WorldWideScience

Sample records for acute brain injury

  1. Interleukin-1 and acute brain injury

    Katie N Murray

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is the key host-defense response to infection and injury, yet also a major contributor to a diverse range of diseases, both peripheral and central in origin. Brain injury as a result of stroke or trauma is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, yet there are no effective treatments, resulting in enormous social and economic costs. Increasing evidence, both preclinical and clinical, highlights inflammation as an important factor in stroke, both in determining outcome and as a contributor to risk. A number of inflammatory mediators have been proposed as key targets for intervention to reduce the burden of stroke, several reaching clinical trial, but as yet yielding no success. Many factors could explain these failures, including the lack of robust preclinical evidence and poorly designed clinical trials, in addition to the complex nature of the clinical condition. Lack of consideration in preclinical studies of associated co-morbidities prevalent in the clinical stroke population is now seen as an important omission in previous work. These co-morbidities (atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, infection have a strong inflammatory component, supporting the need for greater understanding of how inflammation contributes to acute brain injury. Interleukin (IL-1 is the prototypical pro-inflammatory cytokine, first identified many years ago as the endogenous pyrogen. Research over the last 20 years or so reveals that IL-1 is an important mediator of neuronal injury and blocking the actions of IL-1 is beneficial in a number of experimental models of brain damage. Mechanisms underlying the actions of IL-1 in brain injury remain unclear, though increasing evidence indicates the cerebrovasculature as a key target. Recent literature supporting this and other aspects of how IL-1 and systemic inflammation in general contribute to acute brain injury are discussed in this review.

  2. Electrophysiologic monitoring in acute brain injury.

    Claassen, Jan; Vespa, Paul

    2014-12-01

    To determine the optimal use and indications of electroencephalography (EEG) in critical care management of acute brain injury (ABI). An electronic literature search was conducted for articles in English describing electrophysiological monitoring in ABI from January 1990 to August 2013. A total of 165 studies were included. EEG is a useful monitor for seizure and ischemia detection. There is a well-described role for EEG in convulsive status epilepticus and cardiac arrest (CA). Data suggest EEG should be considered in all patients with ABI and unexplained and persistent altered consciousness and in comatose intensive care unit (ICU) patients without an acute primary brain condition who have an unexplained impairment of mental status. There remain uncertainties about certain technical details, e.g., the minimum duration of EEG studies, the montage, and electrodes. Data obtained from both EEG and EP studies may help estimate prognosis in ABI patients, particularly following CA and traumatic brain injury. Data supporting these recommendations is sparse, and high quality studies are needed. EEG is used to monitor and detect seizures and ischemia in ICU patients and indications for EEG are clear for certain disease states, however, uncertainty remains on other applications. PMID:25208668

  3. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    GregoryAElder

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI. The β-amyloid (Aβ peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in experimental animal models of nbTBI. We examined levels of brain Aβ following experimental blast injury using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for Aβ 40 and 42. In both rat and mouse models of blast injury, rather than being increased, endogenous rodent brain Aβ levels were decreased acutely following injury. Levels of the amyloid precursor protein (APP were increased following blast exposure although there was no evidence of axonal pathology based on APP immunohistochemical staining. Unlike the findings in nbTBI animal models, levels of the β-secretase, BACE-1, and the γ-secretase component presenilin-1 were unchanged following blast exposure. These studies have implications for understanding the nature of blast injury to the brain. They also suggest that strategies aimed at lowering Aβ production may not be effective for treating acute blast injury to the brain.

  4. Optimizing sedation in patients with acute brain injury

    Oddo, Mauro; Crippa, Ilaria Alice; Mehta, Sangeeta; Menon, David; Payen, Jean-Francois; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Citerio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Daily interruption of sedative therapy and limitation of deep sedation have been shown in several randomized trials to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay, and to improve the outcome of critically ill patients. However, patients with severe acute brain injury (ABI; including subjects with coma after traumatic brain injury, ischaemic/haemorrhagic stroke, cardiac arrest, status epilepticus) were excluded from these studies. Therefore, whether the new paradi...

  5. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    GregoryAElder; MiguelA.Gama Sosa; RitaDe Gasperi; MichaelCShaughness; StevenTDeKosky; SamGandy; MadhusoodanaPNambiar; JohnWSteele

    2012-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI). The β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in ...

  6. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    De Gasperi, Rita; Gama Sosa, Miguel A; Kim, Soong Ho; Steele, John W.; Shaughness, Michael C; Maudlin-Jeronimo, Eric; Hall, Aaron A.; DeKosky, Steven T.; McCarron, Richard M; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P.; Gandy, Sam; Ahlers, Stephen T.; Elder, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI). The β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in exper...

  7. Nonlinear Dynamic Theory of Acute Cell Injuries and Brain Ischemia

    Taha, Doaa; Anggraini, Fika; Degracia, Donald; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia in the form of stroke and cardiac arrest brain damage affect over 1 million people per year in the USA alone. In spite of close to 200 clinical trials and decades of research, there are no treatments to stop post-ischemic neuron death. We have argued that a major weakness of current brain ischemia research is lack of a deductive theoretical framework of acute cell injury to guide empirical studies. A previously published autonomous model based on the concept of nonlinear dynamic network was shown to capture important facets of cell injury, linking the concept of therapeutic to bistable dynamics. Here we present an improved, non-autonomous formulation of the nonlinear dynamic model of cell injury that allows multiple acute injuries over time, thereby allowing simulations of both therapeutic treatment and preconditioning. Our results are connected to the experimental data of gene expression and proteomics of neuron cells. Importantly, this new model may be construed as a novel approach to pharmacodynamics of acute cell injury. The model makes explicit that any pro-survival therapy is always a form of sub-lethal injury. This insight is expected to widely influence treatment of acute injury conditions that have defied successful treatment to date. This work is supported by NIH NINDS (NS081347) and Wayne State University President's Research Enhancement Award.

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome assessment after traumatic brain injury

    Shahrooz Kazemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is one of the most important complications associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI. ARDS is caused by inflammation of the lungs and hypoxic damage with lung physiology abnormalities associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Aim of this study is to determine the epidemiology of ARDS and the prevalence of risk factors. Methods: This prospective study performed on patients with acute traumatic head injury hospitalization in the intensive care unit of the Shohaday-e Haftom-e-Tir Hospital (September 2012 to September 2013 done. About 12 months, the data were evaluated. Information including age, sex, education, employment, drug and alcohol addiction, were collected and analyzed. The inclusion criteria were head traumatic patients and exclusion was the patients with chest trauma. Questionnaire was designed with doctors supervision of neurosurgery. Then the collected data were analysis. Results: In this study, the incidence of ARDS was 23.8% and prevalence of metabolic acidosis was 31.4%. Most injury with metabolic acidosis was Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH 48 (60% and Subdural hemorrhage (SDH was Next Level with 39 (48% Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS were significantly decreased (P< 0.0001. The level of consciousness in patients with skull fractures significantly lower than those without fractures (P= 0.009 [(2.3±4.6 vs (4.02±7.07]. Prevalence of metabolic acidosis during hospitalization was 80 patients (31.4%. Conclusion: Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Management and treatment is essential to reduce the mortality. In this study it was found the age of patients with ARDS was higher than patients without complications. ARDS risk factor for high blood pressure was higher in men. Most victims were pedestrians. The most common injury associated with ARDS was SDH. Our analysis

  9. Effort test performance in clinical acute brain injury, community brain injury, and epilepsy populations.

    Hampson, Natalie E; Kemp, Steven; Coughlan, Anthony K; Moulin, Chris J A; Bhakta, Bipin B

    2014-01-01

    Effort tests have become commonplace within medico-legal and forensic contexts and their use is rising within clinical settings. It is recognized that some patients may fail effort tests due to cognitive impairment and not because of poor effort. However, investigation of the base rate of failure among clinical populations other than dementia is limited. Forty-seven clinical participants were recruited and comprised three subgroups: acute brain injury (N = 11), community brain injury (N = 20), and intractable epilepsy (N = 16). Base rates of failure on the Word Memory Test (WMT; Green, 2003 ) and six other less well-validated measures were investigated. A significant minority of patients failed effort tests according to standard cutoff scores, particularly patients with severe traumatic brain injury and marked frontal-executive features. The WMT was able to identify failures associated with significant cognitive impairment through the application of profile analysis and/or lowered cutoff levels. Implications for clinical assessment, effort test interpretation, and future research are discussed. PMID:25084843

  10. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P. [Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Servico de Neurocirurgia]. E-mail: centro@cerebroecoluna.com.br; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Neurologicas; Andrade, Almir F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Neurocirurgia da Emergencia

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  11. Optimizing sedation in patients with acute brain injury.

    Oddo, Mauro; Crippa, Ilaria Alice; Mehta, Sangeeta; Menon, David; Payen, Jean-Francois; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Citerio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Daily interruption of sedative therapy and limitation of deep sedation have been shown in several randomized trials to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay, and to improve the outcome of critically ill patients. However, patients with severe acute brain injury (ABI; including subjects with coma after traumatic brain injury, ischaemic/haemorrhagic stroke, cardiac arrest, status epilepticus) were excluded from these studies. Therefore, whether the new paradigm of minimal sedation can be translated to the neuro-ICU (NICU) is unclear. In patients with ABI, sedation has 'general' indications (control of anxiety, pain, discomfort, agitation, facilitation of mechanical ventilation) and 'neuro-specific' indications (reduction of cerebral metabolic demand, improved brain tolerance to ischaemia). Sedation also is an essential therapeutic component of intracranial pressure therapy, targeted temperature management and seizure control. Given the lack of large trials which have evaluated clinically relevant endpoints, sedative selection depends on the effect of each agent on cerebral and systemic haemodynamics. Titration and withdrawal of sedation in the NICU setting has to be balanced between the risk that interrupting sedation might exacerbate brain injury (e.g. intracranial pressure elevation) and the potential benefits of enhanced neurological function and reduced complications. In this review, we provide a concise summary of cerebral physiologic effects of sedatives and analgesics, the advantages/disadvantages of each agent, the comparative effects of standard sedatives (propofol and midazolam) and the emerging role of alternative drugs (ketamine). We suggest a pragmatic approach for the use of sedation-analgesia in the NICU, focusing on some practical aspects, including optimal titration and management of sedation withdrawal according to ABI severity. PMID:27145814

  12. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries.

  13. Pharmacotherapy in rehabilitation of post-acute traumatic brain injury.

    Bhatnagar, Saurabha; Iaccarino, Mary Alexis; Zafonte, Ross

    2016-06-01

    There are nearly 1.8 million annual emergency room visits and over 289,000 annual hospitalizations related to traumatic brain injury (TBI). The goal of this review article is to highlight pharmacotherapies that we often use in the clinic that have been shown to benefit various sequelae of TBI. We have decided to focus on sequelae that we commonly encounter in our practice in the post-acute phase after a TBI. These symptoms are hyper-arousal, agitation, hypo-arousal, inattention, slow processing speed, memory impairment, sleep disturbance, depression, headaches, spasticity, and paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity. In this review article, the current literature for the pharmacological management of these symptoms are mentioned, including medications that have not had success and some ongoing trials. It is clear that the pharmacological management specific to those with TBI is often based on small studies and that often treatment is based on assumptions of how similar conditions are managed when not relating to TBI. As the body of the literature expands and targeted treatments start to emerge for TBI, the function of pharmacological management will need to be further defined. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. PMID:26801831

  14. Diagnostic value of low-field MRI for acute poisoning brain injury

    Objective: To investigate the value of low-field MIR in diagnosis of acute CO poisoning brain injury. Methods: The brain MIR and clinical data of 110 patients with acute CO poisoning brain injury confirmed by clinical examination were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Long T1 and T2 signal intensity was showed on MRI in cerebral hemispheres and globus pallidus symmetrically. There were three basic types of MIR manifestations, white matter of brain type, globus pallidus type and brain mixed type. Conclusions: MRI could be used for confirming the degree and range of acute CO poisoning brain injury. It has important clinical value in the diagnosis, staging and prognosis of patients with acute CO poisoning brain injury. (authors)

  15. Psychiatric Disease and Post-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Zgaljardic, Dennis J; Seale, Gary S; Schaefer, Lynn A; Temple, Richard O; Foreman, Jack; Elliott, Timothy R

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and can include depression, anxiety, and psychosis, as well as other maladaptive behaviors and personality changes. The epidemiologic data of psychiatric disorders post-TBI vary widely, although the incidence and prevalence rates typically are higher than in the general population. Although the experience of psychiatric symptoms may be temporary and may resolve in the acute period, many patients with TBI can experience psychopathology that is persistent or that develops in the post-acute period. Long-term psychiatric disorder, along with cognitive and physical sequelae and greater risk for substance use disorders, can pose a number of life-long challenges for patients and their caregivers, as they can interfere with participation in rehabilitation as well as limit functional independence in the community. The current review of the literature considers the common psychiatric problems affecting individuals with TBI in the post-acute period, including personality changes, psychosis, executive dysfunction, depression, anxiety, and substance misuse. Although treatment considerations (pharmacological and nonpharmacological) are referred to, an extensive description of such protocols is beyond the scope of the current review. The impact of persistent psychiatric symptoms on perceived caregiver burden and distress is also discussed. PMID:25629222

  16. Outcome of 2 284 cases with acute traumatic brain injury

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the prognosis of 2 284 cases with acute traumatic brain injury and discuss possible methods to improve the outcome of head injuries.   Methods: The relationship between trauma cause, trauma severity and management and patients outcome was retrospectively analyzed.   Results: Good recovery was achieved in 60.20%, moderate disability was 13.22%, severe disability 15.24%, vegetative status 0.31% and mortality 11.03%. The mortality was 1.07% in cases with GCS 15-13, 2.47% in cases with GCS 12-9, 13.29% in cases with GCS 8-6, and 57.4% in cases with GCS 5-3.   Conclusions: To prevent hypoxia, remove intracranial hematoma as soon as possible, use standard large traumatic craniotomy and apply mild hypothermia may be useful means for improving the outcome of severely head injured patients.

  17. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    Tong, Wu-song; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Jun-fa; Guo, Yi-jun; Zeng, Jing-song; Yang, Wen-jin; Li, Gao-yi; He, Bin; Yu, Hui [Pudong New Area People' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Shanghai (China)

    2011-05-15

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  18. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  19. Patients' and relatives' experience of difficulties following severe traumatic brain injury: the sub-acute stage

    Holm, Sara; Schönberger, Michael; Poulsen, Ingrid;

    2008-01-01

    The present study aimed to (1) identify the difficulties most frequently reported by individuals with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) at the time of discharge from a sub-acute rehabilitation brain injury unit as well as difficulties reported by their relatives, (2) compare patients' and...... relatives' reports of patient difficulties, and (3) explore the role of injury severity, disability and other factors on subjective experience of difficulties. The primary measure was the European Brain Injury Questionnaire (EBIQ) administered to patients and to one of their close relatives at discharge...

  20. Traumatic brain injury in children: acute care management.

    Geyer, Kristen; Meller, Karen; Kulpan, Carol; Mowery, Bernice D

    2013-01-01

    The care of the pediatric patient with a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an all-encompassing nursing challenge. Nursing vigilance is required to maintain a physiological balance that protects the injured brain. From the time a child and family first enter the hospital, they are met with the risk of potential death and an uncertain future. The family is subjected to an influx of complex medical and nursing terminology and interventions. Nurses need to understand the complexities of TBI and the modalities of treatment, as well as provide patients and families with support throughout all phases of care. PMID:24640314

  1. Systems biomarkers as acute diagnostics and chronic monitoring tools for traumatic brain injury

    Wang, Kevin K. W.; Moghieb, Ahmed; Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhiqun

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant biomedical problem among military personnel and civilians. There exists an urgent need to develop and refine biological measures of acute brain injury and chronic recovery after brain injury. Such measures "biomarkers" can assist clinicians in helping to define and refine the recovery process and developing treatment paradigms for the acutely injured to reduce secondary injury processes. Recent biomarker studies in the acute phase of TBI have highlighted the importance and feasibilities of identifying clinically useful biomarkers. However, much less is known about the subacute and chronic phases of TBI. We propose here that for a complex biological problem such as TBI, multiple biomarker types might be needed to harness the wide range of pathological and systemic perturbations following injuries, including acute neuronal death, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and neuroregeneration to systemic responses. In terms of biomarker types, they range from brain-specific proteins, microRNA, genetic polymorphism, inflammatory cytokines and autoimmune markers and neuro-endocrine hormones. Furthermore, systems biology-driven biomarkers integration can help present a holistic approach to understanding scenarios and complexity pathways involved in brain injury.

  2. An algorithm of neuroroentgenological examination of patients with acute brain injury

    Disadvantages in organization of neurotraumatologic aid to the population of St.Petersburg city are considered. Necessity of maximum optimization of the algorithm of neuroroentgenological examination of the patients with acute brain injury is marked. Experience in examination of the patients with brain injury at the Department of Radiation Diagnosis of St.Petersburg Medical Academy of Postgraduate. Training is described. Examination included the computerized tomography with the use of ultravist-300 (Shering, Germany), routine craniography was used as an additional technique

  3. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma / Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Current State and Emerging Prospects

    R, Namas; A, Ghuma; L, Hermus; R, Zamora; DO Okonkwo; TR, Billiar; Y, Vodovotz

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Inflammation is a finely tuned, dynamic, highly-regulated process that is not inherently detrimental, but rather required for immune surveillance, optimal post-injury tissue repair, and rege...

  4. Correlation of Computed Tomography findings with Glasgow Coma Scale in patients with acute traumatic brain injury

    SK Sah; ND Subedi; K. Poudel; Mallik, M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To correlate Computed Tomography (CT) findings with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury attending in Chitwan Medical College teaching hospital Chitwan, Nepal. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was performed among 50 patients of acute (less than24 hours) cases of craniocerebral trauma over a period of four months. The patient’s level of consciousness (GCS) was determined and a brain CT scan without contrast media was performed. A s...

  5. Uncoupling of the autonomic and cardiovascular systems in acute brain injury.

    Goldstein, B; Toweill, D; Lai, S; Sonnenthal, K; Kimberly, B

    1998-10-01

    We hypothesized that acute brain injury results in decreased heart rate (HR) variability and baroreflex sensitivity indicative of uncoupling of the autonomic and cardiovascular systems and that the degree of uncoupling should be proportional to the degree of neurological injury. We used HR and blood pressure (BP) power spectral analysis to measure neuroautonomic regulation of HR and BP and the transfer function magnitude (TF) between BP and HR as a measure of baroreflex modulation of HR. In 24 brain-injured patients [anoxic/ischemic injury (n = 7), multiple trauma (n = 6), head trauma (n = 5), central nervous system infection (n = 4), and intracranial hemorrhage (n = 2)], neurological injury and survival was associated with low-frequency (0.01-0.15 Hz) HR and BP power and TF. Brain-dead patients showed decreased low-frequency HR power [0. 51 +/- 0.36 (SE) vs. 2.54 +/- 0.14 beats/min2, P = 0.03] and TF [0. 61 +/- 0.16 (SE) vs. 1.29 +/- 0.07 beats . min-1 . mmHg-1, P = 0.05] compared with non-brain-dead patients. We conclude that 1) severity of neurological injury and outcome are inversely associated with HR and BP variability and 2) there is direct evidence for cardiovascular and autonomic uncoupling in acute brain injury with complete uncoupling during brain death. PMID:9756562

  6. Accelerated recovery from acute brain injuries: clinical efficacy of neurotrophic treatment in stroke and traumatic brain injuries.

    Bornstein, N; Poon, W S

    2012-04-01

    Stroke is one of the most devastating vascular diseases in the world as it is responsible for almost five million deaths per year. Almost 90% of all strokes are ischemic and mainly due to atherosclerosis, cardiac embolism and small-vessel disease. Intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage can lead to hemorrhagic stroke, which usually has the poorest prognosis. Cerebrolysin is a peptide preparation which mimics the action of a neurotrophic factor, protecting stroke-injured neurons and promoting neuroplasticity and neurogenesis. Cerebrolysin has been widely studied as a therapeutic tool for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, as well as traumatic brain injury. In ischemic stroke, Cerebrolysin given as an adjuvant therapy to antiplatelet and rheologically active medication resulted in accelerated improvement in global, neurological and motor functions, cognitive performance and activities of daily living. Cerebrolysin was also safe and well tolerated when administered in patients suffering from hemorrhagic stroke. Traumatic brain injury leads to transient or chronic impairments in physical, cognitive, emotional and behavioral functions. This is associated with deficits in the recognition of basic emotions, the capacity to interpret the mental states of others, and executive functioning. Pilot clinical studies with adjuvant Cerebrolysin in the acute and postacute phases of the injury have shown faster recovery, which translates into an earlier onset of rehabilitation and shortened hospitalization time. PMID:22514794

  7. Brain expression of the water channels Aquaporin-1 and -4 in mice with acute liver injury, hyperammonemia and brain edema

    Eefsen, Martin; Jelnes, Peter; Schmidt, Lars E;

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a feared complication to acute liver failure (ALF), but the pathogenesis is still poorly understood. The water channels Aquaporin-1 (Aqp1) and -4 (Aqp4) has been associated with brain edema formation in several neuropathological conditions, indicating a possible role of Aqp1 and....../or Aqp4 in ALF mediated brain edema. We induced acute liver injury and hyperammonemia in mice, to evaluate brain edema formation and the parallel expression of Aqp1 and Aqp4 in ALF. Liver injury and hyperammonemia were induced by +D-galactosamine (GLN) plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intraperitoneally and......(6266) (p <0.05), and stationary levels for Aqp1. Aqp1 and Aqp4 mRNA were stationary. This study indicates that Aqp4, but not Aqp1, may be of importance in the pathogenesis of cortical brain edema in mice with ALF....

  8. Neurosensory Symptom Complexes after Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Michael E Hoffer

    Full Text Available Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI is a prominent public health issue. To date, subjective symptom complaints primarily dictate diagnostic and treatment approaches. As such, the description and qualification of these symptoms in the mTBI patient population is of great value. This manuscript describes the symptoms of mTBI patients as compared to controls in a larger study designed to examine the use of vestibular testing to diagnose mTBI. Five symptom clusters were identified: Post-Traumatic Headache/Migraine, Nausea, Emotional/Affective, Fatigue/Malaise, and Dizziness/Mild Cognitive Impairment. Our analysis indicates that individuals with mTBI have headache, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction far out of proportion to those without mTBI. In addition, sleep disorders and emotional issues were significantly more common amongst mTBI patients than non-injured individuals. A simple set of questions inquiring about dizziness, headache, and cognitive issues may provide diagnostic accuracy. The consideration of other symptoms may be critical for providing prognostic value and treatment for best short-term outcomes or prevention of long-term complications.

  9. Neurosensory Symptom Complexes after Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Hoffer, Michael E; Szczupak, Mikhaylo; Kiderman, Alexander; Crawford, James; Murphy, Sara; Marshall, Kathryn; Pelusso, Constanza; Balaban, Carey

    2016-01-01

    Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) is a prominent public health issue. To date, subjective symptom complaints primarily dictate diagnostic and treatment approaches. As such, the description and qualification of these symptoms in the mTBI patient population is of great value. This manuscript describes the symptoms of mTBI patients as compared to controls in a larger study designed to examine the use of vestibular testing to diagnose mTBI. Five symptom clusters were identified: Post-Traumatic Headache/Migraine, Nausea, Emotional/Affective, Fatigue/Malaise, and Dizziness/Mild Cognitive Impairment. Our analysis indicates that individuals with mTBI have headache, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction far out of proportion to those without mTBI. In addition, sleep disorders and emotional issues were significantly more common amongst mTBI patients than non-injured individuals. A simple set of questions inquiring about dizziness, headache, and cognitive issues may provide diagnostic accuracy. The consideration of other symptoms may be critical for providing prognostic value and treatment for best short-term outcomes or prevention of long-term complications. PMID:26727256

  10. Intraoperative Targeted Temperature Management in Acute Brain and Spinal Cord Injury.

    Kraft, Jacqueline; Karpenko, Anna; Rincon, Fred

    2016-02-01

    Acute brain and spinal cord injuries affect hundreds of thousands of people worldwide. Though advances in pre-hospital and emergency and neurocritical care have improved the survival of some to these devastating diseases, very few clinical trials of potential neuro-protective strategies have produced promising results. Medical therapies such as targeted temperature management (TTM) have been trialed in traumatic brain injury (TBI), spinal cord injury (SCI), acute ischemic stroke (AIS), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), but in no study has a meaningful effect on outcome been demonstrated. To this end, patient selection for potential neuro-protective therapies such as TTM may be the most important factor to effectively demonstrate efficacy in clinical trials. The use of TTM as a strategy to treat and prevent secondary neuronal damage in the intraoperative setting is an area of ongoing investigation. In this review we will discuss recent and ongoing studies that address the role of TTM in combination with surgical approaches for different types of brain injury. PMID:26759319

  11. Acute decrease in alkaline phosphatase after brain injury: A potential mechanism for tauopathy.

    Arun, Peethambaran; Oguntayo, Samuel; Albert, Stephen Van; Gist, Irene; Wang, Ying; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Long, Joseph B

    2015-11-16

    Dephosphorylation of phosphorylated Tau (pTau) protein, which is essential for the preservation of neuronal microtubule assemblies and for protection against trauma-induced tauopathy and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), is primarily achieved in brain by tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). Paired helical filaments (PHFs) and Tau isolated from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients' brains have been shown to form microtubule assemblies with tubulin only after treatment with TNAP or protein phosphatase-2A, 2B and -1, suggesting that Tau protein in the PHFs of neurons in AD brain is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents microtubule assembly. Using blast or weight drop models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats, we observed pTau accumulation in the brain as early as 6h post-injury and further accumulation which varied regionally by 24h post-injury. The pTau accumulation was accompanied by reduced TNAP expression and activity in these brain regions and a significantly decreased plasma total alkaline phosphatase activity after the weight drop. These results reveal that both blast- and impact acceleration-induced head injuries cause an acute decrease in the level/activity of TNAP in the brain, which potentially contributes to trauma-induced accumulation of pTau and the resultant tauopathy. The regional changes in the level/activity of TNAP or accumulation of pTau after these injuries did not correlate with the accumulation of amyloid precursor protein, suggesting that the basic mechanism underlying tauopathy in TBI might be distinct from that associated with AD. PMID:26483321

  12. Significance of serum neuron-specific enolase in patients with acute traumatic brain injury

    官卫; 杨伊林; 夏为民; 李璐; 龚德生

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the association between serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and the extent of brain damage and the outcome after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods: The release patterns of serum NSE in 78 patients after acute TBI were analyzed by using the enzyme linked immunosobent assay. The levels of NSE were compared with Glasgow coma scale, the category of brain injury and the outcome after 6 months of injury. Results: There were different NSE values in patients with minor (12.96 μg/L±2.39 μg/L), moderate (23.44 μg/L±5.33 μg/L) and severe brain injury (42.68 μg/L±4.57 μg/L). After severe TBI, the concentration of NSE in patients with epidural hematomas was 13.38 μg/L±4.01 μg/L, 24.03 μg/L±2.85 μg/L in brain contusion without surgical intervention group, 55.20 μg/L±6.35 μg/L in brain contusion with surgical intervention group, and 83.85 μg/L±15.82 μg/L in diffuse brain swelling group. There were close correlations between NSE values and Glasgow coma scale (r=-0.608, P<0.01) and the extent of brain injury (r=0.75, P<0.01). Patients with poor outcome had significantly higher initial and peak NSE values than those with good outcome (66.40 μg/L±9.46 μg/L, 94.24 μg/L±13.75 μg/L vs 32.16 μg/L±4.21 μg/L, 34.08 μg/L±4.40 μg/L, P<0.01, respectively). Initial NSE values were negatively related to the outcome (r=-0.501, P<0.01). Most patients with poor outcomes had persisting or secondary elevated NSE values. Conclusions: Serum NSE is one of the valuable neurobiochemical markers for assessment of the severity of brain injury and outcome prediction.

  13. Changes of plasma levels of NPY, Hcy and S100β in patients with acute brain injury

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of several relevant plasma markers (NPY, Hcy, S100β) in patients with acute brain injury. Methods: Plasma NPY (with RIA), Hcy (with CLIA) and S100β (with ELISA) levels were determined in 28 patients with mild acute brain injury (Glascow score 9∼15), 12 patients with severe acute brain injury (Glascow score 3∼8) and controls. Results: As a whole, the plasma levels of Hcy and S100β in the patients with acute brain injury were significantly higher than those in the controls (P0.05), but the plasma levels in patients with severe injury were significantly higher than those in patients with mild injury as well as in controls (both P<0.05). The plasma levels of Hcy, NPY and S100β were significantly negatively correlated with the Glascow scores of the patients (r=-0.685, r=-0.583, r=-0.603, P<0.01, P<0.05, P<0.01). Conclusion: Monitoring the changes of plasma NPY, Hcy and S100β levels in patients with acute brain injury would be helpful to assess the patients condition and predict prognosis. (authors)

  14. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma/Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury : Current State and Emerging Prospects

    Namas, R.; Ghuma, A.; Hermus, L.; Zamora, R.; Okonkwo, D. O.; Billiar, T. R.; Vodovotz, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury

  15. Correlation of Computed Tomography findings with Glasgow Coma Scale in patients with acute traumatic brain injury

    SK Sah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To correlate Computed Tomography (CT findings with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS in patients with acute traumatic brain injury attending in Chitwan Medical College teaching hospital Chitwan, Nepal. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was performed among 50 patients of acute (less than24 hours cases of craniocerebral trauma over a period of four months. The patient’s level of consciousness (GCS was determined and a brain CT scan without contrast media was performed. A sixth generation General Electric (GE CT scan was utilized and 5mm and 10mm sections were obtained for infratentorial and supratentorial parts respectively. RESULT The age range of the patients was 1 to 75 years (mean age 35.6± 21.516 years and male: female ratio was 3.1:1. The most common causes of head injury were road traffic accident (RTA (60%, fall injury (20%, physical assault (12% and pedestrian injuries (8%. The distribution of patients in accordance with consciousness level was found to be 54% with mild TBI (GCS score 12 to 14, 28% with moderate TBI (GCS score 11 to 8 and 18% with severe TBI (GCS score less than 7. The presence of mixed lesions and midline shift regardless of the underlying lesion on CT scan was accompanied by lower GCS. CONCLUSION The presence of mixed lesions and midline shift regardless of the underlying lesion on CT scan were accompanied with lower GCS. Patients having single lesion had more GCS level than mixed level and mid line shift type of injury.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i2.12947 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(2; 4-9

  16. Brain injury due to acute organophosphate poisoning Magnetic resonance imaging manifestation and pathological characteristics

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute organophosphate poisoning can cause injuries of multiple visceras; especially,central nervous system injury can increase risk factors of patients with severe acute organophosphate poisoning. An application of modem image may increase diagnostic rate of brain injury in an earlier period and provide evidences for clinical treatment.OBJECTIVE: To reveal imaging manifestations, pathological characteristics and multi-ways injured mechanism of brain injury due to acute organophosphate poisoning.DESIGN: Contrast observational study.SETTING: Department of Medical Image, the Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University.MATERIALS: The experiment was carried out in the Department of Nerve Molecule Imaging Medicine and Laboratory of Neurology, the Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University from August 2003 to February 2004. A total of 30 healthy cats weighing 2.8 - 3.5 g and of both genders were selected from Animal Experimental Center of Hebei Medical University.METHODS: Thirty healthy cats were randomly divided into control group (n =5) and intoxication group (n=25). Cats in the control group were subcutaneously injected with 0.3 mL/kg saline at four points; while, cats in the intoxication group were subcutaneously injected with 400 g/L 0.3 mL/kg O,O-dimethyl-S-(methoxycarbonylmethyl) thiophosphate at four points. Two minutes after intoxication, cats received muscular injection with 0.5 mg/kg atropine sulfate, and then, brain tissues were collected from parietal lobe, basal ganglia, hippocampus, cerebellum and brain stem were observed at 3, 6, 24 hours, 3 and 7 days after intoxication respectively under optic microscope and electron microscope and expressions of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP),glutamic acid (Glu) and γ-amino butyric acid after immunohistochemical staining.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Results of MRI examinations; histological changes under optic microscope and electron

  17. Effects of acute substance use and pre-injury substance abuse on traumatic brain injury severity in adults admitted to a trauma centre

    Schanke Anne-Kristine; Sigurdardottir Solrun; Jerstad Tone; Andelic Nada; Sandvik Leiv; Roe Cecilie

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The aims of this study were to describe the occurrence of substance use at the time of injury and pre-injury substance abuse in patients with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Effects of acute substance use and pre-injury substance abuse on TBI severity were also investigated. Methods A prospective study of 111 patients, aged 16-55 years, injured from May 2005 to May 2007 and hospitalised at the Trauma Referral Centre in Eastern Norway with acute TBI (Glasgo...

  18. [The effect of neurotrophic treatment on the activation of reparative processes in patients with acute traumatic brain injury].

    Selianina, N V; Karakulova, Iu V

    2012-01-01

    The complex study of cognitive and emotional status, levels of serum serotonin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were performed in 72 patients with acute traumatic brain injury, with a special focus on middle brain injuries (MBI), treated with Cerebrolysin. The neurological and cognitive impairment, mild state anxiety and depression and increased levels of humoral serotonin, which depends on the severity of the injury, were identified in patients with MBI before treatment. After the treatment, there were the decrease in the severity of neurological symptoms and a significant positive dynamics on the FAB scale as well as the increase in blood BDNF and serotonin levels. It has been concluded that using cerebrolysin in complex treatment of acute MBI promotes activation of neurotrophic processes and improves outcomes of closed craniocerebral injury. PMID:22951781

  19. Neuroprotective effects of bloodletting atJing points combined with mild induced hypothermia in acute severe traumatic brain injury

    Yue Tu; Xiao-mei Miao; Tai-long Yi; Xu-yi Chen; Hong-tao Sun; Shi-xiang Cheng; Sai Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Bloodletting atJing points has been used to treat coma in traditional Chinese medicine. Mild induced hypothermia has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects. However, the therapeutic effects of bloodletting atJing points and mild induced hypothermia alone are limited. Therefore, we investigated whether combined treatment might have clinical effectiveness for the treatment of acute severe trau-matic brain injury. Using a rat model of traumatic brain injury, combined treatment substantially alleviated cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, neurological function was ameliorated, and cellular necrosis and the inlfammatory response were lessened. These ifndings suggest that the combined effects of bloodletting atJing points (20 µL, twice a day, for 2 days) and mild induced hypothermia (6 hours) are better than their individual effects alone. Their combined application may have marked neuroprotective effects in the clinical treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury.

  20. Neuroprotective effects of bloodletting at Jing points combined with mild induced hypothermia in acute severe traumatic brain injury

    Tu, Yue; Miao, Xiao-mei; Yi, Tai-long; Chen, Xu-yi; Sun, Hong-tao; Cheng, Shi-xiang; Zhang, Sai

    2016-01-01

    Bloodletting at Jing points has been used to treat coma in traditional Chinese medicine. Mild induced hypothermia has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects. However, the therapeutic effects of bloodletting at Jing points and mild induced hypothermia alone are limited. Therefore, we investigated whether combined treatment might have clinical effectiveness for the treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. Using a rat model of traumatic brain injury, combined treatment substantially alleviated cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, neurological function was ameliorated, and cellular necrosis and the inflammatory response were lessened. These findings suggest that the combined effects of bloodletting at Jing points (20 μL, twice a day, for 2 days) and mild induced hypothermia (6 hours) are better than their individual effects alone. Their combined application may have marked neuroprotective effects in the clinical treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury.

  1. Acute Alcohol Intoxication in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Characteristics, Recovery, and Outcome.

    Scheenen, Myrthe E; de Koning, Myrthe E; van der Horn, Harm J; Roks, Gerwin; Yilmaz, Tansel; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba M

    2016-02-15

    A substantial number of patients (30% to 50%) sustains a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) while they are under the influence of alcohol. An acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) at the time of injury has been subject of research in severe TBI, but little is known about the relation between AAI and mTBI. This study aimed to describe the characteristics of this intoxicated subgroup and evaluate recovery and outcome in comparison to sober mTBI patients. We included 528 mTBI patients (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score 13-15) admitted to two Level 1 trauma centers as part of a prospective follow-up study. We compared clinical characteristics, demographics, and injury mechanism between groups. Post-concussive complaints, mood disorders, and post-traumatic stress-related complaints were assessed at 2 weeks post-injury, and outcome at 6 months with the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE). Thirty-three percent of the mTBI patients were intoxicated. Results showed that the intoxicated group was younger (36 vs. 40 years; p = 0.001) and were more frequently of male gender (78% vs. 60%; p violence-related injuries. The intoxicated group was assessed with a lower GCS score and had a higher hospital admission rate. However, at 2 weeks post-injury, intoxicated patients reported less complaints than the non-alcohol group and showed a better recovery at 6 months (average GOSE scores 7 vs. 7.3; p = 0.030). We conclude that AAI in mTBI represents a characteristically different group, which has implications for prevention measures, as well as the course of recovery. PMID:26230219

  2. Altered spontaneous brain activity in patients with acute spinal cord injury revealed by resting-state functional MRI.

    Ling Zhu

    Full Text Available Previous neuroimaging studies have provided evidence of structural and functional reorganization of brain in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI. However, it remains unknown whether the spontaneous brain activity changes in acute SCI. In this study, we investigated intrinsic brain activity in acute SCI patients using a regional homogeneity (ReHo analysis based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.A total of 15 patients with acute SCI and 16 healthy controls participated in the study. The ReHo value was used to evaluate spontaneous brain activity, and voxel-wise comparisons of ReHo were performed to identify brain regions with altered spontaneous brain activity between groups. We also assessed the associations between ReHo and the clinical scores in brain regions showing changed spontaneous brain activity.Compared with the controls, the acute SCI patients showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary motor cortex/primary somatosensory cortex, bilateral supplementary motor area/dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral caudate; and increased ReHo in bilateral precuneus, the left inferior parietal lobe, the left brainstem/hippocampus, the left cingulate motor area, bilateral insula, bilateral thalamus and bilateral cerebellum. The average ReHo values of the left thalamus and right insula were negatively correlated with the international standards for the neurological classification of spinal cord injury motor scores.Our findings indicate that acute distant neuronal damage has an immediate impact on spontaneous brain activity. In acute SCI patients, the ReHo was prominently altered in brain regions involved in motor execution and cognitive control, default mode network, and which are associated with sensorimotor compensatory reorganization. Abnormal ReHo values in the left thalamus and right insula could serve as potential biomarkers for

  3. Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Schaller, Alexandra L; Lakhani, Saquib A; Hsu, Benson S

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a better understanding of pediatric traumatic brain injury and its management. Within the pediatric age group, ages 1 to 19, injuries are the number one cause of death with traumatic brain injury being involved in almost 50 percent of these cases. This, along with the fact that the medical system spends over $1 billion annually on pediatric traumatic brain injury, makes this issue both timely and relevant to health care providers. Over the course of this article the epidemiology, physiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of pediatric traumatic brain injury will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the early responder and the immediate interventions that should be considered and/or performed. The management discussed in this article follows the most recent recommendations from the 2012 edition of the Guidelines for the Acute Medical Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Infants, Children, and Adolescents. Despite the focus of this article, it is important not to lose sight of the fact that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound--or, to be more precise and use the average human's brain measurements, just above three pounds--of cure. PMID:26630835

  4. Connectomic and Surface-Based Morphometric Correlates of Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Dall'Acqua, Patrizia; Johannes, Sönke; Mica, Ladislav; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Glaab, Richard; Fandino, Javier; Schwendinger, Markus; Meier, Christoph; Ulbrich, Erika J.; Müller, Andreas; Jäncke, Lutz; Hänggi, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Reduced integrity of white matter (WM) pathways and subtle anomalies in gray matter (GM) morphology have been hypothesized as mechanisms in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, findings on structural brain changes in early stages after mTBI are inconsistent and findings related to early symptoms severity are rare. Fifty-one patients were assessed with multimodal neuroimaging and clinical methods exclusively within 7 days following mTBI and compared to 53 controls. Whole-brain connectivity based on diffusion tensor imaging was subjected to network-based statistics, whereas cortical surface area, thickness, and volume based on T1-weighted MRI scans were investigated using surface-based morphometric analysis. Reduced connectivity strength within a subnetwork of 59 edges located predominantly in bilateral frontal lobes was significantly associated with higher levels of self-reported symptoms. In addition, cortical surface area decreases were associated with stronger complaints in five clusters located in bilateral frontal and postcentral cortices, and in the right inferior temporal region. Alterations in WM and GM were localized in similar brain regions and moderately-to-strongly related to each other. Furthermore, the reduction of cortical surface area in the frontal regions was correlated with poorer attentive-executive performance in the mTBI group. Finally, group differences were detected in both the WM and GM, especially when focusing on a subgroup of patients with greater complaints, indicating the importance of classifying mTBI patients according to severity of symptoms. This study provides evidence that mTBI affects not only the integrity of WM networks by means of axonal damage but also the morphology of the cortex during the initial post-injury period. These anomalies might be greater in the acute period than previously believed and the involvement of frontal brain regions was consistently pronounced in both findings. The dysconnected subnetwork

  5. Connectomic and Surface-Based Morphometric Correlates of Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Dall'Acqua, Patrizia; Johannes, Sönke; Mica, Ladislav; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Glaab, Richard; Fandino, Javier; Schwendinger, Markus; Meier, Christoph; Ulbrich, Erika J; Müller, Andreas; Jäncke, Lutz; Hänggi, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Reduced integrity of white matter (WM) pathways and subtle anomalies in gray matter (GM) morphology have been hypothesized as mechanisms in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, findings on structural brain changes in early stages after mTBI are inconsistent and findings related to early symptoms severity are rare. Fifty-one patients were assessed with multimodal neuroimaging and clinical methods exclusively within 7 days following mTBI and compared to 53 controls. Whole-brain connectivity based on diffusion tensor imaging was subjected to network-based statistics, whereas cortical surface area, thickness, and volume based on T1-weighted MRI scans were investigated using surface-based morphometric analysis. Reduced connectivity strength within a subnetwork of 59 edges located predominantly in bilateral frontal lobes was significantly associated with higher levels of self-reported symptoms. In addition, cortical surface area decreases were associated with stronger complaints in five clusters located in bilateral frontal and postcentral cortices, and in the right inferior temporal region. Alterations in WM and GM were localized in similar brain regions and moderately-to-strongly related to each other. Furthermore, the reduction of cortical surface area in the frontal regions was correlated with poorer attentive-executive performance in the mTBI group. Finally, group differences were detected in both the WM and GM, especially when focusing on a subgroup of patients with greater complaints, indicating the importance of classifying mTBI patients according to severity of symptoms. This study provides evidence that mTBI affects not only the integrity of WM networks by means of axonal damage but also the morphology of the cortex during the initial post-injury period. These anomalies might be greater in the acute period than previously believed and the involvement of frontal brain regions was consistently pronounced in both findings. The dysconnected subnetwork

  6. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma / Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Current State and Emerging Prospects

    Y Vodovotz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury (TBI. Inflammation is a finely tuned, dynamic, highly-regulated process that is not inherentlydetrimental, but rather required for immune surveillance, optimal post-injury tissue repair, and regeneration. The inflammatory response is driven by cytokines and chemokines and is partiallypropagated by damaged tissue-derived products (Damage-associated Molecular Patterns; DAMP’s.DAMPs perpetuate inflammation through the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but may also inhibit anti-inflammatory cytokines. Various animal models of T/HS in mice, rats, pigs, dogs, and nonhumanprimates have been utilized in an attempt to move from bench to bedside. Novel approaches, including those from the field of systems biology, may yield therapeutic breakthroughs in T/HS andTBI in the near future.

  7. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that people ...

  9. Acute neuroprotective effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Yang, Yang; Li, Ling; Wang, Yan-Gang; Fei, Zhou; Zhong, Jun; Wei, Li-Zhou; Long, Qian-Fa; Liu, Wei-Ping

    2012-05-10

    Traumatic brain injury commonly has a result of a short window of opportunity between the period of initial brain injury and secondary brain injury, which provides protective strategies and can reduce damages of brain due to secondary brain injury. Previous studies have reported neuroprotective effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields. However, the effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on neural damage after traumatic brain injury have not been reported yet. The present study aims to investigate effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the model of lateral fluid percussion injury, which were placed in non-electromagnetic fields and 15 Hz (Hertz) electromagnetic fields with intensities of 1 G (Gauss), 3 G and 5 G. At various time points (ranging from 0.5 to 30 h) after lateral fluid percussion injury, rats were treated with kainic acid (administered by intraperitoneal injection) to induce apoptosis in hippocampal cells. The results were as follows: (1) the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α was dramatically decreased during the neuroprotective time window. (2) The kainic acid-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus was significantly decreased in rats exposed to electromagnetic fields. (3) Electromagnetic fields exposure shortened the escape time in water maze test. (4) Electromagnetic fields exposure accelerated the recovery of the blood-brain barrier after brain injury. These findings revealed that extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields significantly prolong the window of opportunity for brain protection and enhance the intensity of neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury. PMID:22484017

  10. Loss of Microstructural Integrity in the Limbic-Subcortical Networks for Acute Symptomatic Traumatic Brain Injury

    Yanan Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies reported discrepant white matter diffusivity in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI on the base of Glasgow Coma Scale, which are unreliable for some TBI severity indicators and the frequency of missing documentation in the medical record. In the present study, we adopted the Mayo classification system for TBI severity. In this system, the mTBI is also divided into two groups as “probable and symptomatic” TBI. We aimed to investigate altered microstructural integrity in symptomatic acute TBI (<1 week by using tract-based spatial statics (TBSS approach. A total of 12 patients and 13 healthy volunteers were involved and underwent MRI scans including conventional scan, and SWI and DTI. All the patients had no visible lesions by using conventional and SWI neuroimaging techniques, while showing widespread declines in the fractional anisotropy (FA of gray matter and white matter throughout the TBSS skeleton, particularly in the limbic-subcortical structures. By contrast, symptomatic TBI patients showed no significant enhanced changes in FA compared to the healthy controls. A better understanding of the acute changes occurring following symptomatic TBI may increase our understanding of neuroplasticity and continuing degenerative change, which, in turn, may facilitate advances in management and intervention.

  11. Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological follow up in mild traumatic brain injury: acute versus chronic disturbances?

    Metting, Zwany; Spikman, Jacoba M; Rödiger, Lars A; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2014-04-01

    In a subgroup of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) residual symptoms, interfering with outcome and return to work, are found. With neuropsychological assessment cognitive deficits can be demonstrated although the pathological underpinnings of these cognitive deficits are not fully understood. As the admission computed tomography (CT) often is normal, perfusion CT imaging may be a useful indicator of brain dysfunction in the acute phase after injury in these patients. In the present study, directly after admission perfusion CT imaging was performed in mild TBI patients with follow-up neuropsychological assessment in those with complaints and a normal non-contrast CT. Neuropsychological tests comprised the 15 Words test Immediate Recall, Trailmaking test part B, Zoo Map test and the FEEST, which were dichotomized into normal and abnormal. Perfusion CT results of patients with normal neuropsychological test scores were compared to those with abnormal test scores. In total eighteen patients were included. Those with an abnormal score on the Zoo Map test had a significant lower CBV in the right frontal and the bilateral parieto-temporal white matter. Patients with an abnormal score on the FEEST had a significant higher MTT in the bilateral frontal white matter and a significant decreased CBF in the left parieto-temporal grey matter. No significant relation between the perfusion CT parameters and the 15 Words test and the Trailmaking test part B was present. In conclusion, impairments in executive functioning and emotion perception assessed with neuropsychological tests during follow up were related to differences in cerebral perfusion at admission in mild TBI. The pathophysiological concept of these findings is discussed. PMID:24556319

  12. Acute and long-term pituitary insufficiency in traumatic brain injury

    Klose, M; Juul, A; Struck, J;

    2007-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI), describe the time-course and assess the association with trauma-related parameters and early post-traumatic hormone alterations.......To assess the prevalence of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI), describe the time-course and assess the association with trauma-related parameters and early post-traumatic hormone alterations....

  13. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in animal modil with acute ischemic brain infarction : evaluation of reversible brain injury

    To determine whether the analysis of abnormally high signal intensities in ischemic tissue, as revealed by diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) can be used to evaluate reversible brain lesions in a cat model of acute ischemia. Ten cats were divided into two groups of five (Group I and Group II), and in all animals the middle cerebral artery was temporarily occluded. Group I underwent T2-DWI 30 minutes after occlusion, and Group II 120 minutes after occlusion. In both groups, DWI was performed one hour and 24 hours after reperfusion (at one hour, non-T2-weighted; at 24 hours, T2-weighted). Both occlusion and reperfusion were monitored by 99mTC-ECD brain perfusion SPECT. All animals were sacrificed 24 hours later and their brain tissue was stained with TTC. Signal intensity ratios (SIR, signifying average signal intensity within the region of interest divided by that in the contralateral, nonischemic, homologous region) of the two groups, as seen on DWI were compared. The percentage of hemispheric lesions occurring in the two groups was also compared. SIR after occlusion of the middle cerebral artery was 1.29 in Group I and 1.59 in Group II. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, SIR in Group I was higher than in Group II (p<0.01). After occlusion and reperfusion, the percentage of hemispheric lesions in Group I was less than in Group II. For the latter, the percentage of these lesions revealed by TTC staining and T2-weighted imaging was 48% and 59%, respectively, findings distinctly different from those for Group I. In addition, in group I, infarction was revealed by neither TTC staining nor T2-weighted imaging (p<0.01). The use of DWI to evaluate signal intensity ratios can help determine whether or not brain injury after temporary cerebral ischemia is reversible

  14. Osteopontin Expression in Acute Immune Response Mediates Hippocampal Synaptogenesis and Adaptive Outcome Following Cortical Brain Injury

    Chan, Julie L.; Reeves, Thomas M.; Phillips, Linda L.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) produces axotomy, deafferentation and reactive synaptogenesis. Inflammation influences synaptic repair, and the novel brain cytokine osteopontin (OPN) has potential to support axon regeneration through exposure of its integrin receptor binding sites. This study explored whether OPN secretion and proteolysis by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) mediate the initial degenerative phase of synaptogenesis, targeting reactive neuroglia to affect successful repair. Adult r...

  15. Effect of MgSO4 on NMDA receptor in brain tissue and serum NSE in rats with radiation-induced acute brain injury

    Objective: To explore the protection of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) on radiation-induced acute brain injury. Methods Thirty six mature Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: the blank control group, experimental control group and experimental therapy group. The whole brain of SD rats in the experimental control group and experimental therapy group were irradiated with a dose of 20 Gy using 6 MeV electron beam. Magnesium sulfate was injected intraperitoneally into the rats in the experimental therapy group before and after irradiation for seven times. The blood and the brain tissue were taken on the 1st, 3rd and 14th day after irradiation. ELISA was used to measure the level of serum NSE. Western blot technique was used to detect the expression of NR1 and NR2B subunit protein in brain tissue. Results: Compared with the blank control group, the level of serum NSE in the experimental control group increased significantly (P4 used in early stage can inhibit the level of serum NSE and the expression of NR1 and NR2B after radiation-induced acute brain injury. It shows a protective effect on radiation-induced acute brain injury. (authors)

  16. OCT imaging of acute vascular changes following mild traumatic brain injury in mice (Conference Presentation)

    Chico-Calero, Isabel; Shishkov, Milen; Welt, Jonathan; Blatter, Cedric; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    While most people recover completely from mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) and concussions, a subset develop lasting neurological disorders. Understanding the complex pathophysiology of these injuries is critical to developing improved prognostic and therapeutic approaches. Multiple studies have shown that the structure and perfusion of brain vessels are altered after mTBI. It is possible that these vascular injuries contribute to or trigger neurodegeneration. Intravital microscopy and mouse models of TBI offer a powerful platform to study the vascular component of mTBI. Because optical coherence tomography based angiography is based on perfusion contrast and is not significantly degraded by vessel leakage or blood brain barrier disruption, it is uniquely suited to studies of brain perfusion in the setting of trauma. However, existing TBI imaging models require surgical exposure of the brain at the time of injury which conflates TBI-related vascular changes with those caused by surgery. In this work, we describe a modified cranial window preparation based on a flexible, transparent polyurethane membrane. Impact injuries were delivered directly through this membrane, and imaging was performed immediately after injury without the need for additional surgical procedures. Using this model, we demonstrate that mTBI induces a transient cessation of flow in the capillaries and smaller vessels near the injury point. Reperfusion is observed in all animals within 3 hours of injury. This work describes new insight into the transient vascular changes induced by mTBI, and demonstrates more broadly the utility of the OCT/polyurethane window model platform in preclinical studies of mTBI.

  17. MR imaging of associated brain injuries in cases of acute extradural hematoma

    To assess the efficacy of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for detection of associated brain injuries in cases of extradural hematoma (EDH), 32 patients with EDH were examined by MR. CT detected associated lesion in eleven patients (34%), while MR detected them in 24 patients (75%). MR is more sensitive than CT in detecting associated lesions, especially when T2-weighted imaging is used. Non-hemorrhagic contusions adjacent to EDH and near the cranial base were well shown by MR; however, they tended to be missed by CT. EEG findings were clearly related to abnormalities detected by MR. Coupling between functional change and organic change was confirmed. The improved detection and anatomic localization of associated brain injuries by MR should allow more accurate assessment of brain injuries, and sophisticated management of EDH patient. The authors also discuss the cardiorespiratory monitoring and support during MRI examination in critically ill patients. (author)

  18. Radiation-induced acute brain injury and the protective effect of traditional Chinese medicine-salvia miltiorrhiza

    Objective: To understand the expression of acute brain injury induced by radiation and the protective effect of traditional Chinese Medicine in BALB/C mouse. Methods: The whole brain of BALB/C mouse was irradiated to a dose of 25 Gy using a 6 MV X linear accelerator. Ten hours later, the brain tissue and blood sample were taken. Thiobarbituric acid reaction was used to detect the malonaldehyde substitute for the lipid peroxide. Immunohistochemical method was used to detect the expression of ICAM-1 on D1, 2, 3, and 10 after having received radiation. One-Way ANOVA was used to evaluate the differences in the values of LPO in the brain tissue and plasma between the groups. The difference of expression of ICAM-1 between the groups was compared by χ2 method. Results: Two hundred and twelve female BALB/C mice were divided into five groups: Control group, Radiation alone group (R), R + dexamethasone group, R + 654-2 group and R + Salvia Miltiorrhiza group. The contents of LPO in the mouse brain tissue 10 hours after 25 Gy of whole brain irradiation were as follows (mean ± standard error): Control group (1975.5±94.2) nmol/g, Radiation alone group (R) (3417.3±109.7) nmol/g, R + dexamethasone group (3113.6±178.1) nmol/g, R + 654-2 group (3406.4±159.1) nmol/g, R + Salvia Miltiorrhiza group (2981.5±140.1) nmol/g. Salvia Miltiorrhiza significantly reduced the LPO increase induced by irradiation (P<0.05). There were no significant differences between the other groups in the change of LPO in the plasma 10 hours after whole brain irradiation. The expression of ICAM-1 after whole brain irradiation was time-dependent . There was an increase of expression of ICAM-1 24 hours after irradiation, reaching the peak at 48 hours. Salvia Miltiorrhiza and dexamethasone strongly inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 when compared with radiation only, with the difference significant (P<0.01). Conclusions: The change of LPO content in the BALB/C mouse brain tissue and the increase in

  19. Effects of acute substance use and pre-injury substance abuse on traumatic brain injury severity in adults admitted to a trauma centre

    Schanke Anne-Kristine

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to describe the occurrence of substance use at the time of injury and pre-injury substance abuse in patients with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI. Effects of acute substance use and pre-injury substance abuse on TBI severity were also investigated. Methods A prospective study of 111 patients, aged 16-55 years, injured from May 2005 to May 2007 and hospitalised at the Trauma Referral Centre in Eastern Norway with acute TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale 3-12. Based on structural brain damages shown on a computed tomography (CT scan, TBI severity was defined by modified Marshall classification as less severe (score Results Forty-seven percent of patients were positive for substance use on admission to hospital. Significant pre-injury substance abuse was reported by 26% of patients. Substance use at the time of injury was more frequent in the less severe group (p = 0.01. The frequency of pre-injury substance abuse was higher in the more severe group (30% vs. 23%. In a logistic regression model, acute substance use at time of injury tended to decrease the probability of more severe intracranial injury, but the effect was not statistically significant after adjusting for age, gender, education, cause of injury and substance abuse, OR = 0.39; 95% CI 0.11-1.35, p = 0.14. Patients with positive screens for pre-injury substance abuse (CAGE ≥2 were more likely to have more severe TBI in the adjusted regression analyses, OR = 4.05; 95% CI 1.10-15.64, p = 0.04. Conclusions Acute substance use was more frequent in patients with less severe TBI caused by low-energy events such as falls, violence and sport accidents. Pre-injury substance abuse increased the probability of more severe TBI caused by high-energy trauma such as motor vehicle accidents and falls from higher levels. Preventive efforts to reduce substance consumption and abuse in at-risk populations are needed.

  20. Neuropathophysiology of Brain Injury.

    Quillinan, Nidia; Herson, Paco S; Traystman, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Every year in the United States, millions of individuals incur ischemic brain injury from stroke, cardiac arrest, or traumatic brain injury. These acquired brain injuries can lead to death or long-term neurologic and neuropsychological impairments. The mechanisms of ischemic and traumatic brain injury that lead to these deficiencies result from a complex interplay of interdependent molecular pathways, including excitotoxicity, acidotoxicity, ionic imbalance, oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. This article reviews several mechanisms of brain injury and discusses recent developments. Although much is known from animal models of injury, it has been difficult to translate these effects to humans. PMID:27521191

  1. Decreased Regional Homogeneity in Patients With Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Resting-State fMRI Study.

    Zhan, Jie; Gao, Lei; Zhou, Fuqing; Kuang, Hongmei; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Siyong; He, Laichang; Zeng, Xianjun; Gong, Honghan

    2015-10-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is characterized by structural disconnection and large-scale neural network dysfunction in the resting state. However, little is known concerning the intrinsic changes in local spontaneous brain activity in patients with mTBI. The aim of the current study was to assess regional synchronization in acute mTBI patients. Fifteen acute mTBI patients and 15 sex-, age-, and education-matched healthy controls (HCs) were studied. We used the regional homogeneity (ReHo) method to map local connectivity across the whole brain and performed a two-sample t-test between the two groups. Compared with HCs, patients with acute mTBI showed significantly decreased ReHo in the left insula, left precentral/postcentral gyrus, and left supramarginal gyrus (p Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores across all acute mTBI patients (p < 0.05, uncorrected). The ReHo method may provide an objective biomarker for evaluating the functional abnormity of mTBI in the acute setting. PMID:26348589

  2. Inflammatory responses are not sufficient to cause delayed neuronal death in ATP-induced acute brain injury.

    Hey-Kyeong Jeong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain inflammation is accompanied by brain injury. However, it is controversial whether inflammatory responses are harmful or beneficial to neurons. Because many studies have been performed using cultured microglia and neurons, it has not been possible to assess the influence of multiple cell types and diverse factors that dynamically and continuously change in vivo. Furthermore, behavior of microglia and other inflammatory cells could have been overlooked since most studies have focused on neuronal death. Therefore, it is essential to analyze the precise roles of microglia and brain inflammation in the injured brain, and determine their contribution to neuronal damage in vivo from the onset of injury. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Acute neuronal damage was induced by stereotaxic injection of ATP into the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc and the cortex of the rat brain. Inflammatory responses and their effects on neuronal damage were investigated by immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, quantitative RT-PCR, and stereological counting, etc. ATP acutely caused death of microglia as well as neurons in a similar area within 3 h. We defined as the core region the area where both TH(+ and Iba-1(+ cells acutely died, and as the penumbra the area surrounding the core where Iba-1(+ cells showed activated morphology. In the penumbra region, morphologically activated microglia arranged around the injury sites. Monocytes filled the damaged core after neurons and microglia died. Interestingly, neither activated microglia nor monocytes expressed iNOS, a major neurotoxic inflammatory mediator. Monocytes rather expressed CD68, a marker of phagocytic activity. Importantly, the total number of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc at 3 h (∼80% of that in the contralateral side did not decrease further at 7 d. Similarly, in the cortex, ATP-induced neuron-damage area detected at 3 h did not increase for up to 7 d. CONCLUSIONS: Different cellular

  3. Clinical significance of determination of serum NSE and plasma ET, IGF-II, CNP levels in patients with acute brain injury

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of plasma ET, IGF-II, CNP and serum NSE contents in patients with acute brain injury. Methods: Serum contents of neuron specific enolase (NSE) were measured with chemiluminescence immunoassay and plasma endothelin (ET), insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) were measured with radioimmunoassay in 30 patients with acute brain injury and 35 controls. Results: Serum contents of NSE and plasma IGF-II, CNP were not much different in patients with mild brain injury from those in controls (P >0.05), but plasma contents of ET were already significantly higher in patients with mild brain injury than those in controls(P < 0.01). The serum NSE and plasma ET levels in patients with moderate and severe brain injury were significantly higher than those in patients with mild brain injury and controls (P < 0.01). Decrease of plasma levels of IGF-II and CNP was not significant in patients with mild brain injury (vs controls). However, the plasma levels of IGF-II and CNP were significantly lower in patients with moderate and severe brain injury than those in patients with mild brain injury and controls (P <0.01). As a whole, the magnitude of changes of these parameters was proportional to the severity of the injury. Conclusion: Changes of serum NSE and plasma IGF-II, ET and CNP levels were closely related to the pathological process of brain injury. Determination of these parameters was of clinical importance for evaluation of the severity of injury and outcome prediction. (authors)

  4. Acute Alcohol Intoxication and Long-Term Outcome in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Raj, Rahul; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Kivisaari, Riku; Hernesniemi, Juha; Lappalainen, Jaakko; Siironen, Jari

    2015-01-01

    The effect of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) on outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is controversial. We sought to assess the independent effect of positive BAC on long-term outcome in patients with TBI treated in the intensive care unit (ICU). We performed a retrospective analysis of 405 patients with TBI, admitted to the ICU of a large urban Level 1 trauma center between January 2009 and December 2012. Outcome was six-month mortality and unfavorable neurological outcome (defined a...

  5. [Mild brain injuries in emergency medicine].

    Liimatainen, Suvi; Niskakangas, Tero; Ohman, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Diagnostics and correct classification of mild brain injuries is challenging. Problems caused by insufficient documentation at the acute phase become more obvious in situations in which legal insurance issues are to be considered. A small proportion of patients with mild brain injury suffer from prolonged symptoms. Medical recording and classification of the brain injury at the initial phase should therefore be carried out in a structured manner. The review deals with the diagnostic problems of mild brain injuries and presents a treatment protocol for adult patients at the acute phase, aiming at avoiding prolonged problems. PMID:22238915

  6. SECONDARY BRAIN INJURY

    Ida Ayu Basmatika

    2013-01-01

    Secondary brain injury is a condision that occurs at some times after the primary impact and can be largely prevented and treated. Most brain injury ends with deadly consequences which is caused by secondary damage to the brain. Traumatic brain injured still represents the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals under the age of 45 years in the world. The classification of secondary brain injured is divided into extracranial and intracranial causes. The cause of extracranial s...

  7. Multimodal MR imaging of acute and subacute experimental traumatic brain injury: Time course and correlation with cerebral energy metabolites

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death and permanent disability world-wide. The predominant cause of death after TBI is brain edema which can be quantified by non-invasive diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI). To provide a better understanding of the early onset, time course, spatial development, and type of brain edema after TBI and to correlate MRI data and the cerebral energy state reflected by the metabolite adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The spontaneous development of lateral fluid percussion-induced TBI was investigated in the acute (6 h), subacute (48 h), and chronic (7 days) phase in rats by MRI of quantitative T2 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping as well as perfusion was combined with ATP-specific bioluminescence imaging and histology. An induced TBI led to moderate to mild brain damages, reflected by transient, pronounced development of vasogenic edema and perfusion reduction. Heterogeneous ADC patterns indicated a parallel, but mixed expression of vasogenic and cytotoxic edema. Cortical ATP levels were reduced in the acute and subacute phase by 13% and 27%, respectively, but were completely normalized at 7 days after injury. The partial ATP reduction was interpreted to be partially caused by a loss of neurons in parallel with transient dilution of the regional ATP concentration by pronounced vasogenic edema. The normalization of energy metabolism after 7 days was likely due to infiltrating glia and not to recovery. The MRI combined with metabolite measurement further improves the understanding and evaluation of brain damages after TBI

  8. Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    ... inflicted traumatic brain injury (ITBI), is a leading cause of child maltreatment deaths in the United States. Meeting the ... Awareness Additional Prevention Resources Childhood Injuries Concussion in Children and Teens Injuries from Violence Injuries from Motor Vehicle Crashes Teen Driver Safety ...

  9. Attenuation of Acute Phase Injury in Rat Intracranial Hemorrhage by Cerebrolysin that Inhibits Brain Edema and Inflammatory Response.

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhaotao; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Mou; Xu, Ruxiang; Liang, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongtian

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is mainly determined by the volume of the hemorrhage core and the secondary brain damage to penumbral tissues due to brain swelling, microcirculation disturbance and inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of cerebrolysin on brain edema and inhibition of the inflammation response surrounding the hematoma core in the acute stage after ICH. The ICH model was induced by administration of type VII bacterial collagenase into the stratum of adult rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups: ICH + saline; ICH + Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) and sham. Cerebrolysin or saline was administered intraperitoneally 1 h post surgery. Neurological scores, extent of brain edema content and Evans blue dye extravasation were recorded. The levels of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) were assayed by Real-time PCR and Elisa kits. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction proteins (TJPs; claudin-5, occludin and zonula occluden-1) expression were measured at multiple time points. The morphological and intercellular changes were characterized by Electron microscopy. It is found that cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) improved the neurological behavior and reduced the ipsilateral brain water content and Evans blue dye extravasation. After cerebrolysin treated, the levels of pro-inflammatory factors and AQP4 in the peri-hematomal areas were markedly reduced and were accompanied with higher expression of TJPs. Electron microscopy showed the astrocytic swelling and concentrated chromatin in the ICH group and confirmed the cell junction changes. Thus, early cerebrolysin treatment ameliorates secondary injury after ICH and promotes behavioral performance during the acute phase by reducing brain edema, inflammatory response, and blood-brain barrier permeability. PMID:26498936

  10. Endogenous Nitric-Oxide Synthase Inhibitor ADMA after Acute Brain Injury

    Carla S. Jung

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous results on nitric oxide (NO metabolism after traumatic brain injury (TBI show variations in NO availability and controversial effects of exogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS-inhibitors. Furthermore, elevated levels of the endogenous NOS inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA were reported in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF after traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Therefore, we examined whether ADMA and the enzymes involved in NO- and ADMA-metabolism are expressed in brain tissue after TBI and if time-dependent changes occur. TBI was induced by controlled cortical impact injury (CCII and neurological performance was monitored. Expression of NOS, ADMA, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolases (DDAH and protein-arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1 was determined by immunostaining in different brain regions and at various time-points after CCII. ADMA and PRMT1 expression decreased in all animals after TBI compared to the control group, while DDAH1 and DDAH2 expression increased in comparison to controls. Furthermore, perilesionally ADMA is positively correlated with neuroscore performance, while DDAH1 and DDAH2 are negatively correlated. ADMA and its metabolizing enzymes show significant temporal changes after TBI and may be new targets in TBI treatment.

  11. Brain injury requires lung protection

    Lopez-Aguilar, Josefina; Blanch, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    The paper entitled “The high-mobility group protein B1-Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (HMGB1-RAGE) axis mediates traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced pulmonary dysfunction in lung transplantation” published recently in Science Translational Medicine links lung failure after transplantation with alterations in the axis HMGB1-RAGE after TBI, opening a new field for exploring indicators for the early detection of patients at risk of developing acute lung injury (ALI). The lung is on...

  12. Derivation of injury-responsive dendritic cells for acute brain targeting and therapeutic protein delivery in the stroke-injured rat.

    Nathan C Manley

    Full Text Available Research with experimental stroke models has identified a wide range of therapeutic proteins that can prevent the brain damage caused by this form of acute neurological injury. Despite this, we do not yet have safe and effective ways to deliver therapeutic proteins to the injured brain, and this remains a major obstacle for clinical translation. Current targeted strategies typically involve invasive neurosurgery, whereas systemic approaches produce the undesirable outcome of non-specific protein delivery to the entire brain, rather than solely to the injury site. As a potential way to address this, we developed a protein delivery system modeled after the endogenous immune cell response to brain injury. Using ex-vivo-engineered dendritic cells (DCs, we find that these cells can transiently home to brain injury in a rat model of stroke with both temporal and spatial selectivity. We present a standardized method to derive injury-responsive DCs from bone marrow and show that injury targeting is dependent on culture conditions that maintain an immature DC phenotype. Further, we find evidence that when loaded with therapeutic cargo, cultured DCs can suppress initial neuron death caused by an ischemic injury. These results demonstrate a non-invasive method to target ischemic brain injury and may ultimately provide a way to selectively deliver therapeutic compounds to the injured brain.

  13. Acute neuro-endocrine profile and prediction of outcome after severe brain injury

    Olivecrona, Zandra; Dahlqvist, Per; Koskinen, Lars-Owe

    2013-01-01

    Object: The aim of the study was to evaluate the early changes in pituitary hormone levels after severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) and compare hormone levels to basic neuro-intensive care data, a systematic scoring of the CT-findings and to evaluate whether hormone changes are related to outcome. Methods: Prospective study, including consecutive patients, 15-70 years, with sTBI, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score <= 8, initial cerebral perfusion pressure > 10 mm Hg, and arrival to our le...

  14. Acute kidney injury.

    Lang, Joanna; Zuber, Kim; Davis, Jane

    2016-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates up to 20% of all hospital admissions. Responding to the increase in admissions, complications, mortality, morbidity, and cost of AKI, Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes convened an expert panel to study the issue, review the literature, and publish guidelines to evaluate and treat patients with AKI in the acute setting. This article reviews those guidelines. PMID:27023656

  15. Successful use of inhaled nitric oxide to decrease intracranial pressure in a patient with severe traumatic brain injury complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome: a role for an anti-inflammatory mechanism?

    Medhkour Azedine; Papadimos Thomas J; Yermal Sooraj

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Use of inhaled nitric oxide in humans with traumatic brain injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome has twice previously been reported to be beneficial. Here we report a third case. We propose that INO may decrease the inflammatory response in patients with increased intracranial pressure caused by traumatic brain injury accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome thereby contributing to improved outcomes.

  16. Mild traumatic brain injury.

    Vos, P.E.; Alekseenko, Y.; Battistin, L.; Ehler, E.; Gerstenbrand, F.; Muresanu, D.F.; Potapov, A.; Stepan, C.A.; Traubner, P.; Vecsei, L.; Wild, K. von

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is among the most frequent neurological disorders. Of all TBIs 90% are considered mild with an annual incidence of 100-300/100.000. Intracranial complications of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI) are infrequent (10%), requiring neurosurgical intervention in a minority o

  17. Study on changes of partial pressure of brain tissue oxygen and brain temperature in acute phase of severe head injury during mild hypothermia therapy

    朱岩湘; 姚杰; 卢尚坤; 章更生; 周关仁

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of partial pressure of brain tissue oxygen (PbtO2) and brain temperature in acute phase of severe head injury during mild hypothermia therapy and the clinical significance.Methods: One hundred and sixteen patients with severe head injury were selected and divided into a mild hypothermia group (n=58), and a control group (n=58) according to odd and even numbers of hospitalization. While mild hypothermia therapy was performed PbtO2 and brain temperature were monitored for 1-7 days (mean=86 hours), simultaneously, the intracranial pressure, rectum temperature, cerebral perfusion pressure, PaO2 and PaCO2 were also monitored. The patients were followed up for 6 months and the prognosis was evaluated with GOS (Glasgow outcome scale).Results: The mean value of PbtO2 within 24 hour monitoring in the 116 patients was 13.7 mm Hg±4.94 mm Hg, lower than the normal value (16 mm Hg±40 mm Hg) The time of PbtO2 recovering to the normal value in the mild hypothermia group was shortened by 10±4.15 hours compared with the control group (P<0.05). The survival rate of the mild hypothermia group was 60.43%, higher than that of the control group (46.55%). After the recovery of the brain temperature, PbtO2 increased with the rise of the brain temperature. Conclusions: Mild hypothermia can improve the survival rate of severe head injury. The technique of monitoring PbtO2 and the brain temperature is safe and reliable, and has important clinical significance in judging disease condition and instructing clinical therapy.

  18. Role of α-II-spectrin breakdown products in the prediction of the severity and clinical outcome of acute traumatic brain injury

    CHEN, SHANGYU; SHI, QIANKUN; ZHENG, SHUYUN; LUO, LIANGSHEN; YUAN, SHOUTAO; WANG, XIANG; CHENG, ZIHAO; ZHANG, WENHAO

    2016-01-01

    αII-spectrin breakdown products are regarded as potential biomarkers for traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of the present study was to further evaluate these biomarkers by assessing their clinical utility in predicting the severity of injury and clinical outcome of patients with TBI. Eligible patients with acute TBI (n=17), defined by a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of ≤8, were enrolled. Ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was sampled from each patient at 24, 72 and 120 h following TBI. An immunoblot assay was used to determine the concentrations of SBDPs in the CSF samples. The concentrations of SBDPs combined with the GCS score at 24 h after injury and the Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) at 30 days after injury were compared and analyzed. The levels of SBDPs in CSF were markedly increased following acute TBI in comparison with those in the control group. In the early period after TBI, the levels of SBDPs were closely associated with GCS score. Comparisons of the SBDP levels with the severity of injury revealed significant differences between patients with the most severe brain injury and patients with severe brain injury in the first 24 h post-injury (Pinjury. The levels of SBDPs differed significantly between patients grouped according to prognosis (Pinjury and clinical outcome of patients.

  19. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia

    Felicita Pedata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes. Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, that is, microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Proinflammatory cytokines, which upregulate cell adhesion molecules, exert an important role in promoting recruitment of leukocytes that in turn promote expansion of the inflammatory response in ischemic tissue. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. A2A receptors present on central cells and on blood cells account for important effects depending on the time-related evolution of the pathological condition. Evidence suggests that A2A receptor antagonists provide early protection via centrally mediated control of excessive excitotoxicity, while A2A receptor agonists provide protracted protection by controlling massive blood cell infiltration in the hours and days after ischemia. Focus on inflammatory responses provides for adenosine A2A receptor agonists a wide therapeutic time-window of hours and even days after stroke.

  20. Rapid EEG activity during sleep dominates in mild traumatic brain injury patients with acute pain.

    Khoury, Samar; Chouchou, Florian; Amzica, Florin; Giguère, Jean-François; Denis, Ronald; Rouleau, Guy A; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2013-04-15

    Chronic pain is a highly prevalent post-concussion symptom occurring in a majority of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). About half of patients with mTBI report sleep-wake disturbances. It is known that pain can alter sleep quality in this population, but the interaction between pain and sleep is not fully understood. This study aimed to identify how pain affects subjective sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]), sleep architecture, and quantitative electroencephalographic (qEEG) brain activity after mTBI. Twenty-four mTBI patients complaining of sleep-wake disturbances, with and without pain (8 and 16, respectively), were recruited 45 (±22.7) days post-trauma on average. Data were compared with those of 18 healthy controls (no sleep or pain complaints). The PSQI, sleep architecture, and qEEG activity were analyzed. Pain was assessed using questionnaires and a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Patients with mTBI reported three times poorer sleep quality than controls on the PSQI. Sleep architecture significantly differed between patients with mTBI and controls but was within normal range. Global qEEG showed lower delta (deep sleep) and higher beta and gamma power (arousal) at certain EEG derivations in patients with mTBI compared with controls (pEEG frequency bands, mostly during REM sleep, and beta bands in non-REM sleep compared with patients with mTBI without pain and controls (pconcussion symptoms. PMID:23510169

  1. Is the contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries being underestimated in the acute hospital setting?

    O'Toole, O

    2011-04-05

    Alcohol consumption in Ireland has nearly doubled during the period 1989-2001. To evaluate the relationship of alcohol to fatal head injuries in the acute hospital setting we created a data base of all fatal traumatic brain injuries in the Department of Neuropathology at Beaumont Hospital over a ten year period (1997-2006 inclusive). 498 cases were identified (351 males: 147 females). Fatalities were highest in males aged 19-25 years (N=101) and 51-70 years (N=109). Falls (N=210) and road traffic accidents (N=183) were the commonest modes of presentation. 36\\/210 (17%) falls had positive blood alcohol testing, 9\\/210 (4.3%) had documentation of alcohol in notes but no testing, 35\\/210 (16.7%) tested negative for alcohol and 130\\/210 (61.9%) were not tested. The RTA group (N=183) comprised drivers (n=79), passengers (n=47) and pedestrians (n=57). 65\\/79 (82.2%) of drivers were males aged 19-25 years. Blood alcohol was only available in 27\\/79 (34.1%) drivers and was positive in 13\\/27 (48.1%). 14\\/75 (18.7%) pedestrians were tested for alcohol, 4\\/14 (28.6%) were positive. Overall 142\\/183 (77.6%) of the RTA group were not tested. The contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries is probably being underestimated due to omission of blood alcohol concentration testing on admission to hospital. Absence of national guidelines on blood alcohol testing in the emergency department compounds the problem.

  2. Cerebrolysin Asian Pacific trial in acute brain injury and neurorecovery: design and methods.

    Poon, Wai; Vos, Pieter; Muresanu, Dafin; Vester, Johannes; von Wild, Klaus; Hömberg, Volker; Wang, Ernest; Lee, Tatia M C; Matula, Christian

    2015-04-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of injury-related death. In the United States alone, an estimated 1.7 million people sustain a TBI each year, and approximately 5.3 million people live with a TBI-related disability. The direct medical costs and indirect costs such as lost productivity of TBIs totaled an estimated $76.5 billion in the U.S. in the year 2000. Improving the limited treatment options for this condition remains challenging. However, recent reports from interdisciplinary working groups (consisting primarily of neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologists, and biostatisticians) have stated that to improve TBI treatment, important methodological lessons from the past must be taken into account in future clinical research. An evaluation of the neuroprotection intervention studies conducted over the last 30 years has indicated that a limited understanding of the underlying biological concepts and methodological design flaws are the major reasons for the failure of pharmacological agents to demonstrate efficacy. Cerebrolysin is a parenterally-administered neuro-peptide preparation that acts in a manner similar to endogenous neurotrophic factors. Cerebrolysin has a favorable adverse effect profile, and several meta-analyses have suggested that Cerebrolysin is beneficial as a dementia treatment. CAPTAIN is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center, multinational trial of the effects of Cerebrolysin on neuroprotection and neurorecovery after TBI using a multidimensional ensemble of outcome scales. The CAPTAIN trial will be the first TBI trial with a 'true' multidimensional approach based on full outcome scales, while avoiding prior weaknesses, such as loss of information through "dichotomization," or unrealistic assumptions such as "normal distribution." PMID:25222349

  3. Cerebral hemodynamic changes of mild traumatic brain injury at the acute stage.

    Hardik Doshi

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI is a significant public health care burden in the United States. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology following mTBI and its relation to symptoms and recovery. With advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we can investigate brain perfusion and oxygenation in regions known to be implicated in symptoms, including cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. In this study, we assessed 14 mTBI patients and 18 controls with susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM for blood oxygenation quantification. In addition to SWIM, 7 patients and 12 controls had cerebral perfusion measured with arterial spin labeling (ASL. We found increases in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF in the left striatum, and in frontal and occipital lobes in patients as compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.03 respectively. We also found decreases in venous susceptibility, indicating increases in venous oxygenation, in the left thalamostriate vein and right basal vein of Rosenthal (p = 0.04 in both. mTBI patients had significantly lower delayed recall scores on the standardized assessment of concussion, but neither susceptibility nor CBF measures were found to correlate with symptoms as assessed by neuropsychological testing. The increased CBF combined with increased venous oxygenation suggests an increase in cerebral blood flow that exceeds the oxygen demand of the tissue, in contrast to the regional hypoxia seen in more severe TBI. This may represent a neuroprotective response following mTBI, which warrants further investigation.

  4. SECONDARY BRAIN INJURY

    Ida Ayu Basmatika

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Secondary brain injury is a condision that occurs at some times after the primary impact and can be largely prevented and treated. Most brain injury ends with deadly consequences which is caused by secondary damage to the brain. Traumatic brain injured still represents the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals under the age of 45 years in the world. The classification of secondary brain injured is divided into extracranial and intracranial causes. The cause of extracranial such as hipoxia, hypotensi, hyponatremia, hypertermia, hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. The cause of intracranial such as extradural, subdural, intraserebral, intraventrikular, dan subarachnoid hemorrhage. Beside that secondary injury can also be caused by edema and infection. Post-traumatic cerebral injured is characterized by direct tissue damage, impaired regulation of cerebral blood flow (cerebral blood flow / CBF, and disruption of metabolism. Manifestations of secondary brain injured include increased intracranial pressure, ischemic brain damage, cerebral hypoxia and hypercarbi, as well as disruption of cerebral autoregulation. The first priority is to stabilize the patient's cervical spine injury, relieve and maintain airway, ensure adequate ventilation (breathing, and making venous access for fluid resuscitation pathways (circulation and assessing the level of awareness and disability. This steps is crucial in patients with head injured to prevent hypoxia and hypotension, which is the main cause of secondary brain injury.

  5. Brain injury - discharge

    ... 5, 2014. Chuang K, Stroud, NL, Zafonte R. Rehabilitation of patients with traumatic brain injury. In: Winn HR, ed. Youman's Neurological Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011: ...

  6. Lung Injury in Acute Pancreatitis

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Lara Bellacosa; Cristina Felicani

    2009-01-01

    Most knowledge has been accumulated on the mechanisms involved in the development of distant organ injuries during the course of severe acute pancreatitis. Among the various distant organ dysfunctions, both the development of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome represent serious complications. In the following paragraphs the pathophysiological mechanisms capable of determining lung injury during the course of acute pancreatitis will be reviewed. Pancreatic Enzymes and...

  7. Hysteria following brain injury.

    Eames, P

    1992-01-01

    Of 167 patients referred to a unit treating severe behaviour disorders after brain injury, 54 showed clinical features closely resembling those of gross hysteria as described by Charcot. Close correlation was found with very diffuse insults (hypoxia and hypoglycaemia), but not with severity of injury or with family or personal history of hysterical or other psychiatric disorder. The findings may have implications for the understanding of the nature of hysteria.

  8. Is management of acute traumatic brain injury effective?A literature review of published Cochrane Systematic Reviews

    LEI Jin; GAO Guo-yi; JIANG Ji-yao

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate all the possible therapeutic measures concerning the acute management of traumatic brain injury(TBI)mentioned in Cochrane Systematic Reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews(CDSR).Methods:An exhausted literature search for all published Cochrane Systematic Reviews discussing therapeutic rather than prevention or rehabilitative interventions of TBI was conducted.We retrieved such databases as CDSR and Cochrane Injury Group,excluded the duplications,and eventually obtained 20 results,which stand for critical appraisal for as many as 20 different measures for TBI patients.The important data of each systematic review,including total population,intervention,outcome,etc,were collected and presented in a designed table.Besides,we also tried to find out the possible weakness of these clinical trials included in each review.Results:Analysis of these reviews yielded meanfuling observations:(1)The effectiveness of most ordinary treatments in TBI is inconclusive except that corticosteroids are likely to be ineffective or harmful,and tranexamic acid,nimodipine and progesterone show a promising effect in bleeding trauma,traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage,TBI or severe TBI.(2)A majority of the systematic reviews include a small number of clinical trials and the modest numbers of patients,largely due to the uncertainty of the effectiveness.(3)The quality of most trials reported in the systematic reviews is more or less questionable.(4)In addition,lots of other complex factors together may lead to the inconclusive results demonstrated in the Cochrane Systematic Reviews.Conclusions:For clinical physicians,to translate these conclusions into practice with caution is essential.Basic medication and nursing care deserve additional attention as well and can be beneficial.For researchers,high quality trials with perfect design and comprehensive consideration of various factors are urgently required.

  9. Increased Risk of Post-Trauma Stroke after Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Chen, Gunng-Shinng; Liao, Kuo-Hsing; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2016-07-01

    This study determines whether acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an independent risk factor for an increased risk of post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) stroke during 3-month, 1-year, and 5-year follow-ups, respectively, after adjusting for other covariates. Clinical data for the analysis were from the National Health Insurance Database 2000, which covered a total of 2121 TBI patients and 101 patients with a diagnosis of TBI complicated with ARDS (TBI-ARDS) hospitalized between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2005. Each patient was tracked for 5 years to record stroke occurrences after discharge from the hospital. The prognostic value of TBI-ARDS was evaluated using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. The main outcome found that stroke occurred in nearly 40% of patients with TBI-ARDS, and the hazard ratio for post-TBI stroke increased fourfold during the 5-year follow-up period after adjusting for other covariates. The increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke in the ARDS group was considerably higher than in the TBI-only cohort. This is the first study to report that post-traumatic ARDS yielded an approximate fourfold increased risk of stroke in TBI-only patients. We suggest intensive and appropriate medical management and intensive follow-up of TBI-ARDS patients during the beginning of the hospital discharge. PMID:26426583

  10. TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY (TBI) DATABASE

    The Traumatic Brain Injury National Data Center (TBINDC) at Kessler Medical Rehabilitation Research and Education Center is the coordinating center for the research and dissemination efforts of the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) program funded by the National Instit...

  11. Radiation Injury to the Brain

    ... Hits since January 2003 RADIATION INJURY TO THE BRAIN Radiation treatments affect all cells that are targeted. ... fractions, duration of therapy, and volume of [healthy brain] nervous tissue irradiated influence the likelihood of injury. ...

  12. Cognitive activity limitations one year post-trauma in patients admitted to sub-acute rehabilitation after severe traumatic brain injury

    Sommer, Jens Bak; Norup, Anne; Poulsen, Ingrid;

    2013-01-01

    -acute rehabilitation in the Eastern part of Denmark during a 5-year period from 2005 to 2009. Methods: Level of consciousness was assessed consecutively during rehabilitation and at 1 year post-trauma. Severity of traumatic brain injury was classified according to duration of post-traumatic amnesia. The cognitive...... consciousness during the first year post-trauma. At follow-up 33-58% of patients had achieved functional independence within the cognitive domains on the Cog-FIM. Socio-economic status, duration of acute care and post-traumatic amnesia were significant predictors of outcome. Conclusion: Substantial recovery was...

  13. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    ... A. (2008). Mild traumatic brain injury in U.S. soldiers returning from Iraq. New England Journal of Medicine, 358, 453–463. ... and Spotlights U.S. hospitals miss followup for suspected child abuse Q&A with NICHD Acting Director Catherine ...

  14. Brain Injury Association of America

    ... Only) 1-800-444-6443 Welcome to the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) Brain injury is not an event or an outcome. ... misunderstood, under-funded neurological disease. People who sustain brain injuries must have timely access to expert trauma ...

  15. Neuropsychological support to relatives of patients with severe traumatic brain injury in the sub-acute phase

    Norup, Anne; Kristensen, Karin Spangsberg; Siert, Lars;

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have reported emotional distress in relatives of patients with brain injury, but few studies have investigated neuropsychological interventions for relatives. The present study assessed the amount of neuropsychological support as well as the actual number of sessions with a neuropsyc......Many studies have reported emotional distress in relatives of patients with brain injury, but few studies have investigated neuropsychological interventions for relatives. The present study assessed the amount of neuropsychological support as well as the actual number of sessions with a...... characteristics related to the patient: Glasgow Coma Scale, Injury Severity Score, Early Functional Abilities, Functional Independence Measure, Rancho Los Amigos; and to the relative: symptoms of anxiety and depression (SCL-90-R), quality of life (SF-36) and amount and number of sessions of neuropsychological...

  16. PERSONALITY CHANGES IN BRAIN INJURY

    Garcia, Patricia Gracia; Mielke, Michelle M.; Rosenberg, Paul; Bergey, Alyssa; Rao, Vani

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently complicated by alterations in mood and behaviour and changes in personality. We report mild personality changes post-TBI as a possible indicator of traumatic brain injury, but not of injury severity or psychiatric complications.

  17. Perioperative acute kidney injury

    Calvert Stacey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI is a serious complication in the perioperative period, and is consistently associated with increased rates of mortality and morbidity. Two major consensus definitions have been developed in the last decade that allow for easier comparison of trial evidence. Risk factors have been identified in both cardiac and general surgery and there is an evolving role for novel biomarkers. Despite this, there has been no real change in outcomes and the mainstay of treatment remains preventive with no clear evidence supporting any therapeutic intervention as yet. This review focuses on definition, risk factors, the emerging role of biomarkers and subsequent management of AKI in the perioperative period, taking into account new and emerging strategies.

  18. Rho kinase inhibition following traumatic brain injury in mice promotes functional improvement and acute neuron survival but has little effect on neurogenesis, glial responses or neuroinflammation.

    Bye, Nicole; Christie, Kimberly J; Turbic, Alisa; Basrai, Harleen S; Turnley, Ann M

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of neural injuries and diseases. In this manuscript we investigate the role of Rho kinase inhibition in recovery from traumatic brain injury using a controlled cortical impact model in mice. Mice subjected to a moderately severe TBI were treated for 1 or 4weeks with the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, and functional outcomes and neuronal and glial cell responses were analysed at 1, 7 and 35days post-injury. We hypothesised that Y27632-treated mice would show functional improvement, with augmented recruitment of neuroblasts from the SVZ and enhanced survival of newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex, with protection against neuronal degeneration, neuroinflammation and modulation of astrocyte reactivity and blood-brain-barrier permeability. While Rho kinase inhibition enhanced recovery of motor function after trauma, there were no substantial increases in the recruitment of DCX(+) neuroblasts or the number of BrdU(+) or EdU(+) labelled newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex of Y27632-treated mice. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced the number of degenerating cortical neurons at 1day post-injury compared to saline controls but had no longer term effect on neuronal degeneration, with only modest effects on astrocytic reactivity and macrophage/microglial responses. Overall, this study showed that Rho kinase contributes to acute neurodegenerative processes in the injured cortex but does not play a significant role in SVZ neural precursor cell-derived adult neurogenesis, glial responses or blood-brain barrier permeability following a moderately severe brain injury. PMID:26896832

  19. Suppression of acute proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine upregulation by post-injury administration of a novel small molecule improves long-term neurologic outcome in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury

    Van Eldik Linda J

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI with its associated morbidity is a major area of unmet medical need that lacks effective therapies. TBI initiates a neuroinflammatory cascade characterized by activation of astrocytes and microglia, and increased production of immune mediators including proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. This inflammatory response contributes both to the acute pathologic processes following TBI including cerebral edema, in addition to longer-term neuronal damage and cognitive impairment. However, activated glia also play a neuroprotective and reparative role in recovery from injury. Thus, potential therapeutic strategies targeting the neuroinflammatory cascade must use careful dosing considerations, such as amount of drug and timing of administration post injury, in order not to interfere with the reparative contribution of activated glia. Methods We tested the hypothesis that attenuation of the acute increase in proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines following TBI would decrease neurologic injury and improve functional neurologic outcome. We used the small molecule experimental therapeutic, Minozac (Mzc, to suppress TBI-induced up-regulation of glial activation and proinflammatory cytokines back towards basal levels. Mzc was administered in a clinically relevant time window post-injury in a murine closed-skull, cortical impact model of TBI. Mzc effects on the acute increase in brain cytokine and chemokine levels were measured as well as the effect on neuronal injury and neurobehavioral function. Results Administration of Mzc (5 mg/kg at 3 h and 9 h post-TBI attenuates the acute increase in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels, reduces astrocyte activation, and the longer term neurologic injury, and neurobehavioral deficits measured by Y maze performance over a 28-day recovery period. Mzc-treated animals also have no significant increase in brain water content (edema, a major cause of the

  20. Diagnosis of Acute Groin Injuries

    Serner, Andreas; Tol, Johannes L; Jomaah, Nabil;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute groin injuries are common in high-intensity sports, but there are insufficient data on injury characteristics such as injury mechanisms and clinical and radiological findings. PURPOSE: To describe these characteristics in a cohort of athletes. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study......; Level of evidence, 3. METHODS: A total of 110 male athletes (mean age, 25.6 ± 4.7 years) with sports-related acute groin pain were prospectively included within 7 days of injury from August 2012 to April 2014. Standardized history taking, a clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and....../or ultrasound (US) were performed. RESULTS: The most frequent injury mechanism in soccer was kicking (40%), and change of direction was most frequent in other sports (31%). Clinically, adductor injuries accounted for 66% of all injuries and primarily involved the adductor longus on imaging (91% US, 93% MRI...

  1. NONINVASIVE BRAIN STIMULATION IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    Demirtas-Tatlidede, Asli; Vahabzadeh-Hagh, Andrew M.; Bernabeu, Montserrat; Tormos, Jose M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    Brain stimulation techniques have evolved in the last few decades with more novel methods capable of painless, noninvasive brain stimulation. While the number of clinical trials employing noninvasive brain stimulation continues to increase in a variety of medication-resistant neurological and psychiatric diseases, studies evaluating their diagnostic and therapeutic potential in traumatic brain injury (TBI) are largely lacking. This review introduces different techniques of noninvasive brain s...

  2. [Ascites and acute kidney injury].

    Piano, Salvatore; Tonon, Marta; Angeli, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis. Ascites develops as a consequence of an abnormal splanchnic vasodilation with reduction of effecting circulating volume and activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors system causing salt and water retention. Patients with ascites have a high risk to develop further complications of cirrhosis such as hyponatremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and acute kidney injury resulting in a poor survival. In recent years, new studies helped a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ascites and acute kidney injury in cirrhosis. Furthermore, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed for acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome and a new algorithm for their management has been recommended with the aim of an early diagnosis and treatment. Herein we will review the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ascites and acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and we will identify the unmet needs that should be clarified in the next years. PMID:27571467

  3. An experimental study on acute brain radiation injury: Dynamic changes in proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the correlation with histopathology

    Li, Hui, E-mail: lihui@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Li, Jian-peng, E-mail: lijp@sysucc.org.cn [Department of Radiology, Dongguan People' s Hospital, Dongguan City (China); Lin, Cheng-guang, E-mail: linchg@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Xue-wen, E-mail: liuxw@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Geng, Zhi-jun, E-mail: gengzhj@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Mo, Yun-xian, E-mail: moyx@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Rong, E-mail: zhangr@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xie, Chuan-miao, E-mail: xchuanm@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation between the alterations of single-voxel {sup 1}H MRS and the histopathological characteristics of radiation brain injury following radiation. Materials and methods: Twenty-seven rabbits were randomized into nine groups to receive radiation with a single dose of 25 Gy. The observation time points included a pre-radiation and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 wk following radiation. Each treatment group underwent conventional MRI and single-voxel {sup 1}H MRS, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr) were observed over the region of interest, and the presence or absence of lactate (Lac) and lipid (Lip) was detected. Histological specimens of each group were obtained after image acquisition. Results: The values of Cho were significantly increased in the first 3 wk, and decreased over the following 5 wk after radiation. Levels of NAA showed a trend toward a decrease 5 wk after radiation. The levels of Cr were not changed between before and after radiation. The Cho/NAA metabolic ratio was significantly increased in weeks 6, 7, and 8 following irradiation, compared to pre-radiation values. Vascular and glial injury appeared on 2 wk after RT in the histology samples, until 4 wk after RT, necrosis of the oligodendrocytes, neuronal degeneration and demyelination could be observed. Conclusions: MRS is sensitive to detect metabolic changes following radiation, and can be used in the early diagnosis of radiation brain injury.

  4. An experimental study on acute brain radiation injury: Dynamic changes in proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the correlation with histopathology

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation between the alterations of single-voxel 1H MRS and the histopathological characteristics of radiation brain injury following radiation. Materials and methods: Twenty-seven rabbits were randomized into nine groups to receive radiation with a single dose of 25 Gy. The observation time points included a pre-radiation and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 wk following radiation. Each treatment group underwent conventional MRI and single-voxel 1H MRS, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr) were observed over the region of interest, and the presence or absence of lactate (Lac) and lipid (Lip) was detected. Histological specimens of each group were obtained after image acquisition. Results: The values of Cho were significantly increased in the first 3 wk, and decreased over the following 5 wk after radiation. Levels of NAA showed a trend toward a decrease 5 wk after radiation. The levels of Cr were not changed between before and after radiation. The Cho/NAA metabolic ratio was significantly increased in weeks 6, 7, and 8 following irradiation, compared to pre-radiation values. Vascular and glial injury appeared on 2 wk after RT in the histology samples, until 4 wk after RT, necrosis of the oligodendrocytes, neuronal degeneration and demyelination could be observed. Conclusions: MRS is sensitive to detect metabolic changes following radiation, and can be used in the early diagnosis of radiation brain injury.

  5. Acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke due to electric injury.

    Singh Jain, Rajendra; Kumar, Sunil; Suresh, Desai Tushar; Agarwal, Rakesh

    2015-07-01

    Electrical injuries are most commonly due to household accidents.Various factors determine the severity of electric injury, including type of current, amperage, voltage, tissue resistance, pathway of current,and duration of contact with the body. Various types of neurologic damage due to electrical injury have been described in literature. It may manifest as peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord damage, seizures, cerebellarataxia, hypoxic encephalopathy, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Acute ischemic stroke is an infrequent complication of electrical injury. Herein,we report a case of middle-aged man, who accidentally sustained high voltage electrical injury followed by acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed acute infarctin bilateral cerebellar and medial occipital regions. Computed tomographic angiogram of the brain and neck vessels was normal. Possibly,in our patient, the mechanism could be related to direct vascular injury due to electric current. PMID:25684743

  6. Acute kidney injury in children.

    Merouani, A; Flechelles, O; Jouvet, P

    2012-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 5% of critically ill hospitalized children and is a risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality. The current review focuses on new definitions of acute kidney injury, standardized to reflect the entire spectrum of the disease, as well as on ongoing research to identify early biomarkers of kidney injury. Its also provides an overview of current practice and available therapies, with emphasis on new strategies for the prevention and pharmacological treatment of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome. Furthermore, a decision-making algorithm is presented for the use of renal replacement therapies in critically ill children with AKI. PMID:22495187

  7. Evaluation after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Trudel, Tina M.; Halper, James; Pines, Hayley; Cancro, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    It is important to determine if a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has occurred when an individual is assessed in a hospital emergency room after a car accident, fall, or other injury that affects the head. This determination influences decisions about treatment. It is essential to screen for the injury, because the sooner they begin appropriate…

  8. Clinical Outcomes after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Sandsmark, Danielle K

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability that often affects young people. After injury, the degree of recovery can be highly variable, with some people regaining near complete function while others remain severely disabled. Understanding what factors influence recovery is important for counseling patients and families in the acute period after injury and can help guide therapeutic decisions in the acute period following injury. In this review, prognostic algorithms useful for clinicians are discussed. Tools for grading patient outcomes, their role in clinical care and research studies, and their limitations are reviewed. Ongoing work focusing on the development of biomarkers to track TBI recovery and the refinement of clinical outcome metrics is summarized. PMID:27072952

  9. Controversies in preterm brain injury.

    Penn, Anna A; Gressens, Pierre; Fleiss, Bobbi; Back, Stephen A; Gallo, Vittorio

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we highlight critical unresolved questions in the etiology and mechanisms causing preterm brain injury. Involvement of neurons, glia, endogenous factors and exogenous exposures is considered. The structural and functional correlates of interrupted development and injury in the premature brain are under active investigation, with the hope that the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying developmental abnormalities in the human preterm brain can be understood, prevented or repaired. PMID:26477300

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Moderate or Severe

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Moderate or Severe Definition A TBI is classified as moderate or severe when a patient experiences ... skull and enters the brain Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center PATFIAE MN TI LSI ES Traumatic Brain ...

  11. Traumatic brain injury, neuroimaging, and neurodegeneration

    Erin D. Bigler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Depending on severity, traumatic brain injury (TBI induces immediate neuropathological effects that in the mildest form may be transient but as severity increases results in neural damage and degeneration. The first phase of neural degeneration is explainable by the primary acute and secondary neuropathological effects initiated by the injury; however, neuroimaging studies demonstrate a prolonged period of pathological changes that progressively occur even during the chronic phase. This review examines how neuroimaging may be used in TBI to understand (1 the dynamic changes that occur in brain development relevant to understanding the effects of TBI and how these relate to developmental stage when the brain is injured, (2 how TBI interferes with age-typical brain development and the effects of aging thereafter, and (3 how TBI results in greater frontotemporolimbic damage, results in cerebral atrophy, and is more disruptive to white matter neural connectivity. Neuroimaging quantification in TBI demonstrates degenerative effects from brain injury over time. An adverse synergistic influence of TBI with aging may predispose the brain injured individual for the development of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders long after surviving the brain injury.

  12. Two-dimensional electrophoretogram of acute brain injury-associated proteins Comparison between Injured and normal cerebral cortex

    Xuejun Li; Xianrui Yuan; Cui Li; Zefeng Peng; Dun Yuan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:To this date,specific molecular markers for early diagnosis and prognosis monitoring ofcraniocerebral injury in clinical medicine do not exist.Therefore,differential detection of specific proteinsmight play an important role in diagnosis and treatment of this type of brain injury.OBJECTIVE:To compare differential cerebral cortical protein expression of craniocerebral injury patientsand normal subjects through the use of proteomics.DESIGN:Contrast observation.SETTING:Department of Neurosurgery,Xiangya Hospital of Central South University.PARTICIPANTS:Ten patients(6 males and 4 females,20-58 years old),with severe craniocerebral injury,were selected at the Department of Neurosurgery,Xiangya Hospital of Central South University,from June2004 to December 2006.All patients were diagnosed with CT test and Glasgow test(scores <8).Surgery was performed 4-12 hours after craniocerebral injury,and injured cortical tissues of the frontal and temporal lobes were resected for sampling.At the same time,control cortical tissues were collected from frontal and temporal lobes of 2 epileptic patients who underwent hippocampus-nucleus amygdala resection,and 2 lateral ventricular tumor patients who underwent tumor resection.The participants and their relatives provided confirmed consent,and this study received confirmed consent from the local ethics committee. METHODS:Ten samples from injured patients and 4 normal samples were compared through the use of proteomics.Total protein was separated by using two-dimensional electrophoresis with immobilized pH gradients,and the differential protein expressions were compared using image analysis after blue-sliver staining. Differential protein spot expressions were analyzed with a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF MS) and electrospray ionization-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry(ESI-Qq TOF MS).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ①Two-dimensional electrophoresis of protein from

  13. Altered expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 alpha after acute diffuse brain injury Effect of the competitive antagonist 1-aminoindan-1, 5-dicarboxylic acid

    Fei Cao; Mantao Chen; Gu Li; Ke Ye; Xin Huang; Xiujue Zheng

    2012-01-01

    The diffuse brain injury model was conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats, according to Marmarou's free-fall attack. The water content in brain tissue, expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α mRNA and protein were significantly increased after injury, reached a peak at 24 hours, and then gradually decreased. After treatment with the competitive antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α, (RS)-1-aminoindan-1, 5-dicarboxylic acid, the water content of brain tissues decreased between 12-72 hours after injury, and neurological behaviors improved at 2 weeks. These experimental findings suggest that the 1-aminoindan-1, 5-dicarboxylic acid may result in marked neuroprotection against diffuse brain injury.

  14. 重型颅脑损伤急性期病人护理进展%The nursing progress for patients with severe traumatic brain injury in acute phase

    黎艳(综述); 黄丽燕(审校)

    2014-01-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) is a common emergency neurosurgical disease, accounting for about 20%of traumatic brain injury. During the acute phase ,the patients′conditions change qwickly, with much more complications and difficulty to treat and care. Also, it has high rate of disability and mortality, and the mortality rate is about 30%.The quality of nursing care will directly affect the safety of the patients. In this paper, a review is made on disease observation, intracranial pressure monitoring, cerebral protection, enteral nutrition, sedation, treat-ment of dehydration and stress hyperglycemia in patients with sTBI in acut phase.%重型颅脑损伤(severe traumatic brain injury,sTBI)是神经外科常见的急危重症,约占颅脑损伤的20%,其急性期病情变化快,并发症多、治疗困难、护理复杂,致残、致死率高,病死率约30%。而护理质量的高低直接影响着病人的安危。现就重型颅脑损伤急性期病人的病情观察和颅内压监护、脑保护、肠内营养支持、镇痛镇静、脱水治疗、应激性高血糖等重要护理进行综述。

  15. "THE EVALUATION OF THE POSSIBLE EFFECT OF POSITIVE END EXPIRATORY PRESSURE (PEEP ON PHARMACOKINETICS OF PHENYTOIN IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE BRAIN INJURY UNDER MECHANICAL VENTILATION."

    "Elham Hadidi

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Positive ventilation has shown to have an influence on pharmacokinetic and disposition of some drugs.Beacause phenytoin with a narrow therapautic range, is the most commonly used drug for prophylaxis and treatment of early seizures after acute brain injuries, in the present study the effect of short term PEEP (5-10 cm H2O for at least 8 hours on phenytoin serum concentration and pharmacokinetic parameters such as Vmax and clearance in brain injured patients under mechanical ventilation was examined. Ten patients with moderate to severe acute brain injury who were placed on mechanical ventilation with an initial PEEP level of 0-5 cm H2O were included in the study. Patients received phenytoin loading dose of 15 mg/kg followed by a maintenance daily dose of 3-7 mg/kg initiated within 12 hours of loading dose. Sampels were taken on two different occasions before and after PEEP elevation. Total phenytoin serum concentrations were determined by HPLC method. A time invarient Michaelis-Menten pharmacokinetic model was used to calculate Vmax and clearance for each patient.Derrived variables were calculated as follows: Vmax, 3.5-6.8 and 3.7-8.2 mg/kg/day; Clearance, 0.1-0.7 and 0.1-1.2 l/kg/day (before and after PEEP elevation, respectively. Our data have shown a wide range of variability (2.6-32.5 mg/l in phenytoin serum concentrations. There were no statistically significant differences in the measured total concentrations (p=0.721 and calculated Vmax and clearance (p=0.285before and after PEEP elevation. Administration of fluid and inotropic agents, limitation in application of higher levels of PEEP and drug interactions, shall be considered as possible explanations for these findings.

  16. Genetic susceptibility to traumatic brain injury and apolipoprotein E gene

    SUN Xiao-chuan; JIANG Yong

    2008-01-01

    @@ Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as an injury caused by a blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the normal function of the brain. It is a common emergency and severe case in neurosurgery field. Nowadays, there are more and more evidences showing that TBI, which is apparently similar in pathology and severity in the acute stage, may have different outcomes.

  17. Biomarkers in Acute Lung Injury

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Wendt, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and Acute Lung Injury (ALI) result in high permeability pulmonary edema causing hypoxic respiratory failure with high morbidity and mortality. As the population ages, the incidence of ALI is expected to rise. Over the last decade, several studies have identified biomarkers in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid providing important insights into the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of ALI. Several biomarkers have been validated in subjec...

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury Registry (TBI)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — As the number of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) patients has grown, so has the need to track and monitor...

  19. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    Sarvesh Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article.

  20. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Data and Statistics

    ... Submit Search The CDC Injury Prevention & Control: Traumatic Brain Injury & Concussion Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Traumatic Brain Injury & Concussion Basic Information Get the Facts Signs and ...

  1. Pediatric minor traumatic brain injury.

    Gordon, Kevin E

    2006-12-01

    The literature surrounding minor traumatic brain injury is complex, methodologically challenging, and controversial. Although we lack a consistent standardized definition, the annual rate is likely in excess of 200 per 100,000 children. The proportion of children with minor traumatic brain injury who will require neurosurgery is certainly return to play is currently recommended. The recurrence risk for subsequent concussions is elevated, but there is limited documentation of the effectiveness of preventative efforts. Much remains to be learned. PMID:17178354

  2. Bench-to-bedside and bedside back to the bench: seeking a better understanding of the acute pathophysiological process in severe traumatic brain injury

    Denes V Agoston

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite substantial investments, traumatic brain injury (TBI remains one of the major disorders that lack specific pharmacotherapy. To a substantial degree this situation is due to lack of understanding of the pathophysiological process of the disease. Experimental TBI research offers controlled, rapid and cost-effective means to identify the pathophysiology but translating experimental findings into clinical practice can be further improved by using the same or similar outcome measures and clinically relevant time points. The pathophysiology during the acute phase of severe TBI is especially poorly understood. In this Minireview, I discuss the some of the incongruences between current clinical practices and needs versus information provided by experimental TBI research as well as the benefits of designing animal experiments with translation into clinical practice in mind.

  3. Acute brain hemorrhage in dengue

    Somsri Wiwanitkit; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a tropical arboviral infection that can have severe hemorrhagic complication.Acute brain hemorrhage in dengue is rare and is a big challenge in neurosurgery.To perform surgery for management of acute brain hemorrhage in dengue is a controversial issue.Here, the authors try to summarize the previous reports on this topic and compare neurosurgery versus conservative management.

  4. Sleep in traumatic brain injury.

    Vermaelen, James; Greiffenstein, Patrick; deBoisblanc, Bennett P

    2015-07-01

    More than one-half million patients are hospitalized annually for traumatic brain injury (TBI). One-quarter demonstrate sleep-disordered breathing, up to 50% experience insomnia, and half have hypersomnia. Sleep disturbances after TBI may result from injury to sleep-regulating brain tissue, nonspecific neurohormonal responses to systemic injury, ICU environmental interference, and medication side effects. A diagnosis of sleep disturbances requires a high index of suspicion and appropriate testing. Treatment starts with a focus on making the ICU environment conducive to normal sleep. Treating sleep-disordered breathing likely has outcome benefits in TBI. The use of sleep promoting sedative-hypnotics and anxiolytics should be judicious. PMID:26118920

  5. Traumatic Brain Injury Inpatient Rehabilitation

    Im, Brian; Schrer, Marcia J.; Gaeta, Raphael; Elias, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) can cause multiple medical and functional problems. As the brain is involved in regulating nearly every bodily function, a TBI can affect any part of the body and aspect of cognitive, behavioral, and physical functioning. However, TBI affects each individual differently. Optimal management requires understanding the…

  6. Acute Shoulder Injuries in Adults.

    Monica, James; Vredenburgh, Zachary; Korsh, Jeremy; Gatt, Charles

    2016-07-15

    Acute shoulder injuries in adults are often initially managed by family physicians. Common acute shoulder injuries include acromioclavicular joint injuries, clavicle fractures, glenohumeral dislocations, proximal humerus fractures, and rotator cuff tears. Acromioclavicular joint injuries and clavicle fractures mostly occur in young adults as the result of a sports injury or direct trauma. Most nondisplaced or minimally displaced injuries can be treated conservatively. Treatment includes pain management, short-term use of a sling for comfort, and physical therapy as needed. Glenohumeral dislocations can result from contact sports, falls, bicycle accidents, and similar high-impact trauma. Patients will usually hold the affected arm in their contralateral hand and have pain with motion and decreased motion at the shoulder. Physical findings may include a palpable humeral head in the axilla or a dimple inferior to the acromion laterally. Reduction maneuvers usually require intra-articular lidocaine or intravenous analgesia. Proximal humerus fractures often occur in older patients after a low-energy fall. Radiography of the shoulder should include a true anteroposterior view of the glenoid, scapular Y view, and axillary view. Most of these fractures can be managed nonoperatively, using a sling, early range-of-motion exercises, and strength training. Rotator cuff tears can cause difficulty with overhead activities or pain that awakens the patient from sleep. On physical examination, patients may be unable to hold the affected arm in an elevated position. It is important to recognize the sometimes subtle signs and symptoms of acute shoulder injuries to ensure proper management and timely referral if necessary. PMID:27419328

  7. 低场强MRI对急性CO中毒脑损伤的诊断价值%Diagnostic value of low-field MRI for acute poisoning brain injury

    党连荣; 何勤义

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the value of low-field MIR in diagnosis of acute CO poisoning brain injury.Methods The brain MIR and clinical data of 110 patients with acute CO poisoning brain injury confirmed by clinical examination were retrospectively analyzed.Results Long T1 and T2 signal intensity was showed on MRI in cerebral hemispheres and globus pallidus symmetrically.There were three basic types of MIR manifestations,white matter of brain type,globus pallidus type and brain mixed type.Conclusions MRI could be used for confirming the degree and range of acute CO poisoning brain injury.It has important clinical value in the diagnosis,staging and prognosis of patients with acute CO poisoning brain injury.%目的 探讨低场强MRI在急性CO中毒脑损伤诊断中的价值.方法 回顾性分析29例经临床确诊的急性CO中毒脑损伤患者的颅脑MRI和临床资料.结果 CO中毒脑损伤的MRI表现主要为双侧大脑半球白质及苍白球出现长T1、长T2信号灶,两侧对称.MRI表现可分3型,即脑白质型、苍白球型及脑混合型.结论 MRI检查可确定急性CO中毒脑损伤的程度及范围,对急性CO中毒脑损伤的治疗和判断预后有重要的临床指导价值.

  8. Brain Temperature: Physiology and Pathophysiology after Brain Injury

    Ségolène Mrozek; Fanny Vardon; Thomas Geeraerts

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of brain temperature is largely dependent on the metabolic activity of brain tissue and remains complex. In intensive care clinical practice, the continuous monitoring of core temperature in patients with brain injury is currently highly recommended. After major brain injury, brain temperature is often higher than and can vary independently of systemic temperature. It has been shown that in cases of brain injury, the brain is extremely sensitive and vulnerable to small variatio...

  9. Acute Kidney Injury in the Elderly

    Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Palevsky, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The aging kidney undergoes a number of important anatomic and physiologic changes that increase the risk of acute kidney injury (formerly acute renal failure) in the elderly. This article reviews these changes and discusses the diagnoses frequently encountered in the elderly patient with acute kidney injury. The incidence, staging, evaluation, management, and prognosis of acute kidney injury are also examined with special focus given to older adults.

  10. Metabolomics analysis reveals elevation of 3-indoxyl sulfate in plasma and brain during chemically-induced acute kidney injury in mice: Investigation of nicotinic acid receptor agonists

    An investigative renal toxicity study using metabolomics was conducted with a potent nicotinic acid receptor (NAR) agonist, SCH 900424. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques were used to identify small molecule biomarkers of acute kidney injury (AKI) that could aid in a better mechanistic understanding of SCH 900424-induced AKI in mice. The metabolomics study revealed 3-indoxyl sulfate (3IS) as a more sensitive marker of SCH 900424-induced renal toxicity than creatinine or urea. An LC-MS assay for quantitative determination of 3IS in mouse matrices was also developed. Following treatment with SCH 900424, 3IS levels were markedly increased in murine plasma and brain, thereby potentially contributing to renal- and central nervous system (CNS)-related rapid onset of toxicities. Furthermore, significant decrease in urinary excretion of 3IS in those animals due to compromised renal function may be associated with the elevation of 3IS in plasma and brain. These data suggest that 3IS has a potential to be a marker of renal and CNS toxicities during chemically-induced AKI in mice. In addition, based on the metabolomic analysis other statistically significant plasma markers including p-cresol-sulfate and tryptophan catabolites (kynurenate, kynurenine, 3-indole-lactate) might be of toxicological importance but have not been studied in detail. This comprehensive approach that includes untargeted metabolomic and targeted bioanalytical sample analyses could be used to investigate toxicity of other compounds that pose preclinical or clinical development challenges in a pharmaceutical discovery and development. - Research highlights: → Nicotinic acid receptor agonist, SCH 900424, caused acute kidney injury in mice. → MS-based metabolomics was conducted to identify potential small molecule markers of renal toxicity. → 3-indoxyl-sulfate was found to be as a more sensitive marker of renal toxicity than

  11. Traumatic brain injury-induced sleep disorders.

    Viola-Saltzman, Mari; Musleh, Camelia

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are frequently identified following traumatic brain injury, affecting 30%-70% of persons, and often occur after mild head injury. Insomnia, fatigue, and sleepiness are the most frequent sleep complaints after traumatic brain injury. Sleep apnea, narcolepsy, periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias may also occur after a head injury. In addition, depression, anxiety, and pain are common brain injury comorbidities with significant influence on sleep quality. Two types of traumatic brain injury that may negatively impact sleep are acceleration/deceleration injuries causing generalized brain damage and contact injuries causing focal brain damage. Polysomnography, multiple sleep latency testing, and/or actigraphy may be utilized to diagnose sleep disorders after a head injury. Depending on the disorder, treatment may include the use of medications, positive airway pressure, and/or behavioral modifications. Unfortunately, the treatment of sleep disorders associated with traumatic brain injury may not improve neuropsychological function or sleepiness. PMID:26929626

  12. Brain injury - discharge

    ... injuries do not happen. This includes making the bathroom safe, for either a child or an adult , and protecting against falls . Family and caregivers may need to help the person with the following: Exercising ...

  13. Neurobiology of premature brain injury

    Salmaso, Natalina; Jablonska, Beata; Scafidi, Joseph; Vaccarino, Flora M.; Gallo, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Every year in the United States, an estimated 500,000 babies are born preterm (before 37 completed weeks of gestation), and this number is rising, along with the recognition of brain injuries due to preterm delivery. A common underlying pathogenesis appears to be perinatal hypoxia induced by immature lung development, which causes injury to vulnerable neurons and glia. Abnormal growth and maturation of susceptible cell types, particularly neurons and oligodendrocytes, in preterm babies with v...

  14. Missile injuries of the brain

    Data was analyzed relating to a consecutive series of 16 patients of penetrating brain injuries received at forward defense lines. Characteristics studied were the cause of injury, level of consciousness and various neurological deficits presented on initial examination, CT scan findings, the surgical procedures performed and the final outcome after one year of follow-up. One out of 16 patients, died due to severe associated injuries to abdominal viscera and major vessels. Meningitis occurred in one patient during the immediate postoperative period. All patients with motor weakness speech deficits and incontinence showed significant improvement. Hearing loss of one ear persisted in one patient. Two patients developed delayed onset seizures. It is concluded that, patients with penetrating brain injuries should be evacuated to the tertiary care neurosurgical centres as soon as possible. In operation only obviously necrotic brain and easily accessible metal and bone pieces should be removed. There is no need to explore the normal brain as it would only result in increased neurological deficits. The patients with such injuries should receive broad-spectrum antibiotics to prevent the infective complications. (author)

  15. Inflammatory neuroprotection following traumatic brain injury.

    Russo, Matthew V; McGavern, Dorian B

    2016-08-19

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) elicits an inflammatory response in the central nervous system (CNS) that involves both resident and peripheral immune cells. Neuroinflammation can persist for years following a single TBI and may contribute to neurodegeneration. However, administration of anti-inflammatory drugs shortly after injury was not effective in the treatment of TBI patients. Some components of the neuroinflammatory response seem to play a beneficial role in the acute phase of TBI. Indeed, following CNS injury, early inflammation can set the stage for proper tissue regeneration and recovery, which can, perhaps, explain why general immunosuppression in TBI patients is disadvantageous. Here, we discuss some positive attributes of neuroinflammation and propose that inflammation be therapeutically guided in TBI patients rather than globally suppressed. PMID:27540166

  16. Psychotherapy after acquired brain injury: Is less more?

    Rudi Coetzer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the challenges and dilemmas facing psychotherapists working with neurological patients, and in particular those who work in the context of under-resourced brain injury rehabilitation healthcare systems. Through the subjective process of reflective practice integral to clinical supervision, the author attempts to identify five core aspects of psychotherapy intended to augment post-acute long- term rehabilitation programmes and interventions after acquired brain injury.

  17. Brain Injury Safety Tips and Prevention

    ... this? Submit Button Brain Injury Safety Tips and Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir There are ... More HEADS UP Video: Brain Injury Safety and Prevention frame support disabled and/or not supported in ...

  18. Transcranial amelioration of inflammation and cell death after brain injury

    Roth, Theodore L.; Nayak, Debasis; Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Koretsky, Alan P.; Latour, Lawrence L.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is increasingly appreciated to be highly prevalent and deleterious to neurological function. At present, no effective treatment options are available, and little is known about the complex cellular response to TBI during its acute phase. To gain insights into TBI pathogenesis, we developed a novel murine closed-skull brain injury model that mirrors some pathological features associated with mild TBI in humans and used long-term intravital microscopy to study the dynamics of the injury response from its inception. Here we demonstrate that acute brain injury induces vascular damage, meningeal cell death, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that ultimately breach the glial limitans and promote spread of the injury into the parenchyma. In response, the brain elicits a neuroprotective, purinergic-receptor-dependent inflammatory response characterized by meningeal neutrophil swarming and microglial reconstitution of the damaged glial limitans. We also show that the skull bone is permeable to small-molecular-weight compounds, and use this delivery route to modulate inflammation and therapeutically ameliorate brain injury through transcranial administration of the ROS scavenger, glutathione. Our results shed light on the acute cellular response to TBI and provide a means to locally deliver therapeutic compounds to the site of injury.

  19. Family needs after brain injury

    Norup, Anne; Perrin, Paul B; Cuberos-Urbano, Gustavo;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to explore differences by country in the importance of family needs after traumatic brain injury (TBI), as well as differences in met/unmet needs. METHOD: Two hundred and seventy-one family members of an individual with TBI in Mexico, Colombia, Spain...

  20. Hypopituitarism in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Klose, Marianne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    While hypopituitarism after traumatic brain injury (TBI) was previously considered rare, it is now thought to be a major cause of treatable morbidity among TBI survivors. Consequently, recommendations for assessment of pituitary function and replacement in TBI were recently introduced. Given the...

  1. Knowledge of Traumatic Brain Injury among Educators

    Ernst, William J.; Gallo, Adrienne B.; Sellers, Amanda L.; Mulrine, Jessica; MacNamara, Luciana; Abrahamson, Allison; Kneavel, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine knowledge of traumatic brain injury among educators. Few studies have examined knowledge of traumatic brain injury in this population and fewer still have included a substantial proportion of general education teachers. Examining knowledge of traumatic brain injury in educators is important as the vast…

  2. Assessment of Students with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Chesire, David J.; Buckley, Valerie A.; Canto, Angela I.

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of brain injuries, as well as their impact on individuals who sustain them, has received growing attention from American media in recent years. This attention is likely the result of high profile individuals suffering brain injuries. Greater public awareness of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) has also been promoted by sources such as…

  3. The cell cycle and acute kidney injury

    Price, Peter M.; Safirstein, Robert L.; Megyesi, Judit

    2009-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) activates pathways of cell death and cell proliferation. Although seemingly discrete and unrelated mechanisms, these pathways can now be shown to be connected and even to be controlled by similar pathways. The dependence of the severity of renal-cell injury on cell cycle pathways can be used to control and perhaps to prevent acute kidney injury. This review is written to address the correlation between cellular life and death in kidney tubules, especially in acute ki...

  4. Transfusion related acute lung injury

    Sharma Ratti; Bhattacharya Prasun; Thakral Beenu; Saluja Karan; Marwaha Neelam

    2009-01-01

    Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse reaction to transfusion of plasma containing blood components. We describe a case of 10-year-old male child with aplastic anemia, platelet count of 7800/΅l, B positive blood group who developed fever (39.2΀C), difficulty in breathing and cyanosis within 2 hrs after transfusion of a random platelet concentrate. Despite the best resuscitative efforts, the child died within next 24 hrs. The prese...

  5. Exenatide induced acute kidney injury.

    Aijazi, Ishma; Abdulla, Fadhil M; Zuberi, Beyla J; Elhassan, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Exenatide is an incretin mimetic. It was approved by the federal drug authority in 2005 for the treatment of type-2 diabetes. Since it is a relatively new medicine clinicians have limited experience with regards to its side effects and safety profile. We report a 47 year old lady who presented with exenatide associated acute kidney injury. She had type-2 diabetes for 10 years with mild micro albuminuria and normal renal functions. She was also taking a stable dose of metformin, gliclazide, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and diuretic for over a year and there was no history of any recent use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory medications. One week after starting exenatide, she developed severe vomiting, followed by hypotension. She presented with acute renal insufficiency and severe lactic acidosis and had to be dialyzed on emergency basis. To our knowledge this is probably the first case reported in the local United Arab Emirate (U.A.E) population. PMID:25672206

  6. Preconditioning for traumatic brain injury

    Yokobori, Shoji; Mazzeo, Anna T; Hosein, Khadil; Gajavelli, Shyam; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Bullock, M. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) treatment is now focused on the prevention of primary injury and reduction of secondary injury. However, no single effective treatment is available as yet for the mitigation of traumatic brain damage in humans. Both chemical and environmental stresses applied before injury, have been shown to induce consequent protection against post-TBI neuronal death. This concept termed “preconditioning” is achieved by exposure to different pre-injury stressors, to achieve the induction of “tolerance” to the effect of the TBI. However, the precise mechanisms underlying this “tolerance” phenomenon are not fully understood in TBI, and therefore even less information is available about possible indications in clinical TBI patients. In this review we will summarize TBI pathophysiology, and discuss existing animal studies demonstrating the efficacy of preconditioning in diffuse and focal type of TBI. We will also review other non-TBI preconditionng studies, including ischemic, environmental, and chemical preconditioning, which maybe relevant to TBI. To date, no clinical studies exist in this field, and we speculate on possible futureclinical situation, in which pre-TBI preconditioning could be considered. PMID:24323189

  7. Imaging assessment of traumatic brain injury.

    Currie, Stuart; Saleem, Nayyar; Straiton, John A; Macmullen-Price, Jeremy; Warren, Daniel J; Craven, Ian J

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) constitutes injury that occurs to the brain as a result of trauma. It should be appreciated as a heterogeneous, dynamic pathophysiological process that starts from the moment of impact and continues over time with sequelae potentially seen many years after the initial event. Primary traumatic brain lesions that may occur at the moment of impact include contusions, haematomas, parenchymal fractures and diffuse axonal injury. The presence of extra-axial intracranial lesions such as epidural and subdural haematomas and subarachnoid haemorrhage must be anticipated as they may contribute greatly to secondary brain insult by provoking brain herniation syndromes, cranial nerve deficits, oedema and ischaemia and infarction. Imaging is fundamental to the management of patients with TBI. CT remains the imaging modality of choice for initial assessment due to its ease of access, rapid acquisition and for its sensitivity for detection of acute haemorrhagic lesions for surgical intervention. MRI is typically reserved for the detection of lesions that may explain clinical symptoms that remain unresolved despite initial CT. This is especially apparent in the setting of diffuse axonal injury, which is poorly discerned on CT. Use of particular MRI sequences may increase the sensitivity of detecting such lesions: diffusion-weighted imaging defining acute infarction, susceptibility-weighted imaging affording exquisite data on microhaemorrhage. Additional advanced MRI techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging and functional MRI may provide important information regarding coexistent structural and functional brain damage. Gaining robust prognostic information for patients following TBI remains a challenge. Advanced MRI sequences are showing potential for biomarkers of disease, but this largely remains at the research level. Various global collaborative research groups have been established in an effort to combine imaging data with clinical and

  8. Acute kidney injury in children

    Peco-Antić Amira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a clinical condition considered to be the consequence of a sudden decrease (>25% or discontinuation of renal function. The term AKI is used instead of the previous term acute renal failure, because it has been demonstrated that even minor renal lesions may cause far-reaching consequences on human health. Contemporary classifications of AKI (RIFLE and AKIN are based on the change of serum creatinine and urinary output. In the developed countries, AKI is most often caused by renal ischemia, nephrotoxins and sepsis, rather than a (primary diffuse renal disease, such as glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, renovascular disorder and thrombotic microangiopathy. The main risk factors for hospital AKI are mechanical ventilation, use of vasoactive drugs, stem cell transplantation and diuretic-resistant hypervolemia. Prerenal and parenchymal AKI (previously known as acute tubular necrosis jointly account for 2/3 of all AKI causes. Diuresis and serum creatinine concentration are not early diagnostic markers of AKI. Potential early biomarkers of AKI are neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, cystatin C, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1, interleukins 6, 8 and 18, and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP. Early detection of kidney impairment, before the increase of serum creatinine, is important for timely initiated therapy and recovery. The goal of AKI treatment is to normalize the fluid and electrolyte status, as well as the correction of acidosis and blood pressure. Since a severe fluid overload resistant to diuretics and inotropic agents is associated with a poor outcome, the initiation of dialysis should not be delayed. The mortality rate of AKI is highest in critically ill children with multiple organ failure and hemodynamically unstable patients.

  9. [Acute kidney injury in children].

    Amira-Peco-Antić; Paripović, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical condition considered to be the consequence of a sudden decrease (> 25%) or discontinuation of renal function. The term AKI is used instead of the previous term acute renal failure, because it has been demonstrated that even minor renal lesions may cause far-reaching consequences on human health. Contemporary classifications of AKI (RIFLE and AKIN) are based on the change of serum creatinine and urinary output. In the developed countries, AKI is most often caused by renal ischemia, nephrotoxins and sepsis, rather than a (primary) diffuse renal disease, such as glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, renovascular disorder and thrombotic microangiopathy. The main risk factors for hospital AKI are mechanical ventilation, use of vasoactive drugs, stem cell transplantation and diuretic-resistant hypervolemia. Prerenal and parenchymal AKI (previously known as acute tubular necrosis) jointly account for 2/3 of all AKI causes. Diuresis and serum creatinine concentration are not early diagnostic markers of AKI. Potential early biomarkers of AKI are neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin C, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), interleukins 6, 8 and 18, and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP). Early detection of kidney impairment, before the increase of serum creatinine, is important for timely initiated therapy and recovery. The goal of AKI treatment is to normalize the fluid and electrolyte status, as well as the correction of acidosis and blood pressure. Since a severe fluid overload resistant to diuretics and inotropic agents is associated with a poor outcome, the initiation of dialysis should not be delayed. The mortality rate of AKI is highest in critically ill children with multiple organ failure and hemodynamically unstable patients. PMID:25033598

  10. Traumatic brain injury-induced sleep disorders

    Viola-Saltzman M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mari Viola-Saltzman, Camelia Musleh Department of Neurology, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, USA Abstract: Sleep disturbances are frequently identified following traumatic brain injury, affecting 30%–70% of persons, and often occur after mild head injury. Insomnia, fatigue, and sleepiness are the most frequent sleep complaints after traumatic brain injury. Sleep apnea, narcolepsy, periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias may also occur after a head injury. In addition, depression, anxiety, and pain are common brain injury comorbidities with significant influence on sleep quality. Two types of traumatic brain injury that may negatively impact sleep are acceleration/deceleration injuries causing generalized brain damage and contact injuries causing focal brain damage. Polysomnography, multiple sleep latency testing, and/or actigraphy may be utilized to diagnose sleep disorders after a head injury. Depending on the disorder, treatment may include the use of medications, positive airway pressure, and/or behavioral modifications. Unfortunately, the treatment of sleep disorders associated with traumatic brain injury may not improve neuropsychological function or sleepiness. Keywords: traumatic brain injury, insomnia, hypersomnia, sleep apnea, periodic limb movement disorder, fatigue

  11. TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM (TBISS)

    The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had developed and maintains a surveillance system to understand the magnitude and characteristics of hospitalized and fatal traumatic brain injuries in the United State...

  12. Outcome from Complicated versus Uncomplicated Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Iverson, Grant L.; Lange, Rael T.; Minna Wäljas; Suvi Liimatainen; Prasun Dastidar; Hartikainen, Kaisa M.; Seppo Soimakallio; Juha Öhman

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To compare acute outcome following complicated versus uncomplicated mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) using neurocognitive and self-report measures. Method. Participants were 47 patients who presented to the emergency department of Tampere University Hospital, Finland. All completed MRI scanning, self-report measures, and neurocognitive testing at 3-4 weeks after injury. Participants were classified into the complicated MTBI or uncomplicated MTBI group based on the presence/absenc...

  13. Transfusion related acute lung injury

    Sharma Ratti

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse reaction to transfusion of plasma containing blood components. We describe a case of 10-year-old male child with aplastic anemia, platelet count of 7800/΅l, B positive blood group who developed fever (39.2΀C, difficulty in breathing and cyanosis within 2 hrs after transfusion of a random platelet concentrate. Despite the best resuscitative efforts, the child died within next 24 hrs. The present case highlights the fact that TRALI should be kept as a differential diagnosis in all patients developing acute respiratory discomfort within 6 hrs of transfusion. Without a ′gold standard′ the diagnosis of TRALI relies on a high index of suspicion and on excluding other types of transfusion reactions. Notification to transfusion services is crucial to ensure that a proper investigation is carried out and at-risk donor and recipients can be identified, and risk reduction measures can be adopted.

  14. Nephrology Update: Acute Kidney Injury.

    Sarabu, Nagaraju; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) refers to any acute decrease in glomerular filtration rate, regardless of etiology. Staging of AKI has been recommended to stratify AKI patients according to severity of the condition, based on serum creatinine level and urine output. Classification of AKI into prerenal, intrinsic renal, and postrenal etiologies is helpful in differential diagnosis and management. AKI in hospitalized patients typically occurs due to decreased renal perfusion. Drug-induced, contrast-associated, postoperative, and sepsis-associated AKI also can occur. Clinical assessment of a patient with AKI involves a medical record review, thorough history and physical examination, urinary and blood tests, renal imaging, and, in some instances, renal biopsy. Contrast-induced nephropathy is a common iatrogenic etiology of AKI associated with administration of intravenous iodinated contrast media. Measures to prevent AKI should be taken before administration of intravenous iodinated contrast. AKI can result in many short- and long-term complications, including chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Appropriate treatment of AKI patients involves management of the underlying etiology, when possible, and use of nondialytic and dialytic therapies. PMID:27163760

  15. How woodpecker avoids brain injury?

    Wu, C. W.; Zhu, Z. D.; Zhang, W.

    2015-07-01

    It has long been recognized that woodpecker is an excellent anti-shock organism, as its head and brain can bear high deceleration up to 1500 g under fast pecking. To investigate the mechanism of brain protection of woodpecker, we built a finite element model of a whole woodpecker using computed topography scanning technique and geometry modeling. Numerical results show that the periodical changing Young's modulus around the skull affects the stress wave propagation in head and makes the stress lowest at the position of the brain. Modal analysis reveals the application of pre-tension force to the hyoid bone can increase the natural frequency of woodpecker's head. The large gap between the natural and working frequencies enable the woodpecker to effectively protect its brain from the resonance injury. Energy analyses indicate the majority of the impact energy (99.7%) is stored in the bulk of body and is utilized in the next pecking. There is only a small fraction of it enters into the head (0.3%). The whole body of the woodpecker gets involved in the energy conversion and forms an efficient anti-shock protection system for the brain.

  16. Risks of Brain Injury after Blunt Head Trauma

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The association of loss of consciousness (LOC and/or amnesia with traumatic brain injury (TBI identified on CT and TBI requiring acute intervention was evaluated in 2043 children <18 years old enrolled prospectively in a level 1 trauma center ED at University of California, Davis School of Medicine, CA.

  17. A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON THE CT AND MRI IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF ACUTE BRAIN INJURY%CT与MRI在急性颅脑损伤诊断中的比较研究

    付振杰; 付瑜莹

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] To compare CT and MRI in the diagnosis of acute brain injury clinical value. [Methods] In our hospital from July 2008 to July 2010, 60 patients with acute brain injury were collected. 30 patients were treated with CT, 30 cases were tested with MRI examination. We compared the positive rate and abnormal prognosis and abnormal parts of the two methods. [Results] The positive rate of abnormal part detected by MRI examination was significantly higher than that of CT examination, and the sites of brain injury detected by MRI examination was significantly higher than that of CT examination (P < 0.05). [Conclusion] Application of MRI examination has good advantage in diagnosis of brain injury detected by CT.%[目的]比较CT与MRI在急性颅脑损伤诊断中的临床价值.[方法]选择我院2008年7月~2010年7月收治的60例急性颅脑损伤患者作为观察对象,其中30例应用CT检查,30例应用MRI检查,比较两组检查方法发现异常的阳性率及预后以及两种检查方法发现异常的部位.[结果]应用MRI检查发现异常的阳性率明显高于CT检查,且发现颅脑损伤的部位也多于CT检查(P< 0.05).[结论]应用MRI检查颅脑损伤具有较好的诊断优势,明显优于应用CT检查.

  18. Disseminated tuberculosis presenting as acute lung injury

    Mary Grace

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis presenting as acute lung injury is distinctly uncommon, even in India where tuberculosis an endemic disease. Simultaneously, acute lung injury is a highly fatal complication of tuberculosis. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose tuberculosis in such cases. Failure to initiate early treatment can have disastrous consequences as exemplified in this case report. This case attempts to highlight the need to consider tuberculosis as one of the likely causative factors for acute lung injury and the importance of starting empirical antituberculous therapy in suspected cases early.

  19. Quality of Life Following Brain Injury: Perspectives from Brain Injury Association of America State Affiliates

    Degeneffe, Charles Edmund; Tucker, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objective: to examine the perspectives of brain injury professionals concerning family members' feelings about the quality of life experienced by individuals with brain injuries. Participants: participating in the study were 28 individuals in leadership positions with the state affiliates of the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA). Methods:…

  20. Triple Peripheral Nerve Injury Accompanying to Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

    Ižlknur Can

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Secondary injuries especially extremity fractures may be seen concurrently with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Peripheral nerve damages may accompany to these fractures and may be missed out, especially in acute stage. In this case report; damage of radial, ulnar and median nerves which was developed secondarily to distal humerus fracture that could not be detected in acute stage, in a patient who had motor vehicle accident (MVA. 29-year-old male patient was admitted with weakness in the right upper extremity. 9 months ago, he had traumatic brain injury because of MVA, and fracture of distal humerus was detected in follow-ups. Upon the suspect of the peripheral nerve injury, the diagnosis was confirmed with ENMG. The patient responded well to the rehabilitation program treatment. In a TBI patient, it must be kept in mind that there might be a secondary trauma and therefore peripheral nerve lesions may accompany to TBI.

  1. Brain protection by magnesium ion against radioaction brain injury

    Radiation brain injury is a serious complication among the radiotherapy of brain tumors. It is demonstrated that the protective action of magnesium ion in the brain injury from some experimental studies recent years, which is the prospective neuro protective agents overall merits. This article is summarized the causes and the variance of magnesium ion in the brain tissue afterwards the radioactive brain injury, additionally the defense mechanism of magnesium ion from the aspects of inflammation reduction, encephaledema alleviation, anti-apoptosis and improvement of nerve function. (authors)

  2. Staff-reported antecedents to aggression in a post-acute brain injury treatment programme: What are they and what implications do they have for treatment?

    Giles, Gordon Muir; Scott, Karen; Manchester, David

    2013-01-01

    Research in psychiatric settings has found that staff attribute the majority of inpatient aggression to immediate environmental stressors. We sought to determine if staff working with persons with brain injury-related severe and chronic impairment make similar causal attributions. If immediate environmental stressors precipitate the majority of aggressive incidents in this client group, it is possible an increased focus on the management of factors that initiate client aggression may be helpf...

  3. Novel Imaging Techniques in Acute Kidney Injury

    Kalantarinia, Kambiz

    2009-01-01

    Imaging of the kidneys can provide valuable information in the work up and management of acute kidney injury. Several different imaging modalities are used to gather information on anatomy of the kidney, to rule out obstruction, differentiate acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease and to obtain information on renal blood flow and GFR. Ultrasound is the most widely used imaging modality used in the initial work up of AKI. The utility of contrast enhanced computerized tomography a...

  4. Disseminated tuberculosis presenting as acute lung injury

    Mary Grace; V K Shameer; Renjith Bharathan; Kavitha Chandrikakumari

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis presenting as acute lung injury is distinctly uncommon, even in India where tuberculosis an endemic disease. Simultaneously, acute lung injury is a highly fatal complication of tuberculosis. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose tuberculosis in such cases. Failure to initiate early treatment can have disastrous consequences as exemplified in this case report. This case attempts to highlight the need to consider tuberculosis as one of the likely causative factors for acu...

  5. 磁共振在脑干损伤急性期诊断及预后判断中的价值%Value of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis and prognosis prediction of brain stem injury at acute stage

    叶伟; 于明琨

    2010-01-01

    目的 研究脑干损伤患者在急性期(伤后7 d内)的头颅CT和MRI表现特点,以及头颅MRI表现与预后之间的关系,为脑干损伤患者提供影像学诊断依据和预后评价指标.方法 收集本院2007年11月-2008年9月临床确诊为脑干损伤的患者作为研究对象.在脑干损伤早期对其进行头颅CT和MRI检查,伤后随访6个月,根据Barthal指数和残疾分级评分(DRS)来评价患者的预后及生存质量.结果 急性期头颅MRI对脑干损伤的发现率明显高于头颅CT,而且脑干损伤部位不同的患者,其预后差异有统计学意义.结论 在脑干损伤急性期,头颅MRI检查对腩干损伤的检出率较头颅CT高,同时对脑干病灶显示得更加清楚.依据MRI表现可以对脑干损伤进行分类,并为脑干损伤患者提供影像学诊断及预后评价依据.%Objective To study in patients characteristics of head CT and MRI of patients with brain stem injury at acute stage(<7 days)and discuss the relationship of head MRI manifestations and prognosis so as to provide indicators for imaging diagnosis and prognostic evaluation.Methods The patients with brain stem injury from November 2007 to September 2008 were involved in the study.Cranial CT and MRI were performed at early stage after brain stem injury.The patients were followed up for six months to evaluate prognosis and life quality of the patients based on disable rating scale(DRS)and Barthal score.Results MRI could detect more brain stem injuries than CT.The patients with injury at different parts of brain stem showed a statistical difference in regard of prognosis.Conclusions At acute stage of brain stem injury,cranial MRI has higher detection rate and clearer display of the brain stem lesions compared with CT.MRI manifestations can not only help classification of the brain stem injury,but also cater basis for diagnosis and prognosis evaluation of patients with brain stem injury.

  6. Support Network Responses to Acquired Brain Injury

    Chleboun, Steffany; Hux, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) affects social relationships; however, the ways social and support networks change and evolve as a result of brain injury is not well understood. This study explored ways in which survivors of ABI and members of their support networks perceive relationship changes as recovery extends into the long-term stage. Two…

  7. Glucose administration after traumatic brain injury improves cerebral metabolism and reduces secondary neuronal injury

    Moro, Nobuhiro; Ghavim, Sima; Harris, Neil G.; Hovda, David A.; Sutton, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have indicated an association between acute hyperglycemia and poor outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), although optimal blood glucose levels needed to maximize outcomes for these patients’ remains under investigation. Previous results from experimental animal models suggest that post-TBI hyperglycemia may be harmful, neutral, or beneficial. The current studies determined the effects of single or multiple episodes of acute hyperglycemia on cerebral glucose ...

  8. [Perioperative acute kidney injury and failure].

    Chhor, Vibol; Journois, Didier

    2014-04-01

    Perioperative period is very likely to lead to acute renal failure because of anesthesia (general or perimedullary) and/or surgery which can cause acute kidney injury. Characterization of acute renal failure is based on serum creatinine level which is imprecise during and following surgery. Studies are based on various definitions of acute renal failure with different thresholds which skewed their comparisons. The RIFLE classification (risk, injury, failure, loss, end stage kidney disease) allows clinicians to distinguish in a similar manner between different stages of acute kidney injury rather than using a unique definition of acute renal failure. Acute renal failure during the perioperative period can mainly be explained by iatrogenic, hemodynamic or surgical causes and can result in an increased morbi-mortality. Prevention of this complication requires hemodynamic optimization (venous return, cardiac output, vascular resistance), discontinuation of nephrotoxic drugs but also knowledge of the different steps of the surgery to avoid further degradation of renal perfusion. Diuretics do not prevent acute renal failure and may even push it forward especially during the perioperative period when venous retourn is already reduced. Edema or weight gain following surgery are not correlated with the vascular compartment volume, much less with renal perfusion. Treatment of perioperative acute renal failure is similar to other acute renal failure. Renal replacement therapy must be mastered to prevent any additional risk of hemodynamic instability or hydro-electrolytic imbalance. PMID:24656890

  9. Management of acute spinal cord injury.

    Wagner, F C

    1977-06-01

    Based on the experience with 58 patients with acute spinal cord injuries, a system for rapidly evaluating such patients has been developed. With the knowledge that has been acquired clinically and experimentally of spinal cord injury and with the information provided by laminography and by either air or Pantopaque myelography, a reasonably certain diagnosis of the type of spinal cord injury may be made. Treatment designed to restore neurological function may then be instituted promptly. PMID:882906

  10. Treatment of very severe brain injuries

    杨振九; 杨佳勇; 冯承宣; 宋伟健; 孙强

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To sum up the experience in treating very severe traumatic brain injuries.Methods: Retrospective analysis of 68 patients with very severe traumatic brain injuries treated in our hospital from 1997 to 2002 was done.Results: Forty-one (60%) patients died. In the 50 patients treated surgically 27 (40%) survived, 8 recovered well, 9 had moderate disability and 10 had sever deficits. The 18 patients treated non-operatively all died.Conclusions: Much attention should be given to the observation of the changes of severe brain injuries with cranial base injury. Timely operative decompression, basic life support, keeping effective brain blood perfusion and effective oxygen supply, improving cerebral microcirculation and preventing or controlling complications are the main methods to raise the successful rate of treating very severe brain injuries and the life quality of the patients.

  11. All astrocytes are not created equal—the role of astroglia in brain injury

    Moore, Darcie L; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    In two recent papers published in Nature Neuroscience and Cell Stem Cells, Magdalena Götz and colleagues shed new light on the in vivo response of glial cells to brain injury and characterize a highly heterogeneous behavior of astrocytes to chronic and acute brain injury.

  12. Cyclosporine Treatment in Traumatic Brain Injury: Operation Brain Trauma Therapy.

    Dixon, C Edward; Bramlett, Helen M; Dietrich, W Dalton; Shear, Deborah A; Yan, Hong Q; Deng-Bryant, Ying; Mondello, Stefania; Wang, Kevin K W; Hayes, Ronald L; Empey, Philip E; Povlishock, John T; Tortella, Frank C; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2016-03-15

    Operation Brain Trauma Therapy (OBTT) is a consortium of investigators using multiple pre-clinical models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) to bring acute therapies to clinical trials. To screen therapies, we used three rat models (parasagittal fluid percussion injury [FPI], controlled cortical impact [CCI], and penetrating ballistic-like brain injury [PBBI]). We report results of the third therapy (cyclosporin-A; cyclosporine; [CsA]) tested by OBTT. At each site, rats were randomized to treatment with an identical regimen (TBI + vehicle, TBI + CsA [10 mg/kg], or TBI + CsA [20 mg/kg] given intravenously at 15 min and 24 h after injury, and sham). We assessed motor and Morris water maze (MWM) tasks over 3 weeks after TBI and lesion volume and hemispheric tissue loss at 21 days. In FPI, CsA (10 mg/kg) produced histological protection, but 20 mg/kg worsened working memory. In CCI, CsA (20 mg/kg) impaired MWM performance; surprisingly, neither dose showed benefit on any outcome. After PBBI, neither dose produced benefit on any outcome, and mortality was increased (20 mg/kg) partly caused by the solvent vehicle. In OBTT, CsA produced complex effects with histological protection at the lowest dose in the least severe model (FPI), but only deleterious effects as model severity increased (CCI and PBBI). Biomarker assessments included measurements of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) in blood at 4 or 24 h after injury. No positive treatment effects were seen on biomarker levels in any of the models, whereas significant increases in 24 h UCH-L1 levels were seen with CsA (20 mg/kg) after CCI and 24 h GFAP levels in both CsA treated groups in the PBBI model. Lack of behavioral protection in any model, indicators of toxicity, and a narrow therapeutic index reduce enthusiasm for clinical translation. PMID:26671075

  13. Respiratory mechanics in brain injury: A review

    Koutsoukou, Antonia; Katsiari, Maria; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Daganou, Maria; Kyriakopoulou, Magdalini; Koulouris, Nikolaos G.; Rovina, Nikoletta

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical and experimental studies have shown that lung injury occurs shortly after brain damage. The responsible mechanisms involve neurogenic pulmonary edema, inflammation, the harmful action of neurotransmitters, or autonomic system dysfunction. Mechanical ventilation, an essential component of life support in brain-damaged patients (BD), may be an additional traumatic factor to the already injured or susceptible to injury lungs of these patients thus worsening lung injury, in case ...

  14. Effect of AVP on brain edema following traumatic brain injury

    XU Miao; SU Wei; HUANG Wei-dong; LU Yuan-qiang; XU Qiu-ping; CHEN Zhao-jun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) level in patients with traumatic brain injury and investigate the role of AVP in the process of brain edema. Methods: A total of 30 patients with traumatic brain injury were involved in our study. They were divided into two groups by Glasgow Coma Scale: severe traumatic brain injury group (STBI, GCS≤ 8) and moderate traumatic brain injury group (MTBI, GCS>8).Samples of venous blood were collected in the morning at rest from 15 healthy volunteers (control group)and within 24 h after traumatic brain injury from these patients for AVP determinations by radioimmunoassay. The severity and duration of the brain edema were estimated by head CT scan.Results: plasma AVP levels (ng/L) were (mean±SD): control, 3.06±1.49; MTBI, 38.12±7.25; and STBI, 66.61±17.10.The plasma level of AVP was significantly increased within 24 h after traumatic brain injury and followed by the reduction of GCS, suggesting the deterioration of cerebral injury (P<0.01). And the AVP level was correlated with the severity (STBI r=0.919, P<0.01; MTBI r=0.724, P<0.01) and the duration of brain edema (STBI r=0.790, P<0.01; MTBI r=0.712, P<0.01). Conclusions: The plasma AVP level is closely associated with the severity of traumatic brain injury. AVP may play an important role in pathogenesis of brain edema after traumatic brain injury.

  15. Treatment for delayed brain injury after pituitary irradiation

    Treatment for delayed brain injury after pituitary irradiation is discussed. Six cases with delayed brain injury were treated with a combination of dexamethasone or betamethasone, with heparin, glycerol, dextran 40 and some vasodilators. Two cases with temporal lobe syndrome were treated in the early stages of brain injury for a period of over 12 months were almost completely cured, another two cases with chiasma syndrome were treated in the relatively late stages, showed a partial improvement. One case which was irradiated 120 GY during 13 years did not improve. The final case treated with steroids for a short period also resulted in failure and the patient underwent an operation for the removal of the necrotic mass three years after the radiotherapy. Steroid therapy started in the early stages of brain injury after irradiation for over the 12 months is thought to be effective. Heparin therapy was also effective in one out of three cases, but in one of the cases subarachnoid hemorrhage from a traumatic aneurysm occurred during the therapy. In an acute phase, showing edematous change of the injured brain, the administration of glycerol is also thought to be useful. But the effectiveness of the other medicines containing some vasodilators was obscure or doubtful. We propose the following : (1) A meticulous observation is essential for the patients who received high doses of irradiation to diagnose brain injury in the early reversible stage. (2) Steroids should be given immediately in this reversible stage of brain injury before the irreversible ''necrosis'' occurs. (3) Steroids should be maintained for a long period over 12 months. (4) Heparin therapy is also thought to be effective, but careful precautions to avoid hemorrhagic complications before the therapy should be scheduled. This recommended plan may also be used for the treatment of brain injuries after cranial irradiation for other intracranial tumors. (author)

  16. Treatment for delayed brain injury after pituitary irradiation

    Fujii, Takashi; Misumi, Shuzoh; Shibasaki, Takashi; Tamura, Masaru; Kunimine, Hideo; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Hideo; Miyazaki, Mizuho; Miyagi, Osamu.

    1988-03-01

    Treatment for delayed brain injury after pituitary irradiation is discussed. Six cases with delayed brain injury were treated with a combination of dexamethasone or betamethasone, with heparin, glycerol, dextran 40 and some vasodilators. Two cases with temporal lobe syndrome were treated in the early stages of brain injury for a period of over 12 months were almost completely cured, another two cases with chiasma syndrome were treated in the relatively late stages, showed a partial improvement. One case which was irradiated 120 GY during 13 years did not improve. The final case treated with steroids for a short period also resulted in failure and the patient underwent an operation for the removal of the necrotic mass three years after the radiotherapy. Steroid therapy started in the early stages of brain injury after irradiation for over the 12 months is thought to be effective. Heparin therapy was also effective in one out of three cases, but in one of the cases subarachnoid hemorrhage from a traumatic aneurysm occurred during the therapy. In an acute phase, showing edematous change of the injured brain, the administration of glycerol is also thought to be useful. But the effectiveness of the other medicines containing some vasodilators was obscure or doubtful. We propose the following : (1) A meticulous observation is essential for the patients who received high doses of irradiation to diagnose brain injury in the early reversible stage. (2) Steroids should be given immediately in this reversible stage of brain injury before the irreversible ''necrosis'' occurs. (3) Steroids should be maintained for a long period over 12 months. (4) Heparin therapy is also thought to be effective, but careful precautions to avoid hemorrhagic complications before the therapy should be scheduled. This recommended plan may also be used for the treatment of brain injuries after cranial irradiation for other intracranial tumors.

  17. Robust whole-brain segmentation: application to traumatic brain injury.

    Ledig, Christian; Heckemann, Rolf A; Hammers, Alexander; Lopez, Juan Carlos; Newcombe, Virginia F J; Makropoulos, Antonios; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Menon, David K; Rueckert, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    We propose a framework for the robust and fully-automatic segmentation of magnetic resonance (MR) brain images called "Multi-Atlas Label Propagation with Expectation-Maximisation based refinement" (MALP-EM). The presented approach is based on a robust registration approach (MAPER), highly performant label fusion (joint label fusion) and intensity-based label refinement using EM. We further adapt this framework to be applicable for the segmentation of brain images with gross changes in anatomy. We propose to account for consistent registration errors by relaxing anatomical priors obtained by multi-atlas propagation and a weighting scheme to locally combine anatomical atlas priors and intensity-refined posterior probabilities. The method is evaluated on a benchmark dataset used in a recent MICCAI segmentation challenge. In this context we show that MALP-EM is competitive for the segmentation of MR brain scans of healthy adults when compared to state-of-the-art automatic labelling techniques. To demonstrate the versatility of the proposed approach, we employed MALP-EM to segment 125 MR brain images into 134 regions from subjects who had sustained traumatic brain injury (TBI). We employ a protocol to assess segmentation quality if no manual reference labels are available. Based on this protocol, three independent, blinded raters confirmed on 13 MR brain scans with pathology that MALP-EM is superior to established label fusion techniques. We visually confirm the robustness of our segmentation approach on the full cohort and investigate the potential of derived symmetry-based imaging biomarkers that correlate with and predict clinically relevant variables in TBI such as the Marshall Classification (MC) or Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS). Specifically, we show that we are able to stratify TBI patients with favourable outcomes from non-favourable outcomes with 64.7% accuracy using acute-phase MR images and 66.8% accuracy using follow-up MR images. Furthermore, we are able to

  18. Pathogenesis of acute lung injury in severe acute pancreatitis

    SHI Lei; YUE Yuan; ZHANG Mei; PAN Cheng-en

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To study the pathogenesis of acute lung injury in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Methods:Rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, 6, 9 and 12 h after establishment of inducing model. Pancreas and lung tissues were obtained for pathological study, microvascular permeability and MPO examination. Gene expressions of TNF-α and ICAM-1 in pancreas and lung tissues were detected by RT-PCR. Results:After inducing SAP model, the injury degree of the pancreas and the lung increased gradually, accompanied with gradually increased MPO activity and microvascular permeability. Gene expressions of TNF-α and ICAM-1 in pancreas rose at 1 h and reached peak at 7 h. Relatively, their gene expressions in the lungs only rose slightly at 1 h and reached peak at 9-12 h gradually. Conclusion:There is an obvious time window between SAP and lung injury, when earlier protection is beneficial to prevent development of acute lung injury.

  19. Etanercept Attenuates Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats by Reducing Brain TNF-α Contents and by Stimulating Newly Formed Neurogenesis

    Chong-Un Cheong; Ching-Ping Chang; Chien-Ming Chao; Bor-Chih Cheng; Chung-Zhing Yang; Chung-Ching Chio

    2013-01-01

    It remains unclear whether etanercept penetrates directly into the contused brain and improves the outcomes of TBI by attenuating brain contents of TNF- α and/or stimulating newly formed neurogenesis. Rats that sustained TBI are immediately treated with etanercept. Acute neurological and motor injury is assessed in all rats the day prior to and 7 days after surgery. The numbers of the colocalizations of 5-bromodeoxyuridine and doublecortin specific markers in the contused brain injury that oc...

  20. Acute pulmonary injury: high-resolution CT and histopathological spectrum

    Obadina, E T; Torrealba, J M; Kanne, J P

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury usually causes hypoxaemic respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although diffuse alveolar damage is the hallmark of ARDS, other histopathological patterns of injury, such as acute and fibrinoid organising pneumonia, can be associated with acute respiratory failure. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia can also cause acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure and mimic ARDS. This pictorial essay reviews the high-resolution CT findings of acute lung injury and ...

  1. Cognitive impairments in patients with brain injury

    Vladimir Vladimirovich Zakharov; E. A. Drozdova

    2013-01-01

    The paper gives the data of Russian and foreign authors and the results of this paper authors’ investigation of higher cerebral functions in patients who have sustained brain injury (BI). It shows their high prevalence, the predominance of cognitive impairments (CI) over neurological disorders in patients with mild and moderate injury, presents their quantitative and qualitative features (a preponderance of focal symptoms in severe injury and neurodynamic disorders in mild injury), describes ...

  2. Gabapentin in the management of dysautonomia following severe traumatic brain injury: a case series

    Baguley, Ian J; Heriseanu, Roxana E; Gurka, Joseph A;

    2007-01-01

    The pharmacological management of dysautonomia, otherwise known as autonomic storms, following acute neurological insults, is problematic and remains poorly researched. This paper presents six subjects with dysautonomia following extremely severe traumatic brain injury where gabapentin controlled...

  3. Acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis due to multiple wasp stings

    Hemachandar Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    In most patients, wasp stings cause local reactions and rarely anaphylaxis. Acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis are unusual complications of wasp stings. We report a case of acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis secondary to multiple wasp stings. A 55-year-old farmer developed multi organ dysfunction with acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis 3 days after he had sustained multiple wasp stings. The etiology of acute kidney injury is probably both rhabdomyolysis and acute tubular necrosis....

  4. Diabetes Insipidus after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Cristina Capatina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many age groups. Neuroendocrine dysfunction has been recognized as a consequence of TBI and consists of both anterior and posterior pituitary insufficiency; water and electrolyte abnormalities (diabetes insipidus (DI and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH are amongst the most challenging sequelae. The acute head trauma can lead (directly or indirectly to dysfunction of the hypothalamic neurons secreting antidiuretic hormone (ADH or of the posterior pituitary gland causing post-traumatic DI (PTDI. PTDI is usually diagnosed in the first days after the trauma presenting with hypotonic polyuria. Frequently, the poor general status of most patients prevents adequate fluid intake to compensate the losses and severe dehydration and hypernatremia occur. Management consists of careful monitoring of fluid balance and hormonal replacement. PTDI is associated with high mortality, particularly when presenting very early following the injury. In many surviving patients, the PTDI is transient, lasting a few days to a few weeks and in a minority of cases, it is permanent requiring management similar to that offered to patients with non-traumatic central DI.

  5. 45 CFR 1308.16 - Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury.

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury. 1308... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.16 Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury. A child is classified as having traumatic brain injury whose brain injuries are caused by an...

  6. Aquaporin 9 in rat brain after severe traumatic brain injury

    Hui Liu; Mei Yang; Guo-ping Qiu; Fei Zhuo; Wei-hua Yu; Shan-quan Sun; Yun Xiu

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To reveal the expression and possible roles of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) in rat brain, after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). METHODS: Brain water content (BWC), tetrazolium chloride staining, Evans blue staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunofluorescence (IF), western blot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction were used. RESULTS: The BWC reached the first and second (highest) peaks at 6 and 72 hours, and the blood brain barrier (BBB) was severely destroyed at six hours after ...

  7. [Treatment of delayed brain injury after pituitary irradiation].

    Fujii, T; Misumi, S; Shibasaki, T; Tamura, M; Kunimine, H; Hayakawa, K; Niibe, H; Miyazaki, M; Miyagi, O

    1988-03-01

    Treatment for delayed brain injury after pituitary irradiation is discussed. Six cases with delayed brain injury were treated with a combination of dexamethasone or betamethasone, with heparin, glycerol, dextran 40 and some vasodilators. Two cases with temporal lobe syndrome were treated in the early stages of brain injury for a period of over 12 months were almost completely cured, another two cases with chiasma syndrome were treated in the relatively late stages, showed a partial improvement. One case which was irradiated 120 GY during 13 years did not improve. The final case treated with steroids for a short period also resulted in failure and the patient underwent an operation for the removal of the necrotic mass three years after the radiotherapy. Steroid therapy started in the early stages of brain injury after irradiation for over the 12 months is thought to be effective. Heparin therapy was also effective in one out of three cases, but in one of the cases subarachnoid hemorrhage from a traumatic aneurysm occurred during the therapy. In an acute phase, showing edematous change of the injured brain, the administration of glycerol is also thought to be useful. But the effectiveness of the other medicines containing some vasodilators was obscure or doubtful. We propose the following: (1) A meticulous observation is essential for the patients who received high doses of irradiation to diagnose brain injury in the early reversible stage. (2) Steroids should be given immediately in this reversible stage of brain injury before the irreversible "necrosis" occurs. (3) Steroids should be maintained for a long period over 12 months.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2453809

  8. Cognitive impairments in patients with brain injury

    Vladimir Vladimirovich Zakharov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the data of Russian and foreign authors and the results of this paper authors’ investigation of higher cerebral functions in patients who have sustained brain injury (BI. It shows their high prevalence, the predominance of cognitive impairments (CI over neurological disorders in patients with mild and moderate injury, presents their quantitative and qualitative features (a preponderance of focal symptoms in severe injury and neurodynamic disorders in mild injury, describes the predictors of their course and prognosis (the degree of injury is one of the most important predictors, and discusses current trends in the medical correction of detected abnormalities.

  9. Update of Endocrine Dysfunction following Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    Kent Reifschneider

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injuries (TBI are common occurrences in childhood, often resulting in long term, life altering consequences. Research into endocrine sequelae following injury has gained attention; however, there are few studies in children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology and current literature documenting risk for endocrine dysfunction in children suffering from TBI. Primary injury following TBI often results in disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and antidiuretic hormone production and release, with implications for both acute management and survival. Secondary injuries, occurring hours to weeks after TBI, result in both temporary and permanent alterations in pituitary function. At five years after moderate to severe TBI, nearly 30% of children suffer from hypopituitarism. Growth hormone deficiency and disturbances in puberty are the most common; however, any part of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis can be affected. In addition, endocrine abnormalities can improve or worsen with time, having a significant impact on children’s quality of life both acutely and chronically. Since primary and secondary injuries from TBI commonly result in transient or permanent hypopituitarism, we conclude that survivors should undergo serial screening for possible endocrine disturbances. High indices of suspicion for life threatening endocrine deficiencies should be maintained during acute care. Additionally, survivors of TBI should undergo endocrine surveillance by 6–12 months after injury, and then yearly, to ensure early detection of deficiencies in hormonal production that can substantially influence growth, puberty and quality of life.

  10. Nonsurgical interventions after mild traumatic brain injury

    Nygren-de Boussard, Catharina; Holm, Lena W; Cancelliere, Carol;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence regarding the impact of nonsurgical interventions on persistent symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE and other databases were searched (2001-2012) with terms including "rehabilitation." Inclusion criteria were...

  11. Traumatic brain injury and forensic neuropsychology.

    Bigler, Erin D; Brooks, Michael

    2009-01-01

    As part of a special issue of The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, forensic neuropsychology is reviewed as it applies to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and other types of acquired brain injury in which clinical neuropsychologists and rehabilitation psychologists may be asked to render professional opinions about the neurobehavioral effects and outcome of a brain injury. The article introduces and overviews the topic focusing on the process of forensic neuropsychological consultation and practice as it applies to patients with TBI or other types of acquired brain injury. The emphasis is on the application of scientist-practitioner standards as they apply to legal questions about the status of a TBI patient and how best that may be achieved. This article introduces each topic area covered in this special edition. PMID:19333063

  12. Acute Hydrocephalus Following Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Son, Seong; Lee, Sang Gu; Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Woo Kyung

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of acute hydrocephalus secondary to cervical spinal cord injury in a patient with diffuse ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). A 75-year-old male patient visited the emergency department with tetraparesis and spinal shock. Imaging studies showed cervical spinal cord injury with hemorrhage and diffuse OPLL from C1 to C4. We performed decompressive laminectomy and occipitocervical fusion. Two days after surgery, his mental status had deteriorated to drow...

  13. First Aid for Acute Sports Injuries

    Bull, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    This article deals with management of acute sports injuries on the field or on the ice and in the dressing room or in the arena's first-aid room. Its most vital message is “Be prepared”. A team approach and suitable ambulance and hospital back-up are mandatory. Individual management of a specific acute injury should be approached with a practice plan. Collars, splints, back board, doctor's bag, ambu bag, suture tray and emergency medications should be at hand. Care must be taken that no long-...

  14. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Pryhuber, Gloria S.; Chess, Patricia R.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Paul R. Knight; Notter, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by rapid-onset respiratory failure following a variety of direct and indirect insults to the parenchyma or vasculature of the lungs. Mortality from ALI/ARDS is substantial, and current therapy primarily emphasizes mechanical ventilation and judicial fluid management plus standard treatment of the initiating insult and any known underlying disease. Current pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS is not optimal, a...

  15. Health psychology in brain injury rehabilitation services

    Eldred, C.E.

    2006-01-01

    The work carried out in this portfolio was completed while working as a Health Psychologist in Training within a vocational rehabilitation service for adults with acquired brain injury All pieces of work were carried out within this setting expect for the consultancy unit which was carried out within a pilot service delivered by an Adult Disability Team ofa local Social Services. Individuals with acquired brain injury often do not have full understanding of the nature. degree or impact of the...

  16. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI)

    TAJANA ZAH; JASNA MESARIC; VISNJA MAJERIC-KOGLER

    2009-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a complication following transfusion of blood products and is potentially a life-threatening adverse event of transfusion. The first case of fatal pulmonary edema following transfusion was reported in the 1950s. In recent time, TRALI has developed from an almost unknown transfusion reaction to the most common cause of transfusion related major morbidities and fatalities. A clinical definition of TRALI was established in 2004, based on acute res...

  17. Persistent giant U wave inversion with anoxic brain injury

    Peters, Matthew N.; Katz, Morgan J.; Howell, Lucius A.; Moscona, John C.; Turnage, Thomas A.; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Various electrocardiographic changes have been reported in the setting of acute neurological events, among them large, upright U waves. In contrast, the occurrence of inverted U waves is strongly suggestive of cardiovascular disease, most commonly hypertension, coronary artery disease, or valvular abnormalities. Presented herein is the case of a 29-year-old man with previous anoxic brain injury (but without apparent cardiovascular disease) whose electrocardiogram demonstrated persistent giant...

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury: Looking Back, Looking Forward

    Bartlett, Sue; Lorenz, Laura; Rankin, Theresa; Elias, Eileen; Weider, Katie

    2011-01-01

    This article is the eighth of a multi-part series on traumatic brain injury (TBI). Historically, TBI has received limited national attention and support. However, since it is the signature injury of the military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, TBI has gained attention of elected officials, military leaders, policymakers, and the public. The…

  19. Plasticity and Inflammation following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Hånell, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) mainly affects young persons in traffic accidents and the elderly in fall accidents. Improvements in the clinical management have significantly improved the outcome following TBI but survivors still suffer from depression, memory problems, personality changes, epilepsy and fatigue. The initial injury starts a series of events that give rise to a secondary injury process and despite several clinical trials there is no drug available for clinical use that targets se...

  20. Functional level after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Sandhaug, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of the thesis were to describe the functional level (papers I and II) and self awareness of functional deficits (paper III) after moderate and severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), and to evaluate the predictive impact of pre-injury and injury-related factors on functional level (papers I, II) and awareness of functional deficits (paper III). Material and methods: Papers I-II were cohort studies of 55 TBI patients (moderate = 21, severe = 34) and 65...

  1. 'Hidden' Brain Injury a Challenge for Military Doctors

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159316.html 'Hidden' Brain Injury a Challenge for Military Doctors Potentially fatal ... may suffer from a distinctive pattern of "hidden" brain injury, a small study finds. "Blast-related brain ...

  2. 采用CT技术研究颅脑损伤患者的早期神经功能恢复:脑水肿和脑肿胀的比较%CT study of patients neurological function recovery in the acute stage of brain injury:compared brain swelling and brain edema

    李龙; 池晓宇; 黄新才; 刘卫国; 蒋德清

    2002-01-01

    @@ ckground: Secondary clinical manifestations following brain injury may be due to either intracranial hemorrhage or brain edema and brain swelling.But brain swelling hasn't been understand adequately in clinical practice.Objective: 71 patients with brain edema or brain swelling following brain injury admitted to our hospital during Jan 1998 to Dec 1999 were selected for this study.Their CT findings were compared,and CT characters of traumatic brain swelling and neurological function recovery were analyzed emphatically.Unit: Department of Radiology,Guangdong Provincial Corps Hospital,Chinese People's Armed Police Forces.

  3. Acute kidney injury: current concepts and new insights

    Yavuzer Koza

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Acute kidney injury, which was previously named as acute renal failure, is a complex clinical disorder and continues to be associated with poor outcomes. It is frequently seen in hospitalized patients, especially in critically ill patients. The primary causes of acute kidney injury are divided into three categories: prerenal, intrinsic renal and postrenal. The definition and staging of acute kidney injury are mainly based on the risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage kid...

  4. Traumatic brain injuries: Forensic and expertise aspects

    Vuleković Petar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Traumatic brain injuries have major socio-economic importance due to their frequency, high mortality and serious consequences. According to their nature the consequences of these injuries may be classified as neurological, psychiatric and esthetic. Various lesions of brain structures cause neurological consequences such as disturbance of motor functions, sensibility, coordination or involuntary movements, speech disturbances and other deviations, as well as epilepsy. Psychiatric consequences include cognitive deficit, emotional disturbances and behavior disturbances. Criminal-legal aspect of traumatic brain injuries and litigation. Criminal-legal aspect of traumatic brain injuries expertise understands the qualification of these injuries as mild, serious and qualified serious body injuries as well as the expertise about the mechanisms of their occurrence. Litigation expertise includes the estimation of pain, fear, diminished, i.e. lost vital activity and disability, esthetic marring, and psychological suffer based on the diminished general vital activity and esthetic marring. Competence and timing of expertise. Evaluation of consequences of traumatic brain injuries should be performed only when it can be positively confirmed that they are permanent, i.e. at least one year after the injury. Expertise of these injuries is interdisciplinary. Among clinical doctors the most competent medical expert is the one who is in charge for diagnostics and injury treatment, with the recommendation to avoid, if possible, the doctor who conducted treatment. For the estimation of general vital activity, the neurological consequences, pain and esthetic marring expertise, the most competent doctors are neurosurgeon and neurologist. Psychological psychiatric consequences and fear expertise have to be performed by the psychiatrist. Specialists of forensic medicine contribute with knowledge of criminal low and legal expertise.

  5. Centralized rehabilitation after servere traumatic brain injury

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Liebach, Annette; Nordenbo, Annette Mosbæk

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present results from the first 3 years of centralized subacute rehabilitation after very severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to compare results of centralized versus decentralized rehabilitation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospectively, the most severely injured group of adults from...... an uptake area of 2.4 million in Denmark were included at admission to a regional brain injury unit (BIU), on average 19 days after injury. Patients in the retrospective study used for comparison were randomly chosen from the national hospital register. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Out of 117 patients in...

  6. Acute kidney injury following isotretinoin treatment

    Armaly, Zaher; Haj, Shehadeh; Bowirrat, Abdalla; Alhaj, Mohammed; Jabbour, Adel; Fahoum, Yumna; Abassi, Zaid

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 17 Final Diagnosis: Acute kidney injury Symptoms: Flank pain • nausea • vomiting Medication: Isotretinoin Clinical Procedure: Acne treatment Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Unknown etiology Background: Isotretinoin is widely used for the treatment of acne that is unresponsive to topical therapy. Despite its efficacy, isotretinoin has various adverse effects, including cheilitis, increased risk of cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infections, and liver function abnormalities. C...

  7. A SCUBA diver with acute kidney injury.

    Gleeson, Patrick James; Kelly, Yvelynne; Ni Sheaghdha, Eadaoin; Lappin, David

    2015-01-01

    An otherwise healthy young man was transferred to our hospital after a diving incident. He had made an uncontrolled ascent from 10 m. On arrival he appeared well. No hypotensive episodes occurred during the transfer. He denied having arthralgias, back pain, dyspnoea or neurological symptoms. Laboratory investigations revealed acutely elevated creatinine (170 µmol/L) and creatine kinase (909 U/L). Radiology was consistent with a focus of pulmonary barotrauma and intrinsic renal disease. Creatine kinase is a marker of arterial gas embolism (AGE). We determined that our patient suffered acute kidney injury as a result of gas embolisation to his renal vasculature from an area of pulmonary barotrauma. Creatinine fell the following day in response to aggressive intravenous fluids. This is the first reported case of acute kidney injury secondary to AGE. Biochemical studies should be part of the routine assessment of patients involved in diving incidents. PMID:25948841

  8. Recovery after Brain Injury: Mechanisms and Principles

    Randolph J. Nudo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The past 20 years have represented an important period in the development of principles underlying neuroplasticity, especially as they apply to recovery from neurological injury. It is now generally accepted that acquired brain injuries, such as occur in stroke or trauma, initiate a cascade of regenerative events that last for at least several weeks, if not months. Many investigators have pointed out striking parallels between post-injury plasticity and the molecular and cellular events that take place during normal brain development. As evidence for the principles and mechanisms underlying post-injury neuroplasticity has been gleaned from both animal models and human populations, novel approaches to therapeutic intervention have been proposed. One important theme has persisted as the sophistication of clinicians and scientists in their knowledge of neuroplasticity mechanisms has grown: Behavioral experience is the most potent modulator of brain plasticity. While there is substantial evidence for this principle in normal, healthy brains, the injured brain is particularly malleable. Based on the quantity and quality of motor experience, the brain can be reshaped after injury in either adaptive or maladaptive ways. This paper reviews selected studies that have demonstrated the neurophysiological and neuroanatomical changes that are triggered by motor experience, by injury, and the interaction of these processes. In addition, recent studies using new and elegant techniques are providing novel perspectives on the events that take place in the injured brain, providing a real-time window into post-injury plasticity. These new approaches are likely to accelerate the pace of basic research, and provide a wealth of opportunities to translate basic principles into therapeutic methodologies.

  9. Manganese: Brain Species and Mechanisms of Brain Injury

    Neth, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Manganism is a Parkinson-related disease, which can arise by accumulation of the essential trace element manganese (Mn) in the brain by overexposure. Versatile Mn-species and imbalances of trace elements in serum and brain tissue of Mn-exposed rats were analyzed by methods of metallomics. Additionally, non-targeted metabolomics of brain tissue served for analysis of the multilateral mechanisms, which can lead to the neuronal injury. Finally, results from metallomics were correlated to the fin...

  10. Gender and environmental effects on regional brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Chen, X; Li, Y; Kline, A E; Dixon, C E; Zafonte, R D; Wagner, A K

    2005-01-01

    Alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression have been reported in multiple brain regions acutely after traumatic brain injury, however neither injury nor post-injury environmental enrichment has been shown to affect hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression in male rats chronically post-injury. Studies have demonstrated hormone-related neuroprotection for female rats after traumatic brain injury, and estrogen and exercise both influence brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. Despite recent studies suggesting that exposure post-traumatic brain injury to environmental enrichment improves cognitive recovery in male rats, we have shown that environmental enrichment mediated improvements with spatial learning are gender specific and only positively affect males. Therefore the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of gender and environmental enrichment on chronic post-injury cortical and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein expression. Sprague-Dawley male and cycling female rats were placed into environmental enrichment or standard housing after controlled cortical impact or sham surgery. Four weeks post-surgery, hippocampal and frontal cortex brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression were examined using Western blot. Results revealed significant increases in brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the frontal cortex ipsilateral to injury for males (P=0.03). Environmental enrichment did not augment this effect. Neither environmental enrichment nor injury significantly affected cortical brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression for females. In the hippocampus ipsilateral to injury brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression for both males and females was half (49% and 51% respectively) of that observed in shams housed in the standard environment. For injured males, there was a trend in this region for environmental enrichment to restore brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels to sham values

  11. Some biomarkers of acute kidney injury are increased in pre-renal acute injury

    Nejat, Maryam; Pickering, John W; Devarajan, Prasad; Edelstein, Charles L.; Walker, Robert J.; Endre, Zoltán H; Bonventre, Joseph Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Pre-renal acute kidney injury (AKI) is assumed to represent a physiological response to underperfusion. Its diagnosis is retrospective after a transient rise in plasma creatinine, usually associated with evidence of altered tubular transport, particularly that of sodium. In order to test whether pre-renal AKI is reversible because injury is less severe than that of sustained AKI, we measured urinary biomarkers of injury (cystatin C, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), \\(\\gamma\\...

  12. Low level laser therapy for traumatic brain injury

    Wu, Qiuhe; Huang, Ying-Ying; Dhital, Saphala; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Whalen, Michael J.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    Low level laser (or light) therapy (LLLT) has been clinically applied for many indications in medicine that require the following processes: protection from cell and tissue death, stimulation of healing and repair of injuries, and reduction of pain, swelling and inflammation. One area that is attracting growing interest is the use of transcranial LLLT to treat stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The fact that near-infrared light can penetrate into the brain would allow non-invasive treatment to be carried out with a low likelihood of treatment-related adverse events. LLLT may have beneficial effects in the acute treatment of brain damage injury by increasing respiration in the mitochondria, causing activation of transcription factors, reducing key inflammatory mediators, and inhibiting apoptosis. We tested LLLT in a mouse model of TBI produced by a controlled weight drop onto the skull. Mice received a single treatment with 660-nm, 810-nm or 980-nm laser (36 J/cm2) four hours post-injury and were followed up by neurological performance testing for 4 weeks. Mice with moderate to severe TBI treated with 660- nm and 810-nm laser had a significant improvement in neurological score over the course of the follow-up and histological examination of the brains at sacrifice revealed less lesion area compared to untreated controls. Further studies are underway.

  13. Minocycline Attenuates Iron-Induced Brain Injury.

    Zhao, Fan; Xi, Guohua; Liu, Wenqaun; Keep, Richard F; Hua, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Iron plays an important role in brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Our previous study found minocycline reduces iron overload after ICH. The present study examined the effects of minocycline on the subacute brain injury induced by iron. Rats had an intracaudate injection of 50 μl of saline, iron, or iron + minocycline. All the animals were euthanized at day 3. Rat brains were used for immunohistochemistry (n = 5-6 per each group) and Western blotting assay (n = 4). Brain swelling, blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and iron-handling proteins were measured. We found that intracerebral injection of iron resulted in brain swelling, BBB disruption, and brain iron-handling protein upregulation (p < 0.05). The co-injection of minocycline with iron significantly reduced iron-induced brain swelling (n = 5, p < 0.01). Albumin, a marker of BBB disruption, was measured by Western blot analysis. Minocycline significantly decreased albumin protein levels in the ipsilateral basal ganglia (p < 0.01). Iron-handling protein levels in the brain, including ceruloplasmin and transferrin, were reduced in the minocycline co-injected animals. In conclusion, the present study suggests that minocycline attenuates brain swelling and BBB disruption via an iron-chelation mechanism. PMID:26463975

  14. Cellular and temporal expression of NADPH oxidase (NOX) isotypes after brain injury

    Cooney, Sean J.; Bermudez-Sabogal, Sara L; Byrnes, Kimberly R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain injury results in an increase in the activity of the reactive oxygen species generating NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzymes. Preliminary studies have shown that NOX2, NOX3, and NOX4 are the most prominently expressed NOX isotypes in the brain. However, the cellular and temporal expression profile of these isotypes in the injured and non-injured brain is currently unclear. Methods Double immunofluorescence for NOX isotypes and brain cell types was performed at acute (24 hours), sub-ac...

  15. The innate immune response in ischemic acute kidney injury

    Jang, Hye Ryoun; Rabb, Hamid

    2008-01-01

    Kidney ischemia reperfusion injury is a major cause of morbidity in both allograft and native kidneys. Ischemia reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury is characterized by early, allo-antigen independent inflammation. Major components of the innate immune system are activated and participate in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury, plus prime the allograft kidney for rejection. Soluble members of innate immunity implicated in acute kidney injury include the complement system, cytokines, an...

  16. Acute alcohol-induced liver injury

    Gavin Edward Arteel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption is customary in most cultures and alcohol abuse is common worldwide. For example, more than 50% of Americans consume alcohol, with an estimated 23.1% of Americans participating in heavy and/or binge drinking at least once a month. A safe and effective therapy for alcoholic liver disease (ALD in humans is still elusive, despite significant advances in our understanding of how the disease is initiated and progresses. It is now clear that acute alcohol binges not only can be acutely toxic to the liver, but also can contribute to the chronicity of ALD. Potential mechanisms by which acute alcohol causes damage include steatosis, dysregulated immunity and inflammation and altered gut permeability. Recent interest in modeling acute alcohol exposure has yielded new insights into potential mechanisms of acute injury, that also may well be relevant for chronic ALD. Recent work by this group on the role of PAI-1 and fibrin metabolism in mediating acute alcohol-induced liver damage serve as an example of possible new targets that may be useful for alcohol abuse, be it acute or chronic.

  17. Managing traumatic brain injury secondary to explosions

    Burgess Paula

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Explosions and bombings are the most common deliberate cause of disasters with large numbers of casualties. Despite this fact, disaster medical response training has traditionally focused on the management of injuries following natural disasters and terrorist attacks with biological, chemical, and nuclear agents. The following article is a clinical primer for physicians regarding traumatic brain injury (TBI caused by explosions and bombings. The history, physics, and treatment of TBI are outlined.

  18. Change of G-protein expression in the myocardial damage induced by acute brain injury%急性脑损伤致心肌损害中心肌G蛋白表达的改变

    郭彩霞; 曾翔俊; 杜凤和; 陈步星

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the effect of Gs-protein and Gq-protein on cardiac damage induced by acute brain injury,and the contribution ofβ1-ARB and 5-HT2A RB to G-protein.Methods The Wistar rat model of acute brain injury was built.The mRNA level of Gsαand Gqαwere evaluated with real time PCR,and the protein level of Gsαand Gqαwere detected by Western blotting assay.Results Compared with NORMgroup,the mRNA level of Gsαwas (92.6 ±24)%in SHAMgroup,(39.7 ±30)%in ABI group and (80.1 ± 1 2)% in BETA group,respectively.The mRNA level of Gsαwas significantly decreased in ABI group compared to SHAM group,but significantly increased in β1-ARB treated BETA group,and there is no difference of GsαmRNA level betweenβ1-ARB treated BETA and SHAM groups.Compared with NORM group,the protein level of Gqαwas (1 05 ±30)% in SHAM group,(1 1 0 ±1 4)% in ABI group and (1 07 ±23)% in BETA group.There was no statistical difference among three groups.Conclusion The mRNA and protein of Gsαwere significantly decreased after acute brain injury,which indicates the occurrence of myocardial damage induced by acute brain injury may be related to the inhibition in signal transduction pathway mediated Gs-protein.Gs-protein may be in the form of expression change involved in the occurrence of myocardial damage induced by acute brain injury.%目的:建立动物急性脑损伤(acute brain injury,ABI)模型,观察心肌Gs 蛋白α亚基(αsubunite of Gs ,Gsα)和Gq 蛋白α亚基(αsubunite of Gq ,Gqα)的变化,探讨Gs 和Gq 在急性脑损伤致心肌损伤中的作用及其β1肾上腺素受体阻断剂(adrenalinβ1 receptor blocker,β1-ARB)和5-羟色胺受体2A阻断剂(5-hydroxytryptamine 2A receptor blocker,5-HT2ARB)对G蛋白的影响。方法复制Wistar大鼠ABI模型(n=8)。采用数字表法随机分为正常组(NORM)、假手术对照组(SHAM)、急性脑损伤模型组(ABI)、β1-ARB组(BETA)和5-HT2A RB组(KETA组

  19. First aid for acute sports injuries.

    Bull, R C

    1987-09-01

    This article deals with management of acute sports injuries on the field or on the ice and in the dressing room or in the arena's first-aid room. Its most vital message is "Be prepared". A team approach and suitable ambulance and hospital back-up are mandatory. Individual management of a specific acute injury should be approached with a practice plan. Collars, splints, back board, doctor's bag, ambu bag, suture tray and emergency medications should be at hand. Care must be taken that no long-term harm befalls the player. The attending physician must be knowledgeable about preventive equipment and immediate institution of rehabilitation procedures, and must try to inform the coach or trainer and parent as to when the athlete can safely return to play. It is important that the athlete not return to play until he/she is 100% fit. PMID:21263977

  20. Sodium hypochlorite-induced acute kidney injury

    Brandon W Peck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium hypochlorite (bleach is commonly used as an irrigant during dental proce-dures as well as a topical antiseptic agent. Although it is generally safe when applied topically, reports of accidental injection of sodium hypochlorite into tissue have been reported. Local necrosis, pain and nerve damage have been described as a result of exposure, but sodium hypo-chlorite has never been implicated as a cause of an acute kidney injury (AKI. In this report, we describe the first case of accidental sodium hypochlorite injection into the infraorbital tissue during a dental procedure that precipitated the AKI. We speculate that oxidative species induced by sodium hypochlorite caused AKI secondary to the renal tubular injury, causing mild acute tubular necrosis.

  1. Continuous Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Infusion After Methylprednisolone Treatment in Severe Spinal Cord Injury

    Kim, Daniel H.; Jahng, Tae-Ahn

    2004-01-01

    Although methylprednisolone (MP) is the standard of care in acute spinal cord injury (SCI), its functional outcome varies in clinical situation. Recent report demonstrated that MP depresses the expression of growth-promoting neurotrophic factors after acute SCI. The present study was designed to investigate whether continuous infusion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) after MP treatment promotes functional recovery in severe SCI. Contusion injury was produced at the T10 vertebral le...

  2. Auditory Orienting and Inhibition of Return in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A FMRI study

    Mayer, Andrew R.; Mannell, Maggie V.; Ling, Josef; Elgie, Robert; Gasparovic, Charles; Phillips, John P.; Doezema, David; Yeo, Ronald A

    2009-01-01

    The semi-acute phase of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is associated with deficits in the cognitive domains of attention, memory, and executive function, which previous work suggests may be related to a specific deficit in disengaging attentional focus. However, to date there have only been a few studies that have employed dynamic imaging techniques to investigate the potential neurological basis of these cognitive deficits during the semi-acute stage of injury. Therefore, event-related f...

  3. Dengue-associated acute kidney injury

    Oliveira, João Fernando Picollo; Burdmann, Emmanuel A

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is presently the most relevant viral infection transmitted by a mosquito bite that represents a major threat to public health worldwide. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious and potentially lethal complication of this disease, and the actual incidence is unknown. In this review, we will assess the most relevant epidemiological and clinical data regarding dengue and the available evidence on the frequency, etiopathogenesis, outcomes and treatment of dengue-associated AKI.

  4. Mediators of Inflammation in Acute Kidney Injury

    Ali Akcay; Quocan Nguyen; Edelstein, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains to be an independent risk factor for mortality and morbidity. Inflammation is now believed to play a major role in the pathopathophysiology of AKI. It is hypothesized that in ischemia, sepsis and nephrotoxic models that the initial insult results in morphological and/or functional changes in vascular endothelial cells and/or in tubular epithelium. Then, leukocytes including neutrophils, macrophages, natural killer cells, and lymphocytes infiltrate into the in...

  5. Determinants of postoperative acute kidney injury

    Abelha, Fernando José; Botelho, Miguela; Fernandes, Vera; Barros, Henrique

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Development of acute kidney injury (AKI) during the perioperative period is associated with increases in morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to evaluate the incidence and determinants of postoperative AKI after major noncardiac surgery in patients with previously normal renal function. Methods This retrospective cohort study was carried out in the multidisciplinary Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU) with five intensive care beds. The study population consisted of 1166 patients wi...

  6. Classification of acute subaxial cervical spine injury

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Study Design Literature review Objective The aim of this thesis is to compare the main classification systems available for classifying acute subaxial cervical spinal injury and compare their relative strengths and weaknesses, especially in their ability to guide treatment and predict prognosis. Methods A PICO question was formulated and used to select search terms. The search terms were used to search the online database Pubmed/Medline for English language revi...

  7. Time dysperception perspective for acquired brain injury

    Federica ePiras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Distortions of time perception are presented by a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we survey timing abilities in clinical populations with acquired brain injuries in key cerebral areas recently implicated in human studies of timing. We purposely analyzed the complex relationship between cognitive and contextual factors involved in time estimation, as to characterize the correlation between timed and other cognitive behaviors in each group. We assume that interval timing is a solid construct to study cognitive dysfunctions following brain injury, as timing performance is a sensitive metric of information processing, while temporal cognition has the potential of influencing a wide range of cognitive processes. Moreover, temporal performance is a sensitive assay of damage to the underlying neural substrate after a brain insult. Further research in neurological and psychiatric patients will definitively answer the question of whether time distortions are manifestations of cognitive and behavioral symptoms of brain damage and definitively clarify their mechanisms.

  8. Prehospital Care of Traumatic Brain Injury

    TVSP Murthy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI occurs when a sudden trauma causes brain damage. Depending on the severity, outcome can be anything from complete recovery to permanent disability or death. Emergency medical services play a dominant role in provision of primary care at the site of injury. Since little can be done to reverse the initial brain damage due to trauma, attempts to prevent further brain damage and stabilize the patient before he can be brought to a specialized trauma care centre play a pivotal role in the final outcome. Recognition and early treatment of hypoten-sion, hypoxemia, and hypoglycemia, objective neurological assessment based on GCS and pupils, and safe transport to an optimal care centre are the key elements of prehospital care of a TBI patient.

  9. Brain SPECT in severs traumatic head injury

    The aim of this work was to compare the results of the early brain scintigraphy in traumatic brain injury to the long term neuropsychological behavior. Twenty four patients had an ECD-Tc99m SPECT, within one month after the trauma; scintigraphic abnormalities were evaluated according to a semi-quantitative analysis. The neuropsychological clinical investigation was interpreted by a synthetic approach to evaluate abnormalities related to residual motor deficit, frontal behavior, memory and language disorders. Fourteen patients (58%) had sequela symptoms. SPECT revealed 80 abnormalities and CT scan only 31. Statistical analysis of uptake values showed significantly lower uptake in left basal ganglia and brain stem in patients with sequela memory disorders. We conclude that the brain perfusion scintigraphy is able to detect more lesions than CT and that it could really help to predict the neuropsychological behavior after severe head injury. Traumatology could become in the future a widely accepted indication of perfusion SPECT. (authors)

  10. Progress in imaging of brain radiation injury

    The mechanisms of brain radiation injury mainly include three hypotheses: vascular injury, glial cells damage and immune response. Most scholars' studies have recently supported the former two ones. Vascular injury plays a major role in the effect of delayed radiation injury. Focal brain injury and diffuse white matter injury can be definitely diagnosed by CT and MRI. T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) in MRI shows high sensitivity in water contents, and is not affected by the beam hardening artifacts from the cranial base. Compared with CT, the sensitivity of MR for detecting white matter lesions is two to threefold higher. When lesions occurs at the site of an irradiated cerebral tumor, tumor recurrence and focal cerebral necrosis cannot be differentiated by CT or MR, PET and MRS now present a certain advantage of differential diagnosis. Tumor presents high metabolism and necrosis demonstrates low metabolism by utilizing PET scanning, however PET's sensitivity and specificity are far from satisfactory. The amount or ratio of metabolic products in the region of interest measured by MRS contributes to the deferential diagnosis. In addition, PET functional imaging and MRS can also predict the early asymptomatic reversible radiation injury so as to allow the early therapy of steroids and possibly other drugs, prior to the development of irreversible changes

  11. Resting Network Plasticity Following Brain Injury

    Toru Nakamura; Hillary, Frank G.; Biswal, Bharat B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine neural network properties at separate time-points during recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI) using graph theory. Whole-brain analyses of the topological properties of the fMRI signal were conducted in 6 participants at 3 months and 6 months following severe TBI. Results revealed alterations of network properties including a change in the degree distribution, reduced overall strength in connectivity, and increased "small-worldness" from 3 months ...

  12. Plasticity and Injury in the Developing Brain

    Johnston, Michael V.; Ishida, Akira; ISHIDA, Wako Nakajima; MATSUSHITA, Hiroko Baber; NISHIMURA, Akira; Tsuji, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    The child’s brain is more malleable or plastic than that of adults and this accounts for the ability of children to learn new skills quickly or recovery from brain injuries. Several mechanisms contribute to this ability including overproduction and deletion of neurons and synapses, and activity-dependent stabilization of synapses. The molecular mechanisms for activity dependent synaptic plasticity are being discovered and this is leading to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of severa...

  13. Modeling premature brain injury and recovery

    Scafidi, Joey; Fagel, Devon M.; Ment, Laura R.; Vaccarino, Flora M.

    2009-01-01

    Premature birth is a growing and significant public health problem because of the large number of infants that survive with neurodevelopmental sequelae from brain injury. Recent advances in neuroimaging have shown that although some neuroanatomical structures are altered, others improve over time. This review outlines recent insights into brain structure and function in these preterm infants at school age and relevant animal models. These animal models have provided scientists with an opportu...

  14. Traumatic Brain Injury: a Case Study of the School Reintegration Process

    McWilliams, Karen P.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this linear-analytic exploratory case study is to illustrate the reintegration process from acute care and rehabilitative care to the traditional school setting after one has sustained a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). TBI is an unrecognized educational challenge. Few educational professionals are aware of the divarication of TBI. Traumatic Brain Injury is the leading cause of death and disability in children and adolescents in the United States. The review of literature reveals ...

  15. Amelioration of acute sequelae of blast induced mild traumatic brain injury by N-acetyl cysteine: a double-blind, placebo controlled study.

    Michael E Hoffer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI secondary to blast exposure is the most common battlefield injury in Southwest Asia. There has been little prospective work in the combat setting to test the efficacy of new countermeasures. The goal of this study was to compare the efficacy of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC versus placebo on the symptoms associated with blast exposure mTBI in a combat setting. METHODS: This study was a randomized double blind, placebo-controlled study that was conducted on active duty service members at a forward deployed field hospital in Iraq. All symptomatic U.S. service members who were exposed to significant ordnance blast and who met the criteria for mTBI were offered participation in the study and 81 individuals agreed to participate. Individuals underwent a baseline evaluation and then were randomly assigned to receive either N-acetyl cysteine (NAC or placebo for seven days. Each subject was re-evaluated at 3 and 7 days. Outcome measures were the presence of the following sequelae of mTBI: dizziness, hearing loss, headache, memory loss, sleep disturbances, and neurocognitive dysfunction. The resolution of these symptoms seven days after the blast exposure was the main outcome measure in this study. Logistic regression on the outcome of 'no day 7 symptoms' indicated that NAC treatment was significantly better than placebo (OR = 3.6, p = 0.006. Secondary analysis revealed subjects receiving NAC within 24 hours of blast had an 86% chance of symptom resolution with no reported side effects versus 42% for those seen early who received placebo. CONCLUSION: This study, conducted in an active theatre of war, demonstrates that NAC, a safe pharmaceutical countermeasure, has beneficial effects on the severity and resolution of sequelae of blast induced mTBI. This is the first demonstration of an effective short term countermeasure for mTBI. Further work on long term outcomes and the potential use of NAC in civilian m

  16. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-09-01

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury. PMID:25624828

  17. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury

    Sevil Bilgin; Arzu Guclu-Gunduz; Hakan Oruckaptan; Nezire Kose; Bülent Celik

    2012-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27)received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury.

  18. Using the endocannabinoid system as a neuroprotective strategy in perinatal hypoxic- ischemic brain injury

    Lara-Celador, I.; Go(n)i-de-Cerio, F.; Antonia Alvarez; Enrique Hilario

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important causes of brain injury in the neonatal period is a perinatal hypoxic- ischemic event. This devastating condition can lead to long-term neurological deficits or even death. After hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, a variety of specific cellular mechanisms are set in motion, triggering cell damage and finally producing cell death. Effective therapeutic treatments against this phenomenon are still unavailable because of complex molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. After a thorough understanding of the mechanism underlying neural plasticity following hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, various neuroprotective therapies have been developed for alleviating brain injury and improving long-term outcomes. Among them, the endocannabinoid system emerges as a natural system of neuroprotection. The endocannabinoid system modulates a wide range of physiological processes in mammals and has demonstrated neuroprotective effects in different paradigms of acute brain injury, acting as a natural neuroprotectant. The aim of this review is to study the use of different therapies to induce long-term therapeutic effects after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, and analyze the important role of the endocannabinoid system as a new neuroprotective strategy against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

  19. Diffusion-weighted MRI and proton MR spectroscopy in adult hypoxic brain injury

    Full text: The clinical and imaging assessment of patients with severe hypoxic brain injury is difficult, especially in the first few days after the insult. Proton spectroscopy has shown promise in the assessment of neonatal hypoxic brain injury, but there has been little experience with it in adults with such injury. The high sensitivity of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for early stroke suggests that it may be more sensitive to hypoxic injury than conventional sequences. Patients with documented acute hypoxic episodes (cardiac arrest, hanging, measured severe arterial hypotension) and clinical evidence of hypoxic brain injury were included. MRI was not performed until sedation had been ceased for at least 24 hours. In addition to conventional T2-weighted and FLAIR imaging, six patients underwent DWI. A further ten patients underwent conventional imaging plus DWI and proton spectroscopy (PRESS TE 135, 2 x 2 x 2 cm voxel in parasagittal occipital cortex antero-inferiorly). Three of these patients were examined twice because of ongoing radiological and clinical uncertainty. In acute hypoxic insults, a negative diffusion-weighted study does not exclude significant brain injury. Proton spectroscopy is more sensitive to hypoxic brain injury, at least from 48 hours post-ictus, and may provide an index of severity. The findings suggest that acute hypoxia can trigger ongoing neuronal loss (over at least a week) without evidence of macroscopic infarction. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  20. Brain injury biomechanics in closed-head impact : Studies on injury epidemiology, tolerance criteria, biomechanics and traffic injury prevention

    Viano, David

    1997-01-01

    Permanent disability from traumatic brain injury is a devastating consequence of traffic crashes. Injury prevention is a fruitful approach to reduce the incidence and severity of disabling brain injury. However, the development of effective prevention techniques requires better knowledge on the mechanisms and biomechanics of brain injury in closed-head impact. The overall aim of this study is focused on brain injury mechanisms, biomechanics, and tolerances in closed-head ...

  1. Injury potentials associated with severity of acute spinal cord injury in an experimental rat model

    Suying Pan; Guanghao Zhang; Xiaolin Huo; Jinzhu Bai; Tao Song

    2011-01-01

    To investigate characteristics of injury potentials after different degrees of spinal cord injury in rats, the present study established models of spinal cord contusion with severe, moderate, and mild degrees of injury. Injury potential was measured in vivo using a direct current voltage amplification system. Results revealed that in the first 4 hours after acute spinal cord injury, initial amplitude of injury potential was greatest after severe injury, followed by moderate and mild injuries. Amplitude of injury potential decreased gradually with injury time, and the recession curve was logarithmic. Under the same degree of injuries, amplitude of rostral injury potential was generally less than caudal injury potential. Results suggested that injury potential reflected injury severity, because large initial amplitude of injury potential during the early injury stage implied severe injury.

  2. Recovery of resting brain connectivity ensuing mild traumatic brain injury

    Rose Dawn Bharath

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Brains reveal amplified plasticity as they recover from an injury. We aimed to define time dependent plasticity changes in patients recovering from mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI. 25 subjects with mild head injury were longitudinally evaluated within 36 hours, 3 and 6 months using resting state functional connectivity (RSFC. Region of interest (ROI based connectivity differences over time within the patient group and in comparison with a healthy control group were analyzed at p<0.005. We found 33 distinct ROI pairs that revealed significant changes in their connectivity strength with time. Within three months, the majority of the ROI pairs had decreased connectivity in mTBI population, which increased and became comparable to healthy controls at 6 months. Initial imaging within 36 hours of injury revealed hyper connectivity predominantly involving the salience network and default mode network, which reduced at 3 months when lingual, inferior frontal and fronto-parietal networks revealed hyper connectivity. At six months all the evaluated networks revealed hyper connectivity and became comparable to the healthy controls. Our findings in a fairly homogenous group of patients with mTBI evaluated during the 6 month window of recovery defines time varying brain connectivity changes as the brain recovers from an injury. A majority of these changes were seen in the frontal and parietal lobes between 3-6 months after injury. Hyper connectivity of several networks supported normal recovery in the first six months and it remains to be seen in future studies whether this can predict an early and efficient recovery of brain function.

  3. Cerebral Blood Flow and Autoregulation after Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    Udomphorn, Yuthana; Armstead, William M.; Vavilala, Monica S.

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a global health concern and is the leading cause of traumatic morbidity and mortality in children. Despite a lower overall mortality than in adult traumatic brain injury, the cost to society from the sequelae of pediatric traumatic brain injury is very high. Predictors of poor outcome after traumatic brain injury include altered systemic and cerebral physiology, including altered cerebral hemodynamics. Cerebral autoregulation is often impaired following traumatic bra...

  4. Working with Students with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Lucas, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    The participation of a student with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in general physical education can often be challenging and rewarding for the student and physical education teacher. This article addresses common characteristics of students with TBI and presents basic solutions to improve the education of students with TBI in the general physical…

  5. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Facilitating School Success.

    Hux, Karen; Hacksley, Carolyn

    1996-01-01

    A case study is used to demonstrate the effects of mild traumatic brain injury on educational efforts. Discussion covers factors complicating school reintegration, ways to facilitate school reintegration, identification of cognitive and behavioral consequences, minimization of educators' discomfort, reintegration program design, and family…

  6. Group Treatment in Acquired Brain Injury Rehabilitation

    Bertisch, Hilary; Rath, Joseph F.; Langenbahn, Donna M.; Sherr, Rose Lynn; Diller, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    The current article describes critical issues in adapting traditional group-treatment methods for working with individuals with reduced cognitive capacity secondary to acquired brain injury. Using the classification system based on functional ability developed at the NYU Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (RIRM), we delineate the cognitive…

  7. New Antioxidant Drugs for Neonatal Brain Injury

    Maria Luisa Tataranno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The brain injury concept covers a lot of heterogeneity in terms of aetiology involving multiple factors, genetic, hemodynamic, metabolic, nutritional, endocrinological, toxic, and infectious mechanisms, acting in antenatal or postnatal period. Increased vulnerability of the immature brain to oxidative stress is documented because of the limited capacity of antioxidant enzymes and the high free radicals (FRs generation in rapidly growing tissue. FRs impair transmembrane enzyme Na+/K+-ATPase activity resulting in persistent membrane depolarization and excessive release of FR and excitatory aminoacid glutamate. Besides being neurotoxic, glutamate is also toxic to oligodendroglia, via FR effects. Neuronal cells die of oxidative stress. Excess of free iron and deficient iron/binding metabolising capacity are additional features favouring oxidative stress in newborn. Each step in the oxidative injury cascade has become a potential target for neuroprotective intervention. The administration of antioxidants for suspected or proven brain injury is still not accepted for clinical use due to uncertain beneficial effects when treatments are started after resuscitation of an asphyxiated newborn. The challenge for the future is the early identification of high-risk babies to target a safe and not toxic antioxidant therapy in combination with standard therapies to prevent brain injury and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment.

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury: Nuclear Medicine Neuroimaging

    Sánchez-Catasús, Carlos A; Vállez Garcia, David; Le Riverend Morales, Eloísa; Galvizu Sánchez, Reinaldo; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; de Vries, Erik FJ; van Waarde, Aren; Leenders, Klaus L

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an up-to-date review of nuclear medicine neuroimaging in traumatic brain injury (TBI). 18F-FDG PET will remain a valuable tool in researching complex mechanisms associated with early metabolic dysfunction in TBI. Although evidence-based imaging studies are needed, 18F-FDG PET i

  9. Narrative Language in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Marini, Andrea; Galetto, Valentina; Zampieri, Elisa; Vorano, Lorenza; Zettin, Marina; Carlomagno, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI) often show impaired linguistic and/or narrative abilities. The present study aimed to document the features of narrative discourse impairment in a group of adults with TBI. 14 severe TBI non-aphasic speakers (GCS less than 8) in the phase of neurological stability and 14 neurologically intact participants…

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury and Personality Change

    Fowler, Marc; McCabe, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and lifelong disability in the United States for individuals below the age of 45. Current estimates from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) indicate that at least 1.4 million Americans sustain a TBI annually. TBI affects 475,000 children under age 14 each year in the United States alone.…

  11. Interviewing Children with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

    Boylan, Anne-Marie; Linden, Mark; Alderdice, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    Research into the lives of children with acquired brain injury (ABI) often neglects to incorporate children as participants, preferring to obtain the opinions of the adult carer (e.g. McKinlay et al., 2002). There has been a concerted attempt to move away from this position by those working in children's research with current etiquette…

  12. Monitoring Agitated Behavior After acquired Brain Injury

    Aadal, Lena; Mortensen, Jesper; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbaek

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the onset, duration, intensity, and nursing shift variation of agitated behavior in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI) at a rehabilitation hospital. Design: Prospective descriptive study. Methods: A total of 11 patients with agitated behavior were included. Agitated...

  13. Acute liver failure and acute kidney injury: Definitions, prognosis, and outcome

    Włodzimirow, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to investigate definitions, prognostic indicators and their association with adverse events, mainly mortality for acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) and acute kidney injury (AKI).

  14. Relatives of patients with severe brain injury

    Norup, Anne; Petersen, Janne; Lykke Mortensen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: To investigate trajectories and predictors of trajectories of anxiety and depression in relatives of patients with a severe brain injury during the first year after injury. RESEARCH DESIGN: A prospective longitudinal study with four repeated measurements. SUBJECTS: Ninety...... relatives of patients with severe brain injury. METHODS: The relatives were assessed on the anxiety and depression scales from the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised and latent variable growth curve models were used to model the trajectories. The effects of patient's age, patient's Glasgow Coma Score, level of...... function and consciousness, gender and relationship of the relatives were modelled. RESULTS: Improvement was found in both symptoms of anxiety and depression during the 12-month study period. The analysis revealed different trajectories for symptoms of anxiety and depression, as anxiety had a more rapid...

  15. Resting network plasticity following brain injury.

    Toru Nakamura

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine neural network properties at separate time-points during recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI using graph theory. Whole-brain analyses of the topological properties of the fMRI signal were conducted in 6 participants at 3 months and 6 months following severe TBI. Results revealed alterations of network properties including a change in the degree distribution, reduced overall strength in connectivity, and increased "small-worldness" from 3 months to 6 months post injury. The findings here indicate that, during recovery from injury, the strength but not the number of network connections diminishes, so that over the course of recovery, the network begins to approximate what is observed in healthy adults. These are the first data examining functional connectivity in a disrupted neural system during recovery.

  16. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (153). Severe hypoxic ischaemic brain injury.

    Chua, Wynne; Lim, Boon Keat; Lim, Tchoyoson Choie Cheio

    2014-01-01

    A 58-year-old Indian woman presented with asystole after an episode of haemetemesis, with a patient downtime of 20 mins. After initial resuscitation efforts, computed tomography of the brain, obtained to evaluate neurological injury, demonstrated evidence of severe hypoxic ischaemic brain injury. The imaging features of hypoxic ischaemic brain injury and the potential pitfalls with regard to image interpretation are herein discussed.

  17. Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury

    ... Defense Centers of Excellence For Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury U.S. Department of Defense About DCoE Centers Leadership ... PTSD Suicide Prevention Provider Resources DCoE Resources Traumatic Brain Injury About Traumatic Brain Injury Tips for Treating mTBI ...

  18. The Impact of Traumatic Brain Injury on the Aging Brain.

    Young, Jacob S; Hobbs, Jonathan G; Bailes, Julian E

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has come to the forefront of both the scientific and popular culture. Specifically, sports-related concussions or mild TBI (mTBI) has become the center of scientific scrutiny with a large amount of research focusing on the long-term sequela of this type of injury. As the populace continues to age, the impact of TBI on the aging brain will become clearer. Currently, reports have come to light that link TBI to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, as well as certain psychiatric diseases. Whether these associations are causations, however, is yet to be determined. Other long-term sequelae, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), appear to be associated with repetitive injuries. Going forward, as we gain better understanding of the pathophysiological process involved in TBI and subclinical head traumas, and individual traits that influence susceptibility to neurocognitive diseases, a clearer, more comprehensive understanding of the connection between brain injury and resultant disease processes in the aging brain will become evident. PMID:27432348

  19. Contrasting Acute and Slow-Growing Lesions: A New Door to Brain Plasticity

    Desmurget, Michel; Bonnetblanc, FranCois; Duffau, Hugues

    2007-01-01

    The concept of plasticity describes the mechanisms that rearrange cerebral organization following a brain injury. During the last century, plasticity has been mainly investigated in humans with acute strokes. It was then shown: (i) that the brain is organized into highly specialized functional areas, often designated "eloquent" areas and (ii) that…

  20. Chronic cerebrovascular dysfunction after traumatic brain injury.

    Jullienne, Amandine; Obenaus, Andre; Ichkova, Aleksandra; Savona-Baron, Catherine; Pearce, William J; Badaut, Jerome

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) often involve vascular dysfunction that leads to long-term alterations in physiological and cognitive functions of the brain. Indeed, all the cells that form blood vessels and that are involved in maintaining their proper function can be altered by TBI. This Review focuses on the different types of cerebrovascular dysfunction that occur after TBI, including cerebral blood flow alterations, autoregulation impairments, subarachnoid hemorrhage, vasospasms, blood-brain barrier disruption, and edema formation. We also discuss the mechanisms that mediate these dysfunctions, focusing on the cellular components of cerebral blood vessels (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, astrocytes, pericytes, perivascular nerves) and their known and potential roles in the secondary injury cascade. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27117494

  1. Emotional distress and quality of life in relatives of patients with severe brain injury: the first month after injury

    Norup, Anne; Siert, Lars; Lykke Mortensen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: To investigate emotional distress and quality of life in a sample of Danish relatives of patients with severe brain injury at admission to intensive rehabilitation in the sub-acute phase. RESEARCH DESIGN: Clinical convenience sample. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Participants included...

  2. Forensic Pathology of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Finnie, J W

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury constitutes a significant proportion of cases requiring forensic examination, and it encompasses (1) blunt, nonmissile head injury, especially involving motor vehicle accidents, and (2) penetrating, missile injury produced by a range of high- and lower-velocity projectiles. This review examines the complex pathophysiology and biomechanics of both types of neurotrauma and assesses the macroscopic and histologic features of component lesions, which may be used to determine the cause and manner of death resulting from an intentional assault or accident. Estimation of the survival time postinjury by pathologic examination is also important where malicious head injury is suspected, in an attempt to ascertain a time at which the traumatic event might have been committed, thereby evaluating the authenticity of statements made by the alleged perpetrator. PMID:26578643

  3. Simvastatin Treatment in Traumatic Brain Injury: Operation Brain Trauma Therapy.

    Mountney, Andrea; Bramlett, Helen M; Dixon, C Edward; Mondello, Stefania; Dietrich, W Dalton; Wang, Kevin K W; Caudle, Krista; Empey, Philip E; Poloyac, Samuel M; Hayes, Ronald L; Povlishock, John T; Tortella, Frank C; Kochanek, Patrick M; Shear, Deborah A

    2016-03-15

    Simvastatin, the fourth drug selected for testing by Operation Brain Trauma Therapy (OBTT), is a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor used clinically to reduce serum cholesterol. In addition, simvastatin has demonstrated potent antineuroinflammatory and brain edema reducing effects and has shown promise in promoting functional recovery in pre-clinical models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of this study was to assess the potential neuroprotective effects of oral administration of simvastatin on neurobehavioral, biomarker, and histopathological outcome measures compared across three pre-clinical TBI animal models. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to either moderate fluid percussion injury (FPI), controlled cortical impact injury (CCI), or penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI). Simvastatin (1 or 5 mg/kg) was delivered via oral gavage at 3 h post-injury and continued once daily out to 14 days post-injury. Results indicated an intermediate beneficial effect of simvastatin on motor performance on the gridwalk (FPI), balance beam (CCI), and rotarod tasks (PBBI). No significant therapeutic benefit was detected, however, on cognitive outcome across the OBTT TBI models. In fact, Morris water maze (MWM) performance was actually worsened by treatment in the FPI model and scored full negative points for low dose in the MWM latency and swim distance to locate the hidden platform. A detrimental effect on cortical tissue loss was also seen in the FPI model, and there were no benefits on histology across the other models. Simvastatin also produced negative effects on circulating glial fibrillary acidic protein biomarker outcomes that were evident in the FPI and PBBI models. Overall, the current findings do not support the beneficial effects of simvastatin administration over 2 weeks post-TBI using the oral route of administration and, as such, it will not be further pursued by OBTT. PMID:26541177

  4. Acute injury of the ankle joint

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography could be performed. There is no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, particularly about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today MRI is not used for this indication, although it allows, with controlled positioning of the foot and with defined sections, visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In ankle injuries, plain radiographs form the established basis of diagnostic imaging and can provide definitive answers in most cases. CT is used in complex fractures for complete visualization. MRI is the method of choice for several diagnostic problem cases, including occult fractures and post-traumatic avascular necrosis. In tendon injuries, MRI is important if ultrasound is not diagnostic. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI is the most important second-step procedure when radiographs are nondiagnostic. (orig.)

  5. Temporal assessment of nanoparticle accumulation after experimental brain injury: Effect of particle size

    Bharadwaj, Vimala N.; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Adelson, P. David; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Stabenfeldt, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) based therapeutic and theranostic agents have been developed for various diseases, yet application to neural disease/injury is restricted by the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in a host of pathological alterations, including transient breakdown of the BBB, thus opening a window for NP delivery to the injured brain tissue. This study focused on investigating the spatiotemporal accumulation of different sized NPs after TBI. Specifically, animal cohorts sustaining a controlled cortical impact injury received an intravenous injection of PEGylated NP cocktail (20, 40, 100, and 500 nm, each with a unique fluorophore) immediately (0 h), 2 h, 5 h, 12 h, or 23 h after injury. NPs were allowed to circulate for 1 h before perfusion and brain harvest. Confocal microscopy demonstrated peak NP accumulation within the injury penumbra 1 h post-injury. An inverse relationship was found between NP size and their continued accumulation within the penumbra. NP accumulation preferentially occurred in the primary motor and somatosensory areas of the injury penumbra as compared to the parietal association and visual area. Thus, we characterized the accumulation of particles up to 500 nm at different times acutely after injury, indicating the potential of NP-based TBI theranostics in the acute period after injury. PMID:27444615

  6. Acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements

    Gary C Chen, Vivek S Ramanathan, David Law, Pauline Funchain, George C Chen, Samuel French, Boris Shlopov, Viktor Eysselein, David Chung, Sonya Reicher, Binh V Pham

    2010-01-01

    We report three cases of patients with acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements. One patient took Hydroxycut while the other two took Herbalife supplements. Liver biopsies for all patients demonstrated findings consistent with drug-induced acute liver injury. To our knowledge, we are the first institute to report acute liver injury from both of these two types of weight-loss herbal supplements together as a case series. The series emphasizes the importance of taking a caut...

  7. Quantification of structural changes in the corpus callosumin children with profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury

    Stivaros, Stavros M. [Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Academic Unit of Paediatric Radiology, Royal Manchester Children' s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Centre for Imaging Sciences, Institute of Population Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Radon, Mark R. [The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neuroradiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mileva, Reneta; Gledson, Ann; Keane, John A. [University of Manchester, School of Computer Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Connolly, Daniel J.A.; Batty, Ruth [Sheffield Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neuroradiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Cowell, Patricia E. [University of Sheffield, Department of Human Communication Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hoggard, Nigel; Griffiths, Paul D. [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Wright, Neville B.; Tang, Vivian [Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Academic Unit of Paediatric Radiology, Royal Manchester Children' s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    Birth-related acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury has specific patterns of damage including the paracentral lobules. To test the hypothesis that there is anatomically coherent regional volume loss of the corpus callosum as a result of this hemispheric abnormality. Study subjects included 13 children with proven acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and 13 children with developmental delay but no brain abnormalities. A computerised system divided the corpus callosum into 100 segments, measuring each width. Principal component analysis grouped the widths into contiguous anatomical regions. We conducted analysis of variance of corpus callosum widths as well as support vector machine stratification into patient groups. There was statistically significant narrowing of the mid-posterior body and genu of the corpus callosum in children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. Support vector machine analysis yielded over 95% accuracy in patient group stratification using the corpus callosum centile widths. Focal volume loss is seen in the corpus callosum of children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury secondary to loss of commissural fibres arising in the paracentral lobules. Support vector machine stratification into the hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury group or the control group on the basis of corpus callosum width is highly accurate and points towards rapid clinical translation of this technique as a potential biomarker of hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. (orig.)

  8. Quantification of structural changes in the corpus callosumin children with profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury

    Birth-related acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury has specific patterns of damage including the paracentral lobules. To test the hypothesis that there is anatomically coherent regional volume loss of the corpus callosum as a result of this hemispheric abnormality. Study subjects included 13 children with proven acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and 13 children with developmental delay but no brain abnormalities. A computerised system divided the corpus callosum into 100 segments, measuring each width. Principal component analysis grouped the widths into contiguous anatomical regions. We conducted analysis of variance of corpus callosum widths as well as support vector machine stratification into patient groups. There was statistically significant narrowing of the mid-posterior body and genu of the corpus callosum in children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. Support vector machine analysis yielded over 95% accuracy in patient group stratification using the corpus callosum centile widths. Focal volume loss is seen in the corpus callosum of children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury secondary to loss of commissural fibres arising in the paracentral lobules. Support vector machine stratification into the hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury group or the control group on the basis of corpus callosum width is highly accurate and points towards rapid clinical translation of this technique as a potential biomarker of hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. (orig.)

  9. The Anatomic Pattern of Injuries in Acute Inversion Ankle Sprains

    Khor, Yuet Peng; Tan, Ken Jin

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are little data on the incidence and patterns of injuries seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute inversion ankle sprains. This study may help in the understanding of the pathomechanics, natural history, and outcomes of this common injury. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: From June 2011 to June 2013, a total of 64 consecutive patients had MRI of the ankle performed for acute inversion injury to the ankle. All injuries/pathologies reported w...

  10. Acute Kidney Injury Predicts Mortality after Charcoal Burning Suicide.

    Chen, Yu-Chin; Tseng, Yi-Chia; Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Yang, Huang-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jen-Fen; Lin, Wey-Ran; Wang, I-Kuan; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-01-01

    A paucity of literature exists on risk factors for mortality in charcoal burning suicide. In this observational study, we analyzed the data of 126 patients with charcoal burning suicide that seen between 2002 and 2013. Patients were grouped according to status of renal damage as acute kidney injury (N = 49) or non-acute kidney injury (N = 77). It was found that patients with acute kidney injury suffered severer complications such as respiratory failure (P = 0.002), myocardial injury (P = 0.049), hepatic injury (P acute kidney injury. Moreover, patients with acute kidney injury suffered longer hospitalization duration (16.9 ± 18.3 versus 10.7 ± 10.9, P = 0.002) and had higher mortality rate (8.2% versus 0%, P = 0.011) than patients without injury. In a multivariate Cox regression model, it was demonstrated that serum creatinine level (P = 0.019) and heart rate (P = 0.022) were significant risk factors for mortality. Finally, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with acute kidney injury suffered lower cumulative survival than without injury (P = 0.016). In summary, the overall mortality rate of charcoal burning suicide population was 3.2%, and acute kidney injury was a powerful predictor of mortality. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27430168

  11. Cognitive and psychopathological sequelae of pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Beauchamp, M H; Anderson, V

    2013-01-01

    Childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a frequent cause of acquired disability in childhood and can have a serious impact on development across the lifespan. The consequences of early TBI vary according to injury severity, with severe injuries usually resulting in more serious physical, cognitive and behavioral sequelae. Both clinical and research reports document residual deficits in a range of skills, including intellectual function, attention, memory, learning, and executive function. In addition, recent investigations suggest that early brain injury also affects psychological and social development and that problems in these domains may increase in the long term postinjury. Together, these deficits affect children's ability to function effectively at school, in the home, and in their social environment, resulting in impaired acquisition of knowledge, psychological and social problems, and overall reduced quality of life. Ultimately, recovery from childhood TBI depends on a range of complex biological, developmental, and psychosocial factors making prognosis difficult to predict. This chapter will detail the cognitive (intellectual, attentional, mnesic, executive, educational, and vocational) and psychopathological (behavioral, adaptive, psychological, social) sequelae of childhood TBI with a particular focus on postinjury recovery patterns in the acute, short-, and long-term phases, as well as into adulthood. PMID:23622301

  12. Male pituitary-gonadal dysfunction following severe traumatic brain injury.

    Lee, S C; Zasler, N D; Kreutzer, J S

    1994-01-01

    A prospective study was conducted to evaluate pituitary-gonadal function and correlated parameters in 21 adult males with severe traumatic brain injury during acute inpatient rehabilitation. Serum concentrations of testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) were measured within 1 week after the patient was transferred to the rehabilitation unit. Fourteen of 21 patients (67%) had abnormally low testosterone levels. One of 21 patients had a subnormal FSH level and one had a supranormal level. Three of 21 patients had subnormal LH levels and two had supranormal levels. There was no correlation between the severity of brain injury and the levels of testosterone, FSH or LH. The presence of increased intracranial pressure, hypoxia, skull fracture or abnormal CT findings had no significant influence on the levels of testosterone, FSH or LH. The high incidence of hypotestosteronaemia in survivors of severe traumatic brain injury is seemingly more related to accompanying physiological stressors rather than structural or neurochemical disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Early identification is important relative to the potential neuromedical and rehabilitative consequences of prolonged hypotestosteronaemia in this patient population. PMID:7987293

  13. Respiratory mechanics in brain injury: A review.

    Koutsoukou, Antonia; Katsiari, Maria; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Daganou, Maria; Kyriakopoulou, Magdalini; Koulouris, Nikolaos G; Rovina, Nikoletta

    2016-02-01

    Several clinical and experimental studies have shown that lung injury occurs shortly after brain damage. The responsible mechanisms involve neurogenic pulmonary edema, inflammation, the harmful action of neurotransmitters, or autonomic system dysfunction. Mechanical ventilation, an essential component of life support in brain-damaged patients (BD), may be an additional traumatic factor to the already injured or susceptible to injury lungs of these patients thus worsening lung injury, in case that non lung protective ventilator settings are applied. Measurement of respiratory mechanics in BD patients, as well as assessment of their evolution during mechanical ventilation, may lead to preclinical lung injury detection early enough, allowing thus the selection of the appropriate ventilator settings to avoid ventilator-induced lung injury. The aim of this review is to explore the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in BD patients along with the underlying mechanisms, and to translate the evidence of animal and clinical studies into therapeutic implications regarding the mechanical ventilation of these critically ill patients. PMID:26855895

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse brain injury

    Forty cases diagnosed as diffuse brain injury (DBI) were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within 3 days after injury. These cases were divided into two groups, which were the concussion group and diffuse axonal injury (DAI) group established by Gennarelli. There were no findings on computerized tomography (CT) in the concussion group except for two cases which had a brain edema or subarachnoid hemorrhage. But on MRI, high intensity areas on T2 weighted imaging were demonstrated in the cerebral white matter in this group. Many lesions in this group were thought to be edemas of the cerebral white matter, because of the fact that on serial MRI, they were isointense. In mild types of DAI, the lesions on MRI were located only in the cerebral white matter, whereas, in the severe types of DAI, lesions were located in the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum, the dorsal part of the brain stem as well as in the cerebral white matter. As for CT findings, parenchymal lesions were not visualized especially in mild DAI. Our results suggested that the lesions in cerebral concussion were edemas in cerebral white matter. In mild DAI they were non-hemorrhagic contusion; and in severe DAI they were hemorrhagic contusions in the cerebral white matter, the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum or the dorsal part of the brain stem. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse brain injury

    Yokota, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Mashiko, Kunihiro; Henmi, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Toshibumi; Kobayashi, Shiro; Nakazawa, Shozo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-01-01

    Forty cases diagnosed as diffuse brain injury (DBI) were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within 3 days after injury. These cases were divided into two groups, which were the concussion group and diffuse axonal injury (DAI) group established by Gennarelli. There were no findings on computerized tomography (CT) in the concussion group except for two cases which had a brain edema or subarachnoid hemorrhage. But on MRI, high intensity areas on T2 weighted imaging were demonstrated in the cerebral white matter in this group. Many lesions in this group were thought to be edemas of the cerebral white matter, because of the fact that on serial MRI, they were isointense. In mild types of DAI, the lesions on MRI were located only in the cerebral white matter, whereas, in the severe types of DAI, lesions were located in the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum, the dorsal part of the brain stem as well as in the cerebral white matter. As for CT findings, parenchymal lesions were not visualized especially in mild DAI. Our results suggested that the lesions in cerebral concussion were edemas in cerebral white matter. In mild DAI they were non-hemorrhagic contusion; and in severe DAI they were hemorrhagic contusions in the cerebral white matter, the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum or the dorsal part of the brain stem. (author).

  16. Transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Dixit Ramakant; Sharma Sidharth; Parmez A

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is related to the transfusion of blood components. Typically, it is a clinical syndrome, characterized by the sudden onset of dyspnea, hypoxemia and bilateral non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. A 83-year-old female patient with a history of AML developed TRALI after receiving 6 units of platelets. TRALI symptoms was started 10 min later the transfusion. AML is a risky group for TRALI. While giving transfusion to the risky groups of TRALI one must be...

  17. Acute kidney injury: A rare cause.

    Mendonca, Satish; Barki, Satish; Mishra, Mayank; Kumar, R S V; Gupta, Devika; Gupta, Pooja

    2015-09-01

    We present a young lady who consumed hair dye, which contained paraphenylene diamine (PPD), as a means of deliberate self-harm. This resulted in severe angio-neurotic edema for which she had to be ventilated, and thereafter developed rhabdomyolysis leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). The unusual aspect was that the patient continued to have flaccid quadriparesis and inability to regain kidney function. Renal biopsy performed 10 weeks after the dye consumption revealed severe acute tubular necrosis with myoglobin pigment casts. This suggests that PPD has a long-term effect leading to ongoing myoglobinuria, causing flaccid paralysis to persist and preventing the recovery of AKI. In such instances, timely treatment to prevent AKI in the form alkalinization of urine should be initiated promptly. Secondly, because PPD is a nondialyzable toxin, and its long-term effect necessitates its speedy removal, hemoperfusion might be helpful and is worth considering. PMID:26354573

  18. Acute kidney injury: A rare cause

    Satish Mendonca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a young lady who consumed hair dye, which contained paraphenylene diamine (PPD, as a means of deliberate self-harm. This resulted in severe angio-neurotic edema for which she had to be ventilated, and thereafter developed rhabdomyolysis leading to acute kidney injury (AKI. The unusual aspect was that the patient continued to have flaccid quadriparesis and inability to regain kidney function. Renal biopsy performed 10 weeks after the dye consumption revealed severe acute tubular necrosis with myoglobin pigment casts. This suggests that PPD has a long-term effect leading to ongoing myoglobinuria, causing flaccid paralysis to persist and preventing the recovery of AKI. In such instances, timely treatment to prevent AKI in the form alkalinization of urine should be initiated promptly. Secondly, because PPD is a nondialyzable toxin, and its long-term effect necessitates its speedy removal, hemoperfusion might be helpful and is worth considering

  19. Traumatic brain injury and olfactory deficits

    Fortin, Audrey; Lefebvre, Mathilde Beaulieu; Ptito, Maurice

    2010-01-01

    PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: Olfactory functions are not systematically evaluated following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study aimed at comparing two smell tests that are used in a clinical setting. RESEARCH DESIGN: The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and the Alberta Smell....... RESULTS: The scores of the two smell tests were significantly correlated. Both tests indicated that patients with frontal lesion performed significantly worse than patients with other types of lesion. Mood and injury severity were not associated with olfactory impairment when age was taken into account...... Alberta Smell test. To refine their diagnosis, the UPSIT can also be used....

  20. Surviving severe traumatic brain injury in Denmark

    Odgaard, Lene; Poulsen, Ingrid; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify all hospitalized patients surviving severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Denmark and to compare these patients to TBI patients admitted to highly specialized rehabilitation (HS-rehabilitation). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients surviving severe TBI were identified from The...... severe TBI were admitted to HS-rehabilitation. Female sex, older age, and non-working status pre-injury were independent predictors of no HS-rehabilitation among patients surviving severe TBI. CONCLUSION: The incidence rate of hospitalized patients surviving severe TBI was stable in Denmark and the...

  1. Low level primary blast injury in rodent brain

    Enci MaryKan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of blast attacks and resulting traumatic brain injuries has been on the rise in recent years. Primary blast is one of the mechanisms in which the blast wave can cause injury to the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single sub-lethal blast over pressure exposure of either 48.9 kPa (7.1 psi or 77.3 kPa (11.3 psi to rodents in an open-field setting. Brain tissue from these rats was harvested for microarray and histopathological analyses. Gross histopathology of the brains showed that cortical neurons were ‘darkened’ and shrunken with narrowed vasculature in the cerebral cortex day 1 after blast with signs of recovery at day 4 and day 7 after blast. TUNEL-positive cells were predominant in the white matter of the brain at day 1 after blast and double-labeling of brain tissue showed that these DNA-damaged cells were both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes but were mainly not apoptotic due to the low caspase-3 immunopositivity. There was also an increase in amyloid precursor protein immunoreactive cells in the white matter which suggests acute axonal damage. In contrast, Iba-1 staining for macrophages or microglia was not different from control post-blast. Blast exposure altered the expression of over 5786 genes in the brain which occurred mostly at day 1 and day 4 post-blast. These genes were narrowed down to 10 overlapping genes after time-course evaluation and functional analyses. These genes pointed towards signs of repair at day 4 and 7 post-blast. Our findings suggest that the blast over pressure levels in the study resulted in mild cellular injury to the brain as evidenced by acute neuronal, cerebrovascular and white matter perturbations that showed signs of resolution. It is unclear whether these perturbations exist at a milder level or normalize completely and will need more investigation. Specific changes in gene expression may be further evaluated to understand the mechanism of blast

  2. Pregnancy related acute kidney injury: nondialytic management

    Kaliki Hymavathi Reddy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute Kidney Injury (AKI is associated with increased mortality and morbidity unless timely diagnosed and promptly managed. An understanding of the renal physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy is essential for Proper evaluation, diagnosis, and management of Pregnancy Related AKI (PRAKI. In the general population, AKI can occur from prerenal, intrinsic/renal, and post-renal causes. Major causes of pre-renal azotemia include hyperemesis gravidarum and uterine hemorrhage in the setting of placental abruption. Intrinsic etiologies include infections from acute pyelonephritis and septic abortion, bilateral cortical necrosis, and acute tubular necrosis. Particular attention should be paid to specific conditions that lead to AKI during the second and third trimesters, such as preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and TTP-HUS. An understanding of the various etiologies of AKI in the pregnant patient is key to the appropriate clinical management and prevention of adverse maternal/fetal outcomes. Sometimes PRAKI may require intensive management and even dialysis adding additional economical burden to the patient. We here, with report an interesting case of PRAKI diagnosed and managed in time by simple medical measures thus delivering an effective treatment at a much lesser cost. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(2.000: 486-489

  3. Analysis of Pre-Hospital Emergency Care of Acute Traumatic Brain Injury Patients%急性颅脑损伤患者院前急救护理分析

    周艳

    2014-01-01

    Objective:to analyze the ef ect of nursing care in patients with acute craniocerebral injury in pre hospital emergency. Methods in our hospital 95 patients with acute traumatic brain injury, according to figures randomly divided into observation group and control group, observation group after pre-hospital emergency care into the hospital, first aid care in the control group fed directly to the hospital, more the ef ect of two emergency care. Results The total ef ective rate was significantly higher in the observation group, the dif erence was statistical y significant (P<0.05). Conclusion:the implementation of the timely and ef ective for patients with acute craniocerebral trauma emergency care,create favorable conditions for further treatment,significantly reduce the mortality and disability rate,improve the prognosis of the patients.%目的:分析急性颅脑损伤患者院前急救护理效果。方法选取我院收治的急性颅脑损伤患者95例,按照数字随机法随机分成观察组和对照组,观察组进行院前急救护理后送入院内,对照组直接送入院内后进行急救护理,比较两组急救护理效果。结果观察组总有效率明显高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论对急性颅脑损伤患者实施及时有效的现场急救护理,可为进一步治疗创造有利条件,显著降低死亡率和致残率,改善患者的预后。

  4. Fatigue in adults with traumatic brain injury

    Mollayeva, Tatyana; Kendzerska, Tetyana; Mollayeva, Shirin;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite strong indications that fatigue is the most common and debilitating symptom after traumatic brain injury, little is known about its frequency, natural history, or relation to other factors. The current protocol outlines a strategy for a systematic review that will identify......, assess, and critically appraise studies that assessed predictors for fatigue and the consequences of fatigue on at least two separate time points following traumatic brain injury. METHODS/DESIGN: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, and PsycINFO will be systematically...... quality appraisal. Randomized control trial data will be treated as a cohort. The quality will be assessed using the criteria defined by Hayden and colleagues. The review will be conducted and reported in compliance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines...

  5. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury: The Work of DAMPs*

    Land, Walter G.

    2013-01-01

    Current notions in immunology hold that not only pathogen-mediated tissue injury but any injury activates the innate immune system. In principle, this evolutionarily highly conserved, rapid first-line defense system responds to pathogen-induced injury with the creation of infectious inflammation, and non-pathogen-induced tissue injury with ‘sterile’ tissue inflammation. In this review, evidence has been collected in support of the notion that the transfusion-related acute lung injury induces ...

  6. Human models of acute lung injury

    Alastair G. Proudfoot

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a syndrome that is characterised by acute inflammation and tissue injury that affects normal gas exchange in the lungs. Hallmarks of ALI include dysfunction of the alveolar-capillary membrane resulting in increased vascular permeability, an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung and a local pro-coagulant state. Patients with ALI present with severe hypoxaemia and radiological evidence of bilateral pulmonary oedema. The syndrome has a mortality rate of approximately 35% and usually requires invasive mechanical ventilation. ALI can follow direct pulmonary insults, such as pneumonia, or occur indirectly as a result of blood-borne insults, commonly severe bacterial sepsis. Although animal models of ALI have been developed, none of them fully recapitulate the human disease. The differences between the human syndrome and the phenotype observed in animal models might, in part, explain why interventions that are successful in models have failed to translate into novel therapies. Improved animal models and the development of human in vivo and ex vivo models are therefore required. In this article, we consider the clinical features of ALI, discuss the limitations of current animal models and highlight how emerging human models of ALI might help to answer outstanding questions about this syndrome.

  7. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries.

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-18

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  8. Standardizing Data Collection in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Maas, Andrew I.R.; Harrison-Felix, Cynthia L.; Menon, David; Adelson, P. David; Balkin, Tom; Bullock, Ross; Engel, Doortje C.; Gordon, Wayne; Langlois-Orman, Jean; Lew, Henry L.; Robertson, Claudia; Temkin, Nancy; Valadka, Alex; VERFAELLIE, MIEKE; Wainwright, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Collaboration among investigators, centers, countries, and disciplines is essential to advancing the care for traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is thus important that we “speak the same language.” Great variability, however, exists in data collection and coding of variables in TBI studies, confounding comparisons between and analysis across different studies. Randomized controlled trials can never address the many uncertainties concerning treatment approaches in TBI. Pooling data from differen...

  9. Traumatic Brain Injury, Boredom and Depression

    James Danckert; Yael Goldberg

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often presents with co-morbid depression and elevated levels of boredom. We explored the relationship between boredom and depression in a group of mild (n = 38), moderate-to-severe TBI patients (n = 14) and healthy controls (n = 88), who completed the Beck Depression Inventory and Boredom Proneness Scales as part of a larger study. Results showed that the relationship between boredom and depression was strongest in moderate-to-severe TBI patients. We explored two ...

  10. Cooking breakfast after a brain injury

    Tanguay, Annick N.; Davidson, Patrick S. R.; K. Vanessa eGuerrero Nuñez; Ferland, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) often compromises the ability to carry out instrumental activities of daily living such as cooking. ABI patients' difficulties with executive functions and memory result in less independent and efficient meal preparation. Accurately assessing safety and proficiency in cooking is essential for successful community reintegration following ABI, but in vivo assessment of cooking by clinicians is time-consuming, costly, and difficult to standardize. Accordingly, we exam...

  11. Anemia and brain oxygen after severe traumatic brain injury

    Oddo, Mauro; Levine, Joshua M.; Kumar, Monisha; Iglesias, Katia; Frangos, Suzanne; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Le Roux, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship between hemoglobin (Hgb) and brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to examine its impact on outcome. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort of severe TBI patients whose PbtO2 was monitored. The relationship between Hgb—categorized into four quartiles (≤9; 9–10; 10.1–11; >11 g/dl)—and PbtO2 was analyzed using mixed-effects models. Anemia with compromised PbtO2 was defined as episodes...

  12. Traumatic brain injury in modern war

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Hawley, Jason; Grimes, Jamie; Macedonia, Christian; Hancock, James; Jaffee, Michael; Dombroski, Todd; Ecklund, James M.

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common and especially with military service. In Iraq and Afghanistan, explosive blast related TBI has become prominent and is mainly from improvised explosive devices (IED). Civilian standard of care clinical practice guidelines (CPG) were appropriate has been applied to the combat setting. When such CPGs do not exist or are not applicable, new practice standards for the military are created, as for TBI. Thus, CPGs for prehospital care of combat TBI CPG [1] and mild TBI/concussion [2] were introduced as was a DoD system-wide clinical care program, the first large scale system wide effort to address all severities of TBI in a comprehensive organized way. As TBI remains incompletely understood, substantial research is underway. For the DoD, leading this effort are The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, National Intrepid Center of Excellence and the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. This program is a beginning, a work in progress ready to leverage advances made scientifically and always with the intent of providing the best care to its military beneficiaries.

  13. Hymenoptera Stings and the Acute Kidney Injury

    Yashad Dongol

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera stings are a health concern. Apidae (bees, Vespidae (hornets, yellow jackets and wasps and Formicidae (ants are medically-important stinging insects under the order Hymenoptera. Clinical features from simple skin manifestations to severe and fatal organ injury are due to the hypersensitivity reactions and/ or the toxic effects of the venom inoculated. Here we discuss on Hymenoptera stings involving apids (honey bees and vespids (wasps, hornets and yellow jackets and their effect on renal function and associated morphological changes in the kidney. Despite the differences in venom composition and quantity released per sting in two insect groups, both lead to similar medical consequences, such as localised normal allergic reactions, mild to severe anaphylaxis and shock and multiple organ and tissue injury leading to multiple organ failure. Acute kidney injury (AKI is one of the unusual complications of Hymenoptera stings and has the basis of both immune-mediated and toxic effects. Evidence has proven that supportive therapy along with the standard medication is very efficient in completely restoring the kidney function without any recurrence.

  14. Perioperative aspirin and clonidine and risk of acute kidney injury

    Garg, Amit X; Kurz, Andrea; Sessler, Daniel I;

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Acute kidney injury, a common complication of surgery, is associated with poor outcomes and high health care costs. Some studies suggest aspirin or clonidine administered during the perioperative period reduces the risk of acute kidney injury; however, these effects are uncertain and ...

  15. Neonatal ischemic brain injury: what every radiologist needs to know

    We present a pictorial review of neonatal ischemic brain injury and look at its pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnoses from a radiologist's perspective. The concept of perinatal stroke is defined and its distinction from hypoxic-ischemic injury is emphasized. A brief review of recent imaging advances is included and a diagnostic approach to neonatal ischemic brain injury is suggested. (orig.)

  16. Secondary Damage after Traumatic Brain Injury: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology and Therapy

    D.C. Engel (Doortje Caroline)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a microscopic or macroscopic injury to the brain caused by external physical forces. Road traffic accidents, falls, sports injuries (i.e. boxing), recreational accidents (i.e. parachute jumping), the use of firearms, assault, child abuse, and se

  17. Cerebral perfusion changes in traumatic diffuse brain injury. IMP SPECT studies

    Diffuse brain injury (DBI) is characterized by axonal degeneration and neuronal damage which cause diffuse brain atrophy. We have investigated the time course of abnormalities in cerebral perfusion distribution in cases of DBI by using Iodine-123-IMP SPECT, and the relationship to the appearance of diffuse brain atrophy. SPECT scans were performed on eight patients with diffuse brain injury due to closed cranial trauma in acute and chronic stages. All patients showed abnormalities in cerebral perfusion with decreases in perfusion, even in non-depicted regions on MRI, and the affected areas varied throughout the period of observation. Diffuse brain atrophy appeared in all patients. In some patients, diffuse brain atrophy was observed at or just after the time when the maximum number of lesions on SPECT were seen. The abnormalities in cerebral perfusion in cases of DBI might therefore be related to axonal degeneration and neuronal damage which causes diffuse brain atrophy. (author)

  18. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  19. Neuroimaging in adult penetrating brain injury: a guide for radiographers

    Temple, Nikki; Donald, Cortny; Skora, Amanda [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Reed, Warren, E-mail: warren.reed@sydney.edu.au [Medical Image Optimisation and Perception Group, Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are a medical emergency, often resulting in complex damage and high mortality rates. Neuroimaging is essential to evaluate the location and extent of injuries, and to manage them accordingly. Currently, a myriad of imaging modalities are included in the diagnostic workup for adult PBI, including skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, with each modality providing their own particular benefits. This literature review explores the current modalities available for investigating PBI and aims to assist in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging when presented with an adult PBI. Based on the current literature, the authors have developed an imaging pathway for adult penetrating brain injury that functions as both a learning tool and reference guide for radiographers and other health professionals. Currently, CT is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for the initial assessment of PBI patients, while MRI is important in the sub-acute setting where it aids prognosis prediction and rehabilitation planning, Additional follow-up imaging, such as angiography, should be dependent upon clinical findings.

  20. Neuroimaging in adult penetrating brain injury: a guide for radiographers

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are a medical emergency, often resulting in complex damage and high mortality rates. Neuroimaging is essential to evaluate the location and extent of injuries, and to manage them accordingly. Currently, a myriad of imaging modalities are included in the diagnostic workup for adult PBI, including skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, with each modality providing their own particular benefits. This literature review explores the current modalities available for investigating PBI and aims to assist in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging when presented with an adult PBI. Based on the current literature, the authors have developed an imaging pathway for adult penetrating brain injury that functions as both a learning tool and reference guide for radiographers and other health professionals. Currently, CT is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for the initial assessment of PBI patients, while MRI is important in the sub-acute setting where it aids prognosis prediction and rehabilitation planning, Additional follow-up imaging, such as angiography, should be dependent upon clinical findings

  1. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    Fong Daniel TP; Chan Yue-Yan; Mok Kam-Ming; Yung Patrick SH; Chan Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprai...

  2. Aquaporin 9 in rat brain after severe traumatic brain injury

    Hui Liu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To reveal the expression and possible roles of aquaporin 9 (AQP9 in rat brain, after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI. METHODS: Brain water content (BWC, tetrazolium chloride staining, Evans blue staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC, immunofluorescence (IF, western blot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction were used. RESULTS: The BWC reached the first and second (highest peaks at 6 and 72 hours, and the blood brain barrier (BBB was severely destroyed at six hours after the TBI. The worst brain ischemia occurred at 72 hours after TBI. Widespread AQP9-positive astrocytes and neurons in the hypothalamus were detected by means of IHC and IF after TBI. The abundance of AQP9 and its mRNA increased after TBI and reached two peaks at 6 and 72 hours, respectively, after TBI. CONCLUSIONS: Increased AQP9 might contribute to clearance of excess water and lactate in the early stage of TBI. Widespread AQP9-positive astrocytes might help lactate move into neurons and result in cellular brain edema in the later stage of TBI. AQP9-positive neurons suggest that AQP9 plays a role in energy balance after TBI.

  3. Astrocytes mediate the neuroprotective effects of Tibolone following brain injury

    Luis Miguel Garcia-Segura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, astrocytes have become a key central player in mediating important functions in the brain. These physiological processes include neurotransmitter recycling, energy management, metabolic shuttle, immune sensing, K+ buffer, antioxidant supply and release of neurotrophic factors and gliotransmitters. These astrocytic roles are somehow altered upon brain injury, therefore strategies aimed at better protecting astrocytes are an essential asset to maintain brain homeostasis. In this context, estrogenic compounds, such as Tibolone, have attracted attention for their beneficial effects in acute and chronic degenerative diseases. Tibolone may act through binding to estrogen, androgen or progesterone receptors and exert protective effects by reducing astrocytes cell death and oxidative stress signaling mechanisms. Although Tibolone has a multifactorial effect in the brain, its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. In this work, we highlight the role of Tibolone in brain protection upon damage, how astrocytes might mediate part of its neuroprotective actions and discuss the effects of Tibolone in diminishing the harmful consequences of a metabolic insult and energy failure in the setting of a pathological event.

  4. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury -A Case Report

    Anamika,; Vasanth Nayak; Jose Chacko; G Parameswara

    2008-01-01

    Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare but life threatening complication of blood transfusion which is being increasingly recognized. It is caused by cross reaction between donor antibodies and host leucocytes or between donor leucocytes with host antibodies. TRALI usually presents as an Acute Lung Injury (ALI) resulting in pulmonary congestion and edema, often leading to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of TRALI in a patient who underwent laparoto...

  5. Pressure Controlled Ventilation to Induce Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    Koeppen, Michael; Eckle, Tobias; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2011-01-01

    Murine models are extensively used to investigate acute injuries of different organs systems (1-34). Acute lung injury (ALI), which occurs with prolonged mechanical ventilation, contributes to morbidity and mortality of critical illness, and studies on novel genetic or pharmacological targets are areas of intense investigation (1-3, 5, 8, 26, 30, 33-36). ALI is defined by the acute onset of the disease, which leads to non-cardiac pulmonary edema and subsequent impairment of pulmonary gas exch...

  6. Hepatic expression of serum amyloid A1 is induced by traumatic brain injury and modulated by telmisartan.

    Villapol, Sonia; Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Balarezo, Maria G; Campbell, Ashley M; Saavedra, Juan M; Shewmaker, Frank P; Symes, Aviva J

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury affects the whole body in addition to the direct impact on the brain. The systemic response to trauma is associated with the hepatic acute-phase response. To further characterize this response, we performed controlled cortical impact injury on male mice and determined the expression of serum amyloid A1 (SAA1), an apolipoprotein, induced at the early stages of the acute-phase response in liver and plasma. After cortical impact injury, induction of SAA1 was detectable in plasma at 6 hours post-injury and in liver at 1 day post-injury, followed by gradual diminution over time. In the liver, cortical impact injury increased neutrophil and macrophage infiltration, apoptosis, and expression of mRNA encoding the chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL10. An increase in angiotensin II AT1 receptor mRNA at 3 days post-injury was also observed. Administration of the AT1 receptor antagonist telmisartan 1 hour post-injury significantly decreased liver SAA1 levels and CXCL10 mRNA expression, but did not affect CXCL1 expression or the number of apoptotic cells or infiltrating leukocytes. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that SAA1 is induced in the liver after traumatic brain injury and that telmisartan prevents this response. Elucidating the molecular pathogenesis of the liver after brain injury will assist in understanding the efficacy of therapeutic approaches to brain injury. PMID:26435412

  7. Optical microangiography enabling visualization of change in meninges after traumatic brain injury in mice in vivo

    Choi, Woo June; Qin, Wan; Qi, Xiaoli; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a form of brain injury caused by sudden impact on brain by an external mechanical force. Following the damage caused at the moment of injury, TBI influences pathophysiology in the brain that takes place within the minutes or hours involving alterations in the brain tissue morphology, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and pressure within skull, which become important contributors to morbidity after TBI. While many studies for the TBI pathophysiology have been investigated with brain cortex, the effect of trauma on intracranial tissues has been poorly studied. Here, we report use of high-resolution optical microangiography (OMAG) to monitor the changes in cranial meninges beneath the skull of mouse after TBI. TBI is induced on a brain of anesthetized mouse by thinning the skull using a soft drill where a series of drilling exert mechanical stress on the brain through the skull, resulting in mild brain injury. Intracranial OMAG imaging of the injured mouse brain during post-TBI phase shows interesting pathophysiological findings in the meningeal layers such as widening of subdural space as well as vasodilation of subarachnoid vessels. These processes are acute and reversible within hours. The results indicate potential of OMAG to explore mechanism involved following TBI on small animals in vivo.

  8. Outcome from Complicated versus Uncomplicated Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Iverson, Grant L; Lange, Rael T; Wäljas, Minna; Liimatainen, Suvi; Dastidar, Prasun; Hartikainen, Kaisa M; Soimakallio, Seppo; Ohman, Juha

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To compare acute outcome following complicated versus uncomplicated mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) using neurocognitive and self-report measures. Method. Participants were 47 patients who presented to the emergency department of Tampere University Hospital, Finland. All completed MRI scanning, self-report measures, and neurocognitive testing at 3-4 weeks after injury. Participants were classified into the complicated MTBI or uncomplicated MTBI group based on the presence/absence of intracranial abnormality on day-of-injury CT scan or 3-4 week MRI scan. Results. There was a large statistically significant difference in time to return to work between groups. The patients with uncomplicated MTBIs had a median of 6.0 days (IQR = 0.75-14.75, range = 0-77) off work compared to a median of 36 days (IQR = 13.5-53, range = 3-315) for the complicated group. There were no significant differences between groups for any of the neurocognitive or self-report measures. There were no differences in the proportion of patients who (a) met criteria for ICD-10 postconcussional disorder or (b) had multiple low scores on the neurocognitive measures. Conclusion. Patients with complicated MTBIs took considerably longer to return to work. They did not perform more poorly on neurocognitive measures or report more symptoms, at 3-4 weeks after injury compared to patients with uncomplicated MTBIs. PMID:22577556

  9. Outcome from Complicated versus Uncomplicated Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Grant L. Iverson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare acute outcome following complicated versus uncomplicated mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI using neurocognitive and self-report measures. Method. Participants were 47 patients who presented to the emergency department of Tampere University Hospital, Finland. All completed MRI scanning, self-report measures, and neurocognitive testing at 3-4 weeks after injury. Participants were classified into the complicated MTBI or uncomplicated MTBI group based on the presence/absence of intracranial abnormality on day-of-injury CT scan or 3-4 week MRI scan. Results. There was a large statistically significant difference in time to return to work between groups. The patients with uncomplicated MTBIs had a median of 6.0 days (IQR = 0.75–14.75, range = 0–77 off work compared to a median of 36 days (IQR = 13.5–53, range = 3–315 for the complicated group. There were no significant differences between groups for any of the neurocognitive or self-report measures. There were no differences in the proportion of patients who (a met criteria for ICD-10 postconcussional disorder or (b had multiple low scores on the neurocognitive measures. Conclusion. Patients with complicated MTBIs took considerably longer to return to work. They did not perform more poorly on neurocognitive measures or report more symptoms, at 3-4 weeks after injury compared to patients with uncomplicated MTBIs.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Cognitive Dysfunction following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Kendall Rae Walker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration.

  11. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  12. Cushing's ulcer in traumatic brain injury

    Biteghe-bi-Nzeng Alain; WANG Yun-jie

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury(TBI)remains a complicated and urgent disease in our modernized cities. It becomes now a public health disease. We have got more and more patients in Neurosurgery Intensive Care Unit following motor vehicle accidents and others causes. TBI brings multiple disorders,from the primary injury to secondary injury. The body received the disturbances in the brain,in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical(HPA)axis,in the gastric mucosa,in the immune and neuroendocrine systems.The mortality of TBI is more than 50 000 deaths/year, the third of the mortality of all iniuries. Cushing ulcer is one of the severe complications of TBI and its mortality rate is more than 50%. Many studies have improved the management of TBI and the associated complications to give patients a better outcome. Furthers studies need to be done based on the similar methodology to clarify the different steps of the HPA axis and the neuroendocrine change associated. The aim of the present review is to assess the clinical and endocrinal features of hypopituitarism and stress ulcer following TBI.

  13. Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Linagliptin.

    Nandikanti, Deepak K; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Gosmanov, Aidar R

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. About 5% of linagliptin is eliminated by the kidneys and no dose adjustment is recommended in kidney impairment. We report a first case of linagliptin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) in a patient with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD). We hypothesize that AKI was due to renal hypoperfusion from linagliptin-induced natriuresis and intravascular volume contraction in the setting of concomitant lisinopril use, which is known to impair autoregulation and potentiate hypotension-induced AKI. It may be prudent to exert caution and closely monitor kidney function when initiating linagliptin in combination with ACE-inhibitors in CKD patients. PMID:26981294

  14. Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Linagliptin

    Deepak K. Nandikanti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. About 5% of linagliptin is eliminated by the kidneys and no dose adjustment is recommended in kidney impairment. We report a first case of linagliptin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI in a patient with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD. We hypothesize that AKI was due to renal hypoperfusion from linagliptin-induced natriuresis and intravascular volume contraction in the setting of concomitant lisinopril use, which is known to impair autoregulation and potentiate hypotension-induced AKI. It may be prudent to exert caution and closely monitor kidney function when initiating linagliptin in combination with ACE-inhibitors in CKD patients.

  15. Fluid management in acute kidney injury.

    Goldstein, Stuart L

    2014-01-01

    Fluid management in critical illness has undergone extensive reevaluation in the past decade. Since a significant percentage of critically ill patients develop acute kidney injury (AKI), optimal fluid management is even more paramount to prevent the ill effects of either underhydration or overhydration. The concepts of early goal-directed fluid therapy (EGDT) and conservative late fluid management permeate current clinical research, and the independent association between fluid accumulation and mortality has been repeatedly demonstrated. A number of prospective randomized trials are planned to provide an adequately powered assessment of the effect of EGDT or earlier renal replacement therapy initiation in patients with, or at risk for AKI. The aim of this analytical review is to use existing clinical and physiological studies to support a 3-phase model of fluid management in the critically ill patient with AKI. PMID:23753221

  16. Acute kidney injury in HCT: an update.

    Lopes, J A; Jorge, S; Neves, M

    2016-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is highly prevalent whether the patients undergo myeloablative or non-myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT); however, the pathogenesis and risk factors leading to AKI can differ between the two. The prognosis of AKI in patients receiving HCT is poor. In fact, AKI following HCT is associated not only with increased short- and long-term mortality, but also with progression to chronic kidney disease. Herein, the authors provide a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the definition and diagnosis, as well as of the incidence, pathogenesis and outcome of AKI in patients undergoing HCT, centering on the differences between myeloablative and non-myeloablative regimens. PMID:26855155

  17. Traumatic brain injury: a review of characteristics, molecular basis and management.

    Wang, Ke; Cui, Daming; Gao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a critical cause of hospitalization, disability, and death worldwide. The global increase in the incidence of TBI poses a significant socioeconomic burden. Guidelines for the management of acute TBI mostly pertain to emergency treatment. Comprehensive gene expression analysis is currently available for several animal models of TBI, along with enhanced understanding of the molecular mechanisms activated during injury and subsequent recovery. The current review focuses on the characteristics, molecular basis and management of TBI. PMID:27100477

  18. Acute kidney injury in asphyxiated neonates

    Roy Amardiyanto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Asphyxia neonatorum may result in multiorgan dysfunction including renal involvement. There is no consensus on the determination of acute kidney injury (AKI in neonates making establishment of the diagnosis and its management becomes difficult. The Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN recommends AKI criteria based on increased serum creatinine level and reduced urine output. Objectives To identify the prevalence of AKI in asphyxiated neonates using the AKIN criteria, to compare the difference of AKI stages, and the glomerular filtration rates (GFR between moderate and severe asphyxia. Methods This was a cross-sectional analytical study conducted between July 2012 and January 2013. Subjects were all asphyxiated neonates (Apgar score 35 weeks delivered and hospitalized in Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital and Koja District Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Glomerular filtration rate was calculated using the components of urine creatinine, serum creatinine, and urine output; while AKI stages were determined according to AKIN criteria. Urinary output was measured via urethral catheterization. Results Of 94 subjects, there were 70 neonates with moderate and 24 neonates with severe asphyxia, with the prevalence of AKI was 63%. Twenty one out of 24 neonates with severe asphyxia experienced AKI, while neonates with moderate asphyxia who experienced AKI was 38 out of 70 subjects (54%. Two third of neonates with severe asphyxia who experienced AKI had stage 3 of AKI. More severe AKI stages and lower median GFR were found in neonates with severe compared to moderate asphyxia (P<0.001. Conclusion The prevalence of AKI in neonatal asphyxia is high (63%. The more severe degree of neonatal asphyxia, the more severe AKI stage and the lower median GFR. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:232-8.].

  19. Spillway-induced salmon head injury triggers the generation of brain alphaII-spectrin breakdown product biomarkers similar to mammalian traumatic brain injury.

    Ann Miracle

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biomedical research have resulted in the development of specific biomarkers for diagnostic testing of disease condition or physiological risk. Of specific interest are alphaII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs, which are produced by proteolytic events in traumatic brain injury and have been used as biomarkers to predict the severity of injury in humans and other mammalian brain injury models. This study describes and demonstrates the successful use of antibody-based mammalian SBDP biomarkers to detect head injury in migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that have been injured during passage through high-energy hydraulic environments present in spillways under different operational configurations. Mortality and injury assessment techniques currently measure only near-term direct mortality and easily observable acute injury. Injury-based biomarkers may serve as a quantitative indicator of subacute physical injury and recovery, and aid hydropower operators in evaluation of safest passage configuration and operation actions for migrating juvenile salmonids. We describe a novel application of SBDP biomarkers for head injury for migrating salmon. To our knowledge, this is the first documented cross-over use of a human molecular biomarker in a wildlife and operational risk management scenario.

  20. Clinical utility of brain stimulation modalities following traumatic brain injury: current evidence

    Li S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shasha Li,1,2 Ana Luiza Zaninotto,2,3 Iuri Santana Neville,4 Wellingson Silva Paiva,4 Danuza Nunn,2 Felipe Fregni21Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 2Spaulding Neuromodulation Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3Division of Psychology, Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 4Division of Neurosurgery, University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Traumatic brain injury (TBI remains the main cause of disability and a major public health problem worldwide. This review focuses on the neurophysiology of TBI, and the rationale and current state of evidence of clinical application of brain stimulation to promote TBI recovery, particularly on consciousness, cognitive function, motor impairments, and psychiatric conditions. We discuss the mechanisms of different brain stimulation techniques including major noninvasive and invasive stimulations. Thus far, most noninvasive brain stimulation interventions have been nontargeted and focused on the chronic phase of recovery after TBI. In the acute stages, there is limited available evidence of the efficacy and safety of brain stimulation to improve functional outcomes. Comparing the studies across different techniques, transcranial direct current stimulation is the intervention that currently has the higher number of properly designed clinical trials, though total number is still small. We recognize the need for larger studies with target neuroplasticity modulation to fully explore the benefits of brain stimulation to effect TBI recovery during different stages of recovery.Keywords: traumatic brain injury, brain stimulation, neuroplasticity

  1. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far.......Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  2. Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries : A 10-year follow-up

    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth; Bedics, Beate Kärrdahl; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2011-01-01

    Objective and design: Long-term consequences of mild traumatic brain injuries were investigated based on a 10-year follow-up of patients from a previously published randomized controlled study of mild traumatic brain injuries. One aim was to describe changes over time after mild traumatic brain injuries in terms of the extent of persisting post-concussion symptoms, life satisfaction, perceived health, activities of daily living, changes in life roles and sick leave. Another aim was to identif...

  3. Depression, anxiety and quality-of-life among relatives of patients with severe brain injury

    Norup, Anne; Welling, Karen-Lise; Qvist, Jesper;

    2012-01-01

    Primary objective: To investigate the emotional well-being of relatives of patients with a severe brain injury in the acute setting, as well as risk factors associated with high anxiety and depression scores and impaired quality-of-life. Research design: Clinical convenience sample. Methods and...

  4. Increased vagal tone accounts for the observed immune paralysis in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Kox, M.; Pompe, J.C.; Pickkers, P.; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.; Vugt, A.B. van; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability, especially in the younger population. In the acute phase after TBI, patients are more vulnerable to infection, associated with a decreased immune response in vitro. The cause of this immune paralysis is poorly understood. Apart

  5. Gabapentin in the management of dysautonomia following severe traumatic brain injury: a case series

    Baguley, Ian J; Heriseanu, Roxana E; Gurka, Joseph A;

    2007-01-01

    The pharmacological management of dysautonomia, otherwise known as autonomic storms, following acute neurological insults, is problematic and remains poorly researched. This paper presents six subjects with dysautonomia following extremely severe traumatic brain injury where gabapentin controlled...... stimuli may represent a better option for dysautonomia management than drugs which increase inhibition of efferent pathways. Potential mechanisms for these effects are discussed....

  6. Hematological parameters after acute radiation injury

    According to clinical experiences of radiation accidents during the past two decades, utilization of measured hematologic changes as a direcrt indicator of the severity of radiation injury provides important information for diagnosis and prognostic evaluation in individual cases. Hematologic changes can be described in terms of prognostic categories based on the possible outcome of the acute radiation syndrome. The five categories suggested by Wald according to the grade of severity. By the actual application of this category to our experience of the 1971 Chiba accident of exposure to irridium 192, it was proved that the estimated dose was well correlated to the value by cytogenetic analysis and physical estimation used of thermo-luminescence phenomena. In hematological parameters, a decrease of lymphocytes occurs whithin 24 hours after the exposure. The level of this early lymphopenia is regarded as one of the best indicators of severity of radiation injury. For the decision of therapeutic procedures, however, the total granulocyte count and platelet count are more valuable to exclude severe infection and bleeding symptoms occurred one month after the exposure. The limitation of the approach by hematologic data must exist in the case exposed in a non-uniform fashion. To overwhelm this difficulty, the application of rapid marrow scanning by short-lived RI such as 52Fe is expected and the bone marrow imaging by magnetic resonance studies is more exciting. For more sensitive and technically easy-drived methods detecting hematologic injury, our new method of detecting micro-nucleus in polychromatic erythroblasts from cultured erythroid colonies from peripheral blood is now developing. Preliminary data have shown the sensitivity of this method is comparable to the cytogenetic study of pheripheral lymphocytes. (author)

  7. Extending the viability of acute brain slices.

    Buskila, Yossi; Breen, Paul P; Tapson, Jonathan; van Schaik, André; Barton, Matthew; Morley, John W

    2014-01-01

    The lifespan of an acute brain slice is approximately 6-12 hours, limiting potential experimentation time. We have designed a new recovery incubation system capable of extending their lifespan to more than 36 hours. This system controls the temperature of the incubated artificial cerebral spinal fluid (aCSF) while continuously passing the fluid through a UVC filtration system and simultaneously monitoring temperature and pH. The combination of controlled temperature and UVC filtering maintains bacteria levels in the lag phase and leads to the dramatic extension of the brain slice lifespan. Brain slice viability was validated through electrophysiological recordings as well as live/dead cell assays. This system benefits researchers by monitoring incubation conditions and standardizing this artificial environment. It further provides viable tissue for two experimental days, reducing the time spent preparing brain slices and the number of animals required for research. PMID:24930889

  8. Gabapentin in the management of dysautonomia following severe traumatic brain injury: a case series

    Baguley, Ian J; Heriseanu, Roxana E; Gurka, Joseph A; Nordenbo, Annette; Cameron, Ian D

    2007-01-01

    The pharmacological management of dysautonomia, otherwise known as autonomic storms, following acute neurological insults, is problematic and remains poorly researched. This paper presents six subjects with dysautonomia following extremely severe traumatic brain injury where gabapentin controlled paroxysmal autonomic changes and posturing in the early post‐acute phase following limited success with conventional medication regimens. In two subjects, other medications were reduced or ceased wit...

  9. Cell kinetics and acute lung injury

    In order to estimate whether acute lung injury is followed by a stereotype pattern of cell proliferation in the lungs, mice were treated with three cytostatic drugs: cyclophosphamide, busulfan, or 1,3-Bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU). The alveolar labeling index was measured following drug administration with a pulse of 3H-labeled thymidine and autoradiography. In cyclophosphamide treated animals, peak alveolar cell proliferation was seen 5 days after injection of the drug. In animals treated with busulfan or BCNU, proliferation was even more delayed (occurring 2 to 3 wks after administration). In contrast, with oleic acid, the highest alveolar cell labeling was found 2 days after intravenous administration. In animals exposed to a cytostatic drug, proliferation of type II alveolar cells was never a prominent feature; whereas, in animals treated with oleic acid there was an initial burst of type II cell proliferation. It was concluded that the patterns of pulmonary repair vary between chemical designed to interfere with DNA replication as compared to agents which produce acute lung damage such as oleic acid

  10. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI

    TAJANA ZAH

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI is a complication following transfusion of blood products and is potentially a life-threatening adverse event of transfusion. The first case of fatal pulmonary edema following transfusion was reported in the 1950s. In recent time, TRALI has developed from an almost unknown transfusion reaction to the most common cause of transfusion related major morbidities and fatalities. A clinical definition of TRALI was established in 2004, based on acute respiratory distress which has temporal association with transfusion of blood components. In 2008 a distinction between classic and delayed syndrome was proposed. However, pathophysiology of TRALI still remains controversial. A number of different models were proposed to explain the pathogenesis. The two, presently most accepted models, are not mutually exclusive. The first is the antibody mediated model and the second is the two-event model.In this review article the definition of TRALI, patient predisposition, treatment, prevention and reporting guidelines are examined. The current knowledge on the topic TRALI is summarized.

  11. Acute Kidney Injury:Global Health Alert

    Philip Kam TaoLi; Emmanuel A Burdmann; Ravindra L Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly prevalent in developing and developed countries and is associated with severe morbidity and mortality.Most etiologies of AKI can be prevented by interventions at the individual,community,regional and in-hospital levels.Effective measures must include community-wide efforts to increase an awareness of the devastating effects of AKI and provide guidance on preventive strategies,as well as early recognition and management.Efforts should be focused on minimizing causes of AKI,increasing awareness of the importance of serial measurements of serum creatinine in high risk patients,and documenting urine volume in acutely ill people to achieve early diagnosis; there is as yet no definitive role for alternative biomarkers.Protocols need to be developed to systematically manage prerenal conditions and specific infections.More accurate data about the true incidence and clinical impact of AKI will help to raise the importance of the disease in the community,increase awareness of AKI by governments,the public,general and family physicians and other health care professionals to help prevent the disease.Prevention is the key to avoid the heavy burden of mortality and morbidity associated with AKI.

  12. Establishing a cat model of acute optic nerve injury

    2007-01-01

    optic nerve (about 3 mm) went through optic foramen and entered into brain tissue. It was squeezed with noninvasive vascular clip for 20 seconds, then the clip was removed, and then the skull was closed after it was examined to be no bleeding. The size of bilateral pupils, direct and indirect light reflexes were observed postoperatively. Successfully established models were judged by larger operated pupil than controlateral one,disappearance of direct light reflex and the existence of indirect light reflex. No model establishment was performed in the control group. Each cat was tested with flash visual evoked potential (F-VEP) to observe the electrophysiological changes before and after experiment. All the cats in the control group and model groups were killed under anesthesia before model establishment and at 6 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after model establishment respectively, and the pathological changes of the optic nerve after injury were observed under electron microscope and light microscope.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: VEP and the ultrastructural changes of optic nerve after acute optic nerve injury in both groups.RESULTS: All the 28 cats were involved in the analysis of results. ① VEP results: The VEP latencies were obviously different between the control group and model group at each time point (P < 0.05), whereas there were no obvious differences among different time points in the model group (P > 0.05). The VEP amplitudes were obviously different between the control group and model group at each time point (P < 0.05), whereas there were no obvious differences among different time points in the model group (P > 0.05).② Ultrastructural changes of the optic nerve: Under electron microscope, normal optic nerve myelin sheath had complete structure, tramal plates were clear and arranged tightly, axolemma was complete, whereas the structures of endoneurium, myelin sheath, tramal plates, axolemma and axon were in disorders after optic nerve injury

  13. Salvianolic Acids Attenuate Rat Hippocampal Injury after Acute CO Poisoning by Improving Blood Flow Properties

    Li Guan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO poisoning causes the major injury and death due to poisoning worldwide. The most severe damage via CO poisoning is brain injury and mortality. Delayed encephalopathy after acute CO poisoning (DEACMP occurs in forty percent of the survivors of acute CO exposure. But the pathological cause for DEACMP is not well understood. And the corresponding therapy is not well developed. In order to investigate the effects of salvianolic acid (SA on brain injury caused by CO exposure from the view point of hemorheology, we employed a rat model and studied the dynamic of blood changes in the hemorheological and coagulative properties over acute CO exposure. Compared with the groups of CO and 20% mannitol + CO treatments, the severe hippocampal injury caused by acute CO exposure was prevented by SA treatment. These protective effects were associated with the retaining level of hematocrit (Hct, plasma viscosity, fibrinogen, whole blood viscosities and malondialdehyde (MDA levels in red blood cells (RBCs. These results indicated that SA treatment could significantly improve the deformation of erythrocytes and prevent the damage caused by CO poisoning. Meanwhile, hemorheological indexes are good indicators for monitoring the pathological dynamic after acute CO poisoning.

  14. A study of rotational brain injury.

    Misra, J C; Chakravarty, S

    1984-01-01

    Of concern in the paper is an investigation on brain injuries which may occur owing to an input angular acceleration of the head. The study is based on the use of an improved mathematical model for the cranium. The eccentricity of the braincase is incorporated through the consideration of a prolate spheroidal shell as the representative of the skull. Also the dissipative mechanical behaviour of the brain material (as per the observations of experimenters) has been accounted for by considering the material contained in the shell as viscoelastic. The problem is formulated in terms of prolate spheroidal coordinates. The singularities of the governing equations of motion (when expressed in the prolate coordinate system) are removed by a suitable transformation of the concerned dependent variable, viz. the one that stands for the angular displacement of a representative point of the system. In the first place the solution of the boundary value problem is sought in the Laplace transform space, by employing a finite difference technique. Use of the alternating-direction-implicit method together with Thomas algorithm was made for obtaining the angular acceleration in the transformed space. The Laplace inversion is also carried out with the help of numerical procedures (Gauss quadrature formula is used for this purpose). The results of the parametric study are presented through graphs. The plots illustrate the shear stresses and strains in the brain medium. A meaningful comparison of the computational results with those of previous investigations indicate that the eccentricity of the braincase plays a significant role in causing injury to the brain. PMID:6480621

  15. Violence-related mild traumatic brain injury in women: identifying a triad of postinjury disorders.

    Davis, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Violence against women whether from domestic partner abuse, sex trafficking injuries, or sexual assault is a pervasive health problem without racial or social boundaries. Regardless of cause, violence results in a complex triad of physical, emotional, and psychological injuries. There is clear evidence that female victims of violence or "battered women" experience brain injury. What is less certain is whether the constellations of events surrounding brain injury including postconcussion syndrome, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder are acute symptoms after the brain injury, premorbid as a result of persistent abuse, or a synergistic triad of combined disorders as a result of the injuries. The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between physical violence-associated mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) and postinjury cognitive, emotional, and psychological disorders. The review of the literature addresses epidemiological factors associated with domestic partners and sexual violence, abuse and health outcomes in women, physical injury, and its consequences. Along with MTBI, a triad of disorders is hypothesized that includes postconcussion syndrome, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Screening for MTBI and the triad of disorders is advocated, and assessment methods are offered. PMID:25397339

  16. Erythropoietin Treatment in Traumatic Brain Injury: Operation Brain Trauma Therapy.

    Bramlett, Helen M; Dietrich, W Dalton; Dixon, C Edward; Shear, Deborah A; Schmid, Kara E; Mondello, Stefania; Wang, Kevin K W; Hayes, Ronald L; Povlishock, John T; Tortella, Frank C; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2016-03-15

    Experimental studies targeting traumatic brain injury (TBI) have reported that erythropoietin (EPO) is an endogenous neuroprotectant in multiple models. In addition to its neuroprotective effects, it has also been shown to enhance reparative processes including angiogenesis and neurogenesis. Based on compelling pre-clinical data, EPO was tested by the Operation Brain Trauma Therapy (OBTT) consortium to evaluate therapeutic potential in multiple TBI models along with biomarker assessments. Based on the pre-clinical TBI literature, two doses of EPO (5000 and 10,000 IU/kg) were tested given at 15 min after moderate fluid percussion brain injury (FPI), controlled cortical impact (CCI), or penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) with subsequent behavioral, histopathological, and biomarker outcome assessments. There was a significant benefit on beam walk with the 5000 IU dose in CCI, but no benefit on any other motor task across models in OBTT. Also, no benefit of EPO treatment across the three TBI models was noted using the Morris water maze to assess cognitive deficits. Lesion volume analysis showed no treatment effects after either FPI or CCI; however, with the 5000 IU/kg dose of EPO, a paradoxical increase in lesion volume and percent hemispheric tissue loss was seen after PBBI. Biomarker assessments included measurements of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) in blood at 4 or 24 h after injury. No treatment effects were seen on biomarker levels after FPI, whereas treatment at either dose exacerbated the increase in GFAP at 24 h in PBBI but attenuated 24-4 h delta UCH-L1 levels at high dose in CCI. Our data indicate a surprising lack of efficacy of EPO across three established TBI models in terms of behavioral, histopathological, and biomarker assessments. Although we cannot rule out the possibility that other doses or more prolonged treatment could show different effects, the lack of efficacy of EPO

  17. Acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements.

    Chen, Gary C; Ramanathan, Vivek S; Law, David; Funchain, Pauline; Chen, George C; French, Samuel; Shlopov, Boris; Eysselein, Viktor; Chung, David; Reicher, Sonya; Pham, Binh V

    2010-11-27

    We report three cases of patients with acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements. One patient took Hydroxycut while the other two took Herbalife supplements. Liver biopsies for all patients demonstrated findings consistent with drug-induced acute liver injury. To our knowledge, we are the first institute to report acute liver injury from both of these two types of weight-loss herbal supplements together as a case series. The series emphasizes the importance of taking a cautious approach when consuming herbal supplements for the purpose of weight loss. PMID:21173910

  18. The History and Evolution of Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury Models.

    Povlishock, John

    2016-01-01

    This narrative provides a brief history of experimental animal model development for the study of traumatic brain injury. It draws upon a relatively rich history of early animal modeling that employed higher order animals to assess concussive brain injury while exploring the importance of head movement versus stabilization in evaluating the animal's response to injury. These themes are extended to the development of angular/rotational acceleration/deceleration models that also exploited brain movement to generate both the morbidity and pathology typically associated with human traumatic brain injury. Despite the significance of these early model systems, their limitations and overall practicality are discussed. Consideration is given to more contemporary rodent animal models that replicate individual/specific features of human injury, while via various transgenic technologies permitting the evaluation of injury-mediated pathways. The narrative closes on a reconsideration of higher order, porcine animal models of injury and their implication for preclinical/translational research. PMID:27604709

  19. Correlation between emergency treatment time and prognosis of acute traumatic brain injury patients caused by external violence%外部暴力所致急性颅脑创伤预后的相关性因素分析

    杨玲昌

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation of prognosis with emergency treatment time,gender,age and GCS score of acute traumatic brain injury patients caused by external violence.Methods 92 acute traumatic brain injury patients caused by external violence were selected.The gender,age,emergency treatment time,post-resuscita-tion GCS and GOS after 5 months were collected and analyzed.The relationship between patients′signs and emergency treatment time and prognosis were analyzed.Results The differences of prognosis between elderly patients and youn-ger patients were statistically significant(χ2 =5.30,P<0.05).The differences of prognosis in patients with different GCS scores were statistically significant(χ2 =11.97,P<0.01).The differences of prognosis in patients with different emergency treatment time were statistically significant(χ2 =15.74,P<0.01).The prognosis with age and emergency treatment time had a significant correlation(P=0.016,0.007).The prognosis of patients with different emergency treatment time had a significant difference(χ2 =28.45,P<0.01).Conclusion The age,post-resuscitation GCS and emergency treatment time are meaningful in predicating patients′mortality and prognosis.The shorter the emer-gency treatment time,the better the prognosis.%目的:探讨外部暴力所致急性颅脑创伤患者现场及院内抢救时间、性别、年龄及格拉斯哥昏迷评分(GCS评分)与预后的相关性。方法选取92例外部暴力所致急性颅脑创伤患者为研究对象,回顾性分析其临床资料。收集患者的性别、年龄、受伤到抢救的时间、入院时 GCS 及5个月后格拉斯哥预后评分(GOS),分析各征象及抢救时间与临床预后的相关性。结果高龄和低龄患者的预后差异有统计学意义(χ2=5.30,P<0.05);GCS评分不同对预后好坏的影响有统计学意义(χ2=11.97,P<0.01);伤后到抢救的时间不同亦对预后好坏产生显著性影响(χ2

  20. Increased expression of aquaporin-4 in human traumatic brain injury and brain tumors

    HU Hua; YAO Hong-tian; ZHANG Wei-ping; ZHANG LEI; DING Wei; ZHANG Shi-hong; CHEN Zhong; WEI Er-qing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), one of the aquaporins (AQPs), in human brain specimens from patients with traumatic brain injury or brain tumors. Methods: Nineteen human brain specimens were obtained from the patients with traumatic brain injury, brain tumors, benign meningioma or early stage hemorrhagic stroke. MRI or CT imaging was used to assess brain edema. Hematoxylin and eosin staining were used to evaluate cell damage. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the AQP4 expression. Results: AQP4 expression was increased from 15h to at least 8 d after injury. AQP4immunoreactivity was strong around astrocytomas, ganglioglioma and metastatic adenocarcinoma. However, AQP4 immunoreactivity was only found in the centers of astrocytomas and ganglioglioma, but not in metastatic adenocarcinoma derived from lung.Conclusion: AQP4 expression increases in human brains after traumatic brain injury, within brain-derived tumors, and around brain tumors.

  1. Lung injury in acute pancreatitis: mechanisms, prevention, and therapy.

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    Lung injury is the most pertinent manifestation of extra-abdominal organ dysfunction in pancreatitis. The propensity of this retroperitoneal inflammatory condition to engender a diffuse and life-threatening lung injury is significant. Approximately one third of patients will develop acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which account for 60% of all deaths within the first week. The variability in the clinical course of pancreatitis renders it a vexing entity and makes demonstration of the efficacy of any specific intervention difficult. The distinct pathologic entity of pancreatitis-associated lung injury is reviewed with a focus on etiology and potential therapeutic maneuvers.

  2. Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide attenuates trauma-/haemorrhagic shock-induced acute lung injury through inhibiting oxidative stress and the NF-κB-dependent inflammatory/MMP-9 pathway.

    Song, Zhi; Zhao, Xiu; Liu, Martin; Jin, Hongxu; Wang, Ling; Hou, Mingxiao; Gao, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is one of the most serious complications in traumatic patients and is an important part of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP) is a peptide with a wide range of biological activity. In this study, we investigated local changes in oxidative stress and the NF-κB-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) pathway in rats with trauma/haemorrhagic shock (TH/S)-induced ALI and evaluated the effects of pretreatment with rhBNP. Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham operation group, model group, low-dosage rhBNP group and high-dosage rhBNP group (n = 12 for each group). Oxidative stress and MPO activity were measured by ELISA kits. MMP-9 activity was detected by zymography analysis. NF-κB activity was determined using Western blot assay. With rhBNP pretreatment, TH/S-induced protein leakage, increased MPO activity, lipid peroxidation and metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activity were inhibited. Activation of antioxidative enzymes was reversed. The phosphorylation of NF-κB and the degradation of its inhibitor IκB were suppressed. The results suggested that the protection mechanism of rhBNP is possibly mediated through upregulation of anti-oxidative enzymes and inhibition of NF-κB activation. More studies are needed to further evaluate whether rhBNP is a suitable candidate as an effective inhaling drug to reduce the incidence of TH/S-induced ALI. PMID:26852688

  3. Determining client cognitive status following mild traumatic brain injury.

    Hobson, Elizabeth; Lannin, Natasha A; Taylor, Amelia; Farquhar, Michelle; Morarty, Jacqui; Unsworth, Carolyn

    2016-03-01

    Background People with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) commonly experience cognitive impairments. Occupational therapists working in acute general hospitals in Australia routinely access client Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, and assess cognitive status using standardized tools and by observing basic activity of daily living (ADL) performance. However, limited evidence exists to identify the best assessment(s) to determine client cognitive status. Aim/objectives To determine whether cognitive status assessed by GCS score and the Cognistat are predictive of basic ADL performance among clients with mTBI in an acute general hospital and make inferences concerning the clinical utility of these assessment tools. Material and methods Retrospective analysis of medical record data on demographics, Cognistat, GCS, and modified Barthel Index (MBI) using descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and linear regression. Results Data analysis of 166 participants demonstrated that no associations exist between GCS and Cognistat scores, or Cognistat scores and MBI dependency level. The presence of co-morbid multi-trauma injuries and length of stay were the only variables that significantly predicted MBI dependency level. Conclusion and significance While the MBI scores are of value in identifying clients with difficulty in basic ADLs, Cognistat and GCS scores are of limited use in differentiating client levels of cognitive impairment and the authors caution against the routine administration of the Cognistat following mTBI. Further research is required to identify more suitable assessments for use with a mTBI population. PMID:26458152

  4. Neuropsychological rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury patients

    Marzena Chantsoulis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to discuss the basic forms of neuropsychological rehabilitation for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI. More broadly, we discussed cognitive rehabilitation therapy (CRT which constitutes a fundamental component in therapeutic interaction at many centres worldwide. Equally presented is a comprehensive model of rehabilitation, the fundamental component of which is CRT. It should be noted that the principles of this approach first arose in Poland in the 1970s, in other words, several decades before their appearance in other programmemes. Taken into consideration are four factors conditioning the effectiveness of such a process: comprehensiveness, earlier interaction, universality and its individualized character. A comprehensive programmeme of rehabilitation covers: cognitive rehabilitation, individual and group rehabilitation with the application of a therapeutic environment, specialist vocational rehabilitation, as well as family psychotherapy. These training programmemes are conducted within the scope of the ‘Academy of Life,’ which provides support for the patients in their efforts and shows them the means by which they can overcome existing difficulties. Equally emphasized is the close cooperation of the whole team of specialists, as well as the active participation of the family as an essential condition for the effectiveness of rehabilitation and, in effect, a return of the patient to a relatively normal life. Also presented are newly developing neurothechnologies and the neuromarkers of brain injuries. This enables a correct diagnosis to be made and, as a result, the selection of appropriate methods for neuropsychological rehabilitation, including neurotherapy.

  5. Psychiatric disorders and traumatic brain injury

    Marcelo Schwarzbold

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Marcelo Schwarzbold1, Alexandre Diaz1, Evandro Tostes Martins2, Armanda Rufino1, Lúcia Nazareth Amante1,3, Maria Emília Thais1, João Quevedo4, Alexandre Hohl1, Marcelo Neves Linhares1,5,6, Roger Walz1,61Núcleo de Pesquisas em Neurologia Clínica e Experimental (NUPNEC, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Hospital Universitário, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 2Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, Hospital Governador Celso Ramos, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 3Departamento de Enfermagem, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 4Laboratório de Neurociências, UNESC, Criciúma, SC, Brazil; 5Departamento de Cirurgia, Hospital Universitário, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 6Centro de Cirurgia de Epilepsia de Santa Catarina (CEPESC, Hospital Governador Celso Ramos, Florianópolis, SC, BrazilAbstract: Psychiatric disorders after traumatic brain injury (TBI are frequent. Researches in this area are important for the patients’ care and they may provide hints for the comprehension of primary psychiatric disorders. Here we approach epidemiology, diagnosis, associated factors and treatment of the main psychiatric disorders after TBI. Finally, the present situation of the knowledge in this field is discussed.Keywords: psychiatric disorders, traumatic brain injury, neuropsychiatry, diagnostic, epidemiology, pathophysiology

  6. Blocking leukotriene synthesis attenuates the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury and associated cognitive deficits.

    Corser-Jensen, Chelsea E; Goodell, Dayton J; Freund, Ronald K; Serbedzija, Predrag; Murphy, Robert C; Farias, Santiago E; Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Frey, Lauren C; Serkova, Natalie; Heidenreich, Kim A

    2014-06-01

    Neuroinflammation is a component of secondary injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI) that can persist beyond the acute phase. Leukotrienes are potent, pro-inflammatory lipid mediators generated from membrane phospholipids. In the absence of injury, leukotrienes are undetectable in the brain, but after trauma they are rapidly synthesized by a transcellular event involving infiltrating neutrophils and endogenous brain cells. Here, we investigate the efficacy of MK-886, an inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP), in blocking leukotriene synthesis, secondary brain damage, synaptic dysfunction, and cognitive impairments after TBI. Male Sprague Dawley rats (9-11weeks) received either MK-886 or vehicle after they were subjected to unilateral moderate fluid percussion injury (FPI) to assess the potential clinical use of FLAP inhibitors for TBI. MK-886 was also administered before FPI to determine the preventative potential of FLAP inhibitors. MK-886 given before or after injury significantly blocked the production of leukotrienes, measured by reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (RP LC-MS/MS), and brain edema, measured by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MK-886 significantly attenuated blood-brain barrier disruption in the CA1 hippocampal region and deficits in long-term potentiation (LTP) at CA1 hippocampal synapses. The prevention of FPI-induced synaptic dysfunction by MK-886 was accompanied by fewer deficits in post-injury spatial learning and memory performance in the radial arm water maze (RAWM). These results indicate that leukotrienes contribute significantly to secondary brain injury and subsequent cognitive deficits. FLAP inhibitors represent a novel anti-inflammatory approach for treating human TBI that is feasible for both intervention and prevention of brain injury and neurologic deficits. PMID:24681156

  7. Transfusion related acute lung injury presenting with acute dyspnoea: a case report

    Haji Altaf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative period. Investigation results were non-specific and a diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury was made after excluding other possible causes of acute lung injury. She responded to symptomatic management with ventilatory and vasopressor support and recovered completely over the next 72 hours. Conclusion The diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury relies on excluding other causes of acute pulmonary edema following transfusion, such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. All plasma containing blood products have been implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury, with the majority being linked to whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, involving priming of the inflammatory machinery and then activation of this primed mechanism. Treatment is supportive, with prognosis being substantially better than for most other causes of acute lung injury.

  8. Estrogen treatment following severe burn injury reduces brain inflammation and apoptotic signaling

    Idris Ahamed H

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with severe burn injury experience a rapid elevation in multiple circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines, with the levels correlating with both injury severity and outcome. Accumulations of these cytokines in animal models have been observed in remote organs, however data are lacking regarding early brain cytokine levels following burn injury, and the effects of estradiol on these levels. Using an experimental animal model, we studied the acute effects of a full-thickness third degree burn on brain levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and the protective effects of acute estrogen treatment on these levels. Additionally, the acute administration of estrogen on regulation of inflammatory and apoptotic events in the brain following severe burn injury were studied through measuring the levels of phospho-ERK, phospho-Akt, active caspase-3, and PARP cleavage in the placebo and estrogen treated groups. Methods In this study, 149 adult Sprague-Dawley male rats received 3rd degree 40% total body surface area (TBSA burns. Fifteen minutes following burn injury, the animals received a subcutaneous injection of either placebo (n = 72 or 17 beta-estradiol (n = 72. Brains were harvested at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 18, and 24 hours after injury from the control (n = 5, placebo (n = 8/time point, and estrogen treated animals (n = 8/time point. The brain cytokine levels were measured using the ELISA method. In addition, we assessed the levels of phosphorylated-ERK, phosphorylated-Akt, active caspase-3, and the levels of cleaved PARP at the 24 hour time-point using Western blot analysis. Results In burned rats, 17 beta-estradiol significantly decreased the levels of brain tissue TNF-α (~25%, IL-1β (~60%, and IL-6 (~90% when compared to the placebo group. In addition, we determined that in the estrogen-treated rats there was an increase in the levels of phospho-ERK (p p p p Conclusion Following severe burn injury, estrogens decrease both

  9. Magnetic susceptibility artifacts in a diffuse brain injury and their pathological significance

    In our study, FLAIR images and multishot echo planar imaging T2-weighted images (EPI T2-WI) were used in addition to conventional T1-weighted images, T2-weighted images and T2-weighted sagittal images. In this series we focused our attention on small parenchymatous lesions of a mild or moderate form of diffuse brain injury. These injuries are shown as high intensity areas on T2-weighted images (T2-high intensity lesions) but are not visualized in CT images. This series consisted of 29 patients who were diagnosed with diffuse brain injury and whose CT scans showed a Diffuse Injury I or II. Nineteen patients were studied in an acute or subacute stage. In all but 3 patients, small T2-high intensity lesions were found in the brain parenchyma. In the follow-up study brain edema was suggested because the lesions tended to be absent within 3 months in T2-weighted images and FLAIR. In 10 patients examined during a chronic stage. Small hemorrhages in patients with Diffuse Injury II were shown with variable intensities on the conventional T1- and T2-weighted images, but were visualized with low intensity in an EPI T2-WI. In diffuse brain injuries, small T2-high intensity lesions have been considered to be brain edema or ischemic insults. Our data however, suggested that microhemorrhages associated with brain edema were resent in most of the supratentorial lesions, and in more than a half of the lesions in the corpus callosum and the brain stem. These findings appear similar to contusions, which are defined as traumatic bruises of the neural parenchyma. The use of MRI has increased our understanding of in vivo pathological changes in mild or moderate forms of diffuse brain injury. (K.H.)

  10. CT and MRI diagnosis of acute hepatic injury

    To evaluate and compare MR and CT in diagnosis of acute traumatic hepatic laceration, ten patients with acute hepatic rupture underwent CT scan and/or MRI in the first 24 hours after injury. The injury was graded as mild (50% of one lobe). In the first 24 hours after injury, 33.3% (3/9) and 28.6%(2/7) of the hepatic injury demonstrated isodensity and isointensity on plain CT scan and T1-weighted images. All the lesions (100%) were clearly identified as marked hyperintensity on T2-weighted images. On T2WI, T1WI and non-contrast CT, 100%, 57.1% and 55.6% of the acute hepatic injuries could be graded respectively. Delayed complications occurred in four patients with deep hepatic injury about 1 to 3 weeks after injury. T2-weighted MR imaging is more sensitive and useful for detection of the type and severity of acute hepatic rupture. Follow-up MRI or CT within the first few weeks after injury is needed in patients with deep hepatic injury for detection of delayed complications

  11. Establishing a cat model of acute optic nerve injury

    2007-01-01

    optic nerve (about 3 mm) went through optic foramen and entered into brain tissue. It was squeezed with noninvasive vascular clip for 20 seconds, then the clip was removed, and then the skull was closed after it was examined to be no bleeding. The size of bilateral pupils, direct and indirect light reflexes were observed postoperatively. Successfully established models were judged by larger operated pupil than controlateral one,disappearance of direct light reflex and the existence of indirect light reflex. No model establishment was performed in the control group. Each cat was tested with flash visual evoked potential (F-VEP) to observe the electrophysiological changes before and after experiment. All the cats in the control group and model groups were killed under anesthesia before model establishment and at 6 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after model establishment respectively, and the pathological changes of the optic nerve after injury were observed under electron microscope and light microscope.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: VEP and the ultrastructural changes of optic nerve after acute optic nerve injury in both groups.RESULTS: All the 28 cats were involved in the analysis of results. ① VEP results: The VEP latencies were obviously different between the control group and model group at each time point (P < 0.05), whereas there were no obvious differences among different time points in the model group (P > 0.05). The VEP amplitudes were obviously different between the control group and model group at each time point (P < 0.05), whereas there were no obvious differences among different time points in the model group (P > 0.05).② Ultrastructural changes of the optic nerve: Under electron microscope, normal optic nerve myelin sheath had complete structure, tramal plates were clear and arranged tightly, axolemma was complete, whereas the structures of endoneurium, myelin sheath, tramal plates, axolemma and axon were in disorders after optic nerve injury

  12. Graph Analysis of Functional Brain Networks for Cognitive Control of Action in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Caeyenberghs, Karen; Leemans, Alexander; Heitger, Marcus H.; Leunissen, Inge; Dhollander, Thijs; Sunaert, Stefan; Dupont, Patrick; Swinnen, Stephan P.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with traumatic brain injury show clear impairments in behavioural flexibility and inhibition that often persist beyond the time of injury, affecting independent living and psychosocial functioning. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown that patients with traumatic brain injury typically show increased and more broadly…

  13. The role of markers of inflammation in traumatic brain injury

    Thomas eWoodcock

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Within minutes of a traumatic impact, a robust inflammatory response is elicited in the injured brain. The complexity of this post-traumatic squeal involves a cellular component, comprising the activation of resident glial cells, microglia and astrocytes, and the infiltration of blood leukocytes. The second component regards the secretion immune mediators, which can be divided into the following sub-groups: the archetypal pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, TNF, IL-6, the anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-beta and the chemotactic cytokines or chemokines, which specifically drive the accumulation of parenchymal and peripheral immune cells in the injured brain region. Such mechanisms have been demonstrated in animal models, mostly in rodents, as well as in human brain. Whilst the humoral immune response is particularly pronounced in the acute phase following TBI, the activation of glial cells seems to be a rather prolonged effect lasting for several months. The complex interaction of cytokines and cell types installs a network of events, which subsequently intersect with adjacent pathological cascades including oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, or reparative events including angiogenesis, scarring and neurogenesis. It is well accepted that neuroinflammation is responsible of beneficial and detrimental effects, contributing to secondary brain damage but also facilitating neurorepair.Although such mediators are clear markers of immune activation, to what extent cytokines can be defined as diagnostic factors reflecting brain injury or as predictors of long term outcome needs to be further substantiated. In clinical studies some groups reported a proportional cytokine production in either the cerebrospinal fluid or intraparenchymal tissue with initial brain damage, mortality or poor outcome scores. However, the validity of cytokines as biomarkers is not broadly accepted. This review article will discuss the evidence from both clinical and

  14. White Matter Damage and Cognitive Impairment after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Kinnunen, Kirsi Maria; Greenwood, Richard; Powell, Jane Hilary; Leech, Robert; Hawkins, Peter Charlie; Bonnelle, Valerie; Patel, Maneesh Chandrakant; Counsell, Serena Jane; Sharp, David James

    2011-01-01

    White matter disruption is an important determinant of cognitive impairment after brain injury, but conventional neuroimaging underestimates its extent. In contrast, diffusion tensor imaging provides a validated and sensitive way of identifying the impact of axonal injury. The relationship between cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury…

  15. Referral decision support in patients with subacute brain injury

    Pedersen, Asger R; Nielsen, Jørgen F; Jensen, Jim;

    2016-01-01

    support in the RCS-E and the item specific threshold model, when patients with acquired brain injury are to be referred to CSS or DSS as their primary rehabilitation. Implications for Rehabilitation Efficient rehabilitation after acquired brain injury requires rehabilitation settings that meet patient...

  16. Acute and subacute chemical-induced lung injuries: HRCT findings

    Akira, Masanori, E-mail: Akira@kch.hosp.go.jp [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, 1180 Nagasone-cho, Kita-ku, Sakai City, Osaka 591-8555 (Japan); Suganuma, Narufumi [Department of Environmental Medicine, Kochi Medical School (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Lung injury caused by chemicals includes bronchitis, bronchiolitis, chemical pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease. Each chemical induces variable pathophysiology and the situation resembles to the drug induced lung disease. The HRCT features are variable and nonspecific, however HRCT may be useful in the evaluation of the lung injuries and so we should know about HRCT features of lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by chemicals.

  17. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approache...

  18. Reflex anuria: a rare cause of acute kidney injury

    Dhakarwal, Pradeep; Adediran, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute Kidney Injury results from pre renal, post renal or intrinsic renal causes. Reflex anuria is a very rare cause of renal impairment which happens due to irritation or trauma to one kidney or ureter, or severely painful stimuli to other nearby organs.Case Presentation: Here we present a case of acute kidney injury secondary to reflex anuria in a patient who underwent extensive gynecological surgery along with ureteral manipulation which recovered spontaneously.Conclusion: Refl...

  19. Acute Kidney Injury Classification in Neuro-ICU Patient Group

    Canan Akıncı; Nahit Çakar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of acute kidney injury (AKI) classification system for kidney injury outcome in neuro-Intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Material and Method: Total 432 patients who admitted to ICU between 2005 and 2009 evaluated in this study. All patients’ AKI stage, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE-II), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score (SOFA), Glasgow Coma Score (GCS), Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS), mortality rate, length of ICU stay, need...

  20. Acute and subacute chemical-induced lung injuries: HRCT findings

    Lung injury caused by chemicals includes bronchitis, bronchiolitis, chemical pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease. Each chemical induces variable pathophysiology and the situation resembles to the drug induced lung disease. The HRCT features are variable and nonspecific, however HRCT may be useful in the evaluation of the lung injuries and so we should know about HRCT features of lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by chemicals

  1. Increased expression of aquaporin-4 in human traumatic brain injury and brain tumors

    HuaHu; Wei-PingZhang; LeiZhang; ZhongChen; Er-QingWei

    2004-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is one of the aquaporins (AQPs), a water channel family. In the brain, AQP4 is expressed in astroeyte foot processes, and plays an important role in water homeostasis and in the formation of brain edema. In our study, AQP4 expression in human brain specimens from patients with traumatic brain injury or different brain tumors was detected

  2. Matrix Metalloproteinases and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Lakhan, Shaheen E.; Kirchgessner, Annette; Tepper, Deborah; Leonard, Aidan

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke continues to be one of the most challenging diseases in translational neurology. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but its use is limited to the first hours after stroke onset due to an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation over time resulting in enhanced brain injury. In this review we discuss the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption as a consequence of ischemic ...

  3. Evidence for Impaired Plasticity after Traumatic Brain Injury in the Developing Brain

    Li, Nan; Yang, Ya; Glover, David P.; Zhang, Jiangyang; Saraswati, Manda; Robertson, Courtney

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The robustness of plasticity mechanisms during brain development is essential for synaptic formation and has a beneficial outcome after sensory deprivation. However, the role of plasticity in recovery after acute brain injury in children has not been well defined. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability among children, and long-term disability from pediatric TBI can be particularly devastating. We investigated the altered cortical plasticity 2–3 weeks after injury in a pediatric rat model of TBI. Significant decreases in neurophysiological responses across the depth of the noninjured, primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in TBI rats, compared to age-matched controls, were detected with electrophysiological measurements of multi-unit activity (86.4% decrease), local field potential (75.3% decrease), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (77.6% decrease). Because the corpus callosum is a clinically important white matter tract that was shown to be consistently involved in post-traumatic axonal injury, we investigated its anatomical and functional characteristics after TBI. Indeed, corpus callosum abnormalities in TBI rats were detected with diffusion tensor imaging (9.3% decrease in fractional anisotropy) and histopathological analysis (14% myelination volume decreases). Whole-cell patch clamp recordings further revealed that TBI results in significant decreases in spontaneous firing rate (57% decrease) and the potential to induce long-term potentiation in neurons located in layer V of the noninjured S1 by stimulation of the corpus callosum (82% decrease). The results suggest that post-TBI plasticity can translate into inappropriate neuronal connections and dramatic changes in the function of neuronal networks. PMID:24050267

  4. Acute Kidney Injury – An Update

    Matt Varrier

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of acute kidney injury (AKI occurs frequently in hospitalised patients, leading to increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditure. In the context of a precipitating insult, disturbances in both global and microcirculatory renal blood flow, tubular cell damage, and activation of pro- inflammatory pathways lead to impairment of numerous elements of renal function. Classification systems, including the recent ‘Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes’ (KDIGO classification, typically define and stage AKI in terms of the magnitude of rise in serum creatinine (SCr and the presence of oliguria. At present there is no cure for AKI and the key principles of its management include early recognition, haemodynamic optimisation, correction of hypovolaemia, ceasing and avoidance of nephrotoxic medications, and treatment of the underlying cause. Recent data show that the type and volume of fluid therapy can affect renal function and that further guidance is required. In the future it is hoped that novel technologies, including biomarkers and real-time measurement of glomerular filtration rate will allow the earlier identification of patients with AKI, whilst a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of AKI will lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. Despite SCr usually recovering after an episode of AKI, there is growing recognition that survivors of AKI are at an increased risk of subsequent chronic kidney disease, including end-stage renal failure and premature death.

  5. Serious brain injury coexisting with multiple injuries caused by traffic accidents in 69 cases

    张浚; 张鹤飞; 等

    1999-01-01

    Objective To explore the speciality,diagnosis,cure principle of serious brain injury coexisting with nultiple injuries caused by traffic accidents.Methods To analyze the clinic data of 69 cases of serious rain injury combined by oter parts of injuries caused by traffic accidents received from January 1998 to April 1999.Results This type of injury took up 11.5 percent of brain injuries in the same term and 33.6 percent of serious brain injuries.The specialities of the injury are that most of them were pedestrians crashed by vehicles.Coesisting injuries including chest injury and limb fractures accounted for a large part.The brain injury usally presented profound disturbance of consciousness,being dangerous and complicated,and a high ISS value.After treatment 13 cases died,9 cases was heavily crippled,11 cases lightly crippled,and 36 cases recovered.The death was usually caused by brain injury.Conclusions Road traffic accidents increased substantially every year.Most of them are related with violating drive rules and regulations.It is important to decrease the road traffic accidents by strengthening propaganda on traffic safety and traffic management.The main principles for salvage should emphasize the importance of pre-hospital emergency rescue and the accurate diagnosis rate,especially the distinction between coma and shock.The priority should be put on those injuries threatening to life.

  6. Brain and head injury in infancy and childhood

    This article describes typical head injuries in infants and children. In comparison with adults there are distinct differences in the etiology of trauma and in the kind of reaction of the skull and brain. In infants and children there are three different types of trauma: birth trauma, accidental and non-accidental injury. The typical injuries in these three groups are described. (orig.)

  7. Astrocytes as therapeutic targets of estrogenic compounds following brain injuries

    George E. Barreto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available For decades, astrocytes have been considered to be non-excitable support cells that are relatively resistant to brain injury. This view has changed radically during the past twenty years. Multiple essential functions are performed by astrocytes in normal brain. Astrocytes are dynamically involved in synaptic transmission, metabolic and ionic homeostasis, and inflammatory maintenance of the blood brain barrier. Advances in our understanding of astrocytes include new observations about their structure, organization, and function. Astrocytes play an active and important role in the pathophysiology of brain damage. Brain injury impairs mitochondrial function and this is accompanied by increased oxidative stress, leading to prominent astrogliosis, which involves changes in gene expression and morphology, and therefore glial scar formation. Recent works have demonstrated a protective role of reactive astrocytes after brain injury. Nevertheless, others have pointed to an inhibitory role of astrocytes in axonal regeneration after injury. Reactive astrogliosis is a complex phenomenon that includes a mixture of positive and negative responses for neuronal survival and regeneration. Reactive astroglia maintains the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and the survival of the perilesional tissue, but may prevent axonal and damaged tissue regeneration. Neuroprotective strategies aiming at reducing gliosis and enhance brain plasticity are of potential interest for translational neuroscience research in brain injuries. In this context, neurosteroids have shown to be a promising strategy to protect brain against injury, as their effects may rely on reducing gliosis, brain inflammation and potentially modulating recovery from brain injury by engaging mechanisms of neural plasticity. In conclusion, in this work we will consider particularly the two-edged sword role of reactive astrocytes, which is an experimental paradigm helpful in discriminating destructive

  8. Patterns of Brain Injury in Inborn Errors of Metabolism

    Gropman, Andrea L.

    2012-01-01

    Many inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) are associated with irreversible brain injury. For many, it is unclear how metabolite intoxication or substrate depletion accounts for the specific neurologic findings observed. IEM-associated brain injury patterns are characterized by whether the process involves gray matter, white matter, or both, and beyond that, whether subcortical or cortical gray matter nuclei are involved. Despite global insults, IEMs may result in selective injury to deep gray m...

  9. Neonatal ischemic brain injury: what every radiologist needs to know

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Ishak, Gisele E. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    We present a pictorial review of neonatal ischemic brain injury and look at its pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnoses from a radiologist's perspective. The concept of perinatal stroke is defined and its distinction from hypoxic-ischemic injury is emphasized. A brief review of recent imaging advances is included and a diagnostic approach to neonatal ischemic brain injury is suggested. (orig.)

  10. Secondary Damage after Traumatic Brain Injury: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology and Therapy

    Engel, Doortje Caroline

    2008-01-01

    textabstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a microscopic or macroscopic injury to the brain caused by external physical forces. Road traffic accidents, falls, sports injuries (i.e. boxing), recreational accidents (i.e. parachute jumping), the use of firearms, assault, child abuse, and several rare causes e.g. the use of nail guns or lawn mowers have all been described as causes of TBI. The pathology of TBI can be classified by mechanism (closed versus penetrating); clinical severi...

  11. Routine and quantitative EEG in mild traumatic brain injury.

    Nuwer, Marc R; Hovda, David A; Schrader, Lara M; Vespa, Paul M

    2005-09-01

    This article reviews the pathophysiology of mild traumatic brain injury, and the findings from EEG and quantitative EEG (QEEG) testing after such an injury. Research on the clinical presentation and pathophysiology of mild traumatic brain injury is reviewed with an emphasis on details that may pertain to EEG or QEEG and their interpretation. Research reports on EEG and QEEG in mild traumatic brain injury are reviewed in this setting, and conclusions are drawn about general diagnostic results that can be determined using these tests. QEEG strengths and weaknesses are reviewed in the context of factors used to determine the clinical usefulness of proposed diagnostic tests. Clinical signs, symptoms, and the pathophysiologic axonal injury and cytotoxicity tend to clear over weeks or months after a mild head injury. Loss of consciousness might be similar to a non-convulsive seizure and accompanied subsequently by postictal-like symptoms. EEG shows slowing of the posterior dominant rhythm and increased diffuse theta slowing, which may revert to normal within hours or may clear more slowly over many weeks. There are no clear EEG or QEEG features unique to mild traumatic brain injury. Late after head injury, the correspondence is poor between electrophysiologic findings and clinical symptoms. Complicating factors are reviewed for the proposed commercial uses of QEEG as a diagnostic test for brain injury after concussion or mild traumatic brain injury. The pathophysiology, clinical symptoms and electrophysiological features tend to clear over time after mild traumatic brain injury. There are no proven pathognomonic signatures useful for identifying head injury as the cause of signs and symptoms, especially late after the injury. PMID:16029958

  12. [PARTICULAR QUALITIES OF DIAGNOSTIC ACUTE LATERAL ANKLE LIGAMENT INJURIES].

    Krasnoperov, S N; Shishka, I V; Golovaha, M L

    2015-01-01

    Delayed diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligaments injury and subsequent inadequate treatment leads to the development of chronic instability and rapid progression of degenerative processes in the joint. The aim of our work was to improve treatment results by developing an diagnostic algorithm and treatment strategy of acute lateral ankle ligament injuries. The study included 48 patients with history of acute inversion ankle injury mechanism. Diagnostic protocol included clinical and radiological examination during 48 hours and after 7-10 days after injury. According to the high rate of inaccurate clinical diagnosis in the first 48 hours of the injury a short course of conservative treatment for 7-10 days is needed with follow-up and controlling clinical and radiographic instability tests. Clinical symptoms of ankle inversion injury showed that the combination of local tenderness in the projection of damaged ligaments, the presence of severe periarticular hematoma in the lateral department and positive anterior drawer and talar tilt tests in 7-10 days after the injury in 87% of cases shows the presence of ligament rupture. An algorithm for diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligament injury was developed, which allowed us to determine differential indications for surgical repair of the ligaments and conservative treatment of these patients. PMID:27089717

  13. The potential of neural transplantation for brain repair and regeneration following traumatic brain injury

    Dong Sun

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major health problem worldwide. Currently, there is no effective treatment to improve neural structural repair and functional recovery of patients in the clinic. Cell transplantation is a potential strategy to repair and regenerate the injured brain. This review article summarized recent de-velopment in cell transplantation studies for post-traumatic brain injury brain repair with varying types of cell sources. It also discussed the potential of neural transplantation to repair/promote recovery of the injured brain following traumatic brain injury.

  14. 78 FR 37834 - Submission for OMB review; 30-Day Comment Request; Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury...

    2013-06-24

    ... Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) Informatics System Data Access Request SUMMARY: Under the... Collection: Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) Informatics System Data...

  15. Scales for assessment of patients with traumatic brain injury

    Vieira RC

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rita de Cassia Almeida Vieira,1 Daniel Vieira de Oliveira,2 Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira,2 Wellingson da Silva Paiva2 1Nursing School, 2Division of Neurological Surgery, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, BrazilWe read with great interest the paper by Ślusarz et al1 published in the Patient Preference and Adherence. The functional recovery after traumatic brain injury (TBI is related to the severity of the brain lesion and the time after TBI. The consequences of brain damage remain beyond the acute phase, extending and modifying for a long period after the traumatic event.2 Knowing the functional recovery after TBI is relevant to evaluating the results of new techniques and treatments to minimize the severity of the disability. As a result, the pathophysiology of disability after TBI and the mechanisms involved in functional recovery are the subject of investigations, which provide the foundation to direct rehabilitation programs and guide the development of individualized therapy after TBI.3 Ślusarz et al’s1 article focused on the role of establishing the relationships between measurements by the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and the scales used for the assessment of functional capacity of TBI patients.View original paper by Ślusarz et al.

  16. Role of Chemokines in the Pathogenesis of Acute Lung Injury

    Bhatia, Madhav; Zemans, Rachel L.; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is due to an uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response resulting from direct injury to the lung or indirect injury in the setting of a systemic process. Such insults lead to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which includes activation of leukocytes—alveolar macrophages and sequestered neutrophils—in the lung. Although systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a physiologic response to an insult, systemic leukocyte activation, if excessive, can lead ...

  17. MRI in acute ligamentous injuries of the ankle.

    Martella, Ilenia; Azzali, Emanuele; Milanese, Gianluca; Praticò, Francesco Emanuele; Ruggirello, Margherita; Trunfio, Vincenzo; Parziale, Raffaele; Corrado, Michele; Della Casa, Giovanni; Capasso, Raffaella; De Filippo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprains are the most common lower limb injuries and affect more frequently young athletes; imaging is needed for an accurate diagnosis of such traumatic injuries. The purpose of this review is to analyse the magnetic resonance (MR) findings of both normal and pathological ankle's ligaments; indeed, MRI is the gold standard for the diagnosis of acute traumatic injuries and is useful for differentiation of the causes of ankle instability as well as for pre-operative planning. PMID:27467862

  18. Unique aspects of downhill ski injuries part 2: diagnosis and acute management of specific injuries.

    Buck, P G; Sophocles, A M; Beckenbaugh, R D

    1982-04-01

    As in many sports, a wide spectrum of injuries is seen in skiing (Table 1). This includes injuries to the upper and lower extremities as well as miscellaneous injuries and medical problems (frostbite, hypothermia, and high altitude effects). Six relatively unique injuries in skiing will be presented in detail. The discussion will focus on the acute management of these injuries: subluxing peroneal tendons, fibular stress fractures, tibial shaft fractures (spiral, transverse), medical compartment knee injuries, anterior shoulder dislocations with associated greater tuberosity fractures, and gamekeeper's thumb. PMID:24822536

  19. Levetiracetam Treatment in Traumatic Brain Injury: Operation Brain Trauma Therapy.

    Browning, Megan; Shear, Deborah A; Bramlett, Helen M; Dixon, C Edward; Mondello, Stefania; Schmid, Kara E; Poloyac, Samuel M; Dietrich, W Dalton; Hayes, Ronald L; Wang, Kevin K W; Povlishock, John T; Tortella, Frank C; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2016-03-15

    Levetiracetam (LEV) is an antiepileptic agent targeting novel pathways. Coupled with a favorable safety profile and increasing empirical clinical use, it was the fifth drug tested by Operation Brain Trauma Therapy (OBTT). We assessed the efficacy of a single 15 min post-injury intravenous (IV) dose (54 or 170 mg/kg) on behavioral, histopathological, and biomarker outcomes after parasagittal fluid percussion brain injury (FPI), controlled cortical impact (CCI), and penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) in rats. In FPI, there was no benefit on motor function, but on Morris water maze (MWM), both doses improved latencies and path lengths versus vehicle (p < 0.05). On probe trial, the vehicle group was impaired versus sham, but both LEV treated groups did not differ versus sham, and the 54 mg/kg group was improved versus vehicle (p < 0.05). No histological benefit was seen. In CCI, there was a benefit on beam balance at 170 mg/kg (p < 0.05 vs. vehicle). On MWM, the 54 mg/kg dose was improved and not different from sham. Probe trial did not differ between groups for either dose. There was a reduction in hemispheric tissue loss (p < 0.05 vs. vehicle) with 170 mg/kg. In PBBI, there was no motor, cognitive, or histological benefit from either dose. Regarding biomarkers, in CCI, 24 h glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) blood levels were lower in the 170 mg/kg group versus vehicle (p < 0.05). In PBBI, GFAP blood levels were increased in vehicle and 170 mg/kg groups versus sham (p < 0.05) but not in the 54 mg/kg group. No treatment effects were seen for ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 across models. Early single IV LEV produced multiple benefits in CCI and FPI and reduced GFAP levels in PBBI. LEV achieved 10 points at each dose, is the most promising drug tested thus far by OBTT, and the only drug to improve cognitive outcome in any model. LEV has been advanced to testing in the micropig model in OBTT. PMID:26671550

  20. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    Lau Breda HF; Lafave Mark R; Mohtadi Nicholas G; Butterwick Dale J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC). The g...

  1. Coronary heart disease is not significantly linked to acute kidney injury identified using Acute Kidney Injury Group criteria

    Yayan J

    2012-01-01

    Josef YayanDepartment of Internal Medicine, Vinzentius Hospital, Landau, GermanyBackground: Patients with unstable angina or myocardial infarction are at risk of acute kidney injury, which may be aggravated by the iodine-containing contrast agent used during coronary angiography; however, the relationship between these two conditions remains unclear.Objective: The current study investigated the relationship between acute kidney injury and coronary heart disease prior to coronary angiography.M...

  2. Preliminary Experience of Integrative Medicine in Acute Kidney Injury

    RAO Xiang-rong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Acute kidney injury (AKI), a concept that replaces the traditional concept known as acute renal failure (ARF),has been adopted by more and more nephrologists and intensive-care specialists in recent years. The definition and diagnostic criteria of AKI are quite different from thoseof ARF(1).

  3. Surgical management of traumatic brain injury

    Hartings, Jed A; Vidgeon, Steven; Strong, Anthony J;

    2014-01-01

    for TBI were enrolled in the Co-Operative Studies on Brain Injury Depolarizations (COSBID) at King's College Hospital (KCH, n = 27) and Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU, n = 24) from July 2004 to March 2010. Subdural electrode strips were placed at the time of surgery for subsequent...... contusions: 48%-52%), signs of mass effect (midline shift ≥ 5 mm: 43%-52%), and preoperative intracranial pressure (ICP). At VCU, however, surgeries were performed earlier (median 0.51 vs 0.83 days posttrauma, p < 0.05), bone flaps were larger (mean 82 vs 53 cm(2), p < 0.001), and craniectomies were more......-effectiveness study provides evidence for major practice variation in surgical management of severe TBI. Although ages differed between the 2 cohorts, the results suggest that a more aggressive approach, including earlier surgery, larger craniotomy, and removal of bone flap, may reduce ICP, prevent cortical spreading...

  4. Accommodation in mild traumatic brain injury

    Wesley Green, MS

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Accommodative dysfunction in individuals with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI can have a negative impact on quality of life, functional abilities, and rehabilitative progress. In this study, we used a range of dynamic and static objective laboratory and clinical measurements of accommodation to assess 12 adult patients (ages 18-40 years with mTBI. The results were compared with either 10 control subjects with no visual impairment or normative literature values where available. Regarding the dynamic parameters, responses in those with mTBI were slowed and exhibited fatigue effects. With respect to static parameters, reduced accommodative amplitude and abnormal accommodative interactions were found in those with mTBI. These results provide further evidence for the substantial impact of mTBI on accommodative function. These findings suggest that a range of accommodative tests should be included in the comprehensive vision examination of individuals with mTBI.

  5. Investigation of blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    Taylor, Paul A.; Ludwigsen, John S.; Ford, Corey C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Many troops deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan have sustained blast-related, closed-head injuries from being within non-lethal distance of detonated explosive devices. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms associated with blast exposure that give rise to traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study attempts to identify the precise conditions of focused stress wave energy within the brain, resulting from blast exposure, which will correlate with a threshold for persistent brain in...

  6. Traumatic Brain Injury and Delayed Sequelae: A Review - Traumatic Brain Injury and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Concussion) are Precursors to Later-Onset Brain Disorders, Including Early-Onset Dementia

    Michael A. Kiraly; Kiraly, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Brain injuries are too common. Most people are unaware of the incidence of and horrendous consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Research and the advent of sophisticated imaging have led to progression in the understanding of brain pathophysiology following TBI. Seminal evidence from animal and human experiments demonstrate links between TBI and the subsequent onset of premature, psychiatric syndromes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzh...

  7. Demyelination as a rational therapeutic target for ischemic or traumatic brain injury.

    Shi, Hong; Hu, Xiaoming; Leak, Rehana K; Shi, Yejie; An, Chengrui; Suenaga, Jun; Chen, Jun; Gao, Yanqin

    2015-10-01

    Previous research on stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) heavily emphasized pathological alterations in neuronal cells within gray matter. However, recent studies have highlighted the equal importance of white matter integrity in long-term recovery from these conditions. Demyelination is a major component of white matter injury and is characterized by loss of the myelin sheath and oligodendrocyte cell death. Demyelination contributes significantly to long-term sensorimotor and cognitive deficits because the adult brain only has limited capacity for oligodendrocyte regeneration and axonal remyelination. In the current review, we will provide an overview of the major causes of demyelination and oligodendrocyte cell death following acute brain injuries, and discuss the crosstalk between myelin, axons, microglia, and astrocytes during the process of demyelination. Recent discoveries of molecules that regulate the processes of remyelination may provide novel therapeutic targets to restore white matter integrity and improve long-term neurological recovery in stroke or TBI patients. PMID:25819104

  8. Effects of ganglioside GM1 on reduction of brain edema and amelioration of cerebral metabolism after traumatic brain injury

    陈志刚; 卢亦成; 朱诚; 张光霁; 丁学华; 江基尧

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of ganglioside GM1 on reduction of brain edema and amelioration of cerebral metabolism after traumatic brain injury (TBI).Methods: An acute experimental closed TBI model in rats was induced by a fluid-percussion brain injury model. At five and sixty minutes after TBI, the animals were intraperitoneally injected by ganglioside GM1 (30 mg/kg) or the same volume of saline. At the 6th hour after TBI, effects of ganglioside GM1 or saline on changes of mean arterial pressure (MAP), contents of water, lactic acid (LA) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the injured cerebral tissues were observed.Results: After TBI, MAP decreased and contents of water, LA and LPO increased in brain injury group; however, MAP was back to normal levels and contents of water, LA and LPO decreased in ganglioside GM1 treated group, compared with those in brain injury group (P0.05) was observed.Conclusions: Ganglioside GM1 does have obvious neuroprotective effect on early TBI.

  9. Mild traumatic brain injuries in adults

    Dhaval Shukla

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI is the commonest form of TBI. Though the name implies, it may not be mild in certain cases. There is a lot of heterogeneity in nomenclature, classification, evaluation and outcome of mTBI. We have reviewed the relevant articles on mTBI in adults, particularly its definition, evaluation and outcome, published in the last decade. The aspects of mTBI like pediatric age group, sports concussion, and postconcussion syndrome were not reviewed. There is general agreement that Glasgow coma score (GCS of 13 should not be considered as mTBI as the risk of intracranial lesion is higher than in patients with GCS 14-15. All patients with GCS of <15 should be evaluated with a computed tomography (CT scan. Patients with GCS 15 and risk factors or neurological symptoms should also be evaluated with CT scan. The outcome of mTBI depends on the combination of preinjury, injury and postinjury factors. Overall outcome of mTBI is good with mortality around 0.1% and disability around 10%.

  10. Sexual changes associated with traumatic brain injury.

    Ponsford, Jennie

    2003-01-01

    Findings from numerous outcome studies have suggested that people with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) experience relationship difficulties and changes in sexuality. However, there have been few investigations of these problems. This paper reports the results of a study of sexuality following TBI, which aimed to identify changes in sexual behaviour, affect, self-esteem, and relationship quality, and their inter-relationships. Two hundred and eight participants with moderate-to-severe TBI (69% males) completed a questionnaire 1-5 years post-injury. Their responses were compared with those of 150 controls, matched for age, gender, and education. Of TBI participants 36-54% reported: (1) A decrease in the importance of sexuality, opportunities, and frequency of engaging in sexual activities; (2) reduced sex drive; (3) a decline in their ability to give their partner sexual satisfaction and to engage in sexual intercourse; and (4) decreased enjoyment of sexual activity and ability to stay aroused and to climax. The frequencies of such negative changes were significantly higher than those reported by controls and far outweighed the frequency of increases on these dimensions. A significant proportion of TBI participants also reported decreased self-confidence, sex appeal, higher levels of depression, and decreased communication levels and relationship quality with their sexual partner. Factors associated with sexual problems in the TBI group are explored and implications of all findings discussed. PMID:21854338

  11. MR imaging of acute hemorrhagic brain infarction

    Six patients with acute hemorrhagic brain infarct were imaged using spin-echo (SE) pulse sequences on a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner. Including two patients with repeated MR imaging, a total of eight examinations, all performed within 15 days after stroke, were analyzed retrospectively. Four patients revealed massive hemorrhages in the basal ganglia or cerebellum and three cases demonstrated multiple linear hemorrhages in the cerebral cortex. On T1-weighted images, hemorrhages were either mildly or definitely hyperintense relative to gray matter, while varied from mildly hypointense to hyperintense on T2-weighted images. T1-weighted images were superior to T2-weighted images in detection of hemorrhgage. CT failed to detect hemorrhage in two of five cases: indicative of MR superiority to CT in the diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic infarcts. (author)

  12. MR imaging of acute hemorrhagic brain infarction

    Uchino, Akira; Ohnari, Norihiro; Ohno, Masato (Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    Six patients with acute hemorrhagic brain infarct were imaged using spin-echo (SE) pulse sequences on a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner. Including two patients with repeated MR imaging, a total of eight examinations, all performed within 15 days after stroke, were analyzed retrospectively. Four patients revealed massive hemorrhages in the basal ganglia or cerebellum and three cases demonstrated multiple linear hemorrhages in the cerebral cortex. On T1-weighted images, hemorrhages were either mildly or definitely hyperintense relative to gray matter, while varied from mildly hypointense to hyperintense on T2-weighted images. T1-weighted images were superior to T2-weighted images in detection of hemorrhgage. CT failed to detect hemorrhage in two of five cases: indicative of MR superiority to CT in the diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic infarcts. (author).

  13. Acute rehabilitation of spinal cord injury

    KIDRIČ-SIVEC, Urška; SEDEJ, Bogdana; Marolt, Melita

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury presents with loss of function of neuromuscular and other systems below the level of injury. Patients may suffer from minor loss of strength to complete quadriplegia with respiratory distress. All the patients with traumatic spinal cord injury who are admitted and treated in University Medical Centre Ljubljana are evaluated after admission and individualized plan of rehabilitation is made. The neurological level of injury is documented with international standa...

  14. Pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in acute lung injury

    Price, Laura C.; Mcauley, Danny F.; Marino, Philip S; Finney, Simon J; Griffiths, Mark J.; Wort, Stephen John

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome are characterized by protein rich alveolar edema, reduced lung compliance, and acute severe hypoxemia. A degree of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is also characteristic, higher levels of which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The increase in right ventricular (RV) afterload causes RV dysfunction and failure in some patients, with associated adverse effects on oxygen delivery. Although the introduction of lung p...

  15. Clinical neurorestorative progress in traumatic brain injury

    Huang H

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Huiling Huang,1 Lin Chen,2,3 Hongyun Huang4–61Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cerebral Vascular and Neurodegenerative Diseases, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital, Tianjin Neurosurgical Institute, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 2Medical Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 3Tsinghua University Yuquan Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 4General Hospital of Chinese people's Armed Police Forces, 5Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 6Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability from trauma to the central nervous system. Besides the surgical interventions and symptomatic management, the conventional therapies for TBI and its sequelae are still limited. Recently emerging evidence suggests that some neurorestorative treatments appear to have a potential therapeutic role for TBI and improving the patient's quality of life. The current clinical neurorestorative strategies available in TBI include pharmacological treatments (recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, amantadine, lithium, and valproate, the neuromodulation treatments (repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and low-level laser therapy, cell transplantation (bone marrow stromal cells and umbilical cord stromal cells, and combined neurorehabilitation. In this review, we summarize the recent clinical neurorestorative progress in the management of neurodegeneration as well as cognitive and motor deficits after TBI; indeed further clinical trials are required to provide more robust evidence.Keywords: brain trauma, neurorestorative treatment, cell transplantation, clinical study

  16. Malarial acute kidney injury: Prognostic markers

    Ruhi Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria has protean clinical manifestations and acute kidney injury (AKI is one of its serious and life threatening complications. This study was carried out to describe the clinical characteristics, and factors associated with adverse outcomes, in patients with malarial AKI. Materials and Methods: Data of 100 patients with AKI and smear positive malaria was retrospectively analyzed to evaluate the incidence, clinical profile, outcome and predictors of mortality among all cases presented to us at the Nephrology unit of Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh between November 2010 to October 2011. Results were expressed as mean, standard deviation (SD and range. Results: One hundred (22.1% (68 males, 32 females cases of malaria induced AKI, amongst 452 total cases of AKI, were evaluated. The mean age (± SD was 30 ± 11.23 years. Male to female ratio was 3.3:1. Plasmodium falciparum was reported in 76%, P. vivax in 11%, and both in 13% patients. The mean serum creatinine was 8.7 ± 3.7 mg%, and oligo/anuria was present in 84% of the patients. 78% of the patients required hemodialysis. 67% of the patients recovered completely, 12% did not show full recovery, and 6% developed chronic kidney failure. Mortality occurred in 15% of the patients. Conclusion : Malarial AKI most commonly occurs in patients infected by Plasmodium Falciparum. Falciparum malaria associated with AKI is a life threatening condition. Prolonged disease duration, low hemoglobin, oligo/anuria on admission, hyperbilirubinemia, cerebral malaria, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and high serum creatinine were the main predictors of mortality in our study.

  17. Molecular determinants of acute kidney injury

    Holger Husi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI is a condition that leads to a rapid deterioration of renal function associated with impairment to maintain electrolyte and acid balance, and, if left untreated, ultimately irreversible kidney damage and renal necrosis. There are a number of causes that can trigger AKI, ranging from underlying conditions as well as trauma and surgery. Specifically, the global rise in surgical procedures led to a substantial increase of AKI incidence rates, which in turn impacts on mortality rates, quality of life and economic costs to the healthcare system. However, no effective therapy for AKI exists. Current approaches, such as pharmacological intervention, help in alleviating symptoms in slowing down the progression, but do not prevent or reverse AKI-induced organ damage. Methods: An in-depth understanding of the molecular machinery involved in and modulated by AKI induction and progression is necessary to specifically pharmacologically target key molecules. A major hurdle to devise a successful strategy is the multifactorial and complex nature of the disorder itself, whereby the activation of a number of seemingly independent molecular pathways in the kidney leads to apoptotic and necrotic events. Results: The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system (RAAS axis appears to be a common element, leading to downstream events such as triggers of immune responses via the NFB pathway. Other pathways intricately linked with AKI-induction and progression are the tumor necrosis factor alpha(TNF and transforming growth factor beta (TGF signaling cascades, as well as a number of other modulators. Surprisingly, it has been shown that the involvement of the glutamatergic axis, believed to be mainly a component of the neurological system, is also a major contributor. Conclusions: Here we address the current understanding of the molecular pathways evoked in AKI, their interplay, and the potential to pharmacologically

  18. Laboratory test surveillance following acute kidney injury.

    Michael E Matheny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with hospitalized acute kidney injury (AKI are at increased risk for accelerated loss of kidney function, morbidity, and mortality. We sought to inform efforts at improving post-AKI outcomes by describing the receipt of renal-specific laboratory test surveillance among a large high-risk cohort. METHODS: We acquired clinical data from the Electronic health record (EHR of 5 Veterans Affairs (VA hospitals to identify patients hospitalized with AKI from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2009, and followed these patients for 1 year or until death, enrollment in palliative care, or improvement in renal function to estimated GFR (eGFR ≥ 60 L/min/1.73 m(2. Using demographic data, administrative codes, and laboratory test data, we evaluated the receipt and timing of outpatient testing for serum concentrations of creatinine and any as well as quantitative proteinuria recommended for CKD risk stratification. Additionally, we reported the rate of phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH monitoring recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. RESULTS: A total of 10,955 patients admitted with AKI were discharged with an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. During outpatient follow-up at 90 and 365 days, respectively, creatinine was measured on 69% and 85% of patients, quantitative proteinuria was measured on 6% and 12% of patients, PTH or phosphorus was measured on 10% and 15% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of creatinine was common among all patients following AKI. However, patients with AKI were infrequently monitored with assessments of quantitative proteinuria or mineral metabolism disorder, even for patients with baseline kidney disease.

  19. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Neuropathological Legacy of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Hay, Jennifer; Johnson, Victoria E; Smith, Douglas H; Stewart, William

    2016-05-23

    Almost a century ago, the first clinical account of the punch-drunk syndrome emerged, describing chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae occurring in former boxers. Thereafter, throughout the twentieth century, further reports added to our understanding of the neuropathological consequences of a career in boxing, leading to descriptions of a distinct neurodegenerative pathology, termed dementia pugilistica. During the past decade, growing recognition of this pathology in autopsy studies of nonboxers who were exposed to repetitive, mild traumatic brain injury, or to a single, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, has led to an awareness that it is exposure to traumatic brain injury that carries with it a risk of this neurodegenerative disease, not the sport or the circumstance in which the injury is sustained. Furthermore, the neuropathology of the neurodegeneration that occurs after traumatic brain injury, now termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is acknowledged as being a complex, mixed, but distinctive pathology, the detail of which is reviewed in this article. PMID:26772317

  20. Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury or subarachnoid haemorrhage - in "Endocrine Management in the Intensive Care Unit".

    Hannon, M J

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed world. There is a large body of evidence that demonstrates that both conditions may adversely affect pituitary function in both the acute and chronic phases of recovery. Diagnosis of hypopituitarism and accurate treatment of pituitary disorders offers the opportunity to improve mortality and outcome in both traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In this article, we will review the history and pathophysiology of pituitary function in the acute phase following traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage, and we will discuss in detail three key aspects of pituitary dysfunction which occur in the early course of TBI; acute cortisol deficiency, diabetes insipidus and SIAD.

  1. Effects of cerebral perfusion pressure on acute cerebral ischemia after traumatic brain injury%脑灌注压对创伤性脑损伤后急性脑缺血的影响

    刘胜; 王诚; 刘远新; 吴涛; 郝建忠; 郭强

    2010-01-01

    目的 观察不同脑灌注压(CPP)对创伤性脑损伤后急性脑缺血的影响.方法 实验家兔60只,随机分为正常对照组(无损伤组)、高CPP组(90~110)mm Hg、中CPP组(70~80)mm Hg、低CPP组(50~60)mm Hg、极低CPP组(35~45)mm Hg.采用Feeney's自由落体撞击法建立急性局灶性脑挫裂伤模型,伤后80 min静脉给予升压和降压药物调控血压使CPP达到设计要求,同步进行脑血流、CPP测定,并进行图像分析,且观察不同CPP下颅脑损伤后急性脑缺血动物脑含水量及神经组织超微结构改变.结果 对照组局部脑血流量(rCBF)为156.18±6.22;高CPP组实验组rCBF为140.03±17.32,中CPP组rCBF为100.46±21.37,低CPP组rCBF为86.46±10.30,极低CPP组rCBF为60.36±8.32.对照组脑含水量为(78.21±0.26)%;高CPP组实验组脑含水量为(80.15±0.52)%,中CPP组脑含水量为(80.27±0.36)%,低CPP组脑含水量为(81.18±0.62)%,极低CPP组脑含水量为(81.34±0.83)%.实验组脑组织含水量高于对照组(P0.05).低CPP组及极低CPP组脑含水量、超微结构较对照组差异有统计学意义(P0.05). The changes in water content in brain and ultra-microstructures in nervous tissue in the low CPP group and the lower group were more significant than the control group (P<0.01). Conclusion To improve cerebral circulation availably is the important link to prevent the acute cerebral ischemia making the irreversible damage of brain after traumatic brain injury.

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury and Delayed Sequelae: A Review - Traumatic Brain Injury and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Concussion are Precursors to Later-Onset Brain Disorders, Including Early-Onset Dementia

    Michael A. Kiraly

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain injuries are too common. Most people are unaware of the incidence of and horrendous consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI and mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI. Research and the advent of sophisticated imaging have led to progression in the understanding of brain pathophysiology following TBI. Seminal evidence from animal and human experiments demonstrate links between TBI and the subsequent onset of premature, psychiatric syndromes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD. Objectives of this summary are, therefore, to instill appreciation regarding the importance of brain injury prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, and to increase awareness regarding the long-term delayed consequences following TBI.

  3. DARPA challenge: developing new technologies for brain and spinal injuries

    Macedonia, Christian; Zamisch, Monica; Judy, Jack; Ling, Geoffrey

    2012-06-01

    The repair of traumatic injuries to the central nervous system remains among the most challenging and exciting frontiers in medicine. In both traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injuries, the ultimate goals are to minimize damage and foster recovery. Numerous DARPA initiatives are in progress to meet these goals. The PREventing Violent Explosive Neurologic Trauma program focuses on the characterization of non-penetrating brain injuries resulting from explosive blast, devising predictive models and test platforms, and creating strategies for mitigation and treatment. To this end, animal models of blast induced brain injury are being established, including swine and non-human primates. Assessment of brain injury in blast injured humans will provide invaluable information on brain injury associated motor and cognitive dysfunctions. The Blast Gauge effort provided a device to measure warfighter's blast exposures which will contribute to diagnosing the level of brain injury. The program Cavitation as a Damage Mechanism for Traumatic Brain Injury from Explosive Blast developed mathematical models that predict stresses, strains, and cavitation induced from blast exposures, and is devising mitigation technologies to eliminate injuries resulting from cavitation. The Revolutionizing Prosthetics program is developing an avant-garde prosthetic arm that responds to direct neural control and provides sensory feedback through electrical stimulation. The Reliable Neural-Interface Technology effort will devise technologies to optimally extract information from the nervous system to control next generation prosthetic devices with high fidelity. The emerging knowledge and technologies arising from these DARPA programs will significantly improve the treatment of brain and spinal cord injured patients.

  4. Tensor-Based Morphometry Reveals Volumetric Deficits in Moderate=Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Dennis, Emily L; Hua, Xue; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Moran, Lisa M; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C; Thompson, Paul M; Asarnow, Robert F

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause widespread and prolonged brain degeneration. TBI can affect cognitive function and brain integrity for many years after injury, often with lasting effects in children, whose brains are still immature. Although TBI varies in how it affects different individuals, image analysis methods such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) can reveal common areas of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), secondary effects of the initial injury, which will differ between subjects. Here we studied 36 pediatric moderate to severe TBI (msTBI) participants in the post-acute phase (1-6 months post-injury) and 18 msTBI participants who returned for their chronic assessment, along with well-matched controls at both time-points. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests that we used to create a global cognitive performance score. Using TBM, we created three-dimensional (3D) maps of individual and group differences in regional brain volumes. At both the post-acute and chronic time-points, the greatest group differences were expansion of the lateral ventricles and reduction of the lingual gyrus in the TBI group. We found a number of smaller clusters of volume reduction in the cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and fusiform gyrus, and throughout the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, we found extensive associations between our cognitive performance measure and regional brain volume. Our results indicate a pattern of atrophy still detectable 1-year post-injury, which may partially underlie the cognitive deficits frequently found in TBI. PMID:26393494

  5. Tensor-Based Morphometry Reveals Volumetric Deficits in Moderate=Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    Hua, Xue; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Moran, Lisa M.; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Asarnow, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause widespread and prolonged brain degeneration. TBI can affect cognitive function and brain integrity for many years after injury, often with lasting effects in children, whose brains are still immature. Although TBI varies in how it affects different individuals, image analysis methods such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) can reveal common areas of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), secondary effects of the initial injury, which will differ between subjects. Here we studied 36 pediatric moderate to severe TBI (msTBI) participants in the post-acute phase (1–6 months post-injury) and 18 msTBI participants who returned for their chronic assessment, along with well-matched controls at both time-points. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests that we used to create a global cognitive performance score. Using TBM, we created three-dimensional (3D) maps of individual and group differences in regional brain volumes. At both the post-acute and chronic time-points, the greatest group differences were expansion of the lateral ventricles and reduction of the lingual gyrus in the TBI group. We found a number of smaller clusters of volume reduction in the cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and fusiform gyrus, and throughout the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, we found extensive associations between our cognitive performance measure and regional brain volume. Our results indicate a pattern of atrophy still detectable 1-year post-injury, which may partially underlie the cognitive deficits frequently found in TBI. PMID:26393494

  6. Assessing neuro-systemic & behavioral components in the pathophysiology of blast-related brain injury.

    Kobeissy, Firas; Mondello, Stefania; Tümer, Nihal; Toklu, Hale Z; Whidden, Melissa A; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Zhang, Zhiqun; Prima, Victor; Yassin, Walid; Anagli, John; Chandra, Namas; Svetlov, Stan; Wang, Kevin K W

    2013-01-01

    Among the U.S. military personnel, blast injury is among the leading causes of brain injury. During the past decade, it has become apparent that even blast injury as a form of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) may lead to multiple different adverse outcomes, such as neuropsychiatric symptoms and long-term cognitive disability. Blast injury is characterized by blast overpressure, blast duration, and blast impulse. While the blast injuries of a victim close to the explosion will be severe, majority of victims are usually at a distance leading to milder form described as mild blast TBI (mbTBI). A major feature of mbTBI is its complex manifestation occurring in concert at different organ levels involving systemic, cerebral, neuronal, and neuropsychiatric responses; some of which are shared with other forms of brain trauma such as acute brain injury and other neuropsychiatric disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder. The pathophysiology of blast injury exposure involves complex cascades of chronic psychological stress, autonomic dysfunction, and neuro/systemic inflammation. These factors render blast injury as an arduous challenge in terms of diagnosis and treatment as well as identification of sensitive and specific biomarkers distinguishing mTBI from other non-TBI pathologies and from neuropsychiatric disorders with similar symptoms. This is due to the "distinct" but shared and partially identified biochemical pathways and neuro-histopathological changes that might be linked to behavioral deficits observed. Taken together, this article aims to provide an overview of the current status of the cellular and pathological mechanisms involved in blast overpressure injury and argues for the urgent need to identify potential biomarkers that can hint at the different mechanisms involved. PMID:24312074

  7. Assessing Neuro-Systemic & Behavioral Components in the Pathophysiology of Blast-Related Brain Injury

    Firas H Kobeissy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the U.S. military personnel, blast injury is among the leading causes of brain injury. During the past decade, it has become apparent that even blast injury as a form of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI may lead to multiple different adverse outcomes, such as neuropsychiatric symptoms and long-term cognitive disability. Blast injury is characterized by blast overpressure (BOP, blast duration, and blast impulse. While the blast injuries of a victim close to the explosion will be severe, majority of victims are usually at a distance leading to milder form described as mild blast TBI (mbTBI. A major feature of mbTBI is its complex manifestation occurring in concert at different organ levels involving systemic, cerebral, neuronal and neuropsychiatric responses; some of which are shared with other forms of brain trauma such as acute brain injury and other neuropsychiatric disorders such as PTSD. The pathophysiology of blast injury exposure involves complex cascades of chronic psychological stress, autonomic dysfunction and neuro/systemic inflammation. These factors render blast injury as an arduous challenge in terms of diagnosis and treatment as well as identification of sensitive and specific biomarkers distinguishing mTBI from other non-TBI pathologies and from neuropsychiatric disorders with similar symptoms. This is due to the distinct but shared and partially identified biochemical pathways and neuro-histopathological changes that might be linked to behavioral deficits observed. Taken together, this article aims to provide an overview of the current status of the cellular and pathological mechanisms involved in blast overpressure injury and argues for the urgent need to identify potential biomarkers that can hint at the different mechanisms involved.

  8. 急性脑损伤致心肌损害的内源性NE及心肌β_1-AR变化%Endogenetic NE and Myocardial β_1-AR in the myocardial damage after acute brain injury

    郭彩霞; 张立克; 王红霞; 芦玲巧; 杜凤和

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨急性脑损伤(acute brain injury,ABI)致心肌损害的内源性去甲肾上腺素(noradrenaline,NE)和β_1肾上腺素受体(adrenalin β_1 receptor,β_1-AR)变化,为了解ABI致心肌损害的发生机制提供理论依据.方法 采用动物模型观察肌酸磷酸激酶同工酶(MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase,CK-MB)含量判断心肌损害与否及损伤程度,采用高效液相色谱-电化学检测(high performance liquid chromatogramphy-electrical conductivity detector,HPLC-ECD)测定血浆及心肌组织NE水平,观察1、6、24和48 h时间点的变化.采用反转录多聚酶链反应(reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction,RT-PCR)和实时定量反转录多聚酶链反应(real-time RT-PCR,rt-RT-PCR)测定β_1-AR mRNA表达.实验分为正常组、假手术组、ABI组和β_1肾上腺素受体阻断剂(adrenalin β_1 receptor blocker,β_1-ARB)组.结果 ABI致心肌损害表现为CK-MB含量显著增加(P<0.05),脑损伤后24 h心肌损害最严重.血浆和心肌组织NE水平显著升高(P<0.05),血浆NE水平与CK-MB含量呈正相关(P<0.05).ABI及预先应用β_1-AR阻断剂后心肌组织β_1-AR mRNA表达与对照组相比差异无统计学意义.结论 ABI可导致心肌损害的发生,可增加内源性NE,NE可能是参与急性脑损伤后心肌损害的机制之一.

  9. Erythropoietin 2nd cerebral protection after acute injuries: a double-edged sword?

    Velly, L; Pellegrini, L; Guillet, B; Bruder, N; Pisano, P

    2010-12-01

    Over the past 15 years, a large body of evidence has revealed that the cytokine erythropoietin exhibits non-erythropoietic functions, especially tissue-protective effects. The discovery of EPO and its receptors in the central nervous system and the evidence that EPO is made locally in response to injury as a protective factor in the brain have raised the possibility that recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) could be administered as a cytoprotective agent after acute brain injuries. This review highlights the potential applications of rhEPO as a neuroprotectant in experimental and clinical settings such as ischemia, traumatic brain injury, and subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage. In preclinical studies, EPO prevented apoptosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress induced by injury and exhibited strong neuroprotective and neurorestorative properties. EPO stimulates vascular repair by facilitating endothelial progenitor cell migration into the brain and neovascularisation, and it promotes neurogenesis. In humans, small clinical trials have shown promising results but large prospective randomized studies failed to demonstrate a benefit of EPO for brain protection and showed unwanted side effects, especially thrombotic complications. Recently, regions have been identified within the EPO molecule that mediate tissue protection, allowing the development of non-erythropoietic EPO variants for neuroprotection conceptually devoid of side effects. The efficacy and the safety profile of these new compounds are still to be demonstrated to obtain, in patients, the benefits observed in experimental studies. PMID:20732352

  10. Mental Trauma Experienced by Caregivers of patients with Diffuse Axonal Injury or Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Syed Tajuddin Syed Hassan; Husna Jamaludin; Rosna Abd Raman; Haliza Mohd Riji; Khaw Wan Fei

    2013-01-01

    Context: As with care giving and rehabilitation in chronic illnesses, the concern with traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly with diffuse axonal injury (DAI), is that the caregivers are so overwhelmingly involved in caring and rehabilitation of the victim that in the process they become traumatized themselves. This review intends to shed light on the hidden and silent trauma sustained by the caregivers of severe brain injury survivors. Motor vehicle accident (MVA) is the highest contribu...

  11. Inhibitory effect of MgSO4 on calcium overload after radiation-induced brain injuries

    Objective: To explore the neuroprotective effect of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4 ) on radiation-induced acute brain injuries. Methods: A total of 60 mature Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: blank control group, experimental control group and experimental therapy group. The whole brain of SD rats of experimental control group and experimental therapy group was irradiated to a dose of 20 Gy using 6 MeV electrons. Magnesium sulfate was injected intraperitoneally into the rats of experimental therapy group before and after irradiation for five times. At different time points (24 h, 7 days, 14 days, 30 days after irradiation), the brain tissue was taken. Plasma direct reading spectrography was used to measure the contents of Ca2+, Mg2+ in brain tissue, and the percentage of brain water content was calculated with the wet-dry weight formula. Results: Compared with the blank control group, the percentage of brain water and content of Ca2+ in brain of the experimental control group increased markedly (P2+ decreased significantly (P2+ in brain of the experimental therapy group were significantly lower than those of the experimental control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Magnesium sulfate used in the early stage after irradiation can inhibit the calcium overload in rat brain , and attenuate brain edema and injuries. (authors)

  12. Brain injury tolerance limit based on computation of axonal strain.

    Sahoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and permanent impairment over the last decades. In both the severe and mild TBIs, diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is the most common pathology and leads to axonal degeneration. Computation of axonal strain by using finite element head model in numerical simulation can enlighten the DAI mechanism and help to establish advanced head injury criteria. The main objective of this study is to develop a brain injury criterion based on computation of axonal strain. To achieve the objective a state-of-the-art finite element head model with enhanced brain and skull material laws, was used for numerical computation of real world head trauma. The implementation of new medical imaging data such as, fractional anisotropy and axonal fiber orientation from Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) of 12 healthy patients into the finite element brain model was performed to improve the brain constitutive material law with more efficient heterogeneous anisotropic visco hyper-elastic material law. The brain behavior has been validated in terms of brain deformation against Hardy et al. (2001), Hardy et al. (2007), and in terms of brain pressure against Nahum et al. (1977) and Trosseille et al. (1992) experiments. Verification of model stability has been conducted as well. Further, 109 well-documented TBI cases were simulated and axonal strain computed to derive brain injury tolerance curve. Based on an in-depth statistical analysis of different intra-cerebral parameters (brain axonal strain rate, axonal strain, first principal strain, Von Mises strain, first principal stress, Von Mises stress, CSDM (0.10), CSDM (0.15) and CSDM (0.25)), it was shown that axonal strain was the most appropriate candidate parameter to predict DAI. The proposed brain injury tolerance limit for a 50% risk of DAI has been established at 14.65% of axonal strain. This study provides a key step for a realistic novel injury metric for DAI. PMID:27038501

  13. Utility of EEG measures of brain function in patients with acute stroke.

    Wu, Jennifer; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Burke Quinlan, Erin; Solodkin, Ana; Small, Steven L; Cramer, Steven C

    2016-06-01

    EEG has been used to study acute stroke for decades; however, because of several limitations EEG-based measures rarely inform clinical decision-making in this setting. Recent advances in EEG hardware, recording electrodes, and EEG software could overcome these limitations. The present study examined how well dense-array (256 electrodes) EEG, acquired with a saline-lead net and analyzed with whole brain partial least squares (PLS) modeling, captured extent of acute stroke behavioral deficits and varied in relation to acute brain injury. In 24 patients admitted for acute ischemic stroke, 3 min of resting-state EEG was acquired at bedside, including in the ER and ICU. Traditional quantitative EEG measures (power in a specific lead, in any frequency band) showed a modest association with behavioral deficits [NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score] in bivariate models. However, PLS models of delta or beta power across whole brain correlated strongly with NIHSS score (R(2) = 0.85-0.90) and remained robust when further analyzed with cross-validation models (R(2) = 0.72-0.73). Larger infarct volume was associated with higher delta power, bilaterally; the contralesional findings were not attributable to mass effect, indicating that EEG captures significant information about acute stroke effects not available from MRI. We conclude that 1) dense-array EEG data are feasible as a bedside measure of brain function in patients with acute stroke; 2) high-dimension EEG data are strongly correlated with acute stroke behavioral deficits and are superior to traditional single-lead metrics in this regard; and 3) EEG captures significant information about acute stroke injury not available from structural brain imaging. PMID:26936984

  14. Proton spectroscopy of radiation-induced injury to the brain

    This paper reports on the role of hydrogen MR spectroscopy (HMRS) in differentiating radiation-injured brain from normal brain and neoplasm, the authors performed HMRS on five cat brains with iatrogenically produced radiation injury. Reductions in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA/choline, and NAA/creatine-phosphocreatine (CR)) resonances were demonstrated in voxels from the five irradiated hemispheres compared with normal hemispheres (P < .01). NAA/CR ratios below 1.21 were always associated with radiation injury; ratios above 1.30 demarcated normal hemispheres. Large unassigned amino acid resonances from 2.0 to 2.5 ppm were also present. Results of autopsy examination confirmed radiation-induced white matter injury. Using NAA/CR ratios, one can separate normal brain from radiation-injured brain. Differentiating residual tumor from radiation-injured and normal brain may be possible with HMRS

  15. Dementia Resulting From Traumatic Brain Injury

    Shively, Sharon; Scher, Ann I.; Perl, Daniel P.; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is among the earliest illnesses described in human history and remains a major source of morbidity and mortality in the modern era. It is estimated that 2% of the US population lives with long-term disabilities due to a prior TBI, and incidence and prevalence rates are even higher in developing countries. One of the most feared long-term consequences of TBIs is dementia, as multiple epidemiologic studies show that experiencing a TBI in early or midlife is associated with an increased risk of dementia in late life. The best data indicate that moderate and severe TBIs increase risk of dementia between 2-and 4-fold. It is less clear whether mild TBIs such as brief concussions result in increased dementia risk, in part because mild head injuries are often not well documented and retrospective studies have recall bias. However, it has been observed for many years that multiple mild TBIs as experienced by professional boxers are associated with a high risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a type of dementia with distinctive clinical and pathologic features. The recent recognition that CTE is common in retired professional football and hockey players has rekindled interest in this condition, as has the recognition that military personnel also experience high rates of mild TBIs and may have a similar syndrome. It is presently unknown whether dementia in TBI survivors is pathophysiologically similar to Alzheimer disease, CTE, or some other entity. Such information is critical for developing preventive and treatment strategies for a common cause of acquired dementia. Herein, we will review the epidemiologic data linking TBI and dementia, existing clinical and pathologic data, and will identify areas where future research is needed. PMID:22776913

  16. Acute traumatic cervical cord injury in patients with os odontoideum.

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Zhou, Yue; Wang, Jian; Chu, Tongwei; Li, Changqing; Ren, Xianjun; Wang, Weidong

    2010-10-01

    We retrospectively reviewed acute cervical cord injury after minor trauma in 10 patients with os odontoideum. Their clinical history, neurological symptoms, radiological investigations, follow-up period, American Spinal Injury Association impairment classification and motor score were reviewed. Before their traumatic injury, three patients were asymptomatic and seven reported myelopathic symptoms, including four patients with neck pain, two patients with unsteadiness and one patient with dizziness. Falls were the most common cause of injury (n=6), followed by minor motor vehicle accidents (n=3) and assault (n=1). MRI and dynamic cervical lateral radiographs showed that all patients had atlantoaxial instability and cord compression. Most patients had spinal cord thinning and hyperintensity on T2-weighted MRI. Spinal cord compression was posterior (n=5), or both anterior and posterior (n=5). All patients underwent posterior rigid screw fixation and fusion, including atlantoaxial fusion (n=8) and occipitocervical fusion (n=2). We conclude that patients with asymptomatic or myelopathic atlantoaxial instability secondary to os odontoideum are at risk for acute spinal cord injury after minor traumatic injury. Fixation and fusion should be undertaken as prophylactic treatment for patients at risk of developing myelopathy and to avoid the neurological deterioration associated with acute traumatic cervical cord injury. PMID:20655229

  17. Early magnetic resonance detection of cortical necrosis and acute network injury associated with neonatal and infantile cerebral infarction

    Okabe, Tetsuhiko; Aida, Noriko; Nozawa, Kumiko [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); Niwa, Tetsu [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); Tokai University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Isehara (Japan); Shibasaki, Jun [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Neonatology, Yokohama (Japan); Osaka, Hitoshi [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    Knowledge of MRI findings in pediatric cerebral infarction is limited. To determine whether cortical necrosis and network injury appear in the acute phase in post-stroke children and to identify anatomical location of acute network injury and the ages at which these phenomena are seen. Images from 12 children (age range: 0-9 years; neonates [<1 month], n=5; infants [1 month-12 months], n=3; others [≥1 year], n=4) with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) cortical infarction were retrospectively analyzed. Cortical necrosis was defined as hyperintense cortical lesions on T1-weighted imaging that lacked evidence of hemorrhage. Acute network injury was defined as hyperintense lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging that were not in the MCA territory and had fiber connections with the affected cerebral cortex. MRI was performed within the first week after disease onset. Cortical necrosis was only found in three neonates. Acute network injury was seen in the corticospinal tract (CST), thalamus and corpus callosum. Acute network injury along the CST was found in five neonates and one 7-month-old infant. Acute network injury was evident in the thalamus of four neonates and two infants (ages 4 and 7 months) and in the corpus callosum of five neonates and two infants (ages 4 and 7 months). The entire thalamus was involved in three children when infarction of MCA was complete. In acute MCA cortical infarction, MRI findings indicating cortical necrosis or acute network injury was frequently found in neonates and early infants. Response to injury in a developing brain may be faster than that in a mature one. (orig.)

  18. Traumatic Knee Dislocation with Acute Artery Injury

    Hüseyin Şahin1; Mustafa Uzkeser2; Ayhan Aköz; et al.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic knee dislocation is very rare injury in patients presenting to the emergency room. The complications associated with knee dislocation such as amputation of extremities and die is required emergency response. We discussed a case, that he has only knee dislocation and popliteal artery injury and mortal as soon as possible.

  19. Time Series Analysis of Spontaneous Upper-Extremity Movements of Premature Infants With Brain Injuries

    Ohgi, Shohei; Morita, Satoru; Loo, Kek Khee; Mizuike, Chihiro

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Comparisons of spontaneous movements of premature infants with brain injuries and those without brain injuries can provide insights into normal and abnormal processes in the ontogeny of motor development. In this study, the characteristics of spontaneous upper-extremity movements of premature infants with brain injuries and those without brain injuries were examined with time series analysis.

  20. Injury to Allografts: innate immune pathways to acute and chronic rejection

    An emerging body of evidence suggests that innate immunity, as the first line of host defense against invading pathogens or their components [pathogen-associated molecular patterns, (PAMPs)], plays also a critical role in acute and chronic allograft rejection. Injury to the donor organ induces an inflammatory milieu in the allograft, which appears to be the initial key event for activation of the innate immune system. Injury-induced generation of putative endogenous molecular ligand, in terms of damaged/danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as heat shock proteins, are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a family of pattern recognition receptors on cells of innate immunity. Acute allograft injury (e.g. oxidative stress during donor brain-death condition, post-ischemic reperfusion injury in the recipient) includes DAMPs which may interact with, and activate, innate TLR-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) which, in turn, via direct allo-recognition through donor-derived DCs and indirect allo-recogntion through recipient-derived DCs, initiate the recipient's adaptive alloimmune response leading to acute allograft rejection. Chronic injurious events in the allograft (e.g. hypertension, hyperlipidemia, CMV infection, administration of cell-toxic drugs [calcineurin-inhibitors]) induce the generation of DAMPs, which may interact with and activate innate TLR-bearing vascular cells (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells) which, in turn, contribute to the development of atherosclerosis of donor organ vessels (alloatherosclerosis), thus promoting chronic allograft rejection. (author)

  1. Cortical edema in moderate fluid percussion brain injury is attenuated by vagus nerve stimulation.

    Clough, R W; Neese, S L; Sherill, L K; Tan, A A; Duke, A; Roosevelt, R W; Browning, R A; Smith, D C

    2007-06-29

    Development of cerebral edema (intracellular and/or extracellular water accumulation) following traumatic brain injury contributes to mortality and morbidity that accompanies brain injury. Chronic intermittent vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) initiated at either 2 h or 24 h (VNS: 30 s train of 0.5 mA, 20 Hz, biphasic pulses every 30 min) following traumatic brain injury enhances recovery of motor and cognitive function in rats in the weeks following brain injury; however, the mechanisms of facilitated recovery are unknown. The present study examines the effects of VNS on development of acute cerebral edema following unilateral fluid percussion brain injury (FPI) in rats, concomitant with assessment of their behavioral recovery. Two hours following FPI, VNS was initiated. Behavioral testing, using both beam walk and locomotor placing tasks, was conducted at 1 and 2 days following FPI. Edema was measured 48 h post-FPI by the customary method of region-specific brain weights before and after complete dehydration. Results of this study replicated that VNS initiated at 2 h after FPI: 1) effectively facilitated the recovery of vestibulomotor function at 2 days after FPI assessed by beam walk performance (P<0.01); and 2) tended to improve locomotor placing performance at the same time point (P=0.18). Most interestingly, results of this study showed that development of edema within the cerebral cortex ipsilateral to FPI was significantly attenuated at 48 h in FPI rats receiving VNS compared with non-VNS FPI rats (P<0.04). Finally, a correlation analysis between beam walk performance and cerebral edema following FPI revealed a significant inverse correlation between behavior performance and cerebral edema. Together, these results suggest that VNS facilitation of motor recovery following experimental brain injury in rats is associated with VNS-mediated attenuation of cerebral edema. PMID:17543463

  2. Evaluating the prognosis and degree of brain injury by combined S-100 protein and neuron specific enolase determination

    Xihua Wang; Xinding Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Background:S-100 and neuron specific enolase(NSE)possess the characteristics of specific distribution in brain and relative stable content.Some studies suggest that combined detection of the both is of very importance for evaluating the degree of brain injury.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of S-100 protein and NSE levels at different time points after acute brain injury,and evaluate the values of combined detection detection of the both for different injury degrees,pathological changes and prognosis.DESIGN: Case-control observation SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery,Second Affiliated Hospital,Lanzhou University.PARTICIPANTS:Thirty-four inpatients with brain injury,19 males and 15 females,aged 15 to 73 years.who received treatment between September 2005 and May 2006 in the Department of Neurosurgery. Second Affiliated Hospital,Lanzhou University,were recruited.The patients were admitted to hospital at 24 hours after brain injury.After admission,skull CT confirmed that they suffered from brain injury.Following Glasgow coma score(GCS)on admission,the patients were assigned into 3 groups:severe group(GCS 3 to 8 points,n=15).moderate group(GCS 9 to 12 points,n=8)and mild group(GCS 13 to 15 points,n=11).Following Glasgow outcome scale(GOS)at 3 months after brain injury,the patients were assigned into good outcome group (GOS 4 to 5 points,good recovery and moderate disability included,n=19)and poor outcome group(GOS 1 to 3 points,severe disability,vegetative state and death,n=15).Ten subjects who received health examination concurrently were chosen as normal control group,including 6 males and 4 females,aged(45.4±14.3)years.In our laboratory,the normal level of NSE was≤15.2 ng/L,and that of S100 was≤0.105 μg/L.METHODS:①Blood samples of control group were collected when the subjects received health examination Blood samples of patients with brain injury were collected at 24 hours,3,7 and 14 days after injury.According to the instructions of NSE and S-100 kits

  3. Money, Language Barriers Can Affect Kids' Brain Injury Care

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159124.html Money, Language Barriers Can Affect Kids' Brain Injury Care Those ... included providers of physical and occupational therapy; speech, language and cognitive therapy; and mental health services. The ...

  4. Money, Language Barriers Can Affect Kids' Brain Injury Care

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159124.html Money, Language Barriers Can Affect Kids' Brain Injury Care Those ... included providers of physical and occupational therapy; speech, language and cognitive therapy; and mental health services. The ...

  5. Spreading depolarizations and late secondary insults after traumatic brain injury

    Hartings, Jed A; Strong, Anthony J; Fabricius, Martin;

    2009-01-01

    Here we investigated the incidence of cortical spreading depolarizations (spreading depression and peri-infarct depolarization) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their relationship to systemic physiologic values during neurointensive care. Subdural electrode strips were placed on peri...

  6. Spreading depolarisations and outcome after traumatic brain injury

    Hartings, Jed A; Bullock, M Ross; Okonkwo, David O;

    2011-01-01

    Pathological waves of spreading mass neuronal depolarisation arise repeatedly in injured, but potentially salvageable, grey matter in 50-60% of patients after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We aimed to ascertain whether spreading depolarisations are independently associated with unfavourable...

  7. Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) Informatics System

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) informatics system is an extensible, scalable informatics platform for TBI relevant imaging,...

  8. MRI findings of acute cerebral swelling and brain edema in the acute stage

    We report two cases, one of acute cerebral swelling and the other with a major stroke, whose MRI has shown very interesting findings. Case 1, a 32-year-old male, was admitted to our service because of a lowering of his consciousness immediately after a head injury. On admission, the patient was semicomatous (E1M2V1, with anisocoria (R > L). His plain skull X-ray was normal. A CT scan, however, demonstrated right isodensity hemispheric swelling associated with a subarachnoid hemorrhage in the right Sylvian fissure. A right carotid angiogram showed no vascular disorders. MR imaging of the spin density demonstrated a hyperintensitive thickening of the gray matter in the whole right hemisphere. Case 2, a 58-year-old female, was admitted because of a sudden onset of loss of consciousness, with right hemiparesis and dysarthria. On admission, her consciousness was semicomatous (E1M3V1), and it deteriorated to a deep coma 1 hour later. A CT scan demonstrated a diffuse left hemispheric low density, with a finding of hemorrhagic infarction in the basal ganglia. MR imaging of the spin density showed a hyperintensitive thickening of the gray matter resembling that of Case 1. The findings of the spin-echo images of our two cases showed a hyperintensitive thickening of the gray matter in both. The hyperintensity and thickening of the gray matter apparently indicated a sort of hyperemia and brain edema. These findings led us to suspect that the hyperemia associated with acute cerebral swelling and ischemic brain edema of our two cases originated in the gray matter, although it has been considered that the pathogenesis of acute cerebral swelling is not known and that brain edema, especially vasogenic edema, will mostly develop in the white matter rather than in the gray matter. (author)

  9. Early endocrine alterations reflect prolonged stress and relate to one year functional outcome in patients with severe brain injury

    Marina, Djordje; Klose, Marianne; Nordenbo, Annette;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Severe brain injury poses a risk of developing acute and chronic hypopituitarism. Pituitary hormone alterations developed in the early recovery phase after brain injury may have implications for long-term functional recovery. The objective was to assess the pattern and prevalence of......-Extended. RESULTS: Three months after the injury, elevated stress hormones (i.e. 30 min. stimulated cortisol, prolactin and/or insulin-like growth factor 1) and/or suppressed gonadal- or thyroid hormones were recorded in 68% and 32% of the patients, respectively. At one year, lower functioning level (Functional...

  10. Cooking breakfast after a brain injury

    Tanguay, Annick N.; Davidson, Patrick S. R.; Guerrero Nuñez, Karla V.; Ferland, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) often compromises the ability to carry out instrumental activities of daily living such as cooking. ABI patients' difficulties with executive functions and memory result in less independent and efficient meal preparation. Accurately assessing safety and proficiency in cooking is essential for successful community reintegration following ABI, but in vivo assessment of cooking by clinicians is time-consuming, costly, and difficult to standardize. Accordingly, we examined the usefulness of a computerized meal preparation task (the Breakfast Task; Craik and Bialystok, 2006) as an indicator of real life meal preparation skills. Twenty-two ABI patients and 22 age-matched controls completed the Breakfast Task. Patients also completed the Rehabilitation Activities of Daily Living Survey (RADLS; Salmon, 2003) and prepared actual meals that were rated by members of the clinical team. As expected, the ABI patients had significant difficulty on all aspects of the Breakfast Task (failing to have all their foods ready at the same time, over- and under-cooking foods, setting fewer places at the table, and so on) relative to controls. Surprisingly, however, patients' Breakfast Task performance was not correlated with their in vivo meal preparation. These results indicate caution when endeavoring to replace traditional evaluation methods with computerized tasks for the sake of expediency. PMID:25228863

  11. Cooking breakfast after a brain injury

    Annick N. Tanguay

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acquired brain injury (ABI often compromises the ability to carry out instrumental activities of daily living such as cooking. ABI patients’ difficulties with executive functions and memory result in less independent and efficient meal preparation. Accurately assessing safety and proficiency in cooking is essential for successful community reintegration following ABI, but in vivo assessment of cooking by clinicians is time-consuming, costly, and difficult to standardize. Accordingly, we examined the usefulness of a computerized meal preparation task (the Breakfast Task; Craik & Bialystok, 2006 as an indicator of real life meal preparation skills. Twenty-two ABI patients and 22 age-matched controls completed the Breakfast Task and the Rehabilitation Activities of Daily Living Survey (RADLS; Salmon, 2003. Patients also prepared actual meals, and were rated by members of the clinical team. As expected, the ABI patients had significant difficulty on all aspects of the Breakfast Task (failing to have all their foods ready at the same time, over- and under-cooking foods, setting fewer places at the table, and so on relative to controls. Surprisingly, however, patients’ Breakfast Task performance was not correlated with their in vivo meal preparation. These results indicate caution when endeavoring to replace traditional evaluation methods with computerized tasks for the sake of expediency.

  12. The psychosocial outcome of anoxic brain injury following cardiac arrest

    Wilson, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The psychosocial outcome of anoxic brain injury following cardiac arrest is a relatively under researched, but clinically important area. The aim of the current study was to add to the limited existing literature exploring the psychosocial outcome for cardiac arrest survivors, but specifically explore if there is a greater impact on psychosocial outcome in individuals experiencing anoxic brain injury as a result. Methods A range of self report measures were used to c...

  13. Cognitive functions in drivers with brain injury : Anticipation and adaption

    Lundqvist, Anna

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to improve the understanding of what cognitive functions are important for driving performance, investigate the impact of impaired cognitive functions on drivers with brain injury, and study adaptation strategies relevant for driving performance after brain injury. Finally, the predictive value of a neuropsychological test battery was evaluated for driving performance. Main results can be summarized in the following conclusions: (a) Cognitive functions in terms ...

  14. Endogenous lipoid pneumonia in a cachectic patient after brain injury

    Zhang, Ji; Mu, Jiao; Lin, Wei; Dong, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous lipoid pneumonia (EnLP) is an uncommon non-life-threatening inflammatory lung disease that usually occurs in patients with conditions such as lung cancers, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and undifferentiated connective tissue disease. Here we report a case of EnLP in a paralytic and cachectic patient with bronchopneumonia after brain injury. A 40-year-old man experienced a severe brain injury in an automobile accident. He was treated for 1 month and his status plateaued. However, ...

  15. Antagonism of purinergic signalling improves recovery from traumatic brain injury

    Choo, Anthony M.; William J. Miller; Chen, Yung-Chia; Nibley, Philip; Patel, Tapan P.; Goletiani, Cezar; Morrison, Barclay; Kutzing, Melinda K.; Firestein, Bonnie L.; Sul, Jai-Yoon; Haydon, Philip G.; Meaney, David F.

    2013-01-01

    The recent public awareness of the incidence and possible long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury only heightens the need to develop effective approaches for treating this neurological disease. In this report, we identify a new therapeutic target for traumatic brain injury by studying the role of astrocytes, rather than neurons, after neurotrauma. We use in vivo multiphoton imaging and show that mechanical forces during trauma trigger intercellular calcium waves throughout the astroc...

  16. Hyperbaric Oxygen for Cerebral Vasospasm and Brain Injury Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Ostrowski, Robert P.; Zhang, John H.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of acute brain injury and delayed neurological deficits due to cerebral vasospasm (CVS) are major determinants of outcomes after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Although hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) had been used to treat patients with SAH, the supporting evidence and underlying mechanisms have not been systematically reviewed. In the present paper, the overview of studies of HBO for cerebral vasospasm is followed by a discussion of HBO molecular mechanisms involved in the protection aga...

  17. Increased vagal tone accounts for the observed immune paralysis in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Kox, M; Pompe, J.C.; Pickkers, P; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.; van Vugt, A. B.; van der Hoeven, J. G.

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability, especially in the younger population. In the acute phase after TBI, patients are more vulnerable to infection, associated with a decreased immune response in vitro. The cause of this immune paralysis is poorly understood. Apart from other neurologic dysfunction, TBI also results in an increase in vagal activity. Recently, the vagus nerve has been demonstrated to exert an anti-inflammatory effect, termed the cholinergic a...

  18. Retinochoroidal changes after severe brain impact injury in rabbits

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate retinochoroidal changes and establisheye damage model after brain impact injury.Methods: An eye damage model after brain impact injury was established by striking the frontoparietal zone in rabbits with BIM-Ⅱ bioimpact machine. Seventeen rabbits were killed at 4 different intervals after injury. The pathological characteristics of the retinal and choroid damages were observed.Results: All the rabbits had severe brain injury with subarachnoid hemorrhage and brain contusion. The eye damage occurred in all of the 17 rabbits. Hemorrhage in optic nerve sheaths was observed and retinal edema and bleeding was discovered with ophthalmoscope. Histopathologic study displayed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the retrobulbar portion of the retinal nerve, general choroid blood vessel dilatation, retinal nerve fibre swelling within 6 hours after injury, and flat retinal detachment with subretinal proteinoid exudation, and degeneration and disappearance of the outer segment of the optic cell over 6 hours after injury.Conclusions: The pathological characteristic of the eye damage at early stage following brain impact injury is local circulation disturbance. At late stage, it features in retinal detachment, and optic cellular degeneration and necrosis.

  19. Genetic deficiency of adiponectin protects against acute kidney injury

    Jin, Xiaogao; Chen, Jiyuan; Hu, Zhaoyong; Chan, Lawrence; Wang, Yanlin

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin is a multifunctional cytokine that has a role in regulating inflammation. Here we determined if adiponectin modulates ischemic acute kidney injury. Compared with wild-type mice, adiponectin knockout mice were found to have lower serum creatinine and less tubular damage or apoptosis following ischemia/reperfusion injury. This latter process was associated with decreased Bax and reduced activation of p53 and caspase-3. Targeted disruption of adiponectin was also found to inhibit the...

  20. Development of an Ontology for Rehabilitation: Traumatic Brain Injury

    Grove, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) rehabilitation interventions are very heterogeneous due to injury characteristics and pathology, patient demographics, healthcare settings, caregiver variability, and individualized, multi-discipline treatment plans. Consequently, comparing and generalizing the effectiveness of interventions is limited largely due to…

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury: Persistent Misconceptions and Knowledge Gaps among Educators

    Ettel, Deborah; Glang, Ann E.; Todis, Bonnie; Davies, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Each year approximately 700,000 U.S. children aged 0-19 years sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) placing them at risk for academic, cognitive, and behavioural challenges. Although TBI has been a special education disability category for 25 years, prevalence studies show that of the 145,000 students each year who sustain long-term injury from…

  2. Neuroprotective effect of Pycnogenol® following traumatic brain injury

    Scheff, Stephen W.; Ansari, Mubeen A.; Roberts, Kelly N.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) involves primary and secondary injury cascades that underlie delayed neuronal dysfunction and death. Oxidative stress is one of the most celebrated secondary injury mechanisms. A close relationship exists between levels of oxidative stress and the pathogenesis of TBI. However, other cascades, such as an increase in proinflammatory cytokines, also play important roles in the overall response to the trauma. Pharmacologic intervention, in order to be successful, requ...

  3. Head motions while riding roller coasters: Implications for brain injury

    Pfister, Bryan J.; Chickola, Larry; Smith, Douglas H.

    2009-01-01

    The risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while riding roller coasters has received substantial attention. Case reports of TBI around the time of riding roller coasters have led many medical professionals to assert that the high gravitational forces (G-forces) induced by roller coasters pose a significant TBI risk. Head injury research, however, has shown that G-forces alone cannot predict TBI. Established head injury criterions and procedures were employed to compare the potential of TBI betw...

  4. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury -A Case Report

    Anamika

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI is a rare but life threatening complication of blood transfusion which is being increasingly recognized. It is caused by cross reaction between donor antibodies and host leucocytes or between donor leucocytes with host antibodies. TRALI usually presents as an Acute Lung Injury (ALI resulting in pulmonary congestion and edema, often leading to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. We report a case of TRALI in a patient who underwent laparotomy for ruptured corpus luteal cyst requiring blood transfusion. She presented with acute pulmonary edema about an hour after commencing a blood transfusion .This was managed conservatively with oxygen, steroids and diuretics. Patient improved rapidly and later discharged without any residual complications.

  5. Changes in T lymphocyte subsets after severe traumatic brain injury

    Yulu Miao; Mingxia Zhang; Yulin Nie; Wan Zhao; Bin Huang; Zhengming Jiang; Shaoxiong Yu; Zhibin Huang; Hongjin Fu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Besides local changes of cranial parenchymal cells, hemorrhage, etc., severe traumatic brain injuries also cause the changes of total body fluid and various functions, and the changes of lymphocytes and T lymphocyte subsets should be paid more attention to.OBJECTIVE: To reveal the changing laws of T lymphocyte subsets after severe traumatic brain injury, and compare with mild to moderate brain injury.DESIGN: A comparative observation.SETTINGS: Department of Neurosurgery, Longgang District Buji People's Hospital of Shenzhen City;Central Laboratory of Shenzhen Hospital of Prevention and Cure for Chronic Disease.PARTICIPANTS: All the subjects were selected from the Department of Neurosurgery, Longgang District Buji People's Hospital of Shenzhen City from August 2002 to August 2005. Thirty patients with severe brain injury, whose Glasgow coma score (GCS) was ≤ 8 points, were taken as the experimental group, including 21 males and 9 females, aging 16 - 62 years. Meanwhile, 30 patients with mild traumatic brain injury were taken as the control group (GCS ranged 14 - 15 points), including 18 males and 12 females, aging 15 - 58 years. All the subjects were in admission at 6 hours after injury, without disease of major organs before injury.Informed consents were obtained from all the patients or their relatives.conditions of pulmonaryinfections were observed at 4 days after injury. The differences of measurement data were compared with the t test.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes of T lymphocytes subsets at 1 - 14 days after severe and mild or moderate traumatic injury.RESULTS: Finally, 28 and 25 patients with mild to moderate traumatic brain injury, whereas 25 and 21 patients with severe traumatic brain injury were analyzed at 7 and 14 days respectively, and the missed ones CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8 began to decrease, whereas CD8 increased in the experimental group, which were very significantly different from those in the control group (t =2.77 - 3.26, P < 0

  6. Assessment of brain retraction injury from tumor operation with 99Tcm-ECD brain SPECT imaging

    Objective: To evaluate the rCBF of brain retraction injury by 99Tcm-ECD SPECT imaging. Methods: The 99Tcm-ECD SPECT brain imaging was performed in 21 patients with brain tumor before and after operation. To compare the rCBF of peripheral tumor region with that of retraction injury region by semi-quantitative analysis. The rCBF levels of the central and peripheral areas of brain retraction injury were also studied. Results: Both the peripheral tumor region before operation and retraction region after operation were ischemic, but the difference between them was significant (P99Tcm-ECD SPECT brain imaging is a useful technique in detecting retraction injury come from brain tumor operation

  7. Montelukast induced acute hepatocellular liver injury

    Harugeri A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 46-year-old male with uncontrolled asthma on inhaled albuterol and formoterol with budesonide was commenced on montelukast. He developed abdominal pain and jaundice 48 days after initiating montelukast therapy. His liver tests showed an increase in serum total bilirubin, conjugated bilirubin, aspartate aminotranferase, alanine aminotranferase, and alkaline phosphatase. The patient was evaluated for possible non-drug related liver injury. Montelukast was discontinued suspecting montelukast induced hepatocellular liver injury. Liver tests began to improve and returned to normal 55 days after drug cessation. Causality of this adverse drug reaction by the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences or Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method (CIOMS or RUCAM and Naranjo′s algorithm was ′probable′. Liver tests should be monitored in patients receiving montelukast and any early signs of liver injury should be investigated with a high index of suspicion for drug induced liver injury.

  8. A suspected case of transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Lulu Sherif; Srikantu, J.; Prithi Jain; Kishan Shetty; Brijesh Khandige

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare but serious complication of blood transfusion. We present a suspected case of TRALI in a 39-year-old female patient who underwent total abdominal hysterectomy under uneventful general anesthesia. The patient developed acute desaturation due to noncardiogenic pulmonary edema while receiving compatible blood transfusion on the second postoperative day. As her symptoms were refractory to supportive treatment, she was mechanically ventilated...

  9. Pattern Recognition Receptor–Dependent Mechanisms of Acute Lung Injury

    Xiang, Meng; Fan, Jie

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) that clinically manifests as acute respiratory distress syndrome is caused by an uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response resulting from clinical events including sepsis, major surgery and trauma. Innate immunity activation plays a central role in the development of ALI. Innate immunity is activated through families of related pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize conserved microbial motifs or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Toll-like...

  10. Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Kidney Injury due to Severe Heat Stroke

    Carlos Fragachán G.; Máximo H. Trujillo

    2011-01-01

    We present a case of heat stroke (HS) and acute kidney injury (AKI) due to severe rhabdomyolysis in a 14-year-old previously healthy female patient. When she was practicing strenuous exercise she suffered acute seizures and high fever. These symptoms were followed by coma and multiple organ failure (MOF), which included AKI, encephalopathy, fulminant hepatic failure (FHF), and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The patient was managed in the ICU with renal replacement therapy, vent...

  11. Adult Stem Cells for Acute Lung Injury: Remaining Questions & Concerns

    Zhu, Ying-Gang; Hao, Qi; Monsel, Antoine; Feng, Xiao-mei; Lee, Jae W.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. The pathophysiology of ALI involves complex interactions between the inciting event, such as pneumonia, sepsis or aspiration, and the host immune response resulting in lung protein permeability, impaired resolution of pulmonary edema, an intense inflammatory response in the injured alveolus and hypoxemia. In multiple pre-clinical studies, adult stem cells h...

  12. Patient Satisfaction in the Treatment of Acute Hamstring Strain Injury

    LingLing- Lai

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The impact of musculoskeletal injuries often caused loss time in sport participation. Athletes who suffered from these injuries experienced a decrease in performance and physical disability. Although a variety of treatments have been implemented to the muscle injuries, the administration of autologous blood injection is replacing the conventional rehabilitation to expedite the process of muscle recovery. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is relatively new in muscle injury treatment and there is lack of evidence of the satisfaction of PRP treatment in muscle injuries. Purposes: The study aimed to investigate the patient satisfaction in the administration of PRP treatment and rehabilitation program for acute hamstring strain injury. Methods: Participants (competitive, semi-competitive and recreational athletes with acute hamstring strain injury (Grade II were recruited. Participants were randomly divided into either the PRP treatment or rehabilitation program. Participants were required to attend weekly follow up assessment for recovery evaluation. All the participants were required to complete a patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ-18 at the end of study.  The questionnaire is divided into seven sub-scales: general satisfaction, technical quality, interpersonal manner, communication, financial aspect, time spent with doctor, accessibility and convenience. Results: Participants were 22.35 ± 3.41 years. Duration from injury to first presentation in clinic ranged from two to ten days. Mean duration of recovery was 5.64 weeks. No statistically significant difference in the patient satisfaction sub-scales score between the two groups (p>0.05. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that PRP treatment is as satisfactory as conventional rehabilitation program in managing acute hamstring strain injury. Both  modalities are correspondingly safe and have high degree of satisfaction. Given the acceptable outcomes, patients are likely to

  13. Interventional effect of magnesium sulfate on nitric oxide synthase activity after acute craniocerebral injury

    Ximin Yang; Jiangong Zhu; Zongchun Tang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abnormal changes in magnesium ion are closely related to cerebral injury. At present,some evidence indicates that magnesium reagent can improve nerve function and prognosis of patients with cerebral injury.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of magnesium sulfate on changes in nitric oxide synthase (NOS)activity in brain tissue of rats with acute craniocerebral injury.DESIGN: Completely randomized grouping design and randomly controlled study.SETTING: Laboratory of Neurosurgery, the Third Hospital of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Fifty-four male SD rats of clean grade and weighing 220 - 250 g were randomly divided into normal control group (n =6), cerebral injury group (n =24) and magnesium sulfate group (n =24). Especially,rats in cerebral injury group and magnesium sulfate group were equally divided into four subgroups and observed at 0.5, 2, 6 and 24 hours after model establishment. A solution of 125 g/L of magnesium sulfate was provided by the Seventh Pharmaceutical Factory of Wuxi and the NOS assay kit by Nanjing Jiancheng Bioengineering Institute.METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Institute of Neurosurgery, the Third Hospital of Chinese PLA from August 2000 to August 2002. ① Rats in the cerebral injury group and magnesium sulfate group were anesthetized to establish cerebral injury models based on modified Feeney technique; magnesium sulfate group were intraperitoneally injected 600 mg/kg magnesium sulfate (125 g/L), but rats in the normal control group remained untreated. ② At 0.5, 2, 6 and 24 hours after cerebral injury, rats in cerebral injury group and magnesium sulfate group were decapitated and brains were dissected. Cerebral cortex of rats in cerebral injury group was selected for NOS assay; in addition, at 0.5 hour after cerebral injury, a portion of the parietal lobe was selected from the brains of rats in the normal control group. Brain samples were homogenized, the homogenated centrifuged and the supernatants were used to measure

  14. Preventive effect of eccentric training on acute hamstring injuries in men's soccer

    Petersen, Jesper; Thorborg, Kristian; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann;

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of acute hamstring injuries is high in several sports, including the different forms of football.......The incidence of acute hamstring injuries is high in several sports, including the different forms of football....

  15. Neutrophils contain cholesterol crystals in transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)

    Van Ness, Michael; Jensen, Hanne; Adamson, Grete N; Kysar, Patricia E; Holland, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular components of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy.......Intracellular components of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy....

  16. Differential effects of kidney-lung cross-talk during acute kidney injury and bacterial pneumonia

    Singbartl, Kai; Bishop, Jeffery; Wen, Xiaoyan; Murugan, Raghavan; Chandra, Saurabh; Filippi, Marie-Dominique; John A Kellum

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and acute lung injury (ALI) represent serious, complex clinical problems. The combination of AKI and ALI drastically decreases survival. However, detailed knowledge about the interactions between these two organs is scarce.

  17. Neuronal regeneration in a zebrafish model of adult brain injury

    Norihito Kishimoto

    2012-03-01

    Neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the adult mammalian forebrain are a potential source of neurons for neural tissue repair after brain insults such as ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI. Recent studies show that neurogenesis in the ventricular zone (VZ of the adult zebrafish telencephalon has features in common with neurogenesis in the adult mammalian SVZ. Here, we established a zebrafish model to study injury-induced neurogenesis in the adult brain. We show that the adult zebrafish brain possesses a remarkable capacity for neuronal regeneration. Telencephalon injury prompted the proliferation of neuronal precursor cells (NPCs in the VZ of the injured hemisphere, compared with in the contralateral hemisphere. The distribution of NPCs, viewed by BrdU labeling and ngn1-promoter-driven GFP, suggested that they migrated laterally and reached the injury site via the subpallium and pallium. The number of NPCs reaching the injury site significantly decreased when the fish were treated with an inhibitor of γ-secretase, a component of the Notch signaling pathway, suggesting that injury-induced neurogenesis mechanisms are at least partly conserved between fish and mammals. The injury-induced NPCs differentiated into mature neurons in the regions surrounding the injury site within a week after the injury. Most of these cells expressed T-box brain protein (Tbr1, suggesting they had adopted the normal neuronal fate in this region. These results suggest that the telencephalic VZ contributes to neural tissue recovery following telencephalic injury in the adult zebrafish, and that the adult zebrafish is a useful model for regenerative medicine.

  18. Minocycline Transiently Reduces Microglia/Macrophage Activation but Exacerbates Cognitive Deficits Following Repetitive Traumatic Brain Injury in the Neonatal Rat.

    Hanlon, Lauren A; Huh, Jimmy W; Raghupathi, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    Elevated microglial/macrophage-associated biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid of infant victims of abusive head trauma (AHT) suggest that these cells play a role in the pathophysiology of the injury. In a model of AHT in 11-day-old rats, 3 impacts (24 hours apart) resulted in spatial learning and memory deficits and increased brain microglial/macrophage reactivity, traumatic axonal injury, neuronal degeneration, and cortical and white-matter atrophy. The antibiotic minocycline has been effective in decreasing injury-induced microglial/macrophage activation while simultaneously attenuating cellular and functional deficits in models of neonatal hypoxic ischemia, but the potential for this compound to rescue deficits after impact-based trauma to the immature brain remains unexplored. Acute minocycline administration in this model of AHT decreased microglial/macrophage reactivity in the corpus callosum of brain-injured animals at 3 days postinjury, but this effect was lost by 7 days postinjury. Additionally, minocycline treatment had no effect on traumatic axonal injury, neurodegeneration, tissue atrophy, or spatial learning deficits. Interestingly, minocycline-treated animals demonstrated exacerbated injury-induced spatial memory deficits. These results contrast with previous findings in other models of brain injury and suggest that minocycline is ineffective in reducing microglial/macrophage activation and ameliorating injury-induced deficits following repetitive neonatal traumatic brain injury. PMID:26825312

  19. Brain injury-associated biomarkers of TGF-beta1, S100B, GFAP, NF-L, tTG, AbetaPP, and tau were concomitantly enhanced and the UPS was impaired during acute brain injury caused by Toxocara canis in mice

    Ji Dar-Der

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because the outcomes and sequelae after different types of brain injury (BI are variable and difficult to predict, investigations on whether enhanced expressions of BI-associated biomarkers (BIABs, including transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1, S100B, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, neurofilament light chain (NF-L, tissue transglutaminases (tTGs, β-amyloid precursor proteins (AβPP, and tau are present as well as whether impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS is present have been widely used to help delineate pathophysiological mechanisms in various BIs. Larvae of Toxocara canis can invade the brain and cause BI in humans and mice, leading to cerebral toxocariasis (CT. Because the parasitic burden is light in CT, it may be too cryptic to be detected in humans, making it difficult to clearly understand the pathogenesis of subtle BI in CT. Since the pathogenesis of murine toxocariasis is very similar to that in humans, it appears appropriate to use a murine model to investigate the pathogenesis of CT. Methods BIAB expressions and UPS function in the brains of mice inoculated with a single dose of 250 T. canis embryonated eggs was investigated from 3 days (dpi to 8 weeks post-infection (wpi by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Results Results revealed that at 4 and 8 wpi, T. canis larvae were found to have invaded areas around the choroid plexus but without eliciting leukocyte infiltration in brains of infected mice; nevertheless, astrogliosis, an indicator of BI, with 78.9~142.0-fold increases in GFAP expression was present. Meanwhile, markedly increased levels of other BIAB proteins including TGF-β1, S100B, NF-L, tTG, AβPP, and tau, with increases ranging 2.0~12.0-fold were found, although their corresponding mRNA expressions were not found to be present at 8 wpi. Concomitantly, UPS impairment was evidenced by the overexpression of conjugated ubiquitin and ubiquitin in the brain. Conclusion Further studies

  20. Neuroprotective levels of IGF-1 exacerbate epileptogenesis after brain injury.

    Song, Yu; Pimentel, Corrin; Walters, Katherine; Boller, Lauren; Ghiasvand, Shabnam; Liu, Jing; Staley, Kevin J; Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) is neuroprotective in animal models of brain injury, and has been considered as a potential therapeutic. Akt-mTOR and MAPK are downstream targets of IGF-1 signaling that are activated after brain injury. However, both brain injury and mTOR are linked to epilepsy, raising the possibility that IGF-1 may be epileptogenic. Here, we considered the role of IGF-1 in development of epilepsy after brain injury, using the organotypic hippocampal culture model of post-traumatic epileptogenesis. We found that IGF-1 was neuroprotective within a few days of injury but that long-term IGF-1 treatment was pro-epileptic. Pro-epileptic effects of IGF-1 were mediated by Akt-mTOR signaling. We also found that IGF-1 - mediated increase in epileptic activity led to neurotoxicity. The dualistic nature of effects of IGF-1 treatment demonstrates that anabolic enhancement through IGF-1 activation of mTOR cascade can be beneficial or harmful depending on the stage of the disease. Our findings suggest that epilepsy risk may need to be considered in the design of neuroprotective treatments for brain injury. PMID:27561791

  1. Intranasal epidermal growth factor treatment rescues neonatal brain injury

    Scafidi, Joseph; Hammond, Timothy R.; Scafidi, Susanna; Ritter, Jonathan; Jablonska, Beata; Roncal, Maria; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Coman, Daniel; Huang, Yuegao; McCarter, Robert J.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Horvath, Tamas L.; Gallo, Vittorio

    2014-02-01

    There are no clinically relevant treatments available that improve function in the growing population of very preterm infants (less than 32 weeks' gestation) with neonatal brain injury. Diffuse white matter injury (DWMI) is a common finding in these children and results in chronic neurodevelopmental impairments. As shown recently, failure in oligodendrocyte progenitor cell maturation contributes to DWMI. We demonstrated previously that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has an important role in oligodendrocyte development. Here we examine whether enhanced EGFR signalling stimulates the endogenous response of EGFR-expressing progenitor cells during a critical period after brain injury, and promotes cellular and behavioural recovery in the developing brain. Using an established mouse model of very preterm brain injury, we demonstrate that selective overexpression of human EGFR in oligodendrocyte lineage cells or the administration of intranasal heparin-binding EGF immediately after injury decreases oligodendroglia death, enhances generation of new oligodendrocytes from progenitor cells and promotes functional recovery. Furthermore, these interventions diminish ultrastructural abnormalities and alleviate behavioural deficits on white-matter-specific paradigms. Inhibition of EGFR signalling with a molecularly targeted agent used for cancer therapy demonstrates that EGFR activation is an important contributor to oligodendrocyte regeneration and functional recovery after DWMI. Thus, our study provides direct evidence that targeting EGFR in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells at a specific time after injury is clinically feasible and potentially applicable to the treatment of premature children with white matter injury.

  2. Low Level Primary Blast Injury in Rodent Brain

    Pun, Pamela B. L.; Kan, Enci Mary; Salim, Agus; Li, Zhaohui; Ng, Kian Chye; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Ling, Eng-Ang; Tan, Mui Hong; Lu, Jia

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of blast attacks and resulting traumatic brain injuries has been on the rise in recent years. Primary blast is one of the mechanisms in which the blast wave can cause injury to the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single sub-lethal blast over pressure (BOP) exposure of either 48.9 kPa (7.1 psi) or 77.3 kPa (11.3 psi) to rodents in an open-field setting. Brain tissue from these rats was harvested for microarray and histopathological analyses. Gross...

  3. Low level primary blast injury in rodent brain

    Enci MaryKan; AgusSalim; Zhao HuiLi; Eng-AngLing

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of blast attacks and resulting traumatic brain injuries has been on the rise in recent years. Primary blast is one of the mechanisms in which the blast wave can cause injury to the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single sub-lethal blast over pressure exposure of either 48.9 kPa (7.1 psi) or 77.3 kPa (11.3 psi) to rodents in an open-field setting. Brain tissue from these rats was harvested for microarray and histopathological analyses. Gross histo...

  4. Emergency treatment options for pediatric traumatic brain injury

    Exo, J; Smith, C.; Smith, R.; Bell, MJ

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading killer of children and is a major public health problem around the world. Using general principles of neurocritical care, various treatment strategies have been developed to attempt to restore homeostasis to the brain and allow brain healing, including mechanical factors, cerebrospinal fluid diversion, hyperventilation, hyperosmolar therapies, barbiturates and hypothermia. Careful application of these therapies, normally in a step-wise fashion as intracrani...

  5. Astrocytes mediate the neuroprotective effects of Tibolone following brain injury

    Luis Miguel Garcia-Segura; Barreto, George E.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, astrocytes have become a key central player in mediating important functions in the brain. These physiological processes include neurotransmitter recycling, energy management, metabolic shuttle, immune sensing, K+ buffer, antioxidant supply and release of neurotrophic factors and gliotransmitters. These astrocytic roles are somehow altered upon brain injury, therefore strategies aimed at better protecting astrocytes are an essential asset to maintain brain homeostasis. In this cont...

  6. A prospective study to evaluate a new residential community reintegration programme for severe chronic brain injury: the Brain Integration Programme.

    Geurtsen, G.J.; Martina, J.D.; Heugten, C.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the effectiveness of a residential community reintegration programme for participants with chronic sequelae of severe acquired brain injury that hamper community functioning. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SUBJECTS: Twenty-four participants with acquired brain injury (traumatic

  7. Ritonavir-induced acute kidney injury: kidney biopsy findings and review of literature

    Shafi, T.; Choi, M.J.; Racusen, L. C.; Spacek, L. A.; Berry, C; Atta, M.; Fine, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    Ritonavir therapy is not generally considered nephrotoxic. We report a case of acute kidney injury secondary to ritonavir, with kidney biopsy demonstrating extensive acute tubular injury. This is the first report of a kidney biopsy and pathology in acute kidney injury associated with ritonavir. A review of published medical literature on the topic is also presented.

  8. Acute Kidney Injury Induced by Herbal Products: A Case Report

    Erhan TATAR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, consumption of herbal products has become widespread both in Turkey and worldwide. However, the safety of these products is substantially controversial. We here present a case of acute kidney injury in a patient with excessive use of herbal products for cardio-protective purposes.

  9. Transfusion-related acute lung injury in multiple traumatized patients

    Alijanpour, Ebrahim; Jabbari, Ali; Hoseini, Fahimeh; Tabasi, Shabnam

    2012-01-01

    Background: Many of the multiple traumatized patients who refer to the hospital need transfusion. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious clinical syndrome associated with the transfusion of plasma-containing blood components. In the article, we present a case of TRALI following transfusion of packed red blood cells

  10. Acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome in cirrhosis

    Israelsen, Mads Egerod; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Krag, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    Cirrhosis is the eighth leading cause of "years of lost life" in the US and accounts for approximately 1 to 2% of all deaths in Europe. Patients with cirrhosis have a high risk of developing acute kidney injury. The clinical characteristics of HRS are similar to prerenal uraemia, but the condition...

  11. Therapeutic effect of nimodipine on experimental brain injury

    杨树源; 王增光

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the therapeutic effect of nimodipine on experimental brain injury.Methods: Experimental and control rabbits were subjected to a closed head injury. In one group nimodipine was given intravenously and the effect evaluated by electron microscopy, brain water content, calcium levels, transcranial Doppler, and intracranial pressure monitoring.Results: In rabbits treated with nimodipine the level of neuronal cytosolic free calcium was markedly decreased. There were less cellular damage and less spasm of the middle cerebral artery seen on electron microscopy. No difference regarding intracranial pressure changes between the two groups was noted. Conclusions: Nimodipine has a protective action on brain injury by blocking a series of pathological reactions induced by neuronal calcium overload, and by reducing the spasm of brain vessels and improving cerebral blood flow.

  12. Translational Research for Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury: Injury Mechanism to Development of Medical Instruments

    Nakagawa, A.; Ohtani, K.; Arafune, T.; Washio, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Endo, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Kumabe, T.; Takayama, K.; Tominaga, T.

    1. Investigation of shock wave-induced phenomenon: blast-induced traumatic brain injury Blast wave (BW) is generated by explosion and is comprised of lead shock wave (SE) followed by subsequent supersonic flow.

  13. Recovery of Content and Temporal Order Memory for Performed Activities following Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Seelye, Adriana M.

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the complex nature of everyday activity memory following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study examined recovery of content and temporal order memory for performed activities during the first year in individuals who suffered moderate to severe TBI. TBI and control participants completed eight different cognitive activities at baseline (i.e., acutely following injury for TBI) and then again approximately one year later (follow-up). Participants’ free recall of ...

  14. Acute arterial infarcts in patients with severe head injuries

    Deepak Agrawal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To study the incidence, demographic profile, and outcome of patients with severe closed head injuries who develop acute arterial infarcts. Materials and Methods: Patients with severe head injury (Glasgow coma score (GCS ≤8 presenting within 8 h of injury in the Department of Neurosurgery over a period of 5 months were enrolled in the study. Patients with penetrating head injury, infarct due to herniation and iatrogenic arterial injuries were excluded from the study. Only arterial infarcts developing within 8 h of injury were included in the study. A computed tomography (CT head was done on all patients within 8 h of injury and repeated if necessary. Arterial infarct was defined as well-demarcated wedge-shaped hypodensity corresponding to an arterial territory on plain CT of the head. Outcome was assessed using Glasgow outcome score (GOS at 1 month post-injury or at death (whichever came earlier. Results: Forty-four patients of severe head injury were included in the study during the above period. Of these, four patients (9.1% had arterial infarcts on the initial CT scan. The male:female ratio was 1:3. The mean age was 54 years (range 3-85 years. Two patients had infarcts in the middle cerebral artery distribution and two in the superior cerebellar artery distribution. Poor outcome (GOS 1-3 was seen in 100% of the patients with arterial infarct compared to 52.5% (n=21 in patients with severe head injury without arterial infarct. Conclusions: A significant percentage of patients with severe head injury have arterial infarcts on admission, which may imply arterial injury. Our study shows that these patients have a poorer prognosis vis-a-vis patient without these findings.

  15. Midbrain raphe stimulation improves behavioral and anatomical recovery from fluid-percussion brain injury.

    Carballosa Gonzalez, Melissa M; Blaya, Meghan O; Alonso, Ofelia F; Bramlett, Helen M; Hentall, Ian D

    2013-01-15

    The midbrain median raphe (MR) and dorsal raphe (DR) nuclei were tested for their capacity to regulate recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI). An implanted, wireless self-powered stimulator delivered intermittent 8-Hz pulse trains for 7 days to the rat's MR or DR, beginning 4-6 h after a moderate parasagittal (right) fluid-percussion injury. MR stimulation was also examined with a higher frequency (24 Hz) or a delayed start (7 days after injury). Controls had sham injuries, inactive stimulators, or both. The stimulation caused no apparent acute responses or adverse long-term changes. In water-maze trials conducted 5 weeks post-injury, early 8-Hz MR and DR stimulation restored the rate of acquisition of reference memory for a hidden platform of fixed location. Short-term spatial working memory, for a variably located hidden platform, was restored only by early 8-Hz MR stimulation. All stimulation protocols reversed injury-induced asymmetry of spontaneous forelimb reaching movements tested 6 weeks post-injury. Post-mortem histological measurement at 8 weeks post-injury revealed volume losses in parietal-occipital cortex and decussating white matter (corpus callosum plus external capsule), but not hippocampus. The cortical losses were significantly reversed by early 8-Hz MR and DR stimulation, the white matter losses by all forms of MR stimulation. The generally most effective protocol, 8-Hz MR stimulation, was tested 3 days post-injury for its acute effect on forebrain cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a key trophic signaling molecule. This procedure reversed injury-induced declines of cAMP levels in both cortex and hippocampus. In conclusion, midbrain raphe nuclei can enduringly enhance recovery from early disseminated TBI, possibly in part through increased signaling by cAMP in efferent targets. A neurosurgical treatment for TBI using interim electrical stimulation in raphe repair centers is suggested. PMID:22963112

  16. Acute kidney injury in burns: a story of volume and inflammation

    COLPAERT, KIRSTEN; Hoste, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Acute kidney injury occurs in approximately one-quarter to one-third of patients with major burn injury. Apart from the usual suspects – such as older age, severity of burn injury, sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction – volume overload probably has an important role in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury.

  17. Proton MR spectroscopy in mild traumatic brain injury

    To assess the role of 1H MRS in the detection of changes in cerebral metabolite levels in pyramidal tracts after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) and to compare metabolite alterations to the clinical status (Glasgow Coma Scale). Study group consisted of 25 patients after mild traumatic brain injury, with a score of 11 to 15 in GCS. The MR studies were performed with a 1.5 T scanner. The results of spectra approximation (presented as metabolite ratios: NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, Cho/Cr, lac/Cr, lip/Cr, Glx/Cr) were subjected to statistical analysis. MR spectra were recorded from a normal-appearing brain region: internal capsules and cerebral peduncles. Spectra from traumatic patients were compared with a control group including 34 healthy volunteers recorded with the same techniques. The statistical analysis revealed significant differences between the data obtained from various brain regions of the same patients after an MTBI and between the study and the control group. Proton MR spectroscopy detects changes in cerebral metabolite levels in apparently normal regions. In pyramidal tracts (internal capsules, cerebral peduncles), we noticed a significant reduction of NAA /Cho, lip/Cr, lac/Cr and Glx/Cr. In patients with mild brain injury, we can detect some metabolite abnormalities in normal-appearing brain structures. Proton MRS is a very useful tool for evaluation of major changes in metabolite levels in pyramidal tracts after mild traumatic brain injury

  18. Injury timing alters metabolic, inflammatory and functional outcomes following repeated mild traumatic brain injury.

    Weil, Zachary M; Gaier, Kristopher R; Karelina, Kate

    2014-10-01

    Repeated head injuries are a major public health concern both for athletes, and members of the police and armed forces. There is ample experimental and clinical evidence that there is a period of enhanced vulnerability to subsequent injury following head trauma. Injuries that occur close together in time produce greater cognitive, histological, and behavioral impairments than do injuries separated by a longer period. Traumatic brain injuries alter cerebral glucose metabolism and the resolution of altered glucose metabolism may signal the end of the period of greater vulnerability. Here, we injured mice either once or twice separated by three or 20days. Repeated injuries that were separated by three days were associated with greater axonal degeneration, enhanced inflammatory responses, and poorer performance in a spatial learning and memory task. A single injury induced a transient but marked increase in local cerebral glucose utilization in the injured hippocampus and sensorimotor cortex, whereas a second injury, three days after the first, failed to induce an increase in glucose utilization at the same time point. In contrast, when the second injury occurred substantially later (20days after the first injury), an increase in glucose utilization occurred that paralleled the increase observed following a single injury. The increased glucose utilization observed after a single injury appears to be an adaptive component of recovery, while mice with 2 injuries separated by three days were not able to mount this response, thus this second injury may have produced a significant energetic crisis such that energetic demands outstripped the ability of the damaged cells to utilize energy. These data strongly reinforce the idea that too rapid return to activity after a traumatic brain injury can induce permanent damage and disability, and that monitoring cerebral energy utilization may be a tool to determine when it is safe to return to the activity that caused the initial

  19. Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: An Update.

    Chalikias, George; Drosos, Ioannis; Tziakas, Dimitrios N

    2016-04-01

    Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is defined as an abrupt deterioration in renal function associated with the administration of iodinated contrast media. This type of acute kidney injury is frequently encountered as a complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and is associated with adverse short- and long-term outcomes including mainly mortality, cardiovascular morbidity and prolongation of hospitalization. The incidence of CI-AKI after PCI ranges from 2 to 20 % according to baseline kidney function. It may also range according to the clinical setting, being higher after emergency PCI. The primary manifestation is a small decline in kidney function, occurring 1 to 3 days after the procedure. Kidney function usually returns to preexisting levels within 7 days. Incidence of acute renal failure requiring dialysis following PCI is rare (hospital epidemic. PMID:26780748

  20. Evidence-based treatment for acute spinal cord injury

    Zhouming Deng; Jiajia Su; Lin Cai; Ansong Ping; Wei Jin; Renxiong Wei; Yan Zhan

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To formulate an evidence-based treatment for one patient with acute spinal cord injury and summarize evidence for evaluating acute spinal cord injury treatment. METHODS: Studies related to the treatment for acute spinal cord injury were identified via a search of National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC, 2000-11), the Cochrane Library (Issue 1, 2011), TRIP Database (2000-11), and PubMed (1966-2011). Treatment strategies were formulated according to three basic principles: best evidence, doctor's professional experience, and wishes of the patient. RESULTS: A total of 34 articles were selected, including 1 NGC guideline, 22 systematic reviews, and 11 randomized controlled trials. Based on our review, we arrived at the following recommendations: no clinical evidence exists definitively to recommend the use of any of neuroprotective pharmaceuticals; surgery should be undertaken early; mechanical compression devices and low-molecular weight heparin should be employed to prevent thrombosis; respiratory muscle training is beneficial for pulmonary function and quality of life; and functional electrical stimulation and acupuncture can promote functional recovery. The patient accordingly underwent surgery 6 hours after trauma without receiving any neuroprotective pharmaceuticals; low-molecular weight heparin and intermittent pneumatic compression were applied to prevent thrombosis. He also underwent respiratory muscle training daily for 8 weeks and received functional electrical stimulation for 15 minutes and acupuncture for 30 minutes every day. After follow-up for 3 months, the above therapeutic regimen was confirmed efficacious for acute spinal cord injury.CONCLUSION: Evidence-based medicine provides an individualized treatment protocol for acute spinal cord injury, which can significantly improve the therapeutic effect and prognosis.

  1. Dexmedetomidine Postconditioning Reduces Brain Injury after Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia in Neonatal Rats.

    Ren, Xiaoyan; Ma, Hong; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2016-06-01

    Perinatal asphyxia can lead to death and severe disability. Brain hypoxia-ischemia (HI) injury is the major pathophysiology contributing to death and severe disability after perinatal asphyxia. Here, seven-day old Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to left brain HI. Dexmedetomidine was given intraperitoneally after the brain HI. Yohimbine or atipamezole, two α2 adrenergic receptor antagonists, were given 10 min before the dexmedetomidine injection. Neurological outcome was evaluated 7 or 28 days after the brain HI. Frontal cerebral cortex was harvested 6 h after the brain HI. Left brain HI reduced the left cerebral hemisphere weight assessed 7 days after the brain HI. This brain tissue loss was dose-dependently attenuated by dexmedetomidine. Dexmedetomidine applied within 1 h after the brain HI produced this effect. Dexmedetomidine attenuated the brain HI-induced brain tissue and cell loss as well as neurological and cognitive dysfunction assessed from 28 days after the brain HI. Dexmedetomidine postconditioning-induced neuroprotection was abolished by yohimbine or atipamezole. Brain HI increased tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β in the brain tissues. This increase was attenuated by dexmedetomidine. Atipamezole inhibited this dexmedetomidine effect. Our results suggest that dexmedetomidine postconditioning reduces HI-induced brain injury in the neonatal rats. This effect may be mediated by α2 adrenergic receptor activation that inhibits inflammation in the ischemic brain tissues. PMID:26932203

  2. Improved Cognitive Function After Transcranial, Light-Emitting Diode Treatments in Chronic, Traumatic Brain Injury: Two Case Reports

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Saltmarche, Anita; Krengel, Maxine H.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Knight, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases, where cognition improved following treatment with red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs), applied transcranially to forehead and scalp areas, are presented. Background: Significant benefits have been reported following application of transcranial, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to humans with acute stroke and mice with acute TBI. These are the first case reports documenting improved cognitive function in chronic, TBI pati...

  3. Nonessential Role for the NLRP1 Inflammasome Complex in a Murine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Thomas Brickler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI elicits the immediate production of proinflammatory cytokines which participate in regulating the immune response. While the mechanisms of adaptive immunity in secondary injury are well characterized, the role of the innate response is unclear. Recently, the NLR inflammasome has been shown to become activated following TBI, causing processing and release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β. The inflammasome is a multiprotein complex consisting of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing proteins (NLR, caspase-1, and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC. ASC is upregulated after TBI and is critical in coupling the proteins during complex formation resulting in IL-1β cleavage. To directly test whether inflammasome activation contributes to acute TBI-induced damage, we assessed IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 expression, contusion volume, hippocampal cell death, and motor behavior recovery in Nlrp1−/−, Asc−/−, and wild type mice after moderate controlled cortical impact (CCI injury. Although IL-1β expression is significantly attenuated in the cortex of Nlrp1−/− and Asc−/− mice following CCI injury, no difference in motor recovery, cell death, or contusion volume is observed compared to wild type. These findings indicate that inflammasome activation does not significantly contribute to acute neural injury in the murine model of moderate CCI injury.

  4. Role of Melatonin in Traumatic Brain Injury and Spinal Cord Injury

    Mehar Naseem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain and spinal cord are implicated in incidences of two of the most severe injuries of central nervous system (CNS. Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a devastating neurological deficit involving primary and secondary injury cascades. The primary and secondary mechanisms include complex consequences of activation of proinflammatory cytokines, cerebral edema, upregulation of NF-κβ, disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB, and oxidative stress. Spinal cord injury (SCI includes primary and secondary injury cascades. Primary injury leads to secondary injury in which generation of free radicals and oxidative or nitrative damage play an important pathophysiological role. The indoleamine melatonin is a hormone secreted or synthesized by pineal gland in the brain which helps to regulate sleep and wake cycle. Melatonin has been shown to be a versatile hormone having antioxidative, antiapoptotic, neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory properties. It has a special characteristic of crossing BBB. Melatonin has neuroprotective role in the injured part of the CNS after TBI and SCI. A number of studies have successfully shown its therapeutic value as a neuroprotective agent in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Here in this review we have compiled the literature supporting consequences of CNS injuries, TBI and SCI, and the protective role of melatonin in it.

  5. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Autoimmunity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Federica Guaraldi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of secondary hypopituitarism in children and adults, and is responsible for impaired quality of life, disabilities and compromised development. Alterations of pituitary function can occur at any time after the traumatic event, presenting in various ways and evolving during time, so they require appropriate screening for early detection and treatment. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, several mechanisms have been hypothesized, including hypothalamic-pituitary autoimmunity (HP-A. The aim of this study was to systematically review literature on the association between HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Major pitfalls related to the HP-A investigation were also discussed. Methods: The PubMed database was searched with a string developed for this purpose, without temporal or language limits, for original articles assessing the association of HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Results: Three articles from the same group met the inclusion criteria. Anti-pituitary and anti-hypothalamic antibodies were detected using indirect immunofluorescence in a significant number of patients with acute and chronic TBI. Elevated antibody titer was associated with an increased risk of persistent hypopituitarism, especially somatotroph and gonadotroph deficiency, while no correlations were found with clinical parameters. Conclusion: HPA seems to contribute to TBI-induced pituitary damage, although major methodological issues need to be overcome and larger studies are warranted to confirm these preliminary data.

  6. Lateral fluid percussion: model of traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Alder, Janet; Fujioka, Wendy; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Crockett, David P; Thakker-Varia, Smita

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) research has attained renewed momentum due to the increasing awareness of head injuries, which result in morbidity and mortality. Based on the nature of primary injury following TBI, complex and heterogeneous secondary consequences result, which are followed by regenerative processes (1,2). Primary injury can be induced by a direct contusion to the brain from skull fracture or from shearing and stretching of tissue causing displacement of brain due to movement (3,4). The resulting hematomas and lacerations cause a vascular response (3,5), and the morphological and functional damage of the white matter leads to diffuse axonal injury (6-8). Additional secondary changes commonly seen in the brain are edema and increased intracranial pressure (9). Following TBI there are microscopic alterations in biochemical and physiological pathways involving the release of excitotoxic neurotransmitters, immune mediators and oxygen radicals (10-12), which ultimately result in long-term neurological disabilities (13,14). Thus choosing appropriate animal models of TBI that present similar cellular and molecular events in human and rodent TBI is critical for studying the mechanisms underlying injury and repair. Various experimental models of TBI have been developed to reproduce aspects of TBI observed in humans, among them three specific models are widely adapted for rodents: fluid percussion, cortical impact and weight drop/impact acceleration (1). The fluid percussion device produces an injury through a craniectomy by applying a brief fluid pressure pulse on to the intact dura. The pulse is created by a pendulum striking the piston of a reservoir of fluid. The percussion produces brief displacement and deformation of neural tissue (1,15). Conversely, cortical impact injury delivers mechanical energy to the intact dura via a rigid impactor under pneumatic pressure (16,17). The weight drop/impact model is characterized by the fall of a rod with a specific

  7. Iptakalim protects against hypoxic brain injury through multiple pathways associated with ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    Zhu, H-L; Luo, W-Q; Wang, H

    2008-12-10

    The rapid and irreversible brain injury produced by anoxia when stroke occurs is well known. Cumulative evidence suggests that the activation of neuronal ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels may have inherent protective effects during cerebral hypoxia, yet little information regarding the therapeutic effects of KATP channel openers is available. We hypothesized that pretreatment with a KATP channel opener might protect against brain injury induced by cerebral hypoxia. In this study, adult Wistar rats were treated with iptakalim, a new KATP channel opener, which is selective for SUR2 type KATP channels, by intragastric administration at doses of 2, 4, or 8 mg/kg/day for 7 days before being exposed to simulated high altitude equivalent to 8000 m in a decompression chamber for 8 h leading to hypoxic brain injury. By light and electron microscopic images, we observed that hypobaric hypoxia-induced brain injury could be prevented by pretreatment with iptakalim. It was also observed that the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, water content, Na+ and Ca2+ concentration, and activities of Na+,K+-ATPase, Ca2+-ATPase and Mg2+-ATPase in rat cerebral cortex were increased and the gene expression of the occludin or aquaporin-4 was down- or upregulated respectively, which could also be prevented by the pretreatment with iptakalim at doses of 2, 4, or 8 mg/kg in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that in an oxygen-and-glucose-deprived model in ECV304 cells and rat cortical astrocytes, pretreatment with iptakalim significantly increased survived cell rates and decreased lactate dehydrogenate release, which were significantly antagonized by glibenclamide, a K(ATP) channel blocker. We conclude that iptakalim is a promising drug that may protect against brain injury induced by acute hypobaric hypoxia through multiple pathways associated with SUR2-type K(ATP) channels, suggesting a new therapeutic strategy for stroke treatment. PMID:18951957

  8. The Role of Cytokines and Inflammatory Cells in Perinatal Brain Injury

    McAdams, Ryan M.; Juul, Sandra E.

    2012-01-01

    Perinatal brain injury frequently complicates preterm birth and leads to significant long-term morbidity. Cytokines and inflammatory cells are mediators in the common pathways associated with perinatal brain injury induced by a variety of insults, such as hypoxic-ischemic injury, reperfusion injury, toxin-mediated injury, and infection. This paper examines our current knowledge regarding cytokine-related perinatal brain injury and specifically discusses strategies for attenuating cytokine-med...

  9. Correlation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to cognitive impairment following traumatic brain injury in rats

    Dezhi Kang; Zhang Guo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In vitro and in vivo studies have confirmed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can promote survival and differentiation of cholinergic, dopaminergic and motor neurons, and axonal regeneration. BDNF has neuroprotective effects on the nervous system. OBJECTIVE: To explore changes in BDNF expression and cognitive function in rats after brain injury DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The neuropathology experiment was performed at the Second Research Room, Department of Neurosurgery, Fujian Medical University (China) from July 2007 to July 2008. MATERIALS: A total of 72 healthy, male, Sprague Dawley, rats were selected for this study. METHODS: Rat models of mild and moderate traumatic brain injury were created by percussion, according to Feeney's method (n = 24, each group). A bone window was made in rats from the sham operation group (n = 24), but no attack was conducted. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: At days 1,2, 4 and 7 following injury, BDNF expression in the rat frontal lobe cortex, hippocampus and basal forebrain was examined by immunohistochemistry (streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method). Changes in rat cognitive function were assessed by the walking test, balance-beam test and memory function detection. RESULTS: Cognitive impairment was aggravated at day 2, and recovered to normal at days 3 and 7 in rats from the mild and moderate traumatic brain injury groups. BDNF expression in the rat frontal lobe cortex, hippocampus and basal forebrain was increased at 1 day, decreased at day 2, and then gradually increased in the mild and moderate traumatic brain injury groups. BDNF expression was greater in rats from the moderate traumatic brain injury group than in the sham operation and mild traumatic brain injury groups (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: BDNF expression in the rat frontal lobe cortex, hippocampus and basal forebrain is correlated to cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury. BDNF has a protective effect on cognitive function in rats

  10. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    Fong Daniel TP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms. Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms. The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative

  11. Montelukast induced acute hepatocellular liver injury

    Harugeri A; Parthasarathi G; Sharma J; D′Souza G; Ramesh M

    2009-01-01

    A 46-year-old male with uncontrolled asthma on inhaled albuterol and formoterol with budesonide was commenced on montelukast. He developed abdominal pain and jaundice 48 days after initiating montelukast therapy. His liver tests showed an increase in serum total bilirubin, conjugated bilirubin, aspartate aminotranferase, alanine aminotranferase, and alkaline phosphatase. The patient was evaluated for possible non-drug related liver injury. Montelukast was discontinued suspecting montelukast i...

  12. Antioxidant therapies in traumatic brain and spinal cord injury*

    Bains, Mona; Hall, Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    Free radical formation and oxidative damage have been extensively investigated and validated as important contributors to the pathophysiology of acute central nervous system injury. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) is an early event following injury occurring within minutes of mechanical impact. A key component in this event is peroxynitrite-induced lipid peroxidation. As discussed in this review, peroxynitrite formation and lipid peroxidatio...

  13. Inflammatory Mechanisms of Organ Crosstalk during Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury

    Laura E. White

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication during inpatient hospitalization, and clinical outcomes remain poor despite advancements in renal replacement therapy. AKI in the setting of multiple organ failure (MOF remains a formidable challenge to clinicians and incurs an unacceptably high mortality rate. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI incites a proinflammatory cascade and releases cellular and soluble mediators with systemic implications for remote organ injury. Evidence from preclinical models cites mechanisms of organ crosstalk during ischemic AKI including the expression of cellular adhesion molecules, lymphocyte trafficking, release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and modification of the host innate and adaptive immune response systems. In this paper, the influence of kidney IRI on systemic inflammation and distant organ injury will be examined. Recent experimental data and evolving concepts of organ crosstalk during ischemic AKI will also be discussed in detail.

  14. Acute care management of spinal cord injuries.

    Mitcho, K; Yanko, J R

    1999-08-01

    Meeting the health care needs of the spinal cord-injured patient is an immense challenge for the acute care multidisciplinary team. The critical care nurse clinician, as well as other members of the team, needs to maintain a comprehensive knowledge base to provide the care management that is essential to the care of the spinal cord-injured patient. With the active participation of the patient and family in care delivery decisions, the health care professionals can help to meet the psychosocial and physical needs of the patient/family unit. This article provides an evidence-based, comprehensive review of the needs of the spinal cord-injured patient in the acute care setting including optimal patient outcomes, methods to prevent complications, and a plan that provides an expeditious transition to rehabilitation. PMID:10646444

  15. Theta burst stimulation to characterize changes in brain plasticity following mild traumatic brain injury: a proof-of-principle study

    Tremblay, Sara; Vernet, Marine; Bashir, Shahid; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Théoret, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies investigating the acute effects of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) suggest the presence of unbalanced excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms within primary motor cortex (M1). Whether these abnormalities are associated with impaired synaptic plasticity remains unknown. Methods The effects of continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) on transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were assessed on average two weeks and six weeks following mTBI in five individuals. Results The procedure was well-tolerated by all participants. Continuous TBS failed to induce a significant reduction of MEP amplitudes two weeks after the injury, but response to cTBS normalized six weeks following injury, as a majority of patients became asymptomatic. Conclusions These preliminary results suggest that cTBS can be used to assess M1 synaptic plasticity in the acute and sub-acute phases following mTBI and may provide insights into neurobiological substrates of symptoms and consequences of mTBI. PMID:25735241

  16. Expression of PHB2 in Rat Brain Cortex Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Ting Xu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Prohibitin2 (PHB2 is a ubiquitous, evolutionarily strongly conserved protein. It is one of the components of the prohibitin complex, which comprises two highly homologous subunits, PHB1 and PHB2. PHB2 is present in various cellular compartments including the nucleus and mitochondria. Recent studies have identified PHB2 as a multifunctional protein that controls cell proliferation, apoptosis, cristae morphogenesis and the functional integrity of mitochondria. However its distribution and function in the central nervous system (CNS are not well understood. In this study, we examined PHB2 expression and cellular localization in rats after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI. Western Blot analysis showed PHB2 level was significantly enhanced at five days after injury compared to control, and then declined during the following days. The protein expression of PHB2 was further analyzed by immunohistochemistry. In comparison to contralateral cerebral cortex, we observed a highly significant accumulation of PHB2 at the ipsilateral brain. Immunofluorescence double-labeling showed that PHB2 was co-expressed with NeuN, GFAP. Besides, PHB2 also colocalized with activated caspase-3 and PCNA. To further investigate the function of PHB2, primary cultured astrocytes and the neuronal cell line PC12 were employed to establish a proliferation model and an apoptosis model, respectively, to simulate the cell activity after TBI to a certain degree. Knocking down PHB2 by siRNA partly increased the apoptosis level of PC12 stimulated by H2O2. While the PHB2 was interrupted by siRNA, the proliferation level of primary cultured astrocytes was inhibited notably than that in the control group. Together with our data, we hypothesized that PHB2 might play an important role in CNS pathophysiology after TBI.

  17. Hypothyroidism causing paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury - case report

    Rodrigo Chaturaka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a patient with severe hypothyroidism complicated by paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury. A 65 year old male patient, diagnosed with hypothyroidism one year ago was transferred to our unit in a state of drowsiness and confusion. He was severely hypothyroid and had paralytic ileus and impaired renal function at the time of transfer. Hypokalaemia was present, and was likely to have contributed to the paralytic ileus and this together with dehydration was likely to have contributed to renal injury. Nonetheless, hypothyroidism is very likely to have been the principal precipitant of both these complications, and both paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury improved with thyroxine replacement. Unfortunately, the patient died unexpectedly eight days after admission to the unit. Hypothyroidism may induce de novo acute kidney injury or it may exacerbate ongoing chronic kidney disease. This rare complication is assumed to be due to the hypodynamic circulatory state created by thyroid hormone deficiency. Paralytic ileus is an even rarer fatal manifestation of hypothyroidism and is thought to be due to an autonomic neuropathy affecting the intestines that is reversible with thyroxine replacement. To our knowledge, both these complications have not been observed in a single patient so far. It is important that clinicians are aware of these rare manifestations of hypothyroidism as in most occasions, thyroxine deficiency may be missed, and treatment can reverse the complications.

  18. Synaptic Mechanisms of Blast-Induced Brain Injury.

    Przekwas, Andrzej; Somayaji, Mahadevabharath R; Gupta, Raj K

    2016-01-01

    Blast wave-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most common injuries to military personnel. Brain tissue compression/tension due to blast-induced cranial deformations and shear waves due to head rotation may generate diffuse micro-damage to neuro-axonal structures and trigger a cascade of neurobiological events culminating in cognitive and neurodegenerative disorders. Although diffuse axonal injury is regarded as a signature wound of mild TBI (mTBI), blast loads may also cause synaptic injury wherein neuronal synapses are stretched and sheared. This synaptic injury may result in temporary disconnect of the neural circuitry and transient loss in neuronal communication. We hypothesize that mTBI symptoms such as loss of consciousness or dizziness, which start immediately after the insult, could be attributed to synaptic injury. Although empirical evidence is beginning to emerge; the detailed mechanisms underlying synaptic injury are still elusive. Coordinated in vitro-in vivo experiments and mathematical modeling studies can shed light into the synaptic injury mechanisms and their role in the potentiation of mTBI symptoms. PMID:26834697

  19. Subacute Changes in Cleavage Processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein and Tau following Penetrating Traumatic Brain Injury

    Mountney, Andrea; Hwang, Hye; Swiercz, Adam; Rammelkamp, Zoe; Boutte, Angela M.; Shear, Deborah A.; Tortella, Frank C.; Schmid, Kara E.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an established risk factor for the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here the effects of severe penetrating TBI on APP and tau cleavage processing were investigated in a rodent model of penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI). PBBI was induced by stereotactically inserting a perforated steel probe through the right frontal cortex of the anesthetized rat and rapidly inflating/deflating the probe’s elastic tubing into an elliptical shaped balloon to 10% of total rat brain volume causing temporary cavitation injury. Separate animals underwent probe injury (PrI) alone without balloon inflation. Shams underwent craniectomy. Brain tissue was collected acutely (4h, 24h, 3d) and subacutely (7d) post-injury and analyzed by immunoblot for full length APP (APP-FL) and APP beta c-terminal fragments (βCTFs), full length tau (tau-FL) and tau truncation fragments and at 7d for cytotoxic Beta amyloid (Aβ) peptides Aβ40 and Aβ42 analysis. APP-FL was significantly decreased at 3d and 7d following PBBI whereas APP βCTFs were significantly elevated by 4h post-injury and remained elevated through 7d post-injury. Effects on βCTFs were mirrored with PrI, albeit to a lesser extent. Aβ40 and Aβ42 were significantly elevated at 7d following PBBI and PrI. Tau-FL decreased substantially 3d and 7d post-PBBI and PrI. Importantly, a 22 kDa tau fragment (tau22), similar to that found in AD, was significantly elevated by 4h and remained elevated through 7d post-injury. Thus both APP and tau cleavage was dramatically altered in the acute and subacute periods post-injury. As cleavage of these proteins has also been implicated in AD, TBI pathology shown here may set the stage for the later development of AD or other tauopathies. PMID:27428544

  20. Increased leakage of brain antigens after traumatic brain injury and effect of immune tolerance induced by cells on traumatic brain injury

    YAN Hua; ZHANG Hong-wei; WU Qiao-li; ZHANG Guo-bin; LIU Kui; ZHI Da-shi; HU Zhen-bo; ZENG Xian-wei

    2012-01-01

    Background Although traumatic brain injury can lead to opening the blood-brain barrier and leaking of blood substances (including water) into brain tissue,few studies of brain antigens leaking into the blood and the pathways have been reported.Brain antigens result in damage to brain tissues by stimulating the immune system to produce anti-brain antibodies,but no treatment has been reported to reduce the production of anti-brain antibodies and protect the brain tissue.The aim of the study is to confirm the relationship between immune injury and arachnoid granulations following traumatic brain injury,and provide some new methods to inhibit the immune injury.Methods In part one,methylene blue was injected into the rabbits' cisterna magna after traumatic brain injury,and concentrations of methylene blue and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in blood were detected to determine the permeability of arachnoid granulations.In part two,umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and immature dendritic cells were injected into veins,and concentrations of interleukin 1 (IL-1),IL-10,interferon (IFN)-y,transforming growth factor (TGF)-β,anti-brain antibodies (ABAb),and IL-12 were measured by ELISA on days 1,3,7,14 and 21 after injury,and the numbers of leukocytes in the blood were counted.Twenty-one days after injury,expression of glutamate in brain tissue was determined by immunohistochemical staining,and neuronal degeneration was detected by H&E staining.Results In part one,blood concentrations of methylene blue and TNF-α in the traumatic brain injury group were higher than in the control group (P <0.05).Concentrations of methylene blue and TNF-α in the trauma cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)injected group were higher than in the control cerebrospinal fluid injected group (P <0.05).In part two,concentrations of IL-1,IFN-y,ABAb,IL-12,expression of glutamate (Glu),neuronal degeneration and number of peripheral blood leukocytes were lower in the group with cell treatment compared to the