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Sample records for acute crush injury

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of acute crush injury of rabbit sciatic nerve: correlation with histology

    Li, X. [Dept. of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College, Guangzhou (China)], E-mail: xinchunli@163.com; Shen, J.; Chen, J.; Wang, X.; Liu, Q.; Liang, B. [Dept. of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen Univ., Guangzhou (China)

    2008-06-15

    was not found statistically significantly different (P > 0.05). The SIR of crushed nerves at distal portion increased at one week after the crush injury, subsequently further increased, and reached a maximum at 2 weeks. The pathological examination revealed myelin swelling and axonal fragmentation of crushed nerve. Abduction function of injured hind limb was deficit. From 4 to 8 weeks following the crush, the SIR decreased, correspondingly, nerve regeneration was revealed on pathology including extensive Schwann cells proliferation and the immature myelin formation. The abduction function gradually recovered. There was no abnormal finding on MRI for control and sham-operated nerves. The SIR of injured nerve at distal portion increased on MRI. The evolution of SIR after injury was correlated with the degeneration and regeneration of nerve and the function recovery of lower extremities. Assessment of peripheral nerve injury by using SIR could reveal acute nerve injury, as well as aid in monitoring the recovery process. The pathophysiological basis for the SIR is predominantly the results of axon breakdown and myelin regeneration. (author)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of acute crush injury of rabbit sciatic nerve: correlation with histology

    swelling and axonal fragmentation of crushed nerve. Abduction function of injured hind limb was deficit. From 4 to 8 weeks following the crush, the SIR decreased, correspondingly, nerve regeneration was revealed on pathology including extensive Schwann cells proliferation and the immature myelin formation. The abduction function gradually recovered. There was no abnormal finding on MRI for control and sham-operated nerves. The SIR of injured nerve at distal portion increased on MRI. The evolution of SIR after injury was correlated with the degeneration and regeneration of nerve and the function recovery of lower extremities. Assessment of peripheral nerve injury by using SIR could reveal acute nerve injury, as well as aid in monitoring the recovery process. The pathophysiological basis for the SIR is predominantly the results of axon breakdown and myelin regeneration. (author)

  3. Acute sciatic nerve crush injuries in rabbits: MRI and pathological comparative study

    Objective: Simulating injury mechanism in human peripheral nerve, acute sciatic nerve crush injuries model was produced in rabbits to investigate the relationship between the manifestations of MRI and pathology in order to provide the information for clinical therapy and operative plan. Methods: Thirty-two adult rabbits were randomly divided into two groups: group A (n=16) and B (n=16). In group A, the left sciatic nerves were crushed with a stress of 3.61 kg; In group B, with a stress of 10.50 kg. 4 time intervals in each group were observed in 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks, respectively, and each time interval contained 4 rabbits. Left sciatic nerves were served as injured sides, right sciatic nerves were regarded as control sides. MRI was performed at different time interval after crush injury. Then the nerves were examined pathologically. Results: There were no obvious changes on T1WI in injured sides, but the injured distal segment of sciatic nerve thickened and twisted, showing high signal intensity on 3D T2WI, T2WI/SPIR, B-FFE, and T2WI/STIR. MRI could show abnormality of 30 sciatic nerves, the correct diagnostic rate was 93.75% and false negative rate was 6.25%. The distal sciatic nerve/muscle signal intensity ratio (SIR) of the injured sides was significantly higher than that of the control sides (P0.05). SIR in injured side increased at 1 week, reached the peak at 2 weeks, at this time, nerve axons disappeared and lots of myelin degenerated, abduction function disappeared. SIR decreased during 4-8 weeks, the myelin sheath breakdown and Schwann cell proliferated obviously, and abduction functions were observed. The control sciatic nerves showed no abnormality in MRI and pathology. Conclusion: MRI can make the diagnosis of crush injury of sciatic nerve, and dynamic SIR measurement of nerve injury correlates well with the pathological and functional recovery process. MRI is an effective method to monitor degeneration, regeneration, and prognosis after injuries

  4. Acute crush injuries of skeletal muscle of mice with ice-compression therapy: a dynamic study with diffusion tensor imaging

    Objective: To evaluate the value of ice-compression therapy in mice skeletal muscle after acute crush injuries and correlate treatment effect with different compression time by MR DTI. Methods: Forty Weistar mice were randomly divided into 4 groups by random number table method: control group (A), 5 min compression time group (B), 15 min compression time group (C) and 30 min compression time group (D). Diffusion tensor imaging examinations were performed before, immediately after, 24, 48 and 72 hours after injuries. ADC and FA values were calculated by fiber tracking tool. The morphological changes were confirmed by histopathology, and immunohistochemical methods were used for the assessment of Desmin expression with mean of A value. Statistical analysis by LSD-t test and Spearman rank correlation. Results: (1) For every group before injuries, ADC values were (1.38±0.04) × 10-3, (1.38±0.08) × 10-3, (1.34±0.05) × 10-3, (1.36±0.09) × 10-3 mm2/s respectively, FA value were 0.46±0.05, 0.45±0.03, 0.45±0.05, 0.48±0.04 respectively. ADC values increased significantly and FA values reduced in each group immediately after injuries compared with pre-injury values. ADC values were (1.84± 0.10) × 10-3 (1.79±0.09) × 10-3, (1.55±0.07) × 10-3, (1.57±0.04) × 10-3 mm2/s respectively, FA value were 0.21±0.04, 0.26±0.03, 0.31±0.02, 0.30±0.04 respectively. ADC values were still higher and FA values lower than pre-injury values at 24 hours after injury in A, B groups. ADC values were (1.54±0.13) × 10-3, (1.57±0.13) × 10-3 mm2/s, FA value were 0.25±0.03, 0.26±0.02. (2) DTT showed fibers distorted and the number of fiber bundles reduced, some separation and displacement in each group immediately after injury. C, D groups improved more than A, B groups over time. (3) The disorder arrangement of skeletal muscle cells with edema and filaments separation were found in HE staining after injury, but the degree mitigated in C, D groups. Desmin staining became

  5. Common complication of crush injury, but a rare compartment syndrome

    Shaikh Nissar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Compartment syndrome (CS is a common complication of crush injury but it is rare to find bilateral gluteal compartment syndrome (BGCS. Only six cases of BGCS have been reported in the literature. This syndrome has been reported after crush injury, drug overdose, surgical positioning, and vascular surgery. Apart from CS, crush injury is associated with multi-system adverse effects and these patients are at high risk for renal failure and sepsis. CS patients may present with dehydration; coagulation disorders; elevated creatine phosphokinase and myoglobin levels; hyperkalemia and hypocalcaemia, which may cause life-threatening arrhythmias and therefore need urgent and aggressive therapy. The early goal in these patients is prevention of acute renal failure with aggressive fluid therapy, alkalinization of urine, and forced diuresis. Early treatment of hyperkalemia, antibiotic therapy, immunoprophylaxis, and wound care will minimize the risk of arrhythmias and sepsis. CS must be considered when any patient is diagnosed with crush injury syndrome. CS is defined as elevation of interstitial/intracompartmental pressure, leading to microvascular and myoneural dysfunction and secondary hypoxia; it may cause functional loss or even death if not detected early and treated properly. The increase in pressure in one or all compartments of the gluteal region causes CS with devastating effects on muscle and neurovascular bundles. CS is traditionally diagnosed on the basis of five ′p′s: pain, pallor, paraesthesia, pulselessness and paralysis. Diagnosis of gluteal CS is difficult as the peripheral pulses are preserved and the condition is usually only diagnosed when neurological abnormality is noticed. Diagnosis of CS can be made by direct measurement of the compartment pressure and magnetic resonance imaging or computerized tomography. Gluteal CS is managed by fasciotomy and debridement of necrosed tissue, with secondary closure of fascia. A high index of

  6. Current concepts for oil decontamination of crush injuries: a review

    Karimkhani, Chante; Amir, Mahsa; Dellavalle, Robert P.; Ipaktchi, Kyros

    2014-01-01

    This anecdotal, non-systematic review serves to explore the principles and methods of effective oil decontamination from cutaneous wounds, particularly crush injuries. The current expansion of the petroleum industry is necessary to meet increasing world demands for oil. Most stages of oil refining and applications involve significant injury risks, particularly for crush injuries that become contaminated with petroleum compounds. A literature review regarding a standard of care for effective c...

  7. A rodent model to advance the field treatment of crush muscle injury during earthquakes and other natural disasters.

    Speck, Kirsten; Schneider, Barbara St Pierre; Deashinta, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 170 earthquakes of 6.0 or higher magnitude occur annually worldwide. Victims often suffer crush muscle injuries involving impaired blood flow to the affected muscle and damage to the muscle fiber membrane. Current rescue efforts are directed toward preventing acute kidney injury (AKI), which develops upon extrication and muscle reperfusion. But field-usable, muscle-specific interventions may promote muscle regeneration and prevent or minimize the pathologic changes of reperfusion. Although current rodent crush injury models involve reperfusion upon removal of the crush stimulus, an analysis of their methodological aspects is needed to ensure adequate simulation of the earthquake-related crush injury. The objectives of this systematic review are to (a) describe rodent crush muscle injury models, (b) discuss the benefits and limitations of these models, and (c) offer a recommendation for animal models that would increase our understanding of muscle recovery processes after an earthquake-induced crush muscle injury. The most commonly used rodent model uses a clamping or pressing crush stimulus directly applied to murine hindlimb muscle. This model has increased our understanding of muscle regeneration but its open approach does not adequately represent the earthquake-related crush injury. The model we recommend for developing field-usable, muscle-specific interventions is a closed approach that involves a nonclamping crush stimulus. Findings from studies employing this recommended model may have greater relevance for developing interventions that lessen the earthquake's devastating impact on individual and community health and quality of life, especially in developing countries. PMID:21821639

  8. Morus alba Enhanced Functional Recovery After Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury

    Supaporn Mucimapura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Traumatic nerve injury has been recognized as one of the problems commonly found in road traffic crashes. Therefore, searching for the effective substances for promoting the functional recovery of nerve after injury is in required. Accumulating lines of evidence show that free radicals generated after injury contribute the important role to retard functional recovery, thus the substance possessing anti-oxidant could facilitate functional recovery. Based on the effect of antioxidant to promote functional recovery of nerve after injury mentioned earlier, we hypothesized that Morus alba extract, a substance possessing anti-oxidant activity, should be able to facilitate the functional recovery of peripheral nerve after injury. Approach: To elucidate this issue, male Wistar rats, weighing 180-220 g, were orally given the aqueous extract of Morus alba at various doses ranging from 0.1, 1 and 10 mg kg-1 BW 5days before and 21 days after sciatic nerve injury. Motor, sensory and sensorimotor coordination were observed every 3 days for 3 weeks by using De Medinacelli method, foot reflex withdrawal test and rotarod test, respectively. Results: The low dose of the extract significantly improved both sensory and motor functions after crush injury. Although sensory function recovers more sooner than the motor function, it fails to show full recovery within weeks. Thus, the present study demonstrates the potential of M. alba extract to enhance functional recovery after crush injury. Conclusion: In conclusion, Morus alba may serve as functional food to promote nerve recovery after injury. However, further studies about the possible active ingredient (s and underlying mechanism (s are required.

  9. Swimming Exercise in the Acute or Late Phase after Sciatic Nerve Crush Accelerates Nerve Regeneration

    Rosana Macher Teodori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no consensus about the best time to start exercise after peripheral nerve injury. We evaluated the morphological and functional characteristics of the sciatic nerves of rats that began to swim immediately after crush nerve injury (CS1, those that began to swim 14 days after injury (CS14, injured rats not submitted to swimming (C, and uninjured rats submitted to swimming (S. After 30 days the number of axons in CS1 and CS14 was lower than in C (P0.05. Swimming exercise applied during the acute or late phase of nerve injury accelerated nerve regeneration and synaptic elimination after axonotmesis, suggesting that exercise may be initiated immediately after injury.

  10. Swimming Exercise in the Acute or Late Phase after Sciatic Nerve Crush Accelerates Nerve Regeneration

    Teodori, Rosana Macher; Betini, Joice; de Oliveira, Larissa Salgado; Sobral, Luciane Lobato; Takeda, Sibele Yoko Mattozo; Montebelo, Maria Imaculada de Lima

    2011-01-01

    There is no consensus about the best time to start exercise after peripheral nerve injury. We evaluated the morphological and functional characteristics of the sciatic nerves of rats that began to swim immediately after crush nerve injury (CS1), those that began to swim 14 days after injury (CS14), injured rats not submitted to swimming (C), and uninjured rats submitted to swimming (S). After 30 days the number of axons in CS1 and CS14 was lower than in C (P 0.05). Swimming exercise applied during the acute or late phase of nerve injury accelerated nerve regeneration and synaptic elimination after axonotmesis, suggesting that exercise may be initiated immediately after injury. PMID:21876821

  11. Single session of brief electrical stimulation immediately following crush injury enhances functional recovery of rat facial nerve

    Eileen M. Foecking, PhD

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries lead to a variety of pathological conditions, including paresis or paralysis when the injury involves motor axons. We have been studying ways to enhance the regeneration of peripheral nerves using daily electrical stimulation (ES following a facial nerve crush injury. In our previous studies, ES was not initiated until 24 h after injury. The current experiment tested whether ES administered immediately following the crush injury would further decrease the time for complete recovery from facial paralysis. Rats received a unilateral facial nerve crush injury and an electrode was positioned on the nerve proximal to the crush site. Animals received daily 30 min sessions of ES for 1 d (day of injury only, 2 d, 4 d, 7 d, or daily until complete functional recovery. Untreated animals received no ES. Animals were observed daily for the return of facial function. Our findings demonstrated that one session of ES was as effective as daily stimulation at enhancing the recovery of most functional parameters. Therefore, the use of a single 30 min session of ES as a possible treatment strategy should be studied in human patients with paralysis as a result of acute nerve injuries.

  12. Contaminated open fracture and crush injury:a murine model

    Shawn R Gilbert; Justin Camara; Richard Camara; Lynn Duffy; Ken Waites; Hyunki Kim; Kurt Zinn

    2015-01-01

    Modern warfare has caused a large number of severe extremity injuries, many of which become infected. In more recent conflicts, a pattern of co-infection with Acinetobacter baumannii and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged. We attempted to recreate this pattern in an animal model to evaluate the role of vascularity in contaminated open fractures. Historically, it has been observed that infected bones frequently appear hypovascular, but vascularity in association with bone infection has not been examined in animal models. Adult rats underwent femur fracture and muscle crush injury followed by stabilization and bacterial contamination with A. baumannii complex and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Vascularity and perfusion were assessed by microCT angiography and SPECT scanning, respectively, at 1, 2 and 4 weeks after injury. Quantitative bacterial cultures were also obtained. Multi-bacterial infections were successfully created, with methicillin-resistant S. aureus predominating. There was overall increase in blood flow to injured limbs that was markedly greater in bacteria-inoculated limbs. Vessel volume was greater in the infected group. Quadriceps atrophy was seen in both groups, but was greater in the infected group. In this animal model, infected open fractures had greater perfusion and vascularity than non-infected limbs.

  13. Acute kidney injury.

    Lang, Joanna; Zuber, Kim; Davis, Jane

    2016-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates up to 20% of all hospital admissions. Responding to the increase in admissions, complications, mortality, morbidity, and cost of AKI, Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes convened an expert panel to study the issue, review the literature, and publish guidelines to evaluate and treat patients with AKI in the acute setting. This article reviews those guidelines. PMID:27023656

  14. Functional and morphological assessment of a standardized rat sciatic nerve crush injury with a non-serrated clamp.

    Varejão, Artur S P; Cabrita, António M; Meek, Marcel F; Bulas-Cruz, José; Melo-Pinto, Pedro; Raimondo, Stefania; Geuna, Stefano; Giacobini-Robecchi, Maria G

    2004-11-01

    Peripheral nerve researchers frequently use the rat sciatic nerve crush as a model for axonotmesis. Unfortunately, studies from various research groups report results from different crush techniques and by using a variety of evaluation tools, making comparisons between studies difficult. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the sequence of functional and morphologic changes after an acute sciatic nerve crush injury with a non-serrated clamp, giving a final standardized pressure of p = 9 MPa. Functional recovery was evaluated using the sciatic functional index (SFI), the extensor postural thrust (EPT) and the withdrawal reflex latency (WRL), before injury, and then at weekly intervals until week 8 postoperatively. The rats were also evaluated preoperatively and at weeks 2, 4, and 8 by ankle kinematics, toe out angle (TOA), and gait-stance duration. In addition, the motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and the gastrocnemius-soleus weight parameters were measured just before euthanasia. Finally, structural, ultrastructural and histomorphometric analyses were carried out on regenerated nerve fibers. At 8 weeks after the crush injury, a full functional recovery was predicted by SFI, EPT, TOA, and gait-stance duration, while all the other parameters were still recovering their original values. On the other hand, only two of the histomorphometric parameters of regenerated nerve fibers, namely myelin thickness/axon diameter ratio and fiber/axon diameter ratio, returned to normal values while all other parameters were significantly different from normal values. The employment of traditional methods of functional evaluation in conjunction with the modern techniques of computerized analysis of gait and histomorphometric analysis should thus be recommended for an overall assessment of recovery in the rat sciatic nerve crush model. PMID:15684656

  15. Severe crush syndrome complicated with acute pancreatitis: a case report and review of the literatures

    LIU Fang; ZHANG Ling; FU Ping; SU Bai-hai; CHEN Xiao-lei; LIU Ling; CHEN Wei-xia; TAO Ye; HUANG Song-min

    2009-01-01

    @@ Earthquake is one of the most catastrophic natural disasters. As we know, crush syndrome is the second most frequent cause of mortality after the direct impact of trauma.~(1-3) It is a serious clinical case that develops among casualties of earthquakes or other catastrophic events that may also result in a variety of ensuing uncommon complications. Cases of crush syndrome complicated with acute pancreatitis (AP) following the earthquakes are seldom reported.

  16. Lung Injury in Acute Pancreatitis

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Lara Bellacosa; Cristina Felicani

    2009-01-01

    Most knowledge has been accumulated on the mechanisms involved in the development of distant organ injuries during the course of severe acute pancreatitis. Among the various distant organ dysfunctions, both the development of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome represent serious complications. In the following paragraphs the pathophysiological mechanisms capable of determining lung injury during the course of acute pancreatitis will be reviewed. Pancreatic Enzymes and...

  17. Dexamethasone Enhanced Functional Recovery after Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury in Rats

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone is currently used for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury, but its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is known to be an essential trigger of the pathological changes that have a critical impact on nerve repair and regeneration. In this study, we observed the effects of various doses of dexamethasone on the functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model. Motor functional recovery w...

  18. Neurturin enhances the recovery of erectile function following bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury in the rat

    Klein Robert D

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms responsible for the survival and preservation of function for adult parasympathetic ganglion neurons following injury remain incompletely understood. However, advances in the neurobiology of growth factors, neural development, and prevention of cell death have led to a surge of clinical interest for protective and regenerative neuromodulatory strategies, as surgical therapies for prostate, bladder, and colorectal cancers often result in neuronal axotomy and debilitating loss of sexual function or continence. In vitro studies have identified neurturin, a glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, as a neuromodulator for pelvic cholinergic neurons. We present the first in vivo report of the effects of neurturin upon the recovery of erectile function following bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury in the rat. Methods In these experiments, groups (n = 8 each consisted of uninjured controls and animals treated with injection of albumin (blinded crush control group, extended release neurotrophin-4 or neurturin to the site of cavernous nerve crush injury (100 μg per animal. After 5 weeks, recovery of erectile function (treatment effect was assessed by cavernous nerve electrostimulation and peak aortic pressures were measured. Investigators were unblinded to specific treatments after statistical analyses were completed. Results Erectile dysfunction was not observed in the sham group (mean maximal intracavernous pressure [ICP] increase of 117.5 ± 7.3 cmH2O, whereas nerve injury and albumin treatment (control produced a significant reduction in ICP elevation of 40.0 ± 6.3 cmH2O. Neurturin facilitated the preservation of erectile function, with an ICP increase of 55% at 62.0 ± 9.2 cmH2O (p Conclusion Treatment with neurturin at the site of cavernous nerve crush injury facilitates recovery of erectile function. Results support further investigation of neurturin as a neuroprotective and/or neuroregenerative

  19. Acute stent thrombosis after bifurcation stenting with the crush technique visualized with 64-slice computed tomography

    Kristensen, T.S.; Engstrom, T.; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang

    2008-01-01

    Acute stent thrombosis remains a potential complication after stent implantation. With the introduction of electrocardiographic gated multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT), a new nonnvasive imaging modality has become available that may contribute to the detection of complications after co...... complex interventional procedures. We present a case where CT angiography was performed just prior to the clinical presentation of acute stent thrombosis in a 55-year-old male who was treated with the crush technique in a bifurcation lesion Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  20. The christchurch earthquake: crush injury, neuropathic pain, and posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Cammack, Frances; Shipton, Edward A

    2013-01-01

    On February 22, 2011, an earthquake of magnitude 6.3 struck Christchurch, New Zealand. The peak ground acceleration, a measure of the shaking or intensity of an earthquake, was one of the highest ever recorded worldwide. One hundred and eighty-five people lost their lives; many others were injured. Two cases both involving young women are presented; they sustained crush injuries to limbs after being trapped by falling debris and went on to develop severe neuropathic pain. This report examines the mechanisms of neuropathic pain in the setting of crush injury, the treatment modalities, and the association between chronic pain and posttraumatic stress disorder. These case reports highlight the fact that crush injury is relatively common during major earthquakes and that neuropathic pain is an important sequel of this. Post-traumatic stress disorder is common in earthquake survivors with a recognised association with chronic pain. Pain-related disability may increase as well. Issues such as chronic pain and physical disability should not be overlooked as attention focuses on disaster management and the treatment of life-threatening injuries. PMID:23956754

  1. Crocin Enhanced Functional Recovery after Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury in Rats

    Esmaeal Tamaddonfard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Crocin is a constituent of saffron and has many biological functions. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of intraperitoneal (IP injection of crocin on sciatic nerve regeneration in male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four rats were divided into 9 groups: groups 1-4 (intact + normal saline and intact + crocin at doses of 5, 20 and 80 mg/kg, respectively; group 5 (sham surgery + normal saline; groups 6-9 (crush + normal saline and crush + crocin at doses of 5, 20 and 80 mg/kg, respectively. Normal saline and crocin were IP injected for 10 consecutive days after induction of a standard crush injury in left sciatic nerve. Footprints were obtained 1 day before and weekly after induction of nerve injury for evaluation of sciatic functional index (SFI. Blood samples were taken for evaluation of malondialdehyde (MDA levels. Histopathological changes of sciatic nerve were investigated by light microscopy. Results: Sciatic nerve crush-injured rats showed SFI values reduction, increased plasma MDA levels and produced Wallerian degeneration in sciatic nerve. Crocin at a dose of 5 mg/kg had no significant effects. At doses of 20 and 80 mg/kg, crocin accelerated the SFI recovery, decreased MDA levels and reduced Wallerian degeneration severity. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the neuroprotective effects afforded by crocin may be due in part to reduction of free radicals-induced toxic effects.

  2. Morphological and functional aspects of sciatic nerve regeneration after crush injury.

    Răducan, Andreea; Mirică, Silvia; Duicu, Oana; Răducan, S; Muntean, Danina; Fira-Mlădinescu, O; Lighezan, Rodica

    2013-01-01

    Experimental models for the investigation of nerve regeneration are critical in studying new strategies able to promote the repair process. The aim of the present work was to characterize morphological and functional aspects of sciatic nerve regeneration after mechanical crush injury in rodents. Morphological changes were assessed after a four minutes sciatic nerve injury induced by means of a standardized compression clip. Rat nerve samples were collected before injury and after 24 hours, four days, two weeks, and four weeks after injury, respectively. In an additional group with unilateral sciatic nerve injury, animals were evaluated for four weeks using walking track analysis and the sciatic static index (SSI) measured in both rearing and normal standing position. Histological study showed important axonal degeneration at four days and axonal regeneration at four weeks after injury. We observed no significant differences between SSI in rearing and normal standing stance and a strong correlation between SSI values measured in the two positions during the evaluation period. Positive correlations were also found for the footprint parameters. Our data provide a baseline characterization of the sciatic nerve crush injury that will further allow the investigation of peripheral nerve regeneration in the presence of potential neuroprotective agents in post-traumatic nerve repair. PMID:24322020

  3. Swimming Exercise in the Acute or Late Phase after Sciatic Nerve Crush Accelerates Nerve Regeneration

    Rosana Macher Teodori; Joice Betini; Larissa Salgado de Oliveira; Luciane Lobato Sobral; Sibele Yoko Mattozo Takeda; Maria Imaculada de Lima Montebelo

    2011-01-01

    There is no consensus about the best time to start exercise after peripheral nerve injury. We evaluated the morphological and functional characteristics of the sciatic nerves of rats that began to swim immediately after crush nerve injury (CS1), those that began to swim 14 days after injury (CS14), injured rats not submitted to swimming (C), and uninjured rats submitted to swimming (S). After 30 days the number of axons in CS1 and CS14 was lower than in C (P < 0.01). The diameter of axons and...

  4. Restorative effect and mechanism of mecobalamin on sciatic nerve crush injury in mice

    Gan, Lin; Qian, Minquan; Shi, Keqin; Chen, Gang; Gu, Yanglin; Du, Wei; Zhu, Guoxing

    2014-01-01

    Mecobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 containing a central metal element (cobalt), is one of the most important mediators of nervous system function. In the clinic, it is often used to accelerate recovery of peripheral nerves, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we performed sciatic nerve crush injury in mice, followed by daily intraperitoneal administration of mecobalamin (65 μg/kg or 130 μg/kg) or saline (negative control). Walking track analysis, histomorphologi...

  5. Perioperative acute kidney injury

    Calvert Stacey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI is a serious complication in the perioperative period, and is consistently associated with increased rates of mortality and morbidity. Two major consensus definitions have been developed in the last decade that allow for easier comparison of trial evidence. Risk factors have been identified in both cardiac and general surgery and there is an evolving role for novel biomarkers. Despite this, there has been no real change in outcomes and the mainstay of treatment remains preventive with no clear evidence supporting any therapeutic intervention as yet. This review focuses on definition, risk factors, the emerging role of biomarkers and subsequent management of AKI in the perioperative period, taking into account new and emerging strategies.

  6. Cytidine 5′-diphosphocholine administration prevents peripheral neuropathic pain after sciatic nerve crush injury in rats

    Emril, Dessy R; Wibowo, Samekto; Meliala, Lucas; Susilowati, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Background Cytidine 5′-diphosphocholine (citicoline) has been shown to have beneficial effects in central nervous system injury as well as in motoric functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. This study aimed to examine the effect of citicoline on prevention of neuropathic pain in a rat model of sciatic nerve crush injury. Methods Forty experimental rats were divided into four groups. In three groups, the right sciatic nerves were crushed in the mid-thigh region, and a gelatin sponge moistened with 0.4 or 0.8 mL of 100 µmol/L citicoline, or saline 0.4 mL in the control group, was applied. The fourth group of rats was sham-operated, ie the sciatic nerve was exposed with no crush. Functional assessments were performed 4 weeks after crush injury. von Frey filaments (100 g threshold) were used to assess neuropathic pain. In addition, the sciatic functional index and extensor postural thrust (EPT) tests were used to assess motoric function. Results The crush/citicoline 0.4 mL group had a lower percentage of pain (23.53%, n=17) compared with the crush/saline group (53.33%, n=15, Pnerve injury due to compression with a larger administered volume. Conclusion In situ administration of 0.4 mL of 100 µmol/L citicoline prevents the occurrence of neuropathic pain and induces motoric recovery, evaluated by EPT test, 4 weeks after sciatic nerve injury. PMID:27284264

  7. Diagnosis of Acute Groin Injuries

    Serner, Andreas; Tol, Johannes L; Jomaah, Nabil;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute groin injuries are common in high-intensity sports, but there are insufficient data on injury characteristics such as injury mechanisms and clinical and radiological findings. PURPOSE: To describe these characteristics in a cohort of athletes. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study......; Level of evidence, 3. METHODS: A total of 110 male athletes (mean age, 25.6 ± 4.7 years) with sports-related acute groin pain were prospectively included within 7 days of injury from August 2012 to April 2014. Standardized history taking, a clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and....../or ultrasound (US) were performed. RESULTS: The most frequent injury mechanism in soccer was kicking (40%), and change of direction was most frequent in other sports (31%). Clinically, adductor injuries accounted for 66% of all injuries and primarily involved the adductor longus on imaging (91% US, 93% MRI...

  8. L-carnitine alleviates sciatic nerve crush injury in rats:functional and electron microscopy assessments

    Ümmü Zeynep Avsar; Umit Avsar; Ali Aydin; Muhammed Yayla; Berna Ozturkkaragoz; Harun Un; Murat Saritemur; Tolga Mercantepe

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. It is hypothesized that L-carnitine exhibits neuro-protective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats. Rat sciatic nerve was crush injured by a forceps and exhibited degenerative changes. After intragastric administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg L-carnitine for 30 days, axon area, myelin sheath area, axon diameter, myelin sheath diameter, and numerical density of the myelinated axons of injured sciatic nerve were similar to normal, and the function of injured sciatic nerve also improved signiifcantly. These ifndings suggest that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on sciatic nerve crush injury in rats.

  9. [Ascites and acute kidney injury].

    Piano, Salvatore; Tonon, Marta; Angeli, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis. Ascites develops as a consequence of an abnormal splanchnic vasodilation with reduction of effecting circulating volume and activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors system causing salt and water retention. Patients with ascites have a high risk to develop further complications of cirrhosis such as hyponatremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and acute kidney injury resulting in a poor survival. In recent years, new studies helped a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ascites and acute kidney injury in cirrhosis. Furthermore, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed for acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome and a new algorithm for their management has been recommended with the aim of an early diagnosis and treatment. Herein we will review the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ascites and acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and we will identify the unmet needs that should be clarified in the next years. PMID:27571467

  10. Intraperitoneal Alpha-Lipoic Acid to prevent neural damage after crush injury to the rat sciatic nerve

    Ozbag Davut

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Crush injury to the sciatic nerve causes oxidative stress. Alfa Lipoic acid (a-LA is a neuroprotective metabolic antioxidant. This study was designed to investigate the antioxidant effects of pretreatment with a-LA on the crush injury of rat sciatic nerve. Methods Forty rats were randomized into four groups. Group I and Group II received saline (2 ml, intraperitoneally and a-LA (100 mg/kg, 2 ml, intraperitoneally in the groups III and IV at the 24 and 1 hour prior to the crush injury. In groups II, III and IV, the left sciatic nerve was exposed and compressed for 60 seconds with a jeweler's forceps. In Group I (n = 10, the sciatic nerve was explored but not crushed. In all groups of rats, superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT activities, as well as malondialdehyde (MDA levels were measured in samples of sciatic nerve tissue. Results Compared to Group I, Group II had significantly decreased tissue SOD and CAT activities and elevated MDA levels indicating crush injury (p < 0.05. In the a-LA treatment groups (groups III and IV, tissue CAT and SOD activities were significantly increased and MDA levels significantly decreased at the first hour (p < 0.05 and on the 3rd day (p < 0.05. There was no significant difference between a-LA treatment groups (p > 0.05. Conclusion A-LA administered before crush injury of the sciatic nerve showed significant protective effects against crush injury by decreasing the oxidative stress. A-LA should be considered in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries, but further studies are needed to explain the mechanism of its neuroprotective effects.

  11. Low-Level Laser Irradiation Improves Functional Recovery and Nerve Regeneration in Sciatic Nerve Crush Rat Injury Model

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm2 and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 o...

  12. Low-Level Laser Irradiation Improves Functional Recovery and Nerve Regeneration in Sciatic Nerve Crush Rat Injury Model

    Chau-Zen Wang; Yi-Jen Chen; Yan-Hsiung Wang; Ming-Long Yeh; Mao-Hsiung Huang; Mei-Ling Ho; Jen-I Liang; Chia-Hsin Chen

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm(2) and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8...

  13. Acute kidney injury in children.

    Merouani, A; Flechelles, O; Jouvet, P

    2012-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 5% of critically ill hospitalized children and is a risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality. The current review focuses on new definitions of acute kidney injury, standardized to reflect the entire spectrum of the disease, as well as on ongoing research to identify early biomarkers of kidney injury. Its also provides an overview of current practice and available therapies, with emphasis on new strategies for the prevention and pharmacological treatment of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome. Furthermore, a decision-making algorithm is presented for the use of renal replacement therapies in critically ill children with AKI. PMID:22495187

  14. Biomarkers in Acute Lung Injury

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Wendt, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and Acute Lung Injury (ALI) result in high permeability pulmonary edema causing hypoxic respiratory failure with high morbidity and mortality. As the population ages, the incidence of ALI is expected to rise. Over the last decade, several studies have identified biomarkers in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid providing important insights into the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of ALI. Several biomarkers have been validated in subjec...

  15. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    Sarvesh Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article.

  16. Low-level laser irradiation improves functional recovery and nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve crush rat injury model.

    Chau-Zen Wang

    Full Text Available The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm(2 and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm(2. Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI and hindlimb range of motion (ROM. Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43 in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm(2 had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm(2. Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm(2. Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm(2 and 8 J/cm(2 is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury.

  17. Low-level laser irradiation improves functional recovery and nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve crush rat injury model.

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm(2) and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm(2). Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI) and hindlimb range of motion (ROM). Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm(2) had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm(2). Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm(2). Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm(2) and 8 J/cm(2)) is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury. PMID:25119457

  18. Cytidine 5’-diphosphocholine administration prevents peripheral neuropathic pain after sciatic nerve crush injury in rats

    Emril DR

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dessy R Emril,1 Samekto Wibowo,2 Lucas Meliala,2 Rina Susilowati3 1Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, 2Department of Neurology, 3Department of Histology and Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, IndonesiaBackground: Cytidine 5’-diphosphocholine (citicoline has been shown to have beneficial effects in central nervous system injury as well as in motoric functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. This study aimed to examine the effect of citicoline on prevention of neuropathic pain in a rat model of sciatic nerve crush injury.Methods: Forty experimental rats were divided into four groups. In three groups, the right sciatic nerves were crushed in the mid-thigh region, and a gelatin sponge moistened with 0.4 or 0.8 mL of 100 µmol/L citicoline, or saline 0.4 mL in the control group, was applied. The fourth group of rats was sham-operated, ie the sciatic nerve was exposed with no crush. Functional assessments were performed 4 weeks after crush injury. von Frey filaments (100 g threshold were used to assess neuropathic pain. In addition, the sciatic functional index and extensor postural thrust (EPT tests were used to assess motoric function.Results: The crush/citicoline 0.4 mL group had a lower percentage of pain (23.53%, n=17 compared with the crush/saline group (53.33%, n=15, P<0.005. The crush/citicoline 0.4 mL group also showed better motoric recovery, as seen in stronger EPT results (P<0.001. However, the sciatic functional index analysis did not show significant differences between groups (P=0.35. The crush/citicoline 0.8 mL group showed a higher percentage of pain (66.67%, n=18 and less EPT recovery. These results may be explained by more severe nerve injury due to compression with a larger administered volume.Conclusion: In situ administration of 0.4 mL of 100 μmol/L citicoline prevents the occurrence of neuropathic pain and induces motoric recovery

  19. Restorative effect and mechanism of mecobalamin on sciatic nerve crush injury in mice.

    Gan, Lin; Qian, Minquan; Shi, Keqin; Chen, Gang; Gu, Yanglin; Du, Wei; Zhu, Guoxing

    2014-11-15

    Mecobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 containing a central metal element (cobalt), is one of the most important mediators of nervous system function. In the clinic, it is often used to accelerate recovery of peripheral nerves, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we performed sciatic nerve crush injury in mice, followed by daily intraperitoneal administration of mecobalamin (65 μg/kg or 130 μg/kg) or saline (negative control). Walking track analysis, histomorphological examination, and quantitative real-time PCR showed that mecobalamin significantly improved functional recovery of the sciatic nerve, thickened the myelin sheath in myelinated nerve fibers, and increased the cross-sectional area of target muscle cells. Furthermore, mecobalamin upregulated mRNA expression of growth associated protein 43 in nerve tissue ipsilateral to the injury, and of neurotrophic factors (nerve growth factor, brain-derived nerve growth factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor) in the L4-6 dorsal root ganglia. Our findings indicate that the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of mecobalamin after sciatic nerve injury involves the upregulation of multiple neurotrophic factor genes. PMID:25598780

  20. Restorative effect and mechanism of mecobalamin on sciatic nerve crush injury in mice

    Lin Gan; Minquan Qian; Keqin Shi; Gang Chen; Yanglin Gu; Wei Du; Guoxing Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Mecobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 containing a central metal element (cobalt), is one of the most important mediators of nervous system function. In the clinic, it is often used to accelerate recovery of peripheral nerves, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we performed sciatic nerve crush injury in mice, followed by daily intraperitoneal administra-tion of mecobalamin (65 μg/kg or 130 μg/kg) or saline (negative control). Walking track analysis, histomorphological examination, and quantitative real-time PCR showed that mecobalamin signiifcantly improved functional recovery of the sciatic nerve, thickened the myelin sheath in myelinated nerve ifbers, and increased the cross-sectional area of target muscle cells. Further-more, mecobalamin upregulated mRNA expression of growth associated protein 43 in nerve tissue ipsilateral to the injury, and of neurotrophic factors (nerve growth factor, brain-derived nerve growth factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor) in the L4–6 dorsal root ganglia. Our ifndings indicate that the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of mecobalamin after sciatic nerve injury involves the upregulation of multiple neurotrophic factor genes.

  1. Acute Shoulder Injuries in Adults.

    Monica, James; Vredenburgh, Zachary; Korsh, Jeremy; Gatt, Charles

    2016-07-15

    Acute shoulder injuries in adults are often initially managed by family physicians. Common acute shoulder injuries include acromioclavicular joint injuries, clavicle fractures, glenohumeral dislocations, proximal humerus fractures, and rotator cuff tears. Acromioclavicular joint injuries and clavicle fractures mostly occur in young adults as the result of a sports injury or direct trauma. Most nondisplaced or minimally displaced injuries can be treated conservatively. Treatment includes pain management, short-term use of a sling for comfort, and physical therapy as needed. Glenohumeral dislocations can result from contact sports, falls, bicycle accidents, and similar high-impact trauma. Patients will usually hold the affected arm in their contralateral hand and have pain with motion and decreased motion at the shoulder. Physical findings may include a palpable humeral head in the axilla or a dimple inferior to the acromion laterally. Reduction maneuvers usually require intra-articular lidocaine or intravenous analgesia. Proximal humerus fractures often occur in older patients after a low-energy fall. Radiography of the shoulder should include a true anteroposterior view of the glenoid, scapular Y view, and axillary view. Most of these fractures can be managed nonoperatively, using a sling, early range-of-motion exercises, and strength training. Rotator cuff tears can cause difficulty with overhead activities or pain that awakens the patient from sleep. On physical examination, patients may be unable to hold the affected arm in an elevated position. It is important to recognize the sometimes subtle signs and symptoms of acute shoulder injuries to ensure proper management and timely referral if necessary. PMID:27419328

  2. Acute Kidney Injury in the Elderly

    Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Palevsky, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The aging kidney undergoes a number of important anatomic and physiologic changes that increase the risk of acute kidney injury (formerly acute renal failure) in the elderly. This article reviews these changes and discusses the diagnoses frequently encountered in the elderly patient with acute kidney injury. The incidence, staging, evaluation, management, and prognosis of acute kidney injury are also examined with special focus given to older adults.

  3. The cell cycle and acute kidney injury

    Price, Peter M.; Safirstein, Robert L.; Megyesi, Judit

    2009-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) activates pathways of cell death and cell proliferation. Although seemingly discrete and unrelated mechanisms, these pathways can now be shown to be connected and even to be controlled by similar pathways. The dependence of the severity of renal-cell injury on cell cycle pathways can be used to control and perhaps to prevent acute kidney injury. This review is written to address the correlation between cellular life and death in kidney tubules, especially in acute ki...

  4. Transfusion related acute lung injury

    Sharma Ratti; Bhattacharya Prasun; Thakral Beenu; Saluja Karan; Marwaha Neelam

    2009-01-01

    Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse reaction to transfusion of plasma containing blood components. We describe a case of 10-year-old male child with aplastic anemia, platelet count of 7800/΅l, B positive blood group who developed fever (39.2΀C), difficulty in breathing and cyanosis within 2 hrs after transfusion of a random platelet concentrate. Despite the best resuscitative efforts, the child died within next 24 hrs. The prese...

  5. Exenatide induced acute kidney injury.

    Aijazi, Ishma; Abdulla, Fadhil M; Zuberi, Beyla J; Elhassan, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Exenatide is an incretin mimetic. It was approved by the federal drug authority in 2005 for the treatment of type-2 diabetes. Since it is a relatively new medicine clinicians have limited experience with regards to its side effects and safety profile. We report a 47 year old lady who presented with exenatide associated acute kidney injury. She had type-2 diabetes for 10 years with mild micro albuminuria and normal renal functions. She was also taking a stable dose of metformin, gliclazide, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and diuretic for over a year and there was no history of any recent use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory medications. One week after starting exenatide, she developed severe vomiting, followed by hypotension. She presented with acute renal insufficiency and severe lactic acidosis and had to be dialyzed on emergency basis. To our knowledge this is probably the first case reported in the local United Arab Emirate (U.A.E) population. PMID:25672206

  6. Critical role of p38 MAPK for regeneration of the sciatic nerve following crush injury in vivo

    Kato Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological function of p38α, which is an isoform of p38 MAPK, has been investigated previously in several studies using pharmacological inhibitors. However, the results regarding whether p38α promotes or inhibits nerve regeneration in vivo have been controversial. Methods We generated novel p38α mutant mice (sem mice with a point mutation in the region encoding the p38α substrate-docking-site, which serves as a limited loss-of-function model of p38α. In the present study, we utilized sem mice and wild-type littermates (wt mice to investigate the physiological role of p38α in nerve regeneration following crush injuries. Results At four weeks after crush injury, the average axon diameter and the average axon area in sem mice were significantly smaller than those in wt mice. The average myelin sheath thickness in sem mice was reduced compared to wt mice, but no significant difference was observed in the G-ratio between the two groups. The sciatic functional index value demonstrated that functional nerve recovery in sem mice following crush injury was delayed, which is consistent with the histological findings. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of these findings, we examined inflammatory responses of the sciatic nerve by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. At an early phase following crush injury, sem mice showed remarkably lower expression of inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β, than wt mice. The expression of Caspase-3 and Tenascin-C were also lower in sem mice. Conversely, at a late phase of the response, sem mice showed considerably higher expression of TNF-α and of IL-1β with lower expression of S-100 than wt mice. Conclusions This is the first study of the physiological role of p38 MAPK in nerve regeneration that does not rely on the use of pharmacological inhibitors. Our results indicate that p38α insufficiency may cause an inflammatory disorder, resulting in a delay of

  7. [Acute kidney injury in children].

    Amira-Peco-Antić; Paripović, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical condition considered to be the consequence of a sudden decrease (> 25%) or discontinuation of renal function. The term AKI is used instead of the previous term acute renal failure, because it has been demonstrated that even minor renal lesions may cause far-reaching consequences on human health. Contemporary classifications of AKI (RIFLE and AKIN) are based on the change of serum creatinine and urinary output. In the developed countries, AKI is most often caused by renal ischemia, nephrotoxins and sepsis, rather than a (primary) diffuse renal disease, such as glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, renovascular disorder and thrombotic microangiopathy. The main risk factors for hospital AKI are mechanical ventilation, use of vasoactive drugs, stem cell transplantation and diuretic-resistant hypervolemia. Prerenal and parenchymal AKI (previously known as acute tubular necrosis) jointly account for 2/3 of all AKI causes. Diuresis and serum creatinine concentration are not early diagnostic markers of AKI. Potential early biomarkers of AKI are neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin C, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), interleukins 6, 8 and 18, and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP). Early detection of kidney impairment, before the increase of serum creatinine, is important for timely initiated therapy and recovery. The goal of AKI treatment is to normalize the fluid and electrolyte status, as well as the correction of acidosis and blood pressure. Since a severe fluid overload resistant to diuretics and inotropic agents is associated with a poor outcome, the initiation of dialysis should not be delayed. The mortality rate of AKI is highest in critically ill children with multiple organ failure and hemodynamically unstable patients. PMID:25033598

  8. Acute kidney injury in children

    Peco-Antić Amira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a clinical condition considered to be the consequence of a sudden decrease (>25% or discontinuation of renal function. The term AKI is used instead of the previous term acute renal failure, because it has been demonstrated that even minor renal lesions may cause far-reaching consequences on human health. Contemporary classifications of AKI (RIFLE and AKIN are based on the change of serum creatinine and urinary output. In the developed countries, AKI is most often caused by renal ischemia, nephrotoxins and sepsis, rather than a (primary diffuse renal disease, such as glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, renovascular disorder and thrombotic microangiopathy. The main risk factors for hospital AKI are mechanical ventilation, use of vasoactive drugs, stem cell transplantation and diuretic-resistant hypervolemia. Prerenal and parenchymal AKI (previously known as acute tubular necrosis jointly account for 2/3 of all AKI causes. Diuresis and serum creatinine concentration are not early diagnostic markers of AKI. Potential early biomarkers of AKI are neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, cystatin C, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1, interleukins 6, 8 and 18, and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP. Early detection of kidney impairment, before the increase of serum creatinine, is important for timely initiated therapy and recovery. The goal of AKI treatment is to normalize the fluid and electrolyte status, as well as the correction of acidosis and blood pressure. Since a severe fluid overload resistant to diuretics and inotropic agents is associated with a poor outcome, the initiation of dialysis should not be delayed. The mortality rate of AKI is highest in critically ill children with multiple organ failure and hemodynamically unstable patients.

  9. Transfusion related acute lung injury

    Sharma Ratti

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse reaction to transfusion of plasma containing blood components. We describe a case of 10-year-old male child with aplastic anemia, platelet count of 7800/΅l, B positive blood group who developed fever (39.2΀C, difficulty in breathing and cyanosis within 2 hrs after transfusion of a random platelet concentrate. Despite the best resuscitative efforts, the child died within next 24 hrs. The present case highlights the fact that TRALI should be kept as a differential diagnosis in all patients developing acute respiratory discomfort within 6 hrs of transfusion. Without a ′gold standard′ the diagnosis of TRALI relies on a high index of suspicion and on excluding other types of transfusion reactions. Notification to transfusion services is crucial to ensure that a proper investigation is carried out and at-risk donor and recipients can be identified, and risk reduction measures can be adopted.

  10. Nephrology Update: Acute Kidney Injury.

    Sarabu, Nagaraju; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) refers to any acute decrease in glomerular filtration rate, regardless of etiology. Staging of AKI has been recommended to stratify AKI patients according to severity of the condition, based on serum creatinine level and urine output. Classification of AKI into prerenal, intrinsic renal, and postrenal etiologies is helpful in differential diagnosis and management. AKI in hospitalized patients typically occurs due to decreased renal perfusion. Drug-induced, contrast-associated, postoperative, and sepsis-associated AKI also can occur. Clinical assessment of a patient with AKI involves a medical record review, thorough history and physical examination, urinary and blood tests, renal imaging, and, in some instances, renal biopsy. Contrast-induced nephropathy is a common iatrogenic etiology of AKI associated with administration of intravenous iodinated contrast media. Measures to prevent AKI should be taken before administration of intravenous iodinated contrast. AKI can result in many short- and long-term complications, including chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Appropriate treatment of AKI patients involves management of the underlying etiology, when possible, and use of nondialytic and dialytic therapies. PMID:27163760

  11. Up-regulated uridine kinase gene identified by RLCS in the ventral horn after crush injury to rat sciatic nerves.

    Yuh, I; Yaoi, T; Watanabe, S; Okajima, S; Hirasawa, Y; Fushiki, S

    1999-12-01

    Rat sciatic nerve crush injury is one of the models commonly employed for studying the mechanisms of nerve regeneration. In this study, we analyzed the temporal change of gene expression after injury in this model, to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in nerve regeneration. First, a cDNA analysis method, Restriction Landmark cDNA Scanning (RLCS), was applied to cells in the ventral horn of the spinal cord during a 7-day period after the crush injury. A total of 1991 cDNA species were detected as spots on gels, and 37 of these were shown to change after the injury. Temporally changed patterns were classified into three categories: the continuously up-regulated type (10 species), the transiently up-regulated type (22 species), and the down-regulated type (5 species). These complex patterns of gene expression demonstrated after the injury suggest that precise regulation in molecular pathways is required for accomplishing nerve regeneration. Secondly, the rat homologue of uridine kinase gene was identified as one of the up-regulated genes. Northern blot analysis on rat ventral horn tissue and brain revealed that the UK gene had three transcripts with different sizes (4.3, 1. 4, and 1.35 kb, respectively). All of the transcripts, especially the 4.3 kb one, were up-regulated mainly in a bimodal fashion during the 28-day period after the injury. The RLCS method that we employed in the present study shows promise as a means to fully analyze molecular changes in nerve regeneration in detail. PMID:10581173

  12. Disseminated tuberculosis presenting as acute lung injury

    Mary Grace

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis presenting as acute lung injury is distinctly uncommon, even in India where tuberculosis an endemic disease. Simultaneously, acute lung injury is a highly fatal complication of tuberculosis. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose tuberculosis in such cases. Failure to initiate early treatment can have disastrous consequences as exemplified in this case report. This case attempts to highlight the need to consider tuberculosis as one of the likely causative factors for acute lung injury and the importance of starting empirical antituberculous therapy in suspected cases early.

  13. Crocin Enhanced Functional Recovery after Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury in Rats

    Esmaeal Tamaddonfard; Amir Abbas Farshid; Elham Ahmadian; Abbas Hamidhoseyni

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Crocin is a constituent of saffron and has many biological functions. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of intraperitoneal (IP) injection of crocin on sciatic nerve regeneration in male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four rats were divided into 9 groups: groups 1-4 (intact + normal saline and intact + crocin at doses of 5, 20 and 80 mg/kg, respectively); group 5 (sham surgery + normal saline); groups 6-9 (crush + normal saline and crush + crocin at do...

  14. Disseminated tuberculosis presenting as acute lung injury

    Mary Grace; V K Shameer; Renjith Bharathan; Kavitha Chandrikakumari

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis presenting as acute lung injury is distinctly uncommon, even in India where tuberculosis an endemic disease. Simultaneously, acute lung injury is a highly fatal complication of tuberculosis. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose tuberculosis in such cases. Failure to initiate early treatment can have disastrous consequences as exemplified in this case report. This case attempts to highlight the need to consider tuberculosis as one of the likely causative factors for acu...

  15. Novel Imaging Techniques in Acute Kidney Injury

    Kalantarinia, Kambiz

    2009-01-01

    Imaging of the kidneys can provide valuable information in the work up and management of acute kidney injury. Several different imaging modalities are used to gather information on anatomy of the kidney, to rule out obstruction, differentiate acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease and to obtain information on renal blood flow and GFR. Ultrasound is the most widely used imaging modality used in the initial work up of AKI. The utility of contrast enhanced computerized tomography a...

  16. [Perioperative acute kidney injury and failure].

    Chhor, Vibol; Journois, Didier

    2014-04-01

    Perioperative period is very likely to lead to acute renal failure because of anesthesia (general or perimedullary) and/or surgery which can cause acute kidney injury. Characterization of acute renal failure is based on serum creatinine level which is imprecise during and following surgery. Studies are based on various definitions of acute renal failure with different thresholds which skewed their comparisons. The RIFLE classification (risk, injury, failure, loss, end stage kidney disease) allows clinicians to distinguish in a similar manner between different stages of acute kidney injury rather than using a unique definition of acute renal failure. Acute renal failure during the perioperative period can mainly be explained by iatrogenic, hemodynamic or surgical causes and can result in an increased morbi-mortality. Prevention of this complication requires hemodynamic optimization (venous return, cardiac output, vascular resistance), discontinuation of nephrotoxic drugs but also knowledge of the different steps of the surgery to avoid further degradation of renal perfusion. Diuretics do not prevent acute renal failure and may even push it forward especially during the perioperative period when venous retourn is already reduced. Edema or weight gain following surgery are not correlated with the vascular compartment volume, much less with renal perfusion. Treatment of perioperative acute renal failure is similar to other acute renal failure. Renal replacement therapy must be mastered to prevent any additional risk of hemodynamic instability or hydro-electrolytic imbalance. PMID:24656890

  17. Management of acute spinal cord injury.

    Wagner, F C

    1977-06-01

    Based on the experience with 58 patients with acute spinal cord injuries, a system for rapidly evaluating such patients has been developed. With the knowledge that has been acquired clinically and experimentally of spinal cord injury and with the information provided by laminography and by either air or Pantopaque myelography, a reasonably certain diagnosis of the type of spinal cord injury may be made. Treatment designed to restore neurological function may then be instituted promptly. PMID:882906

  18. L-carnitine alleviates sciatic nerve crush injury in rats: functional and electron microscopy assessments

    Avsar, Ümmü Zeynep; Avsar, Umit; Aydin, Ali; Yayla, Muhammed; Ozturkkaragoz, Berna; Un, Harun; Saritemur, Murat; Mercantepe, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. It is hypothesized that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats. Rat sciatic nerve was crush injured by a forceps and exhibited degenerative changes. After intragastric administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg L-carnitine for 30 days, axon area, myelin sheath area, axon diameter, myelin sheath diameter, and numerical densi...

  19. Pathogenesis of acute lung injury in severe acute pancreatitis

    SHI Lei; YUE Yuan; ZHANG Mei; PAN Cheng-en

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To study the pathogenesis of acute lung injury in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Methods:Rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, 6, 9 and 12 h after establishment of inducing model. Pancreas and lung tissues were obtained for pathological study, microvascular permeability and MPO examination. Gene expressions of TNF-α and ICAM-1 in pancreas and lung tissues were detected by RT-PCR. Results:After inducing SAP model, the injury degree of the pancreas and the lung increased gradually, accompanied with gradually increased MPO activity and microvascular permeability. Gene expressions of TNF-α and ICAM-1 in pancreas rose at 1 h and reached peak at 7 h. Relatively, their gene expressions in the lungs only rose slightly at 1 h and reached peak at 9-12 h gradually. Conclusion:There is an obvious time window between SAP and lung injury, when earlier protection is beneficial to prevent development of acute lung injury.

  20. Acute pulmonary injury: high-resolution CT and histopathological spectrum

    Obadina, E T; Torrealba, J M; Kanne, J P

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury usually causes hypoxaemic respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although diffuse alveolar damage is the hallmark of ARDS, other histopathological patterns of injury, such as acute and fibrinoid organising pneumonia, can be associated with acute respiratory failure. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia can also cause acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure and mimic ARDS. This pictorial essay reviews the high-resolution CT findings of acute lung injury and ...

  1. Acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis due to multiple wasp stings

    Hemachandar Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    In most patients, wasp stings cause local reactions and rarely anaphylaxis. Acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis are unusual complications of wasp stings. We report a case of acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis secondary to multiple wasp stings. A 55-year-old farmer developed multi organ dysfunction with acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis 3 days after he had sustained multiple wasp stings. The etiology of acute kidney injury is probably both rhabdomyolysis and acute tubular necrosis....

  2. Acute Hydrocephalus Following Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Son, Seong; Lee, Sang Gu; Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Woo Kyung

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of acute hydrocephalus secondary to cervical spinal cord injury in a patient with diffuse ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). A 75-year-old male patient visited the emergency department with tetraparesis and spinal shock. Imaging studies showed cervical spinal cord injury with hemorrhage and diffuse OPLL from C1 to C4. We performed decompressive laminectomy and occipitocervical fusion. Two days after surgery, his mental status had deteriorated to drow...

  3. First Aid for Acute Sports Injuries

    Bull, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    This article deals with management of acute sports injuries on the field or on the ice and in the dressing room or in the arena's first-aid room. Its most vital message is “Be prepared”. A team approach and suitable ambulance and hospital back-up are mandatory. Individual management of a specific acute injury should be approached with a practice plan. Collars, splints, back board, doctor's bag, ambu bag, suture tray and emergency medications should be at hand. Care must be taken that no long-...

  4. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Pryhuber, Gloria S.; Chess, Patricia R.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Paul R. Knight; Notter, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by rapid-onset respiratory failure following a variety of direct and indirect insults to the parenchyma or vasculature of the lungs. Mortality from ALI/ARDS is substantial, and current therapy primarily emphasizes mechanical ventilation and judicial fluid management plus standard treatment of the initiating insult and any known underlying disease. Current pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS is not optimal, a...

  5. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI)

    TAJANA ZAH; JASNA MESARIC; VISNJA MAJERIC-KOGLER

    2009-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a complication following transfusion of blood products and is potentially a life-threatening adverse event of transfusion. The first case of fatal pulmonary edema following transfusion was reported in the 1950s. In recent time, TRALI has developed from an almost unknown transfusion reaction to the most common cause of transfusion related major morbidities and fatalities. A clinical definition of TRALI was established in 2004, based on acute res...

  6. Acute kidney injury: current concepts and new insights

    Yavuzer Koza

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Acute kidney injury, which was previously named as acute renal failure, is a complex clinical disorder and continues to be associated with poor outcomes. It is frequently seen in hospitalized patients, especially in critically ill patients. The primary causes of acute kidney injury are divided into three categories: prerenal, intrinsic renal and postrenal. The definition and staging of acute kidney injury are mainly based on the risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage kid...

  7. Acute kidney injury following isotretinoin treatment

    Armaly, Zaher; Haj, Shehadeh; Bowirrat, Abdalla; Alhaj, Mohammed; Jabbour, Adel; Fahoum, Yumna; Abassi, Zaid

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 17 Final Diagnosis: Acute kidney injury Symptoms: Flank pain • nausea • vomiting Medication: Isotretinoin Clinical Procedure: Acne treatment Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Unknown etiology Background: Isotretinoin is widely used for the treatment of acne that is unresponsive to topical therapy. Despite its efficacy, isotretinoin has various adverse effects, including cheilitis, increased risk of cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infections, and liver function abnormalities. C...

  8. Therapeutic Effect of Exendin-4, a Long-Acting Analogue of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist, on Nerve Regeneration after the Crush Nerve Injury

    Koji Yamamoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 is glucose-dependent insulinotropic hormone secreted from enteroendocrine L cells. Its long-acting analogue, exendin-4, is equipotent to GLP-1 and is used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, exendin-4 has effects on the central and peripheral nervous system. In this study, we administered repeated intraperitoneal (i.p. injections of exendin-4 to examine whether exendin-4 is able to facilitate the recovery after the crush nerve injury. Exendin-4 injection was started immediately after crush injury and was repeated every day for subsequent 14 days. Rats subjected to sciatic nerve crush exhibited marked functional loss, electrophysiological dysfunction, and atrophy of the tibialis anterior muscle (TA. All these changes, except for the atrophy of TA, were improved significantly by the administration of exendin-4. Functional, electrophysiological, and morphological parameters indicated significant enhancement of nerve regeneration 4 weeks after nerve crush. These results suggest that exendin-4 is feasible for clinical application to treat peripheral nerve injury.

  9. A SCUBA diver with acute kidney injury.

    Gleeson, Patrick James; Kelly, Yvelynne; Ni Sheaghdha, Eadaoin; Lappin, David

    2015-01-01

    An otherwise healthy young man was transferred to our hospital after a diving incident. He had made an uncontrolled ascent from 10 m. On arrival he appeared well. No hypotensive episodes occurred during the transfer. He denied having arthralgias, back pain, dyspnoea or neurological symptoms. Laboratory investigations revealed acutely elevated creatinine (170 µmol/L) and creatine kinase (909 U/L). Radiology was consistent with a focus of pulmonary barotrauma and intrinsic renal disease. Creatine kinase is a marker of arterial gas embolism (AGE). We determined that our patient suffered acute kidney injury as a result of gas embolisation to his renal vasculature from an area of pulmonary barotrauma. Creatinine fell the following day in response to aggressive intravenous fluids. This is the first reported case of acute kidney injury secondary to AGE. Biochemical studies should be part of the routine assessment of patients involved in diving incidents. PMID:25948841

  10. Some biomarkers of acute kidney injury are increased in pre-renal acute injury

    Nejat, Maryam; Pickering, John W; Devarajan, Prasad; Edelstein, Charles L.; Walker, Robert J.; Endre, Zoltán H; Bonventre, Joseph Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Pre-renal acute kidney injury (AKI) is assumed to represent a physiological response to underperfusion. Its diagnosis is retrospective after a transient rise in plasma creatinine, usually associated with evidence of altered tubular transport, particularly that of sodium. In order to test whether pre-renal AKI is reversible because injury is less severe than that of sustained AKI, we measured urinary biomarkers of injury (cystatin C, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), \\(\\gamma\\...

  11. An Optic Nerve Crush Injury Murine Model to Study Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival

    Tang, Zhongshu; Zhang, Shuihua; Lee, Chunsik; Kumar, Anil; Arjunan, Pachiappan; LI Yang; Zhang, Fan; Li, Xuri

    2011-01-01

    Injury to the optic nerve can lead to axonal degeneration, followed by a gradual death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which results in irreversible vision loss. Examples of such diseases in human include traumatic optic neuropathy and optic nerve degeneration in glaucoma. It is characterized by typical changes in the optic nerve head, progressive optic nerve degeneration, and loss of retinal ganglion cells, if uncontrolled, leading to vision loss and blindness.

  12. The innate immune response in ischemic acute kidney injury

    Jang, Hye Ryoun; Rabb, Hamid

    2008-01-01

    Kidney ischemia reperfusion injury is a major cause of morbidity in both allograft and native kidneys. Ischemia reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury is characterized by early, allo-antigen independent inflammation. Major components of the innate immune system are activated and participate in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury, plus prime the allograft kidney for rejection. Soluble members of innate immunity implicated in acute kidney injury include the complement system, cytokines, an...

  13. Acute alcohol-induced liver injury

    Gavin Edward Arteel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption is customary in most cultures and alcohol abuse is common worldwide. For example, more than 50% of Americans consume alcohol, with an estimated 23.1% of Americans participating in heavy and/or binge drinking at least once a month. A safe and effective therapy for alcoholic liver disease (ALD in humans is still elusive, despite significant advances in our understanding of how the disease is initiated and progresses. It is now clear that acute alcohol binges not only can be acutely toxic to the liver, but also can contribute to the chronicity of ALD. Potential mechanisms by which acute alcohol causes damage include steatosis, dysregulated immunity and inflammation and altered gut permeability. Recent interest in modeling acute alcohol exposure has yielded new insights into potential mechanisms of acute injury, that also may well be relevant for chronic ALD. Recent work by this group on the role of PAI-1 and fibrin metabolism in mediating acute alcohol-induced liver damage serve as an example of possible new targets that may be useful for alcohol abuse, be it acute or chronic.

  14. First aid for acute sports injuries.

    Bull, R C

    1987-09-01

    This article deals with management of acute sports injuries on the field or on the ice and in the dressing room or in the arena's first-aid room. Its most vital message is "Be prepared". A team approach and suitable ambulance and hospital back-up are mandatory. Individual management of a specific acute injury should be approached with a practice plan. Collars, splints, back board, doctor's bag, ambu bag, suture tray and emergency medications should be at hand. Care must be taken that no long-term harm befalls the player. The attending physician must be knowledgeable about preventive equipment and immediate institution of rehabilitation procedures, and must try to inform the coach or trainer and parent as to when the athlete can safely return to play. It is important that the athlete not return to play until he/she is 100% fit. PMID:21263977

  15. Sodium hypochlorite-induced acute kidney injury

    Brandon W Peck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium hypochlorite (bleach is commonly used as an irrigant during dental proce-dures as well as a topical antiseptic agent. Although it is generally safe when applied topically, reports of accidental injection of sodium hypochlorite into tissue have been reported. Local necrosis, pain and nerve damage have been described as a result of exposure, but sodium hypo-chlorite has never been implicated as a cause of an acute kidney injury (AKI. In this report, we describe the first case of accidental sodium hypochlorite injection into the infraorbital tissue during a dental procedure that precipitated the AKI. We speculate that oxidative species induced by sodium hypochlorite caused AKI secondary to the renal tubular injury, causing mild acute tubular necrosis.

  16. Dengue-associated acute kidney injury

    Oliveira, João Fernando Picollo; Burdmann, Emmanuel A

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is presently the most relevant viral infection transmitted by a mosquito bite that represents a major threat to public health worldwide. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious and potentially lethal complication of this disease, and the actual incidence is unknown. In this review, we will assess the most relevant epidemiological and clinical data regarding dengue and the available evidence on the frequency, etiopathogenesis, outcomes and treatment of dengue-associated AKI.

  17. Mediators of Inflammation in Acute Kidney Injury

    Ali Akcay; Quocan Nguyen; Edelstein, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains to be an independent risk factor for mortality and morbidity. Inflammation is now believed to play a major role in the pathopathophysiology of AKI. It is hypothesized that in ischemia, sepsis and nephrotoxic models that the initial insult results in morphological and/or functional changes in vascular endothelial cells and/or in tubular epithelium. Then, leukocytes including neutrophils, macrophages, natural killer cells, and lymphocytes infiltrate into the in...

  18. Determinants of postoperative acute kidney injury

    Abelha, Fernando José; Botelho, Miguela; Fernandes, Vera; Barros, Henrique

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Development of acute kidney injury (AKI) during the perioperative period is associated with increases in morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to evaluate the incidence and determinants of postoperative AKI after major noncardiac surgery in patients with previously normal renal function. Methods This retrospective cohort study was carried out in the multidisciplinary Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU) with five intensive care beds. The study population consisted of 1166 patients wi...

  19. Classification of acute subaxial cervical spine injury

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Study Design Literature review Objective The aim of this thesis is to compare the main classification systems available for classifying acute subaxial cervical spinal injury and compare their relative strengths and weaknesses, especially in their ability to guide treatment and predict prognosis. Methods A PICO question was formulated and used to select search terms. The search terms were used to search the online database Pubmed/Medline for English language revi...

  20. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen on the regeneration of experimental crush injuries of nerves Efeito da oxigenioterapia hiperbárica na regeneração de lesões experimentais de nervos

    Paulo Tuma Jr.

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen has been successfully used on treatment of acute ischemic injuries involving soft tissues and chronic injuries. In nerve crush injuries, the mechanisms involved are very similar to those found in ischemic injuries. Consequently, it is logical to hypothesize that hyperbaric oxygen should improve nerve repair, which is a critical step on functional recovery. In the present study, we created standard nerve crush injuries on sciatic nerves of rats, which underwent treatment with hyperbaric oxygen. Results were assessed by functional evaluation using walking-track analysis. The functional recovery indexes observed did not differ from control group. We concluded that hyperbaric oxygen therapy, in the schedule used, had no influence on functional recovery after nerve crush injuries.O oxigênio hiperbárico exerce efeitos comprovadamente benéficos no tratamento de lesões isquêmicas agudas de partes moles e em feridas de difícil cicatrização. Nas lesões neurais por esmagamento, os mecanismos fisiopatológicos assemelham-se aos efeitos dependentes da isquemia tissular. Portanto, a terapia com oxigênio hiperbárico teria participação nos processos de reparação neural, que constitui um dos pontos críticos para a recuperação funcional após as lesões por esmagamento de nervos periféricos. Neste estudo, foram realizadas lesões por esmagamento em nervo ciático de ratos, submetidos à terapia com oxigênio hiperbárico no pós-operatório. Os resultados foram quantificados através de avaliação funcional pelo método de "walking-track analysis". Os índices de recuperação funcional observados não diferiram dos observados no grupo controle. Portanto, verificou-se que a terapia com oxigênio hiperbárico, no esquema proposto, não teve influência na recuperação funcional após lesões neurais por esmagamento.

  1. Interleukin-1 and acute brain injury

    Katie N Murray

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is the key host-defense response to infection and injury, yet also a major contributor to a diverse range of diseases, both peripheral and central in origin. Brain injury as a result of stroke or trauma is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, yet there are no effective treatments, resulting in enormous social and economic costs. Increasing evidence, both preclinical and clinical, highlights inflammation as an important factor in stroke, both in determining outcome and as a contributor to risk. A number of inflammatory mediators have been proposed as key targets for intervention to reduce the burden of stroke, several reaching clinical trial, but as yet yielding no success. Many factors could explain these failures, including the lack of robust preclinical evidence and poorly designed clinical trials, in addition to the complex nature of the clinical condition. Lack of consideration in preclinical studies of associated co-morbidities prevalent in the clinical stroke population is now seen as an important omission in previous work. These co-morbidities (atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, infection have a strong inflammatory component, supporting the need for greater understanding of how inflammation contributes to acute brain injury. Interleukin (IL-1 is the prototypical pro-inflammatory cytokine, first identified many years ago as the endogenous pyrogen. Research over the last 20 years or so reveals that IL-1 is an important mediator of neuronal injury and blocking the actions of IL-1 is beneficial in a number of experimental models of brain damage. Mechanisms underlying the actions of IL-1 in brain injury remain unclear, though increasing evidence indicates the cerebrovasculature as a key target. Recent literature supporting this and other aspects of how IL-1 and systemic inflammation in general contribute to acute brain injury are discussed in this review.

  2. Injury potentials associated with severity of acute spinal cord injury in an experimental rat model

    Suying Pan; Guanghao Zhang; Xiaolin Huo; Jinzhu Bai; Tao Song

    2011-01-01

    To investigate characteristics of injury potentials after different degrees of spinal cord injury in rats, the present study established models of spinal cord contusion with severe, moderate, and mild degrees of injury. Injury potential was measured in vivo using a direct current voltage amplification system. Results revealed that in the first 4 hours after acute spinal cord injury, initial amplitude of injury potential was greatest after severe injury, followed by moderate and mild injuries. Amplitude of injury potential decreased gradually with injury time, and the recession curve was logarithmic. Under the same degree of injuries, amplitude of rostral injury potential was generally less than caudal injury potential. Results suggested that injury potential reflected injury severity, because large initial amplitude of injury potential during the early injury stage implied severe injury.

  3. Acute liver failure and acute kidney injury: Definitions, prognosis, and outcome

    Włodzimirow, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to investigate definitions, prognostic indicators and their association with adverse events, mainly mortality for acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) and acute kidney injury (AKI).

  4. Acute injury of the ankle joint

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography could be performed. There is no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, particularly about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today MRI is not used for this indication, although it allows, with controlled positioning of the foot and with defined sections, visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In ankle injuries, plain radiographs form the established basis of diagnostic imaging and can provide definitive answers in most cases. CT is used in complex fractures for complete visualization. MRI is the method of choice for several diagnostic problem cases, including occult fractures and post-traumatic avascular necrosis. In tendon injuries, MRI is important if ultrasound is not diagnostic. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI is the most important second-step procedure when radiographs are nondiagnostic. (orig.)

  5. Acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements

    Gary C Chen, Vivek S Ramanathan, David Law, Pauline Funchain, George C Chen, Samuel French, Boris Shlopov, Viktor Eysselein, David Chung, Sonya Reicher, Binh V Pham

    2010-01-01

    We report three cases of patients with acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements. One patient took Hydroxycut while the other two took Herbalife supplements. Liver biopsies for all patients demonstrated findings consistent with drug-induced acute liver injury. To our knowledge, we are the first institute to report acute liver injury from both of these two types of weight-loss herbal supplements together as a case series. The series emphasizes the importance of taking a caut...

  6. The Anatomic Pattern of Injuries in Acute Inversion Ankle Sprains

    Khor, Yuet Peng; Tan, Ken Jin

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are little data on the incidence and patterns of injuries seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute inversion ankle sprains. This study may help in the understanding of the pathomechanics, natural history, and outcomes of this common injury. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: From June 2011 to June 2013, a total of 64 consecutive patients had MRI of the ankle performed for acute inversion injury to the ankle. All injuries/pathologies reported w...

  7. Acute Kidney Injury Predicts Mortality after Charcoal Burning Suicide.

    Chen, Yu-Chin; Tseng, Yi-Chia; Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Yang, Huang-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jen-Fen; Lin, Wey-Ran; Wang, I-Kuan; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-01-01

    A paucity of literature exists on risk factors for mortality in charcoal burning suicide. In this observational study, we analyzed the data of 126 patients with charcoal burning suicide that seen between 2002 and 2013. Patients were grouped according to status of renal damage as acute kidney injury (N = 49) or non-acute kidney injury (N = 77). It was found that patients with acute kidney injury suffered severer complications such as respiratory failure (P = 0.002), myocardial injury (P = 0.049), hepatic injury (P acute kidney injury. Moreover, patients with acute kidney injury suffered longer hospitalization duration (16.9 ± 18.3 versus 10.7 ± 10.9, P = 0.002) and had higher mortality rate (8.2% versus 0%, P = 0.011) than patients without injury. In a multivariate Cox regression model, it was demonstrated that serum creatinine level (P = 0.019) and heart rate (P = 0.022) were significant risk factors for mortality. Finally, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with acute kidney injury suffered lower cumulative survival than without injury (P = 0.016). In summary, the overall mortality rate of charcoal burning suicide population was 3.2%, and acute kidney injury was a powerful predictor of mortality. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27430168

  8. Transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Dixit Ramakant; Sharma Sidharth; Parmez A

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is related to the transfusion of blood components. Typically, it is a clinical syndrome, characterized by the sudden onset of dyspnea, hypoxemia and bilateral non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. A 83-year-old female patient with a history of AML developed TRALI after receiving 6 units of platelets. TRALI symptoms was started 10 min later the transfusion. AML is a risky group for TRALI. While giving transfusion to the risky groups of TRALI one must be...

  9. Acute kidney injury: A rare cause

    Satish Mendonca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a young lady who consumed hair dye, which contained paraphenylene diamine (PPD, as a means of deliberate self-harm. This resulted in severe angio-neurotic edema for which she had to be ventilated, and thereafter developed rhabdomyolysis leading to acute kidney injury (AKI. The unusual aspect was that the patient continued to have flaccid quadriparesis and inability to regain kidney function. Renal biopsy performed 10 weeks after the dye consumption revealed severe acute tubular necrosis with myoglobin pigment casts. This suggests that PPD has a long-term effect leading to ongoing myoglobinuria, causing flaccid paralysis to persist and preventing the recovery of AKI. In such instances, timely treatment to prevent AKI in the form alkalinization of urine should be initiated promptly. Secondly, because PPD is a nondialyzable toxin, and its long-term effect necessitates its speedy removal, hemoperfusion might be helpful and is worth considering

  10. Acute kidney injury: A rare cause.

    Mendonca, Satish; Barki, Satish; Mishra, Mayank; Kumar, R S V; Gupta, Devika; Gupta, Pooja

    2015-09-01

    We present a young lady who consumed hair dye, which contained paraphenylene diamine (PPD), as a means of deliberate self-harm. This resulted in severe angio-neurotic edema for which she had to be ventilated, and thereafter developed rhabdomyolysis leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). The unusual aspect was that the patient continued to have flaccid quadriparesis and inability to regain kidney function. Renal biopsy performed 10 weeks after the dye consumption revealed severe acute tubular necrosis with myoglobin pigment casts. This suggests that PPD has a long-term effect leading to ongoing myoglobinuria, causing flaccid paralysis to persist and preventing the recovery of AKI. In such instances, timely treatment to prevent AKI in the form alkalinization of urine should be initiated promptly. Secondly, because PPD is a nondialyzable toxin, and its long-term effect necessitates its speedy removal, hemoperfusion might be helpful and is worth considering. PMID:26354573

  11. Pregnancy related acute kidney injury: nondialytic management

    Kaliki Hymavathi Reddy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute Kidney Injury (AKI is associated with increased mortality and morbidity unless timely diagnosed and promptly managed. An understanding of the renal physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy is essential for Proper evaluation, diagnosis, and management of Pregnancy Related AKI (PRAKI. In the general population, AKI can occur from prerenal, intrinsic/renal, and post-renal causes. Major causes of pre-renal azotemia include hyperemesis gravidarum and uterine hemorrhage in the setting of placental abruption. Intrinsic etiologies include infections from acute pyelonephritis and septic abortion, bilateral cortical necrosis, and acute tubular necrosis. Particular attention should be paid to specific conditions that lead to AKI during the second and third trimesters, such as preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and TTP-HUS. An understanding of the various etiologies of AKI in the pregnant patient is key to the appropriate clinical management and prevention of adverse maternal/fetal outcomes. Sometimes PRAKI may require intensive management and even dialysis adding additional economical burden to the patient. We here, with report an interesting case of PRAKI diagnosed and managed in time by simple medical measures thus delivering an effective treatment at a much lesser cost. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(2.000: 486-489

  12. Crush Grinding

    Crush Grinding is a special process used at the Kansas City Plant to finish stem sections of reservoir products. In this process, a precise profile of the desired product is formed on a tungsten carbide roll. This roll slowly transfers a mirror image of the profile onto the grinding surface of a wheel. The transfer rate of the profile is between 0.001 and 0.010 inches per minute. Crush grinding is desirable since it provides consistent surface finishes and thin walls at a high production rate. In addition, it generates very sharp fillet radii. However, crush grinding is a complex process since many variables affect the final product. Therefore, the process requires more attention and knowledge beyond basic metal removal practices. While the Kansas City Plant began using these machines in 1995, a formal study regarding crush grinding has not been conducted there. In addition, very little literature is available in the grinding industry regarding this process. As a result, new engineers at the Kansas City Plant must learn the process through trial and error. The purpose of this document is to address this literature deficit while specifically promoting a better understanding of the stem crush grinding process at the Kansas City Plant.

  13. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury: The Work of DAMPs*

    Land, Walter G.

    2013-01-01

    Current notions in immunology hold that not only pathogen-mediated tissue injury but any injury activates the innate immune system. In principle, this evolutionarily highly conserved, rapid first-line defense system responds to pathogen-induced injury with the creation of infectious inflammation, and non-pathogen-induced tissue injury with ‘sterile’ tissue inflammation. In this review, evidence has been collected in support of the notion that the transfusion-related acute lung injury induces ...

  14. Electrophysiologic monitoring in acute brain injury.

    Claassen, Jan; Vespa, Paul

    2014-12-01

    To determine the optimal use and indications of electroencephalography (EEG) in critical care management of acute brain injury (ABI). An electronic literature search was conducted for articles in English describing electrophysiological monitoring in ABI from January 1990 to August 2013. A total of 165 studies were included. EEG is a useful monitor for seizure and ischemia detection. There is a well-described role for EEG in convulsive status epilepticus and cardiac arrest (CA). Data suggest EEG should be considered in all patients with ABI and unexplained and persistent altered consciousness and in comatose intensive care unit (ICU) patients without an acute primary brain condition who have an unexplained impairment of mental status. There remain uncertainties about certain technical details, e.g., the minimum duration of EEG studies, the montage, and electrodes. Data obtained from both EEG and EP studies may help estimate prognosis in ABI patients, particularly following CA and traumatic brain injury. Data supporting these recommendations is sparse, and high quality studies are needed. EEG is used to monitor and detect seizures and ischemia in ICU patients and indications for EEG are clear for certain disease states, however, uncertainty remains on other applications. PMID:25208668

  15. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries.

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-18

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  16. Human models of acute lung injury

    Alastair G. Proudfoot

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a syndrome that is characterised by acute inflammation and tissue injury that affects normal gas exchange in the lungs. Hallmarks of ALI include dysfunction of the alveolar-capillary membrane resulting in increased vascular permeability, an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung and a local pro-coagulant state. Patients with ALI present with severe hypoxaemia and radiological evidence of bilateral pulmonary oedema. The syndrome has a mortality rate of approximately 35% and usually requires invasive mechanical ventilation. ALI can follow direct pulmonary insults, such as pneumonia, or occur indirectly as a result of blood-borne insults, commonly severe bacterial sepsis. Although animal models of ALI have been developed, none of them fully recapitulate the human disease. The differences between the human syndrome and the phenotype observed in animal models might, in part, explain why interventions that are successful in models have failed to translate into novel therapies. Improved animal models and the development of human in vivo and ex vivo models are therefore required. In this article, we consider the clinical features of ALI, discuss the limitations of current animal models and highlight how emerging human models of ALI might help to answer outstanding questions about this syndrome.

  17. Hymenoptera Stings and the Acute Kidney Injury

    Yashad Dongol

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera stings are a health concern. Apidae (bees, Vespidae (hornets, yellow jackets and wasps and Formicidae (ants are medically-important stinging insects under the order Hymenoptera. Clinical features from simple skin manifestations to severe and fatal organ injury are due to the hypersensitivity reactions and/ or the toxic effects of the venom inoculated. Here we discuss on Hymenoptera stings involving apids (honey bees and vespids (wasps, hornets and yellow jackets and their effect on renal function and associated morphological changes in the kidney. Despite the differences in venom composition and quantity released per sting in two insect groups, both lead to similar medical consequences, such as localised normal allergic reactions, mild to severe anaphylaxis and shock and multiple organ and tissue injury leading to multiple organ failure. Acute kidney injury (AKI is one of the unusual complications of Hymenoptera stings and has the basis of both immune-mediated and toxic effects. Evidence has proven that supportive therapy along with the standard medication is very efficient in completely restoring the kidney function without any recurrence.

  18. Perioperative aspirin and clonidine and risk of acute kidney injury

    Garg, Amit X; Kurz, Andrea; Sessler, Daniel I;

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Acute kidney injury, a common complication of surgery, is associated with poor outcomes and high health care costs. Some studies suggest aspirin or clonidine administered during the perioperative period reduces the risk of acute kidney injury; however, these effects are uncertain and ...

  19. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  20. Long-term functional and morphological assessment of a standardized rat sciatic nerve crush injury with a non-serrated clamp.

    Luís, A L; Amado, S; Geuna, S; Rodrigues, J M; Simões, M J; Santos, J D; Fregnan, F; Raimondo, S; Veloso, A Prieto; Ferreira, A J A; Armada-da-Silva, P A S; Varejão, A S P; Maurício, A C

    2007-06-15

    We have recently described the sequence of functional and morphologic changes occurring after a standardized sciatic nerve crush injury. An 8-week post-injury time was used because this end point is the far most used. Unexpectedly, both functional and morphological data revealed that animals had still not recovered to normal pre-injury levels. Therefore, the present study was designed in order to prolong the observation up to 12 weeks. Functional recovery was evaluated using sciatic functional index (SFI), static sciatic index (SSI), extensor postural thrust (EPT), withdrawal reflex latency (WRL) and ankle kinematics. In addition, quantitative morphology was carried out on regenerated nerve fibers. A full functional recovery was predicted by SFI/SSI, EPT and WRL but not all ankle kinematics parameters. Moreover, only two morphological parameters (myelin thickness/axon diameter ratio and fiber/axon diameter ratio) returned to normal values. Data presented in this paper provide a baseline for selecting the adequate end-point and methods of recovery assessment for a rat sciatic nerve crush study and suggest that the combined use of functional and morphological analysis should be recommended in this experimental model. PMID:17397932

  1. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    Fong Daniel TP; Chan Yue-Yan; Mok Kam-Ming; Yung Patrick SH; Chan Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprai...

  2. Acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke due to electric injury.

    Singh Jain, Rajendra; Kumar, Sunil; Suresh, Desai Tushar; Agarwal, Rakesh

    2015-07-01

    Electrical injuries are most commonly due to household accidents.Various factors determine the severity of electric injury, including type of current, amperage, voltage, tissue resistance, pathway of current,and duration of contact with the body. Various types of neurologic damage due to electrical injury have been described in literature. It may manifest as peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord damage, seizures, cerebellarataxia, hypoxic encephalopathy, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Acute ischemic stroke is an infrequent complication of electrical injury. Herein,we report a case of middle-aged man, who accidentally sustained high voltage electrical injury followed by acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed acute infarctin bilateral cerebellar and medial occipital regions. Computed tomographic angiogram of the brain and neck vessels was normal. Possibly,in our patient, the mechanism could be related to direct vascular injury due to electric current. PMID:25684743

  3. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury -A Case Report

    Anamika,; Vasanth Nayak; Jose Chacko; G Parameswara

    2008-01-01

    Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare but life threatening complication of blood transfusion which is being increasingly recognized. It is caused by cross reaction between donor antibodies and host leucocytes or between donor leucocytes with host antibodies. TRALI usually presents as an Acute Lung Injury (ALI) resulting in pulmonary congestion and edema, often leading to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of TRALI in a patient who underwent laparoto...

  4. Pressure Controlled Ventilation to Induce Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    Koeppen, Michael; Eckle, Tobias; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2011-01-01

    Murine models are extensively used to investigate acute injuries of different organs systems (1-34). Acute lung injury (ALI), which occurs with prolonged mechanical ventilation, contributes to morbidity and mortality of critical illness, and studies on novel genetic or pharmacological targets are areas of intense investigation (1-3, 5, 8, 26, 30, 33-36). ALI is defined by the acute onset of the disease, which leads to non-cardiac pulmonary edema and subsequent impairment of pulmonary gas exch...

  5. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  6. Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Linagliptin.

    Nandikanti, Deepak K; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Gosmanov, Aidar R

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. About 5% of linagliptin is eliminated by the kidneys and no dose adjustment is recommended in kidney impairment. We report a first case of linagliptin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) in a patient with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD). We hypothesize that AKI was due to renal hypoperfusion from linagliptin-induced natriuresis and intravascular volume contraction in the setting of concomitant lisinopril use, which is known to impair autoregulation and potentiate hypotension-induced AKI. It may be prudent to exert caution and closely monitor kidney function when initiating linagliptin in combination with ACE-inhibitors in CKD patients. PMID:26981294

  7. Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Linagliptin

    Deepak K. Nandikanti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. About 5% of linagliptin is eliminated by the kidneys and no dose adjustment is recommended in kidney impairment. We report a first case of linagliptin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI in a patient with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD. We hypothesize that AKI was due to renal hypoperfusion from linagliptin-induced natriuresis and intravascular volume contraction in the setting of concomitant lisinopril use, which is known to impair autoregulation and potentiate hypotension-induced AKI. It may be prudent to exert caution and closely monitor kidney function when initiating linagliptin in combination with ACE-inhibitors in CKD patients.

  8. Fluid management in acute kidney injury.

    Goldstein, Stuart L

    2014-01-01

    Fluid management in critical illness has undergone extensive reevaluation in the past decade. Since a significant percentage of critically ill patients develop acute kidney injury (AKI), optimal fluid management is even more paramount to prevent the ill effects of either underhydration or overhydration. The concepts of early goal-directed fluid therapy (EGDT) and conservative late fluid management permeate current clinical research, and the independent association between fluid accumulation and mortality has been repeatedly demonstrated. A number of prospective randomized trials are planned to provide an adequately powered assessment of the effect of EGDT or earlier renal replacement therapy initiation in patients with, or at risk for AKI. The aim of this analytical review is to use existing clinical and physiological studies to support a 3-phase model of fluid management in the critically ill patient with AKI. PMID:23753221

  9. Acute kidney injury in HCT: an update.

    Lopes, J A; Jorge, S; Neves, M

    2016-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is highly prevalent whether the patients undergo myeloablative or non-myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT); however, the pathogenesis and risk factors leading to AKI can differ between the two. The prognosis of AKI in patients receiving HCT is poor. In fact, AKI following HCT is associated not only with increased short- and long-term mortality, but also with progression to chronic kidney disease. Herein, the authors provide a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the definition and diagnosis, as well as of the incidence, pathogenesis and outcome of AKI in patients undergoing HCT, centering on the differences between myeloablative and non-myeloablative regimens. PMID:26855155

  10. Acute kidney injury in asphyxiated neonates

    Roy Amardiyanto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Asphyxia neonatorum may result in multiorgan dysfunction including renal involvement. There is no consensus on the determination of acute kidney injury (AKI in neonates making establishment of the diagnosis and its management becomes difficult. The Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN recommends AKI criteria based on increased serum creatinine level and reduced urine output. Objectives To identify the prevalence of AKI in asphyxiated neonates using the AKIN criteria, to compare the difference of AKI stages, and the glomerular filtration rates (GFR between moderate and severe asphyxia. Methods This was a cross-sectional analytical study conducted between July 2012 and January 2013. Subjects were all asphyxiated neonates (Apgar score 35 weeks delivered and hospitalized in Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital and Koja District Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Glomerular filtration rate was calculated using the components of urine creatinine, serum creatinine, and urine output; while AKI stages were determined according to AKIN criteria. Urinary output was measured via urethral catheterization. Results Of 94 subjects, there were 70 neonates with moderate and 24 neonates with severe asphyxia, with the prevalence of AKI was 63%. Twenty one out of 24 neonates with severe asphyxia experienced AKI, while neonates with moderate asphyxia who experienced AKI was 38 out of 70 subjects (54%. Two third of neonates with severe asphyxia who experienced AKI had stage 3 of AKI. More severe AKI stages and lower median GFR were found in neonates with severe compared to moderate asphyxia (P<0.001. Conclusion The prevalence of AKI in neonatal asphyxia is high (63%. The more severe degree of neonatal asphyxia, the more severe AKI stage and the lower median GFR. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:232-8.].

  11. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far.......Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  12. Hematological parameters after acute radiation injury

    According to clinical experiences of radiation accidents during the past two decades, utilization of measured hematologic changes as a direcrt indicator of the severity of radiation injury provides important information for diagnosis and prognostic evaluation in individual cases. Hematologic changes can be described in terms of prognostic categories based on the possible outcome of the acute radiation syndrome. The five categories suggested by Wald according to the grade of severity. By the actual application of this category to our experience of the 1971 Chiba accident of exposure to irridium 192, it was proved that the estimated dose was well correlated to the value by cytogenetic analysis and physical estimation used of thermo-luminescence phenomena. In hematological parameters, a decrease of lymphocytes occurs whithin 24 hours after the exposure. The level of this early lymphopenia is regarded as one of the best indicators of severity of radiation injury. For the decision of therapeutic procedures, however, the total granulocyte count and platelet count are more valuable to exclude severe infection and bleeding symptoms occurred one month after the exposure. The limitation of the approach by hematologic data must exist in the case exposed in a non-uniform fashion. To overwhelm this difficulty, the application of rapid marrow scanning by short-lived RI such as 52Fe is expected and the bone marrow imaging by magnetic resonance studies is more exciting. For more sensitive and technically easy-drived methods detecting hematologic injury, our new method of detecting micro-nucleus in polychromatic erythroblasts from cultured erythroid colonies from peripheral blood is now developing. Preliminary data have shown the sensitivity of this method is comparable to the cytogenetic study of pheripheral lymphocytes. (author)

  13. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI

    TAJANA ZAH

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI is a complication following transfusion of blood products and is potentially a life-threatening adverse event of transfusion. The first case of fatal pulmonary edema following transfusion was reported in the 1950s. In recent time, TRALI has developed from an almost unknown transfusion reaction to the most common cause of transfusion related major morbidities and fatalities. A clinical definition of TRALI was established in 2004, based on acute respiratory distress which has temporal association with transfusion of blood components. In 2008 a distinction between classic and delayed syndrome was proposed. However, pathophysiology of TRALI still remains controversial. A number of different models were proposed to explain the pathogenesis. The two, presently most accepted models, are not mutually exclusive. The first is the antibody mediated model and the second is the two-event model.In this review article the definition of TRALI, patient predisposition, treatment, prevention and reporting guidelines are examined. The current knowledge on the topic TRALI is summarized.

  14. Cell kinetics and acute lung injury

    In order to estimate whether acute lung injury is followed by a stereotype pattern of cell proliferation in the lungs, mice were treated with three cytostatic drugs: cyclophosphamide, busulfan, or 1,3-Bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU). The alveolar labeling index was measured following drug administration with a pulse of 3H-labeled thymidine and autoradiography. In cyclophosphamide treated animals, peak alveolar cell proliferation was seen 5 days after injection of the drug. In animals treated with busulfan or BCNU, proliferation was even more delayed (occurring 2 to 3 wks after administration). In contrast, with oleic acid, the highest alveolar cell labeling was found 2 days after intravenous administration. In animals exposed to a cytostatic drug, proliferation of type II alveolar cells was never a prominent feature; whereas, in animals treated with oleic acid there was an initial burst of type II cell proliferation. It was concluded that the patterns of pulmonary repair vary between chemical designed to interfere with DNA replication as compared to agents which produce acute lung damage such as oleic acid

  15. Acute Kidney Injury:Global Health Alert

    Philip Kam TaoLi; Emmanuel A Burdmann; Ravindra L Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly prevalent in developing and developed countries and is associated with severe morbidity and mortality.Most etiologies of AKI can be prevented by interventions at the individual,community,regional and in-hospital levels.Effective measures must include community-wide efforts to increase an awareness of the devastating effects of AKI and provide guidance on preventive strategies,as well as early recognition and management.Efforts should be focused on minimizing causes of AKI,increasing awareness of the importance of serial measurements of serum creatinine in high risk patients,and documenting urine volume in acutely ill people to achieve early diagnosis; there is as yet no definitive role for alternative biomarkers.Protocols need to be developed to systematically manage prerenal conditions and specific infections.More accurate data about the true incidence and clinical impact of AKI will help to raise the importance of the disease in the community,increase awareness of AKI by governments,the public,general and family physicians and other health care professionals to help prevent the disease.Prevention is the key to avoid the heavy burden of mortality and morbidity associated with AKI.

  16. Acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements.

    Chen, Gary C; Ramanathan, Vivek S; Law, David; Funchain, Pauline; Chen, George C; French, Samuel; Shlopov, Boris; Eysselein, Viktor; Chung, David; Reicher, Sonya; Pham, Binh V

    2010-11-27

    We report three cases of patients with acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements. One patient took Hydroxycut while the other two took Herbalife supplements. Liver biopsies for all patients demonstrated findings consistent with drug-induced acute liver injury. To our knowledge, we are the first institute to report acute liver injury from both of these two types of weight-loss herbal supplements together as a case series. The series emphasizes the importance of taking a cautious approach when consuming herbal supplements for the purpose of weight loss. PMID:21173910

  17. Lung injury in acute pancreatitis: mechanisms, prevention, and therapy.

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    Lung injury is the most pertinent manifestation of extra-abdominal organ dysfunction in pancreatitis. The propensity of this retroperitoneal inflammatory condition to engender a diffuse and life-threatening lung injury is significant. Approximately one third of patients will develop acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which account for 60% of all deaths within the first week. The variability in the clinical course of pancreatitis renders it a vexing entity and makes demonstration of the efficacy of any specific intervention difficult. The distinct pathologic entity of pancreatitis-associated lung injury is reviewed with a focus on etiology and potential therapeutic maneuvers.

  18. Transfusion related acute lung injury presenting with acute dyspnoea: a case report

    Haji Altaf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative period. Investigation results were non-specific and a diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury was made after excluding other possible causes of acute lung injury. She responded to symptomatic management with ventilatory and vasopressor support and recovered completely over the next 72 hours. Conclusion The diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury relies on excluding other causes of acute pulmonary edema following transfusion, such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. All plasma containing blood products have been implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury, with the majority being linked to whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, involving priming of the inflammatory machinery and then activation of this primed mechanism. Treatment is supportive, with prognosis being substantially better than for most other causes of acute lung injury.

  19. CT and MRI diagnosis of acute hepatic injury

    To evaluate and compare MR and CT in diagnosis of acute traumatic hepatic laceration, ten patients with acute hepatic rupture underwent CT scan and/or MRI in the first 24 hours after injury. The injury was graded as mild (50% of one lobe). In the first 24 hours after injury, 33.3% (3/9) and 28.6%(2/7) of the hepatic injury demonstrated isodensity and isointensity on plain CT scan and T1-weighted images. All the lesions (100%) were clearly identified as marked hyperintensity on T2-weighted images. On T2WI, T1WI and non-contrast CT, 100%, 57.1% and 55.6% of the acute hepatic injuries could be graded respectively. Delayed complications occurred in four patients with deep hepatic injury about 1 to 3 weeks after injury. T2-weighted MR imaging is more sensitive and useful for detection of the type and severity of acute hepatic rupture. Follow-up MRI or CT within the first few weeks after injury is needed in patients with deep hepatic injury for detection of delayed complications

  20. Acute and subacute chemical-induced lung injuries: HRCT findings

    Lung injury caused by chemicals includes bronchitis, bronchiolitis, chemical pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease. Each chemical induces variable pathophysiology and the situation resembles to the drug induced lung disease. The HRCT features are variable and nonspecific, however HRCT may be useful in the evaluation of the lung injuries and so we should know about HRCT features of lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by chemicals

  1. Acute and subacute chemical-induced lung injuries: HRCT findings

    Akira, Masanori, E-mail: Akira@kch.hosp.go.jp [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, 1180 Nagasone-cho, Kita-ku, Sakai City, Osaka 591-8555 (Japan); Suganuma, Narufumi [Department of Environmental Medicine, Kochi Medical School (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Lung injury caused by chemicals includes bronchitis, bronchiolitis, chemical pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease. Each chemical induces variable pathophysiology and the situation resembles to the drug induced lung disease. The HRCT features are variable and nonspecific, however HRCT may be useful in the evaluation of the lung injuries and so we should know about HRCT features of lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by chemicals.

  2. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approache...

  3. Acute Kidney Injury Classification in Neuro-ICU Patient Group

    Canan Akıncı; Nahit Çakar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of acute kidney injury (AKI) classification system for kidney injury outcome in neuro-Intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Material and Method: Total 432 patients who admitted to ICU between 2005 and 2009 evaluated in this study. All patients’ AKI stage, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE-II), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score (SOFA), Glasgow Coma Score (GCS), Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS), mortality rate, length of ICU stay, need...

  4. Reflex anuria: a rare cause of acute kidney injury

    Dhakarwal, Pradeep; Adediran, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute Kidney Injury results from pre renal, post renal or intrinsic renal causes. Reflex anuria is a very rare cause of renal impairment which happens due to irritation or trauma to one kidney or ureter, or severely painful stimuli to other nearby organs.Case Presentation: Here we present a case of acute kidney injury secondary to reflex anuria in a patient who underwent extensive gynecological surgery along with ureteral manipulation which recovered spontaneously.Conclusion: Refl...

  5. Acute Kidney Injury – An Update

    Matt Varrier

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of acute kidney injury (AKI occurs frequently in hospitalised patients, leading to increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditure. In the context of a precipitating insult, disturbances in both global and microcirculatory renal blood flow, tubular cell damage, and activation of pro- inflammatory pathways lead to impairment of numerous elements of renal function. Classification systems, including the recent ‘Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes’ (KDIGO classification, typically define and stage AKI in terms of the magnitude of rise in serum creatinine (SCr and the presence of oliguria. At present there is no cure for AKI and the key principles of its management include early recognition, haemodynamic optimisation, correction of hypovolaemia, ceasing and avoidance of nephrotoxic medications, and treatment of the underlying cause. Recent data show that the type and volume of fluid therapy can affect renal function and that further guidance is required. In the future it is hoped that novel technologies, including biomarkers and real-time measurement of glomerular filtration rate will allow the earlier identification of patients with AKI, whilst a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of AKI will lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. Despite SCr usually recovering after an episode of AKI, there is growing recognition that survivors of AKI are at an increased risk of subsequent chronic kidney disease, including end-stage renal failure and premature death.

  6. MR findings of acute rhabdomyolysis: case report

    Rhabdomyolysis is an acute disorder resulting from skeletal muscle injury in which intracellular contents are released into extracellular space and plasma. The condition may result from drug or alcohol overdose, infection, crush injuries, collagen disease, or intensive exercise. We report two cases of acute rhabdomyolysis resulting from CO poisoning and alcohol overdose, and discuss the MRI and ultrasonographic findings

  7. [PARTICULAR QUALITIES OF DIAGNOSTIC ACUTE LATERAL ANKLE LIGAMENT INJURIES].

    Krasnoperov, S N; Shishka, I V; Golovaha, M L

    2015-01-01

    Delayed diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligaments injury and subsequent inadequate treatment leads to the development of chronic instability and rapid progression of degenerative processes in the joint. The aim of our work was to improve treatment results by developing an diagnostic algorithm and treatment strategy of acute lateral ankle ligament injuries. The study included 48 patients with history of acute inversion ankle injury mechanism. Diagnostic protocol included clinical and radiological examination during 48 hours and after 7-10 days after injury. According to the high rate of inaccurate clinical diagnosis in the first 48 hours of the injury a short course of conservative treatment for 7-10 days is needed with follow-up and controlling clinical and radiographic instability tests. Clinical symptoms of ankle inversion injury showed that the combination of local tenderness in the projection of damaged ligaments, the presence of severe periarticular hematoma in the lateral department and positive anterior drawer and talar tilt tests in 7-10 days after the injury in 87% of cases shows the presence of ligament rupture. An algorithm for diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligament injury was developed, which allowed us to determine differential indications for surgical repair of the ligaments and conservative treatment of these patients. PMID:27089717

  8. MRI in acute ligamentous injuries of the ankle.

    Martella, Ilenia; Azzali, Emanuele; Milanese, Gianluca; Praticò, Francesco Emanuele; Ruggirello, Margherita; Trunfio, Vincenzo; Parziale, Raffaele; Corrado, Michele; Della Casa, Giovanni; Capasso, Raffaella; De Filippo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprains are the most common lower limb injuries and affect more frequently young athletes; imaging is needed for an accurate diagnosis of such traumatic injuries. The purpose of this review is to analyse the magnetic resonance (MR) findings of both normal and pathological ankle's ligaments; indeed, MRI is the gold standard for the diagnosis of acute traumatic injuries and is useful for differentiation of the causes of ankle instability as well as for pre-operative planning. PMID:27467862

  9. Role of Chemokines in the Pathogenesis of Acute Lung Injury

    Bhatia, Madhav; Zemans, Rachel L.; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is due to an uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response resulting from direct injury to the lung or indirect injury in the setting of a systemic process. Such insults lead to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which includes activation of leukocytes—alveolar macrophages and sequestered neutrophils—in the lung. Although systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a physiologic response to an insult, systemic leukocyte activation, if excessive, can lead ...

  10. Unique aspects of downhill ski injuries part 2: diagnosis and acute management of specific injuries.

    Buck, P G; Sophocles, A M; Beckenbaugh, R D

    1982-04-01

    As in many sports, a wide spectrum of injuries is seen in skiing (Table 1). This includes injuries to the upper and lower extremities as well as miscellaneous injuries and medical problems (frostbite, hypothermia, and high altitude effects). Six relatively unique injuries in skiing will be presented in detail. The discussion will focus on the acute management of these injuries: subluxing peroneal tendons, fibular stress fractures, tibial shaft fractures (spiral, transverse), medical compartment knee injuries, anterior shoulder dislocations with associated greater tuberosity fractures, and gamekeeper's thumb. PMID:24822536

  11. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    Lau Breda HF; Lafave Mark R; Mohtadi Nicholas G; Butterwick Dale J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC). The g...

  12. Coronary heart disease is not significantly linked to acute kidney injury identified using Acute Kidney Injury Group criteria

    Yayan J

    2012-01-01

    Josef YayanDepartment of Internal Medicine, Vinzentius Hospital, Landau, GermanyBackground: Patients with unstable angina or myocardial infarction are at risk of acute kidney injury, which may be aggravated by the iodine-containing contrast agent used during coronary angiography; however, the relationship between these two conditions remains unclear.Objective: The current study investigated the relationship between acute kidney injury and coronary heart disease prior to coronary angiography.M...

  13. Preliminary Experience of Integrative Medicine in Acute Kidney Injury

    RAO Xiang-rong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Acute kidney injury (AKI), a concept that replaces the traditional concept known as acute renal failure (ARF),has been adopted by more and more nephrologists and intensive-care specialists in recent years. The definition and diagnostic criteria of AKI are quite different from thoseof ARF(1).

  14. Acute rehabilitation of spinal cord injury

    KIDRIČ-SIVEC, Urška; SEDEJ, Bogdana; Marolt, Melita

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury presents with loss of function of neuromuscular and other systems below the level of injury. Patients may suffer from minor loss of strength to complete quadriplegia with respiratory distress. All the patients with traumatic spinal cord injury who are admitted and treated in University Medical Centre Ljubljana are evaluated after admission and individualized plan of rehabilitation is made. The neurological level of injury is documented with international standa...

  15. Pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in acute lung injury

    Price, Laura C.; Mcauley, Danny F.; Marino, Philip S; Finney, Simon J; Griffiths, Mark J.; Wort, Stephen John

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome are characterized by protein rich alveolar edema, reduced lung compliance, and acute severe hypoxemia. A degree of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is also characteristic, higher levels of which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The increase in right ventricular (RV) afterload causes RV dysfunction and failure in some patients, with associated adverse effects on oxygen delivery. Although the introduction of lung p...

  16. Nonlinear Dynamic Theory of Acute Cell Injuries and Brain Ischemia

    Taha, Doaa; Anggraini, Fika; Degracia, Donald; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia in the form of stroke and cardiac arrest brain damage affect over 1 million people per year in the USA alone. In spite of close to 200 clinical trials and decades of research, there are no treatments to stop post-ischemic neuron death. We have argued that a major weakness of current brain ischemia research is lack of a deductive theoretical framework of acute cell injury to guide empirical studies. A previously published autonomous model based on the concept of nonlinear dynamic network was shown to capture important facets of cell injury, linking the concept of therapeutic to bistable dynamics. Here we present an improved, non-autonomous formulation of the nonlinear dynamic model of cell injury that allows multiple acute injuries over time, thereby allowing simulations of both therapeutic treatment and preconditioning. Our results are connected to the experimental data of gene expression and proteomics of neuron cells. Importantly, this new model may be construed as a novel approach to pharmacodynamics of acute cell injury. The model makes explicit that any pro-survival therapy is always a form of sub-lethal injury. This insight is expected to widely influence treatment of acute injury conditions that have defied successful treatment to date. This work is supported by NIH NINDS (NS081347) and Wayne State University President's Research Enhancement Award.

  17. Molecular determinants of acute kidney injury

    Holger Husi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI is a condition that leads to a rapid deterioration of renal function associated with impairment to maintain electrolyte and acid balance, and, if left untreated, ultimately irreversible kidney damage and renal necrosis. There are a number of causes that can trigger AKI, ranging from underlying conditions as well as trauma and surgery. Specifically, the global rise in surgical procedures led to a substantial increase of AKI incidence rates, which in turn impacts on mortality rates, quality of life and economic costs to the healthcare system. However, no effective therapy for AKI exists. Current approaches, such as pharmacological intervention, help in alleviating symptoms in slowing down the progression, but do not prevent or reverse AKI-induced organ damage. Methods: An in-depth understanding of the molecular machinery involved in and modulated by AKI induction and progression is necessary to specifically pharmacologically target key molecules. A major hurdle to devise a successful strategy is the multifactorial and complex nature of the disorder itself, whereby the activation of a number of seemingly independent molecular pathways in the kidney leads to apoptotic and necrotic events. Results: The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system (RAAS axis appears to be a common element, leading to downstream events such as triggers of immune responses via the NFB pathway. Other pathways intricately linked with AKI-induction and progression are the tumor necrosis factor alpha(TNF and transforming growth factor beta (TGF signaling cascades, as well as a number of other modulators. Surprisingly, it has been shown that the involvement of the glutamatergic axis, believed to be mainly a component of the neurological system, is also a major contributor. Conclusions: Here we address the current understanding of the molecular pathways evoked in AKI, their interplay, and the potential to pharmacologically

  18. Malarial acute kidney injury: Prognostic markers

    Ruhi Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria has protean clinical manifestations and acute kidney injury (AKI is one of its serious and life threatening complications. This study was carried out to describe the clinical characteristics, and factors associated with adverse outcomes, in patients with malarial AKI. Materials and Methods: Data of 100 patients with AKI and smear positive malaria was retrospectively analyzed to evaluate the incidence, clinical profile, outcome and predictors of mortality among all cases presented to us at the Nephrology unit of Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh between November 2010 to October 2011. Results were expressed as mean, standard deviation (SD and range. Results: One hundred (22.1% (68 males, 32 females cases of malaria induced AKI, amongst 452 total cases of AKI, were evaluated. The mean age (± SD was 30 ± 11.23 years. Male to female ratio was 3.3:1. Plasmodium falciparum was reported in 76%, P. vivax in 11%, and both in 13% patients. The mean serum creatinine was 8.7 ± 3.7 mg%, and oligo/anuria was present in 84% of the patients. 78% of the patients required hemodialysis. 67% of the patients recovered completely, 12% did not show full recovery, and 6% developed chronic kidney failure. Mortality occurred in 15% of the patients. Conclusion : Malarial AKI most commonly occurs in patients infected by Plasmodium Falciparum. Falciparum malaria associated with AKI is a life threatening condition. Prolonged disease duration, low hemoglobin, oligo/anuria on admission, hyperbilirubinemia, cerebral malaria, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and high serum creatinine were the main predictors of mortality in our study.

  19. Laboratory test surveillance following acute kidney injury.

    Michael E Matheny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with hospitalized acute kidney injury (AKI are at increased risk for accelerated loss of kidney function, morbidity, and mortality. We sought to inform efforts at improving post-AKI outcomes by describing the receipt of renal-specific laboratory test surveillance among a large high-risk cohort. METHODS: We acquired clinical data from the Electronic health record (EHR of 5 Veterans Affairs (VA hospitals to identify patients hospitalized with AKI from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2009, and followed these patients for 1 year or until death, enrollment in palliative care, or improvement in renal function to estimated GFR (eGFR ≥ 60 L/min/1.73 m(2. Using demographic data, administrative codes, and laboratory test data, we evaluated the receipt and timing of outpatient testing for serum concentrations of creatinine and any as well as quantitative proteinuria recommended for CKD risk stratification. Additionally, we reported the rate of phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH monitoring recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. RESULTS: A total of 10,955 patients admitted with AKI were discharged with an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. During outpatient follow-up at 90 and 365 days, respectively, creatinine was measured on 69% and 85% of patients, quantitative proteinuria was measured on 6% and 12% of patients, PTH or phosphorus was measured on 10% and 15% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of creatinine was common among all patients following AKI. However, patients with AKI were infrequently monitored with assessments of quantitative proteinuria or mineral metabolism disorder, even for patients with baseline kidney disease.

  20. Cytidine 5’-diphosphocholine administration prevents peripheral neuropathic pain after sciatic nerve crush injury in rats

    Emril, Dessy

    2016-01-01

    Dessy R Emril,1 Samekto Wibowo,2 Lucas Meliala,2 Rina Susilowati3 1Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, 2Department of Neurology, 3Department of Histology and Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, IndonesiaBackground: Cytidine 5’-diphosphocholine (citicoline) has been shown to have beneficial effects in central nervous system injury as well as in motoric functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. ...

  1. Cytidine 5’-diphosphocholine administration prevents peripheral neuropathic pain after sciatic nerve crush injury in rats

    Emril DR; Wibowo S; Meliala L; Susilowati R

    2016-01-01

    Dessy R Emril,1 Samekto Wibowo,2 Lucas Meliala,2 Rina Susilowati3 1Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, 2Department of Neurology, 3Department of Histology and Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, IndonesiaBackground: Cytidine 5’-diphosphocholine (citicoline) has been shown to have beneficial effects in central nervous system injury as well as in motoric functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. This...

  2. Acute traumatic cervical cord injury in patients with os odontoideum.

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Zhou, Yue; Wang, Jian; Chu, Tongwei; Li, Changqing; Ren, Xianjun; Wang, Weidong

    2010-10-01

    We retrospectively reviewed acute cervical cord injury after minor trauma in 10 patients with os odontoideum. Their clinical history, neurological symptoms, radiological investigations, follow-up period, American Spinal Injury Association impairment classification and motor score were reviewed. Before their traumatic injury, three patients were asymptomatic and seven reported myelopathic symptoms, including four patients with neck pain, two patients with unsteadiness and one patient with dizziness. Falls were the most common cause of injury (n=6), followed by minor motor vehicle accidents (n=3) and assault (n=1). MRI and dynamic cervical lateral radiographs showed that all patients had atlantoaxial instability and cord compression. Most patients had spinal cord thinning and hyperintensity on T2-weighted MRI. Spinal cord compression was posterior (n=5), or both anterior and posterior (n=5). All patients underwent posterior rigid screw fixation and fusion, including atlantoaxial fusion (n=8) and occipitocervical fusion (n=2). We conclude that patients with asymptomatic or myelopathic atlantoaxial instability secondary to os odontoideum are at risk for acute spinal cord injury after minor traumatic injury. Fixation and fusion should be undertaken as prophylactic treatment for patients at risk of developing myelopathy and to avoid the neurological deterioration associated with acute traumatic cervical cord injury. PMID:20655229

  3. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    GregoryAElder

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI. The β-amyloid (Aβ peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in experimental animal models of nbTBI. We examined levels of brain Aβ following experimental blast injury using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for Aβ 40 and 42. In both rat and mouse models of blast injury, rather than being increased, endogenous rodent brain Aβ levels were decreased acutely following injury. Levels of the amyloid precursor protein (APP were increased following blast exposure although there was no evidence of axonal pathology based on APP immunohistochemical staining. Unlike the findings in nbTBI animal models, levels of the β-secretase, BACE-1, and the γ-secretase component presenilin-1 were unchanged following blast exposure. These studies have implications for understanding the nature of blast injury to the brain. They also suggest that strategies aimed at lowering Aβ production may not be effective for treating acute blast injury to the brain.

  4. Traumatic Knee Dislocation with Acute Artery Injury

    Hüseyin Şahin1; Mustafa Uzkeser2; Ayhan Aköz; et al.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic knee dislocation is very rare injury in patients presenting to the emergency room. The complications associated with knee dislocation such as amputation of extremities and die is required emergency response. We discussed a case, that he has only knee dislocation and popliteal artery injury and mortal as soon as possible.

  5. Genetic deficiency of adiponectin protects against acute kidney injury

    Jin, Xiaogao; Chen, Jiyuan; Hu, Zhaoyong; Chan, Lawrence; Wang, Yanlin

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin is a multifunctional cytokine that has a role in regulating inflammation. Here we determined if adiponectin modulates ischemic acute kidney injury. Compared with wild-type mice, adiponectin knockout mice were found to have lower serum creatinine and less tubular damage or apoptosis following ischemia/reperfusion injury. This latter process was associated with decreased Bax and reduced activation of p53 and caspase-3. Targeted disruption of adiponectin was also found to inhibit the...

  6. Optimizing sedation in patients with acute brain injury

    Oddo, Mauro; Crippa, Ilaria Alice; Mehta, Sangeeta; Menon, David; Payen, Jean-Francois; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Citerio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Daily interruption of sedative therapy and limitation of deep sedation have been shown in several randomized trials to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay, and to improve the outcome of critically ill patients. However, patients with severe acute brain injury (ABI; including subjects with coma after traumatic brain injury, ischaemic/haemorrhagic stroke, cardiac arrest, status epilepticus) were excluded from these studies. Therefore, whether the new paradi...

  7. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury -A Case Report

    Anamika

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI is a rare but life threatening complication of blood transfusion which is being increasingly recognized. It is caused by cross reaction between donor antibodies and host leucocytes or between donor leucocytes with host antibodies. TRALI usually presents as an Acute Lung Injury (ALI resulting in pulmonary congestion and edema, often leading to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. We report a case of TRALI in a patient who underwent laparotomy for ruptured corpus luteal cyst requiring blood transfusion. She presented with acute pulmonary edema about an hour after commencing a blood transfusion .This was managed conservatively with oxygen, steroids and diuretics. Patient improved rapidly and later discharged without any residual complications.

  8. High-voltage electrical stimulation improves nerve regeneration after sciatic crush injury Estimulação elétrica de alta voltagem favorece a regeneração nervosa após compressão do nervo isquiático

    Rosana M. Teodori; Andréia M. Silva; Meiricris T. Silva; Larissa S. Oliveira; Polacow, Maria L. O.; Elaine C. O. Guirro

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peripheral nerve injury causes prolonged functional limitation being a clinical challenge to identify resources that accelerates its recovery. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of high-voltage electrical stimulation (HVES) on the morphometric and functional characteristics of the regenerated nerve after crush injury in rats. METHODS: Twenty Wistar rats were randomly allocated into 4 groups: Control (CON) - without injury and without HVES; Denervated (D) - sciatic nerve crush o...

  9. Montelukast induced acute hepatocellular liver injury

    Harugeri A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 46-year-old male with uncontrolled asthma on inhaled albuterol and formoterol with budesonide was commenced on montelukast. He developed abdominal pain and jaundice 48 days after initiating montelukast therapy. His liver tests showed an increase in serum total bilirubin, conjugated bilirubin, aspartate aminotranferase, alanine aminotranferase, and alkaline phosphatase. The patient was evaluated for possible non-drug related liver injury. Montelukast was discontinued suspecting montelukast induced hepatocellular liver injury. Liver tests began to improve and returned to normal 55 days after drug cessation. Causality of this adverse drug reaction by the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences or Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method (CIOMS or RUCAM and Naranjo′s algorithm was ′probable′. Liver tests should be monitored in patients receiving montelukast and any early signs of liver injury should be investigated with a high index of suspicion for drug induced liver injury.

  10. A suspected case of transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Lulu Sherif; Srikantu, J.; Prithi Jain; Kishan Shetty; Brijesh Khandige

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare but serious complication of blood transfusion. We present a suspected case of TRALI in a 39-year-old female patient who underwent total abdominal hysterectomy under uneventful general anesthesia. The patient developed acute desaturation due to noncardiogenic pulmonary edema while receiving compatible blood transfusion on the second postoperative day. As her symptoms were refractory to supportive treatment, she was mechanically ventilated...

  11. Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Kidney Injury due to Severe Heat Stroke

    Carlos Fragachán G.; Máximo H. Trujillo

    2011-01-01

    We present a case of heat stroke (HS) and acute kidney injury (AKI) due to severe rhabdomyolysis in a 14-year-old previously healthy female patient. When she was practicing strenuous exercise she suffered acute seizures and high fever. These symptoms were followed by coma and multiple organ failure (MOF), which included AKI, encephalopathy, fulminant hepatic failure (FHF), and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The patient was managed in the ICU with renal replacement therapy, vent...

  12. Adult Stem Cells for Acute Lung Injury: Remaining Questions & Concerns

    Zhu, Ying-Gang; Hao, Qi; Monsel, Antoine; Feng, Xiao-mei; Lee, Jae W.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. The pathophysiology of ALI involves complex interactions between the inciting event, such as pneumonia, sepsis or aspiration, and the host immune response resulting in lung protein permeability, impaired resolution of pulmonary edema, an intense inflammatory response in the injured alveolus and hypoxemia. In multiple pre-clinical studies, adult stem cells h...

  13. Pattern Recognition Receptor–Dependent Mechanisms of Acute Lung Injury

    Xiang, Meng; Fan, Jie

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) that clinically manifests as acute respiratory distress syndrome is caused by an uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response resulting from clinical events including sepsis, major surgery and trauma. Innate immunity activation plays a central role in the development of ALI. Innate immunity is activated through families of related pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize conserved microbial motifs or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Toll-like...

  14. Patient Satisfaction in the Treatment of Acute Hamstring Strain Injury

    LingLing- Lai

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The impact of musculoskeletal injuries often caused loss time in sport participation. Athletes who suffered from these injuries experienced a decrease in performance and physical disability. Although a variety of treatments have been implemented to the muscle injuries, the administration of autologous blood injection is replacing the conventional rehabilitation to expedite the process of muscle recovery. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is relatively new in muscle injury treatment and there is lack of evidence of the satisfaction of PRP treatment in muscle injuries. Purposes: The study aimed to investigate the patient satisfaction in the administration of PRP treatment and rehabilitation program for acute hamstring strain injury. Methods: Participants (competitive, semi-competitive and recreational athletes with acute hamstring strain injury (Grade II were recruited. Participants were randomly divided into either the PRP treatment or rehabilitation program. Participants were required to attend weekly follow up assessment for recovery evaluation. All the participants were required to complete a patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ-18 at the end of study.  The questionnaire is divided into seven sub-scales: general satisfaction, technical quality, interpersonal manner, communication, financial aspect, time spent with doctor, accessibility and convenience. Results: Participants were 22.35 ± 3.41 years. Duration from injury to first presentation in clinic ranged from two to ten days. Mean duration of recovery was 5.64 weeks. No statistically significant difference in the patient satisfaction sub-scales score between the two groups (p>0.05. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that PRP treatment is as satisfactory as conventional rehabilitation program in managing acute hamstring strain injury. Both  modalities are correspondingly safe and have high degree of satisfaction. Given the acceptable outcomes, patients are likely to

  15. Neutrophils contain cholesterol crystals in transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)

    Van Ness, Michael; Jensen, Hanne; Adamson, Grete N; Kysar, Patricia E; Holland, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular components of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy.......Intracellular components of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy....

  16. Preventive effect of eccentric training on acute hamstring injuries in men's soccer

    Petersen, Jesper; Thorborg, Kristian; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann;

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of acute hamstring injuries is high in several sports, including the different forms of football.......The incidence of acute hamstring injuries is high in several sports, including the different forms of football....

  17. Differential effects of kidney-lung cross-talk during acute kidney injury and bacterial pneumonia

    Singbartl, Kai; Bishop, Jeffery; Wen, Xiaoyan; Murugan, Raghavan; Chandra, Saurabh; Filippi, Marie-Dominique; John A Kellum

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and acute lung injury (ALI) represent serious, complex clinical problems. The combination of AKI and ALI drastically decreases survival. However, detailed knowledge about the interactions between these two organs is scarce.

  18. Minocycline protects retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve crush injury in mice by delaying autophagy and upregulating nuclear factor-κB2

    Jiao Xiaoling; Peng Yuan; Yang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently,no medicine is available that can prevent or treat neural damage associated with optic nerve injury.Minocycline is recently reported to have a neuroprotective function.The aims of this study were to exarmine the neuroprotective effect of minocycline on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and determine its underlying mechanisms,using a mouse model of optic nerve crush (ONC).Methods ONC was performed in the left eye of adult male mice,and the mice were randomly divided into minocycline-treated group and saline-treated control group.The mice without receiving ONC injury were used as positive controls.RGC densities were assessed in retinal whole mounts with immunofluorescence labeling of βⅢ-tubulin.Transmission electron microscopy was used to detect RGC morphologies,and Western blotting and real-time PCR were applied to investigate the expression of autophagy markers LC3-Ⅰ,LC3-Ⅱ,and transcriptional factors nuclear factor-κB1 (NF-κB1),NF-κB2.Results In the early stage after ONC (at Days 4 and 7),the density of RGCs in the minocycline-treated group was higher than that of the saline-treated group.Electron micrographs showed that minocycline prevented nuclei and mitochondria injuries at Day 4.Western blotting analysis demonstrated that the conversion of LC3-Ⅰ to LC3-Ⅱ was reduced in the minocycline-treated group at Days 4 and 7,which meant autophagy process was inhibited by minocycline.In addition,the gene expression of NF-κB2 was upregulated by minocycline at Day 4.Conclusion The neuroprotective effect of minocycline is generated in the early stage after ONC in mice,partly through delaying autophagy process and regulating NF-κB2 pathway.

  19. Ritonavir-induced acute kidney injury: kidney biopsy findings and review of literature

    Shafi, T.; Choi, M.J.; Racusen, L. C.; Spacek, L. A.; Berry, C; Atta, M.; Fine, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    Ritonavir therapy is not generally considered nephrotoxic. We report a case of acute kidney injury secondary to ritonavir, with kidney biopsy demonstrating extensive acute tubular injury. This is the first report of a kidney biopsy and pathology in acute kidney injury associated with ritonavir. A review of published medical literature on the topic is also presented.

  20. Transfusion-related acute lung injury in multiple traumatized patients

    Alijanpour, Ebrahim; Jabbari, Ali; Hoseini, Fahimeh; Tabasi, Shabnam

    2012-01-01

    Background: Many of the multiple traumatized patients who refer to the hospital need transfusion. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious clinical syndrome associated with the transfusion of plasma-containing blood components. In the article, we present a case of TRALI following transfusion of packed red blood cells

  1. Acute Kidney Injury Induced by Herbal Products: A Case Report

    Erhan TATAR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, consumption of herbal products has become widespread both in Turkey and worldwide. However, the safety of these products is substantially controversial. We here present a case of acute kidney injury in a patient with excessive use of herbal products for cardio-protective purposes.

  2. Acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome in cirrhosis

    Israelsen, Mads Egerod; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Krag, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    Cirrhosis is the eighth leading cause of "years of lost life" in the US and accounts for approximately 1 to 2% of all deaths in Europe. Patients with cirrhosis have a high risk of developing acute kidney injury. The clinical characteristics of HRS are similar to prerenal uraemia, but the condition...

  3. Acute arterial infarcts in patients with severe head injuries

    Deepak Agrawal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To study the incidence, demographic profile, and outcome of patients with severe closed head injuries who develop acute arterial infarcts. Materials and Methods: Patients with severe head injury (Glasgow coma score (GCS ≤8 presenting within 8 h of injury in the Department of Neurosurgery over a period of 5 months were enrolled in the study. Patients with penetrating head injury, infarct due to herniation and iatrogenic arterial injuries were excluded from the study. Only arterial infarcts developing within 8 h of injury were included in the study. A computed tomography (CT head was done on all patients within 8 h of injury and repeated if necessary. Arterial infarct was defined as well-demarcated wedge-shaped hypodensity corresponding to an arterial territory on plain CT of the head. Outcome was assessed using Glasgow outcome score (GOS at 1 month post-injury or at death (whichever came earlier. Results: Forty-four patients of severe head injury were included in the study during the above period. Of these, four patients (9.1% had arterial infarcts on the initial CT scan. The male:female ratio was 1:3. The mean age was 54 years (range 3-85 years. Two patients had infarcts in the middle cerebral artery distribution and two in the superior cerebellar artery distribution. Poor outcome (GOS 1-3 was seen in 100% of the patients with arterial infarct compared to 52.5% (n=21 in patients with severe head injury without arterial infarct. Conclusions: A significant percentage of patients with severe head injury have arterial infarcts on admission, which may imply arterial injury. Our study shows that these patients have a poorer prognosis vis-a-vis patient without these findings.

  4. Acute kidney injury in burns: a story of volume and inflammation

    COLPAERT, KIRSTEN; Hoste, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Acute kidney injury occurs in approximately one-quarter to one-third of patients with major burn injury. Apart from the usual suspects – such as older age, severity of burn injury, sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction – volume overload probably has an important role in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury.

  5. Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: An Update.

    Chalikias, George; Drosos, Ioannis; Tziakas, Dimitrios N

    2016-04-01

    Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is defined as an abrupt deterioration in renal function associated with the administration of iodinated contrast media. This type of acute kidney injury is frequently encountered as a complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and is associated with adverse short- and long-term outcomes including mainly mortality, cardiovascular morbidity and prolongation of hospitalization. The incidence of CI-AKI after PCI ranges from 2 to 20 % according to baseline kidney function. It may also range according to the clinical setting, being higher after emergency PCI. The primary manifestation is a small decline in kidney function, occurring 1 to 3 days after the procedure. Kidney function usually returns to preexisting levels within 7 days. Incidence of acute renal failure requiring dialysis following PCI is rare (hospital epidemic. PMID:26780748

  6. Evidence-based treatment for acute spinal cord injury

    Zhouming Deng; Jiajia Su; Lin Cai; Ansong Ping; Wei Jin; Renxiong Wei; Yan Zhan

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To formulate an evidence-based treatment for one patient with acute spinal cord injury and summarize evidence for evaluating acute spinal cord injury treatment. METHODS: Studies related to the treatment for acute spinal cord injury were identified via a search of National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC, 2000-11), the Cochrane Library (Issue 1, 2011), TRIP Database (2000-11), and PubMed (1966-2011). Treatment strategies were formulated according to three basic principles: best evidence, doctor's professional experience, and wishes of the patient. RESULTS: A total of 34 articles were selected, including 1 NGC guideline, 22 systematic reviews, and 11 randomized controlled trials. Based on our review, we arrived at the following recommendations: no clinical evidence exists definitively to recommend the use of any of neuroprotective pharmaceuticals; surgery should be undertaken early; mechanical compression devices and low-molecular weight heparin should be employed to prevent thrombosis; respiratory muscle training is beneficial for pulmonary function and quality of life; and functional electrical stimulation and acupuncture can promote functional recovery. The patient accordingly underwent surgery 6 hours after trauma without receiving any neuroprotective pharmaceuticals; low-molecular weight heparin and intermittent pneumatic compression were applied to prevent thrombosis. He also underwent respiratory muscle training daily for 8 weeks and received functional electrical stimulation for 15 minutes and acupuncture for 30 minutes every day. After follow-up for 3 months, the above therapeutic regimen was confirmed efficacious for acute spinal cord injury.CONCLUSION: Evidence-based medicine provides an individualized treatment protocol for acute spinal cord injury, which can significantly improve the therapeutic effect and prognosis.

  7. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    Fong Daniel TP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms. Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms. The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative

  8. Montelukast induced acute hepatocellular liver injury

    Harugeri A; Parthasarathi G; Sharma J; D′Souza G; Ramesh M

    2009-01-01

    A 46-year-old male with uncontrolled asthma on inhaled albuterol and formoterol with budesonide was commenced on montelukast. He developed abdominal pain and jaundice 48 days after initiating montelukast therapy. His liver tests showed an increase in serum total bilirubin, conjugated bilirubin, aspartate aminotranferase, alanine aminotranferase, and alkaline phosphatase. The patient was evaluated for possible non-drug related liver injury. Montelukast was discontinued suspecting montelukast i...

  9. Inflammatory Mechanisms of Organ Crosstalk during Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury

    Laura E. White

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication during inpatient hospitalization, and clinical outcomes remain poor despite advancements in renal replacement therapy. AKI in the setting of multiple organ failure (MOF remains a formidable challenge to clinicians and incurs an unacceptably high mortality rate. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI incites a proinflammatory cascade and releases cellular and soluble mediators with systemic implications for remote organ injury. Evidence from preclinical models cites mechanisms of organ crosstalk during ischemic AKI including the expression of cellular adhesion molecules, lymphocyte trafficking, release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and modification of the host innate and adaptive immune response systems. In this paper, the influence of kidney IRI on systemic inflammation and distant organ injury will be examined. Recent experimental data and evolving concepts of organ crosstalk during ischemic AKI will also be discussed in detail.

  10. Acute care management of spinal cord injuries.

    Mitcho, K; Yanko, J R

    1999-08-01

    Meeting the health care needs of the spinal cord-injured patient is an immense challenge for the acute care multidisciplinary team. The critical care nurse clinician, as well as other members of the team, needs to maintain a comprehensive knowledge base to provide the care management that is essential to the care of the spinal cord-injured patient. With the active participation of the patient and family in care delivery decisions, the health care professionals can help to meet the psychosocial and physical needs of the patient/family unit. This article provides an evidence-based, comprehensive review of the needs of the spinal cord-injured patient in the acute care setting including optimal patient outcomes, methods to prevent complications, and a plan that provides an expeditious transition to rehabilitation. PMID:10646444

  11. Hypothyroidism causing paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury - case report

    Rodrigo Chaturaka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a patient with severe hypothyroidism complicated by paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury. A 65 year old male patient, diagnosed with hypothyroidism one year ago was transferred to our unit in a state of drowsiness and confusion. He was severely hypothyroid and had paralytic ileus and impaired renal function at the time of transfer. Hypokalaemia was present, and was likely to have contributed to the paralytic ileus and this together with dehydration was likely to have contributed to renal injury. Nonetheless, hypothyroidism is very likely to have been the principal precipitant of both these complications, and both paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury improved with thyroxine replacement. Unfortunately, the patient died unexpectedly eight days after admission to the unit. Hypothyroidism may induce de novo acute kidney injury or it may exacerbate ongoing chronic kidney disease. This rare complication is assumed to be due to the hypodynamic circulatory state created by thyroid hormone deficiency. Paralytic ileus is an even rarer fatal manifestation of hypothyroidism and is thought to be due to an autonomic neuropathy affecting the intestines that is reversible with thyroxine replacement. To our knowledge, both these complications have not been observed in a single patient so far. It is important that clinicians are aware of these rare manifestations of hypothyroidism as in most occasions, thyroxine deficiency may be missed, and treatment can reverse the complications.

  12. NMDA Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    Yang Li

    Full Text Available Glutamate is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS. Large amount of glutamate can overstimulate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR, causing neuronal injury and death. Recently, NMDAR has been reported to be found in the lungs. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of memantine, a NMDAR channel blocker, on bleomycin-induced lung injury mice.C57BL/6 mice were intratracheally injected with bleomycin (BLM to induce lung injury. Mice were randomized to receive saline, memantine (Me, BLM, BLM plus Me. Lungs and BALF were harvested on day 3 or 7 for further evaluation.BLM caused leukocyte infiltration, pulmonary edema and increase in cytokines, and imposed significant oxidative stress (MDA as a marker in lungs. Memantine significantly mitigated the oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury caused by BLM. Moreover, activation of NMDAR enhances CD11b expression on neutrophils.Memantine mitigates oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury in BLM challenged mice.

  13. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    Lau Breda HF

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC. The goal of this paper is to evaluate and report on the appropriateness, efficiency, and effectiveness of the C-AKIC through healthcare utilization and costs associated with acute knee injuries. Methods This quasi-experimental study measured and evaluated cost and utilization associated with specific healthcare services for patients presenting with acute knee injuries. The goal was to compare patients receiving care from two clinical care pathways: the existing pathway (i.e. comparison group and a new model, the C-AKIC (i.e. experimental group. This was accomplished through the use of a Healthcare Access and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (HAPSQ. Results Data from 138 questionnaires were analyzed in the experimental group and 136 in the comparison group. A post-hoc analysis determined that both groups were statistically similar in socio-demographic characteristics. With respect to utilization, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC used significantly less resources. Overall, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC incurred 37% of the cost of patients with knee injuries in the comparison group and significantly incurred less costs when compared to the comparison group. The total aggregate average cost for the C-AKIC group was $2,549.59 compared to $6,954.33 for the comparison group (p Conclusions The Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic was able to manage and treat knee injured patients for less cost than the existing state of healthcare delivery. The

  14. Acute respiratory distress syndrome assessment after traumatic brain injury

    Shahrooz Kazemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is one of the most important complications associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI. ARDS is caused by inflammation of the lungs and hypoxic damage with lung physiology abnormalities associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Aim of this study is to determine the epidemiology of ARDS and the prevalence of risk factors. Methods: This prospective study performed on patients with acute traumatic head injury hospitalization in the intensive care unit of the Shohaday-e Haftom-e-Tir Hospital (September 2012 to September 2013 done. About 12 months, the data were evaluated. Information including age, sex, education, employment, drug and alcohol addiction, were collected and analyzed. The inclusion criteria were head traumatic patients and exclusion was the patients with chest trauma. Questionnaire was designed with doctors supervision of neurosurgery. Then the collected data were analysis. Results: In this study, the incidence of ARDS was 23.8% and prevalence of metabolic acidosis was 31.4%. Most injury with metabolic acidosis was Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH 48 (60% and Subdural hemorrhage (SDH was Next Level with 39 (48% Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS were significantly decreased (P< 0.0001. The level of consciousness in patients with skull fractures significantly lower than those without fractures (P= 0.009 [(2.3±4.6 vs (4.02±7.07]. Prevalence of metabolic acidosis during hospitalization was 80 patients (31.4%. Conclusion: Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Management and treatment is essential to reduce the mortality. In this study it was found the age of patients with ARDS was higher than patients without complications. ARDS risk factor for high blood pressure was higher in men. Most victims were pedestrians. The most common injury associated with ARDS was SDH. Our analysis

  15. Lipocalin-2 Test in Distinguishing Acute Lung Injury Cases from Septic Mice Without Acute Lung Injury

    Gao Zeng; Cong-wei Jia; Jie Liu; Shu-bin Guo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore whether the amount of lipocalin-2 in the biofluid could reflect the onset of sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Methods Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 10 mg/kg) injection or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was performed to induce severe sepsis and ALI in C57 BL/6 male mice randomly divided into 5 groups (n=10 in each group):group A (intraperitoneal LPS injection), group B (intravenous LPS injection via tail vein), group C (CLP with 25%of the cecum ligated), group D (CLP with 75%of the cecum ligated), and the control group (6 sham-operation controls plus 4 saline controls). All the mice received volume resuscitation. Measurements of pulmonary morphological and functional alterations were used to identify the presence of experimental ALI. The expressions of lipocalin-2 and interleukin (IL)-6 in serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung tissue were quantified at both protein and mRNA levels. The overall abilities of lipocalin-2 and IL-6 tests to diagnose sepsis-induced ALI were evaluated by generating receiver operator characteristic curves (ROC) and computing area under curve (AUC). Results In both group B and group D, most of the“main features”of experimental ALI were reproduced in mice, while group A and group C showed septic syndrome without definite evidence for the presence of ALI. Compared with septic mice without ALI (group A+group C), lipocalin-2 protein expression in septic mice with ALI (group B+group D) was significantly up-regulated in BALF (P Conclusions Lipocalin-2 expression is significantly up-regulated in septic ALI mice compared with those without ALI. Lipocalin-2 tests with a dual cutoff system could be an effective tool in distinguishing experimental ALI cases.

  16. Paeoniflorin ameliorates acute necrotizing pancreatitis and pancreatitis‑induced acute renal injury.

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Weixing; Shi, Qiao; Zhao, Liang; Mei, Fangchao; Li, Chen; Zuo, Teng; He, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    Acute renal injury caused by acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) is a common complication that is associated with a high rate of mortality. Paeoniflorin is the active ingredient of paeonia radix and exhibits a number of pharmacological effects, such as anti‑inflammatory, anticancer, analgesic and immunomodulatory effects. The present study detected the potential treatment effects of paeoniflorin on acute renal injury induced by ANP in a rat model. The optimal dose of paeoniflorin for preventing acute renal injury induced by ANP was determined. Then, the possible protective mechanism of paeoniflorin was investigated. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α, interleukin (IL)‑1β and IL‑6 were measured with enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay kits. Renal inflammation and apoptosis were measured by immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The expression of nitric oxide in kidney tissues was also evaluated. The p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were measured by western blotting. The results shown that paeoniflorin may ameliorate acute renal injury following ANP in rats by inhibiting inflammatory responses and renal cell apoptosis. These effects may be associated with the p38MAPK and nuclear factor‑κB signal pathway. PMID:27279569

  17. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  18. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    GregoryAElder; MiguelA.Gama Sosa; RitaDe Gasperi; MichaelCShaughness; StevenTDeKosky; SamGandy; MadhusoodanaPNambiar; JohnWSteele

    2012-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI). The β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in ...

  19. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    De Gasperi, Rita; Gama Sosa, Miguel A; Kim, Soong Ho; Steele, John W.; Shaughness, Michael C; Maudlin-Jeronimo, Eric; Hall, Aaron A.; DeKosky, Steven T.; McCarron, Richard M; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P.; Gandy, Sam; Ahlers, Stephen T.; Elder, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI). The β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in exper...

  20. Transfusion related acute lung injury presenting with acute dyspnoea: a case report

    Haji Altaf; Sharma Shekhar; Vijaykumar DK; Paul Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative...

  1. Role of Ventilation in Cases of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome /Acute Lung injury

    Hemant M Shah; Shilpa B Sutariya; Parul M Bhatt; Nishil Shah; Shweta Gamit

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute lung injury (ALI) and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by refractory hypoxemia that develops secondary to high-permeability pulmonary edema. These syndromes are gaining more attention as a means of better comprehending the pathophysiology of ARDS and possiblyfor modifying ventilatory management. In this context a study was done to compare role of invasive and non-invasive ventilation in cases of ARDS/ALI. Methods: in this study patients of AR...

  2. Severe but reversible acute kidney injury resulting from Amanita punctata poisoning

    Kang, Eunjung; Cheong, Ka-Young; Lee, Min-Jeong; Kim, Seirhan; Shin, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Heungsoo; Park, In-Whee

    2015-01-01

    Mushroom-related poisoning can cause acute kidney injury. Here we report a case of acute kidney injury after ingestion of Amanita punctata, which is considered an edible mushroom. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred within 24 hours from the mushroom intake and were followed by an asymptomatic period, acute kidney injury, and elevation of liver and pancreatic enzymes. Kidney function recovered with supportive care. Nephrotoxic mushroom poisoning should be considered as a cause of acute kidney i...

  3. Acute Kidney Injury Classification in Neuro-ICU Patient Group

    Canan Akıncı

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the role of acute kidney injury (AKI classification system for kidney injury outcome in neuro-Intensive care unit (ICU patients. Material and Method: Total 432 patients who admitted to ICU between 2005 and 2009 evaluated in this study. All patients’ AKI stage, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE-II, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score (SOFA, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS, Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS, mortality rate, length of ICU stay, need for intubation, and mechanical ventilation were recorded. Results: AKI was found in 24 of all 432 patents’ (5.5%. We found that, patients with AKI had higher APHACE-II score, SOFA score and mortality rates; longer ICU stay, duration of mechanical ventilation and intubation and lower GCS and GOS than without AKI group. Conclusion: Length of ICU stay and mortality rate were higher in AKI positive group.

  4. Acute kidney injury caused by bothrops snake venom.

    Rodrigues Sgrignolli, Lívia; Florido Mendes, Glória Elisa; Carlos, Carla Patricia; Burdmann, Emmanuel A

    2011-01-01

    Medically important venomous snakes in Latin America belong to the genus Bothrops, Crotalus, Lachesis and Micrurus. The Bothrops genus is responsible for the majority of accidents. The WHO globally estimates 2,500,000 poisonous snakebites and 125,000 deaths annually. In its last report in 2001, the Brazilian Ministry of Health accounted 359 deaths due to snakebites, of which the Bothrops genus was responsible for 185. Snake venoms cause local and systemic damage, including acute kidney injury, which is the most important cause of death among patients surviving the early effects of envenoming by the Crotalus and Bothrops genuses. Venom-induced acute kidney injury is a frequent complication of Bothrops snakebite, carrying relevant morbidity and mortality. PMID:21757950

  5. Recently published papers: Acute kidney injury – diagnosis and treatment

    Lee, Jasmine BL; Forni, Lui G

    2009-01-01

    When faced with the management of the patient on intensive care with acute kidney injury, the clinician has various choices to consider. The conventional therapy, where appropriate, is renal replacement therapy. This technique used to be relatively straightforward but now a relative feast of alternatives is available, not least in choice of buffer and anticoagulant. Two recent studies add to the growing body of literature concerning alternative anticoagulant regimes, and one in particular sho...

  6. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury Following Upper Extremity Replantation

    Celalettin Sever; Yalçın Külahçı; Cihan Şahin; Sinan Öksüz; Haluk Duman; Fuat Yüksel

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a common adverse effect of blood transfusion that is often underrecognised and underreported. We would like to report a case of TRALI after the replantation and transfusion of blood components in a male patient who had sustained a complete amputation of the right upper extremity. The level of amputation was just proximal to the humeral condyles. Replantation was performed 5 hours after the accident and 36 units of blood products were transfused...

  7. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: incidence and risk factors

    Toy, Pearl; Gajic, Ognjen; Bacchetti, Peter; Looney, Mark R.; Gropper, Michael A.; Hubmayr, Rolf; Lowell, Clifford A.; Norris, Philip J; Murphy, Edward L; Weiskopf, Richard B.; Wilson, Gregory; Koenigsberg, Monique; Lee, Deanna; Schuller, Randy; Wu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. To determine TRALI incidence by prospective, active surveillance and to identify risk factors by a case-control study, 2 academic medical centers enrolled 89 cases and 164 transfused controls. Recipient risk factors identified by multivariate analysis were higher IL-8 levels, liver surgery, chronic alcohol abuse, shock, higher peak airway pressure while being mechanically ventilated, current s...

  8. Transfusion-related acute lung injury; clinical perspectives.

    Kim, Jeongmin; Na, Sungwon

    2015-04-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was introduced in 1983 to describe a clinical syndrome seen within 6 h of a plasma-containing blood products transfusion. TRALI is a rare transfusion complication; however, the FDA has suggested that TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Understanding the pathogenesis of TRALI will facilitate adopting preventive strategies, such as deferring high plasma volume female product donors. This review outlines the clinical features, pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of TRALI. PMID:25844126

  9. Transfusion-related acute lung injury; clinical perspectives

    Kim, Jeongmin; Na, Sungwon

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was introduced in 1983 to describe a clinical syndrome seen within 6 h of a plasma-containing blood products transfusion. TRALI is a rare transfusion complication; however, the FDA has suggested that TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Understanding the pathogenesis of TRALI will facilitate adopting preventive strategies, such as deferring high plasma volume female product donors. This review outlines the clinical features...

  10. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: Incidence and risk factors

    Toy, P; Gajic, O; Bacchetti, P; Looney, MR; Gropper, MA; Hubmayr, R; Lowell, CA; Norris, PJ; Murphy, EL; Weiskopf, RB; Wilson, G; Koenigsberg, M; Lee, D.; Schuller, R.; Wu, P.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion- related mortality. To determine TRALI incidence by prospective, active surveillance and to identify risk factors by a case-control study, 2 academic medical centers enrolled 89 cases and 164 transfused controls. Recipient risk factors identified by multivariate analysis were higher IL-8 levels, liver surgery, chronic alcohol abuse, shock, higher peak airway pressure while being mechanically ventilated, current ...

  11. Acute lung injury during antithymocyte globulin therapy for aplastic anemia

    Goligher, Ewan Christopher; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine; Balter, Meyer; Gupta, Vikas; Joseph E Brandwein

    2009-01-01

    The case of a 33-year-old man with aplastic anemia who experienced recurrent episodes of hypoxemia and pulmonary infiltrates during infusions of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is described. With the use of high-dose corticosteroids, the patient’s original episodes resolved, and were subsequently prevented before additional administrations of ATG. Rare reports of an association between ATG and acute lung injury are found in the literature, but this is the first report of successful steroid-suppo...

  12. Acute hepatic injury with atorvastatin: An unusual occurrence

    Pinki Vishwakarma; Rajiv Nehra; Alok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Atorvastatin, a commonly used and well-tolerated hypolipidemic drug, belongs to the class of statins or hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. Use of atorvastatin may be associated with minor asymptomatic elevations in serum aminotransferases, but clinically significant hepatotoxicity is usually infrequent. Here we present a case of self-limiting clinically apparent acute hepatic injury attributable to atorvastatin occurring at recommended daily dose of 20 mg once a day. This ...

  13. Iron, hormesis, and protection in acute kidney injury.

    Swaminathan, Sundararaman

    2016-07-01

    Iron is critical for cellular, organismal, and possibly universal existence. Use of iron complexes to treat human diseases is ancient and is described in detail in Ayurveda/Siddha systems of medicine. Old aphorisms from Siddha medicine ("Alavukku Minjinal Amirdhamum Nanjagum," an elixir turns poisonous when taken in excess) and Paracelsus ("Die Dosis macht das Gift," the dose makes the poison) are of practical relevance in understanding the role of this ancient metal in acute kidney injury. PMID:27312440

  14. Crocin attenuates lipopolysacchride-induced acute lung injury in mice

    Jian WANG; Kuai, Jianke; Luo, Zhonghua; Wang, Wuping; Wang, Lei; Ke, Changkang; LI, XIAOFEI; Ni, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Crocin, a representative of carotenoid compounds, exerts a spectrum of activities including radical scavenger, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties. To investigate the protective effect of crocin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS (1 mg/kg). The mice received intragastric injection of crocin (50 mg/kg) 1 h before LPS administration. Pulmonary histological changes were evaluated by hematox...

  15. Acute kidney injury in severe sepsis and septic shock

    Poukkanen, Meri

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis is the main cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) among critically ill patients. Septic AKI has been shown to associate with lower mean arterial pressure (MAP) levels. The initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT) is mainly based on clinical judgment. The objectives of this study were to assess the incidence and 90-day mortality of patients with severe sepsis associated AKI treated in the intensive care units (ICUs), to evaluate the impact of MAP on development of AKI, to asses...

  16. Epidemiology of Acute Kidney Injury in the Intensive Care Unit

    James Case; Supriya Khan; Raeesa Khalid; Akram Khan

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the intensive care unit (ICU) has increased during the past decade due to increased acuity as well as increased recognition. Early epidemiology studies were confounded by erratic definitions of AKI until recent consensus guidelines (RIFLE and AKIN) standardized its definition. This paper discusses the incidence of AKI in the ICU with focuses on specific patient populations. The overall incidence of AKI in ICU patients ranges from 20% to 50% with l...

  17. Early acute kidney injury and sepsis: a multicentre evaluation

    Bagshaw, Sean M.; George, Carol; Bellomo, Rinaldo; ,

    2008-01-01

    Introduction We conducted a study to evaluate the incidence, risk factors and outcomes associated with early acute kidney injury (AKI) in sepsis. Methods The study was a retrospective interrogation of prospectively collected data from the Australian New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database. Data were collected from 57 intensive care units (ICUs) across Australia. In total, 120,123 patients admitted to ICU for more than 24 hours from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2005 were inc...

  18. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Kidney Injury: Present Status

    Hai Ying Zhou; Tian Wu Chen; Xiao Ming Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of hospitalization that is characterized by a sudden loss of renal excretory function and associated with the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease, poor prognosis, and increased mortality. Although the pathophysiology of renal functional impairment in the setting of AKI remains poorly understood, previous studies have identified changes in renal hemodynamics, perfusion, and oxygenation as key factors in the development and progres...

  19. Evolution of endotoxin induced acute lung injury in the rat.

    Domenici-Lombardo, L.; C. Adembri; Consalvo, M.; Forzini, R.; Meucci, M.; Romagnoli, P; Novelli, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    To clarify the evolution of acute lung injury induced by endotoxin, the progression of lung damage in 26 rats submitted to intratracheal instillation of 5 mg/kg body weight endotoxin was examined by blood gas analysis, computerized tomography, light and electron microscopy. Hypoxaemia, hypercapnia, acidosis and inhomogeneous bilateral infiltrates developed gradually within 48 hours. Monocytes appeared within blood capillaries and the instertitium by 12 hours after treatment, then migrated int...

  20. Update on the diagnosis and management of acute kidney injury

    Ali Akcay; Kultigin Turkmen; DongWon Lee; et al, ...

    2010-01-01

    Ali Akcay, Kultigin Turkmen, DongWon Lee, Charles L EdelsteinDivision of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, University of Colorado and the Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado, USAAbstract: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality. This review provides essential information for the diagnosis and management of AKI. Blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine are used for the diagnosis of AKI. The review also focuses on recent studies on the diagnosis o...

  1. Acute kidney injury in severe acute pancreatitis: An experience from a tertiary care center

    Ravindra Kumar; Naresh Pahwa; Neeraj Jain

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). We aimed in our study to explore the risk factors of AKI in patients with SAP and assess the prognosis of patients with SAP and AKI. This is a retrospective study consisting of analysis of outcome and complications encountered in 72 severe acute pancreatitis patients admitted to a tertiary care center at Indore, India, from May 2011 to April 2012. We encountered 14 AKI cases in the S...

  2. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  3. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Boorman, Gary A. [Covance, Chantilly, VA 20151 (United States); Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P. [Laboratory of Toxicology and Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, RTP, NC 27713 (United States); Melnyk, Stepan B. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72201 (United States); Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  4. Acute gastroduodenal injury after ingestion of diluted herbicide pendimethalin.

    Tsukada, K; Azuhata, H; Katoh, H; Kuwano, H

    2009-03-01

    The herbicide, pendimethalin, is used worldwide, but its acute toxicity is not yet widely known. There have been some reported acute pendimethalin poisoning cases in humans and most of them intentionally ingested the concentrated formulation. We describe a 73-year-old man who developed corrosive gastroduodenal injury after accidental ingestion of the diluted (300 times with water) pendimethalin formulation. He had a history of reflux oesophagitis and had been taking omeprazol (10 mg/day) for a year. He consumed alcohol two hours after the accidental ingestion and then had nausea and epigastric pain. Endoscopy performed three days post-exposure revealed gastroduodenal injury. As he had consumed alcohol every day for years and had no history of gastroduodenal ulcer, the accidental ingestion may be associated with this injury. He was successfully treated by increasing his dosage of omeprazol (20 mg/day) for two weeks. This case indicates that ingestion of a small quantity of pendimethalin can provoke gastroduodenal injury. PMID:19352552

  5. Application of a Low-Level Laser Therapy and the Purified Protein from Natural Latex (Hevea brasiliensis in the Controlled Crush Injury of the Sciatic Nerve of Rats: A Morphological, Quantitative, and Ultrastructural Study

    Fernando José Dias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the effects of a low-level laser therapy (LLLT, 15 J/cm2, 780 nm wavelength and the natural latex protein (P1, 0.1% in sciatic nerve after crush injury (15 Kgf, axonotmesis in rats. Sixty rats (male, 250 g were allocated into the 6 groups (n=10: CG—control group; EG—nerve exposed; IG—injured nerve without treatment; LG—crushed nerve treated with LLLT; PG—injured nerve treated with P1; and LPG—injured nerve treated with LLLT and P1. After 4 or 8 weeks, the nerve samples were processed for morphological, histological quantification and ultrastructural analysis. After 4 weeks, the myelin density and morphological characteristics improved in groups LG, PG, and LPG compared to IG. After 8 weeks, PG, and LPG were similar to CG and the capillary density was higher in the LG, PG, and LPG. In the ultrastructural analysis the PG and LPG had characteristics that were similar to the CG. The application of LLLT and/or P1 improved the recovery from the nerve crush injury, and in the long term, the P1 protein was the better treatment used, since only the application of LLLT has not reached the same results, and these treatments applied together did not potentiate the recovery.

  6. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  7. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young [Eulji University, Department of Radiology, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  8. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P. [Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Servico de Neurocirurgia]. E-mail: centro@cerebroecoluna.com.br; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Neurologicas; Andrade, Almir F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Neurocirurgia da Emergencia

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  9. Nutritional parameters are associated with mortality in acute kidney injury

    Marina Nogueira Berbel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:The objective of this study was to perform a nutritional assessment of acute kidney injury patients and to identify the relationship between nutritional markers and outcomes.METHOD:This was a prospective and observational study. Patients who were hospitalized at the Hospital of Botucatu School of Medicine were evaluated between January 2009 and December 2011. We evaluated a total of 133 patients with a clinical diagnosis of acute kidney injury and a clinical presentation suggestive of acute tubular necrosis. We explored the associations between clinical, laboratory and nutritional markers and in-hospital mortality. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust for confounding and selection bias.RESULTS:Non-survivor patients were older (67±14 vs. 59±16 years and exhibited a higher prevalence of sepsis (57.1 vs. 21.4% and higher Acute Tubular Necrosis-Individual Severity Scores (0.60±0.22 vs. 0.41±0.21 than did survivor patients. Based on the multivariable analysis, laboratorial parameters such as blood urea nitrogen and C-reactive protein were associated with a higher risk of death (OR: 1.013, p= 0.0052; OR: 1.050, p= 0.01, respectively, and nutritional parameters such as low calorie intake, higher levels of edema, lower resistance based on bioelectrical impedance analysis and a more negative nitrogen balance were significantly associated with a higher risk of death (OR: 0.950, p= 0.01; OR: 1.138, p= 0.03; OR: 0.995, p= 0.03; OR: 0.934, p= 0.04, respectively.CONCLUSIONS:In acute kidney injury patients, a nutritional assessment seems to identify nutritional markers that are associated with outcome. In this study, a low caloric intake, higher C-reactive protein levels, the presence of edema, a lower resistance measured during a bioelectrical impedance analysis and a lower nitrogen balance were significantly associated with risk of death in acute kidney injury patients.

  10. 急诊室职业性手外伤患者的特点分析%An epidemiological investigation of acute occupational hand injuries

    易传军; 田光磊; 田文; 郑炜; 戴鲁飞; 朱瑾; 刘波

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解北京地区手外伤发生、构成、分布及其影响因素.方法 对2005年4月1日至9月30日间在北京积水潭医院就诊的所有职业性手外伤患者进行问卷调查,分析其流行病学特点.结果 共2658例职业性手外伤患者,占骨科急诊的17.3%(2658/15 323),占手外伤患者的50.8%(2658/5233),平均年龄为(30.4±10.8)岁,男:女为5.7∶1,就诊距受伤时间为2.6 h.受伤患者多是与机器或工具操作有关的行业.损伤以压砸伤(43.9%)和切割伤(36.9%)最常见.损伤以双侧示指和中指最易受累.94.9%为开放性损伤,87.6%的患者合并有深层组织损伤.结论 职业性手外伤仍是一种高发损伤,主要发生在青壮年男性,尤其在机器和工具操作相关的职业,需要从多方面着手进行预防.%Objective To study composition, distribution and causes of acute occupational hand injuries in Beijing Jishuitan Hospital. Methods From April 1st 2005 to September 30th 2005, all patients with acute hand injuries were investigated by questionnaire focusing on all related epidemiological elements. Results Two thousand six hundred fifty eight cases with acute hand injuries were about 17.3 % of patients with acute orthopedic injuries. Their mean age was (30.4±10.8) years old. The radio of males to females in cases with acute hand injuries was 57:1. The cutting and crushing injuries were the main causes of acute hand injuries. Most of cases with acute hand injuries were engaged in work related to machines. The acute hand injuries were mainly involved in index and middle figures of both hands, 94.9 % of acute hand injuries were opening, and 87.6% of acute hand injuries were involved in the deep tissues. Conclusion Acute hand injuries are the common occupational severe injuries for young male workers. The acute hand injuries occur in patients engaged in work related to machines. The prevention of acute hand injuries should be emphasized.

  11. Glutamine Attenuates Acute Lung Injury Caused by Acid Aspiration

    Chih-Cheng Lai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate ventilator settings may cause overwhelming inflammatory responses associated with ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Here, we examined potential benefits of glutamine (GLN on a two-hit model for VILI after acid aspiration-induced lung injury in rats. Rats were intratracheally challenged with hydrochloric acid as a first hit to induce lung inflammation, then randomly received intravenous GLN or lactated Ringer’s solution (vehicle control thirty min before different ventilator strategies. Rats were then randomized to receive mechanical ventilation as a second hit with a high tidal volume (TV of 15 mL/kg and zero positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP or a low TV of 6 mL/kg with PEEP of 5 cm H2O. We evaluated lung oxygenation, inflammation, mechanics, and histology. After ventilator use for 4 h, high TV resulted in greater lung injury physiologic and biologic indices. Compared with vehicle treated rats, GLN administration attenuated lung injury, with improved oxygenation and static compliance, and decreased respiratory elastance, lung edema, extended lung destruction (lung injury scores and lung histology, neutrophil recruitment in the lung, and cytokine production. Thus, GLN administration improved the physiologic and biologic profiles of this experimental model of VILI based on the two-hit theory.

  12. Imaging of acute thoracic injury: the advent of MDCT screening.

    Mirvis, Stuart E

    2005-10-01

    Chest radiography remains the primary screening study for the assessment of victims of chest trauma, but computed tomography (CT), particularly multidetector CT (MDCT), has progressively changed the imaging approach to these patients. MDCT acquires thinner sections with greater speed, allowing higher quality axial images and nonaxial reformations than conventional or single-detector helical CT. The speed of MDCT, both in acquiring data and in reconstructing images, makes the performance of total body surveys in the blunt polytrauma patient practicable. In general, CT has been well documented to offer major advantages over chest radiography in both screening for thoracic injuries and in characterizing such injuries. This capacity has been enhanced by the application of multichannel data acquisition. The greater sensitivity of MDCT has been well demonstrated in diagnosing vascular and diaphragmatic injuries. This article reviews current concepts of diagnostic imaging in acute chest trauma from blunt force and penetrating mechanisms emphasizing the spectrum of diagnostic imaging findings for various injuries, based primarily on radiographic and CT appearances. The advantages of MDCT for selected injuries are emphasized. PMID:16274001

  13. [Sequential changes in acute phase reactant proteins and complement activation in patients with acute head injuries].

    Ikeda, Y; Matsuura, H; Nakazawa, S

    1987-12-01

    The role of immunological mechanisms in head injury is not clearly defined. In this study we investigated the immunological function in patients with acute head injuries. Serum acute phase reactant proteins (APRP), complement activation and immunoglobulines as immunological parameters were studied. APRP are produced in the liver and increase in cancer patients as well as those with acute and chronic inflammations, trauma and autoimmune diseases. APRP are known to be one of the immunosuppressive factors in the serum. Forty patients with acute head injuries were studied. Thirty-four patients were male and six patients were female, ages ranged from 12 to 81 years. Serial blood samples were obtained during the first seven days of trauma. The Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) were recorded at the time of admission for all patients. Clinical outcome was assessed at the time of discharge according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale. The "good" group consisted of patients with good recovery or moderate disability. The "bad" group consisted of patients with severe disability, persistent vegetative state and death. The concentrations of immunoglobulines (IgG, IgM, IgA) were within normal range and humoral immunity was not affected. Complement activation at the time of admission was closely related to GCS (p less than 0.01), but the levels of C4, C3, and C3 activator except for these of CH50 were within normal range.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2451531

  14. The microbiota regulates susceptibility to Fas-mediated acute hepatic injury

    Celaj, Stela; Gleeson, Michael W; Jie DENG; O'Toole, George A.; Hampton, Thomas H.; Toft, Martin F.; Morrison, Hilary G; Sogin, Mitchell L.; Putra, Juan; Suriawinata, Arief A.; Gorham, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Whereas a significant role for intestinal microbiota in affecting the pathogenesis and progression of chronic hepatic diseases is well documented, the contribution of the intestinal flora to acute liver injury has not been extensively addressed. Elucidating the influence of the intestinal microbiota on acute liver inflammation would be important for better understanding the transition from acute injury to chronic liver disease. Using the Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced liver injury model in lab...

  15. Acute Kidney Injury due to Crescentic Glomerulonephritis in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Maggard, Reuben; Makary, Raafat; Monteiro, Carmela l.; James, Leighton R.

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease is an inherited condition, characterized by the development of cysts in the kidney, as well as in other organs. Patients with polycystic kidney can suffer from the same causes of acute kidney injury as the general population. Nephritic syndrome is an uncommon cause of acute kidney injury in the general population and less common in patients with polycystic kidney disease. We report the second case of crescentic glomerulonephritis, causing acute kidney injury, in a pa...

  16. Biomarkers of acute kidney injury and associations with short- and long-term outcomes

    Schaub, Jennifer A.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is strongly associated with increased mortality and other adverse outcomes. Medical researchers have intensively investigated novel biomarkers to predict short- and long-term outcomes of acute kidney injury in many patient care settings, such as cardiac surgery, intensive care units, heart failure, and transplant. Future research should focus on leveraging this relationship to improve enrollment for clinical trials of acute kidney injury.

  17. Innate danger signals in acute injury: From bench to bedside.

    Fontaine, Mathieu; Lepape, Alain; Piriou, Vincent; Venet, Fabienne; Friggeri, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    The description of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) as a reaction to numerous insults marked a turning point in the understanding of acute critical states, which are intensive care basic cases. This concept highlighted the final inflammatory response features whichever the injury mechanism is: infectious, or non-infectious such as extensive burns, traumas, major surgery or acute pancreatitis. In these cases of severe non-infectious insult, many endogenous mediators are released. Like infectious agents components, they can activate the immune system (via common signaling pathways) and initiate an inflammatory response. They are danger signals or alarmins. These molecules generally play an intracellular physiological role and acquire new functions when released in extracellular space. Many progresses brought new information on these molecules and on their function in infectious and non-infectious inflammation. These danger signals can be used as biomarkers and provide new pathophysiological and therapeutic approaches, particularly for immune dysfunctions occurring after an acute injury. We present herein the danger model, the main danger signals and the clinical consequences. PMID:26987739

  18. Primary Injuries and Secondary Organ Failures in Trauma Patients with Acute Kidney Injury Treated with Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    Sigrid Beitland; Ingrid Os; Kjetil Sunde

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acute kidney injury (AKI) treated with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is a severe complication in trauma patients. The aim of the study was to assess primary traumatic injuries and secondary organ failures in severe posttraumatic AKI. Methods. Retrospective review of adult trauma patients admitted to the trauma centre at Oslo University Hospital Ullevål. Injury severity score (ISS) was used to assess the severity of primary injuries, and sequential organ failure asses...

  19. Hematocolpos as a Result of Delayed Treatment of Acute Straddle Injury in an Adolescent Girl

    Hae Jin Hwang; Hyun Wook Lim; Young Shin Han; Jeong In Choi; Min Jeong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Accidental genital trauma is most commonly caused by straddle-type injuries and is usually treatable by nonoperative management, and most of the injuries have a good prognosis. When the bleeding occurred due to straddle injury in adolescent girl, experienced gynecological examination and treatment were very important. We experienced a case of straddle injury to the posterior fourchette that caused acute hematocolpos due to delayed adequate treatment with hypotension and acute abdomen in an ad...

  20. KL-6 in acute lung injury: will it leave its mark?

    Shyamsundar, Murali; Danny F McAuley

    2008-01-01

    Studies have indicated that measuring biochemical measures of epithelial injury in plasma and alveolar fluid may be useful in predicting outcome in acute lung injury. The present commentary briefly reviews the evidence supporting the use of these biochemical biomarkers of epithelial injury in acute lung injury, and in particular KL-6, as well as their limitations. The article additionally proposes the need for physiological markers of epithelial function to complement current biochemical biom...

  1. Neutrophil Elastase Contributes to Acute Lung Injury Induced by Bilateral Nephrectomy

    Ishii, Tomoko; DOI, Kent; Okamoto, Koji; Imamura, Mitsuru; Dohi, Makoto; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Fujita, Toshiro; Noiri, Eisei

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious problem in critically ill patients of intensive care units. It has been reported previously that AKI can induce acute lung injury (ALI), as well as cause injuries to other remote organs, including the lungs. Patients with AKI complicated by ALI show remarkably high mortality. ALI is characterized by neutrophil infiltration into the lung. Neutrophil elastase (NE) is a key enzyme for tissue injury caused by activated neutrophils, such as occurs in ALI. The...

  2. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury in children and adults

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF), defined as acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are critical conditions. AHRF results from a number of systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has...

  3. Establishing a cat model of acute optic nerve injury

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to investigate the progress in optic nerve injury and the following regeneration and repair, many kinds of animal models of optic nerve injury have been established, such as models of acute and chronic ocular hypertension, compression, amputating wound, ischemia reperfusion or hypoxia,intravitreal injection of excitatory amino acids, etc. However, most of these models are established by squeezing intraorbital optic nerve, and suitable for ophthalmology, and there are fewer models suitable for the acute cranial contusion in neurosurgery.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of optic nerve after acute injury, and the characteristics of methods for establishing model of acute optic nerve injury in cats.DESIGN: A complete randomized grouping and controlled animal trial.SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Ji'nan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Twenty-eight healthy adult cats, common degree, either sex, weighing 2.0 - 3.5 kg, were provided by the animal experimental center of Fudan University. The cats were randomly divided into control group (n =3) and model group (n =25), and 5 cats in the model group were observed at 6 hours and 1,3, 7 and 14 days after injury respectively. JX-2000 biological signal processing system (Department of Physiology, Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA, Shanghai); Inverted phase contrast microscope (Olympus); Axioplan 2 imaging microgram analytical system (Labsystems).METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Jinan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA from June 2004 to June 2005. The cats in the model groups were made into models of acute optic nerve injury: The cats were anesthetized, then the limbs were fixed in a lateral recumbent position. Pterion approach in human was imitated, the operative incision was made along the line between lateral canthus and tragus, and it could be seen deep along the skull base that white

  4. Quantitative assessment of acute radiation injury of the lens

    An attempt is made to unify various approaches to the assessment of acute radiation injury of the organ of vision. The development of cataracts was studied on mice subjected to local irradiation of the head at doses: 7, 10, 12, 15, 20 and 25 Gy. A clinical picture of radiation injury of the eye at different X-ray doses at different stages was established during ophthalmological examination using a manual electroophthalmoscope (X5). A method of the quantitative assessment of radiation injury of the mouse eye at different radiation doses was proposed using the light transmission factor tau; its experimental value was obtained, values for different clinical stages of cataracts were established. The time course of the development of radiation cataracts in mice subjected to X-ray irradiation in a wide spectrum of doses, was observed; clinical features of the process were revealed. Dose fractionation under the above conditions did not make aprotective effect on the lens. Dependence of a degree of lens injury on irradiation dose obtained owing to the use of the light transmission factor tau, was described with the following equation: N=Nsub(0)esup(-D/Dsup(0))

  5. Management of Acute Lumbar Injuries in the Workplace.

    Lurati, Ann Regina

    2016-01-01

    Occupational acute lumbar injuries are a common injury. One intervention that is unique to occupational health is the determination of the amount of physical activity that an injured worker can perform without increasing the risk of further injury. Clinical recommendations suggest that workers continue to stay active; however, it is still the clinician's responsibility to determine the level of activity. The level of work activity is determined on a case-to-case basis and is done by evaluating the physical capacity of an injured worker and the job description. Current evidence-based guidelines suggest that staying active may actually reduce pain levels. The purpose of this evidence-based literature review is to outline the proper assessment and management of workers who have sustained a work-related low back injury. The related literature has been reviewed as well as red flags for more severe neurological conditions that require more in-depth evaluation. Determining the safe level of activity and guided return to work have been discussed. PMID:27187219

  6. Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract

    Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract. Exposure to ionising radiation at medium to high doses results in the manifestation of mixed pathologies. Following the analysis of several radiation accidents it is clear that intestinal injury influences patient survival. However the appearance of the classically defined gastrointestinal syndrome is not always evident. Nevertheless injury to the gastrointestinal tract, in particular loss of barrier function, seems to play an important role in the development of Multiple Organ Failure such as reported in the recent accident at Tokai Mura. Ionising radiation overexposure results in changes in intestinal motility and nutrient, fluid and electrolyte absorption and secretion all which may contribute to the genesis of diarrhea. In addition to modified cellular transport properties for nutrients or electrolytes, important loss of epithelial cells is also a major contributing factor. Intestinal functions are controlled by many factors such as neurotransmitters, locally released mediators from endocrine cells or immunocompetent cells in addition to luminal agents. To date, treatment of radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury is mainly symptomatic. However treatments such as growth factors, anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as cellular transplantation remain to be validated in the radiation accident situation. (author)

  7. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury Following Upper Extremity Replantation

    Celalettin Sever

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI is a common adverse effect of blood transfusion that is often underrecognised and underreported. We would like to report a case of TRALI after the replantation and transfusion of blood components in a male patient who had sustained a complete amputation of the right upper extremity. The level of amputation was just proximal to the humeral condyles. Replantation was performed 5 hours after the accident and 36 units of blood products were transfused intraoperatively. Subsequently, during the early postoperative period, TRALI was revealed. In this case report, the circumstances of this injury and preventive measures are discussed to understand and recognise this condition in order to reduce the morbidity and mortality of TRALI. It is important to distinguish TRALI from other causes of pulmonary oedema because early diagnosis and management are associated with a favourable outcome.

  8. Oligodendrocyte-like cell transplantation for acute spinal cord injury

    Yongtao Xu; Anmin Chen; Feng Li; Hougeng Lu

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we used insulin-like growth factor-1 to induce bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to differentiate into oligodendrocyte-like cells. Cell surface marker identification showed that they expressed myelin basic protein and galactosylceramide, two specific markers of oligodendrocytes. These cells were transplanted into rats with acute spinal cord injury at T10. At 8 weeks post-implantation, oligodendrocyte-like cells were observed to have survived at the injury site. The critical angle of the inclined plane, and Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores were all increased. Furthermore, latencies of motion-evoked and somatosensory-evoked potentials were decreased. These results demonstrate that transplantation of oligodendrocytic-induced MSCs promote functional recovery of injured spinal cord.

  9. Snakebite-induced acute kidney injury in Latin America.

    Pinho, Fábia M Oliveira; Yu, Luis; Burdmann, Emmanuel A

    2008-07-01

    There are 4 genera of venomous snakes in Latin America: Bothrops, Crotalus, Lachesis, and Micrurus. Acute kidney injury (AKI) has been reported consistently after Bothrops and Crotalus envenomations. In fact, these 2 genera of snakes are responsible, along with the Russell's viper, for the majority of cases of snakebite-induced AKI reported worldwide. Although the Bothrops snakes are the leading cause of venomous snakebites in Latin America, the absolute number of AKI cases seen after Bothrops and Crotalus snakebites is similar. In this article the main characteristics of Bothrops and Crotalus snakes and their venoms, the clinical picture, and the pattern of accidents, risk factors, and mechanisms of renal injury are reviewed. PMID:18620958

  10. Triptolide ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    Gao, Jianling; Zhan, Ying; Chen, Jun; Wang, Lina; Yang, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) is a serious clinical syndrome with a high rate of mortality. In this study, the effects of triptolide on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in rats were investigated. Methods Sixty-five male Sprague Dawley rats(approved by ethics committee of the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University) were randomly divided into five groups. The control group was injected with 2.5 mL saline/kg body weight via the tail vein and intraperitoneally with 1% dimethyl s...

  11. Acute hepatic injury with atorvastatin: An unusual occurrence

    Pinki Vishwakarma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atorvastatin, a commonly used and well-tolerated hypolipidemic drug, belongs to the class of statins or hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. Use of atorvastatin may be associated with minor asymptomatic elevations in serum aminotransferases, but clinically significant hepatotoxicity is usually infrequent. Here we present a case of self-limiting clinically apparent acute hepatic injury attributable to atorvastatin occurring at recommended daily dose of 20 mg once a day. This case was postulated to be an unusual idiosyncratic reaction of the drug.

  12. Septic acute kidney injury in critically ill Indian patients

    Mohan Gurjar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is an independent variable for poor outcome in critically ill patients. The pathophysiology of septic AKI is distinct from that of non-septic AKI. We studied the clinical profile and outcome of septic AKI since such data is sparse in Indian patients. In this single-center retrospective, observational, cohort study, septic AKI has been found with high incidence (31% and overall mortality was 52%. Age, number of non-renal organ failure, and APACHE II score were found as significant predictors of outcome in this population.

  13. An Unusual Complication of Foam Sclerotherapy: Acute Kidney Injury

    Müge EREK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sclerotherapy, in which an irritant solution is administered, is a method used to treat venous failure that results in complete venous destruction due to endothelial reaction and fibrosis. In recent years, foam sclerotherapy, in which a sclerosing agent (aethyl sclerole and air are mixed until they turn into foam and the resultant mixture is injected into noticeable veins directly and into other veins under ultrasonography in doses depending on the diameters of the varices, has been introduced. The drugs or gases used in foam sclerotherapy can cause local or systemic complications. Foam affects vessel endothelial cells and causes severe spasm in the vessel. It has been reported that endothelin-1 levels are high after foam sclerotherapy compared to the initial levels and that neurological complications vary with the endothelin levels. In this report, we present a case of acute kidney injury due to acute tubular necrosis probably caused by endothelin release following foam sclerotherapy.

  14. Metformin-Associated Acute Kidney Injury and Lactic Acidosis

    David Arroyo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Metformin is the preferred oral antidiabetic agent for type 2 diabetes. Lactic acidosis is described as a rare complication, usually during an acute kidney injury (AKI. Material and Methods. We conducted a prospective observational study of metformin-associated AKI cases during four years. 29 cases were identified. Previous renal function, clinical data, and outcomes were recorded. Results. An episode of acute gastroenteritis precipitated the event in 26 cases. Three developed a septic shock. Three patients died, the only related factor being liver dysfunction. More severe metabolic acidosis hyperkalemia and anemia were associated with higher probabilities of RRT requirement. We could not find any relationship between previous renal dysfunction and the outcome of the AKI. Conclusions. AKI associated to an episode of volume depletion due to gastrointestinal losses is a serious complication in type 2 diabetic patients on metformin. Previous renal dysfunction (mild-to-moderate CKD has no influence on the severity or outcome.

  15. A suspected case of transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Lulu Sherif

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI is a rare but serious complication of blood transfusion. We present a suspected case of TRALI in a 39-year-old female patient who underwent total abdominal hysterectomy under uneventful general anesthesia. The patient developed acute desaturation due to noncardiogenic pulmonary edema while receiving compatible blood transfusion on the second postoperative day. As her symptoms were refractory to supportive treatment, she was mechanically ventilated for 3 days and successfully extubated on the fourth day. By exclusion, a clinical diagnosis of TRALI was made. The treatment for TRALI requires discontinuing transfusion and giving respiratory and cardiovascular support. Most cases show clinical improvement in first few hours and resolve completely within 96 h.

  16. Pros and cons of recruitment maneuvers in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Rocco, Patricia R M; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama

    2010-08-01

    In patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, a protective mechanical ventilation strategy characterized by low tidal volumes has been associated with reduced mortality. However, such a strategy may result in alveolar collapse, leading to cyclic opening and closing of atelectatic alveoli and distal airways. Thus, recruitment maneuvers (RMs) have been used to open up collapsed lungs, while adequate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels may counteract alveolar derecruitment during low tidal volume ventilation, improving respiratory function and minimizing ventilator-associated lung injury. Nevertheless, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the appropriateness of RMs. The most commonly used RM is conventional sustained inflation, associated with respiratory and cardiovascular side effects, which may be minimized by newly proposed strategies: prolonged or incremental PEEP elevation; pressure-controlled ventilation with fixed PEEP and increased driving pressure; pressure-controlled ventilation applied with escalating PEEP and constant driving pressure; and long and slow increase in pressure. The efficiency of RMs may be affected by different factors, including the nature and extent of lung injury, capability of increasing inspiratory transpulmonary pressures, patient positioning and cardiac preload. Current evidence suggests that RMs can be used before setting PEEP, after ventilator circuit disconnection or as a rescue maneuver to overcome severe hypoxemia; however, their routine use does not seem to be justified at present. The development of new lung recruitment strategies that have fewer hemodynamic and biological effects on the lungs, as well as randomized clinical trials analyzing the impact of RMs on morbidity and mortality of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome patients, are warranted. PMID:20658909

  17. Establishing a cat model of acute optic nerve injury

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to investigate the progress in optic nerve injury and the following regeneration and repair, many kinds of animal models of optic nerve injury have been established, such as models of acute and chronic ocular hypertension, compression, amputating wound, ischemia reperfusion or hypoxia,intravitreal injection of excitatory amino acids, etc. However, most of these models are established by squeezing intraorbital optic nerve, and suitable for ophthalmology, and there are fewer models suitable for the acute cranial contusion in neurosurgery.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of optic nerve after acute injury, and the characteristics of methods for establishing model of acute optic nerve injury in cats.DESIGN: A complete randomized grouping and controlled animal trial.SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Ji'nan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Twenty-eight healthy adult cats, common degree, either sex, weighing 2.0 - 3.5 kg, were provided by the animal experimental center of Fudan University. The cats were randomly divided into control group (n =3) and model group (n =25), and 5 cats in the model group were observed at 6 hours and 1,3, 7 and 14 days after injury respectively. JX-2000 biological signal processing system (Department of Physiology, Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA, Shanghai); Inverted phase contrast microscope (Olympus); Axioplan 2 imaging microgram analytical system (Labsystems).METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Jinan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA from June 2004 to June 2005. The cats in the model groups were made into models of acute optic nerve injury: The cats were anesthetized, then the limbs were fixed in a lateral recumbent position. Pterion approach in human was imitated, the operative incision was made along the line between lateral canthus and tragus, and it could be seen deep along the skull base that white

  18. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: CRUSHED STONE

    This report describes a study of air emissions from crushed stone production. The potential environmental effect of the source is evaluated. Crushed stone production in 1972 was 1.07 x 10 to the 8th power metric tons (1.18 x 10 to the 8th power tons), 68% of which was traprock. C...

  19. Pharmacological Strategies to Prevent Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    Pattharawin Pattharanitima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI is the most common iatrogenic cause of acute kidney injury after intravenous contrast media administration. In general, the incidence of CI-AKI is low in patients with normal renal function. However, the rate is remarkably elevated in patients with preexisting chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, old age, high volume of contrast agent, congestive heart failure, hypotension, anemia, use of nephrotoxic drug, and volume depletion. Consequently, CI-AKI particularly in high risk patients contributes to extended hospitalizations and increases long-term morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of CI-AKI involves at least three mechanisms; contrast agents induce renal vasoconstriction, increase of oxygen free radicals through oxidative stress, and direct tubular toxicity. Several strategies to prevent CI-AKI have been evaluated in experimental studies and clinical trials. At present, intravascular volume expansion with either isotonic saline or sodium bicarbonate solutions has provided more consistent positive results and was recommended in the prevention of CI-AKI. However, the proportion of patients with risk still develops CI-AKI. This review critically evaluated the current evidence for pharmacological strategies to prevent CI-AKI in patients with a risk of developing CI-AKI.

  20. Preemptive mechanical ventilation can block progressive acute lung injury.

    Sadowitz, Benjamin; Jain, Sumeet; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Gatto, Louis A; Nieman, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unacceptable, approaching 45% in certain high-risk patient populations. Treating fulminant ARDS is currently relegated to supportive care measures only. Thus, the best treatment for ARDS may lie with preventing this syndrome from ever occurring. Clinical studies were examined to determine why ARDS has remained resistant to treatment over the past several decades. In addition, both basic science and clinical studies were examined to determine the impact that early, protective mechanical ventilation may have on preventing the development of ARDS in at-risk patients. Fulminant ARDS is highly resistant to both pharmacologic treatment and methods of mechanical ventilation. However, ARDS is a progressive disease with an early treatment window that can be exploited. In particular, protective mechanical ventilation initiated before the onset of lung injury can prevent the progression to ARDS. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is a novel mechanical ventilation strategy for delivering a protective breath that has been shown to block progressive acute lung injury (ALI) and prevent ALI from progressing to ARDS. ARDS mortality currently remains as high as 45% in some studies. As ARDS is a progressive disease, the key to treatment lies with preventing the disease from ever occurring while it remains subclinical. Early protective mechanical ventilation with APRV appears to offer substantial benefit in this regard and may be the prophylactic treatment of choice for preventing ARDS. PMID:26855896

  1. Liver autophagy in anorexia nervosa and acute liver injury.

    Kheloufi, Marouane; Boulanger, Chantal M; Durand, François; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy, a lysosomal catabolic pathway for long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, is crucial for cell homeostasis, and survival under stressful conditions. During starvation, autophagy is induced in numerous organisms ranging from yeast to mammals, and promotes survival by supplying nutrients and energy. In the early neonatal period, when transplacental nutrients supply is interrupted, starvation-induced autophagy is crucial for neonates' survival. In adult animals, autophagy provides amino acids and participates in glucose metabolism following starvation. In patients with anorexia nervosa, autophagy appears initially protective, allowing cells to copes with nutrient deprivation. However, when starvation is critically prolonged and when body mass index reaches 13 kg/m(2) or lower, acute liver insufficiency occurs with features of autophagic cell death, which can be observed by electron microscopy analysis of liver biopsy samples. In acetaminophen overdose, a classic cause of severe liver injury, autophagy is induced as a protective mechanism. Pharmacological enhancement of autophagy protects against acetaminophen-induced necrosis. Autophagy is also activated as a rescue mechanism in response to Efavirenz-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. However, Efavirenz overdose blocks autophagy leading to liver cell death. In conclusion, in acute liver injury, autophagy appears as a protective mechanism that can be however blocked or overwhelmed. PMID:25250330

  2. Adiponectin Ameliorates Endotoxin-Induced Acute Cardiac Injury

    Yoshio Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Increasing evidence suggests that reduced levels of the adipocyte-derived plasma protein adiponectin are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Here, we examined the effects of adiponectin on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced acute cardiac injury in vivo. Methods and Results. A single dose of LPS (10 mg/kg was intraperitoneally injected into wild-type (WT and adiponectin-knockout (APN-KO mice. Following LPS administration, APN-KO mice had exacerbation of left ventricular (LV systolic dysfunction compared with WT mice. Administration of LPS to WT and APN-KO mice led to an increased expression of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-6 in the heart, but the magnitude of this induction was greater in APN-KO mice compared to WT mice. Systemic delivery of an adenoviral vector expressing adiponectin (Ad-APN improved LPS-induced LV dysfunction in APN-KO mice, and this effect was accompanied by the reduced expression of TNF-α and IL-6 in the heart. Administration of etanercept, a soluble TNF receptor abolished the reduced LV contractile function in response to LPS in APN-KO mice. Conclusion. These results suggest that adiponectin protects against LPS-induced acute cardiac injury by suppressing cardiac inflammatory responses, and could represent a potential therapeutic target in sepsis-associated myocardial dysfunction.

  3. Liver Autophagy in Anorexia Nervosa and Acute Liver Injury

    Marouane Kheloufi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, a lysosomal catabolic pathway for long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, is crucial for cell homeostasis, and survival under stressful conditions. During starvation, autophagy is induced in numerous organisms ranging from yeast to mammals, and promotes survival by supplying nutrients and energy. In the early neonatal period, when transplacental nutrients supply is interrupted, starvation-induced autophagy is crucial for neonates’ survival. In adult animals, autophagy provides amino acids and participates in glucose metabolism following starvation. In patients with anorexia nervosa, autophagy appears initially protective, allowing cells to copes with nutrient deprivation. However, when starvation is critically prolonged and when body mass index reaches 13 kg/m2 or lower, acute liver insufficiency occurs with features of autophagic cell death, which can be observed by electron microscopy analysis of liver biopsy samples. In acetaminophen overdose, a classic cause of severe liver injury, autophagy is induced as a protective mechanism. Pharmacological enhancement of autophagy protects against acetaminophen-induced necrosis. Autophagy is also activated as a rescue mechanism in response to Efavirenz-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. However, Efavirenz overdose blocks autophagy leading to liver cell death. In conclusion, in acute liver injury, autophagy appears as a protective mechanism that can be however blocked or overwhelmed.

  4. Acute kidney injury in severe acute pancreatitis: An experience from a tertiary care center

    Ravindra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. We aimed in our study to explore the risk factors of AKI in patients with SAP and assess the prognosis of patients with SAP and AKI. This is a retrospective study consisting of analysis of outcome and complications encountered in 72 severe acute pancreatitis patients admitted to a tertiary care center at Indore, India, from May 2011 to April 2012. We encountered 14 AKI cases in the SAP study patients. There was a significant association of diabetes and alcohol with AKI in patients with SAP. Alcohol was found to be an independent significant risk factor for AKI in SAP. All the eight patients with SAP who expired had AKI. None of the patients of SAP without AKI expired during the study. We conclude that the patients with SAP with AKI have a greater mortality rate as compared with the SAP patients without AKI.

  5. [Role of computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Franchi, Federico; Volterrani, Luca; Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Macarini, Luca

    2012-11-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a complex pulmonary pathology with high mortality rates, manifesting over a wide range of severity. Clinical diagnosis relies on the following 4 criteria stated by the American-European Consensus Conference: acute onset of impaired gas exchange, severe hypoxemia defined as a PaO2 to FiO2 ratio <300 (PaO2 in mmHg), bilateral diffuse infiltration on chest X-ray; pulmonary artery wedge pressure of ≤18 mmHg to rule out cardiogenic causes of pulmonary edema. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of CT in the diagnosis and management of this condition. PMID:23096732

  6. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    Tong, Wu-song; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Jun-fa; Guo, Yi-jun; Zeng, Jing-song; Yang, Wen-jin; Li, Gao-yi; He, Bin; Yu, Hui [Pudong New Area People' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Shanghai (China)

    2011-05-15

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  7. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  8. Acute kidney injury: from clinical to molecular diagnosis.

    Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The RIFLE classification was introduced in 2004 to describe the presence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and to define its clinical stage, based upon the serum creatinine level and urine output. The same criteria, although slightly modified, are used in the other scoring systems AKIN and KDIGO. Mortality and morbidity remain high in AKI, suggesting that current diagnostic methods are suboptimal, poorly accurate, and often timely inadequate in detecting the presence of early kidney injury. Conversely, a growing body of evidence indicates that new AKI biomarkers can be used to both rule out AKI and to assess high-risk conditions or the presence of subclinical forms. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin or cell cycle arrest biomarkers seem to be sensitive and specific enough to be used in conjunction with existing markers of AKI for better classifying renal injury as well as dysfunction. Improvements in diagnosis, risk identification, stratification, prognosis, and therapeutic monitoring may improve prevention and protection from organ damage and help to identify patients at risk, allowing individualized therapy. In this view, we may say that AKI diagnosis has finally moved from clinical to molecular level with potential benefits for the patients because similar progress has been shown in other disciplines. PMID:27384344

  9. Costs and effectiveness of a brief MRI examination of patients with acute knee injury

    E.H.G. Oei (Edwin); J.J. Nikken (Jeroen); A.Z. Ginai (Abida); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); A.B. van Vugt (Arie); M.G.M. Hunink (Myriam)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this study was to assess the costs and effectiveness of selective short magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute knee injury. A model was developed to evaluate the selective use of MRI in patients with acute knee injury and no fracture on radiography based on th

  10. Psychiatric Disease and Post-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Zgaljardic, Dennis J; Seale, Gary S; Schaefer, Lynn A; Temple, Richard O; Foreman, Jack; Elliott, Timothy R

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and can include depression, anxiety, and psychosis, as well as other maladaptive behaviors and personality changes. The epidemiologic data of psychiatric disorders post-TBI vary widely, although the incidence and prevalence rates typically are higher than in the general population. Although the experience of psychiatric symptoms may be temporary and may resolve in the acute period, many patients with TBI can experience psychopathology that is persistent or that develops in the post-acute period. Long-term psychiatric disorder, along with cognitive and physical sequelae and greater risk for substance use disorders, can pose a number of life-long challenges for patients and their caregivers, as they can interfere with participation in rehabilitation as well as limit functional independence in the community. The current review of the literature considers the common psychiatric problems affecting individuals with TBI in the post-acute period, including personality changes, psychosis, executive dysfunction, depression, anxiety, and substance misuse. Although treatment considerations (pharmacological and nonpharmacological) are referred to, an extensive description of such protocols is beyond the scope of the current review. The impact of persistent psychiatric symptoms on perceived caregiver burden and distress is also discussed. PMID:25629222