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Sample records for acute dosimetry consensus

  1. BiodosEPR-2006 Meeting: Acute dosimetry consensus committee recommendations on biodosimetry applications in events involving uses of radiation by terrorists and radiation accidents

    , USA; NCRP, 2005. Key elements of preparing emergency responders for nuclear and radiological terrorism. NCRP Commentary No. 19, Bethesda, Maryland, USA] and international [IAEA, 2005. Generic procedures for medical response during a nuclear or radiological emergency. EPR-Medical 2005, IAEA, Vienna, Austria] agencies have reviewed strategies for acute-phase biodosimetry. Consensus biodosimetric guidelines include: (a) clinical signs and symptoms, including peripheral blood counts, time to onset of nausea and vomiting and presence of impaired cognition and neurological deficits, (b) radioactivity assessment, (c) personal and area dosimetry, (d) cytogenetics, (e) in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and (f) other dosimetry approaches (i.e. blood protein assays, etc.). Emerging biodosimetric technologies may further refine triage and dose assessment strategies. However, guidance is needed regarding which biodosimetry techniques are most useful for different radiological scenarios and consensus protocols must be developed. The Local Organizing Committee for the Second International Conference on Biodosimetry and Seventh International Symposium on EPR Dosimetry and Applications (BiodosEPR-2006 Meeting) convened an Acute Dosimetry Consensus Committee composed of national and international experts to: (a) review the current literature for biodosimetry applications for acute-phase applications in radiological emergencies, (b) describe the strengths and weaknesses of each technique, (c) provide recommendations for the use of biodosimetry assays for selected defined radiation scenarios, and (d) develop protocols to apply these recommended biological dosimetry techniques with currently available supplies and equipment for first responders. The Acute Dosimetry Consensus Committee developed recommendations for use of a prioritized multiple-assay biodosimetric-based strategy, concluding that no single assay is sufficiently robust to address all of the potential radiation

  2. BiodosEPR-2006 Meeting: Acute dosimetry consensus committee recommendations on biodosimetry applications in events involving uses of radiation by terrorists and radiation accidents

    Alexander, George A. [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Preparedness and Emergency Operations, 200 Independence Avenue, SW, Room 403B-1, Washington, DC 20201 (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Dept. of Radiology and Physiology Dept., Dartmouth Medical School, HB 7785, Vail 702, Rubin 601, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Amundson, Sally A. [Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 W. 168th Street, VC11-215, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Blakely, William F. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)], E-mail: blakely@afrri.usuhs.mil; Buddemeier, Brooke [Science and Technology, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DC 20528 (United States); Gallez, Bernard [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit and Lab. of Medicinal Chemistry and Radiopharmacy, Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Dainiak, Nicholas [Dept. of Medicine, Bridgeport Hospital, 267 Grant Street, Bridgeport, CT 06610 (United States); Goans, Ronald E. [MJW Corporation, 1422 Eagle Bend Drive, Clinton, TN 37716-4029 (United States); Hayes, Robert B. [Remote Sensing Lab., MS RSL-47, P.O. Box 98421, Las Vegas, NV 89193 (United States); Lowry, Patrick C. [Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), Oak Ridge Associated Universities, P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 (United States); Noska, Michael A. [Food and Drug Administration, FDA/CDRH, 1350 Piccard Drive, HFZ-240, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Okunieff, Paul [Dept. of Radiation Oncology (Box 647), Univ. of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Salner, Andrew L. [Helen and Harry Gray Cancer Center, Hartford Hospital, 80 Seymour Street, Hartford, CT 06102 (United States); Schauer, David A. [National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 400, Bethesda, MD 20814-3095 (United States)] (and others)

    2007-07-15

    , USA; NCRP, 2005. Key elements of preparing emergency responders for nuclear and radiological terrorism. NCRP Commentary No. 19, Bethesda, Maryland, USA] and international [IAEA, 2005. Generic procedures for medical response during a nuclear or radiological emergency. EPR-Medical 2005, IAEA, Vienna, Austria] agencies have reviewed strategies for acute-phase biodosimetry. Consensus biodosimetric guidelines include: (a) clinical signs and symptoms, including peripheral blood counts, time to onset of nausea and vomiting and presence of impaired cognition and neurological deficits, (b) radioactivity assessment, (c) personal and area dosimetry, (d) cytogenetics, (e) in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and (f) other dosimetry approaches (i.e. blood protein assays, etc.). Emerging biodosimetric technologies may further refine triage and dose assessment strategies. However, guidance is needed regarding which biodosimetry techniques are most useful for different radiological scenarios and consensus protocols must be developed. The Local Organizing Committee for the Second International Conference on Biodosimetry and Seventh International Symposium on EPR Dosimetry and Applications (BiodosEPR-2006 Meeting) convened an Acute Dosimetry Consensus Committee composed of national and international experts to: (a) review the current literature for biodosimetry applications for acute-phase applications in radiological emergencies, (b) describe the strengths and weaknesses of each technique, (c) provide recommendations for the use of biodosimetry assays for selected defined radiation scenarios, and (d) develop protocols to apply these recommended biological dosimetry techniques with currently available supplies and equipment for first responders. The Acute Dosimetry Consensus Committee developed recommendations for use of a prioritized multiple-assay biodosimetric-based strategy, concluding that no single assay is sufficiently robust to address all of the potential radiation

  3. The development of consensus standards on dosimetry for radiation processing

    Subcommittee E10.01 open-quotes Dosimetry for Radiation Processingclose quotes of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), comprised of 165 diverse experts from 45 countries, is developing standards on dosimetry for radiation processing. Eight standards will be published in the 1992 Annual Book of ASTM Standards and an additional 16 are under development. Three are specifically for food applications and the balance are relevant for all radiation processing applications, including food processing. When complete, the set will be published as a separate handbook. In addition, the group encourages the use of these standards through publications, workshops, and training courses; and identifies areas where new standards are needed. A related effort is underway to promote the inclusion of these standards into procedures now being developed by groups such as the International Organization of Legal Metrology (OIML) and the International Consultative Group on Food Irradiation (ICGFI) to harmonize regulations and help avoid trade barriers

  4. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: a Delphi consensus.

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Escherich, Gabriele; Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Halsey, Christina; Hough, Rachael; Jeha, Sima; Kato, Motohiro; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Möricke, Anja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Piette, Caroline; Putti, Maria Caterina; Raetz, Elizabeth; Silverman, Lewis B; Skinner, Roderick; Tuckuviene, Ruta; van der Sluis, Inge; Zapotocka, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14 toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall assessment of outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment, these expert opinion-based definitions will allow reliable comparisons of frequencies and severities of acute toxic effects across treatment protocols, and facilitate international research on cause, guidelines for treatment adaptation, preventive strategies, and development of consensus algorithms for reporting on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment. PMID:27299279

  5. Acute pancreatitis: reflections through the history of the Atlanta Consensus

    Torres López, Ana María

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process with systemic and local repercussions. Most cases are mild with low mortality rate, but 20% of the patients have severe pancreatitis with a mortality rate up to 30%. Through the years the medical community has tried to reach consensus about this disease in order to better understand, classify and treat it. The most important of these has been known as the Atlanta Consensus 1992, in use for many years. However, it has been recently the subject of various proposals for changes and updates, which are discussed in this review article.

  6. Neuroprotection as initial therapy in acute stroke - Third report of an Ad Hoc Consensus Group Meeting

    Bogousslavsky, J; De Keyser, J; Diener, HC; Fieschi, C; Hacke, W; Kaste, M; Orgogozo, JM; Pulsinelli, W; Wahlgren, NG

    1998-01-01

    Although a considerable body of scientific data is now available on neuroprotection in acute ischaemic stroke, this field is not yet established in clinical practice. At its third meeting, the European Ad Hoc Consensus Group considered the potential for neuroprotection in acute stroke and the practi

  7. Dosimetry

    Eight articles treat the dosimetry. Two articles evaluate the radiation doses in specific cases, dosimetry of patients in radiodiagnosis, three articles are devoted to detectors (neutrons and x and gamma radiations) and a computer code to build up the dosimetry of an accident due to an external exposure. (N.C.)

  8. An evidence and consensus based guideline for acute diarrhoea management

    Armon, K; Stephenson, T; MacFaul, R; Eccleston, P; Werneke, U; Baumer, H

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To develop an evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of the child who presents to hospital with diarrhoea (with or without vomiting), a common problem representing 16% of all paediatric medical attenders at an accident and emergency department. Clinical assessment, investigations (biochemistry and stool culture in particular), admission, and treatment are addressed. The guideline aims to aid junior doctors in recognising children who need admi...

  9. Consensus for the manaegment of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Chinese Medical Association,China Association of C

    2003-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Since recognition of the first case of sever acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Guangdong Province in November 2002,health care worker engaged in basic medicine,clinical medicine and preventive progress in the understanding of the etiology,epidemiology,diagnosis,treatment and prevention of SARS.

  10. Dosimetry

    The fundamental units of dosimetry are defined, such as exposure rate, absorbed dose and equivalent dose. A table is given of relative biological effectiveness values for the different types of radiation. The relation between the roentgen and rad units is calculated and the concepts of physical half-life, biological half-life and effective half-life are discussed. Referring to internal dosimetry, a mathematical treatment is given to β particle-and γ radiation dosimetry. The absorbed dose is calculated and a practical example is given of the calculation of the exposure and of the dose rate for a gama source

  11. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit;

    2016-01-01

    toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall......Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi...... method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis...

  12. An expert consensus on the evaluation and treatment of acute thoracolumbar spine and spinal cord injury in China

    Zhicheng Zhang; Fang Li; Tiansheng Sun

    2013-01-01

    This is an expert consensus on the evaluation and treatment of thoracolumbar spinal injury, estab-lished from February 2009 to July 2010. The expert consensus consists mainly of six parts with a total of 54 recommendations including the overview (one item);pre-hospital care (one item);evalu-ation and diagnosis (13 items);treatment (23 items); prevention and treatment of major complica-tions (12 items);and rehabilitation (four items). This is the first time that Chinese experts have pub-lished a consensus on spine and spinal cord injury. The expert consensus was established based on Delphi methods, literature analysis, and clinical experiences. Each recommendation is supported by and was interpreted using multi-level evidences. The level of agreement with the recommenda-tion among the panel members was assessed as either low, moderate, or strong. Each panel member was asked to indicate his or her level of agreement on a 5-point scale, with “1” corre-sponding to neutrality and“5”representing maximum agreement. Scores were aggregated across the panel members and an arithmetic mean was calculated. This mean score was then translated into low, moderate, or strong. After al of the votes were col ected and calculated, the results showed no low-level recommendations, 10 moderate-level recommendations, and 44 strong-level recom-mendations. An expert consensus was reached and was recognized by Chinese spine surgeons. Wide-scale adoption of these recommendations is urgent in the management of acute thoracol-umbar spine and spinal cord injury in a broader attempt to create a standard evaluation and treat-ment strategy for acute thoracolumbar spine and spinal cord injury in China.

  13. Noninvasive Biomonitoring Approaches to Determine Dosimetry and Risk Following Acute Chemical Exposure: Analysis of Lead or Organophosphate Insecticide in Saliva

    There is a need to develop approaches for assessing risk associated with acute exposures to a broad-range of chemical agents and to rapidly determine the potential implications to human health. Non-invasive biomonitoring approaches are being developed using reliable portable analytical systems to quantitate dosimetry utilizing readily obtainable body fluids, such as saliva. Saliva has been used to evaluate a broad range of biomarkers, drugs, and environmental contaminants including heavy metals and pesticides. To advance the application of non-invasive biomonitoring a microfluidic/ electrochemical device has also been developed for the analysis of lead (Pb), using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry. The system demonstrates a linear response over a broad concentration range (1 2000 ppb) and is capable of quantitating saliva Pb in rats orally administered acute doses of Pb-acetate. Appropriate pharmacokinetic analyses have been used to quantitate systemic dosimetry based on determination of saliva Pb concentrations. In addition, saliva has recently been used to quantitate dosimetry following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos in a rodent model system by measuring the major metabolite, trichloropyridinol, and saliva cholinesterase inhibition following acute exposures. These results suggest that technology developed for non-invasive biomonitoring can provide a sensitive, and portable analytical tool capable of assessing exposure and risk in real-time. By coupling these non-invasive technologies with pharmacokinetic modeling it is feasible to rapidly quantitate acute exposure to a broad range of chemical agents. In summary, it is envisioned that once fully developed, these monitoring and modeling approaches will be useful for accessing acute exposure and health risk

  14. Acute kidney injury in the era of big data: the 15(th) Consensus Conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI).

    Bagshaw, Sean M; Goldstein, Stuart L; Ronco, Claudio; Kellum, John A

    2016-01-01

    The world is immersed in "big data". Big data has brought about radical innovations in the methods used to capture, transfer, store and analyze the vast quantities of data generated every minute of every day. At the same time; however, it has also become far easier and relatively inexpensive to do so. Rapidly transforming, integrating and applying this large volume and variety of data are what underlie the future of big data. The application of big data and predictive analytics in healthcare holds great promise to drive innovation, reduce cost and improve patient outcomes, health services operations and value. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may be an ideal syndrome from which various dimensions and applications built within the context of big data may influence the structure of services delivery, care processes and outcomes for patients. The use of innovative forms of "information technology" was originally identified by the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) in 2002 as a core concept in need of attention to improve the care and outcomes for patients with AKI. For this 15(th) ADQI consensus meeting held on September 6-8, 2015 in Banff, Canada, five topics focused on AKI and acute renal replacement therapy were developed where extensive applications for use of big data were recognized and/or foreseen. In this series of articles in the Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, we describe the output from these discussions. PMID:26925244

  15. The role of levosimendan in acute heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome: A review and expert consensus opinion.

    Nieminen, Markku S; Buerke, Michael; Cohen-Solál, Alain; Costa, Susana; Édes, István; Erlikh, Alexey; Franco, Fatima; Gibson, Charles; Gorjup, Vojka; Guarracino, Fabio; Gustafsson, Finn; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Husebye, Trygve; Karason, Kristjan; Katsytadze, Igor; Kaul, Sundeep; Kivikko, Matti; Marenzi, Giancarlo; Masip, Josep; Matskeplishvili, Simon; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Møller, Jacob E; Nessler, Jadwiga; Nessler, Bohdan; Ntalianis, Argyrios; Oliva, Fabrizio; Pichler-Cetin, Emel; Põder, Pentti; Recio-Mayoral, Alejandro; Rex, Steffen; Rokyta, Richard; Strasser, Ruth H; Zima, Endre; Pollesello, Piero

    2016-09-01

    Acute heart failure and/or cardiogenic shock are frequently triggered by ischemic coronary events. Yet, there is a paucity of randomized data on the management of patients with heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome, as acute coronary syndrome and cardiogenic shock have frequently been defined as exclusion criteria in trials and registries. As a consequence, guideline recommendations are mostly driven by observational studies, even though these patients have a particularly poor prognosis compared to heart failure patients without signs of coronary artery disease. In acute heart failure, and especially in cardiogenic shock related to ischemic conditions, vasopressors and inotropes are used. However, both pathophysiological considerations and available clinical data suggest that these treatments may have disadvantageous effects. The inodilator levosimendan offers potential benefits due to a range of distinct effects including positive inotropy, restoration of ventriculo-arterial coupling, increases in tissue perfusion, and anti-stunning and anti-inflammatory effects. In clinical trials levosimendan improves symptoms, cardiac function, hemodynamics, and end-organ function. Adverse effects are generally less common than with other inotropic and vasoactive therapies, with the notable exception of hypotension. The decision to use levosimendan, in terms of timing and dosing, is influenced by the presence of pulmonary congestion, and blood pressure measurements. Levosimendan should be preferred over adrenergic inotropes as a first line therapy for all ACS-AHF patients who are under beta-blockade and/or when urinary output is insufficient after diuretics. Levosimendan can be used alone or in combination with other inotropic or vasopressor agents, but requires monitoring due to the risk of hypotension. PMID:27232927

  16. Mental and social health during and after acute emergencies: emerging consensus?

    van Ommeren, Mark; Saxena, Shekhar; Saraceno, Benedetto

    2005-01-01

    Mental health care programmes during and after acute emergencies in resource-poor countries have been considered controversial. There is no agreement on the public health value of the post-traumatic stress disorder concept and no agreement on the appropriateness of vertical (separate) trauma-focused services. A range of social and mental health intervention strategies and principles seem, however, to have the broad support of expert opinion. Despite continuing debate, there is emerging agreem...

  17. Applications for detection of acute kidney injury using electronic medical records and clinical information systems: workgroup statements from the 15(th) ADQI Consensus Conference.

    James, Matthew T; Hobson, Charles E; Darmon, Michael; Mohan, Sumit; Hudson, Darren; Goldstein, Stuart L; Ronco, Claudio; Kellum, John A; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2016-01-01

    Electronic medical records and clinical information systems are increasingly used in hospitals and can be leveraged to improve recognition and care for acute kidney injury. This Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) workgroup was convened to develop consensus around principles for the design of automated AKI detection systems to produce real-time AKI alerts using electronic systems. AKI alerts were recognized by the workgroup as an opportunity to prompt earlier clinical evaluation, further testing and ultimately intervention, rather than as a diagnostic label. Workgroup members agreed with designing AKI alert systems to align with the existing KDIGO classification system, but recommended future work to further refine the appropriateness of AKI alerts and to link these alerts to actionable recommendations for AKI care. The consensus statements developed in this review can be used as a roadmap for development of future electronic applications for automated detection and reporting of AKI. PMID:26925245

  18. Hematological dosimetry

    The principles of hematological dosimetry after acute or protracted whole-body irradiation are reviewed. In both cases, over-exposure is never homogeneous and the clinical consequences, viz medullary aplasia, are directly associated with the mean absorbed dose and the seriousness and location of the overexposure. The main hematological data required to assess the seriousness of exposure are the following: repeated blood analysis, blood precursor cultures, as indicators of whole-body exposure; bone marrow puncture, medullary precursor cultures and medullary scintigraphy as indicators of the importance of a local over-exposure and capacity for spontaneous repair. These paraclinical investigations, which are essential for diagnosis and dosimetry, are also used for surveillance and for the main therapeutic issues

  19. Utilizing electronic health records to predict acute kidney injury risk and outcomes: workgroup statements from the 15(th) ADQI Consensus Conference.

    Sutherland, Scott M; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Kane-Gill, Sandra L; Hsu, Raymond K; Kramer, Andrew A; Goldstein, Stuart L; Kellum, John A; Ronco, Claudio; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2016-01-01

    The data contained within the electronic health record (EHR) is "big" from the standpoint of volume, velocity, and variety. These circumstances and the pervasive trend towards EHR adoption have sparked interest in applying big data predictive analytic techniques to EHR data. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a condition well suited to prediction and risk forecasting; not only does the consensus definition for AKI allow temporal anchoring of events, but no treatments exist once AKI develops, underscoring the importance of early identification and prevention. The Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) convened a group of key opinion leaders and stakeholders to consider how best to approach AKI research and care in the "Big Data" era. This manuscript addresses the core elements of AKI risk prediction and outlines potential pathways and processes. We describe AKI prediction targets, feature selection, model development, and data display. PMID:26925247

  20. ADMET evaluation in drug discovery: 15. Accurate prediction of rat oral acute toxicity using relevance vector machine and consensus modeling

    Lei, Tailong; Li, Youyong; Song, Yunlong; Li, Dan; Sun, Huiyong; Hou, Tingjun

    2016-01-01

    Background Determination of acute toxicity, expressed as median lethal dose (LD50), is one of the most important steps in drug discovery pipeline. Because in vivo assays for oral acute toxicity in mammals are time-consuming and costly, there is thus an urgent need to develop in silico prediction models of oral acute toxicity. Results In this study, based on a comprehensive data set containing 7314 diverse chemicals with rat oral LD50 values, relevance vector machine (RVM) technique was employ...

  1. Post mastectomy linac IMRT irradiation of chest wall and regional nodes: dosimetry data and acute toxicities

    Conventional post-mastectomy radiation therapy is delivered with tangential fields for chest wall and separate fields for regional nodes. Although chest wall and regional nodes delineation has been discussed with RTOG contouring atlas, CT-based planning to treat chest wall and regional nodes as a whole target has not been widely accepted. We herein discuss the dosimetric characteristics of a linac IMRT technique for treating chest wall and regional nodes as a whole PTV after modified radical mastectomy, and observe acute toxicities following irradiation. Patients indicated for PMRT were eligible. Chest wall and supra/infraclavicular region +/−internal mammary nodes were contoured as a whole PTV on planning CT. A simplified linac IMRT plan was designed using either integrated full beams or two segments of half beams split at caudal edge of clavicle head. DVHs were used to evaluate plans. The acute toxicities were followed up regularly. Totally, 85 patients were enrolled. Of these, 45 had left-sided lesions, and 35 received IMN irradiation. Planning designs yielded 55 integrated and 30 segmented plans, with median number of beams of 8 (6–12). The integrated and segmented plans had similar conformity (1.41±0.14 vs. 1.47±0.15, p=0.053) and homogeneity indexes (0.13±0.01 vs. 0.14±0.02, p=0.069). The percent volume of PTV receiving >110% prescription dose was <5%. As compared to segmented plans, integrated plans typically increased V5 of ipsilateral lung (p=0.005), and heart (p=0.001) in patients with left-sided lesions. Similarly, integrated plans had higher spinal cord Dmax (p=0.009), ipsilateral humeral head (p<0.001), and contralateral lung Dmean (p=0.019). During follow-up, 36 (42%) were identified to have ≥ grade 2 radiation dermatitis (RD). Of these, 35 developed moist desquamation. The median time to onset of moist desquamation was 6 (4–7) weeks from start of RT. The sites of moist desquamation were most frequently occurred in anterior axillary fold

  2. Acute skin toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy or EGFR inhibitors: Literature review and consensus.

    Russi, Elvio G; Moretto, Francesco; Rampino, Monica; Benasso, Marco; Bacigalupo, Almalina; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Numico, Gianmauro; Bossi, Paolo; Buglione, Michela; Lombardo, Antonino; Airoldi, Mario; Merlano, Marco C; Licitra, Lisa; Denaro, Nerina; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Pinto, Carmine; Bensadoun, Renè-Jean; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2015-10-01

    The adverse effects of radiation therapy, often integrated with chemotherapy and/or targeted therapies, on the skin include severe acute and chronic dermatitis associated with pain, discomfort, itching, and burning, and may heavily affect patients' quality of life. The management of these skin adverse effects in head and neck cancer patients (HNCPs) are very heterogeneous due to the lack of shared rigorous classification systems and evidence based treatments. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of dermatitis in HNCPs treated with radiotherapy with or without systemic therapies in order to improve skin toxicity management. The Delphi Appropriateness Method was used. External expert reviewers then evaluated the conclusions carefully according to their area of expertise. This paper offers contains seven clusters of statements about the management of dermatitis in HNCPs and a review of recent literature on these topics. PMID:26187236

  3. Recommendations on pre-hospital & early hospital management of acute heart failure : a consensus paper from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, the European Society of Emergency Medicine and the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine

    Mebazaa, Alexandre; Yilmaz, M. Birhan; Levy, Phillip; Ponikowski, Piotr; Peacock, W. Frank; Laribi, Said; Ristic, Arsen D.; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Masip, Josep; Riley, Jillian P.; McDonagh, Theresa; Mueller, Christian; deFilippi, Christopher; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Thiele, Holger; Piepoli, Massimo F.; Metra, Marco; Maggioni, Aldo; McMurray, John; Dickstein, Kenneth; Damman, Kevin; Seferovic, Petar M.; Ruschitzka, Frank; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F.; Bellou, Abdelouahab; Anker, Stefan D.; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-01-01

    Acute heart failure is a fatal syndrome. Emergency physicians, cardiologists, intensivists, nurses and other health care providers have to cooperate to provide optimal benefit. However, many treatment decisions are opinion-based and few are evidenced-based. This consensus paper provides guidance to

  4. Current treatment and future prospects for the management of acute coronary syndromes: consensus recommendations of the 1997 ushuaia conference, tierra del fuego, Argentina.

    Gurfinkel, E

    1998-01-01

    Management of acute coronary syndromes, particularly unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction and non-Q-wave myocardial infarction, is one of the most common and costly problems facing modern medicine. Furthermore, the increasing availability of new research and clinical information relevant to the treatment of these conditions means that continuing reappraisal of management strategies is necessary. Accordingly, the Ushuaia conference, Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina, was convened to discuss current approaches and future treatment prospects for patients with these conditions. The conference was comprised of leading Argentinian cardiologists whose primary aim was to formulate consensus recommendations regarding the management of patients with acute coronary syndromes. The first of the major recommendations for the pharmacological management of acute coronary syndromes arising from the Ushuaia Consensus Conference was that aspirin (200 to 500mg initially, then 100 to 325 mg/day) should be administered to all patients except those for whom aspirin is absolutely (or relatively, depending on the clinician's discretion) contraindicated. In such cases, ticlopidine is a suitable alternative. Intravenous nitrates are indicated for patients with angina pain (24 to 48 hours' duration), ECG changes, recurrence of angina, or signs of heart failure; in other cases, oral, transdermal or sublingual nitrates may be administered. Use of beta-blockers is recommended except when absolutely contraindicated or when there is a strong suspicion of vasospasm as a dominant mechanism in angina. Intravenous administration of these agents is preferred in patients with tachycardia, arterial hypertension or angina. Calcium antagonists are generally not recommended as first choice therapy, but can be indicated (preferably using agents that decrease heart rate) when beta-blockers are contraindicated or when there is a strong suspicion of vasospasm as a dominant mechanism in angina. Calcium

  5. Radiation dosimetry

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  6. Dosimetry Service

    2004-01-01

    We wish to remind the people who are invited to the dosimetry service to exchange the new CERN dosimeter that the hours are from Monday to Friday 8.30 to 11.00 and 14.00 to 16.00. http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/

  7. Dosimetry Service

    2006-01-01

    Cern Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page: http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 - 12.00. Closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after the use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel. 7 2155 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  8. Consensus conferences

    Nielsen, Annika Porsborg; Lassen, Jesper

    , the differing perceptions are each in their own way rooted in an argument for democratic legitimacy. We therefore argue that national interpretations of consensus conferences, and of their ability to functions as a tool for public participation, depend to a great extent on the dominant ideals of...... democratic legitimacy embedded in national political cultures....

  9. Preclinical acute toxicity studies and rodent-based dosimetry estimates of the novel sigma-1 receptor radiotracer [18F]FPS

    [18F]1-(Fluoropropyl)-4-[(4-cyanophenoxy)methyl]piperidine ([18F]FPS) is a novel high affinity (KD = 0.5 nM) sigma receptor radioligand that exhibits saturable and selective in vivo binding to sigma receptors in rats, mice and non-human primates. In order to support an IND application for the characterization of [18F]FPS through PET imaging studies in humans, single organ and whole body radiation adsorbed doses associated with [18F]FPS injection were estimated from distribution data obtained in rats. In addition, acute toxicity studies were conducted in rats and rabbits and limited toxicity analyses were performed in dogs. Radiation dosimetry estimates obtained using rat biodistribution analysis of [18F]FPS suggest that most organs would receive around 0.012-0.015 mGy/MBq. The adrenal glands, brain, kidneys, lungs, and spleen would receive slightly higher doses (0.02-0.03 mGy/MBq). The adrenal glands were identified as the organs receiving the greatest adsorbed radiation dose. The total exposure resulting from a 5 mCi administration of [18F]FPS is well below the FDA defined limits for yearly cumulative and per study exposures to research participants. Extended acute toxicity studies in rats and rabbits, and limited acute toxicity studies in beagle dogs suggest at least a 175-fold safety margin in humans at a mass dose limit of 2.8 μg per intravenous injection. This estimate is based on the measured no observable effect doses (in mg/m2) in these species. These data support the expectation that [18F]FPS will be safe for use in human PET imaging studies at a maximum administration of 5 mCi and a mass dose equal to or less than 2.8 μg FPS per injection

  10. Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once a month. Regular read-outs are vital to ensure that your personal dose is periodically monitored. Dosimeters should be read even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Dosimetry Service - Tel. 72155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  11. Dosimetry Service

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once a month. Regular read-outs are vital to ensure that your personal dose is periodically monitored. Dosimeters should be read even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Dosimetry Service Tel. 7 2155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  12. Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once a month. Regular read-outs are vital to ensure that your personal dose is periodically monitored. Dosimeters should be read even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Dosimetry Service - Tel. 7 2155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  13. ESR Dosimetry

    ESR dosimetry is widely used for several applications such as dose assessment in accidents, medical applications and sterilization of food and other materials. In this work the dosimetric properties of natural and synthetic Hydroxyapatite, Alanine, and 2-Methylalanine are presented. Recent results on the use of a K-Band (24 GHz) ESR spectrometer in dosimetry are also presented

  14. Internal dosimetry, past and future

    This paper is a review of the progress in the dosimetry of internally deposited radionuclides (internal dosimetry) since World War II. Previous to that, only naturally occurring radionuclides were available and only a limited number of studies of biokinetics and dosimetry were done. The main radionuclides studied were 226Ra, 228Ra, and 224Ra but natural uranium was also studied mainly because of its toxic effect as a heavy metal, and not because it was radioactive. The effects of 226Ra in bone, mainly from the radium dial painters, also formed the only bases for the radiotoxicity of radionuclides in bone for many years, and it is still, along with 224Ra, the main source of information on the effects of alpha emitters in bone. The publications of the International Commission on Radiological Protection that have an impact on internal dosimetry are used as mileposts for this review. These series of publications, more than any other, represent a broad consensus of opinion within the radiation protection community at the time of their publication, and have formed the bases for radiation protection practice throughout the world. This review is not meant to be exhaustive; it is meant to be a personnel view of the evolution of internal dosimetry, and to present the author's opinion of what the future directions in internal dosimetry will be. 39 refs., 2 tabs

  15. Dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    Dosimetry is an area of increasing importance in diagnostic radiology. There is a realisation amongst health professionals that the radiation dose received by patients from modern X-ray examinations and procedures can be at a level of significance for the induction of cancer across a population, and in some unfortunate instances, in the acute damage to particular body organs such as skin and eyes. The formulation and measurement procedures for diagnostic radiology dosimetry have recently been standardised through an international code of practice which describes the methodologies necessary to address the diverging imaging modalities used in diagnostic radiology. Common to all dosimetry methodologies is the measurement of the air kerma from the X-ray device under defined conditions. To ensure the accuracy of the dosimetric determination, such measurements need to be made with appropriate instrumentation that has a calibration that is traceable to a standards laboratory. Dosimetric methods are used in radiology departments for a variety of purposes including the determination of patient dose levels to allow examinations to be optimized and to assist in decisions on the justification of examination choices. Patient dosimetry is important for special cases such as for X-ray examinations of children and pregnant patients. It is also a key component of the quality control of X-ray equipment and procedures.

  16. Dosimetry Service

    Dosimetry Service

    2004-01-01

    We wish to remind the people who are invited to the dosimetry service to exchange the new CERN dosimeter that the hours are from Monday to Friday 8:30 to 11:00 and 14:00 to 16:00. For all other services we are at your disposition from 8:30 to 12:00 and 14:00 to 17:00. Do not forget to read your dosimeter. A regular read-out is indispensable in order to ensure a periodic monitoring of personal dose. This read-out should be done during the first week of every month. Thank you for your cooperation. The personnel of the Dosimetry Service wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Dosimetry Service Tel. 767 21 55 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  17. Dosimetry methods

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, A.; Kovacs, A.; Mehta, K. K.

    Chemical and physical radiation dosimetry methods, used for the measurement of absorbed dose mainly during the practical use of ionizing radiation, are discussed with respect to their characteristics and fields of application.......Chemical and physical radiation dosimetry methods, used for the measurement of absorbed dose mainly during the practical use of ionizing radiation, are discussed with respect to their characteristics and fields of application....

  18. Dosimetry Service

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once every month. A regular read-out is indispensable to ensure periodic monitoring of your personal dose. You must read your dosimeter even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Film badges are no longer valid at CERN and holders of film badges are no longer allowed to enter the controlled radiation areas or work with a source. Dosimetry Service Tel. 72155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  19. Phototherapy with low intensity laser in carrageenan-induced acute inflammatory process in mice paw - dosimetry studies

    The importance of modulation of inflammation on the treatment of inflammatory diseases and the difficulty in determining the laser irradiation parameters has led us to study the effects of different protocols of phototherapy with low intensity laser (power, energy, time and place of irradiation) in the treatment and prevention of edema in acute inflammatory process using the experimental model of paw edema induced by carrageenan (CGN) in three strains of mice (Balb-c, Swiss and C57BL/6). The first stage of the study evaluated different combinations of energy (1J and 3J) with different powers (30, 60 and 100mW) in Balb-C mice paw irradiated 1 and 2h after injection of CGN. The second stage studied different combinations of location (foot, inguinal lymph nodes and both) and exposure time (2 and 1h before, 1h and immediately before the CGN, 1 and 2h and 3.5 and 4.5h after CGN) using fixed irradiation parameters (1J, 100mW, 35J/cm2, spot area of 0.028 cm2). The third stage compared different strains of mice Balb-c and C57BL/6) in the best local and time parameters found in step 2. At all stages, we evaluated the change in paw volume by plethysmography and inflammatory infiltrate by histomorphometry or analysis of myeloperoxidase (MPO). The results showed that laser phototherapy treated and prevented edema and modulated the inflammatory process with paw and inguinal lymph nodes irradiations accordingly with the parameters and mice strain used. (author)

  20. Dosimetry standards

    The following leaflets are contained in this folder concerning the National Physical Laboratory's measurement services available in relation to dosimetry standards: Primary standards of X-ray exposure and X-ray irradiation facilities, X-ray dosimetry at therapy levels, Protection-level X-ray calibrations, Therapy-level gamma-ray facility, Fricke dosemeter reference service, Low-dose-rate gamma-ray facility, Penetrameter and kV meter calibration, Measurement services for radiation processing, Dichromate dosemeter reference service, Electron linear accelerator. (U.K.)

  1. Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    The Dosimetry Service will be closed every afternoon the week of 21st to 25th February 2005. The opening hours will be from 8.30 am to 12.00 midday. Don't forget to read your dosimeter, as regular read-outs are indispensable to ensure periodic monitoring of personal doses. Thank you for you cooperation.

  2. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments

  3. Dosimetry Service

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter every month at least once and preferably during the first week. A regular read-out is indispensable in order to ensure a periodic monitoring of the personal dose. You should read your dosimeter even if you have not visited the controlled areas. If you still have the old dosimeter (film badge), please send it immediately for evaluation to us (Bdg 24 E-011). After January 2005 there will be no developing process for the old film system. Information for Contractors: Please remember also to bring the form ‘Confirm Reception of a CERN Dosimeter' signed with ‘Feuille d'enregistrement du CERN'. Without these forms the dosimeter cannot be assigned. Thank you for your cooperation. Dosimetry Service Tel 767 2155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  4. Radiation dosimetry.

    Cameron, J.

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists.

  5. Dosimetry Service

    2004-01-01

    We wish to remind the people who are invited to the Dosimetry Service to exchange the new CERN dosimeter that the hours are from Monday to Friday 8.30 to 11.00 and 14.00 to 16.00. Do not forget to read your dosimeter. The reading should be done during the first week of every month. Thank you for your cooperation.

  6. Acute skin toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy or EGFR inhibitors : Literature review and consensus

    Russi, Elvio G.; Moretto, Francesco; Rampino, Monica; Benasso, Marco; Bacigalupo, Almalina; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Numico, Gianrnauro; Bossi, Paolo; Buglione, Michela; Lombardo, Antonino; Airoldi, Mario; Merlano, Marco C.; Licitra, Lisa; Denaro, Nerina; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Pinto, Carmine; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Girolomoni, Giarnpiero; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    The adverse effects of radiation therapy, often integrated with chemotherapy and/or targeted therapies, on the skin include severe acute and chronic dermatitis associated with pain, discomfort, itching, and burning, and may heavily affect patients' quality of life. The management of these skin adver

  7. Topics in radiation dosimetry radiation dosimetry

    1972-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry, Supplement 1: Topics in Radiation Dosimetry covers instruments and techniques in dealing with special dosimetry problems. The book discusses thermoluminescence dosimetry in archeological dating; dosimetric applications of track etching; vacuum chambers of radiation measurement. The text also describes wall-less detectors in microdosimetry; dosimetry of low-energy X-rays; and the theory and general applicability of the gamma-ray theory of track effects to various systems. Dose equivalent determinations in neutron fields by means of moderator techniques; as well as developm

  8. Consensus Sequence Zen

    Schneider, Thomas D.

    2002-01-01

    Consensus sequences are widely used in molecular biology but they have many flaws. As a result, binding sites of proteins and other molecules are missed during studies of genetic sequences and important biological effects cannot be seen. Information theory provides a mathematically robust way to avoid consensus sequences. Instead of using consensus sequences, sequence conservation can be quantitatively presented in bits of information by using sequence logo graphics to repre...

  9. Efficient decentralized consensus protocols

    Lakshman, T. V.; Agrawala, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Decentralized consensus protocols are characterized by successive rounds of message interchanges. Protocols which achieve a consensus in one round of message interchange require O(N-squared) messages, where N is the number of participants. In this paper, a communication scheme, based on finite projective planes, which requires only O(N sq rt N) messages for each round is presented. Using this communication scheme, decentralized consensus protocols which achieve a consensus within two rounds of message interchange are developed. The protocols are symmetric, and the communication scheme does not impose any hierarchical structure. The scheme is illustrated using blocking and nonblocking commit protocols, decentralized extrema finding, and computation of the sum function.

  10. Breast dosimetry

    The estimation of the absorbed dose to the breast is an important part of the quality control of the mammographic examination. Knowledge of breast dose is essential for the design and performance assessment of mammographic imaging systems. This review gives a historical introduction to the measurement of breast dose. The mean glandular dose (MGD) is introduced as an appropriate measure of breast dose. MGD can be estimated from measurements of the incident air kerma at the surface of the breast and the application of an appropriate conversion factor. Methods of calculating and measuring this conversion factor are described and the results discussed. The incident air kerma itself may be measured for patients or for a test phantom simulating the breast. In each case the dose may be determined using TLD measurements, or known exposure parameters and measurements of tube output. The methodology appropriate to each case is considered and the results from sample surveys of breast dose are presented. Finally the various national protocols for breast dosimetry are compared

  11. Consensus protein design

    Porebski, Benjamin T.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2016-01-01

    A popular and successful strategy in semi-rational design of protein stability is the use of evolutionary information encapsulated in homologous protein sequences. Consensus design is based on the hypothesis that at a given position, the respective consensus amino acid contributes more than average to the stability of the protein than non-conserved amino acids. Here, we review the consensus design approach, its theoretical underpinnings, successes, limitations and challenges, as well as providing a detailed guide to its application in protein engineering. PMID:27274091

  12. Neutron dosimetry - A review

    This review summarizes information on the following subjects: (1) physical processes of importance in neutron dosimetry; (2) biological effects of neutrons; (3) neutron sources; and (4) instruments and methods used in neutron dosimetry. Also, possible improvements in dosimetry instrumentation are outlined and discussed. (author)

  13. Dosimetry in intravascular brachytherapy

    Among the cardiovascular diseases responsible for deaths in the adult population in almost all countries of the world, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which generally occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Several diagnostic techniques and therapies are being tested for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than traditional surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment).Recently, the idea of delivering high radiation doses to coronary arteries to avoid or delay restenosis has been suggested. Known as intravascular brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis in some patient populations. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for the attending staff for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, o,30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several candidate radionuclides as well. Two s tent sources (metallic prosthesis that put inside of patient's artery through angioplasty) employing 32 P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the various radionuclides and source geometries are discussed. The dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients for this promising new technology. (author)

  14. The Vinca dosimetry experiment

    On 15 October 1958 there occurred a very brief uncontrolled run of the zero-power reactor at the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Science, Vinca, near Belgrade, Yugoslavia. During this run six persons received various doses of radiation. They were subsequently given medical treatment of a novel kind at the Curie Hospital, Paris. In atomic energy operations to date, very few accidents involving excessive radiation exposure to human beings have occurred. In fact, the cases of acute radiation injury are limited to about 30 known high exposures, few of which were in the lethal or near-lethal range. Since direct experiment to determine the effects of ionizing radiation on man is unacceptable, information on these effects has to be based on a consideration of data relating to accidental exposures, viewed in the light of the much more extensive data obtained from experiments on animals. Therefore, any direct information on the effects of radiation on humans is very valuable. The international dosimetry project described in this report was carried out at Vinca, Yugoslavia, under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency to determine the precise amount of radiation to which the persons had been exposed during the accident. These dosimetry data, together with the record of the carefully observed clinical effects, are of importance both for the scientific study of radiation effects on man and for the development of methods of therapy. The experiment and measurements were carried out at the end of April 1960. The project formed part of the Agency's research programme in the field of health and safety. The results of the experiment are made available through this report to all Member States

  15. Neutron dosimetry

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq 241 Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s-1 and 0,5 μSv s-1. A calibrated 50 nSv s-1 thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the 241 Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold 241 Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,α) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kVpp cm-1, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46± 0,09) 104 tracks cm-2 mSv-1 for thermal neutrons, (9±3) 102 tracks cm-2 mSV-1 for intermediate neutrons and (26±4) tracks cm-2 mSv-1 for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990's ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is sufficiently sensitive to thermal and intermediate neutrons but fast neutron monitoring ar radiological protection level

  16. Dosimetry of total body irradiation

    In the treatment of disseminated malignancies an improvement in the curability and reduction of complication rates require high precision total body irradiation (TBI) and correct reporting of relevant treatment parameters. Optimal TBI dosimetry is the basis. Radiooncological and radiobiological requirements as well as the special physical situation have to be considered. To review the efforts of medical physicists, highlights from TBI workshops and publications are summarized. Additionally, dosimetric data from 34 European radiooncological centres contributing to the recent ESTRO inquiry on TBI are analysed. The topics are: absorbed dose and dose monitor calibration, determination of absolute and relative doses, dose ratios, attenuation data and heterogeneity corrections; TBI dose calculation methods regarding patient position, beam incidence, body shape and thickness, lung size and density; methods of TBI treatment planning including calculated dose modification and of TBI quality assurance. In conclusion, the following recommendations can be given: TBI dosimetry shall be performed under TBI conditions, close to the real treatment situation. The absorbed dose to water must be determined. The dose monitor should be calibrated against dose measurements at the centre of a water equivalent phantom of TBI equivalent size and typical thickness. Photon fluence profiles have to be measured with small phantoms. Influences on the local dose must be investigated systematically. A reproducible AP/PA TBI technique should be used. The TBI dose shall be specified to mid-abdomen and reported in units of gray. The single and total dose and the dose rate to the lungs, the number of fractions and the treatment time schedule must be stated. In vivo dosimetry is required if non-reliable TBI techniques are used. An international TBI dosimetry intercomparison could assist these efforts to improve the treatment of acute leukaemia. (author). 89 refs, 3 figs, 13 tabs

  17. Continuity and consensus

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    maternal leave. These changes can be explained as adjustments to post-industrial conditions within a political culture relying on class compromises and a broad consensus informed by expert advice coming from civil servants and ad hoc policy commissions. The paper concludes that changes in Danish family...... policy reflect changing conditions for employment and the minding of children and that there has been a high degree of continuity and consensus about the change, as indicated by the strong increase in female labour market involvement....

  18. Silicon diode dosimetry

    The theory of silicon dosimetry is briefly reviewed with respect to operation of these diodes without reverse bias in the short-circuit current mode. The problems of temperature dependence, radiation damage, and the dependence on photon energy are discussed. Various applications of the diodes to practical radiation dosimetry are then described with a view toward pointing out the pitfalls as well as the advantages of using these diodes for dosimetry. (author)

  19. Silicon diode dosimetry

    Dixon, R.L.; Ekstrand, K.E. (Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (USA). Bowman Gray School of Medicine)

    1982-11-01

    The theory of silicon dosimetry is briefly reviewed with respect to operation of these diodes without reverse bias in the short-circuit current mode. The problems of temperature dependence, radiation damage, and the dependence on photon energy are discussed. Various applications of the diodes to practical radiation dosimetry are then described with a view toward pointing out the pitfalls as well as the advantages of using these diodes for dosimetry.

  20. Advances in biomedical dosimetry

    The symposium was organized in order to focus on the problems, developments and areas of further research in the life sciences. Forty-nine papers were presented dealing with instrumentation, techniques, experimental and theoretical studies. They included neutron sources and mixed-field dosimetry; developments (e.g. thermocurrent dosimetry) in dosimetry; physical aspects of radiation therapy, and treatment planning; international, national and regional radiation metrology programmes; diagnostic medical x-ray sources, imaging systems and patient doses; high-energy electron and γ-ray dosimetry; and doses determination for ingested or administered radionuclides

  1. Measurement assurance in dosimetry

    The uses of radiation in medicine and industry are today wide in scope and diversity and there is a need for reliable dosimetry in most applications. In particular, high accuracy in dosimetry is required in the therapeutic use of radiation. Consequently, calibration procedures for radiotherapy generally meet also the accuracy requirements for applications in other fields, such as diagnostic radiology, radiation protection and industrial radiation processing. The emphasis at this symposium was therefore mainly or radiotherapy dosimetry, but the meeting also included one session devoted to dosimetry in diagnostic radiology. Refs, fig and tabs

  2. Internal sources dosimetry

    The absorbed dose, need of estimation in risk evaluation in the application of radiopharmaceuticals in Nuclear Medicine practice,internal dosimetry,internal and external sources. Calculation methodology,Marinelli model,MIRD system for absorbed dose calculation based on biological parameters of radiopharmaceutical in human body or individual,energy of emitted radiations by administered radionuclide, fraction of emitted energy that is absorbed by target body.Limitation of the MIRD calculation model. A explanation of Marinelli method of dosimetry calculation,β dosimetry. Y dosimetry, effective dose, calculation in organs and tissues, examples. Bibliography .

  3. Dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    The publication deals with a major field of ionizing radiation dosimetry, viz., integrating dosimetric methods, which are the basic means of operative dose determination. It is divided into the following sections: physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation; integrating dosimetric methods for low radiation doses (film dosimetry, nuclear emulsions, thermoluminescence, radiophotoluminescence, solid-state track detectors, integrating ionization dosemeters); dosimetry of high ionizing radiation doses (chemical dosimetric methods, dosemeters based on the coloring effect, activation detectors); additional methods applicable to integrating dosimetry (exoelectron emission, electron spin resonance, lyoluminescence, etc.); and calibration techniques for dosimetric instrumentation. (Z.S.). 422 refs

  4. Preclinical pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, radiation dosimetry and acute toxicity studies required for regulatory approval of a Clinical Trial Application for a Phase I/II clinical trial of 111In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab

    Introduction: 111In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab is a novel imaging probe for detecting changes in HER2 expression in breast cancer (BC) caused by treatment with trastuzumab (Herceptin). Our aim was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, normal tissue biodistribution, radiation dosimetry and acute toxicity of 111In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab in non-tumor bearing mice in order to obtain regulatory approval to advance this agent to a first-in-humans Phase I/II clinical trial. Methods: Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic studies were performed in non-tumor bearing Balb/c mice injected i.v. with 111In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab (2.5 MBq; 2 μg). The cumulative number of disintegrations per source organ derived from the biodistribution data was used to predict the radiation absorbed doses in humans using OLINDA/EXM software. Acute toxicity was studied at two weeks post-injection of 111In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab (1.0 MBq, 20 μg) with comparison to control mice injected with unlabeled BzDTPA-pertuzumab (20 μg) or Sodium Chloride Injection USP. The dose of 111In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab corresponded to 23-times the human radioactivity dose and 10-times the protein dose on a MBq/kg and mg/kg basis, respectively. Toxicity was assessed by monitoring body mass, complete blood cell count (CBC), hematocrit (Hct), hemoglobin (Hb), serum creatinine (SCr) and alanine aminotransferease (ALT) and by histopathological examination of tissues at necropsy. Results: 111In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab exhibited a biphasic elimination from the blood with a distribution half-life (t1/2α) of 3.8 h and an elimination half-life (t1/2β) of 228.2 h. The radiopharmaceutical was distributed mainly in the blood, heart, lungs, liver, kidneys and spleen. The projected whole-body radiation absorbed dose in humans was 0.05 mSv/MBq corresponding to a total of 16.8 mSv for three separate administrations of 111In-BzDTPA-pertuzumab (111 MBq) planned for the Phase I/II trial. There were slight changes in Hb and SCr levels associated with administration of

  5. Dosimetry service removal

    Safety Commission

    2010-01-01

    Dear personal dosimeter user, Please note that the Dosimetry service has moved in building 55, the service is now located in the main floor: 55-R-004. Main floor instead of second floor. On your right hand when accessing in the building. Thank you Dosimetry Service

  6. Radiation therapy dosimetry system

    New therapeutic treatments generally aim to increase therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity. Many aspects of radiation dosimetry have been studied and developed particularly in the field of external radiation. The success of radiotherapy relies on monitoring the dose of radiation to which the tumor and the adjacent tissues are exposed. Radiotherapy techniques have evolved through a rapid transition from conventional three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments or radiosurgery and robotic radiation therapy. These advances push the frontiers in our effort to provide better patient care by improving the precision of the absorbed dose delivered. This paper presents state-of-the art radiation therapy dosimetry techniques as well as the value of integral dosimetry (INDOS), which shows promise in the fulfillment of radiation therapy dosimetry requirements. - highlights: • Pre-treatment delivery and phantom dosimetry in brachytherapy treatments were analyzed. • Dose distribution in the head and neck was estimated by physical and mathematical dosimetry. • Electron beam flattening was acquired by means of mathematical, physical and “in vivo” dosimetry. • Integral dosimetry (INDOS) has been suggested as a routine dosimetric method in all radiation therapy treatments

  7. Dosimetry in process control

    Measurement of absorbed dose and dose distribution in irradiated medical products relies on the use of quality dosimetry systems, trained personnel and a thorough understanding of the energy deposition process. The interrelationship of these factors will be discussed with emphasis on the current and future practices of process control dosimetry. (author)

  8. Usage of JENDL dosimetry file for material dosimetry in JOYO

    A cross section set with covariance error matrix for neutron spectrum unfolding has been newly prepared from JENDL-3 dosimetry file and was applied to the dosimetry test in the MK-II core (the irradiation core) of Experimental Fast Reactor 'JOYO'. The dosimetry results by the new cross section set were compared with the previous ones by ENDF/B-V dosimetry file to evaluate the applicability and accuracy for the fast reactor dosimetry. In this work, it has been concluded that more improvement can be expected for the JOYO dosimetry test by employing JENDL-3 dosimetry file. (author)

  9. Association between exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields assessed by dosimetry and acute symptoms in children and adolescents: a population based cross-sectional study

    Radon Katja

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increase in numbers of mobile phone users was accompanied by some concern that exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMF might adversely affect acute health especially in children and adolescents. The authors investigated this potential association using personal dosimeters. Methods A 24-hour exposure profile of 1484 children and 1508 adolescents was generated in a population-based cross-sectional study in Germany between 2006 and 2008 (participation 52%. Personal interview data on socio-demographic characteristics, self-reported exposure and potential confounders were collected. Acute symptoms were assessed twice during the study day using a symptom diary. Results Only few of the large number of investigated associations were found to be statistically significant. At noon, adolescents with a measured exposure in the highest quartile during morning hours reported a statistically significant higher intensity of headache (Odd Ratio: 1.50; 95% confidence interval: 1.03, 2.19. At bedtime, adolescents with a measured exposure in the highest quartile during afternoon hours reported a statistically significant higher intensity of irritation in the evening (4th quartile 1.79; 1.23, 2.61, while children reported a statistically significant higher intensity of concentration problems (4th quartile 1.55; 1.02, 2.33. Conclusions We observed few statistically significant results which are not consistent over the two time points. Furthermore, when the 10% of the participants with the highest exposure are taken into consideration the significant results of the main analysis could not be confirmed. Based on the pattern of these results, we assume that the few observed significant associations are not causal but rather occurred by chance.

  10. Achieving diagnosis by consensus

    Kane, Bridget

    2009-08-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the collaborative work conducted at a multidisciplinary medical team meeting, where a patient’s definitive diagnosis is agreed, by consensus. The features that distinguish this process of diagnostic work by consensus are examined in depth. The current use of technology to support this collaborative activity is described, and experienced deficiencies are identified. Emphasis is placed on the visual and perceptual difficulty for individual specialities in making interpretations, and on how, through collaboration in discussion, definitive diagnosis is actually achieved. The challenge for providing adequate support for the multidisciplinary team at their meeting is outlined, given the multifaceted nature of the setting, i.e. patient management, educational, organizational and social functions, that need to be satisfied.

  11. Overlapping Consensus in Malaysia

    Monsen, Mats

    2007-01-01

    An empirical study of how Malaysian pluralism is understood through Islam Hadhari, Article 11 and the Inter-faith Commission against the backdrop of current Malaysian political and social history, coupled with a theoretical analysis through John Rawls' Political Liberalism, with particular emphasis on the idea of Overlapping Consensus. The thesis is an attempt at applying Rawls' theory on the practical case of Malaysia, as a plural society, while at the same time using the practical case of M...

  12. Note on level r consensus

    Poliakov, Nikolay L.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the hierarchy of level $r$ consensus partially collapses. In particular, any profile $\\pi\\in \\mathcal{P}$ that exhibits consensus of level $(K-1)!$ around $\\succ_0$ in fact exhibits consensus of level $1$ around $\\succ_0$.

  13. Spanish Consensus Statement

    Rey, Guillermo Álvarez; Cuesta, Jordi Ardevol; Loureda, Rafael Arriaza; España, Fernando Ávila; Matas, Ramón Balius; Pazos, Fernando Baró; de Dios Beas Jiménez, Juan; Rosell, Jorge Candel; Fernandez, César Cobián; Ros, Francisco Esparza; Colmenero, Josefina Espejo; de Prado, Jorge Fernández; Cota, Juan José García; González, Jose Ignacio Garrido; Santander, Manuela González; Munilla, Miguel Ángel Herrador; Ruiz, Francisco Ivorra; Díaz, Fernando Jiménez; Marqueta, Pedro Manonelles; Fernandez, Antonio Maestro; Benito, Juan José Muñoz; Vilás, Ramón Olivé; Teres, Xavier Peirau; Amaro, José Peña; Roque, Juan Pérez San; Parenteu, Christophe Ramírez; Serna, Juan Ribas; Álvarez, Mikel Sánchez; Marchori, Carlos Sanchez; Soto, Miguel del Valle; Alonso, José María Villalón; García, Pedro Guillen; de la Iglesia, Nicolas Hugo; Alcorocho, Juan Manuel Lopez

    2016-01-01

    On the 21st of March, 2015, experts met at Clínica CEMTRO in Madrid, Spain, under the patronage of The Spanish Society for Sports Traumatology (SETRADE), The Spanish Federation of Sports Medicine (FEMEDE), The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Football Clubs (AEMEF), and The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Basketball Clubs (AEMB) with the aim of establishing a round table that would allow specialists to consider the most appropriate current general actions to be taken when treating muscle tears in sport, based on proven scientific data described in the medical literature. Each expert received a questionnaire prior to the aforementioned meeting comprising a set of questions concerning therapeutic indications generally applied in the different stages present during muscle repair. The present Consensus Document is the result of the answers to the questionnaire and resulting discussion and consensus over which are the best current indications in the treatment of muscle tears in sport. Avoiding immobilization, not taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) randomly, fostering early mobilization, increasing vascularization of injured, site and regulating inflammatory mechanisms—without inhibiting these from the early stages of the recovery period—all stood out as main points of the Consensus Document. Additionally, there is controversy concerning cell stimulation techniques and the use of growth factors or cell inhibitors. The decision concerning discharge was unanimous, as was the criteria considered when it came to performing sport techniques without pain. PMID:27213161

  14. Achieving consensus in environmental programs

    Kurstedt, Jr., H. A.; Jones, R. M.; Walker, J. A.; Middleman, L. I.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new research effort on consensus tied to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) within the US Department of Energy's Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management (DWTM). We define consensus and explain why consensus decisions are not merely desirable but necessary in furthering ERP activities. As examples of our planned applied research, we first discuss Nominal Group Technique as a representative consensus-generating tool, and we conclude by describing the consensus-related mission of the Waste Management Review Group, established at Virginia Tech to conduct independent, third-party review of DWTM/ERP plans and activities. 10 refs.

  15. Achieving consensus in environmental programs

    In this paper, the authors describe a research effort on consensus tied to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) within the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management (DWTM). They define consensus and explain why consensus decisions are not merely desirable but necessary in furthering ERP activities. As examples of their planned applied research, the authors first discuss nominal group technique as a representative consensus-generating tool, and conclude by describing the consensus-related mission of the Waste Management Review Group, established to conduct independent, third-party review of DWTM/ERP plans and activities

  16. ASTM Standards for Reactor Dosimetry and Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    The ASTM standards provide guidance and instruction on how to field and interpret reactor dosimetry. They provide a roadmap towards understanding the current ''state-of-the-art'' in reactor dosimetry, as reflected by the technical community. The consensus basis to the ASTM standards assures the user of an unbiased presentation of technical procedures and interpretations of the measurements. Some insight into the types of standards and the way in which they are organized can assist one in using them in an expeditious manner. Two example are presented to help orient new users to the breadth and interrelationship between the ASTM nuclear metrology standards. One example involves the testing of a new ''widget'' to verify the radiation hardness. The second example involves quantifying the radiation damage at a pressure vessel critical weld location through surveillance dosimetry and calculation

  17. INFORMATION: INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    2004-01-01

    We inform you that the Individual Dosimetry Service will be exceptionally closed on April 13 and 14 (Tuesday and Wednesday). Only the very urgent cases will be handled during the days mentioned above.

  18. Dosimetry for radiation processing

    Miller, Arne

    1986-01-01

    During the past few years significant advances have taken place in the different areas of dosimetry for radiation processing, mainly stimulated by the increased interest in radiation for food preservation, plastic processing and sterilization of medical products. Reference services both by...... and sterilization dosimetry, optichromic dosimeters in the shape of small tubes for food processing, and ESR spectroscopy of alanine for reference dosimetry. In this paper the special features of radiation processing dosimetry are discussed, several commonly used dosimeters are reviewed, and factors...... international organizations (IAEA) and national laboratories have helped to improve the reliability of dose measurements. Several dosimeter systems like calorimetry, perspex, and radiochromic dye films are being improved and new systems have emerged, e.g. spectrophotometry of dichromate solution for reference...

  19. Individual Dosimetry Service

    2004-01-01

    Individual Dosimetry Service will be closed on Thursday 9 September (Jeûne genevois) and on Friday 10 September. We inform all staffs and users under regular dosimetry control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2004 are available from their usual dispatchers. Please have your films changed before the 13 SEPTEMBER 2004. The color of the dosimeter valid in SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2004 is RED.

  20. News on personal dosimetry

    What is going on in personal monitoring? The DIS-1 dosimeter (Rados/Mirion Technologies), on the market since 2000, is being introduced in the 4th dosimetry service in Switzerland. In Germany, dosimetry services are looking for alternatives to the film dosimeter. They have recently taken the decision for two technical solutions. IEC has published a standard which shall regulate technical requirements for dosimeters world-wide. (orig.)

  1. Dosimetry and Calibration Section

    The Dosimetry and Calibration Section fulfils two tasks within CERN's Radiation Protection Group: the Individual Dosimetry Service monitors more than 5000 persons potentially exposed to ionizing radiation on the CERN sites, and the Calibration Laboratory verifies throughout the year, at regular intervals, over 1000 instruments, monitors, and electronic dosimeters used by RP Group. The establishment of a Quality Assurance System for the Individual Dosimetry Service, a requirement of the new Swiss Ordinance for personal dosimetry, put a considerable workload on the section. Together with an external consultant it was decided to identify and then describe the different 'processes' of the routine work performed in the dosimetry service. The resulting Quality Manual was submitted to the Federal Office for Public Health in Bern in autumn. The CERN Individual Dosimetry Service will eventually be officially endorsed after a successful technical test in March 1999. On the technical side, the introduction of an automatic development machine for gamma films was very successful. It processes the dosimetric films without an operator being present, and its built-in regeneration mechanism keeps the concentration of the processing chemicals at a constant level

  2. BRAINSTORMING: Consensus Learning in Practice

    Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2009-01-01

    We present here an introduction to Brainstorming approach, that was recently proposed as a consensus meta-learning technique, and used in several practical applications in bioinformatics and chemoinformatics. The consensus learning denotes heterogeneous theoretical classification method, where one trains an ensemble of machine learning algorithms using different types of input training data representations. In the second step all solutions are gathered and the consensus is build between them....

  3. Surface Hopping by Consensus.

    Martens, Craig C

    2016-07-01

    We present a new stochastic surface hopping method for modeling molecular dynamics with electronic transitions. The approach, consensus surface hopping (CSH), is a numerical framework for solving the semiclassical limit Liouville equation describing nuclear dynamics on coupled electronic surfaces using ensembles of trajectories. In contrast to existing techniques based on propagating independent classical trajectories that undergo stochastic hops between the electronic states, the present method determines the probabilities of transition of each trajectory collectively with input from the entire ensemble. The full coherent dynamics of the coupled system arise naturally at the ensemble level and ad hoc corrections, such as momentum rescaling to impose strict trajectory energy conservation and artificial decoherence to avoid the overcoherence of the quantum states associated with independent trajectories, are avoided. PMID:27345103

  4. Rethinking the Beijing Consensus

    Jiang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    proposed by the Chinese leadership. A prominent feature of China's responses to the crisis is a bias towards state-owned enterprises and the public sector, which exacerbates the existing problems of monopoly, over-capacity, inequality, the regulators being ‘captured’ by industrial interests and...... protectionism. Given limited economic resources, domestic political contentions and the questionable credibility of the China Model, it would be difficult for China to practice ‘responsible great power’ diplomacy or assume leadership in the region or globally.......This paper discusses the role of the Beijing Consensus type of foreign and economic policymaking in China's development since the Asian financial crisis and in its response to the global crisis, and argues that it has been a double-edged sword, as reflected in several aspects. First, the lesson...

  5. Secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL)

    A secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory has been established in the Tun Ismail Research Centre, Malaysia as a national laboratory for reference and standardization purposes in the field of radiation dosimetry. This article gives brief accounts on the general information, development of the facility, programmes to be carried out as well as other information on the relevant aspects of the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory. (author)

  6. Topics in radiation dosimetry radiation dosimetry, v.1

    Attix, Frank H

    2013-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry, Supplement 1: Topics in Radiation Dosimetry covers instruments and techniques in dealing with special dosimetry problems. The book discusses thermoluminescence dosimetry in archeological dating; dosimetric applications of track etching; vacuum chambers of radiation measurement. The text also describes wall-less detectors in microdosimetry; dosimetry of low-energy X-rays; and the theory and general applicability of the gamma-ray theory of track effects to various systems. Dose equivalent determinations in neutron fields by means of moderator techniques; as well as developm

  7. Between consensus and contestation.

    Weale, Albert

    2016-08-15

    Purpose - Noting that discussions of public participation and priority setting typically presuppose certain political theories of democracy, the purpose of this paper is to discuss two theories: the consensual and the agonistic. The distinction is illuminating when considering the difference between institutionalized public participation and contestatory participation. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is a theoretical reconstruction of two ways of thinking about public participation in relation to priority setting in health care, drawing on the work of Habermas, a deliberative theorist, and Mouffe, a theorist of agonism. Findings - The different theoretical approaches can be associated with different ways of understanding priority setting. In particular, agonistic democratic theory would understand priority setting as system of inclusions and exclusions rather than the determination of a consensus of social values, which is the typical deliberative way of thinking about the issues. Originality/value - The paper shows the value of drawing out explicitly the tacit assumptions of practices of political participation in order to reveal their scope and limitations. It suggests that making such theoretical presuppositions explicit has value for health services management in recognizing these implicit choices. PMID:27468774

  8. Dosimetry of neutron irradiations

    Biological dosimetry of neutron irradiation appears to be of great difficulty due to the multiparametric aspect of the relative biological effectiveness and the heterogeneity of the neutron dose distribution. Dosimetry by sodium 24 activation which can be performed by means of portable radiameters appears to be very useful for early triage within the 3 h following neutron irradiation, whereas hematological dosimetry by slope and level analysis of the lymphocyte drop cannot be used in this case. Chromosomic aberration analysis allows to evaluate the neutron dose heterogeneity by the frequency measurement of acentric fragments not originating from the formation of dicentrics or rings. Finally, recent experimental data on large primate models (baboons) have shown that some plasma hemostasia factors appear to be reliable biological indicators and noticeable markers of the prognosis of neutron irradiation

  9. Interstitial brachytherapy dosimetry update

    In March 2004, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) published an update to the AAPM Task Group No. 43 Report (TG-43) which was initially published in 1995. This update was pursued primarily due to the marked increase in permanent implantation of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources in the United States over the past decade, and clinical rationale for the need of accurate dosimetry in the implementation of interstitial brachytherapy. Additionally, there were substantial improvements in the brachytherapy dosimetry formalism, accuracy of related parameters and methods for determining these parameters. With salient background, these improvements are discussed in the context of radiation dosimetry. As an example, the impact of this update on the administered dose is assessed for the model 200 103Pd brachytherapy source. (authors)

  10. Secondary standards dosimetry laboratories

    The Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) is part of an international network of dosimetry laboratories established by the IAEA and WHO. The network services maintain the consistency and accuracy of the therapeutic dose by exercising a national and international intercomparison program as well as providing calibration services to the end users, mainly radiotherapy departments in hospitals. The SSDL's are designated by national laboratories (such as Primary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories, PSDL's) to provide national and international absorbed dose traceability for users in that country. The advantage of the SSDL is that the absorbed dose measurements are consistent among the stakeholder countries.The Physics and Safety divisions have recently re-established an SSDL at ANSTO. The SSDL utilises a collimated cobalt-60 source of activity 170 TBq and dose rate of SmGy/sec at 1 metre (within ±2%), and provides a service to calibrate therapy level thimble ionisation chambers and electrometers

  11. Consensus on consensus: a synthesis of consensus estimates on human-caused global warming

    Cook, John; Oreskes, Naomi; Doran, Peter T.; Anderegg, William R. L.; Verheggen, Bart; Maibach, Ed W.; Carlton, J. Stuart; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Skuce, Andrew G.; Green, Sarah A.; Nuccitelli, Dana; Jacobs, Peter; Richardson, Mark; Winkler, Bärbel; Painting, Rob; Rice, Ken

    2016-04-01

    The consensus that humans are causing recent global warming is shared by 90%–100% of publishing climate scientists according to six independent studies by co-authors of this paper. Those results are consistent with the 97% consensus reported by Cook et al (Environ. Res. Lett. 8 024024) based on 11 944 abstracts of research papers, of which 4014 took a position on the cause of recent global warming. A survey of authors of those papers (N = 2412 papers) also supported a 97% consensus. Tol (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 048001) comes to a different conclusion using results from surveys of non-experts such as economic geologists and a self-selected group of those who reject the consensus. We demonstrate that this outcome is not unexpected because the level of consensus correlates with expertise in climate science. At one point, Tol also reduces the apparent consensus by assuming that abstracts that do not explicitly state the cause of global warming (‘no position’) represent non-endorsement, an approach that if applied elsewhere would reject consensus on well-established theories such as plate tectonics. We examine the available studies and conclude that the finding of 97% consensus in published climate research is robust and consistent with other surveys of climate scientists and peer-reviewed studies.

  12. Nuclear medicine radiation dosimetry

    McParland, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    Complexities of the requirements for accurate radiation dosimetry evaluation in both diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine (including PET) have grown over the past decade. This is due primarily to four factors: growing consideration of accurate patient-specific treatment planning for radionuclide therapy as a means of improving the therapeutic benefit, development of more realistic anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in estimating radiation transport and dosimetry in patients, design and use of advanced Monte Carlo algorithms in calculating the above-mentioned radiation transport and

  13. Political Consensus and Fiscal Outcomes

    Houlberg, Kurt; Holm Pedersen, Lene

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming difficult to maintain consensus in a period of economic austerity, and this possibly challenges the ability of democratic institutions to take decisions on tough economic questions. In order to find out how political consensus influences fiscal outcomes, this article sets out to...... cost, while at the same time politicians may be better at sticking to budgets if political consensus exists. The analysis is based on a pooled regression analysis of the local governments in Denmark in the years 2008 and 2009 using a data set combining survey data with administrative data on the local...

  14. Status of radiation processing dosimetry

    Miller, A.

    Several milestones have marked the field of radiation processing dosimetry since IMRP 7. Among them are the IAEA symposium on High Dose Dosimetry for Radiation Processing and the international Workshops on Dosimetry for Radiation Processing organized by the ASTM. Several standards have been or are...... being published by the ASTM in this field, both on dosimetry procedures and on the proper use of specific dosimeter systems. Several individuals are involved in this international cooperation which contribute significantly to the broader understanding of the role of dosimetry in radiation processing....... The importance of dosimetry is emphasized in the standards on radiation sterilization which are currently drafted by the European standards organization CEN and by the international standards organization ISO. In both standards, dosimetry plays key roles in characterization of the facility, in...

  15. Ion storage dosimetry

    Mathur, V. K.

    2001-09-01

    The availability of a reliable, accurate and cost-effective real-time personnel dosimetry system is fascinating to radiation workers. Electronic dosimeters are contemplated to meet this demand of active dosimetry. The development of direct ion storage (DIS) dosimeters, a member of the electronic dosimeter family, for personnel dosimetry is also an attempt in this direction. DIS dosimeter is a hybrid of the well-established technology of ion chambers and the latest advances in data storage using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) analog memory device. This dosimeter is capable of monitoring legal occupational radiation doses of gamma, X-rays, beta and neutron radiation. Similar to an ion chamber, the performance of the dosimeter for a particular application can be optimized through the selection of appropriate wall materials. The use of the floating gate of a MOSFET as one of the electrodes of the ion chamber allows the miniaturization of the device to the size of a dosimetry badge and avoids the use of power supplies during dose accumulation. The concept of the device, underlying physics and the design of the DIS dosimeter are discussed. The results of preliminary testing of the device are also provided.

  16. Individual Dosimetry Service

    2004-01-01

    We inform all staffs and users under regular dosimetry control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period MAY-JUNE 2004 are available from their usual dispatchers. Please have your films changed before the 11th MAY 2004. The color of the dosimeter valid in MAY-JUNE 2004 is YELLOW.

  17. Individual dosimetry service

    2004-01-01

    We inform all staffs and users under regular dosimetry control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period MARCH/APRIL 2004 are available from their usual dispatchers. Please have your films changed before the 11th MARCH 2004. The color of the dosimeter valid in MARCH/APRIL 2004 is BLUE.

  18. Individual dosimetry service

    2004-01-01

    We inform all staff and users under regular dosimetry control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period JULY-AUGUST 2004 are available from their usual dispatchers. Please have your films changed before the 15 JULY 2004. The color of the dosimeter valid in July-August 2004 is PINK.

  19. Dosimetry and Calibration Section

    The two tasks of the Dosimetry and Calibration Section at CERN are the Individual Dosimetry Service which assures the personal monitoring of about 5000 persons potentially exposed to ionizing radiation at CERN, and the Calibration Laboratory which verifies all the instruments and monitors. This equipment is used by the sections of the RP Group for assuring radiation protection around CERN's accelerators, and by the Environmental Section of TISTE. In addition, nearly 250 electronic and 300 quartz fibre dosimeters, employed in operational dosimetry, are calibrated at least once a year. The Individual Dosimetry Service uses an extended database (INDOS) which contains information about all the individual doses ever received at CERN. For most of 1997 it was operated without the support of a database administrator as the technician who had assured this work retired. The Software Support Section of TIS-TE took over the technical responsibility of the database, but in view of the many other tasks of this Section and the lack of personnel, only a few interventions for solving immediate problems were possible

  20. Ion-kill dosimetry

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  1. High frequency electromagnetic dosimetry

    Sánchez-Hernández, David A

    2009-01-01

    Along with the growth of RF and microwave technology applications, there is a mounting concern about the possible adverse effects over human health from electromagnetic radiation. Addressing this issue and putting it into perspective, this groundbreaking resource provides critical details on the latest advances in high frequency electromagnetic dosimetry.

  2. Dosimetry of pion beams

    Negative pion beams are probably the most esoteric and most complicated type of radiation which has been suggested for use in clinical radiotherapy. Because of the limited availability of pion beams in the past, even to nuclear physicists, there exist relatively fewer basic data for this modality. Pion dosimetry is discussed

  3. Dosimetry for food irradiation

    A Manual of Food Irradiation Dosimetry was published in 1977 under the auspices of the IAEA as Technical Reports Series No. 178. It was the first monograph of its kind and served as a reference in the field of radiation processing and in the development of standards. While the essential information about radiation dosimetry in this publication has not become obsolete, other publications on radiation dosimetry have become available which have provided useful information for incorporation in this updated version. There is already a Codex General Standard for Irradiated Foods and an associated Code of Practice for Operation of Irradiation Facilities used for Treatment of Food, issued in 1984 by the Codex Alimentarius Commission of the FAO/WHO Food Standard Programme. The Codex Standard contains provisions on irradiation facilities and process control which include, among other requirements, that control of the processes within facilities shall include the keeping of adequate records including quantitative dosimetry. Appendix A of the Standard provides an explanation of process control and dosimetric requirements in compliance with the Codex Standard. By 1999, over 40 countries had implemented national regulations or issued specific approval for certain irradiated food items/classes of food based on the principles of the Codex Standard and its Code of Practice. Food irradiation is thus expanding, as over 30 countries are now actually applying this process for the treatment of one or more food products for commercial purposes. Irradiated foods are being marketed at retail level in several countries. With the increasing recognition and application of irradiation as a sanitary and phytosanitary treatment of food based on the provisions of the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures of the World Trade Organization, international trade in irradiated food is expected to expand during the next decade. It is therefore essential that proper dosimetry

  4. Modern methods of personnel dosimetry

    The physical properties of radiation detectors for personnel dosimetry are described and compared. The suitability of different types of dosimeters for operational and central monitoring of normal occupational exposure, for accident and catastrophe dosimetry and for background and space-flight dosimetry is discussed. The difficulties in interpreting the dosimeter reading with respect to the dose in individual body organs are discussed briefly. 430 literature citations (up to Spring 1966) are given

  5. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    1990-01-01

    A continuation of the treatise The Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation, Volume III builds upon the foundations of Volumes I and II and the tradition of the preceeding treatise Radiation Dosimetry. Volume III contains three comprehensive chapters on the applications of radiation dosimetry in particular research and medical settings, a chapter on unique and useful detectors, and two chapters on Monte Carlo techniques and their applications.

  6. Objective consensus from decision trees

    Consensus-based approaches provide an alternative to evidence-based decision making, especially in situations where high-level evidence is limited. Our aim was to demonstrate a novel source of information, objective consensus based on recommendations in decision tree format from multiple sources. Based on nine sample recommendations in decision tree format a representative analysis was performed. The most common (mode) recommendations for each eventuality (each permutation of parameters) were determined. The same procedure was applied to real clinical recommendations for primary radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Data was collected from 16 radiation oncology centres, converted into decision tree format and analyzed in order to determine the objective consensus. Based on information from multiple sources in decision tree format, treatment recommendations can be assessed for every parameter combination. An objective consensus can be determined by means of mode recommendations without compromise or confrontation among the parties. In the clinical example involving prostate cancer therapy, three parameters were used with two cut-off values each (Gleason score, PSA, T-stage) resulting in a total of 27 possible combinations per decision tree. Despite significant variations among the recommendations, a mode recommendation could be found for specific combinations of parameters. Recommendations represented as decision trees can serve as a basis for objective consensus among multiple parties

  7. Ocular allergy latin american consensus

    Myrna Serapião dos Santos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To establish current definition, classification and staging, and to develop diagnosis and treatment recommendations for ocular allergy, by using Delphi approach. METHODS: Ten Latin American experts on ocular allergy participated in a 4-round Delphi panel approach. Four surveys were constructed and answered by panelists. A two-thirds majority was defined as consensus. Definition, classification, staging and diagnosis and treatment recommendations were the main outcomes. RESULTS: "Ocular allergy" was proposed as the general term to describe ocular allergic diseases. Consensus regarding classification was not reached. Signs and symptoms were considered extremely important for the diagnosis. It was consensus that a staging system should be proposed based on the disease severity. Environmental control, avoidance of allergens and the use of artificial tears were recommended as first line treatment. The secondary treatment should include topical anti-histamines, mast cell stabilizers and multi actions drugs. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and vasoconstrictors were not recommended. Topical corticosteroids were recommended as third line of treatment for the most severe keratoconjunctivitis. Consensus was not reached regarding the use of systemic corticosteroids or immunosuppressant. Surgical approach and unconventional treatments were not recommended as routine. CONCLUSION: The task of creating guidelines for ocular allergies showed to be very complex. Many controversial topics remain unsolved. A larger consensus including experts from different groups around the world may be needed to further improve the current recommendations for several aspects of ocular allergy.

  8. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR

  9. Ambiguities in thermoluminescence dosimetry

    On one hand, thermoluminescence dosimetry is one of most reliable, rugged and economical system of passive dosimetry but on the other hand there are several ambiguities, which need attention. The PTTL is a complex phenomenon and it is difficult to identify the source for the transfer of the charge carrier to repopulate the traps related to the glow peaks. For the photon energy dependence it is difficult to explain the change in the response for 662 keV gamma rays of 137Cs as compared to the response for 1.25 MeV gamma rays of 60Co. The increase in the response of a TLD with increasing heating rate poses another ambiguity and so is the case with the observations of the supra linearity of different glow peaks. To over come the ambiguities, efforts have to continue to enhance the understanding and to harmonize the protocol for reliable experimental data

  10. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    Amaro, C.R. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR.

  11. Sixth symposium on neutron dosimetry

    This booklet contains all abstracts of papers presented in 13 sessions. Main topics: Cross sections and Kerma factors; analytical radiobiology; detectors for personnel monitoring; secondary charged particles and microdosimetric basis of q-value for neutrons; personnel dosimetry; concepts for radiation protection; ambient monitoring; TEPC and ion chambers in radiation protection; beam dosimetry; track detectors (CR-39); dosimetry at biomedical irradiation facilities; health physics at therapy facilities; calibration for radiation protection; devices for beam dosimetry (TLD and miscellaneous); therapy and biomedical irradiation facilities; treatment planning. (HP)

  12. Personal radon daughter dosimetry

    The conventional means of radon daughter exposure estimatikn for uranium miners in Canada is by grab sampling and time weighting. Personal dosimetry is a possible alternative method with its own advantages and limitations. The author poses basic questions with regard to two methods of radon daughter detection, thermoluminescent chips and track-etch film. An historical review of previous and current research and development programs in Canada and in other countries is presented, as are brief results and conclusions of each dosimeter evaluation

  13. Personnel radiation dosimetry

    The book contains the 21 technical papers presented at the Technical Committee Meeting to Elaborate Procedures and Data for the Intercomparison of Personnel Dosimeters organizaed by the IAEA on 22-26 April 1985. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. A list of areas in which additional research and development work is needed and recommendations for an IAEA-sponsored intercomparison program on personnel dosimetry is also included

  14. Dosimetry: an ARDENT topic

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The first annual ARDENT workshop took place in Vienna from 20 to 23 November. The workshop gathered together the Early-Stage Researchers (ESR) and their supervisors, plus other people involved from all the participating institutions.   “The meeting, which was organised with the local support of the Austrian Institute of Technology, was a nice opportunity for the ESRs to get together, meet each other, and present their research plans and some preliminary results of their work,” says Marco Silari, a member of CERN Radiation Protection Group and the scientist in charge of the programme. Two full days were devoted to a training course on radiation dosimetry, delivered by renowned experts. The workshop closed with a half-day visit to the MedAustron facility in Wiener Neustadt. ARDENT (Advanced Radiation Dosimetry European Network Training) is a Marie Curie ITN project funded under EU FP7 with €4 million. The project focuses on radiation dosimetry exploiting se...

  15. Consensus clustering in complex networks

    Lancichinetti, Andrea; 10.1038/srep00336

    2012-01-01

    The community structure of complex networks reveals both their organization and hidden relationships among their constituents. Most community detection methods currently available are not deterministic, and their results typically depend on the specific random seeds, initial conditions and tie-break rules adopted for their execution. Consensus clustering is used in data analysis to generate stable results out of a set of partitions delivered by stochastic methods. Here we show that consensus clustering can be combined with any existing method in a self-consistent way, enhancing considerably both the stability and the accuracy of the resulting partitions. This framework is also particularly suitable to monitor the evolution of community structure in temporal networks. An application of consensus clustering to a large citation network of physics papers demonstrates its capability to keep track of the birth, death and diversification of topics.

  16. Main: ANAERO5CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Full Text Available ); Hordeum vulgare (barley); Oryza sativa (rice); Petunia hybrida (petunia); Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato); TTCCCTGTT ... ...ANAERO5CONSENSUS S000481 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs found in silico in promoters...obic; Zea mays (maize); Arabidopsis thaliana; Pisum sativum (pea... of 13 anaerobic genes involved in the fermentative pathway (anaerobic set 1)(Mohan...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO5CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S000479, S000480; anaer

  17. Main: ANAERO1CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Full Text Available ); Hordeum vulgare (barley); Oryza sativa (rice); Petunia hybrida (petunia); Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato); AAACAAA ... ...ANAERO1CONSENSUS S000477 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs found in silico in promoters...obic; Zea mays (maize); Arabidopsis thaliana; Pisum sativum (pea... of 13 anaerobic genes involved in the fermentative pathway (anaerobic set 1)(Mohan...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO1CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000478, S000479, S000480, S000481; anaer

  18. Main: ANAERO2CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Full Text Available ); Hordeum vulgare (barley); Oryza sativa (rice); Petunia hybrida (petunia); Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato); AGCAGC ... ...ANAERO2CONSENSUS S000478 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs found in silico in promoters...obic; Zea mays (maize); Arabidopsis thaliana; Pisum sativum (pea... of 13 anaerobic genes involved in the fermentative pathway (anaerobic set 1)(Mohan...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO2CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000479, S000480, S000481; anaer

  19. Main: ANAERO4CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Full Text Available a); Hordeum vulgare (barley); Oryza sativa (rice); Petunia hybrida (petunia); Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato); GTTTHGCAA ... ...ANAERO4CONSENSUS S000480 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs found in silico in promoters...9, S000481; H=A/T/C; anaerobic; Zea mays (maize); Arabidopsis thaliana; Pisum sativum (pe... of 13 anaerobic genes involved in the fermentative pathway (anaerobic set 1)(Mohan...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO4CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S00047

  20. Main: ANAERO3CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Full Text Available ); Hordeum vulgare (barley); Oryza sativa (rice); Petunia hybrida (petunia); Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato); TCATCAC ... ...ANAERO3CONSENSUS S000479 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs found in silico in promoters...obic; Zea mays (maize); Arabidopsis thaliana; Pisum sativum (pea... of 13 anaerobic genes involved in the fermentative pathway (anaerobic set 1)(Mohan...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO3CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S000480, S000481; anaer

  1. Advances in biomedical dosimetry

    Full text: Radiation dosimetry, the accurate determination of the absorbed dose within an irradiated body or a piece of material, is a prerequisite for all applications of ionizing radiation. This has been known since the very first radiation applications in medicine and biology, and increasing efforts are being made by radiation researchers to develop more reliable, effective and safe instruments, and to further improve dosimetric accuracy for all types of radiation used. Development of new techniques and instrumentation was particularly fast in the field of both medical diagnostic and therapeutic radiology. Thus, in Paris in October the IAEA held the latest symposium in its continuing series on dosimetry in medicine and biology. The last one was held in Vienna in 1975. High-quality dosimetry is obviously of great importance for human health, whether the objectives lie in the prevention and control of risks associated with the nuclear industry, in medical uses of radioactive substances or X-ray beams for diagnostic purposes, or in the application of photon, electron or neutron beams in radiotherapy. The symposium dealt with the following subjects: General aspects of dosimetry; Special physical and biomedical aspects; Determination of absorbed dose; Standardization and calibration of dosimetric systems; and Development of dosimetric systems. The forty or so papers presented and the discussions that followed them brought out a certain number of dominant themes, among which three deserve particular mention. - The recent generalization of the International System of Units having prompted a fundamental reassessment of the dosimetric quantities to be considered in calibrating measuring instruments, various proposals were advanced by the representatives of national metrology laboratories to replace the quantity 'exposure' (SI unit = coulomb/kg) by 'Kerma' or 'absorbed dose' (unit joule/kg, the special name of which is 'gray'), this latter being closer to the practical

  2. Spanish National Dosimetry Bank

    The National Dosimetry Bank (BDN) was designed to be a useful instrument for the protection of exposed workers. On the basis of individual doses, in conjunction with the type of facility where they were received and the type of work involved, it is possible to monitor and control the individual conditions of an exposed worker. In addition to this primary objective, the BDN's structure and utilities are such that it can be used for applications such as determining the suitability of the working conditions in various areas of ionizing radiation applications, evaluating exposure trends and the most affected areas, and supplying statistical data that can be used for legal studies

  3. Relocation of Dosimetry Service

    2007-01-01

    The Dosimetry Service is moving from Building 24 to Building 55 and will therefore be closed on Friday, March 30. From Monday, April 2 onwards you will find us in building 55/1-001. Please note that during that day we might still have some problems with the internet connections and cannot fully guarantee normal service procedures. The service's opening hours and telephone number will not change as a result of the move 8.30 - 12.00, afternoons closed Tel. 72155

  4. Individual dosimetry and calibration

    In 1995 both the Individual Dosimetry and Calibration Sections worked under the condition of a status quo and concentrated fully on the routine part of their work. Nevertheless, the machine for printing the bar code which will be glued onto the film holder and hence identify the people when entering into high radiation areas was put into operation and most of the holders were equipped with the new identification. As far as the Calibration Section is concerned the project of the new source control system that is realized by the Technical Support Section was somewhat accelerated

  5. Dosimetry in Radiology

    The steady growth in the use of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging requires to maintain a proper management of patient’s dose. Dosimetry in Radiology is a difficult topic to address, but vital for proper estimation of the dose the patient is receiving. The awareness that every day is perceived in our country on these issues is the appropriate response to this problem. This article describes the main dosimetric units used and easily exemplifies doses in radiology through internationally known reference values. (authors)

  6. Fast neutron dosimetry

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period.

  7. C1 inhibitor deficiency: 2014 United Kingdom consensus document.

    Longhurst, H J; Tarzi, M D; Ashworth, F; Bethune, C; Cale, C; Dempster, J; Gompels, M; Jolles, S; Seneviratne, S; Symons, C; Price, A; Edgar, D

    2015-06-01

    C1 inhibitor deficiency is a rare disorder manifesting with recurrent attacks of disabling and potentially life-threatening angioedema. Here we present an updated 2014 United Kingdom consensus document for the management of C1 inhibitor-deficient patients, representing a joint venture between the United Kingdom Primary Immunodeficiency Network and Hereditary Angioedema UK. To develop the consensus, we assembled a multi-disciplinary steering group of clinicians, nurses and a patient representative. This steering group first met in 2012, developing a total of 48 recommendations across 11 themes. The statements were distributed to relevant clinicians and a representative group of patients to be scored for agreement on a Likert scale. All 48 statements achieved a high degree of consensus, indicating strong alignment of opinion. The recommendations have evolved significantly since the 2005 document, with particularly notable developments including an improved evidence base to guide dosing and indications for acute treatment, greater emphasis on home therapy for acute attacks and a strong focus on service organization. PMID:25605519

  8. Dosimetry of industrial sources

    The gamma rays are produced during the disintegration of the atomic nuclei, its high energy allows them to cross thick materials. The capacity to attenuate a photons beam allows to determine the density, in line, of industrial interest materials as the mining. By means of two active dosemeters and a TLDs group (passive dosimetry) the dose rates of two sources of Cs-137 used for determining in line the density of mining materials were determined. With the dosemeters the dose levels in diverse points inside the grave that it harbors the sources and by means of calculations the isodoses curves were determined. In the phase of calculations was supposed that both sources were punctual and the isodose curves were calculated for two situations: naked sources and in their Pb packings. The dosimetry was carried out around two sources of 137Cs. The measured values allowed to develop a calculation procedure to obtain the isodoses curves in the grave where the sources are installed. (Author)

  9. Internal Dosimetry. Chapter 18

    The Committee on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) is a committee within the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The MIRD Committee was formed in 1965 with the mission to standardize internal dosimetry calculations, improve the published emission data for radionuclides and enhance the data on pharmacokinetics for radiopharmaceuticals [18.1]. A unified approach to internal dosimetry was published by the MIRD Committee in 1968, MIRD Pamphlet No. 1 [18.2], which was updated several times thereafter. Currently, the most well known version is the MIRD Primer from 1991 [18.3]. The latest publication on the formalism was published in 2009 in MIRD Pamphlet No. 21 [18.4], which provides a notation meant to bridge the differences in the formalism used by the MIRD Committee and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) [18.5]. The formalism presented in MIRD Pamphlet No. 21 [18.4] will be used here, although some references to the quantities and parameters used in the MIRD primer [18.3] will be made. All symbols, quantities and units are presented

  10. Thermo-luminescent dosimetry

    The development of paediatric radiology which began in the late 195O's has been characterised by the need to limit the dose of ionising radiation to which the child is subjected. The aim has been to keep radiation exposure as low as possible by the introduction of suitable techniques and by the development of new methods. It is therefore surprising that studies in dosimetry in the paediaytric age range have only been carried out in recent years. One reason for this may have been the fact that a suitable technique of measurement was not available at the time. The introduction of solid state dosimetry based on thermo-luminescence, first into radiotherapy (1968) and subsequently into radiodiagnosis, has made it possible to abandon the previously widely used ionisation chamber (1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, 14, and 14). The purpose of the present paper is to indicate the suitability of this form of dose measurement for paediatric radiological purposes and to stimulate its application in this field. (orig.)

  11. Clinical dosimetry using mosfets

    Purpose: The use of metal oxide-silicon field effect transistors (MOSFETs) as clinical dosimeters is demonstrated for a number of patients with targets at different clinical sites. Methods and Materials: Commercially available MOSFETs were characterized for energy response, angular dependency of response, and effect of accumulated dose on sensitivity and some inherent properties of MOSFETs. The doses determined both by thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) and MOSFETs in clinical situation were evaluated and compared to expected doses determined by calculation. Results: It was observed that a standard calibration of 0.01 Gy/mV gave MOSFET determined doses which agreed with expected doses to within 5% at the 95% confidence limit for photon beams from 6 to 25 MV and electron beams from 5 to 14 MeV. An energy-dependent variation in response of up to 28% was observed between two orientations of a MOSFET. The MOSFET doses compared very well with the doses estimated by TLDs, and the patients tolerated MOSFETs very well. A standard deviation of 3.9% between expected dose and MOSFET determined dose was observed, while for TLDs the standard deviation was 5.1%. The advantages and disadvantages of using MOSFETs for clinical dosimetry are discussed in detail. Conclusion: It was concluded that MOSFETs can be used as clinical dosimeters and can be a good alternative to TLDs. However, they have limitations under certain clinical situations

  12. Radiation dosimetry in Cyprus

    Cyprus is a small island in the eastern part of the mediterranean sea with a population of 700,000. A small Physics Department in the Nicosia General Hospital is responsible for all matters related to ionising radiation. The main applications of ionising radiation are in medicine, some applications of radioisotopes in agriculture and hydrology research and very few applications in industry with sealed radiation sources. The same problems in radiation dosimetry are encountered as in any other countries but on a smaller scale. These have to be solved locally, because of the island's geographic isolation. All the infrastructure including Secondary Standard Dosemeters, field instruments and calibration sources is needed in order to achieve this, but the financial resources available are very limited. For this reason improvisation is often necessary. The Co-60 and other X-ray units intended for radiotherapy or other clinical use, are used as radiation sources for dosimetry and calibration of the instruments. Simple, locally made phantoms are designed in order to decrease costs whenever possible. (author). 7 refs, 1 fig

  13. Dosimetry considerations in patients with renal pathology

    Adult dosimetry is generally performed for normal individuals and these are the absorbed dose calculations sent to FDA and listed on package inserts. However, in a variety of circumstances pathophysiologic state may significantly alter the biodistribution and kinetics of a radiopharmaceutical, and radiation doses calculated for normal individuals may not be appropriate approximations for these patients. In addition, the presence of certain pathophysiologic states often guarantees that the patient will have multiple studies over a period of days, weeks, months, or years. In order to have a true appreciation for the radiation dose commitment to such patients, it is important to examine dose totals from multiple nuclear medicine studies. Dosimetry calculations will be presented for I-123, I-124, I-125, and I-131 labeled hippuran in moderate and severe ATN, acute and chronic near-total obstruction, and renal transplants. In addition, a nuclear medicine examination profile will be presented for patients receiving renal transplants. This profile was constructed by retrospectively examining the records of 20 randomly-chosen transplant patients and recording all nuclear medicine procedures performed up to July, 1985. A total of 172 studies was performed, of which 69 were Tc-99m-DTPA flows, 62 were hippurans, and 22 were indium-111-oxine-platelets. The dosimetric contribution of all studies was assessed. The importance of the hippuran component will be discussed. 8 references, 8 tables

  14. Canadian asthma consensus report, 1999

    Boulet, L. P.; A. Becker; Bérubé, D; Beveridge, R.; Ernst, P

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To provide physicians with current guidelines for the diagnosis and optimal management of asthma in children and adults, including pregnant women and the elderly, in office, emergency department, hospital and clinic settings. OPTIONS: The consensus group considered the roles of education, avoidance of provocative environmental and other factors, diverse pharmacotherapies, delivery devices and emergency and in-hospital management of asthma. OUTCOMES: Provision of the best control o...

  15. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a decide-announce-defend'' approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other's positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a safe'' context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  16. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a ``decide-announce-defend`` approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other`s positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a ``safe`` context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  17. Ocular allergy latin american consensus

    Myrna Serapião dos Santos; Milton Ruiz Alves; Denise de Freitas; Luciene Barbosa de Sousa; Ricardo Wainsztein; Sérgio Kandelman; Mauricio Lozano; Francisco Beltrán; Oscar Baça Lozada; Concepción Santacruz; Giovanni Guzzo; Carlos Alberto Zaccarelli Filho; José Álvaro Pereira Gomes

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To establish current definition, classification and staging, and to develop diagnosis and treatment recommendations for ocular allergy, by using Delphi approach. METHODS: Ten Latin American experts on ocular allergy participated in a 4-round Delphi panel approach. Four surveys were constructed and answered by panelists. A two-thirds majority was defined as consensus. Definition, classification, staging and diagnosis and treatment recommendations were the main outcomes. RESULTS: "Ocul...

  18. C3 glomerulopathy: consensus report.

    Lavin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED C3 glomerulopathy is a recently introduced pathological entity whose original definition was glomerular pathology characterized by C3 accumulation with absent or scanty immunoglobulin deposition. In August 2012, an invited group of experts (comprising the authors of this document) in renal pathology, nephrology, complement biology, and complement therapeutics met to discuss C3 glomerulopathy in the first C3 Glomerulopathy Meeting. The objectives were to reach a consensus on: the ...

  19. International consensus on safety principles

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been regularly requested by its Member States to provide evidence that radioactive waste can be managed safely and to help demonstrate a harmonization of approach at the international level by providing safety documents. In response, IAEA established a special series of safety documents devoted to radioactive waste management. These documents will be elaborated within the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme [1,2] which covers all aspects of radioactive waste management. The RADWASS programme develops a series of international consensus documents on all parts of the safe management of radioactive waste, including disposal. The purpose of the RADWASS programme is to (i) document existing international consensus in the approaches and methodologies for safe radioactive waste management, (ii) create a mechanism to establish consensus where it does not exist and (iii) provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed upon documents to complement national standards and criteria. This paper describes the RADWASS programme, and covers the structure, implementation plans and status of documents under preparation

  20. Radiation dosimetry instrumentation and methods

    Shani, Gad

    2000-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry has made great progress in the last decade, mainly because radiation therapy is much more widely used. Since the first edition, many new developments have been made in the basic methods for dosimetry, i.e. ionization chambers, TLD, chemical dosimeters, and photographic films. Radiation Dosimetry: Instrumentation and Methods, Second Edition brings to the reader these latest developments. Written at a high level for medical physicists, engineers, and advanced dosimetrists, it concentrates only on evolvement during the last decade, relying on the first edition to provide the basics.

  1. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    2006-01-01

    Please note the following opening hours of the Service: From 31st July onwards: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 The Service is closed in the afternoons. We should like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCTs) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel 72155 Bldg. 24 E 011 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  2. Pediatric renal iodine-123 orthoiodohippurate dosimetry

    Radiation exposure to the kidney from iodine-123 orthoiodohippurate ([123I]OIH) and any associated [124I]OIH contamination may vary by a factor of several hundred depending upon the health of the kidney. Calculations of kidney dose were made for patients with the following renal states: normal, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), obstruction, and renal transplant. The dosimetry was based on a minimum practical administered activity (MPAA) of 200 microCi for pediatric patients and 500 microCi for adults. High-grade obstruction of recent onset and severe ATN are the only disease processes which could result in high exposures, and this is due primarily to the contribution of 124I. For selected cases, OIH labeled with pure 123I should be very seriously considered

  3. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs

  4. Results of the dosimetry intercomparison

    The appropriate way to verify the accuracy of the results of dose reported by the laboratories that offer lend personal dosimetry service is in the periodic participation of round of intercomparison dosimetry, undertaken by laboratories whose standards are trace (Secondary Laboratory). The Laboratory of External Personal Dosimetry of the CNEA-PY has participated in three rounds of intercomparison. The first two were organized in the framework of the Model Project RLA/9/030 RADIOLOGICAL WASTE SECURITY, and the irradiations were carried out in the Laboratory of Regional Calibration of the Center of Nuclear Technology Development, Belo Horizonte-Brazil (1998) and in the National Laboratory of Metrology of the ionizing radiations of the Institute of Radioprotection and Dosimetry, Rio de Janeiro-Brazil (1999). The third was organized by the IAEA and the irradiations were made in the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt PTB, Braunschweig - Federal Republic of Germany (1999-2000)

  5. Radioembolization Dosimetry: The Road Ahead

    Smits, Maarten L. J., E-mail: m.l.j.smits-3@umcutrecht.nl; Elschot, Mattijs [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Sze, Daniel Y. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Kao, Yung H. [Austin Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Australia); Nijsen, Johannes F. W. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Iagaru, Andre H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (United States); Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Lam, Marnix G. E. H. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands)

    2015-04-15

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the optimization of the results of RE. The heterogeneous and often clustered intrahepatic biodistribution of millions of point-source radioactive particles poses a challenge for dosimetry. Several studies found a relationship between absorbed doses and treatment outcome, with regard to both toxicity and efficacy. This should ultimately lead to improved patient selection and individualized treatment planning. New calculation methods and imaging techniques and a new generation of microspheres for image-guided RE will all contribute to these improvements. The aim of this review is to give insight into the latest and most important developments in RE dosimetry and to suggest future directions on patient selection, individualized treatment planning, and study designs.

  6. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    1990-12-20

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs.

  7. GENII (Generation II): The Hanford Environmental Radiation Dosimetry Software System: Volume 3, Code maintenance manual: Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project

    Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1988-09-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project was undertaken to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in updated versions of the environmental pathway analysis models used at Hanford. The resulting second generation of Hanford environmental dosimetry computer codes is compiled in the Hanford Environmental Dosimetry System (Generation II, or GENII). This coupled system of computer codes is intended for analysis of environmental contamination resulting from acute or chronic releases to, or initial contamination of, air, water, or soil, on through the calculation of radiation doses to individuals or populations. GENII is described in three volumes of documentation. This volume is a Code Maintenance Manual for the serious user, including code logic diagrams, global dictionary, worksheets to assist with hand calculations, and listings of the code and its associated data libraries. The first volume describes the theoretical considerations of the system. The second volume is a Users' Manual, providing code structure, users' instructions, required system configurations, and QA-related topics. 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. GENII [Generation II]: The Hanford Environmental Radiation Dosimetry Software System: Volume 3, Code maintenance manual: Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project

    The Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project was undertaken to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in updated versions of the environmental pathway analysis models used at Hanford. The resulting second generation of Hanford environmental dosimetry computer codes is compiled in the Hanford Environmental Dosimetry System (Generation II, or GENII). This coupled system of computer codes is intended for analysis of environmental contamination resulting from acute or chronic releases to, or initial contamination of, air, water, or soil, on through the calculation of radiation doses to individuals or populations. GENII is described in three volumes of documentation. This volume is a Code Maintenance Manual for the serious user, including code logic diagrams, global dictionary, worksheets to assist with hand calculations, and listings of the code and its associated data libraries. The first volume describes the theoretical considerations of the system. The second volume is a Users' Manual, providing code structure, users' instructions, required system configurations, and QA-related topics. 7 figs., 5 tabs

  9. Medical dosimetry in Hungary

    Turák, O.; Osvay, M.; Ballay, L.

    2012-09-01

    Radiation exposure of medical staff during cardiological and radiological procedures was investigated. The exposure of medical staff is directly connected to patient exposure. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of doses on uncovered part of body of medical staff using LiF thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters in seven locations. Individual Kodak film dosimeters (as authorized dosimetry system) were used for the assessment of medical staff's effective dose. Results achieved on dose distribution measurements confirm that wearing only one film badge under the lead apron does not provide enough information on the personal dose. The value of estimated annual doses on eye lens and extremities (fingers) were in good correlation with international publications.

  10. Dosimetry of breast cancer

    The systemic therapy of breast cancer has also changed profoundly during the last 60 years, and in this time the integration of treatment modalities involve a major area of investigation. The dosimetry of breast cancer presents different complications which can range from the Physician's handling of the neoplasia up to the simple aspects of physical simulation, contour design, radiation fields, irregular surfaces and computer programs containing mathematical equations which differ little or largely with the reality of the radiation distribution into the volume to be irradiated. We have studied the problem using two types of measurements to determine how the radiation distribution is in irregular surfaces, and designing an easier skill to be used with each patient, in order to optimize the treatment with respect to the simulation and verification process. (author). 7 refs

  11. Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine

    Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine labeled with radioactive iodine was determined by measuring the biodistribution of 131I-iodoantipyrine in 41 female rabbits. Following administration of the radiopharmaceutical, subjects were killed at 0.5, 6, 12, 17, 24, 36, and 48 h. Organs and samples of tissues and body fluids were assayed. Results were corrected for physical decay. Exponential functions were employed to describe the time-concentration curves; representative value would be the biological half life of 9.96±0.55 h for blood. Cumulated activity estimates for 123I, 125I and 131I were then computed. Extrapolation to absorbed dose in humans followed the formulation of the Medical International Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The whole body absorbed doses are 0.7 μGray, 0.5 μGray and 2.9 μGray per MBq of 123I, 123I, and 131I administered respectively. (orig.)

  12. Strahlungsmessung und Dosimetrie

    Krieger, Hanno

    2013-01-01

    „Strahlungsquellen und Dosimetrie“ ist Teil einer Lehrbuchreihe zur Strahlungsphysik und zum Strahlenschutz. Der erste Teil befasst sich mit den physikalischen Grundlagen der Strahlungsdetektoren und der Strahlungsmessung. Im zweiten Teil werden die Konzepte und Verfahren der klinischen Dosimetrie dargestellt. Der dritte Abschnitt erläutert ausführlich die Dosisverteilungen der klinisch angewendeten Strahlungsarten. Im vierten Teil werden weitere Messaufgaben der Strahlungsphysik einschließlich der Messsysteme für die Bildgebung mit Röntgenstrahlung dargestellt. Neben den grundlegenden Ausführungen enthält dieser Band im laufenden Text zahlreiche Tabellen und Grafiken zur technischen und medizinischen Radiologie, die bei der praktischen Arbeit sehr hilfreich sein können und 199 Übungsaufgaben mit Lösungen zur Vertiefung der Inhalte. Für die zweite Auflage wurden die Darstellungen der Elektronen- und der Protonendosimetrie sowie der bildgebenden Verfahren mit Computertomografen deutlich erweit...

  13. Radioiodotherapy: dosimetry planning

    The results of treatment of 142 case histories of 125 patients who had been treated with radioactive iodine at the Medical Radiological Research Center of Russian Academy of Medicine Sciences from 1983 to 1999 are given in the presentation. Among the patients, 35 cases of diffuse toxic goiter with signs of thyrotoxicosis of a mild degree, 25 cases of Diffuse toxic goiter with severe thyrotoxicosis, 6 cases of differentiated thyroid cancer with metastases to lymph-nodes of the neck, 30 cases of thyroid cancer with metastases to lymph-nodes of the neck and lung and 1 case of thyroid cancer with metastases to bones were diagnosed. This paper gives recommendations for individual dosimetry planning for radioiodine-therapy. (authors)

  14. Greatly improving consensus performance via predictive mechanism

    Zhang, Hai-Tao; Chen, Michael ZhiQiang; Zhou, Tao

    2007-01-01

    An important natural phenomenon surfaces that ultrafast consensus can be achieved by introducing the predictive mechanism. By predicting the dynamics of the network several steps ahead and using this information in the design of the consensus protocol of each agent, it is shown that drastic improvement can be achieved in terms of the speed of convergence towards consensus without changing the topology of the network. Moreover, with the predictive mechanism, the range of sampling rates leading to consensus convergence is broadly expanded compared to the routine consensus protocol. In natural science, this study provides support for the idea that some predictive mechanisms exist in widely-spread biological swarms, flocks, and schools. From the industrial engineering point of view, inclusion of an efficient predictive mechanism allows for not only a significant increase in the speed of convergence toward consensus but also a reduction of the communication energy required to achieve a predefined consensus perform...

  15. Dosimetry in radionuclide therapy

    While it is known that therapeutic effects of radionuclides are due to absorbed radiation dose and to radiosensitivity, individual dosimetry in 'Gy' is practiced rarely in clinical Nuclear Medicine but 'doses' are described in 'mCi' or 'MBq', which is only indirectly related to 'Gy' in the target. To estimate 'Gy', the volume of the target, maximum concentration of the radiopharmaceutical in it and residence time should be assessed individually. These parameters can be obtained usually only with difficulty, involving possibly also quantitative SPET or PET, modern imaging techniques (sonography, CT, MRT), substitution of y- or positron emitting radiotracers for β-emitting radiopharmaceuticals as well as whole-body distribution studies. Residence time can be estimated by obtaining data on biological half-life of a comparable tracer and transfer of these data in the physical characteristics of the therapeutic agent. With all these possibilities for gross dosimetry the establishment of a dose-response-relation should be possible. As distribution of the radiopharmaceutical in lesions is frequently inhomogenous and microdosimetric conditions are difficult to assess in vivo as yet, it could be observed since decades that empirically set, sometimes 'fixed' doses (mCi or MBq) can also be successful in many diseases. Detailed dosimetric studies, however, are work- and cost-intensive. Nevertheless, one should be aware at a time when more sophisticated therapeutic possibilities in Nuclear Medicine arise, that we should try to estimate radiation dose (Gy) in our new methods even as differences in individual radiosensitivity cannot be assessed yet and studies to define individual radiosensitivity in lesions should be encouraged. (author)

  16. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1989-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

  17. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs

  18. Fifth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    This meeting was held to exchange information on how to get better estimates of the radiation absorbed dose. There seems to be a high interest of late in patient dosimetry; discussions were held in the light of revised risk estimates for radiation. Topics included: Strategies of Dose Assessment; Dose Estimation for Radioimmunotherapy; Dose Calculation Techniques and Models; Dose Estimation for Positron Emission Tomography (PET); Kinetics for Dose Estimation; and Small Scale Dosimetry and Microdosimetry. (VC)

  19. Radiotherapy gel dosimetry

    shapes and sizes while sparing normal tissue. The situation is further complicated if the normal tissues are critical organs or are particularly sensitive to radiation. Radiotherapy techniques employed to obtain a closer conformation of the dose distribution to the tumour volume are referred to as conformal radiotherapy techniques. The clinical implementation of conformal therapy has been delayed by limitations in the verification of conformal dose distributions calculated by treatment planning systems prior to the irradiation of the patient and the verification of complex treatments during its delivery to the patient. There are several aspects of conformal therapy that complicate dose verification. To achieve the dose distributions conforming to complex 3D volumes, high dose gradients arise in the treatment volume. Further, overdose or underdose regions can exist when separate radiation fields are used to deliver additional radiation. These aspects require that practical dose measurement (dosimetry) techniques be able to integrate dose over time and easily measure dose distributions in 3D with high spatial resolution. Traditional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, thermoluminescent dosimeters and radiographic film do not fulfil these requirements. Novel gel dosimetry techniques are being developed in which dose distributions can potentially be determined in vitro in 3D using anthropomorphic phantoms to simulate a clinically irradiated situation. As long ago as the 1950's, radiation-induced colour change in dyes was used to investigate radiation doses in gels. It was subsequently shown that radiation induced changes in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation properties of gels infused with conventional Fricke dosimetry solutions could be measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In Fricke gels, Fe2+ ions in ferrous sulphate solutions are usually dispersed throughout a gelatin, agarose or PVA matrix. Radiation-induced changes in the dosimeters are considered to

  20. Hilar cholangiocarcinoma: expert consensus statement.

    Mansour, John C; Aloia, Thomas A; Crane, Christopher H; Heimbach, Julie K; Nagino, Masato; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    An American Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association (AHPBA)-sponsored consensus meeting of expert panellists met on 15 January 2014 to review current evidence on the management of hilar cholangiocarcinoma in order to establish practice guidelines and to agree consensus statements. It was established that the treatment of patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma requires a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach to optimize the chances for both durable survival and effective palliation. An adequate diagnostic and staging work-up includes high-quality cross-sectional imaging; however, pathologic confirmation is not required prior to resection or initiation of a liver transplant trimodal treatment protocol. The ideal treatment for suitable patients with resectable hilar malignancy is resection of the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts, as well as resection of the involved ipsilateral liver. Preoperative biliary drainage is best achieved with percutaneous transhepatic approaches and may be indicated for patients with cholangitis, malnutrition or hepatic insufficiency. Portal vein embolization is a safe and effective strategy for increasing the future liver remnant (FLR) and is particularly useful for patients with an FLR of biliary cancers. PMID:26172136

  1. Thermoluminescence Dosimetry Applied to Radiation Protection

    Christensen, Poul; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars; Majborn, Benny

    1982-01-01

    This is a general review of the present state of the development and application of thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) for radiation protection purposes. A description is given of commonly used thermoluminescent dosimeters and their main dosimetric properties, e.g. energy response, dose range......, fading, and LET dependence. The applications of thermoluminescence dosimetry in routine personnel monitoring, accident dosimetry, u.v. radiation dosimetry, and environmental monitoring are discussed with particular emphasis on current problems in routine personnel monitoring. Finally, the present state...

  2. Upgrading the dosimetry at Ontario Hydro

    Ontario Hydro has embarked upon a major programme to replace and upgrade its external dosimetry systems. In two year's time, the utility expects to have two state-of-the-art dosimetry systems in place: a new TLD dosimetry of legal record that was designed nearly 30 years ago; and an electronic dosimetry system which could eventually replace the TLD as the primary system. (Author)

  3. Biological dosimetry; Dosimetria biologica

    Guerrero C, C.; Arceo M, C., E-mail: citlali.guerrero@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Biologia, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    In the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) the works to establish a laboratory of biological dosimetry were initiated in 1998, with the purpose that could assist any situation with respect to the exposition to radiation, so much of the occupational exposed personnel as of individuals not related with the handling of radio-active material. The first activity that was realized was to develop the corresponding curves in vitro of dose response for different qualities and radiation types. In the year 2000 the curve corresponding to the gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co was published and up to 2002 the curve corresponding to the X rays of 58 KeV, 120 and 250 kVp. In all the cases, the curves contain the requirements to be used in the determination of the exposition dose. At the present time the curves dose-response are developing for neutrons take place in the reactor Triga Mark III of ININ. Additionally to these activities, cases of suspicion of accidental exposition to radiation have been assisted, using in a beginning the curves published by the IAEA and, from the year 2000, the curves developed in the ININ. (Author)

  4. Fast neutron dosimetry

    During 1988--1990 the magnetic resonance dosimetry project was completed, as were the 250 MeV proton shielding measurements. The first cellular experiment using human cells in vitro at the 1 GeV electron storage ring was also accomplished. More detail may be found in DOE Report number-sign DOE/EV/60417-002 and the open literature cited in the individual progress subsections. We report Kinetic Energy Released in Matter (KERMA), factor measurements in several elements of critical importance to neutron radiation therapy and radiation protection for space habitation and exploration for neutron energies below 30 MeV. The results of this effort provide the only direct measurements of the oxygen and magnesium kerma factors above 20 MeV neutron energy, and the only measurements of the iron kerma factor above 15 MeV. They provide data of immediate relevance to neutron radiotherapy and impose strict criteria for normalizing and testing nuclear models used to calculate kerma factors at higher neutron energies

  5. Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine

    Chu, R.Y.L.; Ekeh, S. (Oklahoma Univ., Oklahoma City, OK (USA). Dept. of Radiological Sciences; Veterans Administration Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (USA)); Basmadjian, G. (Oklahoma Univ., Oklahoma City, OK (USA). Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences)

    1989-12-01

    Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine labeled with radioactive iodine was determined by measuring the biodistribution of {sup 131}I-iodoantipyrine in 41 female rabbits. Following administration of the radiopharmaceutical, subjects were killed at 0.5, 6, 12, 17, 24, 36, and 48 h. Organs and samples of tissues and body fluids were assayed. Results were corrected for physical decay. Exponential functions were employed to describe the time-concentration curves; representative value would be the biological half life of 9.96+-0.55 h for blood. Cumulated activity estimates for {sup 123}I, {sup 125}I and {sup 131}I were then computed. Extrapolation to absorbed dose in humans followed the formulation of the Medical International Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The whole body absorbed doses are 0.7 {mu}Gray, 0.5 {mu}Gray and 2.9 {mu}Gray per MBq of {sup 123}I, {sup 123}I, and {sup 131}I administered respectively. (orig.).

  6. Dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    The book informs of the whole range of the physical foundations of dosimetry. In the chapter dealing with the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter the processes are described of the interaction between the individual types of ionizing radiation and matter and the effects of ionizing radiation on matter. The chapter dealing with dosimetric quantities and units gives a survey and definitions of quantities and their inter-relations. The chapters relating to the determination of basic dosimetric quantities and to integral dosimetric methods give a detailed description of the individual methods. The chapter relating to radionuclides in the environment concerns the occurrence of natural radionuclides in the environment and in the human organism, cosmic radiation and artificial sources of radioactivity connected with the development of civilisation and technology. The chapter related to radiation protection gives guidelines for the calculation of shielding for individual types of radiation. The supplement contains a list of the properties of certain radionuclides widespread in the environment, their basic physico-chemical and biological characteristics, parameters of metabolism and values of maximum permissible concentrations. (M.D.)

  7. Nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies.

    Sims, C S

    1989-09-01

    Twenty-two nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies utilizing the fast-pulse Health Physics Research Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducted since 1965. These studies have provided a total of 62 different organizations a forum for discussion of criticality accident dosimetry, an opportunity to test their neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry systems under a variety of simulated criticality accident conditions, and the experience of comparing results with reference dose values as well as with the measured results obtained by others making measurements under identical conditions. Sixty-nine nuclear accidents (27 with unmoderated neutron energy spectra and 42 with eight different shielded spectra) have been simulated in the studies. Neutron doses were in the 0.2-8.5 Gy range and gamma doses in the 0.1-2.0 Gy range. A total of 2,289 dose measurements (1,311 neutron, 978 gamma) were made during the intercomparisons. The primary methods of neutron dosimetry were activation foils, thermoluminescent dosimeters, and blood sodium activation. The main methods of gamma dose measurement were thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiophotoluminescent glass, and film. About 68% of the neutron measurements met the accuracy guidelines (+/- 25%) and about 52% of the gamma measurements met the accuracy criterion (+/- 20%) for accident dosimetry. PMID:2777549

  8. Standardization of dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    Three objectives of dosimetry in diagnostic radiology can be identified: (1) Measurement of patient doses for comparison with diagnostic reference levels; (2) Assessment of equipment performance; (3) Patient dose measurements for risk assessment. In this paper author deals with problems of standardization of dosimetry in diagnostic radiology. Recommended application specific quantities for dosimetry in diagnostic radiology are presented

  9. 4.2 Methods for Internal Dosimetry

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.2 Methods for Internal Dosimetry' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy' with the contents:

  10. Initial radiation dosimetry at Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    The dosimetry of A-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki is discussed in light of the new dosimetry developed in 1980 by the author. The important changes resulting from the new dosimetry are the ratios of neutron to gamma doses, particularly at Hiroshima. The implications of these changes in terms of epidemiology and radiation protection standards are discussed

  11. Miniature semiconductor detectors for in vivo dosimetry

    Silicon mini-semiconductor detectors are found in wide applications for in vivo personal dosimetry and dosimetry and Micro-dosimetry of different radiation oncology modalities. These applications are based on integral and spectroscopy modes of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor and silicon p-n junction detectors. The advantages and limitations of each are discussed. (authors)

  12. Dosimetry Termoluminiscent a new personal dosimetry concept in Nicaragua

    The present work is based on to study carried out along one year April 1996 until April 1997 at a hospital that located in Managua, here to control of personal dosimetric has been taken in 20 of people that work in the same one, this has been using jointly so much pocket dosemeters (ionization chambers) and thermoluminiscent dosemeters (TLD). To comparison was made among the two systems of personal dosimetry and the varying b was shown among the same ones, considering the fact that the pocket dosemeters to be able to carry out such to delicate company ace it is it the personal dosimetry inside the radiological protection

  13. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    2006-01-01

    Please note the following opening hours of the Service: In June: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 In July: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 8:30 to 11:30 Closed all day on Tuesdays and Thursdays From 31st July onwards: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 The Service is closed in the afternoons. We should like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCTs) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel 72155 Bldg. 24 E 011 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  14. External audit in radiotherapy dosimetry

    Quality audit forms an essential part of any comprehensive quality assurance programme. This is true in radiotherapy generally and in specific areas such as radiotherapy dosimetry. Quality audit can independently test the effectiveness of the quality system and in so doing can identify problem areas and minimize their possible consequences. Some general points concerning quality audit applied to radiotherapy are followed by specific discussion of its practical role in radiotherapy dosimetry, following its evolution from dosimetric intercomparison exercises to routine measurement-based on-going audit in the various developing audit networks both in the UK and internationally. Specific examples of methods and results are given from some of these, including the Scottish+ audit group. Quality audit in radiotherapy dosimetry is now well proven and participation by individual centres is strongly recommended. Similar audit approaches are to be encouraged in other areas of the radiotherapy process. (author)

  15. For information: Individual dosimetry service

    2004-01-01

    The service has noticed that there are dosimeter holders who have changed their activities and thus have no longer need of dosimeter as a permanent basis in their work (persons who go rarely to the controlled areas). The reduction of persons in the regular distribution list of dosimeters will lighten the work of the service (distribution, evaluation and consolidation of doses) as well as the work of the distributors, needless to say the economical input this would have for CERN. For the persons who only need a dosimeter temporarily we would like to remind that there is a quick and simple procedure to have one immediately from the Individual Dosimetry Service. Please contact the service (dosimetry.service@cern.ch) if you do not need a dosimeter regularly. Thank you for your cooperation. http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  16. Rectal cancer radiotherapy: Towards European consensus

    Background and purpose. During the first decade of the 21st century several important European randomized studies in rectal cancer have been published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: Looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) was organized. This article summarizes the consensus about imaging and radiotherapy of rectal cancer and gives an update until May 2010. Methods. Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. Eight chapters were identified: epidemiology, diagnostics, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, treatment toxicity and quality of life, follow-up, and research questions. Each chapter was subdivided by topic, and a series of statements were developed. Each committee member commented and voted, sentence by sentence three times. Sentences which did not reach agreement after voting round no 2 were openly debated during the Conference in Perugia (Italy) December 2008. The Executive Committee scored percentage consensus based on three categories: 'large consensus', 'moderate consensus', 'minimum consensus'. Results. The total number of the voted sentences was 207. Of the 207, 86% achieved large consensus, 13% achieved moderate consensus, and only three (1%) resulted in minimum consensus. No statement was disagreed by more than 50% of members. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the members, and the majority was voted on by >85%. Considerable progress has been made in staging and treatment, including radiation treatment of rectal cancer. Conclusions. This Consensus Conference represents an expertise opinion process that may help shape future programs, investigational protocols, and guidelines for staging and treatment of rectal cancer throughout Europe. In spite of substantial progress, many research challenges remain

  17. Distributed Filter with Consensus Strategies for Sensor Networks

    Huang Caimou; Xie Li; Hu Haoji

    2013-01-01

    Consensus algorithm for networked dynamic systems is an important research problem for data fusion in sensor networks. In this paper, the distributed filter with consensus strategies known as Kalman consensus filter and information consensus filter is investigated for state estimation of distributed sensor networks. Firstly, an in-depth comparison analysis between Kalman consensus filter and information consensus filter is given, and the result shows that the information consensus filter perf...

  18. Dosimetry standards for radiation processing

    For irradiation treatments to be reproducible in the laboratory and then in the commercial environment, and for products to have certified absorbed doses, standardized dosimetry techniques are needed. This need is being satisfied by standards being developed by experts from around the world under the auspices of Subcommittee E10.01 of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). In the time period since it was formed in 1984, the subcommittee has grown to 150 members from 43 countries, representing a broad cross-section of industry, government and university interests. With cooperation from other international organizations, it has taken the combined part-time effort of all these people more than 13 years to complete 24 dosimetry standards. Four are specifically for food irradiation or agricultural applications, but the majority apply to all forms of gamma, x-ray, Bremsstrahlung and electron beam radiation processing, including dosimetry for sterilization of health care products and the radiation processing of fruits, vegetables, meats, spices, processed foods, plastics, inks, medical wastes and paper. An additional 6 standards are under development. Most of the standards provide exact procedures for using individual dosimetry systems or for characterizing various types of irradiation facilities, but one covers the selection and calibration of dosimetry systems, and another covers the treatment of uncertainties. Together, this set of standards covers essentially all aspects of dosimetry for radiation processing. The first 20 of these standards have been adopted in their present form by the International Organization of Standardization (ISO), and will be published by ISO in 1999. (author)

  19. Delay-Induced Consensus and Quasi-Consensus in Multi-Agent Dynamical Systems

    Yu, Wenwu; Chen, Guanrong; Cao, Ming; Ren, Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies consensus and quasi-consensus in multi-agent dynamical systems. A linear consensus protocol in the second-order dynamics is designed where both the current and delayed position information is utilized. Time delay, in a common perspective, can induce periodic oscillations or even c

  20. Calorimetric dosimetry of reactor radiation

    Calorimetric dosimetry of reactor radiation is relatively new reactor dosimetry method and the number of relevant papers is rather small. Some difficulties in applying standard methods (chemical dosemeters, ionization chambers) exist because of the complexity of radiation. In general application of calorimetric dosemeters for measuring absorbed doses is most precise. In addition to adequate choice of calorimetric bodies there is a possibility of determining the yields of each component of the radiation mixture in the total absorbed dose. This paper contains a short review of the basic calorimetry methods and some results of measurements at the RA reactor in Vinca performed by isothermal calorimeter

  1. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with the design and measurement of physical parameters used in theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and uses the theoretical developments for experimental design, and provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  2. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with design and measurement of those physical parameters used in the theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and makes use of the theoretical developments for experimental design. Also, this program provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  3. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    2006-01-01

    CERN Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page: http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry. The Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 to 12.00 and is closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats.

  4. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    2006-01-01

    CERN Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry. The Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 - 12.00, and closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats.

  5. Static consensus in passifiable linear networks

    Junussov, Ibragim A.

    2014-01-01

    Sufficient conditions of consensus (synchronization) in networks described by digraphs and consisting of identical determenistic SIMO systems are derived. Identical and nonidentical control gains (positive arc weights) are considered. Connection between admissible digraphs and nonsmooth hypersurfaces (sufficient gain boundary) is established. Necessary and sufficient conditions for static consensus by output feedback in networks consisting of certain class of double integrators are rediscover...

  6. Ideal dosimetry system: dosimetry systems in current use

    In radiation processing - validation and process control (sterilization, food irradiation, etc.) depend on the measurement of absorbed dose. Measurements of absorbed dose shall be performed using a dosimetric system or systems having a known level of accuracy and precision (European standard EN552:1994). Lecture describes application of different dosimetry systems in the radiation processing of different materials

  7. Consensus statement on genetic research in dementia

    Rikkert, M.G. Olde; der, V van; Burns, A.;

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how the European Dementia Consensus Network developed a consensus on research ethics in dementia, taking into account the questions posed by the era of genetic research and its new research methods. The consensus process started with a Delphi procedure to...... procedure fuelled the development of the consensus statement, which is presented in this paper. The consensus statement aims to stimulate ethically acceptable research in the field of dementia and the protection of vulnerable elderly patients with dementia from application of inadequate research methods or...... analyze relevant stakeholders' positions by describing their statements on the possibilities and limitations of research into genetic determinants of Alzheimer disease and to describe and analyze the moral desirability of genetic research on Alzheimer disease. The conclusions drawn from the Delphi...

  8. In aqua vivo EPID dosimetry

    Wendling, M.; McDermott, L.N.; Mans, A.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; Pecharroman-Gallego, R.; Sonke, J.J.; Stroom, J.; Herk, M. van; Mijnheer, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: At the Netherlands Cancer Institute--Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in vivo dosimetry using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been implemented for almost all high-energy photon treatments of cancer with curative intent. Lung cancer treatments were initially excluded, because t

  9. Manual of food irradiation dosimetry

    Following items are discussed: Fundamentals of dosimetry; description of irradiators; dose distribution in the product and commissioning the process; plant operation and process control; detailed instructions on using various dose-meter systems; references; glossary of some basic terms and concepts

  10. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy

    Tanderup, Kari; Beddar, Sam; Andersen, Claus Erik; Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Cygler, Joanna E.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the...

  11. Thermoluminescence dosimetry environmental monitoring system

    In this report, characteristics and performances of an environmental monitoring system with thermoluminescence dosimetry are presented. Most of the work deals with the main physical parameters necessary for measurements of ambiental dose. At the end of this report some of level doses in the environment around the site of the ENEA Center of Energy Research Salluggia (Italy) are illustrated

  12. Dosimetry for Electron Beam Applications

    Miller, Arne

    1983-01-01

    This report describes two aspects of electron bean dosimetry, on one hand developaent of thin fil« dosimeters and measurements of their properties, and on the other hand developaent of calorimeters for calibration of routine dosimeters, e.g. thin films. Two types of radiochromic thin film dosimet...

  13. The personal dosimetry in Mexico

    The Personal Dosimetry in Mexico, has an approximately 30 year-old history; and it had been and it is at the moment, one of the more important resources with which the personnel that works with ionizing radiation sources counts for its protection. The Personal Dosimetry begins with the film dosimetry, technique that even continues being used at the present time by some users, and the main reason of its use is for economic reasons. At the moment this technique, it has been surpassed, by the Thermoluminescent dosimetry, which has taken a lot of peak, mainly by the technological development with which it is counted at the present time; what has given as a result that this technique becomes tip technology; that supported in the characteristic of the used materials, as the handling and processing of the information associated with the new PC, digitizer cards, software etc, what has allowed increases it potential. In this work the current necessities of the market are presented as well as an analysis of the future real necessities in Mexico, at national level, the companies that provide this service and that they spread to satisfy this necessity of the market, including the different used technologies are also mentioned. The application ranges, at the same time, of the advantages and disadvantages of the different systems of Personal Dosimetry in the market. The companies that at the moment provide the service of Personal Dosimetry, its use materials and equipment in indistinct form, for the monitoring of gamma radiation, beta particles, different qualities of x-ray radiation, and sometimes neutrons. The monitoring of the exposed personnel at the diverse sources of ionizing radiation mentioned is carried out in many occasions without having with the materials (detectors), neither the appropriate infrastructure and therefore without the quality control that guarantees a correct evaluation of the dose equivalent, as a result of the exposure to the ionizing radiations; it

  14. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    Mariani, Alberto; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreatitis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis. There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation, hereditary a...

  15. ESR dosimetry: achievements and challenges

    Baffa, O., E-mail: baffa@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), also known as Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and more recently as Electron Magnetic Resonance (Emr), is a spectroscopy technique able to detect unpaired electrons such as those created by the interaction ionizing radiation with matter. When the unpaired electrons created by ionizing radiation are stable over some reasonable time, ESR can be used to measure the radiation dose deposited in the material under study. In principle, any insulating material that satisfies this requisite can be used as a dosimeter. ESR has been used in retrospective dosimetry in case of radiological accidents using natural constituents of human body such as teeth, bones and nails as well as fortuitous materials as sugar, sweeteners and plastics. When using teeth the typical detected dose is 0.5 Gy for, for X-Band spectrometers (9 GHz) and even lower doses if higher frequency spectrometers are used. Clinical dosimetry is another area of potential use of this dosimetric modality. In this application the amino acid alanine has been proposed and being used. Alanine dosimeters are very easy to prepare and require no complicated treatments for use. Alanine/ESR dosimetry satisfies many of the required properties for clinical applications such as water equivalent composition, independence of response for the energy range used in therapy and high precision. Other organic materials such as ammonium tartrate are being investigated to increase the sensitivity of ESR for clinical applications. Finally, industrial applications can also benefit from this dosimetry. The challenges to expand applications, the number of users and research groups of ESR dosimetry will be discussed. (Author)

  16. ESR dosimetry: achievements and challenges

    Full text: Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), also known as Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and more recently as Electron Magnetic Resonance (Emr), is a spectroscopy technique able to detect unpaired electrons such as those created by the interaction ionizing radiation with matter. When the unpaired electrons created by ionizing radiation are stable over some reasonable time, ESR can be used to measure the radiation dose deposited in the material under study. In principle, any insulating material that satisfies this requisite can be used as a dosimeter. ESR has been used in retrospective dosimetry in case of radiological accidents using natural constituents of human body such as teeth, bones and nails as well as fortuitous materials as sugar, sweeteners and plastics. When using teeth the typical detected dose is 0.5 Gy for, for X-Band spectrometers (9 GHz) and even lower doses if higher frequency spectrometers are used. Clinical dosimetry is another area of potential use of this dosimetric modality. In this application the amino acid alanine has been proposed and being used. Alanine dosimeters are very easy to prepare and require no complicated treatments for use. Alanine/ESR dosimetry satisfies many of the required properties for clinical applications such as water equivalent composition, independence of response for the energy range used in therapy and high precision. Other organic materials such as ammonium tartrate are being investigated to increase the sensitivity of ESR for clinical applications. Finally, industrial applications can also benefit from this dosimetry. The challenges to expand applications, the number of users and research groups of ESR dosimetry will be discussed. (Author)

  17. Dosimetry for radiopharmaceuticals (invited paper)

    Developments in internal dosimetry for radiopharmaceuticals are summarised, with special reference to work carried out within the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Differences and similarities with internal dosimetry for occupationally exposed workers and for members of the public are identified. What is unique for radiopharmaceuticals is their special biokinetics. The products are designed to get high uptake in certain organs and tissues. When a new compound is introduced there are few long-term retention data for humans available. Therefore efforts have continuously to be made to investigate the biokinetics and dosimetry of new products as well as older products, for which the dosimetry is uncertain, e.g. pure β-emitters. Serial, quantitative gamma camera images of patients will continue to be the base for biokinetic information together with analysis of urine samples. The observed time-activity curves are described using exponential functions with specified fractional activities and half-times. The physical calculations are based on the MIRD formalism. For more detailed dosimetry, CT, MR and ultrasound can be used to localise organs and to determine their volumes. Such measurements are also needed for the construction of realistic phantoms (mathematically describable phantoms, 'voxel' phantoms and anthropomorphic phantoms) which are the geometrical base for dose calculations. Variations in anatomy and biokinetics between individuals due to age, gender and disease have to be given greater consideration in the future. Information on the distribution of a radionuclide within organs and tissues is of importance for its therapeutic use as is the intracellular localisation of low energy electron emitters both in therapy and diagnosis. (author)

  18. Sampled-Data Consensus Over Random Networks

    Wu, Junfeng; Meng, Ziyang; Yang, Tao; Shi, Guodong; Johansson, Karl Henrik

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the consensus problem for a network of nodes with random interactions and sampled-data control actions. We first show that consensus in expectation, in mean square, and almost surely are equivalent for a general random network model when the inter-sampling interval and network size satisfy a simple relation. The three types of consensus are shown to be simultaneously achieved over an independent or a Markovian random network defined on an underlying graph with a directed spanning tree. For both independent and Markovian random network models, necessary and sufficient conditions for mean-square consensus are derived in terms of the spectral radius of the corresponding state transition matrix. These conditions are then interpreted as the existence of critical value on the inter-sampling interval, below which global mean-square consensus is achieved and above which the system diverges in mean-square sense for some initial states. Finally, we establish an upper bound on the inter-sampling interval below which almost sure consensus is reached, and a lower bound on the inter-sampling interval above which almost sure divergence is reached. Some numerical simulations are given to validate the theoretical results and some discussions on the critical value of the inter-sampling intervals for the mean-square consensus are provided.

  19. Proceedings of the 5. symposium on neutron dosimetry. Beam dosimetry

    Proceedings of the fifth symposium on neutron dosimetry, organized at Neuherberg, 17-21 September 1984, by the Commission of the European Communities and the GSF Neuherberg, with the co-sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Environmental Research. The proceedings deal with research on concepts, instruments and methods in radiological protection for neutrons and mixed neutron-gamma fields, including the generation, collection and evaluation of new dosimetric data, the derivation of relevant radiation protection quantitites, and the harmonization of experimental methods and instrumentation by intercomparison programmes. Besides radiation protection monitoring, the proceedings also report on the improvement of neutron beam dosimetry in the fields of radiobiology and radiation therapy

  20. Phototherapy with low intensity laser in carrageenan-induced acute inflammatory process in mice paw - dosimetry studies; Fototerapia com laser em baixa intensidade em processo inflamatorio agudo induzido por carragenina em pata de camundongos - estudos de dosimetria

    Meneguzzo, Daiane Thais

    2010-07-01

    The importance of modulation of inflammation on the treatment of inflammatory diseases and the difficulty in determining the laser irradiation parameters has led us to study the effects of different protocols of phototherapy with low intensity laser (power, energy, time and place of irradiation) in the treatment and prevention of edema in acute inflammatory process using the experimental model of paw edema induced by carrageenan (CGN) in three strains of mice (Balb-c, Swiss and C57BL/6). The first stage of the study evaluated different combinations of energy (1J and 3J) with different powers (30, 60 and 100mW) in Balb-C mice paw irradiated 1 and 2h after injection of CGN. The second stage studied different combinations of location (foot, inguinal lymph nodes and both) and exposure time (2 and 1h before, 1h and immediately before the CGN, 1 and 2h and 3.5 and 4.5h after CGN) using fixed irradiation parameters (1J, 100mW, 35J/cm{sup 2}, spot area of 0.028 cm{sup 2}). The third stage compared different strains of mice Balb-c and C57BL/6) in the best local and time parameters found in step 2. At all stages, we evaluated the change in paw volume by plethysmography and inflammatory infiltrate by histomorphometry or analysis of myeloperoxidase (MPO). The results showed that laser phototherapy treated and prevented edema and modulated the inflammatory process with paw and inguinal lymph nodes irradiations accordingly with the parameters and mice strain used. (author)

  1. Dosimetry Control: Technic and methods. Proceedings of the international workshop 'Actual problems of dosimetry'

    There is a number of unsolved problems of both dosimetric and radiometric control, questions of the biological dosimetry, reconstruction of dozes of irradiation of the population at radiation incidents, which require coordination of efforts of scientists in various areas of a science. The submitted materials are grouped on five units: dosimetry engineering, biological dosimetry and markers of radiation impact, dosimetry of a medical irradiation, normative and measurement assurance of the dosimetric control, monitoring and reconstruction of dozes at radiation incidents

  2. OGC Consensus: How Successful Standards Are Made

    Carl Reed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the history, background, and current status of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC standards development consensus process. The roots of the formation of the OGC lie in the early 1990s when a very strong market requirement for exchanging GIS data content was clearly stated. At that time, each GIS vendor had their own formats for publishing and/or exchanging their GIS data. There was no mechanism or organization that provided a forum for the GIS vendors and GIS data users to collaborate and agree on how to share GIS data. That requirement, along with the vision of a few individuals, led to the formation of the OGC. This paper describes the early development of the consensus process in the OGC, how this process has evolved over time, why consensus is so important for defining open standards that are implemented in the marketplace, and the future of the OGC consensus process.

  3. Distributed Detection via Bayesian Updates and Consensus

    Liu, Qipeng; Wang, Xiaofan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a class of distributed detection algorithms which can be viewed as implementations of Bayes' law in distributed settings. Some of the algorithms are proposed in the literature most recently, and others are first developed in this paper. The common feature of these algorithms is that they all combine (i) certain kinds of consensus protocols with (ii) Bayesian updates. They are different mainly in the aspect of the type of consensus protocol and the order of the two operations. After discussing their similarities and differences, we compare these distributed algorithms by numerical examples. We focus on the rate at which these algorithms detect the underlying true state of an object. We find that (a) The algorithms with consensus via geometric average is more efficient than that via arithmetic average; (b) The order of consensus aggregation and Bayesian update does not apparently influence the performance of the algorithms; (c) The existence of communication delay dramatically slows do...

  4. Solid-state dosimetry applications: thermoluminescence dating, thermocurrent dosimetry

    In the new TL method for the testing of authenticity of archaeological findings the fraction between 100-250 μm from the whole substance of the pottery is used. The mass of the sample being about 0.1 g the method entails a negligible destruction of the object. For the determination of absolute age the TL of quartz grains separated from the ceramic object is used. A TLD method for the measurement of internal dose rate was developed an supplemented with elemental analysis to raise accuracy (at present about 20%). The temporary change in the conductivity of the insulating materials under ionizing radiation and heating - the so-called thermocurrent (TC) effect - offer new possibilities for the dosimetry of ionizing radiations. From the practical point of view the TC dosimetry distinguishes itself by the simplicity of read-out and, consequently, by excellent reproducibility. The dose measurable by sapphire crystals ranges from 100 μGy to 10 Gy, so the method is hopeful in personal dosimetry, too. The only drawback is the high scattering of parameters of the samples measured. (author)

  5. Worldwide quality assurance networks for radiotherapy dosimetry

    Several national and international organizations have developed various types and levels of external audit systems for radiotherapy dosimetry, either based on on-site review visits or using mailed dosimetry systems.Three major TLD (thermoluminescence dosimetry) networks make available postal dose audits to a large number of radiotherapy centres on a regular basis. These are the IAEA/WHO (World Health Organization) TLD postal dose audit service, which operates worldwide; the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) network, known as EQUAL, which operates in the European Union; and the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) network in North America. Other external audit programmes are either associated with national and international clinical trial groups or perform national dosimetry comparisons that check radiotherapy dosimetry at various levels. The paper discusses the present status of the worldwide quality assurance networks in radiotherapy dosimetry and reviews the activities of the three main TLD networks: the IAEA/WHO, EQUAL and RPC networks. (author)

  6. A microcomputer controlled thermoluminescence dosimetry system

    Using a microcomputer, an automatic thermoluminescence dosimetry system for personal dosimetry and thermoluminescence detector (TLD) research was developed. Process automation, statistical computation and dose calculation are provided by this microcomputer. Recording of measurement data, as well as dose record keeping for radiological workers is carried out with floppy disk. The microcomputer also provides a human/system interface by means of a video display and a printer. The main features of this dosimetry system are its low cost, high degree of flexibility, high degree of automation and the feasibility for use in routine dosimetry as well as in TLD research. The system is in use for personal dosimetry, environmental dosimetry and for TL-research work. Because of its modular set-up several components of the system are in use for other applications, too. The system seems suited for medium sized health physics groups. (author)

  7. Dosimetry by ESR spectroscopy of alanine

    Dosimetry based on electron spin resonance analysis of radiation-induced free radicals in amino acids (e.g. L-alanine) is relevant to biological dosimetry applications. Typical features are a wide dose range covering more than 5 decades (1-105Gy), energy independent response for photons above 100 keV, long-term stability of the ESR signal, and fast straightforward readout technique. Typical dosimeter samples, consisting of small pellets of microcrystalline amino acids in paraffin, are rugged, non-toxic, and insensitive to surface contaminations. Moreover, they are prepared homogeneously and inexpensively in large batches and can be evaluated repeatedly and supply archival dosimetry data. They have proven to be highly useful in various applications of radiation processing and sterilization dosimetry, food irradiation, quality control, radiation dosimetry, radiation therapy measurements, and as a reference system for dosimetry mailing intercomparisons. (author)

  8. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in veterinary diagnostic radiology

    This paper presents the results of Environmental and Personnel Dosimetry made in a radiology area of a veterinary hospital. Dosimetry was realized using thermoluminescent (TL) materials. Environmental Dosimetry results show that areas closer to the X-ray equipment are safe. Personnel Dosimetry shows important measurements of daily workday in some persons near to the limit established by ICRP. TL results of radiation measurement suggest TLDs are good candidates as a dosimeter to radiation dosimetry in veterinary radiology. - Highlights: ► Personnel dosimetry in laboratory veterinary diagnostic was determined. ► Student workplaces are safe against radiation. ► Efficiency value of apron lead was determined. ► X-ray beams distribution into veterinarian laboratory was measured.

  9. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen;

    2015-01-01

    initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug...... management of canine idiopathic epilepsy. Furthermore, for the management of structural epilepsy AEDs are inevitable in addition to treating the underlying cause, if possible....

  10. Implementation and experimental analysis of consensus clustering

    Perc, Domen

    2011-01-01

    Consensus clustering is a machine learning tehnique for class discovery and clustering validation. The method uses various clustering algorithms in conjunction with different resampling tehniques for data clustering. It is based on multiple runs of clustering and sampling algorithm. Data gathered in these runs is used for clustering and for visual representation of clustering. Visual representation helps us to understand clustering results. In this thesis we compare consensus clustering with ...

  11. A Consensus-Focused Group Recommender System

    Ioannidis, Stratis; Muthukrishnan, S.; Yan, Jinyun

    2013-01-01

    In many cases, recommendations are consumed by groups of users rather than individuals. In this paper, we present a system which recommends social events to groups. The system helps groups to organize a joint activity and collectively select which activity to perform among several possible options. We also facilitate the consensus making, following the principle of group consensus decision making. Our system allows users to asynchronously vote, add and comment on alternatives. We observe soci...

  12. Results from 2010 Caliban Criticality Dosimetry Intercomparison

    The external dosimetry program participated in a criticality dosimetry intercomparison conducted at the Caliban facility in Valduc, France in 2010. Representatives from the dosimetry and instrumentation groups were present during testing which included irradiations of whole-body beta/gamma (HBGT) and neutron thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD), electronic alarming dosimeters, and a humanoid phantom filled with reference man concentrations of sodium. This report reviews the testing procedures, preparations, irradiations, and presents results of the tests.

  13. On the Cost of Deciding Consensus

    Blondel, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We study the computational complexity of a general consensus problem for switched systems. A set of n by n stochastic matrices {P_1, ..., P_k} is a consensus set if for every switching map tau from N to {1, ..., k} and for every initial state x(0), the sequence of states defined by x(t+1)=P_{tau(t)} x(t) converges to a state whose entries are all identical. We show in this paper that, unless P=NP, the problem of determining if a set of matrices is a consensus set cannot be decided in polynomial-time. As a consequence, unless P=NP, it is not possible to give efficiently checkable necessary and sufficient conditions for consensus. This provides a possible explanation for the absence of such conditions in the current literature on consensus. On the positive side, we provide a simple algorithm which checks whether {P_1, ...,P_k} is a consensus set in O(Bkn^2+k^{2^{2n}} n^3) operations where B is the number of bits needed to specify each entry of P_1, ..., P_k.

  14. Pragmatism and Political Pluralism - Consensus and Pluralism

    Michele Marsonet

    2015-07-01

    In our day the German philosopher Jürgen Habermas has in a way revived these Peircean insights, putting forward an influential theory to the effect that consensus indeed plays a key role in human praxis, so that the primary task of philosophy is to foster it by eliminating the disagreement which we constantly have to face in the course of our daily life. In his “communicative theory of consensus,” furthermore, he claims that human communication rests on an implicit commitment to a sort of “ideal speech situation” which is the normative foundation of agreement in linguistic matters. Consequently, the quest for consensus is a constitutive feature of our nature of (rational human beings: rationality and consensus are tied together. A very strong consequence derives from Habermas’ premises: were we to abandon the search for consensus we would lose rationality, too, and this makes us understand that he views the pursuit of consensus as a regulative principle (rather than as a merely practical objective. Rescher opposes both Peirce’s eschatological view and Habermas’ regulative and idealized one.

  15. Gel dosimetry for conformal radiotherapy

    With the continuum development of conformal radio therapies, aimed at delivering high dose to tumor tissue and low dose to the healthy tissue around, the necessities has appeared of suitable improvement of dosimetry techniques giving the possibility of obtaining dose images to be compared with diagnostic images. Also if wide software has been developed for calculating dose distributions in the fields of various radiotherapy units, experimental verifications are necessary, in particular in the case of complex geometries in conformal radiotherapy. Gel dosimetry is a promising method for imaging the absorbed dose in tissue-equivalent phantoms, with the possibility of 3D reconstruction of the spatial dose distribution, with milli metric resolution. Optical imaging of gel dosimeters, based on visible light absorbance analysis, has shown to be a reliable technique for achieving dose distributions. (Author)

  16. Dosimetry in radiotherapy. V.1

    A series of symposia on dosimetry in medicine and biology have been held by the IAEA in co-operation with WHO. The present symposium was the first one focusing on ''Dosimetry in Radiotherapy''. The papers presented reflected the different steps in the calibration chain such as the calibration standards established by the National Standards Laboratories and the conversion of the reading of calibrated instruments to the desired quantity, i.e. absorbed dose to water at a reference point in the user's beam at the radiotherapy clinic. The programme further examined the procedures necessary for optimization of the treatment of the patient, such as treatment planning methods, dose distribution studies, new techniques of dose measurement, improvements in the physical dose distributions/conformation therapy and special problems involved in total body treatments. Results of quality assurance in radiotherapy were presented from local hospitals as well as from national and international studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Radiation protection dosimetry and calibrations

    At the SCK-CEN different specialised services are delivered for a whole range of external and internal customers in the radiation protection area. For the expertise group of radiation protection dosimetry and calibrations, these services are organized in four different laboratories: dosimetry, anthropogammametry, nuclear calibrations and non-nuclear calibrations. The services are given by a dedicated technical staff who has experience in the handling of routine and specialised cases. The scientific research that is performed by the expertise group makes sure that state-of-the-art techniques are being used, and that constant improvements and developments are implemented. Quality Assurance is an important aspect for the different services, and accreditation according national and international standards is achieved for all laboratories

  18. Relative dosimetry by Ebt-3

    In the present work relative dosimetry in two linear accelerator for radiation therapy was studied. Both Varian Oncology systems named Varian Clinac 2100-Cd and MLC Varian Clinac i X were used. Gaf Chromic Ebt-3 film was used. Measurements have been performed in a water equivalent phantom, using 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams on both Linacs. Both calibration and Electron irradiations were carried out with the ionization chamber placed at the isocenter, below a stack of solid water slabs, at the depth of dose maximum (D max), with a Source-to-Surface Distance (SSD) of 100 cm and a field size of 10 cm x 10 cm. Calibration and dosimetric measurements photons were carried out under IAEA-TRS 398 protocol. Results of relative dosimetry in the present work are discussed. (Author)

  19. Some aspects on neutron dosimetry

    The American National Council on Radiation Protection and measurements (1) has recently issued a statement regarding dose limitation system for neutrons. The changes proposed in that statement presented substantial problems regarding the personnel exposure to neutrons and had pointed out the need to reassess an adequate current neutron dosimetry practice. Generally, the same types of dosimeters i.e. Nuclear Track (NTA films) and TLD-Albedo, have been used at major nuclear facilities over the past 15 years. here recently, other dosimetry methods such as track etch with polycarbonates such as CR-39 have been developed. However these should be recognized as local systems aiming to the development of better and more applicable dosimeters. 4 tab

  20. Dosimetry in radiotherapy. V.2

    A series of symposia on dosimetry in medicine and biology have been held by the IAEA in co-operation with WHO. The present symposium was the first one focusing on ''Dosimetry in Radiotherapy''. The papers presented reflected the different steps in the calibration chain such as the calibration standards established by the National Standards Laboratories and the conversion of the reading of calibrated instruments to the desired quantity, i.e. absorbed dose to water at a reference point in the user's beam at the radiotherapy clinic. The programme further examined the procedures necessary for optimization of the treatment of the patient, such as treatment planning methods, dose distribution studies, new techniques of dose measurement, improvements in the physical dose distributions/conformation therapy and special problems involved in total body treatments. Results of quality assurance in radiotherapy were presented from local hospitals as well as from national and international studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. NOTE FROM THE DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    2002-01-01

    During March, the Dosimetry Service will be opened from 8h30 to 12h in the morning and closed every afternoon.   We have established that many people, who are provided regularly with a personal dosimeter (film badge), have changed their activity and do not need it anymore, because they do not, or only exceptionally, enter controlled areas. If you are one of these persons, please contact the Personal Dosimeter Service (tel: 72155). There is a simplified procedure for obtaining a dosimeter if you have an immediate need for short-term visits in controlled areas. A reduction of the number of persons on the regular distribution list of dosimeters would decrease our and the distributors workload. It would also contribute to significant savings in the dosimetry, and thus CERN, budget. We thank you in advance for your understanding and for your collaboration.

  2. Acute emesis: moderately emetogenic chemotherapy

    Herrstedt, Jørn; Rapoport, Bernardo; Warr, David;

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a review of the recommendations for the prophylaxis of acute emesis induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy as concluded at the third Perugia Consensus Conference, which took place in June 2009. The review will focus on new studies appearing since the Second consensus conference...... in April 2004. The following issues will be addressed: dose and schedule of antiemetics, different groups of antiemetics such as corticosteroids, serotonin(3) receptor antagonists, dopamine(2) receptor antagonists, and neurokinin(1) receptor antagonists. Furthermore, antiemetic prophylaxis in...

  3. MISTI Shielding and Dosimetry Experiment Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reliable on-orbit dosimetry is necessary for understanding effects of space radiation environments on spacecraft microelectronics performance and comparison of...

  4. Radio-analysis. Applications: biological dosimetry

    Radioisotopes have revolutionized the medical biology. Radio-immunology remains the reference measurement of the infinitely small in biology. Constant efforts have been performed to improve the simpleness, detectability and fastness of the method thanks to an increasing automation. This paper presents: 1 - the advantages of compounds labelling and the isotopic dilution; 2 - the antigen-antibody system: properties, determination of the affinity constant using the Scatchard method; 3 - radio-immunologic dosimetry: competitive dosimetry (radioimmunoassay), calibration curve and mathematical data processing, application to the free thyroxine dosimetry, immunoradiometric dosimetry (immunoradiometric assay), evaluation of the analytical efficiency of a radioimmunoassay; 4 - detection of the radioactive signal (solid and liquid scintillation). (J.S.)

  5. Dosimetry for electron beam sterilization

    According to ISO 11137-1 (sect 4.3.4) dosimetry used in the development, validation and routine control of the sterilization process shall have measurement traceability to national or international standards and shall have a known level of uncertainty. It can only be obtained through calibration of the dosimeters. In presented lecture different types of dosimeter systems for electron beams (calorimeters, radiochromic film dosimeters, alanine / EPR) and their calibration are described

  6. Dosimetry of β extensive sources

    In this work, we have been studied, making use of the Penelope Monte Carlo simulation code, the dosimetry of β extensive sources in situations of spherical geometry including interfaces. These configurations are of interest in the treatment of the called cranealfaringyomes of some synovia leisure of knee and other problems of interest in medical physics. Therefore, its application can be extended toward problems of another areas with similar geometric situation and beta sources. (Author)

  7. Topical Review: Polymer gel dosimetry

    Baldock, C; De Deene, Y; Doran, S.; Ibbott, G; Jirasek, A.; Lepage, M.; McAuley, K B; Oldham, M; Schreiner, L J

    2010-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose ...

  8. Radiation protection, dosimetry and archaeometry

    The activities performed by the radiation protection, dosimetry and archeometry group of the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities during 1999-2001 are briefly described, they include: internal radiation protection (a pilot project based on select x-ray diagnostics investigations where the surface dose was measured and compared against the EU standards), dose rates for patients and personnel during radiological check up, environmental monitoring. In the field of dosimetry, a new dosimeter material (CaF2:Tm was investigated), an active and a passive Bonner-Kugel-spectrometer to measure the neutron spectrum and their dose at high altitudes was built. In the project phantom during 600 days the energy distribution and equivalent dose in a human phantom was measured. Dosimetry and spectrometry (neutrons) on high mountains and airplanes were performed. Earlier cells apoptosis after irradiation with 60Co gamma radiation and neutrons was investigated and age estimation was performed on samples from middle Neolithic period, Bronze age an Roman empire. (nevyjel)

  9. EPR Dosimetry - Present and Future

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as in coordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as bio markers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (Astm), and by the International Organisation of Standards (ISO). The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) is considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (Author)

  10. EPR Dosimetry - Present and Future

    Regulla, D.F. [GSF - National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as in coordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as bio markers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (Astm), and by the International Organisation of Standards (ISO). The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) is considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (Author)

  11. Dosimetry studies in Zaborie village

    Takada, J. E-mail: jtakada@ipc.hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Hoshi, M.; Endo, S.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Kondrashov, A.E.; Petin, D.; Skvortsov, V.; Ivannikov, A.; Tikounov, D.; Gavrilin, Y.; Snykov, V.P

    2000-05-15

    Dosimetry studies in Zaborie, a territory in Russia highly contaminated by the Chernobyl accident, were carried out in July, 1997. Studies on dosimetry for people are important not only for epidemiology but also for recovery of local social activity. The local contamination of the soil was measured to be 1.5-6.3 MBq/m{sup 2} of Cs-137 with 0.7-4 {mu}Sv/h of dose rate. A case study for a villager presently 40 years old indicates estimations of 72 and 269 mSv as the expected internal and external doses during 50 years starting in 1997 based on data of a whole-body measurement of Cs-137 and environmental dose rates. Mean values of accumulated external and internal doses for the period from the year 1986 till 1996 are also estimated to be 130 mSv and 16 mSv for Zaborie. The estimation of the 1986-1996 accumulated dose on the basis of large scale ESR teeth enamel dosimetry provides for this village, the value of 180 mSv. For a short term visitor from Japan to this area, external and internal dose are estimated to be 0.13 mSv/9d (during visit in 1997) and 0.024 mSv/50y (during 50 years starting from 1997), respectively.

  12. EPR dosimetry - present and future

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as co-ordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as biomarkers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (ASTM), and the International Organisation of Standards (ISO) as well as those of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (author)

  13. Fourth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    The focus of the Fourth International Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry Symposium was to explore the impact of current developments in nuclear medicine on absorbed dose calculations. This book contains the proceedings of the meeting including the edited discussion that followed the presentations. Topics that were addressed included the dosimetry associated with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and blood elements, ultrashort-lived radionuclides, and positron emitters. Some specific areas of discussion were variations in absorbed dose as a result of alterations in the kinetics, the influence of radioactive contaminants on dose, dose in children and in the fetus, available instrumentation and techniques for collecting the kinetic data needed for dose calculation, dosimetry requirements for the review and approval of new radiopharmaceuticals, and a comparison of the effect on the thyroid of internal versus external irradiation. New models for the urinary blader, skeleton including the active marrow, and the blood were presented. Several papers dealt with the validity of traditional ''average-organ'' dose estimates to express the dose from particulate radiation that has a short range in tissue. These problems are particularly important in the use of monoclonal antibodies and agents used to measure intracellular functions. These proceedings have been published to provide a resource volume for anyone interested in the calculation of absorbed radiation dose

  14. [Kawasaki disease: interdisciplinary and intersocieties consensus (clinical guidelines). Brief version].

    2016-08-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute self-limiting systemic vasculitis. It is the most common cause of acquired heart disease, with the risk of developing coronary artery aneurysms, myocardial infarction and sudden death. Diagnosis is based on the presence of fever in addition to other clinical criteria. The quarter of the Kawasaki disease patients have "incomplete" presentation. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin within ten days of fever onset improves clinical outcomes and reduces the incidence of coronary artery dilation to less than 5%. Non-responders to standard therapy have shown a successful response with the use of corticosteroids and/or biological agents. The long-term management must be delineated according to the degree of coronary involvement in a multidisciplinary manner. To facilitate the pediatrician's diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of Kawasaki disease, a group of experts from the Argentine Society of Pediatrics and the Argentine Society of Cardiology carried out a consensus to develop practical clinical guidelines. PMID:27399018

  15. IOC consensus paper on the use of platelet-rich plasma in sports medicine

    Engebretsen, Lars; Steffen, Kathrin; Alsousou, Joseph; Anitua, Eduardo; Bachl, Norbert; Everts, Peter; Hamilton, Bruce; Huard, Johnny; Jenoure, Peter; Kelberine, Francois; Kon, Elizaveta; Maffulli, Nicola; Matheson, Gordon; Mei-Dan, Omer; MENETREY, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Acute and chronic musculoskeletal injuries in sports are common and problematic for both athletes and clinicians. A significant proportion of these injuries remain difficult to treat, and many athletes suffer from decreased performance and longstanding pain and discomfort. In 2008, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) published a consensus document on the importance of molecular mechanisms in connective tissue and skeletal muscle injury and healing. This document predicted an increase in...

  16. Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.7 Necessity of Patient-Specific Dose Planning in Radionuclide Therapy' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy'.

  17. Dosimetry of Low-Energy Beta Radiation

    Borg, Jette

    Useful techniques and procedures for derermination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy beta radiation were studied and evaluated. The four techniques included were beta spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical...

  18. Patient dosimetry and protection in diagnostic radiology

    The paper discussed the following subjects: x-ray in medicine as they represent by far the largest man-made sources of population exposure to ionizing radiation, methods of patient dosimetry, entrance surface dose per radiograph, dose-area product per examination, dosimetry for assessing risk, potential of dose reduction

  19. Good Practice of Clinical Dosimetry Reporting

    The intention of the guidance of this paper, Good Practice of Clinical Dosimetry Reporting, by the Dosimetry Committee of the European Association for Nuclear Medicine, is to guide the reader through a series of suggestions for reporting dosimetric approaches in nuclear medicine. (author)

  20. High dose dosimetry for radiation processing

    Radiation processing today offers various advantages in the field of sterilization of medical and pharmaceutical products, food preservation, treatment of chemical materials and a variety of other products widely used in modern society, all of which are of direct relevance to health and welfare. The safety and economic importance of radiation processing is clearly recognized. It is understood that reliable dosimetry is a key parameter for quality assurance of radiation processing and irradiated products. Furthermore, the standardization of dosimetry can provide a justification for the regulatory approval of irradiated products and form the basis of international clearance for free trade. After the initiation of the Agency's high dose standardization programme (1977), the first IAEA Symposium on High Dose Dosimetry was organized in 1984. As a result, concern as to the necessity of reliable dosimetry has greatly escalated not only in the scientific community but also in the radiation processing industry. The second International Symposium on High Dose Dosimetry for Radiation Processing was held in Vienna from 5 to 9 November, 1990, with a view to providing an international forum for the exchange of technical information on up to date developments in this particular field. The scientific programme held promises for an authoritative account of the status of high dose dosimetry throughout the world in 1990. Forty-one papers presented at the meeting discussed the development of new techniques, the improvement of reference and routine dosimetry systems, and the quality control and assurance of dosimetry. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Basics of the ionizing radiation dosimetry

    The dosimetry basic physics issues, ionizing irradiation interaction with the substance and the radiation parameter regulation principles were considered. The special attention was paid to the methods of the ionizing radiation measurement. The edition is the manual on the dosimetry principles and is intended, first of all, for the university students of the technical and engineering specialties

  2. Dynamic Average Consensus and Consensusability of General Linear Multiagent Systems with Random Packet Dropout

    Wen-Min Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the consensus problem of general linear discrete-time multiagent systems (MASs with random packet dropout that happens during information exchange between agents. The packet dropout phenomenon is characterized as being a Bernoulli random process. A distributed consensus protocol with weighted graph is proposed to address the packet dropout phenomenon. Through introducing a new disagreement vector, a new framework is established to solve the consensus problem. Based on the control theory, the perturbation argument, and the matrix theory, the necessary and sufficient condition for MASs to reach mean-square consensus is derived in terms of stability of an array of low-dimensional matrices. Moreover, mean-square consensusable conditions with regard to network topology and agent dynamic structure are also provided. Finally, the effectiveness of the theoretical results is demonstrated through an illustrative example.

  3. Report on external occupational dosimetry in Canada

    In light of the new recommendations of the ICRP in Report 60 on dose quantities and dose limits, this working group was set up to examine the implications for external dosimetry in Canada. The operational quantities proposed by the ICRU are discussed in detail with regard to their applicability in Canada. The current occupational dosimetry services available in Canada are described as well as the several performance intercomparisons that have been carried out within the country as well as internationally. Recommendations are given with respect to standards for dosimetry, including accuracy and precision. More practical advice is given on the choice of dosimeter to use for external dosimetry, frequency of monitoring, and who should be monitored. Specific advice is given on the monitoring of pregnant workers and problem of non-uniform irradiation. Accident and emergency dosimetry are dealt with briefly. Suggestions are given regarding record keeping both for employers and for the national dose registry. 48 refs., 6 tabs., 1 fig

  4. Consensus in personality judgments at zero acquaintance.

    Albright, L; Kenny, D A; Malloy, T E

    1988-09-01

    This research focused on the target effect on a perceiver's judgments of personality when the perceiver and the target are unacquainted. The perceiver was given no opportunity to interact with the target, a condition we refer to as zero acquaintance. We reasoned that in order to make personality judgments, perceivers would use the information available to them (physical appearance). Consensus in personality judgments would result, then, from shared stereotypes about particular physical appearance characteristics. Results from three separate studies with 259 subjects supported this hypothesis. On two of the five dimensions (extraversion and conscientiousness) on which subjects rated each other, a significant proportion of variance was due to the stimulus target. Consensus on judgments of extraversion appears to have been largely mediated by judgments of physical attractiveness. Across the three studies there was also evidence that the consensus in judgments on these two dimensions had some validity, in that they correlated with self-judgments on those two dimensions. PMID:3171912

  5. Fastest Distributed Consensus on Petal Networks

    Jafarizadeh, Saber

    2010-01-01

    Providing an analytical solution for the problem of finding Fastest Distributed Consensus (FDC) is one of the challenging problems in the field of sensor networks. Here in this work we present analytical solution for the problem of fastest distributed consensus averaging algorithm by means of stratification and semi-definite programming, for two particular types of Petal networks, namely symmetric and Complete Cored Symmetric (CCS) Petal networks. Our method in this paper is based on convexity of fastest distributed consensus averaging problem, and inductive comparing of the characteristic polynomials initiated by slackness conditions in order to find the optimal weights. Also certain types of leaves are introduced along with their optimal weights which are not achievable by the method used in this work if these leaves are considered individually.

  6. Lack of consensus in social systems

    Benczik, I. J.; Benczik, S. Z.; Schmittmann, B.; Zia, R. K. P.

    2008-05-01

    We propose an exactly solvable model for the dynamics of voters in a two-party system. The opinion formation process is modeled on a random network of agents. The dynamical nature of interpersonal relations is also reflected in the model, as the connections in the network evolve with the dynamics of the voters. In the infinite time limit, an exact solution predicts the emergence of consensus, for arbitrary initial conditions. However, before consensus is reached, two different metastable states can persist for exponentially long times. One state reflects a perfect balancing of opinions, the other reflects a completely static situation. An estimate of the associated lifetimes suggests that lack of consensus is typical for large systems.

  7. Prophylactic cerebral irradiation in children with leukemia: In vivo evaluation of the irradiation dose applied to the thyroid during prophylactic cerebral irradiation delivered within the framework of the children leukemia treatment; Dosimetrie in vivo pour l`evaluation de la dose recue par la thyroide lors de l`irradiation cerebrale prophylactique delivree dans le cadre du traitement des leucemies de l`enfant

    Ricardi, U.; Rossi, G.; Tessa, M.; Monetti, U.; Verna, R.; Urgesi, A.; Barisone, E.; Besenzon, L.; Corrias, A. [Turin Univ. (Italy)

    1997-09-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate by in vivo dosimetry, the dose received by the thyroid parenchyma during an encephalon irradiation for children having acute lymphoid leukemia, then to look for a correlation between the thyroid alterations ( hypothyroidism, second tumors) and the dosimetry data. (N.C.). 5 refs.

  8. Proceedings of the international workshop 'Actual problems of dosimetry'

    Materials grouped to six main issues: dosimetry and radiometry equipment, dosimetry of the medical irradiation, standard and metrology support of dosimetric and radiometric control, biological dosimetry and markers of radiation effects, monitoring and reconstruction of radiation doses at radiation accidents and dosimetry of unionizing radiations

  9. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen; Penderis, Jacques; Stein, Veronika; Tipold, Andrea; Berendt, Mette; Farqhuar, Robyn; Fischer, Andrea; Long, Sam; Mandigers, Paul J J; Matiasek, Kaspar; Packer, Rowena M A; Pakozdy, Akos; Patterson, Ned; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Batlle, Martí Pumarola; Rusbridge, Clare; Volk, Holger A

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient...... on the factors listed in tier I and II and identification of electroencephalographic abnormalities characteristic for seizure disorders. The authors recommend performing MRI of the brain and routine CSF analysis, after exclusion of reactive seizures, in dogs with age at epileptic seizure onset <6...

  10. Static Consensus in Passifiable Linear Networks

    Ibragim A. Junussov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sufficient conditions of consensus (synchronization in networks described by digraphs and consisting of identical deterministic SIMO systems are derived. Identical and nonidentical control gains (positive arc weights are considered. Connection between admissible digraphs and nonsmooth hypersurfaces (sufficient gain boundary is established. Necessary and sufficient conditions for static consensus by output feedback in networks consisting of certain class of double integrators are rediscovered. Scalability for circle digraph in terms of gain magnitudes is studied. Examples and results of numerical simulations are presented.

  11. ESR dosimetry using eggshells and tooth enamel for accidental dosimetry

    The CO2- signal of eggshells showed a good dose linearity and was appropriate in the wide dose range from 1 to 10 kGy, while ESR signal of CO2- in sea and fresh water shells were saturated at a dose od below 10 kGy. The minimum detectable dose and G-value of CO2- in eggshells were estimated 0.3 Gy and 0.28, respectively. The lifetime of CO2- in eggshells could not be determined exactly because of overlapping organic signals, however it is still sufficiently long for practical use as ESR dosimeter materials. Various bird's or reptile's eggshells would be available as natural retrospective ESR dosimeter materials after nuclear accidents. Eggshells will be useful for the food irradiation dosimetry in the dose range of about a few kGy. Tooth enamel is one of the most useful dosimeter materials in public at a accident because of its high sensitivity. ESR dosimetry will replace TLD in near future if the cost of an ESR reader is further reduced . (author)

  12. Radiation dosimetry and standards at the austrian dosimetry laboratory

    The Austrian Dosimetry Laboratory, established and operated in cooperation between the Austrian Research Center Seibersdorf and the Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying (Bundesamt and Eich- und Vermessungswesen) maintains the national primary standards for radiation dosimetry. Furthermore its tasks include routine calibration of dosemeters and dosimetric research. The irradiation facilities of the laboratory comprise three X-ray machines covering the voltage range from 5 kV to 420 kV constant potential, a 60Co teletherapy unit, a circular exposure system for routine batch calibration of personnel dosemeters with four gamma ray sources (60Co and 137Cs) and a reference source system with six gamma ray sources (60Co and 137Cs). In addition a set of calibrated beta ray sources are provided (147Pm, 204Tl and 90Sr). The dosimetric equipment consists of three free-air parallelplate ionization chambers serving as primary standards of exposure for the X-ray energy region, graphite cavity chambers with measured volume as primary standards for the gamma radiation of 137Cs and 60Co as well as different secondary standard ionization chambers covering the dose rate range from the natural background level up to the level of modern therapy accelerators. In addition for high energy photon and electron radiation a graphite calorimeter is provided as primary standard of absorbed dose. The principle experimental set-ups for the practical use of the standards are presented and the procedures for the calibration of the different types of dosemeters are described. (Author)

  13. Gamma dosimetry of high doses

    The gamma dosimetry of high doses is problematic in almost all the classic dosemeters either based on the thermoluminescence, electric, chemical properties, etc., because they are saturated to very high dose and they are no longer useful. This work carries out an investigation in the interval of high doses. The solid system of heptahydrate ferrous sulfate, can be used as solid dosemeter of routine for high doses of radiation. The proposed method is simple, cheap and it doesn't require sophisticated spectrophotometers or spectrometers but expensive and not common in some laboratories

  14. Air Force neutron dosimetry program

    Approximately 1000 Air Force personnel are monitored for neutron radiation resulting from various sources at more than thirty worldwide locations. Neutron radiation spanning several orders of magnitude in energy is encountered. The Air Force currently uses albedo thermoluminescent neutron dosimeters for personnel monitoring. The energy dependence of the albedo neutron dosimeter is a current problem and the development of site specific correction factors is ongoing. A summary of data on the energy dependence is presented as well as efforts to develop algorithms for the dosimeter. An overview of current Air Force neutron dosimetry users and needs is also presented

  15. Relocation of the Dosimetry Service

    2007-01-01

    The Dosimetry Service is moving from Building 24 to Building 55 and will therefore be closed on Friday, 30 March. From Monday, 2 April onwards you will find us in Building 55/1-001. Please note that we cannot exclude problems with Internet connections on that day and are therefore unable to guarantee normal service. The Service's opening hours and telephone number will not change as a result of the move: Open from 8.30 - 12.00. Closed in the afternoons. Tel. 7 2155

  16. Quality assurance of BNCT dosimetry

    The Phase I clinical trials for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) started in May 1999 in Otaniemi, Espoo. For BNCT no uniform international guidance for the quality assurance of dosimetry exists, so far. Because of the complex dose distribution with several different dose components, the international recommendations on conventional radiotherapy dosimetry are not applicable in every part. Therefore, special guidance specifically for BNCT is needed. To obtain such guidelines a European collaboration project has been defined. The aim of the project is a generally accepted Code of Practice for use by all European BNCT centres. This code will introduce the traceability of the dosimetric methods to the international measurement system. It will also ensure the comparability of the results in various BNCT beams and form the basis for the comparison of the treatment results with the conventional radiotherapy or other treatment modalities. The quality assurance of the dosimetry in BNCT in Finland covers each step of the BNCT treatment, which include dose planning imaging, dose planning, boron infusion, boron kinetics, patient positioning, monitoring of the treatment beam, characterising the radiation spectrum, calibration of the beam model and the dosimetric measurements both in patients (in viva measurements) and in various phantoms. The dose planning images are obtained using a MR scanner with MRI sensitive markers and the dose distribution is computed with a dose planning software BNCTRtpe. The program and the treatment beam (DORT) model used have been verified with measurements and validated with MCNP calculations in phantom. Dosimetric intercomparison has been done with the Brookhaven BNCT beam (BMRR). Before every patient irradiation the relationship between the beam monitor pulse rate and neutron fluence rate in the beam is checked by activation measurements. Kinetic models used to estimate the time-behavior of the blood boron concentration have been verified

  17. The Future of Medical Dosimetry

    The world of health care delivery is becoming increasingly complex. The purpose of this manuscript is to analyze current metrics and analytically predict future practices and principles of medical dosimetry. The results indicate five potential areas precipitating change factors: a) evolutionary and revolutionary thinking processes, b) social factors, c) economic factors, d) political factors, and e) technological factors. Outcomes indicate that significant changes will occur in the job structure and content of being a practicing medical dosimetrist. Discussion indicates potential variables that can occur within each process and change factor and how the predicted outcomes can deviate from normative values. Finally, based on predicted outcomes, future opportunities for medical dosimetrists are given

  18. Radiation dosimetry by potassium feldspar

    Arun Pandya; S G Vaijapurkar; P K Bhatnagar

    2000-04-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of raw and annealed feldspar have been studied for their use in gamma dosimetry. The raw gamma exposed feldspar shows glow peaks at 120°C and 319°C. Gamma dose beyond 500 cGy can be measured without any significant fading even after 40 days of termination of exposure. The annealed feldspar shows a glow peak at 120°C after gamma exposure. This peak can be used to measure gamma doses beyond 25 cGy when the TL is measured after 24 h from termination of exposure.

  19. The Future of Medical Dosimetry

    Adams, Robert D., E-mail: robert_adams@med.unc.edu

    2015-07-01

    The world of health care delivery is becoming increasingly complex. The purpose of this manuscript is to analyze current metrics and analytically predict future practices and principles of medical dosimetry. The results indicate five potential areas precipitating change factors: a) evolutionary and revolutionary thinking processes, b) social factors, c) economic factors, d) political factors, and e) technological factors. Outcomes indicate that significant changes will occur in the job structure and content of being a practicing medical dosimetrist. Discussion indicates potential variables that can occur within each process and change factor and how the predicted outcomes can deviate from normative values. Finally, based on predicted outcomes, future opportunities for medical dosimetrists are given.

  20. Foibles of internal dosimetry systems

    Any system of internal dosimetry intended for widespread use must provide a series of assumptions, and models of calculation. These models will depend upon the basic limitations of dose, risk, or quantity of material that the system is designed to meet. The quirks in most systems arise at this point, depending upon the desires of the designers to provide a workable system that provides safety and depends on the proper use of the models chosen to implement the system. This paper presents illustrations of some of the quirks, or foibles in the past and the current system and discusses a few of the options open for the future. 16 figs

  1. Solid-State Personal Dosimetry

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2005-01-01

    This document is a web site page, and a data sheet about Personal protection (i.e., space suits) presented to the Radiation and Micrometeoroid Mitigation Technology Focus Group meeting. The website describes the work of the PI to improve solid state personal radiation dosimetry. The data sheet presents work on the active personal radiation detection system that is to provide real-time local radiation exposure information during EVA. Should undue exposure occur, knowledge of the dynamic intensity conditions during the exposure will allow more precise diagnostic assessment of the potential health risk to the exposed individual.

  2. Dosimetry for electron beam application

    This report describes two aspects of electron beam dosimetry, on one hand development of film dosimeters and measurements of their properties, and on the other hand development of calorimeters for calibration of routine dosimeters, e.g. thin films. Two types of radiochromic thin film dosimeters have been developed in this department, and the properties of these and commercially available dosimeters have been measured and found to be comparable. Calorimeters which are in use for routine measurements, are being investigated with reference to their application as standardizing instruments, and new calorimeters are being developed. (author)

  3. Anniversary Paper: Fifty years of AAPM involvement in radiation dosimetry

    This article reviews the involvement of the AAPM in various aspects of radiation dosimetry over its 50 year history, emphasizing the especially important role that external beam dosimetry played in the early formation of the organization. Topics covered include the AAPM's involvement with external beam and x-ray dosimetry protocols, brachytherapy dosimetry, primary standards laboratories, accredited dosimetry chains, and audits for machine calibrations through the Radiological Physics Center

  4. Biological dosimetry-knowing what happened

    Effective medical management of a suspected radiation overexposure incident necessitates recording dynamic medical data and measuring appropriate radiation bioassays in order to provide diagnostic information to the treating physician and dose assessment for the personnel radiation protection records. Biological Assessment Tool (BAT), a radiation casualty management software application available at the AFRRI's website (www.afrri.usuhs.mil), was developed to facilitate medical recording and to assist in bioassay dose predictions. Prodromal signs and symptoms as well as the body location and degree of transitory radiation-induced erythema should be recorded. Goans and colleagues have recently published dose prediction models for the prodromal symptom, time until onset of vomiting, following photon and criticality accident exposures. A complete blood cell count (CBC) with white cell differential should be obtained immediately after exposure, three times a day for the next 2-3 days, and then twice a day for the following 3- 6 days. Lymphocyte cell counts and lymphocyte depletion kinetics provide a dose assessment prediction between 1 and 10 Gy photon equivalent dose range. A blood sample should also be taken for dose assessment, following coordination with a qualified radiation cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory, typically 24 hours after exposure using the 'gold standard' lymphocyte-dicentric radiation bioassay. Several of these cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratories use the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) bioassay, which permits dose assessment at higher doses (>5 Gy photon equivalent and acute high-dose rate exposures). Other opportunistic dosimetry approaches should be considered if available. Automated instrumentation to accomplish sample preparation and analysis for the conventional cytogenetic-based bioassays need to be integrated and beta tested in reference cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratories. Complimentary novel interphase-based cytological

  5. Retrospective dosimetry by chromosomal analysis

    The joint EU/CIS project ECP-6, was set up to examine whether cytogenetic dosimetry is possible for persons irradiated years previously at Chernobyl. The paper describes the possibility of achieving this by the examination of blood lymphocytes for unstable and stable chromosome aberrations; dicentrics and translocations. Emphasis was placed on the relatively new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method for rapid screening for stable translocations. In a collaborative experiment in vitro dose response calibration curves for dicentrics and FISH were produced with gamma radiation over the range 0-1.0 Gy. A pilot study of about 60 liquidators with registered doses ranging from 0-300 mSv was undertaken to determine whether the chromosomal methods may verify the recorded doses. It was concluded that the dicentric is no longer valid as a measured endpoint. Translocations may be used to verify early dosimetry carried out on highly irradiated persons. For the vast majority of lesser exposed subjects FISH is impractical as an individual dosimeter; it may have some value for comparing groups of subjects

  6. Internal dosimetry, past and future

    Progress in the dosimetry of internally deposited radionuclides since World War II is reviewed. The Permissible Doses Conference held at Chalk River in 1949 defined the Standard Man and a biokinetic lung model, setting maximum permissible body burdens (MPBB), maximum permissible concentrations in air (MPCA), and maximum permissible concentrations in water (MPCW) for selected radionuclides. ICRP publications 2, 6 and 9 followed, focusing on setting MPCs. The use of the power function to describe radionuclide retention in the human body was discussed in Publication 2, but not recommended for use until Publication 6. Publication 2 defined the term effective energy. The integration time for internal exposures became 50 years, and the committed dose was defined. ICRP publications 10, 10A and 54 provided guidance for the calculation of doses from measured activity in vivo or in excreta. In 1979 ICRP publication 30 replaced publication 2 as the handbook for internal dosimetry. There will be a major revision of Publication 30 following the release of the new ICRP recommendations. A future publication will give doses to patients who have been administered radiopharmaceuticals. New computer tools will allow the development of more realistic metabolic models, and new dosimetric models that calculate doses to cells will be developed. The availability of high resolution solid state detectors has resulted in improvement in measurements of radionuclides in vivo, and some improvement in radiochemical analyses of excreta. However, poor sensitivity to actinides leaves something to be desired in vitro measurements and air monitoring

  7. Fast neutron dosimetry: Progress summary

    The purpose was to investigate the radiological physics and biology of very low energy photons derived from a 1-GeV electron synchrotron storage ring. An extensive beam line and irradiation apparatus was designed, developed, and constructed. Dosimetry measurements required invention and testing of a miniature absolute calorimeter and a cell irradiation fixture suitable for scanning exposures under computer control. Measurements of the kerma factors of oxygen, aluminum and silicon for 14-20 MeV neutrons. Custom designed miniature proportional counters of cylindrical symmetry were employed in these determinations. The oxygen kerma factor was found significantly lower than values calculated from microscopic cross sections. We also tested Mg and Fe walled conventional spherical counters. The direct neutron-counting gas interaction is significant enough for these counters that a correction is needed. We also investigated the application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to radiation dosimetry. Our purpose was to take advantage of recent development of very high-field magnets, complex RF-pulse techniques for solvent suppression, and improved spectral analysis techniques

  8. Instrumentation for Dosimetry. Chapter 21

    Measurements of absorbed dose (or air kerma) are required in varying situations in diagnostic radiology. The radiation fields vary from plain, slit and even point projection geometry, and may be stationary or moving, including rotational. Owing to the use of low photon energies for these fields, it is important that dosimeters have a satisfactory energy response. In general, the requirements for dosimeter accuracy are less stringent than those in radiation therapy; however, the dose and dose rate measurements cover a large range. Patient dosimetry (see Chapter 22) is a primary responsibility of the medical physicist specializing in diagnostic radiology and is required by legislation in many countries. Dose data are also required in the optimization of examinations for image quality and dose. Radiation measurement is also critical for occupational and public exposure control (see Chapter 24). Dose measurements are essential in acceptance testing and quality control (see Chapter 19). Several types of dosimeter can be used, provided that they have a suitable energy response, but typically, ionization chambers of a few cubic centimetres in volume, or solid state detectors specifically designed for such measurements, are used. If dosimeters are used to make measurements during an examination, they must not interfere with the examination. These devices are also used for determination of the half value layer (HVL). Special types of ionization chamber are employed for computed tomography (CT), mammography and interventional radiology dosimetry

  9. Dosimetry effects of film packing

    Full text: Dosimetric artefacts in film based dosimetry have been addressed by a number of authors. We have investigated the influence on film dose results, of a number of materials that are commonly packed against the film including, solid water, paper, air and plastic. The results indicate that variations in optical density occur due to the character and relative quantity of the packing material as well as the film itself. Kodak X-omat V and GAFChromic film samples were placed in a solid water cassette with packing sheets of various materials placed in contact with the film. Photon and electron exposures were carried out with various film orientation and beam qualities. Results have been obtained for solid water, paper and air. An example of the relative change in film density as a function of depth due to four paper sheets packed adjacent to a film aligned with the central axis of a 6MV photon beam is shown. Other results indicate dose variation can be attributed to Cerenkov radiation. Packing materials in contact or in close proximity with dosimetric film, contribute to optical density variations of the order of several percent. Careful consideration of these effects is necessary when using film in high accuracy dosimetry. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  10. CT dosimetry and risk estimates

    Conventional approaches to CT dosimetry are inadequate because they fail to evaluate the risk to the patient. A risk related approach to CT dosimetry is developed which explicitly takes into account the non-uniform dose distribution in the body and the relative sensitivities of different organs and tissues. The principal radiological risks to patients undergoing CT examinations are the stochastic processes of carcinogenesis and genetic effects. Radiation risk estimates have been obtained for an EMI 5005 CT scanner by measuring the mean organ doses in a Rando phantom for CT studies on the head, chest, abdomen and pelvis. The application of these risk estimates to the population served by this CT scanner indicates that during the lifetime of the CT scanner, approximately 50,000 patients will undergo CT scanning and 60% will result in a positive diagnosis. The radiation detriment is estimated to be about 1 induced cancer and a negligible genetic effect. The radiation detriment is considerably smaller than the total detriment associated with contrast material used in 76% of the CT studies. (author)

  11. International Consensus for ultrasound lesions in gout

    Gutierrez, Marwin; Schmidt, Wolfgang A; Thiele, Ralf G;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To produce consensus-based definitions of the US elementary lesions in gout and to test their reliability in a web-based exercise. METHODS: The process consisted of two steps. In the first step a written Delphi questionnaire was developed from a systematic literature review and expert ...

  12. Adaptive bipartite consensus on coopetition networks

    Hu, Jiangping; Zhu, Hong

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a bipartite consensus tracking problem is considered for a group of autonomous agents on a coopetition network, on which the agents interact cooperatively and competitively simultaneously. The coopetition network involves positive and negative edges and is conveniently modeled by a signed graph. Additionally, the dynamics of all the agents are subjected to unknown disturbances, which are represented by linearly parameterized models. An adaptive estimation scheme is designed for each agent by virtue of the relative position measurements and the relative velocity measurements from its neighbors. Then a consensus tracking law is proposed for a new distributed system, which uses the relative measurements as the new state variables. The convergence of the consensus tracking error and the parameter estimation are analyzed even when the coopetition network is time-varying and no more global information about the bounds of the unknown disturbances is available to all the agents. Finally, some simulation results are provided to demonstrate the formation of the bipartite consensus on the coopetition network.

  13. Consumer and professional standards: working towards consensus

    C. Williamson

    2000-01-01

    Standards of treatment and care should be acceptable to healthcare consumers as well as to healthcare professionals. A simple categorisation of standards according to their acceptability to consumers is outlined. Professional/consumer groups which review and set standards are discussed, with emphasis on the principles of partnership. Working together towards consensus can be difficult but is now an important way forward.

  14. Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education--Consensus?

    Rink, Judith

    2014-01-01

    This article synthesizes the series of manuscripts on teacher effectiveness in physical education recently published by the "Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport" and highlights both the consensus and points of disagreement. Although there is much agreement as to the mission to develop a physically active lifestyle, there is a great…

  15. Consensus among Economists--An Update

    Fuller, Dan; Geide-Stevenson, Doris

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore consensus among economists on specific propositions based on a fall 2011 survey of American Economic Association members. Results are based on 568 responses and provide evidence of changes in opinion over time by including propositions from earlier studies in 2000 (Fuller and Geide-Stevenson 2003) and 1992…

  16. 3rd BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON Helicobacter pylori

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  17. On consensus functions in the biopolar case

    Saminger, S.; Dubois, D.; Mesiar, Radko

    Linz : Johannes Kepler Universität, 2006, s. 116-119. [Linz Seminar on Fuzzy Set Theory /27./. Linz (AT), 07.02.2006-11.02.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA402/04/1026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : decision theory * bipolar measures * consensus * decomposability Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  18. Acute Renal Failure and the Critically Ill Surgical Patient

    Sykes, Eliot; Cosgrove, Joseph F

    2007-01-01

    Acute renal failure can occur following major surgery. Predisposing factors include massive haemorrhage, sepsis, diabetes, hypertension, cardiac disease, peripheral vascular disease, chronic renal impairment and age. Understanding epidemiology, aetiology and pathophysiology can aid effective diagnosis and management. A consensus definition for acute renal failure has recently been developed. It relates to deteriorating urine output, serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate. In the surg...

  19. Health physics research reactor reference dosimetry

    Reference neutron dosimetry is developed for the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) in the new operational configuration directly above its storage pit. This operational change was physically made early in CY 1985. The new reference dosimetry considered in this document is referred to as the 1986 HPRR reference dosimetry and it replaces any and all HPRR reference documents or papers issued prior to 1986. Reference dosimetry is developed for the unshielded HPRR as well as for the reactor with each of five different shield types and configurations. The reference dosimetry is presented in terms of three different dose and six different dose equivalent reporting conventions. These reporting conventions cover most of those in current use by dosimetrists worldwide. In addition to the reference neutron dosimetry, this document contains other useful dosimetry-related data for the HPRR in its new configuration. These data include dose-distance measurements and calculations, gamma dose measurements, neutron-to-gamma ratios, ''9-to-3 inch'' ratios, threshold detector unit measurements, 56-group neutron energy spectra, sulfur fluence measurements, and details concerning HPRR shields. 26 refs., 11 figs., 31 tabs

  20. Non-conventional personal dosimetry techniques

    Established dosimetry has achieved a high standard in personnel monitoring. This applies particularly to photon dosimetry. Nevertheless, even in photon dosimetry, improvements and changes are being made. The reason may be technological progress, or the introduction of new tasks on the basis of the recommendations of international bodies (e.g. the new ICRU measurement unit) of national legislation. Since we are restricting ourselves here to technical trends the author would like to draw attention to various activities of current interest, e.g. the computation of receptor-related conversion coefficients from personal dose to organ or body doses, taking into account the conditions of exposure with respect to differential energy and angular distribution of the radiation field. Realistic data on exposure geometry are taken from work place analyses. Furthermore, the data banks of central personal dosimetry services are subject to statistical evaluation and radiation protection trend analysis. Technological progress and developments are considered from the point of view of personal dosimetry, partial body or extremity dosimetry and accidental dosimetry

  1. Suitability of Israeli Household Salt for Retrospective Dosimetry

    Following a nuclear accident or a terror attack involving the dispersal of radioactive material, radiation dose assessment to first responders and the members of the public is essential. This information may be used by medical personnel to decide whether to refer the exposed individual for medical treatment or not. Few people, if any, will be wearing standard dosimeters at the exposure scene, so the need for a retrospective assessment of the radiation dose is an acute necessity. Previously developed methods for retrospective dosimetry (RD) have suggested various types of materials such as tiles, bricks, CDs, electronic components, mobile phones, electron paramagnetic resonance of tooth enamel, hair, nails, biological dosimetry techniques etc. These techniques involve significant disadvantages such as: the long time required to prepare the samples for measurement the considerable expense of the measuring equipment, invasive procedure and others. The need for an RD technique which will be fast, inexpensive, reliable, non-invasive and, if possible, portable, remains an on-going challenge. The ideal retrospective dosimeter must fulfill the following basic criteria: a) Availability in the contaminated area, b) Adequate dose measurement capability in the relevant range of dose levels, c) Negligible or known fading between exposure and measurement

  2. Dosimetry optimization at COGEMA-La Hague

    At the present time, the la Hague site strives to apply international recommendations together with national regulations concerning radiation protection, and especially the respect of limitation and optimization principles. The application of these principles is based on the implementation of a passive dosimetry and an active dosimetry. The monthly passive dosimetry is monitored by means of a photographic dosimetry film, completed with lithium fluorine thermoluminescent film badges. This personal dosimetry common to X, β, γ and neutron radiations is carried out in close relationship between the Radiation Protection Department, the Occupational Medical Department and the staff running the Plant. The application or ALARA's principle as well as that of radiation protection optimization implies to implement a complementary active dosimetry enabling to gain in real time, the personal dosimetry of each intervening person, either they be COGEMA's workers or external companies'. This active dosimetry provides with following information: This preventive dosimetry is based on the knowledge of doses integration in real time and is fitted with alarm thresholds according to the total amount of doses and dose rates. Thresholds on the dose rate are also set relatively to the radiological environment. This knowledge of doses and dose rates allows a stricter management of the works, while analyzing them according to the nature of the work, to the location and to the skills of the intervening people. This dosimetry allows to analyze and optimize doses integration according to the works nature for the whole intervening staff. The la Hague Site has developed an active personal dosimetry system, common to every intervening person, COGEMA or external companies. The DOSICARD was thus elaborated, shaped as an electronic dosimeter fitted with an alarm and a smart card. The access to controlled areas is conditioned to information given by the DOSICARD concerning medical aptitudes and

  3. Basic physical data for neutron dosimetry

    Based on the results of a workshop on basic physical data for neutron dosimetry held in Rijswijk (The Netherlands) on 19-21 May 1976, this monograph reviews the current status in neutron dosimetry and the agreements that were reached on the use of some common basic physical parameters. As appendices are joint tables of kerma factors and a draft of a protocol for neutron dosimetry for radiobiological and medical applications. Main topic treated: source and field characteristics; cross sections and mass energy transfer coefficients; measurements and calculations; detector response, measurements and calculations; dose distributions in phantoms for a limited set of conditions; standardization, calibration and intercomparison

  4. Introduction to radiological physics and radiation dosimetry

    Attix, Frank Herbert

    2004-01-01

    A straightforward presentation of the broad concepts underlying radiological physics and radiation dosimetry for the graduate-level student. Covers photon and neutron attenuation, radiation and charged particle equilibrium, interactions of photons and charged particles with matter, radiotherapy dosimetry, as well as photographic, calorimetric, chemical, and thermoluminescence dosimetry. Includes many new derivations, such as Kramers X-ray spectrum, as well as topics that have not been thoroughly analyzed in other texts, such as broad-beam attenuation and geometrics, and the reciprocity theorem

  5. A TLD for whole body dosimetry our experience in neutron personnel dosimetry

    One of the Greek Atomic Energy, Commission's (GAEC) responsibilities is the personnel dosimetry and the record keeping for the workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. The personnel dosimetry laboratory of the GAEC assures the monitoring of almost 7000 workers in the whole country, including about 100 working in areas where neutrons might be present. For this purpose a thermoluminescence dosimetry system (TLD) in neutron dosimetry has been introduced. Scope of the present work is the quality control and the preliminary results on the implementation of the TLD system. The quality control of the system has been completed and the results are presented. (authors)

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance technique for radiation dosimetry: emerging trends for laboratory and accidental dosimetry

    The applications of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) for radiation dosimetry are briefly reviewed. In particular, EPR-alanine dosimetry and accidental dosimetry using EPR signals from human tooth enamel have been discussed. The alanine dosimetry was found to be useful from low doses such as 1 Gy to high doses such as 100 kGy. The signals from tooth enamel are found to be invaluable in assessing the absorbed dose of people exposed to radiation accidents and also survivors of atomic bomb explosions. New emerging trends using EPR signals from bones exposed to radiation have also been briefly reviewed. (author)

  7. GENII: The Hanford Environmental Radiation Dosimetry Software System: Volume 1, Conceptual representation

    The Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project was undertaken to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in updated versions of the environmental pathway analysis models used at Hanford. The resulting second generation of Hanford environmental dosimetry computer codes is compiled in the Hanford Environmental Dosimetry System (Generation II, or GENII). The purpose of this coupled system of computer codes is to analyze environmental contamination resulting from acute or chronic releases to, or initial contamination of, air, water, or soil. This is accomplished by calculating radiation doses to individuals or populations. GENII is described in three volumes of documentation. The first volume describes the theoretical considerations of the system. The second volume is a Users' Manual, providing code structure, users' instructions, required system configurations, and QA-related topics. The third volume is a Code Maintenance Manual for the user who requires knowledge of code detail. It includes code logic diagrams, global dictionary, worksheets, example hand calculations, and listings of the code and its associated data libraries. 72 refs., 15 figs., 34 tabs

  8. Activities developed by the biological dosimetry laboratory of the Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear - ARN of Argentina

    Biological dosimetry (DB) allows to estimate doses absorbed in individuals exposed to ionizing radiation through the quantification of stable and unstable chromosome aberrations (SCA and UCA). The frequency of these aberrations is referred to a calibration dose response curve (in vitro) to determine the doses of the individual to the whole body. The DB is a necessary support for programs of national radiation protection and response systems in nuclear or radiological emergencies in the event of accidental or incidental, single overexposure or large scale. In this context the Laboratory of Dosimetry Biological (LDB) of the Authority Regulatory Nuclear (ARN) Argentina develops and applies different dosimeters cytogenetic from four decades ago. These dosimeters provide a fact more within the whole of the information necessary for an accidental, complementing the physical and clinical dosimetry exposure assessment. The most widely used in the DB biodosimetric method is the quantification of SCA (dicentrics and rings Central) from a sample of venous blood. The LDB is accredited for the trial, under rules IRAM 301: 2005 (ISO / IEC 17025: 2005) and ISO 19238:2004. Test applies to the immediate dosimetry evaluation of acute exposures, all or a large part of the body in the range 0,1-5 Gy. In this context the LDB is part of the Latin American network of DB (LBDNet), BioDoseNet-who and response system in radiological emergencies and nuclear IAEA-RANET, being enabled to summon the LBDNet if necessary

  9. Application of High Precision EPR Dosimetry with Teeth for Reconstruction of Doses to Chernobyl Populations

    An acute need for reliable dose estimates calls for development and implementation of high precision retrospective dosimetric techniques. Among others, maybe the most preferable approach is EPR dosimetry using tooth enamel as a natural lifetime dosemeter. During the past eight years a vast experience in the field of EPR dosimetry has been accumulated in SCRM. In this research, the main effort was put into providing the highest achievable accuracy and reproducibility of results as well as on reduction of labour intensity for the analyses. The technique developed in SCRM comprises sophisticated sample preparation procedures, analysis of EPR spectra using a Mn2+:MgO spectrometric standard, and individual calibration of dose response for each sample. Methods for taking into account confounding factors (e.g. medical X ray exposure, UV light effects and non-linearity of dose-response curves) and assessment of overall uncertainty of dose estimation were also developed. A systematic approach to ERP dosimetry of an exposed population also includes efforts on acquisition of teeth from Chernobyl clean-up workers on a national scale. So far, samples from more than 700 individuals collected in Ukraine, and doses to more than 300 liquidators have been reconstructed. Application of this EPR dosimetric system allowed verification of Chernobyl dosimetry and provided on-going biomedical research with reliable retrospective dose estimates. (author)

  10. Acute Bronchitis

    ... of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your cough ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when people ...

  11. Need of reactor dosimetry preservation

    Full text: Today's nuclear renaissance in national and European aspect, expressed in building of new NPPs, as well as the development of Gen. IV nuclear reactors, meets new challenges of accuracy of the reactor analysis methods used for reliable operation and nuclear safety assessment. The nuclear safety requirements and philosophy have changed by the development of new nuclear systems and this imposes special research and development activity. Reactor Dosimetry (RD) which is applied for determination of neutron field parameters and neutron flux responses in different regions of the reactor system plays an important role in determining of consecutive effects from the irradiation. That is, for determination of radiation exposure on reactor system elements as reactor vessel, internals, shielding; dose determination for material damage study; determination of radiation field parameters for conditioning of irradiation; dose determination for medicine and industry application; induced activity determination for decommissioning purposes. The management of nuclear knowledge has emerged as a growing challenge in recent years. The need to preserve and transfer nuclear knowledge is compounded by recent trends such as ageing of the nuclear workforce, declining student numbers in nuclear related fields, and the threat of losing accumulated nuclear knowledge. Reinforcement of science and technology potential of many EU institutes is needed so to be able to support the nuclear operators and nuclear regulator in safety assessment as well as to strengthen the utilization of the research reactor for medicine and industry purposes. The ways to preserve and develop the RD knowledge could be asked in the good practice of the near past within the European Working Group for Reactor Dosimetry (EWGRD), members of which are research organizations of the countries in Europe operating VVER, PWR and BWR type reactors. Joint workshops and training, common intercomparisons will maintain the RD

  12. GENII-S, Environmental Radiation Dosimetry System

    1 - Description of program or function: GENII-S is the result of implementing GENII in the SUNS software shell. SUNS was developed to simplify the application of Monte Carlo methods of uncertainty analysis to a variety of problems. The GENII portion of the GENII-S package contains the program which was developed to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) into the environmental pathway analysis models used at Hanford. GENII, which is available as CCC-0601, is a coupled system of seven programs and the associated data libraries that comprise the Hanford Dosimetry System (Generation II) to estimate potential radiation doses to individuals or populations from both routine and accidental releases of radionuclides to air or water and residual contamination from spills or decontamination operations. The GENII system includes interactive menu-driven programs which allow the user to effectively address the parameters required for scenario generation and data input, internal and external dose factor generators, and environmental dosimetry programs. There also exist pull-down help menus which provide the user with a description of the input parameter and the possible options. The programs in GENII-S analyse environmental contamination resulting from both far-field and near-field scenarios. GENII-S can calculate annual dose, committed dose, and accumulated dose from acute and chronic releases from ground or elevated sources to air or water and from initial contamination of soil or surfaces and can evaluate exposure pathways including direct exposure via water, soil, air, inhalation pathways, and ingestion pathways. In addition, GENII-S can perform 10,000-years migration analyses and can be used for retrospective calculations of potential radiation doses resulting from routine emissions and for prospective dose calculations. HEDL contributed additional data to the CCC-0601/GENII package in March

  13. Alanine - ESR dosimetry, feasibility and possible applications

    Alanine ESR dosimetry presents a great interest for quality controls in radiotherapy. This new developed water equivalent alanine dosimeter allows a reproducible dose measurement, by a non-destructive readout technique in a large dose range. In this paper the stability of the dosimeter response has been shown but also its independence with the energy or the dose rate of the absorbed radiation. Through this different studies, one can broaden the application field of alanine / ESR dosimetry especially for in-vivo dosimetry. The results of the experiments and the intra operative treatment, indicate that this kind of dosimetry seems to be a promising technique for in-vivo quality controls in electron beam, γ ray or X ray radiotherapy. (authors)

  14. Biological dosimetry - Dose estimation method using biomakers

    The individual radiation dose estimation is an important step in the radiation risk assessment. In case of radiation incident or radiation accident, sometime, physical dosimetry method can not be used for calculating the individual radiation dose, the other complement method such as biological dosimetry is very necessary. This method is based on the quantitative specific biomarkers induced by ionizing radiation, such as dicentric chromosomes, translocations, micronuclei... in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The basis of the biological dosimetry method is the close relationship between the biomarkers and absorbed dose or dose rate; the effects of in vitro and in vivo are similar, so it is able to generate the calibration dose-effect curve in vitro for in vivo assessment. Possibilities and perspectives for performing biological dosimetry method in radiation protection area are presented in this report. (author)

  15. The International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-85)

    This document describes the contents of the second version of the International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-85), distributed by the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency. This library superseded IRDF-82. (author)

  16. The BNFL legal electronic dosimetry service

    BNFL Magnox Generation started a three year scheme in April 1996 to introduce Siemens Electronic Personal Dosimetry (EPD) systems into its reactor sites as part of an initiative to improve the control of doses and the accuracy of dose statistics and to record personal legal dose. Concurrent with the installation of the EPD systems a successful application was made to the United Kingdom Health and Safety Executive (HSE) for approval of the BNFL dosimetry service to use the Siemens EPD Mk 1.2 for recording legal doses. This paper discusses the experiences of the BNFL dosimetry service in operating the approved dosimetry service since it's approval by the HSE in January 2000. (authors)

  17. Emerging technological bases for retrospective dosimetry.

    Straume, T; Anspaugh, L R; Haskell, E H; Lucas, J N; Marchetti, A A; Likhtarev, I A; Chumak, V V; Romanyukha, A A; Khrouch, V T; Gavrilin YuI; Minenko, V F

    1997-01-01

    In this article we discuss examples of challenging problems in retrospective dosimetry and describe some promising solutions. The ability to make measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry and luminescence techniques promises to provide improved dosimetry for regions of Belarus, Ukraine and Russian Federation contaminated by radionuclides from the Chernobyl accident. In addition, it may soon be possible to resolve the large neutron discrepancy in the dosimetry system for Hiroshima through novel measurement techniques that can be used to reconstruct the fast-neutron fluence emitted by the bomb some 51 years ago. Important advances in molecular cytogenetics and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements have produced biodosimeters that show potential in retrospective dosimetry. The most promising of these are the frequency of reciprocal translocations measured in chromosomes of blood lymphocytes using fluorescence in situ hybridization and the electron paramagnetic resonance signal in tooth enamel. PMID:9368303

  18. Consensus Through Conversation How to Achieve High-Commitment Decisions

    Dressler, Larry

    2006-01-01

    Facilitation expert Larry Dressler's Consensus Through Conversation is a guide for the effective facilitation and practice of one of business's most popular - but most widely misunderstood - decision-making models: consensus.

  19. Audits for advanced treatment dosimetry

    Radiation therapy has advanced rapidly over the last few decades, progressing from 3D conformal treatment to image-guided intensity modulated therapy of several different flavors, both 3D and 4D and to adaptive radiotherapy. The use of intensity modulation has increased the complexity of quality assurance and essentially eliminated the physicist's ability to judge the validity of a treatment plan, even approximately, on the basis of appearance and experience. Instead, complex QA devices and procedures are required at the institutional level. Similarly, the assessment of treatment quality through remote and on-site audits also requires greater sophistication. The introduction of 3D and 4D dosimetry into external audit systems must follow, to enable quality assurance systems to perform meaningful and thorough audits

  20. Advanced materials in radiation dosimetry

    Bruzzi, M; Nava, F; Pini, S; Russo, S

    2002-01-01

    High band-gap semiconductor materials can represent good alternatives to silicon in relative dosimetry. Schottky diodes made with epitaxial n-type 4 H SiC and Chemical Vapor Deposited diamond films with ohmic contacts have been exposed to a sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma-source, 20 MeV electrons and 6 MV X photons from a linear accelerator to test the current response in on-line configuration in the dose range 0.1-10 Gy. The released charge as a function of the dose and the radiation-induced current as a function of the dose-rate are found to be linear. No priming effects have been observed using epitaxial SiC, due to the low density of lattice defects present in this material.

  1. Development of radiation biological dosimetry

    Up until now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline (triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the premature chromosome condensation assay and apoptotic fragment assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiation dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with conventional chromosome aberration assay and micronuclei assay

  2. Development of radiation biological dosimetry

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil; Son, Young Sook; Kim, Soo Kwan; Jang, Won Suk; Le, Sun Joo; Jee, Young Heun; Jung, Woo Jung

    1999-04-01

    Up until now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline (triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the premature chromosome condensation assay and apoptotic fragment assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiation dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with conventional chromosome aberration assay and micronuclei assay.

  3. The future of medical dosimetry.

    Adams, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    The world of health care delivery is becoming increasingly complex. The purpose of this manuscript is to analyze current metrics and analytically predict future practices and principles of medical dosimetry. The results indicate five potential areas precipitating change factors: a) evolutionary and revolutionary thinking processes, b) social factors, c) economic factors, d) political factors, and e) technological factors. Outcomes indicate that significant changes will occur in the job structure and content of being a practicing medical dosimetrist. Discussion indicates potential variables that can occur within each process and change factor and how the predicted outcomes can deviate from normative values. Finally, based on predicted outcomes, future opportunities for medical dosimetrists are given. PMID:25861838

  4. Personal dosimetry in NPP refuelling

    Doses received by people involved in the operation of Nuclear Power Plants may reach high values, sometimes near limits, particularly during the refuelling operation. With the new ICRP recommendations, the doses produced may exceed the limits that have been now established, hence the practice used must be revised and/or exposure times reduced. In this paper, personal dosimetry from the workers of a Service Company involved in the operation of several Nuclear Power Plants, has been analyzed in order to state the implications of the new ICRP recommendations. Doses higher than new limits will imply a revision of the refuelling policies, thus exposure time would be reduced, and perhaps more workers must be involved in the operation, at least in critical stages. Statistics over the collected data have been estimated and major remarks on possible changes in the practice have been summarized. (author)

  5. Critical Reflections on Neutron Dosimetry

    Neutron dosimetry is unsatisfactory at present because the true meaning of the experimental data is not clear. Flux measurements cannot be used to determine the absorbed doses without simultaneous measurement of the spectral distribution of the neutrons, whose QF varies considerably according to the energy. Even with a unit of absorbed dose such as the rad (whose definition is based on physical measuring systems), there is still the problem of how to measure the absorbed energy. Essentially, an instrument for measuring absorbed doses should satisfy at least the following conditions: (1) It should produce no change in the primary flux incident on the subject or should modify it in the same proportions as the subject. (2) It should indicate the absorbed energy accurately. Calorimetric measurements come to mind, but they are insufficiently sensitive (100 rads/min in a substance of unit specific heat produces a temperature rise of 2.5 x 10-4 degC/min). (3) The absorbed energy per unit mass of the dosimeter should be equal or proportional to that absorbed per unit mass of human tissue. Personal dosimetry by means of film badges is inaccurate and insufficiently sensitive. At present, the most reliable dose measurements are those made with tissue-equivalent ionization chambers, but these, too, are unsatisfactory, at least for neutrons of energy between 0.025 eV and 20 keV and above 30 MeV. The authors propose a method for measuring high-energy neutron doses capable of causing nuclear disintegrations in the body. (author)

  6. Neutron excitation function guide for reactor dosimetry

    Neutron Excitation Function Guide for Reactor Dosimetry (NEFGRD) has been prepared in the Ukrainian Nuclear Data Center (UKRNDC) using ZVV 9.2 code for graphical data presentation. The data can be retrieved through Web or obtained on CD-ROM or as hard copy report. NEFGRD contains graphical and text information for 56 nuclides (81 dosimetry reactions). Each reaction is provided by the information part and several graphical function blocks (from one to nine). (author)

  7. Application of radiation damage effects in dosimetry

    some general aspects of radiation dosimetry are outlined. The techniques of radiophotoluminescence, radiothermoluminescence and exo-electron emission are discussed individually. It is thought that the trend in personnel dosimetry is such that thermoluminescence will steadily replace film and photoluminescence techniques over the next decade, and that more unusual techniques, such as exo-electron emission, will make inroads only for special purposes. (B.R.H.)

  8. EPR dosimetry of human dental enamel

    Dental enamel was the object of dosimetry with the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR); the teeth extracted for medical causes in the residents of Kiev, the Kiev and Zhitomir regions were analyzed. New data on radiation defects in dental enamel are presented and problems of EPR dosimetry in humans analyzed, approaches to the development and improvement of the method of retrospective assessment of the dose load with this method are outlined

  9. Developments in Patient Dosimetry for Unsealed Sources

    In molecular radiotherapy, treatment planning essentially is the determination of the activity to administer to optimize safety and efficacy of a treatment. Individualization is possible, for example, by using quantitative imaging modalities, external counting and blood sampling for pre-therapeutic biokinetics measurements. Patient specific dosimetry can be performed as in radiation therapy. Over- or under treatment of patients can be avoided. Here, the standard methods and the expected advances in performing individualized dosimetry are discussed. (author)

  10. Consensus Formation in Science Modeled by Aggregated Bibliographic Coupling

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Frandsen, Tove Faber

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The level of consensus in science has traditionally been measured by a number of different methods. The variety is important as each method measures different aspects of science and consensus. Citation analytical studies have previously measured the level of consensus using the scientific...... (ABC) between documents. The advantages of the ABC-technique are demonstrated in a study of two selected disciplines in which the levels of consensus are measured using the proposed technique....

  11. Consensus formation in science modeled by aggregated bibliographic coupling

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Frandsen, Tove Faber

    2012-01-01

    The level of consensus in science has traditionally been measured by a number of different methods. The variety is important as each method measures different aspects of science and consensus. Citation analytical studies have previously measured the level of consensus using the scientific journal......) between documents. The advantages of the ABC-technique are demonstrated in a study of two selected disciplines in which the levels of consensus are measured using the propopsed technique....

  12. Using consensus building to improve utility regulation

    The utility industry and its regulatory environment are at a crossroads. Utilities, intervenors and even public utility commissions are no longer able to initiate and sustain changes unilaterally. Traditional approaches to regulation are often contentious and costly, producing results that are not perceived as legitimate or practical. Consensus building and alternative dispute resolution have the potential to help utilities, intervenors and regulators resolve a host of regulatory issues. This book traces the decline of consensus in utility regulation and delineates current controversies. It presents the theory and practice of alternative dispute resolution in utility regulation and offers a framework for evaluating the successes and failures of attempts to employ these processes. Four regulatory cases are analyzed in detail: the Pilgrim nuclear power plant outage settlement, the use of DSM collaboratives, the New Jersey resource bidding policy and the formation of integrated resource management rules in Massachusetts

  13. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen;

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient...... paroxysmal events can be challenging. Criteria that can be used to make this differentiation are presented in detail and discussed. Criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy (IE) are described in a three-tier system. Tier I confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on a history of two or more...... diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and unremarkable fasting and post-prandial bile acids, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain (based on an epilepsy-specific brain MRI protocol) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Tier III confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based...

  14. Consensus Decision for Protein Structure Classification

    Khaddouja Boujenfa; Mohamed Limam

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental aim of protein classification is to recognize the family of a given protein and determine its biological function. In the literature, the most common approaches are based on sequence or structure similarity comparisons. Other methods use evolutionary distances between proteins. In order to increase classification performance, this work proposes a novel method, namely Consensus, which combines the decisions of several sequence and structure comparison tools to classify a given ...

  15. Asymptomatic carotid disease and cardiac surgery consensus

    Stansby, G.; MacDonald, S.; Allison, R; de Belder, M; Brown, MM; Dark, J; Featherstone, R; Flather, M; Ford, GA; Halliday, A.; Malik, I; R. Naylor; Pepper, J.; Rothwell, PM

    2011-01-01

    The Carotid Disease and Cardiac Surgery Consensus Meeting was convened as a multidisciplinary gathering to consider the management of patients undergoing cardiac surgery who are found to have asymptomatic carotid artery disease. There are no randomized trials concerning whether carotid interventions are of value in this situation and the natural history is unclear. Bilateral carotid artery disease (≥70% stenosis) should be regarded clinically relevant when considering hemodynamic and short-te...

  16. Asymptotic Consensus Without Self-Confidence

    Nowak, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies asymptotic consensus in systems in which agents do not necessarily have self-confidence, i.e., may disregard their own value during execution of the update rule. We show that the prevalent hypothesis of self-confidence in many convergence results can be replaced by the existence of aperiodic cores. These are stable aperiodic subgraphs, which allow to virtually store information about an agent's value distributedly in the network. Our results are applicable to systems with m...

  17. UK national consensus conference on radwaste management

    UK CEED organised a consensus conference to debate radwaste disposal. It lasted from 21-24 May 1999. Among the witnesses called to give evidence were UKAEA, BNFL, Nuclear Industries' Inspectorate, Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, Friends of the Earth and Greenpeace. The end result was a report produced by the panel of members of the public, recording their views and recommendations. Conclusions are presented. (author)

  18. Stochastic stability of continuous time consensus protocols

    Medvedev, Georgi S.

    2010-01-01

    A unified approach to studying convergence and stochastic stability of continuous time consensus protocols (CPs) is presented in this work. Our method applies to networks with directed information flow; both cooperative and noncooperative interactions; networks under weak stochastic forcing; and those whose topology and strength of connections may vary in time. The graph theoretic interpretation of the analytical results is emphasized. We show how the spectral properties, such as algebraic co...

  19. On Conditions for Convergence to Consensus

    Lorenz, Jan; Lorenz, Dirk A.

    2008-01-01

    A new theorem on conditions for convergence to consensus of a multiagent time-dependent time-discrete dynamical system is presented. The theorem is build up on the notion of averaging maps. We compare this theorem to results by Moreau (IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, vol. 50, no. 2, 2005) about set-valued Lyapunov theory and convergence under switching communication topologies. We give examples that point out differences of approaches including examples where Moreau's theorem is not a...

  20. Sarcopenia: European consensus on definition and diagnosis

    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Baeyens, Jean Pierre; Bauer, Jürgen M.; Boirie, Yves,; Cederholm, Tommy; Landi, Francesco; Martin, Finbarr C.; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Rolland, Yves; Schneider, Stéphane M.; Topinková, Eva; Vandewoude, Maurits; Zamboni, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    The European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) developed a practical clinical definition and consensus diagnostic criteria for age-related sarcopenia. EWGSOP included representatives from four participant organisations, i.e. the European Geriatric Medicine Society, the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics—European Region and the International Association of Nutrition and Aging. These organisation...

  1. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S.; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Mi...

  2. A Self-Categorization Explanation for Opinion Consensus Perceptions

    Zhang, Jinguang; Reid, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The public expression of opinions (and related communicative activities) hinges upon the perception of opinion consensus. Current explanations for opinion consensus perceptions typically focus on egocentric and other biases, rather than functional cognitions. Using self-categorization theory we showed that opinion consensus perceptions flow from…

  3. Modeling Consensus Semantics in Social Tagging Systems

    Bin Zhang; Yin Zhang; Ke-Ning Gao

    2011-01-01

    In social tagging systems,people can annotate arbitrary tags to online data to categorize and index them.However,the lack of the "a priori" set of words makes it difficult for people to reach consensus about the semantics of tags and how to categorize data.Ontologies based approaches can help reaching such consensus,but they are still facing problems such as inability of model ambiguous and new concepts properly.For tags that are used very few times,since they can only be used in very specific contexts,their semantics are very clear and detailed.Although people have no consensus on these tags,it is still possible to leverage these detailed semantics to model the other tags.In this paper we introduce a random walk and spreading activation like model to represent the semantics of tags using semantics of unpopular tags.By comparing the proposed model to the classic Latent Semantic Analysis approach in a concept clustering task,we show that the proposed model can properly capture the semantics of tags.

  4. Convergence Speed of Binary Interval Consensus

    Draief, Moez

    2012-01-01

    We consider the convergence time for solving the binary consensus problem using the interval consensus algorithm proposed by B\\' en\\' ezit, Thiran and Vetterli (2009). In the binary consensus problem, each node initially holds one of two states and the goal for each node is to correctly decide which one of these two states was initially held by a majority of nodes. We derive an upper bound on the expected convergence time that holds for arbitrary connected graphs, which is based on the location of eigenvalues of some contact rate matrices. We instantiate our bound for particular networks of interest, including complete graphs, paths, cycles, star-shaped networks, and Erd\\" os-R\\' enyi random graphs; for these graphs, we compare our bound with alternative computations. We find that for all these examples our bound is tight, yielding the exact order with respect to the number of nodes. We pinpoint the fact that the expected convergence time critically depends on the voting margin defined as the difference betwe...

  5. Validation criteria of an internal dosimetry laboratory in vivo

    People working with radioactive materials, under certain circumstances (e.g. not using the proper protective equipment, an incident not covered, etc.) could be incorporated into the body. The radiation protection programs include direct measurement methods -in vivo- or indirect -in vitro- or both, to know that radioactive material is incorporated into the body. The monitoring measurements of internal contamination or (Radio-bioassay) are carried out with the purpose of determining the amount of radioactive material incorporated in the body; estimate the effective dose and committed dose; management administration of radiation protection; appropriate medical management; and to provide the data necessary for the legal requirements and the preservation of records. The measurement methods used in the monitoring of internal contamination must be validated by the combination of the following processes: calibration, using standards reference materials and/or simulators; execute systematic research, using control samples; and intercomparison between laboratories and performance tests. In this paper the validation criteria of an internal dosimetry laboratory in vivo are presented following the information provided by the standard ANSI N13-30-1996 and ISO/TEC 17025-2005 as are the criteria of facilities, staff training, interpretation of measurements, performance criteria for monitoring of internal contamination in vivo, results reporting and records retention. Thereby we achieve standardized quantitative performance criteria of truthfulness, accuracy and detection limit and a consensus on statistical definitions to establish the validation plan of a monitoring laboratory of internal contamination in vivo. (Author)

  6. Uncertainty in 3D gel dosimetry

    De Deene, Yves; Jirasek, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) gel dosimetry has a unique role to play in safeguarding conformal radiotherapy treatments as the technique can cover the full treatment chain and provides the radiation oncologist with the integrated dose distribution in 3D. It can also be applied to benchmark new treatment strategies such as image guided and tracking radiotherapy techniques. A major obstacle that has hindered the wider dissemination of gel dosimetry in radiotherapy centres is a lack of confidence in the reliability of the measured dose distribution. Uncertainties in 3D dosimeters are attributed to both dosimeter properties and scanning performance. In polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout, discrepancies in dose response of large polymer gel dosimeters versus small calibration phantoms have been reported which can lead to significant inaccuracies in the dose maps. The sources of error in polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout are well understood and it has been demonstrated that with a carefully designed scanning protocol, the overall uncertainty in absolute dose that can currently be obtained falls within 5% on an individual voxel basis, for a minimum voxel size of 5 mm3. However, several research groups have chosen to use polymer gel dosimetry in a relative manner by normalizing the dose distribution towards an internal reference dose within the gel dosimeter phantom. 3D dosimetry with optical scanning has also been mostly applied in a relative way, although in principle absolute calibration is possible. As the optical absorption in 3D dosimeters is less dependent on temperature it can be expected that the achievable accuracy is higher with optical CT. The precision in optical scanning of 3D dosimeters depends to a large extend on the performance of the detector. 3D dosimetry with X-ray CT readout is a low contrast imaging modality for polymer gel dosimetry. Sources of error in x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry (XCT) are currently under investigation and include inherent

  7. Cobalt-60 total body irradiation dosimetry at 220 cm source-axis distance

    Adults with acute leukemia are treated with cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI) followed by autologous marrow transplants. For TBI, patients seated in a stand angled 450 above the floor are treated for about 2 hours at 220 cm source-axis distance (SAD) with sequential right and left lateral 87 cm x 87 cm fields to a 900 rad mid-pelvic dose at about 8 rad/min using a 5000 Ci cobalt unit. Maximum (lateral) to minimum (mid-plane) dose ratios are: hips--1.15, shoulders--1.30, and head--1.05, which is shielded by a compensator filter. Organ doses are small intestine, liver and kidneys--1100 rad, lung--1100 to 1200 rad, and heart--1300 rad. Verification dosimetry reveals the prescribed dose is delivered to within +-5%. Details of the dosimetry of this treatment are presented

  8. Recommendations for the management of biofilm: a consensus document.

    Bianchi, T; Wolcott, R D; Peghetti, A; Leaper, D; Cutting, K; Polignano, R; Rosa Rita, Z; Moscatelli, A; Greco, A; Romanelli, M; Pancani, S; Bellingeri, A; Ruggeri, V; Postacchini, L; Tedesco, S; Manfredi, L; Camerlingo, Maria; Rowan, S; Gabrielli, A; Pomponio, G

    2016-06-01

    The potential impact of biofilm on healing in acute and chronic wounds is one of the most controversial current issues in wound care. A significant amount of laboratory-based research has been carried out on this topic, however, in 2013 the European Wound Management Association (EWMA) pointed out the lack of guidance for managing biofilms in clinical practice and solicited the need for guidelines and further clinical research. In response to this challenge, the Italian Nursing Wound Healing Society (AISLeC) initiated a project which aimed to achieve consensus among a multidisciplinary and multiprofessional international panel of experts to identify what could be considered part of 'good clinical practice' with respect to the recognition and management of biofilms in acute and chronic wounds. The group followed a systematic approach, developed by the GRADE working group, to define relevant questions and clinical recommendations raised in clinical practice. An independent librarian retrieved and screened approximately 2000 pertinent published papers to produce tables of levels of evidence. After a smaller focus group had a multistep structured discussion, and a formal voting process had been completed, ten therapeutic interventions were identified as being strongly recommendable for clinical practice, while another four recommendations were graded as being 'weak'. The panel subsequently formulated a preliminary statement (although with a weak grade of agreement): 'provided that other causes that prevent optimal wound healing have been ruled out, chronic wounds are chronically infected'. All members of the panel agreed that there is a paucity of reliable, well-conducted clinical trials which have produced clear evidence related to the effects of biofilm presence. In the meantime it was agreed that expert-based guidelines were needed to be developed for the recognition and management of biofilms in wounds and for the best design of future clinical trials. This is a

  9. In aqua vivo EPID dosimetry

    Purpose: At the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in vivo dosimetry using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been implemented for almost all high-energy photon treatments of cancer with curative intent. Lung cancer treatments were initially excluded, because the original back-projection dose-reconstruction algorithm uses water-based scatter-correction kernels and therefore does not account for tissue inhomogeneities accurately. The aim of this study was to test a new method, in aqua vivo EPID dosimetry, for fast dose verification of lung cancer irradiations during actual patient treatment. Methods: The key feature of our method is the dose reconstruction in the patient from EPID images, obtained during the actual treatment, whereby the images have been converted to a situation as if the patient consisted entirely of water; hence, the method is termed in aqua vivo. This is done by multiplying the measured in vivo EPID image with the ratio of two digitally reconstructed transmission images for the unit-density and inhomogeneous tissue situation. For dose verification, a comparison is made with the calculated dose distribution with the inhomogeneity correction switched off. IMRT treatment verification is performed for each beam in 2D using a 2D γ evaluation, while for the verification of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments in 3D a 3D γ evaluation is applied using the same parameters (3%, 3 mm). The method was tested using two inhomogeneous phantoms simulating a tumor in lung and measuring its sensitivity for patient positioning errors. Subsequently five IMRT and five VMAT clinical lung cancer treatments were investigated, using both the conventional back-projection algorithm and the in aqua vivo method. The verification results of the in aqua vivo method were statistically analyzed for 751 lung cancer patients treated with IMRT and 50 lung cancer patients treated with VMAT. Results: The improvements by applying

  10. In aqua vivo EPID dosimetry

    Wendling, Markus; McDermott, Leah N.; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Pecharroman-Gallego, Raul; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Stroom, Joep; Herk, Marcel J.; Mijnheer, Ben van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: At the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in vivo dosimetry using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been implemented for almost all high-energy photon treatments of cancer with curative intent. Lung cancer treatments were initially excluded, because the original back-projection dose-reconstruction algorithm uses water-based scatter-correction kernels and therefore does not account for tissue inhomogeneities accurately. The aim of this study was to test a new method, in aqua vivo EPID dosimetry, for fast dose verification of lung cancer irradiations during actual patient treatment. Methods: The key feature of our method is the dose reconstruction in the patient from EPID images, obtained during the actual treatment, whereby the images have been converted to a situation as if the patient consisted entirely of water; hence, the method is termed in aqua vivo. This is done by multiplying the measured in vivo EPID image with the ratio of two digitally reconstructed transmission images for the unit-density and inhomogeneous tissue situation. For dose verification, a comparison is made with the calculated dose distribution with the inhomogeneity correction switched off. IMRT treatment verification is performed for each beam in 2D using a 2D {gamma} evaluation, while for the verification of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments in 3D a 3D {gamma} evaluation is applied using the same parameters (3%, 3 mm). The method was tested using two inhomogeneous phantoms simulating a tumor in lung and measuring its sensitivity for patient positioning errors. Subsequently five IMRT and five VMAT clinical lung cancer treatments were investigated, using both the conventional back-projection algorithm and the in aqua vivo method. The verification results of the in aqua vivo method were statistically analyzed for 751 lung cancer patients treated with IMRT and 50 lung cancer patients treated with VMAT. Results: The improvements by

  11. Imaging based, patient specific dosimetry

    Full text: The prognosis of achieving longtime remission for disseminated cancer disease is in many cases poor. A systemic treatment is required and therefore external beam radiation therapy is less suited. Treatment with radiolabeled pharmaceuticals, so called radionuclide therapy is such a systemic treatment. In radionuclide therapy, the absorbed dose is delivered by administration of radionuclides that emit electrons or alpha particles. It is here assumed that the released kinetic energy is transferred by interactions to sensitive parts of the cells activating cell death, and thus an accurate dosimetry is important. However, absorbed dose planning for radionuclide therapy is a real challenge in that the source cannot be turned on or off (as in external beam therapy) but decays exponentially with characteristics depending on the biokinetics and the radionuclide half-life. On a small-scale, the radiopharmaceutical is also heterogeneously distributed which means that the energy deposition is generally nonuniform. The biokinetics may also change over time which means that activity measurements need to be made at several time points to estimate the total amount of released energy in an organ or tumour. Practical issues regarding the number of measurements and patient mobility may therefore limit the accuracy in this calculation. The dose-rate for radionuclide therapy is also much lower than in external beam therapy. Since the treatment is systemic, circulating activity may result in absorbed doses to normal organs and tissues. Often this poses a problem and puts a limit on the amount of activity to can be administered. This is one of the major reasons for the requirement of an accurate patient-specific dosimetry. One of the major problems is that the biokinetics varies between patients and the activity uptake and clearance should therefore be measured for each individual patient in order to estimate the total number of decays in a particular organ/tissue. The way

  12. Cellular dosimetry in nuclear medicine imaging: training

    The radionuclides used in nuclear medicine imaging emit not only diagnostically useful photons, but also energy electron emissions, responsible for dose heterogeneity at the cellular level. The mean dose delivered to the cell nucleus by electron emissions of 99mTc, 123I, 111In, 67Ga, and 201Tl, has been calculated, for the cell nucleus, a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distribution of radioactivity. This model takes into account both the self-dose which results from the radionuclide located in the target cell, and the cross-dose, which comes from the surrounding cells. The results obtained by cellular dosimetry (Dcel) have been compared with those obtained with conventional dosimetry (Dconv), by assuming the same amount of radioactivity per cell. Cellular dosimetry shows, for a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distributions of radioactivity, that the main contribution to the dose to the cell nucleus, comes from the surrounding cells. On the other hand, for a cell nucleus distribution of radioactivity, the self-dose is not negligible and may be the main contribution. The comparison between cellular and conventional dosimetry shows that Dcel/Dconv ratio ranges from 0.61 and O.89, in case of a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distributions of radioactivity, depending on the radionuclide and cell dimensions. Thus, conventional dosimetry slightly overestimates the mean dose to the cell nucleus. On the other hand, Dcel/Dconv ranges from 1.1 to 75, in case of a cell nucleus distribution of radioactivity. Conventional dosimetry may strongly underestimates the absorbed dose to the nucleus, when radioactivity is located in the nucleus. The study indicates that in nuclear medicine imaging, cellular dosimetry may lead to a better understanding of biological effects of radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  13. Dosimetry and operation of irradiation facilities

    The industrial use of ionizing radiation has required, from the very first, the measurement of delivered and absorbed doses; hence the necessity of providing dosimetric systems. Laboratories, scientists, industries and potential equipment manufacturers have all collaborated in this new field of activity. Dosimetric intercomparisons have been made by each industry at their own facilities and in collaboration with specialists, national organizations and the IAEA. Dosimetry has become a way of ensuring that treatment by irradiation has been carried out in accordance with the rules. It has become in effect assurance of quality. Routine dosimetry should determine a maximum and minimum dose. Numerous factors play a part in dosimetry. Industry is currently in possession of routine dosimetric systems that are sufficiently accurate, fairly easy to handle and reasonable in cost, thereby satisfying all the requirements of industry and the need for control. Dosimetry is important in the process of marketing irradiated products. The operator of an industrial irradiation facility bases his dosimetry on comparison with reference systems. Research aimed at simplifying the practice of routine dosimetry should be continued. New physical and chemical techniques will be incorporated into systems already in use. The introduction of microcomputers into the operation of radiation facilities has increased the value of dosimetry and made the conditions of treatment more widespread. Stress should be placed on research in several areas apart from reference systems, for example: dosimetric systems at temperatures from +8 deg. C to -45 deg. C, over the dose range 100 krad to a little more than 1 Mrad, liquids and fluidized solids carried at high speed through ducts, thin-film liquids circulating at a high flow rate, and various other problems. (author)

  14. International consensus on ANA patterns (ICAP): the bumpy road towards a consensus on reporting ANA results.

    Damoiseaux, Jan; von Mühlen, Carlos A; Garcia-De La Torre, Ignacio; Carballo, Orlando Gabriel; de Melo Cruvinel, Wilson; Francescantonio, Paulo Luiz Carvalho; Fritzler, Marvin J; Herold, Manfred; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Satoh, Minoru; Andrade, Luis E C; Chan, Edward K L; Conrad, Karsten

    2016-12-01

    The International Consensus on ANA Patterns (ICAP) was initiated as a workshop aiming to thoroughly discuss and achieve consensus regarding the morphological patterns observed in the indirect immunofluorescence assay on HEp-2 cells. One of the topics discussed at the second ICAP workshop, and addressed in this paper, was the harmonization of reporting ANA test results. This discussion centered on the issue if cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns should be reported as positive or negative. This report outlines the issues that impact on two major different reporting methods. Although it was appreciated by all participants that cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns are clinically relevant, implications for existing diagnostic/classification criteria for ANA-associated diseases in particular hampered a final consensus on this topic. Evidently, a more concerted action of all relevant stakeholders is required. Future ICAP workshops may help to facilitate this action. PMID:26831867

  15. Breast dosimetry in clinical mammography

    Benevides, Luis Alberto Do Rego

    The objective of this study was show that a clinical dosimetry protocol that utilizes a dosimetric breast phantom series based on population anthropometric measurements can reliably predict the average glandular dose (AGD) imparted to the patient during a routine screening mammogram. In the study, AGD was calculated using entrance skin exposure and dose conversion factors based on fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness, mammography unit parameters and modifying parameters for homogeneous phantom (phantom factor), compressed breast lateral dimensions (volume factor) and anatomical features (anatomical factor). The protocol proposes the use of a fiber-optic coupled (FOCD) or Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter to measure the entrance skin exposure at the time of the mammogram without interfering with diagnostic information of the mammogram. The study showed that FOCD had sensitivity with less than 7% energy dependence, linear in all tube current-time product stations, and was reproducible within 2%. FOCD was superior to MOSFET dosimeter in sensitivity, reusability, and reproducibility. The patient fibroglandular content was evaluated using a calibrated modified breast tissue equivalent homogeneous phantom series (BRTES-MOD) designed from anthropomorphic measurements of a screening mammography population and whose elemental composition was referenced to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 44 tissues. The patient fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness along with unit parameters and spectrum half-value layer were used to derive the currently used dose conversion factor (DgN). The study showed that the use of a homogeneous phantom, patient compressed breast lateral dimensions and patient anatomical features can affect AGD by as much as 12%, 3% and 1%, respectively. The protocol was found to be superior to existing methodologies. In addition, the study population anthropometric

  16. The Hanford Emergency Dosimetry System

    The Hanford project is a major atomic industrial complex, including nuclear reactors, fuel fabrication plants, chemical separation facilities and research laboratories. In addition to a surveillance and control programme for personnel radiation exposures, an emergency dosimetry system has been developed to provide rapid assessment of high dose rates, identification and control of employees, staff notifications and formation of staff emergency control centres, assessment of external exposure doses, evaluation of body burdens of radioactive materials, detection and control of radioactive environmental contamination and rapid exposure estimates for guidance of rescue and medical personnel. Primary reliance is placed upon the Hanford Film Badge Dosimeter, worn by all persons within controlled areas. The badge provides positive identification of the wearer and the film can be evaluated within 90 min. Separately, yet simultaneously, the remaining components of the badge can be processed for determinations of the neutron spectrum and dose in five energy groups, as well as provide an early estimate of the single collision neutron dose from a few to several thousand rads. Gamma-ray detection ranges from 20 mr to 1500 r from the film components to 10 to 10 000 r from tantalum shielded fluorods. The emergency system includes programmes that ensure employee understanding, monitor training and management co-operation for fast identification, control and segregation of affected employees. Monitoring personnel, using portable instrumentation, obtain on-site in vivo measurements of Na24 or measurements of activated indium foil in the film-badge dosimeter for preliminary dose estimates. The staff notification and operation of emergency control centres provide technical guidance and mobile supportive equipment including a mobile whole-body counter. Back-up laboratory facilities give supportive dosimetry through the analysis of blood for Na24 activation, P32 hair content

  17. The ARN critical dosimetry system

    The ARN critical dosimetry system is shown in this work. It includes personal and area dosemeters, and the information of typical spectra. The spectra of the critical facilities in our country are characterised by measurements with our Bonner Sphere System (BSS) or by computational methods in order to evaluate the dose in each case with the actual spectrum. The personal and area dosemeters are able to evaluate the gamma and neutron contributions. The detectors used are thermoluminescents, (TLD) 7Li:Mg,Ti for gamma and threshold detectors (Indium and sulphur pellets) and activation detectors Au (bare and Cd cover) for neutron. The Gamma-ray spectrometry is made with GeHp and MCA (Canberra) calibrated with 133Ba and 137Cs sources. The Beta-ray counting is made with a Geiger Muller (LND)(8%) with an electronic counter prototype developed in Argentina. The system is calibrated with the tioacetamida-technique carried out in our chemistry laboratory. The TLD are calibrated in Argentine SSDL with 60Co source, free in air. The calibration curve has been extended up to 10Gy. The neutron fluence distribution is obtained considering the thermal region as a Maxwellian distribution with a modal energy of 0.0253 eV and the intermediate region with a 1/E spectrum from 0.5 eV to E=200 keV. The basic data are the measured activities in the gold foils. The fast neutron fluence is calculated considering the mean cross section for the selected spectrum over the energy range. The basic data are the measured activities in indium foil and sulphur pellets with threshold energy of 1.7MeV and 2.5MeV respectively. The neutron kerma dose, the recoil charged particle dose and the contribution of the 1H(n, γ) 2H dose component, are calculated applying the dose conversion factors published in TRS211. The area dosemeter gives the gamma incident radiation kerma, and the personal dosemeter, the gamma total dose. This system has participated at the International Intercomparison of Criticality

  18. Treatment of Seborrhoeic Dermatitis in Asia: A Consensus Guide.

    Cheong, Wai Kwong; Yeung, Chi Keung; Torsekar, Raghunandan Govind; Suh, Dae Hun; Ungpakorn, Rataporn; Widaty, Sandra; Azizan, Noor Zalmy; Gabriel, Maria Teresita; Tran, Hau Khang; Chong, Wei Sheng; Shih, I-Hsin; Dall'Oglio, Federica; Micali, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Seborrhoeic dermatitis (SD) is common in Asia. Its prevalence is estimated to be 1-5% in adults. However, larger population-based studies into the epidemiology of SD in Asia are lacking, and the aetiology of SD may differ widely from Western countries and in different parts of Asia. In addition, clinically significant differences between Asian and Caucasian skin have been reported. There is a need to define standardized clinical diagnostic criteria and/or a grading system to help determine appropriate treatments for SD within Asia. With this in mind, experts from India, South Korea, Taiwan, Malaysia, Vietnam, Singapore, Thailand, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Italy convened to define the landscape of SD in Asia at a meeting held in Singapore. The consensus group developed a comprehensive algorithm to aid clinicians to recommend appropriate treatment of SD in both adults and children. In most cases, satisfactory therapeutic results can be accomplished with topical antifungal agents or topical corticosteroids. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents with antifungal properties have been shown to be a viable option for both acute and maintenance therapy. PMID:27386464

  19. SEVENTH DOE WORKSHOP ON PERSONNEL NEUTRON DOSIMETRY

    Vallario, E J

    1978-10-24

    This workshop was the seventh of a series and was held on October 23-24. 1978, at the Central Electricity Generating Board, HQ, London, England. Typically~ attendees at the Workshop were concerned with one of three activities: studying and refining existing techniques in an attempt to quantify already-known parameters with greater precision, looking for ways to apply existing neutron dosirr:etry techniques to a specific local problem, identifying the needs and weaknesses of existing systems, with the goal of improving and passibly simplifying field measurements. The types of neutron dosimetry techniques discussed by participants included albedo dosimeters, track etch, and TLD. One speaker reported on NTA film, noting that fading could be eliminated by drying the emulsion in dry nitrogen before field use. There were no reports on tissue equivalent proportional counters or activation analysis. One participant discussed a metal oxide silicon dosimeter. The need to develop a consistent standard terminology, as well as calibration sources and techniques, on both the national and international level was evident. The need for standardization is particularly acute in the U.S. Techniques for evaluating dosimeter response in the field should he standardized, since several different instruments with widely different response characteristics are currently being used. The choice of instruments is often parochial. Also. the type and use of phantoms should be standardized. Neutron dose assignment is significantly affected by the position of the dosimeter on the body. for example, a typical albedo dosimeter may give differences of up to 20% depending on whether it is worn on the belt or chest. Larger errors are encountered with front-to-back (angular} orientation. 1n an attempt to minimize such errors~ at least two European facilities are using neutron dosimeter belts, which provide dosimeters both in front and in back of the wearer. The gamma-to-neutron ratio around nuclear power

  20. New ICRP recommendations 2005: without full consensus?

    Ionising radiation is viewed as one of the most studied of all known carcinogens. Over the last 50 years Recommendations of International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been changed regularly every 10 years. At the beginning these changes were significant, sometimes even radical, according to quick acquiring of new scientific evidence on physical, biological and health effects of radiation. In order to handle each new situation evolution of the radiation protection system has been extended and new portions have been added (the ubiquitous exposure of public to radon gas and its progeny, and the need to develop an appropriate response to emergency situations, increasing social desire to participate in decision making processes, concern for the protection of non-human species and environment), that resulted in a system that is increasingly complicated. Over the last few years very broad discussions of major radiation protection concepts have been encouraged by the ICRP in order to achieve consensus on a more operational and coherent system of radiation protection elaborated in a transparent fashion, and presented in readily understandable terms. This process for the first time involves a broad spectrum of stake holders in these discussions. It is further assumed that these debates will eventually result in consensus on the basis for the next round of ICRP general recommendations, probably in the 2005. While now it is certain that the consensus is not yet reached within the international community and the discussion of these issues will continue for some time the new recommendations should be seen as a consolidation of recommendations from 1990 to give a single unified set that can be simply and coherently expressed. The paper presents essential issues of the outcome of the Commission discussions and improvement of the current system of radiation protection.(author)

  1. Personnel neutron dosimetry at Department of Energy facilities

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Endres, G.W.R.; Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.

    1980-08-01

    This study assesses the state of personnel neutron dosimetry at DOE facilities. A survey of the personnel dosimetry systems in use at major DOE facilities was conducted, a literature search was made to determine recent advances in neutron dosimetry, and several dosimetry experts were interviewed. It was concluded that personnel neutron dosimeters do not meet current needs and that serious problems exist now and will increase in the future if neutron quality factors are increased and/or dose limits are lowered.

  2. Dosimetry at a 400 keV accelerator

    Miller, A.

    1992-01-01

    Absolute calorimetric dosimetry and relative dose mapping methods are described for a 400 keV electron accelerator used for polymer curing and crosslinking experiments. These methods of dosimetry are also useful at accelerators used in gas cleaning processes.......Absolute calorimetric dosimetry and relative dose mapping methods are described for a 400 keV electron accelerator used for polymer curing and crosslinking experiments. These methods of dosimetry are also useful at accelerators used in gas cleaning processes....

  3. Experimental verification of internal dosimetry calculations. Annual progress report

    During the past year a dosimetry research program has been established in the School of Nuclear Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The major objective of this program has been to provide research results upon which a useful internal dosimetry system could be based. The important application of this dosimetry system will be the experimental verification of internal dosimetry calculations such as those published by the MIRD Committee

  4. Personnel neutron dosimetry at Department of Energy facilities

    This study assesses the state of personnel neutron dosimetry at DOE facilities. A survey of the personnel dosimetry systems in use at major DOE facilities was conducted, a literature search was made to determine recent advances in neutron dosimetry, and several dosimetry experts were interviewed. It was concluded that personnel neutron dosimeters do not meet current needs and that serious problems exist now and will increase in the future if neutron quality factors are increased and/or dose limits are lowered

  5. Dosimetry intercomparisons in European medical device sterilization plants

    Miller, A.; Sharpe, P.H.G.

    2000-01-01

    Dosimetry intercomparisons have been carried out involving two-thirds of all European radiation sterilization facilities. Dosimeters for the intercomparisons were supplied by two accredited calibration laboratories. The results show good agreement, and indicate overall dosimetry accuracy of the o......Dosimetry intercomparisons have been carried out involving two-thirds of all European radiation sterilization facilities. Dosimeters for the intercomparisons were supplied by two accredited calibration laboratories. The results show good agreement, and indicate overall dosimetry accuracy...

  6. Technical Basis Document for PFP Area Monitoring Dosimetry Program

    Cooper, J R

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the phantom dosimetry used for the PFP Area Monitoring program and establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) area monitoring dosimetry program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 835, ''Occupational Radiation Protection'' Part 835.403; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1), Part 514; HNF-PRO-382, Area Dosimetry Program; and PNL-MA-842, Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual.

  7. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias.

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya; Yoneda, Makoto; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto's encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Miller Fisher syndrome, ataxia associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Humoral mechanisms, cell-mediated immunity, inflammation, and vascular injuries contribute to the cerebellar deficits in immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias. PMID:25823827

  8. Consensus document on European brain research

    Di Luca, Monica; Baker, Mary; Corradetti, Renato;

    2011-01-01

    the economic and social challenge posed by management of brain diseases in European countries. To setup a platform for discussion, EBC published in 2006 a Consensus Document on European Brain Research, describing needs and achievements of research in Europe and presenting proposals for future research...... programs. Since 2006, European research in neuroscience has advanced tremendously. The present document represents an update elaborated to reflect changes in research priorities and advances in brain research that have taken place since 2006. The same approach and format have been used here as in the...

  9. Energy consensus talks collapse over nuclear issues

    1993-12-01

    Germany's energy consensus talks, ongoing since March 1993, were brought to unsuccessful end on October 26. Representatives from the Social Democratic Party (SDP), led by Lower Saxony's prime minister, Gerhard Schroeder, failed to get approval from party leaders on continued development of advanced reactors with enhanced safety - notably the Siemens/Framatome-designed 1500-MWe European pressurized water reactor (EPR) plan, for which the prospective schedule envisages a construction start in 1998. Nor would the SDP leadership accept the continued operation of existing nuclear plans to the end of their design life (some 20 to 25 years).

  10. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    Potschka, Heidrun; Fischer, Andrea; Löscher, Wolfgang;

    2015-01-01

    Common criteria for the diagnosis of drug resistance and the assessment of outcome are needed urgently as a prerequisite for standardized evaluation and reporting of individual therapeutic responses in canine epilepsy. Thus, we provide a proposal for the definition of drug resistance and partial...... therapeutic success in canine patients with epilepsy. This consensus statement also suggests a list of factors and aspects of outcome, which should be considered in addition to the impact on seizures. Moreover, these expert recommendations discuss criteria which determine the validity and informative value of...

  11. Consensus Formation on Simplicial Complex of Opinions

    Maletic, Slobodan

    2012-01-01

    Geometric realization of opinion is considered as a simplex and the opinion space of a group of individuals is a simplicial complex whose topological features are monitored in the process of opinion formation. The agents are physically located on the nodes of the scale-free network. Social interactions include all concepts of social dynamics present in the mainstream models augmented by four additional interaction mechanisms which depend on the local properties of opinions and their overlapping properties. The results pertaining to the formation of consensus are of particular interest. An analogy with quantum mechanical pure states is established through the application of the high dimensional combinatorial Laplacian.

  12. Wireless sensor networks distributed consensus estimation

    Chen, Cailian; Guan, Xinping

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief evaluates the cooperative effort of sensor nodes to accomplish high-level tasks with sensing, data processing and communication. The metrics of network-wide convergence, unbiasedness, consistency and optimality are discussed through network topology, distributed estimation algorithms and consensus strategy. Systematic analysis reveals that proper deployment of sensor nodes and a small number of low-cost relays (without sensing function) can speed up the information fusion and thus improve the estimation capability of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). This brief also investiga

  13. Energy consensus talks collapse over nuclear issues

    Germany's energy consensus talks, ongoing since March 1993, were brought to unsuccessful end on October 26. Representatives from the Social Democratic Party (SDP), led by Lower Saxony's prime minister, Gerhard Schroeder, failed to get approval from party leaders on continued development of advanced reactors with enhanced safety - notably the Siemens/Framatome-designed 1500-MWe European pressurized water reactor (EPR) plan, for which the prospective schedule envisages a construction start in 1998. Nor would the SDP leadership accept the continued operation of existing nuclear plans to the end of their design life (some 20 to 25 years)

  14. Oesophageal dosimetry during cardial catheterisation

    The purpose of this two-fold study has been the measurement of absorbed dose to patients during cardiac catheterization. Radiothermoluminescence (RTL), the method of choice for dosimetry in vivo, has been used extensively in this work. The first part of the study involved 49 unselected patients. A ratio (the equivalent fluoroscopic time) was established between the duration of fluoroscopy and the length of film exposed; this simplified the calculation of patient-dose. The dose absorbed in a central region of the mediastinum was designated the heart dose and was calculated by means of a formula in which the variables were fluoroscopic time and length of film. It was shown that the dose absorbed was unrelated to the thoracic thickness of the patients examined. The second part of the study was confined to 15 selected patients; infants and young children could not be included because of the requirement to insert an oesophageal catheter. The catheter was made of flexible polyethylene with a lithium fluoride tip enabling measurement of the dose within the oesophagus. Employing this technique, we were able to confirm the accuracy of our earlier study by comparing the measured oesophageal dose with the estimated heart dose

  15. Semiconductor Compounds For Occupational Dosimetry

    One of the main objectives of radiation dosimetry is developing suitable sensitive materials for measurements in different radiation fields and applying it in practical situations. Semiconductors vary in their radiation response according to the nature of the material used and the impurities added to them. Our exploration of potentially suitable high gamma radiation dosimeters which can be used inside restricted areas, led us to a series of materials giving thermoluminescent emission upon giving exposure to gamma radiation in the range of 0.5-1.5 Mrad (0.5x104-1.5x104 gray). The experimental work has been carried out in part at the National Center for Radiation Research and Technology at the Atomic Energy Authority using industrial 60Co gamma ray unit giving a dose rate of 136 Gy/min. The results indicated that some of the tested materials have been shown to exhibit thermoluminescence linearly with dose. Hence it is suggested that these materials can act as radiation dosimeters for high exposures of occupational workers and for workplaces

  16. Sixth personnel dosimetry intercomparison study

    The Sixth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted March 25 to 27, 1980, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dosimeters from 28 participating agencies were mounted on anthropomorphic phantoms and exposed to a range of low-level dose equivalents (1.8 to 11.5 mSv neutron, 0.1 to 1.1 mSv gamma) which could be encountered during routine personnel monitoring in mixed radiation fields. The Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) operated in the steady-state mode served as the source of radiation for six separate exposures. Lucite and concrete shields along with the unshielded reactor were used to provide three different neutron and gamma spectra. Results reported by the participating agencies showed that TLD-albedo and TLD-700 dosimeters generally provided the most accurate measurements of neutron and gamma dose equivalents, respectively. Film was found to be unsatisfactory for measuring neutron doses produced by HPRR spectra in that measured dose equivalents were much lower than reference values. The TLD-100 dosimeters yielded gamma doses which were much too high indicating that this dosimeter type is generally unsuitable for use in mixed radiation fields similar to those encountered in this study without the use of large correction factors. Although the overall reported results exhibited improvement in performance relative to previous intercomparison studies, the composite measured data showed variations of more than a factor of 2 between measurements of the same exposure made by different agencies

  17. Radiosynoviorthesis. Clinical and preclinical dosimetry

    Accurate calculation of internal dose estimates in the Radiosynoviorthesis treatment requires several steps of analysis. The use of animal models (rabbits) to predict human kinetics and dosimetry is an essential first step in the evaluation of new radiocolloids, but involves many uncertainties. There is no gold standard method for extrapolating animal data to humans. Nonetheless, human dose estimates based on animal data are considered to be reasonable approximations to be used for proceeding with dose estimates based on human data, which are ultimately used to assess the safety and efficacy evaluations of radiopharmaceuticals, and continues to be an important element in the radiopharmaceutical approval process. The obtained absorbed dose profiles versus synovial tissue, bone and articular cartilage depth will permit the specialist to prescribe the adequate dose of radionuclide to treat rheumatoid arthritis in medium and large joints without expose the healthy structures of the synovial joint to an excessive and unnecessary irradiation risk, eliminating the fixed dose and fixed radionuclides for each joints (Author)

  18. EVA dosimetry in manned spacecraft

    Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) will become a large part of the astronaut's work on board the International Space Station (ISS). It is already well known that long duration space missions inside a spacecraft lead to radiation doses which are high enough to be a significant health risk to the crew. The doses received during EVA, however, have not been quantified to the same degree. This paper reviews the space radiation environment and the current dose limits to critical organs. Results of preliminary radiation dosimetry experiments on the external surface of the BION series of satellites indicate that EVA doses will vary considerably due to a number of factors such as EVA suit shielding, temporal fluctuations and spacecraft orbit and shielding. It is concluded that measurement of doses to crew members who engage in EVA should be done on board the spacecraft. An experiment is described which will lead the way to implementing this plan on the ISS. It is expected that results of this experiment will help future crew mitigate the risks of ionising radiation in space

  19. Dosimetry and Risk Assessment: Fundamental Concepts

    Radiation dosimetry is important for characterizing radiation exposures and for risk assessment. In a medical setting, dosimetry is important for evaluating the safety of administered radiopharmaceuticals and for planning the safe administration of therapeutic radionuclides. Environmental dosimetry helps establish the safety of radionuclide releases from electric power production and other human activities. Internal and external dosimetry help us understand the consequences of radiation exposure. The absorbed dose is the fundamental quantity in radiation dosimetry from which all other operational values in radiation protection are obtained. Equivalent dose to tissue and effective dose to the whole body are derivatives of absorbed dose and constructs of risk. Mathematical systems supported by computer software facilitate dose calculations and make it possible to estimate internal dose based on bioassay or other biokinetic data. Risk coefficients for radiation-induced cancer rely primarily on data from animal studies and long-term observations of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bomb survivors. Low-dose research shows that mechanisms of radiation interactions with tissue are dose-dependent, but the resulting biological effects are not necessarily linear with absorbed dose. Thus, the analysis of radiation effects and associated risks must account for the influences of microscopic energy distributions at the cellular level, dose-rate, cellular repair of sub-lethal radiation damage, and modifying factors such as bystander effects, adaptive response, and genomic instability.

  20. Dosimetry in radiation processing- Indian scenario

    Radiation processing is a method for producing chemical, physical, and microbiological changes in substances by exposing to ionizing radiation. Availability of high intensity cobalt-60 gamma ray sources and high power electron beam accelerators has led to a continuous growth of radiation processing industry in India. Commercial viability and safe operation of these radiation-processing plants depends on accurate dosimetry. Depending on the purpose to be achieved, a widespread dose range, from few grays to few hundred kilo grays, is encountered in radiation processing technology and this necessitates the use of different dosimetry systems. In the present paper, current status of radiation processing facilities in India has been reviewed. Various indigenously developed dosimetry systems such as Alanine/glutamine (Spectrophotometric readout), FBX and ceric-cerous (potentiometry) are being used for quality assurance and routine plant dosimetry. Fricke dosimeter is used as a reference standard for calibrating other dosimetry systems. Glutamine (Spectrophotometric read out) dosimeter, used as transfer standard for Q.A. has traceability to NPL, UK and has shown an agreement within ±2% during dose intercomparisons carried out with various international standards laboratories. Performance of these dosimeters was found to be better than ±10% during dose measurements in radiation sterilization and food irradiation plants. (author)

  1. Long term nuclear data needs for internal radiation dosimetry

    The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) is the principle source of nuclear data for internal radiation dosimetry and is, therefore, described briefly. Nuclear data needs and accuracy requirements for internal radiation dosimetry are summarized. Currently available sources of internal radiation dosimetry data are outlined and the need for traceability and documentation of these data is discussed. (author)

  2. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304... Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to... nuclear accident is possible, shall provide nuclear accident dosimetry for those individuals. (b)...

  3. Dosimetry methods for fuels, cladding and structural materials

    This volume of the proceedings of the symposium on reactor dosimetry covers the following topics: the metallurgy and dosimetry interface, radiation damage correlations of structural materials and damage analyses techniques, dosimetry for fusion materials, light water reactor pressure vessel surveillance in practice and irradiation experiments, fast reactor and reseach reactor characterization

  4. Development and implementation of own software for dosimetry multichannel film

    The objective of this work is to develop its own software for multichannel film dosimetry Radiochromic EBT2. Compare the results obtained with its use in multichannel and single-channel dosimetry. Check that the multi-channel dosimetry eliminates much of the artifacts caused by dirt, fingerprints, scratches, etc. Radiochromic in film and scanner devices. (Author)

  5. Updating the INDAC computer application of internal dosimetry

    The initial objective of this project is to expand the application INDAC currently used in internal dosimetry services of the Spanish nuclear power plants and Tecnatom for estimating the effective doses of internal dosimetry of workers in direct action. or in-vivo dosimetry. (Author)

  6. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    ... Acute Pancreatitis > Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  7. Meeting Proceedings: Recommendations for Improved Acute Pain Services: Canadian Collaborative Acute Pain Initiative

    David H Goldstein

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Collaborative Acute Pain Initiative, established in 2002, is a voluntary, multidisciplinary consortium of acute pain health professionals from across Canada whose goal is to improve acute pain management through discussion and consensus. The group met in January 2002 to define strategic areas related to the treatment of acute pain. The areas identified were: the definition of pain; the epidemiology of pain; the concept of an 'ideal' acute pain management service; education; therapeutic options; symptom management; and research and safety. In November 2002, a second meeting was held to develop objectives and recommendations for the management of acute pain based on the defined areas. The outcome of these discussions is summarized in this paper.

  8. Bayesian Methods for Radiation Detection and Dosimetry

    Groer, Peter G

    2002-01-01

    We performed work in three areas: radiation detection, external and internal radiation dosimetry. In radiation detection we developed Bayesian techniques to estimate the net activity of high and low activity radioactive samples. These techniques have the advantage that the remaining uncertainty about the net activity is described by probability densities. Graphs of the densities show the uncertainty in pictorial form. Figure 1 below demonstrates this point. We applied stochastic processes for a method to obtain Bayesian estimates of 222Rn-daughter products from observed counting rates. In external radiation dosimetry we studied and developed Bayesian methods to estimate radiation doses to an individual with radiation induced chromosome aberrations. We analyzed chromosome aberrations after exposure to gammas and neutrons and developed a method for dose-estimation after criticality accidents. The research in internal radiation dosimetry focused on parameter estimation for compartmental models from observed comp...

  9. Instrumentation for the individual dosimetry of workers

    Thévenin, J C

    2003-01-01

    The control of the radiation dose exposure of workers and personnel exposed to ionizing radiations (nuclear industry, nuclear medicine, army, university laboratories etc..) is ensured by individual dosemeters. This dosimetry is mandatory for all workers susceptible to be exposed to more than 30% of the regulatory dose limit. dosemeters are worn on the chest and in some particular cases, on the finger (dosemeter rings) or on the wrist. Passive dosemeters allow to measure the dose a posteriori, while electronic dosemeters allow a direct reading and recording of the dose. This article presents successively: 1 - the general principles of individual dosimetry: situations of exposure, radiation detection, operational data, standardization, calibration and quality assurance, measurement uncertainties; 2 - goals and regulatory framework of individual dosimetry: regulation and recommendations, optimization, respect of dose limits, accidental situations; 3 - passive dosemeters: film, thermoluminescent, radio-photolumin...

  10. Performance testing of UK personal dosimetry laboratories

    Marshall, T O

    1985-01-01

    The proposed Ionising Radiations Regulations will require all UK personal dosimetry laboratories that monitor classified personnel to be approved for personal dosimetry by the Health and Safety Executive. It is suggested that these approvals should be based on general and supplementary criteria published by the British Calibration Service (BCS) for laboratory approval for the provision of personal dosimetry services. These criteria specify certain qualitative requirements and also indicate the need for regular tests of performance to be carried out to ensure constancy of dosimetric standards. This report concerns the latter. The status of the BCS criteria is discussed and the need for additional documents to cover new techniques and some modifications to existing documents is indicated. A means is described by which the technical performance of laboratories, concerned with personal monitoring for external radiations, can be assessed, both initially and ongoing. The costs to establish the scheme and operate it...

  11. Dosimetry procedures for an industrial irradiation plant

    Grahn, Ch.

    Accurate and reliable dosimetry procedures constitute a very important part of process control and quality assurance at a radiation processing plant. γ-Dose measurements were made on the GBS 84 irradiator for food and other products on pallets or in containers. Chemical dosimeters wre exposed in the facility under conditions of the typical plant operation. The choice of the dosimeter systems employed was based on the experience in chemical dosimetry gained over several years. Dose uniformity information was obtained in air, spices, bulbs, feeds, cosmetics, plastics and surgical goods. Most products currently irradiated require dose uniformity which can be efficiently provided by pallet or box irradiators like GBS 84. The radiation performance characteristics and some dosimetry procedures are discussed.

  12. Radiation dosimetry activities in the Netherlands

    The Netherlands Commission for Radiation Dosimetry (NCS) was officially established on 3 September 1982 with the aim of promoting the appropriate use of dosimetry of ionizing radiation both for scientific research and practical applications. The present report provides a compilation of the dosimetry acitivities and expertise available in the Netherlands, based on the replies to a questionnaire mailed under the auspices of the NCS and might suffer from some incompleteness in specific details. The addresses of the Dutch groups with the names of the scientists are given. Individual scientists, not connected with a scientific group, hospital or organization have not been included in this list. Also the names of commercial firms producing dosimetric systems have been omitted. (Auth.)

  13. Model selection for radiochromic film dosimetry

    Méndez, Ignasi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find the most accurate model for radiochromic film dosimetry by comparing different channel independent perturbation models. A model selection approach based on (algorithmic) information theory was followed, and the results were validated using gamma-index analysis on a set of benchmark test cases. Several questions were addressed: (a) whether incorporating the information of the non-irradiated film, by scanning prior to irradiation, improves the results; (b) whether lateral corrections are necessary when using multichannel models; (c) whether multichannel dosimetry produces better results than single-channel dosimetry; (d) which multichannel perturbation model provides more accurate film doses. It was found that scanning prior to irradiation and applying lateral corrections improved the accuracy of the results. For some perturbation models, increasing the number of color channels did not result in more accurate film doses. Employing Truncated Normal perturbations was found to...

  14. Reference dosimetry and measurement quality assurance

    Measurements of absorbed dose made by a reference dosimetry system, such as alanine, have been suggested for achieving quality assurance through traceability to primary standards. Such traceability can assist users of radiation worldwide in enhancing quality control in medicine, agriculture, and industry. International and national standards of absorbed dose are still needed for applications of γ-ray and electron dosimetry at high doses (e.g. radiation therapy, food irradiation and industrial radiation processing). Reference systems, such as ferrous sulfate dosimeters measured by spectrophotometry and alanine measured by electron spin resonance spectrometry are already well established. Another useful reference system for high doses is supplied as dichromate solutions measured by spectrophotometry. Reference dosimetry, particularly for electron beams, can be accomplished with thin alanine or radiochromic dye film dosemeters. (author)

  15. Performance testing of UK personal dosimetry laboratories

    The proposed Ionising Radiations Regulations will require all UK personal dosimetry laboratories that monitor classified personnel to be approved for personal dosimetry by the Health and Safety Executive. It is suggested that these approvals should be based on general and supplementary criteria published by the British Calibration Service (BCS) for laboratory approval for the provision of personal dosimetry services. These criteria specify certain qualitative requirements and also indicate the need for regular tests of performance to be carried out to ensure constancy of dosimetric standards. This report concerns the latter. The status of the BCS criteria is discussed and the need for additional documents to cover new techniques and some modifications to existing documents is indicated. A means is described by which the technical performance of laboratories, concerned with personal monitoring for external radiations, can be assessed, both initially and ongoing. The costs to establish the scheme and operate it are also estimated. (author)

  16. Survey of international personnel radiation dosimetry programs

    In September of 1983, a mail survey was conducted to determine the status of external personnel gamma and neutron radiation dosimetry programs at international agencies. A total of 130 agencies participated in this study including military, regulatory, university, hospital, laboratory, and utility facilities. Information concerning basic dosimeter types, calibration sources, calibration phantoms, corrections to dosimeter responses, evaluating agencies, dose equivalent reporting conventions, ranges of typical or expected dose equivalents, and degree of satisfaction with existing systems was obtained for the gamma and neutron personnel monitoring programs at responding agencies. Results of this survey indicate that to provide the best possible occupational radiation monitoring programs and to improve dosimetry accuracy in performance studies, facility dosimetrists, regulatory and standards agencies, and research laboratories must act within their areas of responsibility to become familiar with their radiation monitoring systems, establish common reporting guidelines and performance standards, and provide opportunities for dosimetry testing and evaluation. 14 references, 10 tables

  17. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    Alberto Mariani; Pier Alberto Testoni

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreaUtis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis.There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association.Cystic fibrosis transmembrane con ductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation,hereditary and obstructive pancreatitis seem an acute disease that progress to chronic pancreatitis,likely as a consequence of the activation and proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells that produce and activate collagen and therefore fibrosis.From the diagnostic point of view,in patients with acute recurrent pancreatitis Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) seems the more reliable technique for an accurate evaluation and follow-up of some ductal and parenchymal abnormalities suspected for early chronic pancreatitis.

  18. Reactor Dosimetry State of the Art 2008

    Voorbraak, Wim; Debarberis, Luigi; D'Hondt, Pierre; Wagemans, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Oral session 1: Retrospective dosimetry. Retrospective dosimetry of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel at the 3rd unit of Dukovany NPP / M. Marek ... [et al.]. Retrospective dosimetry study at the RPV of NPP Greifswald unit 1 / J. Konheiser ... [et al.]. Test of prototype detector for retrospective neutron dosimetry of reactor internals and vessel / K. Hayashi ... [et al.]. Neutron doses to the concrete vessel and tendons of a magnox reactor using retrospective dosimetry / D. A. Allen ... [et al.]. A retrospective dosimetry feasibility study for Atucha I / J. Wagemans ... [et al.]. Retrospective reactor dosimetry with zirconium alloy samples in a PWR / L. R. Greenwood and J. P. Foster -- Oral session 2: Experimental techniques. Characterizing the Time-dependent components of reactor n/y environments / P. J. Griffin, S. M. Luker and A. J. Suo-Anttila. Measurements of the recoil-ion response of silicon carbide detectors to fast neutrons / F. H. Ruddy, J. G. Seidel and F. Franceschini. Measurement of the neutron spectrum of the HB-4 cold source at the high flux isotope reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory / J. L. Robertson and E. B. Iverson. Feasibility of cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy for dose rate monitoring on nuclear reactor / H. Tomita ... [et al.]. Measuring transistor damage factors in a non-stable defect environment / D. B. King ... [et al.]. Neutron-detection based monitoring of void effects in boiling water reactors / J. Loberg ... [et al.] -- Poster session 1: Power reactor surveillance, retrospective dosimetry, benchmarks and inter-comparisons, adjustment methods, experimental techniques, transport calculations. Improved diagnostics for analysis of a reactor pulse radiation environment / S. M. Luker ... [et al.]. Simulation of the response of silicon carbide fast neutron detectors / F. Franceschini, F. H. Ruddy and B. Petrović. NSV A-3: a computer code for least-squares adjustment of neutron spectra and measured dosimeter responses / J. G

  19. Dosimetry in intravascular brachytherapy; Calculos dosimetricos em braquiterapia intravascular

    Campos, Laelia Pumilla Botelho

    2000-03-01

    Among the cardiovascular diseases responsible for deaths in the adult population in almost all countries of the world, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which generally occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Several diagnostic techniques and therapies are being tested for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than traditional surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment).Recently, the idea of delivering high radiation doses to coronary arteries to avoid or delay restenosis has been suggested. Known as intravascular brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis in some patient populations. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for the attending staff for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, o,30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several candidate radionuclides as well. Two s tent sources (metallic prosthesis that put inside of patient's artery through angioplasty) employing {sup 32} P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the various radionuclides and source geometries are discussed. The dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients for this promising new technology. (author)

  20. Individual dosimetry of workers and patients: implementation and perspectives

    These days organised by the section of the technical protection of the S.F.R.P. review the different techniques of dosimetry used in France and Europe, and present the future orientations.The different interventions are as follow: Individual exposures of the workers: historic assessment and perspectives; medical exposure: where are the doses; legal obligations in individual dosimetry: which are the objective and the need on the subject; the dosimetry follow-up of workers by the S.I.S.E.R.I. system: assessment and perspectives; impact of the norm ISO 20553 on the follow-up of internal exposure; the implementation of the patient dose measurement in Belgium; techniques of passive dosimetry used in Europe; Supervision radiation protection at EDF: long term and short term approach; Comparison active and passive dosimetry at Melox; methodology for the choice of new neutron dosemeters; the working group M.E.D.O.R.: guide of internal dosimetry for the use of practitioners; O.E.D.I.P.E.: tool of modeling for the personalized internal dosimetry; the use of the Monte-Carlo method for the planning of the cancer treatment by radiotherapy becomes a reality; the works of the committee 2 of the ICRP; passive dosimetry versus operational dosimetry: situation in Europe; Implementation of the in vivo dosimetry in a radiotherapy department: experience of the Gustave Roussy institute; experience feedback on the in vivo measures in radiotherapy, based on the use of O.S.L. pellets; multi points O.S.L. instrumentation for the radiation dose monitoring in radiotherapy; dosimetry for extremities for medical applications: principle results of the European contract C.O.N.R.A.D.; references and perspectives in dosimetry; what perspectives for numerical dosimetry, an example: Sievert; system of dose management: how to answer to needs; the last technical evolutions in terms of electronic dosimetry in nuclear power plant; the fourth generation type reactors: what dosimetry. (N.C.)

  1. HSE performance tests for dosimetry services

    In the United Kingdom a dosimetry service that measures and assesses whole-body or part-body doses arising from external radiation must successfully complete a performance test. Results of the performance tests for routine whole-body, routine extremity/skin and special accident dosimetry, carried out over the past six years by the AEA Technology Calibration Service at Winfrith, and DRaStaC, the AWE Calibration Service at Aldermaston, are presented. The test involves irradiating groups of dosemeters to known doses of gamma radiation and determining the bias and relative standard deviations for each dose group. The results are compared with the pass criteria specified by the UK Health and Safety Executive. For routine whole-body dosimetry, both the film badge and thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) perform adequately for irradiations between 0.6 and 30 mSv. For higher doses up to 250 mSv, where the slow emulsion of the film is used, the film badge shows poorer performance with a tendency to overestimate the dose. For routine extremity/skin dosimetry there is a wider spread of relative standard deviation results than is seen for routine whole-body dosimetry. This is to be expected since the results will include dosemeters that are based on 'disposable' TLDs and ones based on lithium fluoride powder in sachets. For special accident dosimetry the dosemeters are tested between 0.26 and 6 Gy. For the highest dose group the film badge invariably underestimates the true dose, whereas the TLD has a tendency to overestimate it. (author)

  2. Bronchitis - acute

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute bronchitis is swelling and inflammation in the main passages ... present only for a short time. Causes When acute bronchitis occurs, it almost always comes after having a ...

  3. Bronchitis - acute

    Acute bronchitis is swelling and inflammation in the main passages that carry air to the lungs. The swelling narrows ... makes it harder to breathe. Another symptom of bronchitis is a cough. Acute means the symptoms have ...

  4. Acute Bronchitis

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  5. TL detectors in BNCT dosimetry

    The main detectors for characterising and controlling of BNCT beams are activation foils and paired ionisation chambers. Thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters are also of interest because of their following advantages: i) small physical size, ii) no need for high voltage or cables, i.e. stand alone character, and iii) suitability for large scale measurements; with TL dosimeters it is possible to measure depth dose curves and profiles at the same time, with one irradiation. Also, TL dosimeters may be possible detectors for in vivo use. At the Finnish BNCT facility, a TL detector MTS-Ns of TLD Niewiadomski and Co. (Krakow, Poland) with an ultrathin active LiF:Mg,Ti layer for small self-shielding of thermal neutrons was selected for use as a neutron sensitive dosimeter. A TL detector MCP-7s (7LiF:Mg,Cu,P) of the same manufacturer was used for gamma detection because of its high sensitivity to gamma radiation compared to that to high LET radiation. The gamma dose and neutron fluence distributions have been measured in PMMA, water and brain substitute liquid phantoms at the BNCT beam. Gamma dose and neutron fluence profiles measured with TL detectors correlate with those calculated using DORT (Two Dimensional Discrete Ordinates Transport Code) and measured with ionisation chambers. NITS-Ns TL detectors were found to measure accurately (8%, 1 S.D.) the relative neutron fluence, and therefore to be a useful addition to the activation foils in BNCT neutron dosimetry. Due to the high uncertainty of the thermal neutron sensitivity of the MCP-7s TL detectors, the absorbed gamma doses can be measured with MCP-7s detectors within 20% in the mixed neutron-gamma field of BNCT. The treatments of glioma patients at the Finnish BNCT facility will start in the spring 1999. The doses to the target volume and sensitive organs, i.e. brain, will be calculated individually in the dose planning. Since it is also necessary to monitor the absorbed doses to the head and to the body, in vivo

  6. SNL RML recommended dosimetry cross section compendium

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); VanDenburg, J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-11-01

    A compendium of dosimetry cross sections is presented for use in the characterization of fission reactor spectrum and fluence. The contents of this cross section library are based upon the ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90 cross section libraries and are recommended as a replacement for the DOSCROS84 multigroup library that is widely used by the dosimetry community. Documentation is provided on the rationale for the choice of the cross sections selected for inclusion in this library and on the uncertainty and variation in cross sections presented by state-of-the-art evaluations.

  7. Eurados trial performance test for photon dosimetry

    Stadtmann, H.; Bordy, J.M.; Ambrosi, P.; Bartlett, D.T.; Christensen, P.; Colgan, T.; Hyvonen, H.

    paper summarises the results of the whole-body photon dosemeter test. Twenty-six dosimetry services from all EU Member States and Switzerland participated. Twelve different radiation fields were used to simulate various workplace irradiation fields. Dose values from 0.4 mSv to 80 mSv were chosen. From...... 312 single results, 26 fell outside the limits of the trumpet curve and 32 were outside the range 1/1.5 to 1.5. Most outliers resulted from high energy R-F irradiations without electronic equilibrium. These fields are not routinely encountered by many of the participating dosimetry services. If the...

  8. Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    1991-01-01

    This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations.

  9. An updated computer software for personal dosimetry

    For use in personal dosimetry the ALNOR electronic pocket dosimetry system was installed in 1992. The standard error obtained routinely with this system was less than 10 % in the dose range of 5 μSv to 10 Sv. To keep the database up-to-date, a new software was developed with special emphasis on speed, minimum handling error, and ease-of-use. Except for archivation, this menu-controlled and user-friendly software fits well to different tasks of both datahandling and data-processing. (author)

  10. Dosimetry requirements derived from the sterilization standards

    Miller, A.

    1998-01-01

    The main standards for radiation sterilization, ISO 11137 and EN 552, rest the documentation for the properly executed sterilization process on dosimetry. Both standards describe general requirements to the dosimetry system: The dose measurements must be traceable to national standards......, the uncertainty of the dose measurement and the environmental influences must be known. This paper discusses how to obtain and maintain traceability and how to document measurement uncertainty. The implications of these requirements in the process control of radiation sterilization are further discussed. Known...

  11. Optically stimulated luminescence in retrospective dosimetry

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s the exploration of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in retrospective accident dosimetry has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Riso into measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes of this progr......Since the beginning of the 1990s the exploration of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in retrospective accident dosimetry has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Riso into measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes...

  12. Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations

  13. Use of semiconductor devices in integrating dosimetry

    Radiation effects in semiconductors have been investigated with a big effort during the last years and some results of these studies are also usable for dosimetric purposes. Silicon diodes for neutron dosimetry are the best known example of such application. Nevertheless, some other devices show measurable radiation-induced changes of parameters as well and can work as integrating dosemeters. The review of potential possibilities of using such effects in dosimetry is given in the first part of this paper. Dosimetric properties of one type of optoelectronic devices, namely photo-couplers of Czechoslovak make, are discussed in the other part. (author)

  14. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (58Co, 60Co, 54Mn, and 59Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs

  15. Role of dosimetry in quality control

    Dosimetry plays an important role in the quality control of radiation processing. Increasingly, quality control systems are based on the standards in the 9000 series from the International Organization for Standardization, ISO. This is true not only in radiation sterilization but also in food treatment, polymer modification and other uses of radiation. It is required that all measurements - including radiation measurements -are traceable to national standards, and the uncertainty of the measurements must be stated with appropriate confidence limits. The paper discusses the significance of dosimetry, the evaluation of uncertainty, and the way in which traceability may be obtained. (author). 11 refs, 2 tabs

  16. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (58Co, 60Co, 54Mn, and 59Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs

  17. Advances in electron dosimetry of irregular fields

    In this work it is presented an advance in Electron dosimetry of irregular fields for beams emitted by linear accelerators. At present diverse methods exist which are coming to apply in the Radiotherapy centers. In this work it is proposed a method for irregular fields dosimetry. It will be allow to calculate the dose rate absorbed required for evaluating the time for the treatment of cancer patients. Utilizing the results obtained by the dosimetric system, it has been possible to prove the validity of the method describe for 12 MeV energy and for square field 7.5 x 7.5 cm2 with percentile error less than 1 % . (Author)

  18. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1989-04-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (/sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 54/Mn, and /sup 59/Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs.

  19. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1991-07-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products ({sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 59}Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs.

  20. Practical neutron dosimetry at high energies

    Dosimetry at high energy particle accelerators is discussed with emphasis on physical measurements which define the radiation environment and provide an immutable basis for the derivation of any quantities subsequently required for risk evaluation. Results of inter-laboratory dosimetric comparisons are reviewed and it is concluded that a well-supported systematic program is needed which would make possible detailed evaluations and inter-comparisons of instruments and techniques in well characterized high energy radiation fields. High-energy dosimetry is so coupled with radiation transport that it is clear their study should proceed concurrently

  1. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingest...

  2. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion....

  3. Kinetics model for lutate dosimetry

    Lima, M.F.; Mesquita, C.H., E-mail: mflima@ipen.br, E-mail: chmesqui@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    The use of compartmental analysis to predict the behavior of drugs in the organism is considered the better option among numerous methods employed in pharmacodynamics. A six compartments model was developed to determinate the kinetic constants of 177Lu-DOTATATO biodistribution using data from one published study with 67 patients treated by PRRT (Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy) and followed by CT during 68,25 hours. The compartmental analysis was made using the software AnaComp Registered-Sign . The influence of the time pos-injection over the dose assessment was studied taking into account the renal excretion management by aminoacid coinfusion, whose direct effects persist in the first day. The biodistribution curve was split in five sectors: 0-0.25h; 0-3.25h; 3.25-24.25h; 24.25-68.25h and 3.25-68.25h. After the examination of that influence, the study was concentrated in separate the biodistribution curve in two phases. Phase 1: governed by uptake from the blood, considering the time pos-injection until 3.25h and phase 2: governed by renal excretion, considering the time pos-injection from 3.25h to 68.25h. The model considered the organs and tissues superposition in the CT image acquisition by sampling parameters as the contribution of the the activity concentration in blood and relation between the sizes of the whole body and measured organs. The kinetic constants obtained from each phase (1 and 2) were used in dose assessment to patients in 26 organs and tissues described by MIRD. Dosimetry results were in agreement with the available results from literature, restrict to whole body, kidneys, bone marrow, spleen and liver. The advantage of the proposed model is the compartmental method quickness and power to estimate dose in organs and tissues, including tumor that, in the most part, were not discriminate by voxels of phantoms built using CT images. (author)

  4. Metabolic models for tritium dosimetry

    Tritium (3H or T) is the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, which is produced by both natural, and man made sources. Tritium has a small relative natural abundance compared to hydrogen and deuterium (D). As was assessed by the United Nations scientific committee the contribution of cosmogenic tritium to annual effective dose in human is very small, only about 0.01 μSv (UNSCEAR, 2000). In case of heavy water reactors annual tritium doses for critical groups are also very small but theoretically could reach values of several μSv. In this case professionally exposed personnel could be exposed to tritium doses of some mSv. According to these considerations environmental and dosimetric aspects of this radionuclide are of special concern for health physicists. Tritium dose assessment methodologies have special particularities because hydrogen is a chemical element with an important metabolic role in the human body. Operating experience to date of CANDU reactors has indicated that the major contributor to the internal dose of professionally exposed people is the tritiated heavy water (DTO). DTO, like the tritiated water HTO, is assumed to be uniformly mixed with body water pool and reaching equilibrium immediately after the intake. All the statements in this paper related to HTO dosimetry are also considered valid in case of DTO. The results of the computations performed with different retention functions corresponding to different compartment models are presented. The differences between the models due to OBT (Organically Bound Tritium) contribution are 5.6% for two- compartment model and 13% for three-compartment Dunford - Johnson model, respectively. In practice the contribution of OBT is considered to be about 10%. (authors)

  5. Automation at NRCN Dosimetry Laboratory

    Running a dosimetric service based on TLD technology such as at the Nuclear Research Centre Negev (NRCN) requires a large group of workers to carry out simple mechanical actions such as opening and closing TLD badges, placing and removal of TLD cards from the badges and operating the TLD reader. These actions can be automated to free human resources for other assignments and to improve the quality assurance. At NRCN a project was undertaken to design and build a robotic system based on a manipulator arm. The design was based on the experience achieved with an earlier prototype (1,2). The system stores the TLD badges in special designed boxes, which are transported and stored in computer defined bins. The robotic arm loads and unloads TLD cards to the badges, and loads/unloads the cards to a magazine for the TLD reader. At the Nuclear Research Center Negev (NRCN) each badge is assigned to a specific worker and bears a sticker containing the worker's personal details, also in a machine readable form (barcode). In order to establish a proper QA check, a barcode reader records the information on the badge and on the TLD card placed in this badge and checks their compatibility with the information contained in the main database. Besides the TLD cards loading/unloading station, there is a contamination check station, a cards cleaning station and a UV irradiation box used to reduce the history dependent residual dose. The system was installed at the NRCN dosimetry laboratory It was successfully tested for several hundreds of cycles and will become operational in the first quarter of 2014. As far as we know, there is no similar product available for automatic handling in a TLD laboratory

  6. Kinetics model for lutate dosimetry

    The use of compartmental analysis to predict the behavior of drugs in the organism is considered the better option among numerous methods employed in pharmacodynamics. A six compartments model was developed to determinate the kinetic constants of 177Lu-DOTATATO biodistribution using data from one published study with 67 patients treated by PRRT (Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy) and followed by CT during 68,25 hours. The compartmental analysis was made using the software AnaComp®. The influence of the time pos-injection over the dose assessment was studied taking into account the renal excretion management by aminoacid coinfusion, whose direct effects persist in the first day. The biodistribution curve was split in five sectors: 0-0.25h; 0-3.25h; 3.25-24.25h; 24.25-68.25h and 3.25-68.25h. After the examination of that influence, the study was concentrated in separate the biodistribution curve in two phases. Phase 1: governed by uptake from the blood, considering the time pos-injection until 3.25h and phase 2: governed by renal excretion, considering the time pos-injection from 3.25h to 68.25h. The model considered the organs and tissues superposition in the CT image acquisition by sampling parameters as the contribution of the the activity concentration in blood and relation between the sizes of the whole body and measured organs. The kinetic constants obtained from each phase (1 and 2) were used in dose assessment to patients in 26 organs and tissues described by MIRD. Dosimetry results were in agreement with the available results from literature, restrict to whole body, kidneys, bone marrow, spleen and liver. The advantage of the proposed model is the compartmental method quickness and power to estimate dose in organs and tissues, including tumor that, in the most part, were not discriminate by voxels of phantoms built using CT images. (author)

  7. Internal dosimetry hazard and risk assessments: methods and applications

    Routine internal dose exposures are typically (in the UK nuclear industry) less than external dose exposures: however, the costs of internal dosimetry monitoring programmes can be significantly greater than those for external dosimetry. For this reason decisions on when to apply routine monitoring programmes, and the nature of these programmes, can be more critical than for external dosimetry programmes. This paper describes various methods for performing hazard and risk assessments which are being developed by RWE NUKEM Limited Approved Dosimetry Services to provide an indication when routine internal dosimetry monitoring should be considered. (author)

  8. Perioperative acute kidney injury

    Calvert Stacey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI is a serious complication in the perioperative period, and is consistently associated with increased rates of mortality and morbidity. Two major consensus definitions have been developed in the last decade that allow for easier comparison of trial evidence. Risk factors have been identified in both cardiac and general surgery and there is an evolving role for novel biomarkers. Despite this, there has been no real change in outcomes and the mainstay of treatment remains preventive with no clear evidence supporting any therapeutic intervention as yet. This review focuses on definition, risk factors, the emerging role of biomarkers and subsequent management of AKI in the perioperative period, taking into account new and emerging strategies.

  9. Consensus on Moving Neighborhood Model of Peterson Graph

    Arendt, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the consensus problem of multiple agents on a kind of famous graph, Peterson graph. It is an undirected graph with 10 vertices and 15 edges. Each agent randomly walks on this graph and communicates with each other if and only if they coincide on a node at the same time. We conduct numerical study on the consensus problem in this framework and show that global consensus can be achieved.

  10. Average-Consensus Algorithms in a Deterministic Framework

    Topley, Kevin; Krishnamurthy, Vikram

    2011-01-01

    We consider the average-consensus problem in a multi-node network of finite size. Communication between nodes is modeled by a sequence of directed signals with arbitrary communication delays. Four distributed algorithms that achieve average-consensus are proposed. Necessary and sufficient communication conditions are given for each algorithm to achieve average-consensus. Resource costs for each algorithm are derived based on the number of scalar values that are required for communication and ...

  11. [Management strategies and choice of antithrombotic treatment in patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome--executive summary for clinical practice. Consensus Document of the Regional Chapters of the Italian National Association of Hospital Cardiologists (ANMCO) and of the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine (SIMEU)].

    Uguccioni, Massimo; Pugliese, Francesco; De Luca, Leonardo; Tubaro, Marco; Ruggieri, Maria Pia; Colivicchi, Furio; Ammirati, Fabrizio; Ansalone, Gerardo; Avella, Andrea; Azzolini, Paolo; Bertazzoni, Giuliano; Brama, Paolo; Cacciatore, Giuseppe; De Luca, Massimo; De Simone, Massimo; Di Fusco, Stefania Angela; Ferraiuolo, Giuseppe; Ferranti, Fabio; Granatelli, Antonino; Loschiavo, Paolo; Mezzanotte, Roberto; Mirante, Enrico; Monti, Francesco; Pajes, Giuseppe; Pandolfo, Luciano; Proiettil, Fabrizio; Revello, Alessandra; Rigattieri, Stefano; Sabetta, Francesco; Sciahbasi, Alessandro; Scioli, Roberto; Serdoz, Roberto; Susi, Beniamino; Vincentelli, Giovanni Maria; Zuccalà, Giuseppe; Zulli, Luigi

    2013-03-01

    This document has been developed by the Lazio regional chapters of two scientific associations, the Italian National Association of Hospital Cardiologists (ANMCO) and the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine (SIMEU), whose members are actively involved in the everyday management of Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS). The document is aimed at providing a specific, practical, evidence-based guideline for the effective management of antithrombotic treatment (antiplatelet and anticoagulant) in the complex and ever changing scenario of ACS. The document employs a synthetic approach which considers two main issues: the actual operative context of treatment delivery and the general management strategy. PMID:23923585

  12. Public health crises: the development of a consensus document on their management in Spain.

    Rodrigo, T; Caylà, Ja

    2011-01-01

    Several public health crises in Europe have led to sustained outbreaks, political problems, or have generated social alarm. For this reason, a nationwide study was conducted in Spain with the objective to determine which public health events provoke the most frequent crises, to reach a consensus regarding the appropriate actions to be taken when responding to public health crises, and to provide recommendations for their management. The events which had most frequently provoked crises between 1999 and 2004 were identified. A consensus was obtained by public health experts from the 17 Autonomous Regions of Spain and the National Epidemiological Centre using the RAND/UCLA method which combines the Nominal Groups and Delphi techniques. Legionellosis, foodborne diseases, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), bioterrorism, meningococcal meningitis, tuberculosis, heat waves, and influenza epidemics were found to be cause for most public health crises. In Spain, 75% of the crises identified by senior public health experts from the Autonomous Regions involved infectious diseases. Factors triggering a crisis included the type of disease, social alarm, population affected, and the course of action taken by public institutions and reporting in the media. There was consensus that correct information, qualified personnel, availability of standardised protocols for investigation and control, information distribution, and setting up of ‘crisis offices’ were actions with a positive effect regarding crisis resolution. Appropriate management of outbreaks or other situations being perceived as a risk to health can mitigate or even contain the generation of public health crises. PMID:21507319

  13. Operationalising emergency care delivery in sub-Saharan Africa: consensus-based recommendations for healthcare facilities.

    Calvello, Emilie J B; Tenner, Andrea G; Broccoli, Morgan C; Skog, Alexander P; Muck, Andrew E; Tupesis, Janis P; Brysiewicz, Petra; Teklu, Sisay; Wallis, Lee; Reynolds, Teri

    2016-08-01

    A major barrier to successful integration of acute care into health systems is the lack of consensus on the essential components of emergency care within resource-limited environments. The 2013 African Federation of Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference was convened to address the growing need for practical solutions to further implementation of emergency care in sub-Saharan Africa. Over 40 participants from 15 countries participated in the working group that focused on emergency care delivery at health facilities. Using the well-established approach developed in the WHO's Monitoring Emergency Obstetric Care, the workgroup identified the essential services delivered-signal functions-associated with each emergency care sentinel condition. Levels of emergency care were assigned based on the expected capacity of the facility to perform signal functions, and the necessary human, equipment and infrastructure resources identified. These consensus-based recommendations provide the foundation for objective facility capacity assessment in developing emergency health systems that can bolster strategic planning as well as facilitate monitoring and evaluation of service delivery. PMID:26202673

  14. First aid guidelines for psychosis in Asian countries: A Delphi consensus study

    Langlands Robyn L

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines for how a member of the public should give first aid to a person who is becoming psychotic have been developed for English-speaking countries. However, these guidelines may not be appropriate for use in other cultures. A study was therefore carried out to examine whether it was possible to achieve consensus on guidelines that could apply in a range of Asian countries. Methods A Delphi consensus study was carried out with a panel of 28 Asian mental health clinicians drawn from Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Mongolia, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam. The panel was given a 211 item questionnaire about possible first aid actions and asked to rate whether they thought these should be included in guidelines. Panel members were invited to propose additional items. Results After three Delphi rounds, there were 128 items that were rated as "essential" or "important" by 80% or more of the panel members. These items covered: recognition of psychosis, encouraging and assisting the person to seek help, how to interact with the person, responding to acute psychosis, responding to aggression, and what to do if the person refuses to get professional help. Conclusion Despite the diversity of the countries involved, there was consensus on a core set of first aid items that were considered as suitable for assisting a psychotic person. Future work is needed to develop guidelines for specific countries.

  15. First aid guidelines for psychosis in Asian countries: A Delphi consensus study

    Jorm, Anthony F; Minas, Harry; Langlands, Robyn L; Kelly, Claire M

    2008-01-01

    Background Guidelines for how a member of the public should give first aid to a person who is becoming psychotic have been developed for English-speaking countries. However, these guidelines may not be appropriate for use in other cultures. A study was therefore carried out to examine whether it was possible to achieve consensus on guidelines that could apply in a range of Asian countries. Methods A Delphi consensus study was carried out with a panel of 28 Asian mental health clinicians drawn from Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Mongolia, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam. The panel was given a 211 item questionnaire about possible first aid actions and asked to rate whether they thought these should be included in guidelines. Panel members were invited to propose additional items. Results After three Delphi rounds, there were 128 items that were rated as "essential" or "important" by 80% or more of the panel members. These items covered: recognition of psychosis, encouraging and assisting the person to seek help, how to interact with the person, responding to acute psychosis, responding to aggression, and what to do if the person refuses to get professional help. Conclusion Despite the diversity of the countries involved, there was consensus on a core set of first aid items that were considered as suitable for assisting a psychotic person. Future work is needed to develop guidelines for specific countries. PMID:18291042

  16. HAE international home therapy consensus document

    Longhurst, Hilary J; Farkas, Henriette; Craig, Timothy; Aygoren-Pursun, Emel; Bethune, Claire; Bjorkander, Janne; Bork, Konrad; Bouillet, Laurence; Boysen, Henrik; Bygum, Anette; Caballero, Teresa; Cicardi, Marco; Dempster, John; Gompels, Mark; Gooi, Jimmy; Grigoriadou, Sofia; Huffer, Ursula; Kreuz, Wolfhart; Levi, Marcel M; Long, Janet; Martinez-Saguer, Inmaculada; Raguet, Michel; Reshef, Avner; Bowen, Tom; Zuraw, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    for parenteral treatment results in delays. Home therapy offers the possibility of earlier treatment and better symptom control, enabling patients to live more healthy, productive lives. This paper examines the evidence for patient-controlled home treatment of acute attacks ('self or assisted...

  17. Review of translocations detected by fish for retrospective biological dosimetry applications

    Several European laboratories have combined their research efforts to arrive at a consensus view on using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) for retrospective dosimetry. The aim of this review is to report these views and to highlight some areas where further work is needed. Translocations in the stable cells should be measured only in the cells that contain the full complement of the painted material. Two-way and one-way translocations should be combined with equal weight. The control level of translocations has a strong dependence on age, which has now been measured and the system has been calibrated. In conclusion, the technique works and a lifetime dose to the bone marrow from low-linear energy transfer radiation of 0.5 Gy above normal background levels can be measured for any individual. The main application is considered to provide an independent verification of lifetime doses to individuals who might form a part of an epidemiological study. (authors)

  18. Using Network Dynamical Influence to Drive Consensus.

    Punzo, Giuliano; Young, George F; Macdonald, Malcolm; Leonard, Naomi E

    2016-01-01

    Consensus and decision-making are often analysed in the context of networks, with many studies focusing attention on ranking the nodes of a network depending on their relative importance to information routing. Dynamical influence ranks the nodes with respect to their ability to influence the evolution of the associated network dynamical system. In this study it is shown that dynamical influence not only ranks the nodes, but also provides a naturally optimised distribution of effort to steer a network from one state to another. An example is provided where the "steering" refers to the physical change in velocity of self-propelled agents interacting through a network. Distinct from other works on this subject, this study looks at directed and hence more general graphs. The findings are presented with a theoretical angle, without targeting particular applications or networked systems; however, the framework and results offer parallels with biological flocks and swarms and opportunities for design of technological networks. PMID:27210291

  19. Distributed Consensus with Finite Message Passing

    Dash, Debashis

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by distributed resource allocation problems in dynamic topology networks, we initiate the study of distributed consensus with finite messaging passing. We first find a sufficient condition on the network graph for which no distributed protocol can guarantee a conflict-free allocation after $R$ rounds of message passing. Secondly we fully characterize the conflict minimizing zero-round protocol for path graphs, namely random allocation, which partitions the graph into small conflict groups. Thirdly, we enumerate all one-round protocols for path graphs and show that the best one further partitions each of the smaller groups. Finally, we show that the number of conflicts decrease to zero as the number of available resources increase.

  20. Using Network Dynamical Influence to Drive Consensus

    Punzo, Giuliano; Young, George F.; MacDonald, Malcolm; Leonard, Naomi E.

    2016-05-01

    Consensus and decision-making are often analysed in the context of networks, with many studies focusing attention on ranking the nodes of a network depending on their relative importance to information routing. Dynamical influence ranks the nodes with respect to their ability to influence the evolution of the associated network dynamical system. In this study it is shown that dynamical influence not only ranks the nodes, but also provides a naturally optimised distribution of effort to steer a network from one state to another. An example is provided where the “steering” refers to the physical change in velocity of self-propelled agents interacting through a network. Distinct from other works on this subject, this study looks at directed and hence more general graphs. The findings are presented with a theoretical angle, without targeting particular applications or networked systems; however, the framework and results offer parallels with biological flocks and swarms and opportunities for design of technological networks.

  1. Child abuser stereotypes: consensus among clinicians.

    Krowchuk, H V

    1989-02-01

    This article reports the results of an investigation of nurses' stereotypes of child abusers. Ninety-four registered nurses completed a questionnaire that measured subjects' knowledge of child abuse; professional contact with perpetrators and victims of abuse; knowledge of the causes of child abuse; and child abuser stereotypes. Results reveal a consensus among the subjects as to the stereotypes associated with child abusers. This study supports the notion that nurses stereotype individuals on the basis of demographic characteristics. This study also raises questions regarding the bias that may result from the use of child abuser stereotypes. Clinical decision-making processes could become compromised if biased judgements are used in planning nursing care for clients diagnosed as child abusers. PMID:2930179

  2. Consensus document on European brain research

    Di Luca, Monica; Baker, Mary; Corradetti, Renato;

    2011-01-01

    the economic and social challenge posed by management of brain diseases in European countries. To setup a platform for discussion, EBC published in 2006 a Consensus Document on European Brain Research, describing needs and achievements of research in Europe and presenting proposals for future research...... programs. Since 2006, European research in neuroscience has advanced tremendously. The present document represents an update elaborated to reflect changes in research priorities and advances in brain research that have taken place since 2006. The same approach and format have been used here as in the......Psychiatric and neurological diseases combined represent a considerable social and economic burden in Europe. A recent study conducted by the European Brain Council (EBC) quantified the 'cost and burden' of major brain diseases in Europe, amounting to €386bn per year. Considering that these costs...

  3. Robust point matching via vector field consensus.

    Jiayi Ma; Ji Zhao; Jinwen Tian; Yuille, Alan L; Zhuowen Tu

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an efficient algorithm, called vector field consensus, for establishing robust point correspondences between two sets of points. Our algorithm starts by creating a set of putative correspondences which can contain a very large number of false correspondences, or outliers, in addition to a limited number of true correspondences (inliers). Next, we solve for correspondence by interpolating a vector field between the two point sets, which involves estimating a consensus of inlier points whose matching follows a nonparametric geometrical constraint. We formulate this a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of a Bayesian model with hidden/latent variables indicating whether matches in the putative set are outliers or inliers. We impose nonparametric geometrical constraints on the correspondence, as a prior distribution, using Tikhonov regularizers in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. MAP estimation is performed by the EM algorithm which by also estimating the variance of the prior model (initialized to a large value) is able to obtain good estimates very quickly (e.g., avoiding many of the local minima inherent in this formulation). We illustrate this method on data sets in 2D and 3D and demonstrate that it is robust to a very large number of outliers (even up to 90%). We also show that in the special case where there is an underlying parametric geometrical model (e.g., the epipolar line constraint) that we obtain better results than standard alternatives like RANSAC if a large number of outliers are present. This suggests a two-stage strategy, where we use our nonparametric model to reduce the size of the putative set and then apply a parametric variant of our approach to estimate the geometric parameters. Our algorithm is computationally efficient and we provide code for others to use it. In addition, our approach is general and can be applied to other problems, such as learning with a badly corrupted training data set. PMID:24808341

  4. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions: Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  5. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions : Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  6. The International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-82)

    This document describes the contents of the first version of the International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-82), distributed by the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency. This document is a brief summary of the IRDF-82 documentation contained in IAEA-NDS-41. (author)

  7. New dosimetry of atomic bomb radiations.

    Fry, R J; Sinclair, W K

    1987-10-10

    The reassessment of the radiation dosimetry from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs is almost complete. Since atomic bomb survivors provide a major source of data for estimates of risk of cancer induction by radiation the impact of the new dosimetry on risk estimates and radiation protection standards is important. The changes include an increase of about 20% in the estimated yield of the Hiroshima bomb and a reduction in the estimated doses from neutrons in both cities. The estimated neutron dose for Hiroshima is about 10% of the previous estimate. The neutron doses are now so small that direct estimates of neutron relative biological effectiveness may be precluded or be much more difficult. There is little change in most of the gamma ray organ doses because various changes in the new estimates tend to cancel each other out. The new estimate of the attenuation of the free-in-air kerma by the walls of the homes is about twice that used in the previous dosimetry. But the transmission of gamma radiation to the deep organs such as bone marrow is significantly greater than earlier estimates. Probably future risk estimates for radiogenic cancer will be somewhat higher because of both the new dosimetry and the new cancer mortality data. New risk estimates should be available in 1988. PMID:2889042

  8. Personnel radiation dosimetry symposium: program and abstracts

    The purpose was to provide applied and research dosimetrists with sufficient information to evaluate the status and direction of their programs relative to the latest guidelines and techniques. A technical program was presented concerning experience, requirements, and advances in gamma, beta, and neutron personnel dosimetry

  9. A history of medical internal dosimetry

    This paper presents a short history of the development of medical dosimetry. It reviews the evaluation of the equations and discusses the development of various mathematical models used to improve radiation absorbed dose estimates. The contributions of Leonides Marinelli, Edith Qulmby, William Mayneord, Robert Loevinger, Walter Snyder, and others are emphasized. (author), 74 Refs., 7 Figs., 3 Tabs

  10. Optically stimulated luminescence in retrospective dosimetry

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    Since the beginning of the 1990s the exploration of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in retrospective accident dosimetry has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Riso into measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes of this...

  11. From ``micro`` to ``macro`` internal dosimetry

    Fisher, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    Radiation dose is the amount of radiation energy deposited per unit mass of absorbing tissue. Internal dosimetry applies to assessments of dose to internal organs from penetrating radiation sources outside the body and from radionuclides taken into the body. Dosimetry is essential for correlating energy deposition with biological effects that are observed when living tissues are irradiated. Dose-response information provides the basis for radiation protection standards and risk assessment. Radiation interactions with living matter takes place on a microscopic scale, and the manifestation of damage may be evident at the cellular, multi-cellular, and even organ levels of biological organization. The relative biological effectiveness of ionization radiation is largely determined by the spatial distribution of energy deposition events within microscopic as well as macroscopic biological targets of interest. The spatial distribution of energy imparted is determined by the spatial distribution of radionuclides and properties of the emitted charged-particle radiation involved. The nonuniformity of energy deposition events in microscopic volumes, particularly from high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, results in large variations in the amount of energy imparted to very small volumes or targets. Microdosimetry is the study of energy deposition events at the cellular level. Macrodosimetry is a term for conventional dose averaging at the tissue or organ level. In between is a level of dosimetry sometimes referred to as multi-cellular dosimetry. The distinction between these terms and their applications in assessment of dose from internally deposited radionuclides is described.

  12. The new dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    In particular the recent data about the effects of atom bombs upon Hiroshima and Nagasaki have lead to new insights in the risks of radiation. In this article a survey is given of the effects of improved dosimetry. (author). 3 refs.; 2 tabs

  13. Secondary standard dosimetry laboratories: Development and trends

    This publication describes the work of the IAEA and the WHO in the establishment of a network of Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories. Membership in the SSDL network has now risen to about 50 laboratories, of which 36 are in developing countries

  14. Dosimetry and control of radiation processing

    Eight invited papers on the general theme of 'Dosimetry and Control of Radiation Processing', presented at a one day symposium held at the National Physical Laboratory, are collected together in this document. Seven of the papers are selected and indexed separately. (author)

  15. GENMOD - A program for internal dosimetry calculations

    The computer code GENMOD was created to calculate the retention and excretion, and the integrated retention for selected radionuclides under a variety of exposure conditions. Since the creation of GENMOD new models have been developed and interfaced to GENMOD. This report describes the models now included in GENMOD, the dosimetry factors database, and gives a brief description of the GENMOD program

  16. Optically stimulated luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence signals from natural quartz and feldspar are now used routinely in dating geological and archaeological materials. More recently they have also been employed in accident dosimetry, i.e. the retrospective assessment of doses received as a result of a nuclear...

  17. The United Kingdom's radiotherapy dosimetry audit network

    The first comprehensive national dosimetry intercomparison in the United Kingdom involving all UK radiotherapy centres was carried out in the late 1980s. Out of this a regular radiotherapy dosimetry audit network evolved in the early 1990s. The network is co-ordinated by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine and comprises eight co-operative regional groups. Audits are based on site visits using ionization chambers and epoxy resin water substitute phantoms. The basic audit methodology and phantom design follows that of the original national intercomparison exercise. However, most of the groups have evolved more complex methods, to extend the audit scope to include other parameters, other parts of the radiotherapy process and other treatment modalities. A number of the groups have developed phantoms to simulate various clinical treatment situations, enabling the sharing of phantoms and expertise between groups, but retaining a common base. Besides megavoltage external beam photon dosimetry, a number of the groups have also included the audit of kilovoltage X ray beams, electron beams and brachytherapy dosimetry. The National Physical Laboratory is involved in the network and carries out basic beam calibration audits to link the groups. The network is described and the methods and results are illustrated using the Scottish+ group as an example. (author)

  18. Dosimetry implant for treating restenosis and hyperplasia

    Srivastava, Suresh; Gonzales, Gilbert R; Howell, Roger W; Bolch, Wesley E; Adzic, Radoslav

    2014-09-16

    The present invention discloses a method of selectively providing radiation dosimetry to a subject in need of such treatment. The radiation is applied by an implant comprising a body member and .sup.117mSn electroplated at selected locations of the body member, emitting conversion electrons absorbed immediately adjacent selected locations while not affecting surrounding tissue outside of the immediately adjacent area.

  19. Dosimetry in Interventional Radiology - Effective Dose Estimation

    Interventional radiological procedures can lead to significant radiation doses to patients and to staff members. In order to evaluate the personal doses with respect to the regulatory dose limits, doses measured by dosimeters have to be converted to effective doses (E). Measurement of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) using a single unshielded dosimeter above the lead apron can lead to significant overestimation of the effective dose, while the measurement with dosimeter under the apron can lead to underestimation. To improve the accuracy, measurements with two dosimeters, one above and the other under the apron have been suggested (double dosimetry). The ICRP has recommended that interventional radiology departments develop a policy that staff should wear two dosimeters. The aim of this study was to review the double dosimetry algorithms for the calculation of effective dose in high dose interventional radiology procedures. The results will be used to develop general guidelines for personal dosimetry in interventional radiology procedures. This work has been carried out by Working Group 9 (Radiation protection dosimetry of medical staff) of the CONRAD project, which is a Coordination Action supported by the European Commission within its 6th Framework Program.(author)

  20. Advances in reference and transfer dosimetry

    All prerequisites are now in place to create a fundamentally and radically different type of calibration service for the radiation processing industry. Advancements in dosimetry and information technology can be combined to provide industry with on-line calibrations, on demand at a low cost. The remote calibration service will serve as a basis for other areas of metrology. (Author)

  1. Development of A-bomb survivor dosimetry

    An all important datum in risk assessment is the radiation dose to individual survivors of the bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The first set of dose estimates for survivors was based on a dosimetry system developed in 1957 by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These Tentative 1957 Doses (T57D) were later replaced by a more extensive and refined set of Tentative 1965 Doses (T65D). The T65D system of dose estimation for survivors was also developed at ORNL and served as a basis for risk assessment throughout the 1970s. In the late 1970s, it was suggested that there were serious inadequacies with the T65D system, and these inadequacies were the topic of discussion at two symposia held in 1981. In early 1983, joint US- Japan research programs were established to conduct a thorough review of all aspects of the radiation dosimetry for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. A number of important contributions to this review were made by ORNL staff members. The review was completed in 1986 and a new Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) was adopted for use. This paper discusses the development of the various systems of A-bomb survivor dosimetry, and the status of the current DS86 system as it is being applied in the medical follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors and their offspring

  2. The ENEA neutron personal dosimetry service

    The ENEA Radiation Protection Inst. has been operating the only neutron personal dosimetry service in Italy since the 1970's. Since the 1980's the service has been based on PADC (poly-allyl-diglycol carbonate) for fast neutron dosimetry, while thermal neutron dosimetry has been performed using thermoluminescence (TL) dosemeters. Since the service was started, a number of aspects have undergone evolution. The latest and most important changes are as follows: in 1998 a new PADC material was introduced in routine, since 2001 TL thermal dosimetry has been based on LiF(Mg,Cu,P) [GR-200] and 7LiF(Mg,Cu,P) [GR-207] detectors and since 2003 a new image analysis reading system for the fast neutron dosemeters has been used. Herein an updated summary of how the service operates and performs today is presented. The approaches to calibration and traceability to estimate the quantity of Hp(10) are mentioned. Results obtained at the performance test of dosimetric services in the EU member states and Switzerland sponsored by the European Commission and organised by Eurados in 1999 are reported. Last but not least, quality assurance (QA) procedures introduced in the routine operation to track the whole process of dose evaluation (i.e. plastic QA, acceptance test, test etching bath reproducibility and 'dummy customer' (blind test) for each issuing monitoring period) are presented and discussed. (authors)

  3. Czech results at criticality dosimetry intercomparison 2002

    Spurný, František; Trousil, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 110, 1-4 (2004), s. 455-458. ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : personal dosimetry * thermoluminescent detectors * individual dosimeters Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.617, year: 2003

  4. 3-dimensional polymer gel dosimetry

    was observed. Polymer gel dosimetry system used in this study proved that it is reliable system for dose distribution measurement with error less than 5 % for doses higher than 3 Gy. (author)

  5. Film dosimetry in conformal radiotherapy

    Danciu, C.; Proimos, B.S. [Patras Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1995-12-01

    Dosimetry, through a film sandwiched in a transverse cross-section of a solid phantom, is a method of choice in Conformal Radiotherapy because: (a) the blackness (density) of the film at each point offers a measure of the total dose received at that point, and (b) the film is easily calibrated by exposing a film strip in the same cross-section, through a stationary field. The film must therefore have the following properties: (a) it must be slow, in order not to be overexposed, even at a therapeutic dose of 200 cGy, and (b) the response of the film (density versus dose curve) must be independent of the photon energy spectrum. A few slow films were compared. It was found that the Kodak X-Omat V for therapy verification was the best choice. To investigate whether the film response was independent of the photon energy, response curves for six depths, starting from the depth of maximum dose to the depth of 25 cm, in solid phantom were derived. The vertical beam was perpendicular to the anterior surface of the phantom, which was at the distance of 100 cm from the source and the field was 15x15 cm at that distance. This procedure was repeated for photon beams emitted by a Cobalt-60 unit, two 6 MV and 15 MV Linear Accelerators, as well as a 45 MV Betatron. For each of those four different beams the film response was the same for all six depths. The results, as shown in the diagrams, are very satisfactory. The response curve under a geometry similar to that actually applied, when the film is irradiated in a transverse cross-section of the phantom, was derived. The horizontal beam was almost parallel (angle of 85) to the plane of the film. The same was repeated with the central ray parallel to the film (angle 90) and at a distance of 1.5 cm from the horizontal film. The field size was again 15x15 at the lateral entrance surface of the beam. The response curves remained the same, as when the beam was perpendicular to the films.

  6. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Fratin, Luciano

    1993-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  7. Dose modulated computed tomography automated dosimetry

    Full text: Computed Tomography (CT) scans contribute a significant portion of the effective radiation dose from medical procedures and generally large effective radiation doses per diagnostic examination. With the advent of Multislice CT, the potential for large radiation exposures increased. This combined with the appeal of the resultant isotropic imaging and the increasing number of applications for which CT could be utilised (including screening procedures) has further increased the need for vigilant monitoring of CT protocols and use with respect to radiation dose. The introduction of dose modulated Computed Tomography has proven an effective method for reducing patient dose and is now widely used by CT manufacturers. This involves lowering the mA when scanning through anatomical regions which do not require a large mA. Many CT investigations now utilise dose modulation. Some of these studies will include over 900 images for which the mA and occasionally other factors could vary. In order to utilise the existing software to perform CT dosimetry a program has been written to automatically extract scan parameters from CT dicom image files and apply the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator, for slices with differing factors. Matlab has been used to write and compile a program which sorts through a folder of dicom images and extracts the appropriate dicom header information. Some manufacturers store different series and reformatted images all within the same folder. The images of the CT study for which the dosimetry is to be performed must be stored within the one folder and must be in a dicom format. The program has been written to accommodate several manufacturers, which all contain different information in their dicom headers. The Matlab program groups the various study/image types, extracting the relevant dicom header information, which is written to an Excel worksheet. An Excel file uses this information to run the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator with

  8. Aspects of dosimetry using radiation sensitive gels

    The use of radiation sensitive gels for dosimetry measurements was first suggested in the 1950s. It was subsequently shown that radiation induced changes in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation properties of gels infused with conventional Fricke dosimetry solutions could be measured. However, due to predominantly diffusion-related limitations, alternative polymer gel dosimeters were suggested. Clinical applications of these radiologically tissue equivalent gel dosimeters using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have subsequently been reported in the literature. In Fricke gels, Fe2+ ions in ferrous sulphate solutions are usually dispersed throughout a gelatin or agarose hydrogel matrix. Radiation-induced changes in the dosimeters are considered to be either through direct absorption of ionising radiation or via intermediate water free radicals. Fe2+ ions are converted to Fe3+ ions with a corresponding change in paramagnetic properties that may be quantified using NMR relaxation measurements. In polymer gels, monomers are also dispersed in a gelatin or agarose hydrogel matrix. Monomers undergo a polymerisation reaction as a function of absorbed dose resulting in a three-dimensional polymer gel matrix. The radiation-induced formation of polymer influences NMR relaxation properties. The growth in polymer also results in other physical changes that may be used to quantify absorbed radiation dose. This thesis investigates various aspects of radiation dosimetry using radiation sensitive gels. Image processing software was developed to calculate NMR relaxation images of dosimetry gels. Measurements were undertaken to investigate the diffusion problem in Fricke gels. Radiological properties were theoretically modelled for both Fricke and polymer gels. A methodology was developed for the preparation of polymer gels. Vibrational spectroscopic studies were undertaken to investigate the underlying mechanism involved in the radiation-induced formation of polymer. MRI pulse

  9. Radiation dosimetry in radiotherapy with internal emitters

    Stabin, Michael G. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Radiation dosimetry radionuclides are currently being labeled to various biological agents used in internal emitter radiotherapy. This talk will review the various technologies and types of radiolabel in current use, with focus on the characterization of the radiation dose to the various important tissues of the body. Methods for obtaining data, developing kinetic models, and calculating radiation doses will be reviewed. Monoclonal antibodies are currently being labeled with both alpha and beta emitting radionuclides in attempts to find effective agents against cancer. Several radionuclides are also being used as bone pain palliation agents. These agents must be studied in clinical trials to determine the biokinetics and radiation dosimetry prior to approval for general use. In such studies, it is important to ensure the collection of the appropriate kinds of data and to collect the data at appropriate time intervals. The uptake and retention of activity in all significant source organs and in excreta be measured periodically (with at least 2 data points phase of uptake or clearance). Then, correct dosimetry methods must be applied - the best available methods for characterizing the radionuclide kinetic and for estimating the dosimetry in the various organs of the body especially the marrow, should be used. Attempts are also under way to develop methods for estimating true patient-specific dosimetry. Cellular and animal studies are also. Valuable in evaluating the efficacy of the agents in shrinking or eliminating tumors; some results from such studies will also be discussed. The estimation of radiation doses to patients in therapy with internal emitters involves several complex phases of analysis. Careful attention to detail and the use of the best available methods are essential to the protection of the patient and a successful outcome

  10. Argentine intercomparison programme for personal dosimetry

    Full text: In 1997 began in Argentine, sponsored by Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) the intercomparison program for personal dosimetry laboratories, on a voluntary basis. Up to know 6 exercises have been done. The program began with a workshop to present the quantities, personal dose equivalent, Hp(10) and extremities dose equivalent, Hs(d). The first aim of this program was to know the true sate of personal dosimetry laboratories in the country, and then introduce the personal dose equivalent, Hp(10) into the dose measurements. The Regional Reference Center for Dosimetry (CCR), belonging to CNEA and the Physical Dosimetry Laboratory of ARN performed the irradiation. Those were done air free and on ICRU phantom, using x-ray, quality ISO: W60, W110 and W200; and 137Cs and 60Co gamma rays. The irradiation was made following ISO 4037 (2) recommendations. There are studied the dose, energy and angular response of the different measuring system. The range of the dose analyzed was from 0.2 mSv up to 80 mSv. The beam incidence was normal and also 20o and 60o. The dosimeters irradiation's were performed kerma in free in air and in phantom in order to study the availability of the service to evaluate the behavior as a function of kerma free in air or Hp(10). At the same time several items have been asked to each participant referring to the action range, the detectors characteristics, the laboratory procedures, the existence of an algorithm and its use for the dosimeter evaluation and the wish to participate in a quality assurance program. The program worked in writing a standard of personal dosimetry laboratories, that was published in 2001. In this work the results of each laboratory and its performance based on the ICRP-60 and ICRP-35 acceptance criteria are shown. Also the laboratory evolution and inquiry analyses have been included. (author)

  11. Radiation processing dosimetry - past, present and future

    Since the two United Nations Conferences were held in Geneva in 1955 and 1958 on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy and the concurrent foundation of the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1957, the IAEA has fostered high-dose dosimetry and its applications. This field is represented in industrial radiation processing, agricultural programmes, and therapeutic and preventative medicine. Such dosimetry is needed specifically for pest and quarantine control and in the processing of medical products, pharmaceuticals, blood products, foodstuffs, solid, liquid and gaseous wastes, and a variety of useful commodities, e.g. polymers, composites, natural rubber and elastomers, packaging, electronic, and automotive components, as well as in radiotherapy. Improvements and innovations of dosimetry materials and analytical systems and software continue to be important goals for these applications. Some of the recent advances in high-dose dosimetry include tetrazolium salts and substituted polydiacetylene as radiochromic media, on-line real-time as well as integrating semiconductor and diamond-detector monitors, quantitative label dosimeters, photofluorescent sensors for broad dose range applications, and improved and simplified parametric and computational codes for imaging and simulating 3D radiation dose distributions in model products. The use of certain solid-state devices, e.g. optical quality LiF, at low (down to 4K) and high (up to 500 K) temperatures, is of interest for materials testing. There have also been notable developments in experimental dose mapping procedures, e.g. 2D and 3D dose distribution analyses by flat-bed optical scanners and software applied to radiochromic and photofluorescent images. In addition, less expensive EPR spectrometers and new EPR dosimetry materials and high-resolution semiconductor diode arrays, charge injection devices, and photostimulated storage phosphors have been introduced. (author)

  12. Dosimetry for members of the extended Techa River cohort

    Anspaugh, L R.; Degteva, M. O.; Vorobiova, M I.; Mokrov, Y; Napier, Bruce A.

    2006-10-01

    The undersigned and colleagues are creators and a critic of the Techa River Dosimetry System-2000 (TRDS-2000), which was the subject of a recent article by Balonov et al. This article presented a consensus on a review of the TRDS-2000 achieved following a workshop in December 2003. The TRDS-2000 was used to derive risk coefficients for members of an unselected general population exposed to moderate doses of radiation at low dose rates on the Techa River in the 1950s. Because it is now more than two years since the workshop, a significant number of events have transpired, and the purpose of this letter is to inform readers of current developments. As noted in Balonov et al., much of the concern about the dosimetric and epidemiologic investigation of the Extended Techa River Cohort was heightened by a preliminary derivation of risk estimates that were higher than those derived from study of the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan, but not significantly different. Similar results showing risks for leukemia and solid cancers about 50% higher than those in the Japanese survivors have now been published. These unexpected results have raised the issue of the validity of the doses being calculated with the TRDS-2000. Much of the honest differences of opinion among the undersigned about the TRDS-2000 is concerned with the accuracy and precision of the releases to the Techa River during the 1949-1951 period. Balonov et al. recommended many steps to investigate further information available on the releases, and to take other steps to resolve differences in opinion. As noted by Balonov et al., one of the more promising was a proposed study (with funding requested from the International Science and Technology Center) for the undersigned to work together on the ?source-term problem? along with additional Russian experts from the Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology, Ekaterinburg, and the Zababakhin Institute of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk. We are pleased that the study

  13. Dosimetry for members of the extended Techa River cohort

    The undersigned and colleagues are creators and a critic of the Techa River Dosimetry System-2000 (TRDS-2000), which was the subject of a recent article by Balonov et al. This article presented a consensus on a review of the TRDS-2000 achieved following a workshop in December 2003. The TRDS-2000 was used to derive risk coefficients for members of an unselected general population exposed to moderate doses of radiation at low dose rates on the Techa River in the 1950s. Because it is now more than two years since the workshop, a significant number of events have transpired, and the purpose of this letter is to inform readers of current developments. As noted in Balonov et al., much of the concern about the dosimetric and epidemiologic investigation of the Extended Techa River Cohort was heightened by a preliminary derivation of risk estimates that were higher than those derived from study of the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan, but not significantly different. Similar results showing risks for leukemia and solid cancers about 50% higher than those in the Japanese survivors have now been published. These unexpected results have raised the issue of the validity of the doses being calculated with the TRDS-2000. Much of the honest differences of opinion among the undersigned about the TRDS-2000 is concerned with the accuracy and precision of the releases to the Techa River during the 1949-1951 period. Balonov et al. recommended many steps to investigate further information available on the releases, and to take other steps to resolve differences in opinion. As noted by Balonov et al., one of the more promising was a proposed study (with funding requested from the International Science and Technology Center) for the undersigned to work together on the ?source-term problem? along with additional Russian experts from the Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology, Ekaterinburg, and the Zababakhin Institute of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk. We are pleased that the study

  14. The Decrits Consensus Algorithm: Decentralized Agreement without Proof of Work

    Pfeiffer, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Decrits is a cryptocurrency in development that makes use of a novel consensus algorithm that does not require proof-of-work. This paper describes how the Decrits Consensus Algorithm (DCA) is as trustless as a proof-of-work algorithm while offering superior transaction security at virtually no cost.

  15. Consensus in Directed Networks of Agents With Nonlinear Dynamics

    Yu, Wenwu; Chen, Guanrong; Cao, Ming; Qu, Z.

    2011-01-01

    This technical note studies the consensus problem for cooperative agents with nonlinear dynamics in a directed network. Both local and global consensus are defined and investigated. Techniques for studying the synchronization in such complex networks are exploited to establish various sufficient con

  16. Consensus for switched networks with unknown but bounded disturbances

    Bauso, D.; Giarré, L.; Pesenti, R

    2006-01-01

    We consider stationary consensus protocols for networks of dynamic agents with switching topologies. The measure of the neighbors' state is affected by Unknown But Bounded disturbances. Here the main contribution is the formulation and solution of what we call the $\\epsilon$-consensus problem, where the states are required to converge in a tube of ray $\\epsilon$ asymptotically or in finite time.

  17. An IAEA Survey of Dosimetry Audit Networks for Radiotherapy

    A Survey: In 2010, the IAEA undertook a task to investigate and review the coverage and operations of national and international dosimetry audit programmes for radiotherapy. The aim was to organize the global database describing the activities of dosimetry audit networks in radiotherapy. A dosimetry audit questionnaire has been designed at an IAEA consultants' meeting held in 2010 for organizations conducting various levels of dosimetry audits for radiotherapy. Using this questionnaire, a survey was conducted for the first time in 2010 and repeated in 2011. Request for information on different aspects of the dosimetry audit was included, such as the audit framework and resources, its coverage and scope, the dosimetry system used and the modes of audit operation, i.e. remotely and through on-site visits. The IAEA questionnaire was sent to over 80 organizations, members of the IAEA/WHO Network of Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) and other organizations known for having operated dosimetry audits for radiotherapy in their countries or internationally. Survey results and discussion: In response to the IAEA survey, 53 organizations in 45 countries confirmed that they operate dosimetry audit services for radiotherapy. Mostly, audits are conducted nationally, however there are five organizations offering audits abroad, with two of them operating in various parts of the world and three of them at the regional level, auditing radiotherapy centres in neighbouring countries. The distribution of dosimetry audit services in the world is given. (author)

  18. Personal dosimetry service of VF, a.s. company

    The VF, a.s. Company will extend its services in the area of personal dosimetry at the end of 2008, which is fully in compliance with the requirements of the Atomic Act, section 9 paragraph (1) letter r) and Decree on Radiation Protection, section 59 paragraph (1) letter a). Optically stimulated luminescence was selected in VF .a.s. as the most advantageous and the most advanced technology for the integral personal dosimetry . Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) has been using in dosimetry for more than ten years. Although it is relatively new technology , its indisputable advantages predetermine that technology has significantly benefited in personal dosimetry services within a short time all over the advanced world. The VF, a.s. personal dosimetry service is based on the licensed products of LANDAUER, the US company, which is the world leader in OSL dosimetry. Crystalline Al2O3:C was selected as the detection material. All equipment of personal dosimetry service is installed in the VF Centre of Technology in Cerna Hora. The personal dosimetry service is incorporated in the International LANDAUER Dosimetry Service Network, and in the European Union, it is directly linked to the LANDAUER European Headquarters with its office in Paris. As a part of the OSL technology licence, the VF personal dosimetry service was included in the inter-laboratory comparison programme of the LANDAUER syndicate. (author)

  19. Near consensus complex linear and nonlinear social networks

    Ling, Bingo Wing-Kuen; Ho, Charlotte Yuk-Fan; Wang, Lidong; Teo, Kok-Lay; Tse, Chi K.; Dai, Qingyun

    2014-05-01

    Some of the nodes of complex social networks may support for a given proposal, while the rest of the nodes may be against the given proposal. Even though all the nodes support for or are against the given proposal, the decision certitudes of individual nodes may be different. In this case, the steady state values of the decision certitudes of the majority of the nodes are either higher than or lower than a threshold value. Deriving the near consensus property is a key to the analysis of the behaviors of complex social networks. So far, no result on the behaviors of the complex social networks satisfying the near consensus property has been reported. Hence, it is useful to extend the definition of the exact consensus property to that of a near consensus property and investigate the behaviors of the complex social networks satisfying the near consensus property. This paper extends the definition of exact consensus complex social networks to that of near consensus complex social networks. For complex linear social networks, this paper investigates the relationships among the vectors representing the steady state values of the decision certitudes of the nodes, the influence weight matrix and the set of vectors representing the initial state values of the decision certitudes of the nodes under a given near consensus specification. The above analysis is based on the Eigen theory. For complex nonlinear social networks with certain types of nonlinearities, the relationship between the influence weight matrix and the vectors representing the steady state values of the decision certitudes of the nodes is studied. When a complex nonlinear social network does not achieve the exact consensus property, the optimal near consensus condition that the complex social network can achieve is derived. This problem is formulated as an optimization problem. The total number of nodes that the decision certitudes of the nodes are either higher than or lower than a threshold value is

  20. The American-European Consensus Conference definition of the acute respiratory distress syndrome is dead, long live positive end-expiratory pressure! La definición del síndrome de distrés respiratorio agudo según la Conferencia de Consenso Americana-Europea está muerta, ¡larga vida a la presión positiva espiratoria final!

    J. Villar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In 1994, an American-European Consensus Conference (AECC formalized the criteria for the diagnosis of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Although that definition is simple to apply in the clinical setting, it has been challenged over the years in several studies since the assessment of the oxygenation defect does not require standardized ventilatory support. We were the first to propose new guidelines, based on a specific, standard method of evaluating oxygenation status, a proposal that was later advocated by others. To address the limitations of the AECC definition, a modified ARDS definition has been proposed by a task force panel of experts, referred to as the Berlin Defintion, using a terminology similar to that we previously proposed. However, that proposal has several methodological flaws. Since all ARDS patients start off with terrible oxygenation, the Berlin Definition offers no room for stratifying and identifyng true ARDS patients since there is no further re-evaluation of the hypoxemia under standard ventilator setting in a specific time period. In this Point of View, we review the history of the definition of ARDS and discussed the methodological concerns regarding adopting this new, revised ARDS definition.En 1994, una Conferencia de Consenso Americana-Europea (CCAE formalizó los criterios para el diagnóstico del Síndrome de Distrés Respiratorio Agudo (SDRA. Aunque esa definición es sencilla de aplicar en la clínica, ha sido criticada en varios estudios ya que la medida del defecto de oxigenación no requiere de la estandarización del soporte ventilatorio. Nosotros fuimos los primeros en proponer nuevas guías basadas en un método estándar específico para evaluar el estado de la oxigenación, una propuesta que más tarde fue apoyada por otros autores. Para solucionar las limitaciones de la definición de la CCAE del SDRA, una modificación de esta definición ha sido propuesta por un panel de expertos

  1. Individual Monitoring and TL Dosimetry in Hungary

    The widespread development and application of X-ray and nuclear energy resulted in the problem of ionizing radiation dosimetry also in Hungary. The individual monitoring started in 1955 using film badge and various ''pen type'' ionization chambers with different measuring ranges to determine the external photon radiation doses. Since 1966 the film badge has been accepted as the official personal dosimeter system in Hungary. The film monitors are presently processed bimonthly. The personal monitoring for about 16 000 occupationally exposed ''A category'' workers is conducted by the National Research Institute of Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, with Kodak film badge. The calibration of dosimeters is performed in the primary standard laboratory of the National Standardization Laboratory (OMH) according to ISO17025 standard. The thermoluminescent (TL) method for personal dosimetry purposes was introduced in Hungary in the early 1970's. Central Research Insitute of Physics and Insitute of Isotopes developed together a solid state dosimetry system using first 2 pieces of LiF (TLD-100) TL dosimeters in the same badge together with the film. Later, the Harshaw LiF dosimeters were changed to the Polish LiF (MTS-N) ones, having higher sensitivity to gamma and to mixed neutron-gamma field dosimetry purposes. At present, besides the national film dosimetry service, there are three TL dosimetry services as well (Atomic Energy Research Institute, Institute of Isotopes, Nuclear Power Plant). The thermoluminescent (TL) whole body dosimeters are used for individual monitoring parallel with the film and the evaluation of the various types of LiF (TLD-100, Polish MTS-N etc.) is performed at ''home'' dosimetry services using different manual and automatic TL readers (Harshaw 4000, Harshaw 3500, Alnor TLD reader). Personal dosimetry data measured by film and TL method are regularly compared. In addition to the successful applications of various TL dosimeters for work place monitoiring

  2. Worldwide QA networks for radiotherapy dosimetry

    A number of national or international organizations have developed various types and levels of external audits for radiotherapy dosimetry. There are three major programmes who make available external audits, based on mailed TLD (thermoluminescent dosimetry), to local radiotherapy centres on a regular basis. These are the IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose audit service operating worldwide, the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) system, EQUAL, in European Union (EU) and the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) in North America. The IAEA, in collaboration with WHO, was the first organization to initiate TLD audits on an international scale in 1969, using mailed system, and has a well-established programme for providing dose verification in reference conditions. Over 32 years, the IAEA/WHO TLD audit service has checked the calibration of more than 4300 radiotherapy beams in about 1200 hospitals world-wide. Only 74% of those hospitals who receive TLDs for the first time have results with deviation between measured and stated dose within acceptance limits of ±5%, while approximately 88% of the users that have benefited from a previous TLD audit are successful. EQUAL, an audit programme set up in 1998 by ESTRO, involves the verification of output for high energy photon and electron beams, and the audit of beam parameters in non-reference conditions. More than 300 beams are checked each year, mainly in the countries of EU, covering approximately 500 hospitals. The results show that although 98% of the beam calibrations are within the tolerance level of ±5%, a second check was required in 10% of the participating centres, because a deviation larger than ±5% was observed in at least one of the beam parameters in non-reference conditions. EQUAL has been linked to another European network (EC network) which tested the audit methodology prior to its application. The RPC has been funded continuously since 1968 to monitor radiation therapy dose delivery at

  3. Pitfalls in patient specific dosimetry

    Introduction: I-131 is used to treat patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer after thyroidectomy to eliminate the malignant tissue. The dose was calculated by the MIRD dosimetry. The aim of this paper was to analyze the pitfalls that occurred while calculating the lesion tumoricidal dose with the objective to minimize the damage to normal organs (lung and bone marrow). Radionuclide therapeutic activity was calculated after image quantitative analysis and treatment planning taking into account the radiobiology of the patient. Material and methods: 30 patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer were studied determining whole body I-131 retention after 3 mCi administration of this radiotracer with a planar gamma camera during 5 days or until the retained activity was less than 1 %. Images of the target and risk tissues were acquired to procure I-131 uptake and biological half life. Blood concentration of the same isotope (% Dose/liter) was also measured at different times after the isotope ingestion. Additional organ and metastatic tissue kinetic analysis was carried out. Accurate determination of the retained activity in the lesions is not easy to obtain on account of different factors that introduce important errors which have to be corrected: a) tissue Attenuation, b) Scattering, c) Collimator Septal penetration and d) Partial Volume Effect. The quantification of the activity in the lesions was performed by determining the uptake in a region of interest (ROI) corresponding to the tissue to be evaluated and comparing its activity with a known standard. From the isotope ''Residence Time'' in the whole body, the blood kinetic data and the application of the MIRD software, the maximum treatment dose that could be administered to the patient without producing injury to normal tissues, was established. Influence of other factors were also evaluated: a) Instrument dead time contribution on whole body uptake determination, b) Amount of I-131 administered activity to

  4. 12''th International Conference on Solid State Dosimetry Casa del Cordon. Conference Center (Caja de Burgos), July 5''th-10''th, 1998, Burgos Spain: Programme and Abstracts

    The 12 International Conference on Solid State Dosimetry celebrate in Burgos (Spain) during July on 1998. 1.- Basic Physical Processes 2.- Materials characteristics 3.- Instrumentation 4.- Personal Dosimetry 5.- Clinical Dosimetry 6.- Environmental Dosimetry 7.- Dating retrospective dosimetry 8.- Miscellaneous

  5. Fetal dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    Diagnostic radiology examinations are frequently performed in all countries because of the benefit that the patient derives from the resultant diagnosis. Given that so many examinations are performed it is inevitable that there will be occasions when the planned exposure of a woman who is known to be pregnant is contemplated. In these circumstances, there must be rigorous justification of the examination and the procedure itself must be optimised as well. Radiation risks from fetal irradiation are well established. These risks fall into three categories: 1) a cancer induction risk (mainly leukaemia); 2) hereditary effects (as the fetus is a potential parent); 3) a risk of serious mental retardation (if the fetus is exposed in the critical 8-15 weeks period when the forebrain is being developed). Risk factors for these effects have been reviewed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Special rules apply to the radiology of women who are or who may be pregnant. These rules have been developed to avoid he unintended irradiation of the fetus. These rules have been variously referred to as the 10-day rule and the 28-day rules, in which radiology of potentially pregnant women is restricted to the first 10 or 28 days following menstruation. It is apparent that the advice provided by national bodies varies, as different rules apply internationally, due presumably to a lack of an international consensus on the subject. The advice from the National Radiological Protection Board, the College of Radiographers and the Royal College of Radiologists applies in the United Kingdom. In summary, the advice is that women of child bearing age are asked before a diagnostic radiology examination in which the pelvis is in, or near, the primary beam are asked if they are, or may be, pregnant. If pregnancy can be excluded then the examination can proceed. If it is likely that the patient is pregnant, then the proposed examination must undergo rigorous justification. If

  6. Consensus maps of cloned plant cuticle genes

    Eviatar; Nevo

    2010-01-01

    Plant cuticle,which covers the plant surface,consists of waxes and cutins,and is associated with plant drought,cold,and salt resistance.Hitherto,at least 47 genes participating in the formation of plant cuticle have been cloned from Arabidopsis thaliana,Oryza sativa,Zea mays,Ricinus communis,Brassica napus,and Medicago truncatula;and about 85% of them encode proteins sharing above 50% identities with their rice homologous sequences.These cloned cuticle genes were mapped in silico on different chromosomes of rice and Arabidopsis,respectively.The mapping results revealed that plant cuticle genes were not evenly distributed in both genomes.About 40% of the mapped cuticle genes were located on chromosome 1 in Arabidopsis,while 20% of the mapped cuticle genes were located on chromosome 2 but none on chromosome 12 in rice.Some cloned plant cuticle genes have several rice homologous sequences,which might be produced by chromosomal segment duplication.The consensus map of cloned plant cuticle genes will provide important clues for the selection of candidate genes in a positional cloning of an unknown cuticle gene in plants.

  7. The role of fanatics in consensus formation

    Gündüç, Semra

    2015-08-01

    A model of opinion dynamics with two types of agents as social actors are presented, using the Ising thermodynamic model as the dynamics template. The agents are considered as opportunists which live at sites and interact with the neighbors, or fanatics/missionaries which move from site to site randomly in persuasion of converting agents of opposite opinion with the help of opportunists. Here, the moving agents act as an external influence on the opportunists to convert them to the opposite opinion. It is shown by numerical simulations that such dynamics of opinion formation may explain some details of consensus formation even when one of the opinions are held by a minority. Regardless the distribution of the opinion, different size societies exhibit different opinion formation behavior and time scales. In order to understand general behavior, the scaling relations obtained by comparing opinion formation processes observed in societies with varying population and number of randomly moving agents are studied. For the proposed model two types of scaling relations are observed. In fixed size societies, increasing the number of randomly moving agents give a scaling relation for the time scale of the opinion formation process. The second type of scaling relation is due to the size dependent information propagation in finite but large systems, namely finite-size scaling.

  8. Consensus and Synchronization in Complex Networks

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization in complex networks is one of the most captivating cooperative phenomena in nature and has been shown to be of fundamental importance in such varied circumstances as the continued existence of species, the functioning of heart pacemaker cells, epileptic seizures, neuronal firing in the feline visual cortex and cognitive tasks in humans. E.g. coupled visual and acoustic interactions make fireflies flash, crickets chirp, and an audience clap in unison. On the other hand, in distributed systems and networks, it is often necessary for some or all of the nodes to calculate some function of certain parameters, e.g. sink nodes in sensor networks being tasked with calculating the average measurement value of all the sensors or multi-agent systems in which all agents are required to coordinate their speed and direction. When all nodes calculate the same function of the initial values in the system, they are said to reach consensus. Such concepts - sometimes also called state agreement, rendezvous, and ...

  9. Experiences with alanine dosimetry in afterloading brachytherapy

    At the present, the most commonly used dosimetry for radiotherapy applications are ionisation chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). However, there are some undesirable characteristics of these dosimetry systems, such as large detection volume (ionisation chamber) as well as fading of the radiation induced signal with time and destructive readout (TLG). The present study is an investigation into the use of the alanine/ESR dosimetry in fractionated afterloading brachytherapy during the whole radiotherapy course. There are some qualities which make alanine dosimetry attractive. These are the linear energy response, low fading under standard conditions, and the nondestructive readout. Thus the alanine dosimetry makes possible cumulative dose measurements during the radiotherapy course and an archival storage. By ionizing radiation (gamma, e, n, p, charged particles) free radicals (unpaired electrons) are produced in the amino acid alanine. The continuous wave electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to determine the number of free radicals, which is proportional to the absorbed dose and the alanine content of the dosimeter. The ESR measurements were made at room temperature using a Bruker EPR analyzer EMS-104. The dosimeters used in the test are alanine pellets (23.72 mg weight, 4.9 mm diameter, 1 mm height) as well as flexible alanine film dosimeters (thickness about 500 μm). The dosimeters consist of a blend of L-alpha-alanine and a binder. The alanine content of the pellets and the film dosimeters is about 88 % and 50 % by weight, respectively. The dosimeters for the calculation of the dose-effect-relationship were irradiated at the Physical-Technical Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig by a standard 60Co source. The maximum deviation from the calculated linear function is about 0.12 Gy in the dose range up to 80 Gy. The goal of medical applications was the superficial dose measurement in afterloading brachytherapy during the radiotherapy course in

  10. Development and current state of dosimetry in Cuba

    In Cuba, the application of the radiation technologies has been growing in the last years, and at present there are several dosimetry systems with different ranges of absorbed dose. Diverse researches were carried out on high dose dosimetry with the following dosimetry systems: Fricke, ceric-cerous sulfate, ethanol-chlorobenzene, cupric sulfate and Perspex (Red 4034 AE and Clear HX). In this paper the development achieved during the last 15 years in the high dose dosimetry for radiation processing in Cuba is presented, as well as, the current state of different dosimetry systems employed for standardization and for process control. The paper also reports the results of dosimetry intercomparison studies that were performed with the Ezeiza Atomic Center of Argentine and the International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) of IAEA. (author)

  11. Small and Composite Field Dosimetry: The Problems and Recent Progress

    The increased use of small fields in intensity modulated and stereotactic treatments has created the demand for more standardization of dosimetry procedures for these non-reference fields. In addition, treatment units such as GammaKnife, CyberKnife and TomoTherapy cannot establish broad beam reference conditions prescribed in conventional dosimetry. For dynamic, modulated deliveries, the step between dosimetry in the conventional static broad beam reference field and the actual treatment delivery is large and it has been suggested that performing reference dosimetry for an intermediate field may substantially reduce the uncertainty. This paper reviews the problems associated with introducing standard dosimetry procedures for these non-standard fields, proposed solution and a status of data and information needed for providing recommendations for reference dosimetry. (author)

  12. Thermoluminescence in medical dosimetry; Termoluminiscencia en dosimetria medica

    Rivera, T., E-mail: trivera@ipn.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    The dosimetry by thermoluminescence (Tl) is applied in the entire world for the dosimetry of ionizing radiations specially to personal and medical dosimetry. This dosimetry method has been very interesting for measures in vivo because the Tl dosimeters have the advantage of being very sensitive in a very small volume and they are also equivalent to tissue and they do not need additional accessories (for example, cable, electrometer, etc.) The main characteristics of the diverse Tl materials to be used in the radiation measures and practical applications are: the Tl curve, the share homogeneity, the signal stability after the irradiation, precision and exactitude, the response in function with the dose and the energy influence. In this work a brief summary of the advances of the radiations dosimetry is presented by means of the thermally stimulated luminescence and its application to the dosimetry in radiotherapy. (Author)

  13. Dosimetry as an integral part of radiation processing

    Different connections between high-dose dosimetry and radiation processing are discussed. Radiation processing cannot be performed without proper dosimetry. Accurate high dose and high dose rate dosimetry exhibits several aspects: first of all it is the preservation of the quality of the product, then fulfillment of legal aspects and last but not the least the safety of processing. Further, seldom discussed topics are as follow: dosimetric problems occurring with double-side EB irradiations, discussed in connection with the deposition of electric charge during electron beam irradiation. Although dosimetry for basic research and for medical purposes are treated here only shortly, some conclusions reached from these fields are considered in dosimetry for radiation processing. High-dose dosimetry of radiation has become a separate field, with many papers published every year, but applied dosimetric projects are usually initiated by a necessity of particular application. (author)

  14. Bio-dosimetry for radiation-exposed individuals

    Exposure of civil populations to genotoxic chemicals or radioactive hazard is an increased concern. It is not only an industrial risk (chemistry plant accident for example) but also a national security problem due to the threat of radiological and nuclear terrorism. It is important to anticipate the need of a bio-dosimetry tool aimed at identifying exposed population in the absence of acute syndrome, in order to assure the medical care that would prevent carcinogenic consequences. DNA repair is a bio-marker of exposure to geno-toxics in individuals. A DNA repair signature can be assessed from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) that reflects the exposure history of the individuals, using a functional enzymatic assay on bio-chip. A proof of concept was obtained using PBMCs from patients undergoing radiotherapy regimen. We identified two classes of responses among patients, if we except a very atypical signature in one patient that could reflect defects in DNA repair. Interestingly, repair of the major oxidative lesions increased during the course of the radiotherapy. We propose to implement this fast, quantitative, possibly automatized assay to identify bio-markers of exposure to geno-toxics and to validate the exposure bio-markers through ex vivo exposure of blood from volunteers. (authors)

  15. Personal dosimetry for external radiation exposure in Europe

    This article summarizes a report on harmonisation and dosimetric quality assurance in individual monitoring for external radiation, published by the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS). The report comprises three parts: (1) procedures and regulations in countries of the European Union and Switzerland with respect to personal dosimetry; (2) a catalogue with descriptions of dosimetry systems in the fore-mentioned countries; and (3) performance testing of dosimetric services in EU Member States and Switzerland. 17 refs

  16. Four decades of thermoluminescence dosimetry research in India

    Last four decades have witnessed tremendous progress in the field of thermo-luminescence dosimetry. During this period development of new and sensitive TL phosphors was reported. Application of these phosphors was exploited in different fields, such as personnel and environmental monitoring, accident and retrospective dosimetry, high dose dosimetry, archaeological and geological dating. Commensurate with these developments, progress in TL instrumentation also took place. This paper reviews some of these developments in the last four decades in India. (author)

  17. Precision and accuracy of neutron dosimetry with TEP ionization chamber

    Precision of neutron dosimetry for medical irradiation could be maintained within a few percent over a year. However, accuracy or absolute dose is not well established yet. The results of neutron dosimetry intercomparison between Japan and USA showed that the agreement in both stated absolute dose was as good as 5 percents. Further studies should be made for the better establishment of neutron dosimetry both experimentally and theoretically. (author)

  18. Performance of dichromate dosimetry systems in calibration and dose intercomparison

    This report presents the results of the High Dose Dosimetry Laboratory of Argentina during ten years of international intercomparisons for high dose with the International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) of the IAEA, using the standard high dose dichromate dosimetry system, and the results of a high dose intercomparison regional exercise in which our Laboratory acted as a reference laboratory, using the standard high dose and low dose dichromate dosimetry system. (author)

  19. Status of conversion of NE standards to national consensus standards

    One major goal of the Nuclear Standards Program is to convert existing NE standards into national consensus standards (where possible). This means that an NE standard in the same subject area using the national consensus process. This report is a summary of the activities that have evolved to effect conversion of NE standards to national consensus standards, and the status of current conversion activities. In some cases, all requirements in an NE standard will not be incorporated into the published national consensus standard because these requirements may be considered too restrictive or too specific for broader application by the nuclear industry. If these requirements are considered necessary for nuclear reactor program applications, the program standard will be revised and issued as a supplement to the national consensus standard. The supplemental program standard will contain only those necessary requirements not reflected by the national consensus standard. Therefore, while complete conversion of program standards may not always be realized, the standards policy has been fully supported in attempting to make maximum use of the national consensus standard. 1 tab

  20. Developing syndrome definitions based on consensus and current use

    Dowling, John N; Baer, Atar; Buckeridge, David L; Cochrane, Dennis; Conway, Michael A; Elkin, Peter; Espino, Jeremy; Gunn, Julia E; Hales, Craig M; Hutwagner, Lori; Keller, Mikaela; Larson, Catherine; Noe, Rebecca; Okhmatovskaia, Anya; Olson, Karen; Paladini, Marc; Scholer, Matthew; Sniegoski, Carol; Thompson, David; Lober, Bill

    2010-01-01

    Objective Standardized surveillance syndromes do not exist but would facilitate sharing data among surveillance systems and comparing the accuracy of existing systems. The objective of this study was to create reference syndrome definitions from a consensus of investigators who currently have or are building syndromic surveillance systems. Design Clinical condition–syndrome pairs were catalogued for 10 surveillance systems across the United States and the representatives of these systems were brought together for a workshop to discuss consensus syndrome definitions. Results Consensus syndrome definitions were generated for the four syndromes monitored by the majority of the 10 participating surveillance systems: Respiratory, gastrointestinal, constitutional, and influenza-like illness (ILI). An important element in coming to consensus quickly was the development of a sensitive and specific definition for respiratory and gastrointestinal syndromes. After the workshop, the definitions were refined and supplemented with keywords and regular expressions, the keywords were mapped to standard vocabularies, and a web ontology language (OWL) ontology was created. Limitations The consensus definitions have not yet been validated through implementation. Conclusion The consensus definitions provide an explicit description of the current state-of-the-art syndromes used in automated surveillance, which can subsequently be systematically evaluated against real data to improve the definitions. The method for creating consensus definitions could be applied to other domains that have diverse existing definitions. PMID:20819870

  1. US accreditation programmes for personal radiation dosimetry

    In order to verify an acceptable level of safety in the workplace, it is necessary to measure the quantity of ionising radiation to which radiation workers could be, or actually are, exposed. At present, there are organisations capable of providing measurement results with good accuracy and precision. These organisations may provide personal dosimetry services to their own facilities, or to others on a contractual basis. They generally have high quality equipment and well trained personnel. However, in today's climate, it is important to demonstrate and document that these systems and services to others meet national standards of quality. In order to provide a higher level of confidence in the results generated by organisations that provide personal dosimetry services in the US, two accreditation programmes have been established. They are the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) and the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). These two programmes will be described and results will be given, along with plans for future development. (author)

  2. Technical basis document for internal dosimetry

    Hickman, D P

    1991-01-01

    This document provides the technical basis for the Chem-Nuclear Geotech (Geotech) internal dosimetry program. Geotech policy describes the intentions of the company in complying with radiation protection standards and the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) program. It uses this policy and applicable protection standards to derive acceptable methods and levels of bioassay to assure compliance. The models and computational methods used are described in detail within this document. FR-om these models, dose- conversion factors and derived limits are computed. These computations are then verified using existing documentation and verification information or by demonstration of the calculations used to obtain the dose-conversion factors and derived limits. Recommendations for methods of optimizing the internal dosimetry program to provide effective monitoring and dose assessment for workers are provided in the last section of this document. This document is intended to be used in establishing an accredited dosi...

  3. Mathematical operations in cytogenetic dosimetry: Dosgen

    Handling of formulas and mathematical procedures for fitting and using of dose-response relationships in cytogenetic dosimetry is often difficulted by the absence of collaborators specialized in mathematics and computation. DOSGEN program contains the main mathematical operations which are used in cytogenetic dosimetry. It is able to run in IBM compatible Pc's by non-specialized personnel.The program possibilities are: Poisson distribution fitting test for the number of aberration per cell, dose assessment for whole body irradiation, dose assessment for partial irradiation and determination of irradiated fraction. The program allows on screen visualization and printing of results. DOSGEN has been developed in turbo pascal and is 33Kb of size. (authors). 4 refs

  4. Trigeminal neuralgia treatment dosimetry of the Cyberknife

    There are 2 Cyberknife units at Stanford University. The robot of 1 Cyberknife is positioned on the patient's right, whereas the second is on the patient's left. The present study examines whether there is any difference in dosimetry when we are treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia when the target is on the right side or the left side of the patient. In addition, we also study whether Monte Carlo dose calculation has any effect on the dosimetry. We concluded that the clinical and dosimetric outcomes of CyberKnife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia are independent of the robot position. Monte Carlo calculation algorithm may be useful in deriving the dose necessary for trigeminal neuralgia treatments.

  5. Trigeminal neuralgia treatment dosimetry of the Cyberknife

    Ho, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Lo, Anthony T., E-mail: tonyho22003@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Dieterich, Sonja; Soltys, Scott G.; Gibbs, Iris C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chang, Steve G.; Adler, John R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    There are 2 Cyberknife units at Stanford University. The robot of 1 Cyberknife is positioned on the patient's right, whereas the second is on the patient's left. The present study examines whether there is any difference in dosimetry when we are treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia when the target is on the right side or the left side of the patient. In addition, we also study whether Monte Carlo dose calculation has any effect on the dosimetry. We concluded that the clinical and dosimetric outcomes of CyberKnife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia are independent of the robot position. Monte Carlo calculation algorithm may be useful in deriving the dose necessary for trigeminal neuralgia treatments.

  6. EURADOS trial performance test for photon dosimetry

    Within the framework of the EURADOS Action entitled Harmonisation and Dosimetric Quality Assurance in Individual Monitoring for External Radiation, trial performance tests for whole-body and extremity personal dosemeters were carried out. Photon, beta and neutron dosemeters were considered. This paper summarises the results of the whole-body photon dosemeter test. Twenty-six dosimetry services from all EU Member States and Switzerland participated. Twelve different radiation fields were used to simulate various workplace irradiation fields. Dose values from 0.4 mSv to 80 mSv were chosen. From 312 single results, 26 fell outside the limits of the trumpet curve and 32 were outside the range 1/1.5. Most outliers resulted from high energy R-F irradiations without electronic equilibrium. These fields are not routinely encountered by many of the participating dosimetry services. If the results for this field are excluded, most participating services satisfied the evaluation criteria. (author)

  7. Biological dosimetry: biochemical and cellular parameters

    Early after the beginning of radiobiology studies, biochemistry has led to research of a biological dosimeter. From an extensive literature review, methods were selected that might be suitable for dose assessment via biochemical indicators. By now, research both in laboratory animals and in therapeutic or accidental human exposures, do not allow to retain a biochemical parameter alone for the purpose of diagnosis or prognosis. Several enzymatic activities have been precociously studied after irradiation: from these studies, it seems that analysis of four enzymatic activities in serum (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, amylase, lactic dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase) could be the most useful dosimetry system for mass sorting. Detection of DNA damage or methods for measuring somatic mutations are currently advancing and provide important new opportunities for biological dosimetry of low doses

  8. Argentine intercomparison programme for personal dosimetry

    An Intercomparison Programme is being carried out in Argentina for individual monitoring services. The programme was designed to test, on a voluntary basis, the performance of the laboratories that provide individual monitoring services for X and gamma radiation fields in the range from low-level dose up to 100 mSv. Irradiations were performed in full accordance with ISO 4037-3 recommendations by the Regional Reference Centre for Dosimetry (CRRD), belonging to Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) and the Physical Dosimetry Laboratory of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN). At the same time, several items have been asked to each participant pertaining to the action range, the detectors' characteristics, the laboratory procedures, the existence of an algorithm and its use for the dosemeter evaluation. In this study the evolution of the laboratories' performance throughout the programme, based on ISO 14146 acceptance criteria, is shown. (authors)

  9. Local overexposure: the role of physical dosimetry

    The role of physical dosimetry in cases of local overexposure is limited. However, if dosimetry, which is usually of no use for diagnosis, is combined with clinical and biological data, it can be useful for therapy and prognosis. This paper, based on cases treated at the Hopital Curie, proposes a method which may be used. It consists of: determination of isodose curves at the surface (skin) by an experimental reconstruction of the accident or by calculation; comparison of these isodoses with the skin pathology: area of erythema (3-8 Gy), area of dry desquamation (> 5 Gy), area of exudative desquamation (12-20 Gy) and area of necrosis (> 25 Gy); calibration of the depth-dose curves after this comparison and the determination of the dose to essential organs or tissues. Examples illustrating this approach are given for accidents involving X rays and 192Ir and 60Co sources. (author)

  10. Radiation protection dosimetry - From amateur to professional

    Radiation Protection Dosimetry was founded in 1981 and there has been a close link between the journal and the solid state dosimetry series of conferences from 1983 to the present day. The background to and the creation and development of the journal is described, having started as one volume of four issues per year in 1981 rising to six volumes in 1994. During the period of development there have been considerable advances in all forms of technology, requiring continued attention to the introduction of this new technology. Some of the changes in the world of publishing over the past 25 y are quite dramatic. Whilst simplistic approaches have been adequate within a small publishing house for a considerable time, further progressive technology changes that are required in the future mean that the necessary resources are only realistically available to large publishers. The journal thus moved to Oxford Univ. Press at the beginning of 2004. It will celebrate its 25. year in 2005. (authors)

  11. Eleventh DOE workshop on personnel neutron dosimetry

    Since its formation, the Office of Health (EH-40) has stressed the importance of the exchange of information related to and improvements in neutron dosimetry. This Workshop was the eleventh in the series sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). It provided a forum for operational personnel at DOE facilities to discuss current issues related to neutron dosimetry and for leading investigators in the field to discuss promising approaches for future research. A total of 26 papers were presented including the keynote address by Dr. Warren K. Sinclair, who spoke on, ''The 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP and their Biological Background.'' The first several papers discussed difficulties in measuring neutrons of different energies and ways of compensating or deriving correction factors at individual facilities. Presentations were also given by the US Navy and Air Force. Current research in neutron dosimeter development was the subject of the largest number of papers. These included a number on the development of neutron spectrometers

  12. Risk factors and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in the critically ill : A nested case-control study

    Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Prins, David; van Stein, Danielle; Hofstra, Jorrit J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the incidence, risk factors, and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in a cohort of critically ill patients. Design: In a retrospective cohort study, patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury were identified using the consensus criteria of acute lung i

  13. DS86: new dosimetry for Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    A summary is given of Volume 1 of the Final Report of the US-Japan Joint Re-assessment of Atomic Bomb Radiation Dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki (DS86 Dosimetry System 86) published in 1987 by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The nine chapters include topics covering the yield of the bombs, the calculation and verification of source terms, the transport of initial radiations in air over ground, thermoluminescence measurements of gamma-rays, measurements of neutron fluences, radiation doses from residual activity, house and terrain shielding, organ dosimetry and computerized dosimetry system 86. (U.K.)

  14. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2005-02-25

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database.

  15. Radio-analysis. Applications: biological dosimetry; Radioanalyse. Applications: dosage biologique

    Bourrel, F. [CEA Saclay, INSTN, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Courriere, Ph. [UFR de Pharmacie, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2003-06-01

    Radioisotopes have revolutionized the medical biology. Radio-immunology remains the reference measurement of the infinitely small in biology. Constant efforts have been performed to improve the simpleness, detectability and fastness of the method thanks to an increasing automation. This paper presents: 1 - the advantages of compounds labelling and the isotopic dilution; 2 - the antigen-antibody system: properties, determination of the affinity constant using the Scatchard method; 3 - radio-immunologic dosimetry: competitive dosimetry (radioimmunoassay), calibration curve and mathematical data processing, application to the free thyroxine dosimetry, immunoradiometric dosimetry (immunoradiometric assay), evaluation of the analytical efficiency of a radioimmunoassay; 4 - detection of the radioactive signal (solid and liquid scintillation). (J.S.)

  16. Reference dosimetry and small-field dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy: Results from a Danish intercomparison study

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Behrens, Claus F.; Sibolt, Patrik;

    A comparison of dosimetry methods at different clinics can be used as a means to uncover systematic uncertainties in ra-diotherapy. To assess the current status of reference dosimetry and small-field dosimetry in clinical practice, a collaborative compari-son study involving several dosimetry...... methods was performed by DTU Nutech at six Danish clinics. The first part of the intercompa-rison regarded the consistency of reference dosimetry. Absorbed dose to water under reference conditions was measured using a Farmer ionization chamber, and was found to agree within 1 % with the daily dose checks...... obtained routinely at each clinic. The second part of the study concerned the accuracy of small-field dosimetry and dose calculations. The geometric size of small fields down to 1 cm x 1 cm was measured using radiochromic film. Minor discre-pancies were seen between the nominal field sizes set by the colli...

  17. 3D dosimetry fundamentals: gels and plastics

    Lepage, M.; Jordan, K.

    2010-11-01

    Many different materials have been developed for 3D radiation dosimetry since the Fricke gel dosimeter was first proposed in 1984. This paper is intended as an entry point into these materials where we provide an overview of the basic principles for the most explored materials. References to appropriate sources are provided such that the reader interested in more details can quickly find relevant information.

  18. Background dose subtraction in personnel dosimetry

    In this paper it is proposed to consider the mode of the frequency distribution of the low dose dosemeters from each clinic that uses X rays as the background environmental dose that should be subtracted from the personnel dosimetry to evaluate the doses due to practice. The problems and advantages of this indirect method to estimate the environmental background dose are discussed. The results for 60 towns are presented. (author)

  19. Results of personnel dosimetry and their interpretation

    The results of the official personnel dose supervision by the authority for evaluation of radiation dosimetry of GSF show radiation protection for personnel in nuclear medicine to be important. The total amount of annual personnel doses (collective dose) is accounted for by medicine only in a portion of 1/4. Excepting the application of radium 226, orthopaedists, radiologists and specialists in internal diseases practising nuclear medicine sustain higher personnel doses than personnel in other fields of nuclear medicine. (DG)

  20. Dosimetry intercomparisons between fast neutron radiotherapy facilities

    Neutron dosimetry intercomparisons have been made between M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Naval Research Laboratory, University of Washington Hospital, and Hammersmith Hospital. The parameters that are measured during these visits are: tissue kerma in air, tissue dose at depth of dose maximum, depth dose, beam profiles, neutron/gamma ratios and photon calibrations of ionization chambers. A preliminary report of these intercomparisons will be given including a comparison of the calculation and statement of tumor doses for each institution