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Sample records for acute cholesterol loading

  1. Cholesterol granuloma of the right epididymis mimicking an acute scrotum

    Borislav Spajic; Hrvoje Cupic; Goran Stimac; Ivica Brigic; Bozo Kruslin; Ognjen Kraus

    2006-01-01

    @@ Dear Sir, I am B. Spajic, the urologist from Clinical Department of Urology, Sestre Milosrdnice University Hospital,Zagreb, Croatia. Recently, we had a rare case of a cholesterol granuloma of the right epididymis at our department, showing clinical signs of acute scrotum. The case described here appears to be the second reporting cholesterol granuloma in the epididymis and the first one presenting with clinical signs of acute scrotum.

  2. Significant improvement in statin adherence and cholesterol levels after acute myocardial infarction

    Brogaard, Hilde Vaiva Tonstad; Køhn, Morten Ganderup; Berget, Oline Sofie; Hansen, Henrik Steen; Gerke, Oke; Mickley, Hans; Diederichsen, Axel C P

    2012-01-01

    Not all patients recovering from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are optimally treated with statin, and their adherence to statin treatment may be inadequate. We set out to describe changes in statin treatment adherence and cholesterol values over time.......Not all patients recovering from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are optimally treated with statin, and their adherence to statin treatment may be inadequate. We set out to describe changes in statin treatment adherence and cholesterol values over time....

  3. Receptor-mediated uptake of remnant lipoproteins by cholesterol-loaded human monocyte-macrophages

    Normal human monocyte-macrophages were cholesterol-loaded, and the rates of uptake and degradation of several lipoproteins were measured and compared to rates in control cells. Receptor activities for 125I-rabbit beta-very low density lipoproteins (beta-VLDL), 125I-human low density lipoprotein, and 125I-human chylomicrons were down-regulated in cholesterol-loaded cells; however, the rate of uptake and degradation of 125I-human chylomicron remnants was unchanged from control cells. Cholesterol-loaded alveolar macrophages from a Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbit, which lack low density lipoprotein receptors, showed receptor down-regulation for 125I-beta-VLDL but not for 125I-human chylomicron remnants. In addition to chylomicron remnants, apo-E-phospholipid complexes competed for 125I-chylomicron remnant uptake, but apo-A-I-phospholipid complexes did not. Chylomicron remnants and beta-VLDL were equally effective in competing for 125I-beta-VLDL and 125I-chylomicron remnant uptake in cholesterol-loaded macrophages. The authors conclude: 1) specific lipoprotein receptor activity persists in cholesterol-loaded cells; 2) this receptor activity recognizes lipo-proteins (at least in part) by their apo-E content; and 3) cholesteryl ester accumulation can occur in monocyte-macrophages incubated with chylomicron remnants

  4. The Structural Basis of Cholesterol Accessibility in Membranes

    Olsen, Brett N.; Bielska, Agata A.; Lee, Tiffany; Daily, Michael D.; Covey, Douglas F.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Baker, Nathan A.; Ory, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Although the majority of free cellular cholesterol is present in the plasma membrane, cholesterol homeostasis is principally regulated through sterol-sensing proteins that reside in the cholesterol-poor endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In response to acute cholesterol loading or depletion, there is rapid equilibration between the ER and plasma membrane cholesterol pools, suggesting a biophysical model in which the availability of plasma membrane cholesterol for trafficking to internal membranes mo...

  5. Cholesterol loaded cyclodextrin increases freezability of buffalo bull (Bubalus bubalis spermatozoa by increasing cholesterol to phospholipid ratio

    J. S. Rajoriya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was conducted to investigate the effect of cholesterol loaded cyclodextrin (CLC on freezability of buffalo spermatozoa. Materials and Methods: Murrah buffalo bull semen samples with progressive motility of 70% and greater were used. After the evaluation of motility and livability, four equal fractions of semen samples were made. Group I was kept as control and diluted with Tris, whereas Group II, III and IV were treated with CLC solution at the rate of 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0 mg/ml respectively to obtain 120 × 106 sperm/ml as final spermatozoa concentration. The aliquots of all the groups were incubated for action of CLC, followed by dilution and freezing. Evaluation at pre-freeze and post-thaw stage of progressive motility, viability and level of cholesterol and phospholipid was done. Results: The mean cholesterol content (μg/100 × 106 spermatozoa of Group I, II, III and IV at pre-freeze stage was 21.55±0.63, 49.56±1.38, 55.67±0.45 and 47.79±1.01 and at post-thaw stage were 13.18±0.45, 34.27±0.71, 36.21±0.48 and 33.68±0.56, respectively. At pre-freeze stage, cholesterol content was significantly (p<0.01 higher in Group III in comparison to other groups. The mean cholesterol and phospholipids content of fresh sperm was 24.14±0.58 and 51.13±0.66 μg/100 × 106 sperm cells, respectively, and C/P ratio of spermatozoa at fresh stage was 0.47±0.067. Conclusion: CLC treatment maintains the C/P ratio and plays an important role in maintaining membrane architecture of spermatozoa. Hence, addition of CLC may be helpful in increasing freezability of buffalo spermatozoa by increasing the C/P ratio of spermatozoa.

  6. Phospholipid liposomes acquire apolipoprotein E in atherogenic plasma and block cholesterol loading of cultured macrophages.

    Williams, K J; Tall, A.R.; Bisgaier, C; Brocia, R

    1987-01-01

    A single infusion of phospholipid liposomes promptly and persistently abolished the ability of hypercholesterolemic rabbit plasma to cause cholesteryl ester loading in cultured macrophages. This phospholipid enrichment of plasma caused moderate stimulation of cellular cholesterol efflux and, unexpectedly, almost complete inhibition of cellular uptake of beta-very low density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), the major cholesteryl ester-rich particle in hypercholesterolemic rabbit plasma. Cell viabilit...

  7. Effect of Cholesterol on the Properties of Spray-Dried Lysozyme-Loaded Liposomal Powders

    Charnvanich, Dusadee; Vardhanabhuti, Nontima; Kulvanich, Poj

    2010-01-01

    The influence of cholesterol (Chol) in the liposomal bilayer on the properties of inhalable protein-loaded liposomal powders prepared by spray-drying technique was investigated. Lysozyme (LSZ) was used as a model protein. Feed solution for spray drying was prepared by direct mixing of aqueous solution of LSZ with mannitol solution and empty liposome dispersions composed of hydrogenated phosphatidylcholine and Chol at various molar ratios. The spray-dried powders were characterized with respec...

  8. Phosphatidylcholine: Greasing the Cholesterol Transport Machinery

    Lagace, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Negative feedback regulation of cholesterol metabolism in mammalian cells ensures a proper balance of cholesterol with other membrane lipids, principal among these being the major phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC). Processes such as cholesterol biosynthesis and efflux, cholesteryl ester storage in lipid droplets, and uptake of plasma lipoproteins are tuned to the cholesterol/PC ratio. Cholesterol-loaded macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions display increased PC biosynthesis that buffers against elevated cholesterol levels and may also facilitate cholesterol trafficking to enhance cholesterol sensing and efflux. These same mechanisms could play a generic role in homeostatic responses to acute changes in membrane free cholesterol levels. Here, I discuss the established and emerging roles of PC metabolism in promoting intracellular cholesterol trafficking and membrane lipid homeostasis. PMID:27081313

  9. Retinoid regulated macrophage cholesterol efflux involves the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein

    Manna, Pulak R.

    2016-01-01

    Elimination of excess cholesteryl esters from macrophage-derived foam cells is known to be a key process in limiting plaque stability and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. We have recently demonstrated that regulation of retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux is influenced by liver X receptor (LXR) signaling in mouse macrophages (Manna, P.R. et al., 2015, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 464:312-317). The data presented in this article evaluate the importance of the steroidogenic acute reg...

  10. Acute cholesterol depletion leads to net loss of the organic osmolyte taurine in Ehrlich Lettré tumor cells

    Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Duelund, Lars; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2010-01-01

    reveals that cholesterol depletion increases TauT's affinity toward taurine but reduces its maximal transport capacity. Cholesterol depletion has no impact on TauT regulation by protein kinases A and C. Phospholipase A2 activity, which is required for the activation of volume-sensitive organic anion......In mammalian cells, the organic osmolyte taurine is accumulated by the Na-dependent taurine transporter TauT and released though the volume- and DIDS-sensitive organic anion channel. Incubating Ehrlich Lettré tumor cells with methyl-ß-cyclodextrin (5 mM, 1 h) reduces the total cholesterol pool to...... channel (VSOAC), is increased under isotonic and hypotonic conditions following cholesterol depletion, whereas taurine release under hypotonic conditions is reduced following cholesterol depletion. Hence, acute cholesterol depletion of Ehrlich Lettré cells leads to reduced TauT and VSOAC activities and at...

  11. Retinoid regulated macrophage cholesterol efflux involves the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein.

    Manna, Pulak R

    2016-06-01

    Elimination of excess cholesteryl esters from macrophage-derived foam cells is known to be a key process in limiting plaque stability and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. We have recently demonstrated that regulation of retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux is influenced by liver X receptor (LXR) signaling in mouse macrophages (Manna, P.R. et al., 2015, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 464:312-317). The data presented in this article evaluate the importance of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in retinoid mediated macrophage cholesterol efflux. Overexpression of StAR in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages increased the effects of both all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) and 9-cis RA on cholesterol efflux, suggesting StAR enhances the efficacy of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and/or retinoid X receptor (RXR) ligands. Additional data revealed that atRA enhances (Bu)2cAMP induced StAR and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 protein levels. Treatment of macrophages transfected with an LXRE reporter plasmid (pLXREx3-Luc) was found to induce the effects of RAR and RXR analogs on LXR activity. PMID:27081671

  12. Free-cholesterol loading does not trigger phase separation of the fluorescent sterol dehydroergosterol in the plasma membrane of macrophages

    Wüstner, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    . DHE's surface distribution matched exactly large ruffles and membrane protrusions which were pronounced in FC-loaded cells. Plasma membrane blebs, however, formed in FC-loaded J774 cells had a homogenous staining along the membrane bilayer at 20 degrees C. The results show that even in FC-loaded cells...... with increased membrane cholesterol content, sterols do not form a separate phase in the plasma membrane....

  13. Clinical Factors and Viral Load Influencing Severity of Acute Hepatitis A.

    Hyun Woong Lee

    Full Text Available Clinical manifestations of hepatitis A virus (HAV infection vary from mild to fulminant hepatic failure (FHF in adults. We investigated the relationship between laboratory findings, including viral load, and clinical outcomes in patients with acute hepatitis A (AHA and evaluated predictive factors for severe acute hepatitis (s-AH.We analyzed the clinical manifestations of AHA in 770 patients. Patients with a prothrombin time (PT of less than 40% of normal were classified as s-AH and included 4 patients with FHF, 11 patients with acute renal failure, and 3 patients with prolonged jaundice (n = 128. Other patients were defined as mild acute hepatitis (m-AH (n = 642. Serum samples were obtained from 48 patients with acute hepatitis A. Among them, 20 with s-AH, and 28 with m-AH, were tested for HAV RNA titer.In a multivariate analysis, age (HR = 1.042, P = 0.041, peak creatinine (HR = 4.014, P = 0.001, bilirubin (HR = 1.153, P = 0.003, alanine aminotransferase (ALT (HR = 1.001, P < 0.001, initial lactate dehydrogenase (LDH (HR = 1.000, P = 0.045 and total cholesterol (HR = 0.978, P < 0.001 were independent factors for s-AH. Serum HAV RNA was detected in 20/20 (100% patients with s-AH and 22/28 (78.6% patients with m-AH. In a multivariate analysis of the 48 patients who were tested for HAV RNA, peak ALT (HR = 1.001, P = 0.004 and HAV RNA titer (HR = 2.076, P = 0.012 were independent factors for s-AH.Clinical factors including age, peak creatinine, bilirubin, ALT, initial LDH and total cholesterol were independent factors for s-AH in a multivariate analysis. In particular, HAV load strongly correlated with the severity of hepatitis A.

  14. Effect of cholesterol-loaded-cyclodextrin on sperm viability and acrosome reaction in boar semen cryopreservation.

    Lee, Yong-Seung; Lee, Seunghyung; Lee, Sang-Hee; Yang, Boo-Keun; Park, Choon-Keun

    2015-08-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of cholesterol-loaded-cyclodextrin (CLC) on boar sperm viability and spermatozoa cryosurvival during boar semen cryopreservation, and methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MBCD) was treated for comparing with CLC. Boar semen treated with CLC and MBCD before freezing process to monitor the effect on survival and capacitation status by flow cytometry with appropriate fluorescent probes. Sperm viability was higher in 1.5mg CLC-treated sperm (76.9±1.01%, Psemen, in which CLC treatment prior to freezing and thawing increased the development of oocytes to blastocyst stage in vitro. In conclusion, CLC could protect the viability of spermatozoa from cryodamage prior to cryopreservation in boar semen. PMID:26091957

  15. Myeloperoxidase and serum amyloid A contribute to impaired in vivo reverse cholesterol transport during the acute phase response but not group IIA secretory phospholipase A(2)

    Annema, Wijtske; Nijstad, Niels; Toelle, Markus; de Boer, Jan Freark; Buijs, Ruben V. C.; Heeringa, Peter; van der Giet, Markus; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is linked to inflammation. HDL protects against atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, mainly by mediating cholesterol efflux and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). The present study aimed to test the impact of acute inflammation as well as selected acute phase proteins on RCT wit

  16. Concentration-dependent Diversification Effects of Free Cholesterol Loading on Macrophage Viability and Polarization

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Aolin; Li, Ningjun; Li, Pin-Lan; Zhang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of free cholesterol in atherosclerotic lesions has been well documented in both animals and humans. In studying the relevance of free cholesterol buildup in atherosclerosis, contradictory results have been generated, indicating that free cholesterol produces both pro- and anti-atherosclerosis effects in macrophages. This inconsistency might stem from the examination of only select concentrations of free cholesterol. In the present study, we sought to investigate the implicati...

  17. Cognitive Load Undermines Thought Suppression in Acute Stress Disorder.

    Nixon, Reginald D V; Rackebrandt, Julie

    2016-05-01

    Thought suppression studies demonstrate that attempts to suppress can be undermined by cognitive load. We report the first instance in which this has been tested experimentally in a sample of recently traumatized individuals. Individuals with and without acute stress disorder (ASD) were recruited following recent trauma and randomized to load or no load conditions (N=56). They monitored intrusive memories during baseline, suppression, and think anything phases. The impact of suppression and load on self-reported intrusions, attention bias (dot-probe), and memory priming (word-stem task) was assessed. The ASD load group were less able to suppress memories (d=0.32, CI95 [-0.15, 0.83], p=.088) than the ASD no load group (d=0.63, CI95 [0.08, 1.24], panything phase, the ASD load group reported more intrusions than the ASD no load or non-ASD groups (with and without load). No consistent findings were observed in relation to attentional bias. ASD load individuals exhibited stronger priming responses for motor vehicle accident and assault words than all other groups (ds between 0.35-0.73). Working memory did not moderate any outcomes of interest. The findings indicate that cognitive load interferes with suppression and may enhance access to trauma memories and associated material. The study extends previous research by demonstrating these effects for the first time in a clinical sample of recent survivors of trauma. PMID:27157032

  18. Transcriptome analysis of genes regulated by cholesterol loading in two strains of mouse macrophages associates lysosome pathway and ER stress response with atherosclerosis susceptibility.

    Berisha, Stela Z; Hsu, Jeffrey; Robinet, Peggy; Smith, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol loaded macrophages in the arterial intima are the earliest histological evidence of atherosclerosis. Studies of mouse models of atherosclerosis have shown that the strain background can have a significant effect on lesion development. We have previously shown that DBA/2 ApoE(-/-) mice have aortic root lesions 10-fold larger than AKR ApoE(-/-) mice. The current study analyzes the response to cholesterol loading of macrophages from these two strains. Macrophages from the atherosclerosis susceptible DBA/2 strain had significantly higher levels of total and esterified cholesterol compared to atherosclerosis resistant AKR macrophages, while free cholesterol levels were higher in AKR cells. Gene expression profiles were obtained and data were analyzed for strain, cholesterol loading, and strain-cholesterol loading interaction effects by a fitted linear model. Pathway and transcriptional motif enrichment were identified by gene set enrichment analysis. In addition to observed strain differences in basal gene expression, we identified many transcripts whose expression was significantly altered in response to cholesterol loading, including P2ry13 and P2ry14, Trib3, Hyal1, Vegfa, Ccr5, Ly6a, and Ifit3. Eight pathways were significantly enriched in transcripts regulated by cholesterol loading, among which the lysosome and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathways had the highest number of significantly regulated transcripts. Of the differentially regulated transcripts with a strain-cholesterol loading interaction effect, we identified three genes known to participate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, Ddit3, Trib3 and Atf4. These three transcripts were highly up-regulated by cholesterol in AKR and either down-regulated or unchanged in loaded DBA/2 macrophages, thus associating a robust ER stress response with atherosclerosis resistance. We identified significant transcripts with strain, loading, or strain-loading interaction effect that

  19. Relationship between serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and in-hospital mortality following acute myocardial infarction (the lipid paradox).

    Reddy, Vanessa S; Bui, Quang T; Jacobs, Joan R; Begelman, Susan M; Miller, Dave P; French, William J

    2015-03-01

    Lipoprotein levels are currently recognized as independent risk factors for long-term cardiovascular events after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). During the acute-phase reaction after AMI, previous studies have reported trends of decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), increased triglycerides, and variable high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. However, the association between LDL-C and HDL-C levels and in-hospital mortality has not been well established following AMI. The relationship between lipid levels and in-hospital all-cause mortality in 115,492 patients hospitalized for AMI (July 2002 to December 2006), registered in the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction (NRMI) 4b-5, was evaluated using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models. Mean LDL-C was 104 ± 38, HDL-C was 41 ± 14, and triglycerides 143 ± 83 mg/dl. Compared with the lowest quartile of LDL-C (NRMI 4b-5 suggest a lipid paradox, with lower LDL-C levels associated with increased risk of in-hospital mortality, contrary to findings outside the acute setting. Consistent with previous analyses, lowest HDL-C levels were associated with increased in-hospital mortality. In conclusion, further explorations of the relationship between very low levels of LDL-C, myocardial necrosis, and subsequent adverse cardiovascular events are warranted. PMID:25727079

  20. An apoA-I mimetic peptide facilitates off-loading cholesterol from HDL to liver cells through scavenger receptor BI

    Xuelei Song, Paul Fischer, Xun Chen, Charlotte Burton, Jun Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I mimetic peptides have been pursued as new therapeutic agents for the treatment of atherosclerosis, yet their precise mechanism responsible for atheroprotection remains unclear. Like apoA-I itself, most of these peptides are capable of stimulating cholesterol efflux from macrophages or foam cells, and some of them stimulate lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT activity in the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT pathway. However, the ability of mimetic peptides to deliver cholesterol into hepatocytes (off-loading, the last step of the RCT pathway, has not been demonstrated. In this study, we compared a mimetic peptide D-4F to purified apoA-I, to address the role that mimetics play during the off-loading process. Both D-4F and apoA-I formed spherical nano-particles when reconstituted with cholesteryl ester and phospholipids. Compared to apoA-I, D-4F particles were 20 times more efficient in off-loading cholesterol to HepG2 hepatocytes with an apparent Kt (transport of 0.74 μg/mL. Furthermore, D-4F also facilitated cholesteryl ester offloading from HDL particles into HepG2 cells when it was pre-incubated with these HDL particles. Using an inducible HEK293 cell line, we demonstrated that these nano-particles were able to be taken up through SR-BI, a HDL selective receptor. Cholesterol uptake by HepG2 cells was completely blocked by a neutralizing monoclonal antibody against SR-BI, demonstrating that D-4F particles, similar to HDL, specifically off-loaded cholesterol through SR-BI. Overall our data provides evidence that D-4F is capable of mimicking apoA-I to form HDL-like particles, and off-loads cholesterol for catabolism and excretion, thus completing RCT.

  1. Faecal loading in the cecum as a new radiological sign of acute appendicitis

    Purpose: Although the radiological features of acute appendicitis have been well documented, the value of the plain radiography has not been fully appreciated. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of the association of acute appendicitis and images of faecal loading in the cecum. Methods: Plain abdominal radiographs of 100 consecutive adult patients operated on acute appendicitis were assessed. The presence of faecal loading was registered. Results: The presence of faecal loading in the cecum occurred in 97 of the cases of acute appendicitis. Conclusion: This study seems to demonstrate that the presence of radiological images of faecal loading in the cecum may be a useful sign of acute appendicitis

  2. Neutrophils contain cholesterol crystals in transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)

    Van Ness, Michael; Jensen, Hanne; Adamson, Grete N; Kysar, Patricia E; Holland, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular components of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy.......Intracellular components of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy....

  3. Adjuvant Effect of Cationic Liposomes for Subunit Influenza Vaccine: Influence of Antigen Loading Method, Cholesterol and Immune Modulators

    Alexander Kros

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cationic liposomes are potential adjuvants for influenza vaccines. In a previous study we reported that among a panel of cationic liposomes loaded with influenza hemagglutinin (HA, DC-Chol:DPPC (1:1 molar ratio liposomes induced the strongest immune response. However, it is not clear whether the cholesterol (Chol backbone or the tertiary amine head group of DC-Chol was responsible for this. Therefore, in the present work we studied the influence of Chol in the lipid bilayer of cationic liposomes. Moreover, we investigated the effect of the HA loading method (adsorption versus encapsulation and the encapsulation of immune modulators in DC-Chol liposomes on the immunogenicity of HA. Liposomes consisting of a neutral lipid (DPPC or Chol and a cationic compound (DC-Chol, DDA, or eDPPC were produced by film hydration-extrusion with/without an encapsulated immune modulator (CpG or imiquimod. The liposomes generally showed comparable size distribution, zeta potential and HA loading. In vitro studies with monocyte-derived human dendritic cells and immunization studies in C57Bl/6 mice showed that: (1 liposome-adsorbed HA is more immunogenic than encapsulated HA; (2 the incorporation of Chol in the bilayer of cationic liposomes enhances their adjuvant effect; and (3 CpG loaded liposomes are more efficient at enhancing HA-specific humoral responses than plain liposomes or Alhydrogel.

  4. Fecal loading in the cecum as a new radiological sign of acute appendicitis

    Andy Petroianu; Luiz Ronaldo Alberti; Renata Indelicato Zac

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Although the radiological features of acute appendicitis have been well documented, the value of plain radiography has not been fully appreciated. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of the association of acute appendicitis with images of fecal loading in the cecum.METHODS: Plain abdominal radiographs of 400 patients operated upon for acute appendicitis (n = 100), acute cholecystitis (n = 100), right acute pelvic inflammatory disease (n = 100) and right nephrolithiasis (n = 100)were assessed. The presence of fecal loading was recorded and the sensitivity and specificity of this sign for acute appendicitis were calculated.RESULTS: The presence of fecal loading in the cecum occurred in 97 patients with acute appendicitis, 13 patients with acute cholecystitis, 12 patients with acute inflammatory pelvic disease and 19 patients with nephrolithiasis. The sensitivity of this sign for appendicitis was 97% and its specificity to this disease was 85.3%. Its positive predictive value for appendicitis was 68.7%; however, its negative predictive value for appendicitis was 98.8%.CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that the presence of radiological images of fecal loading in the cecum may be a useful sign of acute appendicitis, and the absence of this sign probably excludes this disease.This is the first description of fecal loading as a radiological sign for acute appendicitis.

  5. Intestine-specific MTP and global ACAT2 deficiency lowers acute cholesterol absorption with chylomicrons and HDLs

    Iqbal, Jahangir; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Rudel, Lawrence L.; Hussain, M. Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal cholesterol absorption involves the chylomicron and HDL pathways and is dependent on microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) and ABCA1, respectively. Chylomicrons transport free and esterified cholesterol, whereas HDLs transport free cholesterol. ACAT2 esterifies cholesterol for secretion with chylomicrons. We hypothesized that free cholesterol accumulated during ACAT2 deficiency may be secreted with HDLs when chylomicron assembly is blocked. To test this, we studied cholest...

  6. Acute and chronic effects of a 24-hour intravenous triglyceride emulsion challenge on plasma lecithin : cholesterol acyltransferase, phospholipid transfer protein, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein activities

    Riemens, SC; Van Tol, A; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    1999-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) are key factors in remodeling of high density lipoproteins (HDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. We examined the effect of a large, 24 h intravenous fat load on plasma

  7. What's Cholesterol?

    ... Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? What's Cholesterol? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Cholesterol? Print A A ... thing for food to be low in it? Cholesterol and Your Body Cholesterol (say: kuh-LES-tuh- ...

  8. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol target goal attainment rate and related factors in patients with acute coronary syndrome after percutaneous coronary intervention

    张波

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol(LDL-C)target goal attainment rate and related factors in patients with acute coronary syndrome(ACS)after percutaneous coronary intervention(PCI).Methods From March 2011 to March 2012,a total of832 ACS patients were retrospectively evaluated in the Cardiology Department of the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University.The target goal attainment

  9. Impaired homeostatic mechanism of potassium handling after acute oral potassium load in diabetes mellitus.

    H.J. Kim; Ahn, Y. H.; Park, C H; Kang, C M; Park, H C; Bae, H. Y.; Choi, S. D.

    1993-01-01

    Chronic stable diabetic patients (n = 6) were compared with healthy control subjects (n = 5) after acute oral intake of 50 mEq of potassium chloride (KCl) to investigate for possible derangements of homeostatic responses for acute term (3 hrs) to acute potassium load. Plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma aldosterone (PA), and transtubular potassium concentration gradient (TTKG) known as a useful semiquantative index of distal nephron potassium secretion were measured. All the baseline paramete...

  10. Associations between COX-2 polymorphisms, blood cholesterol and risk of acute coronary syndrome

    Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Segel, Stine; Dethlefsen, Claus;

    2010-01-01

    Background: The use of specific COX-2 inhibitors in cancer prevention has been associated with higher risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and myocardial infarction. The aim of this study was to investigate if the polymorphisms COX2 T8473C (rs5275), and COX2 A-1195G (rs689466), which modify the...... enzyme levels of COX-2, were associated with risk of ACS and if alcohol intake, smoking, and use of NSAID would modify the associations. We also wanted to investigate associations with blood lipid levels. Methods: A case–cohort study including 1031 ACS cases and a sub-cohort of 1703 persons was nested...... within the population-based prospective study Diet, Cancer and Health of 57,053 individuals aged 55-64 at recruitment 1993-1997. Results: Male variant allele carriers of COX-2 T8473C were at lower risk of ACS (IRR=0.75, CI=0.61-0.93, p=0.008) than homozygous wildtype carriers. There were no statistically...

  11. About Cholesterol

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More About Cholesterol Updated:Aug 10,2016 It may surprise you ... our bodies to keep us healthy. What is cholesterol and where does it come from? Cholesterol is ...

  12. Changes in cholesterol homeostasis and acute phase response link pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes to risk of cardiovascular disease

    Poulsen, Sarah S.; Saber, Anne T.; Mortensen, Alicja;

    2015-01-01

    has led to concerns that inhalation exposure to MWCNTs might pose similar risks. We analyzed parameters related to cardiovascular disease, including plasma acute phase response (APR) proteins and plasma lipids, in female C57BL/6 mice exposed to a single intratracheal instillation of 0, 18,54 or 162 mu...... g/mouse of small, entangled (CNTsmall, 0.8 +/- 0.1 pm long) or large, thick MWCNTs (CNTLarge, 4 +/- 0.4 mu m long). Liver tissues and plasma were harvested 1,3 and 28 days post-exposure. In addition, global hepatic gene expression, hepatic cholesterol content and liver histology were used to assess...... hepatic effects. The two MWCNTs induced similar systemic responses despite their different physicochemical properties. APR proteins SAA3 and haptoglobin, plasma total cholesterol and low-density/very low-density lipoprotein were significantly increased following exposure to either MWCNTs. Plasma SAA3...

  13. Validated HPLC Method for the Determination of Paclitaxel-related Substances in an Intravenous Emulsion Loaded with a Paclitaxel–Cholesterol Complex

    Xia, X. J.; Peng, J.; Zhang, P. X.; D J Jin; Liu, Y L

    2013-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for the determination of related substances in an intravenous emulsion loaded with a paclitaxel-cholesterol complex. The separation was achieved using Agilent Eclipse XDB-C18 column (150×4.6 mm, 3.5 μm), which was kept at 40°. The gradient mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and water with a flow rate of 1.2 ml/min. The ultraviolet detection wavelength was set at 227 nm. The preparation of the sample solution began with the addi...

  14. Efficacy of antibacterial-loaded coating in an in vivo model of acutely highly contaminated implant

    Giavaresi, Gianluca; Meani, Enzo; Sartori, Maria; Ferrari, Andrea; BELLINI, Davide; Sacchetta, Anna C.; Meraner, Joachim; Sambri, Andrea; Vocale, Caterina; Sambri, Vittorio; Fini, Milena; Romanò, Carlo L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to test the ability of DAC®, a fast resorbable, antibacterial-loaded hydrogel coating, to prevent acute bacterial colonization in an in vivo model of an intra-operatively highly contaminated implant. Methods A histocompatibility study was performed in 10 adult New Zealand rabbits. Then, methicillin-resistant Staph. aureus were inoculated in the femur of 30 adult New Zealand rabbits at the time of intra-medullary nailing; vancomycin-loaded DAC® coated nail...

  15. THE RATE OF CLINICAL RESPONSE OF ORAL LOADING SODIUM VALPROATE IN ACUTELY MANLC PATIENT

    K SHAFIEE; M BAREKATEYN; N BASHARDOOST; Mahmoudi, J

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Acheiving accelerated clinical response is desirable in patients with acute manic episode. We conducted a prospective study to compare the rate of clinical response of oral loading sodium valproate versus standard dose titration. Methods: Fourty - two patients who met DSM - IV critevia for current manic episode and who had a "Young mania rating scale "score between 20 and 50 were randomly assigned on a double blind basis to recieve valproate oral "loading"(N = 21) at a dose...

  16. Self-assembly study and formation of hydrophobized PVA dense and stable nanoparticles loaded with cholesterol or a steroid-type drug.

    Delbecq, Frederic; Kawakami, Kohsaku

    2014-08-15

    This work reports the preparation of modified poly(vinyl alcohol) PVA decorated with two different hydrophobic side-arms. Each material displays various percentages of pendant oleate and cholesteryl groups. The molar amount and the difference between their respective physico-chemical contributions are able to induce size variations of the formed micelles in aqueous media. These large amphiphilic structures hold a hydrophobic core ready for the incorporation of strong hydrophobic species such as cholesterol or prednisolone, a well-known low-water soluble steroid-type drug. In the presence of a steroid derivative, the modified PVA could form smaller and dense nanoparticles loaded in their cores. The synthesis of each polymer was controlled by (1)H NMR and FT-IR spectroscopies. The size of the empty micelles and the diameter of the loaded nanoparticles were determined by dynamic light scatting (DLS) studies. The measurement of the critical micelle concentration (CMC) was carried out for each polymer sample by fluorescence probing using pyrene. The amount of cholesterol incorporated into the hydrophobic core was estimated and all binding modes between the steroids and each amphiphilic polymer were also discussed in regard to their size distribution, concentration and stability. PMID:24910035

  17. Renal response to acute acid loading--an organ physiological approach

    Osther, P J; Engel, K; Kildeberg, P

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In previous studies of the renal response to acute NH4Cl acidosis no correlation was found between systemic acid-base status and the traditionally used quantity, renal net acid excretion (NAE). If NAE is to be considered a physiologically meaningful quantity then this is surprising, as......-base metabolism during acid loading than previously described methods....

  18. Cholesterol (image)

    Cholesterol is a soft, waxy substance that is present in all parts of the body including the ... and obtained from animal products in the diet. Cholesterol is manufactured in the liver and is needed ...

  19. Cholesterol Embolism: An Overlooked Diagnosis

    Sinem Nihal ESATOĞLU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure following angiography is usually due to radiocontrast nephropathy; however, cholesterol embolism should be kept in mind when making the differential diagnosis. Cholesterol embolism is a multisystem disease, usually seen in elderly men who have severe atherosclerosis. In this case report, we describe a patient with cholesterol embolism who had a typical clinical history of progressive renal failure. We hope that this case report will emphasize the importance of this overlooked syndrome.

  20. Long distance running and acute effects on plantar foot sensitivity and plantar foot loading.

    Alfuth, Martin; Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2011-09-26

    The plantar surface of the foot senses local pressures during stance and locomotion. These foot loading characteristics may be affected by long distance running. Little is known about the physiological effects of sports-related loading on plantar sensitivity and their relationship with plantar foot loading. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of long distance running on plantar sensitivity to touch and their relationship with foot loading characteristics. It was hypothesized that plantar sensation would decrease after long distance running and may be related to foot loading characteristics. In 15 middle-aged runners, sensory detection thresholds to light touch and plantar pressures were measured before and after a 10 km run. After the run, no significant changes in sensory perception thresholds were observed so that correlations between foot sensitivity and foot loading could not be calculated. A significant decrease of force-time integrals and maximum forces was demonstrated in the whole foot (-6.2%, p=0.003; -3.9%, p=0.001) and the heel (-10.5%, p=0.003; -8.5%, p=0.002). Furthermore, maximum force was significantly reduced in the lateral midfoot (-6.4%, p=0.002). In conclusion, a sub-maximal 10 km running exercise appears to have no significant acute effects on plantar sensitivity, plantar pressure distribution and peak forces. PMID:21871535

  1. Reduced natriuretic response to acute sodium loading in COMT Gene deleted mice

    Uhlén Staffan

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intrarenal natriuretic hormone dopamine (DA is metabolised by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT and monoamine oxidase (MAO. Inhibition of COMT, as opposed to MAO, results in a potent natriuretic response in the rat. The present study in anaesthetized homozygous and heterozygous COMT gene deleted mice attempted to further elucidate the importance of COMT in renal DA and sodium handling. After acute intravenous isotonic sodium loading, renal function was followed. Results COMT activity in heterozygous mice was about half of that in wild type mice and was zero in the homozygous mice. MAO activity did not differ between the genotypes. Urinary sodium excretion increased 10-fold after sodium loading in wild type mice. In heterozygous and homozygous mice, the natriuretic effects of sodium loading were only 29 % and 39 %, respectively, of that in wild type mice. Arterial pressure and glomerular filtration rate did not differ between genotypes. Baseline norepinephrine and DA excretions in urine were elevated in the homozygous, but not in heterozygous, COMT gene deleted mice. Urinary DA excretion increased after isotonic sodium loading in the wild type mice but not in the COMT gene deleted mice. Conclusions Mice with reduced or absent COMT activity have altered metabolism of catecholamines and are unable to increase renal DA activity and produce normal natriuresis in response to acute sodium loading. The results support the hypothesis that COMT has an important role in the DA-mediated regulation of renal sodium excretion.

  2. THE RATE OF CLINICAL RESPONSE OF ORAL LOADING SODIUM VALPROATE IN ACUTELY MANLC PATIENT

    K SHAFIEE

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acheiving accelerated clinical response is desirable in patients with acute manic episode. We conducted a prospective study to compare the rate of clinical response of oral loading sodium valproate versus standard dose titration. Methods: Fourty - two patients who met DSM - IV critevia for current manic episode and who had a "Young mania rating scale "score between 20 and 50 were randomly assigned on a double blind basis to recieve valproate oral "loading"(N = 21 at a dose of 20 mg/kg in divided doses for 7 days and valproate "non -loading" at a starting dose of 10 mg/kg followed by standard titration which at day 6 , they recieved 20 mg/kg valproate. Patients were scored at day 0, 3, 5 and 7 by a blindraterusing YMRS. Results: There was no significat differences between the groups in advers events and useing of adjunctive tranquilizer .The efficacy of valproate in both two groups was similar but " the rate of improvement on YMRS" over the first 3 days was significantly greater in loading group. Conclusion: Valproate oral loading with sodium valproate can induced a more rapid clinical response in acutely manic patient.

  3. Ethanol Extract of Fructus Schisandrae Decreases Hepatic Triglyceride Level in Mice Fed with a High Fat/Cholesterol Diet, with Attention to Acute Toxicity

    Si-Yuan Pan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of the ethanol extract of Fructus Schisandrae (EtFSC on serum and liver lipid contents were investigated in mice fed with high fat/cholesterol (HFC diet for 8 or 15 days. The induction of hypercholesterolemia by HFC diet caused significant increases in serum and hepatic total cholesterol (TC levels (up to 62% and 165%, resp. and hepatic triglyceride (TG levels (up to 528% in mice. EtFSC treatment (1 or 5 g/kg/day for 7 days; from Day 1 to 7 or from Day 8 to 14, i.g. significantly decreased the hepatic TG level (down to 35% and slightly increased the hepatic index (by 8% in hypercholesterolemic mice. Whereas fenofibrate treatment (0.1 g/kg/day for 7 days, i.g. significantly lowered the hepatic TG level (by 61%, it elevated the hepatic index (by 77% in hypercholesterolemic mice. Acute toxicity test showed that EtFSC was relatively non-toxic, with an LD50 value of 35.63 ± 6.46 g/kg in mice. The results indicate that EtFSC treatment can invariably decrease hepatic TG in hypercholesterolemic mice, as assessed by both preventive and therapeutic protocols, suggesting its potential use for fatty liver treatment.

  4. Ethanol Extract of Fructus Schisandrae Decreases Hepatic Triglyceride Level in Mice Fed with a High Fat/Cholesterol Diet, with Attention to Acute Toxicity

    Pan, Si-Yuan; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Dong, Hang; Xiang, Chun-Jing; Fong, Wang-Fun; Ko, Kam-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Effects of the ethanol extract of Fructus Schisandrae (EtFSC) on serum and liver lipid contents were investigated in mice fed with high fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet for 8 or 15 days. The induction of hypercholesterolemia by HFC diet caused significant increases in serum and hepatic total cholesterol (TC) levels (up to 62% and 165%, resp.) and hepatic triglyceride (TG) levels (up to 528%) in mice. EtFSC treatment (1 or 5 g/kg/day for 7 days; from Day 1 to 7 or from Day 8 to 14, i.g.) significantly decreased the hepatic TG level (down to 35%) and slightly increased the hepatic index (by 8%) in hypercholesterolemic mice. Whereas fenofibrate treatment (0.1 g/kg/day for 7 days, i.g.) significantly lowered the hepatic TG level (by 61%), it elevated the hepatic index (by 77%) in hypercholesterolemic mice. Acute toxicity test showed that EtFSC was relatively non-toxic, with an LD50 value of 35.63 ± 6.46 g/kg in mice. The results indicate that EtFSC treatment can invariably decrease hepatic TG in hypercholesterolemic mice, as assessed by both preventive and therapeutic protocols, suggesting its potential use for fatty liver treatment. PMID:19592476

  5. Good vs. Bad Cholesterol

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Good vs. Bad Cholesterol Updated:Mar 23,2016 Cholesterol can't dissolve ... test . View an animation of cholesterol . LDL (Bad) Cholesterol LDL cholesterol is considered the “bad” cholesterol because ...

  6. Effect of acute acid loading on acid-base and calcium metabolism

    Osther, Palle J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the acid-base and calcium metabolic responses to acute non-carbonic acid loading in idiopathic calcium stone-formers and healthy males using a quantitative organ physiological approach. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five-h ammonium chloride loading studies were performed in 12...... male recurrent idiopathic calcium stone-formers and 12 matched healthy men using a randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Arterialized capillary blood, serum and urine were collected hourly for measurement of electrolytes, ionized calcium, magnesium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone and acid-base...... status. Concentrations of non-metabolizable base (NB) and acid (NA) were calculated from measured concentrations of non-metabolizable ions. RESULTS: The extracellular acid-base status in the stone-formers during basal conditions and acid loading was comparable to the levels in the healthy controls...

  7. Validated HPLC method for the determination of paclitaxel-related substances in an intravenous emulsion loaded with a paclitaxel-cholesterol complex

    X J Xia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for the determination of related substances in an intravenous emulsion loaded with a paclitaxel-cholesterol complex. The separation was achieved using Agilent Eclipse XDB-C18 column (150×4.6 mm, 3.5 μm, which was kept at 40°. The gradient mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and water with a flow rate of 1.2 ml/min. The ultraviolet detection wavelength was set at 227 nm. The preparation of the sample solution began with the addition of anhydrous sodium sulphate to break the emulsion. Then, methanol and ethyl ether were added to pick up the drug and remove the accessories of the emulsion by extraction and centrifugation. Finally, paclitaxel was enriched by a nitrogen blow method and resolved with a mixture of methanol:glacial acetic acid (200:1. The method was proven to be selective, sensitive, robust, linear, repeatable, accurate and suitable for the determination of paclitaxel-related substances in the emulsion formulations, and the major degradation products in the potential pharmaceutical product were 7-epipaclitaxel and 10-deacetylpaclitaxel.

  8. Changes in cholesterol homeostasis and acute phase response link pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes to risk of cardiovascular disease

    Adverse lung effects following pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are well documented in rodents. However, systemic effects are less understood. Epidemiological studies have shown increased cardiovascular disease risk after pulmonary exposure to airborne particles, which has led to concerns that inhalation exposure to MWCNTs might pose similar risks. We analyzed parameters related to cardiovascular disease, including plasma acute phase response (APR) proteins and plasma lipids, in female C57BL/6 mice exposed to a single intratracheal instillation of 0, 18, 54 or 162 μg/mouse of small, entangled (CNTSmall, 0.8 ± 0.1 μm long) or large, thick MWCNTs (CNTLarge, 4 ± 0.4 μm long). Liver tissues and plasma were harvested 1, 3 and 28 days post-exposure. In addition, global hepatic gene expression, hepatic cholesterol content and liver histology were used to assess hepatic effects. The two MWCNTs induced similar systemic responses despite their different physicochemical properties. APR proteins SAA3 and haptoglobin, plasma total cholesterol and low-density/very low-density lipoprotein were significantly increased following exposure to either MWCNTs. Plasma SAA3 levels correlated strongly with pulmonary Saa3 levels. Analysis of global gene expression revealed perturbation of the same biological processes and pathways in liver, including the HMG-CoA reductase pathway. Both MWCNTs induced similar histological hepatic changes, with a tendency towards greater response following CNTLarge exposure. Overall, we show that pulmonary exposure to two different MWCNTs induces similar systemic and hepatic responses, including changes in plasma APR, lipid composition, hepatic gene expression and liver morphology. The results link pulmonary exposure to MWCNTs with risk of cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: • Systemic and hepatic alterations were evaluated in female mice following MWCNT instillation. • Despite being physicochemically different, the two

  9. Changes in cholesterol homeostasis and acute phase response link pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes to risk of cardiovascular disease

    Poulsen, Sarah S., E-mail: spo@nrcwe.dk [National Research Centre for the Working Environment, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Saber, Anne T., E-mail: ats@nrcwe.dk [National Research Centre for the Working Environment, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Mortensen, Alicja, E-mail: almo@food.dtu.dk [National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Søborg (Denmark); Szarek, Józef, E-mail: szarek@uwm.edu.pl [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, 10-719 Olsztyn (Poland); Wu, Dongmei, E-mail: dongmei.wu@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Williams, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.williams@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Andersen, Ole, E-mail: oa@ruc.dk [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Jacobsen, Nicklas R., E-mail: nrj@nrcwe.dk [National Research Centre for the Working Environment, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Yauk, Carole L., E-mail: carole.yauk@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Wallin, Håkan, E-mail: hwa@nrcwe.dk [National Research Centre for the Working Environment, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, DK-1014 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Halappanavar, Sabina, E-mail: sabina.halappanavar@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Vogel, Ulla, E-mail: ubv@nrcwe.dk [National Research Centre for the Working Environment, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-03-15

    Adverse lung effects following pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are well documented in rodents. However, systemic effects are less understood. Epidemiological studies have shown increased cardiovascular disease risk after pulmonary exposure to airborne particles, which has led to concerns that inhalation exposure to MWCNTs might pose similar risks. We analyzed parameters related to cardiovascular disease, including plasma acute phase response (APR) proteins and plasma lipids, in female C57BL/6 mice exposed to a single intratracheal instillation of 0, 18, 54 or 162 μg/mouse of small, entangled (CNT{sub Small}, 0.8 ± 0.1 μm long) or large, thick MWCNTs (CNT{sub Large}, 4 ± 0.4 μm long). Liver tissues and plasma were harvested 1, 3 and 28 days post-exposure. In addition, global hepatic gene expression, hepatic cholesterol content and liver histology were used to assess hepatic effects. The two MWCNTs induced similar systemic responses despite their different physicochemical properties. APR proteins SAA3 and haptoglobin, plasma total cholesterol and low-density/very low-density lipoprotein were significantly increased following exposure to either MWCNTs. Plasma SAA3 levels correlated strongly with pulmonary Saa3 levels. Analysis of global gene expression revealed perturbation of the same biological processes and pathways in liver, including the HMG-CoA reductase pathway. Both MWCNTs induced similar histological hepatic changes, with a tendency towards greater response following CNT{sub Large} exposure. Overall, we show that pulmonary exposure to two different MWCNTs induces similar systemic and hepatic responses, including changes in plasma APR, lipid composition, hepatic gene expression and liver morphology. The results link pulmonary exposure to MWCNTs with risk of cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: • Systemic and hepatic alterations were evaluated in female mice following MWCNT instillation. • Despite being physicochemically

  10. Acute urinary toxicity following transperineal prostate brachytherapy using a modified Quimby loading method

    Purpose: To examine the acute urinary toxicity following transperineal prostate implant using a modified Quimby loading method with regard to time course, severity, and factors that may be associated with a higher incidence of morbidity. Methods and Materials: One hundred thirty-nine patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated with brachytherapy from 1997 through 1999 had follow-up records available for review. Patients considered for definitive brachytherapy alone included those with prostate specific antigen (PSA) ≤6, Gleason score (GS) ≤6, clinical stage 6, PSA>6, or Stage>T2a were treated with external beam radiation therapy followed by brachytherapy boost. Sources were loaded according to a modified Quimby method. At each follow-up, toxicity was graded based on a modified RTOG urinary toxicity scale. Results: Acute urinary toxicity occurred in 88%. Grade I toxicity was reported in 23%, grade II in 45%, and grade III in 20%, with 14% requiring prolonged (greater than 1 week) intermittent or indwelling catheterization. Overall median duration of symptoms was 12 months. There was no difference in duration of symptoms between patients treated with I-125 or Pd-103 sources (p=0.71). After adjusting for GS and PSA, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed higher incidence of grade 3 toxicity in patients with larger prostate volumes (p=0.002), and those with more seeds implanted (p<0.001). Higher incidence of prolonged catheterization was found in patients receiving brachytherapy alone (p=0.01), with larger prostate volumes (p=0.01), and those with more seeds implanted (p<0.001). Conclusion: Interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer leads to a high incidence of acute urinary toxicity, most of which is mild to moderate in severity. A prolonged need for catheterization can occur in some patients. Patients receiving brachytherapy alone, those with prostate volumes greater than 30 cc, and those implanted with a greater number of seeds have the highest

  11. REDUCTION DEGREE OF LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS CHOLESTEROL LEVELS ACCORDING TO DIFFERENT DOSES OF STATINS; ITS EFFECT ON THE RISK OF ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE ACUTE EPISODES DEPENDING ON TREATMENT DURATION; AND RISK OF ISCHEMIC AND THROMBOEMBOLIC STROKE. COMMENT ON THE PAPER OF LAW M.R., WALD N.J., RUDNICKA A.R. QUANTIFYING EFFECT OF STATINS ON LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL, ISCHAEMIC HEART DISEASE, AND STROKE: SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS. BMJ 2003; 326:1423-1427

    N. V. Perova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative dose-dependent ability of different statins to lower serum low-density lipoproteins (LDL cholesterol was determined in three large meta-analysis. Besides, it was found that standardized decrease in LDL cholesterol levels on 1.0 or 1.8 mmol/l leads to rate reduction in ischemic heart disease acute episodes as well as stroke depending on treatment duration. Effect of LDL cholesterol reduction on stroke occurrence was more significant in studies, which included a major share of patients with vascular disease, because these patients have a higher risk of thromboembolic stroke (rather than haemorrhagic stroke in comparison with the general population.

  12. Contribution to the study of renal load and its therapeutic modifications during acute uranium contaminations

    The renal load during acute experimental contaminations in rats and the possible effects of treatment with chelators (DTPA) and bicarbonates are estinated. The following points are examined in turn: kidney uptake of uranyl nitrate and therapeutic tests; in vitro solubility of oxides UO3 and U3O8 in synthetic serum, their kidney uptake and therapeutic tests. The experimental values of the in vitro uranium oxide dissolution method were checked against in vivo observations. These experiments lead to the following conclusions: concerning the solubility of uranium compounds the strong solubility of UO3 and much lesser solubility of U3O8 in biological media are confirmed; with regard to the kidney uptake of uranium derivatives the fixation is proportional to the amount injected when the compound (uranyl nitrate) is soluble, which would correspond to the dissolved fraction in the case of more or less insoluble oxide. The right-left uptake is symmetrical. The therapeutic conclusions are as follows: the effectiveness of DTPA, in clearing the organism, especially from bone contamination is proved, but the renal uranium load is neither increased nor reduced; single injections of bicarbonates appear to reduce the kidney load in cases of U3O8 contamination but are ineffective for UO3 and UO2++. This difference may be explained by the low circulating concentration, due to weak contamination and low solubility, of U3O8 as compared with the other two compounds

  13. Cholesterol Test

    ... seen when there is an existing problem like malnutrition , liver disease , or cancer . However there is no ... cholesterol levels include anabolic steroids, beta blockers , epinephrine, oral contraceptives, and vitamin D. ^ Back to top ... Health Professionals Get the Mobile App iTunes | Android | Kindle ...

  14. Cholesterol and Your Child

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Cholesterol and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Cholesterol and ... child's risk of developing heart disease later. About Cholesterol Cholesterol is a waxy substance produced by the ...

  15. Women and Cholesterol

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Women and Cholesterol Updated:Apr 1,2016 The female sex hormone ... Glossary Related Sites Nutrition Center My Life Check Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol • Why Cholesterol Matters • Understand Your ...

  16. HDL Cholesterol Test

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? HDL Cholesterol Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... HDL; HDL-C Formal name: High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Related tests: Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; Lipid Profile ; ...

  17. LDL Cholesterol Test

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? LDL Cholesterol Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... LDL; LDL-C Formal name: Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Related tests: Cholesterol ; HDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; Lipid Profile ; ...

  18. Cholesterol IQ Quiz

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cholesterol IQ Quiz Updated:Feb 2,2015 Begin the quiz Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol Introduction Good vs. Bad Cholesterol ...

  19. Acute acetaminophen intoxication leads to hepatic iron loading by decreased hepcidin synthesis.

    van Swelm, Rachel P L; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Blous, Linda; Peters, Janny G P; Blaney Davidson, Esmeralda N; van der Kraan, Peter M; Swinkels, Dorine W; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Russel, Frans G M

    2012-09-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), a major cause of acute liver injury in the Western world, is mediated by metabolism and oxidative stress. Recent studies have suggested a role for iron in potentiating APAP-induced liver injury although its regulatory mechanism is not completely understood. The current study was designed to unravel the iron-regulating pathways in mice after APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Mice with severe injury showed a significant increase in liver iron concentration and oxidative stress. Concurrently, the plasma concentration of hepcidin, the key regulator in iron metabolism, and hepatic hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (Hamp) mRNA expression levels were significantly reduced. We showed that hepcidin transcription was inhibited via several hepcidin-regulating factors, including the bone morphogenetic protein/small mother against decapentaplegic (BMP/SMAD) pathway, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), and possibly also via erythropoietin (EPO). Downregulation of the BMP/SMAD signaling pathway was most likely caused by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), which was increased in mice with severe APAP-induced liver injury. HIF-1α stimulates cleaving of hemojuvelin, the cofactor of the BMP receptor, thereby blocking BMP-induced signaling. In addition, gene expression levels of C/ebpα were significantly reduced, and Epo mRNA expression levels were significantly increased after APAP intoxication. These factors are regulated through HIF-1α during oxidative stress and suggest that HIF-1α is a key modulator in reduced hepcidin transcription after APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. In conclusion, acute APAP-induced liver injury leads to activation of HIF-1α, which results in a downregulation in hepcidin expression through a BMP/SMAD signaling pathway and through C/EBPα inhibition. Eventually, this leads to hepatic iron loading associated with APAP cytotoxicity. PMID:22610607

  20. Acute toxicity study of tilmicosin-loaded hydrogenated castor oil-solid lipid nanoparticles

    Xie Shuyu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous studies demonstrated that tilmicosin-loaded hydrogenated castor oil solid lipid nanoparticles (Til-HCO-SLN are a promising formulation for enhanced pharmacological activity and therapeutic efficacy in veterinary use. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the acute toxicity of Til-HCO-SLN. Methods Two nanoparticle doses were used for the study in ICR mice. The low dose (766 mg/kg.bw with tilmicosin 7.5 times of the clinic dosage and below the median lethal dose (LD50 was subcutaneously administered twice on the first and 7th day. The single high dose (5 g/kg.bw was the practical upper limit in an acute toxicity study and was administered subcutaneously on the first day. Blank HCO-SLN, native tilmicosin, and saline solution were included as controls. After medication, animals were monitored over 14 days, and then necropsied. Signs of toxicity were evaluated via mortality, symptoms of treatment effect, gross and microscopic pathology, and hematologic and biochemical parameters. Results After administration of native tilmicosin, all mice died within 2 h in the high dose group, in the low dose group 3 died after the first and 2 died after the second injections. The surviving mice in the tilmicosin low dose group showed hypoactivity, accelerated breath, gloomy spirit and lethargy. In contrast, all mice in Til-HCO-SLN and blank HCO-SLN groups survived at both low and high doses. The high nanoparticle dose induced transient clinical symptoms of treatment effect such as transient reversible action retardation, anorexy and gloomy spirit, increased spleen and liver coefficients and decreased heart coefficients, microscopic pathological changes of liver, spleen and heart, and minor changes in hematologic and biochemical parameters, but no adverse effects were observed in the nanoparticle low dose group. Conclusions The results revealed that the LD50 of Til-HCO-SLN and blank HCO-SLN exceeded 5 g/kg.bw and thus the

  1. Load dependence of changes in forearm and peripheral vascular resistance after acute leg exercise in man.

    Piepoli, M; Isea, J E; Pannarale, G; Adamopoulos, S; Sleight, P; Coats, A J

    1994-07-15

    1. It is known that acute exercise is often followed by a reduction in arterial blood pressure. Little is known about the time course of the recovery of the blood pressure or the influence of the intensity of the exercise on this response. Controversy exists, in particular, concerning the changes in peripheral resistance that occur during this period. 2. Eight normal volunteers performed, in random order on separate days, voluntary upright bicycle exercise of three different intensities (maximal, moderate and minimal load) and, on another day, a control period of sitting on a bicycle. They were monitored for 60 min after each test. 3. Diastolic pressure fell after maximal exercise at 5 min (-15.45 mmHg) and 60 min (-9.45 mmHg), compared with the control day. Systolic and mean pressure also fell (non-significantly) after 45 min; heart rate was significantly elevated for the whole hour of recovery (at 60 min, +7.23 beats min-1). No changes in post-exercise blood pressure and heart rate were observed on the days of moderate and minimal exercises. 4. An increase in cardiac index was observed after maximal exercise compared with control (at 60 min, 2.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.2 l min-1 m-2). This was entirely accounted for by the persistent increase in heart rate, with no significant alteration in stroke volume after exercise on any day.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7965851

  2. Acute Toxicity Study of Zerumbone-Loaded Nanostructured Lipid Carrier on BALB/c Mice Model

    Heshu Sulaiman Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Zerumbone- (ZER- loaded nanostructure lipid carrier (NLC (ZER-NLC prepared for its antileukemia effect in vitro was evaluated for its toxicological effects by observing changes in the liver, kidney, spleen, lung, heart, and brain tissues, serum biochemical parameters, total haemogram, and bone marrow stem cells. The acute toxicity study for ZER-NLC was conducted by orally treating BALB/c mice with a single dose with either water, olive oil, ZER, NLC, or ZER-NLC for 14 days. The animals were observed for clinical and behavioral abnormalities, toxicological symptoms, feed consumption, and gross appearance. The liver, kidney, heart, lung, spleen, and brain tissues were assessed histologically. Total haemogram was counted by hemocytometry and microhematocrit reader. Bone marrow examination in terms of cellular morphology was done by Wright staining with bone marrow smear. Furthermore, serum biochemical parameters were determined spectrophotometrically. Grossly all treated mice, their investigated tissues, serum biochemical parameters, total haemogram, and bone marrow were normal. At oral doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg ZER-NLC there was no sign of toxicity or mortality in BALB/c mice. This study suggests that the 50% lethal dose (LD50 of ZER-NLC is higher than 200 mg/kg, thus, safe by oral administration.

  3. What Is Cholesterol?

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cholesterol KidsHealth > For Teens > Cholesterol Print A A A ... High Cholesterol? en español ¿Qué es el colesterol? Cholesterol Is a Fat in the Blood Cholesterol (kuh- ...

  4. Ethanol Extract of Fructus Schisandrae Decreases Hepatic Triglyceride Level in Mice Fed with a High Fat/Cholesterol Diet, with Attention to Acute Toxicity

    Si-Yuan Pan; Zhi-Ling Yu; Hang Dong; Chun-Jing Xiang; Wang-Fun Fong; Kam-Ming Ko

    2011-01-01

    Effects of the ethanol extract of Fructus Schisandrae (EtFSC) on serum and liver lipid contents were investigated in mice fed with high fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet for 8 or 15 days. The induction of hypercholesterolemia by HFC diet caused significant increases in serum and hepatic total cholesterol (TC) levels (up to 62% and 165%, resp.) and hepatic triglyceride (TG) levels (up to 528%) in mice. EtFSC treatment (1 or 5 g/kg/day for 7 days; from Day 1 to 7 or from Day 8 to 14, i.g.) significant...

  5. Acute Inflammatory Response to Low-, Moderate-, and High-Load Resistance Exercise in Women With Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema.

    Cormie, Prue; Singh, Benjamin; Hayes, Sandi; Peake, Jonathan M; Galvão, Daniel A; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Nosaka, Kazunori; Cornish, Bruce; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Newton, Robert U

    2016-09-01

    Background Resistance exercise is emerging as a potential adjunct therapy to aid in the management of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). However, the mechanisms underlying the relationships between the acute and long-term benefits of resistance exercise on BCRL are not well understood. Purpose To examine the acute inflammatory response to upper-body resistance exercise in women with BCRL and to compare these effects between resistance exercises involving low, moderate, and high loads. The impact on lymphedema status and associated symptoms was also compared. Methods A total of 21 women, 62 ± 10 years old, with BCRL participated in the study. Participants completed low-load (15-20 repetition maximum [RM]), moderate-load (10-12 RM), and high-load (6-8 RM) exercise sessions consisting of 3 sets of 6 upper-body resistance exercises. Sessions were completed in a randomized order separated by a 7- to 10-day wash-out period. Venous blood samples were obtained to assess markers of exercise-induced muscle damage and inflammation. Lymphedema status was assessed using bioimpedance spectroscopy and arm circumferences, and associated symptoms were assessed using Visual Analogue Scales for pain, heaviness, and tightness. Measurements were conducted before and 24 hours after the exercise sessions. Results No significant changes in creatine kinase, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α were observed following the 3 resistance exercise sessions. There were no significant changes in arm swelling or symptom severity scores across the 3 resistance exercise conditions. Conclusions The magnitude of acute exercise-induced inflammation following upper-body resistance exercise in women with BCRL does not vary between resistance exercise loads. PMID:26582633

  6. Cholesterol and lifestyle

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000099.htm Cholesterol and lifestyle To use the sharing features on ... Stroke Serious heart or blood vessel disease Your Cholesterol Numbers All men should have their blood cholesterol ...

  7. Cholesterol testing and results

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000386.htm Cholesterol testing and results To use the sharing features ... can tell you what your goal should be. Cholesterol Tests Some cholesterol is considered good and some ...

  8. Cholesterol Facts and Statistics

    ... Blood Pressure Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program High Cholesterol Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir As ... the facts about high cholesterol [PDF-281K] . High Cholesterol in the United States 73.5 million adults ( ...

  9. Tissue-selective acute effects of inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase on cholesterol biosynthesis in lens

    To evaluate the effects of lovastatin, simvastatin and pravastatin on cholesterol synthesis in the lens, we developed a facile, reproducible ex-vivo assay using lenses from wean ling rats explanted to tissue culture medium. [14 C] acetate incorporation into cholesterol was proportional to time and to the number of lenses in the incubation and was completely eliminated by high concentrations of inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase. At the same time, incorporation into free fatty acids was not inhibited, In market contrast to the liver, the dose-response curve for pravastatin in lens was shifted two orders of magnitude to the right of the curves for lovastatin acid and simvastatin acid. The calculated I C50 values were 4.5 ± 0.7 nM, 5.2 ± 1.5 nM, and 469 ± 42 nM for lovastatin acid, simvastatin acid, and pravastatin, respectively. Thus, while equally active in the liver, pravastatin was 100-fold less inhibitory in the lens compared to lovastatin and simvastatin. Similar selectivity was observed with rabbit lens. Following oral dosing, ex vivo inhibition of [14 C] acetate incorporation into cholesterol in rat liver was similar for lovastatin and pravastatin, but cholesterol synthesis is in lens was inhibited by lovastatin by as much as 70%. This inhibition was dose-dependent and no inhibition in lens was observed with pravastatin even at very high doses. (author)

  10. Acute hormonal and force responses to combined strength and endurance loadings in men and women: the "order effect".

    Ritva S Taipale

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To examine acute responses and recovery of serum hormones and muscle force following combined strength (S and endurance (E loading sessions in which the order of exercises is reversed (ES vs. SE. METHODS: This cross-over study design included recreationally endurance trained men and women (age 21-45 years, n = 12 men n = 10 women who performed both loadings. Maximal bilateral isometric strength (MVC, isometric rate of force development (RFD and serum concentrations of testosterone (T, cortisol (C, growth hormone (GH, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1, binding protein 3 (IGFBP3 and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG were measured during and after both loadings. RESULTS: Both of the present combined (ES and SE loadings led to a greater acute decrease in MVC in men than in women, while RFD was slightly affected only in men. Recovery of MVC and RFD to baseline was complete at 24 h regardless of the order of exercises. In men, neuromuscular fatigue was accompanied by increased C concentrations observed post SE. This was followed by decreased concentrations of T at 24 h and 48 h that were significantly lower than those observed following ES. GH response in men also differed significantly post loadings. In women, only a significant difference in T between ES and SE loadings was observed at post. CONCLUSION: These observed differences in hormonal responses despite similarities in neuromuscular fatigue in men indicate the presence of an order effect as the body was not fully recovered at 48 h following SE. These findings may be applicable in training prescription in order to optimize specific training adaptations.

  11. Influence factors of salt-sensitive hypertension and responses of blood pressure and urinary sodium and potassium excretion to acute oral saline loading among essential hypertensive patients

    刘叶舟

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the influence factors of saltsensitive hypertension and to observe changes of blood pressures and urinary sodium and potassium excretion in response to acute oral saline loading among essential hypertensive patients in China.Methods Essential hypertensive patients from Beijing Jinzhan second community were included in this study.Salt-sensitivity was determined via the improved Sullivan’s acute oral saline loading

  12. Changes in cholesterol homeostasis and acute phase response link pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes to risk of cardiovascular disease

    Poulsen, Sarah S.; Saber, Anne T.; Mortensen, Alicja;

    2015-01-01

    Adverse lung effects following pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are well documented in rodents. However, systemic effects are less understood. Epidemiological studies have shown increased cardiovascular disease risk after pulmonary exposure to airborne particles, which...... hepatic effects. The two MWCNTs induced similar systemic responses despite their different physicochemical properties. APR proteins SAA3 and haptoglobin, plasma total cholesterol and low-density/very low-density lipoprotein were significantly increased following exposure to either MWCNTs. Plasma SAA3...

  13. Affective Responses to Acute Resistance Exercise Performed at Self-Selected and Imposed Loads in Trained Women.

    Focht, Brian C; Garver, Matthew J; Cotter, Joshua A; Devor, Steven T; Lucas, Alexander R; Fairman, Ciaran M

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the affective responses to acute resistance exercise (RE) performed at self-selected (SS) and imposed loads in recreationally trained women. Secondary purposes were to (a) examine differences in correlates of motivation for future participation in RE and (b) determine whether affective responses to RE were related to these select motivational correlates of RE participation. Twenty recreationally trained young women (mean age = 23 years) completed 3 RE sessions involving 3 sets of 10 repetitions using loads of 40% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM), 70% 1RM, and an SS load. Affective responses were assessed before, during, and after each RE session using the Feeling Scale. Self-efficacy and intention for using the imposed and SS loads for their regular RE participation during the next month were also assessed postexercise. Results revealed that although the SS and imposed load RE sessions yielded different trajectories of change in affect during exercise (p motivational correlates of resistance training. PMID:26506060

  14. Reverse cholesterol transport revisited

    Astrid; E; van; der; Velde

    2010-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport was originally described as the high-density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol flux from the periphery via the hepatobiliary tract to the intestinal lumen, leading to fecal excretion. Since the introduction of reverse cholesterol transport in the 1970s, this pathway has been intensively investigated. In this topic highlight, the classical reverse cholesterol transport concepts are discussed and the subject reverse cholesterol transport is revisited.

  15. Tissue storage and control of cholesterol metabolism in man on high cholesterol diets.

    Quintão, E C; Brumer, S; Stechhahn, K

    1977-03-01

    The possibility of accumulation of tissue cholesterol in human beings submitted to high cholesterol feeding was investigated in liver biopsies and through fecal sterol balance studies. Feeding to 10 individuals 3.1 to 3.4 g/day of cholesterol for 3 weeks raised the mean serum level from 293 to 349 mg/100 ml, namely 19%, whereas the liver cholesterol content was 417 mg/100 g of wet weight. In 10 control cases eating 0.1--0.4 g/day of cholesterol serum cholesterol remained stable throughout the experimental period and the liver cholesterol content was 256 mg/100 g. Difference of liver colesterol level between the two groups was 62%. In 7 patients submitted to two periods of balance investigation on a cholesterol-free synthetic formula diet respectively prior to (PI) and after (PIII) eating the high cholesterol solid food from 4 to 15 weeks (PII), fecal steroid excretion in PIII exceeded PI in 3 patients. Such data are a direct evidence for the existence of an efficient system to release acutely stored cholesterol. In one patient bile acid excretion accounted for the difference between PIII and PI. PMID:849375

  16. Acute Effects of Loaded Half-Squat Jumps on Sprint Running Speed in Track and Field Athletes and Soccer Players.

    Vanderka, Marián; Krčmár, Matúš; Longová, Katarína; Walker, Simon

    2016-06-01

    Vanderka, M, Krčmár, M, Longová, K, and Walker, S. Acute effects of loaded half-squat jumps on sprint running speed in track and field athletes and soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1540-1546, 2016-The purpose of the study was to determine the acute responses to a jump squat protocol designed to induce postactivation potentiation on sprint running performance in experienced track and field athletes and soccer players. Twenty-five regional level athletes (12 track and field: ∼17 years; ∼177 cm; ∼73 kg and 13 soccer: ∼18 years; ∼175 cm; ∼72 kg) performed 2 test sessions assessing 40-m sprint running performance in a balanced, crossover design. Dual-beam light timing gates measured 0-20 and 20-40 m sprint times before and after either 9 minutes of sitting (control) or 2 sets of 6 repetition half-squat jump with the load eliciting maximum power (experimental) conditions. Sprint performance was significantly enhanced over both 0-20 m (3.09 ± 0.07 to 3.04 ± 0.08 seconds; Δ ∼1.5%; p ≤ 0.05) and 20-40 m (2.42 ± 0.09 to 2.39 ± 0.09 seconds; Δ ∼1%; p ≤ 0.05) in track and field athletes only. Also, the magnitude of enhanced sprint performance was related to baseline 0-20 m sprint performance (r = 0.44; p = 0.028; n = 25). It seems that using loaded half-squat jumps to enhance sprint performance could be used in training of high-level young athletes. PMID:26562707

  17. Cholesterol - drug treatment

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000314.htm Cholesterol - drug treatment To use the sharing features on ... treatment; Hardening of the arteries - statin Statins for Cholesterol Statins reduce your risk of heart disease, stroke, ...

  18. Get Your Cholesterol Checked

    ... You also get cholesterol by eating foods like egg yolks, fatty meats, and regular cheese. If you have too much cholesterol in your body, it can build up inside your blood vessels and make it hard for blood to ...

  19. Acute Consumption of Walnuts and Walnut Components Differentially Affect Postprandial Lipemia, Endothelial Function, Oxidative Stress, and Cholesterol Efflux in Humans with Mild Hypercholesterolemia.

    Walnut consumption improves cardiovascular disease risk; however, to our knowledge, the contribution of individual walnut components has not been assessed. This study evaluated the acute consumption of whole walnuts (85 g), separated nut skins (5.6 g), de-fatted nutmeat (34 g), and nut oil (51 g) on...

  20. Common Misconceptions about Cholesterol

    ... your doctor recommends. Learn more about eating a healthy diet. Thin people don't have to worry about high cholesterol. A person with any body type can have high cholesterol. Overweight people are more likely to have ... heart-healthy. Have your cholesterol checked regularly regardless of your ...

  1. Home-Use Tests - Cholesterol

    ... Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Home Use Tests Cholesterol Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... a home-use test kit to measure total cholesterol. What cholesterol is: Cholesterol is a fat (lipid) ...

  2. Prognostic impact of FLT3-ITD load in NPM1 mutated acute myeloid leukemia.

    Schnittger, S; Bacher, U; Kern, W; Alpermann, T; Haferlach, C; Haferlach, T

    2011-08-01

    High FLT3-ITD/wildtype (wt) load in FLT3-ITD-mutated AML has been associated with adverse impact on outcome in several studies. To clarify whether FLT3-ITD load as expressed as FLT3-ITD/wt ratio is also relevant in patients with NPM1 mutated AML, we assessed the FLT3-ITD mutation status and FLT3-ITD/wt ratio by fragment analysis in 638 NPM1mut AML (339 females; 299 males; 17.8-88.0 years), and analyzed its prognostic relevance in 355 patients. FLT3-ITD of various length and load were detected in 243/638 cases (38.1%). Median EFS (19.3 vs 9.7 months, P<0.001) and median 2-year survival rate (72.0 vs 52.7%, P=0.006) was better in FLT3wt (n=212 with available follow-up data) than FLT3-ITD (n=143). A higher FLT3-ITD/wt ratio as continuous variable was correlated with a shorter EFS (P=0.028). When patients were separated into subgroups according to the FLT3-ITD mutation load, only a FLT3-ITD/wt ratio 0.5 conferred an independent adverse impact on EFS and OS, and retained its prognostic significance also in multivariate analysis (P=0.009 for EFS, P=0.008 for OS). In conclusion, for risk estimation in NPM1 mutated AML not only the FLT3-ITD status, but also the FLT3-ITD load has to be taken into account. These data might contribute to clinical decision making in AML. PMID:21537333

  3. Changes in cholesterol homeostasis and acute phase response link pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes to risk of cardiovascular disease

    Poulsen, Sarah S.; Saber, Anne T.; Mortensen, Alicja; Szarek, Jozef; Wu, Dongmei; Williams, Andrew; Andersen, Ole; Nicklas R. Jacobsen; Yauk, Carole L.; Wallin, Hakan; Halappanavar, Sabina; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    Adverse lung effects following pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are well documented in rodents. However, systemic effects are less understood. Epidemiological studies have shown increased cardiovascular disease risk after pulmonary exposure to airborne particles, which has led to concerns that inhalation exposure to MWCNTs might pose similar risks. We analyzed parameters related to cardiovascular disease, including plasma acute phase response (APR) proteins and pla...

  4. Statin-induced chronic cholesterol depletion inhibits Leishmania donovani infection: Relevance of optimum host membrane cholesterol.

    Kumar, G Aditya; Roy, Saptarshi; Jafurulla, Md; Mandal, Chitra; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-09-01

    Leishmania are obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that invade and survive within host macrophages leading to leishmaniasis, a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, particularly among economically weaker sections in tropical and subtropical regions. Visceral leishmaniasis is a potent disease caused by Leishmania donovani. The detailed mechanism of internalization of Leishmania is poorly understood. A basic step in the entry of Leishmania involves interaction of the parasite with the host plasma membrane. In this work, we have explored the effect of chronic metabolic cholesterol depletion using lovastatin on the entry and survival of Leishmania donovani in host macrophages. We show here that chronic cholesterol depletion of host macrophages results in reduction in the attachment of Leishmania promastigotes, along with a concomitant reduction in the intracellular amastigote load. These results assume further relevance since chronic cholesterol depletion is believed to mimic physiological cholesterol modulation. Interestingly, the reduction in the ability of Leishmania to enter host macrophages could be reversed upon metabolic replenishment of cholesterol. Importantly, enrichment of host membrane cholesterol resulted in reduction in the entry and survival of Leishmania in host macrophages. As a control, the binding of Escherichia coli to host macrophages remained invariant under these conditions, thereby implying specificity of cholesterol requirement for effective leishmanial infection. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute the first comprehensive demonstration that an optimum content of host membrane cholesterol is necessary for leishmanial infection. Our results assume relevance in the context of developing novel therapeutic strategies targeting cholesterol-mediated leishmanial infection. PMID:27319380

  5. Complement lysis activity in autologous plasma is associated with lower viral loads during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection.

    Michael Huber

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To explore the possibility that antibody-mediated complement lysis contributes to viremia control in HIV-1 infection, we measured the activity of patient plasma in mediating complement lysis of autologous primary virus. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Sera from two groups of patients-25 with acute HIV-1 infection and 31 with chronic infection-were used in this study. We developed a novel real-time PCR-based assay strategy that allows reliable and sensitive quantification of virus lysis by complement. Plasma derived at the time of virus isolation induced complement lysis of the autologous virus isolate in the majority of patients. Overall lysis activity against the autologous virus and the heterologous primary virus strain JR-FL was higher at chronic disease stages than during the acute phase. Most strikingly, we found that plasma virus load levels during the acute but not the chronic infection phase correlated inversely with the autologous complement lysis activity. Antibody reactivity to the envelope (Env proteins gp120 and gp41 were positively correlated with the lysis activity against JR-FL, indicating that anti-Env responses mediated complement lysis. Neutralization and complement lysis activity against autologous viruses were not associated, suggesting that complement lysis is predominantly caused by non-neutralizing antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively our data provide evidence that antibody-mediated complement virion lysis develops rapidly and is effective early in the course of infection; thus it should be considered a parameter that, in concert with other immune functions, steers viremia control in vivo.

  6. Effect of a pre-freezing treatment with cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrins on boar sperm longevity, capacitation dynamics, ability to adhere to porcine oviductal epithelial cells in vitro and DNA fragmentation dynamics.

    Tomás, C; Blanch, E; Fazeli, A; Mocé, E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to examine how a pre-freezing treatment with cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrins (CLC) affects boar sperm longevity, capacitation dynamics, ability to bind to a porcine telomerase-immortalised oviductal epithelial cell line (TERT-OPEC) in vitro and DNA integrity dynamics after freeze-thawing. Although the samples treated with CLC exhibited lower sperm quality than the control samples (P0.05) after long-term incubation (26h at 37 or 16°C). Additionally, the CLC-treated spermatozoa underwent similar capacitation and DNA fragmentation dynamics as the control spermatozoa (P>0.05). However, CLC-treated spermatozoa were better able to bind to TERT-OPEC in vitro (POPEC in vitro, which could have an effect on the establishment of the sperm reservoir in the ampullary--isthmic junction in vivo. Additionally, frozen-thawed spermatozoa can be stored at 16°C for at least 6h without a significant observable decline in sperm quality, which could be beneficial for the transport of thawed diluted doses of spermatozoa from the laboratory to the farm. PMID:23036662

  7. Relationships between static foot alignment and dynamic plantar loads in runners with acute and chronic stages of plantar fasciitis: a cross-sectional study

    Ana P. Ribeiro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk factors for the development of plantar fasciitis (PF have been associated with the medial longitudinal arch (MLA, rearfoot alignment and calcaneal overload. However, the relationships between the biomechanical variables have yet to be determined. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate the relationships between the MLA, rearfoot alignment, and dynamic plantar loads in runners with unilateral PF in acute and chronic phases. METHOD: Cross-sectional study which thirty-five runners with unilateral PF were evaluated: 20 in the acute phase (with pain and 15 with previous chronic PF (without pain. The MLA index and rearfoot alignment were calculated using digital images. The contact area, maximum force, peak pressure, and force-time integral over three plantar areas were acquired with Pedar X insoles while running at 12 km/h, and the loading rates were calculated from the vertical forces. RESULTS: The multiple regression analyses indicated that both the force-time integral (R2=0.15 for acute phase PF; R2=0.17 for chronic PF and maximum force (R2=0.35 for chronic PF over the forefoot were predicted by an elevated MLA index. The rearfoot valgus alignment predicted the maximum force over the rearfoot in both PF groups: acute (R2=0.18 and chronic (R2=0.45. The rearfoot valgus alignment also predicted higher loading rates in the PF groups: acute (R2=0.19 and chronic (R2=0.40. CONCLUSION: The MLA index and the rearfoot alignment were good predictors of plantar loads over the forefoot and rearfoot areas in runners with PF. However, rearfoot valgus was demonstrated to be an important clinical measure, since it was able to predict the maximum force and both loading rates over the rearfoot.

  8. Mitochondrial cholesterol: mechanisms of import and effects on mitochondrial function.

    Martin, Laura A; Kennedy, Barry E; Karten, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria require cholesterol for biogenesis and membrane maintenance, and for the synthesis of steroids, oxysterols and hepatic bile acids. Multiple pathways mediate the transport of cholesterol from different subcellular pools to mitochondria. In steroidogenic cells, the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) interacts with a mitochondrial protein complex to mediate cholesterol delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane for conversion to pregnenolone. In non-steroidogenic cells, several members of a protein family defined by the presence of a StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain play key roles in the delivery of cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes. Subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), termed mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM), form membrane contact sites with mitochondria and may contribute to the transport of ER cholesterol to mitochondria, either independently or in conjunction with lipid-transfer proteins. Model systems of mitochondria enriched with cholesterol in vitro and mitochondria isolated from cells with (patho)physiological mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation clearly demonstrate that mitochondrial cholesterol levels affect mitochondrial function. Increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels have been observed in several diseases, including cancer, ischemia, steatohepatitis and neurodegenerative diseases, and influence disease pathology. Hence, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms maintaining mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis may reveal additional targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we give a brief overview of mitochondrial cholesterol import in steroidogenic cells, and then focus on cholesterol trafficking pathways that deliver cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes in non-steroidogenic cells. We also briefly discuss the consequences of increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels on mitochondrial function and their potential role in disease pathology. PMID:25425472

  9. National Cholesterol Education Month

    2009-09-01

    Do you know your cholesterol numbers? Your doctor can do a simple test to check your cholesterol levels and help you make choices that lower your risk for heart disease and stroke.  Created: 9/1/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/9/2009.

  10. Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000787.htm Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol To use the sharing features on this page, ... are medicines that help lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol . Too much cholesterol in your blood can stick ...

  11. What Causes High Blood Cholesterol?

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes High Blood Cholesterol? Many factors can affect the cholesterol levels in your blood. You can control some ... but not others. Factors You Can Control Diet Cholesterol is found in foods that come from animal ...

  12. Clinical Impact of Rapid Reduction of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Level on Long-Term Outcome of Acute Myocardial Infarction in the Statin Era: Subanalysis of the ALPS-AMI Study.

    Takashi Miura

    Full Text Available The optimal period to achieve target percent reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C level for secondary prevention of acute myocardial infarction (AMI is not well established.The Assessment of Lipophilic vs. Hydrophilic Statin Therapy in AMI (ALPS-AMI study enrolled 508 patients (mean age, 66.0± 11.6 years; 80.6% male who were hospitalized for AMI and underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. Of these patients, 81 were excluded because of the absence of LDL-C measurements at 4 weeks after randomization. In the remaining 427 patients, the target LDL-C level reduction of ≥30% was achieved and not reached within 4 weeks after randomization in 204 cases (early reduction group and 223 cases (late reduction group. The groups were formed prospectively and analyzed with regard to the composite end point (major adverse cardiovascular event [MACE]: all-cause death, myocardial infarction, and stroke and clinical outcomes.MACE were significantly more frequent in the late reduction group compared to the early reduction group (9.4% vs. 3.4%, P = 0.013. The incidence of cardiac deaths was also significantly higher in the late reduction group (3.1% vs. 0.5%, P = 0.044. On age-adjusted Cox proportional hazards analysis in statin-naïve patients, percent reduction of LDL-C level during the initial 4 weeks (HR, 0.98; 95% CI: 0.97-0.99, P = 0.042 and baseline LDL-C level (HR, 0.98; 95% CI: 0.97-0.99, P = 0.033 predicted adverse events.Rapid reduction of LDL-C level is strongly associated with favorable outcome in patients with AMI.

  13. Lifestyle Changes and Cholesterol

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Lifestyle Changes and Cholesterol Updated:Oct 26,2015 As ... disease and stroke, your doctor may suggest some lifestyle changes. Regardless of whether your plan includes drug ...

  14. Impact of acute vivax malaria on the immune system and viral load of HIV-positive subjects

    陈小平; 肖斌权; 施文钧; 徐慧芳; 高凯; 饶纪礼; 张周斌

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore the mechanisms of malariotherapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and to identify which stage(s) of HIV infection is suitable for the treatment of malariotherapy.Methods Therapeutic acute vivax malaria was induced and terminated after 10 fever episodes in 12 HIV-1-infected subjects: Group 1 (G1) had 5 patients with CD4 T-cell counts500/μl at baseline, Group 2 (G2) had 5 patients with CD4 at 499-200/μl and Group 3 had 2 patients with CD4<200/μl (not included in statistical analysis). Enzyme-Linked-Immuno-Sorbent Assay (ELISA) was used to measure plasma levels of cytokines and soluble activation markers. Flow cytometry was used to measure levels of lymphocyte subsets and phenotypes and CD4 cell apoptosis. Bayer bDNA assay was used to test plasma levels of HIV-1 RNA (viral load). Samples were taken and tested twice before malaria (baselines), three times during malaria and seven times after termination of malaria (at day 10 and 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months). Results Levels of plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), soluble TNF-α receptor-2 (sTNF-RII), neopterin (NPT) and soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R) significantly increased during malaria and sharply reduced to baselines post malaria in all groups. Stronger responses of the aforementioned factors were seen in G2 than in G1 during malaria (P=0.081, 0.001, 0.013, 0.020). CD4 count and percentage; CD4/CD8 ratio and CD25+ and CD4+CD25+ percentages increased but HLA DR+ percentage decreased either during or post malaria in G2. Most G2 patients experienced sustained increase but most G1 patients underwent natural history decline of CD4 counts and percentages during 2-year follow-up. Percentage of apoptotic CD4 cells decreased post malaria in all groups. G3 patients had weaker immune responses, however, one advanced AIDS patient in this group experienced clinical improvement after malariotherapy. Most of the 12 patients experienced increase of HIV viral load during

  15. Reverse cholesterol transport: a potential therapeutic target for atherosclerosis

    Ying ZHAO

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of death in the Western society due to the development of acute clinical events such as myocardial infarction and cerebral stroke. Currently, lowering plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) levels using statins, inhibitors of de-novo cholesterol synthesis, is the main therapeutic strategy to prevent the progression of atherosclerosis. The remaining high incidence of cardiovascular disease indicates a clear need for new therapies. Numerous epidemiological studies hav...

  16. Hubungan Kadar Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol dengan Kejadian dan Keparahan Stroke Akut

    Hasibuan, Azwita Effrina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : The role of serum cholesterol as the stroke etiology is still uncertain. Studies that focused on the association between low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC) and acute stroke was still rare, with inconsistent results. The aim of this study is to evaluate the correlation between LDL-C level and the acute stroke occurance and severity. Methods : We conducted a cross-sectional study of 51-acute stroke patients in Adam Malik General Hospital, Medan. Subjects...

  17. HDL cholesterol: atherosclerosis and beyond

    Stroes, E. S. G.; Hovingh, G. K.; Kuivenhoven, J. A.; Bochem, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the Western world. Myocardial infarction and stroke are the result of a compromised blood flow which may result from cholesterol accumulation in the vessel wall due to high plasma levels of LDL cholesterol. High plasma levels of HDL cholesterol, however, are inversely associated with CVD. This is commonly ascribed to a concept called "reverse cholesterol transport" a mechanism by which the HDL particle takes up cholesterol from the...

  18. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol of less than 70 mg/dL is associated with fewer cardiovascular events in acute coronary syndrome patients: a real-life cohort in Thailand

    Chinwong D

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dujrudee Chinwong,1,2 Jayanton Patumanond,3 Surarong Chinwong,1 Khanchai Siriwattana,4 Siriluck Gunaparn,5 John Joseph Hall,6 Arintaya Phrommintikul5 1Department of Pharmaceutical Care, Faculty of Pharmacy, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 2Clinical Epidemiology Program, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 3Center of Excellence in Applied Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand; 4Division of Medicine, Nakornping Hospital, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 5Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 6Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia Background: Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease or mortality; however, the LDL-C goal for therapy in acute coronary syndrome (ACS patients is controversial and varies among guidelines. This study aimed to assess the effect of reaching an LDL-C goal of <70 mg/dL (<1.8 mmol/L on first composite cardiovascular outcomes in routine clinical practice in Thailand.Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using medical charts and the electronic hospital database of patients diagnosed with ACS and treated with statins at a tertiary care hospital in Thailand between 2009 and 2012. After admission, patients were followed from the date of LDL-C goal assessment until the first event of composite cardiovascular outcomes (nonfatal ACS, nonfatal stroke, or all-cause death. Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for potential confounders were used.Results: Of 405 patients, mean age was 65 years (60% males. Twenty-seven percent of the patients attained an LDL-C goal of <70 mg/dL, 38% had LDL-C between 70 and 99 mg/dL, and 35% had LDL-C ≥100 mg/dL. Forty-six patients experienced a composite

  19. Regulation of cholesterol homeostasis

    van der Wulp, Mariette Y. M.; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Groen, Albert K.

    2013-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is caused by a disturbed balance between cholesterol secretion into the blood versus uptake. The pathways involved are regulated via a complex interplay of enzymes, transport proteins, transcription factors and non-codin

  20. Characterization of placental cholesterol transport

    Lindegaard, Marie L; Wassif, Christopher A; Vaisman, Boris;

    2008-01-01

    cholesterol, in utero treatment with TO901317 resulted in increased cholesterol content in Dhcr7(-/-) embryos. Our data support the hypothesis that Abca1, and possibly Sr-b1, contributes to transport maternal cholesterol to the developing fetus. Furthermore, we show, as a proof of principle, that modulating......Patients with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) are born with multiple congenital abnormalities. Postnatal cholesterol supplementation is provided; however, it cannot correct developmental malformations due to in utero cholesterol deficit. Increased transport of cholesterol from maternal to fetal...... embryonic days 13.5 and 18.5 in placental tissue; whereas, Sr-b1 expression decreased. To examine the functional role of Abca1, Abcg1 and Sr-b1 we measured the maternal-fetal transfer of (14)C-cholesterol in corresponding mutant embryos. Disruption of either Abca1 or Sr-b1 decreased cholesterol transfer by...

  1. What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean Updated:Aug 9,2016 How’s your ... the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Interactive Cholesterol Guide Find videos, trackers and more with our ...

  2. Mitochondria, cholesterol and cancer cell metabolism.

    Ribas, Vicent; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2016-12-01

    Given the role of mitochondria in oxygen consumption, metabolism and cell death regulation, alterations in mitochondrial function or dysregulation of cell death pathways contribute to the genesis and progression of cancer. Cancer cells exhibit an array of metabolic transformations induced by mutations leading to gain-of-function of oncogenes and loss-of-function of tumor suppressor genes that include increased glucose consumption, reduced mitochondrial respiration, increased reactive oxygen species generation and cell death resistance, all of which ensure cancer progression. Cholesterol metabolism is disturbed in cancer cells and supports uncontrolled cell growth. In particular, the accumulation of cholesterol in mitochondria emerges as a molecular component that orchestrates some of these metabolic alterations in cancer cells by impairing mitochondrial function. As a consequence, mitochondrial cholesterol loading in cancer cells may contribute, in part, to the Warburg effect stimulating aerobic glycolysis to meet the energetic demand of proliferating cells, while protecting cancer cells against mitochondrial apoptosis due to changes in mitochondrial membrane dynamics. Further understanding the complexity in the metabolic alterations of cancer cells, mediated largely through alterations in mitochondrial function, may pave the way to identify more efficient strategies for cancer treatment involving the use of small molecules targeting mitochondria, cholesterol homeostasis/trafficking and specific metabolic pathways. PMID:27455839

  3. Effects of dietary cholesterol on cholesterol and bile acid homeostasis in patients with cholesterol gallstones.

    Kern, F

    1994-01-01

    We examined changes in cholesterol and bile acid metabolism produced by dietary cholesterol in gallstone subjects and matched controls. Healthy women were recruited and, after confirming the presence or absence of radiolucent gallstones, they were studied on regular diets and again on the same diet supplemented with five eggs daily for 15-18 d. Studies included plasma lipids, lipoproteins and apolipoproteins, dietary records, cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis, plasma clearance of ...

  4. Lysosomes, cholesterol and atherosclerosis

    Jerome, W. Gray

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol-engorged macrophage foam cells are a critical component of the atherosclerotic lesion. Reducing the sterol deposits in lesions reduces clinical events. Sterol accumulations within lysosomes have proven to be particularly hard to mobilize out of foam cells. Moreover, excess sterol accumulation in lysosomes has untoward effects, including a complete disruption of lysosome function. Recently, we demonstrated that treatment of sterol-engorged macrophages in culture with triglyceride-c...

  5. HDL: More Than Just Cholesterol

    Anna Meilina

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasma concentration of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C are strongly, consistenly, and independently inversely associated with risk of atheroschlerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD. However, the last decade has seen several observations that do not follow this simple script. CONTENT: A proteomic analysis of HDL has given us an intriguing glimpse into novel components of HDL. HDL isolated from normal humans contains several classes of proteins, including not only apolipoproteins, but also complement regulatory proteins, endopeptidase inhibitors, hemopexin, and acute phase response proteins. These observations raise the possibility of unsuspected roles for HDL. HDL delivery of complement proteins would implicate HDL in innate immunity. Serine proteinase inhibitors would enable HDL to modulate proteolysis of the vessel wall. HDL from patients with coronary artery disease was enriched in apoE, apoC-IV, apoA-IV, Paraoxonase (PON, and complement factor C3. Highlighted additional mechanisms through which HDL protects the vessel wall are: HDL improves vascular function, decreases vascular inflammation, detoxifies radicals, and limits thrombosis. SUMMARY: Both inter- and intra-organ desynchrony may be involved in the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic disease attributable to effects in brain and multiple metabolic tissues including heart, liver, fat, muscle, pancreas, and gut. Efforts to dissect the molecular mediators that coordinate circadian, metabolic, and cardiovascular systems may ultimately lead to both improved therapeutics and preventive interventions. KEYWORDS: HDL, Apo–A1, RCT, inflammation, HDL dysfunction, HDL proteome, HDL & Apo-A1 mimetics.

  6. The production and characterization of drug-loaded liposomal and PLGA nanocarriers for targeted treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    Gundersen, Edvin Tang

    2016-01-01

    While some progress has been made lately in developing transplantation therapy against acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it remains a problematic and aggressive disease, associated with both poor survival, as well as treatments with high toxicity. The field of nanomedicine is however aiming to improve treatment therapies by using dedicated nanocarriers to deliver therapeutics. Such drug delivery systems may provide benefits like more targeted drug delivery, as wel...

  7. Importance of macrophage cholesterol content on the flux of cholesterol mass

    Sankaranarayanan, Sandhya; de la Llera-Moya, Margarita; Drazul-Schrader, Denise; Asztalos, Bela F.; Weibel, Ginny L.; Rothblat, George H.

    2010-01-01

    Net flux of cholesterol represents the difference between efflux and influx and can result in net cell-cholesterol accumulation, net cell-cholesterol depletion, or no change in cellular cholesterol content. We measured radiolabeled cell-cholesterol efflux and cell-cholesterol mass using cholesterol-normal and -enriched J774 and elicited mouse peritoneal macrophage cells. Net cell-cholesterol effluxes were observed when cholesterol-enriched J774 cells were incubated with 3.5% apolipoprotein (a...

  8. Anti-inflammatory effects of locally applied enzyme-loaded ultradeformable vesicles on an acute cutaneous model.

    Simões, Sandra; Marques, Cláudia; Cruz, Maria Eugénia; Martins, Maria Bárbara Figueira

    2009-11-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) are active scavengers of reactive oxygen species and were incorporated into ultradeformable vesicles with the aim of increasing enzyme bioavailability (skin delivery). These special very adaptable vesicles have been formulated and optimized for enzyme transport in order to penetrate into or across the intact skin barrier. Anti-inflammatory activity of SOD-loaded, CAT-loaded and of SOD- and CAT-loaded ultradeformable vesicles applied epicutaneously was measured using different protein doses on the skin, on an arachidonic acid-induced mouse ear oedema. The biological anti-oedema activity is a measurement of drug-targeting potentiation in the organ. Delivery by means of deformable vesicles was compared to conventional vesicles or the absence of an enzyme carrier mediated transport. This was done at various times following prophylactic application of the test formulations. Positive reference groups were treated epicutaneously with several low molecular weight non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The latter included indomethacin (3 mg kg(-1)), etofenamate (30 mg kg(-1)) and piroxicam (1 mg kg(-1)) and reduced the oedema by 94 +/- 4%, 81 +/- 4% and 42 +/- 5%, respectively, if measured 30 min after ear treatment with a NSAID. Of the enzyme-loaded carriers tested, only the enzyme-loaded ultradeformable vesicles reduced the swelling of ears significantly: SOD (90 microg kg(-1)), CAT (250 microg kg(-1)) and SOD (90 microg kg(-1)) plus CAT (250 microg kg(-1)) reduced the oedema by 70 +/- 12%, 65 +/- 10% and 61 +/- 19%, respectively, at t = 30 min. Aqueous enzyme solutions and empty carriers had no such effect. The combination of two enzymes resulted in no increased therapeutic effect, but the results are inconclusive since only two dose combinations were tested. The results presented in this study suggest that antioxidant enzymes delivered by means of ultradeformable lipid vesicles can serve as a novel region

  9. Nova imagem radiográfica de apendicite aguda: acúmulo fecal no ceco New radiographic sign of acute appendicitis: fecal loading in the cecum

    Andy Petroianu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apesar das características radiográficas da apendicite aguda estarem bem documentadas, o valor da radiografia simples de abdome ainda não foi completamente estudado. Nesse sentido, o objetivo do presente trabalho foi verificar um novo sinal radiográfico caracterizado pela imagem de acúmulo fecal no ceco. MÉTODO: Foram estudados prospectivamente 170 pacientes consecutivos, de ambos os sexos, internados com abdome agudo e dor localizada no flanco direito, distribuídos em dois grupos: Grupo 1 (n = 100 - portadores de apendicite aguda, submetidos a um estudo radiográfico do abdome antes do tratamento cirúrgico, Grupo 2 (n = 70 - submetidos a dois estudos radiográficos do abdome:antes da operação e outro no dia seguinte à cirurgia. Todas as radiografias foram simples, em incidência ântero-posterior. RESULTADOS: A presença do sinal de acúmulo fecal no ceco esteve presente em 97 (97% pacientes do Grupo 1 e em 68 (97,14% pacientes do Grupo 2. No pós-operatório, dos 68 pacientes que apresentaram o sinal radiográfico, esse desapareceu em 66 casos. A sensibilidade do sinal radiográfico para apendicite aguda foi de 97,05 %. CONCLUSÕES: A imagem radiográfica de acúmulo fecal no ceco associa-se a apendicite aguda. Essa imagem geralmente desaparece após o apêndice cecal ser removido.BACKGROUND: Although the radiographic characteristics of acute appendicitis have been well documented, the value of plain abdominal radiograph has not been completely studied. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to verify a new radiographic sign: the presence of fecal loading in the cecum. METHODS: One hundred seventy consecutive patients of both sexes have been studied prospectively. They were admitted to the hospital due to acute abdominal pain localized in the right flank. The patients were divided in two groups: Group 1 (n = 100 - diagnosed clinically as acute appendicitis and submitted to an abdominal radiographic study a few

  10. Specificity of the Acute Tryptophan and Tyrosine Plus Phenylalanine Depletion and Loading Tests I. Review of Biochemical Aspects and Poor Specificity of Current Amino Acid Formulations

    Abdulla A.-B. Badawy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The acute tryptophan or tyrosine plus phenylalanine depletion and loading tests are powerful tools for studying the roles of serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline in normal subjects and those with behavioural disorders. The current amino acid formulations for these tests, however, are associated with undesirable decreases in ratios of tryptophan or tyrosine plus phenylalanine to competing amino acids resulting in loss of specificity. This could confound biochemical and behavioural findings. Compositions of current formulations are reviewed, the biochemical principles underpinning the tests are revisited and examples of unintended changes in the above ratios and their impact on monoamine function and behaviour will be demonstrated from data in the literature. The presence of excessive amounts of the 3 branched-chain amino acids Leu, Ile and Val is responsible for these unintended decreases and the consequent loss of specificity. Strategies for enhancing the specificity of the different formulations are proposed.

  11. Data on respiratory variables in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+).

    Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Xirouchaki, Nectaria; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Younes, Magdy

    2016-09-01

    The data show respiratory variables in 108 critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+) after at least 36 h on passive mechanical ventilation. PAV+ was continued for 48 h until the patients met pre-defined criteria either for switching to controlled modes or for breathing without ventilator assistance. Data during passive mechanical ventilation and during PAV+ are reported. Data are acquired from the whole population, as well as from patients with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome. The reported variables are tidal volume, driving pressure (ΔP, the difference between static end-inspiratory plateau pressure and positive end-expiratory airway pressure), respiratory system compliance and resistance, and arterial blood gasses. The data are supplemental to our original research article, which described individual ΔP in these patients and examined how it related to ΔP when the same patients were ventilated with passive mechanical ventilation using the currently accepted lung-protective strategy "Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation. Is it controlled by patient brain?" [1]. PMID:27358909

  12. Reducing Cholesterol Intake: Are the recommendations valid?

    Chan, Joanna K.; McDonald, Bruce E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors question dietary recommendations for the general public calling for reduced cholesterol intake. Metabolic studies have shown that dietary cholesterol normally induces only small increases in blood cholesterol level. There is evidence that only a portion of the population responds to a change in cholesterol intake; hence lowering dietary cholesterol will be effective for only some.

  13. Effects of load-volume on EPOC after acute bouts of resistance training in resistance-trained men.

    Abboud, George J; Greer, Beau K; Campbell, Sara C; Panton, Lynn B

    2013-07-01

    Recent investigations have shown excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) to be elevated for up to 48 hours in both untrained and trained subjects after resistance training (RT). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of load-volume on EPOC. Eight trained men (aged 22 ± 3 years) participated in 2 randomized RT bouts separated by at least 1 week with total load-volumes of 10,000 and 20,000 kg, respectively. Intensity of RT (85% 1 repetition maximum) did not differ between trials. Exercise energy expenditure and resting metabolic rate (RMR) were measured by indirect calorimetry at 8.5 hours before, 1.5 hours before, and during RT bouts and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after exercise. Creatine kinase (CK) was measured before and after RT, and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours postexercise; ratings of perceived muscle soreness were measured on a similar time course save the immediate postexercise time point. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to analyze dependent variables. During the 20,000 kg trial, subjects expended significantly (p < 0.01) more energy (484 ± 29 kcal) than the 10,000 kg lift (247 ± 18 kcal). After the 20,000 kg lift, 12 hours postexercise, CK (1,159 ± 729 U·L) was significantly elevated (p < 0.05) as compared with baseline (272 ± 280 U·L) and immediately postexercise (490 ± 402 U·L). No significant time or trial differences were found in RMR between the 10,000 and 20,000 kg trials. In conclusion, high-intensity RT with load-volumes of up to 20,000 kg using resistance-trained men does not significantly increase EPOC above baseline RMR. PMID:23085971

  14. Inhibition of pancreatic cholesterol esterase reduces cholesterol absorption in the hamster

    Heidrich, John E.; Contos, Linda M; Hunsaker, Lucy A; Deck, Lorraine M.; Vander Jagt, David L.

    2004-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cholesterol esterase has three proposed functions in the intestine: 1) to control the bioavailability of cholesterol from dietary cholesterol esters; 2) to contribute to incorporation of cholesterol into mixed micelles; and 3) to aid in transport of free cholesterol to the enterocyte. Inhibitors of cholesterol esterase are anticipated to limit the absorption of dietary cholesterol. Results The selective and potent cholesterol esterase inhibitor 6-chloro-3-(1-ethyl-2-cycl...

  15. Epigenetic Regulation of Cholesterol Homeostasis

    Steve eMeaney

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although best known as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, cholesterol is a vital component of all mammalian cells. In addition to key structural roles, cholesterol is a vital biochemical precursor for numerous biologically important compounds including oxysterols and bile acids, as well as acting as an activator of critical morphogenic systems (e.g. the Hedgehog system. A variety of sophisticated regulatory mechanisms interact to coordinate the overall level of cholesterol in cells, tissues and the entire organism. Accumulating evidence indicates that in additional to the more ‘traditional’ regulatory schemes, cholesterol homeostasis is also under the control of epigenetic mechanisms such as histone acetylation and DNA methylation. The available evidence supporting a role for these mechanisms in the control of cholesterol synthesis, elimination, transport and storage are the focus of this review.

  16. Understand Your Risk for High Cholesterol

    ... Resources Stroke More Understand Your Risk for High Cholesterol Updated:Apr 1,2016 LDL (bad) cholesterol is ... content was last reviewed on 04/21/2014. Cholesterol Guidelines: Putting the pieces together Myth vs. Truth – ...

  17. Overview of Cholesterol and Lipid Disorders

    ... Medical Dictionary Additional Content Medical News Overview of Cholesterol and Lipid Disorders By Anne Carol Goldberg, MD ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Cholesterol Disorders Overview of Cholesterol and Lipid Disorders Dyslipidemia ...

  18. Cholesterol - what to ask your doctor

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000211.htm Cholesterol - what to ask your doctor To use the ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your body needs cholesterol to work properly. When you have extra cholesterol ...

  19. Anaerobic oxidation of cholesterol by a denitrifying enrichment.

    Barrandeguy, E; Tarlera, S

    2001-01-01

    Sterols (e.g. cholesterol) present in wool scouring effluent represent the most recalcitrant fraction in anaerobic treatment. This study was conducted to examine the feasibility of removal of this organic load through a denitrifying post-treatment stage. A stable cholesterol-denitrifying enrichment (CHOL-1) was obtained from sludge of a bench-scale upflow sludge bed (USB) denitrifying reactor integrated to a carbon and nitrogen removal system for sanitary landfill leachate. According to the amounts of cholesterol degraded and of nitrite and nitrogen gas formed, the capacity for complete cholesterol oxidation under anaerobic conditions by CHOL-1 can be assumed. Nitrite accumulation observed at a low C/N ratio outlines the importance of determining the optimal C/N ratio for adequate denitrifying reactor performance. The enrichment was partly identified with molecular analysis of cloned 16S rDNA sequences revealing the presence of two groups of bacteria belonging to the beta subclass of the Proteobacteria. According to analysis of sequences, it can be inferred that a yet uncultivated new bacterium is the one responsible for cholesterol oxidation. Results of this study suggest that sludge from a denitrifying reactor treating leachate is potentially useful in a combined anaerobic-anoxic system for degradation of cholesterol that remains after methanogenic treatment. PMID:11575077

  20. Bacterial load of pneumococcal serotypes correlates with their prevalence and multiple serotypes is associated with acute respiratory infections among children less than 5 years of age.

    Bhim Gopal Dhoubhadel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among pneumococcal serotypes, some serotypes are more prevalent in the nasopharynx than others; determining factors for higher prevalence remain to be fully explored. As non-vaccine serotypes have emerged after the introduction of 7-valent conjugate vaccines, study of serotype specific epidemiology is in need. When two or more serotypes co-colonize, they evolve rapidly to defend host's immune responses; however, a clear association of co-colonization with a clinical outcome is lacking. METHODS: Children less than 5 years old who were admitted to hospital due to acute respiratory infections (ARI (n = 595 and healthy children (n = 350 were recruited. Carriage of pneumococcus was determined by culture and lytA PCR in the nasopharyngeal samples. Serotype/serogroup detection and its quantification were done by the nanofluidic real time PCR system. Spearman's correlation and logistic regression were used to examine a correlation of serotype/serogroup specific bacterial load with its prevalence and an association of co-colonization with ARI respectively. RESULTS: Serotype/serogroup specific bacterial load was correlated with its prevalence, both in ARI cases (Spearman's rho = 0.44, n = 186; P<0.0001 and healthy children (Spearman's rho = 0.41, n = 115; P<0.0001. The prevalence of multiple serotypes was more common in ARI cases than in healthy children (18.5% vs 7.1%; aOR 2.92, 95% CI: 1.27-6.71; P = 0.01. The dominant serotype in the co-colonization had a 2 log10 higher bacterial load than the subdominant serotype, both in ARI cases (P<0.001 and healthy children (P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: High bacterial load in the nasopharynx may help transmit pneumococci among hosts, and increase the chance of successful acquisition and colonization. Co-colonization of multiple serotypes of pneumococci is linked with ARI, which infers the interactions of multiple serotypes may increase their pathogenicity; however, they may compete

  1. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport.

    Fernández-Suárez, María E; Escolà-Gil, Joan C; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [(3)H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. PMID:27601313

  2. Lecithin:Cholesterol Acyltransferase (LCAT) Deficiency Promotes Differentiation of Satellite Cells to Brown Adipocytes in a Cholesterol-dependent Manner.

    Nesan, Dinushan; Tavallaee, Ghazaleh; Koh, Deborah; Bashiri, Amir; Abdin, Rawand; Ng, Dominic S

    2015-12-18

    Our laboratory previously reported that lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and LDL receptor double knock-out mice (Ldlr(-/-)xLcat(-/-) or DKO) spontaneously develop functioning ectopic brown adipose tissue (BAT) in skeletal muscle, putatively contributing to protection from the diet-induced obesity phenotype. Here we further investigated their developmental origin and the mechanistic role of LCAT deficiency. Gene profiling of skeletal muscle in DKO newborns and adults revealed a classical lineage. Primary quiescent satellite cells (SC) from chow-fed DKO mice, not in Ldlr(-/-)xLcat(+/+) single-knock-out (SKO) or C57BL/6 wild type, were found to (i) express exclusively classical BAT-selective genes, (ii) be primed to express key functional BAT genes, and (iii) exhibit markedly increased ex vivo adipogenic differentiation into brown adipocytes. This gene priming effect was abrogated upon feeding the mice a 2% high cholesterol diet in association with accumulation of excess intracellular cholesterol. Ex vivo cholesterol loading of chow-fed DKO SC recapitulated the effect, indicating that cellular cholesterol is a key regulator of SC-to-BAT differentiation. Comparing adipogenicity of Ldlr(+/+)xLcat(-/-) (LCAT-KO) SC with DKO SC identified a role for LCAT deficiency in priming SC to express BAT genes. Additionally, we found that reduced cellular cholesterol is important for adipogenic differentiation, evidenced by increased induction of adipogenesis in cholesterol-depleted SC from both LCAT-KO and SKO mice. Taken together, we conclude that ectopic BAT in DKO mice is classical in origin, and its development begins in utero. We further showed complementary roles of LCAT deficiency and cellular cholesterol reduction in the SC-to-BAT adipogenesis. PMID:26494623

  3. Monomethylarsonous acid inhibited endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in human skin fibroblasts

    Guo, Lei [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States); Xiao, Yongsheng [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States); Wang, Yinsheng, E-mail: yinsheng.wang@ucr.edu [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Human exposure to arsenic in drinking water is a widespread public health concern, and such exposure is known to be associated with many human diseases. The detailed molecular mechanisms about how arsenic species contribute to the adverse human health effects, however, remain incompletely understood. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a highly toxic and stable metabolite of inorganic arsenic. To exploit the mechanisms through which MMA(III) exerts its cytotoxic effect, we adopted a quantitative proteomic approach, by coupling stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) with LC-MS/MS analysis, to examine the variation in the entire proteome of GM00637 human skin fibroblasts following acute MMA(III) exposure. Among the ∼ 6500 unique proteins quantified, ∼ 300 displayed significant changes in expression after exposure with 2 μM MMA(III) for 24 h. Subsequent analysis revealed the perturbation of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis, selenoprotein synthesis and Nrf2 pathways evoked by MMA(III) exposure. Particularly, MMA(III) treatment resulted in considerable down-regulation of several enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, real-time PCR analysis showed reduced mRNA levels of select genes in this pathway. Furthermore, MMA(III) exposure contributed to a distinct decline in cellular cholesterol content and significant growth inhibition of multiple cell lines, both of which could be restored by supplementation of cholesterol to the culture media. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) may arise, at least in part, from the down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis enzymes and the resultant decrease of cellular cholesterol content. - Highlights: • MMA(III)-induced perturbation of the entire proteome of GM00637 cells is studied. • Quantitative proteomic approach revealed alterations of multiple cellular pathways. • MMA(III) inhibits de novo cholesterol biosynthesis. • MMA

  4. Monomethylarsonous acid inhibited endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in human skin fibroblasts

    Human exposure to arsenic in drinking water is a widespread public health concern, and such exposure is known to be associated with many human diseases. The detailed molecular mechanisms about how arsenic species contribute to the adverse human health effects, however, remain incompletely understood. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a highly toxic and stable metabolite of inorganic arsenic. To exploit the mechanisms through which MMA(III) exerts its cytotoxic effect, we adopted a quantitative proteomic approach, by coupling stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) with LC-MS/MS analysis, to examine the variation in the entire proteome of GM00637 human skin fibroblasts following acute MMA(III) exposure. Among the ∼ 6500 unique proteins quantified, ∼ 300 displayed significant changes in expression after exposure with 2 μM MMA(III) for 24 h. Subsequent analysis revealed the perturbation of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis, selenoprotein synthesis and Nrf2 pathways evoked by MMA(III) exposure. Particularly, MMA(III) treatment resulted in considerable down-regulation of several enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, real-time PCR analysis showed reduced mRNA levels of select genes in this pathway. Furthermore, MMA(III) exposure contributed to a distinct decline in cellular cholesterol content and significant growth inhibition of multiple cell lines, both of which could be restored by supplementation of cholesterol to the culture media. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) may arise, at least in part, from the down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis enzymes and the resultant decrease of cellular cholesterol content. - Highlights: • MMA(III)-induced perturbation of the entire proteome of GM00637 cells is studied. • Quantitative proteomic approach revealed alterations of multiple cellular pathways. • MMA(III) inhibits de novo cholesterol biosynthesis. • MMA

  5. Cholesterol crystal embolization diagnosed on bladder transurethral resection.

    Chatelain, Denis; Cordonnier, Carole; Brevet, Marie; Petit, Jacques; Sevestre, Henri

    2005-08-01

    Cholesterol crystal embolization (CCE) is a severe systemic disorder caused by vascular migration of cholesterol crystals originating from ulcerative atherosclerotic plaques located in large arteries. We report 2 cases of CCE diagnosed on bladder transurethral resection in 2 men aged 94 and 72 years. Both patients had atherosclerosis disease. One patient had been treated by heparin 1 month before for pulmonary embolism and the other had had a coronary angiography and bypass graft surgery 5 months before for silent myocardial infarction. One patient presented with hematuria and the other with acute renal failure. Cystoscopy showed multiple papillary tumors of the bladder wall. Bladder transurethral resections showed transitional cell carcinoma with cholesterol crystals occluding the lumen of small arterioles in the submucosa. Eight cases of CCE in the bladder wall have been reported in the literature in 3 women and 5 men aged 56 to 79 years. Cholesterol crystal embolization is often discovered in the bladder wall on necropsy specimens. Only 2 cases have been fortuitously discovered on bladder transurethral resection performed for transitional cell carcinoma. Cholesterol crystal embolization in the bladder wall is often a marker of severe disease although the evolution is quite favorable in our patients, still alive 1 and 2 years after diagnosis. PMID:16084459

  6. A relation between high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and bile cholesterol saturation.

    Thornton, J R; Heaton, K. W.; Macfarlane, D G

    1981-01-01

    The association of cholesterol gall stones with coronary artery disease is controversial. To investigate this possible relation at the biochemical level, bile cholesterol saturation and the plasma concentrations of triglycerides, total cholesterol, and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL cholesterol) were measured in 25 healthy, middle-aged women. Bile cholesterol saturation index was negatively correlated with HDL cholesterol. It was positively correlated with plasma triglycerides and ...

  7. Imaging appearances of cholesterol pneumonia

    Objection: To analyze the imaging appearances of cholesterol pneumonia. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the X-ray and CT findings of 3 patients with cholesterol pneumonia confirmed pathologically and reviewed correlative literature. Results: Lesions similar to mass were found in X-ray and CT imaging of three cases. Two of them appeared cavity with fluid-level and one showed multiple ring enhancement after CT contrast. The course of disease was very. long and it had no respond to antibiotic therapy. Amounts of foam cells rich in cholesterol crystal were detected in pathological examination. Conclusions: Cholesterol pneumonia is a rare chronic pulmonary idiopathic disease, and the radiological findings can do some help to its diagnosis. (authors)

  8. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers.

    Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Wassall, Stephen R; Harroun, Thad A; Katsaras, John

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that cholesterol modifies the physical properties of lipid bilayers. For example, the much studied liquid-ordered Lo phase contains rapidly diffusing lipids with their acyl chains in the all trans configuration, similar to gel phase bilayers. Moreover, the Lo phase is commonly associated with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts, which are thought to serve as platforms for signaling proteins in the plasma membrane. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers has been studied extensively, and it has been shown - at least in some bilayers - to align differently from its canonical upright orientation, where its hydroxyl group is in the vicinity of the lipid-water interface. In this article we review recent works describing cholesterol's location in different model membrane systems with emphasis on results obtained from scattering, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics studies. PMID:27056099

  9. Cholesterol confusion and statin controversy.

    DuBroff, Robert; de Lorgeril, Michel

    2015-07-26

    The role of blood cholesterol levels in coronary heart disease (CHD) and the true effect of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs are debatable. In particular, whether statins actually decrease cardiac mortality and increase life expectancy is controversial. Concurrently, the Mediterranean diet model has been shown to prolong life and reduce the risk of diabetes, cancer, and CHD. We herein review current data related to both statins and the Mediterranean diet. We conclude that the expectation that CHD could be prevented or eliminated by simply reducing cholesterol appears unfounded. On the contrary, we should acknowledge the inconsistencies of the cholesterol theory and recognize the proven benefits of a healthy lifestyle incorporating a Mediterranean diet to prevent CHD. PMID:26225201

  10. to HDL-cholesterol functionality

    Malara Marzena

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyse the scientific evidence concerning the effects of two enzymes – paraoxonase 1 and myeloperoxidase – on the functions of HDL-cholesterol. It is well documented that disturbed circulating lipoproteins (a high total and high LDL-cholesterol, and low HDL-cholesterol bring about atherosclerosis and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD which is recognised as the main cause of death all around the world. In consequence, numerous studies have focused on procedures which will improve the plasma lipoproteins profile by decreasing the total cholesterol and the LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C and increasing the HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C. However, the anti-atherogenic role of HDL-C has been challenged in studies showing that genetically elevated HDL-cholesterol does not offer protection against CVD. Moreover, it has been found that raising the circulating HDL-cholesterol fails to reduce atherosclerosis. The doubts concerning the protective role of HDL-C have been supported by in vitro studies which indicate that the HDL-C from patients with atherosclerosis does not have a protective action, but does stimulate inflammation and free radical synthesis. The above data suggests that HDL-C, commonly recognised as protective against atherosclerosis, in some circumstances becomes pro-atherogenic, and is thus dysfunctional. Our review focuses on two enzymes – paraoxonase 1 (PON1 and myeloperoxidase (MPO – which markedly affect the properties of HDL-C and contribute to its anti – or pro-atherogenic activity. Moreover, the effects of the diet and physical activity on PON1 and MPO are summarised with respect to the HDL-C functionality.

  11. Cholesterol Worships a New Idol

    Ira G. Schulman

    2009-01-01

    The growing worldwide epidemic of cardiovascular disease suggests that new therapeutic strategies are needed to complement statins in the lowering of cholesterol levels. In a recent paper in Science, Tontonoz and colleagues have identified Idol as a protein that can control cholesterol levels by regulating the stability of the low-density lipoprotein receptor; inhibiting the activity of Idol could provide novel approaches for the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  12. Cholesterol and benign prostate disease.

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    The origins of benign prostatic diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), are poorly understood. Patients suffering from benign prostatic symptoms report a substantially reduced quality of life, and the relationship between benign prostate conditions and prostate cancer is uncertain. Epidemiologic data for BPH and CP/CPPS are limited, however an apparent association between BPH symptoms and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been consistently reported. The prostate synthesizes and stores large amounts of cholesterol and prostate tissues may be particularly sensitive to perturbations in cholesterol metabolism. Hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for CVD, is also a risk factor for BPH. Animal model and clinical trial findings suggest that agents that inhibit cholesterol absorption from the intestine, such as the class of compounds known as polyene macrolides, can reduce prostate gland size and improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Observational studies indicate that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while prostate cancer cell growth and survival pathways depend in part on cholesterol-sensitive biochemical mechanisms. Here we review the evidence that cholesterol metabolism plays a role in the incidence of benign prostate disease and we highlight possible therapeutic approaches based on this concept. PMID:21862201

  13. Formation of Cholesterol Bilayer Domains Precedes Formation of Cholesterol Crystals in Cholesterol/Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine Membranes: EPR and DSC Studies

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2013-01-01

    Saturation-recovery EPR along with DSC were used to determine the cholesterol content at which pure cholesterol bilayer domains (CBDs) and cholesterol crystals begin to form in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes. To preserve compositional homogeneity throughout the membrane suspension, lipid multilamellar dispersions were prepared using a rapid solvent exchange method. The cholesterol content increased from 0 to 75 mol%. With spin-labeled cholesterol analogs it was shown that the...

  14. Endometrial Cholesterol Granuloma Associated with Prolapsed Uterus- A Rare Case Report with Unusual Clinical Presentation.

    Sumathi, S

    2016-03-01

    Cholesterol granuloma is a chronic inflammatory reaction to cholesterol deposition. It may develop in variety of sites including middle ear, mastoid process, para nasal sinuses, mediastinum, breast, testis and kidney. But endometrial cholesterol granuloma is a rarely reported case and is usually presented clinically as pyometra. This article reports a case of cholesterol granuloma in the endometrium associated with prolapsed uterus. In this case the patient clinically presented with urinary retention and overflow incontinence of urine. The reason of acute urinary retention in this case was pelvic fibrosis and adhesion secondary to this chronic inflammatory reaction. This was supported by the presence of pus like yellowish material over the uterine surface and pelvic adhesion, noted during surgery. Endometrial biopsy revealed cholesterol granuloma that confirmed the source of chronic inflammatory reaction and pelvic fibrosis. PMID:27134881

  15. Blocking of α4β7 Gut-Homing Integrin during Acute Infection Leads to Decreased Plasma and Gastrointestinal Tissue Viral Loads in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques

    Aftab A. Ansari; Reimann, Keith A.; Mayne, Ann E.; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Stephenson, Susan T.; Wang, Rijian; Wang, Xinyue; Li, JiChu; Price, Andrew A.; Little, Dawn M.; Zaidi, Mohammad; Lyles, Robert; Villinger, Francois

    2010-01-01

    Intravenous administration of a novel recombinant rhesus mAb against the α4β7 gut-homing integrin (mAb) into rhesus macaques just prior to and during acute SIV infection resulted in significant decrease in plasma and gastrointestinal (GI) tissue viral load and a marked reduction in GI tissue proviral DNA load as compared with control SIV-infected rhesus macaques. This mAb administration was associated with increases in peripheral blood naive and central memory CD4+ T cells and maintenance of ...

  16. Anti-bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate antibody accumulates acetylated LDL-derived cholesterol in cultured macrophages.

    Delton-Vandenbroucke, Isabelle; Bouvier, Jerome; Makino, Asami; Besson, Nelly; Pageaux, Jean-François; Lagarde, Michel; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2007-03-01

    Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP), also called lysobisphosphatidic acid, is a phospholipid highly enriched in the internal membranes of multivesicular late endosomes, in which it forms specialized lipid domains. It has been suggested that BMP-rich membranes regulate cholesterol transport. Here, we examine the effects of an anti-BMP antibody on cholesterol metabolism and transport in two macrophage cell lines, RAW 264.7 and THP-1, during loading with acetylated low density lipoprotein (AcLDL). Anti-BMP antibody was internalized and accumulated in both macrophage cell types. Cholesterol staining with filipin and mass measurements indicate that AcLDL-stimulated accumulation of free cholesterol (FC) was enhanced in macrophages that had accumulated the antibody. Unlike the hydrophobic amine U18666A (3-beta-[2-(diethylamino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one), esterification of AcLDL-derived cholesterol by ACAT was not modified after anti-BMP treatment. AcLDL loading led to an increase of FC in the plasma membrane. This increase was further enhanced in anti-BMP-treated macrophages. However, cholesterol efflux to HDL was reduced in antibody-treated cells. These results suggest that the accumulation of anti-BMP antibody alters cholesterol homeostasis in AcLDL-loaded macrophages. PMID:17146116

  17. Effect of rosuvastatin dose-loading on serum sLox-1, hs-CRP, and postoperative prognosis in diabetic patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing selected percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)

    Jiao, Yungen; Hu, Feng; Zhang, Zhengang; Gong, Kaizheng; Sun, Xiaoning; Li, Aihua; Liu, Naifeng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of rosuvastatin dose-loading on serum levels of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (Lox-1) and high-sensitivity c-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and postoperative prognosis in patients with diabetes and non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTEACS) undergoing selected percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods: A total of 72 patients with diabetes and NSTEACS were randomized to either the group treated with 20 mg rosuva...

  18. Free cholesterol-induced macrophage apoptosis is mediated by inositol-requiring enzyme 1 alpha-regulated activation of Jun N-terminal kinase

    Fangming Li; Yi Guo; Shenggang Sun; Xin Jiang; Bingshan Tang; Qizhang Wang; Ling Wang

    2008-01-01

    Macrophage death in advanced atherosclerotic lesions leads to iesional necrosis, possible plaque rupture, and acute vascular occlusion. A likely cause of macrophage death is the accumulation of free cholesterol (FC) leading to activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis.Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 alpha (IRE1α) is an integral membrane protein of the ER that is a key signaling step in cholesterol-induced apoptosis in macrophages, activated by stress in the ER. However, the role of IRE1α in the regulation of ER stress-induced macrophage death and the mechanism for this process are largely unclear.In this study,a cell culture model was used to explore the mechanisms involved in the ER stress pathway of FC-induced macrophage death.The results herein showed that FC loading of macrophages leads to an apoptotic response that is partially dependent on initiation by activation of IRE1α.Taken together,these results showed that the IRE1-apoptosis-signaling kinase 1-c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase cascade pathway was required in this process.Moreover,the data suggested a novel cellular mechanism for cholesterol-induced macrophage death in advanced atherosclerotic lesions.The critical function of this signaling cascade is indicated by prevention of ER stress-induced apoptosis after inhibition of IRE1α,or c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase.

  19. Increased cardiovascular reactivity to acute stress and salt-loading in adult male offspring of fat fed non-obese rats.

    Olena Rudyk

    Full Text Available Diet-induced obesity in rat pregnancy has been shown previously to be associated with consistently raised blood pressure in the offspring, attributed to sympathetic over-activation, but the relative contributions to this phenotype of maternal obesity versus raised dietary fat is unknown. Sprague-Dawley female rats were fed either a control (4.3% fat, n = 11 or lard-enriched (23.6% fat, n = 16 chow 10 days prior to mating, throughout pregnancy and lactation. In conscious adult (9-month-old offspring cardiovascular parameters were measured (radiotelemetry. The short period of fat-feeding did not increase maternal weight versus controls and the baseline blood pressure was similar in offspring of fat fed dams (OF and controls (OC. However, adult male OF showed heightened cardiovascular reactivity to acute restraint stress (p<0.01; Δ systolic blood pressure (SBP and Δheart rate (HR with a prolonged recovery time compared to male OC. α1/β-adrenergic receptor blockade normalised the response. Also, after dietary salt-loading (8%-NaCl ad libitum for 1 week male OF demonstrated higher SBP (p<0.05 in the awake phase (night-time and increased low/high frequency ratio of power spectral density of HR variability versus OC. Baroreflex gain and basal power spectral density components of the heart rate or blood pressure were similar in male OF and OC. Minor abnormalities were evident in female OF. Fat feeding in the absence of maternal obesity in pregnant rats leads to altered sympathetic control of cardiovascular function in adult male offspring, and hypertension in response to stressor stimuli.

  20. The acute effects of different training loads of whole body vibration on flexibility and explosive strength of lower limbs in divers

    Paradisis, G; Kirialanis, P; Mellos, V; Argitaki, P; Smirniotou, A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of different vibration loads (frequency and amplitude) of whole-body vibration (WBV) on flexibility and explosive strength of lower limbs in springboard divers. Eighteen male and female divers, aged 19 ± 2 years, volunteered to perform 3 different WBV protocols in the present study. To assess the vibration effect, flexibility and explosive strength of lower limbs were measured before (Pre), immediately after (Post 1) and 15 min after the end of vibration exposure (Post 15). Three protocols with different frequencies and amplitudes were used in the present study: a) low vibration frequency and amplitude (30 Hz/2 mm); b) high vibration frequency and amplitude (50 Hz/4 mm); c) a control protocol (no vibration). WBV protocols were performed on a Power Plate platform, whereas the no vibration divers performed the same protocol but with the vibration platform turned off. A two-way ANOVA 3 x 3 (protocol × time) with repeated measures on both factors was used. The level of significance was set at p < 0.05. Univariate analyses with simple contrasts across time were selected as post hoc tests. Intraclass coefficients (ICC) were used to assess the reliability across time. The results indicated that flexibility and explosive strength of lower limbs were significantly higher in both WBV protocols compared to the no vibration group (NVG). The greatest improvement in flexibility and explosive strength, which occurred immediately after vibration treatment, was maintained 15 min later in both WBV protocols, whereas NVG revealed a significant decrease 15 min later, in all examined strength parameters. In conclusion, a bout of WBV significantly increased flexibility and explosive strength in competitive divers compared with the NVG. Therefore, it is recommended to incorporate WBV as a method to increase flexibility and vertical jump height in sports where these parameters play an important role in the success outcome of

  1. Cholesterol confusion and statin controversy

    Robert; Du; Broff; Michel; de; Lorgeril

    2015-01-01

    The role of blood cholesterol levels in coronary heart disease(CHD) and the true effect of cholesterollowering statin drugs are debatable. In particular,whether statins actually decrease cardiac mortality and increase life expectancy is controversial. Concurrently,the Mediterranean diet model has been shown to prolong life and reduce the risk of diabetes,cancer,and CHD. We herein review current data related to both statins and the Mediterranean diet. We conclude that the expectation that CHD could be prevented or eliminated by simply reducing cholesterol appears unfounded. On the contrary,we should acknowledge the inconsistencies of the cholesterol theory and recognize the proven benefits of a healthy lifestyle incorporating a Mediterranean diet to prevent CHD.

  2. Effect of cholesterol oxidation products on cholesterol metabolism in the laying hen.

    Naber, E C; Allred, J B; Winget, C J; Stock, A E

    1985-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effect of purified cholesterol and oxidized cholesterol in the diet of the laying hen on egg production characteristics, in vitro - in ovo utilization of acetate for cholesterol biosynthesis, and the activity of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in biosynthesis of cholesterol. Previous work has demonstrated inhibition of cholesterol synthesis by cholesterol oxides in tissue culture cells but not in hepatic tissues of animals through dietary administration. Feeding .5% of either purified or oxidized cholesterol had no effect on egg production, egg weight, body weight, or diet consumption. In both experiments egg yolk cholesterol was significantly increased by both cholesterol sources, but eggs from hens fed oxidized cholesterol had lower cholesterol contents than those from hens fed purified cholesterol. Relative utilization of acetate for cholesterol biosynthesis was significantly reduced by feeding both cholesterol sources. Hepatic enzyme activity measured by production of mevalonic acid was significantly inhibited by feeding purified cholesterol. A further significant reduction in enzyme activity was observed when oxidized cholesterol was fed, indicating that dietary cholesterol oxides are much more potent than purified cholesterol in limiting the activity of the enzyme. PMID:4001052

  3. Polarizable multipolar electrostatics for cholesterol

    Fletcher, Timothy L.; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2016-08-01

    FFLUX is a novel force field under development for biomolecular modelling, and is based on topological atoms and the machine learning method kriging. Successful kriging models have been obtained for realistic electrostatics of amino acids, small peptides, and some carbohydrates but here, for the first time, we construct kriging models for a sizeable ligand of great importance, which is cholesterol. Cholesterol's mean total (internal) electrostatic energy prediction error amounts to 3.9 kJ mol-1, which pleasingly falls below the threshold of 1 kcal mol-1 often cited for accurate biomolecular modelling. We present a detailed analysis of the error distributions.

  4. [Attitude of blood donors towards cholesterol measurement].

    Flesland, O; Botten, G; Solheim, B G; Orjasaeter, H

    1992-05-20

    In analyses of cost-effectiveness it is customary to count knowledge of having a high serum cholesterol level as a negative factor. There is little support for this practice in the literature. We have studied the attitude of 305 Norwegian blood donors towards cholesterol testing. 63% stated that they were interested in their serum cholesterol level, and 40% said they knew their own serum cholesterol level. The attitude towards cholesterol testing was clearly positive, both among men and among women, regardless of age. Only one donor stated that she did not want to have her serum cholesterol tested in conjunction with blood donation. PMID:1509430

  5. Zymosan-mediated inflammation impairs in vivo reverse cholesterol transport.

    Malik, Priya; Berisha, Stela Z; Santore, Jennifer; Agatisa-Boyle, Colin; Brubaker, Gregory; Smith, Jonathan D

    2011-05-01

    Inflammation has been proposed to impair HDL function and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). We investigated the effects of inflammation mediated by zymosan, a yeast glucan, on multiple steps along the RCT pathway in vivo and ex vivo. Acute inflammation with 70 mg/kg zymosan impaired RCT to plasma, liver, and feces similarly by 17-22% (P < 0.05), with no additional block at the liver. Hepatic gene expression further demonstrated no change in ABCG5, ABCB4, and ABCB11 expression but a decline in ABCG8 mRNA (32% P < 0.05). Plasma from zymosan-treated mice had a 21% decrease in cholesterol acceptor ability (P < 0.01) and a 35% decrease in ABCA1-specific efflux capacity (P < 0.01) in vitro. Zymosan treatment also decreased HDL levels and led to HDL remodeling with increased incorporation of serum amyloid A. In addition, cholesterol efflux from cultured macrophages declined with zymosan treatment in a dose dependent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that zymosan impairs in vivo RCT primarily by decreasing macrophage-derived cholesterol entering the plasma, with minimal additional blocks downstream. Our study supports the notion that RCT impairment is one of the mechanisms for the increased atherosclerotic burden observed in inflammatory conditions. PMID:21335620

  6. The ABC of cholesterol transport

    Plösch, Torsten

    2004-01-01

    Cholesterol fulfills an indispensable role in mammalian physiology. It is an important constituent of all cell membranes. Furthermore, it is the precursor of steroid hormones, which regulate a variety of physiological functions, and of bile salts, which are necessary for the generation of bile flow

  7. Membrane Cholesterol Modulates Superwarfarin Toxicity.

    Marangoni, M Natalia; Martynowycz, Michael W; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Braun, David; Polak, Paul E; Weinberg, Guy; Rubinstein, Israel; Gidalevitz, David; Feinstein, Douglas L

    2016-04-26

    Superwarfarins are modified analogs of warfarin with additional lipophilic aromatic rings, up to 100-fold greater potency, and longer biological half-lives. We hypothesized that increased hydrophobicity allowed interactions with amphiphilic membranes and modulation of biological responses. We find that superwarfarins brodifacoum and difenacoum increase lactate production and cell death in neuroblastoma cells. In contrast, neither causes changes in glioma cells that have higher cholesterol content. After choleterol depletion, lactate production was increased and cell viability was reduced. Drug-membrane interactions were examined by surface X-ray scattering using Langmuir monolayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and/or cholesterol. Specular X-ray reflectivity data revealed that superwarfarins, but not warfarin, intercalate between dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine molecules, whereas grazing incidence X-ray diffraction demonstrated changes in lateral crystalline order of the film. Neither agent showed significant interactions with monolayers containing >20% cholesterol. These findings demonstrate an affinity of superwarfarins to biomembranes and suggest that cellular responses to these agents are regulated by cholesterol content. PMID:27119638

  8. Membrane Cholesterol Modulates Superwarfarin Toxicity

    Marangoni, M. Natalia; Martynowycz, Michael W.; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Braun, David; Polak, Paul E.; Weinberg, Guy; Rubinstein, Israel; Gidalevitz, David; Feinstein, Douglas L.

    2016-04-26

    Superwarfarins are modified analogs of warfarin with additional lipophilic aromatic rings, up to 100-fold greater potency, and longer biological half-lives. We hypothesized that increased hydrophobicity allowed interactions with amphiphilic membranes and modulation of biological responses. We find that superwarfarins brodifacoum and difenacoum increase lactate production and cell death in neuroblastoma cells. In contrast, neither causes changes in glioma cells that have higher cholesterol content. After choleterol depletion, lactate production was increased and cell viability was reduced. Drug-membrane interactions were examined by surface X-ray scattering using Langmuir monolayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and/or cholesterol. Specular X-ray reflectivity data revealed that superwarfarins, but not warfarin, intercalate between dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine molecules, whereas grazing incidence X-ray diffraction demonstrated changes in lateral crystalline order of the film. Neither agent showed significant interactions with monolayers containing >20% cholesterol. These findings demonstrate an affinity of superwarfarins to biomembranes and suggest that cellular responses to these agents are regulated by cholesterol content.

  9. Mechanical modeling of cholesterol crystallization in atherosclerotic plaques base on Micro-OCT images (Conference Presentation)

    Luo, Yuemei; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Cui, Dongyao; Wang, Xianghong; Liu, Linbo

    2016-02-01

    Plaque rupture is the critical cause of cardiovascular thrombosis but this process is still under discussion. Recent studies show that, during crystallization, cholesterol crystals in atheromatous plaques accumulate rapidly in a limited space and may result in plaque rupture. However, the actual role of cholesterol crystals on plaque rupture remains unclear due to the lack of detailed morphological information of cholesterol crystals. In this study, we used a Micro-optical coherence tomography (µOCT) setup with 1-2 µm spatial resolution to extract the geometry of cholesterol crystals from human atherosclerotic artery ex vivo firstly. With measured dimensions of cholesterol crystals by this µOCT system (the average length and thickness of 269.1±80.16 µm and 3.0±0.33 µm), we developed a two-dimensional mechanical model in which rectangular shaped cholesterol crystals distribute at different locations spatially. We predicted the stress on the thin cap induced by the expansion of cholesterol crystals by use of finite-element method. Since a large portion of plaques (58%) rupture at points of peak circumferential stress (PCS), we used PCS as the primary indicator of plaque stability with blood pressure of 14.6 kPa on the lumen. The results demonstrate that loading of the concentrated crystals especially at the cap shoulder destabilize the plaque by proportionally increasing the PCS, while evenly distributed crystals loading along the cap might impose less PCS to the plaque than the concentrated case.

  10. Anti-bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate antibody accumulates acetylated LDL-derived cholesterol in cultured macrophages.

    Delton-Vandenbroucke, Isabelle; Bouvier, Jerome; Makino, Asami; Besson, Nelly; Pageaux, Jean-François; Lagarde, Michel; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2007-01-01

    Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP), also called lysobisphosphatidic acid, is a phospholipid highly enriched in the internal membranes of multivesicular late endosomes, in which it forms specialized lipid domains. It has been suggested that BMP-rich membranes regulate cholesterol transport. Here, we examine the effects of an anti-BMP antibody on cholesterol metabolism and transport in two macrophage cell lines, RAW 264.7 and THP-1, during loading with acetylated low density lipoprotein (AcLDL...

  11. Active membrane cholesterol as a physiological effector.

    Lange, Yvonne; Steck, Theodore L

    2016-09-01

    Sterols associate preferentially with plasma membrane sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids to form stoichiometric complexes. Cholesterol in molar excess of the capacity of these polar bilayer lipids has a high accessibility and fugacity; we call this fraction active cholesterol. This review first considers how active cholesterol serves as an upstream regulator of cellular sterol homeostasis. The mechanism appears to utilize the redistribution of active cholesterol down its diffusional gradient to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, where it binds multiple effectors and directs their feedback activity. We have also reviewed a broad literature in search of a role for active cholesterol (as opposed to bulk cholesterol or lipid domains such as rafts) in the activity of diverse membrane proteins. Several systems provide such evidence, implicating, in particular, caveolin-1, various kinds of ABC-type cholesterol transporters, solute transporters, receptors and ion channels. We suggest that this larger role for active cholesterol warrants close attention and can be tested easily. PMID:26874289

  12. Do You Know Your Cholesterol Levels?

    ... The Health Information Center Do You Know Your Cholesterol Levels? Print-friendly Version (PDF, 6.1 MB) ... Eat Smart Did you know that high blood cholesterol is a serious problem among Latinos? About one ...

  13. Cerebral cholesterol granuloma in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    Francis, Gordon A; Johnson, Royce L.; Findlay, J. Max; Wang, Jian; Hegele, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is characterized by the accumulation of excess cholesterol in tissues including the artery wall and tendons. We describe a patient with homozygous FH who presented with asymptomatic cholesterol granuloma of the brain. The patient's plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was remarkably responsive to combination hypolipidemic therapy with statin plus ezetimibe. This case illustrates another potential complication of whole-body cholesterol excess and ...

  14. Quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism by promoting cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and cholesterol efflux in rats.

    Zhang, Min; Xie, Zongkai; Gao, Weina; Pu, Lingling; Wei, Jingyu; Guo, Changjiang

    2016-03-01

    Quercetin, a common member of the flavonoid family, is widely present in plant kingdom. Despite that quercetin is implicated in regulating cholesterol metabolism, the molecular mechanism is poorly understood. We hypothesized that quercetin regulates cholesterol homeostasis through regulating the key enzymes involved in hepatic cholesterol metabolism. To test this hypothesis, we compared the profile of key enzymes and transcription factors involved in the hepatic cholesterol metabolism in rats with or without quercetin supplementation. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control and quercetin-supplemented groups. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total bile acids in feces and bile were measured. Hepatic enzymatic activities were determined by activity assay kit and high-performance liquid chromatography-based analyses. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses, respectively. The results showed that the activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, a critical enzyme in the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, was significantly elevated by quercetin. The expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, as well as liver X receptor α, an important transcription factor, was also increased at both mRNA and protein levels by quercetin. However, quercetin exposure had no impact on the activity of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of cholesterol. We also found that quercetin treatment significantly increased ATP binding cassette transporter G1 mRNA and protein expression in the liver, suggesting that quercetin may increase hepatic cholesterol efflux. Collectively, the results presented here indicate that quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism mainly through the pathways that promote cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and

  15. Imagem radiográfica de acúmulo fecal no ceco, como sinal diagnóstico de apendicite aguda Radiographic image of fecal loading in the cecum as a diagnostic sign of acute appendicitis

    Andy Petroianu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apesar de os achados radiográficos de apendicite aguda serem bem documentados, o valor da radiografia simples ainda não foi completamente determinado. O objetivo do presente estudo foi estabelecer a freqüência da associação de apendicite aguda a um sinal radiográfico caracterizado por imagem de acúmulo fecal ocupando todo o ceco. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram realizadas radiografias simples de abdome de 100 pacientes consecutivos com apendicite aguda, comprovada por operação e exame anatomopatológico. Pesquisou-se, nas radiografias, a presença de imagem de acúmulo fecal no ceco, caracterizada por hipotransparência ocupando todo o ceco e, eventualmente, também o cólon ascendente. RESULTADOS: A imagem de acúmulo fecal no ceco foi encontrada em 97% dos doentes, independentemente de idade, sexo, cor da pele ou estádio da apendicite. CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo sugere que a presença de imagem radiográfica de acúmulo fecal no ceco pode ser um sinal útil no diagnóstico de apendicite aguda.OBJECTIVE: Although the radiological features of acute appendicitis are well documented, the value of the plain radiography has not been fully appreciated yet. The present study was aimed at determining the frequency of association between acute appendicitis and a radiological sign characterized as an image of fecal loading in the whole cecum. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Plain abdominal radiographs of 100 consecutive adult patients with acute appendicitis proved by surgery and histology were assessed. The presence of fecal loading characterized by hypotransparency in the whole cecum, and sometimes also in the ascending colon, was observed. RESULTS: The image of fecal loading in the cecum was found in 97% of cases of acute appendicitis, independently of age, gender, skin color or stage of appendicitis. CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that the presence of radiological images of fecal loading in the cecum may be a useful sign for the

  16. High Cholesterol: Medicines to Help You

    ... risks of taking these medicines. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about all of the risks of taking your ... 20 should have their cholesterol checked by a doctor. Most people do not show ... Good vs. Bad Cholesterol Not all cholesterol in your blood ...

  17. Isolation of Cholesterol from an Egg Yolk

    Taber, Douglass F.; Li, Rui; Anson, Cory M.

    2011-01-01

    A simple procedure for the isolation of the cholesterol, by hydrolysis and extraction followed by column chromatography, is described. The cholesterol can be further purified by complexation with oxalic acid. It can also be oxidized and conjugated to cholestenone. The source of the cholesterol is one egg yolk, which contains about 200 mg of…

  18. Intestinal cholesterol secretion : future clinical implications

    Jakulj, L.; Besseling, J.; Stroes, E. S. G.; Groen, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Together with the liver, the intestine serves as a homeostatic organ in cholesterol metabolism. Recent evidence has substantiated the pivotal role of the intestine in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). RCT is a fundamental antiatherogenic pathway, mediating the removal of cholesterol from tissues

  19. Remnant cholesterol and ischemic heart disease

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review recent advances in the field of remnant cholesterol as a contributor to the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD). RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiologic, mechanistic, and genetic studies all support a role for elevated remnant cholesterol (=cholesterol in triglyceride...

  20. HDL functionality in reverse cholesterol transport - Challenges in translating data emerging from mouse models to human disease.

    Lee-Rueckert, Miriam; Escola-Gil, Joan Carles; Kovanen, Petri T

    2016-07-01

    Whereas LDL-derived cholesterol accumulates in atherosclerotic lesions, HDL particles are thought to facilitate removal of cholesterol from the lesions back to the liver thereby promoting its fecal excretion from the body. Because generation of cholesterol-loaded macrophages is inherent to atherogenesis, studies on the mechanisms stimulating the release of cholesterol from these cells and its ultimate excretion into feces are crucial to learn how to prevent lesion development or even induce lesion regression. Modulation of this key anti-atherogenic pathway, known as the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport, has been extensively studied in several mouse models with the ultimate aim of applying the emerging knowledge to humans. The present review provides a detailed comparison and critical analysis of the various steps of reverse cholesterol transport in mouse and man. We attempt to translate this in vivo complex scenario into practical concepts, which could serve as valuable tools when developing novel HDL-targeted therapies. PMID:26968096

  1. Study on Cholesterol Renewal of Fatty Livers by Means of Tritiated Cholesterol

    It is known that ingestion by rats of a diet rich in cholesterol (2%) results in the formation of cholesterol-fatty liver. In the experiment, animals so fed for periods of one to three months were made to ingest the same diet in which the cholesterol had been replaced by tritiated cholesterol of known specific radioactivity. The rats were sacrificed after various ingestion periods up to a maximum of 51 d. Examination of the specific radioactivities of liver and serum cholesterol, free and esterified, gave the same values. Hence, the cholesterol of cholesterol-fatty livers is entirely renewed and does not represent an inert mass in the liver. (author)

  2. Effect of cholesterol supplementation on cryosurvival of goat spermatozoa

    Sunita Behera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Sperm membrane cholesterol influences cryodamage during cryopreservation. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of varying cholesterol levels in Tris based extenders on the freezability of sexually healthy Malabari buck semen. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 ejaculates from two adults healthy sexually healthy Malabari bucks were utilized for the study. The collected and pooled ejaculates were divided into four groups with Group I serving as Control - I, Group II and III were treated with 1 mg and 2 mg of cholesterol-loaded-cyclodextrin (CLC/120 × 106 spermatozoa, respectively, and Group IV treated with 1 mg methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD served as Control - II. Manual freezing was carried out to cryopreserve the treated and control spermatozoa. Results: Treatment of semen samples with CLC resulted in improved maintenance of sperm motility at pre-freeze and post-thaw stages of cryopreservation without affecting hypo-osmotic swelling response. Treatment of semen with 1 mg of CLC/120 × 106 spermatozoa was observed to be better than treatment with 2 mg of CLC/120 × 106 spermatozoa. In general, MβCD treatment was found to result in significantly lower sperm characteristics than those of Control - I and CLC treatment at pre-feeze and post-thaw stages and when incubated up to 4 h. Conclusion: Cholesterol treatment of sexually healthy Malabari buck semen was found to hold promise for improving cryopreser-vability of spermatozoa.

  3. Non-cholesterol sterols and cholesterol metabolism in sitosterolemia.

    Othman, Rgia A; Myrie, Semone B; Jones, Peter J H

    2013-12-01

    Sitosterolemia (STSL) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, manifested by extremely elevated plant sterols (PS) in plasma and tissue, leading to xanthoma and premature atherosclerotic disease. Therapeutic approaches include limiting PS intake, interrupting enterohepatic circulation of bile acid using bile acid binding resins such as cholestyramine, and/or ileal bypass, and inhibiting intestinal sterol absorption by ezetimibe (EZE). The objective of this review is to evaluate sterol metabolism in STSL and the impact of the currently available treatments on sterol trafficking in this disease. The role of PS in initiation of xanthomas and premature atherosclerosis is also discussed. Blocking sterols absorption with EZE has revolutionized STSL patient treatment as it reduces circulating levels of non-cholesterol sterols in STSL. However, none of the available treatments including EZE have normalized plasma PS concentrations. Future studies are needed to: (i) explore where cholesterol and non-cholesterol sterols accumulate, (ii) assess to what extent these sterols in tissues can be mobilized after blocking their absorption, and (iii) define the factors governing sterol flux. PMID:24267242

  4. Cholesterol Depletion from a Ceramide/Cholesterol Mixed Monolayer: A Brewster Angle Microscope Study

    Mandal, Pritam

    2016-06-01

    Cholesterol is crucial to the mechanical properties of cell membranes that are important to cells’ behavior. Its depletion from the cell membranes could be dramatic. Among cyclodextrins (CDs), methyl beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) is the most efficient to deplete cholesterol (Chol) from biomembranes. Here, we focus on the depletion of cholesterol from a C16 ceramide/cholesterol (C16-Cer/Chol) mixed monolayer using MβCD. While the removal of cholesterol by MβCD depends on the cholesterol concentration in most mixed lipid monolayers, it does not depend very much on the concentration of cholesterol in C16-Cer/Chol monolayers. The surface pressure decay during depletion were described by a stretched exponential that suggested that the cholesterol molecules are unable to diffuse laterally and behave like static traps for the MβCD molecules. Cholesterol depletion causes morphology changes of domains but these disrupted monolayers domains seem to reform even when cholesterol level was low.

  5. SIGNIFICANCE OF LIPID PROFILE ESTIMATION IN PATIENT WITH ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Santhosh Kumar N; Mohammad Anwar; Balu Mahendran.K; Kalaivanam. K N

    2013-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is one of the important reasons of death and unhealthiness in the world. The present study was undertaken to investigate the changes in serum lipids and lipoproteins in patients with acute myocardial infarction. The levels of lipid profile were significantly changed in the acute myocardial infarction patients. Acute myocardial infarction patients had significantly higher levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, TG, Lipoprotein and lower level of HDL-cholestero...

  6. How cholesterol homeostasis is regulated by plasma membrane cholesterol in excess of phospholipids

    Lange, Yvonne; Ye, Jin; Steck, Theodore L.

    2004-01-01

    How do cells sense and control their cholesterol levels? Whereas most of the cell cholesterol is located in the plasma membrane, the effectors of its abundance are regulated by a small pool of cholesterol in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The size of the ER compartment responds rapidly and dramatically to small changes in plasma membrane cholesterol around the normal level. Consequently, increasing plasma membrane cholesterol in vivo from just below to just above the basal level evoked an ac...

  7. Boots for Achilles: progesterone's reduction of cholesterol is a second-order adaptation.

    Amir, Dorsa; Fessler, Daniel M T

    2013-06-01

    Progesterone and cholesterol are both vital to pregnancy. Among other functions, progesterone downregulates inflammatory responses, allowing for maternal immune tolerance of the fetal allograft. Cholesterol a key component of cell membranes, is important in intracellular transport, cell signaling, nerve conduction, and metabolism Despite the importance of each substance in pregnancy, one exercises an antagonistic effect on the other, as periods of peak progesterone correspond with reductions in cholesterol availability, a consequence of progesterone's negative effects on cholesterol biosynthesis. This arrangement is understandable in light of the threat posed by pathogens early in pregnancy. Progesterone-induced immunomodulation entails increased vulnerability to infection, an acute problem in the first trimester, when fetal development is highly susceptible to insult. Many pathogens rely on cholesterol for cell entry, egress, and replication. Progesterone's antagonistic effects on cholesterol thus partially compensate for the costs entailed by progesterone-induced immunomodulation. Among pathogens to which the host's vulnerability is increased by progesterone's effects, approximately 90% utilize cholesterol, and this is notably true of pathogens that pose a risk during pregnancy. In addition to having a number of possible clinical applications, our approach highlights the potential importance of second-order adaptations, themselves a consequence of the lack of teleology in evolutionary processes. PMID:23909226

  8. Endogenous cholesterol synthesis, fecal steroid excretion and serum lanosterol in subjects with high or low response of serum cholesterol to dietary cholesterol

    A. C. Beynen; Katan, M B; Gent, van, H.

    1986-01-01

    In this study we addressed the question whether hypo- and hyper-responders to dietary cholesterol differ with regard to the flexibility of endogenous cholesterol synthesis after changes in cholesterol intake. Whole-body cholesterol synthesis was measured as faecal excretion of neutral steroids and bile acids minus cholesterol intake. In addition, we determined serum concentrations of lanosterol, a precursor of cholesterol and a possible indicator of cholesterol biosynthetic activity. The stud...

  9. Epididymis cholesterol homeostasis and sperm fertilizing ability

    Fabrice Saez; Aurélia Ouvrier; Jo(e)l R Drevet

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol, being the starting point of steroid hormone synthesis, is a long known modulator of both female and male reproductive physiology especially at the level of the gonads and the impact cholesterol has on gametogenesis. Less is known about the effects cholesterol homeostasis may have on postgonadic reproductive functions. Lately, several data have been reported showing how imbalanced cholesterol levels may particularly affect the post-testicular events of sperm maturation that lead to fully fertile male gametes. This review will focus on that aspect and essentially centers on how cholesterol is important for the physiology of the mammalian epididymis and spermatozoa.

  10. Effects of acute and chronic attenuation of postprandial hyperglycemia on postglucose-load endothelial function in insulin resistant individuals: is stimulation of first phase insulin secretion beneficial for the endothelial function?

    Major-Pedersen, A; Ihlemann, N; Hermann, T S;

    2008-01-01

    -resistant subjects with the Flow-Mediated-Dilation (FMD) technique. We randomized subjects to intervention/control group, and examined the acute and chronic effect of nateglinide, an oral antidiabetic drug of rapid action. In the intervention group, postoral glucose-load (post-OGL) FMD delta values deteriorated when......-day "Closing day", p=0.001]. Post-OGL changes in the control group were nonsignificant both at Baseline and on Closing day. After a single dose of nateglinide "Acute day", post-OGL FMD deterioration was abolished. There was an increment in post-OGL FMD delta values most significant at 2 h post-OGL (p=0....... We found no relationship between postprandial hyperglycemia and post-OGL FMD....

  11. Poly(amidoamine-Cholesterol Conjugate Nanoparticles Obtained by Electrospraying as Novel Tamoxifen Delivery System

    R. Cavalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new poly(amidoamine-cholesterol (PAA-cholesterol conjugate was synthesized, characterized and used to produce nanoparticles by the electrospraying technique. The electrospraying is a method of liquid atomization that consists in the dispersion of a solution into small charged droplets by an electric field. Tuning the electrospraying process parameters spherical PAA-chol nanoparticles formed. The PAA-cholesterol nanoparticles showed sizes lower than 500 nm and spherical shape. The drug incorporation capacity was investigated using tamoxifen, a lipophilic anticancer drug, as model drug. The incorporation of the tamoxifen did not affect the shape and sizes of nanoparticles showing a drug loading of 40%. Tamoxifen-loaded nanoparticles exhibited a higher dose-dependent cytotoxicity than free tamoxifen, while blank nanoparticles did not show any cytotoxic effect at the same concentrations. The electrospray technique might be proposed to produce tamoxifen-loaded PAA-chol nanoparticle in powder form without any excipient in a single step.

  12. Peptide mediators of cholesterol efflux

    Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan

    2013-04-09

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABAC1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  13. Trapping crystal nucleation of cholesterol monohydrate

    Solomonov, I.; Weygand, M.J.; Kjær, K.; Rapaport, H.; Leiserowitz, L.

    2005-01-01

    Crystalline nucleation of cholesterol at the air-water interface has been studied via grazing incidence x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The various stages of cholesterol molecular assembly from monolayer to three bilayers incorporating interleaving hydrogen-bonded water layers in a...... least initially, an intralayer cholesterol rearrangement in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transition. The preferred nucleation of the monoclinic phase of cholesterol . H2O followed by transformation to the stable monohydrate phase may be associated with an energetically more stable cholesterol...... bilayer arrangement of the former and a more favorable hydrogen-bonding arrangement of the latter. The relevance of this nucleation process of cholesterol monohydrate to pathological crystallization of cholesterol from cell biomembranes is discussed....

  14. An unusual case of a patient who lost his native kidneys and renal allograft from cholesterol crystal emboli

    Wasim Ahmed; Abdulkareem Al Garni; Elbadri Abdelgadir; Khamess Obeid Khamees; Mohammed Ali Ahmed Ellouly; Abdul Haleem

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol crystal emboli (CCE) syndrome involving native kidneys is an underdiagnosed condition. CCE is rare in renal allografts. It may present with acute kidney injury, but usually not acute graft loss. CCE should be considered in patients with a history of atherosclerosis and an invasive arterial procedure who present with acute or chronic renal allograft dysfunction. Therapy for CCE is mainly supportive and carries a high rate of mortality. To the best of our knowledge, this is the firs...

  15. The Role of Cholesterol in Cancer.

    Kuzu, Omer F; Noory, Mohammad A; Robertson, Gavin P

    2016-04-15

    The roles played by cholesterol in cancer development and the potential of therapeutically targeting cholesterol homeostasis is a controversial area in the cancer community. Several epidemiologic studies report an association between cancer and serum cholesterol levels or statin use, while others suggest that there is not one. Furthermore, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project using next-generation sequencing has profiled the mutational status and expression levels of all the genes in diverse cancers, including those involved in cholesterol metabolism, providing correlative support for a role of the cholesterol pathway in cancer development. Finally, preclinical studies tend to more consistently support the role of cholesterol in cancer, with several demonstrating that cholesterol homeostasis genes can modulate development. Because of space limitations, this review provides selected examples of the epidemiologic, TCGA, and preclinical data, focusing on alterations in cholesterol homeostasis and its consequent effect on patient survival. In melanoma, this focused analysis demonstrated that enhanced expression of cholesterol synthesis genes was associated with decreased patient survival. Collectively, the studies in melanoma and other cancer types suggested a potential role of disrupted cholesterol homeostasis in cancer development but additional studies are needed to link population-based epidemiological data, the TCGA database results, and preclinical mechanistic evidence to concretely resolve this controversy. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2063-70. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197250

  16. The phase behavior of hydrated cholesterol.

    Loomis, C R; Shipley, G G; Small, D M

    1979-05-01

    The thermotropic phase behavior of cholesterol monohydrate in water was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, polarizing light microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. In contrast to anhydrous cholesterol which undergoes a polymorphic crystalline transition at 39 degrees C and a crystalline to liquid transition at 151 degrees C, the closed system of cholesterol monohydrate and water exhibited three reversible endothermic transitions at 86, 123, and 157 degrees C. At 86 degrees C, cholesterol monohydrate loses its water of hydration, forming the high temperature polymorph of anhydrous cholesterol. At least 24 hours were required for re-hydration of cholesterol and the rate of hydration was dependent on the polymorphic crystalline form of anhydrous cholesterol. At 123 degrees C, anhydrous crystalline cholesterol in the presence of excess water undergoes a sharp transition to a birefringent liquid crystalline phase of smectic texture. The x-ray diffraction pattern obtained from this phase contained two sharp low-angle reflections at 37.4 and 18.7 A and a diffuse wide-angle reflection centered at 5.7 A, indicating a layered smectic type of liquid crystalline structure with each layer being two cholesterol molecules thick. The liquid crystalline phase is stable over the temperature range of 123 to 157 degrees C before melting to a liquid dispersed in water. The observation of a smectic liquid crystalline phase for hydrated cholesterol correlates with its high surface activity and helps to explain its ability to exist in high concentrations in biological membranes. PMID:458269

  17. Enriching membrane cholesterol improves stability and cryosurvival of buffalo spermatozoa.

    Rajoriya, J S; Prasad, J K; Ramteke, S S; Perumal, P; Ghosh, S K; Singh, M; Pande, Megha; Srivastava, N

    2016-01-01

    Buffalo spermatozoa are comparatively more susceptible to freezing hazards than cattle spermatozoa. In recent times incubation of spermatozoa with cholesterol-loaded-cyclodextrins (CLC) has shown improvements in semen quality in several species. Therefore, this study was undertaken to evaluate the incubation level of CLC at which maximum benefit is derived for the buffalo spermatozoa. For the study, 120 million spermatozoa were incubated in 2, 3 and 4 mg/mL of CLC (Gr II, III and IV, respectively) and cholesterol and phospholipids content, their ratio, flow cytometric evaluation of plasma membrane integrity (PMI), plasma membrane fluidity and extent of cryoinjury (Chlortetracycline, CTC assay) were compared with an untreated control (Gr I). Additionally the ability of cholesterol-loaded-spermatozoa to undergo induced acrosome reaction (IAR) using ionophore calcium (A23187) was evaluated in frozen-thaw samples. Data show a significant and linear increase (CV=0.88) in cholesterol content of spermatozoa in Gr II, III and IV and a significant decrease in phospholipids content at frozen-thaw stage in Gr IV than Gr III spermatozoa. The study revealed a significant improvement in PMI and significant reduction in plasma membrane fluidity and cryoinjury of CLC treated spermatozoa at progressive stages in three groups compared to control. Nevertheless, spermatozoa of Gr II, III and IV were significantly less responsive to ionophore calcium (A23187) than Gr I. This study shows for the first time that incubation of buffalo bull spermatozoa with CLC (3mg/120×10(6)) prior to processing permits greater numbers of sperm to survive cryopreservation while allowing spermatozoa to capacitate and the acrosome to react to AR inducer ionophore calcium (A23187). PMID:26619942

  18. The macrophage and its related cholesterol efflux as a HDL function index in atherosclerosis.

    Yamamoto, Suguru; Narita, Ichiei; Kotani, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    The macrophage and its related cholesterol efflux are considered to be a key player in atherosclerotic formation in relation to the function of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The HDL function can be evaluated by the reaction between lipid-loaded macrophages and lipid-acceptors in the HDL fraction from the plasma, apolipoprotein B-depleted serum, and/or whole serum/plasma. Recent studies have reported that an impaired cholesterol efflux of HDL is observed in patients with cardiometabolic diseases, such as dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. A population-based cohort study has reported an inverse association between the cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL and the incidence of atherosclerotic disease, regardless of the serum HDL-cholesterol level. Moreover, in this paper, when we summarized several clinical interventional studies of statin treatment that examined cholesterol efflux, a potential increase in the efflux in patients treated with statins was implied. However, the effect was not fully defined in the current situation because of the small sample sizes, lack of a unified protocol for measuring the efflux, and short-term intervention periods without cardiovascular outcomes in available studies. Further investigation is necessary to determine the effect of drugs on cholesterol efflux. With additional advanced studies, cholesterol efflux is a promising laboratory index to understand the HDL function. PMID:27087419

  19. Novel technique for generating macrophage foam cells for in vitro reverse cholesterol transport studies.

    Sengupta, Bhaswati; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2013-12-01

    Generation of foam cells, an essential step for reverse cholesterol transport studies, uses the technique of receptor-dependent macrophage loading with radiolabeled acetylated LDL. In this study, we used the ability of a biologically relevant detergent molecule, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PtdCho), to form mixed micelles with cholesterol or cholesteryl ester (CE) to generate macrophage foam cells. Fluorescent or radiolabeled cholesterol/lyso-PtdCho mixed micelles were prepared and incubated with RAW 264.7 or mouse peritoneal macrophages. Results showed that such micelles were quite stable at 4°C and retained the solubilized cholesterol during one month of storage. Macrophages incubated with cholesterol or CE (unlabeled, fluorescently labeled, or radiolabeled)/lyso-PtdCho mixed micelles accumulated CE as documented by microscopy, lipid staining, labeled oleate incorporation, and by TLC. Such foam cells unloaded cholesterol when incubated with HDL but not with oxidized HDL. We propose that stable cholesterol or CE/lyso-PtdCho micelles would offer advantages over existing methods. PMID:24115226

  20. Biliary cholesterol secretion: More than a simple ABC

    Arne; Dikkers; Uwe; JF; Tietge

    2010-01-01

    Biliary cholesterol secretion is a process important for 2 major disease complexes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and cholesterol gallstone disease. With respect to cardiovascular disease, biliary cholesterol secretion is regarded as the f inal step for the elimination of cholesterol originating from cholesterol-laden macrophage foam cells in the vessel wall in a pathway named reverse cholesterol transport. On the other hand, cholesterol hypersecretion into the bile is considered the main pathophys...

  1. CHOLESTEROL ASSIMILATION BY COMMERCIAL YOGHURT STARTER CULTURES

    Małgorzata Ziarno; Ewa Sękul; Alvaro Aguado Lafraya

    2007-01-01

    The ability to in vitro cholesterol level reduction in laboratory media has been shown for numerous strains of lactic acid bacteria, but not for all strains of lactic bacteria used in the dairy industry. The aim of this work was the determination of the ability of selected thermophilic lactic acid bacteria to cholesterol assimilation during 24 h culture in MRS broth. Commercial starter cultures showed various ability to cholesterol assimilation from laboratory medium. In case of starter cultu...

  2. Structure of cholesterol/ceramide monolayer mixtures

    Scheffer, L.; Solomonov, I.; Weygand, M.J.; Kjær, K.; Leiserowitz, L.; Addadi, L.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of monolayers of cholesterol/ ceramide mixtures was investigated using grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, immunofluorescence, and atomic force microscopy techniques. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements showed the existence of a crystalline mixed phase of the two...... was determined and modeled. Immunolabeling was performed with an antibody specific to the cholesterol monohydrate crystalline arrangement. The antibody recognizes crystalline cholesterol monolayers, but does not interact with crystalline ceramide. Immunofluorescence and atomic force microscopy data...

  3. Structure of Cholesterol in Lipid Rafts

    Toppozini, Laura; Meinhardt, Sebastian; Armstrong, Clare L.; Yamani, Zahra; Kučerka, Norbert; Schmid, Friederike; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2014-11-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano-or mesoscopic structures in the plasma membrane and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as signal transduction, adhesion, trafficking, and lipid or protein sorting. Observations of these membrane heterogeneities have proven challenging, as they are thought to be both small and short lived. With a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and neutron diffraction using deuterium labeled cholesterol molecules, we observe raftlike structures and determine the ordering of the cholesterol molecules in binary cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. From coarse-grained computer simulations, heterogenous membranes structures were observed and characterized as small, ordered domains. Neutron diffraction was used to study the lateral structure of the cholesterol molecules. We find pairs of strongly bound cholesterol molecules in the liquid-disordered phase, in accordance with the umbrella model. Bragg peaks corresponding to ordering of the cholesterol molecules in the raftlike structures were observed and indexed by two different structures: a monoclinic structure of ordered cholesterol pairs of alternating direction in equilibrium with cholesterol plaques, i.e., triclinic cholesterol bilayers.

  4. Lysobisphosphatidic acid controls endosomal cholesterol levels.

    Chevallier, Julien; Chamoun, Zeina; Jiang, Guowei; Prestwich, Glenn; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan; Parton, Robert G; Gruenberg, Jean

    2008-10-10

    Most cell types acquire cholesterol by endocytosis of circulating low density lipoprotein, but little is known about the mechanisms of intra-endosomal cholesterol transport and about the primary cause of its aberrant accumulation in the cholesterol storage disorder Niemann-Pick type C (NPC). Here we report that lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), an unconventional phospholipid that is only detected in late endosomes, regulates endosomal cholesterol levels under the control of Alix/AlP1, which is an LBPA-interacting protein involved in sorting into multivesicular endosomes. We find that Alix down-expression decreases both LBPA levels and the lumenal vesicle content of late endosomes. Cellular cholesterol levels are also decreased, presumably because the storage capacity of endosomes is affected and thus cholesterol clearance accelerated. Both lumenal membranes and cholesterol can be restored in Alix knockdown cells by exogenously added LBPA. Conversely, we also find that LBPA becomes limiting upon pathological cholesterol accumulation in NPC cells, because the addition of exogenous LBPA, but not of LBPA isoforms or analogues, partially reverts the NPC phenotype. We conclude that LBPA controls the cholesterol capacity of endosomes. PMID:18644787

  5. Potential of BODIPY-cholesterol for analysis of cholesterol transport and diffusion in living cells

    Wüstner, Daniel; Lund, Frederik Wendelboe; Röhrl, Clemens;

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is an abundant and important lipid component of cellular membranes. Analysis of cholesterol transport and diffusion in living cells is hampered by the technical challenge of designing suitable cholesterol probes which can be detected for example by optical microscopy. One strategy is to...... use intrinsically fluorescent sterols, as dehydroergosterol (DHE), having minimal chemical alteration compared to cholesterol but giving low fluorescence signals in the UV region of the spectrum. Alternatively, one can use dye-tagged cholesterol analogs and in particular BODIPY-cholesterol (BChol......), whose synthesis and initial characterization was pioneered by Robert Bittman. Here, we give a general overview of the properties and applications but also limitations of BODIPY-tagged cholesterol probes for analyzing intracellular cholesterol trafficking. We describe our own experiences and...

  6. Arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages through PPAR-γ/LXR-α signaling pathway

    Xu, Xiaolin [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Li, Qian [Department of Integrative Medicine and Neurobiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Pang, Liewen; Huang, Guoqian; Huang, Jiechun; Shi, Meng; Sun, Xiaotian [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wang, Yiqing, E-mail: yiqingwangbiopaper@163.com [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Arctigenin enhanced cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages. •The expression of ABCA1, ABCG1 and apoE was upregulated in arctigenin-treated cells. •Arctigenin promoted the expression of PPAR-γ and LXR-α. •Inhibition of PPAR-γ or LXR-α reversed arctigenin-mediated biological effects. •Arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux via activation of PPAR-γ/LXR-α/ABCA1 pathway. -- Abstract: Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a critical mechanism to prevent the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa, on the cholesterol efflux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-loaded THP-1 macrophages. Our data showed that arctigenin significantly accelerated apolipoprotein A-I- and high-density lipoprotein-induced cholesterol efflux in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Moreover, arctigenin treatment enhanced the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and apoE, all of which are key molecules in the initial step of cholesterol efflux, at both mRNA and protein levels. Arctigenin also caused a concentration-dependent elevation in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) and liver X receptor-alpha (LXR-α). The arctigenin-mediated induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and apoE was abolished by specific inhibition of PPAR-γ or LXR-α using small interfering RNA technology. Our results collectively indicate that arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages through upregulation of ABCA1, ABCG1 and apoE, which is dependent on the enhanced expression of PPAR-γ and LXR-α.

  7. Arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages through PPAR-γ/LXR-α signaling pathway

    Highlights: •Arctigenin enhanced cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages. •The expression of ABCA1, ABCG1 and apoE was upregulated in arctigenin-treated cells. •Arctigenin promoted the expression of PPAR-γ and LXR-α. •Inhibition of PPAR-γ or LXR-α reversed arctigenin-mediated biological effects. •Arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux via activation of PPAR-γ/LXR-α/ABCA1 pathway. -- Abstract: Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a critical mechanism to prevent the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa, on the cholesterol efflux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-loaded THP-1 macrophages. Our data showed that arctigenin significantly accelerated apolipoprotein A-I- and high-density lipoprotein-induced cholesterol efflux in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Moreover, arctigenin treatment enhanced the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and apoE, all of which are key molecules in the initial step of cholesterol efflux, at both mRNA and protein levels. Arctigenin also caused a concentration-dependent elevation in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) and liver X receptor-alpha (LXR-α). The arctigenin-mediated induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and apoE was abolished by specific inhibition of PPAR-γ or LXR-α using small interfering RNA technology. Our results collectively indicate that arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages through upregulation of ABCA1, ABCG1 and apoE, which is dependent on the enhanced expression of PPAR-γ and LXR-α

  8. Hemorheological and Glycemic Parameters and HDL Cholesterol for the Prediction of Cardiovascular Events

    Sung Woo Cho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Hemorheological and glycemic parameters and high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol are used as biomarkers of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Objective: To investigate the association and clinical relevance of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, fibrinogen, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, and HDL cholesterol in the prediction of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE and coronary heart disease (CHD in an outpatient population. Methods: 708 stable patients who visited the outpatient department were enrolled and followed for a mean period of 28.5 months. Patients were divided into two groups, patients without MACE and patients with MACE, which included cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction, newly diagnosed CHD, and cerebral vascular accident. We compared hemorheological and glycemic parameters and lipid profiles between the groups. Results: Patients with MACE had significantly higher ESR, fibrinogen, fasting glucose, and HbA1c, while lower HDL cholesterol compared with patients without MACE. High ESR and fibrinogen and low HDL cholesterol significantly increased the risk of MACE in multivariate regression analysis. In patients with MACE, high fibrinogen and HbA1c levels increased the risk of multivessel CHD. Furthermore, ESR and fibrinogen were significantly positively correlated with HbA1c and negatively correlated with HDL cholesterol, however not correlated with fasting glucose. Conclusion: Hemorheological abnormalities, poor glycemic control, and low HDL cholesterol are correlated with each other and could serve as simple and useful surrogate markers and predictors for MACE and CHD in outpatients.

  9. Treating patients with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol: choices, issues and opportunities

    Watts Gerald F

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Three clinical trials have recently focused on the benefits of lipid-regulating therapy in populations with normocholesterolaemia and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol. Two secondary prevention studies (Veterans Affairs HDL-Cholesterol Intervention Trial [VA-HIT] and Bezafibrate Infarction Prevention [BIP] trial testified to the efficacy of fibrates in decreasing cardiovascular events, particularly in patients with coexisting risk factors, including hypertriglyceridaemia. The Air Force/Texas Coronary Atherosclerosis Prevention Study (AFCAPS/TexCAPS demonstrated that a statin could decrease acute coronary events in patients with isolated low HDL-cholesterol in a primary prevention setting. The absolute risk reduction in coronary events in the VA-HIT study compares favourably with those reported from the statin-based Cholesterol and Recurrent Events (CARE and Long-term Intervention with Pravastatin in Ischaemic Disease (LIPID trials. The absolute risk reduction in AFCAPS-TexCAPS is similar to that in West of Scotland Coronary Pravastatin Study (WOSCOPS. Recommendations are given concerning lifestyle and pharmacological management of low HDL-cholesterol. Optimal management also requires review of current treatment targets for HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides levels.

  10. Oxidised LDL, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol levels in patients of coronary artery disease

    Ghosh, Joya; T K Mishra; Rao, Y. N.; Aggarwal, S. K.

    2006-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is a major cause of morbidity and has various risk factors. Lipid profile i.e. low HDL-cholesterol, high LDL cholesterol, high total cholesterol, high triglycerides playing important role in its causation. Recently interest has been shown in the oxidized fraction of LDL as one of the risk factors. In the present study 60 age and sex matched normal healthy individuals were taken as controls and 60 patients of CAD were taken. Cholesterol was measured by enzymatic method,...

  11. Mast Cells and HDL Studies on Cholesterol Efflux and Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    Kareinen, Ilona

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease characterized by the accumulation of cholesterol in the arterial intima and consequently the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Formation of these plaques is initiated by the appearance of macrophage foam cell in the arterial intima. Foam cells are formed as excessive cholesterol accumulates in the cytosol of macrophages and finally the net influx exceeds the efflux of cholesterol. Excessive accumulation of chemically modified cholesterol in foam ...

  12. Intracellular cholesterol-binding proteins enhance HDL-mediated cholesterol uptake in cultured primary mouse hepatocytes

    Storey, Stephen M.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Huang, Huan; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Martin, Gregory G.; Landrock, Danilo; Payne, H. Ross; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2012-01-01

    A major gap in our knowledge of rapid hepatic HDL cholesterol clearance is the role of key intracellular factors that influence this process. Although the reverse cholesterol transport pathway targets HDL to the liver for net elimination of free cholesterol from the body, molecular details governing cholesterol uptake into hepatocytes are not completely understood. Therefore, the effects of sterol carrier protein (SCP)-2 and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), high-af...

  13. Dietary cholesterol and fats at a young age : do they influence cholesterol metabolism in adult life?

    Temmerman, A M; Vonk, R J; Niezen-Koning, K; Berger, R.; Fernandes, J

    1989-01-01

    The effects of dietary cholesterol and fats on cholesterol metabolism later in life were studied in Mongolian gerbils. Three groups were given a basic diet with soybean oil, palm kernel oil amounting to 8.75% (w/w), or the basic diet only. In three other groups, cholesterol (0.05%) was added to the

  14. From blood to gut : Direct secretion of cholesterol via transintestinal cholesterol efflux

    Vrins, Carlos L. J.

    2010-01-01

    The reverse cholesterol transport pathway (RCT) is the focus of many cholesterol lowering therapies By way of this pathway, excess cholesterol is collected from peripheral tissues and delivered back to the liver and gastrointestinal tract for excretion from the body For a long time this removal via

  15. Statins increase hepatic cholesterol synthesis and stimulate fecal cholesterol elimination in mice

    Schonewille, Marleen; de Boer, Jan Freark; Mele, Laura; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W; Wolters, Justina C; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Tietge, Uwe J.F.; Brufau Dones, Gemma; Groen, Albert K

    2016-01-01

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. Statins reduce plasma cholesterol levels, but whether this is actually caused by inhibition of de novo cholesterol synthesis has not been clearly established. Using three different statins we

  16. Mitochondrial function is involved in regulation of cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein (apoA-I from murine RAW 264.7 macrophages

    Allen Anne Marie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA damage, increased production of reactive oxygen species and progressive respiratory chain dysfunction, together with increased deposition of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters, are hallmarks of atherosclerosis. This study investigated the role of mitochondrial function in regulation of macrophage cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I, by the addition of established pharmacological modulators of mitochondrial function. Methods Murine RAW 264.7 macrophages were treated with a range of concentrations of resveratrol, antimycin, dinitrophenol, nigericin and oligomycin, and changes in viability, cytotoxicity, membrane potential and ATP, compared with efflux of [3H]cholesterol to apolipoprotein (apo A-I. The effect of oligomycin treatment on expression of genes implicated in macrophage cholesterol homeostasis were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblotting, relative to the housekeeping enzyme, Gapdh, and combined with studies of this molecule on cholesterol esterification, de novo lipid biosynthesis, and induction of apoptosis. Significant differences were determined using analysis of variance, and Dunnett’s or Bonferroni post t-tests, as appropriate. Results The positive control, resveratrol (24 h, significantly enhanced cholesterol efflux to apoA-I at concentrations ≥30 μM. By contrast, cholesterol efflux to apoA-I was significantly inhibited by nigericin (45%; ppAbca1 mRNA. Oligomycin treatment did not affect cholesterol biosynthesis, but significantly inhibited cholesterol esterification following exposure to acetylated LDL, and induced apoptosis at ≥30 μM. Finally, oligomycin induced the expression of genes implicated in both cholesterol efflux (Abca1, Abcg4, Stard1 and cholesterol biosynthesis (Hmgr, Mvk, Scap, Srebf2, indicating profound dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis. Conclusions Acute loss of mitochondrial function, and in particular Δψm, reduces

  17. Inherited Cholesterol Disorder Significantly Boosts Heart Risks

    ... leaves her cholesterol untreated, her risk of coronary heart disease death or nonfatal heart attack would be comparable to ... Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Cholesterol Heart Diseases--Prevention ... Us Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us ...

  18. Computational model for monitoring cholesterol metabolism.

    Selvakumar, R; Rashith Muhammad, M; Poornima Devi, G

    2014-12-01

    A non-deterministic finite automaton is designed to observe the cholesterol metabolism with the states of acceptance and rejection. The acceptance state of the automaton depicts the normal level of metabolism and production of good cholesterol as an end product. The rejection state of this machine shows the inhibition of enzymatic activity in cholesterol synthesis and removal of free fatty acids. The deficiency in human cholesterol metabolism pathway results in abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in plasma, arterial tissues leading to diseases such as hypercholesterolemia, atherosclerosis respectively and formation of gallstones. The designed machine can be used to monitor the cholesterol metabolism at molecular level through regulation of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol for the treatment of diseases incident due to the respective metabolic disorder. In addition, an algorithm for this machine has been developed to compare the programmed string with the given string. This study demonstrates the construction of a machine that is used for the development of molecular targeted therapy for the disorders in cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26396654

  19. Cholesterol modulates bitter taste receptor function.

    Pydi, Sai Prasad; Jafurulla, Md; Wai, Lisa; Bhullar, Rajinder P; Chelikani, Prashen; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-09-01

    Bitter taste perception in humans is believed to act as a defense mechanism against ingestion of potential toxic substances. Bitter taste is perceived by 25 distinct bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) which belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In the overall context of the role of membrane lipids in GPCR function, we show here that T2R4, a representative member of the bitter taste receptor family, displays cholesterol sensitivity in its signaling function. In order to gain further insight into cholesterol sensitivity of T2R4, we mutated two residues Tyr114(3.59) and Lys117(3.62) present in the cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif in T2R4 with alanines. We carried out functional characterization of the mutants by calcium mobilization, followed by cholesterol depletion and replenishment. CRAC motifs in GPCRs have previously been implicated in preferential cholesterol association. Our analysis shows that the CRAC motif represents an intrinsic feature of bitter taste receptors and is conserved in 22 out of 25 human T2Rs. We further demonstrate that Lys117, an important CRAC residue, is crucial in the reported cholesterol sensitivity of T2R4. Interestingly, cholesterol sensitivity of T2R4 was observed at quinine concentrations in the lower mM range. To the best of our knowledge, our results represent the first report addressing the molecular basis of cholesterol sensitivity in the function of taste receptors. PMID:27288892

  20. Biliary cholesterol excretion: A novel mechanism that regulates dietary cholesterol absorption

    Sehayek, Ephraim; Ono, Jennie G.; Shefer, Sarah; Nguyen, Lien B.; Wang, Nan; Batta, Ashok K.; Salen, Gerald; Smith, Jonathan D.; Tall, Alan R.; Breslow, Jan L.

    1998-01-01

    The regulation of dietary cholesterol absorption was examined in C57BL/6 and transgenic mice with liver overexpression of the scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI Tg). In C57BL/6 animals, feeding 0.02 to 1% (wt/wt) dietary cholesterol resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the percentage of dietary cholesterol absorbed. A plot of total daily mass of dietary cholesterol absorbed versus the percentage by weight of cholesterol in the diet yielded a curve suggesting a saturable process with a Km of 0.4...

  1. The Structure of Cholesterol in Lipid Rafts

    Toppozini, Laura; Armstrong, Clare L; Yamani, Zahra; Kucerka, Norbert; Schmid, Friederike; Rheinstaedter, Maikel C

    2014-01-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano- or mesoscopic structures in the plasma membrane and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as signal transduction, adhesion, trafficking and lipid/protein sorting. Observations of these membrane heterogeneities have proven challenging, as they are thought to be both small and short-lived. With a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and neutron diffraction using deuterium labeled cholesterol molecules we observe raft-like structures and determine the ordering of the cholesterol molecules in binary cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. From coarse-grained computer simulations, heterogenous membranes structures were observed and characterized as small, ordered domains. Neutron diffraction was used to study the lateral structure of the cholesterol molecules. We find pairs of strongly bound cholesterol molecules in the liquid-disordered phase, in accordance with the umbrella model. Bragg peaks corresponding to orderin...

  2. Trapping crystal nucleation of cholesterol monohydrate

    Solomonov, I.; Weygand, M.J.; Kjær, K.;

    2005-01-01

    Crystalline nucleation of cholesterol at the air-water interface has been studied via grazing incidence x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The various stages of cholesterol molecular assembly from monolayer to three bilayers incorporating interleaving hydrogen-bonded water layers in a...... monoclinic cholesterol . H2O phase, has been monitored and their structures characterized to near atomic resolution. Crystallographic evidence is presented that this multilayer phase is similar to that of a reported metastable cholesterol phase of undetermined structure obtained from bile before...... transformation to the triclinic phase of cholesterol . H2O, the thermodynamically stable macroscopic form. According to grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements and crystallographic data, a transformation from the monoclinic film structure to a multilayer of the stable monohydrate phase involves, at...

  3. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: High Blood Cholesterol

    ... Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease High Blood Cholesterol High blood cholesterol is another major risk factor for heart disease ... can do something about. The higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk for developing heart ...

  4. High Blood Cholesterol: What You Need to Know

    ... Audiences Contact The Health Information Center High Blood Cholesterol: What You Need To Know Table of Contents ... Lifestyle Changes (TLC) Drug Treatment Resources Why Is Cholesterol Important? Your blood cholesterol level has a lot ...

  5. SIRT2 ablation has no effect on tubulin acetylation in brain, cholesterol biosynthesis or the progression of Huntington's disease phenotypes in vivo.

    Anna Bobrowska

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder for which there are no disease-modifying treatments. The molecular pathogenesis of HD is complex and many mechanisms and cellular processes have been proposed as potential sites of therapeutic intervention. However, prior to embarking on drug development initiatives, it is essential that therapeutic targets can be validated in mammalian models of HD. Previous studies in invertebrate and cell culture HD models have suggested that inhibition of SIRT2 could have beneficial consequences on disease progression. SIRT2 is a NAD(+-dependent deacetylase that has been proposed to deacetylate α-tubulin, histone H4 K16 and to regulate cholesterol biogenesis - a pathway which is dysregulated in HD patients and HD mouse models. We have utilized mice in which SIRT2 has been reduced or ablated to further explore the function of SIRT2 and to assess whether SIRT2 loss has a beneficial impact on disease progression in the R6/2 mouse model of HD. Surprisingly we found that reduction or loss of SIRT2 had no effect on the acetylation of α-tubulin or H4K16 or on cholesterol biosynthesis in the brains of wild type mice. Equally, genetic reduction or ablation of SIRT2 had no effect on HD progression as assessed by a battery of physiological and behavioural tests. Furthermore, we observed no change in aggregate load or levels of soluble mutant huntingtin transprotein. Intriguingly, neither the constitutive genetic loss nor acute pharmacological inhibition of SIRT2 affected the expression of cholesterol biosynthesis enzymes in the context of HD. Therefore, we conclude that SIRT2 inhibition does not modify disease progression in the R6/2 mouse model of HD and SIRT2 inhibition should not be prioritised as a therapeutic option for HD.

  6. Arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages through PPAR-γ/LXR-α signaling pathway.

    Xu, Xiaolin; Li, Qian; Pang, Liewen; Huang, Guoqian; Huang, Jiechun; Shi, Meng; Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Yiqing

    2013-11-15

    Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a critical mechanism to prevent the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa, on the cholesterol efflux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-loaded THP-1 macrophages. Our data showed that arctigenin significantly accelerated apolipoprotein A-I- and high-density lipoprotein-induced cholesterol efflux in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Moreover, arctigenin treatment enhanced the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and apoE, all of which are key molecules in the initial step of cholesterol efflux, at both mRNA and protein levels. Arctigenin also caused a concentration-dependent elevation in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) and liver X receptor-alpha (LXR-α). The arctigenin-mediated induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and apoE was abolished by specific inhibition of PPAR-γ or LXR-α using small interfering RNA technology. Our results collectively indicate that arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages through upregulation of ABCA1, ABCG1 and apoE, which is dependent on the enhanced expression of PPAR-γ and LXR-α. PMID:24140409

  7. Endogenous cholesterol synthesis, fecal steroid excretion and serum lanosterol in subjects with high or low response of serum cholesterol to dietary cholesterol

    Beynen, A.C.; Katan, M.B.; Gent, van C.M.

    1986-01-01

    In this study we addressed the question whether hypo- and hyper-responders to dietary cholesterol differ with regard to the flexibility of endogenous cholesterol synthesis after changes in cholesterol intake. Whole-body cholesterol synthesis was measured as faecal excretion of neutral steroids and b

  8. Protective effects of alginate–chitosan microspheres loaded with alkaloids from Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss. Benth. (Zuojin Pill against ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats

    Wang QS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Qiang-Song Wang,1,2,* Xiao-Ning Zhu,1,* Heng-Li Jiang,1,* Gui-Fang Wang,3 Yuan-Lu Cui1 1Tianjin State Key Laboratory of Modern Chinese Medicine, Research Center of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 2Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Science & Peking Union Medical College, 3Pharmacy Department, Baokang Hospital, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Zuojin Pill (ZJP, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss. Benth. in a ratio of 6:1 (w/w and was first recorded in “Danxi’s experiential therapy” for treating gastrointestinal disorders in the 15th century. However, the poor solubility of alkaloids from ZJP restricted the protective effect in treating gastritis and gastric ulcer. The aim of the study was to investigate the protective mechanism of mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids from C. chinensis Franch. and E. rutaecarpa (Juss. Benth. on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats. Surface morphology, particle size, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, mucoadhesiveness, and fluorescent imaging of the microspheres in gastrointestinal tract were studied. The results showed that the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could sustain the release of drugs beyond 12 hours and had gastric mucoadhesive property with 82.63% retention rate in vitro. The fluorescence tracer indicated high retention of mucoadhesive microspheres within 12 hours in vivo. The mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could reduce the gastric injury by decreasing the mucosal lesion index, increasing the percentage of inhibition and increasing the amount of mucus in the gastric mucosa in an ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury rat model. Moreover, the

  9. Perturbed cholesterol homeostasis in aging spinal cord.

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2016-09-01

    The spinal cord is vital for the processing of sensorimotor information and for its propagation to and from both the brain and the periphery. Spinal cord function is affected by aging, however, the mechanisms involved are not well-understood. To characterize molecular mechanisms of spinal cord aging, microarray analyses of gene expression were performed on cervical spinal cords of aging rats. Of the metabolic and signaling pathways affected, cholesterol-associated pathways were the most comprehensively altered, including significant downregulation of cholesterol synthesis-related genes and upregulation of cholesterol transport and metabolism genes. Paradoxically, a significant increase in total cholesterol content was observed-likely associated with cholesterol ester accumulation. To investigate potential mechanisms for the perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, we quantified the expression of myelin and neuroinflammation-associated genes and proteins. Although there was minimal change in myelin-related expression, there was an increase in phagocytic microglial and astrogliosis markers, particularly in the white matter. Together, these results suggest that perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, possibly as a result of increased inflammatory activation in spinal cord white matter, may contribute to impaired spinal cord function with aging. PMID:27459933

  10. Brain cholesterol in normal and pathological aging

    Vanmierlo Tim

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Aberrations in cerebral cholesterol homeostasis can lead to severe neurological diseases. Recent findings strengthen the link between brain cholesterol metabolism and factors involved in synaptic plasticity, a process essential for learning and memory functions, as well as regeneration, which are affected in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD. Cholesterol homeostasis within the brain is independent of that in the rest of the body and needs to be strictly regulated for optimal brain functioning. In contrast with what was initially assumed brain cholesterol homeostasis can be modulated by extra-cerebral factors. We have found that enhancement of the cholesterol-turnover in the brain by administration of the synthetic activator of liver x receptos (LXRs, T0901317, leads to restoration of memory functions in an AD mouse-model.Memory in C57Bl6NCrl mice was not further improved by the same treatment. Moreover, it was found that in contrast with cholesterol, the structurally very similar dietary derived plant sterols can enter the brain. Plant sterols may be natural activators of LXRs. Evidence is provided suggesting that brassicasterol may be a novel additional biomarker in cerebrospinal fluid of AD patients. Insight into the regulation of cerebral cholesterol homeostasis will provide possibilities to modulate the key steps involved and may lead to the development of therapies for the prevention as well as treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD.

  11. Cholesterol esterase activity of human intestinal mucosa

    It has been suggested that cholesterol absorption in humans is dependent on bile acid pool composition and that expansion of the cholic acid pool size is followed by an increase of the absorption values. Similar observations were reported in rats. In the present study, therefore, the authors investigated some general properties of human intestinal cholesterol esterase, with particular emphasis on the effect of bile acids on this enzymatic activity. Twenty-nine segments of small intestine were taken during operations; the enzymatic activity was studied by using mucosal homogenate as a source of enzyme and oleic acid, cholesterol, and 14C-labeled cholesterol as substrates. The time-activity relationship was linear within the first two hours; optimal pH for esterification ranged between 5 and 6.2. There was little difference between the esterifying activity of the jejunal and ileal mucosa. Esterification of cholesterol was observed with all the investigated fatty acids but was maximal with oleic acid. Bile acids did not affect cholesterol esterase activity when present in the incubation mixture at 0.1 and 1.0 mM; the enzymatic activity, however, was significantly inhibited when bile acids were added at 20 mM. In conclusion, this study has shown that the human intestinal mucosa possesses a cholesterol esterase activity; at variance with the rat, however, the human enzyme does not seem to be stimulated by trihydroxy bile acids

  12. Diet serum cholesterol and coronary diseases

    Narindar Nath

    1961-07-01

    Full Text Available The probable sequence of events leading to atherosclerotic disease of the coronary artery and heart attack are briefly described. Blood cholesterol as a casual agent in atherosclerosis and how blood cholesterol can be modified are discussed. The effects of various dietary components particularly quality and quantity of fat and protein on the blood cholesterol concentration are discussed and it is emphasized that more work needs to be done to ascertain the role of individual components of the diet and their relative importance in atherogenesis.

  13. The role of cholesterol in membrane fusion.

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kreutzberger, Alex J B; Lee, Jinwoo; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol modulates the bilayer structure of biological membranes in multiple ways. It changes the fluidity, thickness, compressibility, water penetration and intrinsic curvature of lipid bilayers. In multi-component lipid mixtures, cholesterol induces phase separations, partitions selectively between different coexisting lipid phases, and causes integral membrane proteins to respond by changing conformation or redistribution in the membrane. But, which of these often overlapping properties are important for membrane fusion?-Here we review a range of recent experiments that elucidate the multiple roles that cholesterol plays in SNARE-mediated and viral envelope glycoprotein-mediated membrane fusion. PMID:27179407

  14. SIGNIFICANCE OF LIPID PROFILE ESTIMATION IN PATIENT WITH ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Santhosh Kumar .N

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute myocardial infarction is one of the important reasons of death and unhealthiness in the world. The present study was undertaken to investigate the changes in serum lipids and lipoproteins in patients with acute myocardial infarction. The levels of lipid profile were significantly changed in the acute myocardial infarction patients. Acute myocardial infarction patients had significantly higher levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, TG, Lipoprotein and lower level of HDL-cholesterol, as compared to the control subjects. We found a significant association of lipid profiles with acute myocardial infarction. Reduced serum HDL-cholesterol and increased Serum LDL, Serum TG, Lipoprotein (a, in our study subjects may be the effective reasonable lipid disorders in AMI patients.

  15. Novel role of a triglyceride-synthesizing enzyme: DGAT1 at the crossroad between triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism

    Sachdev, Vinay; Leopold, Christina; Bauer, Raimund; Patankar, Jay V.; Iqbal, Jahangir; Obrowsky, Sascha; Boverhof, Renze; Doktorova, Marcela; Scheicher, Bernhard; Goeritzer, Madeleine; Kolb, Dagmar; Turnbull, Andrew V.; Zimmer, Andreas; Hoefler, Gerald; Hussain, M. Mahmood; Groen, Albert K.; Kratky, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) is a key enzyme in triacylglycerol (TG) biosynthesis. Here we show that genetic deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of DGAT1 in mice alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol absorption, as assessed by acute cholesterol uptake, was significantly decreased in the small intestine and liver upon DGAT1 deficiency/inhibition. Ablation of DGAT1 in the intestine (I-DGAT1−/−) alone is sufficient to cause these effects. Consequences of I-DGAT1 deficiency phenocopy findings in whole-body DGAT1−/− and DGAT1 inhibitor-treated mice. We show that deficiency/inhibition of DGAT1 affects cholesterol metabolism via reduced chylomicron size and increased trans-intestinal cholesterol excretion. These effects are independent of cholesterol uptake at the apical surface of enterocytes but mediated through altered dietary fatty acid metabolism. Our findings provide insight into a novel role of DGAT1 and identify a pathway by which intestinal DGAT1 deficiency affects whole-body cholesterol homeostasis in mice. Targeting intestinal DGAT1 may represent a novel approach for treating hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27344248

  16. Novel role of a triglyceride-synthesizing enzyme: DGAT1 at the crossroad between triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism.

    Sachdev, Vinay; Leopold, Christina; Bauer, Raimund; Patankar, Jay V; Iqbal, Jahangir; Obrowsky, Sascha; Boverhof, Renze; Doktorova, Marcela; Scheicher, Bernhard; Goeritzer, Madeleine; Kolb, Dagmar; Turnbull, Andrew V; Zimmer, Andreas; Hoefler, Gerald; Hussain, M Mahmood; Groen, Albert K; Kratky, Dagmar

    2016-09-01

    Acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) is a key enzyme in triacylglycerol (TG) biosynthesis. Here we show that genetic deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of DGAT1 in mice alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol absorption, as assessed by acute cholesterol uptake, was significantly decreased in the small intestine and liver upon DGAT1 deficiency/inhibition. Ablation of DGAT1 in the intestine (I-DGAT1(-/-)) alone is sufficient to cause these effects. Consequences of I-DGAT1 deficiency phenocopy findings in whole-body DGAT1(-/-) and DGAT1 inhibitor-treated mice. We show that deficiency/inhibition of DGAT1 affects cholesterol metabolism via reduced chylomicron size and increased trans-intestinal cholesterol excretion. These effects are independent of cholesterol uptake at the apical surface of enterocytes but mediated through altered dietary fatty acid metabolism. Our findings provide insight into a novel role of DGAT1 and identify a pathway by which intestinal DGAT1 deficiency affects whole-body cholesterol homeostasis in mice. Targeting intestinal DGAT1 may represent a novel approach for treating hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27344248

  17. Specificity of the Acute Tryptophan and Tyrosine Plus Phenylalanine Depletion and Loading Tests Part II: Normalisation of the Tryptophan and the Tyrosine Plus Phenylalanine to Competing Amino Acid Ratios in a New Control Formulation

    Abdulla A.-B. Badawy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Current formulations for acute tryptophan (Trp or tyrosine (Tyr plus phenylalanine (Phe depletion and loading cause undesirable decreases in ratios of Trp or Tyr + Phe to competing amino acids (CAA, thus undermining the specificities of these tests. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA cause these unintended decreases, and lowering their content in a new balanced control formulation in the present study led to normalization of all ratios. Four groups (n = 12 each of adults each received one of four 50 g control formulations, with 0% (traditional, 20%, 30%, or 40% less of the BCAA. The free and total [Trp]/[CAA] and [Phe + Tyr]/[BCAA + Trp] ratios all decreased significantly during the first 5 h following the traditional formulation, but were fully normalized by the formulation containing 40% less of the BCAA. We recommend the latter as a balanced control formulation and propose adjustments in the depletion and loading formulations to enhance their specificities for 5-HT and the catecholamines.

  18. Triglycerides, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in rats exposed to premium motor spirit fumes

    Ogbevire L Aberare

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deliberate and regular exposure to premium motor spirit fumes is common and could be a risk factor for liver disease in those who are occupationally exposed. A possible association between premium motor spirit fumes and plasma levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol using a rodent model could provide new insights in the pathology of diseases where cellular dysfunction is an established risk factor. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible effect of premium motor spirit fumes on lipids and lipoproteins in workers occupationally exposed to premium motor spirit fumes using rodent model. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five Wister albino rats (of both sexes were used for this study between the 4 th of August and 7 th of September, 2010. The rats were divided into five groups of five rats each. Group 1 rats were not exposed to premium motor spirit fumes (control group, group 2 rats were exposed for 1 hour daily, group 3 for 3 hours daily, group 4 for 5 hours daily and group 5 for 7 hours daily. The experiment lasted for a period of 4 weeks. Blood samples obtained from all the groups after 4 weeks of exposure were used for the estimation of plasma levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein- cholesterol and low density lipoprotein- cholesterol. Result: Results showed significant increase in means of plasma total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels (P<0.05. The mean triglyceride and total body weight were significantly lower (P<0.05 in the exposed group when compared with the unexposed. The plasma level of high density lipoprotein, the ratio of low density lipoprotein to high density lipoprotein and the ratio of total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein did not differ significantly in exposed subjects when compared with the control group. Conclusion: These results showed that frequent exposure to petrol fumes

  19. What Do My Cholesterol Levels Mean?

    ... goes beyond cholesterol levels alone and considers overall risk assessment and reduction. It's still important to know your numbers, but work with your healthcare provider to treat your risk. What numbers do ...

  20. How to Get Your Cholesterol Tested

    ... six years as part of a cardiovascular risk assessment. You may need to have your cholesterol and other risk factors assessed more often if your risk is elevated. Your healthcare provider will talk with you about what your ...

  1. Cholesterol oxidation products and their biological importance.

    Kulig, Waldemar; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Rog, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2016-09-01

    The main biological cause of oxysterols is the oxidation of cholesterol. They differ from cholesterol by the presence of additional polar groups that are typically hydroxyl, keto, hydroperoxy, epoxy, or carboxyl moieties. Under typical conditions, oxysterol concentration is maintained at a very low and precisely regulated level, with an excess of cholesterol. Like cholesterol, many oxysterols are hydrophobic and hence confined to cell membranes. However, small chemical differences between the sterols can significantly affect how they interact with other membrane components, and this in turn can have a substantial effect on membrane properties. In this spirit, this review describes the biological importance and the roles of oxysterols in the human body. We focus primarily on the effect of oxysterols on lipid membranes, but we also consider other issues such as enzymatic and nonenzymatic synthesis processes of oxysterols as well as pathological conditions induced by oxysterols. PMID:26956952

  2. Structure of cholesterol/ceramide monolayer mixtures

    Scheffer, L.; Solomonov, I.; Weygand, M.J.;

    2005-01-01

    The structure of monolayers of cholesterol/ ceramide mixtures was investigated using grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, immunofluorescence, and atomic force microscopy techniques. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements showed the existence of a crystalline mixed phase of the two...... components within a range of compositions of cholesterol/ ceramide between 100: 0 and 67: 33. The mixed phase coexists with the ceramide crystalline phase in the range of compositions between 50: 50 and 30: 70; between 30: 70 and 0: 100 only the highly crystalline phase of ceramide was detected. The latter...... was determined and modeled. Immunolabeling was performed with an antibody specific to the cholesterol monohydrate crystalline arrangement. The antibody recognizes crystalline cholesterol monolayers, but does not interact with crystalline ceramide. Immunofluorescence and atomic force microscopy data...

  3. Evaluation of LDL-Cholesterol / HDL-Cholesterol Ratio as Predictor of Dyslipidemia in Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    Smita S. Kottagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subclinical hypothyroidism is defined as a serum TSH concentration above the upper limit of the reference range when serum T3 and T4 concentrations are within reference ranges. Subclinical thyroid disease is a laboratory diagnosis. Patients with subclinical disease have few or no definitive clinical signs or symptoms of thyroid dysfunction. It has been associated with higher levels of some cardiovascular risk factors. Despite some conflicting results, many studies have found that subjects with subclinical hypothyroidism have total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels higher than euthyroid subjects. The association between subclinical hypothyroidism and dyslipidemia is well known. Aims and Objectives: This study is an attempt to find the importance of Low Density Lipoprotein – Cholesterol / Higher Density Lipoprotein - Cholesterol (LDL-C/HDL-C ratio rather than measurement of individual lipid profile parameters in bringing to light the dyslipidemic state associated with subclinical hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods: We studied 30 subclinical hypothyroid cases with age above 35 yrs and 30 age matched euthyroid controls. Serum T3, T4, TSH were estimated by ELISA method, serum total cholesterol, HDL Cholesterol by enzymatic CHOD-PAP method, and LDL cholesterol using Friedewald formula. Results: We found the significant increase in the serum levels of TSH (p < 0.001, Total cholesterol (p<0.001, LDL cholesterol (p<0.001, and LDL-C/HDL-C (p<0.001, Systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure (p<0.001. There was no significant change in the levels of serum T3, T4, HDL- cholesterol. Conclusion: Increased levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and increased LDL-C/HDL-C ratio are seen in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. LDL-C/HDLC ratio is a better indicator for dyslipidemia in subclinical hypothyroid cases.

  4. From blood to gut: Direct secretion of cholesterol via transintestinal cholesterol efflux

    Carlos; LJ; Vrins

    2010-01-01

    The reverse cholesterol transport pathway (RCT) is the focus of many cholesterol-lowering therapies. By way of this pathway, excess cholesterol is collected from peripheral tissues and delivered back to the liver and gastrointestinal tract for excretion from the body. For a long time this removal via the hepatobiliary secretion was considered to be the sole route involved in the RCT. However, observations from early studies in animals and humans already pointed towards the possibility of another route. In t...

  5. A new framework for reverse cholesterol transport: Non-biliary contributions to reverse cholesterol transport

    Ryan; E; Temel; J; Mark; Brown

    2010-01-01

    Reduction of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol through statin therapy has only modestly decreased coronary heart disease (CHD)-associated mortality in developed countries, which has prompted the search for alternative therapeutic strategies for CHD. Major efforts are now focused on therapies that augment high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), and ultimately increase the fecal disposal of cholesterol. The process of RCT has long been thought to simply involve HDL-media...

  6. Dietary Phospholipids and Intestinal Cholesterol Absorption

    Sally Tandy; Chung, Rosanna W. S.; Elaine Wat; Alvin Kamili; Cohn, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Experiments carried out with cultured cells and in experimental animals have consistently shown that phospholipids (PLs) can inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption. Limited evidence from clinical studies suggests that dietary PL supplementation has a similar effect in man. A number of biological mechanisms have been proposed in order to explain how PL in the gut lumen is able to affect cholesterol uptake by the gut mucosa. Further research is however required to establish whether the abili...

  7. Cholesterol content in meat of some Cyprinidae

    Živković Dragić L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to examine cholesterol content in meat of five Cyprinidae species: white bream (Bllica bjoerkna L, carp bream (Abramis brama L, baltic vimba (Vimba vimba carinata Pallas, zope (Abramis balerus L and crucian carp (Carassius carassius gibelio Bloch from the river Danube. Cholesterol content was examined in the function of season factor and individual weight. Cholesterol concentration in meat of white bream carp bream, baltic vimba, zope and crucian carp is on average level below 20 mg/100 g of meat, which makes meat of these fish species nutritively very valuable. Cholesterol content is variable during the season. Its concentration in meat and in lipids is lowest during spring, during summer it increases and during autumn decreases, except in meat of white bream. Body weight has influence on cholesterol content when its concentration is expressed as % of cholesterol in lipids. Its content in lipids decreases with increasing of individual weight, except in meat of carp bream.

  8. CHOLESTEROL ASSIMILATION BY COMMERCIAL YOGHURT STARTER CULTURES

    Małgorzata Ziarno

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to in vitro cholesterol level reduction in laboratory media has been shown for numerous strains of lactic acid bacteria, but not for all strains of lactic bacteria used in the dairy industry. The aim of this work was the determination of the ability of selected thermophilic lactic acid bacteria to cholesterol assimilation during 24 h culture in MRS broth. Commercial starter cultures showed various ability to cholesterol assimilation from laboratory medium. In case of starter cultures used for production of traditional yoghurt, consisting of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, the quantity of assimilated cholesterol did not exceed 27% of its initial contents (0.7 g in 1 dm3. Starter cultures used for bioyoghurt production, containing also probiotic strains (came from Lactobacillus acidophilus species or Bifidobacterium genus assimilated from almost 18% to over 38% of cholesterol. For one monoculture of Lb. acidophilus, cholesterol assimilation ability of 49-55% was observed, despite that the number of bacterial cells in this culture was not different from number of bacteria in other cultures.

  9. Cholesterol suppresses antimicrobial effect of statins

    Mohammad Reza Haeri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Isoprenoid biosynthesis is a key metabolic pathway to produce a wide variety of biomolecules such as cholesterol and carotenoids, which target cell membranes. On the other hand, it has been reported that statins known as inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis and cholesterol lowering agents, may have a direct antimicrobial effect on the some bacteria. The exact action of statins in microbial metabolism is not clearly understood. It is possible that statins inhibit synthesis or utilization of some sterol precursor necessary for bacterial membrane integrity. Accordingly, this study was designed in order to examine if statins inhibit the production of a compound, which can be used in the membrane, and whether cholesterol would replace it and rescue bacteria from toxic effects of statins. Materials and Methods: To examine the possibility we assessed antibacterial effect of statins with different classes; lovastatin, simvastatin, and atorvastatin, alone and in combination with cholesterol on two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis and two Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli bacteria using gel diffusion assay. Results: Our results showed that all of the statins except for lovastatin had significant antibacterial property in S. aureus, E. coli, and Enter. faecalis. Surprisingly, cholesterol nullified the antimicrobial action of effective statins in statin-sensitive bacteria. Conclusion: It is concluded that statins may deprive bacteria from a metabolite responsible for membrane stability, which is effectively substituted by cholesterol.

  10. Dietary cholesterol modulates pathogen blocking by Wolbachia.

    Eric P Caragata

    Full Text Available The bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis protects its hosts from a range of pathogens by limiting their ability to form infections inside the insect. This "pathogen blocking" could be explained by innate immune priming by the symbiont, competition for host-derived resources between pathogens and Wolbachia, or the direct modification of the cell or cellular environment by Wolbachia. Recent comparative work in Drosophila and the mosquito Aedes aegypti has shown that an immune response is not required for pathogen blocking, implying that there must be an additional component to the mechanism. Here we have examined the involvement of cholesterol in pathogen blocking using a system of dietary manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster in combination with challenge by Drosophila C virus (DCV, a common fly pathogen. We observed that flies reared on cholesterol-enriched diets infected with the Wolbachia strains wMelPop and wMelCS exhibited reduced pathogen blocking, with viral-induced mortality occurring 2-5 days earlier than flies reared on Standard diet. This shift toward greater virulence in the presence of cholesterol also corresponded to higher viral copy numbers in the host. Interestingly, an increase in dietary cholesterol did not have an effect on Wolbachia density except in one case, but this did not directly affect the strength of pathogen blocking. Our results indicate that host cholesterol levels are involved with the ability of Wolbachia-infected flies to resist DCV infections, suggesting that cholesterol contributes to the underlying mechanism of pathogen blocking.

  11. l-asparaginase loaded red blood cells in refractory or relapsing acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children and adults: results of the GRASPALL 2005-01 randomized trial.

    Domenech, Carine; Thomas, Xavier; Chabaud, Sylvie; Baruchel, Andre; Gueyffier, François; Mazingue, Françoise; Auvrignon, Anne; Corm, Selim; Dombret, Herve; Chevallier, Patrice; Galambrun, Claire; Huguet, Françoise; Legrand, Faezeh; Mechinaud, Françoise; Vey, Norbert; Philip, Irène; Liens, David; Godfrin, Yann; Rigal, Dominique; Bertrand, Yves

    2011-04-01

    l-asparaginase encapsulated within erythrocytes (GRASPA(®) ) should allow serum asparagine depletion over a longer period than the native form of the enzyme, using lower doses and allowing better tolerance. The GRASPALL 2005-01 study, a multicentre randomized controlled trial, investigated three doses of GRASPA(®) for the duration of asparagine depletion in a phase I/II study in adults and children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in first relapse. Between February 2006 and April 2008, 18 patients received GRASPA(®) (50 iu/kg: n = 6,100 iu/kg: n = 6, 150 iu/kg: n = 6) after randomization, and six patients were assigned to the Escherichia coli native l-asparaginase (E. colil-ASNase) control group. GRASPA(®) was effective at depleting l-asparagine. One single injection of 150 iu/kg of GRASPA(®) provided similar results to 8 × 10,000 iu/m(2) intravenous injections of E. colil-ASNase. The safety profile of GRASPA(®) showed a reduction in the number and severity of allergic reactions and a trend towards less coagulation disorders. Other expected adverse events were comparable to those observed with E. colil-ASNase and there was also no difference between the three doses of GRASPA(®) . PMID:21332712

  12. Dairy products and plasma cholesterol levels

    Lena Ohlsson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol synthesized in the body or ingested is an essential lipid component for human survival from our earliest life. Newborns ingest about 3–4 times the amount per body weight through mother's milk compared to the dietary intake of adults. A birth level of 1.7 mmol/L plasma total cholesterol will increase to 4–4.5 mmol/L during the nursing period and continue to increase from adulthood around 40% throughout life. Coronary artery disease and other metabolic disorders are strongly associated with low-density lipoprotein (LDL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol as well as triacylglycerol concentration. Milk fat contains a broad range of fatty acids and some have a negative impact on the cholesterol rich lipoproteins. The saturated fatty acids (SFAs, such as palmitic acid (C16:0, myristic acid (C14:0, and lauric acid (C12:0, increase total plasma cholesterol, especially LDL, and constitute 11.3 g/L of bovine milk, which is 44.8% of total fatty acid in milk fat. Replacement of dairy SFA and trans-fatty acids with polyunsaturated fatty acids decreases plasma cholesterol, especially LDL cholesterol, and is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Available data shows different effects on lipoproteins for different dairy products and there is uncertainty as to the impact a reasonable intake amount of dairy items has on cardiovascular risk. The aim of this review is to elucidate the effect of milk components and dairy products on total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, and the LDL/HDL quotients. Based on eight recent randomized controlled trials of parallel or cross-over design and recent reviews it can be concluded that replacement of saturated fat mainly (but not exclusively derived from high-fat dairy products with low-fat dairy products lowers LDL/HDL cholesterol and total/HDL cholesterol ratios. Whey, dairy fractions enriched in polar lipids, and techniques such as fermentation, or fortification of cows feeding can be used

  13. Chromatographic separation of cholesterol in foods.

    Fenton, M

    1992-10-30

    Based on the current literature and on experience gained in the laboratory, a simplified procedure using direct saponification (0.4 M potassium hydroxide in ethanol and heating at 60 degrees C for 1 h) is the most appropriate method for the determination of total cholesterol in foods. Extraction of the unsaponifiable matter with hexane is efficient and no extra clean-up is required before quantification. An internal standard, 5 alpha-cholestane or epicoprostanol, should be added to the sample prior to saponification and, together with reference standards, carried through the entire procedure to ensure accurate results. A significant improvement in cholesterol methodology has been achieved by decreasing the sample size and performing all the sample preparation steps in a single tube. The method has the advantages of elimination of an initial solvent extraction for total lipids and errors resulting from multiple extractions, transfers, filtration and wash steps after saponification. The resulting hexane extract, which contains a variety of sterols and fat soluble vitamins, requires an efficient capillary column for complete resolution of cholesterol from the other compounds present. The development of fused-silica capillary columns using cross-linked and bonded liquid phases has provided high thermal stability, inertness and separation efficiency and, together with automated cold on-column gas chromatographic injection systems, has resulted in reproducible cholesterol determinations in either underivatized or derivatized form. If free cholesterol and its esters need to be determined separately, they are initially extracted with other lipids with chloroform-methanol followed by their separation by column or thin-layer chromatography and subsequently analysed by gas or liquid chromatography. Although capillary gas chromatography offers superior efficiency in separation, the inherent benefits of liquid chromatography makes it a potential alternative. Isotope dilution

  14. Taurine ameliorates cholesterol metabolism by stimulating bile acid production in high-cholesterol-fed rats.

    Murakami, Shigeru; Fujita, Michiko; Nakamura, Masakazu; Sakono, Masanobu; Nishizono, Shoko; Sato, Masao; Imaizumi, Katsumi; Mori, Mari; Fukuda, Nobuhiro

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of dietary taurine on cholesterol metabolism in high-cholesterol-fed rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two dietary groups (n = 6 in each group): a high-cholesterol diet containing 0.5% cholesterol and 0.15% sodium cholate, and a high-cholesterol diet with 5% (w/w) taurine. The experimental diets were given for 2 weeks. Taurine supplementation reduced the serum and hepatic cholesterol levels by 37% and 32%, respectively. Faecal excretion of bile acids was significantly increased in taurine-treated rats, compared with untreated rats. Biliary bile acid concentrations were also increased by taurine. Taurine supplementation increased taurine-conjugated bile acids by 61% and decreased glycine-conjugated bile acids by 53%, resulting in a significant decrease in the glycine/taurine (G/T) ratio. Among the taurine-conjugated bile acids, cholic acid and deoxycholic acid were significantly increased. In the liver, taurine supplementation increased the mRNA expression and enzymatic activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme for bile acid synthesis, by three- and two-fold, respectively. Taurine also decreased the enzymatic activity of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). These observations suggest that taurine supplementation increases the synthesis and excretion of taurine-conjugated bile acids and stimulates the catabolism of cholesterol to bile acid by elevating the expression and activity of CYP7A1. This may reduce cholesterol esterification and lipoprotein assembly for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion, leading to reductions in the serum and hepatic cholesterol levels. PMID:26710098

  15. Enhanced vascular permeability facilitates entry of plasma HDL and promotes macrophage-reverse cholesterol transport from skin in mice.

    Kareinen, Ilona; Cedó, Lídia; Silvennoinen, Reija; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka; Jauhiainen, Matti; Julve, Josep; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escola-Gil, Joan Carles; Kovanen, Petri T; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam

    2015-02-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) pathway from macrophage foam cells initiates when HDL particles cross the endothelium, enter the interstitial fluid, and induce cholesterol efflux from these cells. We injected [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded J774 macrophages into the dorsal skin of mice and measured the transfer of macrophage-derived [(3)H]cholesterol to feces [macrophage-RCT (m-RCT)]. Injection of histamine to the macrophage injection site increased locally vascular permeability, enhanced influx of intravenously administered HDL, and stimulated m-RCT from the histamine-treated site. The stimulatory effect of histamine on m-RCT was abolished by prior administration of histamine H1 receptor (H1R) antagonist pyrilamine, indicating that the histamine effect was H1R-dependent. Subcutaneous administration of two other vasoactive mediators, serotonin or bradykinin, and activation of skin mast cells to secrete histamine and other vasoactive compounds also stimulated m-RCT. None of the studied vasoactive mediators affected serum HDL levels or the cholesterol-releasing ability of J774 macrophages in culture, indicating that acceleration of m-RCT was solely due to increased availability of cholesterol acceptors in skin. We conclude that disruption of the endothelial barrier by vasoactive compounds enhances the passage of HDL into interstitial fluid and increases the rate of RCT from peripheral macrophage foam cells, which reveals a novel tissue cholesterol-regulating function of these compounds. PMID:25473102

  16. Cholesterol efflux analyses using stable isotopes and mass spectrometry

    Robert J Brown; Shao, Fei; Baldán, Ángel; Albert, Carolyn J.; Ford, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol efflux from macrophages and the vascular wall is the initial step of the cardiovascular protective reverse cholesterol transport process. This study demonstrates a mass spectrometry based assay to measure the cellular and media content of [d7]-cholesterol and unlabeled cholesterol that can be used to measure cholesterol efflux from cell lines. Using a triple quadrupole ESI-MS instrument in direct infusion mode, product ion scanning for m/z 83, neutral loss (NL) 375.5 scanning and ...

  17. Cholesterol and ocular pathologies: focus on the role of cholesterol-24S-hydroxylase in cholesterol homeostasis

    Fourgeux Cynthia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The retina is responsible for coding the light stimulus into a nervous signal that is transferred to the brain via the optic nerve. The retina is formed by the association of the neurosensory retina and the retinal pigment epithelium that is supported by Bruch’s membrane. Both the physical and metabolic associations between these partners are crucial for the functioning of the retina, by means of nutrient intake and removal of the cell and metabolic debris from the retina. Dysequilibrium are involved in the aging processes and pathologies such as age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of visual loss after the age of 50 years in Western countries. The retina is composed of several populations of cells including glia that is involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Cholesterol is the main sterol in the retina. It is present as free form in cells and as esters in Bruch’s membrane. Accumulation of cholesteryl esters has been associated with aging of the retina and impairment of the retinal function. Under dietary influence and in situ synthesized, the metabolism of cholesterol is regulated by cell interactions, including neurons and glia via cholesterol-24S-hydroxylase. Several pathophysiological associations with cholesterol and its metabolism can be suggested, especially in relation to glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration.

  18. Cholesterol Derivatives Based Charged Liposomes for Doxorubicin Delivery: Preparation, In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization

    Yu Nie, Li Ji, Hong Ding, Li Xie, Li Li, Bin He, Yao Wu, Zhongwei Gu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol plays a critical role in liposome composition. It has great impact on the behavior of liposome in vitro and in vivo. In order to verify the possible effects from cholesterol charge, surface shielding and chemical nature, two catalogs of liposomes with charged and PEGylated cholesterols were synthesized. Anionic liposomes (AL and cationic liposomes (CL were prepared, with charges from hemisuccinate and lysine in cholesterol derivatives, respectively. Characteristics of different formulated liposomes were investigated after doxorubicin encapsulation, using neutral liposomes (NL as control. Results showed that after PEGylation, AL and CL liposomes displayed prolonged retention release profile, while kept similar size distribution, encapsulation efficiency, low cytotoxicity and hemolysis comparing with NL. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry experiments confirmed the significantly higher cell uptake from AL and CL vesicles than the NL in mouse breast carcinoma and melanoma cells, human epithelial carcinoma and hepatoma cells. It was in accordance with our corresponding cellular mortality studies of DOX-loaded liposomes. The in vivo anti-tumor effect experiments from charged liposomes also presented much higher tumor inhibition effect (70% vs 45%, p < 0.05 than NL liposomes. This is the first time reporting anti-cancer effect from charged cholesterol liposome with/without PEGylation. It may give deeper understanding on the liposome formulation which is critical for liposome associated drug research and development.

  19. Emerging roles of the intestine in control of cholesterol metabolism

    Janine K Kruit; Albert K Groen; Theo J van Berkel; Folkert Kuipers

    2006-01-01

    The liver is considered the major "control center" for maintenance of whole body cholesterol homeostasis. This organ is the main site for de novo cholesterol synthesis,clears cholesterol-containing chylomicron remnants and low density lipoprotein particles from plasma and is the major contributor to high density lipoprotein (HDL; good cholesterol) formation. The liver has a central position in the classical definition of the reverse cholesterol transport pathway by taking up peripheryderived cholesterol from lipoprotein particles followed by conversion into bile acids or its direct secretion into bile for eventual removal via the feces. During the past couple of years, however, an additional important role of the intestine in maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis and regulation of plasma cholesterol levels has become apparent. Firstly, molecular mechanisms of cholesterol absorption have been elucidated and novel pharmacological compounds have been identified that interfere with the process and positively impact plasma cholesterol levels. Secondly, it is now evident that the intestine itself contributes to fecal neutral sterol loss as a cholesterol-secreting organ. Finally, very recent work has unequivocally demonstrated that the intestine contributes significantly to plasma HDL cholesterol levels.Thus, the intestine is a potential target for novel antiatherosclerotic treatment strategies that, in addition to interference with cholesterol absorption, modulate direct cholesterol excretion and plasma HDL cholesterol levels.

  20. A novel alkyne cholesterol to trace cellular cholesterol metabolism and localization.

    Hofmann, Kristina; Thiele, Christoph; Schött, Hans-Frieder; Gaebler, Anne; Schoene, Mario; Kiver, Yuriy; Friedrichs, Silvia; Lütjohann, Dieter; Kuerschner, Lars

    2014-03-01

    Cholesterol is an important lipid of mammalian cells and plays a fundamental role in many biological processes. Its concentration in the various cellular membranes differs and is tightly regulated. Here, we present a novel alkyne cholesterol analog suitable for tracing both cholesterol metabolism and localization. This probe can be detected by click chemistry employing various reporter azides. Alkyne cholesterol is accepted by cellular enzymes from different biological species (Brevibacterium, yeast, rat, human) and these enzymes include cholesterol oxidases, hydroxylases, and acyl transferases that generate the expected metabolites in in vitro and in vivo assays. Using fluorescence microscopy, we studied the distribution of cholesterol at subcellular resolution, detecting the lipid in the Golgi and at the plasma membrane, but also in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. In summary, alkyne cholesterol represents a versatile, sensitive, and easy-to-use tool for tracking cellular cholesterol metabolism and localization as it allows for manifold detection methods including mass spectrometry, thin-layer chromatography/fluorography, and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24334219

  1. Increased plasma membrane cholesterol in cystic fibrosis cells correlates with CFTR genotype and depends on de novo cholesterol synthesis

    Sonawane Nitin D; Previs Stephen F; Jiang Dechen; Ruddy Jennifer; Manson Mary E; West Richard H; Fang Danjun; Burgess James D; Kelley Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous observations demonstrate that Cftr-null cells and tissues exhibit alterations in cholesterol processing including perinuclear cholesterol accumulation, increased de novo synthesis, and an increase in plasma membrane cholesterol accessibility compared to wild type controls. The hypothesis of this study is that membrane cholesterol accessibility correlates with CFTR genotype and is in part influenced by de novo cholesterol synthesis. Methods Electrochemical detectio...

  2. An unusual case of a patient who lost his native kidneys and renal allograft from cholesterol crystal emboli.

    Ahmed, Wasim; Al Garni, Abdulkareem; Abdelgadir, Elbadri; Khamees, Khamess Obeid; Ellouly, Mohammed Ali Ahmed; Haleem, Abdul

    2015-09-01

    Cholesterol crystal emboli (CCE) syndrome involving native kidneys is an underdiagnosed condition. CCE is rare in renal allografts. It may present with acute kidney injury, but usually not acute graft loss. CCE should be considered in patients with a history of atherosclerosis and an invasive arterial procedure who present with acute or chronic renal allograft dysfunction. Therapy for CCE is mainly supportive and carries a high rate of mortality. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a patient who lost his native kidneys and renal allograft due to CCE arising from his own vasculature. PMID:26354570

  3. Elevated Remnant Cholesterol Causes Both Low-Grade Inflammation and Ischemic Heart Disease, Whereas Elevated Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Causes Ischemic Heart Disease Without Inflammation

    Varbo, Anette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G;

    2013-01-01

    Elevated nonfasting remnant cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol are causally associated with ischemic heart disease (IHD), but whether elevated nonfasting remnant cholesterol and LDL cholesterol both cause low-grade inflammation is currently unknown....

  4. Lipoproteins, cholesterol homeostasis and cardiac health

    Tyler F. Daniels, Karen M. Killinger, Jennifer J. Michal, Raymond W. Wright Jr., Zhihua Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is an essential substance involved in many functions, such as maintaining cell membranes, manufacturing vitamin D on surface of the skin, producing hormones, and possibly helping cell connections in the brain. When cholesterol levels rise in the blood, they can, however, have dangerous consequences. In particular, cholesterol has generated considerable notoriety for its causative role in atherosclerosis, the leading cause of death in developed countries around the world. Homeostasis of cholesterol is centered on the metabolism of lipoproteins, which mediate transport of the lipid to and from tissues. As a synopsis of the major events and proteins that manage lipoprotein homeostasis, this review contributes to the substantial attention that has recently been directed to this area. Despite intense scrutiny, the majority of phenotypic variation in total cholesterol and related traits eludes explanation by current genetic knowledge. This is somewhat disappointing considering heritability estimates have established these traits as highly genetic. Thus, the continued search for candidate genes, mutations, and mechanisms is vital to our understanding of heart disease at the molecular level. Furthermore, as marker development continues to predict risk of vascular illness, this knowledge has the potential to revolutionize treatment of this leading human disease.

  5. Acute Bronchitis

    ... of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your cough ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when people ...

  6. Aspirin Increases the Solubility of Cholesterol in Lipid Membranes

    Alsop, Richard; Barrett, Matthew; Zheng, Sonbo; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2014-03-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is often prescribed for patients with high levels of cholesterol for the secondary prevention of myocardial events, a regimen known as the Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy. We have recently shown that Aspirin partitions in lipid bilayers. However, a direct interplay between ASA and cholesterol has not been investigated. Cholesterol is known to insert itself into the membrane in a dispersed state at moderate concentrations (under ~37.5%) and decrease fluidity of membranes. We prepared model lipid membranes containing varying amounts of both ASA and cholesterol molecules. The structure of the bilayers as a function of ASA and cholesterol concentration was determined using high-resolution X-ray diffraction. At cholesterol levels of more than 40mol%, immiscible cholesterol plaques formed. Adding ASA to the membranes was found to dissolve the cholesterol plaques, leading to a fluid lipid bilayer structure. We present first direct evidence for an interaction between ASA and cholesterol on the level of the cell membrane.

  7. Ordering effects of cholesterol and its analogues

    Róg, Tomasz; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Vattulainen, Ilpo;

    2009-01-01

    Without any exaggeration, cholesterol is one of the most important lipid species in eukaryotic cells. Its effects on cellular membranes and functions range from purely mechanistic to complex metabolic ones, besides which it is also a precursor of the sex hormones (steroids) and several vitamins. In...... this review, we discuss the biophysical effects of cholesterol on the lipid bilayer, in particular the ordering and condensing effects, concentrating on the molecular level or inter-atomic interactions perspective, starting from two-component systems and proceeding to many-component ones e.g., modeling...... lipid rafts. Particular attention is paid to the roles of the methyl groups in the cholesterol ring system, and their possible biological function. Although our main research methodology is computer modeling, in this review we make extensive comparisons between experiments and different modeling...

  8. CHOBIMALT: A Cholesterol-Based Detergent†

    Howell, Stanley C.; Mittal, Ritesh; Huang, Lijun; Travis, Benjamin; Breyer, Richard M.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol and its hemisuccinate and sulfate derivatives are widely used in studies of purified membrane proteins, but are difficult to solubilize in aqueous solution, even in the presence of detergent micelles. Other cholesterol derivatives do not form conventional micelles and lead to viscous solutions. To address these problems a cholesterol-based detergent, CHOBIMALT, has been synthesized and characterized. At concentrations above 3–4μM, CHOBIMALT forms micelles without the need for elevated temperatures or sonic disruption. Diffusion and fluorescence measurements indicated that CHOBIMALT micelles are large (210 ± 30 kDa). The ability to solubilize a functional membrane protein was explored using a G-protein coupled receptor, the human kappa opioid receptor type 1 (hKOR1). While CHOBIMALT alone was not found to be effective as a surfactant for membrane extraction, when added to classical detergent micelles CHOBIMALT was observed to dramatically enhance the thermal stability of solubilized hKOR1. PMID:20919740

  9. Increased plasma membrane cholesterol in cystic fibrosis cells correlates with CFTR genotype and depends on de novo cholesterol synthesis

    Sonawane Nitin D

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous observations demonstrate that Cftr-null cells and tissues exhibit alterations in cholesterol processing including perinuclear cholesterol accumulation, increased de novo synthesis, and an increase in plasma membrane cholesterol accessibility compared to wild type controls. The hypothesis of this study is that membrane cholesterol accessibility correlates with CFTR genotype and is in part influenced by de novo cholesterol synthesis. Methods Electrochemical detection of cholesterol at the plasma membrane is achieved with capillary microelectrodes with a modified platinum coil that accepts covalent attachment of cholesterol oxidase. Modified electrodes absent cholesterol oxidase serves as a baseline control. Cholesterol synthesis is determined by deuterium incorporation into lipids over time. Incorporation into cholesterol specifically is determined by mass spectrometry analysis. All mice used in the study are on a C57Bl/6 background and are between 6 and 8 weeks of age. Results Membrane cholesterol measurements are elevated in both R117H and ΔF508 mouse nasal epithelium compared to age-matched sibling wt controls demonstrating a genotype correlation to membrane cholesterol detection. Expression of wt CFTR in CF epithelial cells reverts membrane cholesterol to WT levels further demonstrating the impact of CFTR on these processes. In wt epithelial cell, the addition of the CFTR inhibitors, Gly H101 or CFTRinh-172, for 24 h surprisingly results in an initial drop in membrane cholesterol measurement followed by a rebound at 72 h suggesting a feedback mechanism may be driving the increase in membrane cholesterol. De novo cholesterol synthesis contributes to membrane cholesterol accessibility. Conclusions The data in this study suggest that CFTR influences cholesterol trafficking to the plasma membrane, which when depleted, leads to an increase in de novo cholesterol synthesis to restore membrane content.

  10. Estatinas para el Síndrome Coronario Agudo Medicina basada en evidencia sobre la administración temprana con dosis de carga Statins in Acute Coronary Syndrome Use of an Early Loading Dose

    Carlos Fonseca-Gamboa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: En algunos Servicios de Emergencias de la CCSS, a los pacientes con infarto agudo de miocardio se les administra una dosis alta -aunque variable- de lovastatina en las primeras horas de evolución de los síndromes coronarios agudos, con la expectativa de lograr efectos pleiotrópicos, un resultado positivo sobre el endotelio y la disminución de mediadores inflamatorios. Analizar la evidencia científica que sustenta el beneficio de esta intervención farmacológica y clarificar la posible dosis oral y el potencial intervalo idóneo. Búsqueda vía electrónica en sistemas secundarios de información científica y análisis de fuentes primarias, con énfasis en ensayos clínicos aleatorizados que evalúen la eficacia de las estatinas en los eventos coronarios agudos; también de fuentes terciarias, específicamente revisiones sistemáticas y guías de consenso para práctica clínica basadas en evidencia y revisiones por instancias evaluadoras de tecnologías con reconocimiento internacional. Resultados: Cuatro ensayos clínicos aleatorizados controlados con placebo, no demostraron diferencias significativas ni clínicamente relevantes en la variable primaria combinada: evento cardiaco mayor, muerte, IAM recurrente fatal, AVC fatal u otra causa de muerte cardiovascular, ninguno usó dosis de carga, ni se inició la administración en las 24 hs del inicio de la sintomatología. Conclusión: Ante la falta de evidencia que permita proyectar con claridad un papel beneficioso para las estatinas en el manejo inicial del síndrome coronario agudo, esta práctica desequilibra la relación beneficio/riesgo y se aleja de los principios del uso racional de medicamentos y la aplicación del paradigma de la medicina basada en evidencia.Aim: It has been observed that in some emergency services it has become a common practice to prescribe a high but variable loading dose of statins to patients with acute myocardial infarction within the first few

  11. Acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    Barie, Philip S; Eachempati, Soumitra R

    2003-08-01

    Acute cholecystitis can develop without gallstones in critically ill or injured patients. However, the development of acute acalculous cholecystitis is not limited to surgical or injured patients, or even to the intensive care unit. Diabetes, malignant disease, abdominal vasculitis, congestive heart failure, cholesterol embolization, and shock or cardiac arrest have been associated with acute acalculous cholecystitis. Children may also be affected, especially after a viral illness. The pathogenesis of acute acalculous cholecystitis is a paradigm of complexity. Ischemia and reperfusion injury, or the effects of eicosanoid proinflammatory mediators, appear to be the central mechanisms, but bile stasis, opioid therapy, positive-pressure ventilation, and total parenteral nutrition have all been implicated. Ultrasound of the gallbladder is the most accurate diagnostic modality in the critically ill patient, with gallbladder wall thickness of 3.5 mm or greater and pericholecystic fluid being the two most reliable criteria. The historical treatment of choice for acute acalculous cholecystitis has been cholecystectomy, but percutaneous cholecystostomy is now the mainstay of therapy, controlling the disease in about 85% of patients. Rapid improvement can be expected when the procedure is performed properly. The mortality rates (historically about 30%) for percutaneous and open cholecystostomy appear to be similar, reflecting the severity of illness, but improved resuscitation and critical care may portend a decreased risk of death. Interval cholecystectomy is usually not indicated after acute acalculous cholecystitis in survivors; if the absence of gallstones is confirmed and the precipitating disorder has been controlled, the cholecystostomy tube can be pulled out after the patient has recovered. PMID:12864960

  12. The cholesterol system of the swine

    The purpose of this work was to characterize the dynamic system of adult female Large White swine. The content of this system and its relationships with both the external environment and between the different parts of the system were explained. The analysis of these results in terms of compared physiology showed that the structure of the cholesterol system was the same in man and in the swine. Consequently, the swine constitutes a good biological tool to study human cholesterol indirectly and to foresee the changes that might be induced in various physio-pathological cases. (author)

  13. Electron Transfer Pathways in Cholesterol Synthesis.

    Porter, Todd D

    2015-10-01

    Cholesterol synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum requires electron input at multiple steps and utilizes both NADH and NADPH as the electron source. Four enzymes catalyzing five steps in the pathway require electron input: squalene monooxygenase, lanosterol demethylase, sterol 4α-methyl oxidase, and sterol C5-desaturase. The electron-donor proteins for these enzymes include cytochrome P450 reductase and the cytochrome b5 pathway. Here I review the evidence for electron donor protein requirements with these enzymes, the evidence for additional electron donor pathways, and the effect of deletion of these redox enzymes on cholesterol and lipid metabolism. PMID:26344922

  14. Analysis of Cholesterol Trafficking with Fluorescent Probes

    Maxfield, Frederick R.; Wustner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    processes are not well understood. Fluorescence microscopy is a valuable tool for studying intracellular transport processes, but this method can be challenging for lipid molecules because addition of a fluorophore may alter the properties of the molecule greatly. We discuss the use of fluorescent molecules...... that can bind to cholesterol to reveal its distribution in cells. We also discuss the use of intrinsically fluorescent sterols that closely mimic cholesterol, as well as some minimally modified fluorophore-labeled sterols. Methods for imaging these sterols by conventional fluorescence microscopy and by...

  15. Molecular events linking cholesterol to Alzheimer’s disease and inclusion body myositis in a rabbit model

    Liu, Qing Yan; Koukiekolo, Roger; Zhang, Dong Ling; Smith, Brandon; Ly, Dao; Lei, Joy X; Ghribi, Othman

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by cognitive impairment and dementia, resulting from progressive synaptic dysfunction, loss and neuronal cell death. Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is a skeletal muscle degenerative disease, displaying progressive proximal and distal muscle weakness, in association with muscle fiber atrophy, degeneration and death. Studies have shown that the late onset version of AD (LOAD) and sporadic IBM (sIBM) in muscle share many pathological features, including the presence of extracellular plaques of β-amyloid peptides and intracellular tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. High blood cholesterol is suggested to be a risk factor for LOAD. Many neuropathological changes of LOAD can be reproduced by feeding rabbits a 2% enriched cholesterol diet for 12 weeks. The cholesterol fed rabbit model also simultaneously develops sIBM like pathology, which makes it an ideal model to study the molecular mechanisms common to the development of both diseases. In the present study, we determined the changes of gene expression in rabbit brain and muscle during the progression of LOAD and sIBM pathology using a custom rabbit nucleotide microarray, followed by qRT-PCR analyses. Out of 869 unique transcripts screened, 47 genes showed differential expression between the control and the cholesterol-treated group during the 12 week period and 19 changed transcripts appeared to be common to LOAD and sIBM. The most notable changes are the upregulation of the hemoglobin gene family and the downregulation of the genes required for mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in both brain and muscle tissues throughout the time course. The significant overlap on the changes of gene expression in the brain and muscle of rabbits fed with cholesterol-enriched diet supports the notion that LOAD and sIBM may share a common etiology. PMID:27073745

  16. From blood to gut: Direct secretion of cholesterol via transintestinal cholesterol efflux

    Carlos LJ Vrins

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The reverse cholesterol transport pathway (RCT is the focus of many cholesterol-lowering therapies. By way of this pathway, excess cholesterol is collected from peripheral tissues and delivered back to the liver and gastrointestinal tract for excretion from the body. For a long time this removal via the hepatobiliary secretion was considered to be the sole route involved in the RCT. However, observations from early studies in animals and humans already pointed towards the possibility of another route. In the last few years it has become evident that a non-biliary cholesterol secretion pathway exists in which the intestine plays a central role. This transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE pathway contributes significantly to the total fecal neutral sterol excretion. Moreover, recent studies have shown that TICE is also sensitive to stimulation. As a consequence, the direct role of cholesterol secretion from blood via TICE makes the intestine a suitable and approachable target for cholesterol removal from the body and possibly reduction of atherosclerosis. In this review, the discovery and recent findings contributing to understanding the mechanism of TICE will be discussed.

  17. Effect of Processing Methods on Cholesterol Contents and Cholesterol Oxides Formation in Some Dairy Products

    The effects of pasteurization, boiling, microwaving, processing and storage of milk and some locally produced dairy products on cholesterol contents and cholesterol oxides formation were studied and evaluated. The 7-ketocholesterol were not detected (ND) in all raw milk samples. On the contrary, heating of milk led to formation of cholesterol oxidation products (COPs), mostly, 7- ketocholesterol in different quantities. No significant effect of heating of milk on cholesterol level was observed with the exception of the ultra-high temperature (UHT) milk prepared from milk powder heated at 140 + - 1.0 degree C for 4 sec showed the highest value of 7-ketocholesterol (80.97 mgg-1), followed by microwave heated milk for 5 min (31.29 mgg-1), whereas the lowest value was in milk pasteurized at 85 + - 1.0 degree C for 16 sec (3.125 mgg-1). Commercial storage showed no significant effect on cholesterol and 7-ketocholestrol but lowered cholesterol concentration and increased 7-ketocholestrol level of UHT reconstituted milk. Cholesterol content of both yogurt and labaneh strained by centrifugal separator showed significant decrease while 7-ketochostrol level was increased significantly with refrigerated storage. The findings are discussed in the context with the results of previous similar studies. (author)

  18. Cholesterol homeostasis: How do cells sense sterol excess?

    Howe, Vicky; Sharpe, Laura J; Alexopoulos, Stephanie J; Kunze, Sarah V; Chua, Ngee Kiat; Li, Dianfan; Brown, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol is vital in mammals, but toxic in excess. Consequently, elaborate molecular mechanisms have evolved to maintain this sterol within narrow limits. How cells sense excess cholesterol is an intriguing area of research. Cells sense cholesterol, and other related sterols such as oxysterols or cholesterol synthesis intermediates, and respond to changing levels through several elegant mechanisms of feedback regulation. Cholesterol sensing involves both direct binding of sterols to the homeostatic machinery located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and indirect effects elicited by sterol-dependent alteration of the physical properties of membranes. Here, we examine the mechanisms employed by cells to maintain cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:26993747

  19. Cholesterol versus cholesterol sulfate: effects on properties of phospholipid bilayers containing docosahexaenoic acid.

    Schofield, M; Jenski, L J; Dumaual, A C; Stillwell, W

    1998-09-01

    The important omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is present at high concentration in some membranes that also contain the unusual sterol cholesterol sulfate (CS). The association between these lipids and their effect on membrane structure is presented here. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), MC540 fluorescence, erythritol permeability, pressure/area isotherms on lipid monolayers and molecular modeling are used to compare the effect of CS and cholesterol on model phospholipid membranes. By DSC, CS decreases the main phase transition temperature and broadens the transitions of dipalmitolyphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (18:0,18:1 PC) and 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (18:0,22:6 PC) to a much larger extent than does cholesterol. In addition CS produces a three-component transition in 18:0,18:1 PC bilayers that is not seen with cholesterol. In a mixed phospholipid bilayer composed of 18:0,18:1 PC/18:0,22:6 PC (1:1, mol/mol), CS at 2.5 membrane mol% or more induces lateral phase separation while cholesterol does not. CS decreases lipid packing density and increases permeability of 18:0,18:1 PC and 18:0,22:6 PC bilayers to a much larger extent than cholesterol. CS disrupts oleic acid-containing bilayers more than those containing DHA. Molecular modeling confirms that the anionic sulfate moiety on CS renders this sterol more polar than cholesterol with the consequence that CS likely resides higher (extends further into the aqueous environment) in the bilayer. CS can therefore be preferentially accommodated into DHA-enriched bilayers where its tetracyclic ring system may fit into the delta 4 pocket of DHA, a location excluded to cholesterol. It is proposed that CS may in part replace the membrane function of cholesterol in DHA-rich membranes. PMID:9807808

  20. Zymosan-mediated inflammation impairs in vivo reverse cholesterol transport[S

    Malik, Priya; Berisha, Stela Z.; Santore, Jennifer; Agatisa-Boyle, Colin; Brubaker, Gregory; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation has been proposed to impair HDL function and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). We investigated the effects of inflammation mediated by zymosan, a yeast glucan, on multiple steps along the RCT pathway in vivo and ex vivo. Acute inflammation with 70 mg/kg zymosan impaired RCT to plasma, liver, and feces similarly by 17–22% (P < 0.05), with no additional block at the liver. Hepatic gene expression further demonstrated no change in ABCG5, ABCB4, and ABCB11 expression but a decline in ABCG8 mRNA (32% P < 0.05). Plasma from zymosan-treated mice had a 21% decrease in cholesterol acceptor ability (P < 0.01) and a 35% decrease in ABCA1-specfic efflux capacity (P < 0.01) in vitro. Zymosan treatment also decreased HDL levels and led to HDL remodeling with increased incorporation of serum amyloid A. In addition, cholesterol efflux from cultured macrophages declined with zymosan treatment in a dose dependant manner. Taken together, our results suggest that zymosan impairs in vivo RCT primarily by decreasing macrophage-derived cholesterol entering the plasma, with minimal additional blocks downstream. Our study supports the notion that RCT impairment is one of the mechanisms for the increased atherosclerotic burden observed in inflammatory conditions. PMID:21335620

  1. Potential of BODIPY-cholesterol for analysis of cholesterol transport and diffusion in living cells

    Wüstner, Daniel; Lund, Frederik Wendelboe; Röhrl, Clemens; Stangl, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is an abundant and important lipid component of cellular membranes. Analysis of cholesterol transport and diffusion in living cells is hampered by the technical challenge of designing suitable cholesterol probes which can be detected for example by optical microscopy. One strategy is to...... collaborative efforts with Bob Bittman for studying diffusion in the plasma membrane (PM) and uptake of BChol in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, we used a variety of fluorescence approaches including fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and its imaging variants, fluorescence recovery after...

  2. Biliary cholesterol secretion: More than a simple ABC

    Arne Dikkers, Uwe JF Tietge

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Biliary cholesterol secretion is a process important for 2 major disease complexes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and cholesterol gallstone disease. With respect to cardiovascular disease, biliary cholesterol secretion is regarded as the final step for the elimination of cholesterol originating from cholesterol-laden macrophage foam cells in the vessel wall in a pathway named reverse cholesterol transport. On the other hand, cholesterol hypersecretion into the bile is considered the main pathophysiological determinant of cholesterol gallstone formation. This review summarizes current knowledge on the origins of cholesterol secreted into the bile as well as the relevant processes and transporters involved. Next to the established ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters mediating the biliary secretion of bile acids (ABCB11, phospholipids (ABCB4 and cholesterol (ABCG5/G8, special attention is given to emerging proteins that modulate or mediate biliary cholesterol secretion. In this regard, the potential impact of the phosphatidylserine flippase ATPase class I type 8B member 1, the Niemann Pick C1-like protein 1 that mediates cholesterol absorption and the high density lipoprotein cholesterol uptake receptor, scavenger receptor class B type I, is discussed.

  3. Effects of apolipoproteins on the kinetics of cholesterol exchange

    Letizia, J.Y.; Phillips, M.C. (Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA))

    1991-01-22

    The effects of apolipoproteins on the kinetics of cholesterol exchange have been investigated by monitoring the transfer of ({sup 14}C)cholesterol from donor phospholipid/cholesterol complexes containing human apolipoproteins A, B, or C. Negatively charged discoidal and vesicular particles containing purified apolipoproteins complexed with lipid and a trace of ({sup 14}C)cholesterol were incubated with a 10-fold excess of neutral, acceptor, small unilamellar vesicles. The donor and acceptor particles were separated by chromatogrphy of DEAE-Sepharose, and the rate of movement of labeled cholesterol was analyzed as a first-order exchange process. The kinetics of exchange of cholesterol from both vesicular and discoidal complexes that contain apoproteins are consistent with an aqueous diffusion mechanism, as has been established previously for PC/cholesterol SUV. Apolipoproteins A-I, A-II, reduced and carboxymethylated A-11, and B-100 present in SUV at the same lipid/protein (w/w) ratio all enhance the rate of cholesterol exchange to about the same degree. Cholesterol molecules exchange more rapidly from discoidal complexes. Generally, as the diameter of apoprotein/phospholipid/cholesterol discs decreases, t{sub 1/2} for cholesterol exchange decreases. Since small bilayer discs have a relatively high ratio of boundary to face surface area, cholesterol molecules desorb more rapidly than from larger discs. The modulation of lipid packing by the apoprotein molecules present at the surface of lipoprotein particles affects the rate of cholesterol exchange from such particles.

  4. Load Measurements

    Kock, Carsten Weber; Vesth, Allan

    The report describes Load measurements carried out on a given wind turbine. The aim of the measurement program regarding the loads on the turbine is to verify the basic characteristics of the wind turbine and loads on the blades, the rotor and the tower, using [Ref 1], [Ref2] and [Ref 3]. Regarding...

  5. The Success Story of LDL Cholesterol Lowering.

    Pedersen, Terje R

    2016-02-19

    We can look back at >100 years of cholesterol research that has brought medicine to a stage where people at risk of severe or fatal coronary heart disease have a much better prognosis than before. This progress has not come about without resistance. Perhaps one of the most debated topics in medicine, the cholesterol controversy, could only be brought to rest through the development of new clinical research methods that were capable of taking advantage of the amazing achievements in basic and pharmacological science after the second World War. It was only after understanding the biochemistry and physiology of cholesterol synthesis, transport and clearance from the blood that medicine could take advantage of drugs and diets to reduce the risk of atherosclerotic diseases. This review points to the highlights of the history of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol lowering, with the discovery of the low-density lipoprotein receptor and its physiology and not only the development of statins as the stellar moments but also the development of clinical trial methodology as an effective tool to provide scientifically convincing evidence. PMID:26892969

  6. [Giant cholesterol cysts of the petrous apex].

    Pellet, W; Valenzuela, S; Malca, S; Cannoni, M; Perez-Castillo, A M

    1992-01-01

    In connection with their two own cases, the authors deal about the giant cholesterol cysts of the petrous apex. The lesions which are to be differentiated from epidermoid cysts are cholesterol granulomas. Their petrous apex location explains their characteristic large appearance. As each cholesterol granuloma, they occur when a bony cell is obstructed. This chronic obstruction induces mucosal edema then bleedings which lead to the formation and, by the lack of drainage, to the accumulation of cholesterol crystals. These crystals initiate a non specific reaction to foreign bodies, a granuloma, which also can bleed. Thus, a continuous cycle perpetuates the growth of the lesion. This lesion, when it is localized in the petrous apex, can reach a big size before the appearance of some signs. Usually, these are otologic (sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo) and/or cranial nerve palsies (V, VI, VII). C.T. scan (well defined, sharply marginated bony expansible lesion with isodense to the brain central part) and M.R.I. (central region of increased intensity on both T1 and T2 weighted images and peripheral rim of markedly decreased signal intensity in all instances) features are characteristic enough to allow diagnose with other petrous apex lesions (cholesteatoma, mucocele, epithelial cyst, histiocytosis X, ...). Surgical treatment must try to evacuate and to aerate the cavity or perhaps to obliterate it with fatty pieces in order to prevent the recurrence. PMID:1299772

  7. Practical radiochromatographic assay for cholesterol epoxide hydrase

    A method for the assay of cholesterol epoxide hydrase activity is described. The assay involves the thin-layer chromatographic separation and quantitation of radiolabeled cholestan-3β,5α,6α-epoxide and its major hydration product, cholestan-3β,5α,6β-triol. Radiochromatographic scanning is employed to quantitate the reaction. The procedure is sensitive, rapid, and nondestructive

  8. Weight Loss Surgery May Boost Good Cholesterol in Obese Boys

    ... or federal policy. More Health News on: Cholesterol Obesity in Children Weight Loss Surgery Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Cholesterol Obesity in Children Weight Loss Surgery About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs ...

  9. Cholesterol-induced protein sorting: an analysis of energetic feasibility

    Lundbaek, J A; Andersen, O S; Werge, T;

    2003-01-01

    thickness. In this model, Golgi proteins with short TMDs would be excluded from cholesterol-enriched domains (lipid rafts) that are incorporated into transport vesicles destined for the plasma membrane. Although attractive, this model remains unproven. We therefore evaluated the energetic feasibility of a...... cholesterol-dependent sorting process using the theory of elastic liquid crystal deformations. We show that the distribution of proteins between cholesterol-enriched and cholesterol-poor bilayer domains can be regulated by cholesterol-induced changes in the bilayer physical properties. Changes in bilayer...... thickness per se, however, have only a modest effect on sorting; the major effect arises because cholesterol changes also the bilayer material properties, which augments the energetic penalty for incorporating short TMDs into cholesterol-enriched domains. We conclude that cholesterol-induced changes in the...

  10. Plasma Ubiquinone, Alpha-Tocopherol and Cholesterol in Man

    Karlsson, Jan; Diamant, Bertil; Edlund, Per Olof;

    1992-01-01

    Farmakologi, Coenzyme Q10, free cholesterol, vitamin E, antioxidants, Alpha-Tocopherol, vitamin Q, plasma, LDL-particle......Farmakologi, Coenzyme Q10, free cholesterol, vitamin E, antioxidants, Alpha-Tocopherol, vitamin Q, plasma, LDL-particle...

  11. Trans Fat Now Listed With Saturated Fat and Cholesterol

    ... Trans Fat Now Listed With Saturated Fat and Cholesterol Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... I Do About Saturated Fat, Trans Fat, and Cholesterol? When comparing foods, look at the Nutrition Facts ...

  12. Nonfasting triglycerides, cholesterol, and ischemic stroke in the general population

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne;

    2011-01-01

    Current guidelines on stroke prevention have recommendations on desirable cholesterol levels, but not on nonfasting triglycerides. We compared stepwise increasing levels of nonfasting triglycerides and cholesterol for their association with risk of ischemic stroke in the general population....

  13. Talk with Your Health Care Provider about High Cholesterol

    ... you do? Always ask your provider what your cholesterol numbers are and write them down. Discuss these ... provider may prescribe medicine to help lower your cholesterol. y y Take your medicine every day, or ...

  14. Hearing Outcomes after Surgical Drainage of Petrous Apex Cholesterol Granuloma

    Rihani, Jordan; Kutz, J. Walter; Isaacson, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aims to assess the hearing outcomes of patients undergoing surgical management of petrous apex cholesterol granuloma and to discuss the role of otic capsule–sparing approaches in drainage of petrous apex cholesterol granulomas.

  15. Enzymatic Quantification of Cholesterol and Cholesterol Esters from Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lenses

    Pucker, Andrew D.; Thangavelu, Mirunalni; Nichols, Jason J.

    2010-01-01

    There is significant interest in lipid deposition associated with current silicone hydrogel contact lens materials. This work describes the application of a cholesterol assay used to examine this question.

  16. Fluorimetric determination of cholesterol in hypercholesterolemia serum

    Lan, Xiufeng; Liu, Jiangang; Liu, Ying; Luo, Xiaosen; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2005-01-01

    With the increase of people"s living standard and the changes of living form, the number of people who suffer from hypercholesterolemia is increasing. It is not only harmful to heart and blood vessel, but also leading to obstruction of cognition. The conventional blood detection technology has weakness such as complex operation, long detecting period, and bad visibility. In order to develop a new detection method that can checkout hypercholesterolemia conveniently, spectroscopy of cholesterol in hypercholesterolemia serum is obtained by the multifunctional grating spectrograph. The experiment results indicate that, under the excitation of light-emitting diode (LED) with the wavelength at 407 nm, the serum from normal human and the hypercholesterolemia serum emit different fluorescence spectra. The former can emit one fluorescence region with the peak locating at 516 nm while the latter can emit two more regions with peaks locating at 560 nm and 588 nm. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity of serum is non-linear increasing with the concentration of cholesterol increases when the concentration of cholesterol is lower than 13.8 mmol/L, and then, with the concentration of cholesterol increase, the fluorescence intensity decreases. However, the fluorescence intensity is still much higher than that of serum from normal human. Conclusions can be educed from the experiments: the intensity and the shape of fluorescence spectra of hypercholesterolemia serum are different of those of normal serum, from which the cholesterol abnormal in blood can be judged. The consequences in this paper may offer an experimental reference for the diagnosis of the hypercholesterolemia.

  17. Effect of dietary cholesterol on plasma cholesterol concentration in subjects following reduced fat, high fibre diet.

    Edington, J.; Geekie, M; Carter, R.; Benfield, L; Fisher, K; Ball, M.; J. Mann

    1987-01-01

    One hundred and sixty eight subjects participated in a randomised crossover study to determine whether halving or doubling the present dietary cholesterol intake from eggs had any influence on blood cholesterol concentration in people following current dietary recommendations. During the first eight weeks all participants were advised to follow a reduced fat diet (26% total energy for hyperlipidaemic patients, 35% total energy for normolipidaemic volunteers) with an increased ratio of polyuns...

  18. Electron Microscopic Localization of Cholesterol in Bovine Milk Fat Globules

    Martin, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    An electron microscopic method designed for the detection of cholesterol in milk fat was evaluated for reliability. This method is based on the incubation of cream from raw milk with fillipin (a polyene antibiotic) which has a specific affinity for cholesterol followed by freeze fracturing and electron microscopic examination of fat globules. Cholesterol was localized within the membrane and the triglyceride core of milk fat globules. Cholesterol was highly organized within membrane portio...

  19. Remnant cholesterol as a cause of ischemic heart disease

    Varbo, Anette; Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on remnant cholesterol as a causal risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD), on its definition, measurement, atherogenicity, and levels in high risk patient groups; in addition, present and future pharmacological approaches to lowering remnant cholesterol levels...... are considered. Observational studies show association between elevated levels of remnant cholesterol and increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even when remnant cholesterol levels are defined, measured, or calculated in different ways. In-vitro and animal studies also support the contention that elevated...

  20. Cholesterol esterification during differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia (Friend) cells

    Maria Franca Mulas; Antonella Mandas; Claudia Abete; Sandra Dessì; Alessandra Mocali; Francesco Paoletti

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential constituent of all mammalian cell membranes, and its availability is therefore a prerequisite for cellular growth and other functions. Several lines of evidence are now indicating an association between alterations of cholesterol homeostasis and cell cycle progression. However, the role of cholesterol in cell differentiation is still largely unknown. To begin to address this issue, in this study we examined changes in cholesterol metabolism and in the mRNA levels o...

  1. Polymer sorbent with the properties of an artificial cholesterol receptor

    Polyakova, I. V.; Ezhova, N. M.; Osipenko, A. A.; Pisarev, O. A.

    2015-02-01

    A cholesterol-imprinted polymer sorbent and the corresponding reticular control copolymer were synthesized from hydroxyethyl methacrylate and ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate. The sorption isotherms of cholesterol were analyzed using the generalized Langmuir and Freundlich equations. In the case of the imprinted reticular polymer, cholesterol sorption occurred on the energetically homogeneous binding centers, forming one monolayer, while the nonspecific sorption of cholesterol on the control copolymer occurred with energetically nonhomogeneous binding of the sorbate and depended on the physicochemical conditions of sorption.

  2. Structure and function of lysosomal phospholipase A2 and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase

    Glukhova, Alisa; Hinkovska-Galcheva, Vania; Kelly, Robert; Abe, Akira; Shayman, James A.; Tesmer, John J. G.

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomal phospholipase A2 (LPLA2) and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) belong to a structurally uncharacterized family of key lipid-metabolizing enzymes responsible for lung surfactant catabolism and for reverse cholesterol transport, respectively. Whereas LPLA2 is predicted to underlie the development of drug-induced phospholipidosis, somatic mutations in LCAT cause fish eye disease and familial LCAT deficiency. Here we describe several high-resolution crystal structures of human LPLA2 and a low-resolution structure of LCAT that confirms its close structural relationship to LPLA2. Insertions in the α/β hydrolase core of LPLA2 form domains that are responsible for membrane interaction and binding the acyl chains and head groups of phospholipid substrates. The LCAT structure suggests the molecular basis underlying human disease for most of the known LCAT missense mutations, and paves the way for rational development of new therapeutics to treat LCAT deficiency, atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndrome.

  3. Genetic evidence implicates the immune system and cholesterol metabolism in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease.

    Lesley Jones

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Late Onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD is the leading cause of dementia. Recent large genome-wide association studies (GWAS identified the first strongly supported LOAD susceptibility genes since the discovery of the involvement of APOE in the early 1990s. We have now exploited these GWAS datasets to uncover key LOAD pathophysiological processes. METHODOLOGY: We applied a recently developed tool for mining GWAS data for biologically meaningful information to a LOAD GWAS dataset. The principal findings were then tested in an independent GWAS dataset. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found a significant overrepresentation of association signals in pathways related to cholesterol metabolism and the immune response in both of the two largest genome-wide association studies for LOAD. SIGNIFICANCE: Processes related to cholesterol metabolism and the innate immune response have previously been implicated by pathological and epidemiological studies of Alzheimer's disease, but it has been unclear whether those findings reflected primary aetiological events or consequences of the disease process. Our independent evidence from two large studies now demonstrates that these processes are aetiologically relevant, and suggests that they may be suitable targets for novel and existing therapeutic approaches.

  4. Ezetimibe and Simvastatin Reduce Cholesterol Levels in Zebrafish Larvae Fed a High-Cholesterol Diet

    Ji Sun Baek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol-fed zebrafish is an emerging animal model to study metabolic, oxidative, and inflammatory vascular processes relevant to pathogenesis of human atherosclerosis. Zebrafish fed a high-cholesterol diet (HCD develop hypercholesterolemia and are characterized by profound lipoprotein oxidation and vascular lipid accumulation. Using optically translucent zebrafish larvae has the advantage of monitoring vascular pathology and assessing the efficacy of drug candidates in live animals. Thus, we investigated whether simvastatin and ezetimibe, the principal drugs used in management of hypercholesterolemia in humans, would also reduce cholesterol levels in HCD-fed zebrafish larvae. We found that ezetimibe was well tolerated by zebrafish and effectively reduced cholesterol levels in HCD-fed larvae. In contrast, simvastatin added to water was poorly tolerated by zebrafish larvae and, when added to food, had little effect on cholesterol levels in HCD-fed larvae. Combination of low doses of ezetimibe and simvastatin had an additive effect in reducing cholesterol levels in zebrafish. These results suggest that ezetimibe exerts in zebrafish a therapeutic effect similar to that in humans and that the hypercholesterolemic zebrafish can be used as a low-cost and informative model for testing new drug candidates and for investigating mechanisms of action for existing drugs targeting dyslipidemia.

  5. Cholesterol Assimilation by Lactobacillus Probiotic Bacteria: An In Vitro Investigation

    Catherine Tomaro-Duchesneau; Mitchell L. Jones; Divya Shah; Poonam Jain; Shyamali Saha; Satya Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Excess cholesterol is associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD), an important cause of mortality worldwide. Current CVD therapeutic measures, lifestyle and dietary interventions, and pharmaceutical agents for regulating cholesterol levels are inadequate. Probiotic bacteria have demonstrated potential to lower cholesterol levels by different mechanisms, including bile salt hydrolase activity, production of compounds that inhibit enzymes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A, and ch...

  6. CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS IN THE ANALYSIS OF CHOLESTEROL AND RELATED LIPIDS

    HOVING, EB

    1995-01-01

    Methods using thin-layer chromatography, solid-phase extraction, gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography and supercritical fluid chromatography are described for the analysis of single cholesterol, esterified and sulfated cholesterol, and for cholesterol in the context of other li

  7. Hypercholesterolemia: The Role of Schools in Cholesterol Screening.

    Price, James H.; Casler, Suzanne M.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors among children and adolescents, the pros and cons of cholesterol screening among youth, cholesterol assessments of at-risk youth, and the role of schools in cholesterol education and screening (focusing on comprehensive school health education and services). (SM)

  8. Porcine artery elastin preparation reduces serum cholesterol level in rats

    Liyanage, Ruvini; Nakamura, Yumi; Shimada, Ken-ichiro; SEKIKAWA, Mitsuo; Jayawardana, Barana Chaminda; HAN, Kyu-Ho; Tomoko, Okada; Ohba, Kiyoshi; Takahata, Yoshihisa; Morimatsu, Fumiki; FUKUSHIMA, Michihiro; 福島, 道広; 島田, 謙一郎; 関川, 三男; 韓, 圭鎬

    2009-01-01

    The effect of porcine artery elastin on serum cholesterol level was investigated in rats fed a cholesterol-free diet. Rats were fed for 4 weeks, with a diet (ED) containing 15% casein and 5% of porcine artery elastin in comparison with a diet (CD) containing 20% casein. The total serum and non-HDL-cholesterol concentrations were lower (P

  9. Emerging roles of the intestine in control of cholesterol metabolism

    J.K. Kruit; A.K. Groen; T.J. van Berkel; F. Kuipers

    2006-01-01

    The liver is considered the major "control center" for maintenance of whole body cholesterol homeostasis. This organ is the main site for de novo cholesterol synthesis, clears cholesterol-containing chylomicron remnants and low density lipoprotein particles from plasma and is the major contributor t

  10. On the puzzling distribution of cholesterol in the plasma membrane.

    Giang, H; Schick, M

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of cholesterol between the two leaves of the plasma membrane in mammalian cells presents a conundrum; given cholesterol's known affinity for sphingomyelin, which resides predominantly in the exoplasmic leaf, why is it that experiment finds a majority of the cholesterol in the cytoplasmic leaf? This article reviews a recently proposed solution to this puzzle. PMID:26724709

  11. Alcohol consumption stimulates early steps in reverse cholesterol transport

    Gaag, M.S. van der; Tol, A. van; Vermunt, S.H.F.; Scheek, L.M.; Schaafsma, G.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2001-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with increased HDL cholesterol levels, which may indicate stimulated reverse cholesterol transport. The mechanism is, however, not known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of alcohol consumption on the first two steps of the reverse cholesterol pathw

  12. Effects of Cholesterol-altering Pharmaceuticals on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Gene Expression in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    Pharmaceuticals that target cholesterol biosynthesis and uptake are among the most widely prescribed drugs and have been detected in the aquatic environment. Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome pr...

  13. Immobilization of cholesterol esterase and cholesterol oxidase onto sol-gel films for application to cholesterol biosensor

    Singh, Suman [Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, G. Avenue, Durgapur 713209, West Bengal (India); Singhal, Rahul [Biomolecular Electronics and Conducting Polymer Research Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Malhotra, B.D. [Biomolecular Electronics and Conducting Polymer Research Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India)]. E-mail: bansi.malhotra@gmail.com

    2007-01-23

    Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) and cholesterol esterase (ChEt) have been covalently immobilized onto tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) sol-gel films. The tetraethylorthosilicate sol-gel/ChEt/ChOx enzyme films thus prepared have been characterized using scanning electron microscopic (SEM), UV-vis spectroscopic, Fourier-transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic and amperometric techniques, respectively. The results of photometric measurements carried out on tetraethylorthosilicate sol-gel/ChEt/ChOx reveal thermal stability up to 55 deg. C, response time as 180 s, linearity up to 780 mg dL{sup -1} (12 mM), shelf life of 1 month, detection limit of 12 mg dL{sup -1} and sensitivity as 5.4 x 10{sup -5} Abs. mg{sup -1} dL{sup -1}.

  14. Understanding Cholesterol and Heart Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Cholesterol Understanding Cholesterol and Heart Health Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table ... both types of lipoproteins is important. High Blood Cholesterol and Triglycerides High blood cholesterol is a condition ...

  15. Effect of testosterone deficiency on cholesterol metabolism in pigs fed a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet

    Cai, Zhaowei; Xi, Haitao; Pan, Yongming; Jiang, Xiaoling; Chen, Liang; Cai, Yueqin; Zhu, Keyan; Chen, Cheng; XU, XIAOPING; Chen, Minli

    2015-01-01

    Background Testosterone deficiency is associated with increased serum cholesterol levels. However, how testosterone deficiency precisely affects cholesterol metabolism remains unclear. Therefore, in the current study, we examined the effect of testosterone deficiency on cholesterol metabolism and liver gene expression in pigs fed a high-fat and high-cholesterol (HFC) diet. Methods Sexually mature male miniature pigs (6–7 months old) were randomly divided into 3 groups as follows: intact male ...

  16. Accessibility of Cholesterol in Endoplasmic Reticulum Membranes and Activation of SREBP-2 Switch Abruptly at a Common Cholesterol Threshold

    Sokolov, Anna; Radhakrishnan, Arun

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cooperative interactions in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes between Scap, cholesterol, and Insig result in switch-like control over activation of SREBP-2 transcription factors. This allows cells to rapidly adjust rates of cholesterol synthesis and uptake in response to even slight deviations from physiological set-point levels, thereby ensuring cholesterol homeostasis. In the present study we directly probe for the accessibility of cholesterol in purified E...

  17. EFFECTS OF LUDARTIN AND LEUKOMISIN ON THE ACUTE HYPERLIPIDEMIA MODEL INDUCED BY ETHANOL

    A. V. Ratkin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: study sesquiterpene lactones ludartin and leukomisin lipid-lowering properties on the model of acute hyperlipidemia induced by ethanol in rats.Material and methods. Rats during 7 days injected into the stomach ludartin and leukomisin in a dose 10 mg/kg or reference drug nicotinic acid in a dose 25 mg/kg. Hyperlipidemia caused by single introduc-tion of ethanol into the stomach in a dose 5 g/kg. In blood serum of tail vein measured the triacylgly-cerols, total cholesterol, high density and low density lipoproteins cholesterol, also the level of free fatty acids. Calculated the ratio of high density lipoproteins cholesterol to the amount of low density lipopro-teins cholesterol and the index of atherogenicity.Results. A single dose of ethanol increased serum level of triacylglycerols in 1.9 times, free fatty acids – in 3.2 times, low density lipoproteins – on 44% in comparison with the intact animals indices. It shows the development of acute hyperlipidemia. Serum total cholesterol, high density lipoproteins cholesterol and the index of atherogenicity were not changed. Course introduction of sesquiterpene lactones ludartin and leukomisin against the background of acute hyperlipidemia was accompanied by a decrease in the serum of triacylglycerols levels respectively by 37.5% and 49.5%. Nicotinic acid lowered the content of triacylglycerols by 42.4%. Ludartin, leukomisin and nicotinic acid reduced the increased level of free fatty acids in the blood serum by 63.4%, 41.6% and 67.9%. Ludartin, leukomisin and nicotinic acid de-creased by 15.8%, 20.3% and 17.2% of total cholesterol in the blood serum. In acute hyperlipidemia ludartin and leukomisin reduced low density lipoproteins cholesterol by 23.8% and 14.8%, respectively, nicotinic acid – by 15.7%. Both of sesquiterpene lactone and nicotinic acid did not modify the content of high density lipoproteins cholesterol. When introduction ludartin and nicotinic acid ratio of high density

  18. Load forecasting

    Slides used in a presentation at The Power of Change Conference in Vancouver, BC in April 1995 about the changing needs for load forecasting were presented. Technological innovations and population increase were said to be the prime driving forces behind the changing needs in load forecasting. Structural changes, market place changes, electricity supply planning changes, and changes in planning objectives were other factors discussed. It was concluded that load forecasting was a form of information gathering, that provided important market intelligence

  19. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    ... Acute Pancreatitis > Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  20. Fibroblast cholesterol efflux to plasma from metabolic syndrome subjects is not defective despite low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol

    R.P.F. Dullaart (Robin); A. Groen (Albert); G.M. Dallinga-Thie (Geesje); R. de Vries (Rindert); W. Sluiter (Wim); A. van Tol (Arie)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective: We tested whether in metabolic syndrome (MetS) subjects the ability of plasma to stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux, an early step in the anti-atherogenic reverse cholesterol transport pathway, is maintained despite low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Design: In

  1. Amyloid-β (1-40) restores adhesion properties of pulmonary surfactant, counteracting the effect of cholesterol.

    Hane, F T; Drolle, E; Leonenko, Z

    2014-08-01

    A pulmonary surfactant (PS) is a thin lipid-protein film covering the surface of the lung alveoli at the air/liquid interface. The primary purpose of a PS is to control the surface tension of the air/liquid interface and to reduce the work of breathing. High levels of cholesterol in a PS are associated with life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury (ALI). Finding therapeutics to counteract the effect of cholesterol in a PS is a matter of contemporary research. In our earlier work, we showed that the addition of amyloid-β (1-40) (Aβ40), the protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease, can reverse the detrimental effects of cholesterol in surfactants by improving multilayer formation and restoring PS surface active properties. We hypothesized that this phenomenon was due to Aβ40 improving adhesion properties of a surfactant. In this work we used atomic force spectroscopy to demonstrate that Aβ40 counteracts the adhesive properties of a PS compromised by high levels of cholesterol in a PS and helps to restore the functionality of a PS. PMID:24947303

  2. Is the FXR the fix for cholesterol gallstone disease?

    Juran, Brian D; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

    2005-07-01

    Cholesterol gallstone disease is characterized by several events, including cholesterol precipitation in bile, increased bile salt hydrophobicity and gallbladder inflammation. Here, we describe the same phenotype in mice lacking the bile acid receptor, FXR. Furthermore, in susceptible wild-type mice that recapitulate human cholesterol gallstone disease, treatment with a synthetic FXR agonist prevented sequelae of the disease. These effects were mediated by FXR-dependent increases in biliary bile salt and phospholipid concentrations, which restored cholesterol solubility and thereby prevented gallstone formation. Taken together, these results indicate that FXR is a promising therapeutic target for treating or preventing cholesterol gallstone disease. PMID:15962294

  3. [HDL cholesterol as a sensitive diagnostic parameter in malaria].

    Kittl, E M; Diridl, G; Lenhart, V; Neuwald, C; Tomasits, J; Pichler, H; Bauer, K

    1992-01-01

    In patients with malaria the lipid parameters triglycerides, cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol were determined routinely. At the time of admission hypertriglyceridemia, hypocholesterolemia, and an extreme decrease in HDL-cholesterol were found. This dyslipoproteinemia was present in cases of falciparum malaria, as well as in cases of benign tertian malaria. The extent of HDL-cholesterol decrease showed no correlation to the severity of the clinical course of disease. HDL-cholesterol has proven to be an independent diagnostic laboratory finding in cases of suspected malarial infection. This parameter displays high diagnostic sensitivity, but no specificity for malaria. PMID:1546481

  4. Biochemical and Bioimaging Evidence of Cholesterol in Acquired Cholesteatoma

    Thorsted, Bjarne; Bloksgaard, Maria; Groza, Alexandra;

    2016-01-01

    results show that the total lipid content of the cholesteatoma matrix is similar to that of stratum corneum from skin and that the cholesteatoma matrix unquestionably contains cholesterol. The cholesterol content in the cholesteatoma matrix is increased by over 30% (w/w dry weight) compared to the control....... The cholesterol sulfate content is below 1% of the total lipids in both the cholesteatoma and the control. Cholesterol ester was reduced by over 30% when compared to the control. CONCLUSIONS: The content of cholesterol in the cholesteatoma matrix is significantly different from that in stratum corneum...

  5. Common Force Field Thermodynamics of Cholesterol

    Francesco Giangreco; Eiji Yamamoto; Yoshinori Hirano; Milan Hodoscek; Volker Knecht; Matteo di Giosia; Matteo Calvaresi; Francesco Zerbetto; Kenji Yasuoka; Tetsu Narumi; Masato Yasui; Siegfried Höfinger

    2013-01-01

    Four different force fields are examined for dynamic characteristics using cholesterol as a case study. The extent to which various types of internal degrees of freedom become thermodynamically relevant is evaluated by means of principal component analysis. More complex degrees of freedom (angle bending, dihedral rotations) show a trend towards force field independence. Moreover, charge assignments for membrane-embedded compounds are revealed to be critical with significant impact on biologic...

  6. Cholesterol crystal embolisation to the alimentary tract.

    Moolenaar, W; Lamers, C B

    1996-01-01

    The features of cholesterol crystal embolisation (CCE) to the alimentary tract were studied by retrospective analysis of the clinical and pathological data of 96 patients (70 men, 26 women, mean age 73.8 (58-95) years) with this diagnosis in the Dutch national pathology information system (Pathologisch Anatomisch Landelijk Geautomatiseerd Archief (PALGA)) from 1973-92. In the 96 patients, 130 CCE sites were found throughout the alimentary tract, mostly in the colon (42.3%). Most patients had ...

  7. Potent and selective mediators of cholesterol efflux

    Bielicki, John K; Johansson, Jan

    2015-03-24

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABAC1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  8. Individual variation in serum cholesterol levels.

    Hegsted, D. M.; Nicolosi, R J

    1987-01-01

    The intraindividual variances in serum/plasma cholesterol levels from a variety of sources have been examined. It is apparent that these are very substantial with mean coefficients of variation usually between 5% and 10%, even when the diet is controlled in metabolic studies. Some subjects show extreme variability from one blood sample to the next. Thus, it is very difficult to assess the degree of risk of individuals according to the guidelines provided by the Consensus Conference on lowerin...

  9. The Triglyceride-to-HDL Cholesterol Ratio

    Giannini, Cosimo; Santoro, Nicola; Caprio, Sonia; Kim, Grace; Lartaud, Derek; Shaw, Melissa; Pierpont, Bridget; Weiss, Ram

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We evaluated whether the triglyceride-to-HDL cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio is associated with insulin resistance (IR) in a large multiethnic cohort of obese youths. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Obese youths (1,452) had an oral glucose tolerance test and a fasting lipid profile. Insulin sensitivity was estimated using the whole body insulin sensitivity index (WBISI) and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-IR and evaluated, in a subgroup of 146 obese youths, by the hyperinsulinemic-eugl...

  10. Bronchitis - acute

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute bronchitis is swelling and inflammation in the main passages ... present only for a short time. Causes When acute bronchitis occurs, it almost always comes after having a ...

  11. Bronchitis - acute

    Acute bronchitis is swelling and inflammation in the main passages that carry air to the lungs. The swelling narrows ... makes it harder to breathe. Another symptom of bronchitis is a cough. Acute means the symptoms have ...

  12. Acute Bronchitis

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  13. HDL Cholesterol and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

    Haase, Christiane L; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G;

    2015-01-01

    Observationally, low levels of HDL cholesterol are consistently associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, plasma HDL cholesterol increasing has been suggested as a novel therapeutic option to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Whether levels of HDL cholesterol are causally...... associated with type 2 diabetes is unknown. In a prospective study of the general population (n = 47,627), we tested whether HDL cholesterol-related genetic variants were associated with low HDL cholesterol levels and, in turn, with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. HDL cholesterol-decreasing gene scores...... and allele numbers associated with up to -13 and -20% reductions in HDL cholesterol levels. The corresponding theoretically predicted hazard ratios for type 2 diabetes were 1.44 (95% CI 1.38-1.52) and 1.77 (1.61-1.95), whereas the genetic estimates were nonsignificant. Genetic risk ratios for type 2...

  14. Adrenal scanning with 131I-19-cholesterol

    The purpose of this paper is to describe our clinical experience of adrenal scanning with 131I-19-cholesterol and discuss its clinical usefulness. Adrenal scanning was performed for 21 patients with hypertension. One millicurie of 131I-19-cholesterol was injected intravenously and adrenal scannings were taken 6 to 11 days after injection with a rectilinear scanner or a gamma camera. No patient had an untoward reaction to the radiopharmaceutical. Confirmed diagnosis was obtained in 7 of 21 patients, i.e., 3 cases of primary aldosteronism, 1 idiopathic aldosteronism, 1 Cushing's syndrome and 2 cases of the essential hypertension. Among all of the primary aldosteronism and Cushing's syndrome, adrenal scanning gave clear evidence of concentration of radioactivity at the site of tumor. In the idiopathic aldosteronism of our study, uptake of radioactivity was brightly visible on the right, while uptake by the left gland was inhibited, so this case was diagnosed incorrectly as primary aldosteronism. The kidney scan with 203Hg-chlormerodrin obtained without moving the patient after an adrenal scan was very useful for getting information of anatomical site of the activity. The effective half-life was calculated as 1.83 days by means of sequential profile whole-body scannings, and the total-body absorbed radiation dose was estimated as 0.65 rad/mCi by using MIRD pamphlets. Our conclusion is that the adrenal scanning with 131I-19-cholesterol is very useful for localization of the functional adrenal cortical tumor. (author)

  15. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingest...

  16. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion....

  17. Preparation of cholesterol oxidase nanoparticles and their application in amperometric determination of cholesterol

    Chawla, Sheetal; Rawal, Rachna; Sonia; Ramrati; Pundir, C. S., E-mail: pundircs@rediffmail.com [M. D. University, Department of Biochemistry (India)

    2013-09-15

    The nanoparticle (NP) aggregates of commercial cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) were prepared by desolvation method. The formation and characterization of ChOxNP aggregates were studied by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. NP aggregates were more stable, active and had a higher shelf life than that of free enzyme. An amperometric cholesterol biosensor was constructed by immobilizing ChOxNPs onto Au electrode. The biosensor showed optimum response within 8 s at pH 6.0 and 35 Degree-Sign C, when polarized at +0.27 V versus Ag/AgCl. The biosensor possesses high sensitivity and measures cholesterol concentrations as low as 1.56 mg/dl. The working linear range was 12.5-700 mg/dl for cholesterol. The biosensor was evaluated and employed for measurement of total cholesterol in human serum. The enzyme electrode lost 50 % of its initial activity during its regular use for 180 times over a period of 90 days when stored in 0.1 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.0 at 4 Degree-Sign C.

  18. Efficient detection of total cholesterol using (ChEt–ChOx/ZnO/Pt/Si) bioelectrode based on ZnO matrix

    Batra, Neha; Sharma, Anjali [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Tomar, Monika [Department of Physics, Miranda House, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Gupta, Vinay, E-mail: drguptavinay@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Present study highlights the importance of ZnO matrix prepared by vapour phase transport technique on platinum coated Si platform (ZnO/Pt/Si) as a potential matrix for the realization of highly sensitive and selective bioelectrode for detection of total cholesterol. Bienzymes cholesterol esterase (ChEt) and cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) have been immobilized onto the surface of ZnO thin film matrix by physical adsorption technique. The prepared bioelectrode (ChEt–ChOx/ZnO/Pt/Si) is utilized for detection of total cholesterol using the cyclic voltammetry technique. The bioelectrode (ChEt–ChOx/ZnO/Pt/Si) is found to exhibit efficient sensing response characteristics with high sensitivity of 190 μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}; good linearity in the range of 0.5–12 mM total cholesterol concentration, and a very low Michaelis–Menten constant of 0.68 mM which indicates high affinity of bienzymes immobilized on ZnO towards the analyte (total cholesterol). The enhanced response is attributed to the development of ZnO thin film based matrix having good electron transport property and nanoporous morphology for effective loading of enzymes with favourable orientation. - Highlights: • Fabrication of a ZnO nanostructured thin film based efficient matrix • Utilizing prepared matrix for detection of total cholesterol (free + esterified) • Cholesterol oxidase and cholesterol esterase are the corresponding selective enzymes. • Vapour phase transport technique, for the fabrication of nanostructured ZnO matrix • The bioelectrode exhibits enhanced response characteristics towards total cholesterol detection.

  19. When cholesterol is not cholesterol: a note on the enzymatic determination of its concentration in model systems containing vegetable extracts

    Pamplona Reinald

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental evidences demonstrate that vegetable derived extracts inhibit cholesterol absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. To further explore the mechanisms behind, we modeled duodenal contents with several vegetable extracts. Results By employing a widely used cholesterol quantification method based on a cholesterol oxidase-peroxidase coupled reaction we analyzed the effects on cholesterol partition. Evidenced interferences were analyzed by studying specific and unspecific inhibitors of cholesterol oxidase-peroxidase coupled reaction. Cholesterol was also quantified by LC/MS. We found a significant interference of diverse (cocoa and tea-derived extracts over this method. The interference was strongly dependent on model matrix: while as in phosphate buffered saline, the development of unspecific fluorescence was inhibitable by catalase (but not by heat denaturation, suggesting vegetable extract derived H2O2 production, in bile-containing model systems, this interference also comprised cholesterol-oxidase inhibition. Several strategies, such as cholesterol standard addition and use of suitable blanks containing vegetable extracts were tested. When those failed, the use of a mass-spectrometry based chromatographic assay allowed quantification of cholesterol in models of duodenal contents in the presence of vegetable extracts. Conclusions We propose that the use of cholesterol-oxidase and/or peroxidase based systems for cholesterol analyses in foodstuffs should be accurately monitored, as important interferences in all the components of the enzymatic chain were evident. The use of adequate controls, standard addition and finally, chromatographic analyses solve these issues.

  20. Data related to inflammation and cholesterol deposition triggered by macrophages exposition to modified LDL.

    Toledo, Juan; Esteve, Montserrat; Grasa, Mar; Ledda, Angelo; Garda, Horacio; Gulfo, José; Ludovico, Ivo Díaz; Ramella, Nahuel; Gonzalez, Marina

    2016-09-01

    This article supports experimental evidence on the time-dependent effect on gene expression related to inflammation and cholesterol deposition in lipid-loaded cells. The cells employed were human monocytes THP1 line transformed into macrophages by treatment with phorbol esters. Macrophages were treated at different times with oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) and then gene expression was measured. We also include data about the different types of oxidized lipoprotein obtained (low, media or high oxidation) for differential exposure with Cu ions. These data include characterization to lipid and protein peroxidative damage and also quantification of cell viability by exposure to native and modified LDL. The present article complements data published in "Decreased OxLDL uptake and cholesterol efflux in THP1 cells elicited by cortisol and by cortisone through 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1" Ledda et al. (in press) [1]. PMID:27331097

  1. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions: Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  2. Acute pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions : Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  3. In vitro cholesterol uptake by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus isolates

    Małgorzata Ziarno

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Some researchers have indicated that Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus may provide additional health benefits, reduce serum cholesterol level, for example. The aim of this study was to determine cholesterol uptake by Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus commercial yoghurt starter isolates in artificial GIT fluids. Material and methods. Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus isolates were cultured in MRS broth and in artificial GIT fluids contained cholesterol at initial concentration ca. 560 µg/mL, as well as in MRS broth with cholesterol addition. Results. All Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus showed ability to uptake of cholesterol from MRS broth and artificial GIT fluids. The isolates incubated in artificial gastric fluid removed the minimal amounts of cholesterol in comparison to the same isolates incubated in MRS broth. Only two isolates removed significantly more cholesterol from MRS broth that from duodenal fluid. The amount of removed cholesterol from artificial duodenal fluid ranged from 20 µg/mL to 78 µg/mL. All Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus isolates survived worse in artificial GIT fluids than in MRS broth. The viability of Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in GIT fluids depended on isolate. Conclusions. These results proved that Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus shows ability to uptake cholesterol from MRS broth and artificial GIT fluids, and the degree of cholesterol uptake depends on isolate and incubation environment. The ability of Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus to survive in GIT varies according to the isolates and incubation environment.

  4. Cholesterol: Its Regulation and Role in Central Nervous System Disorders

    Matthias Orth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is a major constituent of the human brain, and the brain is the most cholesterol-rich organ. Numerous lipoprotein receptors and apolipoproteins are expressed in the brain. Cholesterol is tightly regulated between the major brain cells and is essential for normal brain development. The metabolism of brain cholesterol differs markedly from that of other tissues. Brain cholesterol is primarily derived by de novo synthesis and the blood brain barrier prevents the uptake of lipoprotein cholesterol from the circulation. Defects in cholesterol metabolism lead to structural and functional central nervous system diseases such as Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Niemann-Pick type C disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. These diseases affect different metabolic pathways (cholesterol biosynthesis, lipid transport and lipoprotein assembly, apolipoproteins, lipoprotein receptors, and signaling molecules. We review the metabolic pathways of cholesterol in the CNS and its cell-specific and microdomain-specific interaction with other pathways such as the amyloid precursor protein and discuss potential treatment strategies as well as the effects of the widespread use of LDL cholesterol-lowering drugs on brain functions.

  5. The Epigenetic Drug 5-Azacytidine Interferes with Cholesterol and Lipid Metabolism*

    Poirier, Steve; Samami, Samaneh; Mamarbachi, Maya; Demers, Annie; Chang, Ta Yuan; Vance, Dennis E.; Hatch, Grant M.; Mayer, Gaétan

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone acetylation inhibitors are widely used to study the role of epigenetic marks in the regulation of gene expression. In addition, several of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials or already in use in the clinic. Antimetabolites, such as the DNA-hypomethylating agent 5-azacytidine (5-AzaC), have been shown to lower malignant progression to acute myeloid leukemia and to prolong survival in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. Here we examined the effects of DNA methylation inhibitors on the expression of lipid biosynthetic and uptake genes. Our data demonstrate that, independently of DNA methylation, 5-AzaC selectively and very potently reduces expression of key genes involved in cholesterol and lipid metabolism (e.g. PCSK9, HMGCR, and FASN) in all tested cell lines and in vivo in mouse liver. Treatment with 5-AzaC disturbed subcellular cholesterol homeostasis, thereby impeding activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (key regulators of lipid metabolism). Through inhibition of UMP synthase, 5-AzaC also strongly induced expression of 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 9 (AGPAT9) and promoted triacylglycerol synthesis and cytosolic lipid droplet formation. Remarkably, complete reversal was obtained by the co-addition of either UMP or cytidine. Therefore, this study provides the first evidence that inhibition of the de novo pyrimidine synthesis by 5-AzaC disturbs cholesterol and lipid homeostasis, probably through the glycerolipid biosynthesis pathway, which may contribute mechanistically to its beneficial cytostatic properties. PMID:24855646

  6. The epigenetic drug 5-azacytidine interferes with cholesterol and lipid metabolism.

    Poirier, Steve; Samami, Samaneh; Mamarbachi, Maya; Demers, Annie; Chang, Ta Yuan; Vance, Dennis E; Hatch, Grant M; Mayer, Gaétan

    2014-07-01

    DNA methylation and histone acetylation inhibitors are widely used to study the role of epigenetic marks in the regulation of gene expression. In addition, several of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials or already in use in the clinic. Antimetabolites, such as the DNA-hypomethylating agent 5-azacytidine (5-AzaC), have been shown to lower malignant progression to acute myeloid leukemia and to prolong survival in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. Here we examined the effects of DNA methylation inhibitors on the expression of lipid biosynthetic and uptake genes. Our data demonstrate that, independently of DNA methylation, 5-AzaC selectively and very potently reduces expression of key genes involved in cholesterol and lipid metabolism (e.g. PCSK9, HMGCR, and FASN) in all tested cell lines and in vivo in mouse liver. Treatment with 5-AzaC disturbed subcellular cholesterol homeostasis, thereby impeding activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (key regulators of lipid metabolism). Through inhibition of UMP synthase, 5-AzaC also strongly induced expression of 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 9 (AGPAT9) and promoted triacylglycerol synthesis and cytosolic lipid droplet formation. Remarkably, complete reversal was obtained by the co-addition of either UMP or cytidine. Therefore, this study provides the first evidence that inhibition of the de novo pyrimidine synthesis by 5-AzaC disturbs cholesterol and lipid homeostasis, probably through the glycerolipid biosynthesis pathway, which may contribute mechanistically to its beneficial cytostatic properties. PMID:24855646

  7. Effects of cholesterol on plasma membrane lipid order in MCF-7 cells by two-photon microscopy

    Zeng, Yixiu; Chen, Jianling; Yang, Hongqin; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and glycosphingolipids- enriched microdomains on plasma membrane surface of mammal cells, involved in a variety of cellular processes. Depleting cholesterol from the plasma membrane by drugs influences the trafficking of lipid raft markers. Optical imaging techniques are powerful tools to study lipid rafts in live cells due to its noninvasive feature. In this study, breast cancer cells MCF-7 were treated with different concentrations of MβCD to deplete cholesterol and an environmentally sensitive fluorescence probe, Laurdan was loaded to image lipid order by two-photon microscopy. The generalized polarization (GP) values were calculated to distinguish the lipid order and disorder phase. GP images and GP distributions of native and cholesterol-depleted MCF-7 cells were obtained. Our results suggest that even at low concentration (0.5 mM) of MβCD, the morphology of the MCF-7 cells changes. Small high GP areas (lipid order phase) decrease more rapidly than low GP areas (lipid disorder phase), indicating that lipid raft structure was altered more severely than nonraft domains. The data demonstrates that cholesterol dramatically affect raft coverage and plasma membrane fluidity in living cells.

  8. Iron load

    Filippo Cassarà

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research addressed the main role of hepcidin in the regulation of iron metabolism. However, while this mechanism could be relevant in causing iron load in Thalassemia Intermedia and Sickle-Cell Anemia, its role in Thalassemia Major (TM is marginal. This is mainly due to the high impact of transfusional requirement into the severe increase of body iron. Moreover, the damage of iron load may be worsened by infections, as HCV hepatitis, or liver and endocrinological damage. One of the most relevant associations was found between splenectomy and increase of risk for mortality due,probably, to more severe iron load. These issues suggest as morbidity and mortality of this group of patients they do not depend only by our ability in controlling heart damage but even in preventing or treating particular infections and complications. This finding is supported by the impairment of survival curves in patients with complications different from heart damage. However, because, during recent years different direct and indirect methods to detect iron overload in patients affected by secondary hemochromatosis have been implemented, our ability to maintain under control iron load is significantly improved. Anyway, the future in iron load management remains to be able to have an iron load map of our body for targeting chelation and other medical treatment according to the single organ damage.

  9. Potassium-doped carbon nanotubes toward the direct electrochemistry of cholesterol oxidase and its application in highly sensitive cholesterol biosensor

    Li Xiaorong [State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu Jingjuan, E-mail: xujj@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chen Hongyuan [State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2011-10-30

    We demonstrate herein a newly developed serum total cholesterol biosensor by using the direct electron transfer of cholesterol oxidase (ChOx), which is based on the immobilization of cholesterol oxidase and cholesterol esterase (ChEt) on potassium-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (KMWNTs) modified electrodes. The KMWNTs accelerate the electron transfer from electrode surface to the immobilized ChOx, achieving the direct electrochemistry of ChOx and maintaining its bioactivity. As a new platform in cholesterol analysis, the resulting electrode (ChOx/KMWNTs/GCE) exhibits a sensitive response to free cholesterol, with a linear range of 0.050-16.0 {mu}mol L{sup -1} and a detection limit of 5.0 nmol L{sup -1} (S/N = 3). Coimmobilization of ChEt and ChOx (ChEt/ChOx/KMWNTs/GCE) allows the determination of both free cholesterol and esterified cholesterol. The resulting biosensor shows the same linear range of 0.050-16.0 {mu}mol L{sup -1} for free cholesterol and cholesteryl oleate, with the detection limit of 10.0 and 12.0 nmol L{sup -1} (S/N = 3), respectively. The concentrations of total (free and esterified) cholesterol in human serum samples, determined by using the techniques developed in the present study, are in good agreement with those determined by the well-established techniques using the spectrophotometry.

  10. Effect of dietary Maitake (Grifola frondosa) mushrooms on plasma cholesterol and hepatic gene expression in cholesterol-fed mice.

    Sato, Mayumi; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Yoneyama, Shozo; Fujii-Akiyama, Kyoko; Kinoshita, Mikio; Chiji, Hideyuki; Ohnishi, Masao

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of dietary Grifola frondosa on cholesterol, normal mice were fed a diet containing 1% cholesterol (HC group) or 1% cholesterol and 10% freeze-dried G. frondosa powder (HC+G group) for 4 weeks and hepatic and plasma lipid levels were compared with those of a cholesterol-free diet-fed mice (N group). Hepatic total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerol contents were considerably increased and plasma TC / phospholipid (PL) was also increased significantly in the HC group compared with the N group. However, plasma TC content decreased in the HC+G group compared with the HC group. To characterize the mechanisms responsible for lowered plasma cholesterol in G. frondosa-supplemented mice, hepatic gene expression was profiled using DNA microarray and gene ontology. Genome analyses revealed that de novo cholesterol synthesis genes were suppressed following cholesterol intake. However, expression of bile acid biosynthesis and low-density lipoprotein receptor genes showed little change. Scarb1, Abcg5, and Abcg8, involved in cholesterol transport and excretion, were slightly upregulated in the HC+G group compared with the HC group. These data indicate the plasma cholesterol-lowering effect of G. frondosa. Moreover, fatty acid (FA) β-oxidation was promoted via adipocytokine signaling pathways, and Saa, encodes serum amyloid A related to arteriosclerosis, was suppressed in the HC+G group. PMID:24292357

  11. Cholesterol overload induces apoptosis in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells through the up regulation of flotillin-2 in the lipid raft and the activation of BDNF/Trkb signaling.

    Huang, Yen-Ning; Lin, Ching-I; Liao, Hsiang; Liu, Chin-Yu; Chen, Yue-Hua; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Lin, Shyh-Hsiang

    2016-07-22

    Epidemiological investigations have shown that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. It has been indicated that the cholesterol concentration in the brain of AD patients is higher than that in normal people. In this study, we investigated the effects of cholesterol concentrations, 0, as the control, 3.125, 12.5, and 25μM, on cholesterol metabolism, neuron survival, AD-related protein expressions, and cell morphology and apoptosis using SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. We observed that expressions of cholesterol hydroxylase (Cyp46), flotillin-2 (a marker of lipid raft content), and truncated tyrosine kinase B (TrkBtc) increased, while expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and full-length TrkB (TrkBfl) decreased as the concentration of cholesterol loading increased. Down-regulation of the PI3K-Akt-glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β cascade and cell apoptosis were also observed at higher concentrations of cholesterol, along with elevated levels of β-amyloid (Aβ), β-secretase (BACE), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In conclusion, we found that cholesterol overload in neuronal cells imbalanced the cholesterol homeostasis and increased the protein expressions causing cell apoptosis, which illustrates the neurodegenerative pathology of abnormally elevated cholesterol concentrations found in AD patients. PMID:27155148

  12. Preparation of intravenous cholesterol tracer using current good manufacturing practices.

    Lin, Xiaobo; Ma, Lina; Racette, Susan B; Swaney, William P; Ostlund, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    Studies of human reverse cholesterol transport require intravenous infusion of cholesterol tracers. Because insoluble lipids may pose risk and because it is desirable to have consistent doses of defined composition available over many months, we investigated the manufacture of cholesterol tracer under current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) conditions appropriate for phase 1 investigation. Cholesterol tracer was prepared by sterile admixture of unlabeled cholesterol or cholesterol-d7 in ethanol with 20% Intralipid(®). The resulting material was filtered through a 1.2 micron particulate filter, stored at 4°C, and tested at time 0, 1.5, 3, 6, and 9 months for sterility, pyrogenicity, autoxidation, and particle size and aggregation. The limiting factor for stability was a rise in thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances of 9.6-fold over 9 months (P manufacturing methods can be achieved in the academic setting and need to be considered for critical components of future metabolic studies. PMID:26416797

  13. Transport of circulating serum cholesterol by human renal cell carcinoma

    Clear cell renal cancer contains a large quantity of cholesterol ester (300-mg./gm. protein). To determine whether abnormalities in cholesterol transport could account for this sterol accumulation, the uptake, release, and imaging capabilities of intravenously injected 131I-6-iodomethyl-29-norcholesterol, a cholesterol analogue, were studied preoperatively in five patients with clear cell renal cancer. At surgery, samples of the liver, tumor, adrenal, and non-tumor kidney were obtained for analysis. 131I-sterol uptake by the tumor, when normalized for cholesterol content, was less than for adrenal, liver or kidney. In contrast, release of preloaded 131I-sterol from the human tumors was consistently slower than for normal kidney. The reduced release of free cholesterol from renal cancer cells may, in part, be responsible for the accumulation of cholesterol in human renal cancer

  14. Cholesterol monohydrate nucleation in ultrathin films on water

    Rapaport, H.; Kuzmenko, I.; Lafont, S.;

    2001-01-01

    The growth of a cholesterol crystalline phase, three molecular layers thick at the air-water interface, was monitored by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and x-ray reflectivity. Upon compression, a cholesterol film transforms from a monolayer of trigonal symmetry and low crystallinity to a...... trilayer, composed of a highly crystalline bilayer in a rectangular lattice and a disordered top cholesterol layer. This system undergoes a phase transition into a crystalline trilayer incorporating ordered water between the hydroxyl groups of the top and middle sterol layers in an arrangement akin to the...... triclinic 3-D crystal structure of cholesterol . H(2)O. By comparison, the cholesterol derivative stigmasterol transforms, upon compression, directly into a crystalline trilayer in the rectangular lattice. These results may contribute to an understanding of the onset of cholesterol crystallization in...

  15. Pairing of cholesterol with oxidized phospholipid species in lipid bilayers

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Loubet, Bastien; Olzynska, Agnieszka;

    2014-01-01

    We claim that (1) cholesterol protects bilayers from disruption caused by lipid oxidation by sequestering conical shaped oxidized lipid species such as 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PZPC) away from phospholipid, because cholesterol and the oxidized lipid have complementary...... shapes and (2) mixtures of cholesterol and oxidized lipids can self-assemble into bilayers much like lysolipid–cholesterol mixtures. The evidence for bilayer protection comes from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. Unimodal size distributions of extruded...... vesicles (LUVETs) made up of a mixture of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and PZPC containing high amounts of PZPC are only obtained when cholesterol is present in high concentrations. In simulations, bilayers containing high amounts of PZPC become porous, unless cholesterol is also present...

  16. Alterations of serum cholesterol and serum lipoprotein in breast cancer of women

    Hasija, Kiran; Bagga, Hardeep K.

    2005-01-01

    Fasting blood sample of 50 normal subjects (control) and 100 patients of breast cancer were investigated for serum total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, very low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein cholesterol:low density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio and total cholesterol:high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio during breast cancer of women. Five cancer stages, types, age groups, parity and menopausal status were undertaken...

  17. Percentage of Adults with High Cholesterol Whose LDL Cholesterol Levels Are Adequately Controlled

    ... non-missing response to cholesterol questionnaire. Exclusion Criteria: Pregnant women. Estimates for 18-39 year olds were not ... for only one type of service, such as dental or vision care. Persons covered by ... and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics from the National ...

  18. Melittin-Lipid Bilayer Interactions and the Role of Cholesterol

    Wessman, Per; Strömstedt, Adam A; Malmsten, Martin; Edwards, Katarina

    2008-01-01

    The membrane-destabilizing effect of the peptide melittin on phosphatidylcholine membranes is modulated by the presence of cholesterol. This investigation shows that inclusion of 40 mol % cholesterol in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes reduces melittin's affinity for the membrane. It is significant that the presence of cholesterol does not increase the amount of membrane-associated melittin needed to cause maximum leakage f...

  19. Interaction of Melittin with Membrane Cholesterol: A Fluorescence Approach

    Raghuraman, H.; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2004-01-01

    We have monitored the organization and dynamics of the hemolytic peptide melittin in membranes containing cholesterol by utilizing the intrinsic fluorescence properties of its functionally important sole tryptophan residue and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The significance of this study is based on the fact that the natural target for melittin is the erythrocyte membrane, which contains high amounts of cholesterol. Our results show that the presence of cholesterol inhibits melittin-induced...

  20. In vitro cholesterol uptake by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus isolates

    Małgorzata Ziarno

    2009-01-01

    Background. Some researchers have indicated that Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus may provide additional health benefits, reduce serum cholesterol level, for example. The aim of this study was to determine cholesterol uptake by Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus commercial yoghurt starter isolates in artificial GIT fluids. Material and methods. Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus isolates were cultured in MRS broth and in artificial GIT fluids contained cholesterol at initial con...

  1. Reverse cholesterol transport: From classical view to new insights

    Astrid E van der Velde

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol is of vital importance for the human body. It is a constituent for most biological membranes, it is needed for the formation of bile salts, and it is the precursor for steroid hormones and vitamin D. However, the presence of excess cholesterol in cells, and in particular in macrophages in the arterial vessel wall, might be harmful. The accumulation of cholesterol in arteries can lead to atherosclerosis, and in turn, to other cardiovascular diseases. The route that is primarily tho...

  2. Studies on PCSK9 in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism

    Persson, Lena

    2011-01-01

    Elevated levels of plasma cholesterol, mainly in low density lipoproteins (LDL), are a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. The level of plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) is largely dependent on the number of hepatic LDL receptors (LDLRs). Increased number of LDLRs leads to higher uptake of LDL particles and lower concentration of plasma LDL-C. Proprotein convertase subtilisin Kexin Type 9 (PCSK9) is a novel key regulator in cholesterol metabolism. PCSK9 reduces the numbe...

  3. Cholesterol esterification during differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia (Friend) cells.

    Mulas, Maria Franca; Mandas, Antonella; Abete, Claudia; Dessì, Sandra; Mocali, Alessandra; Paoletti, Francesco

    2011-08-31

    Cholesterol is an essential constituent of all mammalian cell membranes and its availability is therefore a prerequisite for cellular growth and other functions. Several lines of evidence are now indicating an association between alterations of cholesterol homeostasis and cell cycle progression. However, the role of cholesterol in cell differentiation is still largely unknown. To begin to address this issue, in this study we examined changes in cholesterol metabolism and in the mRNA levels of proteins involved in cholesterol import and esterification (multi-drug resistance, MDR-3) and acylCoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) and cholesterol export (caveolin-1) in Friend virus-induced erythroleukemia cells (MELC), in the absence or in the presence of the chemical inducer of differentiation, hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA). FBS-stimulated growth of MELC was accompanied by an immediate elevation of cholesterol synthesis and cholesterol esterification, and by an increase in the levels of MDR-3 and ACAT mRNAs. A decrease in caveolin-1 expression was also observed. However, when MELC were treated with HMBA, the inhibition of DNA synthesis caused by HMBA treatment, was associated with a decrease in cholesterol esterification and in ACAT and MDR-3 mRNA levels and an increase in caveolin-1 mRNA. Detection of cytoplasmic neutral lipids by staining MELC with oil red O, a dye able to evidence CE but not FC, revealed that HMBA-treatment also reduced growth-stimulated accumulation of cholesterol ester to approximately the same extent as the ACAT inhibitor, SaH. Overall, these results indicate for the first time a role of cholesterol esterification and of some related genes in differentiation of erythroid cells. PMID:22184540

  4. A review on lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency.

    Saeedi, Ramesh; Li, Min; Frohlich, Jiri

    2015-05-01

    Lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) is a plasma enzyme which esterifies cholesterol, and plays a key role in the metabolism of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Genetic disorders of LCAT are associated with lipoprotein abnormalities including low levels of HDL-C and presence of lipoprotein X, and clinical features mainly corneal opacities, changes in erythrocyte morphology and renal failure. Recombinant LCAT is being developed for the treatment of patients with LCAT deficiency. PMID:25172171

  5. Cholesterol esterification during differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia (Friend) cells

    Mulas, Maria Franca; Mandas, Antonella; Abete, Claudia; Dessì, Sandra; Mocali, Alessandra; Paoletti, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential constituent of all mammalian cell membranes and its availability is therefore a prerequisite for cellular growth and other functions. Several lines of evidence are now indicating an association between alterations of cholesterol homeostasis and cell cycle progression. However, the role of cholesterol in cell differentiation is still largely unknown. To begin to address this issue, in this study we examined changes in cholesterol metabolism and in the mRNA levels of proteins involved in cholesterol import and esterification (multi-drug resistance, MDR-3) and acylCoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) and cholesterol export (caveolin-1) in Friend virus-induced erythroleukemia cells (MELC), in the absence or in the presence of the chemical inducer of differentiation, hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA). FBS-stimulated growth of MELC was accompanied by an immediate elevation of cholesterol synthesis and cholesterol esterification, and by an increase in the levels of MDR-3 and ACAT mRNAs. A decrease in caveolin-1 expression was also observed. However, when MELC were treated with HMBA, the inhibition of DNA synthesis caused by HMBA treatment, was associated with a decrease in cholesterol esterification and in ACAT and MDR-3 mRNA levels and an increase in caveolin-1 mRNA. Detection of cytoplasmic neutral lipids by staining MELC with oil red O, a dye able to evidence CE but not FC, revealed that HMBA-treatment also reduced growth-stimulated accumulation of cholesterol ester to approximately the same extent as the ACAT inhibitor, SaH. Overall, these results indicate for the first time a role of cholesterol esterification and of some related genes in differentiation of erythroid cells. PMID:22184540

  6. Cholesterol esterification during differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia (Friend cells

    Maria Franca Mulas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is an essential constituent of all mammalian cell membranes, and its availability is therefore a prerequisite for cellular growth and other functions. Several lines of evidence are now indicating an association between alterations of cholesterol homeostasis and cell cycle progression. However, the role of cholesterol in cell differentiation is still largely unknown. To begin to address this issue, in this study we examined changes in cholesterol metabolism and in the mRNA levels of proteins involved in cholesterol import and esterification (multi-drug resistance, MDR-3 and acylCoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT and cholesterol export (caveolin-1 in Friend virus-induced erythroleukemia cells (MELC, in the absence or in the presence of the chemical inducer of differentiation, hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA. FBS-stimulated growth of MELC was accompanied by an immediate elevation of cholesterol synthesis and cholesterol esterification, and by an increase in the levels of MDR-3 and ACAT mRNAs. A decrease in caveolin-1 expression was also observed. However, when MELC were treated with HMBA, the inhibition of DNA synthesis caused by HMBA treatment, was associated with a decrease in cholesterol esterification and in ACAT and MDR-3 mRNA levels and an increase in caveolin-1 mRNA. Detection of cytoplasmic neutral lipids by staining MELC with oil red O, a dye able to evidence CE but not FC, revealed that HMBA-treatment also reduced growth-stimulated accumulation of cholesterol ester to approximately the same extent as the ACAT inhibitor, SaH. Overall, these results indicate for the first time a role of cholesterol esterification and of some related genes in differentiation of erythroid cells.

  7. Interaction of G protein coupled receptors and cholesterol.

    Gimpl, Gerald

    2016-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest receptor superfamily in eukaryotic cells. Owing to their seven transmembrane helices, large parts of these proteins are embedded in the cholesterol-rich plasma membrane bilayer. Thus, GPCRs are always in proximity to cholesterol. Some of them are functionally dependent on the specific presence of cholesterol. Over the last years, enormous progress on receptor structures has been achieved. While lipophilic ligands other than cholesterol have been shown to bind either inside the helix bundle or at the receptor-lipid interface, the binding site of cholesterol was either a single transmembrane helix or a groove between two or more transmembrane helices. A clear preference for one of the two membrane leaflets has not been observed. Not surprisingly, many hydrophobic residues (primarily leucine and isoleucine) were found to be involved in cholesterol binding. In most cases, the rough β-face of cholesterol contacted the transmembrane helix bundle rather than the surrounding lipid matrix. The polar hydroxy group of cholesterol was localized near the water-membrane interface with potential hydrogen bonding to residues in receptor loop regions. Although a canonical motif, designated as CCM site, was detected as a specific cholesterol binding site in case of the β2AR, this site was not found to be occupied by cholesterol in other GPCRs possessing the same motif. Cholesterol-receptor interactions can increase the compactness of the receptor structure and are able to enhance the conformational stability towards active or inactive receptor states. Overall, all current data suggest a high plasticity of cholesterol interaction sites in GPCRs. PMID:27108066

  8. CHOLESTEROL OXIDATION PRODUCTS IN MILK AND MILK PRODUCTS

    A. Kemal SEÇKİN

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol oxidation products (COPs are occurred by heat and light factors during processing, improper packaging and storage conditions. COPs are mutagenic, carcinogenity, cytotoxic, angiotoxic and damage to cell membrane and effect biosynthesis cholesterol in the metabolism . So, COPs have potential risk for public health. Also, in milk and milk products that have high cholesterol COPs can be also formed during processing and storage. Therefore it is necessary that measurements must be taken and standards must be in dairy about COPs.

  9. Cholesterol assimilation by Lactobacillus probiotic bacteria: an in vitro investigation.

    Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Jones, Mitchell L; Shah, Divya; Jain, Poonam; Saha, Shyamali; Prakash, Satya

    2014-01-01

    Excess cholesterol is associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD), an important cause of mortality worldwide. Current CVD therapeutic measures, lifestyle and dietary interventions, and pharmaceutical agents for regulating cholesterol levels are inadequate. Probiotic bacteria have demonstrated potential to lower cholesterol levels by different mechanisms, including bile salt hydrolase activity, production of compounds that inhibit enzymes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A, and cholesterol assimilation. This work investigates 11 Lactobacillus strains for cholesterol assimilation. Probiotic strains for investigation were selected from the literature: Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 11951, L. reuteri NCIMB 701359, L. reuteri NCIMB 702655, L. reuteri NCIMB 701089, L. reuteri NCIMB 702656, Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221, L. fermentum NCIMB 8829, L. fermentum NCIMB 2797, Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103 GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 314, and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14917. Cholesterol assimilation was investigated in culture media and under simulated intestinal conditions. The best cholesterol assimilator was L. plantarum ATCC 14917 (15.18±0.55 mg/10(10) cfu) in MRS broth. L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 assimilated over 67% (2254.70±63.33 mg/10(10) cfu) of cholesterol, the most of all the strains, under intestinal conditions. This work demonstrates that probiotic bacteria can assimilate cholesterol under intestinal conditions, with L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 showing great potential as a CVD therapeutic. PMID:25295259

  10. Cholesterol Assimilation by Lactobacillus Probiotic Bacteria: An In Vitro Investigation

    Catherine Tomaro-Duchesneau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excess cholesterol is associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD, an important cause of mortality worldwide. Current CVD therapeutic measures, lifestyle and dietary interventions, and pharmaceutical agents for regulating cholesterol levels are inadequate. Probiotic bacteria have demonstrated potential to lower cholesterol levels by different mechanisms, including bile salt hydrolase activity, production of compounds that inhibit enzymes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A, and cholesterol assimilation. This work investigates 11 Lactobacillus strains for cholesterol assimilation. Probiotic strains for investigation were selected from the literature: Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 11951, L. reuteri NCIMB 701359, L. reuteri NCIMB 702655, L. reuteri NCIMB 701089, L. reuteri NCIMB 702656, Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221, L. fermentum NCIMB 8829, L. fermentum NCIMB 2797, Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103 GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 314, and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14917. Cholesterol assimilation was investigated in culture media and under simulated intestinal conditions. The best cholesterol assimilator was L. plantarum ATCC 14917 (15.18 ± 0.55 mg/1010 cfu in MRS broth. L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 assimilated over 67% (2254.70 ± 63.33 mg/1010 cfu of cholesterol, the most of all the strains, under intestinal conditions. This work demonstrates that probiotic bacteria can assimilate cholesterol under intestinal conditions, with L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 showing great potential as a CVD therapeutic.

  11. New horizons for cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors.

    Schwartz, Gregory G

    2012-02-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels bear an inverse relationship to cardiovascular risk. To date, however, no intervention specifically targeting HDL has been demonstrated to reduce cardiovascular risk. Cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates transfer of cholesterol ester from HDL to apolipoprotein B-containing particles. Most, but not all observational cohort studies indicate that genetic polymorphisms of CETP associated with reduced activity and higher HDL cholesterol levels are also associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. Some, but not all studies indicate that CETP inhibition in rabbits retards atherosclerosis, whereas transgenic CETP expression in mice promotes atherosclerosis. Torcetrapib, the first CETP inhibitor to reach phase III clinical development, was abandoned due to excess mortality associated with increases in aldosterone and blood pressure. Two other CETP inhibitors have entered phase III clinical development. Anacetrapib is a potent inhibitor of CETP that produces very large increases in HDL cholesterol and large reductions in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, beyond those achieved with statins. Dalcetrapib is a less potent CETP inhibitor that produces smaller increases in HDL cholesterol with minimal effect on LDL cholesterol. Both agents appear to allow efflux of cholesterol from macrophages to HDL in vitro, and neither agent affects blood pressure or aldosterone in vivo. Two large cardiovascular outcomes trials, one with anacetrapib and one with dalcetrapib, should provide a conclusive test of the hypothesis that inhibition of CETP decreases cardiovascular risk. PMID:22083134

  12. Reconstitution of Cholesterol-Dependent Vaginolysin into Tethered Phospholipid Bilayers

    Budvytyte, Rima; Pleckaityte, M.; Zvirbliene, A.;

    2013-01-01

    Functional reconstitution of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin vaginolysin (VLY) from Gardnerella vaginalis into artificial tethered bilayer membranes (tBLMs) has been accomplished. The reconstitution of VLY was followed in real-time by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Changes of the...... EIS parameters of the tBLMs upon exposure to VLY solutions were consistent with the formation of water-filled pores in the membranes. It was found that reconstitution of VLY is a strictly cholesterol-dependent, irreversible process. At a constant cholesterol concentration reconstitution of VLY...... platform for the detection of the activity of VLY and possibly other cholesterol-dependent cytolysins....

  13. Determination of cholesterol in human biliary calculus by TLC scanning

    Yin Kang Yang; Kai Xiong Qiu; Yu Zhu Zhan; Er Yi Zhan; Hai Ming Yang; Ping Zheng

    2000-01-01

    AIM To study the physico-chemical properties of biliary calculus and the relationship between the calculusformation and the phase change of liquid crystal, providing the best evidence for the biliary calculusprevention and treatment.METHODS The cholesterol contents in thirty one cases of biliary calculus in Kunming were determined bydouble-wave-length TLC scanning with high efficiency silica gel films.RESULTS Under magnifiers, the granular biliary calculus from 31 patients were classified according totheir section structures and colours, as cholesterol cholelith, 25 cases; bilirubin cholelith, 4 cases andcompound cholelith, 2 cases. By TLC scanning, it was found that the content of cholesterol in human biliarycalculus was 71%- 100%, about 80% cholesterol bilestones whose cholesterol content was more than 90%being pure cholesterol bilestones.CONCLUSION Cholesterol bilestone is the main human biliary calculus in Kunming, which was inaccordance with X-ray analysis. Compared with the related reports, it is proved that the proportion ofcholesterol bilestones to biliary calculus is increasing because of the improved life standard and the decreaseof bilirubin bilestones resulted from bile duct ascariasis or bacteria infection in China since 90s, and that theincrease of cholesterol in-take leads to the increase of cholesterol metabolism disorder

  14. Cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex: CT diagnosis

    Lo, W.W.M.; Solti-Bohman, L.G.; Brackmann, D.E.; Gruskin, P.

    1984-12-01

    Cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex is a readily recognizable and treatable entity that is more common than previously realized. Cholesterol granuloma grows slowly in the petrous apex as a mass lesion until it produces hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, and facial twitching. Twelve cases of cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex are illustrated; ten of these analyzed in detail, especially with respect to CT findings. A sharply and smoothly marginated expansile lesion in the petrous apex, isodense with plain and nonenhancing on CT, is in all probability a cholesterol granuloma. Preoperative recognition by CT is important for planning proper treatment.

  15. Late endosomal membranes rich in lysobisphosphatidic acid regulate cholesterol transport.

    Kobayashi, T; Beuchat, M H; Lindsay, M; Frias, S; Palmiter, R D; Sakuraba, H; Parton, R G; Gruenberg, J

    1999-06-01

    The fate of free cholesterol released after endocytosis of low-density lipoproteins remains obscure. Here we report that late endosomes have a pivotal role in intracellular cholesterol transport. We find that in the genetic disease Niemann-Pick type C (NPC), and in drug-treated cells that mimic NPC, cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes and sorting of the lysosomal enzyme receptor is impaired. Our results show that the characteristic network of lysobisphosphatidic acid-rich membranes contained within multivesicular late endosomes regulates cholesterol transport, presumably by acting as a collection and distribution device. The results also suggest that similar endosomal defects accompany the anti-phospholipid syndrome and NPC. PMID:10559883

  16. Cholesterol epoxide is a direct-acting mutagen.

    A. Sevanian; Peterson, A R

    1984-01-01

    A 24-hr treatment of V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts with 12.4 microM cholesterol 5 alpha, 6 alpha-epoxide induced 8-azaguanine-resistant mutants at frequencies 4.6- to 11.8-fold higher than the spontaneous mutation rate. We show that cholesterol epoxide, which is produced by in vivo cholesterol oxidation, is a weak direct-acting mutagen. Cholesterol epoxide was found to be accumulated by cells and transformed to cholestane-3 beta, 5 alpha, 6 beta-triol, which was more toxic and a more p...

  17. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol: How High

    G Rajagopal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C is considered anti-atherogenic good cholesterol. It is involved in reverse transport of lipids. Epidemiological studies have found inverse relationship of HDL-C and coronary heart disease (CHD risk. When grouped according to HDL-C, subjects having HDL-C more than 60 mg/dL had lesser risk of CHD than those having HDL-C of 40-60 mg/dL, who in turn had lesser risk than those who had HDL-C less than 40 mg/dL. No upper limit for beneficial effect of HDL-C on CHD risk has been identified. The goals of treating patients with low HDL-C have not been firmly established. Though many drugs are known to improve HDL-C concentration, statins are proven to improve CHD risk and mortality. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP is involved in metabolism of HDL-C and its inhibitors are actively being screened for clinical utility. However, final answer is still awaited on CETP-inhibitors.

  18. Specific Ion Effects in Cholesterol Monolayers

    Teresa Del Castillo-Santaella

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of ions with interfaces and, in particular, the high specificity of these interactions to the particular ions considered, are central questions in the field of surface forces. Here we study the effect of different salts (NaI, NaCl, CaCl2 and MgCl2 on monolayers made of cholesterol molecules, both experimentally (surface area vs. lateral pressure isotherms measured by a Langmuir Film Balance and theoretically (molecular dynamics (MD all-atomic simulations. We found that surface isotherms depend, both quantitatively and qualitatively, on the nature of the ions by altering the shape and features of the isotherm. In line with the experiments, MD simulations show clear evidences of specific ionic effects and also provide molecular level details on ion specific interactions with cholesterol. More importantly, MD simulations show that the interaction of a particular ion with the surface depends strongly on its counterion, a feature ignored so far in most theories of specific ionic effects in surface forces.

  19. Crystallogeny fundamentals of the cholesterol gallstone

    Wu Jie; Zhou Jianli; He Lijun; Qu Xingang; Gu Lin; Yang Haimin

    2007-01-01

    The nucleation mechanism and crystal growth process of the cholesterol gallstone are studied and a systematic theory expounded by crystallogeny is proposed. Normal feed and stone-forming feed were used to raise guinea pigs in the control and stone-causing groups respectively. The state and transformation of liquid crystal vesicles, the appearance of crystal nuclei, and the formation of microcrystal grains were observed under a polarizing microscope during the experimental period. It was found that the liquid crystal vesicles in the bile of the control group were small, scattered, and always existed as single forms, and no shaped gallstone crystals were formed.While in the stone-causing group, liquid crystal vesicles grew to larger ones, and then aggregated to form large liquid crystal cells. Solid crystal growth along the edge of these liquid crystal cells formed microcrystal grains. These demonstrated that bile liquid crystal vesicles form the basic nuclei of cholesterol gallstone. Heterogeneous nucleation is the common process in the formation of crystal nuclei and crystal growth.

  20. Assessment of modes of action and efficacy of plasma cholesterol-lowering drugs : measurement of cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis and bile acid synthesis and turnover using novel stable isotope techniques

    Stellaard, Frans; Kuipers, Folkert

    2005-01-01

    Several processes are involved in control of plasma cholesterol levels, e.g., intestinal cholesterol absorption, endogenous cholesterol synthesis and transport and bile acid synthesis. Adaptation of either of these processes allows the body to adapt to changes in dietary cholesterol intake. Disturba

  1. Cholesterol efflux via ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and cholesterol uptake via the LDL receptor influences cholesterol-induced impairment of beta cell function in mice

    Kruit, J. K.; Kremer, P. H. C.; Dai, L.; Tang, R.; Ruddle, P.; de Haan, W.; Brunham, L. R.; Verchere, C. B.; Hayden, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular cholesterol accumulation is an emerging mechanism for beta cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. Absence of the cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) results in increased islet cholesterol and impaired insulin secretion, indicating that impaired cholesterol effl

  2. Beam loading

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  3. Cholesterol-Enhanced Polylactide-Based Stereocomplex Micelle for Effective Delivery of Doxorubicin

    Jixue Wang; Weiguo Xu; Jianxun Ding; Shengfan Lu; Xiaoqing Wang; Chunxi Wang; Xuesi Chen

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale micelles as an effective drug delivery system have attracted increasing interest in malignancy therapy. The present study reported the construction of the cholesterol-enhanced doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded poly(D-lactide)-based micelle (CDM/DOX), poly(L-lactide)-based micelle (CLM/DOX), and stereocomplex micelle (CSCM/DOX) from the equimolar enantiomeric 4-armed poly(ethylene glycol)–polylactide copolymers in aqueous condition. Compared with CDM/DOX and CLM/DOX, CSCM/DOX showed the small...

  4. The hedgehog receptor patched is involved in cholesterol transport.

    Michel Bidet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling plays a crucial role in growth and patterning during embryonic development, and also in stem cell maintenance and tissue regeneration in adults. Aberrant Shh pathway activation is involved in the development of many tumors, and one of the most affected Shh signaling steps found in these tumors is the regulation of the signaling receptor Smoothened by the Shh receptor Patched. In the present work, we investigated Patched activity and the mechanism by which Patched inhibits Smoothened. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the well-known Shh-responding cell line of mouse fibroblasts NIH 3T3, we first observed that enhancement of the intracellular cholesterol concentration induces Smoothened enrichment in the plasma membrane, which is a crucial step for the signaling activation. We found that binding of Shh protein to its receptor Patched, which involves Patched internalization, increases the intracellular concentration of cholesterol and decreases the efflux of a fluorescent cholesterol derivative (BODIPY-cholesterol from these cells. Treatment of fibroblasts with cyclopamine, an antagonist of Shh signaling, inhibits Patched expression and reduces BODIPY-cholesterol efflux, while treatment with the Shh pathway agonist SAG enhances Patched protein expression and BODIPY-cholesterol efflux. We also show that over-expression of human Patched in the yeast S. cerevisiae results in a significant boost of BODIPY-cholesterol efflux. Furthermore, we demonstrate that purified Patched binds to cholesterol, and that the interaction of Shh with Patched inhibits the binding of Patched to cholesterol. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that Patched may contribute to cholesterol efflux from cells, and to modulation of the intracellular cholesterol concentration. This activity is likely responsible for the inhibition of the enrichment of Smoothened in the plasma membrane, which is an important step in Shh pathway

  5. Metamaterial Loading

    F. Paredes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that printed antennas loaded with metamaterial resonators can be designed to exhibit multiband functionality. Two different antenna types and metamaterial loading are considered: (i printed dipoles or monopoles loaded with open complementary split ring resonators (OCSRRs and (ii meander line or folded dipole antennas loaded with split ring resonators (SRRs or spiral resonators (SRs. In the first case, multiband operation is achieved by series connecting one or more OCSRRs within the dipole/monopole. Such resonators force opens at their positions, and by locating them at a quarter wavelength (at the required operating frequencies from the feeding point, it is possible to achieve multiple radiation bands. In the second case, dual-band functionality is achieved through the perturbation of the antenna characteristics caused by the presence of the metamaterial resonators. This latter strategy is specially suited to achieve conjugate matching between the antenna and the chip in radiofrequency identification (RFID tags at two of the regulated UHF-RFID bands.

  6. Exposure to polymers reverses inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by serum, meconium, or cholesterol in the captive bubble surfactometer.

    López-Rodríguez, Elena; Ospina, Olga Lucía; Echaide, Mercedes; Taeusch, H William; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2012-10-01

    Dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant in the lungs is associated with respiratory pathologies such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or meconium aspiration syndrome. Serum, cholesterol, and meconium have been described as inhibitory agents of surfactant's interfacial activity once these substances appear in alveolar spaces during lung injury and inflammation. The deleterious action of these agents has been only partly evaluated under physiologically relevant conditions. We have optimized a protocol to assess surfactant inhibition by serum, cholesterol, or meconium in the captive bubble surfactometer. Specific measures of surface activity before and after native surfactant was exposed to inhibitors included i), film formation, ii), readsorption of material from surface-associated reservoirs, and iii), interfacial film dynamics during compression-expansion cycling. Results show that serum creates a steric barrier that impedes surfactant reaching the interface. A mechanical perturbation of this barrier allows native surfactant to compete efficiently with serum to form a highly surface-active film. Exposure of native surfactant to cholesterol or meconium, on the other hand, modifies the compressibility of surfactant films though optimal compressibility properties recover on repetitive compression-expansion cycling. Addition of polymers like dextran or hyaluronic acid to surfactant fully reverses inhibition by serum. These polymers also prevent surfactant inhibition by cholesterol or meconium, suggesting that the protective action of polymers goes beyond the mere enhancement of interfacial adsorption as described by depletion force theories. PMID:23062337

  7. Acute modification in plasma lipid levels in ultramarathon runners.

    Emed, Luiz Gustavo Marin; Passaglia, Daniela Gunther; Guerios, Surya T; João, Paula G D; Moser, André I S; Abdalla, Dulcinéia S P; Guarita-Souza, Luis Cesar; Mikilita, Emanuella Stella; Baena, Cristina Pellegrino; da Costa, Ana Beatriz Brenner Affonso; Faria-Neto, José Rocha

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of a 24-h ultramarathon, an aerobic test of high physical load, on lipid profile and apolipoproteins B (ApoB) and A1 (ApoA1) levels, minimally modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and oxidised LDL. Prospective evaluation of 16 male athletes who participated in an ultramarathon run, where the objective was to run the greatest distance possible in 24 h. Fourteen participants completed the run. The mean distance achieved was 133.1 km (maximum of 169.6 km). There was a trend in reduction of triglycerides and total cholesterol (P = 0.06 and 0.05, respectively), without significant modifications in high-density lipoprotein, LDL and ApoA1 levels (P = 0.16; 0.55 and 0.67). There was a marked reduction in ApoB levels (P < 0.001), correlated directly to the distance covered (Pearson R = 0.68). Accordingly, an increase in the LDL/ApoB ratio was observed. The stress of this physical activity was not associated to an increase in minimally modified LDL or oxidised LDL. Lipid profile levels were not acutely altered by prolonged physical activity. Similarly, there was no evidence of greater oxidation of LDL over a 24-h period of physical activity. The reduction in ApoB was directly proportional to the distance covered, suggesting an acute positive change in phenotype of LDL molecules. PMID:26710938

  8. Acute effects of vinegar intake on some biochemical risk factors of atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    rohani Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exaggerated postprandial spikes in blood glucose and lipids induce proportional increases in oxidative stress, which acutely trigger impairment endothelial, inflammation and increased risk of future cardiovascular events. In this research, we have investigated acute effects of vinegar intake on some of the biochemical atherosclerosis risk factors in high cholesterol fed rabbits to see if we can find a probable protective value for it. Methods The rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: normal diet, high cholesterol diet (%1cholesterol, %1 cholesterol with 5 ml vinegar (low dose, %1 cholesterol with 10 ml vinegar (high dose. After fasting for 12-15 hours, blood samples were taken to determine baseline values. Three hours after feeding, blood samples were collected again to investigate acute effects of vinegar intake on the measured factors. Results Using high-dose vinegar with cholesterolemic diet caused significant reduce in LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C, oxidized-LDL (ox-LDL, malondialdehyde (MDA, total cholesterol (TC and apolipoprotein B (ApoB in comparison with hypercholesterolemic diet. Consumption low-dose vinegar with cholesterolemic diet induced a significant decrease in fibrinogen and glucose compared to hypercholesterolemic diet. Level of serum nitrite, nitrate, triacylglycerol (TAG, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C, apolipoprotein A (ApoA, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT, serum glutamic oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT and C-reactive protein (CRP were not significantly difference in low and high doses vinegar with cholesterolemic diet compared to hypercholesterolemic diet. A significant difference was observed for LDL-C, ApoB100 and TC between low and high doses vinegar. Conclusion This study suggest that vinegar, might have some acute effects on biochemical risk factors of atherosclerosis and a probable protective value can be considered for its postprandial use.

  9. Cholesterol Check (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    2015-09-10

    High blood cholesterol is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This podcast discusses the importance of a healthy diet and regular cholesterol screening.  Created: 9/10/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 9/10/2015.

  10. CDC Vital Signs: High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol

    ... 1.36 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Out of Control Recommend on Facebook ... by County http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/GISCVH2/ High Blood Pressure and High Cholesterol Among US Adults SOURCES: National ...

  11. Transport of cholesterol autoxidation products in rabbit lipoproteins

    Radiolabeled pure [4-14C] cholesterol was kept at 600C under air to autoxidize for 5 weeks, after which approximately 12% cholesterol oxidation products were formed. The mixture, suspended in gelatin, was given to rabbits by gastric gavage. Rabbits were killed 4, 24 and 48 h after treatment. Cholesterol and its autoxidation products were separated by thin-layer chromatography into 5 fractions and radioactivities of each fraction were measured. Percentages of each fraction of cholesterol oxidation products and cholesterol in the original mixture before administration and in the rabbit sera after administration were similar, suggesting that the rates of absorption of cholesterol oxidation products are not significantly different from that of cholesterol. Lipoproteins were fractioned by ultracentrifugation into VLDL, LDL and HDL. Radioactivities of each fraction in lipoproteins separated by thin layer chromatography showed that fractions containing cholestane-3β, 5α, 6β-triol, 7α- and 7β-hydroxycholesterol and 7-ketocholesterol were more selectively transported in VLDL, whereas most of the 25-hydroxycholesterol was present in LDL. HDL contained only minute amounts of cholesterol oxidation products. 22 refs

  12. Effect of honey on serum cholesterol and lipid values.

    Münstedt, Karsten; Hoffmann, Sven; Hauenschild, Annette; Bülte, Michael; von Georgi, Richard; Hackethal, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    Small studies have suggested that honey benefits patients with high cholesterol concentrations. The present study aimed to confirm this finding in a larger group of subjects. Sixty volunteers with high cholesterol, stratified according to gender and hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin) treatment (yes/no), were randomized to receive 75 g of honey solution or a honey-comparable sugar solution once daily over a period of 14 days. Baseline measurements, including body mass index (BMI) and lipid profile, were obtained, and subjects also completed dietary questionnaires and the Inventory for the Assessment of Negative Bodily Affect-Trait form (INKA-h) questionnaire. Measurements were repeated 2 weeks later. BMI and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol values were significantly correlated (r = -0.487; P INKA-h scores and LDL cholesterol values were also significantly correlated (r = 0.273, P = .042). Neither solution influenced significantly cholesterol or triglyceride values in the total group; in women, however, the LDL cholesterol value increased in the sugar solution subgroup but not in the women taking honey. Although ingesting honey did not reduce LDL cholesterol values in general, women may benefit from substituting honey for sugar in their diet. Reducing the BMI lowers the LDL cholesterol value, and psychological interventions also seem important and merit further investigation. PMID:19627212

  13. Composition of and cholesterol in Araucana and commercial eggs.

    Peterson, D W; Lilyblade, A; Clifford, C K; Ernst, R; Clifford, A J; Dunn, P

    1978-01-01

    Araucana eggs from six sources and commercial-type white eggs of two major supermarket brands and from the University of California flock were collected and analyzed for cholesterol content of the yolk. The yolks of Araucana eggs were significantly higher in cholesterol than those of commercial white eggs. PMID:563887

  14. Cholesterol Balance in Prion Diseases and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Samia Hannaoui

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are transmissible and fatal neurodegenerative disorders of humans and animals. They are characterized by the accumulation of PrPSc, an aberrantly folded isoform of the cellular prion protein PrPC, in the brains of affected individuals. PrPC is a cell surface glycoprotein attached to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI anchor. Specifically, it is associated with lipid rafts, membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphinoglipids. It has been established that inhibition of endogenous cholesterol synthesis disturbs lipid raft association of PrPC and prevents PrPSc accumulation in neuronal cells. Additionally, prion conversion is reduced upon interference with cellular cholesterol uptake, endosomal export, or complexation at the plasma membrane. Altogether, these results demonstrate on the one hand the importance of cholesterol for prion propagation. On the other hand, growing evidence suggests that prion infection modulates neuronal cholesterol metabolism. Similar results were reported in Alzheimer’s disease (AD: whereas amyloid β peptide formation is influenced by cellular cholesterol, levels of cholesterol in the brains of affected individuals increase during the clinical course of the disease. In this review, we summarize commonalities of alterations in cholesterol homeostasis and discuss consequences for neuronal function and therapy of prion diseases and AD.

  15. Cholesterol and Sphingomyelin-Containing Model Condensed Lipid Monolayers: Heterogeneities Involving Ordered Microdomains Assessed by Two Cholesterol Derivatives.

    Lecompte, Marie-France; Gaibelet, Gérald; Lebrun, Chantal; Tercé, François; Collet, Xavier; Orlowski, Stéphane

    2015-11-01

    Lipid monolayers are often considered as model membranes, but they are also the physiologic lipid part of the peripheral envelope of lipoproteins and cytosolic lipid bodies. However, their structural organization is still rather elusive, in particular when both cholesterol and sphingomyelin are present. To investigate such structural organization of hemimembranes, we measured, using alternative current voltammetry, the differential capacitance of condensed phosphatidylcholine-based monolayers as a function of applied potential, which is sensitive to their lipid composition and molecular arrangement. Especially, monolayers containing both sphingomyelin and cholesterol, at 15% w/w, presented specific characteristics of the differential capacitance versus potential curves recorded, which was indicative of specific interactions between these two lipid components. We then compared the behavior of two cholesterol derivatives (at 15% w/w), 21-methylpyrenyl-cholesterol (Pyr-met-Chol) and 22-nitrobenzoxadiazole-cholesterol (NBD-Chol), with that of cholesterol when present in model monolayers. Indeed, these two probes were chosen because of previous findings reporting opposite behaviors within bilayer membranes regarding their interaction with ordered lipids, with only Pyr-met-Chol mimicking cholesterol well. Remarkably, in monolayers containing sphingomyelin or not, Pyr-met-Chol and NBD-Chol presented contrasting behaviors, and Pyr-met-Chol mimicked cholesterol only in the presence of sphingomyelin. These two observations (i.e., optimal amounts of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, and the ability to discriminate between Pyr-met-Chol and NBD-Chol) can be interpreted by the existence of heterogeneities including ordered patches in sphingomyelin- and cholesterol-containing monolayers. Since such monolayer lipid arrangement shares some properties with the raft-type lipid microdomains well-described in sphingomyelin- and cholesterol-containing bilayer membranes, our data thus

  16. Cholesterol interactions with ceramide and sphingomyelin.

    García-Arribas, Aritz B; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Felix M

    2016-09-01

    Sphingolipids contain in their polar heads chemical groups allowing them to establish a complex network of H-bonds (through different OH and NHgroups) with other lipids in the bilayer. In the recent years the specific interaction of sphingomyelin (SM) with cholesterol (Chol) has been examined, largely in the context of the "lipid raft" hypothesis. Formation of SM-Ceramide (Cer) complexes, proposed to exist in cell membranes in response to stress, has also been described. More recently, a delicate balance of phase formation and transformation in ternary mixtures of SM, Chol and Cer, with mutual displacement of Chol and Cer from their interaction with SM is considered to exist. In addition, data demonstrating direct Chol-Cer interaction are becoming available. PMID:27132117

  17. Apolipoprotein A-I Helsinki promotes intracellular acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) protein accumulation.

    Toledo, Juan D; Garda, Horacio A; Cabaleiro, Laura V; Cuellar, Angela; Pellon-Maison, Magali; Gonzalez-Baro, Maria R; Gonzalez, Marina C

    2013-05-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport is a process of high antiatherogenic relevance in which apolipoprotein AI (apoA-I) plays an important role. The interaction of apoA-I with peripheral cells produces through mechanisms that are still poorly understood the mobilization of intracellular cholesterol depots toward plasma membrane. In macrophages, these mechanisms seem to be related to the modulation of the activity of acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), the enzyme responsible for the intracellular cholesterol ester biosynthesis that is stored in lipid droplets. The activation of ACAT and the accumulation of lipid droplets play a key role in the transformation of macrophages into foam cells, leading to the formation of atheroma or atherosclerotic plaque. ApoA-I Helsinki (or ∆K107) is a natural apoA-I variant with a lysine deletion in the central protein region, carriers of which have increased atherosclerosis risk. We herein show that treatment of cultured RAW macrophages or CHOK1 cells with ∆K107, but not with wild-type apoA-I or a variant containing a similar deletion at the C-terminal region (∆K226), lead to a marked increase (more than 10 times) in the intracellular ACAT1 protein level as detected by western blot analysis. However, we could only detect a slight increase in cholesteryl ester produced by ∆K107 mainly when Chol loading was supplied by low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although a similar choline-phospholipid efflux is evoked by these apoA-I variants, the change in phosphatidylcholine/sphyngomyelin distribution produced by wild-type apoA-I is not observed with either ∆K107 or ∆K226. PMID:23456478

  18. Ursodeoxycholic Acid for the Treatment of Cholesterol Gallstones

    Cholesterol is the principal constituent of more than three quarters of gallstones. Pure cholesterol crystals are quite soft, and protein contributes importantly to the strength of cholesterol stones. The risk of gallstones does not correlate with total serum cholesterol levels, but it does correlate with decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and increased triglyceride levels. At least 10 percent of adults have gallstones where female: male ratio of about 2:1 in the younger age groups with increasing prevalence with age. Nine patients with gallstones (6 females and 3 males) were included in the study. Patients were treated with ursodeoxycholic acids tablets in two oral doses, one after breakfast, and the other after dinner for 9 months. Ultrasound examination was repeated every 3 months. Re-examination by abdominal ultrasonography revealed that gallstone 1 cm or less in diameter disappeared within 6 months, and the largest stone 3.06 cm in diameter disappeared within 9 months.

  19. Reverse cholesterol transport: From classical view to new insights

    Astrid E van der Velde

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is of vital importance for the human body. It is a constituent for most biological membranes, it is needed for the formation of bile salts, and it is the precursor for steroid hormones and vitamin D. However, the presence of excess cholesterol in cells, and in particular in macrophages in the arterial vessel wall, might be harmful. The accumulation of cholesterol in arteries can lead to atherosclerosis, and in turn, to other cardiovascular diseases. The route that is primarily thought to be responsible for the disposal of cholesterol is called reverse cholesterol transport (RCT. Therefore, RCT is seen as an interesting target for the development of drugs aimed at the prevention of atherosclerosis. Research on RCT has taken off in recent years. In this review, the classical concepts about RCT are discussed, together with new insights about this topic.

  20. SND1 overexpression deregulates cholesterol homeostasis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Navarro-Imaz, Hiart; Rueda, Yuri; Fresnedo, Olatz

    2016-09-01

    SND1 is a multifunctional protein participating, among others, in gene transcription and mRNA metabolism. SND1 is overexpressed in cancer cells and promotes viability and tumourigenicity of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. This study shows that cholesterol synthesis is increased in SND1-overexpressing hepatoma cells. Neither newly synthesised nor extracellularly supplied cholesterol are able to suppress this increase; however, inhibition of cholesterol esterification reverted the activated state of sterol-regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2) and cholesterogenesis. These results highlight SND1 as a potential regulator of cellular cholesterol distribution and homeostasis in hepatoma cells, and support the rationale for the therapeutic use of molecules that influence cholesterol management when SND1 is overexpressed. PMID:27238764

  1. Enzymatic-fluorometric quantification of cholesterol in bovine milk

    Larsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    The present paper describes an enzymatic–fluorometric method for the determination of cholesterol in milk and other opaque matrices. The initial step of the method is to liberate chemically and physically bound cholesterol from the milk fat globule membrane by enzymatic action. The method is able...... to discriminate between esterified and free cholesterol in milk. The analysis is cost effective and is developed to work directly on whole, fresh milk thereby eliminating time consuming and tedious pre-treatment procedures of the sample. More than 1000 milk samples were analysed on the day of...... sampling. The total concentration of milk cholesterol ranged from 80 to 756 μM (n = 1068; mean 351 μM). Milk cholesterol was significantly correlated to milk fat concentration as analysed by mid-infra red spectrometry (r = 0.630; n = 853) and by an enzymatic–fluorometric method (triacylglycerol) (r = 0...

  2. Cholesterol-induced protein sorting: an analysis of energetic feasibility

    Lundbaek, J A; Andersen, O S; Werge, T;

    2003-01-01

    transmembrane domain (TMD). M. S. Bretscher and S. Munro (SCIENCE: 261:1280-1281, 1993) therefore proposed a physical sorting mechanism based on the hydrophobic match between the proteins' TMD and the bilayer thickness, in which cholesterol would regulate protein sorting by increasing the lipid bilayer...... thickness. In this model, Golgi proteins with short TMDs would be excluded from cholesterol-enriched domains (lipid rafts) that are incorporated into transport vesicles destined for the plasma membrane. Although attractive, this model remains unproven. We therefore evaluated the energetic feasibility...... thickness per se, however, have only a modest effect on sorting; the major effect arises because cholesterol changes also the bilayer material properties, which augments the energetic penalty for incorporating short TMDs into cholesterol-enriched domains. We conclude that cholesterol-induced changes...

  3. Interleukin-10 increases reverse cholesterol transport in macrophages through its bidirectional interaction with liver X receptor α

    Highlights: • IL-10 promotes reverse cholesterol efflux from lipid loaded macrophages. • IL-10 increases the expression of ABCA-1 and ABCG-1. • IL-10 exhibits cross-talk with the nuclear receptor LXRα. - Abstract: Interleukin (IL)-10 is a prototypical anti-inflammatory cytokine that has been shown to attenuate atherosclerosis development. In addition to its anti-inflammatory properties, the anti-atherogenic effect of IL-10 has recently also been suggested to reflect a complex effect of IL-10 on lipid metabolism in macrophages. In the present study we examined the effects of IL-10 on cholesterol efflux mechanism in lipid-loaded THP-1 macrophages. Our main findings were: (i) IL-10 significantly enhanced cholesterol efflux induced by fetal-calf serum, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)2 and apolipoprotein A-1. (ii) The IL-10-mediated effects on cholesterol efflux were accompanied by an increased IL-10-mediated expression of the ATP-binding cassette transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1, that was further enhanced when the cells were co-activated with the liver X receptor (LXR)α agonist (22R)-hydroxycholesterol. (iii) The effect of LXRα activation on the IL-10-mediated effects on the ATP-binding cassette transporters seems to include enhancing effects on the IL-10 receptor 1 (IL10R1) expression and interaction with STAT-3 signaling. (iv) These enhancing effects on ABCA1 and ABCG1 was not seen when the cells were stimulated with the IL-10 family members IL-22 and IL-24. This study suggests that the anti-atherogenic properties of IL-10 may include enhancing effects on cholesterol efflux mechanism that involves cross-talk with LXRα activation

  4. Interleukin-10 increases reverse cholesterol transport in macrophages through its bidirectional interaction with liver X receptor α

    Halvorsen, Bente, E-mail: Bente.Halvorsen@rr-research.no [Research Institute of Internal Medicine, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); K.G. Jebsen Inflammation Research Center, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Holm, Sverre [Research Institute of Internal Medicine, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Yndestad, Arne [Research Institute of Internal Medicine, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); K.G. Jebsen Inflammation Research Center, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Scholz, Hanne [Section for Transplantation, Institute for Surgical Research, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Sagen, Ellen Lund [Research Institute of Internal Medicine, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Nebb, Hilde [Department of Nutrition, Institute for Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Holven, Kirsten B. [Department of Nutrition, Institute for Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Dahl, Tuva B. [Research Institute of Internal Medicine, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Aukrust, Pål [Research Institute of Internal Medicine, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Section of Clinical Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); K.G. Jebsen Inflammation Research Center, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • IL-10 promotes reverse cholesterol efflux from lipid loaded macrophages. • IL-10 increases the expression of ABCA-1 and ABCG-1. • IL-10 exhibits cross-talk with the nuclear receptor LXRα. - Abstract: Interleukin (IL)-10 is a prototypical anti-inflammatory cytokine that has been shown to attenuate atherosclerosis development. In addition to its anti-inflammatory properties, the anti-atherogenic effect of IL-10 has recently also been suggested to reflect a complex effect of IL-10 on lipid metabolism in macrophages. In the present study we examined the effects of IL-10 on cholesterol efflux mechanism in lipid-loaded THP-1 macrophages. Our main findings were: (i) IL-10 significantly enhanced cholesterol efflux induced by fetal-calf serum, high-density lipoprotein (HDL){sub 2} and apolipoprotein A-1. (ii) The IL-10-mediated effects on cholesterol efflux were accompanied by an increased IL-10-mediated expression of the ATP-binding cassette transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1, that was further enhanced when the cells were co-activated with the liver X receptor (LXR)α agonist (22R)-hydroxycholesterol. (iii) The effect of LXRα activation on the IL-10-mediated effects on the ATP-binding cassette transporters seems to include enhancing effects on the IL-10 receptor 1 (IL10R1) expression and interaction with STAT-3 signaling. (iv) These enhancing effects on ABCA1 and ABCG1 was not seen when the cells were stimulated with the IL-10 family members IL-22 and IL-24. This study suggests that the anti-atherogenic properties of IL-10 may include enhancing effects on cholesterol efflux mechanism that involves cross-talk with LXRα activation.

  5. Cholesterol-binding viral proteins in virus entry and morphogenesis.

    Schroeder, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    Up to now less than a handful of viral cholesterol-binding proteins have been characterized, in HIV, influenza virus and Semliki Forest virus. These are proteins with roles in virus entry or morphogenesis. In the case of the HIV fusion protein gp41 cholesterol binding is attributed to a cholesterol recognition consensus (CRAC) motif in a flexible domain of the ectodomain preceding the trans-membrane segment. This specific CRAC sequence mediates gp41 binding to a cholesterol affinity column. Mutations in this motif arrest virus fusion at the hemifusion stage and modify the ability of the isolated CRAC peptide to induce segregation of cholesterol in artificial membranes.Influenza A virus M2 protein co-purifies with cholesterol. Its proton translocation activity, responsible for virus uncoating, is not cholesterol-dependent, and the transmembrane channel appears too short for integral raft insertion. Cholesterol binding may be mediated by CRAC motifs in the flexible post-TM domain, which harbours three determinants of binding to membrane rafts. Mutation of the CRAC motif of the WSN strain attenuates virulence for mice. Its affinity to the raft-non-raft interface is predicted to target M2 protein to the periphery of lipid raft microdomains, the sites of virus assembly. Its influence on the morphology of budding virus implicates M2 as factor in virus fission at the raft boundary. Moreover, M2 is an essential factor in sorting the segmented genome into virus particles, indicating that M2 also has a role in priming the outgrowth of virus buds.SFV E1 protein is the first viral type-II fusion protein demonstrated to directly bind cholesterol when the fusion peptide loop locks into the target membrane. Cholesterol binding is modulated by another, proximal loop, which is also important during virus budding and as a host range determinant, as shown by mutational studies. PMID:20213541

  6. Correction of enhanced endothelial permeability by cessation of cholesterol feeding

    Changes in endothelial permeability and the transport of macromolecules may be important in the initiation and/or progression of atherosclerosis. We have previously shown, with a carotid artery preparation isolated in situ with intact adventitia, that long-term cholesterol feeding in rabbits will result in a seven- to tenfold increase in 125I albumin transport across the artery into the systemic circulation. The current studies were undertaken to determine whether this abnormality of enhanced permeability could be reversed by cessation of cholesterol feeding and correction of the hyperlipidemia. Two groups of rabbits were fed either a standard Rabbit Chow or a diet containing 1.5% cholesterol and 5.2% corn oil for 12 to 15 weeks. Another group of rabbits was given cholesterol for 12 to 15 weeks with change to standard rabbit chow for an additional 22 to 24 weeks after which albumin transport studies were then performed. Mean plasma cholesterol level after 12 to 15 weeks of cholesterol feeding was 2052 +/- 395 mg/dl. After the animals were withdrawn from the cholesterol diet for 22 to 24 weeks, the mean plasma cholesterol level decreased to 80 +/- 21 mg/dl. The mean plasma cholesterol value in chow-fed animals was 39 +/- 6 mg/dl. Perfusion studies were done with 125I-labeled albumin and plasma radioactivity served as a measure of transport across the carotid artery. The average level of albumin transport across the artery into venous blood in the cholesterol-fed animals (13,911 dpm/ml of plasma) was significantly greater than that of control animals (2049 dpm/ml of plasma)

  7. Resveratrol Protects Rabbits Against Cholesterol Diet-Induced Hyperlipidaemia.

    Tanko, Y; Jimoh, A; Ahmed, A; Mohammed, A; Ayo, J O

    2016-01-01

    The excessive consumption of high cholesterol diet has been associated with an increased incidence oflipidaemia. Lipidaemia is enhanced by formation of oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation and hyperglycaemia. The aim ofthese experiments was to investigate the protective effect of resveratrol co-administered with cholesterol diet inducedhyperlipidaemia in rabbits. Thirty rabbits divided into six groups of five animal (group= 5) each: group 1 = normal control,group 2 = cholesterol diet/high fat diet group only (HFD), group 3 = resveratrol 200 mg/kg (R200), group 4 = resveratrol400 mg/kg (R400), group 5 = HFD + R200 and group 6 = HFD + R400. The normal group was fed with standard animalfeeds only; while the HFD groups were fed with standard animal feeds + cholesterol diet (10% Groundnut oil, 20%Groundnut mill and 2% cholesterol). Resveratrol-treated rabbits received resveratrol suspended in 10 g/Lcarboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and the control group received the vehicle only, CMC. The preparations were administeredfor 8 weeks of experimental protocol. At the end of the study period, the animals were sacrificed. Blood and plasma sampleswere collected. Serum evaluation of lipid profile such as total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerol (Tg), low density lipoproteincholesterol (LDP-c) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) were also assessed. The results obtained showsignificant (P < 0.05) decrease in total cholesterol (TC), Low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDP-c), total triacylglyceroland an increase in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) in resveratrol treated groups compared to HFD group only.In conclusion, the findings indicated that Resveratrol may contain polar products able to lower plasma lipid concentrationsand might be beneficial in treatment of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:27574767

  8. Bacterial colonization of host cells in the absence of cholesterol.

    Stacey D Gilk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reports implicating important roles for cholesterol and cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in host-pathogen interactions have largely employed sterol sequestering agents and biosynthesis inhibitors. Because the pleiotropic effects of these compounds can complicate experimental interpretation, we developed a new model system to investigate cholesterol requirements in pathogen infection utilizing DHCR24(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. DHCR24(-/- MEFs lack the Δ24 sterol reductase required for the final enzymatic step in cholesterol biosynthesis, and consequently accumulate desmosterol into cellular membranes. Defective lipid raft function by DHCR24(-/- MEFs adapted to growth in cholesterol-free medium was confirmed by showing deficient uptake of cholera-toxin B and impaired signaling by epidermal growth factor. Infection in the absence of cholesterol was then investigated for three intracellular bacterial pathogens: Coxiella burnetii, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Chlamydia trachomatis. Invasion by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis was unaltered in DHCR24(-/- MEFs. In contrast, C. burnetii entry was significantly decreased in -cholesterol MEFs, and also in +cholesterol MEFs when lipid raft-associated α(Vβ(3 integrin was blocked, suggesting a role for lipid rafts in C. burnetii uptake. Once internalized, all three pathogens established their respective vacuolar niches and replicated normally. However, the C. burnetii-occupied vacuole within DHCR24(-/- MEFs lacked the CD63-positive material and multilamellar membranes typical of vacuoles formed in wild type cells, indicating cholesterol functions in trafficking of multivesicular bodies to the pathogen vacuole. These data demonstrate that cholesterol is not essential for invasion and intracellular replication by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis, but plays a role in C. burnetii-host cell interactions.

  9. Cholesterol Levels: What You Need to Know | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Cholesterol Cholesterol Levels: What You Need to Know Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table of Contents Measuring Cholesterol Levels Learn more at MedlinePlus: https://medlineplus.gov/ ...

  10. High Blood Cholesterol Q&A Dr. Michael Lauer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Cholesterol High Blood Cholesterol Q&A with Dr. Michael Lauer Past Issues / ... heavier and older, what does recent research on cholesterol and heart health tell us that Americans need ...

  11. Dose effects of dietary phytosterols on cholesterol metabolism: a controlled feeding study123

    Racette, Susan B.; Lin, Xiaobo; Lefevre, Michael; Spearie, Catherine Anderson; MOST, MARLENE M.; Ma, Lina; Ostlund, Richard E

    2009-01-01

    Background: Phytosterol supplementation of 2 g/d is recommended by the National Cholesterol Education Program to reduce LDL cholesterol. However, the effects of different intakes of phytosterol on cholesterol metabolism are uncertain.

  12. Load sensor

    van den Ende, D.; Almeida, P.M.R.; Dingemans, T.J.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a load sensor comprising a polymer matrix and a piezo-ceramic material such as PZT, em not bedded in the polymer matrix, which together form a compos not ite, wherein the polymer matrix is a liquid crystalline resin, and wherein the piezo-ceramic material is a PZT powder forming 30-60% by volume of the composite, and wherein the PZT powder forms 40-50% by volume of the composite.

  13. The influence of cholesterol and biomass concentration on the uptake of cholesterol by Lactobacillus from MRS broth

    Małgorzata Ziarno

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the determination of some factors influence (i.e. the vitality of bacteria cells and the cholesterol concentration on the ability of selected Lactobacillus sp. to cholesterol uptake during culture in MRS broth. Three Lactobacillus strains (Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lb. acidophilus, Lb. casei isolated from commercial single species lyophilized dairy starter cultures and three Lactobacillus strains (Lb. plantarum, Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lb. acidophilus originated from commercial pharmaceuticals were used in this study. The uptake of cholesterol from MRS broth during the growth of Lactobacillus sp., expressed as the difference between the final and the initial concentrations of cholesterol, ranged from 0.053 to 0.153 g/dm³, apart from the initial cholesterol content and the origin of Lactobacillus sp. The results confirmed that biomass concentration have a statistically significant effect on uptake of cholesterol. The ten-fold increase of the amount of intact cells biomass caused about 1.5-2-fold increase of the amount of cholesterol removed. The influence of the concentration of biomass of alive cells on the removal of cholesterol was bigger than in case of the heat-sterilized cells.

  14. How cholesterol interacts with membrane proteins: an exploration of cholesterol-binding sites including CRAC, CARC and tilted domains

    FranciscoJBarrantes

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells contains several types of lipids displaying high biochemical variability in both their apolar moiety (e.g. the acyl chain of glycerolipids and their polar head (e.g. the sugar structure of glycosphingolipids. Among these lipids, cholesterol is unique because its biochemical variability is almost exclusively restricted to the oxidation of its polar -OH group. Although generally considered the most rigid membrane lipid, cholesterol can adopt a broad range of conformations due to the flexibility of its isooctyl chain linked to the polycyclic sterane backbone. Moreover, cholesterol is an asymmetric molecule displaying a planar face and a rough  face. Overall, these structural features open up a number of possible interactions between cholesterol and membrane lipids and proteins, consistent with the prominent regulatory functions that this unique lipid exerts on membrane components. The aim of this review is to describe how cholesterol interacts with membrane lipids and proteins at the molecular/atomic scale, with special emphasis on transmembrane domains of proteins containing either the consensus cholesterol-binding motifs CRAC and CARC or a tilted peptide. Despite their broad structural diversity, all these domains bind cholesterol through common molecular mechanisms, leading to the identification of a subset of amino acid residues that are overrepresented in both linear and three-dimensional membrane cholesterol-binding sites.

  15. Incorporation of 4-14C labeled cholesterol into the cholesterol ester fractions of plasma lipoproteins in patients with cirrhosis of the liver

    In vivo incorporation studies with 4-14C-cholesterol were performed in five patients cirrhosis of the liver. All patients showed low concentrations of total cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, and a low activity of the lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase activity (LCAT). The pattern of incorporation corresponded to the results known from hypercholesterolemic, normocholesterolemic and hypertriglyceridemic patients. Low cholesterol ester concentrations and low LCAT activity do not modify the pattern of incorporation into the lipoprotein ester fractions. (orig.)

  16. Cholesterol organization in membranes at low concentrations: effects of curvature stress and membrane thickness.

    Rukmini, R; Rawat, S S; Biswas, S. C.; Chattopadhyay, A

    2001-01-01

    Cholesterol is often found distributed nonrandomly in domains in biological and model membranes and has been reported to be distributed heterogeneously among various intracellular membranes. Although a large body of literature exists on the organization of cholesterol in plasma membranes or membranes with high cholesterol content, very little is known about organization of cholesterol in membranes containing low amounts of cholesterol. Using a fluorescent cholesterol analog (25-[N-[(7-nitrobe...

  17. Serum albumin acts as a shuttle to enhance cholesterol efflux from cells[S

    Sankaranarayanan, Sandhya; de la Llera-Moya, Margarita; Drazul-Schrader, Denise; Phillips, Michael C.; Kellner-Weibel, Ginny; Rothblat, George H.

    2013-01-01

    An important mechanism contributing to cell cholesterol efflux is aqueous transfer in which cholesterol diffuses from cells into the aqueous phase and becomes incorporated into an acceptor particle. Some compounds can enhance diffusion by acting as shuttles transferring cholesterol to cholesterol acceptors, which act as cholesterol sinks. We have examined whether particles in serum can enhance cholesterol efflux by acting as shuttles. This task was accomplished by incubating radiolabeled J774...

  18. Relationship between blood uric and acute cerebral infarction

    Objective: To study the relationship between blood uric acid and acute cerebral infarction. Methods: The level of blood uric acid and prevalence of hyperuricemia (HUA) were compared in 360 patients with acute cerebral infarction and 300 patients without it. According to the level of blood uric acid, 360 acute cerebral infarction patients were divided into HUA and normouricemia (NUA) groups. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), blood glucose and total cholesterol were compared between the HUA and NUA group. The degree of neurological functional defection was compared between the two groups when patients were attacked by acute cerebral infarction. After a recovery treatment, the neurological functional defection of the two groups was compared a second time. Results: (1)The average blood uric acid level and prevalence of HUA were higher in patients with acute cerebral infarction. (2) The BMI, blood glucose and total cholesterol were higher in HUA group than in NUA group. (3) The neurological functional defection was more serious in HUA group when patients were attacked by acute cerebral infarction and after a recovery treatment. Conclusion: Hyperuricemia is related to acute cerebral infarction. (authors)

  19. Dietary Cholesterol Affects Plasma Lipid Levels, the Intravascular Processing of Lipoproteins and Reverse Cholesterol Transport without Increasing the Risk for Heart Disease

    Jacqueline Barona

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The associations between dietary cholesterol and heart disease are highly controversial. While epidemiological studies and clinical interventions have shown the lack of correlation between cholesterol intake and cardiovascular disease (CVD risk, there is still concern among health practitioners and the general population regarding dietary cholesterol. In this review, several clinical studies utilizing cholesterol challenges are analyzed in terms of changes that occur in lipoprotein metabolism resulting from excess consumption of cholesterol. Dietary cholesterol has been shown to increase both LDL and HDL in those individuals who respond to a cholesterol challenge without altering the LDL cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio, a key marker of CVD risk. Further, dietary cholesterol has been shown to increase only HDL with no changes in LDL with average cholesterol consumption and during weight loss interventions. Ingestion of cholesterol has also been shown to increase the size of both LDL and HDL particles with the associated implications of a less atherogenic LDL particle as well as more functional HDL in reverse cholesterol transport. Other changes observed in lipoprotein metabolism are a greater number of large LDL and decreases in small LDL subfractions. All this information put together points to specific roles of dietary cholesterol in substantially altering intravascular processing of lipoproteins as well as reverse cholesterol transport.

  20. Acute pancreatitis

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000287.htm Acute pancreatitis To use the sharing features on this page, ... fatty foods after the attack has improved. Outlook (Prognosis) Most cases go away in a week. However, ...

  1. Acute Pericarditis

    ... Sugar Control Helps Fight Diabetic Eye Disease Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... cancer, or heart surgery, the fluid is blood. Causes Acute pericarditis usually results from infection or other ...

  2. Acute dyspnea

    Radiodiagnosis is applied to determine the causes of acute dyspnea. Acute dyspnea is shown to aggravate the course of pulmonary diseases (bronchial asthma, obstructive bronchitis, pulmonary edema, throboembolism of pulmonary arteries etc) and cardiovascular diseases (desiseas of myocardium). The main tasks of radiodiagnosis are to determine volume and state of the lungs, localization and type of pulmonary injuries, to verify heart disease and to reveal concomitant complications

  3. Bronchitis (acute)

    Wark, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Acute bronchitis, with transient inflammation of the trachea and major bronchi, affects over 40/1000 adults a year in the UK. The causes are usually considered to be infective, but only around half of people have identifiable pathogens.The role of smoking or environmental tobacco smoke inhalation in predisposing to acute bronchitis is unclear.A third of people may have longer-term symptoms or recurrence.

  4. Self-assembled nanoparticles of cholesterol-conjugated carboxymethyl curdlan as a novel carrier of epirubicin

    The purpose of this study was to develop nanoparticles made of cholesterol-conjugated carboxymethyl curdlan (CCMC) entrapping epirubicin (EPB) and establish their in vitro and in vivo potential. CCMC was synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (1H NMR). The degrees of substitution (DS) of the cholesterol moiety were 2.3, 3.5 and 6.4, respectively. EPB-loaded CCMC-3.5 nanoparticles were prepared by the remote loading method. The physicochemical characteristics, drug loading efficiency and drug release kinetics of EPB-loaded CCMC-3.5 nanoparticles were characterized. The in vitro release profiles revealed that EPB release was sensitive to the pH as well as the drug loading contents. The cellular cytotoxicity and cellular uptake were accessed by using human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells. The EPB-loaded CCMC-3.5 nanoparticles were found to be more cytotoxic and have a broader distribution within the cells than the free EPB. The in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution were investigated after intravenous injection in rats. Promisingly, a 4.0-fold increase in the mean residence time (MRT), a 4.31-fold increase in the half-life time and a 6.69-fold increase in the area under the curve (AUC0→∞) of EPB were achieved for the EPB-loaded CCMC-3.5 self-assembled nanoparticles compared with the free EPB. The drug level was significantly increased in liver at 24 and 72 h; however, it decreased in heart at 8 and 24 h compared with the free EPB. The in vivo anti-tumor study indicated that the EPB-loaded CCMC-3.5 self-assembled nanoparticles showed greater anti-tumor efficacy than the free EPB. Taken together, the novel CCMC self-assembled nanoparticles might have potential application as anti-cancer drug carriers in a drug delivery system due to good results in vitro and in vivo.

  5. 三磷酸腺苷结合盒转运体A1在巨噬细胞胆固醇流出中的作用%Effects of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 on cholesterol efflux in macrophages

    唐朝克; 严鹏科; 杨永宗

    2003-01-01

    Tangier disease is caused by mutations in ATP binding cassette transporter AI( ABCA1).ABCA1 interacts with lipid-free apolipoproteins, promoting phospholipid and cholesterol ettlux fzom cells and giving rise to HDL particles. ABCA1 may act as a phospholipid translocase facilitating phospholipid binding to apoA-Ⅰ. ABCA1 gene expression is upregulated in cholesterol-loaded cells as a result of activation of IXR/RXR- mediated gene transcription. LXR and RXR coordinately induce a battery of genes mediating cellular cholesterol efllux, centripetal cholesterol tramport, and cholesterol excretion in bile. Small- molecule activators of LXR/RXR or other stimulators of macrophage or intestinal cholesterol efl]ux hold great promise as future treat-ments for atherosclerosis.

  6. CHOLESTEROL LEVELS AND SUICIDAL BEHAVIOR: A CASE CONTROL STUDY

    Nikhil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In modern psychiatry, there is a movement to understand mental health, not solely based on behaviors and subjective report, but also based on objective markers of illness. Several studies have focused on a relationship between serum cholesterol levels and aggressive behaviors including suicide. AIM: To identify a potential link between cholesterol and suicidal behavior. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 150 patients with psychiatry diagnosis were divided into three equal groups (50 each: those who had a recent suicidal attempt, those who had suicidal ideations but no attempts and those with psychiatry diagnosis but no suicidal ideations and attempts. Blood sample for total cholesterol level was on IPD or OPD basis. The study was started after taking approval from institute ethical committee. Analysis was done using Chi square test. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS: It was found that maximum patients who attempted suicide belonged to major depression and schizophrenia followed by substance dependence and bipolar affective disorder (BPAD with major depression and there was statistical difference in cholesterol levels of patients with suicide attempt, with suicidal ideations and control group. 42% and 44% of major depression and schizophrenia cases respectively had low total serum cholesterol levels (below 160 mg%. CONCLUSION: There is a potential link between serum total cholesterol levels and suicidal behavior. Taking the literature as a whole there is substantial evidence that low cholesterol levels are found in suicidal behaviors of various psychiatric illnesses especially major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, substance dependence and bipolar depressive disorder

  7. Quantitation of cholesterol oxidation products in unirradiated and irradiated meats

    A method to detect 7-ketocholesterol, cholesterol-5β,6β-epoxide, cholesterol-5α,6α-epoxide, 4-cholesten-3-one, 4,6-cholestadien-3-one and 4-cholestene-3,6-dione in unirradiated and irradiated beef, pork and veal was developed by use of chloroform-methanol-water extraction, solid-phase extraction, column separation, thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography. This method recovered 78–88% of the cholesterol oxidation products and detected the cholesterol oxidation products at 10 ppb or higher. Irradiation of the meats to a dose of 10 kGy increased these compounds, except 4,6-cholestadien-3-one for all three types of meat, over unirradiated, and except cholesterol-5α,6α-epoxide and 4-cholesten-3-one for the pork. All the cholesterol oxidation products in the unirradiated meats increased during storage at 0–4°C for 2 wk with some exceptions for the pork. The increases of cholesterol oxidation products in stored irradiated meats were greater than those in the unirradiated

  8. Loads and loads and loads: the influence of prospective load, retrospective load, and ongoing task load in prospective memory

    Beat eMeier; Zimmermann, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    In prospective memory tasks different kinds of load can occur. Adding a prospective memory task can impose a load on ongoing task performance. Adding ongoing task load can affect prospective memory performance. The existence of multiple target events increases prospective load and adding complexity to the to-be-remembered action increases retrospective load. In two experiments, we systematically examined the effects of these different types of load on prospective memory performance. Results s...

  9. Cholesterol induces fetal rat enterocyte death in culture

    Gazzola J.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cholesterol on fetal rat enterocytes and IEC-6 cells (line originated from normal rat small intestine was examined. Both cells were cultured in the presence of 20 to 80 µM cholesterol for up to 72 h. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometric analysis and fluorescence microscopy. The expression of HMG-CoA reductase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma was measured by RT-PCR. The addition of 20 µM cholesterol reduced enterocyte proliferation as early as 6 h of culture. Reduction of enterocyte proliferation by 28 and 41% was observed after 24 h of culture in the presence and absence of 10% fetal calf serum, respectively, with the effect lasting up to 72 h. Treatment of IEC-6 cells with cholesterol for 24 h raised the proportion of cells with fragmented DNA by 9.7% at 40 µM and by 20.8% at 80 µM. When the culture period was extended to 48 h, the effect of cholesterol was still more pronounced, with the percent of cells with fragmented DNA reaching 53.5% for 40 µM and 84.3% for 80 µM. Chromatin condensation of IEC-6 cells was observed after treatment with cholesterol even at 20 µM. Cholesterol did not affect HMG-CoA reductase expression. A dose-dependent increase in PPARgamma expression in fetal rat enterocytes was observed. The expression of PPAR-gamma was raised by 7- and 40-fold, in the presence and absence of fetal calf serum, respectively, with cholesterol at 80 mM. The apoptotic effect of cholesterol on enterocytes was possibly due to an increase in PPARgamma expression.

  10. Cholesterol and fat lowering with hydrophobic polysaccharide derivatives.

    Čopíková, Jana; Taubner, Tomáš; Tůma, Jan; Synytsya, Andriy; Dušková, Dagmar; Marounek, Milan

    2015-02-13

    Hydrophobic derivatives of highly methylated citrus pectin, chitosan and cellulose were prepared and tested as potential cholesterol lowering agents. Elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods confirmed high substitution degree for all of them. Substitution with long alkyl/acyl groups led to significant changes in physical and thermal properties of modified polysaccharides. Sorption of cholate and cholesterol by these polysaccharide-based sorbents was estimated in comparison with the synthetic drug cholestyramine. It was found that modified polysaccharides have high affinity to cholesterol. By contrast, cholestyramine was effective only in cholate sorption. PMID:25458291

  11. Lipid-based transfection reagents can interfere with cholesterol biosynthesis.

    Danielli, Mauro; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2016-02-15

    Lipid-based transfection reagents are widely used for delivery of small interfering RNA into cells. We examined whether the commonly used commercial transfection reagents DharmaFECT-4 and Lipofectamine 2000 can interfere with lipid metabolism by studying cholesterogenesis. Cholesterol de novo synthesis from [(14)C]acetate was assessed in human hepatocyte-derived Huh-7 cells. The results revealed that DharmaFECT, but not Lipofectamine, markedly inhibited cholesterol biosynthesis by approximately 70%. Cell viability was not significantly altered. These findings suggest that caution is required in the choice of certain lipid-based transfection reagents for gene silencing experiments, particularly when assessing cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26656923

  12. Reverse cholesterol transport: From classical view to new insights

    Astrid; E; van; der; Velde

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol is of vital importance for the human body. It is a constituent for most biological membranes, it is needed for the formation of bile salts, and it is the pre- cursor for steroid hormones and vitamin D. However, the presence of excess cholesterol in cells, and in particular in macrophages in the arterial vessel wall, might be harmful. The accumulation of cholesterol in arteries can lead to atherosclerosis, and in turn, to other cardiovascular diseases. The route that is primarily thought to be re...

  13. Does fat in milk, butter and and cholesterol differently?

    Tholstrup, T,; Høy, Carl-Erik; Andersen, L.N.;

    2004-01-01

    8 hours following intake of the meals. Results: Fasting LDL cholesterol concentration was significantly higher after butter than cheese diet (p 0.037), with a borderline significant difference in total cholesterol (p = 0.054) after the experimental periods of three weeks. Postprandial glucose showed...... a higher response after cheese diet than after milk diet (p = 0.010, diet X time interaction). Conclusions: A different effect of fat in milk and butter could not be confirmed in this study. The moderately lower LDL cholesterol after cheese diet compared to butter diet should be investigated further....

  14. Statins: Cholesterol guidelines and Indian perspective

    Anil S Menon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins have become an important drug in preventing the occurrence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD. The effectiveness of statins in reducing ASCVD has been established in large-scale clinical trials. The lipid management guidelines have been periodically modified due to accumulating evidence about the proportionate benefit achieved with a progressive reduction in cholesterol levels with higher doses of statins and even in those at low risk of development of ASCVD. The current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines have based its recommendations from data gathered exclusively from randomized controlled trials. It has simplified the use of statins, but also raised questions regarding the validity of its cardiovascular event risk prediction tool. Epidemiology of cardiovascular disease in India differs from the western population; there is an increased the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and atherogenic dyslipidemia phenotype a group not addressed in the current guidelines. The guidelines are based on trials, which do not have a representative South Asian population. This article reviews the relevant literature, and examines the issues involved in adopting the guidelines to the Indian population.

  15. Assessing Cholesterol Storage in Live Cells and C. elegans by Stimulated Raman Scattering Imaging of Phenyl-Diyne Cholesterol

    Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Zhang, Wandi; Zhang, Delong; Yang, Yang; Liu, Bin; Barker, Eric L.; Buhman, Kimberly K.; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V.; Dai, Mingji; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-01-01

    We report a cholesterol imaging method using rationally synthesized phenyl-diyne cholesterol (PhDY-Chol) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscope. The phenyl-diyne group is biologically inert and provides a Raman scattering cross section that is 88 times larger than the endogenous C = O stretching mode. SRS microscopy offers an imaging speed that is faster than spontaneous Raman microscopy by three orders of magnitude, and a detection sensitivity of 31 μM PhDY-Chol (~1,800 molecules in the excitation volume). Inside living CHO cells, PhDY-Chol mimics the behavior of cholesterol, including membrane incorporation and esterification. In a cellular model of Niemann-Pick type C disease, PhDY-Chol reflects the lysosomal accumulation of cholesterol, and shows relocation to lipid droplets after HPβCD treatment. In live C. elegans, PhDY-Chol mimics cholesterol uptake by intestinal cells and reflects cholesterol storage. Together, our work demonstrates an enabling platform for study of cholesterol storage and trafficking in living cells and vital organisms.

  16. The origin of cholesterol in chyle demonstrated by nuclear indicator methods; Origines du cholesterol du chyle mises en evidence par la methode des indicateurs nucleaires

    Vyas, M

    1962-07-01

    In order to obtain information about the mechanism of the intestinal absorption of cholesterol, rats having a lymphatic abdominal fistula are used. The animals receive either 4-{sup 14}C- cholesterol subcutaneously or orally, or the 1-{sup 14}C acetate. The study of the specific radio-activities of the cholesterol in chyle, in serum, in the lining, and in the intestinal contents makes it possible to define the roles played by the transfer cholesterol from the serum, by the cholesterol synthesised intestinally, and by the absorption cholesterol, in the formations of the lymph and of the chylomicrons. A new theory is proposed for the mechanism of cholesterol absorption. (author) [French] Pour obtenir des renseignements concernant le mecanisme de l'absorption intestinale du cholesterol, on utilise des rats porteurs d'une fistule lymphatique abdominale. Les animaux recoivent soit du cholesterol 4-{sup 14}C par voie sous-cutanee ou par voie orale, soit de l'acetate 1-{sup 14}C. L'etude des radioactivites specifiques du cholesterol du chyle, du serum, de la paroi et du contenu intestinal permet de preciser les roles joues par le cholesterol de transfert d'origine serique, par le cholesterol de synthese intestinale et par le cholesterol d'absorption, dans la formation de la lymphe et des chylomicrons. Une theorie nouvelle concernant le mecanisme de l'absorption du cholesterol est proposee. (auteur)

  17. Comparison of biosensors based on entrapment of cholesterol oxidase and cholesterol esterase in electropolymerized films of polypyrrole and diaminonaphthalene derivatives for amperometric determination of cholesterol.

    Vidal, J C; Garcia-Ruiz, E; Espuelas, J; Aramendia, T; Castillo, J R

    2003-09-01

    Cholesterol amperometric biosensors constructed with enzymes entrapped in electropolymerized layers of polypyrrole and poly-naphthalene derivative polymers are compared. The biosensors are based on entrapment of cholesterol oxidase and/or cholesterol esterase in monolayer or multilayer films electrochemically synthesised from pyrrole, 1,8-diaminonaphthalene (1,8-DAN), and 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (1,5-DAN) monomers. Seven configurations were assayed and compared, and different analytical properties were obtained depending on the kind of polymer and the arrangement of the layers. The selectivity properties were evaluated for the different monolayer and bilayer configurations proposed as a function of the film permeation factor. All the steps involved in the preparation of the biosensors and determination of cholesterol were carried out in a flow system. Sensitivity and selectivity depend greatly on hydrophobicity, permeability, compactness, thickness, and the kind of the polymer used. In some cases a protective outer layer of non-conducting poly( o-phenylenediamine) polymer improves the analytical characteristics of the biosensor. A comparative study was made of the analytical performance of each of the configurations developed. The biosensors were also applied to the flow-injection determination of cholesterol in a synthetic serum. PMID:12923606

  18. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  19. Adrenal scanning with {sup 131}I-cholesterol; Diagnostik von Nebennierenrindenerkrankungen mit {sup 131}I-Cholesterol

    Hahn, K. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    Adrenal scanning with {sup 131}I-19-cholesterol is used in patients with various forms of adrenal malfunction (adreno-cortical carcinoma or adenoma, hypothalamic-hypophyseal form of Cushing's syndrome, adrenal hirsutism, primary or secondary adrenocortical insufficiency). Adrenal scanning is optimal between the fourth and tenth day after intravenous injection of {sup 131}I-19-cholesterol. This method makes it possible to estimate the size and functional status of the adrenals. Limitation of the method is the relatively high radiation dose of {sup 131}I-19-cholesterol. (orig.)

  20. Cholesterol granuloma of the orbit: An atypical presentation

    Syed A R Rizvi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol granuloma is a rare, well-defined lesion of the orbit. In the orbit, diploe of the frontal bone is involved almost exclusively. We report an atypical case of cholesterol granuloma involving superomedial quadrant of orbit. A 42-year-old male presented with progressive, painless, proptosis with infero-temporal displacement of left eye. A large mass was felt beneath the bony orbital margin in the superomedial quadrant of the left orbit. Computerized tomography (CT scan revealed an extraconal superomedial, heterogeneous enhancing mass which was isodense with brain and pushing the globe inferolaterally and anteriorly. Excision biopsy of the tumor revealed the typical features of a cholesterol granuloma without any epithelial elements. Cholesterol granuloma of the orbit is a rare entity, but it can be diagnosed and differentiated from other lesions of the superior orbit by its characteristic clinical, radiological and histopathological features. An appropriate intervention in time carries a good prognosis with almost no recurrence.

  1. Alternative to decrease cholesterol in sheep milk cheeses.

    Gómez-Cortés, P; Viturro, E; Juárez, M; de la Fuente, M A

    2015-12-01

    The presence of cholesterol in foods is of nutritional interest because high levels of this molecule in human plasma are associated with an increasing risk of cardiovascular disease and nowadays consumers are demanding healthier products. The goal of this experiment was to diminish the cholesterol content of Manchego, the most popular Spanish cheese manufactured from ewes milk. For this purpose three bulk milks coming from dairy ewe fed with 0 (Control), 3 and 6% of linseed supplement on their diet were used. Nine cheeses (3 per bulk milk) were manufactured and ripened for 3 months. Cholesterol of ewes milk cheese from 6% to 12% linseed supplemented diets decreased by 9.6% and 16.1% respectively, therefore supplying a healthier profile. In a second experiment, different sources of unsaturated fatty acids (rich in oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acids) were supplemented to dairy ewes and no significant differences were found on cheese cholesterol levels. PMID:26041199

  2. Three cases of cholesterol granuloma in the mandible

    Shin, Min Jung; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Moon, Je Woon; Choi, Soon Chul [Seoul National Univ. School of Dentitry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jae Myung [Inje Univ. College of Medicine, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    Cholesterol granuloma is an unusual clinical entity described as an inflammatory granulation in response to the deposit of cholesterol crystals. It can develop in any portion of air cells within the temporal bone as a result of a lack of aeration and inadequate drainage, especially in the middle ear cavity. Here, we report very unusual three cases of cholesterol granuloma developed in mandible. In the first case a 68-year-old male with a large mass arising from the mandible was observed. Panoramic radiograph and computed tomography scans revealed a huge expanding lesion in the mandible. In the second case a 47-years-old female with a cystic lesion in the mandible was observed. And in the third case a 19-year-old male complaining atypical facial pain had a large lesion in the mandibular ramous. The histopathologic examinations of the cases showed numerous cholesterol crystal surrounded by multinucleated foreign body giant cells.

  3. Helical synthetic peptides that stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux

    Bielicki, John K.; Natarajan, Pradeep

    2010-04-06

    The present invention provides peptides comprising at least one amphipathic alpha helix and having an cholesterol mediating activity and a ABCA stabilization activity. The invention further provides methods of using such peptides.

  4. Preterm delivery and low maternal serum cholesterol level: any correlation?

    Ayodeji A. Oluwole

    2014-04-01

    Results: The study showed an incidence of 5.0% for preterm delivery in the low risk study patients. Preterm birth was 4.83-times more common with low total maternal cholesterol than with midrange total cholesterol (11.8% versus 2.2%, P = 0.024. Conclusions: We can infer from the study that the low maternal serum cholesterol (hypocholesterolaemia is associated with preterm delivery. We can therefore recommend on this basis that the concept of an optimal range for maternal serum cholesterol during pregnancy may have merit and pregnant women should be encouraged to follow a healthy, balanced diet and ensure regular antenatal visit to their healthcare provider. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(2.000: 442-446

  5. Interaction between cholesterol and chitosan in Langmuir monolayers

    Felippe J. Pavinatto

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan incorporated in the aqueous subphase is found to affect the Langmuir monolayers of cholesterol, causing the surface pressure and the surface potential isotherms to become more expanded. The mean molecular area per cholesterol molecule in the condensed monolayer increases from 53 Ų in the absence of chitosan to 61 Ų for a concentration of 0.100 mg/mL of chitosan in the subphase. If additional chitosan is incorporated in the subphase, no change is noted, which points to saturation in the effects from chitosan. The interaction between chitosan and cholesterol probably occurs via hydrogen bonding. The monolayer expansion is also manifested in the monolayer morphology, as indicated by Brewster angle microscopy measurements, where larger cholesterol domains are visualized when chitosan is present in the subphase.

  6. Genetic High-Cholesterol Condition More Common Than Thought

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157755.html Genetic High-Cholesterol Condition More Common Than Thought Researchers ... the United States, she said. Rates of the genetic disorder vary based on racial/ethnic background, but ...

  7. Cholesterol-Lowering Probiotics as Potential Biotherapeutics for Metabolic Diseases

    Manoj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are one of the major causes of deaths in adults in the western world. Elevated levels of certain blood lipids have been reported to be the principal cause of cardiovascular disease and other disabilities in developed countries. Several animal and clinical trials have shown a positive association between cholesterol levels and the risks of coronary heart disease. Current dietary strategies for the prevention of cardiovascular disease advocate adherence to low-fat/low-saturated-fat diets. Although there is no doubt that, in experimental conditions, low-fat diets offer an effective means of reducing blood cholesterol concentrations on a population basis, these appear to be less effective, largely due to poor compliance, attributed to low palatability and acceptability of these diets to the consumers. Due to the low consumer compliance, attempts have been made to identify other dietary components that can reduce blood cholesterol levels. Supplementation of diet with fermented dairy products or lactic acid bacteria containing dairy products has shown the potential to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Various approaches have been used to alleviate this issue, including the use of probiotics, especially Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp.. Probiotics, the living microorganisms that confer health benefits on the host when administered in adequate amounts, have received much attention on their proclaimed health benefits which include improvement in lactose intolerance, increase in natural resistance to infectious disease in gastrointestinal tract, suppression of cancer, antidiabetic, reduction in serum cholesterol level, and improved digestion. In addition, there are numerous reports on cholesterol removal ability of probiotics and their hypocholesterolemic effects. Several possible mechanisms for cholesterol removal by probiotics are assimilation of cholesterol by growing cells, binding of cholesterol to cellular surface

  8. Cholesterol Check (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    2015-09-10

    Heart disease and stroke are among the leading causes of death in the U.S. One of the main risk factors is high blood cholesterol. In this podcast, Dr. Carla Mercado discusses the importance of a healthy diet and regular screening to prevent high blood cholesterol.  Created: 9/10/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 9/10/2015.

  9. Dietary fat, cholesterol and colorectal cancer in a prospective study

    Järvinen, R.; Knekt, P; Hakulinen, T; Rissanen, H; Heliövaara, M

    2001-01-01

    The relationships between consumption of total fat, major dietary fatty acids, cholesterol, consumption of meat and eggs, and the incidence of colorectal cancers were studied in a cohort based on the Finnish Mobile Clinic Health Examination Survey. Baseline (1967–1972) information on habitual food consumption over the preceding year was collected from 9959 men and women free of diagnosed cancer. A total of 109 new colorectal cancer cases were ascertained late 1999. High cholesterol intake was...

  10. Tissue cholesterol content alterations in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Xin-ting WANG; Jia LI; Li LIU; Nan HU; Shi JIN; Can LIU; Dan MEI; Xiao-dong LIU

    2012-01-01

    Aim:Diabetes is associated with elevated serum total cholesterol level and disrupted lipoprotein subfractions.The aim of this study was to examine alterations in the tissue cholesterol contents closely related to diabetic complications.Methods:Intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin was used to induce type 1 diabetes in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats.On d 35 after the injection,liver,heart,intestine,kidney,pancreas,cerebral cortex and hippocampus were isolated from the rats.The content of total and free cholesterol in the tissues was determined using HPLC.The ATP-binding cassette protein A1 (ABCA1) protein and ApoE mRNA were measured using Western blot and QT-PCR analyses,respectively.Results:In diabetic rats,the level of free cholesterol was significantly decreased in the peripheral tissues,but significantly elevated in hippocampus,as compared with those in the control rats.Diabetic rats showed a trend of decreasing the total cholesterol level in the peripheral tissues,but significant change was only found in kidney and liver.In diabetic rats,the level of the ABCA1 protein was significantly increased in the peripheral tissues and cerebral cortex; the expression of ApoE mRNA was slightly decreased in hippocampus and cerebral cortex,but the change had no statistical significance.Conclusion:Type 1 diabetes decreases the free cholesterol content in the peripheral tissues and increases the free cholesterol content in hippocampus.The decreased free cholesterol level in the peripheral tissues may be partly due to the increased expression of the ABCA1 protein.

  11. Cholesterol oxidase: sources, physical properties and analytical applications.

    MacLachlan, J; Wotherspoon, A T; Ansell, R O; Brooks, C J

    2000-04-01

    Since Flegg (H.M. Flegg, An investigation of the determination of serum cholesterol by an enzymatic method, Ann. Clin. Biochem. 10 (1973) 79-84) and Richmond (W. Richmond, The development of an enzymatic technique for the assay of cholesterol in biological fluids, Scand. J. clin. Lab. Invest. 29 (1972) 25; W. Richmond, Preparation and properties of a bacterial cholesterol oxidase from Nocardia sp. and its application to enzyme assay of total cholesterol in serum, Clinical Chemistry 19 (1973) 1350-1356) first illustrated the suitability of cholesterol oxidase (COD) for the analysis of serum cholesterol, COD has risen to become the most widely used enzyme in clinical laboratories with the exception of glucose oxidase (GOD). The use is widespread because assays incorporating the enzyme are extremely simple, specific, and highly sensitive and thus offer distinct advantages over the Liebermann-Burchard analytical methodologies which employ corrosive reagents and can be prone to unreliable results due to interfering substances such as bilirubin. Individuals can now readily determine their own serum cholesterol levels with a simple disposable test kit. This review discusses COD in some detail and includes the topics: (1) The variety of bacterial sources available; (2) The various extraction/purification protocols utilised in order to obtain protein of sufficient clarification (purity) for use in food/clinical analysis; (3) Significant differences in the properties of the individual enzymes; (4) Substrate specificities of the various enzymes; (5) Examples of biological assays which have employed cholesterol oxidase as an integral part of the analysis, and the various assay protocols; (6) New steroidal products of COD. This review is not a comprehensive description of published work, but is intended to provide an account of recent and current research, and should promote further interest in the application of enzymes to analytical selectivity. PMID:10822008

  12. Optimizing Conditions to Cholesterol Adsorbed with Carboxymethyl Chitosan

    Mardiyah Kurniasih; Dwi Kartika; Riyanti Riyanti

    2016-01-01

    A research on optimizing conditions to cholesterol adsorbed have been performed. Optimization was performed by varying: contact time, adsorbent weight and temperature of the system's. A full factorial experimental design was used in this study. Characterization performed on the synthesized chitosan and carboxymethyl chitosan including FTIR, water content, ash content, solubility, porosity, and swelling effect. The results showed that carboxymethyl chitosan able to adsorb cholesterol under con...

  13. Cholesterol depletion disorganizes oocyte membrane rafts altering mouse fertilization.

    Jorgelina Buschiazzo

    Full Text Available Drastic membrane reorganization occurs when mammalian sperm binds to and fuses with the oocyte membrane. Two oocyte protein families are essential for fertilization, tetraspanins and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins. The firsts are associated to tetraspanin-enriched microdomains and the seconds to lipid rafts. Here we report membrane raft involvement in mouse fertilization assessed by cholesterol modulation using methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Cholesterol removal induced: (1 a decrease of the fertilization rate and index; and (2 a delay in the extrusion of the second polar body. Cholesterol repletion recovered the fertilization ability of cholesterol-depleted oocytes, indicating reversibility of these effects. In vivo time-lapse analyses using fluorescent cholesterol permitted to identify the time-point at which the probe is mainly located at the plasma membrane enabling the estimation of the extent of the cholesterol depletion. We confirmed that the mouse oocyte is rich in rafts according to the presence of the raft marker lipid, ganglioside GM1 on the membrane of living oocytes and we identified the coexistence of two types of microdomains, planar rafts and caveolae-like structures, by terms of two differential rafts markers, flotillin-2 and caveolin-1, respectively. Moreover, this is the first report that shows characteristic caveolae-like invaginations in the mouse oocyte identified by electron microscopy. Raft disruption by cholesterol depletion disturbed the subcellular localization of the signal molecule c-Src and the inhibition of Src kinase proteins prevented second polar body extrusion, consistent with a role of Src-related kinases in fertilization via signaling complexes. Our data highlight the functional importance of intact membrane rafts for mouse fertilization and its dependence on cholesterol.

  14. HIV-Cholesterol Connection Suggests a New Antiretroviral Strategy

    Zahedi Mujawar; Honor Rose; Morrow, Matthew P.; Tatiana Pushkarsky; Larisa Dubrovsky; Nigora Mukhamedova; Ying Fu; Anthony Dart; Orenstein, Jan M.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.; Michael Bukrinsky; Dmitri Sviridov

    2006-01-01

    Several steps of HIV-1 replication critically depend on cholesterol. HIV infection is associated with profound changes in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Whereas numerous studies have investigated the role of anti-HIV drugs in lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia, the effects of HIV infection on cellular cholesterol metabolism remain uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that HIV-1 impairs ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)-dependent chole...

  15. Apolipoprotein M promotes mobilization of cellular cholesterol in vivo

    Elsøe, Sara; Christoffersen, Christina; Luchoomun, Jayraz;

    2013-01-01

    The HDL associated apolipoprotein M (apoM) protects against experimental atherosclerosis but the mechanism is unknown. ApoM increases prebeta-HDL formation. We explored whether plasma apoM affects mobilization of cholesterol from peripheral cells in mice.......The HDL associated apolipoprotein M (apoM) protects against experimental atherosclerosis but the mechanism is unknown. ApoM increases prebeta-HDL formation. We explored whether plasma apoM affects mobilization of cholesterol from peripheral cells in mice....

  16. Elastic deformation and failure of lipid bilayer membranes containing cholesterol.

    Needham, D; Nunn, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    Giant bilayer vesicles were reconstituted from several lipids and lipid/cholesterol (CHOL) mixtures: stearolyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (SOPC), bovine sphingomyelin (BSM), diarachidonylphosphatidylcholine (DAPC), SOPC/CHOL, BSM/CHOL, DAPC/CHOL, and extracted red blood cell (RBC) lipids with native cholesterol. Single-walled vesicles were manipulated by micropipette suction and several membrane material properties were determined. The properties measured were the elastic area compressibility m...

  17. Emerging Roles for Cholesterol and Lipoproteins in Lung Disease

    Gowdy, Kymberly M; Fessler, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    Dyslipidemia, the condition of elevated serum triglycerides, elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and/or low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, is a public health problem of growing concern. Dyslipidemia clusters with other disorders of the metabolic syndrome that together influence, and may derive from, chronic inflammation. While best recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, lipid dysregulation has recently been shown to influence a variety of dise...

  18. The Role of Cholesterol in Driving IAPP-Membrane Interactions.

    Sciacca, Michele F M; Lolicato, Fabio; Di Mauro, Giacomo; Milardi, Danilo; D'Urso, Luisa; Satriano, Cristina; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; La Rosa, Carmelo

    2016-07-12

    Our knowledge of the molecular events underlying type 2 diabetes mellitus-a protein conformational disease characterized by the aggregation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) in pancreatic β cells-is limited. However, amyloid-mediated membrane damage is known to play a key role in IAPP cytotoxicity, and therefore the effects of lipid composition on modulating IAPP-membrane interactions have been the focus of intense research. In particular, membrane cholesterol content varies with aging and consequently with adverse environmental factors such as diet and lifestyle, but its role in the development of the disease is controversial. In this study, we employ a combination of experimental techniques and in silico molecular simulations to shed light on the role of cholesterol in IAPP aggregation and the related membrane disruption. We show that if anionic POPC/POPS vesicles are used as model membranes, cholesterol has a negligible effect on the kinetics of IAPP fibril growth on the surface of the bilayer. In addition, cholesterol inhibits membrane damage by amyloid-induced poration on membranes, but enhances leakage through fiber growth on the membrane surface. Conversely, if 1:2 DOPC/DPPC raft-like model membranes are used, cholesterol accelerates fiber growth. Next, it enhances pore formation and suppresses fiber growth on the membrane surface, leading to leakage. Our results highlight a twofold effect of cholesterol on the amyloidogenicity of IAPP and help explain its debated role in type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27410742

  19. Cholesterol-dependent hemolytic activity of Passiflora quadrangularis leaves

    L.N. Yuldasheva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants used in traditional medicine are rich sources of hemolysins and cytolysins, which are potential bactericidal and anticancer drugs. The present study demonstrates for the first time the presence of a hemolysin in the leaves of Passiflora quadrangularis L. This hemolysin is heat stable, resistant to trypsin treatment, has the capacity to froth, and acts very rapidly. The hemolysin activity is dose-dependent, with a slope greater than 1 in a double-logarithmic plot. Polyethylene glycols of high molecular weight were able to reduce the rate of hemolysis, while liposomes containing cholesterol completely inhibited it. In contrast, liposomes containing phosphatidylcholine were ineffective. The Passiflora hemolysin markedly increased the conductance of planar lipid bilayers containing cholesterol but was ineffective in cholesterol-free bilayers. Successive extraction of the crude hemolysin with n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol resulted in a 10-fold purification, with the hemolytic activity being recovered in the n-butanol fraction. The data suggest that membrane cholesterol is the primary target for this hemolysin and that several hemolysin molecules form a large transmembrane water pore. The properties of the Passiflora hemolysin, such as its frothing ability, positive color reaction with vanillin, selective extraction with n-butanol, HPLC profile, cholesterol-dependent membrane susceptibility, formation of a stable complex with cholesterol, and rapid erythrocyte lysis kinetics indicate that it is probably a saponin.

  20. Dietary saturated fat/cholesterol, but not unsaturated fat or starch, induces C-reactive protein associated early atherosclerosis and ectopic fat deposition in diabetic pigs

    Serlie Mireille J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is thought to accelerate cardiovascular disease depending on the type of diet. This study in diabetic subjects was performed to investigate the metabolic, inflammatory and cardiovascular effects of nutritional components typically present in a Western, Mediterranean or high glycaemic diet. Methods Streptozotocin-diabetic pigs (~45 kg were fed for 10 weeks supplemental (40% of dietary energy saturated fat/cholesterol (SFC, unsaturated fat (UF or starch (S in an eucaloric dietary intervention study. Results Fasting plasma total, LDL and HDL cholesterol concentrations were 3-5 fold higher (p 2 = 0.95. Retroperitoneal fat depot weight (g was intermediate in SFC (260 ± 72, lowest in S (135 ± 51 and highest (p Conclusion Dietary saturated fat/cholesterol induces inflammation, atherosclerosis and ectopic fat deposition whereas an equally high dietary unsaturated fat load does not induce these abnormalities and shows beneficial effects on postprandial glycaemia in diabetic pigs.

  1. Effect of Moderate Alcohol Consumption on Parameters of Reverse Cholesterol Transport in Postmenopausal Women

    Sierksma, A.; Vermunt, S.H.F.; Lankhuizen, I.M.; Gaag, M.S. van der; Scheek, L.M.; Grobbee, D.E.; Tol, A. van; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Alcohol consumption is associated with increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels. One of the main antiatherogenic functions of HDL is reverse cholesterol transport. Three early steps of reverse cholesterol transport are (1) cellular cholesterol efflux, (2) plasma choles

  2. Trans-intestinal cholesterol effl ux is not mediated through high density lipoprotein

    Vrins, C.L.; Ottenhoff, R.; Oever, K. van den; Waart, D.R. de; Kruyt, J.K.; Zhao, Y.; Berkel, T.J. van; Havekes, L.M.; Aerts, J.M.; Eck, M. van; Rensen, P.C.; Groen, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    Transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) provides an attractive target to increase body cholesterol excretion. At present, the cholesterol donor responsible for direct delivery of plasma cholesterol to the intestine is unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of HDL in TICE. ATP-binding cas

  3. LCAT, HDL Cholesterol and Ischemic Cardiovascular Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Study of HDL Cholesterol in 54,500 Individuals

    Haase, Christiane L; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Ali Qayyum, Abbas;

    2012-01-01

    Background:Epidemiologically, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels associate inversely with risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease. Whether this is a causal relation is unclear.Methods:We studied 10,281 participants in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS) and 50,523 participants in...... the Copenhagen General Population Study (CGPS), of which 991 and 1,693 participants, respectively, had developed myocardial infarction (MI) by August 2010. Participants in the CCHS were genotyped for all six variants identified by resequencing lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase in 380 individuals....... One variant, S208T (rs4986970, allele frequency 4%), associated with HDL cholesterol levels in both the CCHS and the CGPS was used to study causality of HDL cholesterol using instrumental variable analysis.Results:Epidemiologically, in the CCHS, a 13% (0.21 mmol/liter) decrease in plasma HDL...

  4. Cholesterol-Enhanced Polylactide-Based Stereocomplex Micelle for Effective Delivery of Doxorubicin

    Jixue Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale micelles as an effective drug delivery system have attracted increasing interest in malignancy therapy. The present study reported the construction of the cholesterol-enhanced doxorubicin (DOX-loaded poly(D-lactide-based micelle (CDM/DOX, poly(L-lactide-based micelle (CLM/DOX, and stereocomplex micelle (CSCM/DOX from the equimolar enantiomeric 4-armed poly(ethylene glycol–polylactide copolymers in aqueous condition. Compared with CDM/DOX and CLM/DOX, CSCM/DOX showed the smallest hydrodynamic size of 96 ± 4.8 nm and the slowest DOX release. The DOX-loaded micelles exhibited a weaker DOX fluorescence inside mouse renal carcinoma cells (i.e., RenCa cells compared to free DOX·HCl, probably because of a slower DOX release. More importantly, all the DOX-loaded micelles, especially CSCM/DOX, exhibited the excellent antiproliferative efficacy that was equal to or even better than free DOX·HCl toward RenCa cells attributed to their successful internalization. Furthermore, all of the DOX-loaded micelles exhibited the satisfactory hemocompatibility compared to free DOX·HCl, indicating the great potential for systemic chemotherapy through intravenous injection.

  5. Self-assembled nanoparticles of cholesterol-modified O-carboxymethyl chitosan as a novel carrier for paclitaxel

    Wang Yinsong; Li Rongshan; Wang Yumei; Zhao Jing [College of Pharmacy, Tianjin Medical University, No. 22 Qixiangtai Road, Heping District, Tianjin 300070 (China); Jiang Qian; Liu Linglong; Zhang Qiqing [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Peking Union Medical College, PO Box 25(204), Tianjin 300192 (China)], E-mail: wangyinsong@tijmu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhangqiq@xmu.edu.cn

    2008-04-09

    Self-assembled nanoparticles of cholesterol-modified O-carboxymethyl chitosan (CCMC) were prepared to be used as a novel carrier for paclitaxel (PTX) in this study. CCMC-6.9 was synthesized by the covalent conjugation of cholesterol to O-carboxymethyl chitosan with the succinyl linkage and the degree of substitution (DS) of the cholesterol moiety was 6.9%. CCMC-6.9 formed self-assembled nanoparticles with a size of 209.5 nm in aqueous media. Paclitaxel-loaded CCMC-6.9 self-assembled nanoparticles were prepared using a dialysis method and their characteristics were analyzed by dynamic laser light scattering (LLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV). PTX-loaded CCMC-6.9 self-assembled nanoparticles were almost spherical in shape and their size increased from 245.6 to 355.3 nm with PTX-loading content increasing from 18.7% to 34.9%. In vitro release of PTX from CCMC-6.9 self-assembled nanoparticles was carried out by the dynamic dialysis method. PTX continuously released in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solutions for 84 h at 37 deg. C and its release was sensitive to the pH of the release media. The biodistribution of PTX-loaded CCMC-6.9 self-assembled nanoparticles was studied in female Balb/c mice. Compared with PTX in the solution of Cremophor EL (polyethoxylated castor oil)/ethanol (PTX-Cre), CCMC-6.9 self-assembled nanoparticles significantly increased the uptake of PTX in plasma, liver and spleen, but decreased the uptake in heart and kidney. These results suggest that CCMC-6.9 self-assembled nanoparticles can effectively solubilize PTX and modify its tissue biodistribution, which may be advantageous in enhancing the therapeutic index and reducing the toxicity of PTX.

  6. Atorvastatin treatment lowers fasting remnant-like particle cholesterol and LDL subfraction cholesterol without affecting LDL size in type 2 diabetes mellitus : Relevance for non-HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein B guideline targets

    Kappelle, Paul J. W. H.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which atorvastatin treatment affects LDL size, LDL subfraction levels and remnant-like particle cholesterol (RLP-C) was determined in type 2 diabetes. We also compared LDL size and RLP-C in relation to guideline cut-off values for LDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein

  7. Effects of lovastatin and dietary cholesterol on sterol homeostasis in healthy human subjects.

    Duane, W C

    1993-01-01

    We measured biliary and fecal sterol outputs in 12 human subjects on a metabolic ward in four randomly allocated, 6-7 wk periods: (a) lovastatin (40 mg b.i.d.) + low cholesterol diet (mean 246 mg/d), (b) lovastatin + high cholesterol diet (mean 1,071 mg/d), (c) low cholesterol diet alone, (d) high cholesterol diet alone. In addition to lowering serum LDL cholesterol, lovastatin significantly lowered biliary secretion of cholesterol, fecal output of endogenous neutral sterols, cholesterol bala...

  8. The origin of cholesterol in chyle demonstrated by nuclear indicator methods

    In order to obtain information about the mechanism of the intestinal absorption of cholesterol, rats having a lymphatic abdominal fistula are used. The animals receive either 4-14C- cholesterol subcutaneously or orally, or the 1-14C acetate. The study of the specific radio-activities of the cholesterol in chyle, in serum, in the lining, and in the intestinal contents makes it possible to define the roles played by the transfer cholesterol from the serum, by the cholesterol synthesised intestinally, and by the absorption cholesterol, in the formations of the lymph and of the chylomicrons. A new theory is proposed for the mechanism of cholesterol absorption. (author)

  9. How cholesterol interacts with membrane proteins: an exploration of cholesterol-binding sites including CRAC, CARC, and tilted domains

    Fantini, Jacques; Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells contains several types of lipids displaying high biochemical variability in both their apolar moiety (e.g., the acyl chain of glycerolipids) and their polar head (e.g., the sugar structure of glycosphingolipids). Among these lipids, cholesterol is unique because its biochemical variability is almost exclusively restricted to the oxidation of its polar −OH group. Although generally considered the most rigid membrane lipid, cholesterol can adopt a broad r...

  10. Load testing circuit

    2009-01-01

    A load testing circuit a circuit tests the load impedance of a load connected to an amplifier. The load impedance includes a first terminal and a second terminal, the load testing circuit comprising a signal generator providing a test signal of a defined bandwidth to the first terminal of the load...

  11. Hydrophobic ionic liquid immoblizing cholesterol oxidase on the electrodeposited Prussian blue on glassy carbon electrode for detection of cholesterol

    A novel cholesterol biosensor was fabricated on hydrophobic ionic liquid (IL)/aqueous solution interface. The hydrophobic IL thin film played a signal amplification role because it not only enriched the cholesterol from the aqueous solution, but also immobilized matrix for cholesterol oxidase (ChOx). Prussian blue (PB) as advanced sensing materials was used as effective low-potential electron transfer mediation toward hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The fabricated IL-ChOx/PB/Glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammogram (CV), respectively. And it exhibited a linear response to cholesterol in the range of 0.01–0.40 mM with a detection limit of 4.4 μM. In addition, the kinetics behavior of cholesterol at IL-Chox/PB/GCE electrode was examined, and the electrocatalytic mechanism was proposed as shown in first scheme. ChOx immobilized in hydrophobic IL thin film was used as the first electrocatalyst for the cholesterol into H2O2, and the PB film onto the GCE was used as the second electrocatalyst for the 2e− reduction of the produced H2O2 into H2O

  12. Selective delipidation of plasma HDL enhances reverse cholesterol transport in vivo

    Sacks, Frank M.; Rudel, Lawrence L.; Conner, Adam; Akeefe, Hassibullah; Kostner, Gerhard; Baki, Talal; Rothblat, George; de la Llera-Moya, Margarita; Asztalos, Bela; Perlman, Timothy; Zheng, Chunyu; Alaupovic, Petar; Maltais, Jo-Ann B.; Brewer, H. Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Uptake of cholesterol from peripheral cells by nascent small HDL circulating in plasma is necessary to prevent atherosclerosis. This process, termed reverse cholesterol transport, produces larger cholesterol-rich HDL that transfers its cholesterol to the liver facilitating excretion. Most HDL in plasma is cholesterol-rich. We demonstrate that treating plasma with a novel selective delipidation procedure converts large to small HDL [HDL-selectively delipidated (HDL-sdl)]. HDL-sdl contains seve...

  13. Lack of Cholesterol Awareness among Physicians Who Smoke

    Richard E. Scranton

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette use is a known risk factor for the development of coronary artery disease (CAD as it adversely affects HDL cholesterol levels and promotes thrombogenesis. Smoking may also be associated with behavioral characteristics that potentiate the risk of CAD. A lack of cholesterol knowledge would indicate an aversion to a prevention-oriented lifestyle. Thus, our goal was to determine the association between tobacco use and knowledge of self-reported cholesterol among male physicians. Using the 1982 and follow-up questionnaires from the physician health study, we report the changes in the frequencies of awareness of self-reported total cholesterol and cardiovascular risk factors among the 22,067 participants. We classified physicians as being aware of their cholesterol if they reported a cholesterol level and unaware if the question was left unanswered. In 1997, 207 physicians were excluded, as the recorded cholesterol was not interpretable, leaving 21,860 for our follow up analyses. Using unadjusted logistic models, we determined the odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI of not reporting a cholesterol level in either 1982 or 1997 for each specified risk factor. We then evaluated whether the lack of cholesterol awareness at both time points was associated with the use of tobacco throughout the study. After 14-years of follow up, cholesterol awareness increased from 35.9 to 58.6 percent. During this period, the frequency of hypertension and hyperlipidemia treatment increased (13.5 to 40.5% and 0.57% to 19.6% respectively, as did the diagnosis of diabetes (2.40 to 7.79%. Behavioral characteristics such as a sedentary lifestyle and obesity also increased (27.8 to 42% and 43.5 to 53.5%, respectively, however the proportion of current smokers deceased from 11.1 to 4.05%. The percentages of individuals being unaware of their cholesterol decreased in all risk factor groups. However, individuals were likely to be unaware of their cholesterol

  14. Ionic channels and nerve membrane lipids. Cholesterol-tetrodotoxin interaction.

    Villegas, R; Barnola, F V; Camejo, G

    1970-04-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate possible interactions of tetrodotoxin (TTX) with lipid molecules isolated from nerve fiber plasma membranes of the squid Dosidicus gigas. TTX has a highly selective ability to block the channel normally used by Na(+) to cross the axolemma during nervous impulse conduction. In order to investigate the interaction each lipid sample was spread on 5 x 10(-7)M TTX and TTX-free 0.15 M NaCl solutions adjusted to pH 7.4 with 7 x 10(-3)M phosphate buffer. The surface pressure-area diagrams of the lipid monolayers revealed that TTX interacts only with cholesterol. The expansion of the cholesterol monolayers at 5 x 10(-7)M TTX was 2 A(2)/molecule at zero pressure for the experiments at 20 degrees C and 2.5 A(2)/molecule for those at 25 degrees C. Similar results were obtained in KCl subphases. The apparent dissociation constant of the cholesterol-TTX complex calculated from dose-response experiments is 2.6 x 10(-7)M. Experiments at pH 10.1 revealed that the zwitter ionic form of TTX is less active. Experiments with cholesterol derivatives (cholesteryl acetate, cholesterol methyl ether, cholestanol, and cholestanyl acetate) indicate that for the interaction with TTX a partial negatively charged group at C-3 and a double bond between C-5 and C-6 on the steroid nucleus are required. Tetrodonic acid, a biologically inactive derivative of TTX, does not interact with cholesterol. The results lead us to propose that cholesterol is part of the Na(+) channel. PMID:5435784

  15. Measurement of rates of cholesterol synthesis using tritiated water

    Rates of sterol synthesis in various tissues commonly are assessed by assaying levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase on isolated microsomes or by measuring the rates of incorporation of various 14C-labeled substrates or [3H]water into cholesterol by whole cell preparations in vitro or by the tissues of the whole animal in vivo. While measurement of activities of HMG-CoA reductase or rates of incorporation of 14C-labeled substrates into cholesterol give useful relative rates of sterol production, neither method yields absolute rates of cholesterol synthesis. The use of [3H]water circumvents the problem of variable and unknown dilution of the specific activity of the precursor pool encountered when 14C-labeled substrates are used and does yield absolute rates of cholesterol synthesis provided that the 3H/C incorporation ratio is known for a particular tissue. In 12 different experimental situations it has been found that from 21 to 27 micrograms atoms of 3H are incorporated into cholesterol from [3H]water in different tissues of several animal species, so that the 3H/C incorporation ratio is similar under nearly all experimental conditions and varies from 0.78 to 1.00. When administered in vivo, [3H]water rapidly equilibrates with intracellular water and is incorporated into sterols within the various organs at rates that are linear with respect to time. From such data it is possible to obtain absolute rates of cholesterol synthesis in the whole animal and in the various organs of the animal. Current data suggest, therefore, that use of [3H]water yields the most accurate rates of cholesterol synthesis both in vitro and in vivo

  16. Prenatal Ethanol Exposure Up-Regulates the Cholesterol Transporters ATP-Binding Cassette A1 and G1 and Reduces Cholesterol Levels in the Developing Rat Brain

    Zhou, Chunyan; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Xiaolu; Costa, Lucio G.; Guizzetti, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Cholesterol plays a pivotal role in many aspects of brain development; reduced cholesterol levels during brain development, as a consequence of genetic defects in cholesterol biosynthesis, leads to severe brain damage, including microcephaly and mental retardation, both of which are also hallmarks of the fetal alcohol syndrome. We had previously shown that ethanol up-regulates the levels of two cholesterol transporters, ABCA1 (ATP binding cassette-A1) and ABCG1, leading to increased cho...

  17. Cholesterol metabolism changes under long-term dietary restrictions while the cholesterol homeostasis remains unaffected in the cortex and hippocampus of aging rats

    Smiljanic, Kosara; Vanmierlo, Tim; Djordjevic, Aleksandra Mladenovic; Perovic, Milka; Ivkovic, Sanja; Luetjohann, Dieter; Kanazir, Selma

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining cholesterol homeostasis in the brain is vital for its proper functioning. While it is well documented that dietary restriction modulates the metabolism of cholesterol peripherally, little is known as to how it can affect cholesterol metabolism in the brain. The present study was designed to elucidate the impact of long-term dietary restriction on brain cholesterol metabolism. Three-month-old male Wistar rats were exposed to long-term dietary restriction until 12 and 24 months of a...

  18. Dietary Cholesterol Affects Plasma Lipid Levels, the Intravascular Processing of Lipoproteins and Reverse Cholesterol Transport without Increasing the Risk for Heart Disease

    Jacqueline Barona; Maria Luz Fernandez

    2012-01-01

    The associations between dietary cholesterol and heart disease are highly controversial. While epidemiological studies and clinical interventions have shown the lack of correlation between cholesterol intake and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, there is still concern among health practitioners and the general population regarding dietary cholesterol. In this review, several clinical studies utilizing cholesterol challenges are analyzed in terms of changes that occur in lipoprotein metabolis...

  19. Chylomicron remnant model emulsions induce intracellular cholesterol accumulation and cell death due to lysosomal destabilization.

    Wakita, Kyoko; Morita, Shin-ya; Okamoto, Naoko; Takata, Eriko; Handa, Tetsurou; Nakano, Minoru

    2015-05-01

    Chylomicron remnants, which carry dietary fats and cholesterol, play a role in promoting atherosclerosis. Chylomicron remnants are characterized by high cholesterol content at the surface, different from low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) containing high amounts of esterified cholesterol (CE) in the core. We prepared cholesterol-rich emulsions (TO-PC/cholesterol emulsions) as models for chylomicron remnants and compared their effects on J774 macrophages with acetylated-LDL (ac-LDL). Internalization of TO-PC/cholesterol emulsions into macrophages reduced cell viability, whereas ac-LDL did not. Surprisingly, there was no difference in intracellular free cholesterol content between cells incubated with TO-PC/cholesterol emulsions and with ac-LDL. Furthermore, cholesterol in TO-PC/cholesterol emulsions and ac-LDL both were internalized into J774 macrophages; however, incubation with TO-PC/cholesterol emulsions induced leakage of lysosomal protease, cathepsin-L, to cytosol, which was not observed for incubation with ac-LDL. Inhibition of the activity of cathepsin-L recovered the viability of macrophages that ingested TO-PC/cholesterol emulsions. We suggest an alternative fate of cholesterol-rich emulsions taken up by macrophages, which is different from other atherogenic lipoproteins rich in CE; internalization of TO-PC/cholesterol emulsions into macrophages induces rapid free cholesterol accumulation in lysosomes and cell death due to lysosomal destabilization. PMID:25661161

  20. The mechanism of dietary cholesterol effects on lipids metabolism in rats

    Wang Jing-Feng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholesterol administration has been reported to influence hepatic lipid metabolism in rats. In the present study, the effect of dietary cholesterol on hepatic activity and mRNA expression of the enzymes involved in lipid metabolism were investigated. Fourteen male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 2 groups and fed 1% cholesterol or cholesterol free AIN76 diets for 4 weeks. Results The serum triglyceride and high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly decreased but the total cholesterol and non high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly increased in the cholesterol-fed rats compared with the control rats. And the concentrations of the hepatic total cholesterol and triglyceride increased about 4-fold and 20-fold separately by dietary cholesterol. The activities of hepatic malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, fatty acid synthase, phosphatidate phophatase and carnitine palmitoyl transferase were depressed by the cholesterol feeding (40%, 70%, 50%, 15% and 25% respectively. The results of mRNA expression showed that fatty acid synthase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1, carnitine palmitoyl transferase 2, and HMG-CoA reductase were down-regulated (35%, 30%, 50% and 25% respectively and acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase were up regulated (1.6 and 6.5 folds in liver by the cholesterol administration. Conclusions The dietary cholesterol increased the triglyceride accumulation in liver, but did not stimulate the activity and the gene expression of hepatic enzymes related to triglyceride and fatty acid biosynthesis.

  1. Loads and loads and loads: The influence of prospective load, retrospective load, and ongoing task load in prospective memory

    Beat eMeier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In prospective memory tasks different kinds of load can occur. Adding a prospective memory task can impose a load on ongoing task performance. Adding ongoing task load can affect prospective memory performance. The existence of multiple target events increases prospective load and adding complexity to the to-be-remembered action increases retrospective load. In two experiments, we systematically examined the effects of these different types of load on prospective memory performance. Results showed an effect of prospective load on costs in the ongoing task for categorical targets (Experiment 2, but not for specific targets (Experiment 1. Retrospective load and ongoing task load both affected remembering the retrospective component of the prospective memory task. We suggest that prospective load can enhance costs in the ongoing task due to additional monitoring requirements. Retrospective load and ongoing task load seem to impact the division of resources between the ongoing task and retrieval of the retrospective component, which may affect disengagement from the ongoing task. In general, the results demonstrate that the different types of load affect prospective memory differentially.

  2. Plasma lipoprotein profiles and arylesterase activities in two inbred strains of rabbits with high or low response of plasma cholesterol to dietary cholesterol

    Beynen, A.C.; Katan, M.B.; Zutphen, van L.F.M.

    1984-01-01

    1. 1. Cholesterol feeding for 4 weeks of female and male rabbits of two inbred strains increased plasma cholesterol concentrations by about 11 and 48 mmole/I in the hypo- and hyperresponsive strain, respectively. 2. 2. On the low-cholesterol pre-experimental diet, the hyporesponsive animals had sign

  3. Treatment of young rats with cholestyramine or a hypercholesterolemic diet does not influence the response of serum cholesterol to dietary cholesterol in later life

    Beynen, A.C.; Bruijne, J.J. de; Katan, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    Groups of 10 female Wistar rats (aged 4 weeks) were fed for 29 days either a low-cholesterol commercial diet, a commercial diet containing 2% (w/w) cholesterol, 0.5% cholate and 5% olive oil or a diet containing 2% cholestyramine. The rats were then fed the low-cholesterol commercial diet for the ne

  4. Risk Factors for Senile Corneal Arcus in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Mirnaghi Moosavi; Ahmad Sareshtedar; Siamak Zarei-Ghanavati; Mehran Zarei-Ghanavati; Nazanin Ramezanfar

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between senile corneal arcus and atherosclerosis risk factors in patients with recent acute myocardial infarction. Methods: In this cross sectional study, atherosclerosis risk factors including fasting blood sugar, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were measured in 165 patients with recent (less than three months′ duration) acute myocardial infarction. Slitlamp examination was performed to detect corneal arcus. Associations between senile co...

  5. Risk Factors for Senile Corneal Arcus in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Moosavi, Mirnaghi; Sareshtedar, Ahmad; Zarei-Ghanavati, Siamak; Zarei-Ghanavati, Mehran; Ramezanfar, Nazanin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between senile corneal arcus and atherosclerosis risk factors in patients with recent acute myocardial infarction. Methods In this cross sectional study, atherosclerosis risk factors including fasting blood sugar, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were measured in 165 patients with recent (less than three months’ duration) acute myocardial infarction. Slitlamp examination was performed to detect corneal arcus. Associations between senile corneal ...

  6. An engineered specificity of Irinotecan loaded Proniosomes: Design and Characterization

    Prakash s Goudanavar; Vijay G. Joshi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to prepare, characterize and optimize the irinotecan loaded proniosomes for overall improvement in the efficacy, reduced toxicity and enhancement of therapeutic index of irinotecan. Proniosomes of Irinotecan hydrochloride trihydrate were prepared by slurry method using different surfactants, cholesterol and dicetyl phosphate. The formulations were then characterized with respect to shape and surface morphology, entrapment efficiency, invitro drug release prof...

  7. Low cholesterol? Don't brag yet ... hypocholesterolemia blunts HAART effectiveness: a longitudinal study

    Míguez María

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vitro studies suggest that reducing cholesterol inhibits HIV replication. However, this effect may not hold in vivo, where other factors, such as cholesterol's immunomodulatory properties, may interact. Methods Fasting blood samples were obtained on 165 people living with HIV at baseline and after 24 weeks on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Participants were classified as hypocholesterolemic (HypoCHL; 150 mg/dl and were compared on viro-immune outcomes. Results At baseline, participants with HypoCHL (40% exhibited lower CD4 (197 ± 181 vs. 295 ± 191 cells/mm3, p = 0.02 and CD8 (823 ± 448 vs. 1194 ± 598 cells/mm3, p = 0.001 counts and were more likely to have detectable viral loads (OR = 3.5, p = 0.01 than non-HypoCHL controls. After HAART, participants with HypoCHL were twice as likely to experience a virological failure >400 copies (95% CI 1-2.6, p = 0.05 and to exhibit Conclusions The study implicates, for the first time, HypoCHL with impaired HAART effectiveness, including limited CD4 repletion by the thymus and suboptimal viral clearance.

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus impairs reverse cholesterol transport from macrophages.

    Zahedi Mujawar

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Several steps of HIV-1 replication critically depend on cholesterol. HIV infection is associated with profound changes in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Whereas numerous studies have investigated the role of anti-HIV drugs in lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia, the effects of HIV infection on cellular cholesterol metabolism remain uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that HIV-1 impairs ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux from human macrophages, a condition previously shown to be highly atherogenic. In HIV-1-infected cells, this effect was mediated by Nef. Transfection of murine macrophages with Nef impaired cholesterol efflux from these cells. At least two mechanisms were found to be responsible for this phenomenon: first, HIV infection and transfection with Nef induced post-transcriptional down-regulation of ABCA1; and second, Nef caused redistribution of ABCA1 to the plasma membrane and inhibited internalization of apolipoprotein A-I. Binding of Nef to ABCA1 was required for down-regulation and redistribution of ABCA1. HIV-infected and Nef-transfected macrophages accumulated substantial amounts of lipids, thus resembling foam cells. The contribution of HIV-infected macrophages to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis was supported by the presence of HIV-positive foam cells in atherosclerotic plaques of HIV-infected patients. Stimulation of cholesterol efflux from macrophages significantly reduced infectivity of the virions produced by these cells, and this effect correlated with a decreased amount of virion-associated cholesterol, suggesting that impairment of cholesterol efflux is essential to ensure proper cholesterol content in nascent HIV particles. These results reveal a previously unrecognized dysregulation of intracellular lipid metabolism in HIV-infected macrophages and identify Nef and ABCA1 as the key players responsible for this effect. Our findings

  9. The micromethod for determination of cholesterol, cholesteryl esters and phospholipids

    Okabe,Akinobu

    1974-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined the method for determining microquantities of lipids, including cholesterol, cholesteryl esters and phospholipids. A standard colorimetric procedure of cholesteryl esters was modified to accommodate a quantitative thin-layer chromatography. This method involved the following steps. (1 Separation of lipids by a thin-layer chromatography: Lipids were applied to Silica gel G plates. Plates were developed with petroleum ether-diethyl etheracetic acid (82: 18: 2, vIvIv. (2 Elution of cholesterol and its esters from scraped silica gel: After scraping the silica gel with adhered cholesterol and its esters, they were eluted with chloroform-methanol (4: 1, v,tv. In the case of phspholipids, the silica gel was calcified. (3 Colorimetric determination of the lipids: Cholesterol and its esters eluted from the silica gel were determined by the method of ZAK with ROSENTHAL'S color reagent directly and after saponification, respectively. Phospholipids were calculated from the phosphorous content determined by the method of KATES. On the basis of examination of recovery and analyses of lipids extracted from tissue, it was concluded that this method permitted a reliable estimation of microquantities of cholesterol, its esters and phospholipids from small amounts of biological materials.

  10. [An operative case of cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex].

    Saino, M; Kayama, T; Kuroki, A; Siraisi, Y; Sato, K; Nakai, O

    1996-11-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with a rare cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex manifesting as headache, left facial dysesthesia, diplopia, left hearing impairment, and left tinnitus. Neurological examination revealed dysesthesia of territory in all divisions of the left trigeminal nerve, left incomplete abducens nerve palsy, left mixed hearing impairment, and left tinnitus. Plain CT scan showed a smoothly marginated mass involving the left petrous apex. The mass was isodense with the brain parenchyma and not enhanced by contrast medium. The mass appeared heterogeneously slightly hyperintense on the T1-weighted MR image and homogeneously hyperintense on the T2-weighted MR image except for the peripheral portion. The mass was not enhanced after intravenous gadolinium DTPA administration. Surgery via a petrosal approach totally removed the mass in the intracranial, extradural space. Histological examination showed typical features of cholesterol granuloma, with cholesterin clefts, hemosiderin deposits, and erythrocytes in non-specific granulation tissue. Cholesterol granuloma most commonly occurs in the middle ear cavity, and rarely in the petrous apex. The characteristic hyperintense appearance of cholesterol granuloma on T1- and T2-weighted MR images is very useful for differentiation from other lesions of the petrous apex and the cerebellopontine angle such as cholesteatoma, mucocele, chordoma, and meningioma. Solid cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex should be treated by total removal via craniotomy, not by drainage which is commonly performed by otorhinologists. PMID:8934474

  11. Optimizing Conditions to Cholesterol Adsorbed with Carboxymethyl Chitosan

    Mardiyah Kurniasih

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A research on optimizing conditions to cholesterol adsorbed have been performed. Optimization was performed by varying: contact time, adsorbent weight and temperature of the system's. A full factorial experimental design was used in this study. Characterization performed on the synthesized chitosan and carboxymethyl chitosan including FTIR, water content, ash content, solubility, porosity, and swelling effect. The results showed that carboxymethyl chitosan able to adsorb cholesterol under conditions optimal adsorbent with cholesterol ratio (1:200 with a contact time of 90 minutes at temperature of 40 °C. Meanwhile, at a temperature of 55 °C carboxymethyl chitosan capable of adsorb cholesterol under conditions optimal adsorbent with cholesterol ratio (1:300 with a contact time of 30 minutes. Chitosan and carboxymethyl chitosan synthesized has a water content of 7.4 and 10.2%, ash content of 0.14 and 2.29%, solubility in distilled water at 1.10-5and 1.98.10-3%, solubility in acetic acid 0.02 and 0.04%, porosity at 88.3% and 88.8%, and swelling at 163.13 and 182.98%.

  12. 3 Benzyl-6-chloropyrone: a suicide inhibitor of cholesterol esterase

    Cholesterol, absorbed from the intestine, appears in lymph as the ester. Cholesterol esterase is essential for this process, since depletion of the enzyme blocks and repletion restores, absorption. Selective inhibitors of cholesterol esterase may thus prove useful in reducing cholesterol uptake. A series of potential suicide substrates were synthesized which, following cleavage by the enzyme, would attack the putative nucleophile in the active site. One of these, 3-benzyl-6-chloropyrone (3BCP), inhibited both synthesis and hydrolysis of 14C-cholesteryl oleate with an I50 of approximately 150 μM. The inactivation was time-dependent and characteristic of a suicide mechanism. The α pyrone structure (lactone analog) is cleaved by a serine-hydroxyl in the active site. This generates an enoyl chloride which inactivates the imidazole believed to play a part in the catalytic function of the enzyme. Inhibition by 3BCP is selective for cholesterol esterase. The activity of pancreatic lipase as not affected by concentrations up to 1 mM

  13. Treating elevated cholesterol levels: the great Satan in perspective.

    Gibaldi, M; Kradjan, W

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide perspective on the developments leading to the recognition of high cholesterol levels as a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Another objective is to consider the unfolding controversies regarding the relative value of cholesterol-lowering drug therapy in primary and secondary prevention. Should physicians use lipid-lowering drugs to treat patients with elevated cholesterol levels but no clinical evidence of coronary disease, or limit intervention to patients with a previous history of angina, coronary angioplasty, coronary artery bypass surgery, or myocardial infarction? This review finds inadequate data to support a recommendation for screening large populations for the presence of elevated cholesterol levels or for primary prevention in those known to have high cholesterol. On the other hand, there is mounting evidence to support vigorous intervention in those with known coronary disease. Further study is needed to determine whether a subset of patients with one or more well-defined risk factors would benefit from primary prevention. PMID:8690811

  14. Acute pancreatitis

    Al Mofleh Ibrahim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The past few years have witnessed a tremendous progress in our knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and classification of acute pancreatitis. The role of ischemia, lysosomal enzymes, oxygen free radicals, polymorphnuclear cells-byproducts and inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of pancreatic necrosis and multiple organ failure has been emphasized. Furthermore, the recent knowledge about agents infecting pancreatic necrosis, routes of infection, bacteriological examination of fine needle aspirate and appropriate antibiotics have changed the concept of acute pancreatitis. New diagnostic tests such as rapid urinary trypsinogen-2 test and inflammatory mediators including polymorphnuclear elastase, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 contribute to early diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and initiation of an appropriate therapy.

  15. Acute pollution of recipients in urban areas

    Rauch, W.; Harremoës, P.

    1997-01-01

    Oxygen and ammonia concentration are key parameters of acute water pollution in urban rivers. These two abiotic parameters are statistically assessed for a historical rain series by means of a simplified deterministic model of the integrated drainage system. Continuous simulation of the system...... performance indicates that acute water pollution is caused by intermittent discharges from both sewer system and wastewater treatment plant. Neglecting one of them in the evaluation of the environmental impact gives a wrong impression of total system behavior. Detention basins and alternative operational...... modes in the treatment plant under wet weather loading have a limited positive effect for minimizing acute water pollution. (C) 1997 IAWQ. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd....

  16. Plasma PCSK9 concentrations during an oral fat load and after short term high-fat, high-fat high-protein and high-fructose diets

    Cariou Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PCSK9 (Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin Kexin type 9 is a circulating protein that promotes hypercholesterolemia by decreasing hepatic LDL receptor protein. Under non interventional conditions, its expression is driven by sterol response element binding protein 2 (SREBP2 and follows a diurnal rhythm synchronous with cholesterol synthesis. Plasma PCSK9 is associated to LDL-C and to a lesser extent plasma triglycerides and insulin resistance. We aimed to verify the effect on plasma PCSK9 concentrations of dietary interventions that affect these parameters. Methods We performed nutritional interventions in young healthy male volunteers and offspring of type 2 diabetic (OffT2D patients that are more prone to develop insulin resistance, including: i acute post-prandial hyperlipidemic challenge (n=10, ii 4 days of high-fat (HF or high-fat/high-protein (HFHP (n=10, iii 7 (HFruc1, n=16 or 6 (HFruc2, n=9 days of hypercaloric high-fructose diets. An acute oral fat load was also performed in two patients bearing the R104C-V114A loss-of-function (LOF PCSK9 mutation. Plasma PCSK9 concentrations were measured by ELISA. For the HFruc1 study, intrahepatocellular (IHCL and intramyocellular lipids were measured by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Hepatic and whole-body insulin sensitivity was assessed with a two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (0.3 and 1.0 mU.kg-1.min-1. Findings HF and HFHP short-term diets, as well as an acute hyperlipidemic oral load, did not significantly change PCSK9 concentrations. In addition, post-prandial plasma triglyceride excursion was not altered in two carriers of PCSK9 LOF mutation compared with non carriers. In contrast, hypercaloric 7-day HFruc1 diet increased plasma PCSK9 concentrations by 28% (p=0.05 in healthy volunteers and by 34% (p=0.001 in OffT2D patients. In another independent study, 6-day HFruc2 diet increased plasma PCSK9 levels by 93% (p Conclusions Plasma PCSK9 concentrations vary

  17. The fate of chylomicron cholesterol in the rat. 1. research into the storing of chylomicrons (1961)

    Rats conditioned to take their dally meal between midnight and 2 a.m. are given at midnight, by stomach tubing, 0,5 mg 4-14C-cholesterol, and are sacrificed in the following hours. During the most active phase of intestinal absorption, specific radioactivities of free and esterified liver cholesterol and of serum cholesterol are practically equal. Consequently, captation of absorbed cholesterol by the liver is not detectable. The results obtained exclude, on the other hand, the possibility that the lungs might play a similar role. The problem of the fate of chylomicron cholesterol is discussed. In order to avoid any ambiguity in this discussion, we have determined the concentration and specific radioactivity of free and esterified cholesterol in chylomicrons and lymph obtained by continuous drainage of chyle. 5 p. 100 of the radioactive cholesterol of chyle are found in lymph: in chylomicrons, the radioactivity of free cholesterol is higher than that of esterified cholesterol. (authors)

  18. Cholesterol transfer from normal and atherogenic low density lipoproteins to Mycoplasma membranes

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the free cholesterol of hypercholesterolemic low density lipoprotein from cholesterol-fed nonhuman primates has a greater potential for surface transfer to cell membranes than does the free cholesterol of normal low density lipoprotein. The low density lipoproteins were isolated from normal and hypercholesterolemic rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys, incubated with membranes from Acholeplasma laidlawii, a mycoplasma species devoid of cholesterol in its membranes, and the mass transfer of free cholesterol determined by measuring membrane cholesterol content. Since these membranes neither synthesize nor esterify cholesterol, nor degrade the protein or cholesterol ester moieties of low density lipoprotein, they are an ideal model with which to study differences in the cholesterol transfer potential of low density lipoprotein independent of the uptake of the intact low density lipoprotein particle. These studies indicate that, even though there are marked differences in the cholesterol composition of normal and hypercholesterolemic low density lipoproteins, this does not result in a greater chemical potential for surface transfer of free cholesterol. Consequently, if a difference in the surface transfer of free cholesterol is responsible for the enhanced ability of hypercholesterolemic low density lipoprotein to promote cellular cholesterol accumulation and, perhaps, also atherosclerosis, it must be the result of differences in the interaction to the hypercholesterolemic low density lipoprotein with the more complicated mammalian cell membranes, rather than differences in the chemical potential for cholesterol transfer

  19. Influence of molecular packing and phospholipid type on rates of cholesterol exchange

    The rates of [14C]cholesterol transfer from small unilamellar vesicles containing cholesterol dissolved in bilayers of different phospholipids have been determined to examine the influence of phospholipid-cholesterol interactions on the rate of cholesterol desorption from the lipid-water interface. At 370C, for vesicles containing 10 mol % cholesterol, the half-times for exchange are about 1, 13, and 80 h, respectively, for unsaturated PC, saturated PC, and SM. In order to probe how differences in molecular packing in the bilayers cause the rate constants for cholesterol desorption to be in the order unsaturated PC > saturated PC > SM, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and monolayer methods were used to evaluate the cholesterol physical state and interactions with phospholipid. The NMR relaxation parameters for [4-13C] cholesterol reveal no differences in molecular dynamics in the above bilayers. The greater van der Waals interaction in the SM monolayer (or bilayer) compared to PC gives rise to a larger condensation by cholesterol. This is a direct demonstration of the greater interaction of cholesterol with SM compared to PC. An estimate of the van der Waals interactions between cholesterol and these phospholipids has been used to derive a relationship between the ratio of the rate constants for cholesterol desorption and the relative molecular areas (lateral packing density) in two bilayers. This analysis suggests that differences in cholesterol-phospholipid van der Waals interaction energy are an important cause of varying rates of cholesterol exchange from different host phospholipid bilayers

  20. Effects of Lowering LDL Cholesterol on Progression of Kidney Disease

    Haynes, Richard; Lewis, David; Emberson, Jonathan;

    2014-01-01

    Lowering LDL cholesterol reduces the risk of developing atherosclerotic events in CKD, but the effects of such treatment on progression of kidney disease remain uncertain. Here, 6245 participants with CKD (not on dialysis) were randomly assigned to simvastatin (20 mg) plus ezetimibe (10 mg) daily...... or matching placebo. The main prespecified renal outcome was ESRD (defined as the initiation of maintenance dialysis or kidney transplantation). During 4.8 years of follow-up, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe resulted in an average LDL cholesterol difference (SEM) of 0.96 (0.02) mmol.......2%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.01; P=0.09). Exploratory analyses also showed no significant effect on the rate of change in eGFR. Lowering LDL cholesterol by 1 mmol/L did not slow kidney disease progression within 5 years in a wide range of patients with CKD....

  1. biosynthesis of extracellular cholesterol oxidase by irradiated streptomyces species

    streptomyces sp.culture produced extracellular cholesterol oxidase (COD)at favorable conditions (o.5 g/L cholesterol. 200 Gy, 300 C, ph 7 and 100 r.p.m) at the end of 6 days incubation period. an extracellular enzyme activity (cholesterol degradation %) of 95.36 was achieved during the stationary phase, a specific activity of 1.34 e.u was possible by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, 1.7 by ultrafiltration and 4.1 E.U/mg protein by sephadex G100 column . COD was stable over a ph range of 6-9 for 1 h .at 300C, the enzyme was also stable up 400C it retained 95.4% of the original activity but when heated up to 500C for 1 h it retained only 65% of the original activity

  2. High levels of confusion for cholesterol awareness campaigns.

    Hall, Danika V

    2008-09-15

    Earlier this year, two industry-sponsored advertising campaigns for cholesterol awareness that target the general public were launched in Australia. These campaigns aimed to alert the public to the risks associated with having high cholesterol and encouraged cholesterol testing for wider groups than those specified by the National Heart Foundation. General practitioners should be aware of the potential for the two campaigns to confuse the general public as to who should be tested, and where. The campaign sponsors (Unilever Australasia and Pfizer) each have the potential to benefit by increased market share for their products, and increased profits. These disease awareness campaigns are examples of what is increasingly being termed "condition branding" by pharmaceutical marketing experts. PMID:18803537

  3. The Observation of Highly Ordered Domains in Membranes with Cholesterol

    Armstrong, Clare L [McMaster University; Marquardt, Drew [Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada; Dies, Hannah [McMaster University; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Yamani, Zahra [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, National Research Council, Chalk River Laboratorie; Harroun, Thad [Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL; Shi, A-C [McMaster University; Rheinstadter, Maikel C [McMaster University

    2013-01-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano- or mesoscopic structures in the exoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane, and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes. Using neutron diffraction and computer modelling, we present evidence for the existence of highly ordered lipid domains in the cholesterol-rich (32.5 mol%) liquid-ordered (lo) phase of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes. The liquid ordered phase in one-component lipid membranes has previously been thought to be a homogeneous phase. The presence of highly ordered lipid domains embedded in a disordered lipid matrix implies non-uniform distribution of cholesterol between the two phases. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with recent computer simulations of DPPC/cholesterol complexes [Meinhardt, Vink and Schmid (2013). Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110(12): 4476 4481], which reported the existence of nanometer size lo domains in a liquid disordered lipid environment.

  4. Synthesis of the oxysterol, 24(S), 25-epoxycholesterol, parallels cholesterol production and may protect against cellular accumulation of newly-synthesized cholesterol

    Brown Andrew J; Quinn Carmel M; Wong Jenny

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Aim The effects of 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol (24,25EC) on aspects of cholesterol homeostasis is well-documented. When added to cells, 24,25EC decreases cholesterol synthesis and up-regulates cholesterol efflux genes, including ABCA1. Synthesis of 24,25EC occurs in a shunt of the mevalonate pathway which also produces cholesterol. Therefore, 24,25EC synthesis should be subject to the same negative feedback regulation as cholesterol synthesis. To date, no role has been ascribed to 24,2...

  5. Electrical load detection aparatus

    2010-01-01

    A load detection technique for a load comprising multiple frequency-dependant sub-loads comprises measuring a representation of the impedance characteristic of the load; providing stored representations of a multiplicity of impedance characteristics of the load; each one of the stored representat...

  6. Preparation of a Polypyrrole-Polyvinylsulphonate Composite Film Biosensor for Determination of Cholesterol Based on Entrapment of Cholesterol Oxidase

    Ahmet Yaşar

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel amperometric cholesterol biosensor with immobilization of cholesterol oxidase on electrochemically polymerized polypyrrole–polyvinylsulphonate (PPy–PVS films has been accomplished via the entrapment technique on the surface of a platinum electrode. Electropolymerization of pyrrole and polyvinylsulphonate on the Pt surface was carried out by cyclic voltammetry between -1.0 and +2.0 V (vs. Ag/AgCl at a scan rate of 100 mV upon the Pt electrode with an electrochemical cell containing pyrrole and polyvinylsulphonate. The amperometric determination is based on the electrochemical detection of H2O2 generated in the enzymatic reaction of cholesterol. Determination of cholesterol was carried out by the oxidation of enzymatically produced H2O2 at 0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The effects of pH and temperature were investigated and optimum parameters were found to be 7.25 and 35 °C, respectively. The storage stability and operational stability of the enzyme electrode were also studied. The results show that 32% of the response current was retained after 19 activity assays. The prepared cholesterol biosensor retained 43% of initial activity after 45 days when stored in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution at 4 °C.

  7. Intracellular cholesterol transport proteins enhance hydrolysis of HDL-CEs and facilitate elimination of cholesterol into bile.

    Wang, Jing; Bie, Jinghua; Ghosh, Shobha

    2016-09-01

    While HDL-associated unesterified or free cholesterol (FC) is thought to be rapidly secreted into the bile, the fate of HDL-associated cholesteryl esters (HDL-CEs) that represent >80% of HDL-cholesterol, is only beginning to be understood. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that intracellular cholesterol transport proteins [sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) and fatty acid binding protein-1 (FABP1)] not only facilitate CE hydrolase-mediated hydrolysis of HDL-CEs, but also enhance elimination of cholesterol into bile. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of FABP1 or SCP2 in primary hepatocytes significantly increased hydrolysis of HDL-[(3)H]CE, reduced resecretion of HDL-CE-derived FC as nascent HDL, and increased its secretion as bile acids. Consistently, the flux of [(3)H]cholesterol from HDL-[(3)H]CE to biliary bile acids was increased by overexpression of SCP2 or FABP1 in vivo and reduced in SCP2(-/-) mice. Increased flux of HDL-[(3)H]CE to biliary FC was noted with FABP1 overexpression and in SCP2(-/-) mice that have increased FABP1 expression. Lack of a significant decrease in the flux of HDL-[(3)H]CE to biliary FC or bile acids in FABP1(-/-) mice indicates the likely compensation of its function by an as yet unidentified mechanism. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that FABP1 and SCP2 facilitate the preferential movement of HDL-CEs to bile for final elimination. PMID:27381048

  8. Urotensin II promotes atherosclerosis in cholesterol-fed rabbits.

    Yafeng Li

    Full Text Available Urotensin II (UII is a vasoactive peptide composed of 11 amino acids that has been implicated to contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether UII affects the development of atherosclerosis in cholesterol-fed rabbits. UII was infused for 16 weeks through an osmotic mini-pump into male Japanese White rabbits fed on a high-cholesterol diet. Plasma lipids and body weight were measured every 4 weeks. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions along with cellular components, collagen fibers, matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -9 were examined. Moreover, vulnerability index of atherosclerotic plaques was evaluated. UII infusion significantly increased atherosclerotic lesions within the entire aorta by 21% over the control (P = 0.013. Atherosclerotic lesions were increased by 24% in the aortic arch (P = 0.005, 11% in the thoracic aorta (P = 0.054 and 18% in the abdominal aorta (P = 0.035. These increases occurred without changes in plasma levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides or body weight. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that macrophages and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were significantly enhanced by 2.2-fold and 1.6-fold in UII group. In vitro studies demonstrated that UII up-regulated the expression of vascular cell adhesion protein-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, which was inhibited by the UII receptor antagonist urantide. In conclusion, our results showed that UII promotes the development of atherosclerotic lesions and destabilizes atherosclerotic plaques in cholesterol-fed rabbits.

  9. Ezetimibe Promotes Brush Border Membrane-to-Lumen Cholesterol Efflux in the Small Intestine

    Nakano, Takanari; Inoue, Ikuo; Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Ono, Hiraku; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya; Murakoshi, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Ezetimibe inhibits Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), an apical membrane cholesterol transporter of enterocytes, thereby reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption. This treatment also increases extrahepatic reverse cholesterol transport via an undefined mechanism. To explore this, we employed a trans-intestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) assay, which directly detects circulation-to-intestinal lumen 3H-cholesterol transit in a cannulated jejunal segment, and found an increase of TICE by 45%. To examine whether such increase in efflux occurs at the intestinal brush border membrane(BBM)-level, we performed luminal perfusion assays, similar to TICE but the jejunal wall was labelled with orally-given 3H-cholesterol, and determined elevated BBM-to-lumen cholesterol efflux by 3.5-fold with ezetimibe. Such increased efflux probably promotes circulation-to-lumen cholesterol transit eventually; thus increases TICE. Next, we wondered how inhibition of NPC1L1, an influx transporter, resulted in increased efflux. When we traced orally-given 3H-cholesterol in mice, we found that lumen-to-BBM 3H-cholesterol transit was rapid and less sensitive to ezetimibe treatment. Comparison of the efflux and fractional cholesterol absorption revealed an inverse correlation, indicating the efflux as an opposite-regulatory factor for cholesterol absorption efficiency and counteracting to the naturally-occurring rapid cholesterol influx to the BBM. These suggest that the ezetimibe-stimulated increased efflux is crucial in reducing cholesterol absorption. Ezetimibe-induced increase in cholesterol efflux was approximately 2.5-fold greater in mice having endogenous ATP-binding cassette G5/G8 heterodimer, the major sterol efflux transporter of enterocytes, than the knockout counterparts, suggesting that the heterodimer confers additional rapid BBM-to-lumen cholesterol efflux in response to NPC1L1 inhibition. The observed framework for intestinal cholesterol fluxes may provide ways to modulate the flux

  10. Implications of the obesity epidemic for lipid-lowering therapy: Non-HDL cholesterol should replace LDL cholesterol as the primary therapeutic target

    Michel R Hoenig

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Michel R HoenigRoyal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Herston, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes are conditions with increasing prevalence around the world. Cardiovascular risk in diabetics is often so high as to overlap with event rates observed in those with established coronary disease and this has lead to diabetes being classified as a coronary risk equivalent. However, despite the elevated risk of cardiovascular events associated with diabetes and the metabolic syndrome, these patients often have normal low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol despite frequent increases in apolipoprotein B, triglycerides and nonhigh density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol. In contrast to LDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol represents cardiovascular risk across all patient populations but is currently only recommended as a secondary target of therapy by the ATP III report for patients with hypertriglyceridemia. This article provides an overview of the studies that shown non-HDL cholesterol to be superior to LDL cholesterol in predicting cardiovascular events and presents the case for non-HDL cholesterol being the more appropriate primary target of therapy in the context of the obesity pandemic. Adopting non-HDL cholesterol as the primary therapeutic target for all patients will conceivably lead to an appropriate intensification of therapy for high risk patients with low LDL cholesterol.Keywords: obesity, coronary artery disease, non-HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, metabolic syndrome, diabetes

  11. Cholesterol gallstone disease: focusing on the role of gallbladder.

    Chen, Yongsheng; Kong, Jing; Wu, Shuodong

    2015-02-01

    Gallstone disease (GSD) is one of the most common biliary tract diseases worldwide in which both genetic and environmental factors have roles in its pathogenesis. Biliary cholesterol supersaturation from metabolic defects in the liver is traditionally seen as the main pathogenic factor. Recently, there have been renewed investigative interests in the downstream events that occur in gallbladder lithogenesis. This article focuses on the role of the gallbladder in the pathogenesis of cholesterol GSD (CGD). Various conditions affecting the crystallization process are discussed, such as gallbladder motility, concentrating function, lipid transport, and an imbalance between pro-nucleating and nucleation inhibiting proteins. PMID:25502177

  12. Orbitofrontal cholesterol granuloma: percutaneous endoscopic-assisted curettage.

    Selva, Dinesh; Lai, Tze; Krishnan, Suren

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes the use of endoscopic visualization in curettage of orbital cholesterol granuloma (OCG). Two males aged 54 and 50 years presented with orbitofrontal cholesterol granulomas arising in the superolateral frontal bone and abutting the dura. The granulomas were approached via a superior eyelid crease incision and a 70 degree rigid endoscope was used to visualize curettage of the granuloma from the inner surface of the frontal bone and the dura. Both patients made an uncomplicated recovery and there was no recurrence at eight months and two years follow up. Percutaneous endoscopic curettage is an alternative to blind curettage, lateral orbitotomy or frontal craniotomy for OCG. PMID:14670153

  13. Two cholesterol derivative-based PEGylated liposomes as drug delivery system, study on pharmacokinetics and drug delivery to retina

    Geng, Shengyong; Yang, Bin; Wang, Guowu; Qin, Geng; Wada, Satoshi; Wang, Jin-Ye

    2014-07-01

    In this study, two cholesterol derivatives, (4-cholesterocarbonyl-4‧-(N,N,N-triethylamine butyloxyl bromide) azobenzene (CAB) and 4-cholesterocarbonyl-4‧-(N,N-diethylamine butyloxyl) azobenzene (ACB), one of which is positively charged while the other is neutral, were synthesized and incorporated with phospholipids and cholesterol to form doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposomes. PEGylation was achieved by including 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatiylethanol-amine-N-[methoxy-(polyethylene glycol)-2000 (DSPE-PEG2000). Our results showed that PEGylated liposomes displayed significantly improved stability and the drug leakage was decreased compared to the non-PEGylated ones in vitro. The in vivo study with rats also revealed that the pharmacokinetics and circulation half-life of DOX were significantly improved when liposomes were PEGylated (p cholesterol derivative ACB played some role in improving liposomes’ stability in systemic circulation compared to the conventional PC liposome and the positively charged CAB liposome, with or without PEGylation. In addition, in the case of local drug delivery, the positively charged PEG-liposome not only delivered much more of the drug into the rats’ retinas (p , but also maintained much longer drug retention time compared to the neutral PEGylated liposomes.

  14. Distribution load estimation (DLE)

    Seppaelae, A.; Lehtonen, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-08-01

    The load research has produced customer class load models to convert the customers` annual energy consumption to hourly load values. The reliability of load models applied from a nation-wide sample is limited in any specific network because many local circumstances are different from utility to utility and time to time. Therefore there is a need to find improvements to the load models or, in general, improvements to the load estimates. In Distribution Load Estimation (DLE) the measurements from the network are utilized to improve the customer class load models. The results of DLE will be new load models that better correspond to the loading of the distribution network but are still close to the original load models obtained by load research. The principal data flow of DLE is presented

  15. Remnant Cholesterol, Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, and Blood Pressure as Mediators From Obesity to Ischemic Heart Disease

    Varbo, Anette; Benn, Marianne; Smith, George Davey;

    2015-01-01

    lipoproteins, blood pressure, glucose, and C-reactive protein. METHODS AND RESULTS: Approximately 90 000 participants from Copenhagen were included in a Mendelian randomization design with mediation analyses. Associations were examined using conventional measurements of body mass index and intermediate...... pressure, and possibly also through elevated nonfasting glucose levels; however, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated C-reactive protein levels were not mediators in genetic analyses. The 3 intermediate variables that explained the highest excess risk of IHD from genetically determined...... obesity were low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with 8%, systolic blood pressure with 7%, and remnant cholesterol with 7% excess risk of IHD. Corresponding observational excess risks using conventional body mass index were 21%, 11%, and 20%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The increased IHD risk because of...

  16. IMB2026791, a Xanthone, Stimulates Cholesterol Efflux by Increasing the Binding of Apolipoprotein A-I to ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1

    Zijian Xie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 plays a major role in cholesterol homeostasis and high density lipoprotein (HDL metabolism. Several laboratories have demonstrated that ABCA1 binding to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I will mediate the assembly of nascent HDL and cellular cholesterol efflux, which suggests a possible receptor-ligand interaction between ABCA1 and apoA-I. In this study, a cell-based-ELISA-like high-throughput screening (HTS method was developed to identify the synthetic and natural compounds that can regulate binding activity of ABCA1 to apoA-I. The cell-based-ELISA-like high-throughput screen was conducted in a 96-well format using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells stably transfected with ABCA1 pIRE2-EGFP (Enhanced Green Fluorecence Protein expression vector and the known ABCA1 inhibitor glibenclamide as the antagonist control. From 2,600 compounds, a xanthone compound (IMB 2026791 was selected using this HTS assay, and it was proved as an apoA-I binding agonist to ABCA1 by a flow cytometry assay and western blot analysis. The [3H] cholesterol efflux assay of IMB2026791 treated ABCA1-CHO cells and PMA induced THP-1 macrophages (human acute monocytic leukemia cell further confirmed the compound as an accelerator of cholesterol efflux in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 25.23 μM.

  17. Acute abdomen

    Acute abdomen may be connected with the injury of one of the internal organs, injury of large blood vessels, with the spreading of pains from some other area. It may also be a manifestation of systemic disease or poisoning. The main purposes of radiodiagnosis are: determination of the cause of clinical syndrome; determination of the localization and spreading of pathological changes in abdominal organs; finding out the character of complications. If the data of the ordinary roentgenological investiagtion and isn't complete, the computer tomography of abdominal and pelvic cavities is needed

  18. Distribution load estimation - DLE

    Seppaelae, A. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The load research project has produced statistical information in the form of load models to convert the figures of annual energy consumption to hourly load values. The reliability of load models is limited to a certain network because many local circumstances are different from utility to utility and time to time. Therefore there is a need to make improvements in the load models. Distribution load estimation (DLE) is the method developed here to improve load estimates from the load models. The method is also quite cheap to apply as it utilises information that is already available in SCADA systems

  19. Longitudinal Trajectories of Cholesterol from Midlife through Late Life according to Apolipoprotein E Allele Status

    Brian Downer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous research indicates that total cholesterol levels increase with age during young adulthood and middle age and decline with age later in life. This is attributed to changes in diet, body composition, medication use, physical activity, and hormone levels. In the current study we utilized data from the Framingham Heart Study Original Cohort to determine if variations in apolipoprotein E (APOE, a gene involved in regulating cholesterol homeostasis, influence trajectories of total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and total: HDL cholesterol ratio from midlife through late life. Methods: Cholesterol trajectories from midlife through late life were modeled using generalized additive mixed models and mixed-effects regression models. Results: APOE e2+ subjects had lower total cholesterol levels, higher HDL cholesterol levels, and lower total: HDL cholesterol ratios from midlife to late life compared to APOE e3 and APOE e4+ subjects. Statistically significant differences in life span cholesterol trajectories according to gender and use of cholesterol-lowering medications were also detected. Conclusion: The findings from this research provide evidence that variations in APOE modify trajectories of serum cholesterol from midlife to late life. In order to efficiently modify cholesterol through the life span, it is important to take into account APOE allele status.

  20. Cholesterol efflux monitoring in macrophage form cells by using fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Song, Young Sik; Lee, Sang Hak; Park, Byoung Hee; Kim, Soo Hyeok; Hwang, Won Sang; Kim, Dug Young

    2015-03-01

    Macrophages play a key role in atherosclerotic plaque destabilization and rupture, since they accumulate large amounts of lipid through the uptake of modified lipoproteins which results in foam cell formation. Cholesterol efflux is the process of removing cholesterol from macrophages in the subintima of the vessel wall, and efflux mechanism in a cell is one of the critical issues for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. High density lipoproteins (HDL) stimulate cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells in the arterial wall. Radioisotope-labeled cholesterol analysis method is well known conventional method for observing cholesterol efflux. The major drawback of this method is its long and complicated process. Fluorescence intensity imaging schemes are replacing the radioisotope-labeled method in recent years for cholesterol efflux monitoring. Various spectroscopic methods are also adapted for cholesterol efflux imaging. Here we present a fluorescence lifetime imaging method for more quantitative observation of cholesterol efflux process in macrophages, which enables us to observe cholesterol level changes with various conditions. We used J774 macrophage cell and 25-NBD-cholesterol which is a famous cholesterol specific dye. Our lifetime imaging results clearly show cholesterol efflux rate very effectively. We believe that fluorescence lifetime analysis is new and very powerful for cholesterol imaging or monitoring.