correlated with fasting hyperinsulinaemia, and in adults, high-carbohydrate meal consumption was reported to cause hyperinsulinaemia, postprandial hyperglycaemia and hypertriacylglycerolaemia. Dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFA leads to an improved lipid profile but not insulin sensitivity. Inadequate maternal nutrition in pregnancy, low birth weight and childhood 'catch-up' obesity may be important for the development of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. Even in rural populations, who usually consume traditional frugal diets, there is an increasing prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and the metabolic syndrome due to changes in diets and lifestyle. Nationwide community intervention programmes aimed at creating awareness about the consequences of unhealthy food choices and replacing them by healthy food choices are urgently needed in urban and rural populations in India, other countries in South Asia and in migrant South Asians. PMID:18842159

  14. Markers of inflammation and cellular adhesion molecules in relation to insulin resistance in nondiabetic elderly: the Rotterdam study

    A.E. Hak (Liesbeth); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); C.D. Stehouwer (Coen); J. Meijer (John); A.J. Kiliaan (Amanda); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractInsulin resistance, which is highly prevalent in the elderly, is suggested to be accompanied by an increased acute phase response. Until now, it is unclear whether cellular adhesion molecules are involved in the clustering of insulin resistance. In the present study, we

  15. Early Clinical Detection of Pharmacologic Response in Insulin Action in a Nondiabetic Insulin-Resistant Population

    Sudha S. Shankar, MD

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Significant changes in insulin action across multiple insulin-sensitive tissues can be detected within 2 weeks of initiation of insulin-sensitizing therapy with pioglitazone in obese patients with nondiabetic insulin resistance. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01115712.

  16. Defective insulin response of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase in insulin-resistant humans.

    Kida, Y; Nyomba, B L; Bogardus, C; Mott, D M

    1991-01-01

    Insulin-stimulated glycogen synthase activity in human muscle correlates with insulin-mediated glucose disposal and is reduced in insulin-resistant subjects. Inhibition of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase) is considered as a possible mechanism of insulin action for glycogen synthase activation. In this study, we investigated the time course of insulin action on human muscle A-kinase activity during a 2-h insulin infusion in 13 insulin-sensitive (group S) and 7 insulin-resista...

  17. Insulin-induced cytokine production in macrophages causes insulin resistance in hepatocytes.

    Manowsky, Julia; Camargo, Rodolfo Gonzalez; Kipp, Anna P; Henkel, Janin; Püschel, Gerhard P

    2016-06-01

    Overweight and obesity are associated with hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and a low-grade inflammation. Although hyperinsulinemia is generally thought to result from an attempt of the β-cell to compensate for insulin resistance, there is evidence that hyperinsulinaemia itself may contribute to the development of insulin resistance and possibly the low-grade inflammation. To test this hypothesis, U937 macrophages were exposed to insulin. In these cells, insulin induced expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, CCL2, and OSM. The insulin-elicited induction of IL-1β was independent of the presence of endotoxin and most likely mediated by an insulin-dependent activation of NF-κB. Supernatants of the insulin-treated U937 macrophages rendered primary cultures of rat hepatocytes insulin resistant; they attenuated the insulin-dependent induction of glucokinase by 50%. The cytokines contained in the supernatants of insulin-treated U937 macrophages activated ERK1/2 and IKKβ, resulting in an inhibitory serine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor substrate. In addition, STAT3 was activated and SOCS3 induced, further contributing to the interruption of the insulin receptor signal chain in hepatocytes. These results indicate that hyperinsulinemia per se might contribute to the low-grade inflammation prevailing in overweight and obese patients and thereby promote the development of insulin resistance particularly in the liver, because the insulin concentration in the portal circulation is much higher than in all other tissues. PMID:27094035

  18. Methodological and Clinical Studies on Insulin Resistance in Childhood

    Rössner, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a condition in which adequate amounts of insulin fail to give an adequate response in target tissues. This thesis is based on five different studies, aiming to investigate different aspects of insulin resistance and the assessment methods thereof in children and in adults. The rationale for performing these studies is that insulin resistance is a key component of the metabolic syndrome and crucial in the development of type 2 diabetes. Concomitant with the in...

  19. Successful Treatment of Type B Insulin Resistance With Rituximab

    Manikas, Emmanouil-Dimitrios; Isaac, Iona; Semple, Robert K.; Malek, Rana; Führer, Dagmar; Moeller, Lars C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Type B insulin resistance is a very rare disease caused by autoantibodies against the insulin receptor. The mortality of type B insulin resistance is high (>50%), and management of this disease is not yet standardized. We report the successful treatment of a patient with type B insulin resistance with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone. Case Description: A 45-year-old woman presented with unintended weight loss of 20 kg, unusually widespread acanthosis nigricans, and glucose...

  20. Preliminary evidence for obesity-associated insulin resistance in adolescents without elevations of inflammatory cytokines

    Cohen Jessica I

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To ascertain whether the associations between obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance established in human adult studies are found among adolescents. Methods We contrasted 36 obese and 24 lean youth on fasting glucose, insulin levels, lipid profile, hemoglobin A1C, markers of hepatic function, white blood cell count, C-reactive protein (CRP and fibrinogen levels. The cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-4 and the adipokines leptin, resistin, and adiponectin were also compared between the two groups. The fasting glucose and insulin values were used to estimate the degree of insulin resistance with the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. T-tests and correlations were run to examine group differences and associations between groups. In addition, regression analyses were used to ascertain whether the markers of inflammation were predictive of the degree of insulin resistance. Results Although obese adolescents had clear evidence of insulin resistance, only CRP, fibrinogen and leptin were elevated; there were no group differences in pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines nor adiponectin and resistin. Anthropometric measures of obesity and level of insulin resistance were highly correlated to the acute phase reactants CRP and fibrinogen; however, the degree of insulin resistance was not predicted by the pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokine markers. Obese adolescents had higher white blood cell counts. In addition they had higher circulating alanine aminotransferase concentrations and lower circulating albumin and total protein than lean adolescents, possibly as a result of hepatocyte damage from fatty liver. Conclusion Unlike rodent or adult studies, we found that wide-spread systemic inflammation is not necessarily associated with insulin resistance among adolescents. This finding does not support the current paradigm that the associations between obesity and insulin resistance are, to a

  1. Effects of acute and chronic attenuation of postprandial hyperglycemia on postglucose-load endothelial function in insulin resistant individuals: is stimulation of first phase insulin secretion beneficial for the endothelial function?

    Major-Pedersen, A; Ihlemann, N; Hermann, T S;

    2008-01-01

    -resistant subjects with the Flow-Mediated-Dilation (FMD) technique. We randomized subjects to intervention/control group, and examined the acute and chronic effect of nateglinide, an oral antidiabetic drug of rapid action. In the intervention group, postoral glucose-load (post-OGL) FMD delta values deteriorated when......-day "Closing day", p=0.001]. Post-OGL changes in the control group were nonsignificant both at Baseline and on Closing day. After a single dose of nateglinide "Acute day", post-OGL FMD deterioration was abolished. There was an increment in post-OGL FMD delta values most significant at 2 h post-OGL (p=0....... We found no relationship between postprandial hyperglycemia and post-OGL FMD....

  2. Vascular Stiffness in Insulin Resistance and Obesity

    Guanghong eJia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes are associated with a substantially increased prevalence of vascular fibrosis and stiffness, with attendant increased risk of cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Although the underlying mechanisms and mediators of vascular stiffness are not well understood, accumulating evidence supports the role of metabolic and immune dysregulation related to increased adiposity, activation of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system, reduced bioavailable nitric oxide, increased vascular extracellular matrix (ECM and ECM remodeling in the pathogenesis of vascular stiffness. This review will give a brief overview of the relationship between obesity, insulin resistance and increased vascular stiffness to provide a contemporary understanding of the proposed underlying mechanisms and potential therapeutic strategies.

  3. Obesity, Insulin Resistance and Cancer Risk

    Jee, Sun Ha; Kim, Hee Jin; Lee, Jakyoung

    2005-01-01

    Obesity is a known cause of metabolic syndrome which includes Type II diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. It is well documented that insulin resistance contributes to the mortality and the incidence of metabolic syndromes including central obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia and hypertension. Both obesity and diabetes are emerging topics for researchers to consider as having a possible causal association with cancer since the two factors have been viewed as risk factors for cancer. The...

  4. Mitochondrial Deficiency Is Associated With Insulin Resistance

    Goodpaster, Bret H.

    2013-01-01

    The specific cellular underpinnings or mechanisms of insulin resistance (IR) are not clear. Here I present evidence to support a causal association between mitochondrial energetics and IR. A large body of literature indicates that mitochondrial capacity for oxidative metabolism is lower in human obesity and type 2 diabetes. Whether or not mitochondria play a causal role in IR is hotly debated. First, IR can be caused by many factors, many of which may or may not involve mitochondria. These in...

  5. Adrenocortical tumors and insulin resistance: What is the first step?

    Altieri, Barbara; Tirabassi, Giacomo; Casa, Silvia Della; Ronchi, Cristina L; Balercia, Giancarlo; Orio, Francesco; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Colao, Annamaria; Muscogiuri, Giovanna

    2016-06-15

    The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying the onset of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) are still largely unknown. Recently, more attention has been paid to the role of insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system on general tumor development and progression. Increased levels of insulin, IGF-1 and IGF-2 are associated with tumor cell growth and increased risk of cancer promotion and progression in patients with type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia may play a role in adrenal tumor growth through the activation of insulin and IGF-1 receptors. Interestingly, apparently non-functioning ACTs are often associated with a high prevalence of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. However, it is unclear if ACT develops from a primary insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia or if insulin resistance is only secondary to the slight cortisol hypersecretion by ACT. The aim of this review is to summarize the current evidence regarding the relationship between hyperinsulinemia and adrenocortical tumors. PMID:26637955

  6. Insulin signaling and glucose transport in insulin resistant human skeletal muscle

    Karlsson, Håkan KR

    2005-01-01

    Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is a hallmark feature of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate downstream intermediates in the insulin signaling pathway in an attempt to characterize the molecular mechanism of skeletal muscle insulin resistance in Type 2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from healthy and Type 2 diabetic subjects before and after an in vivo hyperinsulinemic infusion. Insulin infusion increased the...

  7. Ultrastructure of the liver microcirculation influences hepatic and systemic insulin activity and provides a mechanism for age-related insulin resistance.

    Mohamad, Mashani; Mitchell, Sarah Jayne; Wu, Lindsay Edward; White, Melanie Yvonne; Cordwell, Stuart James; Mach, John; Solon-Biet, Samantha Marie; Boyer, Dawn; Nines, Dawn; Das, Abhirup; Catherine Li, Shi-Yun; Warren, Alessandra; Hilmer, Sarah Nicole; Fraser, Robin; Sinclair, David Andrew; Simpson, Stephen James; de Cabo, Rafael; Le Couteur, David George; Cogger, Victoria Carroll

    2016-08-01

    While age-related insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are usually considered to be secondary to changes in muscle, the liver also plays a key role in whole-body insulin handling and its role in age-related changes in insulin homeostasis is largely unknown. Here, we show that patent pores called 'fenestrations' are essential for insulin transfer across the liver sinusoidal endothelium and that age-related loss of fenestrations causes an impaired insulin clearance and hyperinsulinemia, induces hepatic insulin resistance, impairs hepatic insulin signaling, and deranges glucose homeostasis. To further define the role of fenestrations in hepatic insulin signaling without any of the long-term adaptive responses that occur with aging, we induced acute defenestration using poloxamer 407 (P407), and this replicated many of the age-related changes in hepatic glucose and insulin handling. Loss of fenestrations in the liver sinusoidal endothelium is a hallmark of aging that has previously been shown to cause deficits in hepatic drug and lipoprotein metabolism and now insulin. Liver defenestration thus provides a new mechanism that potentially contributes to age-related insulin resistance. PMID:27095270

  8. Fructose, insulin resistance, and metabolic dyslipidemia

    Adeli Khosrow

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity and type 2 diabetes are occurring at epidemic rates in the United States and many parts of the world. The "obesity epidemic" appears to have emerged largely from changes in our diet and reduced physical activity. An important but not well-appreciated dietary change has been the substantial increase in the amount of dietary fructose consumption from high intake of sucrose and high fructose corn syrup, a common sweetener used in the food industry. A high flux of fructose to the liver, the main organ capable of metabolizing this simple carbohydrate, perturbs glucose metabolism and glucose uptake pathways, and leads to a significantly enhanced rate of de novo lipogenesis and triglyceride (TG synthesis, driven by the high flux of glycerol and acyl portions of TG molecules from fructose catabolism. These metabolic disturbances appear to underlie the induction of insulin resistance commonly observed with high fructose feeding in both humans and animal models. Fructose-induced insulin resistant states are commonly characterized by a profound metabolic dyslipidemia, which appears to result from hepatic and intestinal overproduction of atherogenic lipoprotein particles. Thus, emerging evidence from recent epidemiological and biochemical studies clearly suggests that the high dietary intake of fructose has rapidly become an important causative factor in the development of the metabolic syndrome. There is an urgent need for increased public awareness of the risks associated with high fructose consumption and greater efforts should be made to curb the supplementation of packaged foods with high fructose additives. The present review will discuss the trends in fructose consumption, the metabolic consequences of increased fructose intake, and the molecular mechanisms leading to fructose-induced lipogenesis, insulin resistance and metabolic dyslipidemia.

  9. Effects of sleeve gastrectomy on insulin resistance

    CĂTOI, ADRIANA FLORINELA; PÂRVU, ALINA; MIRONIUC, AUREL; GALEA, ROMEO FLORIN; MUREŞAN, ADRIANA; BIDIAN, CRISTINA; POP, IOANA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Obesity is a major risk factor for the onset of insulin resistance (IR), hyperinsulinemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) Evidence data has proven that beyond important weight loss bariatric surgery especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and bilio-pancreatic diversion (BPD) leads to significant early reduction of insulinemia and of IR calculated through the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR), independently of fat mass decrease. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is now used as a sole weight loss operation with good results. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the early changes of fasting blood glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR in a group of morbidly obese (MO) patients i.e. at 7, 30 and 90 days after SG. Methods The study included 20 MO patients (7 male and 13 female) submitted to SG. Anthropometrical (weight, body mass index –BMI, percent excess BMI loss -%EBMIL) and biochemical (plasma glucose, insulin and calculated HOMA-IR ) evaluation were performed before and at 7, 30 and 90 days after SG. In addition, a second group of 10 normal weight healthy subjects with a BMI ranging form 19 kg/m2 to 23.14 kg/m2, matched for age and gender was investigated. Results Plasma glucose (p=0.018), insulin (p=0.004) and HOMA-IR (p=0.006) values were statistically different between the studied groups. After surgery, at every follow-up point, there were statistically different weight and BMI mean values relative to the operation day (p<0.003). BMI, decreased at 7 days (estimated reduction=2.79; 95% CI:[2.12;3.45]), at 30 days (estimated reduction=5.65; 95% CI:[3.57;7.73]) and at 90 days (estimated reduction=10.88; 95% CI:[7.35;14.41]) respectively after SG. We noted a tendency toward statistical significant change of mean insulin values at 7 days after surgery (corrected p=0.075), no statistical change at 30 days (corrected p=0.327) and a significant change at 90 days (corrected p=0.027) after SG as compared to baseline. There was a

  10. Serum Insulin, Proinsulin and Proinsulin/Insulin Ratio in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: As an Index of β-Cell Function or Insulin Resistance

    Kim, Nan Hee; Kim, Dong Lim; Choi, Kyung Mook; Baik, Sei Hyun; Choi, Dong Seop

    2000-01-01

    Background Although insulin resistance and decreased insulin secretion are characteristics of established type 2 DM, which of these metabolic abnormalities is the primary determinant of type 2 DM is controversial. It is also not well known how insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction influence serum insulin, proinsulin, proinsulin/insulin ratio in type 2 DM. Methods We compared serum insulin, proinsulin and proinsulin/insulin ratio in type 2 diabetic patients and control subjects. We also...

  11. Calcineurin inhibitors acutely improve insulin sensitivity without affecting insulin secretion in healthy human volunteers

    Øzbay, Aygen; Møller, Niels; Juhl, Claus;

    2012-01-01

    tacrolimus has been attributed to both beta cell dysfunction and impaired insulin sensitivity. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS: This is the first trial to investigate beta cell function and insulin sensitivity using gold standard methodology in healthy human volunteers treated with clinically relevant doses of...... ciclosporin and tacrolimus. We document that both drugs acutely increase insulin sensitivity, while first phase and pulsatile insulin secretion remain unaffected. This study demonstrates that ciclosporin and tacrolimus have similar acute effects on glucose metabolism in healthy humans. AIM The introduction of...... of NODAT remains unclear. We sought to compare the impact of CsA and Tac on glucose metabolism in human subjects. METHODS: Ten healthy men underwent 5 h infusions of CsA, Tac and saline in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. During infusion glucose metabolism was investigated using following...

  12. A paradox: Insulin inhibits expression and secretion of resistin which induces insulin resistance

    Feng Liu; Mei Guo; Rong-Hua Chen; Xi-Rong Guo; Hong-Qi Fan; Jie Qiu; Bin Wang; Min Zhang; Nan Gu; Chun-Mei Zhang; Li Fei; Xiao-Qing Pan

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To confirm whether insulin regulates resistin expression and secretion during differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and the relationship of resistin with insulin resistance both in vivo and in vitro. METHODS: Supernatant resistin was measured during differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. L6 rat myoblasts and hepatoma cell line H4IIE were used to confirm the cellular function of resistin. Diet-induced obese rats were used as an insulin resistance model to study the relationship of resistin with insulin resistance.RESULTS: Resistin expression and secretion were enhanced during differentiation 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. This cellular differentiation stimulated resistin expression and secretion, but was suppressed by insulin. Resistin also induced insulin resistance in H4IIE hepatocytes and L6 myoblasts. In diet-induced obese rats, serum resistin levels were negatively correlated with insulin sensitivity,but not with serum insulin. CONCLUSION: Insulin can inhibit resistin expression and secretion in vitro, but insulin is not a major regulator of resistin in vivo. Fat tissue mass affects insulin sensitivity by altering the expression and secretion of resistin.

  13. Metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in obese adolescents

    Amanda Oliva Gobato

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in obese adolescents and its relationship with different body composition indicators. Methods: A cross-sectional study comprising 79 adolescents aged ten to 18 years old. The assessed body composition indicators were: body mass index (BMI, body fat percentage, abdominal circumference, and subcutaneous fat. The metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to the criteria proposed by Cook et al. The insulin resistance was determined by the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR index for values above 3.16. The analysis of ROC curves was used to assess the BMI and the abdominal circumference, aiming to identify the subjects with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The cutoff point corresponded to the percentage above the reference value used to diagnose obesity. Results: The metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 45.5% of the patients and insulin resistance, in 29.1%. Insulin resistance showed association with HDL-cholesterol (p=0.032 and with metabolic syndrome (p=0.006. All body composition indicators were correlated with insulin resistance (p<0.01. In relation to the cutoff point evaluation, the values of 23.5 and 36.3% above the BMI reference point allowed the identification of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. The best cutoff point for abdominal circumference to identify insulin resistance was 40%. Conclusions: All body composition indicators, HDL-cholesterol and metabolic syndrome showed correlation with insulin resistance. The BMI was the most effective anthropometric indicator to identify insulin resistance.

  14. Cerebral blood flow links insulin resistance and baroreflex sensitivity.

    John P Ryan

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance confers risk for diabetes mellitus and associates with a reduced capacity of the arterial baroreflex to regulate blood pressure. Importantly, several brain regions that comprise the central autonomic network, which controls the baroreflex, are also sensitive to the neuromodulatory effects of insulin. However, it is unknown whether peripheral insulin resistance relates to activity within central autonomic network regions, which may in turn relate to reduced baroreflex regulation. Accordingly, we tested whether resting cerebral blood flow within central autonomic regions statistically mediated the relationship between insulin resistance and an indirect indicator of baroreflex regulation; namely, baroreflex sensitivity. Subjects were 92 community-dwelling adults free of confounding medical illnesses (48 men, 30-50 years old who completed protocols to assess fasting insulin and glucose levels, resting baroreflex sensitivity, and resting cerebral blood flow. Baroreflex sensitivity was quantified by measuring the magnitude of spontaneous and sequential associations between beat-by-beat systolic blood pressure and heart rate changes. Individuals with greater insulin resistance, as measured by the homeostatic model assessment, exhibited reduced baroreflex sensitivity (b = -0.16, p < .05. Moreover, the relationship between insulin resistance and baroreflex sensitivity was statistically mediated by cerebral blood flow in central autonomic regions, including the insula and cingulate cortex (mediation coefficients < -0.06, p-values < .01. Activity within the central autonomic network may link insulin resistance to reduced baroreflex sensitivity. Our observations may help to characterize the neural pathways by which insulin resistance, and possibly diabetes mellitus, relates to adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

  15. Insulin resistance induced by physical inactivity is associated with multiple transcriptional changes in skeletal muscle in young men

    Alibegovic, A C; Sonne, M P; Højbjerre, L;

    2010-01-01

    of insulin resistance, bed rest resulted in a paradoxically increased response to acute insulin stimulation in the general expression of genes, particularly those involved in inflammation and endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress. Furthermore, bed rest changed gene expressions of several insulin...... resistance and diabetes candidate genes. We also observed a trend toward increased PPARGC1A DNA methylation after bed rest. We conclude that impaired expression of PPARGC1A and other genes involved in mitochondrial function as well as a paradoxically increased response to insulin of genes involved in...

  16. Cerebral Blood Flow Links Insulin Resistance and Baroreflex Sensitivity

    Ryan, John P.; Sheu, Lei K.; Verstynen, Timothy D.; Onyewuenyi, Ikechukwu C.; Gianaros, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance confers risk for diabetes mellitus and associates with a reduced capacity of the arterial baroreflex to regulate blood pressure. Importantly, several brain regions that comprise the central autonomic network, which controls the baroreflex, are also sensitive to the neuromodulatory effects of insulin. However, it is unknown whether peripheral insulin resistance relates to activity within central autonomic network regions, which may in turn relate to reduced baroreflex regula...

  17. Method for preventing and/or treating insulin resistance

    Nieuwdorp, M.; Vos, de W.M.

    2013-01-01

    The present invention describes use of Eubacterium hallii et rel. and/or Alcaligenes faecalis et rel., as well as pharmaceutical, food, or feed compositions comprising these bacteria, as a medicament, in particular for preventing and/or treating insulin resistance and/or insulin resistance-related c

  18. Severe Insulin Resistance Improves Immediately After Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Sharma, Rahul; Hassan, Chandra; Chaiban, Joumana T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Obese individuals exhibit insulin resistance often leading to adverse health outcomes. When compared with intensive medical therapy, bariatric surgery has shown better outcomes mainly in terms of insulin resistance and glycemic control. Using the Homeostasis Model Assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), we report herein a case illustrating a drastic improvement in severe insulin resistance after sleeve gastrectomy in the immediate postoperative period. Case Report. A patient with long-standing history of morbid obesity, type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, and severe insulin resistance (requiring approximately 2 units of insulin per kg per day) was enrolled in the medical weight management program for 6 months during which he lost 40 lbs and his insulin requirements decreased. He then underwent a sleeve gastrectomy and did not require insulin therapy as of postoperative day 1. His HOMA-IR improved by about 76% between day 1 and day 14 postoperatively. Conclusion. Sleeve gastrectomy leads to a drastic improvement in severe insulin resistance as early as the first postoperative day. PMID:26788532

  19. Insulin resistance is associated with reduced fasting and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthase phosphatase activity in human skeletal muscle.

    Kida, Y; Esposito-Del Puente, A; Bogardus, C; Mott, D M

    1990-01-01

    Insulin-stimulated glycogen synthase activity in human skeletal muscle correlates with insulin-mediated glucose disposal rate (M) and is reduced in insulin-resistant subjects. We have previously reported reduced insulin-stimulated glycogen synthase activity associated with reduced fasting glycogen synthase phosphatase activity in skeletal muscle of insulin-resistant Pima Indians. In this study we investigated the time course for insulin stimulation of glycogen synthase and synthase phosphatas...

  20. Mechanisms of human insulin resistance and thiazolidinedione-mediated insulin sensitization

    Sears, D. D.; Hsiao, G.; Hsiao, A.; Yu, J. G.; Courtney, C. H.; Ofrecio, J. M.; Chapman, J.; Subramaniam, S.

    2009-01-01

    Cellular and tissue defects associated with insulin resistance are coincident with transcriptional abnormalities and are improved after insulin sensitization with thiazolidinedione (TZD) PPARγ ligands. We characterized 72 human subjects by relating their clinical phenotypes with functional pathway alterations. We transcriptionally profiled 364 biopsies harvested before and after hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies, at baseline and after 3-month TZD treatment. We have identified molecular and functional characteristics of insulin resistant subjects and distinctions between TZD treatment responder and nonresponder subjects. Insulin resistant subjects exhibited alterations in skeletal muscle (e.g., glycolytic flux and intramuscular adipocytes) and adipose tissue (e.g., mitochondrial metabolism and inflammation) that improved relative to TZD-induced insulin sensitization. Pre-TZD treatment expression of MLXIP in muscle and HLA-DRB1 in adipose tissue from insulin resistant subjects was linearly predictive of post-TZD insulin sensitization. We have uniquely characterized coordinated cellular and tissue functional pathways that are characteristic of insulin resistance, TZD-induced insulin sensitization, and potential TZD responsiveness. PMID:19841271

  1. Postreceptor defects causing insulin resistance in normoinsulinemic non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    The mechanisms of the diminished hypoglycemic response to insulin in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) with normal levels of circulating plasma insulin were investigated. Specific binding of mono-125I (Tyr A14)-insulin to isolated adipocytes and effects of insulin (5--10,000 microunits/ml) on glucose oxidation and lipolysis were determined simultaneously in subcutaneous adipose tissue of seven healthy subjects of normal weight and seven untreated NIDDM patients with normal plasma insulin levels. The two groups were matched for age, sex, and body weight. Insulin binding, measured in terms of receptor number and affinity, was normal in NIDDM, the total number of receptors averaging 350,000 per cell. Neither sensitivity nor the maximum antilipolytic effect of insulin was altered in NIDDM patients as compared with control subjects; the insulin concentration producing half the maximum effect (ED50) was 10 microunits/ml. As regards the effect of insulin on glucose oxidation, for the control subjects ED50 was 30 microunits/ml, whereas in NIDDM patients, insulin exerted no stimulatory effect. The results obtained suggest that the effect of insulin on glucose utilization in normoinsulinemic NIDDM may be diminished in spite of normal insulin binding to receptors. The resistance may be due solely to postreceptor defects, and does not involve antilipolysis

  2. Insulin resistance in human subjects having impaired glucose regulation

    To determine insulin resistance in human subjects having impaired glucose regulation (IGR) by Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). A total of 100 subjects with impaired glucose regulation were selected for evaluation of metabolic syndrome as per the criteria of National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP, ATP III), along with 47 healthy age and gender-matched controls. Physical examination to determine blood pressure and waist circumference was carried out and so was sampling for plasma glucose, serum triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol and insulin. Insulin resistance was calculated by the HOMA-IR. Finally, subjects with and without metabolic syndrome were compared with controls (n=47), using one-way ANOVA for studying insulin resistance between groups, with Tukey's post-hoc comparison. The frequency of finding metabolic syndrome in cases of IGR remained 47%. The insulin resistance demonstrated stepwise worsening from control population (mean=1.54, 95 % CI: 1.77 - 2.37) to subjects suffering from only IGR (mean=2.07, 95 % CI: 1.77- 2.37) to metabolic syndrome (mean=2.67, 95 %, CI: 2.34 - 3.00) (p < 0.001). Patients with impaired glucose regulation may have significant insulin resistance. It is, thus, recommended that a vigorous search be made to measure insulin resistance in all cases diagnosed to have impaired glucose regulation. (author)

  3. Linking Gut Microbiota and Inflammation to Obesity and Insulin Resistance.

    Saad, M J A; Santos, A; Prada, P O

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are the major predisposing factors to comorbidities, such as Type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and several types of cancer. The prevalence of obesity is still increasing worldwide and now affects a large number of individuals. Here, we review the role of the gut microbiota in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance/obesity. The human intestine is colonized by ∼100 trillion bacteria, which constitute the gut microbiota. Studies have shown that lean and overweight rodents and humans may present differences in the composition of their intestinal flora. Over the past 10 years, data from different sources have established a causal link between the intestinal microbiota and obesity/insulin resistance. It is important to emphasize that diet-induced obesity promotes insulin resistance by mechanisms independent and dependent on gut microbiota. In this review, we present several mechanisms that contribute to explaining the link between intestinal flora and insulin resistance/obesity. The LPS from intestinal flora bacteria can induce a chronic subclinical inflammatory process and obesity, leading to insulin resistance through activation of TLR4. The reduction in circulating SCFA may also have an essential role in the installation of reduced insulin sensitivity and obesity. Other mechanisms include effects of bile acids, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), and some other lesser-known factors. In the near future, this area should open new therapeutic avenues for obesity/insulin resistance and its comorbidities. PMID:27252163

  4. Whole-body and hepatic insulin resistance in obese children.

    Lorena del Rocío Ibarra-Reynoso

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance may be assessed as whole body or hepatic.To study factors associated with both types of insulin resistance.Cross-sectional study of 182 obese children. Somatometric measurements were registered, and the following three adiposity indexes were compared: BMI, waist-to-height ratio and visceral adiposity. Whole-body insulin resistance was evaluated using HOMA-IR, with 2.5 as the cut-off point. Hepatic insulin resistance was considered for IGFBP-1 level quartiles 1 to 3 (<6.67 ng/ml. We determined metabolite and hormone levels and performed a liver ultrasound.The majority, 73.1%, of obese children had whole-body insulin resistance and hepatic insulin resistance, while 7% did not have either type. HOMA-IR was negatively associated with IGFBP-1 and positively associated with BMI, triglycerides, leptin and mother's BMI. Girls had increased HOMA-IR. IGFBP-1 was negatively associated with waist-to-height ratio, age, leptin, HOMA-IR and IGF-I. We did not find HOMA-IR or IGFBP-1 associated with fatty liver.In school-aged children, BMI is the best metric to predict whole-body insulin resistance, and waist-to-height ratio is the best predictor of hepatic insulin resistance, indicating that central obesity is important for hepatic insulin resistance. The reciprocal negative association of IGFBP-1 and HOMA-IR may represent a strong interaction of the physiological processes of both whole-body and hepatic insulin resistance.

  5. Relationship between insulin resistance and plasma endothelin in hypertension patients

    To explore the relationship between plasma endothelin and hypertension insulin resistance, and the improvement of insulin resistance in hypertension patients treated with captopril and l-amlodipine, 25 patients with primary hypertension and impaired glucose tolerance were selected and treated by captopril and l-amlodipine. Systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, fasting blood glucose, insulin and insulin antibody were measured before and after treatment and compared with healthy controls. The results showed that the plasma ET-1 level in hypertension group was significantly higher than that of healthy controls (P<0.01), and he plasma ET-1 level was positively correlated with FPG, FINS, Anti-INS, HOMA-IR. The systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, fasting blood glucose, insulin, insulin antibody and insulin resistance index in hypertension patients were decreased significantly after treatment (P<0.05). There is a good correlation between endothelin and insulin resistance index in hypertension patients. Captopril and l-amlodipine had obvious improvement effect on insulin resistance in hypertension patients. (authors)

  6. The Effect of Different Intensities of Acute Aerobic Exercise on Plasma Resistin Concentration and Insulin Resistance Index in Type 2 Diabetic Males

    Ziba Davoudi

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: It can be stated that acute exercise with different intensities does not affect resistin action in individuals with diabetes. These results may be due to the constant energy cost which is equivalent to 300 kcal per session, having no influence on the study variables.

  7. In nondiabetic, human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy, hepatic insulin extraction and posthepatic insulin clearance rate are decreased in proportion to insulin resistance

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte R;

    2005-01-01

    In healthy, nondiabetic individuals with insulin resistance, fasting insulin is inversely correlated to the posthepatic insulin clearance rate (MCRi) and the hepatic insulin extraction (HEXi). We investigated whether similar early mechanisms to facilitate glucose homeostasis exist in nondiabetic...... > .1). Our data suggest that HEXi and MCRi are decreased in proportion to the degree of insulin resistance in nondiabetic HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy....... insulin clearance rate was estimated as the ratio of posthepatic insulin appearance rate to steady-state plasma insulin concentration during a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (40 mU.m-2 .min-1). Posthepatic insulin appearance rate during the clamp was calculated, taking into account the remnant...

  8. Related Factors of Insulin Resistance in Korean Children: Adiposity and Maternal Insulin Resistance

    Kang-Sook Lee; Yang-Im Hur; Jihyun Song; Young-Gyu Cho; Jae-Heon Kang

    2011-01-01

    Increased adiposity and unhealthy lifestyle augment the risk for type 2 diabetes in children with familial predisposition. Insulin resistance (IR) is an excellent clinical marker for identifying children at high risk for type 2 diabetes. This study was conducted to investigate parental, physiological, behavioral and socio-economic factors related to IR in Korean children. This study is a cross-sectional study using data from 111 children aged 7 years and their parents. Homeostasis model asses...

  9. Insulin resistance and breast-cancer risk.

    Bruning, P F; Bonfrèr, J M; van Noord, P A; Hart, A A; de Jong-Bakker, M; Nooijen, W J

    1992-10-21

    Life-style has a major influence on the incidence of breast cancer. To evaluate the effects of life-style related metabolic-endocrine factors on breast cancer risk we conducted a case-control study comparing 223 women aged 38 to 75 years presenting with operable (stage I or II) breast cancer and 441 women of the same age having no breast cancer, who participated in a population-based breast cancer screening program. Women reporting diabetes mellitus were excluded. Sera from 110 women of the same age group presenting with early stage melanoma, lymphoma or cervical cancer were used as a second 'other-cancer control group'. Serum levels of C-peptide were significantly higher in early breast cancer cases compared to controls. The same was found for the ratios C-peptide to glucose or C-peptide to fructosamine, indicating insulin resistance. Sex hormone binding globulin was inversely, triglycerides and available estradiol were positively related to C-peptide. Serum C-peptide levels were related to body mass index (BMI), and to waist/hip ratio (WHR), in particular in controls. However, the relative increase of C-peptide, C-peptide to glucose or C-peptide to fructosamine in cases was independent of BMI or WHR. The log relative risk was linearly related to the log C-peptide levels. Relative risk according to quintiles, and adjusted for age, family history, BMI and WHR, for women at the 80% level was 2.9 as compared with those at the 20% level for C-peptide. Elevated C-peptide or C-peptide to fructosamine values were not observed in the sera from women belonging to the 'other-cancer control group'. This study suggests that hyperinsulinemia with insulin resistance is a significant risk factor for breast cancer independent of general adiposity or body fat distribution. PMID:1399128

  10. Acute and chronic effects of glyceryl trinitrate therapy on insulin and glucose regulation in humans.

    Jedrzkiewicz, Sean; Parker, John D

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the effect of acute and sustained transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) therapy on insulin and glucose regulation. Totally, 12 males (18-30 years) underwent a glucose tolerance test at baseline (visit 1), 90 minutes after acute transdermal GTN 0.6 mg/h (visit 2), following 7 days of continuous GTN (visit 3), and 2 to 3 days after stopping GTN (visit 4). At each visit, plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured before and 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after a 75-g oral glucose load. Indices of glucose metabolism that were examined included the insulin sensitivity index, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and the insulinogenic index. The acute administration of GTN had no effect on glucose and insulin responses (visit 2). However, after 7 days of GTN exposure (visit 3) there was an increase in the mean glucose concentration measured after the oral glucose load. On visit 1, the mean glucose concentration (± standard deviation) following the 75 g oral glucose challenge was 5.7 ± 0.5 µmol/L. On visit 3, after 7 days of transdermal GTN therapy, the mean glucose concentration after the oral glucose was significantly higher; 6.2 ± 0.5 µmol/L (P versus 6.9 (6.8) on visit 3 (P < .015). Other indices of glucose metabolism did not change. These observations document that GTN therapy modifies glucose metabolism causing evidence of increased insulin resistance during sustained therapy in normal humans. PMID:23230283

  11. Prevalence of insulin resistance in obese adolescents

    Aman B. Pulungan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Childhood obesity is a global health problem, with the prevalence is differed in each country and affected by many factors, such as lifestyle and physical activity. Insulin resistance (IR as a basic mechanism of several metabolic diseases in obesity, is related with metabolic syndrome (MetS along with its long term complications, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Several factors are known to be associated with IR, and the presence of acanthosis nigricans (AN has an important meaning in predicting IR. Objectives To assess the prevalence of IR, MetS in obese adolescents and its potentially associated factors, such as gender, signs of AN, and family history of metabolic diseases. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in obese adolescents, aged 12-15 years, over a two-month period. Fasting blood glucose, insulin, and lipid profiles were measured. Oobesity was defined using body mass index (BMI. Insulin resistance was quantified by the homeostasis model assessment for IR (HOMA-IR. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF 2007 criteria. Results Of 92 obese adolescents, IR was found in 38% of subjects, with females predominating (57.2%. Signs of AN were seen in 71.4% of subjects and a positive family history of metabolic diseases was found in 82.8% of subjects, including family history of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, and hypertension. Less than 10% of subjects were considered to be in a prediabetic state, and none had T2DM. No statistical significance was found between gender, family history, or signs of AN and IR (P>0.05. Metabolic syndromes was found in 19.6% of subjects, with the following prevalences for each component: 34.8% for hypertension, 78.3% for central obesity, 8.7% for impaired fasting glucose (IFG, 22.8% for low levels of HDL, and 21.7% for high triglyceride levels. A strong correlation was found between IR and IFG with OR=5.69 (95%CI 1.079 – 29.993, P=0

  12. Prevalence of insulin resistance in obese adolescents

    Aman B. Pulungan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Childhood obesity is a global health problem, with the prevalence is differed in each country and affected by many factors, such as lifestyle and physical activity. Insulin resistance (IR as a basic mechanism of several metabolic diseases in obesity, is related with metabolic syndrome (MetS along with its long term complications, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Several factors are known to be associated with IR, and the presence of acanthosis nigricans (AN has an important meaning in predicting IR.Objectives To assess the prevalence of IR, MetS in obese adolescents and its potentially associated factors, such as gender, signs of AN, and family history of metabolic diseases.Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in obese adolescents, aged 12-15 years, over a two-month period. Fasting blood glucose, insulin, and lipid profiles were measured. Oobesity was defined using body mass index (BMI. Insulin resistance was quantified by the homeostasis model assessment for IR (HOMA-IR. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF 2007 criteria.Results Of 92 obese adolescents, IR was found in 38% of subjects, with females predominating (57.2%. Signs of AN were seen in 71.4% of subjects and a positive family history of metabolic diseases was found in 82.8% of subjects, including family history of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, and hypertension. Less than 10% of subjects were considered to be in a prediabetic state, and none had T2DM. No statistical significance was found between gender, family history, or signs of AN and IR (P>0.05. Metabolic syndromes was found in 19.6% of subjects, with the following prevalences for each component: 34.8% for hypertension, 78.3% for central obesity, 8.7% for impaired fasting glucose (IFG, 22.8% for low levels of HDL, and 21.7% for high triglyceride levels. A strong correlation was found between IR and IFG with OR=5.69 (95%CI 1.079 – 29.993, P=0

  13. Cerebral blood flow links insulin resistance and baroreflex sensitivity.

    Ryan, John P; Sheu, Lei K; Verstynen, Timothy D; Onyewuenyi, Ikechukwu C; Gianaros, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance confers risk for diabetes mellitus and associates with a reduced capacity of the arterial baroreflex to regulate blood pressure. Importantly, several brain regions that comprise the central autonomic network, which controls the baroreflex, are also sensitive to the neuromodulatory effects of insulin. However, it is unknown whether peripheral insulin resistance relates to activity within central autonomic network regions, which may in turn relate to reduced baroreflex regulation. Accordingly, we tested whether resting cerebral blood flow within central autonomic regions statistically mediated the relationship between insulin resistance and an indirect indicator of baroreflex regulation; namely, baroreflex sensitivity. Subjects were 92 community-dwelling adults free of confounding medical illnesses (48 men, 30-50 years old) who completed protocols to assess fasting insulin and glucose levels, resting baroreflex sensitivity, and resting cerebral blood flow. Baroreflex sensitivity was quantified by measuring the magnitude of spontaneous and sequential associations between beat-by-beat systolic blood pressure and heart rate changes. Individuals with greater insulin resistance, as measured by the homeostatic model assessment, exhibited reduced baroreflex sensitivity (b = -0.16, p mediated by cerebral blood flow in central autonomic regions, including the insula and cingulate cortex (mediation coefficients < -0.06, p-values < .01). Activity within the central autonomic network may link insulin resistance to reduced baroreflex sensitivity. Our observations may help to characterize the neural pathways by which insulin resistance, and possibly diabetes mellitus, relates to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:24358272

  14. Persistent Organic Pollutant Exposure Leads to Insulin Resistance Syndrome

    Ruzzin, Jérôme; Petersen, Rasmus; Meugnier, Emmanuelle;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of the insulin resistance syndrome has increased at an alarming rate worldwide creating a serious challenge to public health care in the 21st century. Recently, epidemiological studies have associated the prevalence of type 2 diabetes with elevated body burdens...... of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). However, experimental evidence demonstrating a causal link between POPs and the development of insulin resistance is lacking. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether exposure to POPs contributes to insulin resistance and metabolic disorders. METHODS: Wistar rats were exposed...... salmon oil. We measured body weight, whole-body insulin sensitivity, POP accumulation, lipid and glucose homeostasis, gene expression and performed microarray analysis. RESULTS: Adult male rats exposed to crude, but not refined, salmon oil developed insulin resistance, abdominal obesity...

  15. The Effect of Acute Exercise on Serum Vaspin Level and Its Relation to Insulin Sensitivity in Overweight Elderly Men

    Jabbar Bashiri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vaspin is a new discovered adipocytokine which is a member of serine protease inhibitor family secreted from adipose tissue and might play a role in insulin sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acute exercise on serum vaspin levels and its relation to insulin sensitivity in overweight elderly men. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental study, 12 healthy elderly men volunteers randomly selected and performed one session aerobic exercise including 30 minutes of cycling at 70-75% of HRmax, which was followed by 30 minutes of recovery. Three blood samples were taken before exercise, immediately after exercise and after 30 minutes of recovery. Data were analyzed by repeated measure ANOVA and Bonferroni test and Pearson’s correlations were performed to identify possible relationship among the assessed variables. Statistical significance was set at p≤0.05. Results: There were no significant differences for vaspin across time. Insulin and glucose concentration and insulin resistance decreased immediately after exercise. However insulin concentration and insulin resistance returned to pre-exercise level at the end of recovery. Furthermore, no significant correlations were observed among the variables assessed except for the expected between insulin level and insulin resistance. Conclusion: These results indicate that a sub-maximal aerobic workout does not result in significant changes in vaspin levels in elderly men. Furthermore, we observed that vaspin is not associated with insulin sensitivity in this study.

  16. The Insulin-Like Growth Factor System in Obesity, Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Lewitt, Moira S; Dent, Mairi S.; Kerstin Hall

    2014-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system, acting in concert with other hormone axes, is important in normal metabolism. In obesity, the hyperinsulinaemia that accompanies peripheral insulin resistance leads to reduced growth hormone (GH) secretion, while total IGF-I levels are relatively unchanged due to increased hepatic GH sensitivity. IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-1 levels are suppressed in relation to the increase in insulin levels in obesity and low levels predict the development of typ...

  17. Lipocalin-2 inhibits autophagy and induces insulin resistance in H9c2 cells.

    Chan, Yee Kwan; Sung, Hye Kyoung; Jahng, James Won Suk; Kim, Grace Ha Eun; Han, Meng; Sweeney, Gary

    2016-07-15

    Lipocalin-2 (Lcn2; also known as neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin, NGAL) levels are increased in obesity and diabetes and associate with insulin resistance. Correlations exist between Lcn2 levels and various forms or stages of heart failure. Insulin resistance and autophagy both play well-established roles in cardiomyopathy. However, little is known about the impact of Lcn2 on insulin signaling in cardiomyocytes. In this study, we treated H9c2 cells with recombinant Lcn2 for 1 h followed by dose- and time-dependent insulin treatment and found that Lcn2 attenuated insulin signaling assessed via phosphorylation of Akt and p70S6K. We used multiple assays to demonstrate that Lcn2 reduced autophagic flux. First, Lcn2 reduced pULK1 S555, increased pULK1 S757 and reduced LC3-II levels determined by Western blotting. We validated the use of DQ-BSA to assess autolysosomal protein degradation and this together with MagicRed cathepsin B assay indicated that Lcn2 reduced lysosomal degradative activity. Furthermore, we generated H9c2 cells stably expressing tandem fluorescent RFP/GFP-LC3 and this approach verified that Lcn2 decreased autophagic flux. We also created an autophagy-deficient H9c2 cell model by overexpressing a dominant-negative Atg5 mutant and found that reduced autophagy levels also induced insulin resistance. Adding rapamycin after Lcn2 could stimulate autophagy and recover insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, our study indicated that acute Lcn2 treatment caused insulin resistance and use of gain and loss of function approaches elucidated a causative link between autophagy inhibition and regulation of insulin sensitivity by Lcn2. PMID:27090568

  18. Postreceptor insulin resistance contributes to human dyslipidemia and hepatic steatosis

    Semple, Robert K.; Sleigh, Alison; Murgatroyd, Peter R; Adams, Claire A.; Bluck, Les; Jackson, Sarah; Vottero, Alessandra; Kanabar, Dipak; Charlton-Menys, Valentine; Durrington, Paul; Soos, Maria A.; Carpenter, T. Adrian; David J Lomas; Cochran, Elaine K.; Gorden, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic dyslipidemia is characterized by high circulating triglyceride (TG) and low HDL cholesterol levels and is frequently accompanied by hepatic steatosis. Increased hepatic lipogenesis contributes to both of these problems. Because insulin fails to suppress gluconeogenesis but continues to stimulate lipogenesis in both obese and lipodystrophic insulin-resistant mice, it has been proposed that a selective postreceptor defect in hepatic insulin action is central to the pathogenesis of fat...

  19. Experimental study of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway and insulin resistance

    FeiYE; JiangLI; Jin-ying; TIAN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To set up the GDH method and the insulin resistance cell model for screening the glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT) inhibitors. METHODS: Glutamine can be converted to glutamate by GFAT, then, affected with APAD to produce APADH by GDH. APADH showed a peak at the 360 nm wavelength. Each factor of the active system was regulated. After the insulin administration in HIRc cells, the GFAT activity and the insulin-induced glucose uptake were

  20. The Association Between IGF-I and Insulin Resistance

    Friedrich, Nele; Thuesen, Betina; Jørgensen, Torben;

    2012-01-01

    the association between IGF-I level and insulin resistance in a Danish general population.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSIncluded were 3,354 adults, aged 19-72 years, from the cross-sectional Health2006 study. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used as the index to estimate insulin...... with intermediate (Q3) IGF-I levels. These associations remained statistically significant after the exclusion of subjects with type 2 diabetes and by using the updated computer HOMA2-IR model.CONCLUSIONSLow- and high-normal IGF-I levels are both related to insulin resistance. The biological mechanism......OBJECTIVEIGF-I has an almost 50% amino acid sequence homology with insulin and elicits nearly the same hypoglycemic response. Studies showed that low and high IGF-I levels are related to impaired glucose tolerance and to a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. The aim of the current study was to evaluate...

  1. Mechanisms of human insulin resistance and thiazolidinedione-mediated insulin sensitization

    Sears, D. D.; Hsiao, G.; Hsiao, A.; Yu, J. G.; Courtney, C. H.; J.M. Ofrecio; Chapman, J; Subramaniam, S

    2009-01-01

    Cellular and tissue defects associated with insulin resistance are coincident with transcriptional abnormalities and are improved after insulin sensitization with thiazolidinedione (TZD) PPARγ ligands. We characterized 72 human subjects by relating their clinical phenotypes with functional pathway alterations. We transcriptionally profiled 364 biopsies harvested before and after hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies, at baseline and after 3-month TZD treatment. We have identified molecula...

  2. Treatment of Type B Insulin Resistance: A Novel Approach to Reduce Insulin Receptor Autoantibodies

    "R. Malek; Chong, A. Y.; Lupsa, B. C.; Lungu, A. O.; Cochran, E. K.; Soos, M. A.; Semple, R.K.; Balow, J E; Gorden, P

    2010-01-01

    Background: Type B insulin resistance belongs to a class of diseases caused by an autoantibody to a cell surface receptor. Blockade of insulin action results in hyperglycemia, hypercatabolism, severe acanthosis nigricans, and hyperandrogenism in women. This rare autoimmune disorder has been treated with various forms of immunosuppression with mixed success.

  3. [Severe type A insulin resistance syndrome due to a mutation in the insulin receptor gene].

    Ros, P; Colino-Alcol, E; Grasso, V; Barbetti, F; Argente, J

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance syndromes without lipodystrophy are an infrequent and heterogeneous group of disorders with variable clinical phenotypes, associated with hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The three conditions related to mutations in the insulin receptor gene are leprechaunism or Donohue syndrome, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, and Type A syndrome. A case is presented on a patient diagnosed with type A insulin resistance, defined by the triad of extreme insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, and hyperandrogenism, carrying a heterozygous mutation in exon 19 of the insulin receptor gene coding for its tyrosine kinase domain that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the receptor. The molecular basis of the syndrome is reviewed, focusing on the structure-function relationships of the insulin receptor, knowing that the criteria for survival are linked to residual insulin receptor function. It is also pointed out that, although type A insulin resistance appears to represent a somewhat less severe condition, these patients have a high morbidity and their treatment is still unsatisfactory. PMID:25027621

  4. Intranasal Insulin and Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 as Neuroprotectants in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Lioutas, Vasileios-Arsenios; Alfaro-Martinez, Freddy; Bedoya, Francisco; Chung, Chen-Chih; Pimentel, Daniela A; Novak, Vera

    2015-08-01

    Treatment options for stroke remain limited. Neuroprotective therapies, in particular, have invariably failed to yield the expected benefit in stroke patients, despite robust theoretical and mechanistic background and promising animal data. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) play a pivotal role in critical brain functions, such as energy homeostasis, neuronal growth, and differentiation. They may exhibit neuroprotective properties in acute ischemic stroke based upon their vasodilatory, anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic effects, as well as improvements of functional connectivity, neuronal metabolism, neurotransmitter regulation, and remyelination. Intranasally administered insulin has demonstrated a benefit for prevention of cognitive decline in older people, and IGF-1 has shown potential benefit to improve functional outcomes in animal models of acute ischemic stroke. The intranasal route presents a feasible, tolerable, safe, and particularly effective administration route, bypassing the blood-brain barrier and maximizing distribution to the central nervous system (CNS), without the disadvantages of systemic side effects and first-pass metabolism. This review summarizes the neuroprotective potential of intranasally administered insulin and IGF-1 in stroke patients. We present the theoretical background and pathophysiologic mechanisms, animal and human studies of intranasal insulin and IGF-1, and the safety and feasibility of intranasal route for medication administration to the CNS. PMID:26040423

  5. Related Factors of Insulin Resistance in Korean Children: Adiposity and Maternal Insulin Resistance

    Kang-Sook Lee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased adiposity and unhealthy lifestyle augment the risk for type 2 diabetes in children with familial predisposition. Insulin resistance (IR is an excellent clinical marker for identifying children at high risk for type 2 diabetes. This study was conducted to investigate parental, physiological, behavioral and socio-economic factors related to IR in Korean children. This study is a cross-sectional study using data from 111 children aged 7 years and their parents. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR was calculated using fasting glucose and insulin level as a marker of IR. All children’s adiposity indices (r = 0.309–0.318, all P-value = 0.001 and maternal levels of fasting insulin (r = 0.285, P-value = 0.003 and HOMA-IR (r = 0.290, P-value = 0.002 were positively correlated with children’s HOMA-IR level. There was no statistical difference of children’s HOMA-IR level according to children’s lifestyle habits and socioeconomic status of families. An increase of 1 percentage point in body fat was related to 2.7% increase in children’s HOMA-IR (P-value < 0.001 and an increase of 1% of maternal level of HOMA-IR was related to 0.2% increase in children’s HOMA-IR (P-value = 0.002. This study shows that children’s adiposity and maternal IR are positively associated with children’s IR.

  6. Insulin resistance and mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle

    Dela, Flemming; Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2013-01-01

    are used in the attempt to resolve the mechanisms of insulin resistance. In this context, a dysfunction of mitochondria in the skeletal muscle has been suggested to play a pivotal role. It has been postulated that a decrease in the content of mitochondria in the skeletal muscle can explain the insulin...

  7. Mild electrical stimulation with heat shock ameliorates insulin resistance via enhanced insulin signaling.

    Saori Morino

    Full Text Available Low-intensity electrical current (or mild electrical stimulation; MES influences signal transduction and activates phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway. Because insulin resistance is characterized by a marked reduction in insulin-stimulated PI3K-mediated activation of Akt, we asked whether MES could increase Akt phosphorylation and ameliorate insulin resistance. In addition, it was also previously reported that heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72 alleviates hyperglycemia. Thus, we applied MES in combination with heat shock (HS to in vitro and in vivo models of insulin resistance. Here we show that 10-min treatment with MES at 5 V (0.1 ms pulse duration together with HS at 42 degrees C increased the phosphorylation of insulin signaling molecules such as insulin receptor substrate (IRS and Akt in HepG2 cells maintained in high-glucose medium. MES (12 V+mild HS treatment of high fat-fed mice also increased the phosphorylation of insulin receptor beta subunit (IRbeta and Akt in mice liver. In high fat-fed mice and db/db mice, MES+HS treatment for 10 min applied twice a week for 12-15 weeks significantly decreased fasting blood glucose and insulin levels and improved insulin sensitivity. The treated mice showed significantly lower weight of visceral and subcutaneous fat, a markedly improved fatty liver and decreased size of adipocytes. Our findings indicated that the combination of MES and HS alleviated insulin resistance and improved fat metabolism in diabetes mouse models, in part, by enhancing the insulin signaling pathway.

  8. Metabolism and insulin signaling in common metabolic disorders and inherited insulin resistance

    Højlund, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes, obesity and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are common metabolic disorders which are observed with increasing prevalences, and which are caused by a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors, including increased calorie intake and physical inactivity....... These metabolic disorders are all characterized by reduced plasma adiponectin and insulin resistance in peripheral tissues. Quantitatively skeletal muscle is the major site of insulin resistance. Both low plasma adiponectin and insulin resistance contribute to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes...... action on glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis is impaired. This suggests that the defects in glucose and lipid oxidation in the common metabolic disorders are secondary to other factors. In young women with PCOS, the degree of insulin resistance was similar to that seen in middle-aged patients...

  9. Xylitol prevents NEFA-induced insulin resistance in rats

    Kishore, P.; Kehlenbrink, S.; Hu, M.; Zhang, K.; Gutierrez-Juarez, R.; Koppaka, S.; El-Maghrabi, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Increased NEFA levels, characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus, contribute to skeletal muscle insulin resistance. While NEFA-induced insulin resistance was formerly attributed to decreased glycolysis, it is likely that glucose transport is the rate-limiting defect. Recently, the plant-derived sugar alcohol xylitol has been shown to have favourable metabolic effects in various animal models. Furthermore, its derivative xylulose 5-phosphate may prevent NEFA-induced suppression of glycolysis. We therefore examined whether and how xylitol might prevent NEFA-induced insulin resistance. Methods We examined the ability of xylitol to prevent NEFA-induced insulin resistance. Sustained ~1.5-fold elevations in NEFA levels were induced with Intralipid/heparin infusions during 5 h euglycaemic–hyperinsulinaemic clamp studies in 24 conscious non-diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats, with or without infusion of xylitol. Results Intralipid infusion reduced peripheral glucose uptake by ~25%, predominantly through suppression of glycogen synthesis. Co-infusion of xylitol prevented the NEFA-induced decreases in both glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. Although glycolysis was increased by xylitol infusion alone, there was minimal NEFA-induced suppression of glycolysis, which was not affected by co-infusion of xylitol. Conclusions/interpretation We conclude that xylitol prevented NEFA-induced insulin resistance, with favourable effects on glycogen synthesis accompanying the improved insulin-mediated glucose uptake. This suggests that this pentose sweetener has beneficial insulin-sensitising effects. PMID:22460760

  10. Early insulin resistance in severe trauma without head injury as outcome predictor? A prospective, monocentric pilot study

    Bonizzoli Manuela

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycemia following major trauma is a well know phenomenon related to stress-induced systemic reaction. Reports on glucose level management in patients with head trauma have been published, but the development of insulin resistance in trauma patients without head injury has not been extensively studied. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the prognostic role of acute insulin-resistance, assessed by the HOMA model, in patients with severe trauma without head injury. Methods All patients consecutively admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of a tertiary referral center (Careggi Teaching Hospital, Florence, IT for major trauma without head injury (Jan-Dec 2010 were enrolled. Patients with a previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus requiring insulin therapy or metabolism alteration were excluded from the analysis. Patients were divided into “insulin resistant” and “non-insulin resistant” based on the Homeostasis Model Assessment index (HOMA IR. Results are expressed as medians. Results Out of 175 trauma patients admitted to the ICU during the study period, a total of 54 patients without head trauma were considered for the study, 37 of whom met the inclusion criteria. In total, 23 patients (62.2% resulted insulin resistant, whereas 14 patients (37.8% were non-insulin resistant. Groups were comparable in demographic, clinical/laboratory characteristics, and severity of injury. Insulin resistant patients had a significantly higher BMI (P=0.0416, C-reactive protein (P=0.0265, and leukocytes count (0.0301, compared to non-insulin resistant patients. Also ICU length of stay was longer in insulin resistant patients (P=0.0381. Conclusions Our data suggest that admission insulin resistance might be used as an early outcome predictor.

  11. Relations between obesity, insulin resistance, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D123

    Lamendola, Cynthia A; Ariel, Danit; Feldman, David; Reaven, Gerald M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although low circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations have been associated with insulin resistance and obesity, the relations between these 3 variables have not been completely resolved.

  12. Acute exercise decreases PTP-1B protein level and improves insulin signaling in the liver of old rats

    De Moura, Leandro Pereira; Souza Pauli, Luciana Santos; Cintra, Dennys Esper; de Souza, Claudio Teodoro; da Silva, Adelino Sanchez Ramos; Marinho, Rodolfo; de Melo, Maria Alice Rostom; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; Pauli, José Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    It is now commonly accepted that chronic inflammation associated with obesity during aging induces insulin resistance in the liver. In the present study, we investigated whether the improvement in insulin sensitivity and insulin signaling, mediated by acute exercise, could be associated with modulation of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP-1B) in the liver of old rats. Aging rats were subjected to swimming for two 1.5-h long bouts, separated by a 45 min rest period. Sixteen hours after the ...

  13. Disruption of Adipose Rab10-Dependent Insulin Signaling Causes Hepatic Insulin Resistance.

    Vazirani, Reema P; Verma, Akanksha; Sadacca, L Amanda; Buckman, Melanie S; Picatoste, Belen; Beg, Muheeb; Torsitano, Christopher; Bruno, Joanne H; Patel, Rajesh T; Simonyte, Kotryna; Camporez, Joao P; Moreira, Gabriela; Falcone, Domenick J; Accili, Domenico; Elemento, Olivier; Shulman, Gerald I; Kahn, Barbara B; McGraw, Timothy E

    2016-06-01

    Insulin controls glucose uptake into adipose and muscle cells by regulating the amount of GLUT4 in the plasma membrane. The effect of insulin is to promote the translocation of intracellular GLUT4 to the plasma membrane. The small Rab GTPase, Rab10, is required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation in cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Here we demonstrate that both insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane are reduced by about half in adipocytes from adipose-specific Rab10 knockout (KO) mice. These data demonstrate that the full effect of insulin on adipose glucose uptake is the integrated effect of Rab10-dependent and Rab10-independent pathways, establishing a divergence in insulin signal transduction to the regulation of GLUT4 trafficking. In adipose-specific Rab10 KO female mice, the partial inhibition of stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes induces insulin resistance independent of diet challenge. During euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, there is no suppression of hepatic glucose production despite normal insulin suppression of plasma free fatty acids. The impact of incomplete disruption of stimulated adipocyte GLUT4 translocation on whole-body glucose homeostasis is driven by a near complete failure of insulin to suppress hepatic glucose production rather than a significant inhibition in muscle glucose uptake. These data underscore the physiological significance of the precise control of insulin-regulated trafficking in adipocytes. PMID:27207531

  14. Periodontitis and Insulin Resistance: Casual or Causal Relationship?

    Gurav, Abhijit N.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is now considered as a chronic and low level inflammatory condition. It is closely related to altered glucose tolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, abdominal obesity, and coronary heart disease. IR is accompanied by the increase in the levels of inflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1 and 6, tumor necrosis factor-α. These inflammatory cytokines also play a crucial part in pathogenesis and progression of insulin resistance. Periodontitis is the commonest of oral diseases, ...

  15. Insulin resistance and exercise tolerance in heart failure patients

    Snoer, Martin; Monk-Hansen, Tea; Olsen, Rasmus Huan;

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been linked to exercise intolerance in heart failure patients. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of coronary flow reserve (CFR), endothelial function and arterial stiffness in explaining this linkage.......Insulin resistance has been linked to exercise intolerance in heart failure patients. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of coronary flow reserve (CFR), endothelial function and arterial stiffness in explaining this linkage....

  16. Effect of dehydroepiandrosterone on insulin action and development of insulin-induced resistance in C2C12 muscle cells

    2003-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a precursor of androgens and estrogens, has been demonstrated to have effect of preventing insulin resistance and development of diabetes mellitus. Administration of testosterone appears to induce a marked insulin resistance. How these two hormones affect insulin resistance through regulation of sensitivity of tissues to insulin deserves further studies. Here, the effects of DHEA and testosterone on response to insulin in C2C12 muscle cells are analyzed. After 24 h of DHEA (10-6 mol/L) treatment, C2C12 cells showed an increased insulin- stimulated glucose uptake and enhanced activities of glycogen synthase (GS), phosphofructokinase (PFK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), whereas testosterone gave the opposite effects. Incubation of C2C12 cells with high-dose insulin (5×10-7 mol/L) for 24 hours decreased their sensitivity to insulin and led to a state of resistance as assessed on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and activities of GS, PFK and PDH. Addition of DHEA to insulin-resistant C2C12 cells could reverse the response of these cells to high-dose insulin, but testosterone could further impair insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant C2C12 cells. These results suggest that the two hormones may influence the development or inhibition of insulin-resistance in type 2 diabetes through regulating glucose uptake, glycogenesis and glycolysis to some extent.

  17. Association of resistin with visceral fat and muscle insulin resistance.

    Borst, Stephen E; Conover, Christine F; Bagby, Gregory J

    2005-10-01

    Maturing Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats develop obesity and skeletal muscle insulin resistance. To investigate the relationship between fat mass and insulin responses, we performed surgical removal of the epididymal and retroperitoneal depots of visceral adipose tissue (VF) or sham surgery (SHAM) in male rats aged 4 months. At sacrifice, 30 days later, the mass of visceral fat was 48% lower (pfat was essentially unchanged. VF- animals displayed increased insulin responses in isolated strips of skeletal muscle. Insulin-stimulated glucose transport was increased 28% in soleus muscle (pfat removal. In VF- animals, serum resistin was reduced 26% (pvisceral adiposity leads to an increase in systemic release in resistin and possibly interleukins. Elevation of circulating cytokines may play a role in the development of muscle insulin resistance. PMID:16154759

  18. INFLUENCE OF ACUPUNCTURE ON INSULIN RESISTANCE IN OBESITY PATIENTS

    YI Wei; XU Nenggui; JIN Rui

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the influence of acupuncture on insulin resistance in obesity patients. Methods: In treatment group, 20 obesity patients were treated with acupuncture of Neiguan (PC 6), Zusanli (ST 36), Daimai (GB 26), Sanyinjiao (SP 6), Zhongwan (CV 12), etc.. In control group, 12 normal volunteer subjects were observed.The obesity index, fasting blood sugar (FPG), plasma insulin (FINS) and C-peptide contents, and insulin sensitive index (ISI) were measured before and after acupuncture treatment. Results: Before treatment in comparison with control group, FPG, FINS and C-peptide of obesity patients were significant higher (P < 0.01 ), while ISI was considerably lower ( P< 0.01 ); after acupuncture treatment, the levels of plasma insulin and C peptide decreased obviously, ISI increased markedly (P < 0.01 ), and the obesity index was considerably improved with a total effective rate of 85 %.Conclusion: Acupuncture can alleviate obesity and improve insulin resistance.

  19. Association of sleep duration and insulin resistance in Taiwanese vegetarians

    Chang Jiunn-Kae

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short sleep duration has been reported to associate with increased insulin resistance. However, no studies have investigated whether such association exists in vegetarians. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between sleep duration and insulin resistance in Taiwanese vegetarians. Methods A total of 1290 individuals were recruited from a regional hospital in south Taiwan during their regular routine physical examination. Only individuals who described themselves as Buddhist vegetarians were included in the study. Demographic information and clinical characteristics were collected and multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between sleep duration and insulin resistance. Results A total of 433 vegetarians were included in the study. Results from univariate logistic regression indicated that insulin resistance was significantly associated with male sex, greater waist circumference, higher triglyceride levels, lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, higher plasma creatinine levels, higher alanine transaminase levels, greater energy expenditure, and sleep duration of more than 8 hours per night. Multiple logistic regression revealed that insulin resistance was significantly and independently associated with sleep duration of more than 8 hours per night (odd ratios = 2.27, 95% confidence interval = 1.24, 4.11 after adjusting for waist circumference and levels of alanine transaminase. Conclusions Sleep duration of more than 8 hours per night is an independent risk factor associated with increased insulin resistance in vegetarians.

  20. Higher fetal insulin resistance in Chinese pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus and correlation with maternal insulin resistance.

    Qiuwei Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM on fetal insulin resistance or β-cell function in Chinese pregnant women with GDM. MEASUREMENTS: Maternal fasting blood and venous cord blood samples (reflecting fetal condition were collected in 65 well-controlled Chinese GDM mothers (only given dietary intervention and 83 control subjects. The insulin, glucose and proinsulin concentrations of both maternal and cord blood samples were measured, and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and the proinsulin-to-insulin ratios (an indicator of fetal β-cell function were calculated in maternal and cord blood respectively. RESULTS: Both maternal and fetal levels of insulin, proinsulin and HOMA-IR but not proinsulin-to-insulin ratios were significantly higher in the GDM group than in the control group (maternal insulin, 24.8 vs. 15.4 µU/mL, P = 0.004, proinsulin, 23.3 vs. 16.2 pmol/L, P = 0.005, and HOMA-IR, 5.5 vs. 3.5, P = 0.041, respectively; fetal: insulin, 15.1 vs. 7.9 µU/mL, P<0.001, proinsulin, 25.8 vs. 15.1 pmol/L, P = 0.015, and HOMA-IR, 2.8 vs. 1.4, P = 0.017, respectively. Fetal HOMA-IR but not proinsulin-to-insulin ratios was significantly correlated to maternal HOMA-IR (r = 0.307, P = 0.019, in the pregnant women with GDM. CONCLUSIONS: Fetal insulin resistance was higher in Chinese pregnant women with GDM than control subjects, and correlated with maternal insulin resistance.

  1. Human primary myoblast cell cultures from non-diabetic insulin resistant subjects retain defects in insulin action.

    Thompson, D B; Pratley, R; Ossowski, V

    1996-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a predictor of the development of noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in humans. It is unclear whether insulin resistance is a primary defect leading to NIDDM or the result of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. To determine if insulin resistance is the result of extrinsic factors such as hyperinsulinemia primary skeletal muscle cell cultures were established from muscle biopsies from Pima Indians with differing in vivo insulin sensitivities. These cell cultur...

  2. Insulin resistance: The linchpin between prediabetes and cardiovascular disease.

    Salazar, Martin R; Carbajal, Horacio A; Espeche, Walter G; Aizpurúa, Marcelo; Leiva Sisnieguez, Carlos E; Leiva Sisnieguez, Betty C; Stavile, Rodolfo N; March, Carlos E; Reaven, Gerald M

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that cardiovascular disease occurs to the greatest extent in persons with prediabetes mellitus who are also insulin resistant. In 2003, 664 non-diabetic women (n = 457) and men (n = 207), aged 52 ± 16 and 53 ± 15 years, were surveyed during a programme for cardiovascular disease prevention. Fasting plasma glucose concentrations defined participants as having normal fasting plasma glucose (fasting plasma glucose <5.6 mmol/L) or prediabetes mellitus (fasting plasma glucose ⩾5.6 and <7.0 mmol/L). The tertile of prediabetes mellitus subjects with the highest fasting plasma insulin concentration was classified as insulin resistant. Baseline cardiovascular disease risk factors were accentuated in prediabetes mellitus versus normal fasting glucose, particularly in prediabetes mellitus/insulin resistant. In 2012, 86% of the sample were surveyed again, and the crude incidence for cardiovascular disease was higher in subjects with prediabetes mellitus versus normal fasting glucose (13.7 vs 6.0/100 persons/10 years; age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio = 1.88, p = 0.052). In prediabetes mellitus, the crude incidences were 22.9 versus 9.6/100 persons/10 years in insulin resistant versus non-insulin resistant persons (age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio = 2.36, p = 0.040). In conclusion, cardiovascular disease risk was accentuated in prediabetes mellitus/insulin resistant individuals, with a relative risk approximately twice as high compared to prediabetes mellitus/non-insulin resistant subjects. PMID:26802220

  3. Interleukin-6 and insulin resistance in obese adolescents

    Raynald Takumansang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Obesity has become a rapidly growing epidemic worldwide, increasing the risk of morbidity and mortality in adolescents. is due to an expansion of adipose tissue mass, which is an important source of cytokines and contributes to an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6. Interleukin-6 is significantly increased in obesity and may lead to a state of insulin resistance. Objective To assess for a correlation between IL-6 levels and insulin resistance in obese adolescents Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from January to April 2012 in Manado, North Sulawesi. Subjects were either obese or normal body mass index (BMI teens aged 13-18 years. Data collected were anthropometric status, BMI, and blood specimens for fasting plasma glucose levels, fasting insulin levels, and ILl-6 levels. Insulin resistance was expressed as homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR level >2.77. Data was analyzed by Pearson’s correlation and linear regression tests to assess for a possible correlation between IL-6 levels and insulin resistance. Results The mean BMI in the obese group was 31.21 (SD 3.61 kg/m2 while the mean BMI in the normal group was 19.52 (SD 2.38 kg/m2. There was no significant association between IL-6 and the occurrence of insulin resistance (P=0.309. The log regression coefficient value of IL-6 was negative (b = -0.329. Conclusion There is no correlation between IL-6 levels and incidence of insulin resistance in obese adolescents.[Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:268-72.].

  4. Predictors of insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors 24 to 36 months post-burn

    Chondronikola, Maria; Meyer, Walter J.; Sidossis, Labros S.; Ojeda, Sylvia; Huddleston, Joanna; Stevens, Pamela; Børsheim, Elisabet; Suman, Oscar E.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Herndon, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Burn injury is a dramatic event with acute and chronic consequences including insulin resistance. However, factors associated with insulin resistance have not been previously investigated. Purpose To identify factors associated with long-term insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors. Methods The study sample consisted of 61 pediatric burn injury survivors 24 to 36 months after the burn injury, who underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. To assess insulin resistance, we calculated the area under the curve for glucose and insulin. The diagnostic criteria of the American Diabetes Association were used to define individuals with impaired glucose metabolism. Additional data collected include body composition, anthropometric measurements, burn characteristics and demographic information. The data were analyzed using multivariate linear regression analysis. Results Approximately 12% of the patients met the criteria for impaired glucose metabolism. After adjusting for possible confounders, burn size, age and percent body fat were associated with the area under the curve for glucose (p<0.05 for all). Time post-burn and lean mass were inversely associated with the area under the curve for glucose (p<0.05 for both). Similarly, older age predicted higher insulin area under the curve. Conclusion A significant proportion of pediatric injury survivors suffer from glucose abnormalities 24–36 months post-burn. Burn size, time post-burn, age, lean mass and adiposity are significant predictors of insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors. Clinical evaluation and screening for abnormal glucose metabolism should be emphasized in patients with large burns, older age and survivors with high body fat. PMID:24918945

  5. Conventional insulin vs insulin infusion therapy in acute coronary syndrome diabetic patients

    Caterina; Arvia; Valeria; Siciliano; Kyriazoula; Chatzianagnostou; Gillian; Laws; Alfredo; Quinones; Galvan; Chiara; Mammini; Sergio; Berti; Sabrina; Molinaro; Giorgio; Iervasi

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the impact on glucose variability(GLUCV)of an nurse-implemented insulin infusion protocol when compared with a conventional insulin treatment during the day-to-day clinical activity.METHODS:We enrolled 44 type 2 diabetic patients(n=32 males;n=12 females)with acute coronary syndrome(ACS)and randomy assigned to standard a subcutaneous insulin treatment(n=23)or a nurse-implemented continuous intravenous insulin infusion protocol(n=21).We utilized some parameters of GLUCV representing well-known surrogate markers of prognosis,i.e.,glucose standard deviation(SD),the mean dailyδglucose(mean of daily difference between maximum and minimum glucose),and the coefficient of variation(CV)of glucose,expressed as percent glucose(SD)/glu-cose(mean).RESULTS:At the admission,first fasting blood glucose,pharmacological treatments(insulin and/or anti-diabetic drugs)prior to entering the study and basal glycated hemoglobin(HbA1c)were observed in the two groups treated with subcutaneous or intravenous insulin infusion,respectively.When compared with patients submitted to standard therapy,insulin-infused patients showed both increased first 24-h(median 6.9 mmol/L vs 5.7mmol/L P<0.045)and overall hospitalizationδglucose(median 10.9 mmol/L vs 9.3 mmol/L,P<0.028),with a tendency to a significant increase in first 24-h glycaemic CV(23.1%vs 19.6%,P<0.053).Severe hypoglycaemia was rare(14.3%),and it was observed only in 3 patients receiving insulin infusion therapy.HbA1c values measured during hospitalization and 3 mo after discharge did not differ in the two groups of treatment.CONCLUSION:Our pilot data suggest that no real benefit in terms of GLUCV is observed when routinely managing blood glucose by insulin infusion therapy in type 2 diabetic ACS hospitalized patients in respect to conventional insulin treatment

  6. Obesity, Insulin Resistance and Pregnancy Outcome

    Catalano, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    There has been a significant increase over the past few decades in the number of reproductive age women who are either overweight or obese. Overweight and obese women are at increased risk for having decreased insulin sensitivity as compared with lean or average weight women. The combination of obesity and decreased insulin sensitivity increases the long term risk of these individuals developing the metabolic syndrome and associated problems of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and cardi...

  7. Association of insulin resistance with obesity in children

    Background: Insulin resistance is the primary metabolic disorder associated with obesity. Little is known about its role as a determinant of the metabolic syndrome in obese children. Objectives: To assess the association of insulin resistance with metabolic syndrome in obese and non obese children. Study type and settings: Cross sectional analytical study conducted among children of ten Municipal Corporation high schools of Data Ganj Buksh Town Lahore. Subjects and Methods: A total of 46 obese and 49 non obese children with consent were recruited for the study. Fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, high density lipoprotein in cholesterol, triglycerides, cholesterol, non HDL-cholesterol LDL-cholesterol were measured using standard methods. Data were analyzed by using statistical software SPSS-Version 15. Results: A total of 95 children 49 obese and 46 non obese were recruited for the study. A significant association of serum triglyceride(p<0.001), high density lipoprotein cholesterol(p<0.001), fasting blood glucose(p<0.001), and insulin levels (p<0.001) , was seen between the two groups. For each component of metabolic syndrome, when insulin resistance increased so did odds ratios for cardio metabolic risk factors. Conclusions: Insulin resistance was seen in 34.7% children. Metabolic syndrome was found in 31.6% children reflecting that obese children are at high risk for metabolic syndrome and have low HDL-cholesterol and high triglycerides levels. (author)

  8. Adipose Tissue Hypoxia, Inflammation, and Fibrosis in Obese Insulin-Sensitive and Obese Insulin-Resistant Subjects.

    Lawler, Helen M; Underkofler, Chantal M; Kern, Philip A; Erickson, Christopher; Bredbeck, Brooke; Rasouli, Neda

    2016-04-01

    We confirmed fat hypoxia in obese as compared to lean subjects. However, fat oxygenation was similar in obese insulin sensitive and insulin resistant subjects suggesting fat hypoxia may be simply a consequence of fat expansion. PMID:26871994

  9. Insulin Resistance in Human iPS Cells Reduces Mitochondrial Size and Function

    Burkart, Alison M.; Tan, Kelly; Warren, Laura; Iovino, Salvatore; Hughes, Katelyn J.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance, a critical component of type 2 diabetes (T2D), precedes and predicts T2D onset. T2D is also associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. To define the cause-effect relationship between insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction, we compared mitochondrial metabolism in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from 5 healthy individuals and 4 patients with genetic insulin resistance due to insulin receptor mutations. Insulin-resistant iPSC had increased mitochondrial number...

  10. Intrinsic Frequency and the Single Wave Biopsy: Implications for Insulin Resistance

    Petrasek, Danny; Pahlevan, Niema M.; Tavallali, Peyman; Rinderknecht, Derek G.; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the hallmark of classical type II diabetes. In addition, insulin resistance plays a central role in metabolic syndrome, which astonishingly affects 1 out of 3 adults in North America. The insulin resistance state can precede the manifestation of diabetes and hypertension by years. Insulin resistance is correlated with a low-grade inflammatory condition, thought to be induced by obesity as well as other conditions. Currently, the methods to measure and monitor insulin res...

  11. Acute effects of 17 β-estradiol and genistein on insulin sensitivity and spatial memory in aged ovariectomized female rats.

    Alonso, Ana; González-Pardo, Héctor; Garrido, Pablo; Conejo, Nélida M; Llaneza, Plácido; Díaz, Fernando; Del Rey, Carmen González; González, Celestino

    2010-12-01

    Aging is characterized by decline in metabolic function and insulin resistance, and both seem to be in the basis of neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive dysfunction. Estrogens prevent age-related changes, and phytoestrogens influence learning and memory. Our hypothesis was that estradiol and genistein, using rapid-action mechanisms, are able to modify insulin sensitivity, process of learning, and spatial memory. Young and aged ovariectomized rats received acute treatment with estradiol or genistein. Aged animals were more insulin-resistant than young. In each age, estradiol and genistein-treated animals were less insulin-resistant than the others, except in the case of young animals treated with high doses of genistein. In aged rats, no differences between groups were found in spatial memory test, showing a poor performance in the water maze task. However, young females treated with estradiol or high doses of genistein performed well in spatial memory task like the control group. Only rats treated with high doses of genistein showed an optimal spatial memory similar to the control group. Conversely, acute treatment with high doses of phytoestrogens improved spatial memory consolidation only in young rats, supporting the critical period hypothesis for the beneficial effects of estrogens on memory. Therefore, genistein treatment seems to be suitable treatment in aged rats in order to prevent insulin resistance but not memory decline associated with aging. Acute genistein treatment is not effective to restore insulin resistance associated to the early loss of ovarian function, although it can be useful to improve memory deficits in this condition. PMID:20467821

  12. Binge Drinking Induces Whole-Body Insulin Resistance by Impairing Hypothalamic Insulin Action

    Lindtner, Claudia; Scherer, Thomas; Zielinski, Elizabeth; Filatova, Nika; Fasshauer, Martin; Tonks, Nicholas K.; Puchowicz, Michelle; Buettner, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with a history of binge drinking have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Whether binge drinking impairs glucose homeostasis and insulin action is unknown. To test this, we treated Sprague-Dawley rats daily with alcohol (3 g/kg) for three consecutive days to simulate human binge drinking and found that these rats developed and exhibited insulin resistance even after blood alcohol concentrations had become undetectable. The animals were resis...

  13. Diabetes mellitus in the elderly: insulin resistance and/or impaired insulin secretion?

    Scheen, André

    2005-01-01

    Elderly people are more glucose intolerant and insulin resistant than young individuals, and many of them will develop type 2 diabetes. It remains, however, controversial whether this decrease in function is due to an inevitable consequence of "biological aging" or due to environmental or lifestyle variables. Indeed, increased adiposity/altered fat distribution, decreased fat free mass/abnormal muscle composition, poor dietary habits and physical inactivity all contribute to reduce insulin se...

  14. Insulin Is a Stronger Inducer of Insulin Resistance than Hyperglycemia in Mice with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM)*

    Liu, Hui-Yu; Cao, Sophia Y.; Hong, Tao; Han, Jianmin; Liu, Zhenqi; Cao, Wenhong

    2009-01-01

    Subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) eventually develop insulin resistance and other features of T2DM such as cardiovascular disorders. The exact mechanism has been not been completely understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that excessive or inappropriate exposure to insulin is a primary mediator of insulin resistance in T1DM. We found that continuous exposure of mice with non-obese diabetes to insulin detemir, which is similar to some current conventional treatment of h...

  15. Effects of Dietary n-3 Fatty Acids on Hepatic and Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity in Insulin-Resistant Humans

    Lalia, Antigoni Z; Johnson, Matthew L; Jensen, Michael D.; Hames, Kazanna C.; Port, John D.; Lanza, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), prevent insulin resistance and stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis in rodents, but the findings of translational studies in humans are thus far ambiguous. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of EPA and DHA on insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and muscle mitochondrial function in insulin-resistant, nondiabetic humans using a robust study design and gold-...

  16. Calpain-10 and insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle

    Norton, Luke

    2007-01-01

    Variation in the calpain-10 gene has been linked to a three-fold increased risk for type 2 diabetes in Pima Indian and some European populations. Furthermore, reduced skeletal muscle expression of calpain-10 is associated with reduced insulin mediated glucose disposal and carbohydrate oxidation. The skeletal muscle specific calpain-3 plays a key role in skeletal muscle integrity and has also been linked to insulin resistance in humans and rodents. The major aims of this thesis were to...

  17. Insulin resistance in skeletal muscles of caveolin-3-null mice

    Oshikawa, Jin; Otsu, Koji; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Tsunematsu, Takashi; Hankins, Raleigh; Kawabe, Jun-ichi; Minamisawa, Susumu; Umemura, Satoshi; Hagiwara, Yasuko; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2004-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is preceded by the development of insulin resistance, in which the action of insulin is impaired, largely in skeletal muscles. Caveolin-3 (Cav3) is a muscle-specific subtype of caveolin, an example of a scaffolding protein found within membranes. Cav is also known as growth signal inhibitor, although it was recently demonstrated that the genetic disruption of Cav3 did not augment growth in mice. We found, however, that the lack of Cav3 led to the development of insulin resista...

  18. ADVANCES OF STUDIES ON ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT OF INSULIN RESISTANCE

    PENG Yan; HOU Li-hui; WU Xiao-ke

    2006-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is referred to decrease or loss of reactivity of the insulin target organs and tissues to biological effects of insulin. It has been proved that IR is a common attack basis for diabetes,hypertension, obesity, cerebrovascular diseases, atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The unique therapeutic effects of acupuncture and moxibustion on IR are paid great attention to at home and abroad day by day. In this paper, the survey of studies on interfering action of acupuncture on IR diseases, the mechanisms of acupuncture and moxibustion in treatment of IR, and effects of acupuncture and moxibustion on energy metabolism is reviewed.

  19. Insulin resistance as a physiological defense against metabolic stress

    Nolan, Christopher J; Ruderman, Neil B; Kahn, Steven E;

    2015-01-01

    challenging subgroup of patients with T2D who are overweight or obese with insulin resistance (IR) and the most refractory hyperglycemia due to an inability to change lifestyle to reverse positive energy balance. For this subgroup of patients with T2D, we question the dogma that IR is primarily harmful...... with intensive insulin therapy, could therefore be harmful. Treatments that nutrient off-load to lower glucose are more likely to be beneficial. The concepts of "IR as an adaptive defense mechanism" and "insulin-induced metabolic stress" may provide explanation for some of the unexpected outcomes of recent major...

  20. Midkine, a potential link between obesity and insulin resistance.

    Nengguang Fan

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with increased production of inflammatory mediators in adipose tissue, which contributes to chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Midkine (MK is a heparin-binding growth factor with potent proinflammatory activities. We aimed to test whether MK is associated with obesity and has a role in insulin resistance. It was found that MK was expressed in adipocytes and regulated by inflammatory modulators (TNF-α and rosiglitazone. In addition, a significant increase in MK levels was observed in adipose tissue of obese ob/ob mice as well as in serum of overweight/obese subjects when compared with their respective controls. In vitro studies further revealed that MK impaired insulin signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, as indicated by reduced phosphorylation of Akt and IRS-1 and decreased translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 to the plasma membrane in response to insulin stimulation. Moreover, MK activated the STAT3-suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3 pathway in adipocytes. Thus, MK is a novel adipocyte-secreted factor associated with obesity and inhibition of insulin signaling in adipocytes. It may provide a potential link between obesity and insulin resistance.

  1. Immunometabolism of AMPK in insulin resistance and atherosclerosis.

    Fullerton, Morgan D; Steinberg, Gregory R; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2013-02-25

    Obesity leads to insulin resistance and atherosclerosis, which precede Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Immunometabolism addresses how metabolic and inflammatory pathways converge to maintain health and a contemporary problem is determining how obesity-induced inflammation precipitates chronic diseases such as insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important serine/threonine kinase well known for regulating metabolic processes and maintaining energy homeostasis. However, both metabolic and immunological AMPK-mediated effects play a role in disease. Pro-inflammatory mediators suppress AMPK activity and hinder lipid oxidation. In addition, AMPK activation curbs inflammation by directly inhibiting pro-inflammatory signaling pathways and limiting the build-up of specific lipid intermediates that elicit immune responses. In the context of obesity and chronic disease, these reciprocal responses involve both immune and metabolic cells. Therefore, the immunometabolism of AMPK-mediated processes and therapeutics should be considered in atherosclerosis and insulin resistance. PMID:22361321

  2. Visceral adiposity, insulin resistance and cancer risk

    Donohoe, Claire L

    2011-06-22

    Abstract Background There is a well established link between obesity and cancer. Emerging research is characterising this relationship further and delineating the specific role of excess visceral adiposity, as opposed to simple obesity, in promoting tumorigenesis. This review summarises the evidence from an epidemiological and pathophysiological perspective. Methods Relevant medical literature was identified from searches of PubMed and references cited in appropriate articles identified. Selection of articles was based on peer review, journal and relevance. Results Numerous epidemiological studies consistently identify increased risk of developing carcinoma in the obese. Adipose tissue, particularly viscerally located fat, is metabolically active and exerts systemic endocrine effects. Putative pathophysiological mechanisms linking obesity and carcinogenesis include the paracrine effects of adipose tissue and systemic alterations associated with obesity. Systemic changes in the obese state include chronic inflammation and alterations in adipokines and sex steroids. Insulin and the insulin-like growth factor axis influence tumorigenesis and also have a complex relationship with adiposity. There is evidence to suggest that insulin and the IGF axis play an important role in mediating obesity associated malignancy. Conclusions There is much evidence to support a role for obesity in cancer progression, however further research is warranted to determine the specific effect of excess visceral adipose tissue on tumorigenesis. Investigation of the potential mechanisms underpinning the association, including the role of insulin and the IGF axis, will improve understanding of the obesity and cancer link and may uncover targets for intervention.

  3. Effect of gender on lipid-induced insulin resistance in obese subjects

    Vistisen, Bodil; Hellgren, Lars; Vadset, T.;

    2008-01-01

    Objective: In obese subjects, chronically elevated plasma concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) exert a marked risk to contract insulin resistance and subsequently type 2 diabetes. When NEFA is acutely increased due to i.v. infusion of lipid, glucose disposal during...... a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp is reduced. This effect has been explained by a NEFA-induced decrease in skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity caused by accumulation of the lipid intermediates Such as ceramide and diacylglycerol in the myocytes. However, neither the lipid-induced reduction of glucose disposal nor...... the clamp was similar in females and males (46+/-10 and 60+/-4%,, respectively, NS). However, whole-body insulin sensitivity as well as non-oxidative glucose disposal was higher in obese females compared with obese males both during lipid and saline infusion (P...

  4. Insulin resistance and occurrence and prognosis of ischemic stroke A non-randomized concurrent control and intra-group comparison

    Xiaohong Zhao; Shaojun Jiang; Yue Tan

    2008-01-01

    factors for stroke, including hypertension and lipid metabolism disorder. Insulin resistance was correlated with the prognosis of acute cerebral infarction patients, but it was not an independent predictive factor.

  5. Insulin resistance, insulin response, and obesity as indicators of metabolic risk

    Ferrannini, Ele; Balkau, Beverley; Coppack, Simon W;

    2007-01-01

    -cholesterol, and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and insulin response to higher heart rate, blood pressure and fasting glucose, and the same dyslipidemic profile as IR (P < or = 0.05 for all). By factor analysis, three main factors (related to IR, age, and fatness, respectively) appeared to underlie......CONTEXT: Insulin resistance (IR) and obesity, especially abdominal obesity, are regarded as central pathophysiological features of a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs), but their relative roles remain undefined. Moreover, the differential impact of IR viz. insulin response has not been...... evaluated. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to dissect out the impact of obesity, abdominal obesity, and IR/insulin response on CVRF. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study. SETTING: The study was conducted at 21 research centers in Europe. SUBJECTS: The study included a cohort of 1308...

  6. Obesity-associated Gingival Vascular Inflammation and Insulin Resistance.

    Mizutani, K; Park, K; Mima, A; Katagiri, S; King, G L

    2014-06-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for periodontitis, but the pathogenic mechanism involved is unclear. We studied the effects of insulin in periodontal tissues during the state of obesity-induced insulin resistance. Gingival samples were collected from fatty (ZF) and lean (ZL, control) Zucker rats. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression was decreased, and activities of protein kinase C (PKC) α, ß2, δ, and ϵ isoforms were significantly increased in the gingiva from ZF rats compared with those from ZL rats. Expression of oxidative stress markers (mRNA) and the p65 subunit of NF-κB was significantly increased in ZF rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed that NF-κB activation was also increased in the gingival endothelial cells from transgenic mice overexpressing NF-κB-dependent enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) and on a high-fat vs. normal chow diet. Analysis of the gingiva showed that insulin-induced phosphorylation of IRS-1, Akt, and eNOS was significantly decreased in ZF rats, but Erk1/2 activation was not affected. General PKC inhibitor and an anti-oxidant normalized the action of insulin on Akt and eNOS activation in the gingiva from ZF rats. This provided the first documentation of obesity-induced insulin resistance in the gingiva. Analysis of our data suggested that PKC activation and oxidative stress may selectively inhibit insulin-induced Akt and eNOS activation, causing endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. PMID:24744283

  7. THE ROLE OF MAGNESIUM METABOLISM IN ESSENTIALHYPERTENSION WITH INSULIN RESISTANCE

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of magnesium metabolism and other positive ions in pathogenesis of essential hypertension(EH) patients with insulin resistance(IR). Methods The levels of Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+ in erythrocyte and 24-hour urine samples were observed in 47 EH patients and in 30 subjects with normal blood pres sure. Insulin sensitivity index was used to evaluate the insulin sensitivity. Results In EH patients, the levels of K+ and Mg2+ in erythrocyte declined, but the levels of Na+ and Ca2+ in erythrocyte increased, and the 24-hour urinary excretion of Mg2+ reduced as compared to the subjects with normal blood pressure (P <0. 05). The levels of K+ and Mg2+ in erythrocyte of EH patients positively correlated with insulin sensitivity index, and the Mg2+ level in erythro cyte positively correlated with 24-hour urinary excretion of Ca2+ and Mg2+ , and the K+ level in erythrocyte. Conclu sion Abnormality of magnesium metabolism in EH patients may be the linking factor for hypertension and insulin re sistance, and may relate to inadequate intake of magnesium. Calcium and potassium may be involved in the occur rence of insulin resistance through affecting magnesium metabolism.

  8. Relationship of Insulin Sensitivity, Insulin Secretion, and Adiposity With Insulin Clearance in a Multiethnic Population

    Lorenzo, Carlos; Hanley, Anthony J.G.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Rewers, Marian J.; Stefanovski, Darko; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Haffner, Steven M

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We aimed to examine insulin clearance, a compensatory mechanism to changes in insulin sensitivity, across sex, race/ethnicity populations, and varying states of glucose tolerance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We measured insulin sensitivity index (S I), acute insulin response (AIR), and metabolic clearance rate of insulin (MCRI) by the frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test in 1,295 participants in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study. RESULTS MCRI was positive...

  9. Studies of insulin resistance in congenital generalized lipodystrophy

    Søvik, O; Vestergaard, H; Trygstad, O;

    1996-01-01

    suppressed lipid oxidation in the controls. It is concluded that patients with congenital generalized lipodystrophy may present severe insulin resistance with regard to hepatic glucose production as well as muscle glycogen synthesis and lipid oxidation. The results suggest a postreceptor defect in the action......, immunoreactive protein and mRNA levels. The patients had fasting hyperinsulinaemia, and the rate of total glucose disposal was severely impaired, primarily due to a decreased non-oxidative glucose metabolism. In the patient studied with muscle biopsy, the expected activation of glycogen synthase by insulin did...... not occur. In both patients there was severely increased hepatic glucose output in the basal state, suggesting a failure of insulin to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis. During insulin infusion a substantially elevated rate of lipid oxidation remained in the patients, in contrast to the almost completely...

  10. Blood pressure, sodium intake, insulin resistance, and urinary nitrate excretion.

    Facchini, F S; DoNascimento, C; Reaven, G M; Yip, J W; Ni, X P; Humphreys, M H

    1999-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships among various humoral factors thought to be involved in the regulation of blood pressure during high NaCl intake. Nineteen healthy subjects underwent sequential 5-day periods ingesting a low-sodium (25 mmol/d) or high-sodium (200 mmol/d) diet. Insulin resistance was assessed by the steady-state plasma glucose concentration at the end of a 3-hour insulin suppression test. Insulin resistance correlated inversely with natriuresis (P=0.04) and directly with increase in weight (P=0.03). The increase in mean arterial pressure associated with the high-sodium diet correlated directly with the gain in weight (P<0.05) and inversely with the increase in urinary nitrate excretion (P<0.0001). In a multiple regression model, more than 2/3 of the variance in mean arterial pressure was accounted for by the gain in weight and change in urinary nitrate excretion. The steady-state plasma glucose concentrations obtained with the 2 diets were similar, indicating that insulin resistance was unaffected by sodium intake. During high sodium intake, plasma renin activity and aldosterone decreased and plasma atrial natriuretic peptide increased; these changes did not correlate with the change in mean arterial pressure, insulin resistance, or change in urinary nitrate excretion. To the extent that urinary nitrate excretion reflects activity of the endogenous nitric oxide system, these results suggest that the salt sensitivity of mean arterial pressure may be related to blunted generation of endogenous nitric oxide. The results also demonstrate that insulin-resistant individuals have an impaired natriuretic response to high sodium intake. PMID:10205239

  11. Increased IL-1β activation, the culprit not only for defective insulin secretion but also for insulin resistance?

    Marianne B(o)ni-Schnetzler; Marc Y Donath

    2011-01-01

    @@ Type 2 diabetes is a chronic progressive disease characterized by insufficient insulin secretion to compensate for insulin resistance.The onset of type 2 diabetes and its progression are mainly determined by the progressive failure of the pancreatic islet β-cells to produce sufficient levels of insulin.

  12. Role of PTEN in TNFα induced insulin resistance

    Aims/hypothesis: PTEN may play a reversible role in TNFα induced insulin resistance, which has been linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR). Methods: Western blots for PTEN and p-Akt were performed on H-411E liver cells incubated with insulin, TNFα, and in selected experiments VO-OHpic vanadium complex in the presence and absence of PTEN siRNA. Total PTEN was compared to β-actin loading control and p-Akt was compared to total Akt. Results: Western blot and Real Time RT-PCR experiments showed increased PTEN after TNFα treatment (p = 0.04); slightly decreased PTEN after insulin treatment; and slightly increased PTEN after insulin + TNFα treatment. PTEN siRNA markedly inhibited the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN (p < 0.01) without significantly changing the p-Akt levels. The vanadium complex, exhibiting insulin-like effects, also significantly prevented the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN. Combining insulin and VO-OHpic was additive, providing both proof of concept and insight into mechanism. Discussion: The PTEN increase due to TNFα treatment was reversible by both PTEN siRNA knockdown and VO-OHpic treatment. Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential new therapeutic target for reducing IR in Type 2 DM. - Highlights: • TNFα treatment induced a significant increase in PTEN in H-411E liver cells. • PTEN siRNA knockdown prevented this effect. • VO-OHpic (vanadium complex) treatment, like insulin, decreased PTEN protein levels. • Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential therapeutic target in DM Type 2

  13. Role of PTEN in TNFα induced insulin resistance

    Bulger, David A. [Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States); Wellcome Trust Medical Research Council Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Disease, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Conley, Jermaine [Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States); Conner, Spencer H.; Majumdar, Gipsy [Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States); Solomon, Solomon S., E-mail: ssolomon@uthsc.edu [Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States)

    2015-06-05

    Aims/hypothesis: PTEN may play a reversible role in TNFα induced insulin resistance, which has been linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR). Methods: Western blots for PTEN and p-Akt were performed on H-411E liver cells incubated with insulin, TNFα, and in selected experiments VO-OHpic vanadium complex in the presence and absence of PTEN siRNA. Total PTEN was compared to β-actin loading control and p-Akt was compared to total Akt. Results: Western blot and Real Time RT-PCR experiments showed increased PTEN after TNFα treatment (p = 0.04); slightly decreased PTEN after insulin treatment; and slightly increased PTEN after insulin + TNFα treatment. PTEN siRNA markedly inhibited the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN (p < 0.01) without significantly changing the p-Akt levels. The vanadium complex, exhibiting insulin-like effects, also significantly prevented the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN. Combining insulin and VO-OHpic was additive, providing both proof of concept and insight into mechanism. Discussion: The PTEN increase due to TNFα treatment was reversible by both PTEN siRNA knockdown and VO-OHpic treatment. Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential new therapeutic target for reducing IR in Type 2 DM. - Highlights: • TNFα treatment induced a significant increase in PTEN in H-411E liver cells. • PTEN siRNA knockdown prevented this effect. • VO-OHpic (vanadium complex) treatment, like insulin, decreased PTEN protein levels. • Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential therapeutic target in DM Type 2.

  14. Relationship of serum resistin with insulin resistance and obesity

    Background: Adipokines have been implicated in the modulation of insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance and have thus gained importance in the study of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Resistin, a unique signalling molecule, is being proposed as a significant factor in the pathogenesis of obesity-related insulin resistance. However, its relevance to human diabetes mellitus remains uncertain and controversial. This study was therefore planned to compare and correlate the potential role of resistin in obese patients with T2DM and obese non-diabetic controls and also to evaluate the correlation between resistin and marker of obesity and glycaemic parameters. Method: Fasting serum resistin, glucose and insulin were measured in forty obese diabetics (mean±SD BMI 35±5 kg/m2) and forty obese non-diabetics (mean±SD BMI 33±3 kg/m2). Insulin resistance was assessed using the HOMA-IR formula derived from fasting insulin and glucose levels. Results: Serum resistin levels (38±8 ng/ml) were significantly higher in type 2 diabetic patients as compared with the controls. Fasting blood glucose (164±46 mg/dl), serum insulin (37±7 μU/ml) and insulin resistance (19±8), were considerably higher among the studied diabetics than in the controls. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed positive correlation between serum resistin and BMI (p=0.001) and HOMA-IR (p=0.561) in diabetic subjects. Similarly, a correlation also existed between serum resistin and BMI (p=0.016) and HOMA-IR (p=0.307) in control obese subjects. However, it was highly significant in diabetics as compared to non-diabetic controls. Conclusion: A significant BMI-dependent association exists between resistin and insulin resistance in patients with T2DM. It appears that resistin may play a role in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance and that both of these may contribute to the development of T2DM. (author)

  15. Acute suppression of apo B secretion by insulin occurs independently of MTP

    Sparks, Janet D.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey; O’Dell, Colleen; Khatun, Irani; Hussain, M. Mahmood; Sparks, Charles E.

    2011-01-01

    Secretion of apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins by the liver depends mainly upon apo B availability and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) activity and is subject to insulin regulation. Hepatic MTP mRNA expression is negatively regulated by insulin which correlates with inhibition of apo B secretion suggesting that insulin might suppress apo B secretion through an MTP-dependent mechanism. To investigate this possibility, we examined the acute effect of insulin on hepat...

  16. Acute knockdown of the insulin receptor or its substrates Irs1 and 2 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes suppresses adiponectin production

    Groeneveld, Matthijs P.; Brierley, Gemma V.; Rocha, Nuno M.; Siddle, Kenneth; Semple, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of function of the insulin receptor (INSR) in humans produces severe insulin resistance. Unlike “common” insulin resistance, this is associated with elevated plasma levels of the insulin-sensitising, adipose-derived protein adiponectin. The underlying mechanism for this paradox is unclear, and it is at odds with the acute stimulation of adiponectin secretion reported on insulin treatment of cultured adipocytes. Given recent evidence for ligand-independent actions of the INSR, we used a lentiviral system to knock down Insr or its substrates Irs1 and Irs2 conditionally in 3T3-L1 murine preadipocytes/adipocytes to assess whether acute loss of their expression has different consequences to withdrawal of insulin. Efficient knockdown of either Insr or Irs1/2 was achieved by conditional shRNA expression, severely attenuating insulin-stimulated AKT phosphorylation and glucose uptake. Dual knockdown of Irs1 and Irs2 but not Insr in preadipocytes impaired differentiation to adipocytes. Acute knockdown of Insr or both Irs1 and Irs2 in adipocytes increased Adipoq mRNA expression but reduced adiponectin secretion, assessed by immunoassay. Knockdown sustained for 14 days also reduced immunoassay-detected adiponectin secretion, and moreover induced delipidation of the cells. These findings argue against a distinct effect of Insr deficiency to promote adiponectin secretion as the explanation for paradoxical insulin receptoropathy-related hyperadiponectinaemia. PMID:26888756

  17. Abdominal adiposity largely explains associations between insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and subclinical atherosclerosis: the NEO study

    Gast, K.B.; Smit, J.W.A.; Heijer, M. den; Middeldorp, S.; Rippe, R.C.; Cessie, S. le; Koning, E.J. de; Jukema, J.W.; Rabelink, T.J.; Roos, A. de; Rosendaal, F.R.; Mutsert, R. de; Assendelft, P.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The relative importance of insulin resistance and hyperglycemia to the development of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Furthermore, adiposity may be responsible for observed associations. Our aim was to study the relative contributions of adiposity, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia to

  18. Cancer-drug induced insulin resistance : Innocent bystander or unusual suspect

    Ariaans, G.; de Jong, S.; Gietema, J. A.; Lefrandt, J. D.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Jalving, M.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence strongly suggests an association between type 2 diabetes mellitus and cancer. Insulin resistance, causing hyperinsulinaemia and eventually hyperglycaemia, appears to increase cancer incidence and disease progression. In addition, insulin resistance seems to

  19. Insulin resistance and postreceptor changes of liver metabolism in fat-fed mice

    Hedeskov, Carl Jørgen; Capito, Kirsten; Hansen, Svend Erik;

    1992-01-01

    Medicinsk biokemi, animal diabetes, insulin resistance, postreceptor defects, liver metabolism, high-fat diet......Medicinsk biokemi, animal diabetes, insulin resistance, postreceptor defects, liver metabolism, high-fat diet...

  20. Effects of Diet and Exercise on Insulin Resistance during Pregnancy.

    Clapp, James F

    2006-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that both diet and exercise can alter the usual increase in insulin resistance seen in Western societies during mid and late pregnancy. A low-glycemic diet combined with a low-volume exercise regimen during pregnancy decreases the glucose and insulin response to both mixed caloric intake and exercise, and probably lowers both 24-h blood glucose concentrations and the maternal substrate utilization ratio of carbohydrate/fat. The end result is a marked decrease in both maternal weight gain and size at birth. Regular weight-bearing exercise alone lowers markers of insulin resistance and lowers blood glucose concentration during and immediately after exercise during pregnancy. Changes in diet and/or physical activity appear to prevent the onset of gestational diabetes mellitus in at-risk women and may be of value in the treatment of those who develop gestational diabetes. PMID:18370754

  1. Postexercise muscle glycogen resynthesis in obese insulin-resistant Zucker rats.

    Bruce, C R; Lee, J S; Hawley, J A

    2001-10-01

    We determined the effect of an acute bout of swimming (8 x 30 min) followed by either carbohydrate administration (0.5 mg/g glucose ip and ad libitum access to chow; CHO) or fasting (Fast) on postexercise glycogen resynthesis in soleus muscle and liver from female lean (ZL) and obese insulin-resistant (ZO) Zucker rats. Resting soleus muscle glycogen concentration ([glycogen]) was similar between genotypes and was reduced by 73 (ZL) and 63% (ZO) after exercise (P supercompensation in both genotypes (68% vs. 44% for ZL and ZO). With CHO, liver [glycogen] was restored to resting levels in ZL but remained at postexercise values for ZO after both treatments. We conclude that the increased glucose availability with carbohydrate refeeding after glycogen-depleting exercise resulted in glycogen supercompensation, even in the face of muscle insulin-resistance. PMID:11568131

  2. Adipose tissue gene expression analysis reveals changes in inflammatory, mitochondrial respiratory and lipid metabolic pathways in obese insulin-resistant subjects

    Soronen Jarkko

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To get insight into molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance, we compared acute in vivo effects of insulin on adipose tissue transcriptional profiles between obese insulin-resistant and lean insulin-sensitive women. Methods Subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies were obtained before and after 3 and 6 hours of intravenously maintained euglycemic hyperinsulinemia from 9 insulin-resistant and 11 insulin-sensitive females. Gene expression was measured using Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2 microarrays and qRT-PCR. Microarray data and pathway analyses were performed with Chipster v1.4.2 and by using in-house developed nonparametric pathway analysis software. Results The most prominent difference in gene expression of the insulin-resistant group during hyperinsulinemia was reduced transcription of nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial respiration (mitochondrial respiratory chain, GO:0001934. Inflammatory pathways with complement components (inflammatory response, GO:0006954 and cytokines (chemotaxis, GO:0042330 were strongly up-regulated in insulin-resistant as compared to insulin-sensitive subjects both before and during hyperinsulinemia. Furthermore, differences were observed in genes contributing to fatty acid, cholesterol and triglyceride metabolism (FATP2, ELOVL6, PNPLA3, SREBF1 and in genes involved in regulating lipolysis (ANGPTL4 between the insulin-resistant and -sensitive subjects especially during hyperinsulinemia. Conclusions The major finding of this study was lower expression of mitochondrial respiratory pathway and defective induction of lipid metabolism pathways by insulin in insulin-resistant subjects. Moreover, the study reveals several novel genes whose aberrant regulation is associated with the obese insulin-resistant phenotype.

  3. Waist circumference and insulin resistance: a cross-sectional study of Japanese men

    Hamachi Tadamichi; Yoshimitsu Shinichiro; Tabata Shinji; Abe Hiroshi; Ohnaka Keizo; Kono Suminori

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Visceral obesity is positively related to insulin resistance. The nature of the relationship between waist circumference and insulin resistance has not been known in Japanese populations. This study examined the relationship between waist circumference and insulin resistance and evaluated the optimal cutoff point for waist circumference in relation to insulin resistance in middle-aged Japanese men. Methods Study subjects included 4800 Japanese men aged 39 to 60 years. Insu...

  4. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Saotome, Masao, E-mail: msaotome@hama-med.ac.jp [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Funaki, Makoto [Clinical Research Center for Diabetes, Tokushima University Hospital, 2-50-1 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Hayashi, Hideharu [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin-resistance

  5. LMNA Mutations, Skeletal Muscle Lipid Metabolism, and Insulin Resistance

    Boschmann, M.; Engeli, S; Moro, C.; A Luedtke; Adams, F.; Gorzelniak, K; G Rahn; A Mdhler; Dobberstein, K.; A Kr'ger; S. Schmidt; Spuler, S.; Luft, F. C.; Smith, S.R.; Schmidt, H. H.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Type 2 familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD) is an autosomal-dominant lamin A/C-related disease associated with exercise intolerance, muscular pain, and insulin resistance. The symptoms may all be explained by defective metabolism; however, metabolism at the tissue level has not been investigated.

  6. Neuroendocrinology of insulin resistance : metabolic and endocrine aspects of adiposity

    van Dijk, G; de Vries, K; Benthem, L; Nyakas, C; Buwalda, B; Scheurink, AJW

    2003-01-01

    Abdominal obesity is a major risk factor to attract the insulin resistance syndrome. It is proposed that abdominal obesity exposes the liver to elevated levels of free fatty acids, which activate a neuroendocrine reflex, leading to increased circulating levels of glucocorticoids. Besides directly at

  7. Immunity as a link between obesity and insulin resistance

    Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major health problem in the United States and worldwide. Obesity is causally linked to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and T2DM. A chronic low-grade inflammation occurring in adipose tissue is at least in part responsible for the obesit...

  8. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN ADIPONECTIN, INSULIN RESISTANCE, AND ENDOMETRIAL CANCER

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is a well-known risk factor for the development of endometrial cancer; however, weight alone does not account for all cases. The authors hypothesized that insulin resistance also contributes to an increased risk for endometrial cancer. Adiponectin is a protein secreted by adipose...

  9. Complement activation, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and chronic heart failure

    Bjerre, M.; Kistorp, C.; Hansen, T.K.;

    2010-01-01

    CRP), endothelial activation (soluble E-selectin, sEsel)), endothelial damage/dysfunction (von Willebrand factor, vWf) and insulin resistance (IR) and prognosis in CHF remains unknown. Design. We investigated the association(s) between plasma sMAC, hsCRP, sEsel, vWf and IR (assessed by homeostatic model assessment...

  10. Skeletal muscle lipid metabolism in exercise and insulin resistance

    Kiens, Bente

    2006-01-01

    Lipids as fuel for energy provision originate from different sources: albumin-bound long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) in the blood plasma, circulating very-low-density lipoproteins-triacylglycerols (VLDL-TG), fatty acids from triacylglycerol located in the muscle cell (IMTG), and possibly fatty acids...... of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, including possible molecular mechanisms involved, is discussed....

  11. Osteopontin is required for the early onset of high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in mice.

    Justin Chapman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance is manifested in muscle, adipose tissue, and liver and is associated with adipose tissue inflammation. The cellular components and mechanisms that regulate the onset of diet-induced insulin resistance are not clearly defined. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We initially observed osteopontin (OPN mRNA over-expression in adipose tissue of obese, insulin resistant humans and rats which was normalized by thiazolidinedione (TZD treatment in both species. OPN regulates inflammation and is implicated in pathogenic maladies resulting from chronic obesity. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that OPN is involved in the early development of insulin resistance using a 2-4 week high fat diet (HFD model. OPN KO mice fed HFD for 2 weeks were completely protected from the severe skeletal muscle, liver and adipose tissue insulin resistance that developed in wild type (WT controls, as determined by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and acute insulin-stimulation studies. Although two-week HFD did not alter body weight or plasma free fatty acids and cytokines in either strain, HFD-induced hyperleptinemia, increased adipose tissue inflammation (macrophages and cytokines, and adipocyte hypertrophy were significant in WT mice and blunted or absent in OPN KO mice. Adipose tissue OPN protein isoform expression was significantly altered in 2- and 4-week HFD-fed WT mice but total OPN protein was unchanged. OPN KO bone marrow stromal cells were more osteogenic and less adipogenic than WT cells in vitro. Interestingly, the two differentiation pathways were inversely affected by HFD in WT cells in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: The OPN KO phenotypes we report reflect protection from insulin resistance that is associated with changes in adipocyte biology and adipose tissue inflammatory status. OPN is a key component in the development of HFD-induced insulin resistance.

  12. Insulin resistance in sub clinical hypothyroidism

    Shyam Rameshwar Adhau

    2015-06-01

    Results: HOMA-IR values showed highly significant association between controls and SCH. TSH levels were positively correlated with insulin and HOMA IR in patients with SCH. Conclusions: Therefore, it will be good practice to screen people and Type 2 DM patients for presence of SCH, so that early detection and prompt intervention can prevent or prolong the appearance of various fatal complications associated with IR and help in managing diabetes holistically. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(6.000: 1420-1425

  13. Accuracy and optimization of a subcutaneous insulin model for less acute critical care patients.

    Thomas, Felicity; Dickson, Jennifer; Pretty, Chris; Stewart, Kent; Fisk, Liam; Shaw, Geoffrey; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2015-08-01

    Extending safe, effective glycemic control to the general wards requires a simple approach using subcutaneous (SC) insulin. However, this approach can increase relative risk compared to intravenous insulin due to the increased variability of SC insulin appearance. This paper evaluates the accuracy of a SC plasma insulin model and optimizes its parameters using measured plasma insulin data from 6 less acute critical care patients treated with SC insulin. The SC plasma insulin model used captures the dynamics of regular SC insulin well. However, there appears to be a positive bias leading to an overall median [IQR] residual error of -28.3 [-37 - 19] mU/L. The optimized model reduced the RMS residual error by 20-70% for each patient. The distinct inter- and intra-patient, and cohort variation seen in this data highlights the importance to of understanding how SC insulin appearance dynamics may be affected by the subject condition. PMID:26737279

  14. Monomeric Tartrate Resistant Acid Phosphatase Induces Insulin Sensitive Obesity

    Lång, Pernilla; van Harmelen, Vanessa; Rydén, Mikael; Kaaman, Maria; Parini, Paolo; Carneheim, Claes; Cassady, A. Ian; Hume, David A.; Andersson, Göran; Arner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue, which may link adipose inflammation to insulin resistance. However, the impact of inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of obesity remains unclear. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) is an enzyme expressed by subsets of macrophages and osteoclasts that exists either as an enzymatically inactive monomer or as an active, proteolytically processed dimer. Principal Findings Using mice over expressing TRAP...

  15. Association of Nocturnal Melatonin Secretion With Insulin Resistance in Nondiabetic Young Women

    McMullan, Ciaran J.; CURHAN, Gary C.; Schernhammer, Eva S.; Forman, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous melatonin ameliorates insulin resistance in animals, while among humans, polymorphisms in the melatonin receptor gene are associated with insulin resistance. We aimed to investigate the association of endogenous nocturnal melatonin secretion with insulin resistance in humans. We analyzed the association between endogenous nocturnal melatonin secretion, estimated by measuring the main melatonin metabolite, 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, from the first morning urinary void, and the prevalence ...

  16. Are hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL causal factors in the development of insulin resistance?

    Li, Naishi; Fu, Jingyuan; Koonen, Debby P.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Snieder, Harold; Hofker, Marten H.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance often occurs with dyslipidemia as part of the metabolic syndrome and the current dominant paradigm is that insulin resistance leads to dyslipidemia. However, dyslipidemia may also cause insulin resistance; this was postulated 30 years ago, but has never been substantiated. Establi

  17. Anaesthesia generates neuronal insulin resistance by inducing hypothermia

    Sutherland Calum

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaesthesia is commonly employed prior to surgical investigations and to permit icv injections in rodents. Indeed it is standard practise in many studies examining the subsequent actions of hormones and growth factors on the brain. Recent evidence that the basal activity of specific intracellular signalling proteins can be affected by anaesthesia prompted us to examine the effect of anaesthesia not only on the basal activity but also the insulin sensitivity of the major insulin signalling pathways. Results We find that urethane- and ketamine-induced anaesthesia results in rapid activation of the phosphatidylinositol (PI 3-kinase-protein kinase B (PKB signalling pathway in the brain, increases tau phosphorylation while at the same time reducing basal activity of the Ras-ERK pathway. Subsequent injection of insulin does not alter the activity of either the PI 3-kinase or ERK signalling pathways, indicating a degree of neuronal molecular insulin resistance. However, if body temperature is maintained during anaesthesia then there is no alteration in the basal activity of these signalling molecules. Subsequent response of both pathways to insulin injection is restored. Conclusion The data is consistent with a hypothermia related alteration in neuronal signalling following anaesthesia, and emphasises the importance of maintaining the body temperature of rodents when monitoring insulin (or growth factor/neurotrophic agent action in the brain of anesthetised rodents.

  18. Intrinsic Frequency and the Single Wave Biopsy: Implications for Insulin Resistance.

    Petrasek, Danny; Pahlevan, Niema M; Tavallali, Peyman; Rinderknecht, Derek G; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Insulin resistance is the hallmark of classical type II diabetes. In addition, insulin resistance plays a central role in metabolic syndrome, which astonishingly affects 1 out of 3 adults in North America. The insulin resistance state can precede the manifestation of diabetes and hypertension by years. Insulin resistance is correlated with a low-grade inflammatory condition, thought to be induced by obesity as well as other conditions. Currently, the methods to measure and monitor insulin resistance, such as the homeostatic model assessment and the euglycemic insulin clamp, can be impractical, expensive, and invasive. Abundant evidence exists that relates increased pulse pressure, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and vascular dysfunction with insulin resistance. We introduce a potential method of assessing insulin resistance that relies on a novel signal-processing algorithm, the intrinsic frequency method (IFM). The method requires a single pulse pressure wave, thus the term " wave biopsy." PMID:26183600

  19. Is myopia another clinical manifestation of insulin resistance?

    Galvis, Virgilio; López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Tello, Alejandro; Castellanos-Castellanos, Yuly Andrea; Camacho, Paul Anthony; Cohen, Daniel Dylan; Gómez-Arbeláez, Diego; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús

    2016-05-01

    Myopia is a multifactorial visual refraction disease, in which the light rays from distant objects are focused in front of retina, causing blurry vision. Myopic eyes are characterized by an increased corneal curvature and/or ocular axial length. The prevalence of myopia has increased in recent decades, a trend that cannot be attributed exclusively to genetic factors. Low and middle income countries have a higher burden of refractive error, which we propose could be a consequence of a shorter exposure time to a westernized lifestyle, a phenomenon that may also explain the rapid increase in cardiometabolic diseases, such as diabetes, among those populations. We suggest that interactions between genetic, epigenetic and a rapidly changing environment are also involved in myopia onset and progression. Furthermore, we discuss several possible mechanisms by which insulin resistance may promote abnormal ocular growth and myopia to support the hypothesis that insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are involved in its pathogenesis, providing a link between trends in myopia and those of cardiometabolic diseases. There is evidence that insulin have direct ocular growth promoting effects as well an indirect effect via the induction of insulin-like growth factors leading to decreases insulin-like growth factor-binding protein, also implicated in ocular growth. PMID:27063082

  20. Molecular Mechanism of Insulin Resistance in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes

    Choi, Kangduk; Kim, Young-Bum

    2010-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a major risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes caused by the inability of insulin-target tissues to respond properly to insulin, and contributes to the morbidity of obesity. Insulin action involves a series of signaling cascades initiated by insulin binding to its receptor, eliciting receptor autophosphorylation and activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase, resulting in tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrates (IRSs). Phosphorylation of IRSs leads to...

  1. Insulin as the main regulator of cellular glucose utilization--aetiological aspects of insulin resistance.

    Tatoń, Jan; Czech, Anna; Piatkiewicz, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    This review presents the advances in the molecular biology and the pathophysiology of insulin resistance with emphasis on disturbances in cellular glucose transport. New scientific information about the structure and function of glucotransporters from the GLUT4 and SLGT families underline their significance in endocrinopathies and metabolic disease pathogenesis as related to insulin resistance. The new discoveries in this area also contribute to a better understanding of the regulation of insulin receptor and post-receptor reactivity by hormones and by drugs. They refer to the regulation of glycaemia and to its disturbances in diabetes mellitus, particularly of type 2, to metabolic syndrome, and, in general, to the pathogenesis of many syndromes and clinical disturbances caused by insulin resistance. Impairment of cellular glucose transport may be one of the primary aetiological factors in this respect. Therefore, studies of cellular glucotransporters expression and function promise new clinical and pharmacotherapeutic developments. Progress in this area has already been transformed into many practical proposals which are improving clinical practice. PMID:20806184

  2. Recent Advances in Obesity-induced Inflammation and Insulin Resistance.

    Sanshiro eTateya

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated in rodents and humans that chronic inflammation characterized by macrophage infiltration occurs mainly in adipose tissue or liver during obesity, in which activation of immune cells is closely associated with insulin sensitivity. Macrophages can be classified as classically activated (M1 macrophages that support microbicidal activity or alternatively activated (M2 macrophages that support allergic and antiparasitic responses. In the context of insulin action, M2 macrophages sustain insulin sensitivity by secreting IL-4 and IL-10, while M1 macrophages induce insulin resistance through the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNFα. Polarization of M1/M2 is controlled by various dynamic functions of other immune cells. It has been demonstrated that, in a lean state, TH2 cells, Treg cells, natural killer T cells, or eosinophils contribute to the M2 activation of macrophages by secreting IL-4 or IL10. In contrast, obesity causes alteration of the constituent immune cells, in which TH1 cells, B cells, neutrophils, or mast cells induce M1 activation of macrophages by the elevated secretion of TNFα and IFNγ. Increased secretion of TNFα and free fatty acids from hypertrophied adipocytes also contributes to the M1 activation of macrophages. Since obesity-induced insulin resistance is established by macrophage infiltration and the activation of immune cells inside tissues, identification of the factors that regulate accumulation and the intracellular signaling cascades that define polarization of M1/M2 would be indispensable. Regulation of these factors would lead to the pharmacological inhibition of obesity-induced insulin resistance. In this review, we introduce molecular mechanisms relevant to the pathophysiology and review the most recent studies of clinical applications targeting chronic inflammation.

  3. Recent advances in obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance.

    Tateya, Sanshiro; Kim, Francis; Tamori, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated in rodents and humans that chronic inflammation characterized by macrophage infiltration occurs mainly in adipose tissue or liver during obesity, in which activation of immune cells is closely associated with insulin sensitivity. Macrophages can be classified as classically activated (M1) macrophages that support microbicidal activity or alternatively activated (M2) macrophages that support allergic and antiparasitic responses. In the context of insulin action, M2 macrophages sustain insulin sensitivity by secreting IL-4 and IL-10, while M1 macrophages induce insulin resistance through the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNFα. Polarization of M1/M2 is controlled by various dynamic functions of other immune cells. It has been demonstrated that, in a lean state, TH2 cells, Treg cells, natural killer T cells, or eosinophils contribute to the M2 activation of macrophages by secreting IL-4 or IL-10. In contrast, obesity causes alteration of the constituent immune cells, in which TH1 cells, B cells, neutrophils, or mast cells induce M1 activation of macrophages by the elevated secretion of TNFα and IFNγ. Increased secretion of TNFα and free fatty acids from hypertrophied adipocytes also contributes to the M1 activation of macrophages. Since obesity-induced insulin resistance is established by macrophage infiltration and the activation of immune cells inside tissues, identification of the factors that regulate accumulation and the intracellular signaling cascades that define polarization of M1/M2 would be indispensable. Regulation of these factors would lead to the pharmacological inhibition of obesity-induced insulin resistance. In this review, we introduce molecular mechanisms relevant to the pathophysiology and review the most recent studies of clinical applications targeting chronic inflammation. PMID:23964268

  4. Association of fasting glucagon and proinsulin concentrations with insulin resistance

    Ferrannini, E; Muscelli, E; Natali, A;

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Hyperproinsulinaemia and relative hyperglucagonaemia are features of type 2 diabetes. We hypothesised that raised fasting glucagon and proinsulin concentrations may be associated with insulin resistance (IR) in non-diabetic individuals. METHODS: We measured IR [by a euglycaemic......, controlling for known determinants of insulin sensitivity (i.e. sex, age, BMI and glucose tolerance) as well as factors potentially affecting glucagon and proinsulin (i.e. fasting plasma glucose and C-peptide concentrations), glucagon and proinsulin were still positively associated, and adiponectin...

  5. Development of Wistar rat model of insulin resistance

    Jing Ai; Ning Wang; Mei Yang; Zhi-Min Du; Yong-Chun Zhang; Bao-Feng Yang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To establish a simplified and reliable animal model of insulin resistance with low cost in Wistar rats. METHODS: Wistar rats were treated with a high fat emulsion by ig for 10 d. Changes of the diets, drinking and body weight were monitored every day and insulin resistance was evaluated by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemicclamp techniques and short insulin tolerance test using capillary blood glucose. Morphologic changes of liver, fat, skeletal muscles, and pancreatic islets were assessed under light microscope. mRNA expressions of GLUT2 and α-glucosidase in small intestine epithelium, GLUT4 in skeletal muscles and Kir6.2 in beta cell of islets were determined by in situ hybridization.RESULTS: KITT was smaller in treated animals (4.5±0.9)than in untreated control Wistar rats (6.8±1.5), and so was glucose injection rate. Both adipocyte hypertrophy and large pancreatic islets were seen in high fat fed rats,but no changes of skeletal muscles and livers wereobserved. mRNA levels of GLUT2, α-glucosidase in small intestinal epithelium and Kir6.2 mRNA in beta cells of islets increased, whereas that of GLUT4 in skeletal muscles decreased in high fat fed group compared with normal control group.CONCLUSION: An insulin resistance animal model in Wistar rats is established by ig special fat emulsion.

  6. Proinsulin and insulin profile in acute myocardial infarction

    Proinsulin and insulin in 104 and glucagon in 10 cases were estimated by radioimmunoassay (RIA) technique in uncomplicated cases of acute myocardial infarction (A.M.I.), matched against 44 and 5 controls respectively. Patients were divided into group A and B based on oral glucose tolerance test (G.T.T.) done on the following morning after admission. Group A comprised of 65 and group B comprised of 49 patients with normal and abnormal G.T.T. respectively. The tests were repeated prior to discharge from the hospital at the end of 6th week. The initial values of insulin and glucagon were found to be significantly raised in both the groups but came down to normal in group A whereas they remained unchanged in group B in the follow up study. Proinsulin values in group A were not significantly changed both in initial and follow up study. In group B proinsulin values were found to be significantly low both initially and in the follow up study. G.T.T. in group B remained abnormal even at the end of the 6th week. (author)

  7. Proinsulin and insulin profile in acute myocardial infarction

    Mowar, S.N.; Pal, S.K.; Chhetri, M.K.; Ghosh, K.K. (Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research, Calcutta (India))

    Proinsulin and insulin in 104 and glucagon in 10 cases were estimated by radioimmunoassay (RIA) technique in uncomplicated cases of acute myocardial infarction (A.M.I.), matched against 44 and 5 controls respectively. Patients were divided into group A and B based on oral glucose tolerance test (G.T.T.) done on the following morning after admission. Group A comprised of 65 and group B comprised of 49 patients with normal and abnormal G.T.T. respectively. The tests were repeated prior to discharge from the hospital at the end of 6th week. The initial values of insulin and glucagon were found to be significantly raised in both the groups but came down to normal in group A whereas they remained unchanged in group B in the follow up study. Proinsulin values in group A were not significantly changed both in initial and follow up study. In group B proinsulin values were found to be significantly low both initially and in the follow up study. G.T.T. in group B remained abnormal even at the end of the 6th week.

  8. Insulin sensitivity and metabolic flexibility following exercise training among different obese insulin resistant phenotypes

    Malin, Steven K; Haus, Jacob M; Solomon, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) blunts the reversal of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) after exercise training. Metabolic inflexibility has been implicated in the etiology of insulin resistance, however, the efficacy of exercise on peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity or substrate utilization...... fasting RQ) were also assessed. Glucose incremental area under the curve was calculated from the OGTT (iAUCOGTT). Exercise increased clamp-derived peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity more in adults with IFG or IGT alone than IFG+IGT (P...... in adults with IFG, IGT or IFG+IGT is unknown. Twenty-four older (66.7±0.8yr) obese (34.2±0.9kg/m(2)) adults were categorized as IFG (n=8), IGT (n=8), or IFG+IGT (n=8) according to a 75-gram oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Subjects underwent 12-weeks of exercise (60 min/d for 5 d/wk at ~85% HRmax...

  9. Insulin resistance in different forms of hyperketonemia and in cows affected by puerperal metritis

    In dairy cows selected for high milk production the phenomenon of insulin resistance (IR) seems to play a pivotal role both in adaptation to the postpartum negative energy balance and in the aetiology of some periparturient metabolic disturbances. Perturbation of pancreatic insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity of peripheral tissues has been documented in the pathogenesis of abomasal displacement, cystic ovarian disease, excessive lipid accumulation in the liver and ketosis. In human population and in laboratory animal models pro-inflammatory cytokines like tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) play an essential role in the development of IR that occurs in association with obesity, acute infections and endotoxaemia. A similar interaction between the intensive release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and IR has been recently explored also in ruminants. This trial was conducted in high-yielding dairy cows challenged with standard intravenous doses of glucose and insulin in different time intervals to parturition. The aim was to determine the grade and time-related changes of (i) glucose-stimulated insulin increase and (ii) insulin-induced glucose decline, furthermore (iii) the interrelation of these challenge tests with plasma levels of metabolites and metabolic hormones in cows showing various ketone pattern with and without puerperal metritis. 28 multiparous Holstein cows (previous 305 FCM day milk: 8331±192.8 L) were subjected to intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) on day -18, 7 and 70 around calving. Plasma βOH butyrate (BHB), non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA), glucose, insulin, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and leptin levels were measured regularly from -18 d before, till d 70 after calving. Cows were milked out twice a day. The course of postpartum uterine involution was checked regularly, and cows showing clinical signs of bacterial complications were treated with antibiotics combined with repeated administration of PGF2α. All cows showing

  10. Oxidative stress, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and type 2diabetes mellitus

    Surapon Tangvarasittichai

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in metabolic syndromeand type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this appearsto underlie the development of cardiovascular disease,T2DM and diabetic complications. Increased oxidativestress appears to be a deleterious factor leading to insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, β-cell dysfunction, impaired glucose tolerance and ultimately leading to T2DM. Chronic oxidative stress, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are particularly dangerous for β-cells from lowest levels of antioxidant, have high oxidative energy requirements, decrease the gene expression of key β-cell genes and induce cell death. If β-cell functioning is impaired, it results in an under production of insulin, impairs glucose stimulated insulin secretion, fasting hyperglycemia and eventually the development of T2DM.

  11. Effects of turtle oil on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in insulin resistant cell model

    To evaluate the effects of turtle oil on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in an insulin-resistant (IR) cell model which was established by the way of high concentration of insulin induction with HepG2 cell in vitro culture. The IR cells were treated by turtle oil, the glucose consumption and 3H-D-glucose incorporation rate in IR cells were detected by the way of glucose oxidase and 3H-D-glucose incorporation assay respectively. The state of cell proliferation was tested by MTT method. The results showed that the incorporation rate of 3H-D-glucose in IR cells was significantly lower than that in the control cells(P3H-D-glucose incorporation rate in either IR cells or control cells was increased with the increase of insulin concentration. Moreover, the 3H-D-glucose incorporation rate of IR cells increased slower than that of control cells. The MTT assay showed that turtle oil can promote the proliferation of IR cell and control cell. The glucose uptake and glucose consumption in IR cell which treated with turtle oil was significantly increase than that in the control cells (P<0.05). Turtle oil can improve the insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in the IR cell model. (authors)

  12. Glucose and lipid metabolism in insulin resistance : an experimental study in fat cells

    Burén, Jonas

    2003-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is usually caused by a combination of pancreatic β-cell failure and insulin resistance in target tissues like liver, muscle and fat. Insulin resistance is characterised by an impaired effect of insulin to reduce hepatic glucose production and to promote glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. The focus of this study was to further elucidate cellular mechanisms for insulin resistance that may be of relevance for type 2 diabetes in humans. We used rat and human adipocytes as an es...

  13. The Role of Hepatic FoxO1 in Insulin Resistance

    Ling, Alisha Viva

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a major health concern in the US, affecting a third of all adults and amplifying the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The central pathophysiological root of metabolic syndrome is widely considered to be insulin resistance, though the mechanisms linking insulin resistance to this clinical constellation of obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and hepatic steatosis are poorly understood. In insulin resistance, insulin suppression of the forkhead box protein O1 (F...

  14. Age-related inflammation and insulin resistance: a review of their intricate interdependency

    Park, Min Hi; Kim, Dae Hyun; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Kim, Nam Deuk; Im, Dong Soon; Lee, Jaewon; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a major risk factor underlying aging and the associated diseases of aging; of particular interest is insulin resistance during aging. Chronic inflammation impairs normal lipid accumulation, adipose tissue function, mitochondrial function, and causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which lead to insulin resistance. However, some studies show that insulin resistance itself amplifies chronic inflammation. The activity of the insulin-dependent Akt signaling pathway is h...

  15. Status of serum adiponectin related to insulin resistance in prediabetics

    Obejctive: To find the status of serum adiponectin in individuals progressing towards Type 2 diabetes mellitus and compare it with normal glucose tolerant subjects to determine the stage where alteration of adiponectin occurred. Methods: The cross-sectional study was carried out at the Department of Biochemistry, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, during January to August 2008. Subjects were invited through various diabetes screening camps. A total of 608 subjects >30 years of age without prior history of diabetes were screened through fasting plasma glucose and 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test. Forty randomly selected pre-diabetic subjects and 40 age and gender-matched subjects were included in the study. Anthropometric measurements were done. Serum insulin and adiponectin were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used to calculate insulin resistance mathematically. Result: Mean fasting and two-hour plasma glucose, body mass index, waist, hip circumference and blood pressure were significantly raised in pre-diabetics compared to those with normal glucose tolerance. Adiponectin was significantly decreased, while insulin and HOMA-IR were raised significantly in the pre-diabetics. Adiponectin showed significant negative correlation with body mass index (r=-0.31, p=0.005), fasting plasma glucose (r=-0.24, p= 0.032), 2-hour plasma glucose (r=-0.42, p<0.0001)), insulin (r-0.43, p<0.0001) and HOMA-IR (r= -0.43, p<0.0001) and remained significant after adjustment of body mass index, gender and insulin level in pre-diabetics. Conclusion: Adiponectin estimation may help in earlier identification of impending diabetes. However, casual link between adiponectin and pre-diabetes remained unexplored due to the study design and small sample size that warrants longitudinal large-scale studies. (author)

  16. Bimodal effect on pancreatic β-cells of secretory products from normal or insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle

    Bouzakri, Karim; Plomgaard, Peter; Berney, Thierry;

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance with a relative deficiency in insulin secretion. This study explored the potential communication between insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle and primary (human and rat) ß-cells....

  17. Bimodal effect on pancreatic β-cells of secretory products from normal or insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle

    Bouzakri, Karim; Plomgaard, Peter; Berney, Thierry;

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance with a relative deficiency in insulin secretion. This study explored the potential communication between insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle and primary (human and rat) β-cells....

  18. Metabolic programming in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance.

    Devaskar, Sherin U; Thamotharan, Manikkavasagar

    2007-06-01

    This review focuses on different animal models of nutrient perturbations, inclusive of restrictive and excessive states mimicking human situations during pregnancy and lactation that cause aberrations in the offspring. These aberrations consist of diminished insulin sensitivity in the presence of defective insulin production. These phenotypic changes are due to altered peripheral tissue post-insulin receptor signaling mechanisms and pancreatic beta-islet insulin synthesis and secretion defects. While these changes during in utero or postnatal life serve as essential adaptations to overcome adverse conditions, they become maladaptive subsequently and set the stage for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pregnancy leads to gestational diabetes with trans-generational propagation of the insulin resistant phenotype. This is in response to the metabolically aberrant maternal in utero environment, and tissue specific epigenetic perturbations that permanently alter expression of critical genes transmitted to future generations. These heritable aberrations consisting of altered DNA methylation and histone modifications remodel chromatin and affect transcription of key genes. Along with an altered in utero environment, these chromatin modifications contribute to the world-wide epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus, with nutrient excess dominating in developed and nutrient restriction in developing countries. PMID:17657604

  19. Endothelin-1 exacerbates development of hypertension and atherosclerosis in modest insulin resistant syndrome

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is known as potent vasoconstrictor, by virtue of its mitogenic effects, and may deteriorate the process of hypertension and atherosclerosis by aggravating hyperplasia and migration in VSMCs. Our previous study demonstrated that insulin infusion caused sequential induction of hyperinsulinemia, hyperendothelinemia, insulin resistance, and then hypertension in rats. However, the underlying mechanism of ET-1 interfere insulin signaling in VSMCs remains unclear. To characterize insulin signaling during modest insulin resistant syndrome, we established and monitored rats by feeding high fructose-diet (HFD) until high blood pressure and modest insulin resistance occurred. To explore the role of ET-1/ETAR during insulin resistance, ETAR expression, ET-1 binding, and insulin signaling were investigated in the HFD-fed rats and cultured A-10 VSMCs. Results showed that high blood pressure, tunica medial wall thickening, plasma ET-1 and insulin, and accompanied with modest insulin resistance without overweight and hyperglycemia occurred in early-stage HFD-fed rats. In the endothelium-denuded aorta from HFD-fed rats, ETAR expression, but not ETBR, and ET-1 binding in aorta were increased. Moreover, decreasing of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and increasing of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation were observed in aorta during modest insulin resistance. Interestingly, in ET-1 pretreated VSMCs, the increment of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation was decreased whereas the increment of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation was increased. In addition, insulin potentiated ET-1-induced VSMCs migration and proliferation due to increasing ET-1 binding. ETAR antagonist reversed effects of ET-1 on insulin-induced signaling and VSMCs migration and proliferation. In summary, modest insulin resistance syndrome accompanied with hyperinsulinemia leading to the potentiation on ET-1-induced actions in aortic VSMCs. ET-1 via ETAR pathway suppressed insulin-induced AKT

  20. Rosiglitazone treatment of patients with extreme insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus due to insulin receptor mutations has no effects on glucose and lipid metabolism

    Vestergaard, H; Lund, S; Pedersen, O; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    Rosiglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD), increases insulin sensitivity by reducing levels of plasma NEFA, triglycerides (TG), glucose and serum insulin. Rosiglitazone treatment decreases insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients, but no data exist concerning rosiglitazone treatment of...... patients with syndromes of extreme insulin resistance....

  1. Resistance training, insulin sensitivity and muscle function in the elderly

    Dela, Flemming; Kjaer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Ageing is associated with a loss in both muscle mass and in the metabolic quality of skeletal muscle. This leads to sarcopenia and reduced daily function, as well as to an increased risk for development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. A major part, but not all, of these changes are...... associated with an age-related decrease in the physical activity level and can be counteracted by increased physical activity of a resistive nature. Strength training has been shown to improve insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in both healthy elderly individuals and patients with manifest diabetes, and...... likewise to improve muscle strength in both elderly healthy individuals and in elderly individuals with chronic disease. The increased strength is coupled to improved function and a decreased risk for fall injuries and fractures. Elderly individuals have preserved the capacity to improve muscle strength...

  2. The Impact of Organokines on Insulin Resistance, Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis.

    Choi, Kyung Mook

    2016-03-01

    Immoderate energy intake, a sedentary lifestyle, and aging have contributed to the increased prevalence of obesity, sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. There is an urgent need for the development of novel pharmacological interventions that can target excessive fat accumulation and decreased muscle mass and/or strength. Adipokines, bioactive molecules derived from adipose tissue, are involved in the regulation of appetite and satiety, inflammation, energy expenditure, insulin resistance and secretion, glucose and lipid metabolism, and atherosclerosis. Recently, there is emerging evidence that skeletal muscle and the liver also function as endocrine organs that secrete myokines and hepatokines, respectively. Novel discoveries and research into these organokines (adipokines, myokines, and hepatokines) may lead to the development of promising biomarkers and therapeutics for cardiometabolic disease. In this review, I summarize recent data on these organokines and focus on the role of adipokines, myokines, and hepatokines in the regulation of insulin resistance, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. PMID:26996418

  3. Insulin

    ... Short Acting Humulin N NPH Human Insulin (Human Insulin Isophane Suspension) Intermediate Acting Novolin N NPH Human Insulin (Human Insulin Isophane Suspension) Intermediate Acting Lantus Insulin Glargine Long Acting ...

  4. Relationship between insulin resistance and plasma vitamin D in adults

    Badawi A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Alaa Badawi,1 Suzan Sayegh,2 Eman Sadoun,3 Mohamed Al-Thani,2 Paul Arora,4 Pierre S Haddad51Office of Biotechnology, Genomics and Population Health, Public Health Agency of Canada, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Department of Public Health, 3Clinical Research Division, Supreme Council of Health, Doha, Qatar; 4Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, ON, Canada; 5Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, CanadaAbstract: A recent relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and insulin resistance has been established through several studies. Research suggests a correlation between serum vitamin D and glycemic status measures. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the plasma vitamin D levels (25[OH]D and the factors linked to insulin resistance in a representative sample of Canadians ranging in age from 16–79 years. Data were used from the Canadian Health Measures Survey where direct measures of health and wellness were reported from 1,928 subjects. These data were gathered from March 2007–February 2009 at 15 sites selected through a multistage sampling strategy. An inverse relationship between insulin resistance and plasma vitamin D level in both men and women was observed. This study provides additional evidence for the role of vitamin D in T2DM. If causally associated, the supplementation of vitamin D may help in preventing insulin resistance and subsequent T2DM.Keywords: HOMA-IR, plasma 25(OHD, diabetes

  5. Sildenafil Reduces Insulin-Resistance in Human Endothelial Cells

    Caterina Mammi; Donatella Pastore; Lombardo, Marco F; Francesca Ferrelli; Massimiliano Caprio; Claudia Consoli; Manfredi Tesauro; Lucia Gatta; Massimo Fini; Massimo Federici; Paolo Sbraccia; Giulia Donadel; Alfonso Bellia; Giuseppe M Rosano; Andrea Fabbri

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy of Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors to re-establish endothelial function is reduced in diabetic patients. Recent evidences suggest that therapy with PDE5 inhibitors, i.e. sildenafil, may increase the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) proteins in the heart and cardiomyocytes. In this study we analyzed the effect of sildenafil on endothelial cells in insulin resistance conditions in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cel...

  6. Lifecourse Childhood Adiposity Trajectories Associated With Adolescent Insulin Resistance

    Huang, Rae-Chi; de Klerk, Nicholas H.; Smith, Anne; Kendall, Garth E; Landau, Louis I.; Mori, Trevor A; NEWNHAM, John P; Stanley, Fiona J; Oddy, Wendy H; Hands, Beth; Lawrence J. Beilin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In light of the obesity epidemic, we aimed to characterize novel childhood adiposity trajectories from birth to age 14 years and to determine their relation to adolescent insulin resistance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 1,197 Australian children with cardiovascular/metabolic profiling at age 14 years were studied serially from birth to age 14 years. Semiparametric mixture modeling was applied to anthropometric data over eight time points to generate adiposity trajectories ...

  7. [Free fatty acids: mediators of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis].

    Castro Cabezas, M; Erkelens, D W; van Dijk, H

    2002-01-19

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) are involved in the transportation of energy; in the postprandial phase to the peripheral tissues and in the postabsorptive phase from the adipose tissue to the liver. In the postprandial phase, FFAs are mainly derived from hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich particles like chylomicrons and very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). The flux of FFAs is directed to peripheral cells such as adipocytes and muscle cells. In the postabsorptive period, FFAs are transported to the liver after being released from intracellular storage in the adipocytes. Complement component 3 (C3) plays an important role in the uptake of free fatty acids by the peripheral cells and their esterification to triglycerides. Since C3 is also involved in the pathogenesis of the insulin resistance syndrome, and since a deviant FFA metabolism with an increased FFA flux to the liver may induce insulin resistance, it is hypothesized that C3 may form the missing link between FFA metabolism and insulin resistance. In addition, recent studies have increasingly indicated that atherosclerosis is in fact an inflammation-based process involving complement-dependent responses, in which FFAs seem to play a role in the complement-dependent pathway. It has recently become apparent that FFAs have a regulatory function in the transcription of DNA, in relation to lipoprotein metabolism. This is where PPAR-gamma and PPAR-alpha agonists ('glitazones' and fibrates respectively) are active (PPAR is an abbreviation for peroxisome proliferation activating receptor). Glitazons may play an important role in the treatment of insulin resistance and related disorders. Acquiring more knowledge about the relationship between complement and FFA metabolism may increase our understanding of these processes and provide openings for the development of new antiatherogenic strategies. PMID:11826668

  8. Hyperandrogenism-Insulin Resistance-Acanthosis Nigricans Syndrome

    Dédjan, A. H.; A. Chadli; El Aziz, S.; Farouqi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Female hyperandrogenism is a frequent motive of consultation. It is revealed by hirsutism, acne or seborrhea, and disorders in menstruation cycle combined or not with virilisation signs. Several etiologies are incriminated but the hyperandrogenism-insulin resistance-acanthosis nigricans syndrome is rare. Observation. A 20-year-old girl, having had a five-year-old secondary amenorrhea. The exam revealed a patient, normotensive with a body mass index at 30 kg/m2 and a waist measur...

  9. Insulin resistance of muscle protein metabolism in aging

    Rasmussen, Blake B.; Fujita, Satoshi; Wolfe, Robert R.; Mittendorfer, Bettina; Roy, Mona; Rowe, Vincent L.; Volpi, Elena

    2006-01-01

    A reduced response of older skeletal muscle to anabolic stimuli may contribute to the development of sarcopenia. We hypothesized that muscle proteins are resistant to the anabolic action of insulin in the elderly. We examined the effects of hyperinsulinemia on muscle protein metabolism in young (25±2 year) and older (68±1 year) healthy subjects using stable isotope tracer techniques. Leg blood flow was higher in the young at baseline and increased during hyperinsulinemia, whereas it did not c...

  10. The Links Between Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, and Cancer

    Orgel, Etan; Mittelman, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity has resulted in a large increase in multiple related diseases. Recent evidence has strengthened the proposed synergistic relationship between obesity-related insulin resistance (IR) and/or diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer. Within the past year, many studies have examined this relationship. Although the precise mechanisms and pathways are uncertain, it is becoming clear that hyperinsulinemia and possibly sustained hyperglycemia are important regulators of not o...

  11. Heart Rate Variability, Insulin Resistance, and Insulin Sensitivity in Japanese Adults: The Toon Health Study

    Isao Saito

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although impaired cardiac autonomic function is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in Caucasians, evidence in Asian populations with a lower body mass index is limited. Methods: Between 2009–2012, the Toon Health Study recruited 1899 individuals aged 30–79 years who were not taking medication for diabetes. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was used to diagnose type 2 diabetes, and fasting and 2-h-postload glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. We assessed the homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and Gutt’s insulin sensitivity index (ISI. Pulse was recorded for 5 min, and time-domain heart rate variability (HRV indices were calculated: the standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN and the root mean square of successive difference (RMSSD. Power spectral analysis provided frequency domain measures of HRV: high frequency (HF power, low frequency (LF power, and the LF:HF ratio. Results: Multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models showed decreased SDNN, RMSSD, and HF, and increased LF:HF ratio were associated significantly with increased HOMA-IR and decreased ISI. When stratified by overweight status, the association of RMSSD, HF, and LF:HF ratio with decreased ISI was also apparent in non-overweight individuals. The interaction between LF:HF ratio and decreased ISI in overweight individuals was significant, with the odds ratio for decreased ISI in the highest quartile of LF:HF ratio in non-overweight individuals being 2.09 (95% confidence interval, 1.41–3.10. Conclusions: Reduced HRV was associated with insulin resistance and lower insulin sensitivity. Decreased ISI was linked with parasympathetic dysfunction, primarily in non-overweight individuals.

  12. Increased interaction with insulin receptor substrate 1, a novel abnormality in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes

    Caruso, Michael; Ma, Danjun; Msallaty, Zaher;

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) is a key mediator of insulin signal transduction. Perturbations involving IRS1 complexes may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Surprisingly little is known about the proteins that interact with IRS1 in humans under health...... and disease conditions. We used a proteomic approach to assess IRS1 interaction partners in skeletal muscle from lean healthy control subjects (LCs), obese insulin-resistant nondiabetic control subjects (OCs), and participants with T2D before and after insulin infusion. We identified 113 novel....... Interestingly, dozens of proteins in OCs and/or T2D patients exhibited increased associations with IRS1 compared with LCs under the basal and/or insulin-stimulated conditions, revealing multiple new dysfunctional IRS1 pathways in OCs and T2D patients. This novel abnormality, increased interaction of multiple...

  13. Physical exercise and pancreatic islets: acute and chronic actions on insulin secretion.

    Almeida, Felipe N; Proença, André R G; Chimin, Patrícia; Marçal, Anderson C; Bessa-Lima, Fábio; Carvalho, Carla R O

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a great public health problem, which attacks part of the world population, being characterized by an imbalance in body glucose homeostasis. Physical exercise is pointed as a protective agent and is also recommended to people with DM. As pancreatic islets present an important role in glucose homeostasis, we aim to study the role of physical exercise (chronic adaptations and acute responses) in pancreatic islets functionality in Wistar male rats. First, animals were divided into two groups: sedentary (S) and aerobic trained (T). At the end of 8 weeks, half of them (S and T) were submitted to an acute exercise session (exercise until exhaustion), being subdivided as acute sedentary (AS) and acute trained (AT). After the experimental period, periepididymal, retroperitoneal and subcutaneous fat pads, blood, soleus muscle and pancreatic islets were collected and prepared for further analysis. From the pancreatic islets, total insulin content, insulin secretion stimulated by glucose, leucine, arginine and carbachol were analyzed. Our results pointed that body adiposity and glucose homeostasis improved with chronic physical exercise. In addition, total insulin content was reduced in group AT, insulin secretion stimulated by glucose was reduced in trained groups (T and AT) and insulin secretion stimulated by carbachol was increased in group AT. There were no significant differences in insulin secretion stimulated by arginine and leucine. We identified a possible modulating action on insulin secretion, probably related to the association of chronic adaptation with an acute response on cholinergic activity in pancreatic islets. PMID:22868676

  14. The Role of PTP1B O-GlcNAcylation in Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    Yun Zhao; Zhuqi Tang; Aiguo Shen; Tao Tao; Chunhua Wan; Xiaohui Zhu; Jieru Huang; Wanlu Zhang; Nana Xia; Suxin Wang; Shiwei Cui; Dongmei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), which can directly dephosphorylate both the insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), thereby terminating insulin signaling, reportedly plays an important role in insulin resistance. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that O-GlcNAc modification regulates functions of several important components of insulin signal pathway. In this study, we identified that PTP1B is modified by O-GlcNAcylation at three O-GlcNAc sites (Ser104, Ser201...

  15. Effects of Hormone Replacement Therapy on Insulin Resistance in Postmenopausal Diabetic Women

    Iskra Bitoska

    2016-02-01

    CONCLUSION: HRT was associated with statistically signifficant increase of insulin sensitivity. Larger clinical trials will be necessary to understand whether HRT may improve insulin resistance and glucose homeostasis in women with diabetes, especially when given shortly after entering menopause.

  16. Bariatric surgery in morbidly obese insulin resistant humans normalises insulin signalling but not insulin-stimulated glucose disposal.

    Mimi Z Chen

    Full Text Available Weight-loss after bariatric surgery improves insulin sensitivity, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not clear. To ascertain the effect of bariatric surgery on insulin signalling, we examined glucose disposal and Akt activation in morbidly obese volunteers before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB, and compared this to lean volunteers.The hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp, at five infusion rates, was used to determine glucose disposal rates (GDR in eight morbidly obese (body mass index, BMI=47.3 ± 2.2 kg/m(2 patients, before and after RYGB, and in eight lean volunteers (BMI=20.7 ± 0.7 kg/m2. Biopsies of brachioradialis muscle, taken at fasting and insulin concentrations that induced half-maximal (GDR50 and maximal (GDR100 GDR in each subject, were used to examine the phosphorylation of Akt-Thr308, Akt-473, and pras40, in vivo biomarkers for Akt activity.Pre-operatively, insulin-stimulated GDR was lower in the obese compared to the lean individuals (P<0.001. Weight-loss of 29.9 ± 4 kg after surgery significantly improved GDR50 (P=0.004 but not GDR100 (P=0.3. These subjects still remained significantly more insulin resistant than the lean individuals (p<0.001. Weight loss increased insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle Akt-Thr308 and Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation, P=0.02 and P=0.03 respectively (MANCOVA, and Akt activity towards the substrate PRAS40 (P=0.003, MANCOVA, and in contrast to GDR, were fully normalised after the surgery (obese vs lean, P=0.6, P=0.35, P=0.46, respectively.Our data show that although Akt activity substantially improved after surgery, it did not lead to a full restoration of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. This suggests that a major defect downstream of, or parallel to, Akt signalling remains after significant weight-loss.

  17. Sphingolipids: the nexus between Gaucher disease and insulin resistance

    Fuller Maria

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sphingolipids constitute a diverse array of lipids in which fatty acids are linked through amide bonds to a long-chain base, and, structurally, they form the building blocks of eukaryotic membranes. Ceramide is the simplest and serves as a precursor for the synthesis of the three main types of complex sphingolipids; sphingomyelins, glycosphingolipids and gangliosides. Sphingolipids are no longer considered mere structural spectators, but bioactive molecules with functions beyond providing a mechanically stable and chemically resistant barrier to a diverse array of cellular processes. Although sphingolipids form a somewhat minor component of the total cellular lipid pool, their accumulation in certain cells forms the basis of many diseases. Human diseases caused by alterations in the metabolism of sphingolipids are conventionally inborn errors of degradation, the most common being Gaucher disease, in which the catabolism of glucosylceramide is defective and accumulates. Insulin resistance has been reported in patients with Gaucher disease and this article presents evidence that this is due to perturbations in the metabolism of sphingolipids. Ceramide and the more complex sphingolipids, the gangliosides, are constituents of specialised membrane microdomains termed lipid rafts. Lipid rafts play a role in facilitating and regulating lipid and protein interactions in cells, and their unique lipid composition enables them to carry out this role. The lipid composition of rafts is altered in cell models of Gaucher disease which may be responsible for impaired lipid and protein sorting observed in this disorder, and consequently pathology. Lipid rafts are also necessary for correct insulin signalling, and a perturbed lipid raft composition may impair insulin signalling. Unravelling common nodes of interaction between insulin resistance and Gaucher disease may lead to a better understanding of the biochemical mechanisms behind pathology.

  18. Inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 activity alleviates insulin resistance in diet-induced obese mice

    Keung, Wendy; Ussher, John R.; Jaswal, Jagdip S.; Raubenheimer, Monique; Lam, Victoria H.M.; Wagg, Cory S.; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2013-01-01

    Impaired skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation has been suggested to contribute to insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. However, increasing muscle fatty acid oxidation may cause a reciprocal decrease in glucose oxidation, which might impair insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. We therefore investigated what effect inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid uptake has on whole-body glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in obese insulin-resistant mice. C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-f...

  19. A common variation of the PTEN gene is associated with peripheral insulin resistance

    Grinder-Hansen, L; Ribel-Madsen, R; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen;

    2016-01-01

    ). Hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity was measured using tracer and euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp techniques; insulin secretion was assessed by intravenous glucose tolerance test; and muscle biopsies were taken during insulin infusion from 150 twins for measurement of PI3K and Akt activities....... RESULTS: The minor G allele of PTEN rs11202614 was associated with elevated fasting plasma insulin levels and a decreased peripheral glucose disposal rate, but not with the hepatic insulin resistance index or insulin secretion measured as the first-phase insulin response and disposition index. The single...

  20. Mitochondrial involvement in skeletal muscle insulin resistance: A case of imbalanced bioenergetics.

    Affourtit, Charles

    2016-10-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance in obesity associates with mitochondrial dysfunction, but the causality of this association is controversial. This review evaluates mitochondrial models of nutrient-induced muscle insulin resistance. It transpires that all models predict that insulin resistance arises as a result of imbalanced cellular bioenergetics. The nature and precise origin of the proposed insulin-numbing molecules differ between models but all species only accumulate when metabolic fuel supply outweighs energy demand. This observation suggests that mitochondrial deficiency in muscle insulin resistance is not merely owing to intrinsic functional defects, but could instead be an adaptation to nutrient-induced changes in energy expenditure. Such adaptive effects are likely because muscle ATP supply is fully driven by energy demand. This market-economic control of myocellular bioenergetics offers a mechanism by which insulin-signalling deficiency can cause apparent mitochondrial dysfunction, as insulin resistance lowers skeletal muscle anabolism and thus dampens ATP demand and, consequently, oxidative ATP synthesis. PMID:27473535

  1. Studies on the mechanism of insulin resistance in the liver from humans with noninsulin-dependent diabetes. Insulin action and binding in isolated hepatocytes, insulin receptor structure, and kinase activity.

    Caro, J F; Ittoop, O; Pories, W J; Meelheim, D; Flickinger, E G; F. Thomas; Jenquin, M; Silverman, J F; Khazanie, P G; Sinha, M K

    1986-01-01

    We have developed a method to isolate insulin-responsive human hepatocytes from an intraoperative liver biopsy to study insulin action and resistance in man. Hepatocytes from obese patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes were resistant to maximal insulin concentration, and those from obese controls to submaximal insulin concentration in comparison to nonobese controls. Insulin binding per cell number was similar in all groups. However, insulin binding per surface area was decreased in the...

  2. Role of reduced insulin-stimulated bone blood flow in the pathogenesis of metabolic insulin resistance and diabetic bone fragility.

    Hinton, Pamela S

    2016-08-01

    Worldwide, 387 million adults live with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and an additional 205 million cases are projected by 2035. Because T2D has numerous complications, there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. Identification of early events in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and T2D might lead to more effective treatments that would mitigate health and monetary costs. Here, we present our hypothesis that impaired bone blood flow is an early event in the pathogenesis of whole-body metabolic insulin resistance that ultimately leads to T2D. Two recent developments in different fields form the basis for this hypothesis. First, reduced vascular function has been identified as an early event in the development of T2D. In particular, before the onset of tissue or whole body metabolic insulin resistance, insulin-stimulated, endothelium-mediated skeletal muscle blood flow is impaired. Insulin resistance of the vascular endothelium reduces delivery of insulin and glucose to skeletal muscle, which leads to tissue and whole-body metabolic insulin resistance. Second is the paradigm-shifting discovery that the skeleton has an endocrine function that is essential for maintenance of whole-body glucose homeostasis. Specifically, in response to insulin signaling, osteoblasts secret osteocalcin, which stimulates pancreatic insulin production and enhances insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle, adipose, and liver. Furthermore, the skeleton is not metabolically inert, but contributes to whole-body glucose utilization, consuming 20% that of skeletal muscle and 50% that of white adipose tissue. Without insulin signaling or without osteocalcin activity, experimental animals become hyperglycemic and insulin resistant. Currently, it is not known if insulin-stimulated, endothelium-mediated blood flow to bone plays a role in the development of whole body metabolic insulin resistance. We hypothesize that it is a key, early event. Microvascular dysfunction is a

  3. Role of oxidative stress in endothelial insulin resistance

    Francesco Paneni; Sarah Costantino; Francesco Cosentino

    2015-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation estimates that 316 million people are currently affected by impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Most importantly, recent forecasts anticipate a dramatic IGT increase with more that 470 million people affected by the year 2035. Impaired insulin sensitivity is major feature of obesity and diabetes and is strongly linked with adverse cardiometabolic phenotypes. However, the etiologic pathway linking impaired glucose tolerance and cardiovascular disease remains to be deciphered. Although insulin resistance has been attributed to inflammatory programs starting in adipose tissue, emerging evidence indicates thatendothelial dysfunction may represent the upstreamevent preceding peripheral impairment of insulinsensitivity. Indeed, suppression of reactive oxygenspecies-dependent pathways in the endothelium hasshown to restore insulin delivery to peripheral organsby preserving nitric oxide (NO) availability. Here wedescribe emerging theories concerning endothelialinsulin resistance, with particular emphasis on the roleoxidative stress. Complex molecular circuits includingendothelial nitric oxide synthase, prostacyclin synthase,mitochondrial adaptor p66Shc, nicotinamide adeninedinucleotide phosphate-oxidase oxidase and nuclearfactor kappa-B are discussed. Moreover, the reviewprovides insights on the effectiveness of availablecompounds (i.e. , ruboxistaurin, sildenafil, endothelinreceptor antagonists, NO donors) in restoring endothelialinsulin signalling. Taken together, these aspects maysignificantly contribute to design novel therapeuticapproaches to restore glucose homeostasis in patientswith obesity and diabetes.

  4. Insulin's acute effects on glomerular filtration rate correlate with insulin sensitivity whereas insulin's acute effects on proximal tubular sodium reabsorption correlate with salt sensitivity in normal subjects

    ter Maaten, JC; Bakker, SJL; Serne, EH; ter Wee, PM; Gans, ROB

    1999-01-01

    Background. Insulin induces increasing distal tubular sodium reabsorption. Opposite effects of insulin to offset insulin-induced sodium retention are supposedly increases in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and decreases in proximal tubular sodium reabsorption. Defects in these opposing effects coul

  5. A novel insulin receptor-signaling platform and its link to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

    Alghamdi, Farah; Guo, Merry; Abdulkhalek, Samar; Crawford, Nicola; Amith, Schammim Ray; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2014-06-01

    Insulin-induced insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase activation and insulin cell survival responses have been reported to be under the regulation of a membrane associated mammalian neuraminidase-1 (Neu1). The molecular mechanism(s) behind this process is unknown. Here, we uncover a novel Neu1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) cross-talk in alliance with neuromedin B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), which is essential for insulin-induced IR activation and cellular signaling. Neu1, MMP-9 and neuromedin B GPCR form a complex with IRβ subunit on the cell surface. Oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu®), anti-Neu1 antibodies, broad range MMP inhibitors piperazine and galardin (GM6001), MMP-9 specific inhibitor (MMP-9i), and GPCR neuromedin B specific antagonist BIM-23127 dose-dependently inhibited Neu1 activity associated with insulin stimulated rat hepatoma cells (HTCs) that overly express human IRs (HTC-IR). Tamiflu, anti-Neu1 antibodies and MMP-9i attenuated phosphorylation of IRβ and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) associated with insulin-stimulated cells. Olanzapine, an antipsychotic agent associated with insulin resistance, induced Neu3 sialidase activity in WG544 or 1140F01 human sialidosis fibroblast cells genetically defective in Neu1. Neu3 antagonist 2-deoxy-2,3-didehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (DANA) and anti-Neu3 antibodies inhibited sialidase activity associated with olanzapine treated murine Neu4 knockout macrophage cells. Olanzapine attenuated phosphorylation of IGF-R and IRS1 associated with insulin-stimulated human wild-type fibroblast cells. Our findings identify a novel insulin receptor-signaling platform that is critically essential for insulin-induced IRβ tyrosine kinase activation and cellular signaling. Olanzapine-induced Neu3 sialidase activity attenuated insulin-induced IGF-R and IRS1 phosphorylation contributing to insulin resistance. PMID:24583283

  6. Insulin secretion after dietary supplementation with conjugated linoleic acids and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in normal and insulin-resistant mice.

    Sörhede Winzell, Maria; Pacini, Giovanni; Ahrén, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Insulin secretion after dietary supplementation with conjugated linoleic acids and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in normal and insulin-resistance mice. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 290: E347-E354, 2006. First published September 27, 2005; doi:10.1152/ajpendo.00163.2005.-Conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) improve insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant rodents. However, the effects of these fatty acids on insulin secretion are not known but are of ...

  7. Cocoa-rich diet ameliorates hepatic insulin resistance by modulating insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    Cordero-Herrera, Isabel; Martín, María Ángeles; Escrivá, Fernando; Álvarez, Carmen; Goya, Luis; Ramos, Sonia

    2015-07-01

    Insulin resistance is the primary characteristic of type 2 diabetes and results from insulin signaling defects. Cocoa has been shown to exert anti-diabetic effects by lowering glucose levels. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this preventive activity and whether cocoa exerts potential beneficial effects on the insulin signaling pathway in the liver remain largely unknown. Thus, in this study, the potential anti-diabetic properties of cocoa on glucose homeostasis and insulin signaling were evaluated in type 2 diabetic Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Male ZDF rats were fed a control or cocoa-rich diet (10%), and Zucker lean animals received the control diet. ZDF rats supplemented with cocoa (ZDF-Co) showed a significant decrease in body weight gain, glucose and insulin levels, as well as an improved glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Cocoa-rich diet further ameliorated the hepatic insulin resistance by abolishing the increased serine-phosphorylated levels of the insulin receptor substrate 1 and preventing the inactivation of the glycogen synthase kinase 3/glycogen synthase pathway in the liver of cocoa-fed ZDF rats. The anti-hyperglycemic effect of cocoa appeared to be at least mediated through the decreased levels of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and increased values of glucokinase and glucose transporter 2 in the liver of ZDF-Co rats. Moreover, cocoa-rich diet suppressed c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 activation caused by insulin resistance. These findings suggest that cocoa has the potential to alleviate both hyperglycemia and hepatic insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic ZDF rats. PMID:25814291

  8. A short leucocyte telomere length is associated with development of insulin resistance

    Verhulst, Simon; Dalgård, Christine; Labat, Carlos;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: A number of studies have shown that leucocyte telomere length (LTL) is inversely associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of the present longitudinal cohort study, utilising a twin design, was to assess whether shorter LTL predicts insulin resistance...... and insulin resistance over an average of 12 years were performed in a subset of the Registry consisting of 338 (184 monozygotic and 154 dizygotic) same-sex twin pairs. RESULTS: Age at baseline examination was 37.4 ± 9.6 (mean ± SD) years. Baseline insulin resistance was not associated with age......-dependent changes in LTL (attrition) over the follow-up period, whereas baseline LTL was associated with changes in insulin resistance during this period. The shorter the LTL at baseline, the more pronounced was the increase in insulin resistance over the follow-up period (p 

  9. Role of resistant starch in improving gut health, adiposity, and insulin resistance.

    Keenan, Michael J; Zhou, June; Hegsted, Maren; Pelkman, Christine; Durham, Holiday A; Coulon, Diana B; Martin, Roy J

    2015-03-01

    The realization that low-glycemic index diets were formulated using resistant starch led to more than a decade of research on the health effects of resistant starch. Determination of the metabolizable energy of the resistant starch product allowed for the performance of isocaloric studies. Fermentation of resistant starch in rodent studies results in what appears to be a healthier gut, demonstrated by increased amounts of short-chain fatty acids, an apparent positive change in the microbiota, and increased gene expression for gene products involved in normal healthy proliferation and apoptosis of potential cancer cells. Additionally, consumption of resistant starch was associated with reduced abdominal fat and improved insulin sensitivity. Increased serum glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) likely plays a role in promoting these health benefits. One rodent study that did not use isocaloric diets demonstrated that the use of resistant starch at 8% of the weight of the diet reduced body fat. This appears to be approximately equivalent to the human fiber requirement. In human subjects, insulin sensitivity is increased with the feeding of resistant starch. However, only 1 of several studies reports an increase in serum GLP-1 associated with resistant starch added to the diet. This means that other mechanisms, such as increased intestinal gluconeogenesis or increased adiponectin, may be involved in the promotion of improved insulin sensitivity. Future research may confirm that there will be improved health if human individuals consume the requirement for dietary fiber and a large amount of the fiber is fermentable. PMID:25770258

  10. A single prior bout of exercise protects against palmitate-induced insulin resistance despite an increase in total ceramide content.

    Thrush, A Brianne; Harasim, Ewa; Chabowski, Adrian; Gulli, Roberto; Stefanyk, Leslie; Dyck, David J

    2011-05-01

    Ceramide accumulation has been implicated in the impairment of insulin-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle following saturated fatty acid (FA) exposure. Importantly, a single bout of exercise can protect against acute lipid-induced insulin resistance. The mechanism by which exercise protects against lipid-induced insulin resistance is not completely known but may occur through a redirection of FA toward triacylglycerol (TAG) and away from ceramide and diacylglycerol (DAG). Therefore, in the current study, an in vitro preparation was used to examine whether a prior bout of exercise could confer protection against palmitate-induced insulin resistance and whether the pharmacological [50 μM fumonisin B(1) (FB1)] inhibition of ceramide synthesis in the presence of palmitate could mimic the protective effect of exercise. Soleus muscle of sedentary (SED), exercised (EX), and SED in the presence of FB1 (SED+FB1) were incubated with or without 2 mM palmitate for 4 h. This 2-mM palmitate exposure impaired insulin-stimulated glucose transport (-28%, P TAG accumulation in the SED group (P TAG (P net increase in ceramide content in response to palmitate exposure in the EX group was not different compared with SED, despite the maintenance of insulin sensitivity. The incubation of soleus from SED rats with FB1 (SED+FB1) prevented the detrimental effects of palmitate and caused a redirection of FA toward TAG accumulation (P < 0.05). Therefore, this research suggests that although inhibiting ceramide accumulation can prevent the detrimental effects of palmitate, a single prior bout of exercise appears to protect against palmitate-induced insulin resistance, which may be independent of changes in ceramide content. PMID:21325642