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Sample records for acute compartment syndrome

  1. What's new in acute compartment syndrome?

    Harvey, Edward J; Sanders, David W; Shuler, Michael S; Lawendy, Abdel-Rahman; Cole, Ashley L; Alqahtani, Saad M; Schmidt, Andrew H

    2012-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) after trauma is often the result of increased size of the damaged tissues after acute crush injury or from reperfusion of ischemic areas. It usually is not solely caused by accumulation of free blood or fluid in the compartment, although that can contribute in some cases. There is no reliable and reproducible test that confirms the diagnosis of ACS. A missed diagnosis or failure to cut the fascia to release pressure within a few hours can result in severe intractable pain, paralysis, and sensory deficits. Reduced blood circulation leads to oxygen and nutrient deprivation, muscle necrosis, and permanent disability. Currently, the diagnosis of ACS is made on the basis of physical examination and repeated needle sticks over a short time frame to measure intracompartmental pressures. Missed compartment syndromes continue to be one of most common causes of malpractice lawsuits. Existing technology for continuous pressure measurements are insensitive, particularly in the deep tissues and compartments, and their use is restricted to highly trained personnel. Newer concepts of the pathophysiology accompanied by new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities have recently been advanced. Among these are the concept of inflammatory mediators as markers and anti-inflammatories as medical adjunct therapy. New diagnostic modalities include near-infrared spectroscopy, ultrafiltration catheters, and radio-frequency identification implants. These all address current shortcomings in the diagnostic armamentarium that trauma surgeons can use. The strengths and weaknesses of these new concepts are discussed to allow the trauma surgeon to follow current evolution of the field. PMID:22913965

  2. Pneumococcal sepsis presenting as acute compartment syndrome of the lower limbs: a case report

    Doddi Sudeendra; Singhal Tarun; Sinha Prakash

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Acute compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency requiring immediate fasciotomy. Spontaneous onset of acute compartment syndrome of the lower limbs is rare. We present a very rare case of pneumococcal sepsis leading to spontaneous acute compartment syndrome. Case presentation A 40-year-old Caucasian man presented as an emergency with spontaneous onset of pain in both legs and signs of compartment syndrome. This was confirmed on fasciotomy. Blood culture grew Streptococ...

  3. Opioid overdose with gluteal compartment syndrome and acute peripheral neuropathy

    Adrish, Muhammad; Duncalf, Richard; Diaz-Fuentes, Gilda; Venkatram, Sindhaghatta

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 42 Final Diagnosis: Gluteal compartment syndromeacute peripheral nauropathy Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Management of emergency care Background: Heroin addiction is common, with an estimated 3.7 million Americans reporting to have used it at some point in their lives. Complications of opiate overdose include infection, rhabdomyolysis, respiratory depression and central or peripheral nervous system neurological ...

  4. Pneumococcal sepsis presenting as acute compartment syndrome of the lower limbs: a case report

    Doddi Sudeendra

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency requiring immediate fasciotomy. Spontaneous onset of acute compartment syndrome of the lower limbs is rare. We present a very rare case of pneumococcal sepsis leading to spontaneous acute compartment syndrome. Case presentation A 40-year-old Caucasian man presented as an emergency with spontaneous onset of pain in both legs and signs of compartment syndrome. This was confirmed on fasciotomy. Blood culture grew Streptococcus pneumoniae. Conclusion Sepsis should be strongly suspected in bilateral acute compartment syndrome of spontaneous onset.

  5. Acute lower limb compartment syndrome after Cesarean section: a case report

    Sütterlin Marc

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute compartment syndrome of the lower limb is a rare but severe intra- and post-partum complication. Prompt diagnosis is essential to avoid permanent functional restriction or even the loss of the affected limb. Clinical signs and symptoms might be nonspecific, especially in the early stages; therefore, knowledge of predisposing risk factors can be helpful. Case presentation We present the case of a 32-year-old Caucasian woman with acute post-partum compartment syndrome. Conclusion Acute compartment syndrome is an important differential diagnosis for the sudden onset of intra- or post-partum lower-limb pain. Predisposing factors for the manifestation of acute compartment syndrome in an obstetric environment are augmented intra-partum blood loss, prolonged hypotensive episodes and the use of oxytocin to support or induce labor because of its vasoconstrictive properties. Treatment is prompt surgical decompression by performing fasciotomy in any affected muscular compartments.

  6. Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Foot due to Infection After Local Hydrocortisone Injection: A Case Report.

    Patil, Sampat Dumbre; Patil, Vaishali Dumbre; Abane, Sachin; Luthra, Rohit; Ranaware, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    High-energy trauma associated with calcaneal fracture or Lisfranc fracture dislocation and midfoot crushing injuries are known causes of compartment syndrome in the foot. Suppurative infection in the deep osseofascial compartments can also cause compartment syndrome. We describe the case of a 29-year-old female who had developed a suppurative local infection that resulted in acute compartment syndrome after receiving a local hydrocortisone injection for plantar fasciitis. We diagnosed the compartment syndrome, and fasciotomy was promptly undertaken. After more than 2 years of follow-up, she had a satisfactory functional outcome without substantial morbidity. To our knowledge, no other report in the English-language studies has described compartment syndrome due to abscess formation after a local injection of hydrocortisone. The aim of our report was to highlight this rare, but serious, complication of a routine outpatient clinical procedure. PMID:24838218

  7. Continuous regional arterial infusion and laparotomic decompression for severe acute pancreatitis with abdominal compartment syndrome

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of abdominal decompression plus continuous regional arterial infusion (CRAI) via a drug delivery system (DDS) in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) patients with abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS).

  8. Acute Compartment Syndrome After Gastrocnemius Rupture (Tennis Leg) in a Nonathlete Without Trauma.

    Tao, Li; Jun, Huang; Muliang, Ding; Deye, Song; Jiangdong, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a serious emergency that warrants urgent decompression, and tennis leg (i.e., rupture of the medial head of the gastrocnemius) is a known clinical condition that is usually treated symptomatically, with good results overall. In rare cases, acute compartment syndrome is associated with tennis leg after severe direct muscle trauma or severe exercise in athletes or physically active individuals. We present an unusual case of acute compartment syndrome secondary to tennis leg after the patient, a nonathlete, had disembarked from a truck without any trauma. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion for atraumatic compartment syndrome, and timely surgical fasciotomy must be undertaken to avoid complications resulting from delayed diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25435006

  9. Acute Traumatic Compartment Syndrome in Pediatric Foot: A Systematic Review and Case Report.

    Wallin, Kelly; Nguyen, Hienvu; Russell, Lindsay; Lee, Daniel K

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the lower leg and foot is a not widely reported, but serious, potential complication that can develop after fractures, crush injuries, or high-velocity trauma of the lower extremity. Early recognition and treatment are critical in preventing morbidity and permanent complications. Although compartment syndrome of the lower leg and foot has been well-studied and documented in adults, its occurrence in the pediatric population is rare. We performed a systematic review of the published data and present the case of the youngest patient with isolated ACS of the foot. A high index of suspicion is warranted in pediatric patients with a traumatic injury to the lower extremity for compartment syndrome. Inconclusive radiographic findings owing to skeletal immaturity and the inability to verbalize symptoms place young children at high risk of undiagnosed compartment syndrome. Clinicians should have a very low threshold for fasciotomy to prevent long-term sequelae associated with undiagnosed compartment syndrome. PMID:27067201

  10. Acute compartment syndrome after open forearm fracture – scale of the problem and case report

    Elsaftawy Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute compartment syndrome is caused due to a sudden increase in the tissue pressure in a given fascial compartment. Missed and undiagnosed or not treated in time can lead to irreversible damage to limb muscles and nerves due to ischemia mechanism. This paper presents a case of a patient with an open forearm fracture treated conservatively in plaster.

  11. Acute Exertional Rhabdomyolysis and Triceps Compartment Syndrome During a High School Football Camp

    Oh, John Y.; Laidler, Matthew; Fiala, Steven C.; Hedberg, Katrina

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acute exertional rhabdomyolysis has been infrequently reported among adolescents. In August 2010, several high school football players from one team developed rhabdomyolysis and triceps compartment syndrome following an upper arm exercise held in a non-air-conditioned wrestling room. Purpose: To confirm the diagnoses, characterize the spectrum of illnesses, and determine the factors contributing to rhabdomyolysis and triceps compartment syndromes. Study Design: Descriptive epidemi...

  12. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome and Intra-abdominal Ischemia in Patients with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Smit, M.; Buddingh, K. T.; Bosma, B; Nieuwenhuijs, V B; Hofker, H.S.; Zijlstra, J.G.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Severe acute pancreatitis may be complicated by intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS), and intestinal ischemia. The aim of this retrospective study is to describe the incidence, treatment, and outcome of patients with severe acute pancreatitis and ACS

  13. Acute compartment syndrome of hand resulting from radiographic contrast iohexol extravasation

    Kolar Vishwanath Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous (IV administration of iodinated contrast agents (ICAs is frequently employed for image enhancement while performing radiographic studies such as computed tomography and angiography. Complications related to IV administration of ICAs such as immediate hypersensitivity reactions and nephrotoxicity are well-known. However, severe skin and soft tissue injuries and acute compartment syndrome resulting from contrast extravasation are rare. This is especially so with small volume extravasation of a low osmolar, nonionic ICA such as iohexol. Here, we report a 63-year-old woman who developed acute compartment syndrome of left hand following iohexol extravasation and had swelling, blistering, cutaneous and soft tissue necrosis. She underwent fasciotomy for acute compartment syndrome of hand and later surgical debridement of necrotic skin and soft tissues was carried out. Clinical pharmacology of ICAs, extravasation injuries following their IV administration, their management and measures to reduce them are discussed in brief.

  14. Treatment of abdominal compartment syndrome in severe acute pancreatitis patients with traditional Chinese medicine

    Zhang, Min-Jie; Zhang, Guo-Lei; Yuan, Wen-Bin; Ni, Jun; Huang, Li-Feng

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic effect of traditional Chinese traditional medicines Da Cheng Qi Decoction (Timely-Purging and Yin-Preserving Decoction) and Glauber’s salt combined with conservative measures on abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) patients.

  15. [A case of acute renal failure following compartment syndrome after the surgery for femoral neck fracture].

    Koda, Kenichiro; Uzawa, Masashi; Ide, Yasuo; Harada, Masaki; Sanbe, Norie; Sugano, Takayuki; Satoh, Yasuo; Tagami, Megumi

    2013-02-01

    Compartment syndrome is known to develop after a prolonged surgery in the lithotomy position. We experienced acute renal failure following compartment syndrome after the surgery in hemilithotomy position. A 62-year-old man underwent a left hip fixation for femoral neck fracture. The surgical leg was placed into traction in a foot piece and the intact leg was placed in the hemilithotomy position. Because of the difficulty in repositioning and the trouble with fluoroscope, the surgery took over 5 hours. He suffered acute pain, swelling and spasm in his intact leg placed into hemilithotomy after the surgery. Creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine markedly increased and myoglobinuria was recognized. We diagnosed an acute renal failure following compartment syndrome and treated him in the ICU on close monitoring. In spite of the treatment with massive transfusion and diuretics, he needed hemodialysis twice and then his renal function improved. Prevention is most essential for compartment syndrome after a prolonged surgery in the lithotomy position. Risk factors should be recognized before surgery and appropriate action should be taken such as using Allen stirrups and avoiding hypotension, hypovolemia and the prolonged lithotomy position with exaggerated elevation of legs. PMID:23479927

  16. COMPARTMENT SYNDROME IN TRAUMA PATIENTS

    Alexander Beck

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute limb compartment syndrome (LCS is a limb-threatening and occasionally life-threatening condition caused by bleeding or edema in a closed muscle compartment surrounded by fascia and bone, which leads to muscle and nerve ischemia. Well-known causative factors are acute trauma and reperfusion after treatment for acute arterial obstruction. Untreated compartment syndrome usually leads to muscle necrosis, limb amputation, and, if severe, in large compartments, renal failure and death. Alertness, clinical suspicion of the possibility of LCS, and occasionally intracompartmental pressure (ICP measurement are required to avoid a delay in diagnosis or missed diagnosis. Open fasciotomy, by incising both skin and fascia, is the most reliable method for adequate compartment decompression. The techniques of measuring ICP have advantages and disadvantages, whereas the pressure level that mandates fasciotomy is controversial. Increased awareness of the syndrome and the advent of measurements of ICP pressure have raised the possibility of early diagnosis and treatment. This presentation reports LCS, including etiology, diagnosis, ICP measurement, management, and outcome.

  17. Interventional Treatment of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome during Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Current Status and Historical Perspective.

    Radenkovic, Dejan V; Johnson, Colin D; Milic, Natasa; Gregoric, Pavle; Ivancevic, Nenad; Bezmarevic, Mihailo; Bilanovic, Dragoljub; Cijan, Vladimir; Antic, Andrija; Bajec, Djordje

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is a marker of severe disease. It occurs as combination of inflammation of retroperitoneum, visceral edema, ascites, acute peripancreatic fluid collections, paralytic ileus, and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The frequency of ACS in SAP may be rising due to more aggressive fluid resuscitation, a trend towards conservative treatment, and attempts to use a minimally invasive approach. There remains uncertainty about the most appropriate surgical technique for the treatment of ACS in SAP. Some unresolved questions remain including medical treatment, indications, timing, and interventional techniques. This review will focus on interventional treatment of this serious condition. First line therapy is conservative treatment aiming to decrease IAP and to restore organ dysfunction. If nonoperative measures are not effective, early abdominal decompression is mandatory. Midline laparostomy seems to be method of choice. Since it carries significant morbidity we need randomized studies to establish firm advantages over other described techniques. After ACS resolves efforts should be made to achieve early primary fascia closure. Additional data are necessary to resolve uncertainties regarding ideal timing and indication for operative treatment. PMID:26839539

  18. Interventional Treatment of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome during Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Current Status and Historical Perspective

    Dejan V. Radenkovic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP is a marker of severe disease. It occurs as combination of inflammation of retroperitoneum, visceral edema, ascites, acute peripancreatic fluid collections, paralytic ileus, and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The frequency of ACS in SAP may be rising due to more aggressive fluid resuscitation, a trend towards conservative treatment, and attempts to use a minimally invasive approach. There remains uncertainty about the most appropriate surgical technique for the treatment of ACS in SAP. Some unresolved questions remain including medical treatment, indications, timing, and interventional techniques. This review will focus on interventional treatment of this serious condition. First line therapy is conservative treatment aiming to decrease IAP and to restore organ dysfunction. If nonoperative measures are not effective, early abdominal decompression is mandatory. Midline laparostomy seems to be method of choice. Since it carries significant morbidity we need randomized studies to establish firm advantages over other described techniques. After ACS resolves efforts should be made to achieve early primary fascia closure. Additional data are necessary to resolve uncertainties regarding ideal timing and indication for operative treatment.

  19. Acute renal failure due to abdominal compartment syndrome: report on four cases and literature review

    Cleva Roberto de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on 4 cases of abdominal compartment syndrome complicated by acute renal failure that were promptly reversed by different abdominal decompression methods. Case 1: A 57-year-old obese woman in the post-operative period after giant incisional hernia correction with an intra-abdominal pressure of 24 mm Hg. She was sedated and curarized, and the intra-abdominal pressure fell to 15 mm Hg. Case 2: A 73-year-old woman with acute inflammatory abdomen was undergoing exploratory laparotomy when a hypertensive pneumoperitoneum was noticed. During the surgery, enhancement of urinary output was observed. Case 3: An 18-year-old man who underwent hepatectomy and developed coagulopathy and hepatic bleeding that required abdominal packing, developed oliguria with a transvesical intra-abdominal pressure of 22 mm Hg. During reoperation, the compresses were removed with a prompt improvement in urinary flow. Case 4: A 46-year-old man with hepatic cirrhosis was admitted after incisional hernia repair with intra-abdominal pressure of 16 mm Hg. After paracentesis, the intra-abdominal pressure fell to 11 mm Hg.

  20. EARLY SURGERY TO PATIENTS SUFFERING FULMINANT ACUTE PANCREATITIS WITH ABDOMINAL COMPARTMENT SYNDROME

    YU Xiao; LI Yong-guo; CHEN Dao-jin; LI Xiao-rong; ZHANG Sheng-dao; LEI Ruo-qing; TANG Yao-qing

    2006-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively analyze and compare conservative versus surgical treatment of patients with fulminant acute pancreatitis (FAP) plus abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Methods From January 1998 to September 2005, 21 patients with FAP plus ACS were retrospectively analyzed. Ten patients were conservatively treated by means of intensive care medicine without surgery, and 11 patients received open surgical management and suction drainage. Results Seven of the 10 non-surgical patients died, comprising one with mild, four with moderate and two with severe ACS (70% mortality rate). Of the 11 patients receiving open surgical management in the early phase (within 3 days of disease initiation), three died, comprising one with moderate and two with severe ACS (27.3% mortality rate). The difference in mortality rates was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion Our data indicate patients suffering FAP with severe ACS should be treated with open management of the abdomen in the early phase (within 3 days), even in the absence of infection. This approach appears superior to that of conservative management. Surgical treatment resulted in abdominal decompression and subsequently significantly decreased the mortality rate and improved overall prognosis.

  1. Compartment syndrome without pain!

    O'Sullivan, M J

    2012-02-03

    We report the case of a young male patient who underwent intra-medullary nailing for a closed, displaced mid-shaft fracture of tibia and fibula. He was commenced on patient controlled analgesia post-operatively. A diagnosis of compartment syndrome in the patient\\'s leg was delayed because he did not exhibit a pain response. This ultimately resulted in a below-knee amputation of the patient\\'s leg. We caution against the use of patient controlled analgesia in any traumatised limb distal to the hip or the shoulder.

  2. Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Arm after Minor Trauma in a Patient with Optimal Range of Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Case Report

    Paolo Titolo; Patrizia Milani; Bernardino Panero; Davide Ciclamini; Giulia Colzani; Stefano Artiaco

    2014-01-01

    Compartment syndrome of the arm is a rare event that can be subsequent to trauma or other pathological and physical conditions. At the arm the thin and elastic fascia may allow accumulation of blood more than in other districts, especially in patients undergoing anticoagulant therapy. We describe a rare case of an acute compartment syndrome of the arm after minor trauma with partial biceps brachii rupture in a patient with warfarin therapy and optimal value of INR. Prompt diagnosis and sur...

  3. Compartment Syndrome Resulting from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning.

    Serbest, Sancar; Belhan, Oktay; Gürger, Murat; Tosun, Haci Bayram

    2015-12-01

    Every year, especially in the cooler Fall and Winter months, hundreds of people die because of carbon monoxide poisoning. This occurs usually as an accident. It is a significant cause of poisoning worldwide. We present a case of compartment syndrome in both lower extremities with accompanying acute renal failure and systemic capillary leakage syndrome because of carbon monoxide poisoning. PMID:26588033

  4. Posterior compartment syndrome associated with clopidogrel therapy following trivial trauma

    Byrne, A‐M; Kearns, S. R.; Kelly, E P

    2006-01-01

    Haematomata caused by blunt trauma may potentially induce a compartment syndrome by raising intra‐compartmental pressure. We report a case of acute posterior compartment syndrome following minimal trauma to the leg of an elderly patient on the antiplatelet agent clopidogrel. This case highlights the high index of clinical suspicion required to detect compartment syndrome in those on long term antiplatelet therapy and prompt surgical decompression is recommended.

  5. Surfactant disaturated-phosphatidylcholine kinetics in acute respiratory distress syndrome by stable isotopes and a two compartment model

    Cogo Paola E

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, it is well known that only part of the lungs is aerated and surfactant function is impaired, but the extent of lung damage and changes in surfactant turnover remain unclear. The objective of the study was to evaluate surfactant disaturated-phosphatidylcholine turnover in patients with ARDS using stable isotopes. Methods We studied 12 patients with ARDS and 7 subjects with normal lungs. After the tracheal instillation of a trace dose of 13C-dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine, we measured the 13C enrichment over time of palmitate residues of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine isolated from tracheal aspirates. Data were interpreted using a model with two compartments, alveoli and lung tissue, and kinetic parameters were derived assuming that, in controls, alveolar macrophages may degrade between 5 and 50% of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine, the rest being lost from tissue. In ARDS we assumed that 5–100% of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine is degraded in the alveolar space, due to release of hydrolytic enzymes. Some of the kinetic parameters were uniquely determined, while others were identified as lower and upper bounds. Results In ARDS, the alveolar pool of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine was significantly lower than in controls (0.16 ± 0.04 vs. 1.31 ± 0.40 mg/kg, p de novo synthesis of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine were also significantly lower, while mean resident time in lung tissue was significantly higher in ARDS than in controls. Recycling was 16.2 ± 3.5 in ARDS and 31.9 ± 7.3 in controls (p = 0.08. Conclusion In ARDS the alveolar pool of surfactant is reduced and disaturated-phosphatidylcholine turnover is altered.

  6. Surfactant disaturated-phosphatidylcholine kinetics in acute respiratory distress syndrome by stable isotopes and a two compartment model

    Cogo Paola E; Toffolo Gianna; Ori Carlo; Vianello Andrea; Chierici Marco; Gucciardi Antonina; Cobelli Claudio; Baritussio Aldo; Carnielli Virgilio P

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), it is well known that only part of the lungs is aerated and surfactant function is impaired, but the extent of lung damage and changes in surfactant turnover remain unclear. The objective of the study was to evaluate surfactant disaturated-phosphatidylcholine turnover in patients with ARDS using stable isotopes. Methods We studied 12 patients with ARDS and 7 subjects with normal lungs. After the tracheal instilla...

  7. "Compartment"-syndrom på underben, atypisk traumemekanisme

    Larsen, Michael H; Nielsen, Henrik Toft; Wester, Jens Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (CS) is a limb threatening condition which warrants emergency treatment. We describe a case of a 37-year-old man with acute CS developed without major trauma. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment by decompressive fasciotomy is of vital importance in order to preserve li...

  8. The upper hand on compartment syndrome.

    Dolan, Roisin T

    2012-11-01

    Metacarpal fractures are common injuries, accounting for approximately 30% to 40% of all hand fractures and with a lifetime incidence of 2.5%. Traditionally regarded as an innocuous injury, metacarpal fractures tend to be associated with successful outcomes after closed reduction and immobilization. Hand compartment syndrome (HCS) is a rare clinical entity with potential devastating consequences in terms of loss of function and quality-of-life outcomes. We discuss the case of a 44-year-old woman presenting with multiple closed metacarpal fractures as a result of low-energy trauma, complicated by acute HCS. We review the presentation, clinical assessment, and optimal surgical management of acute HCS with reference to international literature.

  9. Compartment syndrome in a labrador retriever

    Compartment syndrome is an elevation of interstitial pressure in a closed osseofascial compartment that results in microvascular compromise. This report documents a clinical syndrome in the crus of a fourteen-month-old intact male Labrador Retriever which was consistent with trauma-induced compartment syndrome. A six month history of recurring trauma or complications resulted in the need for referral. Survey radiography and ultrasonography aided in the diagnosis, but the definitive answer was provided by femoral angiography. The patient was successfully treated and was discharged with normal limb function. One year later, there were no complications observed. Compartment syndrome is not uncommon in humans, and is routinely considered in certain blunt and most penetrating traumas. However, few reports of this complication in animals are found

  10. Rare times rare: The hyponatremia, rhabdomyolysis, anterior compartment syndrome sequence

    Dubin, Ina; Gelber, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Lesson Primary polydipsia occurs in up to 25% of patients with chronic psychiatric disorders (especially schizophrenia), related to the disease, its treatment or both. Urine output fails to match intake >10 L/day and water intoxication may develop. Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of hyponatremia, and an acute anterior compartment syndrome of the leg, an emergency, may be very rarely associated.

  11. Cutaneous anthrax cases leading compartment syndrome

    Emine Parlak; Ali Aydın; Mehmet Parlak

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax. Anthrax is a zoonotic disease with three clinical forms. Clinical forms are skin, gastrointestinal and inhalational anthrax. Cutaneous anthrax is 95% of the cases. Cutaneous anthrax frequently defines itself. Clinical presentation of anthrax may be severe and complicated in some cases. There may seem complications like meningitis, septic shock and compartment syndrome. Compartment Syndrome is a rare complication of cutaneous anthrax ...

  12. Current concepts in the pathophysiology, evaluation, and diagnosis of compartment syndrome

    Hargens, A. R.; Mubarak, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews present knowledge of the pathophysiology and diagnosis of acute compartment syndromes. Recent results using compression of legs in normal volunteers provide objective data concerning local pressure thresholds for neuromuscular dysfunction in the anterior compartment. Results with this model indicate that a progression of neuromuscular deficits occurs when IMP increases to within 35 to 40 mm Hg of diastolic blood pressure. These findings provide useful information on the diagnosis and compression thresholds for acute compartment syndromes. Time factors are also important, however, and usually are incompletely known in most cases of acute compartment syndrome. Although the slit catheter is a very good technique for monitoring IMP during rest, these catheters and their associated extracorporeal transducer systems are not ideal. Recently developed miniature transducer-tipped catheters and, perhaps, future development of noninvasive techniques may provide accurate recordings of IMP in patients with acute compartment syndromes.

  13. Cutaneous anthrax cases leading compartment syndrome

    Emine Parlak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax. Anthrax is a zoonotic disease with three clinical forms. Clinical forms are skin, gastrointestinal and inhalational anthrax. Cutaneous anthrax is 95% of the cases. Cutaneous anthrax frequently defines itself. Clinical presentation of anthrax may be severe and complicated in some cases. There may seem complications like meningitis, septic shock and compartment syndrome. Compartment Syndrome is a rare complication of cutaneous anthrax and it is life threatening. Physicians working in the endemic area should be aware of this form. In this study, three cases were shown which developed compartment syndrome following cutaneous anthrax. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2013;3(4: 214-217

  14. Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm and hand in a patient of spine surgery -A case report-

    Lee, Jung-ah; Jeon, Yeon Soo; Jung, Hong Soo; Kim, Hyung-Gun; Kim, Yong Shin

    2010-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman underwent a 4-hour operation in the prone position for a laminectomy at C4-7 and posterior cervical decompressive fusion at C7-T1 under general anesthesia. After undraping at the end of surgery, considerable swelling with many blisters of the left forearm and hand was observed. The chest roll at the left side had moved cephalad into the axilla and compressed the axillary structures. An emergency fasciotomy to decompress the compartments of the forearm and dorsal surface of...

  15. Compartment syndrome can also be seen in the forearm

    Asmar, Ali; Broholm, Rikke; Bülow, Jens; Simonsen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Chronic compartment syndrome is a challenge for the clinician and symptomatic similar to neuropathies, tenosynovitis, stress fractures and referred pain from lumbar cervicalis. Thus, chronic compartment syndrome of the upper extremities is probably an underdiagnosed condition. In patients with st...... stress-induced pain in the upper limbs, chronic compartment syndrome should be considered - particularly in young patients with high physical activity. Despite limited literature, the effect of surgical treatment is promising.......Chronic compartment syndrome is a challenge for the clinician and symptomatic similar to neuropathies, tenosynovitis, stress fractures and referred pain from lumbar cervicalis. Thus, chronic compartment syndrome of the upper extremities is probably an underdiagnosed condition. In patients with...

  16. Common complication of crush injury, but a rare compartment syndrome

    Shaikh Nissar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Compartment syndrome (CS is a common complication of crush injury but it is rare to find bilateral gluteal compartment syndrome (BGCS. Only six cases of BGCS have been reported in the literature. This syndrome has been reported after crush injury, drug overdose, surgical positioning, and vascular surgery. Apart from CS, crush injury is associated with multi-system adverse effects and these patients are at high risk for renal failure and sepsis. CS patients may present with dehydration; coagulation disorders; elevated creatine phosphokinase and myoglobin levels; hyperkalemia and hypocalcaemia, which may cause life-threatening arrhythmias and therefore need urgent and aggressive therapy. The early goal in these patients is prevention of acute renal failure with aggressive fluid therapy, alkalinization of urine, and forced diuresis. Early treatment of hyperkalemia, antibiotic therapy, immunoprophylaxis, and wound care will minimize the risk of arrhythmias and sepsis. CS must be considered when any patient is diagnosed with crush injury syndrome. CS is defined as elevation of interstitial/intracompartmental pressure, leading to microvascular and myoneural dysfunction and secondary hypoxia; it may cause functional loss or even death if not detected early and treated properly. The increase in pressure in one or all compartments of the gluteal region causes CS with devastating effects on muscle and neurovascular bundles. CS is traditionally diagnosed on the basis of five ′p′s: pain, pallor, paraesthesia, pulselessness and paralysis. Diagnosis of gluteal CS is difficult as the peripheral pulses are preserved and the condition is usually only diagnosed when neurological abnormality is noticed. Diagnosis of CS can be made by direct measurement of the compartment pressure and magnetic resonance imaging or computerized tomography. Gluteal CS is managed by fasciotomy and debridement of necrosed tissue, with secondary closure of fascia. A high index of

  17. Lower extremity compartment syndrome in the setting of iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis, phlegmasia cerulea dolens and factor VII deficiency.

    Abdul, Wahid; Hickey, Ben; Wilson, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome requires urgent fasciotomies to prevent irreversible muscle damage. We present a case of massive iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis (DVT) presenting as acute compartment syndrome. A healthy 21-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of worsening left leg pain with swelling and bluish discolouration. Clinical diagnosis of compartment syndrome secondary to phlegmasia cerulea dolens (PCD) was made and he underwent emergency fasciotomies. Postoperative venous duplex confirmed a massive iliofemoral DVT and intravenous heparin was started. Following skin grafting, the patient made a good recovery. Massive iliofemoral DVT is an uncommon cause of compartment syndrome and has been reported in lower limbs, secondary to PCD. Failure to treat early carries a high degree of morbidity, with amputation rates up to 50% and mortality rates between 25% and 40%. It is important to recognise compartment syndrome as an acute presentation of PCD. Urgent fasciotomies can prevent limb amputation and mortality. PMID:27113791

  18. [Intestinal occlusion and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS)].

    Stagnitti, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Intestinal occlusion is defined as an independent predictive factor of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) which represents an independent predictor of mortality. Baggot in 1951 classified patients operated with intestinal occlusion as being at risk for IAH ("abdominal blow-out"), recommending them for open abdomen surgery proposed by Ogilvie. Abdominal surgery provokes IAH in 44.7% of cases with mortality which, in emergency, triples with respect to elective surgery (21.9% vs 6.8%). In particular, IAH is present in 61.2% of ileus and bowel distension and is responsible for 52% of mortality (54.8% in cases with intra-abdominal infection). These patients present with an increasing intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) which, over 20-25 mmHg, triggers an Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (ACS) with altered functions in some organs arriving at Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS). The intestine normally covers 58% of abdominal volume but when there is ileus distension, intestinal pneumatosis develops (third space) which can occupy up to 90% of the entire cavity. At this moment, Gastro Intestinal Failure (GIF) can appear, which is a specific independent risk factor of mortality, motor of "Organ Failure". The pathophysiological evolution has many factors in 45% of cases: intestinal pneumatosis is associated with mucosal and serous edema, capillary leakage with an increase in extra-cellular volume and peritoneal fluid collections (fourth space). The successive loss of the mucous barrier permits a bacterial translocation which includes bacteria, toxins, pro-inflammatory factors and oxygen free radicals facilitating the passage from an intra-abdominal to inter-systemic vicious cyrcle. IAH provokes the raising of the diaphragm, and vascular and visceral compressions which induce hypertension in the various spaces with compartmental characteristics. These trigger hypertension in the renal, hepatic, pelvic, thoracic, cardiac, intracranial, orbital and lower extremity areas, giving

  19. Delayed Presentation of Gluteal Compartment Syndrome: The Argument for Fasciotomy

    John E. Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A male patient in his fifties presented to his local hospital with numbness and weakness of the right leg which left him unable to mobilise. He reported injecting heroin the previous morning. Following an initial diagnosis of acute limb ischaemia the patient was transferred to a tertiary centre where Computed Tomography Angiography was reported as normal. Detailed neurological examination revealed weakness in hip flexion and extension (1/5 on the Medical Research Council scale with complete paralysis of muscle groups distal to this. Sensation to pinprick and light touch was globally reduced. Blood tests revealed acute kidney injury with raised creatinine kinase and the patient was treated for rhabdomyolysis. Orthopaedic referral was made the following day and a diagnosis of gluteal compartment syndrome (GCS was made. Emergency fasciotomy was performed 56 hours after the onset of symptoms. There was immediate neurological improvement following decompression and the patient was rehabilitated with complete nerve recovery and function at eight-week follow-up. This is the first documented case of full functional recovery following a delayed presentation of GCS with sciatic nerve palsy. We discuss the arguments for and against fasciotomy in cases of compartment syndrome with significant delay in presentation or diagnosis.

  20. Mannitol extravasation during partial nephrectomy leading to forearm compartment syndrome

    Bradley A. Erickson

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the first known complication of forearm compartment syndrome after mannitol infusion during partial nephrectomy. We stress the importance of excellent intravenous catheter access and constant visual monitoring of the intravenous catheter site during and after mannitol infusion as ways to prevent this complication. Prompt recognition of compartment syndrome with appropriate intervention can prevent long-term sequelae.

  1. Gluteal compartment syndrome due to prolonged immobilization after alcohol intoxication: a case report.

    Iizuka, Shinichi; Miura, Naoyuki; Fukushima, Tomokazu; Seki, Tomoko; Sugimoto, Katuhiko; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2011-07-01

    Gluteal compartment syndrome is a relatively rare condition that mostly result from atraumatic causes such as prolonged immobilization due to drug abuse or alcoholic intoxication and incorrect positioning during surgical procedures rather than traumatic causes. Early diagnosis is difficult and sometimes delayed or overlooked because of poor physical signs resulting from altered mental status and inappropriate diagnosis by clinicians. It has been reported that more than half of the cases of gluteal compartment syndrome are associated with crush syndrome and sciatic nerve palsy. Early diagnosis and immediate fasciotomy are necessary to improve the functional prognosis. Here, we report the case of a patient with gluteal compartment syndrome caused by prolonged immobilization after acute alcoholic intoxication. After disease onset, the patient developed complications of crush syndrome and sciatic nerve palsy, but immediate fasciotomy improved his condition. PMID:21769768

  2. Fulminant crural compartment syndrome preceded by psychogenic polydipsia

    Ulstrup, Anton; Ugleholdt, Randi; Rasmussen, Jeppe Vejlgaard

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral anterolateral crural compartment syndrome elicited by hyponatraemia and psychogenic polydipsia. The unusual constellation of clinical findings and diminished pain expression made initial diagnostic procedures challenging. The possible pathogenesis and treatment options...

  3. Compartment syndrome and popliteal vascular injury complicating unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    Kort, Nanne Pieter; Van Raay, Jos J. J. A. M.; van Horn, Jim R.

    2007-01-01

    Popliteal vascular injury and the compartment syndrome of the leg are rare but important complications of knee arthroplasties. Early diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance in preventing the devastating complications of these conditions. To our knowledge, these complications have not been reported previously after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in the literature. Low level of suspicion may delay the diagnosis, as popliteal vascular injury and compartment syndrome are not well ...

  4. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome and Necrotizing Pancreatitis Following Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy.

    Gupta, S; Scambia, J; Gandillon, C; Aversano, F; Batista, R

    2016-09-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is a common procedure in the treatment of renal calculi. There have been major complications reported with ESWL such as acute pancreatitis, bower perforation, venous thrombosis, and biliary obstruction. There are few reports in the literature of necrotizing pancreatitis secondary to ESWL. We have a case report of a 29-year-old female that developed an abdominal compartment syndrome with an acute necrotizing pancreatitis hours after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. PMID:27462545

  5. Compartment syndrome in a patient treated with perineural liposomal bupivacaine (Exparel).

    Soberón, José Raul; Sisco-Wise, Leslie E; Dunbar, Ross M

    2016-06-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a condition that may result in sensorimotor deficits and loss of function of the affected limb as a result of ischemic injury. It is considered a surgical emergency and prompt diagnosis and treatment results in more favorable outcomes. The use of regional anesthesia is controversial in patients at risk for compartment syndrome due to concern of its potential to mask symptoms of the condition. A 44-year-old African American male presented to surgery for open reduction and internal fixation of a comminuted distal radius fracture. As part of an off-label, investigator-initiated, and institutional review board-approved study, he received a perineural injection of liposomal bupivacaine (Exparel) around the median, ulnar, and radial nerves at the level of the proximal forearm. The following morning, his initial complaints of numbness and incisional pain progressively evolved into worsening numbness, diffuse discomfort, and pain with passive movement. A diagnosis of compartment syndrome was made and he underwent an emergency fasciotomy. The diagnosis of compartment syndrome requires a high index of suspicion and prompt treatment. This patient's changing pattern of symptoms-rather than his pain complaints alone-resulted in the diagnosis of compartment syndrome treated with emergent fasciotomy in spite of finger numbness that was initially attributed to the liposomal bupivacaine. While the use of liposomal bupivacaine did not preclude the diagnosis of compartment syndrome in our patient, it should be used with caution in patients at risk for compartment syndrome until additional data, particularly regarding block characteristics, are available. PMID:27185666

  6. Treatment outcomes of muscle debridement in acute upper limb compartment syndrome%肌肉清创治疗上肢急性期筋膜室间隔综合征的疗效

    王晓刚; 宫可同; 殷中罡; 阚世廉; 李瑞华; 尹路; 鲁毅军; 张宝贵

    2014-01-01

    目的 探索急性期筋膜室间隔综合征患者肌肉清创的手术方法并评估术后疗效.方法 回顾性分析自2005年6月至2013年3月不同原因引起的急性期筋膜室间隔综合征患者13例,全部在筋膜减张的同时行肌肉内坏死组织清创及神经肌肉松解.结果 12例患者直接闭合创面,1例在12 d后延迟闭合创面;11例在术后3周左右获得Ⅰ期愈合;术后3周内9例获得不同程度的运动及感觉功能改善;术后3个月以上5例患者获得随访,对运动和感觉功能恢复较满意.结论 肌肉清创作为筋膜减张术的补充,降低了肌肉内坏死部分所占的比例,使急性期患者创面直接闭合及Ⅰ期愈合的比例升高,并能通过早期功能锻炼,促进患肢近期和远期的功能康复.%Objective To introduce the procedures of muscle debridement in acute compartment syndromes and evaluate the surgical outcomes.Methods From June 2005 to March 2013,thirteen patients who sustained acute compartment syndrome underwent fasciotomy,extensive debridement of necrotic portion of the involved muscles as well as release of nerves and muscles in the meantime.Results Direct wound closure was possible in 12 patients.Delayed wound incision closure in 12 days was done in one patient.Primary wound healing was achieved in 11 patients around 3 weeks postoperatively.Nine patients obtained varied degrees of improvement in both motor and sensory functions.Five patients were follow-up for more than 3 months and they were rather satisfied with the muscle strength and sensory recovery.Conclusion In addition to fasciotomy,debridement of involved muscles can decrease the extent of muscle necrosis in acute compartment syndrome patients.It also increases the chance of direct wound closure and primary wound healing,facilitates early rehabilitation,and thus leads to much better short-term and long-term functional outcomes.

  7. [Compartment syndrome following laparoscopic procedures in the lithotomy position].

    Donckers, Janneke; de Kruif, Jan H; van der Stappen, William A H

    2010-01-01

    A laparoscopic tubectomy in the lithotomy position was performed on a healthy 31-year-old woman, as treatment following an extra-uterine pregnancy. The operation proceeded without complications and took 60 minutes. However, on the third day following surgery the woman was diagnosed with compartment syndrome, which was treated with three-compartment fasciotomy. Compartment syndrome is a rare but dangerous complication of an operation in the lithotomy position. Since pressure on leg compartments increases with time spent in the lithotomy position, regardless of the type of stirrups used, it is important to maintain the position only as long as is necessary for the procedure. The patient's legs should be taken out of the lithotomy position as soon as possible, and the position resumed if necessary at a later stage in the procedure. This can easily be achieved with pneumatic stirrups. PMID:20619013

  8. Acral osteolysis in bilateral compartment syndrome

    Iram Saeed

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common neurological condition with rare yet potentially serious cutaneous and skeletal complications. We present a case of mutilating/ulcerating bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a 63 year old female. Radiographs showed symmetrical acral osteolysis in the index and middle fingers distal phalanges bilaterally. Carpal tunnel decompressions provided symptomatic relief.

  9. Compartment syndrome and popliteal vascular injury complicating unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    Kort, Nanne Pieter; Van Raay, Jos J. J. A. M.; van Horn, Jim R.

    2007-01-01

    Popliteal vascular injury and the compartment syndrome of the leg are rare but important complications of knee arthroplasties. Early diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance in preventing the devastating complications of these conditions. To our knowledge, these complications have not bee

  10. Well-leg compartment syndrome after gynecological laparoscopic surgery

    Boesgaard-Kjer, Diana H; Boesgaard-Kjer, Daniel; Kjer, Jens Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    positioning of the legs during operation (lithotomy and Lloyd-Davies positions), a prolonged operation, external compression and vascular insults, both pre- and intra-operatively. To prevent well-leg compartment syndrome it is important to improve knowledge of the condition among surgeons and nursing staff...

  11. Gluteal compartment syndrome after prostatectomy caused by incorrect positioning.

    Heyn, Jens; Ladurner, R; Ozimek, A; Vogel, T; Hallfeldt, K K; Mussack, T

    2006-04-28

    Gluteal compartment syndrome is an uncommon and rare disease. Most reasonable causes for the development of this disease are trauma, drug induced coma, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, sickle cell associated muscle infarction, incorrect positioning during surgical procedures and prolonged pressure in patients with altered consciousness levels. The diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion, especially in postoperative patient where sedation or peridural anaesthesia can confound the neurological examination. Early signs include gluteal tenderness, decrease in vibratory sensation during clinical examination and increasing CK in laboratory findings. We present a case of a 52 year-old patient, who developed gluteal compartment syndrome after radical prostatectomy in lithotomic position. After operation, diuresis decreased [pain in the gluteal region and both thighs. His thighs and the gluteal region were swollen. Passive stretch of the thighs caused enormous pain. The compartment pressure was 92 mmHg. Therefore, emergency fasciotomy was performed successfully. The gluteal compartment syndrome was most likely caused by elevated pressure on the gluteal muscle during operation. We suggest heightened awareness of positioning the patient on the operating table is important especially in obese patients with lengthy operating procedures. PMID:16720283

  12. Compartment syndrome of the lower leg after surgery in the modified lithotomy position : Report of seven cases

    Wassenaar, Eelco B.; van den Brand, Johan G. H.; van der Werken, Christian

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Acute compartment syndrome is known to develop after trauma or after postischemic revascularization. It also can occur when a patient has been lying in the lithotomy position during prolonged surgery. Methods were searched for the prevention of this iatrogenic complication after a series of

  13. Volume -controlled peritoneal drainage for acute ascites resulted abdominal compartment syndrome%控制引流治疗腹腔积液继发腹腔间隙综合征

    梁玉坚; 黄慧敏; 徐玲玲; 张丽丹; 李素萍; 唐雯

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察腹腔置管持续控制引流治疗急性腹腔积液所致儿童腹腔间隙综合征( abdominal compartment syndrome , ACS)的临床疗效。方法回顾性分析2011-05~2013-05收住中山大学附属第一医院PICU的12例急性腹腔积液所致儿童ACS采用腹腔持续置管控制性引流治疗的患儿,并与8例未能接受引流的急性腹腔积液所致儿童ACS病例进行对比。结果12例急性腹腔积液继发ACS 患儿中,病因为腹腔肿瘤破裂出血7例(7/12),肝肾移植术后3例(3/12),尿瘘致尿性腹水2例(2/12)。引流组在治疗前的腹腔压力、脏器受累数量及危重病评分与未引流组比较差异无统计学意义。在ACS患儿中,呼吸道及胃肠道为受累最多的器官,腹腔压力越高,脏器损害数量及病死率越高。引流组较未引流组死亡率明显降低(引流3/12 vs未引流8/8,P<0.001)。腹腔置管引流偶有发生腹腔感染和电解质紊乱的并发症。结论腹腔置管持续控制性引流是一个微创、高效而安全的治疗急性腹腔积液继发ACS的方法,能有效降低IAP,减少脏器损害的发生,大大降低了死亡率,为原发病的救治争取更多的时间。%Objective Intra -abdominal hypertension ( IAH ) has been identified as an independent risk factor for death .The primary goal of this study was to observe the effect of continuous volume -controlled percutaneous catheter drainage ( PCD ) for acute ascites resulted abdominal compartment syndrome ( ACS) .Methods We retrospectively analyzed the treatment effect of volume -controlled PCD in 12 patients with acute ascites resulted ACS from May 2011 to May 2013 in PICU. Eight patients who were treated without PCD were compared .Results Of these 12 enrolled children , 7 cases (7/12) were abdominal tumor rupture, 3 cases (3/12) were post -operation of liver or kidney transplantation and 2 cases ( 2/12 ) were urinary fistula

  14. Taurine inhibits ischemia/reperfusion-induced compartment syndrome in rabbits

    Ji-xian WANG; Yan LI; Li-ke ZHANG; Jing ZHAO; Yong-zheng PANG; Chao-shu TANG; Jing ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate effects of taurine on ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced compartment syndrome in rabbit hind limbs.Methods: Rabbits underwent femoral artery occ lusion after ligation of branches from terminal aorta to femoral artery.After a 7-h ischemia, reperfusion was established with the use of heparinized by iv infusion 10 min before shunt placement.During reperfusion, anterior compartment pressure (ACP) was monitored continuously in the left lower extremity.Gastrocnemius muscle triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) level, taurine content and myeloperoxidase activity were assayed.Oxidative stress was induced in the in vitro gastrocnemius muscle slices by free radical generating systems (FRGS),and the malondialdehyde content was measured in presence or absence of taurine.Results: After 7 h of ischemia, none of the parameters that we measured were different from those before ischemia, except that TTC reduction decreased by 80%.In the control group, after 2 h of reperfusion, ACP increased 4.5-fold, and gastrocnemius muscle taurine content was reduced by 33%.In taurine-treated animals, at 2 h reperfusion, the mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate were increased, by 6% and 10%.ACP decreased by 39%, muscle edema decreased by 16%, TTC reduction increased by 150%, and lactate dehydrogenase decreased by 36% compared to control group.Plasma and muscle taurine content increased by 70% and 88%, respectively.In the taurine-treated group, at 2 h reperfusion, plasma malondialdehyde and conjugated diene content were decreased by 38% and 23%,respectively, and muscle malondialdehyde and conjugated diene content decreased by 22% and 30%, respectively compared to the control group.At 2 h reperfusion,myeloperoxidase activity was increased 3.5-fold in control animals.In the in vitro study, taurine decreased malondialdehyde content in muscle slices incubated with hypochlorous acid in a dose-dependent manner, but there was no change when incubated with hydrogen peroxide and

  15. COMPARTMENTS

    Binder, Janos X; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Tsafou, Kalliopi;

    2014-01-01

    of the localization of a protein, it is thus necessary to consult multiple databases and prediction tools. To address this, we present the COMPARTMENTS resource, which integrates all sources listed above as well as the results of automatic text mining. The resource is automatically kept up to date...

  16. ANTICOAGULANTS IN ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

    I. A. Latfullin; A. A. Podolskaya

    2016-01-01

    Clinical efficacy of unfractionated and low molecular heparins in acute coronary syndrome is discussed. New synthetic heparin derivative fondaparinux (Arixtra) is focused. Author’s brief experience of fondaparinux clinical implementation is presented.

  17. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Modrykamien, Ariel M.; Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss t...

  18. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Yadam, Suman; Bihler, Eric; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious inflammatory disorder with high mortality. Its main pathologic mechanism seems to result from increased alveolar permeability. Its definition has also changed since first being described according to the Berlin definition, which now classifies ARDS on a severity scale based on PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen, arterial)/FIO2 (fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio. The cornerstone of therapy was found to be a low tidal volume strategy featuring volumes of 6 to 8 mL per kg of ideal body weight that has been shown to have decreased mortality as proven by the ARDSnet trials. There are other areas of treatment right now that include extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, as well for severe refractory hypoxemia. Other methods that include prone positioning for ventilation have also shown improvements in oxygenation. Positive end-expiratory pressure with lung recruitment maneuvers has also been found to be helpful. Other therapies that include vasodilators and neuromuscular agents are still being explored and need further studies to define their role in ARDS. PMID:26919679

  19. Chronic Renal Failure in a Patient Due to Gluteal Compartment Syndrome After a Nephrectomy Operation

    Özkan ULUTAŞ, , ,

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gluteal compartment syndrome is a rare reason of rhabdomyolysis resulting from atraumatic origin, and leading to renal failure. Beside to other atraumatic causes like drug abuse, alcohol intoxication, and antihyperlipidemic medications prolonged operation duration in a fixed position is an important cause of this syndrome. Male sex, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity are risk factors for gluteal compartment syndrome associated kidney failure. We report a 56 year old obese patient with a medical history of diabetes mellitus, and hypertension who undergo a nephrectomy operation resulting with gluteal compartment syndrome, and chronic kidney disease. We also highlight the importance of preventive cares and early recognition of gluteal compartment syndrome to avoid further morbidity.

  20. An iatrogenic popliteal pseudoaneurysm masked under compartment syndrome of leg.

    Sajjad, Jahangir; Coveney, Andrew; Ahmed, Abubakr; Fulton, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    This case describes a 60-year-old gentleman who presented with a pulsating mass behind his knee. Before this, he had a fasciotomy for suspected compartment syndrome of leg following knee arthroscopy, but this failed to resolve his leg symptoms. He was hemodynamically stable on presentation. His left calf was swollen with a circumference of 3 cm greater than right. There was a large pulsating mass palpable in his left popliteal fossa. Distal neurovascular status of the leg was intact. He had a normal cardiovascular, respiratory, abdominal and neurological examination. Ultrasound showed a cystic mass in the popliteal fossa suggestive of aneurysm. CT angiogram demonstrated a 6 × 5 × 4 cm pseudoaneurysm compressing and displacing the left popliteal artery with satisfactory three-vessel run-off. An emergency repair was performed. An arteriotomy was identified at the proximal end of pseudoaneurysm and it was closed with a patch of small saphenous vein. It led to a good clinical outcome. PMID:25362730

  1. The acute radiation syndrome

    Symptoms and signs from medical aspects resulting from whole body exposure, or in the main part, to ionizing radiation are described. The dose-response relationship is studied and the exposure is divided in three parts: central nervous system syndrome, gastrointestinal syndrome and hematopoietic syndrome. Brief comments about the treatment are reported. (M.A.C.)

  2. Stiffness and thickness of fascia do not explain chronic exertional compartment syndrome

    Dahl, Morten; Hansen, Philip; Stål, Per;

    2011-01-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is diagnosed based on symptoms and elevated intramuscular pressure and often is treated with fasciotomy. However, what contributes to the increased intramuscular pressure remains unknown....

  3. Bilateral medial foot compartment syndrome after an aerobics class: a case report.

    Lam, Suet Kam; McAlister, Jeffrey; Oliver, Noah; Pontell, David

    2012-01-01

    The authors present an unusual case of bilateral medial foot compartment syndrome in a healthy woman after a low-intensity aerobics exercise class. The majority of compartment syndrome cases have occurred after trauma, such as combat crush injuries and motor vehicle accidents. We wish to call attention to a rare situation in which compartment syndrome occurs in a healthy young adult after low-intensity exercise and highlight the necessity of a high clinical suspicion and a low threshold for fasciotomies to prevent irreversible muscle damage as a result of extremely high pressures. There is a paucity of cases on the clinical management and follow-up of this rare occurrence of compartment syndrome. PMID:22621857

  4. Bilateral calf chronic compartment syndrome in an elderly male: a case report.

    Siau, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Leg pain is a common presentation to the outpatient department. Bilateral calf chronic compartment syndrome is a rare cause of bilateral calf pain. Although this condition has been well documented in young athletes, it has rarely been reported in the elderly. We present the case of a 68-year-old male bodybuilder with bilateral calf chronic compartment syndrome, describe the presentation and evaluation of the condition, and provide a review of the literature herewith.

  5. Metabolic syndrome in acute coronary syndrome

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome Study design: A Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008 Patients and Methods: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery in the past and other co-morbid diseases were excluded. All patients were assessed for the presence of five components of metabolic syndrome including hypertension, HDL-Cholesterol and triglycerides, glucose intolerance and abdominal obesity. Systolic, diastolic blood pressures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting glucose and lipid profile were also done. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied with a mean age of 54.26 +- 11 years. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 55 (40.7%) patients. MS with all five components was documented in 4 (7.27%) while MS with four and three components was seen in 23 (41.81%) and 28 (50.90%) patients respectively. Only 24 (43.63%) patients with MS had diabetes mellitus, remaining 31(56.36%) were non diabetic. Frequencies of diabetes, hypertension and family history of CAD were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients with normal metabolic status. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is fairly common and important risk factor in patients of IHD. Other risk factors like smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes were also frequently found. Public awareness to control the risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD in our country. (author)

  6. Intramuscular deoxygenation during exercise in patients who have chronic anterior compartment syndrome of the leg

    Mohler, L. R.; Styf, J. R.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.; Gershuni, D. H.

    1997-01-01

    Currently, the definitive diagnosis of chronic compartment syndrome is based on invasive measurements of intracompartmental pressure. We measured the intramuscular pressure and the relative oxygenation in the anterior compartment of the leg in eighteen patients who were suspected of having chronic compartment syndrome as well as in ten control subjects before, during, and after exercise. Chronic compartment syndrome was considered to be present if the intramuscular pressure was at least fifteen millimeters of mercury (2.00 kilopascals) before exercise, at least thirty millimeters of mercury (4.00 kilopascals) one minute after exercise, or at least twenty millimeters of mercury (2.67 kilopascals) five minutes after exercise. Changes in relative oxygenation were measured with use of the non-invasive method of near-infrared spectroscopy. In all patients and subjects, there was rapid relative deoxygenation after the initiation of exercise, the level of oxygenation remained relatively stable during continued exercise, and there was reoxygenation to a level that exceeded the pre-exercise resting level after the cessation of exercise. During exercise, maximum relative deoxygenation in the patients who had chronic compartment syndrome (mean relative deoxygenation [and standard error], -290 +/- 39 millivolts) was significantly greater than that in the patients who did not have chronic compartment syndrome (-190 +/- 10 millivolts) and that in the control subjects (-179 +/- 14 millivolts) (p < 0.05 for both comparisons). In addition, the interval between the cessation of exercise and the recovery of the pre-exercise resting level of oxygenation was significantly longer for the patients who had chronic compartment syndrome (184 +/- 54 seconds) than for the patients who did not have chronic compartment syndrome (39 +/- 19 seconds) and the control subjects (33 +/- 10 seconds) (p < 0.05 for both comparisons).

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Respiratory Failure Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  9. The diagnostic value of MRI scans for the diagnosis of chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the lower leg

    Objective. A prospective descriptive study to determine the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an aid in diagnosing (chronic) exertional compartment syndrome.Design and patients. MRI was performed in 21 patients (41 anterior compartments) with chronic compartment syndrome at rest and following physical exercise. Median (T2-weighted) signal intensity on the MRI scan was determined in the anterior and the (superficial) posterior compartment of the lower leg before and after exercise. Postexercise increases in the signal intensity in these two compartments were compared. After fasciotomy, a second MRI scan was performed in 13 patients (25 anterior compartments) on the basis of the same protocol. MR studies were performed in 12 normal controls (24 anterior muscle compartments) on the basis of the same protocol.Results. T2-weighted signal intensity increased by 27.5% (range 13.6-38.6%) following exercise in the anterior compartment of patients with a chronic compartment syndrome. In the posterior compartment this increase amounted to 4.25% (range 0-10.2%). Following fasciotomy, the increase in the anterior compartment was 4.1% (range 1.0-5.2%), while the increase in the posterior compartment amounted to 5.6% (range 0-11.0%), In normal controls, the increase in the anterior compartment was 7.6% (range 0-9.1%), while in the posterior compartment it was 4.0% (range 0-7.2%).Conclusions. In patients with a chronic compartment syndrome, the affected (anterior) compartment shows a statistically significant increase in (T2-weighted) signal intensity during exercise compared with both the (superficial) posterior compartment and the anterior compartment of normal controls. This effect disappeared after fasciotomy. In view of the substantial increase in T2-weighted signal intensity, MRI can be used in diagnosing chronic compartment syndrome. (orig.)

  10. Acute oesophageal necrosis syndrome

    Garas, George; Wou, Constance; Sawyer, Joseph; Amygdalos, Iakovos; Gould, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    An 89-year-old woman with a known hiatus hernia presented to the accident and emergency department with acute onset epigastric pain. CT of the thorax and abdomen revealed a large hiatus hernia with mesentero-axial volvulus but no evidence of strangulation. A large aneurysmal aortic arch and descending aorta were visible with associated mural thrombus. As the pain was worsening, following discussion with the patient, the decision to operate was taken. The hiatus hernia was successfully reduced...

  11. Open abdomen procedure in managing abdominal compartment syndrome in a child with severe fungal peritonitis and sepsis after gastric perforation

    Wei Lai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal compartment syndrome with increased abdominal pressure resulted in multi-organ dysfunctions can be lethal in children. The open abdomen procedure intentionally leaves the abdominal cavity open in patients with severe abdominal sepsis and abdominal compartment syndrome by temporarily relieving the abdominal pressure. We reported our experience of open abdomen procedure in successfully treating a 4-year old boy with abdominal compartment syndrome caused by severe fungal peritonitis and sepsis after gastric perforation.

  12. Motorcycle racer with unilateral forearm flexor and extensor chronic exertional compartment syndrome.

    Winkes, Michiel B; Teijink, Joep A; Scheltinga, Marc R

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a case of a 26-year-old man, a motorcycle racer, who presented with progressive pain, weakness and swelling of his right forearm and loss of power in his index finger, experienced during motor racing. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) of both flexor and extensor compartments of his forearm was diagnosed by dynamic intracompartmental muscle pressure measurements. After fasciotomies, all symptoms were resolved and the patient was able to improve on his preinjury racing skills, without any limitations. A literature review and a surgical 'how-to' for correct release of the extensor and deep flexor compartments of the forearm are provided. PMID:27080851

  13. Acute aortic valve prolapse in Marfan's syndrome.

    Carr, N J; Cullen, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    A 22 year old man with Marfan's syndrome died suddenly following acute aortic valve prolapse. Although aortic root involvement in Marfan's syndrome is common, we have found no previous description of this particular complication in the literature.

  14. Fascia iliaca compartment blockade for acute pain control in hip fracture patients

    Foss, Nicolai B; Kristensen, Billy B; Bundgaard, Morten;

    2007-01-01

    Hip fracture patients are in severe pain upon arrival at the emergency department. Pain treatment is traditionally based on systemic opioids. No study has examined the effect of fascia iliaca compartment blockade (FICB) in acute hip fracture pain management within a double-blind, randomized setup....

  15. Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome associated with hypovolemic shock and compartment syndrome. Use of transpulmonary thermodilution technique for volume management

    Schmid Roland M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (SCLS is a rare disorder characterized by increased capillary hyperpermeability leading to hypovolemic shock due to a markedly increased shift of fluid and protein from the intravascular to the interstitial space. Hemoconcentration, hypoalbuminemia and a monoclonal gammopathy are characteristic laboratory findings. Here we present a patient who suffered from SCLS with hypovolemic shock and compartment syndrome of both lower legs and thighs. Volume and catecholamine management was guided using transpulmonary thermodilution. Extended hemodynamic monitoring for volume and catecholamine management as well as monitoring of muscle compartment pressure is of crucial importance in SCLS patients.

  16. Quantitative muscle hardness as a noninvasive means for detecting patients at risk of compartment syndromes

    The purpose of this project was to study the efficacy of quantitative muscle hardness (QH) curve analysis for noninvasive measurement of muscle compartment interstitial pressure (IMP), and to eliminate the need for a comparison normal QH measurement to determine a pathologic reading. Elevation of IMP may lead to limb compartment syndrome, which may result in irreversible dysfunction, chronic pain and contracture. Two studies were performed by two separate independent examiners on male volunteers, where IMP measurements and QH curves were obtained. QH curves were divided into three parts comparing the third part to the second part using the coefficient of determination (R2). In 205 limb compartments, there were 1432 comparison readings of the IMP versus R2. Using receiver operator characteristic curve analysis for all data from both studies, an R2 cutoff of 0.974 best corresponded to a pathologic IMP of 50 mmHg. For both sets of data and for each compartment tested, the mean IMP values were statistically different (t-test: P < 0.0001) for the group with R2 values less than 0.974 compared to the group of R2 values greater than or equal to 0.974. In addition, a pressure prediction model was formulated with a strong overall correlation coefficient of 0.78. The data of this study support that QH analysis is potentially useful for the monitoring of IMP elevation in compartment syndrome

  17. Sweet's Syndrome Presenting in Concordance with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Kassardjian, Michael; Holland, Vanessa; Leong, Tracy; Horowitz, David; Hirokane, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet's syndrome) is typically characterized by an acute onset of erythematous papules, plaques, and nodules in a febrile patient. This dermatosis is classically accompanied by leukocytosis and neutrophilia, and has had reported associations with various underlying etiologies including drug reactions, malignancies, infections, autoimmune disorders, and inflammatory bowel diseases. However, most cases of acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis are idiopathi...

  18. Abdominal compartment syndrome in trauma patients: New insights for predicting outcomes

    Aisha W Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS is associated with high morbidity and mortality among trauma patients. Several clinical and laboratory findings have been suggested as markers for ACS, and these may point to different types of ACS and complications. Aims: This study aims to identify the strength of association of clinical and laboratory variables with specific adverse outcomes in trauma patients with ACS. Settings and Design: A 5-year retrospective chart review was conducted at three Level I Trauma Centers in the City of Chicago, IL, USA. Subjects and Methods:A complete set of demographic, pre-, intra- and post-operative variables were collected from 28 patient charts. Statistical Analysis:Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to determine the strength of association between 29 studied variables and eight end outcomes. Results: Thirty-day mortality was associated strongly with the finding of an initial intra-abdominal pressure >20 mmHg and moderately with blunt injury mechanism. A lactic acid >5 mmol/L on admission was moderately associated with increased blood transfusion requirements and with acute renal failure during the hospitalization. Developing ACS within 48 h of admission was moderately associated with increased length of stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU, more ventilator days, and longer hospital stay. Initial operative intervention lasting more than 2 h was moderately associated with risk of developing multi-organ failure. Hemoglobin level 7 days were moderately associated with a disposition to long-term support facility. Conclusions: Clinical and lab variables can predict specific adverse outcomes in trauma patients with ACS. These findings may be used to guide patient management, improve resource utilization, and build capacity within trauma centers.

  19. Abdominal compartment syndrome in trauma patients: New insights for predicting outcomes

    Shaheen, Aisha W.; Crandall, Marie L.; Nicolson, Norman G.; Smith-Singares, Eduardo; Merlotti, Gary J.; Jalundhwala, Yash; Issa, Nabil M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is associated with high morbidity and mortality among trauma patients. Several clinical and laboratory findings have been suggested as markers for ACS, and these may point to different types of ACS and complications. Aims: This study aims to identify the strength of association of clinical and laboratory variables with specific adverse outcomes in trauma patients with ACS. Settings and Design: A 5-year retrospective chart review was conducted at three Level I Trauma Centers in the City of Chicago, IL, USA. Subjects and Methods: A complete set of demographic, pre-, intra- and post-operative variables were collected from 28 patient charts. Statistical Analysis: Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to determine the strength of association between 29 studied variables and eight end outcomes. Results: Thirty-day mortality was associated strongly with the finding of an initial intra-abdominal pressure >20 mmHg and moderately with blunt injury mechanism. A lactic acid >5 mmol/L on admission was moderately associated with increased blood transfusion requirements and with acute renal failure during the hospitalization. Developing ACS within 48 h of admission was moderately associated with increased length of stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), more ventilator days, and longer hospital stay. Initial operative intervention lasting more than 2 h was moderately associated with risk of developing multi-organ failure. Hemoglobin level 7 days were moderately associated with a disposition to long-term support facility. Conclusions: Clinical and lab variables can predict specific adverse outcomes in trauma patients with ACS. These findings may be used to guide patient management, improve resource utilization, and build capacity within trauma centers. PMID:27162436

  20. MEASUREMENT OF TISSUE PRESSURE, AN AID TO PREDICT COMPARTMENT SYNDROME: OUR STUDY

    Satyanarayana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Compartment syndrome ( CS is one of the dreaded complications of fractures. The incidence of CS is more with fractures of tibia and both bones of leg. If not diagnosed early, and treated promptly it may result in much morbidi ty and loss of the limb in extreme cases. So the measurement of tissue pressure in the affected compartment periodically will alert us to the possibility of development of CS. MATERIALS & METHODS : This study was conducted in the Emergency ward , Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Gandhi General Hospital , Secunderabad, during the period June 2007 to June 2009. A total of 46 patients were included in the study. The tissue pressures were measured by using an ingenious method, the instrument can be made from commonly available material in the hospital, there by obviating the need for costly equipment . CONCLUSIONS : Measurement of tissue pressure in the affected and normal compartments of the leg in cases of fractures of the leg give us an idea about the impending Compartment Syndrome. The early initiation of appropriate treatment will prevent serious consequences. The measurement of tissue pressure can be done by using a simple instrument .

  1. [Clinical pathway "Acute Coronary Syndrome"].

    Grimm, W; Maisch, B

    2006-07-01

    The clinical pathway "acute coronary syndrome" of the university hospital Marburg describes the guideline-conform and consented management of patients with ST-segment elevation infarct (STEMI), non-ST-segment elevation infarct (NSTEMI) and Troponin negative unstable angina. A 12-lead ECG recording is made and read in all patients within 10 minutes. All patients with STEMI undergo immediate revascularisation using primary percutanuous catheter intervention (PCI) after administration of basic medical therapy. Primary PCI is also used in all patients with NSTEMI, persistent chest pain, rhythm or hemodynamic instability. Patients with unstable angina, who became free of symptoms after application of basic medication, but who have additional risk factors undergo cardiac catheterisation within 48 hours. Acute myocardial infarction can be ruled out in patients with twofold negative cardiac troponin levels during 6-12 hours. In the absence of further symptoms, these patiens undergo differential diagnostic evaluation of cardiac and extracardiac causes of chest pain. The introduction of this clinical pathway 2 years ago, which was consented before by the hospital board and the clinical directors, has lead to a remarkable improvement in the clinical decision-making at the emergency room of the hospital and reduced the door to intervention time considerably. PMID:16763796

  2. D-lactate is a valid biomarker of intestinal ischemia induced by abdominal compartment syndrome

    Nielsen, Casper; Kirkegård, Jakob; Erlandsen, Erland J;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) often leads to abdominal compartment syndrome, which is followed by intestinal ischemia and associated with a high mortality. The diagnosis of abdominal compartment syndrome is difficult, and no valid biochemical markers are available. We conducted an...... group) without IAH. Blood samples were taken from the portal and jugular veins at 0, 60, 120, 180, and 240 min after insufflation of carbon dioxide, and concentrations of D-lactate and L-lactate in the two groups were compared using an unpaired t-test. RESULTS: The concentrations of D-lactate were......, respectively). Examination of the intestines revealed both macroscopic and microscopic signs of ischemia in all but one animal in the intervention group and only in one sham-pig. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that D-lactate could be a useful biochemical marker of intestinal ischemia induced by IAH....

  3. Abdominal compartment syndrome in trauma patients: New insights for predicting outcomes

    Shaheen, Aisha W.; Marie L Crandall; Nicolson, Norman G.; Smith-Singares, Eduardo; Merlotti, Gary J.; Jalundhwala, Yash; Issa, Nabil M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is associated with high morbidity and mortality among trauma patients. Several clinical and laboratory findings have been suggested as markers for ACS, and these may point to different types of ACS and complications. Aims: This study aims to identify the strength of association of clinical and laboratory variables with specific adverse outcomes in trauma patients with ACS. Settings and Design: A 5-year retrospective chart review was conducted at t...

  4. Noninvasive Monitoring of Elevated Intramuscular Pressure in a Model Compartment Syndrome via Quantitative Fascial Motion

    Lynch, John E.; Lynch, John K; Cole, Steven L.; Carter, Jonathan A.; Hargens, Alan R

    2009-01-01

    Compartment syndromes, caused by elevated intramuscular pressure (IMP) and resulting from trauma or chronic overuse, frequently require invasive IMP monitoring for accurate diagnosis. Our objective is to test a non-invasive ultrasound technique for estimating IMP based on fascial displacement waveforms from arterial blood pressure pulses. In this study, IMP was increased in the legs of 23 healthy adult subjects up to 80 mmHg using two blood pressure cuffs covering the region from the knee to ...

  5. Strategies for modulating the inflammatory response after decompression from abdominal compartment syndrome

    Shah Shinil K; Jimenez Fernando; Letourneau Phillip A; Walker Peter A; Moore-Olufemi Stacey D; Stewart Randolph H; Laine Glen A; Cox Charles S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Management of the open abdomen is an increasingly common part of surgical practice. The purpose of this review is to examine the scientific background for the use of temporary abdominal closure (TAC) in the open abdomen as a way to modulate the local and systemic inflammatory response, with an emphasis on decompression after abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Methods A review of the relevant English language literature was conducted. Priority was placed on articles publ...

  6. Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome Following Acute Pancreatitis

    Sinha A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Haemolytic uraemic syndrome is a common cause of renal failure in children but it is a rare condition in adults. Acute pancreatitis in adult as a cause of haemolytic uraemic syndrome is very rare. CASE REPORT: A 19-year-old male presented with symptom and signs suggestive of acute pancreatitis which was confirmed as his serum amylase was significantly raised. Within three days of admission he developed acute renal failure with evidence of haemolytic anaemia and thrombocytopenia. A clinical diagnosis of haemolytic uraemic syndrome was made and he was treated with plasma exchange. He made a complete recovery. CONCLUSION: Renal failure in a patient with acute pancreatitis is rarely due to haemolytic uraemic syndrome. But it is important to consider this differential diagnosis so that early treatment can be instituted to prevent mortality.

  7. Acute radiation syndrome in human

    The combination of the different types of irradiation dramatically changes the clinical course of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in the case of short term exposure. The recent experience has been compared mostly with the data on the atomic bomb victims in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The comparison of the injuries from different radiation exposures resulted in the possibility to receive summarized data and the actual basis of the observed difference. The situation with total relatively uniform irradiation is observed when human position is at long distance from powerful radiation sources or when he changes his position, as seen in atomic bomb survivors, the results of nuclear weapon tests and the patients in the Chernobyl accident. This is connected with the ARS of bone, marrow and intestine. The situation characterized by the clinical signs of the large area of skin and mucosa injuries was observed in nuclear weapon tests and the Chernobyl accident. In the case of the more localized and less severe beta injuries of skin and mucosa, the long term effects may be important. The majority of accidents in peaceful period are related to the uneven exposure from near sources, and the situation of the combination of external and internal irradiation is related to uneven irradiation and the predominance of internal exposure. (K.I.)

  8. Pathobiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Sapru, Anil; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael W; Dahmer, Mary K

    2015-06-01

    The unique characteristics of pulmonary circulation and alveolar-epithelial capillary-endothelial barrier allow for maintenance of the air-filled, fluid-free status of the alveoli essential for facilitating gas exchange, maintaining alveolar stability, and defending the lung against inhaled pathogens. The hallmark of pathophysiology in acute respiratory distress syndrome is the loss of the alveolar capillary permeability barrier and the presence of protein-rich edema fluid in the alveoli. This alteration in permeability and accumulation of fluid in the alveoli accompanies damage to the lung epithelium and vascular endothelium along with dysregulated inflammation and inappropriate activity of leukocytes and platelets. In addition, there is uncontrolled activation of coagulation along with suppression of fibrinolysis and loss of surfactant. These pathophysiological changes result in the clinical manifestations of acute respiratory distress syndrome, which include hypoxemia, radiographic opacities, decreased functional residual capacity, increased physiologic deadspace, and decreased lung compliance. Resolution of acute respiratory distress syndrome involves the migration of cells to the site of injury and re-establishment of the epithelium and endothelium with or without the development of fibrosis. Most of the data related to acute respiratory distress syndrome, however, originate from studies in adults or in mature animals with very few studies performed in children or juvenile animals. The lack of studies in children is particularly problematic because the lungs and immune system are still developing during childhood and consequently the pathophysiology of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome may differ in significant ways from that seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. This article describes what is known of the pathophysiologic processes of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as we know it today while also presenting the much

  9. Evaluation of the relationship between pelvic fracture and abdominal compartment syndrome in traumatic patients

    Sheikhi Rahim Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An increase in abdominal pressure can lead to so-called intra-abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS. Multiple factors such as an increase in retroperitoneal volume due to pancreatitis, bleeding and edema as a result of pelvic fracture can lead to compartment syndrome. Prevention is better than cure in compartment syndrome. By measuring the intra-abdominal pressure (IAP through the bladder, a quick and accurate assessment of abdominal pressure is achieved. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between pelvic fracture and ACS in traumatic patients. Materials and Methods: This research was a descriptive-analytical study conducted on 100 patients referring to the Shiraz Nemazee Hospital in 2010. IAP was monitored every 4 h in patients suspected to be at high risk for ACS, e.g., those undergoing severe abdominal trauma and pelvic fracture. The IAP was measured via the urinary bladder using the procedure described by Kron et al. Data collected were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The findings showed that ACS occurred in 28 of 100 patients. With regard to the associated injuries with abdominal trauma, 19% of all patients and 46/42% of the patients with ACS had pelvic fracture. Chi-square test revealed a significant relationship between pelvic fracture and incidence rate of ACS ( P < 0.001. Conclusions: According to the collected data, pelvic fracture due to a trauma can be one of the important causes of an increase in IAP and ACS. In this lethal condition, prevention is better than cure. Therefore, serial measurement of IAP through the bladder in high-risk patients (those with pelvic fracture by trauma is recommended to the nurses to diagnose this condition and to decrease the incidence of mortality.

  10. Acute pancreatitis and Cushing's syndrome.

    Clague, H W; B. Warren; Krasner, N.

    1984-01-01

    A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in a 53-year-old man with an ectopic adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) producing bronchial carcinoma is described. The aetiology of acute pancreatitis in relation to steroid therapy and malignancy is discussed and it is suggested that excess endogenous steroid production may also cause acute pancreatitis.

  11. Secondary abdominal compartment syndrome required decompression laparotomy during minimally invasive mitral valve repair.

    Nishi, Hiroyuki; Toda, Koichi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Saito, Tetsuya; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-12-01

    We treated a 77-year-old patient with secondary abdominal compartment syndrome that caused failure to maintain cardiopulmonary bypass while undergoing elective minimally invasive right mini-thoracotomy mitral valve and tricuspid valve repair procedures. During the operation, a decompression laparotomy was needed to relieve elevated intraabdominal pressure that caused instability of the cardiopulmonary bypass. Due to poor oxygenation and the long cardiopulmonary bypass time, the patient required peripheral extracorporeal membrane oxygenation before recovery. We alert surgeons to this rare complication that can occur even in patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery with a right mini-thoracotomy. PMID:26943679

  12. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Pryhuber, Gloria S.; Chess, Patricia R.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Paul R. Knight; Notter, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by rapid-onset respiratory failure following a variety of direct and indirect insults to the parenchyma or vasculature of the lungs. Mortality from ALI/ARDS is substantial, and current therapy primarily emphasizes mechanical ventilation and judicial fluid management plus standard treatment of the initiating insult and any known underlying disease. Current pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS is not optimal, a...

  13. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2016-03-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  14. Acute Abdominal Pain Secondary to Chilaiditi Syndrome

    Buicko, Jessica L.; Miguel Lopez-Viego; David Kang; Lopez, Michael A.; Pan, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    Chilaiditi syndrome is a rare condition occurring in 0.025% to 0.28% of the population. In these patients, the colon is displaced and caught between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm. Patients' symptoms can range from asymptomatic to acute intermittent bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is best achieved with CT imaging. Identification of Chilaiditi syndrome is clinically significant as it can lead to many significant complications such as volvulus, perforation, and bowel obstruction. If the pat...

  15. Contemporary management of acute coronary syndrome

    Large, G

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on the modern management of the non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction). Patients with these syndromes are at varying degrees of risk of (re)infarction and death. This risk can be reliably predicted by clinical, electrocardiographic, and biochemical markers. Aspirin, clopidogrel, heparin (unfractionated or low molecular weight), and anti-ischaemic drugs should be offered to all patients, irrespective of the pre...

  16. Inflammation: a trigger for acute coronary syndrome.

    Sager, Hendrik B; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the vessel wall and a major cause of death worldwide. One of atherosclerosis' most dreadful complications are acute coronary syndromes that comprise ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, and unstable angina. We now understand that inflammation substantially contributes to the initiation, progression, and destabilization of atherosclerosis. In this review, we will focus on the role of inflammatory leukocytes, which are the cellular protagonists of vascular inflammation, in triggering disease progression and, ultimately, the destabilization that causes acute coronary syndromes. PMID:27273431

  17. Extravasation of radiographic contrast material and compartment syndrome in the hand: a case report

    Torrededia Laura

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Radiocontrast agents are a type of medical contrast material used to improve the visibility of internal bodily structures in X-ray based imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT or radiography. Radiocontrast agents are typically iodine or barium compounds. Extravasation of contrast is a possible complication of imaging studies performed with contrasts. Most extravasations cause minimal swelling or erythema, however, skin necrosis, ulceration and compartment syndrome may occur with extravasation of large volumes of contrast. A case report is presented in which significant extravasation of contrast was caused while injecting the contrast intravenously into the back of the hand of a 50 year old patient during computed tomography. The patient was undergoing chemotherapy. The patient developed a compartment syndrome and a fasciotomy was required. Treatment options are outlined and emphasis is made on prevention of this iatrogenic complication. Some of the preventive measures to avoid these complications include use of non-ionic contrast (low osmolarity, careful choice of the site of intravenous administration, and close monitoring of the patient during injection of contrast to minimize or prevent extravasation injuries. Clear information to patients and prompt recognition of the complication can allow for other non-surgical treatment options than the one required in this case.

  18. Acute organophosphorus poisoning complicated by acute coronary syndrome.

    Pankaj, Madhu; Krishna, Kavita

    2014-07-01

    We report a case of 30 year old alcoholic male admitted with vomiting, drowsiness, limb weakness and fasciculations after alleged history of consumption of 30 ml of chlorpyriphos insecticide. He had low serum cholinesterase levels. With standard treatment for organophosphorus poisoning (OPP), he improved gradually until day 5, when he developed neck and limb weakness and respiratory distress. This intermediate syndrome was treated with oximes, atropine and artificial ventilation. During treatment, his ECG showed fresh changes of ST elevation. High CPK & CPK-MB levels, septal hypokinesia on 2D echo suggested acute coronary syndrome. Coronary angiography was postponed due to his bedridden and obtunded status. The patient finally recovered fully by day 15 and was discharged. Acute coronary syndrome is a rare occurrence in OP poisoning. The present case thus emphasises the need for careful electrocardiographic and enzymatic monitoring of all patients of organophosphorus poisoning to prevent potential cardiac complication which can prove fatal. PMID:25672037

  19. MRSA toxic shock syndrome associated with surgery for left leg fracture and co-morbid compartment syndrome

    Taro Shimizu; Yufu Yamamoto; Takahiro Hosoi; Kensuke Kinoshita; Yasuharu Tokuda

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a46-year-oldJapanese man who was brought to the hospital with fever, hypotension and diffuse erythematous rash with multiple organ damage.Three weeks before he had undergone orthopaedic surgery for left leg fracture and comorbid compartment syndrome. Fasciorrhaphy was performed successfully2 weeks before, but the next day he became feverish and hypotensive with signs of systemic low perfusion.He was referred to the hospital for further evaluation and treatment.On arrival, high fever, hypotension and diffuse erythroderma were observed.Lab results revealed multi-organ dysfunction.Clinical manifestations led to the diagnosis of toxic shock syndrome(TSS).The patient was treated with extensive hydration, local drainage and antibiotics.After2 weeks of intensivecare, he recovered and was successfully discharged from the hospital.A culture of the wound tissue revealed the presence ofMRSA with positiveTSST-1.

  20. Acute cardiac failure in neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    Sparrow, Patrick

    2012-02-03

    We present a case of rapid onset acute cardiac failure developing as part of neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a 35-year-old woman following treatment with thioridazine and lithium. Post mortem histology of cardiac and skeletal muscle showed similar changes of focal cellular necrosis and vacuolation suggesting a common disease process.

  1. Radiobiology of the acute radiation syndrome

    Acute radiation syndrome or acute radiation sickness is classically subdivided into three sub syndromes: the hematopoietic, gastrointestinal and neurovascular syndrome but many other tissues can be damaged. The time course and severity of clinical signs and symptoms are a function of the overall body volume irradiated, the inhomogeneity of dose exposure, the particle type, the absorbed dose and the dose rate. Classical pathophysiology explain the failure of each of these organs and the timing of appearance of their signs and symptoms due to radiation-induced cytocidal effects of a great number of parenchymal cells of hierarchically organized tissues. Contemporaneously, many other radiation-induced effects has been described and all of them may lead to tissue injury with their corresponding signs and symptoms that can be expressed after short or long period of time. Radiation-induced multi-organ involvement is thought to be due to radiation-induced systemic inflammatory response mediated by released pro-inflammatory cytokines. (authors)

  2. A prospective blinded evaluation of exercise thallium-201 SPET in patients with suspected chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the leg

    This study compared the quantitative and qualitative results of leg thallium-201 single-photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging in patients with and without raised intracompartmental pressure associated with exercise-related leg pain. The purpose of this study was to clarify the aetiology of chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS), and to investigate the diagnostic applications of 201Tl SPET in CECS. Thirty-four study participants underwent compartment pressure testing (CPT) between March and August 2000. There were 25 positive CPT results (patient group), and nine negative CPT results (control group). All 34 participants underwent scintigraphy. Quantitative and qualitative assessments were performed for the anterolateral and deep posterior compartments of the lower leg. There was no significant difference in either quantitative or qualitative assessments of perfusion between those compartments with and those without CECS. In contrast, a marked effect of exercise type upon compartment perfusion pattern was noted. Results of this study indicate that there is no compartment perfusion deficit in those patients with raised intracompartmental pressure associated with CECS, and suggest a non-ischaemic basis for the pain associated with CECS. They also suggest no role for exercise perfusion scintigraphy in the diagnosis of this syndrome. (orig.)

  3. Acute Abdominal Pain Secondary to Chilaiditi Syndrome

    Pan, Andrew S.; Lopez, Michael A.; Buicko, Jessica L.; Lopez-Viego, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Chilaiditi syndrome is a rare condition occurring in 0.025% to 0.28% of the population. In these patients, the colon is displaced and caught between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm. Patients' symptoms can range from asymptomatic to acute intermittent bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is best achieved with CT imaging. Identification of Chilaiditi syndrome is clinically significant as it can lead to many significant complications such as volvulus, perforation, and bowel obstruction. If the patient is symptomatic, treatment is usually conservative. Surgery is rarely indicated with indications including ischemia and failure of resolution with conservative management. PMID:23936720

  4. Acute Abdominal Pain Secondary to Chilaiditi Syndrome

    David Kang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chilaiditi syndrome is a rare condition occurring in 0.025% to 0.28% of the population. In these patients, the colon is displaced and caught between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm. Patients' symptoms can range from asymptomatic to acute intermittent bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is best achieved with CT imaging. Identification of Chilaiditi syndrome is clinically significant as it can lead to many significant complications such as volvulus, perforation, and bowel obstruction. If the patient is symptomatic, treatment is usually conservative. Surgery is rarely indicated with indications including ischemia and failure of resolution with conservative management.

  5. Surfactant treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Lopez-Herce, J.; de Lucas, N; Carrillo, A.; Bustinza, A.; Moral, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine prospectively the efficacy of surfactant in acute respiratory distress syndrome.
STUDY DESIGN—Twenty patients, 1 month to 16 years of age, diagnosed with an acute pulmonary disease with severe hypoxaemia (PaO2/FiO2 < 100) (13 with systemic or pulmonary disease and seven with cardiac disease) were treated with one to six doses of 50-200 mg/kg of porcine surfactant administered directly into the trachea. The surfactant was considered to be effectiv...

  6. Posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in poststretococcal acute glomerulonephritis

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy (LEPR) is a clinical entity that affects radiation usually the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres. It is frequently associated with acute arterial hypertension and immunosuppressive therapy, among other causes. The clinical presentation is varied, with headache, nausea, vomiting, impaired consciousness and abnormal behavior, seizures and visual disturbances, symptoms that often regress. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images show white matter edema predominantly in posterior regions of the brain. We present a 10 year old boy with leprosy in the course of a nephrotic syndrome secondary to acute diffuse glomerunefritis (GNDA) poststreptococcal. (author)

  7. Acute encephalitis syndrome following scrub typhus infection

    Ayan Kar; Dhanaraj, M.; Devaprasad Dedeepiya; Harikrishna, K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to find the incidence of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) secondary to scrub infection and to observe the clinical, biochemical, radiological profile, and outcomes in these patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 consecutive patients of AES were evaluated for scrub infection using scrub typhus immunoglobulin M enzyme linked immuno-sorbant assay positivity along with the presence or absence of an eschar. Clinical profile, routine laboratory tests, cerebrospinal f...

  8. The Acute Coronary Syndrome in elderly patients

    Kalliopi Vougiouka; Theodore Kapadohos

    2015-01-01

    The Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) is one of the most common and also life-threatening diseases. Elderly patients due to comorbidity and changes in anatomy and physiology of the body, present some differentiation in the clinical presentation of the disease and common symptoms. Aim: The purpose of this study was to review the literature about the specific characteristics that elderly people with ACS present. Method: A review of international and Greek bibliography of the last fifteen years was ...

  9. Ankle fusion with a retrograde locked intramedullary nail for sequela of lower extremity compartment syndrome

    WANG Xu; MA Xin; ZHANG Chao; HUANG Jia-zhang; GU Xiang-jie; JIANG Jian-yuan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of ankle fusion with a retrograde locked intramedullary nail in the treatment of sequela of lower extremity compartment syndrome.Methods:Thirty-five cases of equinus deformity following tibiofibular compartment syndrome treated by means of ankle fusion with a retrograde locked intramedullary nail from January 2001 to December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed.The complications,the time needed for bony fusion of the ankle joint assessed by anteroposterior and lateral X-ray photographs as well as patients' subjective evaluation were recorded and analysed.Results: Among the 35 patients,15 had previously undergone surgical treatment twice on the same limb,13 had thrice and 7 had to be operated on four times before ankle fusion.An anterior midpoint approach to the ankle joint was adopted in 29 cases,while anterior midpoint approach plus a small incision on the posterior ankle joint was made in 17 cases,whereas lateral approach in 6 cases.Tarsus joint fusion was performed on 4 cases.The follow-up period ranged 6-124 months,averaged 40.6 months.Bone grafting was not performed in this series.Preoperative tibial shaft fracture occurred in one patient and was healed after conservative treatment.Incision dehiscence located at previous Achilles tendon incision was found in two patients.As a result,one received an intramedullary nail emplacement at calcaneoplantar part while the wound at anterosuperior part of the other one was healed by dressing change.Two patients failed to bony union 5 months postoperatively,in which one healed 10 weeks after retrieval of proximal tibial nail and another by iliac grafting.Terminal necrosis of the toe due to blood supply dysfunction was not found in this series.All the patients were satisfied with the ankle joint function postoperatively.The time for bony union on X-rays was 9.8 weeks on average.Except for one patient who demanded removal of intramedullary nail,all the intramedullary nails were not retrieved at

  10. Acute rhabdomyolysis associated with atypical Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    Scott, A. J.; Duncan, R; Henderson, L.; Jamal, G A; Kennedy, P G

    1991-01-01

    We report a patient with atypical Guillain-Barré syndrome associated with acute rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis may be the cause of elevation of creatine kinase sometimes seen in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  11. Guillain-Barré syndrome following acute head trauma.

    Duncan, R; Kennedy, P G

    1987-01-01

    A case of classical Guillain-Barré syndrome following acute head trauma is described. The association of Guillain-Barré syndrome with head injury per se is not well recognized, and a possible immunological explanation is proposed.

  12. Acute respiratory failure following ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Antonello Nicolini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is a serious and potentially life-threatening physiological complication that may be encountered in patients who undergo controlled ovarian hyperstimulation cycles. The syndrome is typically associated with regimes of exogenous gonadotropins, but it can be seen, albeit rarely, when clomiphene is administered during the induction phase. Although this syndrome is widely described in scientific literature and is well known by obstetricians, the knowledge of this pathological and potentially life-threatening condition is generally less than satisfactory among physicians. The dramatic increase in therapeutic strategies to treat infertility has pushed this condition into the realm of acute care therapy. The potential complications of this syndrome, including pulmonary involvement, should be considered and identified so as to allow a more appropriate diagnosis and management. We describe a case of a woman with an extremely severe (Stage 6 ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome who presented ascites, bilateral pleural effusion and severe respiratory failure treated with non-invasive ventilation. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit because of severe respiratory failure, ascites, and bilateral pleural effusion due to ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Treatment included non-invasive ventilation and three thoracentesis procedures, plus the administration of albumin, colloid solutions and high-dose furosemid. Severe form of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is observed in 0.5-5% of the women treated, and intensive care may be required for management of thromboembolic complications, renal failure and severe respiratory failure. Pulmonary intensive care may involve thoracentesis, oxygen supplementation and, in more severe cases, assisted ventilation. To our knowledge, there have been only two studies in English language medical literature that describe severe respiratory failure treated with non

  13. MDCT evaluation of acute aortic syndrome (AAS).

    Valente, Tullio; Rossi, Giovanni; Lassandro, Francesco; Rea, Gaetano; Marino, Maurizio; Muto, Maurizio; Molino, Antonio; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    Non-traumatic acute thoracic aortic syndromes (AAS) describe a spectrum of life-threatening aortic pathologies with significant implications on diagnosis, therapy and management. There is a common pathway for the various manifestations of AAS that eventually leads to a breakdown of the aortic intima and media. Improvements in biology and health policy and diffusion of technology into the community resulted in an associated decrease in mortality and morbidity related to aortic therapeutic interventions. Hybrid procedures, branched and fenestrated endografts, and percutaneous aortic valves have emerged as potent and viable alternatives to traditional surgeries. In this context, current state-of-the art multidetector CT (MDCT) is actually the gold standard in the emergency setting because of its intrinsic diagnostic value. Management of acute aortic disease has changed with the increasing realization that endovascular therapies may offer distinct advantages in these situations. This article provides a summary of AAS, focusing especially on the MDCT technique, typical and atypical findings and common pitfalls of AAS, as well as recent concepts regarding the subtypes of AAS, consisting of aortic dissection, intramural haematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer and unstable aortic aneurysm or contained aortic rupture. MDCT findings will be related to pathophysiology, timing and management options to achieve a definite and timely diagnostic and therapeutic definition. In the present article, we review the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, outcomes and therapeutic approaches to acute aortic syndromes. PMID:27033344

  14. Acute coronary syndrome in pregnant women.

    El-Deeb, Mohammed; El-Menyar, Ayman; Gehani, Abdulrazzak; Sulaiman, Kadhim

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the available information on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of acute coronary syndromes (ST-elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI] and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction [NSTEMI]) during all stages of pregnancy. We searched the English-language literature indexed in MEDLINE, Scopus and EBSCO host research databases from 1980 through to August 2010 using the indexing terms 'pregnancy', 'ante-,peri-, and postpartum', 'acute coronary syndrome', 'myocardial infarction', 'STEMI' and 'NSTEMI'. Symptomatic coronary artery disease is still infrequent in women of childbearing age, but the recent increase in its prevalence in pregnancy has been attributed to the modern trend of childbearing in older years because many young working women are postponing having children. Although rare, acute pregnancy-related MI is a devastating event that may claim the life of a mother and her fetus. The incidence of MI is estimated at 0.6-1 per 10,000 pregnancies. The case fatality rate has been reported to be 5-37%. Owing to the rarity of the event, information related to MI in pregnancy is derived from case reports and, therefore, is subject to considerable reporting bias. Treatment needs to be prompt and urgent because of the very high mortality rate. Current guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of MI should be expanded to include pregnancy-related MI. Screening and management of cardiovascular risk factors should be achieved before pregnancy. PMID:21517733

  15. Microwave tomography of extremities: 2. Functional fused imaging of flow reduction and simulated compartment syndrome

    Semenov, Serguei; Kellam, James; Nair, Bindu; Williams, Thomas; Quinn, Michael; Sizov, Yuri; Nazarov, Alexei; Pavlovsky, Andrey

    2011-04-01

    Medical imaging has recently expanded into the dual- or multi-modality fusion of anatomical and functional imaging modalities. This significantly improves the diagnostic power while simultaneously increasing the cost of already expensive medical devices or investigations and decreasing their mobility. We are introducing a novel imaging concept of four-dimensional (4D) microwave tomographic (MWT) functional imaging: three dimensional (3D) in the spatial domain plus one dimensional (1D) in the time, functional dynamic domain. Instead of a fusion of images obtained by different imaging modalities, 4D MWT fuses absolute anatomical images with dynamic, differential images of the same imaging technology. The approach was successively validated in animal experiments with short-term arterial flow reduction and a simulated compartment syndrome in an initial simplified experimental setting using a dedicated MWT system. The presented fused images are not perfect as MWT is a novel imaging modality at its early stage of the development and ways of reading reconstructed MWT images need to be further studied and understood. However, the reconstructed fused images present clear evidence that microwave tomography is an emerging imaging modality with great potentials for functional imaging.

  16. The Abdomen in “Thoracoabdominal” Cannot Be Ignored: Abdominal Compartment Syndrome Complicating Extracorporeal Life Support

    Arthur J. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal life support (ECLS is an incredible life-saving measure that is being used ever more frequently in the care of the critically ill. Management of these patients requires extreme vigilance on the part of the care providers in recognizing and addressing the complications and challenges that may arise. We present a case of overt abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS in a previously well young male on ECLS with a history of trauma, submersion, hypothermia, and no intra-abdominal injuries. The patient developed ACS soon after ECLS was initiated which resulted in drastically compromised flow rates. Taking into account the patient’s critical status, an emergent laparotomy was performed in the intensive care unit which successfully resolved the ACS and restored ECLS flow. The patient had an unremarkable course following and was weaned off ECLS but unfortunately died from his original anoxic injury. This case highlights several salient points: first, care of patients on ECLS is challenging and multiple etiologies can affect our ability to manage these patients; second, intra-abdominal pressures should be monitored liberally in the critically ill, especially in patients on ECLS; third, protocols for emergent operative treatment outside of traditional operating rooms should be established and care providers should be prepared for these situations.

  17. Compartment syndrome as a complication of ileofemoral deep venous thrombosis:a case presentation.

    Lamborn, David R; Schranz, Craig

    2014-02-01

    A 22-year-old morbidly obese, nonpregnant woman presented with left ileofemoral deep vein thrombosis (DVT) presenting as low back pain and bilateral, left greater than right, leg swelling and pain for 2 days. While on heparin, she developed compartment syndrome in her left leg and had evidence of dead muscle tissue at the time of fasciotomy. Three options exist for treatment of ileofemoral DVT: catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), CDT plus pharmacomechanical thrombolysis or percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy, and surgical thrombectomy. Catheter-directed thrombolysis alone or in conjunction with pharmacomechanical thrombolysis in patients with low risk of bleeding has shown significant lysis of occlusion in 79% of patients with ileofemoral DVT with relatively low complication rates. Surgical thrombectomy and fasciotomy have not proven to be as effective but are appropriate alternatives if CDT is not available. Standard anticoagulation alone is likely not a sufficient treatment for ileofemoral DVT. Other therapies including CDT, CDT plus pharmacomechanical thrombolysis or percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy, or surgical thrombectomy to address lysis of the clot should be attempted first or in conjunction with anticoagulation for appropriate patients. Catheter-directed thrombolysis with or without pharmacomechanical thrombolysis is the preferred initial treatment. PMID:24091199

  18. Microwave tomography of extremities: 2. Functional fused imaging of flow reduction and simulated compartment syndrome

    Semenov, Serguei; Nair, Bindu [School of Medicine, ISTM, Keele University, Stoke-on-Trent, ST4 7QB (United Kingdom); Kellam, James; Williams, Thomas; Quinn, Michael [Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC 28203 (United States); Sizov, Yuri [TRINITI, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Nazarov, Alexei [INTEGRIT, Moscow (Russian Federation); Pavlovsky, Andrey, E-mail: s.semenov@pmed.keele.ac.uk [DIGIMEQ, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-07

    Medical imaging has recently expanded into the dual- or multi-modality fusion of anatomical and functional imaging modalities. This significantly improves the diagnostic power while simultaneously increasing the cost of already expensive medical devices or investigations and decreasing their mobility. We are introducing a novel imaging concept of four-dimensional (4D) microwave tomographic (MWT) functional imaging: three dimensional (3D) in the spatial domain plus one dimensional (1D) in the time, functional dynamic domain. Instead of a fusion of images obtained by different imaging modalities, 4D MWT fuses absolute anatomical images with dynamic, differential images of the same imaging technology. The approach was successively validated in animal experiments with short-term arterial flow reduction and a simulated compartment syndrome in an initial simplified experimental setting using a dedicated MWT system. The presented fused images are not perfect as MWT is a novel imaging modality at its early stage of the development and ways of reading reconstructed MWT images need to be further studied and understood. However, the reconstructed fused images present clear evidence that microwave tomography is an emerging imaging modality with great potentials for functional imaging.

  19. Microwave tomography of extremities: 2) Functional fused imaging of flow reduction and simulated compartment syndrome

    Semenov, Serguei; Kellam, James; Nair, Bindu; Williams, Thomas; Quinn, Michael; Sizov, Yuri; Nazarov, Alexei; Pavlovsky, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging has recently expanded into the dual- or multi-modality fusion of anatomical and functional imaging modalities. This significantly improves the diagnostic power while simultaneously increasing the cost of an already expensive medical devices or investigations and decreasing their mobility. We are introducing a novel imaging concept of four-dimensional (4D) Microwave Tomographic (MWT) functional imaging: three-dimensional (3D) in spatial domain plus one-dimension (1D) in the time, functional dynamic domain. Instead of a fusion of images obtained by different imaging modalities, 4D MWT fuses absolute anatomical images with dynamic, differential images of the same imaging technology. The approach was successively validated in animal experiments with short term arterial flow reduction and a simulated compartment syndrome in an initial simplified experimental setting using dedicated microwave tomographic system. The presented fused images are not perfect as MWT is a novel imaging modality at its early stage of the development and ways of reading of reconstructed MWT images need to be further studied and understood. However, the reconstructed fused images present clear evidence that microwave tomography is an emerging imaging modality with great potentials for functional imaging. PMID:21364266

  20. Microwave tomography of extremities: 2. Functional fused imaging of flow reduction and simulated compartment syndrome

    Medical imaging has recently expanded into the dual- or multi-modality fusion of anatomical and functional imaging modalities. This significantly improves the diagnostic power while simultaneously increasing the cost of already expensive medical devices or investigations and decreasing their mobility. We are introducing a novel imaging concept of four-dimensional (4D) microwave tomographic (MWT) functional imaging: three dimensional (3D) in the spatial domain plus one dimensional (1D) in the time, functional dynamic domain. Instead of a fusion of images obtained by different imaging modalities, 4D MWT fuses absolute anatomical images with dynamic, differential images of the same imaging technology. The approach was successively validated in animal experiments with short-term arterial flow reduction and a simulated compartment syndrome in an initial simplified experimental setting using a dedicated MWT system. The presented fused images are not perfect as MWT is a novel imaging modality at its early stage of the development and ways of reading reconstructed MWT images need to be further studied and understood. However, the reconstructed fused images present clear evidence that microwave tomography is an emerging imaging modality with great potentials for functional imaging.

  1. Microwave tomography of extremities: 2. Functional fused imaging of flow reduction and simulated compartment syndrome.

    Semenov, Serguei; Kellam, James; Nair, Bindu; Williams, Thomas; Quinn, Michael; Sizov, Yuri; Nazarov, Alexei; Pavlovsky, Andrey

    2011-04-01

    Medical imaging has recently expanded into the dual- or multi-modality fusion of anatomical and functional imaging modalities. This significantly improves the diagnostic power while simultaneously increasing the cost of already expensive medical devices or investigations and decreasing their mobility. We are introducing a novel imaging concept of four-dimensional (4D) microwave tomographic (MWT) functional imaging: three dimensional (3D) in the spatial domain plus one dimensional (1D) in the time, functional dynamic domain. Instead of a fusion of images obtained by different imaging modalities, 4D MWT fuses absolute anatomical images with dynamic, differential images of the same imaging technology. The approach was successively validated in animal experiments with short-term arterial flow reduction and a simulated compartment syndrome in an initial simplified experimental setting using a dedicated MWT system. The presented fused images are not perfect as MWT is a novel imaging modality at its early stage of the development and ways of reading reconstructed MWT images need to be further studied and understood. However, the reconstructed fused images present clear evidence that microwave tomography is an emerging imaging modality with great potentials for functional imaging. PMID:21364266

  2. Well leg compartment syndrome after surgery for ulcerative colitis in the lithotomy position: A case report

    Enomoto, Tsuyoshi; Ohara, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Oda, Tatsuya; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Well leg compartment syndrome (WLCS) is an uncommon and severe complication that occurs after colorectal surgery in the lithotomy position. Presentation of case The current patient was a 28-year-old male suffering from ulcerative colitis. He was underwent elective proctectomy, including ileal J pouch formation and anal anastomosis with temporary loop ileostomy. The ileoanal pouch procedure was quite difficult, and during this procedure, the high lithotomy and head down tilt positions were continued for 255 min. After the operation, the patient complained of severe cramping pain, swelling and serious tenderness on palpation in both legs. On the first postoperative day, the patient's complaints gradually worsened. The intra-compartmental pressure was measured, and WLCS was diagnosed. Emergency bilateral fasciotomy was performed. Initially, the patient had a sensory deficit and analgesia, however, his sensory disturbance and pain had almost recovered two months after fasciotomy by rehabilitation. Discussion In the current case, the important factors associated with the development of WLCS are thought to be a prolonged operative time in which the patient is placed in the high lithotomy position during ileoanal pouch procedure. Conclusion We would thus like to emphasize that operations for the ileoanal pouch procedure to treat ulcerative colitis have a high potential for inducing WLCS, because it usually requires a prolonged operative time in which the patient remains in the high lithotomy position. PMID:27085103

  3. Contemporary management of acute coronary syndrome

    Large, G

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on the modern management of the non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction). Patients with these syndromes are at varying degrees of risk of (re)infarction and death. This risk can be reliably predicted by clinical, electrocardiographic, and biochemical markers. Aspirin, clopidogrel, heparin (unfractionated or low molecular weight), and anti-ischaemic drugs should be offered to all patients, irrespective of the predicted level of risk. Patients at high risk should also receive a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor inhibitor and should undergo early coronary arteriography with a view to percutaneous or surgical revascularisation. Lower risk patients should undergo non-invasive testing. When inducible myocardial ischaemia is exhibited coronary arteriography should follow. When non-invasive testing is negative, a conservative management strategy is safe. PMID:15811883

  4. Dual pathway therapy in acute coronary syndrome.

    Stachon, Peter; Ahrens, Ingo; Bode, Christoph; Zirlik, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    In 10 % of patients, who suffer an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a major cardiovascular event occurs despite optimal therapy. The occlusion of the vessel is driven by atherothrombosis, which arises from platelet activation and activation of the coagulation cascade. In the last decade the secondary prevention continuously improved by development of dual anti-platelet therapy with new P2Y12-inhibitors such as clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor. Until recently, the coagulation cascade was not targeted in secondary prevention. The coagulation factor Xa plays a crucial role in thrombosis and is elevated in patients after acute coronary syndrome, therefore representing an attractive target for novel therapies in ACS. Former studies with vitamin K antagonists showed reduction of cardiovascular events but increased major bleedings. Two phase-3 trials investigated the role of novel oral anticoagulant agents on top of aspirin and clopidogrel in patients with ACS. The APPRAISE-2 study, which tested the oral factor Xa inhibitor apixaban was prematurely terminated because of an increase of major bleedings in the absence of an effect on cardiovascular events. In contrast, the ATLAS ACS2 TIMI-51 trial interrogating the oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban in a low dose regimen showed significant reduction of cardiovascular events as well as total mortality. Thus, add-on treatment with low dose rivaroxaban emerged as a new option for patients with ACS. This review illustrates recent advances in the development of antithrombotic therapy in acute coronary syndromes, provides guidance on which patients should receive which therapy for secondary prevention of events, and points out potentially fruitful new strategies for the future of antithrombotic treatment in ACS. PMID:26660521

  5. Acute Coronary Syndrome- Conservative vs Invasive Treatment

    LIM; Yean Teng

    2001-01-01

    @@atients with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS)are a clinical continuum-with patients presenting with unstable angina on one end, with patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) at the other end of the spectrum. In between are those with non- ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) The pathophysiology is similar in these patients, namely isruption and fissuring of an atheromatous plaque,leading to enhanced platelet activation and local vasohyperactivity, with reduced flow and thrombus formation. While medical experts have reached consensus in the management of STEMI patients (thrombolysis nd / or percutaneous coronary intervention), optimalmanagement of patients with UA/NSTEMI remainsunclear.

  6. Acute Coronary Syndrome and ST Segment Monitoring.

    Carey, Mary G

    2016-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is caused by a critical obstruction of a coronary artery because of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Three specific conditions are included: ST elevation myocardial infarction, non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, and unstable angina. The ST segment on the electrocardiogram is a sensitive and specific marker of myocardial ischemia and infarction; however, ST segment deviation is regional not global, thus the ECG lead must be placed over the affected region of the myocardium. This article describes ACS and infarction and the use of ST segment monitoring to detect these conditions. PMID:27484662

  7. The Effectiveness of a 6-Week Intervention Program Aimed at Modifying Running Style in Patients With Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome

    Helmhout, Pieter H.; Diebal, Angela R.; van der Kaaden, Lisanne; Harts, Chris C.; Beutler, Anthony; Zimmermann, Wes O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have reported on the promising effects of changing running style in patients with chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) using a 6-week training program aimed at adopting a forefoot strike technique. This study expands that work by comparing a 6-week in-house, center-based run training program with a less extensive, supervised, home-based run training program (50% home training). Hypothesis: An alteration in running technique will lead to improvements in C...

  8. Ecstasy-induced acute coronary syndrome: something to rave about.

    Hoggett, Kerry; McCoubrie, David; Fatovich, Daniel M

    2012-06-01

    Ecstasy or 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine is a commonly used illicit recreational drug, enjoying popularity for its stimulant effects. Although acute coronary syndrome is recognized after cocaine and methamphetamine use, association with Ecstasy use has rarely been reported. We report three cases of significantly delayed acute coronary syndrome and ST elevation myocardial infarction related to ingestion of Ecstasy. PMID:22672176

  9. Rivaroxaban in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome

    Mega, Jessica L; Braunwald, Eugene; Wiviott, Stephen D; Bassand, Jean-Pierre; Bhatt, Deepak L; Bode, Christoph; Burton, Paul; Cohen, Marc; Cook-Bruns, Nancy; Fox, Keith A A; Goto, Shinya; Murphy, Sabina A; Plotnikov, Alexei N; Schneider, David; Sun, Xiang; Verheugt, Freek W A; Gibson, C Michael; Grande, Peer

    2012-01-01

    Acute coronary syndromes arise from coronary atherosclerosis with superimposed thrombosis. Since factor Xa plays a central role in thrombosis, the inhibition of factor Xa with low-dose rivaroxaban might improve cardiovascular outcomes in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome....

  10. The role of inflammatory stress in acute coronary syndrome

    沈成兴; 陈灏珠; 葛均波

    2004-01-01

    Objective To summarize current understanding of the roles of anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndrome and to postulate the novel concept of inflammation stress as the most important factor triggering acute coronary syndrome. Moreover, markers of inflammation stress and ways to block involved pathways are elucidated.Data sources A literature search (MEDLINE 1997 to 2002) was performed using the key words "inflammation and cardiovascular disease". Relevant book chapters were also reviewed.Study selection Well-controlled, prospective landmark studies and review articles on inflammation and acute coronary syndrome were selected.Data extraction Data and conclusions from the selected articles providing solid evidence to elucidate the mechanisms of inflammation and acute coronary syndrome were extracted and interpreted in the light of our own clinical and basic research.Data synthesis Inflammation is closely linked to atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndrome. Chronic and long-lasting inflammation stress, present both systemically or in the vascular walls, can trigger acute coronary syndrome.Conclusions Inflammation stress plays an important role in the process of acute coronary syndrome. Drugs which can modulate the balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory processes and attenuate inflammation stress, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin Ⅱ receptor blockers, statins, and cytokine antagonists may play active roles in the prevention and treatment of acute coronary syndrome when used in addition to conventional therapies (glycoprotein Ⅱb/Ⅲa receptor antagonists, mechanical intervention strategies, etc).

  11. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  12. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far.......Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  13. A CASE REPORT ON SICKLE CELL DISEASE WITH HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA, NEPHROTIC SYNDROME AND ACUTE CHEST SYNDROME

    Putta; Yamini Devi

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to abnormal hemoglobin. Sickling of RBCs occur due to abnormal hemoglobin which leads to vaso - occlusive crisis. This disease manifests as hemolytic anemia, acute chest syndrome, stroke, ischemic leg ulcers and nephrotic syndrome. This patient presented with hemolytic anemia, nephrotic syndrome and acute chest syndrome. This case was diagnosed by electrophoresis of h emoglobin and peripheral smear. Thi...

  14. Compartment syndrome of thigh and lower leg with disruption of the popliteal vascular bundle after being run over by a 25-ton truck

    Burghardt Rolf D

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare condition, potentially resulting in devastating functional outcome. Increasing intracompartmental pressure which suppresses microcirculation and capillary perfusion may lead to cellular anoxia and muscle ischemia. The muscle compartments in the thigh have a more compliant fascia and blend anatomically into the open compartments of the pelvis, thus compensating higher volumes than the compartments in the lower leg. We present a previously unreported case in which the limb of a 36-year-old man was run over by a 25-ton truck. He presented with a sensomotor deficit in his left lower leg with full paralysis of the shank muscles and absence of all foot pulses. CT scan showed a huge haematoma in the thigh with active bleeding out of the popliteal artery into the haematoma which has already expanded into the muscle compartments of the lower leg. The limb had a disastrous compartment syndrome of the thigh and lower leg with disruption of the popliteal neurovascular bundle; however, no bones in the limb were fractured. A complete fasciotomy of all the lower limb muscle compartments was immediately performed. The artery was reconstructed with interposition of the smaller saphenous vein, which was already interrupted through the initial trauma. Key words: Compartment syndromes; Thigh; Hemorrhage; Popliteal artery; Peroneal nerve

  15. Progress and perspectives in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Rotta, Alexandre Tellechea; Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Andreolio, Cinara; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of acute onset characterized by hypoxemia and infiltrates on chest radiographs that affects both adults and children of all ages. It is an important cause of respiratory failure in pediatric intensive care units and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, until recently, the definitions and diagnostic criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome have focused on the adult population. In this article, we review the evolution of the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome over nearly five decades, with a special focus on the new pediatric definition. We also discuss recommendations for the implementation of mechanical ventilation strategies in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and the use of adjuvant therapies. PMID:26331971

  16. Cardiac MRI of acute coronary syndrome.

    Akerem Khan, Shamruz; Khan, Shamruz Akarem; Williamson, Eric E; Foley, Thomas A; Cullen, Ethany L; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A

    2013-05-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. New serological biomarkers, such as troponins, have improved the diagnosis of ACS; however, the diagnosis of ACS can still be difficult as there is marked heterogeneity in its presentation and significant overlap with other disorders presenting with chest pain. Evidence is accumulating that cardiac MRI provides information that can aid the detection and differential diagnosis of ACS, guide clinical decision-making and improve risk-stratification after an event. In this review, we present the relevant cardiac MRI techniques that can be used to detect ACS accurately, provide differential diagnosis, identify the sequelae of ACS, and determine prognostication after ACS. PMID:23668741

  17. Nuclear Cardiology in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Paeng, Jin Chul; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging is very effective in the evaluation of patients with suspicious acute coronary syndrome (ACS), for adequate diagnosis and treatment. There have been many clinical evidences to support the efficacy and cost-effectiveness. In addition, many authoritative guidelines support the utility of myocardial perfusion imaging in ACS with an appropriate diagnostic protocol. However, with the development of other cardiac imaging modalities, the choice of modality for the diagnosis of suspicious ACS now depends on the availability of each modality in each institute. Newly developed imaging technologies, especially including molecular imaging, are expected to have great potential not only for diagnosis but also for primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of ACS.

  18. Nuclear Cardiology in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging is very effective in the evaluation of patients with suspicious acute coronary syndrome (ACS), for adequate diagnosis and treatment. There have been many clinical evidences to support the efficacy and cost-effectiveness. In addition, many authoritative guidelines support the utility of myocardial perfusion imaging in ACS with an appropriate diagnostic protocol. However, with the development of other cardiac imaging modalities, the choice of modality for the diagnosis of suspicious ACS now depends on the availability of each modality in each institute. Newly developed imaging technologies, especially including molecular imaging, are expected to have great potential not only for diagnosis but also for primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of ACS

  19. The clinics of acute coronary syndrome.

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Rastelli, Gianni

    2016-05-01

    Risk stratification and management of patients with chest pain continues to be challenging despite considerable efforts made in the last decades by many clinicians and researchers. The throutful evaluation necessitates that the physicians have a high index of suspicion for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and always keep in mind the myriad of often subtle and atypical presentations of ischemic heart disease, especially in certain patient populations such as the elderly ones. In this article we aim to review and discuss the available evidence on the value of clinical presentation in patients with a suspected ACS, with special emphasis on history, characteristics of chest pain, associated symptoms, atypical presentations, precipitating and relieving factors, drugs, clinical rules and significance of clinical Gestalt. PMID:27294087

  20. ANALYSIS OF PRE-HOSPITAL TREATMENT OF ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

    O. V. Reshetko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the pre-hospital treatment of patients with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina in 2001 and 2006.Material and methods. Retrospective pre-hospital treatment survey was performed in 1114 patients with acute coronary syndrome (acute myocardial infarction (AMI or unstable angina (UA in 2001 and 2006.Results. For acute myocardial infarction use of aspirin, β-blockers, heparin was 0%, 0%, 81,5% in 2001 and 23,9%, 8%, 13,4% in 2006, respectively. Use of aspirin, β-blockers, heparin in unstable angina were 0%, 16,2%, 12,3% in 2001 and 3,4%, 1,6%, 0,5% in 2006, respectively. Fibrinolytic therapy was not provided. Polypragmasia reduced in 2006 in comparison with 2001.Conclusions. This survey demonstrates the discordance between existing current practice and guidelines for acute coronary syndrome.

  1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: epidemiology and management approaches

    Walkey AJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Allan J Walkey,1 Ross Summer,1 Vu Ho,1 Philip Alkana21The Pulmonary Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 2Asthma Research Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Acute lung injury and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome represent a spectrum of lung disease characterized by the sudden onset of inflammatory pulmonary edema secondary to myriad local or systemic insults. The present article provides a review of current evidence in the epidemiology and treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, with a focus on significant knowledge gaps that may be addressed through epidemiologic methods.Keywords: acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, review, epidemiology

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome.

    Fukumoto, Risaku

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome affects military personnel and civilians following the uncontrolled dispersal of radiation, such as that caused by detonation of nuclear devices and inappropriate medical treatments. Therefore, there is a growing need for medical interventions that facilitate the improved recovery of victims and patients. One promising approach may be cell therapy, which, when appropriately implemented, may facilitate recovery from whole body injuries. This editorial highlights the current knowledge regarding the use of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the benefits and limitations of which are under investigation. Establishing successful therapies for acute radiation syndrome may require using such a therapeutic approach in addition to conventional approaches. PMID:27182446

  3. Preventing acute renal failure is crucial during acute tumor lysis syndrome

    Darmon Michael

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumour Lysis syndrome (TLS is characterized by the massive destruction of tumoral cells and the release in the extracellular space of their content. While TLS may occur spontaneously before treatment, it usually develops shortly after the initiation of cytotoxic chemotherapy. These metabolites can overwhelm the homeostatic mechanisms and cause hyperuricemia, hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia and hypocalcemia. Moreover, TLS may lead to an acute renal failure (ARF. In addition to the hospital mortality induced by the acute renal failure itself, development of an ARF may preclude optimal cancer treatment. Therefore, prevention of the acute renal failure during acute tumor lysis syndrome is mandatory. The objective of this review is to describe pathophysiological mechanisms leading to acute tumor lysis syndrome, clinical and biological consequences of this syndrome and to provide up-to-date guidelines to ensure prevention and prompt management of this syndrome.

  4. Acute encephalitis syndrome following scrub typhus infection

    Ayan Kar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to find the incidence of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES secondary to scrub infection and to observe the clinical, biochemical, radiological profile, and outcomes in these patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 consecutive patients of AES were evaluated for scrub infection using scrub typhus immunoglobulin M enzyme linked immuno-sorbant assay positivity along with the presence or absence of an eschar. Clinical profile, routine laboratory tests, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis, and neuroimaging were analyzed. Patients were treated with doxycycline and followed-up. Results: Among 20 consecutive patients with AES, 6 (30% were due to scrub infection. They presented with acute onset fever, altered sensorium, seizures. "Eschar" was seen in 50% of patients. CSF done in two of them was similar to consistent with viral meningitis. Magnetic resonance imaging brain revealed cerebral edema, bright lesions in the putamen and the thalamus on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. Renal involvement was seen in all patients. All patients responded well to oral doxycycline. Conclusion: AES is not an uncommon neurological presentation following scrub typhus infection. It should be suspected in all patients with fever, altered sensorium, and renal involvement. Oral doxycycline should be started as early as possible for better outcomes.

  5. A case report of thoracic compartment syndrome in the setting of penetrating chest trauma and review of the literature

    An Gary C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Trauma-related thoracic compartment syndrome (TCS is a rare, life threatening condition that develops secondary to elevated intra-thoracic pressure and manifests itself clinically as significantly elevated airway pressures, inability to provide adequate ventilation and hemodynamic instability temporally related to closure of a thoracic surgical incision. TCS is exceedingly rare in the trauma population. We present a case of TCS following surgical repair of a stab wound injury that necessitated decompressive thoracotomy and peri-operative open-chest management.

  6. Impact of copeptin on diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome

    Zeinab H. El Sayed

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: In suspected acute coronary syndrome, determination of copeptin and cardiac troponin I provides a remarkable negative predictive value, which aids in early and safe ruling out of myocardial infarction.

  7. Analysis of the Korean Emergency Department Syndromic Surveillance System: Mass Type Acute Diarrheal Syndrome

    Ahn, Shin; Lee, Jae Ho; KIM, WON; Lim, Kyung Soo

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to compare the data from the emergency department syndromic surveillance system of Korea in detection and reporting of acute diarrheal syndrome (mass type) with the data from the Korea Food and Drug Administration. And to offer fundamental materials for making improvements in current surveillance system was our purpose. Methods A study was conducted by reviewing the number of cases reported as acute diarrheal syndrome (mass type) from the Korean Center for D...

  8. A Case with Repeated Recurrent Acute Coronary Syndrome due to Pseudoephedrine Use: Kounis Syndrome

    Metin Çeliker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic reaction-associated acute coronary syndrome picture is defined as Kounis syndrome. Although drug use is the most common cause of allergic reaction, foods and environmental factors may also play a role in the etiology. Herein, a case with acute coronary syndrome that developed two times at 8-month interval due to pseudoephedrine use for upper respiratory tract infection is presented.

  9. Thyroid Hormone Profile in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Abdulaziz Qari, Faiza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thyroid hormone has the a major role in the cardiovascular system function and cardiac a As well as to maintain the cardiovascular homeostasis A slightly change ind thyroid status actually affects cardiovascular mortality hemodynamic. The background of this study was to define the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Objectives: The primary objective was to define the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in acute coronary syndrome, including Non-ST Segm...

  10. Acute Radiation Syndrome. Consequences and outcomes

    The consequences and outcomes of an Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS), induced by external gamma radiation for 59 persons (49 men and 10 women) have been estimated. All incidents have taken place more than 40 years ago in the yearly years of adjustment of an atomic industry (1950-1953-38 persons, 1954-1958-21 persons). According to the degree of severity ARS 5 groups are selected: the severest degree - 7 individuals (average dose in group 43.8±12.8 Sv), severe - 4 individuals (9.3±1.5 Sv), medium - 14 individuals (2.2±0.8 Sv), a light degree - 15 individuals (0.93±0.13 Sv), ''erased'' from - 19 individuals (0.85±0.07 Sv). In all cases, except for lethal (the severest degree), the characteristics of morphological composition of the peripheral blood were restored in the first year after ARS and now correspond to physiological standard. In 2 cases the moderate hypoplasia of granulocytopoiesis was diagnosed. A marker of the acute exposure was the chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of the peripheral blood. The frequency of chromosome aberrations correlates with severity degree of ARS (from 3-7 up to 35-50 stable aberrations per 100 cells). In cases of ARS with severe degree the early development of a cerebral atherosclerosis is detected. The radiation cataract was diagnosed in 5 patients (an exposure doses 4.0-9.8 Sv, a period of development 2-5 years). During the first years after ARS in 80% of cases the complete labour rehabilitation is reached. Of 53 patients with known vital status by 45 year of monitoring 19 persons (35.8%) have died, of these in 2 cases the causes of death are not determined. In remaining cases the causes of death were ARS of severest degree (7 persons), Ischemic Heart Disease (5 persons), malignant tumors (4 persons), accidents and traumas (2 persons). (author)

  11. Acute Radiation Syndrome. Consequences and outcomes

    Okladnikova, N.D.; Pesternikova, V.S.; Sumina, M.V.; Azizova, T.V.; Yurkov, N.N. [Branch No 1 State Research Center of Russia, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Biophysics

    2000-05-01

    The consequences and outcomes of an Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS), induced by external gamma radiation for 59 persons (49 men and 10 women) have been estimated. All incidents have taken place more than 40 years ago in the yearly years of adjustment of an atomic industry (1950-1953-38 persons, 1954-1958-21 persons). According to the degree of severity ARS 5 groups are selected: the severest degree - 7 individuals (average dose in group 43.8{+-}12.8 Sv), severe - 4 individuals (9.3{+-}1.5 Sv), medium - 14 individuals (2.2{+-}0.8 Sv), a light degree - 15 individuals (0.93{+-}0.13 Sv), ''erased'' from - 19 individuals (0.85{+-}0.07 Sv). In all cases, except for lethal (the severest degree), the characteristics of morphological composition of the peripheral blood were restored in the first year after ARS and now correspond to physiological standard. In 2 cases the moderate hypoplasia of granulocytopoiesis was diagnosed. A marker of the acute exposure was the chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of the peripheral blood. The frequency of chromosome aberrations correlates with severity degree of ARS (from 3-7 up to 35-50 stable aberrations per 100 cells). In cases of ARS with severe degree the early development of a cerebral atherosclerosis is detected. The radiation cataract was diagnosed in 5 patients (an exposure doses 4.0-9.8 Sv, a period of development 2-5 years). During the first years after ARS in 80% of cases the complete labour rehabilitation is reached. Of 53 patients with known vital status by 45 year of monitoring 19 persons (35.8%) have died, of these in 2 cases the causes of death are not determined. In remaining cases the causes of death were ARS of severest degree (7 persons), Ischemic Heart Disease (5 persons), malignant tumors (4 persons), accidents and traumas (2 persons). (author)

  12. Nuclear cardiology in acute coronary syndromes

    Acute coronary syndromes are a frequent manifestation of a coronary artery disease, usually being associated with chest pain and presenting as a medical emergency. Since a considerable number of patients with chest pain, however, have a non cardiac etiology of trier pain, properly triaging these patients represents a diagnostic challenge for physicians in the emergency department. As the available diagnostic procedures have limited accuracy, many different diagnostic strategies have been evaluated. Among these, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) at rest or in combination with stress procedures has been investigated in many trails. MPI has been proven to be useful, especially in a patient population with a low to intermediate probability of an ischemic event. Perfusion scintigraphy has a high sensitivity in the detection of myocardial infarction and reveals an excellent negative predictive value, allowing a safe discharge strategy of patients with a negative scan result. Moreover, it enables risk stratification and provides incremental and independent prognostic information regarding short to long term future cardiac adverse events. Several cost effectiveness studies have shown that perfusion imaging leads to lower overall direct costs, mainly by a reduction of unnecessary hospital admissions and diagnostic angiograms, without worsening of the clinical outcome of these patients. As a possible study endpoint, myocardial perfusion imaging in the acute setting enables the quantification of salvaged myocardium and therefore the evaluation of treatment efficacy. Besides perfusion agents, several infarcts avid radiopharmaceuticals have been developed, which in part show promising results. However, larger randomized trials evaluating these tracers in clinical settings are needed to warrant routine clinical application

  13. Near-infrared spectroscopy for monitoring of tissue oxygenation of exercising skeletal muscle in a chronic compartment syndrome model

    Breit, G. A.; Gross, J. H.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Chance, B.; Hargens, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Variations in the levels of muscle hemoglobin and of myoglobin oxygen saturation can be detected non-invasively with near-infrared spectroscopy. This technique could be applied to the diagnosis of chronic compartment syndrome, in which invasive testing has shown increased intramuscular pressure associated with ischemia and pain during exercise. We simulated chronic compartment syndrome in ten healthy subjects (seven men and three women) by applying external compression, through a wide inflatable cuff, to increase the intramuscular pressure in the anterior compartment of the leg. The tissue oxygenation of the tibialis anterior muscle was measured with near-infrared spectroscopy during gradual inflation of the cuff to a pressure of forty millimeters of mercury (5.33 kilopascals) during fourteen minutes of cyclic isokinetic dorsiflexion and plantar flexion of the ankle. The subjects exercised with and without external compression. The data on tissue oxygenation for each subject then were normalized to a scale of 100 per cent (the baseline value, or the value at rest) to 0 per cent (the physiological minimum, or the level of oxygenation achieved by exercise to exhaustion during arterial occlusion of the lower extremity). With external compression, tissue oxygenation declined at a rate of 1.4 +/- 0.3 per cent per minute (mean and standard error) during exercise. After an initial decrease at the onset, tissue oxygenation did not decline during exercise without compression. The recovery of tissue oxygenation after exercise was twice as slow with compression (2.5 +/- 0.6 minutes) than it was without the use of compression (1.3 +/- 0.2 minutes).

  14. Acute pancreatitis and acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating dengue haemorrhagic fever

    Agrawal, Avinash; Jain, Nirdesh; Gutch, Manish; Shankar, Amit

    2011-01-01

    Dengue infection is now known to present with wide spectrum of complications. Isolated cases of acute pancreatitis complicating dengue haemorrhagic fever have been reported in literature. Here the authors report a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever that develops acute pancreatitis and presented with acute onset of breathlessness, which then progressed to full-blown acute respiratory distress syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of dengue haemorrhagic fever complicated wi...

  15. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in an alpaca cria

    Simpson, Katharine M.; Streeter, Robert N.; Genova, Suzanne G.

    2011-01-01

    A 7-hour-old alpaca was presented for lethargy and depression. The cria responded favorably to initial treatment but developed acute-onset dyspnea 48 hours later. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was diagnosed by thoracic imaging and blood gas analysis. The cria was successfully treated with corticosteroids and discharged from the hospital.

  16. Pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    ZHANG Ding-mei; LU Jia-hai; ZHONG Nan-shan

    2008-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) first emerged in Guangdong province,China in November2002.During the following 3 months,it spread rapidly across the world,resulting in approximately 800 deaths.In 2004,subsequent sporadic cases emerged in Singapore and China.A novel coronavims,SARS-CoV,was identified as the etiological agent of SARS.1,2 This virus belongs to a family of large,positive,single-stranded RNA viruses.Nevertheless,genomic characterization shows that the SARS-CoV is only moderately related to other known coronaviruses.3 In contrast with previously described coronaviruses,SARS-CoV infection typically causes severe symptoms related to the lower respiratory tract.The SARS-CoV genome includes 14 putative open reading frames encoding 28 potential proteins,and the functions of many of these proteins are not known.4 A number of complete and partial autopsies of SARS patients have been reported since the first outbreak in 2003.The predominant pathological finding in these cases was diffuse alveolar damage (DAD).This severe pulmonary injury of SARS patients is caused both by direct viral effects and immunopathogenetic factors.5 Many important aspects of the pathogenesis of SARS have not yet been fully clarified.In this article,we summarize the most important mechanisms involved in the complex pathogenesis of SARS,including clinical characters,host and receptors,immune system response and genetic factors.

  17. Acute Coronary Syndrome: Posthospital Outpatient Management.

    Veauthier, Brian; Sievers, Karlynn; Hornecker, Jaime

    2015-10-01

    When providing care for patients who are discharged from the hospital after experiencing acute coronary syndrome (ACS), several issues should be addressed. Drug regimens should be reviewed to ensure that patients are taking appropriate drugs, including antiplatelet agents, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers, aldosterone antagonists, beta blockers/calcium channel blockers, cholesterol-lowering drugs, and nitroglycerin. The review also should confirm that patients understand when and how to take their drugs, and that there are no obstacles (eg, cost) that might result in nonadherence to drug regimens. Lifestyle modifications, including improvements in diet and exercise regimens, along with participation in a cardiac rehabilitation program, should be encouraged. Risk factor reduction measures include smoking cessation for smokers, weight management for patients who are overweight, and optimal control of blood pressure and blood glucose levels. Appropriate vaccinations should be administered; influenza and pneumococcal vaccines are indicated for all patients with ACS in the absence of contraindications. Patients requiring pain control should avoid use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs because they increase the risk of cardiovascular events; acetaminophen or other drugs should be used. Finally, depression is common among patients with ACS. Screening for and management of depression are significant components of care. PMID:26439396

  18. MRI assessment of local acute radiation syndrome

    Weber-Donat, G.; Potet, J.; Baccialone, J.; Teriitehau, C. [Military Hospital Percy, Radiology Department, Clamart (France); Amabile, J.C.; Laroche, P. [Military Hospital Percy, Army Institute of Radioprotection, Clamart (France); Lahutte-Auboin, M. [Military Hospital Val-de-Grace, Radiology Department, Paris (France); Bey, E. [Military Hospital Percy, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Department, Clamart (France)

    2012-12-15

    To describe local acute radiation syndrome and its radiological imaging characteristics. We performed a retrospective study of patients who had suffered skin and deeper radiation damage who were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared the clinical findings, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and MRI results. A total of 22 MRI examinations were performed between 2005 and 2010 in 7 patients; 6 patients had increased CRP levels and MRI abnormalities. They were treated by surgery and local cellular therapy. One patient had no CRP or MRI abnormalities, and had a spontaneous good outcome. Eighteen abnormal MR examinations demonstrated high STIR signal and/or abnormal enhancement in the dermis and muscle tissues. Three MRI examinations demonstrated skeletal abnormalities, consistent with radionecrosis. The four normal MRI examinations were associated only with minor clinical manifestations such as pain and pigmentation disorders. MRI seems to be a useful and promising imaging investigation in radiation burns management i.e. initial lesion evaluation, treatment evaluation and complication diagnosis. MRI findings correlated perfectly with clinical stage and no false negative examinations were obtained. In particular, the association between normal MRI and low CRP level seems to be related to good outcome without specific treatment. (orig.)

  19. MRI assessment of local acute radiation syndrome

    To describe local acute radiation syndrome and its radiological imaging characteristics. We performed a retrospective study of patients who had suffered skin and deeper radiation damage who were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared the clinical findings, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and MRI results. A total of 22 MRI examinations were performed between 2005 and 2010 in 7 patients; 6 patients had increased CRP levels and MRI abnormalities. They were treated by surgery and local cellular therapy. One patient had no CRP or MRI abnormalities, and had a spontaneous good outcome. Eighteen abnormal MR examinations demonstrated high STIR signal and/or abnormal enhancement in the dermis and muscle tissues. Three MRI examinations demonstrated skeletal abnormalities, consistent with radionecrosis. The four normal MRI examinations were associated only with minor clinical manifestations such as pain and pigmentation disorders. MRI seems to be a useful and promising imaging investigation in radiation burns management i.e. initial lesion evaluation, treatment evaluation and complication diagnosis. MRI findings correlated perfectly with clinical stage and no false negative examinations were obtained. In particular, the association between normal MRI and low CRP level seems to be related to good outcome without specific treatment. (orig.)

  20. Prevalence of Burnout Syndrome in Patients Admitted with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Ana Cláudia Giaxa Prosdócimo; Luciane Boreki Lucina; Olandoski Marcia; Priscila Megda João Jobs; Nicolle Amboni Schio; Fernanda Fachin Baldanzi; Costantino Ortiz Costantini; Ana Maria Teresa Benevides-Pereira; Luiz Cesar Guarita-Souza; José Rocha Faria-Neto

    2015-01-01

    Background: Burnout Syndrome is the extreme emotional response to chronic occupational stress, manifesting as physical and mental exhaustion. Although associated with higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, no study so far has evaluated whether the Burnout Syndrome could be a prevalent factor in non-elderly individuals active in the labor market, admitted for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome in non-elderly, economically act...

  1. Role of Ventilation in Cases of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome /Acute Lung injury

    Hemant M Shah; Shilpa B Sutariya; Parul M Bhatt; Nishil Shah; Shweta Gamit

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute lung injury (ALI) and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by refractory hypoxemia that develops secondary to high-permeability pulmonary edema. These syndromes are gaining more attention as a means of better comprehending the pathophysiology of ARDS and possiblyfor modifying ventilatory management. In this context a study was done to compare role of invasive and non-invasive ventilation in cases of ARDS/ALI. Methods: in this study patients of AR...

  2. Acute coronary syndromes: an old age problem

    Alexander D Simms; Philip D Batin; John Kurian; Nigel Durham; Christopher P Gale

    2012-01-01

    The increasing population in older age will lead to greater numbers of them presenting with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). This has implications on global healthcare resources and necessitates better management and selection for evidenced-based therapies. The elderly are a high risk group with more significant treatment benefits than younger ACS. Nevertheless, age related inequalities in ACS care are recognised and persist. This discrepancy in care, to some extent, is explained by the higher frequency of atypical and delayed presentations in the elderly, and less diagnostic electrocardiograms at presentation, potentiating a delay in ACS diagnosis. Under estimation of mortality risk in the elderly due to limited consideration for physiological frailty, co-morbidity, cognitive/psychological impairment and physical disability, less input by cardiology specialists and lack of randomised, controlled trials data to guide management in the elderly may further confound the inequality of care. While these inequalities exist, there remains a substantial opportunity to improve age related ACS outcomes. The selection of elderly patients for specific therapies and medication regimens are unanswered. There is a growing need for randomised, controlled trial data to be more representative of the population and enroll those of advanced age with co-morbidity. A lack of reporting of adverse events, such as renal impairment post coronary angiography, in the elderly further limit risk benefit decisions. Substantial improvements in care of elderly ACS patients are required and should be advocated. Ultimately, these improvements are likely to lead to better outcomes post ACS. However, the improvement in outcome is not infinite and will be limited by non-modifiable factors of age-related risk.

  3. Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome - a Proposition for an Algorithm

    Larsen, Peter Birk; Jensen, Steffen Skov

    patients seen in the period from Nov 2011 to May 2014 (6 women and 7 men, mean age 26 years, range 15-46 years). We used an algorithm of MRI scan or bone scintegraphy to rule out other pathology. Subsequently the patient was examined by a physiotherapist and exposed to SAIS. The objective findings...... additional EASF of other compartments than primarily diagnosed. At three months follow up 82% of the patients had regained their physical capabilities as prior to the condition. Conclusions: Diagnosing CECS using an algorihm consisting of physiotherapist examination including SAIS allows the surgeon...

  4. A CASE REPORT ON SICKLE CELL DISEASE WITH HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA, NEPHROTIC SYNDROME AND ACUTE CHEST SYNDROME

    Putta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease is an autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to abnormal hemoglobin. Sickling of RBCs occur due to abnormal hemoglobin which leads to vaso - occlusive crisis. This disease manifests as hemolytic anemia, acute chest syndrome, stroke, ischemic leg ulcers and nephrotic syndrome. This patient presented with hemolytic anemia, nephrotic syndrome and acute chest syndrome. This case was diagnosed by electrophoresis of h emoglobin and peripheral smear. This patient recovered with blood transfusion, antibiotics, steroids, diuretics and oxygen inhalation. Sickle cell patients have a known predisposition to bacterial infection, particularly pneumococcal infection. The most si gnificant advance in the therapy of sickle cell anemia has been the introduction of hydroxyurea, but hydroxyurea should be considered in patients experiencing repeated episodes of acute chest syndrome. But in this patient as this is first episode, hydroxyu rea was not given and he recovered well.

  5. Perivascular adipose tissue: An unique fat compartment relevant for the cardiometabolic syndrome.

    Siegel-Axel, D I; Häring, H U

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes and its major risk factor, obesity, are an increasing worldwide health problem. The exact mechanisms that link obesity with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular complications and renal diseases, are still not clarified sufficiently. Adipose tissue in general is an active endocrine and paracrine organ that may influence the development of these disorders. Excessive body fat in general obesity may also cause quantitative and functional alterations of specific adipose tissue compartments. Beside visceral and subcutaneous fat depots which exert systemic effects by the release of adipokines, cytokines and hormones, there are also locally acting fat depots such as peri- and epicardial fat, perivascular fat, and renal sinus fat. Perivascular adipose tissue is in close contact with the adventitia of large, medium and small diameter arteries, possesses unique features differing from other fat depots and may act also independently of general obesity. An increasing number of studies are dealing with the "good" or "bad" characteristics and functions of normally sized and dramatically increased perivascular fat mass in lean or heavily obese individuals. This review describes the origin of perivascular adipose tissue, its different locations, the dual role of a physiological and unphysiological fat mass and its impact on diabetes, cardiovascular and renal diseases. Clinical studies, new imaging methods, as well as basic research in cell culture experiments in the last decade helped to elucidate the various aspects of the unique fat compartment. PMID:26995737

  6. Tachyarrhythmias, bradyarrhythmias and acute coronary syndromes

    Trappe Hans-Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of bradyarrhythmias in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS is 0.3% to 18%. It is caused by sinus node dysfunction (SND, high-degree atrioventricular (AV block, or bundle branch blocks. SND presents as sinus bradycardia or sinus arrest. First-degree AV block occurs in 4% to 13% of patients with ACS and is caused by rhythm disturbances in the atrium, AV node, bundle of His, or the Tawara system. First- or second-degree AV block is seen very frequently within 24 h of the beginning of ACS; these arrhythmias are frequently transient and usually disappear after 72 h. Third-degree AV blocks are also frequently transient in patients with infero-posterior myocardial infarction (MI and permanent in anterior MI patients. Left anterior fascicular block occurs in 5% of ACS; left posterior fascicular block is observed less frequently (incidence < 0.5%. Complete bundle branch block is present in 10% to 15% of ACS patients; right bundle branch block is more common (2/3 than left bundle branch block (1/3. In patients with bradyarrhythmia, intravenous (IV atropine (1-3 mg is helpful in 70% to 80% of ACS patients and will lead to an increased heart rate. The need for pacemaker stimulation (PS is different in patients with inferior MI (IMI and anterior MI (AMI. Whereas bradyarrhythmias are frequently transient in patients with IMI and therefore do not need permanent PS, there is usually a need for permanent PS in patients with AMI. In these patients bradyarrhythmias are mainly caused by septal necrosis. In patients with ACS and ventricular arrhythmias (VTA amiodarone is the drug of choice; this drug is highly effective even in patients with defibrillation-resistant out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. There is general agreement that defibrillation and advanced life support is essential and is the treatment of choice for patients with ventricular flutter/fibrillation. If defibrillation is not available in patients with cardiac arrest due to VTA

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome--two decades later.

    Cunningham, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    Twenty years have now elapsed since Ashbaugh and Petty first described the syndrome of acute respiratory failure associated with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. During the past two decades, significant advances have emerged in our understanding of the clinical conditions associated with the syndrome and the pathophysiological changes affecting the alveolar-capillary membrane responsible for the characteristic non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Recent data have reaffirmed the notion that...

  8. Marfan syndrome with acute abdomen: a case report

    Beyazit Zencirci

    2010-01-01

    Beyazit ZencirciKahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University Medical Faculty, Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation Kahramanmaras, TurkeyIntroduction: Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder characterized by a combination of clinical manifestations in different organ systems. Patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) whose lifetimes are extended may be encountered as acute abdomen (appendicitis) cases apart from the obligatory reasons and emergencies arising naturally out ...

  9. GERSTMANN’S SYNDROME IN ACUTE STROKE PATIENTS

    Zukic, Sanela; Mrkonjic, Zamir; Sinanovic, Osman; Vidovic, Mirjana; Kojic, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Gerstmann in 1924. observed in a few patients a concomitant impairment in discriminating their own fingers, writing by hand, distinguishing left from right and performing calculations. He claimed that this tetrad of symptoms constituted a syndromal entity, assigned it to a lesion of the dominant parietal lobe. Since than, Gerstmann`s syndrome (GS) was enigma for neuropsychologists. The aim of this study was to analyze frequency and clinical features of GS among acute stroke patient...

  10. Cardiac computed tomography in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Currently, cardiac computed tomography (CT) is increasingly being implemented into clinical algorithms, primarily due to substantial technical advances over the last decade. Its use in the setting of suspected acute coronary syndrome is of particular relevance, given the high degree of accumulating scientific evidence of improving patient outcomes. Performing cardiac CT requires specific knowledge on the available scan acquisitions and patient preparation. Also, expertise is required in order to interpret the coronary and extra-coronary findings adequately. The present article provides an overview of the different aspects on the use of cardiac CT in the setting of acute coronary syndrome.

  11. Thrombotic occlusion of the ostial left main coronary artery in a patient with acute coronary syndrome

    Tatli, E.

    2009-01-01

    Ostial left main coronary artery (LMCA) occlusion is rarely seen in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Acute coronary syndrome resulting from an LMCA occlusion is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality rate, if it is managed with fibrinolysis. Electrocardiography can predict LMCA occlusion in patients with acute coronary syndrome. We report a 52-year-old male who presented with acute coronary syndrome and ostial LMCA occlusion. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:295-6.19789699)

  12. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: Pulmonary and extrapulmonary not so similar

    Inderpaul Singh Sehgal; Sahajal Dhooria; Digambar Behera; Ritesh Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by acute onset respiratory failure with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and hypoxemia. Current evidence suggests different respiratory mechanics in pulmonary ARDS (ARDSp) and extrapulmonary ARDS (ARDSexp) with disproportionate decrease in lung compliance in the former and chest wall compliance in the latter. Herein, we report two patients of ARDS, one each with ARDSp and ARDSexp that were managed using real-time esophageal pressure m...

  13. Guillain-Barre Syndrome Presenting as Acute Abdomen

    Faruk incecik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barr and eacute; syndrome (GBS is the most common cause of acute flaccid paralysis in childhood. Symmetric weakness, headache, respiratory symptom, neuropathic pain, muscle pain, paresthesia, and facial palsy were the most common clinical presentations. We report 13-year-old boy with GBS who presented with acute abdominal pain. This is the first report, to our knowledge, first presented of acute abdomen of a pediatric patient with GBS. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 601-603

  14. SYNDROME X IN ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME PATIENTS- A TERTIARY CARE CENTER STUDY

    Yogendra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome (MS or insulin resistance syndrome is commonly defined as a group of risk factors or abnormalities associated with insulin resistance that markedly increased risk for both coronary heart disease and diabetes. Cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, even in the absence of baseline CVD and diabetes. Early identification, treatment and prevention of the metabolic syndrome present a major challenge for health care professionals facing an epidemic of overweight and sedentary lifestyle. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in pts. with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS and its effect on hospital outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS Observational study in 55 cases (28 cases and 27 controls was conducted in Dr. BRAMH, Raipur and each patient was assessed with detailed clinical history and was also assessed for parameters of MS. The cases and controls were also followed up during their hospital stay for the presence of or development of heart failure, arrhythmias, shock and death. Chi square and ‘t’ test were used to analyse obtained data. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS In the present study sex ratio amongst the cases was (M:F 1.15:1 and 2.6:1 in controls. Maximum patients were between the ages of 50-60. Non-ST elevation MI was more common in patients with metabolic syndrome and they presented late to the hospital for treatment. Hypertension and fasting hyperglycemia are the most prevalent components of metabolic syndrome in patients of acute coronary syndrome. Our Study also suggests that hypertriglyceridemia is the most common lipid abnormality in patients of acute coronary syndrome. An increase in the incidence of heart failure was observed in patients with metabolic syndrome Cardiogenic shock is seen with increased frequency in patients with metabolic syndrome. Case fatalities were seen with equal frequency in both the groups, hence metabolic syndrome is not associated with increased case fatality while

  15. Acute Sin Nombre hantavirus infection without pulmonary syndrome, United States.

    Kitsutani, P. T.; Denton, R. W.; Fritz, C. L.; Murray, R. A.; Todd, R. L.; Pape, W. J.; Wyatt Frampton, J.; Young, J C; Khan, A. S.; Peters, C. J.; Ksiazek, T. G.

    1999-01-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) occurs in most infections with Sin Nombre virus and other North American hantaviruses. We report five cases of acute hantavirus infection that did not fit the HPS case definition. The patients had characteristic prodromal symptoms without severe pulmonary involvement. These cases suggest that surveillance for HPS may need to be expanded.

  16. Developing diagnostic guidelines for the acute radiation syndrome

    Diagnostic guidelines seem to be promising for improving medical care. One aspect of a diagnostic guideline for the acute radiation syndrome has been tested against an extensive case history database. Subsequently, the guideline has been optimized for a small set of case histories. The improved performance has been proven by a test against the rest of the case history database

  17. Consensus for the manaegment of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Chinese Medical Association,China Association of C

    2003-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Since recognition of the first case of sever acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Guangdong Province in November 2002,health care worker engaged in basic medicine,clinical medicine and preventive progress in the understanding of the etiology,epidemiology,diagnosis,treatment and prevention of SARS.

  18. Serum biomarkers in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome an ailing prognosticator

    Pneumatikos Ioannis

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of biomarkers in medicine lies in their ability to detect disease and support diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. New research and novel understanding of the molecular basis of the disease reveals an abundance of exciting new biomarkers who present a promise for use in the everyday clinical practice. The past fifteen years have seen the emergence of numerous clinical applications of several new molecules as biologic markers in the research field relevant to acute respiratory distress syndrome (translational research. The scope of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge about serum biomarkers in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome and their potential value as prognostic tools and present some of the future perspectives and challenges.

  19. Acute radiation syndrome caused by accidental radiation exposure - therapeutic principles

    Dörr Harald

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fortunately radiation accidents are infrequent occurrences, but since they have the potential of large scale events like the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima, preparatory planning of the medical management of radiation accident victims is very important. Radiation accidents can result in different types of radiation exposure for which the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, as well as the outcomes, differ. The clinical course of acute radiation syndrome depends on the absorbed radiation dose and its distribution. Multi-organ-involvement and multi-organ-failure need be taken into account. The most vulnerable organ system to radiation exposure is the hematopoietic system. In addition to hematopoietic syndrome, radiation induced damage to the skin plays an important role in diagnostics and the treatment of radiation accident victims. The most important therapeutic principles with special reference to hematopoietic syndrome and cutaneous radiation syndrome are reviewed.

  20. Acute idiopathic blue fingers: a young man with Achenbach's syndrome.

    Takeuchi, Hidemi; Uchida, Haruhito Adam; Okuyama, Yuka; Wada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 20-year-old man presenting with acute painful blue fingers. All physical findings, including an Allen test, were normal, and systematic symptoms frequently seen in collagen diseases were absent. Although we performed a wide variety of investigations including medical imaging, no specific abnormal findings were observed. Skin biopsy pathology was an important reference. The patient's symptoms gradually improved and were completely resolved without specific treatment. Based on the clinical presentation and course, we gave a diagnosis of Achenbach's syndrome, developed in a young male. Achenbach's syndrome is rare, but still may be encountered in clinical practice. The symptoms can be startling to the patient, eliciting fear of something terrible when, in fact, the syndrome is relatively benign and has a good prognosis. Recognising this disease quickly after presentation helps to eliminate the anxiety of the patient, as well as reducing excessively invasive investigations. We present a case report to enlighten Achenbach's syndrome. PMID:27090544

  1. Acute myocardial infarction in young adults with Antiphospholipid syndrome: report of two cases and literature review

    Leila Abid; Faten Frikha; Zouhir Bahloul; Samir Kammoun

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is rarely associated with antiphospholipid syndrome. The treatment of these patients is a clinical challenge. We report the observations of 2 young adults (1 woman and 1 man), admitted in our acute care unit for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A coagulopathy work-up concludes the existence of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in the 2 cases. APS syndrome was considered primary in 2 cases. All patients presented an intense inflammatory syndrome (high...

  2. Calcific myonecrosis. A late sequela to compartment syndrome of the leg.

    O'Keefe, R J; O'Connell, J X; Temple, H T; Scully, S P; Kattapuram, S V; Springfield, D S; Rosenberg, A E; Mankin, H J

    1995-09-01

    The clinicopathologic features of calcific myonecrosis are presented from results of an examination of 3 cases of this rare syndrome and review of the literature. Calcific myonecrosis is a painful, expansile, calcified mass that develops in muscle several decades after lower extremity trauma that typically has been associated with vascular injury. Plain radiographs show a well-defined and heavily calcified mass replacing the leg musculature. The calcifications are present in a thin, linear pattern and are organized around the periphery of the lesion. Smooth erosion of the adjacent bone may be present, whereas magnetic resonance imaging shows a heterogeneous signal with enhancement limited to the periphery of the mass. Pathologic features consist of a centrally cystic mass arising in muscle filled with friable, tan to dark red, soft debris. The cyst walls are firm and fibrous and contain many needle-like, elongated, calcified shards of necrotic tissue composed of hypocellular fibrous tissue with focal aggregates of hemosiderin-laden macrophages. The cyst contents are composed of necrotic skeletal muscle and acellular amorphous debris containing many cholesterol crystals, fibrin, and recent hemorrhage, including focal aggregates of organizing thrombus. The pathologic findings suggest that calcific myonecrosis might expand with time by virtue of recurrent intralesional hemorrhage into a chronic calcified mass that eventually becomes symptomatic. Surgical intervention is associated with a high rate of complication, particularly in cases in which intralesional procedures have been done. PMID:7671519

  3. Early Treatment of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Przybysz, Thomas M; Heffner, Alan C

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is defined by acute diffuse inflammatory lung injury invoked by a variety of systemic or pulmonary insults. Despite medical progress in management, mortality remains 27% to 45%. Patients with ARDS should be managed with low tidal volume ventilation. Permissive hypercapnea is well tolerated. Conservative fluid strategy can reduce ventilator and hospital days in patients without shock. Prone positioning and neuromuscular blockers reduce mortality in some patients. Early management of ARDS is relevant to emergency medicine. Identifying ARDS patients who should be transferred to an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation center is an important task for emergency providers. PMID:26614238

  4. Applications of radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging in acute coronary syndrome

    In recent years, acute coronary syndrome(ACS) has been getting more and more attentions. Radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) can make a quick accurate diagnosis for patients with acute chest pain who cann't be diagnosed by conventional methods. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of MPI are relatively high. Besides, MPI can be applicated in the detection of ischemic and infarct size and degree, the risk stratification and the assessment of prognosis of the patients with ACS, and the appraisal of the effect of strategies. (authors)

  5. [Invasive diagnosis, transcatheter and surgical treatment of acute coronary syndromes].

    Fabián, J; Hricák, V; Fridrich, V; Fischer, V

    1998-01-01

    On the basis of long-term personal experiences and critical evaluation of the present literatury sources authors described the role of invasive diagnostic methods and transcathetral and cardiosurgical possibilities in the recognition and therapy of acute coronary syndromes. These techniques are, and in the forthcoming year shall be available only in specialized institutions. The paper describes the indication for these aggressive techniques as well as their limitations and complications. The goal of the presented article is to inform both the cardiological and frequently broad physicians' societies about the possibilities of diaventional cardiology and cardiosurgery which will be gradually more applied in the care of the patients with acute coronary syndromes. (Ref. 39, Tab. 2, Fig. 3.) PMID:9919748

  6. Prevalence of the catatonic syndrome in an acute inpatient sample

    Mirella eStuivenga; Manuel eMorrens

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this exploratory open label study we investigated the prevalence of catatonia in an acute psychiatric inpatient population. In addition, differences in symptom presentation of catatonia depending on the underlying psychiatric illness were investigated.METHODS: 130 patients were assessed with the Bush-Francis Catatonia Rating Scale (BFCRS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and the Simpson-Angus Scale (SAS). A factor analysis wa...

  7. Treatment-Resistant Depression and Mortality after Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Carney, Robert M.; Freedland, Kenneth E

    2009-01-01

    Depression is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), especially following acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Evidence from recent clinical trials suggests that treatment-resistant depression may be associated with a particularly high risk of mortality or cardiac morbidity in post-ACS patients. This manuscript reviews this evidence, and considers possible explanations for this relationship. Directions for future research are also considered, with p...

  8. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Options

    Pierrakos, Charalampos; Karanikolas, Menelaos; Scolletta, Sabino; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Velissaris, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a common entity in critical care. ARDS is associated with many diagnoses, including trauma and sepsis, can lead to multiple organ failure and has high mortality. The present article is a narrative review of the literature on ARDS, including ARDS pathophysiology and therapeutic options currently being evaluated or in use in clinical practice. The literature review covers relevant publications until January 2011. Recent developments in the therapeut...

  9. Scrub Typhus with Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Kurup, Asok; Issac, Aneesh; Loh, Jin Phang; Lee, Too Bou; Chua, Robert; Bist, Pradeep; Chao, Chien-Chung; Lewis, Michael; Gubler, Duane J.; Ching, Wei Mei; Ooi, Eng Eong; Sukumaran, Bindu

    2013-01-01

    Scrub typhus is a major infectious threat in the Asia-Pacific region. We report an unusual case of scrub typhus in a patient in Singapore who presented with sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome but lacked the pathognomonic eschar. The patient recovered after appropriate diagnosis and doxycycline treatment. Rickettsial diseases should be included in the differential diagnosis of febrile illnesses in regions where the diseases are endemic, and absence of eschar should not be the crite...

  10. The acute respiratory distress syndrome: from mechanism to translation

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a form of severe hypoxemic respiratory failure characterized by inflammatory injury to the alveolar capillary barrier with extravasation of protein-rich edema fluid into the airspace. Although many modalities have been investigated to treat ARDS for the past several decades, supportive therapies still remain the mainstay of treatment. Here, we briefly review the definition, epidemiology and pathophysiology of ARDS. Next, we present emerging as...

  11. Extracorporeal life support for acute respiratory distress syndromes

    Don Hayes; Joseph D Tobias; Jasleen Kukreja; Preston, Thomas J.; Yates, Andrew R; Stephen Kirkby; Whitson, Bryan A.

    2013-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome remain to be high. Over the last 50 years, the clinical management of these patients has undergone vast changes. Significant improvement in the care of these patients involves the development of mechanical ventilation strategies, but the benefits of these strategies remain controversial. With a growing trend of extracorporeal support for critically ill patients, we provide a historical review of extracorporeal membrane oxygena...

  12. Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting as acute coronary syndrome.

    Abdin, Amr; Eitel, Ingo; de Waha, Suzanne; Thiele, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rare variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. It is characterized by a local hypertrophy of the apical segments and displays typical electrocardiographic and imaging patterns. The clinical manifestations are variable and range from an asymptomatic course to sudden cardiac death. The most frequent symptom is chest pain and thus apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can mimic the symptoms and repolarization disturbances indicative of acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26628684

  13. The Current Care for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Kawamae, Kaneyuki; Iseki, Ken

    2003-01-01

    The mortality rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been still high. A many kinds of strategies for ARDS are being tried in the world. The important factors which influence for pathological-physiology of ARDS during the mechanical ventilation are gravity consolidation, atelectasis, and ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). VILI is caused by shear stress that is induced by the repeated collapse and recruit of alveolus. Alveolar over-distention caused by large tidal volume als...

  14. Women and the management of acute coronary syndrome

    Ošťádal, P.; Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 9 (2012), s. 1151-1159. ISSN 0008-4212 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Grant ostatní: GA MZd(CZ) NT12153 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : sex differences * acute coronary syndrome * women Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.556, year: 2012

  15. Surfactant alteration and replacement in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Walmrath Dieter; Grimminger Friedrich; Markart Philipp; Schmidt Reinhold; Ruppert Clemens; Günther Andreas; Seeger Werner

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a frequent, life-threatening disease in which a marked increase in alveolar surface tension has been repeatedly observed. It is caused by factors including a lack of surface-active compounds, changes in the phospholipid, fatty acid, neutral lipid, and surfactant apoprotein composition, imbalance of the extracellular surfactant subtype distribution, inhibition of surfactant function by plasma protein leakage, incorporation of surfactan...

  16. Imaging Techniques in Acute Coronary Syndromes: A Review

    Vacek, James L.; Zimmerman, Stanley K.

    2011-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) remains the leading cause of death in the United States. National review of Emergency Department (ED) visits from 2007 to 2008 reveals that 9% are for chest pain. Of these patients, 13% had acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) (Antman et al., 2004). Plaque rupture with thrombus formation is the most frequent cause of ACS, and identifying patients prior to this event remains important for any clinician caring for these patients. There has been an increasing amount of re...

  17. Anti-infectious treatment in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Gao, Min; Xiao, Zhen-Liang; Fu-xiang LI

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is closely correlated with infection. Severe infection, e.g., sepsis and septic shock, can result in ARDS. Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is one of the common complications in ARDS related infection. As regards ARDS related infection, community acquired infection (CAI) is different from hospital acquired infection (HAI) in bacterial spectrum. The former is mainly caused by Streptococcus pneumonia, Hemophilus influenzae, Moraxelle catarrhalis, ...

  18. Two cases of acute myelitis with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome

    Tohge, Rie; Warabi, Yoko; Takahashi, Makio; Nagao, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (IHES) is characterised by persistent eosinophilia and organ damage after ruling out other causes. IHES is clinically and pathologically heterogeneous, and several disease mechanisms have been described. Although neurological involvement with IHES is extremely rare, we report the first cases of acute myelitis with IHES, which are confirmed using MRI, fulfil the diagnostic criteria of IHES and pathologically reveal eosinophilic tissue infiltration in the l...

  19. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome: Clinical and Laboratory Manifestations

    Lam, Christopher W.K.; Chan, Michael H M; Wong, Chun K.

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently emerged infectious disease with significant morbidity and mortality. An epidemic in 2003 affected 8,098 patients in 29 countries with 774 deaths. The aetiological agent is a new coronavirus spread by droplet transmission. Clinical and general laboratory manifestations included fever, chills, rigor, myalgia, malaise, diarrhoea, cough, dyspnoea, pneumonia, lymphopenia, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase...

  20. Acute radiation syndrome caused by accidental radiation exposure - therapeutic principles

    Dörr Harald; Meineke Viktor

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Fortunately radiation accidents are infrequent occurrences, but since they have the potential of large scale events like the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima, preparatory planning of the medical management of radiation accident victims is very important. Radiation accidents can result in different types of radiation exposure for which the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, as well as the outcomes, differ. The clinical course of acute radiation syndrome depends on the ab...

  1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with severe ulcerative colitis

    Shiho; Sagara; Yasuo; Horie; Yumiko; Anezaki; Hideaki; Miyazawa; Masahiro; Iizuka

    2010-01-01

    Various extraintestinal manifestations including pulmonary abnormalities have been reported in patients with ulcerative colitis. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious and fatal pulmonary manifestation. We have experienced a 67-year-old male patient with ARDS associated with a severe type of ulcerative colitis (UC). Severe dyspnea symptoms occurred during the treatment of UC in a previous hospital and the patient was transferred to our hospital on June 27, 2007. Both blood and sputa culture...

  2. Network analysis reveals distinct clinical syndromes underlying acute mountain sickness.

    David P Hall

    Full Text Available Acute mountain sickness (AMS is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, headache, sleep disturbance, fatigue and dizziness are given equal diagnostic weighting. Different pathophysiological mechanisms are now thought to underlie headache and sleep disturbance during acute exposure to high altitude. Hence, these symptoms may not belong together as a single syndrome. Using a novel visual analogue scale (VAS, we sought to undertake a systematic exploration of the symptomatology of AMS using an unbiased, data-driven approach originally designed for analysis of gene expression. Symptom scores were collected from 292 subjects during 1110 subject-days at altitudes between 3650 m and 5200 m on Apex expeditions to Bolivia and Kilimanjaro. Three distinct patterns of symptoms were consistently identified. Although fatigue is a ubiquitous finding, sleep disturbance and headache are each commonly reported without the other. The commonest pattern of symptoms was sleep disturbance and fatigue, with little or no headache. In subjects reporting severe headache, 40% did not report sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance correlates poorly with other symptoms of AMS (Mean Spearman correlation 0.25. These results challenge the accepted paradigm that AMS is a single disease process and describe at least two distinct syndromes following acute ascent to high altitude. This approach to analysing symptom patterns has potential utility in other clinical syndromes.

  3. Desmoid tumor in Gardner's Syndrome presented as acute abdomen

    Hatzimarkou, Andreas; Filippou, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, Vasilios; Filippou, Georgios; Rizos, Spiros; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2006-01-01

    Background Gardner's syndrome can occasionally be complicated with intra-abdominal desmoid tumor. These tumors usually remain asymptomatic but can exhibit symptoms due to intestinal, vascular and ureteral compression and obstruction. Case presentation A rare case of a 41-year-old male patient with Gardner's syndrome complicated with intra-abdominal desmoid tumor, which first presented as acute abdomen, is presented. Conclusion Extra-abdominal manifestations of Gardner's syndrome along with a palpable abdominal mass would raise suspicion for the presence of a desmoid tumor in the majority of cases. In life-threatening cases, surgical treatment should be considered as a palliative approach, though the extent of excision remains debatable PMID:16569244

  4. Desmoid tumor in Gardner's Syndrome presented as acute abdomen

    Rizos Spiros

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gardner's syndrome can occasionally be complicated with intra-abdominal desmoid tumor. These tumors usually remain asymptomatic but can exhibit symptoms due to intestinal, vascular and ureteral compression and obstruction. Case presentation A rare case of a 41-year-old male patient with Gardner's syndrome complicated with intra-abdominal desmoid tumor, which first presented as acute abdomen, is presented. Conclusion Extra-abdominal manifestations of Gardner's syndrome along with a palpable abdominal mass would raise suspicion for the presence of a desmoid tumor in the majority of cases. In life-threatening cases, surgical treatment should be considered as a palliative approach, though the extent of excision remains debatable

  5. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following acute pancreatitis during chemotherapy for acute monocytic leukemia.

    Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Koh, Hideo; Bingo, Masato; Yoshida, Masahiro; Nanno, Satoru; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Nakane, Takahiko; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Shimono, Taro; Hino, Masayuki

    2014-05-01

    We describe an 18-year-old man with acute leukemia who presented with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) shortly after developing acute pancreatitis. On day 15 after the third consolidation course with high-dose cytarabine, treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics was initiated for febrile neutropenia. On day 16, he developed septic shock, and subsequently, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). After adding vancomycin, micafungin and high-dose methylprednisolone (mPSL) to his treatment regimen, these manifestations subsided. On day 22, he received hemodialysis for drug-induced acute renal failure. On day 24, he developed acute pancreatitis possibly due to mPSL; the following day he had generalized seizures, and was intubated. Cerebrospinal fluid findings were normal. Brain MRI revealed hyperintense signals on FLAIR images and increased apparent diffusion coefficient values in the sub-cortical and deep white matter areas of the bilateral temporal and occipital lobes, indicative of vasogenic edema. Thus, we diagnosed PRES. Blood pressure, seizures and volume status were controlled, with MRI findings showing improvement by day 42. He was extubated on day 32 and discharged on day 49 without complications. Although little is known about PRES following acute pancreatitis, clinicians should be aware that this condition may develop. PMID:24881921

  6. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES After Acute Pancreatitis

    Tara Murphy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is an unusual condition typified by acute visual impairment caused by sudden, marked parieto-occipital vasogenic edema. Thought to be inflammatory in origin, it has been described in patients undergoing chemotherapy, with autoimmune disease, and in some infections. We report a case of PRES that occurred one week after an episode of acute pancreatitis in an otherwise healthy 40-year-old female. There was progressive visual impairment over a 24-hour period with almost complete visual loss, with characteristic findings on magnetic resonance imaging. After treatment with steroids, the visual loss recovered. Clinicians should retain an index of suspicion of this rare condition in patients with visual impairment after acute pancreatitis.

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome assessment after traumatic brain injury

    Shahrooz Kazemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is one of the most important complications associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI. ARDS is caused by inflammation of the lungs and hypoxic damage with lung physiology abnormalities associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Aim of this study is to determine the epidemiology of ARDS and the prevalence of risk factors. Methods: This prospective study performed on patients with acute traumatic head injury hospitalization in the intensive care unit of the Shohaday-e Haftom-e-Tir Hospital (September 2012 to September 2013 done. About 12 months, the data were evaluated. Information including age, sex, education, employment, drug and alcohol addiction, were collected and analyzed. The inclusion criteria were head traumatic patients and exclusion was the patients with chest trauma. Questionnaire was designed with doctors supervision of neurosurgery. Then the collected data were analysis. Results: In this study, the incidence of ARDS was 23.8% and prevalence of metabolic acidosis was 31.4%. Most injury with metabolic acidosis was Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH 48 (60% and Subdural hemorrhage (SDH was Next Level with 39 (48% Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS were significantly decreased (P< 0.0001. The level of consciousness in patients with skull fractures significantly lower than those without fractures (P= 0.009 [(2.3±4.6 vs (4.02±7.07]. Prevalence of metabolic acidosis during hospitalization was 80 patients (31.4%. Conclusion: Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Management and treatment is essential to reduce the mortality. In this study it was found the age of patients with ARDS was higher than patients without complications. ARDS risk factor for high blood pressure was higher in men. Most victims were pedestrians. The most common injury associated with ARDS was SDH. Our analysis

  8. Non-invasive neurosensory testing used to diagnose and confirm successful surgical management of lower extremity deep distal posterior compartment syndrome

    Guyton Gregory P

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS is characterized by elevated pressures within a closed space of an extremity muscular compartment, causing pain and/or disability by impairing the neuromuscular function of the involved compartment. The diagnosis of CECS is primarily made on careful history and physical exam. The gold standard test to confirm the diagnosis of CECS is invasive intra-compartmental pressure measurements. Sensory nerve function is often diminished during symptomatic periods of CECS. Sensory nerve function can be documented with the use of non-painful, non-invasive neurosensory testing. Methods Non-painful neurosensory testing of the myelinated large sensory nerve fibers of the lower extremity were obtained with the Pressure Specified Sensory Device™ in a 25 year old male with history and invasive compartment pressures consistent with CECS both before and after running on a tread mill. After the patient's first operation to release the deep distal posterior compartment, the patient failed to improve. Repeat sensory testing revealed continued change in his function with exercise. He was returned to the operating room where a repeat procedure revealed that the deep posterior compartment was not completely released due to an unusual anatomic variant, and therefore complete release was accomplished. Results The patient's symptoms numbness in the plantar foot and pain in the distal calf improved after this procedure and his repeat sensory testing performed before and after running on the treadmill documented this improvement. Conclusion This case report illustrates the principal that non-invasive neurosensory testing can detect reversible changes in sensory nerve function after a provocative test and may be a helpful non-invasive technique to managing difficult cases of persistent lower extremity symptoms after failed decompressive fasciotomies for CECS. It can easily be performed before and after

  9. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury in children and adults

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF), defined as acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are critical conditions. AHRF results from a number of systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has...

  10. Message concerning Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome ("SARS")

    2003-01-01

    IMPORTANT REMINDER If you have just come back from one of the regions identified by the WHO as being infected with SARS, it is essential to monitor your state of health for ten days after your return. The syndrome manifests itself in the rapid onset of a high fever combined with respiratory problems (coughing, breathlessness, breathing difficulty). Should these signs appear, you must contact the CERN Medical Service as quickly as possible on number 73802 or 73186 during normal working hours, and the fire brigade at all other times on number 74444, indicating that you have just returned from one of the WHO-identified areas with recent local transmission.China: Beijing, Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region), Guangdong Province, Inner Mongolia, Shanxi Province, Tianjin ProvinceTaiwan:TaipeiMoreover, until further notice the CERN Management requests that all trips to these various regions of the world be reduced to a strict minimum and then only with the consent of the Division Leader concerned. Anyone comin...

  11. Compartments of the foot: topographic anatomy.

    Faymonville, C; Andermahr, J; Seidel, U; Müller, L P; Skouras, E; Eysel, P; Stein, G

    2012-12-01

    Recent publications have renewed the debate regarding the number of foot compartments. There is also no consensus regarding allocation of individual muscles and communication between compartments. The current study examines the anatomic topography of the foot compartments anew using 32 injections of epoxy-resin and subsequent sheet plastination in 12 cadaveric foot specimens. Six compartments were identified: dorsal, medial, lateral, superficial central, deep forefoot, and deep hindfoot compartments. Communication was evident between the deep hindfoot compartment and the superficial central and deep central forefoot compartments. In the hindfoot, the neurovascular bundles were located in separate tissue sheaths between the central hindfoot compartment and the medial compartment. In the forefoot, the medial and lateral bundles entered the deep central forefoot compartment. The deep central hindfoot compartment housed the quadratus plantae muscle, and after calcaneus fracture could develop an isolated compartment syndrome. PMID:22638720

  12. Intra-abdominal pressure and abdominal compartment syndrome in acute general surgery.

    Sugrue, Michael

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is a harbinger of intra-abdominal mischief, and its measurement is cheap, simple to perform, and reproducible. Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), especially grades 3 and 4 (IAP > 18 mmHg), occurs in over a third of patients and is associated with an increase in intra-abdominal sepsis, bleeding, renal failure, and death. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Increased IAP reading may provide an objective bedside stimulus for surgeons to expedite diagnostic and therapeutic work-up of critically ill patients. One of the greatest challenges surgeons and intensivists face worldwide is lack of recognition of the known association between IAH, ACS, and intra-abdominal sepsis. This lack of awareness of IAH and its progression to ACS may delay timely intervention and contribute to excessive patient resuscitation. CONCLUSIONS: All patients entering the intensive care unit (ICU) after emergency general surgery or massive fluid resuscitation should have an IAP measurement performed every 6 h. Each ICU should have guidelines relating to techniques of IAP measurement and an algorithm for management of IAH.

  13. Compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis and risk of acute renal failure as complications of the urological surgery.

    Kochiashvili, D; Sutidze, M; Tchovelidze, Ch; Rukhadze, I; Dzneladze, A

    2007-02-01

    Current knowledge related to the risk of CS when operating in these positions (Lloyd Davies and Trendelenburg tilt) is such that it can be deemed negligent to keep patients in this position (with legs higher than the heart) when not absolutely necessary. If it means repositioning and redraping, thus adding a few extra minutes to the episode and costing a small amount in additional drapes, surely this is a small price to pay for excellent perioperative care? If repositioning is impossible to execute, the head-down tilt position should be reversed every two hours, for a short period of time, to allow more natural perfusion of the lower limbs to occur. Raza et al recommend that if the anticipated procedure duration is beyond four hours, the legs should be removed from supports every two hours for a short period to prevent reperfusion injury. The use of Allen stirrups is preferred to calf supports or metal skids. Turnbull and Mills suggest that we should certainly review our use of compression stockings and intermittent compression devices when operating on patients in the Lloyd Davies position. It will be deemed negligent to misdiagnose (ie: mistake for a DVT) or delay treatment (by prolonged re-assessment) of CS postoperatively when patients have been subjected to prolonged surgery in these abnormal positions. Delayed or missed diagnosis may not only be limb-threatening (and cause a very protracted hospital stay)--it can be life-threatening. With today's current knowledge, surgeons undertaking prolonged surgery in abnormal positions must be aware of this, fortunately rare, complication. Practice guidelines within perioperative care should reflect current knowledge and ensure that risk is minimized. Patients who take legal action if they have experienced this condition may be awarded substantial costs against negligence if lack of care can be proven or diagnosis has been delayed. PMID:17404439

  14. Gender-specific issues in the management of patients with acute coronary syndrome

    SHEN Wei-feng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) represents a continuum of acute myocardial ischemia including non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina, synonymous with non-ST-elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS),and ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).

  15. A Case of Trastuzumab-Associated Cardiomyopathy Presenting as an Acute Coronary Syndrome: Acute Trastuzumab Cardiotoxicity

    Sylvana Hidalgo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Trastuzumab is a monoclonal antibody highly effective in the treatment of several cancers, but its use is associated with cardiac toxicity which usually responds to cessation of the drug and/or medical therapy. We present an unusual case of acute cardiac toxicity temporally related to administration of trastuzumab in which the clinical presentation suggested an acute coronary syndrome. Coronary angiography, however, demonstrated minimal epicardial disease, but new wall motion abnormalities. Furthermore, the patient did not respond to withdrawal of the drug or medical therapy for heart failure.

  16. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  17. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2016-02-12

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  19. Fractional flow reserve in acute coronary syndromes: A review

    Nikunj R. Shah

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fractional flow reserve (FFR assessment provides anatomical and physiological information that is often used to tailor treatment strategies in coronary artery disease. Whilst robust data validates FFR use in stable ischaemic heart disease, its use in acute coronary syndromes (ACS is less well investigated. We critically review the current data surrounding FFR use across the spectrum of ACS including culprit and non-culprit artery analysis. With adenosine being conventionally used to induce maximal hyperaemia during FFR assessment, co-existent clinical conditions may preclude its use during acute myocardial infarction. Therefore, we include a current review of instantaneous wave free ratio as a novel vasodilator independent method of assessing lesion severity as an alternative strategy to guide revascularisation in ACS.

  20. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Associated with Refractory Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis

    Silvia R. Delgado

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a young man who was transferred to our hospital with worsening acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM despite treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange. He developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS without the use of dopamine-modulating drugs. His progressive clinical improvement started after treatment with intravenous cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone. In our patient, acute demyelination with severe bilateral inflammation of the basal ganglia could have caused a state of central dopamine depletion, creating proper conditions for the development of NMS. Significant clinical improvement of our case after treatment with intravenous cyclophosphamide and steroids provides further evidence for a possible role of the inflammatory lesions in the pathogenesis of NMS in association with ADEM.

  1. Acute Phase Hyperglycemia among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Coronary Syndrome: Prevalence and Prognostic Significance

    Hameed Laftah Wanoose

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjectives: Regardless of diabetes status, hyperglycemia on arrival for patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome, has been associated with adverse outcomes including death. The aim of this study is to look at the frequency and prognostic significance of acute phase hyperglycemia among patients attending the coronary care unit with acute coronary syndrome over the in-hospital admission days.Methods: The study included 287 consecutive patients in the Al- Faiha Hospital in Basrah (Southern Iraq during a one year period from December 2007 to November 2008. Patients were divided into two groups with respect to admission plasma glucose level regardless of their diabetes status (those with admission plasma glucose of <140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L and those equal to or more than that. Acute phase hyperglycemia was defined as a non-fasting glucose level equal to or above 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L regardless of past history of diabetes.Results: Sixty one point seven percent (177 of patients were admitted with plasma glucose of ≥140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L. There were no differences were found between both groups regarding the mean age, qualification, and smoking status, but males were predominant in both groups. A family history of diabetes, and hypertension, were more frequent in patients with plasma glucose of ≥140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L. There were no differences between the two groups regarding past history of ischemic heart disease, stroke, lipid profile, troponin-I levels or type of acute coronary syndrome. Again heart failure was more common in the admission acute phase hyperglycemia group, but there was no difference regarding arrhythmia, stroke, or death. Using logistic regression with heart failure as the dependent variable we found that only the admission acute phase hyperglycemia (OR=2.1344, 95�0CI=1.0282-4.4307; p=0.0419 was independently associated with heart failure. While male gender, family history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and

  2. Extracorporeal life support for acute respiratory distress syndromes

    Don Hayes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The morbidity and mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome remain to be high. Over the last 50 years, the clinical management of these patients has undergone vast changes. Significant improvement in the care of these patients involves the development of mechanical ventilation strategies, but the benefits of these strategies remain controversial. With a growing trend of extracorporeal support for critically ill patients, we provide a historical review of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO including its failures and successes as well as discussing extracorporeal devices now available or nearly accessible while examining current clinical indications and trends of ECMO in respiratory failure.

  3. Multiple Chronic Conditions in Older Adults with Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    Alfredsson, Joakim; Alexander, Karen P

    2016-05-01

    Older adults presenting with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) often have multiple chronic conditions (MCCs). In addition to traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors (ie, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes), common CV comorbidities include heart failure, stroke, and atrial fibrillation, whereas prevalent non-CV comorbidities include chronic kidney disease, anemia, depression, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The presence of MCCs affects the presentation (eg, increased frequency of type 2 myocardial infarctions [MIs]), clinical course, and prognosis of ACS in older adults. In general, higher comorbidity burden increases mortality following MI, reduces utilization of ACS treatments, and increases the importance of developing individualized treatment plans. PMID:27113147

  4. Small molecules targeting severe acute respiratory syndrome human coronavirus

    Wu, Chung-Yi; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Ma, Shiou-Hwa; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Cheng, Yih-Shyun E; Hsu, Hsien-Hua; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Wu, Douglass; Brik, Ashraf; Liang, Fu-Sen; Liu, Rai-Shung; Fang, Jim-Min; Chen, Shui-Tein; Liang, Po-Huang

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an infectious disease caused by a novel human coronavirus. Currently, no effective antiviral agents exist against this type of virus. A cell-based assay, with SARS virus and Vero E6 cells, was developed to screen existing drugs, natural products, and synthetic compounds to identify effective anti-SARS agents. Of >10,000 agents tested, ≈50 compounds were found active at 10 μM; among these compounds, two are existing drugs (Reserpine 13 and Aescin 5) ...

  5. Control dynamics of severe acute respiratory syndrome transmission

    WANG Haiying; RONG Feng; KE Fujiu; BAI Yilong

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a serious disease with many puzzling features. We present a simple, dynamic model to assess the epidemic potential of SARS and the effectiveness of control measures. With this model, we analysed the SARS epidemic data in Beijing. The data fitting gives the basic case reproduction number of 2.16 leading to the outbreak, and the variation of the effective reproduction number reflecting the control effect. Noticeably, our study shows that the response time and the strength of control measures have significant effects on the scale of the outbreak and the lasting time of the epidemic.

  6. Radiohippuran renography in chronic alcoholics with acute alcohol withdrawal syndromes

    Functional changes found in radiohippuran renography in chronic alcoholics with acute alcohol withdrawal syndromes (n=82; AAWS) regressed to normal values with recovery from AAWS (during 4 days on the average) with the exception of the secretory value which increased to a maximum on the 7th day of observation, remaining approximately unchanged for the following 3 days and decreasing more gradually to a normal value on the 23rd day of observation. In various forms of AAWS the same functional changes in the radiohippuran renogram were observed. (author)

  7. [Pre-hospital management of acute coronary syndrome].

    Lefort, Hugues; Fradin, Jordan; Blgnand, Michel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    The medical management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) follows the recommendations of international medical societies. The call to the emergency services by the patient triggers a race against the clock in pre-hospital care. It is essential to reduce the duration of the inadequate perfusion of the heart in order to limit its consequences. An effective reperfusion strategy must be planned in advance taking into account the logistical constraints. It is crucial that the general public is educated to recognise the signs of ACS and to call the emergency services immediately (such as 15, 112 or 991). PMID:26040140

  8. [Role of computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Franchi, Federico; Volterrani, Luca; Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Macarini, Luca

    2012-11-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a complex pulmonary pathology with high mortality rates, manifesting over a wide range of severity. Clinical diagnosis relies on the following 4 criteria stated by the American-European Consensus Conference: acute onset of impaired gas exchange, severe hypoxemia defined as a PaO2 to FiO2 ratio <300 (PaO2 in mmHg), bilateral diffuse infiltration on chest X-ray; pulmonary artery wedge pressure of ≤18 mmHg to rule out cardiogenic causes of pulmonary edema. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of CT in the diagnosis and management of this condition. PMID:23096732

  9. Relationship between Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome Type and Coronary Arteriography of Acute Coronary Syndrome

    WANG Xian(王显); LIN Zhong-xiang(林钟香); GE Jun-bo(葛均波); ZHANG Zhen-xian(张振贤); SHEN Lin(沈琳)

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Syndrome type and coronary arteriography (CAG) with respect to the number and degree of stenosed branches of coronary artery (CA) and ACC/AHA stage of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), to provide an objective evidence for TCM Syndrome typing on ACS.Methods: Ninety patients of ACS with their TCM Syndrome typing and CAG successfully conducted were enrolled in this study. They were classified into 3 Syndrome types, the blood stasis type (typeⅠ), the phlegm stagnant with blood stasis type (typeⅡ), and the endogenous collateral Wind type (typeⅢ). The scores of the number and severity of the stenosis branch of CA and ACC/AHA lesion stage in different Syndrome types were calculated respectively and analysed statistically by Ridit analysis.Results: The number of stenosed branches increased gradually with the Syndrome type changing from Ⅰ→Ⅱ→Ⅲ, compared the type Ⅲ with the other two types(P<0.01). The severity of stenosis in typeⅠ and Ⅱ were similar, but that of Type Ⅲ, much aggravated was significantly different from that in the former two (P<0.01). The ACC/AHA stage of coronary lesion tended to be more complex as the Syndrome type changed, patients of TCM typeⅠ and Ⅱ had mostly lesion of stage A or B1 , while lesion in majority of patients of type Ⅲ belonged to stage B2 or C, comparison between the three types showed significant difference (P<0.01). Conclusion: Most ACS patients of TCM Syndrome type Ⅲ with tri-branch, severe stenosed coronary arteries, belong to the complex ACC/AHA stage of B2 and C.

  10. Prevalence of Burnout Syndrome in Patients Admitted with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Ana Cláudia Giaxa Prosdócimo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burnout Syndrome is the extreme emotional response to chronic occupational stress, manifesting as physical and mental exhaustion. Although associated with higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, no study so far has evaluated whether the Burnout Syndrome could be a prevalent factor in non-elderly individuals active in the labor market, admitted for acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome in non-elderly, economically active patients, hospitalized with ACS. Methods: Cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary and private cardiology center, with economically active patients aged <65 years, hospitalized with diagnosis of ACS. The Burnout Syndrome was evaluated with the Burnout Syndrome Inventory (BSI, which assesses workplace conditions and four dimensions that characterize the syndrome: emotional exhaustion (EE, emotional distancing (EmD, dehumanization (De and professional fulfillment (PF. The Lipp’s Stress Symptoms Inventory for Adults (LSSI was applied to evaluate global stress. Results: Of 830 patients evaluated with suspected ACS, 170 met the study criteria, 90% of which were men, overall average age was 52 years, and 40.5% had an average income above 11 minimum wages. The prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome was 4.1%. When we evaluated each dimension individually, we found high EE in 34.7%, high De in 52.4%, high EDi in 30.6%, and low PF in 5.9%. The overall prevalence of stress was 87.5%. Conclusion: We found a low prevalence of Burnout Syndrome in an economically active, non-elderly population among patients admitted for ACS in a tertiary and private hospital.

  11. Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome: A preventable fatal acute complication.

    Mah, D Y; Yia, H J; Cheong, W S

    2016-04-01

    Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS) is a neurological disorder with varying severity that is postulated to be associated with cerebral oedema. We described a case of DDS resulting in irreversible brain injury and death following acute haemodialysis. A 13-year-old male with no past medical history and weighing 30kg, presented to hospital with severe urosepsis complicated by acute kidney injury (Creatinine 1422mmol/L; Urea 74.2mmol/L, Potassium 6.3mmol/L, Sodium 137mmol/L) and severe metabolic acidosis (pH 6.99, HC03 1.7mmol/L). Chest radiograph was normal. Elective intubation was done for respiratory distress. Acute haemodialysis performed due to refractory metabolic acidosis. Following haemodialysis, he became hypotensive which required inotropes. His Riker's score was low with absence of brainstem reflexes after withholding sedation. CT Brain showed generalised cerebral oedema consistent with global hypoxic changes involving the brainstem. The symptoms of DDS are caused by water movement into the brain causing cerebral oedema. Two theories have been proposed: reverse osmotic shift induced by urea removal and a fall in cerebral intracellular pH. Prevention is the key to the management of DDS. It is important to identify high risk patients and haemodialysis with reduced dialysis efficacy and gradual urea reduction is recommended. Patients who are vulnerable to DDS should be monitored closely. Low efficiency haemodialysis is recommended. Acute peritoneal dialysis might be an alternative option, but further studies are needed. PMID:27326954

  12. Acute coronary syndrome in diclofenac sodium-induced type I hypersensitivity reaction : Kounis syndrome

    Gluvic, Zoran M.; Putnikovic, Biljana; Panic, Milos; Stojkovic, Aleksandra; Rasic-Milutinovic, Zorica; Jankovic-Gavrilovic, Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Drug-induced type I hypersensitivity reactions are frequent. Sometimes, acute coronary syndrome (ACS) can be registered in such patients, which may have a serious impact on the course and management of the allergic reaction. Because of potentially atypical ACS clinical presentations, the ECG is an obligatory diagnostic tool in any allergic reaction. Coronary artery spasm is the pathophysiological basis of ACS, triggered by the action of potent vasoactive mediators (histamine, neutral protease...

  13. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as the Initial Clinical Manifestation of an Antisynthetase Syndrome.

    Kim, Seo-Hyun; Park, I-Nae

    2016-07-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibody to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, mechanic's hand-like cutaneous involvement, Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Lung disease is the presenting feature in 50% of the cases. We report a case of a 60-year-old female with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which later proved to be an unexpected and initial manifestation of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive antisynthetase syndrome. The present case showed resolution of ARDS after treatment with high-dose corticosteroids. Given that steroids are not greatly beneficial in the treatment of ARDS, it is likely that the improvement of the respiratory symptoms in this patient also resulted from the prompt suppression of the inflammatory systemic response by corticosteroids. PMID:27433180

  14. Usefulness of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Iversen, Kasper K; Dalsgaard, Morten; Teisner, Ane S; Schoos, Mikkel; Teisner, Borge; Nielsen, Henrik; Clemmensen, Peter; Grande, Peer

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is a prognostic marker in patients admitted with high-risk acute coronary syndrome. In patients admitted with high-risk non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction...

  15. Stem cell-based therapies for acute radiation syndrome

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation in the event of accidental or intentional incident such as nuclear/radiological terrorism can lead to debilitating injuries to multiple organs resulting in death within days depending on the amount of radiation dose and the quality of radiation. Unfortunately, there is not a single FDA-licensed drug approved against acute radiation injury. The RadStem Center for Medical Countermeasures against Radiation (RadStem CMGR) program at Einstein is developing stem cell-based therapies to treat acute radiation syndrome (ARS). We have demonstrated that intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived and adipose-derived stromal cells, consisting of a mixture of mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid progenitors can mitigate mice exposed to whole body irradiation of 12 Gy or whole abdominal irradiation of up to 20 Gy. We identified a variety of growth and differentiation factors that individually is unable to improve survival of animals exposed to lethal irradiation, but when administered sequentially mitigates radiation injury and improves survival. We termed this phenomenon as synthetic survival and describe a new paradigm whereby the 'synthetic survival' of irradiated tissues can be promoted by systemic administration of growth factors to amplify residual stem cell clonogens post-radiation exposure, followed by a differentiation factor that favors tissue stem cell differentiation. Synthetic survival can be applied to mitigate lethal radiation injury in multiple organs following radiation-induced hematopoeitic, gastrointestinal and pulmonary syndromes. (author)

  16. Impact of Different Obesity Assessment Methods after Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Caroline N. M. Nunes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abdominal obesity is an important cardiovascular risk factor. Therefore, identifying the best method for measuring waist circumference (WC is a priority. Objective: To evaluate the eight methods of measuring WC in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS as a predictor of cardiovascular complications during hospitalization. Methods: Prospective study of patients with ACS. The measurement of WC was performed by eight known methods: midpoint between the last rib and the iliac crest (1, point of minimum circumference (2; immediately above the iliac crest (3, umbilicus (4, one inch above the umbilicus (5, one centimeter above the umbilicus (6, smallest rib and (7 the point of greatest circumference around the waist (8. Complications included: angina, arrhythmia, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, hypotension, pericarditis and death. Logistic regression tests were used for predictive factors. Results: A total of 55 patients were evaluated. During the hospitalization period, which corresponded on average to seven days, 37 (67% patients had complications, with the exception of death, which was not observed in any of the cases. Of these complications, the only one that was associated with WC was angina, and with every cm of WC increase, the risk for angina increased from 7.5 to 9.9%, depending on the measurement site. It is noteworthy the fact that there was no difference between the different methods of measuring WC as a predictor of angina. Conclusion: The eight methods of measuring WC are also predictors of recurrent angina after acute coronary syndromes.

  17. Impact of Different Obesity Assessment Methods after Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Nunes, Caroline N. M.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Farah, Elaine; Fusco, Daniéliso; Azevedo, Paula S.; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M., E-mail: lzornoff@cardiol.br [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Abdominal obesity is an important cardiovascular risk factor. Therefore, identifying the best method for measuring waist circumference (WC) is a priority. To evaluate the eight methods of measuring WC in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) as a predictor of cardiovascular complications during hospitalization. Prospective study of patients with ACS. The measurement of WC was performed by eight known methods: midpoint between the last rib and the iliac crest (1), point of minimum circumference (2); immediately above the iliac crest (3), umbilicus (4), one inch above the umbilicus (5), one centimeter above the umbilicus (6), smallest rib and (7) the point of greatest circumference around the waist (8). Complications included: angina, arrhythmia, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, hypotension, pericarditis and death. Logistic regression tests were used for predictive factors. A total of 55 patients were evaluated. During the hospitalization period, which corresponded on average to seven days, 37 (67%) patients had complications, with the exception of death, which was not observed in any of the cases. Of these complications, the only one that was associated with WC was angina, and with every cm of WC increase, the risk for angina increased from 7.5 to 9.9%, depending on the measurement site. It is noteworthy the fact that there was no difference between the different methods of measuring WC as a predictor of angina. The eight methods of measuring WC are also predictors of recurrent angina after acute coronary syndromes.

  18. Using machine learning techniques to differentiate acute coronary syndrome

    Sougand Setareh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Backgroud: Acute coronary syndrome (ACS is an unstable and dynamic process that includes unstable angina, ST elevation myocardial infarction, and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction. Despite recent technological advances in early diognosis of ACS, differentiating between different types of coronary diseases in the early hours of admission is controversial. The present study was aimed to accurately differentiate between various coronary events, using machine learning techniques. Such methods, as a subset of artificial intelligence, include algorithms that allow computers to learn and play a major role in treatment decisions. Methods: 1902 patients diagnosed with ACS and admitted to hospital were selected according to Euro Heart Survey on ACS. Patients were classified based on decision tree J48. Bagging aggregation algorithms was implemented to increase the efficiency of algorithm. Results: The performance of classifiers was estimated and compared based on their accuracy computed from confusion matrix. The accuracy rates of decision tree and bagging algorithm were calculated to be 91.74% and 92.53%, respectively. Conclusion: The proposed methods used in this study proved to have the ability to identify various ACS. In addition, using matrix of confusion, an acceptable number of subjects with acute coronary syndrome were identified in each class.

  19. Impact of Different Obesity Assessment Methods after Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Abdominal obesity is an important cardiovascular risk factor. Therefore, identifying the best method for measuring waist circumference (WC) is a priority. To evaluate the eight methods of measuring WC in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) as a predictor of cardiovascular complications during hospitalization. Prospective study of patients with ACS. The measurement of WC was performed by eight known methods: midpoint between the last rib and the iliac crest (1), point of minimum circumference (2); immediately above the iliac crest (3), umbilicus (4), one inch above the umbilicus (5), one centimeter above the umbilicus (6), smallest rib and (7) the point of greatest circumference around the waist (8). Complications included: angina, arrhythmia, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, hypotension, pericarditis and death. Logistic regression tests were used for predictive factors. A total of 55 patients were evaluated. During the hospitalization period, which corresponded on average to seven days, 37 (67%) patients had complications, with the exception of death, which was not observed in any of the cases. Of these complications, the only one that was associated with WC was angina, and with every cm of WC increase, the risk for angina increased from 7.5 to 9.9%, depending on the measurement site. It is noteworthy the fact that there was no difference between the different methods of measuring WC as a predictor of angina. The eight methods of measuring WC are also predictors of recurrent angina after acute coronary syndromes

  20. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fibrosis versus Repair.

    Im, Daniel; Shi, Wei; Driscoll, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and basic experimental approaches to pediatric acute lung injury (ALI), including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), have historically focused on acute care and management of the patient. Additional efforts have focused on the etiology of pediatric ALI and ARDS, clinically defined as diffuse, bilateral diseases of the lung that compromise function leading to severe hypoxemia within 7 days of defined insult. Insults can include ancillary events related to prematurity, can follow trauma and/or transfusion, or can present as sequelae of pulmonary infections and cardiovascular disease and/or injury. Pediatric ALI/ARDS remains one of the leading causes of infant and childhood morbidity and mortality, particularly in the developing world. Though incidence is relatively low, ranging from 2.9 to 9.5 cases/100,000 patients/year, mortality remains high, approaching 35% in some studies. However, this is a significant decrease from the historical mortality rate of over 50%. Several decades of advances in acute management and treatment, as well as better understanding of approaches to ventilation, oxygenation, and surfactant regulation have contributed to improvements in patient recovery. As such, there is a burgeoning interest in the long-term impact of pediatric ALI/ARDS. Chronic pulmonary deficiencies in survivors appear to be caused by inappropriate injury repair, with fibrosis and predisposition to emphysema arising as irreversible secondary events that can severely compromise pulmonary development and function, as well as the overall health of the patient. In this chapter, the long-term effectiveness of current treatments will be examined, as will the potential efficacy of novel, acute, and long-term therapies that support repair and delay or even impede the onset of secondary events, including fibrosis. PMID:27066462

  1. Nicorandil in patients with acute coronary syndrome and stable angina undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: literature review

    Neda Partovi; Homa Falsoleiman

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention is an option for the treatment of coronary artery disease such as acute coronary syndrome and stable angina.Acute coronary syndrome has two groups including acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina.Periprocedural myocardial infarction is a frequent and prognostically important complication of percutaneous coronary intervention and can be easily monitored by measuring myocardial enzymes. Coronary microvascular dysfunction in patients undergoing primary...

  2. Time-dependent diffusion in skeletal muscle with the random permeable barrier model (RPBM): Application to normal controls and chronic exertional compartment syndrome patients

    Sigmund, Eric E.; Novikov, Dmitry S.; Sui, Dabang; Ukpebor, Obehi; Baete, Steven; Babb, James S.; Liu, Kecheng; Feiweier, Thorsten; Kwon, Jane; Mcgorty, KellyAnne; Bencardino, Jenny; Fieremans, Els

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To collect diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at multiple diffusion times Td in skeletal muscle in normal subjects and chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) patients and analyze the data with the random permeable barrier model (RPBM) for biophysical specificity. Materials and Methods Using an IRB-approved HIPAA-compliant protocol, seven patients with clinical suspicion of CECS and eight healthy volunteers underwent DTI of the calf muscle in a Siemens MAGNETOM Verio 3-T scanner at rest and after treadmill exertion at 4 different diffusion times. Radial diffusion values λrad were computed for each of 7 different muscle compartments and analyzed with RPBM to produce estimates of free diffusivity D0, fiber diameter a, and permeability κ. Fiber diameter estimates were compared with measurements from literature autopsy reference for several compartments. Response factors (post/pre-exercise ratios) were computed and compared between normal controls and CECS patients using a mixed-model two-way analysis of variance. Results All subjects and muscle compartments showed nearly time-independent diffusion along and strongly time-dependent diffusion transverse to the muscle fibers. RPBM estimates of fiber diameter correlated well with corresponding autopsy reference. D0 showed significant (pmeasurements combined with appropriate tissue modeling can provide enhanced microstructural specificity for in vivo tissue characterization. In CECS patients, our results suggest that high-pressure interfiber edema elevates free diffusion and restricts exercise-induced fiber dilation. Such specificity may be useful in differentiating CECS from other disorders or in predicting its response to either physical therapy or fasciotomy. PMID:24610770

  3. Association of alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position in acute respiratory disease syndrome patients.

    Costa, Daniela Caetano; Rocha, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Tatiane Flores

    2009-06-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome is the clinical presentation of acute lung injury characterized by diffuse alveolar damage and development of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema due to increased pulmonary alveolar-capillary membrane permeability. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position can be used in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome. The objective of this review of literature was to identify possible benefits, indications, complications and care of the associated recruitment maneuvers and prone position for treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. This national and international scientific literature review was developed according to the established criteria for searching the databases MedLine, LILACS, SciElo, PubMed, Cochrane, from 1994 to 2008 in Portuguese and English, with the key words: acute respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar recruitment maneuver and prone position. Despite advances in the understanding of acute respiratory distress syndrome pathophysiology, mortality is still expressive. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position significantly contribute to treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome patient aiming to improve oxygenation and minimizing complications of refractory hypoxemia and reduction of pulmonary compliance. However,as there are few studies in literature associating alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position for treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome, additional research and evidences of clinical application are required. PMID:25303351

  4. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  5. Post-therapeutic acute malignant myeloproliferative syndrome and acute nonlymphocytic leukemia in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    In a prospective randomized study of treatment with radiation therapy (RT) or RT + chemotherapy (CT) for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Stages I-III, one patient developed an acute malignant myeloproliferative syndrome (AMMS) and four others acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL). There was correlation between the intensity of treatment and development of this complication: Among patients treated with local radiation with or without chemotherapy no cases of AMMS or ANLL were observed. However, patients treated with total lymphoid irradiation alone (TLI) had an observed to expected ratio of 162. Among patients treated with TLI plus CT this ratio increased to over 1000. The cytogenetic, clinical, and hematologic abnormalities of these patients are discussed

  6. Hemodynamics of Acute Right Heart Failure in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    McLean, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    In critically ill patients with circulatory shock, the role of the left ventricle has long been appreciated and the object of measurement and therapeutic targeting. The right ventricle is often under appreciated and dysfunction may be overlooked. Generally, the right ventricle operates passively to support the ejection of the left ventricular diastolic volume. A loss of right ventricular wall compliance secondary to pulmonary pressures may result in an alteration in the normal pressure-volume relationship, ultimately affecting the stroke volume and cardiac output. Traditional right heart filling indices may increase because of decreasing compliance, further complicating the picture. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome combined with the effects of a mean airway pressure strategy may create an acute cor pulmonale. PMID:26567491

  7. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Pros and cons of recruitment maneuvers in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Rocco, Patricia R M; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama

    2010-08-01

    In patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, a protective mechanical ventilation strategy characterized by low tidal volumes has been associated with reduced mortality. However, such a strategy may result in alveolar collapse, leading to cyclic opening and closing of atelectatic alveoli and distal airways. Thus, recruitment maneuvers (RMs) have been used to open up collapsed lungs, while adequate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels may counteract alveolar derecruitment during low tidal volume ventilation, improving respiratory function and minimizing ventilator-associated lung injury. Nevertheless, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the appropriateness of RMs. The most commonly used RM is conventional sustained inflation, associated with respiratory and cardiovascular side effects, which may be minimized by newly proposed strategies: prolonged or incremental PEEP elevation; pressure-controlled ventilation with fixed PEEP and increased driving pressure; pressure-controlled ventilation applied with escalating PEEP and constant driving pressure; and long and slow increase in pressure. The efficiency of RMs may be affected by different factors, including the nature and extent of lung injury, capability of increasing inspiratory transpulmonary pressures, patient positioning and cardiac preload. Current evidence suggests that RMs can be used before setting PEEP, after ventilator circuit disconnection or as a rescue maneuver to overcome severe hypoxemia; however, their routine use does not seem to be justified at present. The development of new lung recruitment strategies that have fewer hemodynamic and biological effects on the lungs, as well as randomized clinical trials analyzing the impact of RMs on morbidity and mortality of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome patients, are warranted. PMID:20658909

  9. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  10. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Regent Lee

    2012-01-01

    To the Editor:I congratulate Wang et al1 in reporting further evidence for the role of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9)as a biomarker in acute coronary syndrome (ACS).In this study,the Authors examined the levels of MMP9 and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with a clinical diagnosis of unstable angina pectoris who subsequently underwent coronary angiography to evaluate the presence of coronary artery disease.Two subgroups of patients were defined according to the presence or absence of significant angiographic coronary artery stenosis.The level of MMP9 was significantly higher in patients with angiographic evidence of significant plaque disease (plaque group) compared with those without significant coronary stenosis (non-plaque group).No significant differences in the levels of CRP were observed between the two groups.