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Sample records for acute bacterial meningitis

  1. Cholinesterase modulations in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    Berg, Ronan M G; Ofek, Keren; Qvist, Tavs;

    2011-01-01

    The circulating cholinesterases acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase may be suppressed and subsequently released from the brain in acute bacterial meningitis.......The circulating cholinesterases acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase may be suppressed and subsequently released from the brain in acute bacterial meningitis....

  2. Corticosteroids for acute adult bacterial meningitis

    D. van de Beek

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis in adults is a severe disease, with high fatality and morbidity rates. Experimental studies showed that the inflammatory response in the subarachnoid space is associated with unfavorable outcome. In these experiments, corticosteroids, and in particular dexamethasone, were able t

  3. Bacterial Meningitis

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  4. Meningitis bacteriana Bacterial meningitis

    Ana Teresa Alvarado Guevara

    2006-03-01

    causales son virales lo cual conlleva a las diferentes sub-clasificaciones. También en ciertos casos puede ser ocasionada por hongos, bacterias atípicas, micobacterias y parásitos.In Costa Rica the bacterial meningitis had turn into a high-priority subject in which to monitoring epidemiologist. It had been talked about in the last months, to dice an increase in the attention is published of this subject, due to this phenomenon it becomes necessary to make a revision of topic. Meningitis is an inflammation of leptomeninges and colonization of the subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (LCR due to different agents, which produces meningeal symptoms (ex. migraine, neck rigidity, and photophobia and pleocytosis in LCR. De pending on the variables to take into account is possible to group it in different classifications, taking into account the time of evolution are possible to be divided in acute or chronic, to first with few hours or days of beginning of the symptoms, whereas the chronicle also presents a silence course but of the disease of approximately 4 weeks of instauration. There is a difference according to its etiologic agent; they can be infectious and non-infectious. Examples of common non-infectious causes include medications (ex, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and antibiotics and carcinomatosis. A classification exists as well according to the causal agent. The acute bacterial meningitis remarks a bacterial origin of the syndrome, which characterizes by the by an acute onset of meningeal symptoms and neutrophilic pleocytosis. Each one of the bacteriological agents, parasitic or fungus finishes by characterizing the different presentations of the clinical features (ex, meningocóccica meningitis, Cryptococcus meningitis. Finally, there is also the aseptic meningitis, denominated in this form because it’s nonpyogenic cellular response caused by many types of agents. The patients show an acute beginning of symptoms, fever and lymphocytic pleocytosis. After

  5. Diffusion-weighted imaging in acute bacterial meningitis in infancy

    Bacterial meningitis is frequently fatal or leads to severe neurological impairment. Complications such as vasculitis, resulting in infarcts, should be anticipated and dealt with promptly. Our aim was to demonstrate the complications of meningitis by diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in patients who deteriorated despite therapy. We studied 13 infants between the ages of 1 day and 32 months who presented with symptoms ranging from fever and vomiting to seizures, encephalopathy and coma due to bacterial meningitis, performing MRI, including DWI, 2-5 days after presentation. Multiple infarcts were found on DWI in 12 of the 13, most commonly in the frontal lobes (in 10). Global involvement was seen in four children, three of whom died; the fourth had a very poor outcome. In one case abnormalities on DWI were due to subdural empyemas. We diagnosed vasculitis in three of five patients studied with MRA. We think DWI an important part of an MRI study in infants with meningitis. Small cortical or deep white-matter infarcts due to septic vasculitis can lead to tissue damage not easily recognized on routine imaging and DWI can be used to confirm that extra-axial collections represent empyemas. (orig.)

  6. Diffusion-weighted imaging in acute bacterial meningitis in infancy

    Jan, W.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hunter, J.V.; Simon, E.M.; Haselgrove, J. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Bacterial meningitis is frequently fatal or leads to severe neurological impairment. Complications such as vasculitis, resulting in infarcts, should be anticipated and dealt with promptly. Our aim was to demonstrate the complications of meningitis by diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in patients who deteriorated despite therapy. We studied 13 infants between the ages of 1 day and 32 months who presented with symptoms ranging from fever and vomiting to seizures, encephalopathy and coma due to bacterial meningitis, performing MRI, including DWI, 2-5 days after presentation. Multiple infarcts were found on DWI in 12 of the 13, most commonly in the frontal lobes (in 10). Global involvement was seen in four children, three of whom died; the fourth had a very poor outcome. In one case abnormalities on DWI were due to subdural empyemas. We diagnosed vasculitis in three of five patients studied with MRA. We think DWI an important part of an MRI study in infants with meningitis. Small cortical or deep white-matter infarcts due to septic vasculitis can lead to tissue damage not easily recognized on routine imaging and DWI can be used to confirm that extra-axial collections represent empyemas. (orig.)

  7. Characteristics of acute bacterial meningitis in Southeast Turkey

    Celal Ayaz

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM remains a significant worldwide cause of death in adults. Even in the antibiotic era, the mortality rate in ABM remains significant and has been reported in the range of 8-40%. AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of epidemiology, clinical manifestations, treatment modalities and outcome of patients with ABM in Southeast Turkey. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This retrospective study included all cases of community-acquired ABM diagnosed and treated in Dicle University Hospital between June 1996 and December 2002. METHODS AND PATIENTS: The study group consisted of 186 adult patients (110 male, 76 female with ABM, those patients who are older than 14 years, followed up at Dicle University Hospital from June 1996 to December 2002. Patients′ charts were retrospectively reviewed, clinical characteristics were recorded and final data were analyzed. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: In statistical analyses, the Chi-square test was used for binary variables and Student′s t-test for continuous variables. RESULTS: The patients′ mean age was 30.2 ± 15.3 years (range 14 to 90 years. On admission, typical symptoms of meningitis were found in most of the patients: headache in 92.5%, fever in 88.2%, and nuchal rigidity in 80.1%. The main predisposing factor for ABM was otitis media (40 patients, 21.5% and closed head trauma (12 patients, 6.5%. Streptococcus pneumonia was the most common identified pathogen. Twenty-nine patients (15.6% died during hospitalization period. In multivariate analyses, the significant mortality factor was found as initial level of consciousness, low cerebrospinal fluid/blood glucose ratio, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and initial treatment by penicillin G. CONCLUSIONS: Although still remains as a serious infection, early diagnosis and effective treatment may reduce fatal outcome and improve the course of the disease in patients with ABM. Ceftriaxone should be considered as

  8. Meningitis registry of hospitalized cases in children: epidemiological patterns of acute bacterial meningitis throughout a 32-year period

    Syriopoulou Vassiliki P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial meningitis remains a source of substantial morbidity and mortality in childhood. During the last decades gradual changes have been observed in the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis, related to the introduction of new polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines. The study presents an overview of the epidemiological patterns of acute bacterial meningitis in a tertiary children 's hospital during a 32-year period, using information from a disease registry. Moreover, it discusses the contribution of communicable disease registries in the study of acute infectious diseases. Methods In the early 1970s a Meningitis Registry (MR was created for patients admitted with meningitis in Aghia Sofia Children's Hospital in Athens. The MR includes demographic, clinical and laboratory data as well as treatment, complications and outcome of the patients. In 2000 a database was created and the collected data were entered, analyzed and presented in three chronological periods: A (1974–1984, B (1985–1994 and C (1995–2005. Results Of the 2,477 cases of bacterial meningitis registered in total, 1,146 cases (46.3% were classified as "probable" and 1,331 (53.7% as "confirmed" bacterial meningitis. The estimated mean annual Incidence Rate (IR was 16.9/100,000 for bacterial meningitis, 8.9/100,000 for Neisseria meningitidis, 1.3/100,000 for Streptococcus pneumoniae, 2.5/100,000 for Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib before vaccination and 0.4/100,000 for Hib after vaccination. Neisseria meningitis constituted the leading cause of childhood bacterial meningitis for all periods and in all age groups. Hib was the second most common cause of bacterial meningitis before the introduction of Hib conjugate vaccine, in periods A and B. The incidence of bacterial meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae was stable. The long-term epidemiological pattern of Neisseria meningitidis appears in cycles of approximately 10 years, confirmed by a significant

  9. Meningitis bacteriana Bacterial meningitis

    Ana Teresa Alvarado Guevara; Lizzie Marie Castillo Solano

    2006-01-01

    En Costa Rica la meningitis bacteriana se ha convertido en un tema prioritario en lo que a vigilancia epidemiológica se refiere, en los últimos meses se ha dado un aumento en la atención pública de este tema, debido a este fenómeno se hace necesario realizar una revisión del tema. La meningitis es una inflamación de las leptomeninges y colonización del líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR) debido a diferentes agentes, lo cual produce síntomas meníngeos (Ej., cefalea, rigidez nucal, fotofobia) y pleoc...

  10. Cerebral blood flow autoregulation in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    Møller, Kirsten

    2001-01-01

    Ph.d. afhandlingen omhandler sammenhængen mellem hjernens blodtilførsel (CBF) og middelarterietrykket (MAP) hos patienter med akut bakteriel meningitis. Hos raske er CBF uafhængig af MAP, hvilket kaldes CBF autoregulation. Svækket autoregulation antages at øge risikoen for cerebral hypoperfusion og...... iskæmi under episoder med lavt MAP, og for cerebral hyperperfusion og vasogent ødem ved højt MAP. CBF autoregulationen undersøgtes hos tyve voksne patienter med akut bakteriel meningitis i den tidlige sygdomsfase (<24 timer efter diagnostisk lumbalpunktur). Idet autoregulationen fandtes svækket hos...... meningitis, men retableres ved klinisk restitution. Autoregulationen kan endvidere delvis retableres ved akut hyperventilation. Fundene har potentiel betydning for valg af supportiv terapi hos patienter med meningitis....

  11. Repeat Lumbar Puncture: CSF Lactic Acid Levels are Predictive of Cure with Acute Bacterial Meningitis

    Burke A. Cunha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A common clinical problem concerns the utility of repeat lumbar puncture (LP in adults with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM, e.g., pneumococcal meningitis [1]. An LP is initially done for diagnostic purposes in patients with suspected ABM, i.e., diagnostic lumbar puncture (DLP. A repeat LP (RLP may be done 1–3 days after the initial DLP, if the patient shows no improvement. If a patient with ABM is not doing well after three days, adequacy of antimicrobial therapy is the main concern. Other reasons for RLP is to detect possible intracranial complications of ABM unrelated to adequacy of therapy [1–2].

  12. Role of imaging in the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis and its complications.

    Hughes, D C; Raghavan, A; Mordekar, S R; Griffiths, P D; Connolly, D J A

    2010-08-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis is a common neurological emergency and a leading cause of death and neurological disability worldwide. Diagnosis is based on clinical and microbiological findings with neuroimaging in the form of CT reserved for those with specific adverse clinical features or when an underlying cause such as mastoiditis is suspected. MRI is extremely useful for detecting and monitoring the complications of meningitis. These can be remembered by the mnemonic HACTIVE (hydrocephalus, abscess, cerebritis/cranial nerve lesion, thrombosis, infarct, ventriculitis/vasculopathy and extra-axial collection). Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are useful to distinguish abscess from other ring enhancing lesions. PMID:20709770

  13. Epidemiological, Clinical and Prognostic Profile of Acute Bacterial Meningitis among Children in Alexandria, Egypt

    Farag HF

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To address the epidemiological characteristics and clinical indices that may predict the prognostic profile of meningitis among children. Methods: Children admitted to Alexandria fever hospital with clinical diagnosis of meningitis/meningoencephalitis during the period 2002-2003 were recruited for the study. They were subjected to clinical examination as well as CSF bacteriological and serological investigations Results: Three hundred and ten patients (195 males and 115 females were included. About 65.2% of them were infected with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM and 34.8% were infected with aseptic meningitis. In this study, ABM was caused by Haemophilus influenzae (21%, Streptococcus pneumoniae (13.9%, Neisseria meningitidis (14.2% and other undetermined bacteria (16.1%. ABM showed significant association with age group 1-9 years (66.3%, low socio-economic class (96%, working mother (83.2%, more than two smokers in the family (62.9% and cold seasons(fall 35.1% and winter 48.5%. Aseptic meningitis showed significant association with age group 3-15 months (100% and previous immunization(81.5%. The overall case fatality rate was 10.3%; 13.9% for ABM and 3.4% for aseptic meningitis. 7.1% of all survivors developed epileptic attacks. Predictors for death or epilepsy events were high WHO meningitis score (> 9, decreased CSF glucose level (Conclusion: This study highlights the importance of several predictors of the outcome of meningitis in children. It is concluded that quick and simple scoring scales, such as the WHO scale, are not only applicable but valuable prognostic tools for meningitis in children.

  14. Dependency of cerebral blood flow upon mean arterial pressure in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    Møller, Kirsten; Larsen, Fin Stolze; Qvist, Jesper;

    2000-01-01

    Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. PATIENTS: Sixteen adult patients with acute bacterial meningitis. INTERVENTION: Infusion of norepinephrine to increase MAP. MEASUREMENTS: During a rise in MAP induced by norepinephrine infusion, we measured relative changes in CBF by transcranial Doppler......OBJECTIVE: Patients with acute bacterial meningitis are often treated with sympathomimetics to maintain an adequate mean arterial pressure (MAP). We studied the influence of such therapy on cerebral blood flow (CBF). DESIGN: Prospective physiologic trial. SETTING: The Department of Infectious....... Autoregulation was classified as impaired if Vmean increased by >10% per 30 mm Hg increase in MAP and if no lower limit of autoregulation was identified by the computer program; otherwise, autoregulation was classified as preserved. MAIN RESULTS: Initially, Vmean increased from a median value of 46 cm/sec (range...

  15. Cerebral blood flow, oxidative metabolism and cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    Møller, Kirsten; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Thomsen, Gerda;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal arterial carbon dioxide tension (P(a)CO(2)) in patients with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is unknown and controversial. The objective of this study was to measure global cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity (CO(2)R), and cerebral metabolic rates...... to baseline ventilation, whereas CMR(glu) increased. CONCLUSION: In patients with acute bacterial meningitis, we found variable levels of CBF and cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity, a low a-v DO(2), low cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen and glucose, and a cerebral lactate efflux. In these patients, a...... ventilation strategy guided by jugular bulb oximetry and/or repeated CBF measurements may be more optimal in terms of cerebral oxygenation than a strategy aiming at identical levels of P(a)CO(2) for all patients....

  16. Diagnostic value of latex agglutination test in diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis

    Syeda Fasiha Mohammadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To know the incidence of bacterial meningitis in children below five years of age. To compare conventional culture and antigen detection methods ( Latex agglutination test. Materials and Methods: 100 CSF samples of clinically suspected meningitis cases in children below 5 years of age were included. The samples were subjected to cell count, Gram stain, culture and LAT. The organisms isolated in the study were characterized according to standard procedures. Results: Of the 100 cases studied, 31 cases were diagnosed as ABM by Gram stain, culture and latex agglutination test as per WHO criteria. The hospital frequency of ABM was 1.7%. 15 (48.38 cases were culture positive. Gram stain was positive in 22(70.96 cases and LAT in 17(54.83 cases. Haemophilus influenzae was the most common causative agent of acute bacterial meningitis followed by S.pneumoniae. Case fatality rate was 45.16%.The sensitivity and specificity of LAT was 66.66% and 87.91% respectively. Conclusion : Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency and early diagnosis and treatment is life saving and reduces chronic morbidity. LAT was more sensitive compared to conventional Gram stain and Culture technique in identifying the fastidious organisms like H.influenzae, S.pneumoniae and Group B Streptococcus. However, the combination of Gram stain, Culture and LAT proved to be more productive than any of the single tests alone.

  17. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  18. Bacterial meningitis in children

    To demonstrate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and bacteriological profile of bacterial meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period in our hospital. This was a retrospective descriptive study conducted at Prince Rashid Hospital in Irbid, Jordan. The medical records of 50 children with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis during 4 years period, were reviewed. The main cause of infection was streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenza and Niesseria meningitides. Mortality was higher in infants and meningococcal infection, while complications were more encountered in cases of streptococcus pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid culture was positive in 11 cases and Latex agglutination test in 39. There is a significant reduction of the numbers of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenza type B species. (author)

  19. Acute phase proteins in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in the course of bacterial meningitis.

    Paradowski, M; Lobos, M; Kuydowicz, J; Krakowiak, M; Kubasiewicz-Ujma, B

    1995-08-01

    We carried out estimations of the following acute phase proteins: C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), alpha-2-ceruloplasmin (CER), and alpha-2-haptoglobin (HPT) in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with bacterial meningitis (BM, n = 30) and viral meningitis (VM, n = 30). We have shown that determinations of concentrations of AAG and CRP in serum and CER in CSF are useful in differentiation between BM and VM. The diagnostic power of these three tests (the areas under their ROC curves equal 0.942, 0.929, and 0.931, respectively) is bigger, though statistically not significantly, than that of traditional parameters of BM in CSF, i.e., total protein concentration and white blood cell count. Determination of AAG, CRP, and AAT in serum is a valuable monitoring marker in the course of BM treatment. Convenience of serum sampling constitutes an advantage over traditional BM parameters in CSF. PMID:8521602

  20. Chronic Meningitis

    ... School Lunch Lines FDA Cracks Down on Antibacterial Soaps Health Tip: Schedule a Back-to-School Dental ... the Professional Version Meningitis Introduction to Meningitis Acute Bacterial Meningitis Viral Meningitis Noninfectious Meningitis Recurrent Meningitis Chronic ...

  1. Diagnostic value of latex agglutination test in diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis

    Syeda Fasiha Mohammadi; Patil, Asha B; Shobha D Nadagir; Namrata Nandihal; S A Lakshminarayana

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To know the incidence of bacterial meningitis in children below five years of age. To compare conventional culture and antigen detection methods ( Latex agglutination test). Materials and Methods: 100 CSF samples of clinically suspected meningitis cases in children below 5 years of age were included. The samples were subjected to cell count, Gram stain, culture and LAT. The organisms isolated in the study were characterized according to standard procedures. Results: Of the 100 cas...

  2. Epidemiological, clinical and prognostic profile of childhood acute bacterial meningitis in a resource poor setting

    Bankole Peter Kuti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency that continues to kill and maims children particularly in developing countries with poor immunization coverage. Objective: This study set out to assess the hospital incidence, pattern of presentation, etiologic agents, outcome and determinants of mortality among the children admitted with bacterial meningitis at the Wesley Guild Hospital (WGH, Ilesa. Patients and Methods: We carried out a retrospective review of admitted cases of bacterial meningitis in children aged one month to 15 years at the WGH, Ilesa over a three year period by looking at the hospital records. Factors in the history and examinations were compared among survivors and those that died to determine factors significantly associated with mortality in these children. Results: Eighty-one (5.5% of the 1470 childhood admissions during the study period had bacterial meningitis. Male preponderance was observed and two-thirds of the children were infants. More cases were admitted during the wet rainy season than during the dry harmattan season. Haemophilus influenzae type B and Streptococcus pneumoniae were the leading etiologic agents and ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone adequately cover for these organisms. Twenty-two (27.2% of the 81 children died, while 34 (42.0% survived with neurologic deficits. Children with multiple seizures, coma, neck retraction, hyponatremia, hypoglycorrhachia, turbid CSF as well as Gram positive meningitis at presentation were found to more likely to die (P < 0.05. None of these factors however independently predict mortality. Conclusion: Childhood bacterial meningitis often results in death and neurologic deficit among infants and young children admitted at the WGH, Ilesa. Children diagnosed with meningitis who in addition had multiple seizures, neck retraction and coma at presentation are at increased risk of dying.

  3. Adult bacterial meningitis

    Meyer, C N; Samuelsson, I S; Galle, M;

    2004-01-01

    Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin susceptibi......Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin...... susceptibility occurred in 21 (23%) of 92 cases of known aetiology, compared to an estimated 6% in nationally notified cases (p <0.001). Ceftriaxone plus penicillin as empirical treatment was appropriate in 97% of ABM cases in the study population, and in 99.6% of nationally notified cases. The notification rate...... was 75% for penicillin-susceptible episodes, and 24% for penicillin-non-susceptible episodes (p <0.001). Cases involving staphylococci, Pseudomonas spp. and Enterobacteriaceae were under-reported. Among 51 ABM cases with no identified risk factors, nine of 11 cases with penicillin...

  4. Cognitive outcome in adults after bacterial meningitis.

    Hoogman, M.; Beek, D. van de; Weisfelt, M.; Gans, J. de; Schmand, B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cognitive outcome in adult survivors of bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Data from three prospective multicentre studies were pooled and reanalysed, involving 155 adults surviving bacterial meningitis (79 after pneumococcal and 76 after meningococcal meningitis) and 72 healthy c

  5. Age related clinical manifestation of acute bacterial meningitis in children presenting to emergency department of a tertiary care hospital

    Objective: To determine the signs and symptoms of acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) in different age groups of a paediatric population. Methods: The retrospective study comprised patients who had been admitted through the Emergency Department of Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi with the relevant diagnosis from September 2009 to September 2011. Case record forms were used to collect data from patient files. Data was collected using variables such as age, gender, presenting complaints, clinical signs and symptoms, computed tomography scan findings and final outcome of patients. There was a minimal risk of breach in patient confidentiality. SPSS 19 was used for data analysis. Results: A total of 192 patients were enrolled. The presenting complaint in 165 (86%) patients was fever; vomiting in 93 (48.43%); and 49 (52.68%) of them were more than 5 years old. Irritability was present in 54 (28.12%) children, of whom 27 (50%) were less than one year. Fits were present in 47 (24.47%) cases out of which 21 (44.68%) were less than one year. Neck stiffness and signs of meningeal irritation, Kerning's sign and Brudzincski's sign, were present in 53 (27.60%) patients; 26 (13.54%); and 18 (9.3%) respectively. These signs were more common in children over 5 years of age, reflected by 29 (54.7%), 16 (61.5%) and 11 (61.11%) patients respectively. On presentation, headache was found in 77 (40.10%) children among whom 56 (72.72%) were over 5 years. Besides, 151 (78.6%) patients required admission to the ward, while 40 (20.8%) were admitted in High Dependancy Unit/critical care units. Adverse outcome was observed in 6 (3.12%) patients. Conclusion: Younger children with acute bacterial meningitis presented with non-specific signs and symptoms. Headache and signs of meningeal irritation were common findings in children over 5 years. (author)

  6. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran.

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients' medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients' outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  7. Neurosonographic findings of bacterial meningitis in Infants

    44 infants under 1 year were studied retrospectively during these illness and follow up after 1 week intervals. The spectrum of sonographic features of bacterial meningitis in acute stage included normal scan (20 patients), echogenic sulci (10 patients), echogenic lining of epandymas (8 patients), Abnormal parenchymal echogenecity (6 patients). On follow up examination with 1 week intervals, variety of complications was found in 14 patients (32%) of the infants. There were ventriculomegaly in 7 patients, extraaxial fluid collection in 4 patients, brain abscess in 2 patients and poor encephalic cyst in 1 patient. We conclude that ultrasound was an effective method for evaluation of progression and complications of bacterial meningitis

  8. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute bacterial meningitis in elderly patients over 65: a hospital-based study

    Lai, Wei-An; Chen, Shu-Fang; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chang, Wen-Neng; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Chien, Chun-Chih; Huang, Chi-Ren

    2011-01-01

    Background To examine the clinical characteristics of bacterial meningitis in elderly patients. Methods 261 patients with adult bacterial meningitis (ABM), collected during a study period of 11 years (2000-2010), were included for study. Among them, 87 patients aged ≥ 65 years and were classified as the elderly group. The clinical and laboratory characteristics and prognostic factors were analyzed, and a clinical comparison with those of non-elderly ABM patients was also made. Results The 87 ...

  9. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute bacterial meningitis in elderly patients over 65: a hospital-based study

    Lai Wei-An; Chen Shu-Fang; Tsai Nai-Wen; Chang Chiung-Chih; Chang Wen-Neng; Lu Cheng-Hsien; Chuang Yao-Chung; Chien Chun-Chih; Huang Chi-Ren

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background To examine the clinical characteristics of bacterial meningitis in elderly patients. Methods 261 patients with adult bacterial meningitis (ABM), collected during a study period of 11 years (2000-2010), were included for study. Among them, 87 patients aged ≥ 65 years and were classified as the elderly group. The clinical and laboratory characteristics and prognostic factors were analyzed, and a clinical comparison with those of non-elderly ABM patients was also made. Result...

  10. Integration of Rule Based Expert Systems and Case Based Reasoning in an Acute Bacterial Meningitis Clinical Decision Support System

    Cabrera, Mariana Maceiras

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of the research carried out on the development of a medical diagnostic system applied to the Acute Bacterial Meningitis, using the Case Based Reasoning methodology. The research was focused on the implementation of the adaptation stage, from the integration of Case Based Reasoning and Rule Based Expert Systems. In this adaptation stage we use a higher level RBC that stores and allows reutilizing change experiences, combined with a classic rule-based inference engine. In order to take into account the most evident clinical situation, a pre-diagnosis stage is implemented using a rule engine that, given an evident situation, emits the corresponding diagnosis and avoids the complete process.

  11. Bacterial meningitis by streptococcus agalactiae

    Villarreal-Velásquez Tatiana Paola; Cortés-Daza César Camilo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: bacterial meningitis is an infectious disease considered a medicalemergency. The timely management has an important impact on the evolution of thedisease. Streptococcus agalactiae, a major causative agent of severe infections innewborns can colonize different tissues, including the central nervous system.Case report: Male patient 47 years old from rural areas, with work activity as amilker of cattle, referred to tertiary care, with disorientation, neck stiffness, and grandmal se...

  12. CT scan in children with acute bacterial meningitis: experience from emergency department of a tertiary-care hospital in karachi, pakistan

    Objective: To determine the role of computed tomography scan in children presenting to emergency department with symptoms and signs of suspected acute bacterial meningitis. Methods: The retrospective analysis was done on children who were admitted through the Emergency Department at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from September 2009 to September 2011 with the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis. Information related to age, gender, presenting complaints, clinical signs and symptoms, computed tomography scan findings and final outcome of patients was gathered from the medical records. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 192 patients were admitted with the relevant diagnosis. The male-female ratio was 2.3:1. Computed tomography scan was done in 114 (59.4%) patients. The scan was reported normal in 90 (78.94%) patients. However, cerebral oedema was found in 16 (14.03%) patients, cerebral infarct in 6(5.26%) and hydrocephalus in 2 (1.75%) patients. Overall, there were 6 (3.1%) deaths. Conclusion: Computed tomography scan may have a beneficial role in children with acute bacterial meningitis. However, further studies are required to use the scan as a routine investigation for such a diagnosis. (author)

  13. Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy

    Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby ... advice from your health care provider. What is meningitis? Meningitis is an infection of the lining that ...

  14. CT scan of bacterial and aseptic meningitis

    CT scans of the patients with aseptic and bacterial meningitis were reviewed and compared to previous reports. In aseptic meningitis, no abnormal CT findings were observed. In bacterial meningitis, CT findings were ventricular dilatation, subdural fluid collection, parenchymal low density, intracerebral hematoma and meningeal enhancement after contrast injection. Three patients among 48 suffered from status epileptics during the course of the illness. All of 3 patients developed parenchymal inhomogeneous low density and progressive ventricular dilatation which did not improve after ventricular peritoneal shunt surgery. We believe that these changes are most likely due to hypoxic hypoxemia during epileptic seizure and meningitis itself seems to play a little role. (author)

  15. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute bacterial meningitis in elderly patients over 65: a hospital-based study

    Lai Wei-An

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the clinical characteristics of bacterial meningitis in elderly patients. Methods 261 patients with adult bacterial meningitis (ABM, collected during a study period of 11 years (2000-2010, were included for study. Among them, 87 patients aged ≥ 65 years and were classified as the elderly group. The clinical and laboratory characteristics and prognostic factors were analyzed, and a clinical comparison with those of non-elderly ABM patients was also made. Results The 87 elderly ABM patients were composed of 53 males and 34 females, aged 65-87 years old (median = 71 years. Diabetes mellitus (DM was the most common underlying condition (34%, followed by end stage renal disease (7%, alcoholism (4% and malignancies (4%. Fever was the most common clinical manifestation (86%, followed by altered consciousness (62%, leukocytosis (53%, hydrocephalus (38%, seizure (30%, bacteremia (21% and shock (11%. Thirty-nine of these 87 elderly ABM patients had spontaneous infection, while the other 48 had post-neurosurgical infection. Forty-four patients contracted ABM in a community-acquired state, while the other 43, a nosocomial state. The therapeutic results of the 87 elderly ABM patients were that 34 patients expired and 53 patients survived. The comparative results of the clinical and laboratory characteristics between the elderly and non-elderly ABM patients showed that only peripheral blood leukocytosis was significant. Presence of shock and seizure were significant prognostic factors of elderly ABM patients. Conclusions Elderly ABM patients accounted for 34.8% of the overall ABM cases, and this relatively high incidence rate may signify the future burden of ABM in the elderly population in Taiwan. The relative frequency of implicated pathogens of elderly ABM is similar to that of non-elderly ABM. Compared with non-elderly patients, the elderly ABM patients have a significantly lower incidence of peripheral blood leukocytosis

  16. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection in a patient with bacterial meningitis

    Kinoshita, Kensuke; TSUNODA, YOSHIYA; Watanabe, Shigeyuki; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2013-01-01

    A 40-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of the acute onset of fever and headache, which were attributed to bacterial meningitis. Antibiotic treatment was initiated and his condition gradually improved. On day 5 after admission, immediately after masturbation, he developed abrupt onset of severe chest pain and cold sweat and the ECG suggested acute anterior myocardial infarction. Immediate coronary angiography revealed spontaneous dissection of the left anterior descending arter...

  17. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    K.S. Adriani

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and occurs when bacteria invade the subarachnoid space. The meninges are the protective membranes that surround the brain and the spinal cord. Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening disease because the proximity of the infection to the brai

  18. Diagnostic Accuracy of Procalcitonin in Bacterial Meningitis Versus Nonbacterial Meningitis

    Wei, Ting-Ting; Hu, Zhi-De; Qin, Bao-Dong; Ma, Ning; Tang, Qing-Qin; Wang, Li-li; ZHOU, Lin; Zhong, Ren-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have investigated the diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin (PCT) levels in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in bacterial meningitis (BM), but the results were heterogeneous. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the diagnostic accuracy of PCT as a marker for BM detection. A systematic search of the EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed databases was performed to identify studies published before December 7, 2015 investigating the diagnostic accuracy of ...

  19. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis

    Colding, H; Lind, I

    1977-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) would facilitate the rapid, etiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis when used in parallel with other routine methods in a medical bacteriological laboratory. Of 3,674 consecutive specimens of cerebros......The aim of the present study was to investigate whether counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) would facilitate the rapid, etiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis when used in parallel with other routine methods in a medical bacteriological laboratory. Of 3,674 consecutive specimens of...... culture-negative specimens. CSF specimens from 21 patients with bacterial meningitis caused by other species were all negative in CIE, except four, three of which contained Escherichia coli antigen reacting with antiserum to N. meningitidis group B and one E. coli antigen reacting with antiserum to H...

  20. Hyperglycemia in bacterial meningitis: a prospective cohort study

    E.S. Schut; W.F. Westendorp; J. de Gans; N.D. Kruyt; L. Spanjaard; J.B. Reitsma; D. van de Beek

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hyperglycemia has been associated with unfavorable outcome in several disorders, but few data are available in bacterial meningitis. We assessed the incidence and significance of hyperglycemia in adults with bacterial meningitis. METHODS: We collected data prospectively between

  1. Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Language: English Español ( ... Compartir 2002 Study of the Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Many people have ...

  2. Endolymphatic sac involvement in bacterial meningitis

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    days. Bacteria invaded the inner ear through the cochlear aquaduct. On days 5-6, the bacteria invaded the endolymphatic sac through the endolymphatic duct subsequent to invasion of the vestibular endolymphatic compartment. No evidence of direct bacterial invasion of the sac through the meninges...... was found. Leukocyte infiltration of the sac occurred prior to bacterial invasion. During meningitis, bacteria do not invade the endolymphatic sac through the dura, but solely through the endolymphatic duct, following the invasion of the vestibular system. Leukocyte infiltration of the sac occurs prior to...

  3. [Indication of neuro-imaging for the initial management and the follow-up of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis].

    Béquet, D; de Broucker, T

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar puncture is the best way to prove bacterial meningitis. It should be performed without any delay if the diagnosis is suspected. Herniation is a rare complication of LP. CT is normal in most cases of purulent meningitis, including those complicated by a subsequent herniation; normal CT results does not mean that performing a LP is safe. Three main clinical features can help determine which patient is at risk of herniation and should have a CT before LP. This risk has to be determined rapidly in the emergency ward while assessing anamnestic data, localization signs or symptoms, and level of consciousness. Cranial imaging (mainly MRI) is useful in the course of bacterial meningitis. Patients who do not respond well to treatment or with atypical presentation, persistence of fever, or new neurological signs should undergo brain imaging; MRI and CT may identify subdural effusions, brain abscesses, empyemas, hydrocephaly, or brain parenchymal changes (cerebritis, infarction, hemorrhage). CT and MRI are useful to screen for an ENT cause of bacterial meningitis, and mandatory in case of pneumococcal meningitis. Numerous MRI sequences are useful to identify bacterial meningitis complications: SE T1 without and with gadolinium injection, SE T2, FLAIR, gradient-echo T2, diffusion weighted imaging, MR angiography. PMID:19398288

  4. Predictors of acute bacterial meningitis among children with a first episode of febrile convulsion from Northern India: A prospective study

    Amiraj Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There is limited data to support need of lumbar puncture among Indian children aged less than 5 years presenting with a first episode of fever and seizure. Aims: To determine the incidence and clinical predictors of meningitis among children aged 6-60 months presenting with a first episode of febrile convulsion. Settings and Designs: A prospective study was conducted on 35 children (6-60 months with a first episode of febrile convulsion subjected to lumbar puncture in a tertiary care teaching hospital of North India. Materials and Methods: Clinical characteristics were compared between the two groups: Children with meningitis (n = 17 and children without meningitis (n = 18. Statistical Methods: Multivariate logistic regression was applied to assess the independent predictors of meningitis. Results: A total of 120 children were screened; 35 children subjected to lumbar puncture were finally enrolled. The mean (SD age of enrolled children was 18.49 (10.79 months. The incidence of meningitis was 48.6% (17/35. Children with meningitis significantly had a higher proportion of children with high grade (temperature >104°F fever (P = 0.005, received prior antibiotics (P = 0. 041, had lower hemoglobin levels (P = 0.04 and lower blood sugar levels (P = 0.03 as compared to children with no meningitis. On multivariate logistic regression, it was observed that high-grade fever was an independent predictor of meningitis (odds ratio: 0.03 [0.001-0.86] [P = 0.04]. Conclusion: We found that the presence of high-grade fever was an important predictor of meningitis among children aged 6-60 months presenting with a first episode of febrile convulsion.

  5. C-reactive protein and bacterial meningitis

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Jørgensen, P E; Nexø, E;

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to review published articles on the diagnostic accuracy of C-reactive protein (CRP) tests with cerebrospinal fluid and serum in diagnosing bacterial meningitis. The literature from 1980 and onwards was searched using the electronic databases of MEDLINE, and we used summary...

  6. Proposal for a New Score-Based Approach To Improve Efficiency of Diagnostic Laboratory Workflow for Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Adults.

    Lagi, Filippo; Bartalesi, Filippo; Pecile, Patrizia; Biagioli, Tiziana; Caldini, Anna Lucia; Fanelli, Alessandra; Giannazzo, Giuseppe; Grifoni, Stefano; Massacesi, Luca; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2016-07-01

    Microbiological tests on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) utilize a common urgent-care procedure that does not take into account the chemical and cytological characteristics of the CSF, resulting sometimes in an unnecessary use of human and diagnostic resources. The aim of this study was to retrospectively validate a simple scoring system (bacterial meningitis-Careggi score [BM-CASCO]) based on blood and CSF sample chemical/cytological parameters for evaluating the probability of acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) in adults. BM-CASCO (range, 0 to 6) was defined by the following parameters: CSF cell count, CSF protein levels, CSF lactate levels, CSF glucose-to-serum glucose ratio, and peripheral neutrophil count. BM-CASCO was retrospectively calculated for 784 cases of suspected ABM in adult subjects observed during a four-and-a-half-year-period (2010 to 2014) at the emergency department (ED) of a large tertiary-care teaching hospital in Italy. Among the 28 confirmed ABM cases (3.5%), Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequent cause (16 cases). All ABM cases showed a BM-CASCO value of ≥3. Most negative cases (591/756) exhibited a BM-CASCO value of ≤1, which was adopted in our laboratory as a cutoff to not proceed with urgent microbiological analysis of CSF in cases of suspected ABM in adults. During a subsequent 1-year follow-up, the introduction of the BM-CASCO in the diagnostic workflow of ABM in adults resulted in a significant decrease in unnecessary microbiological analysis, with no false negatives. In conclusion, BM-CASCO appears to be an accurate and simple scoring system for optimization of the microbiological diagnostic workflow of ABM in adults. PMID:27170017

  7. Bacterial meningitis in children. MR findings

    Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Ishii, Kiyoshi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Onuma, Takehide [Sendai City Hospital (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    We analyzed MRI findings for 17 children with bacterial meningitis. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images revealed meningeal enhancement at the basal cistern and/or the convex surface of the brain in 15 cases. Cerebral infarcts were found in the distribution of perforating and/or medullary arteries in four cases. In one neonatal case, venous infarction with hemorrhagic transformation was evident. Communicating hydrocephalus was noted in three cases, subdural effusion in two, subdural empyema in one, and encephalitis in one. In one neonatal case ventriculitis was found. We conclude that MRI is useful for the evaluation of the active inflammatory process of the meninges and the identification of the focal lesions in central nervous system complications. (author)

  8. Aglutinación de partículas de látex vs. contrainmunoelectroforesis en meningitis bacteriana aguda Latex agglutination vs. counterimmunoelectrophoresis in the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis

    Carmen Tulia Zapata Muñoz

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron 57 pacientes con meningitis aguda, de etiología bacteriana comprobada; 47.4% (27 casos fueron causados por Haemophilus influenzae tipo b; 21.0% (12 casos por Streptococcus pneumoniae; 17.5% (10 casos por Neisseria meningitidis; 5.3% (3 casos por Staphylococcus aureus,. 5.3% (3 casos por enterobacterias y 3.5% (2 casos por gérmenes no Identificados por cultivos. Se comparó la aglutinación de partículas de látex (APL con la contralnmunoelectroforesis (CIE en los pacientes con cultivo positivo. La exactitud de ambas fue similar para el H. influenzae tipo b y el S. pneumoniae. Tres de los 10 casos con cultivo positivo para N. meningítidis fueron positivos en la APL pero ninguno lo fue en la CIE. Se presentó un falso positivo para H. ínfluenzae con la APL que correspondió a meningitis por Salmonella typhí, Las pruebas inmunológicas estuvieron plenamente justificadas en 12 de los 57 pacientes (21.0%, previamente tratados, en quienes la bacteriología tradicional fue negativa o se quería identificar el germen porque lo único positivo era el gram y se justificaba utilizar el antibiótico más especifico. Se sugiere el uso de la APL en el Hospital Infantil de Medellín, por ser una prueba confiable y más simple y rápida que la CIE.

    A comparison was made between latex particles agglutination (LPA and counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE in the diagnosis of 57 children with acute bacterial meningitis; reagents were utllized to detect infection by Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neísseria meningitídís. Results of both tests were similar for diagnosis of H. ínfluenzae and S. pneumoniae; in contrast only 30.0% of cases due to N. meningitidis gave a positive result with LP A and none was detected with CIE.in 12 patients (21.0% LPA and CIE were the only tests that allowed a precise determination ot the etiology of the disease. The authors

  9. Probable acute disseminated encephalomyelitis due to Haemophilus influenzae meningitis.

    Beleza, Pedro; Ribeiro, Manuel; Pereira, João; Ferreira, Carla; Jordão, Maria José; Almeida, Fátima

    2008-05-01

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male on long-term steroid therapy for minimal lesion glomerulopathy who, after an upper respiratory infection, presented with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis. Twenty-four hours later he developed depression of consciousness which progressed to coma and left hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multiple lesions (hyperintense on T2 and slightly hypointense on Tl) involving mainly white matter suggestive of inflammation. MRI features were compatible with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), although a differential diagnosis included cerebritis or vasculitis, secondary to bacterial meningitis. The patient was treated with high-dose steroids which resulted in a gradual improvement followed by complete clinical recovery. We propose a diagnosis of ADEM was the best diagnosis because of the radiological features and response to steroids. The occurrence of ADEM associated with acute meningitis, however rare, represents an important diagnostic challenge for the clinician. PMID:18355336

  10. Predictors of acute bacterial meningitis among children with a first episode of febrile convulsion from Northern India: A prospective study

    Amiraj Singh; Joginder Silayach; Geeta Gathwala; Jaya Shankar Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Context: There is limited data to support need of lumbar puncture among Indian children aged less than 5 years presenting with a first episode of fever and seizure. Aims: To determine the incidence and clinical predictors of meningitis among children aged 6-60 months presenting with a first episode of febrile convulsion. Settings and Designs: A prospective study was conducted on 35 children (6-60 months) with a first episode of febrile convulsion subjected to lumbar puncture in a tertiary car...

  11. Bilateral acute retinal necrosis after herpetic meningitis

    Katsura T

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Keisho Hirota1,2, Masayuki Akimoto1,3, Toshiaki Katsura21Department of Ophthalmology, Kyoto Medical Center, National Hospital Organization, 2Internal Medicine, Kyoto Medical Center, 3Clinical Research Center, Kyoto Medical Center, Kyoto, JapanPurpose: The report of a case of bilateral acute retinal necrosis after herpetic meningitis.Case report: A 47-year-old man was admitted with the chief complaint of persistent high fever and transient loss of consciousness. Although his general condition improved after intravenous acyclovir administration, the patient presented with visual loss in both eyes 4 days after admission. Visual acuity in his right eye was 20/200 and his left eye had light perception alone. Both eyes showed panretinal arteritis diagnosed as acute retinal necrosis. Panretinal photocoagulation was performed for both eyes. Progression of retinal detachment was prevented in both eyes; however, visual acuity of the left eye was totally lost because of neovascular glaucoma. Visual acuity of the right eye recovered to 20/20.Conclusion: Although cases of bilateral acute retinal necrosis have been reported after herpetic encephalitis, this condition is rare after herpetic meningitis. Prophylactic acyclovir therapy and early panretinal photocoagulation may prevent retinal detachment and improve the prognosis. Neurologists and ophthalmologists should be aware that not only herpetic encephalitis but also herpetic meningitis can lead to acute retinal necrosis within a very short interval.Keywords: acute retinal necrosis, herpetic meningitis, herpes simplex, varicella zoster virus

  12. Subdural collections associated with pediatric bacterial meningitis MR imaging

    To evaluate meningitis complications caused by spontaneously resolving sterile subdural (SD) effusions in children, the authors used CT and MR imaging to examine six children (age range, 2 months to 5 years) with bacterial meningitis; two patients also underwent Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Seven SD collections were identified, ranging from nearly isointense (two) to hyperintense (five) relative to cerebrospinal fluid. Both collections evaluated with gadolinium enhanced markedly. Although the presence of hyperintense, enhancing SD collections might suggest that they were empyemas, all patients were clinically stable or improving. This contrasted with the acutely ill adolescents with otorhinologic-related empyemas who required immediate extensive craniotomy. Clinical factors (age, type of bacteria, severity of illness) might be more helpful than MR features to assess clinical status and surgical requirements

  13. Host-pathogen interactions in bacterial meningitis.

    Doran, Kelly S; Fulde, Marcus; Gratz, Nina; Kim, Brandon J; Nau, Roland; Prasadarao, Nemani; Schubert-Unkmeir, Alexandra; Tuomanen, Elaine I; Valentin-Weigand, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a devastating disease occurring worldwide with up to half of the survivors left with permanent neurological sequelae. Due to intrinsic properties of the meningeal pathogens and the host responses they induce, infection can cause relatively specific lesions and clinical syndromes that result from interference with the function of the affected nervous system tissue. Pathogenesis is based on complex host-pathogen interactions, some of which are specific for certain bacteria, whereas others are shared among different pathogens. In this review, we summarize the recent progress made in understanding the molecular and cellular events involved in these interactions. We focus on selected major pathogens, Streptococcus pneumonia, S. agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus), Neisseria meningitidis, and Escherichia coli K1, and also include a neglected zoonotic pathogen, Streptococcus suis. These neuroinvasive pathogens represent common themes of host-pathogen interactions, such as colonization and invasion of mucosal barriers, survival in the blood stream, entry into the central nervous system by translocation of the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and induction of meningeal inflammation, affecting pia mater, the arachnoid and subarachnoid spaces. PMID:26744349

  14. Bacterial meningitis in newborn and infant: correlation between organism, CT findings and clinical outcome

    Acute bacterial meningitis often results in significant neurologic complications regardless of the antibiotics treatment Computed tomographic (CT) finding of tuberculous meningitis is fairly well known but not the findings of bacterial meningitis. This study was performed to determine the incidence of causative organisms and to correlate between the organisms and computed tomographic (CT) findings with clinical outcome of bacterial meningitis in newborns and infants. We analyzed the brain CT and clinical records of 15 infants who had been diagnosed as bacterial meningitis by CSF culture. We found that the most common organisms were Group B streptococcus in neonates without no neurologic complications in all but one and Hemophilus influenza in infants whose clinical outcomes were poor in all except one. CT findings related with poor prognosis in this study were cerebral edema, basal cisternal obliteration and enhancement, and cerebral infarction on initial CT and ventriculomegaly on follow-up CT. We concluded that CT diagnosed intracranial complications of bacterial meningitis well and could contributed to better treatment of bacterial meningitis

  15. The early prognosis at the bacterial meningitis

    Yu. V. Lobzin; V. V. Pilipenko; M. V. Rezvansev

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of the studying of clinical and laboratory sings of 150 cases of bacterial meningitis (BM) with the use of various statistical methods, including multivariate logistical regression analysis, the early prognostic criteria of the maximum risk and the relation of chances of the maximum risk of an acyclic (severe, complicated, including lethal) variant of a diseases were estimated. These criteria are: age of the patient ≥ 55 years, late hospitalisation (≥3 days of disease), the expre...

  16. Diagnostic Accuracy of Procalcitonin in Bacterial Meningitis Versus Nonbacterial Meningitis

    Wei, Ting-Ting; Hu, Zhi-De; Qin, Bao-Dong; Ma, Ning; Tang, Qing-Qin; Wang, Li-Li; Zhou, Lin; Zhong, Ren-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have investigated the diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin (PCT) levels in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in bacterial meningitis (BM), but the results were heterogeneous. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the diagnostic accuracy of PCT as a marker for BM detection. A systematic search of the EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed databases was performed to identify studies published before December 7, 2015 investigating the diagnostic accuracy of PCT for BM. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed using the revised Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy method. The overall diagnostic accuracy of PCT detection in CSF or blood was pooled using the bivariate model. Twenty-two studies involving 2058 subjects were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The overall specificities and sensitivities were 0.86 and 0.80 for CSF PCT, and 0.97 and 0.95 for blood PCT, respectively. Areas under the summary receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.90 and 0.98 for CSF PCT and blood PCT, respectively. The major limitation of this systematic review and meta-analysis was the small number of studies included and the heterogeneous diagnostic thresholds adopted by eligible studies. Our meta-analysis shows that PCT is a useful biomarker for BM diagnosis. PMID:26986140

  17. Experimental bacterial meningitis in rabbit; evaluation with CT and MRI

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) in experimental bacterial meningitis. CT and MR images of experimental bacterial meningitis were obtained after inoculation of 1ml suspension of 10-6/ml Staphylococcus aureus directly into the supratentorial arachnoid space of 18 New Zealand white rabbits. Each animal was studied with both pre-enhanced and post-enhanced CT and MRI at 12, 24, 48 hours and 1 week. Cerebrospinal fluid of all of 18 rabbits were sampled and cultured for bacterial growth. All of 18 rabbits had the clinical symptoms such as neck stiffness and anorexia within 24 hours after the inoculation. Cerebrospinal fluid cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus growth. Gd-enhanced MRI exhibited diffuse enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement ratio(CER) at supratentorial meninges increased to 1.93 at 12 hours and 2.99 at 24 hours from 1.06 at 0 hour. Histologic evaluation demonstrated inflammatory cell infiltration into the meninges. MRI also identified the complications of meningitis such as ependymitis and hydrocephalus more effectively than CT. These results indicated that Fd-enhanced MRI detectred earlier the abnormal findingfs of bacterial meningitis and evaluated more effectively the complications of meningitis compared with CT. MRI was more useful than CT in evaluation of the bacterial meningitis

  18. Brain sonography in African infants with complicated sporadic bacterial meningitis

    Kenneth C Eze; Sam U Enukegwu; Odike, Angela I.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To determine the structural findings in brain sonography of African infants with complicated sporadic bacterial meningitis. Materials and Methods: Retrospective assessment of medical records of patients who underwent brain sonography on account of complicated bacterial meningitis. The brain sonography was carried out over a 4-year period (between September 15, 2004 and September 14, 2008). Result : A total of 86 infants were studied (40 boys and 46 girls in a ratio of 1:1.1); more...

  19. Influence of the blood bacterial load on the meningeal inflammatory response in Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    Østergaard, C; O´Reilly, T; Brandt, C;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite bacteraemia is present in the majority of patients with pneumococcal, little is known about the influence of the systemic infection on the meningeal inflammatory response. METHODS: To explore the role of systemic infection on the meningeal inflammation, experimental meningitis...... blood WBC levels in 153 pneumococcal meningitis patients with and without presence of bacteraemia. RESULTS: As designed, blood bacterial concentrations were significantly different among three experimental groups during the 16 hours study period (Kruskal Wallis test, P < 0.05), whereas no differences in...... compared to the two other groups between 12-16 hours from time of infection (P < 0.017), despite accelerated CSF IL-8 levels in bacteraemic rabbits. In patients with pneumococcal meningitis, no significant difference in CSF WBC was observed between patients with or without bacteraemia at admission (n = 103...

  20. Management of Community -Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Children%社区获得性急性细菌性脑膜炎患儿的管理

    郭虎; 郑帼

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis(BM) is a common pediatric infectious disease of the nervous system,which often affect the psychomotor development of children, the correct diagnosis and treatment had always been a challenge. The United States, Europe, Canada, France, England had issued guidelines for the management of BM in 2004 - 2010, which were important reference value for guiding clinicians dealing with BM.%细菌性脑膜炎(BM)是小儿常见的神经系统感染性疾病之一,常影响小儿精神运动发育,其正确的诊断和治疗一直是个挑战;美国、欧洲、加拿大、法国、英国先后于2004 - 2010年发布了BM治疗指南,对于指导临床医师处理BM有重要的参考价值.

  1. CT of the base of the skull in bacterial meningitis

    CT examinations of 42 cases of bacterial meningitis revealed in 38.1% of the cases relevant inflammatory processes at the base of the skull which were of significant importance for a transmitted infection. Such infections were: Sinusitis frontalis, ethmoidalis, maxillaris and sphenoidalis, mastoiditis or petrositis, suppurating mucocele, impression fracture, and an intracranially penetrated foreign body. Excepting the identification of fine fractures, conventional X-ray films were diagnostically superior. Hence, especially in the acute stages, special projections can be omitted, if CT is effected in the region of the osseous base of the skull. CT performed in inflammatory diseases of the brain must include the base of the skull, since this will yield reliable pointers to original focus of the inflammation requiring appropriate treatment and elimination. (orig.)

  2. Dexamethasone therapy for bacterial meningitis: Better never than late?

    King, Susan M.; Law, Barbara; Langley, Joanne M.; Heurter, Helen; Bremner, Diane; Wang, Elaine E; Gold, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    A multicentre randomized controlled trial was conducted in children with bacterial meningitis using dexamethasone or placebo for four days within 24 h of starting antibiotics. Primary outcomes were hearing loss and neurological abnormalities at 12 months after meningitis. The dexamethasone (n=50) and placebo (n=51) groups were similar in age, severity of illness and etiological agent. Hearing loss occurred in 10% and 11% of the dexamethasone and placebo groups and neurological deficits occurr...

  3. Sonographic Findings in Bacterial Meningitis in Neonates and Young Infants

    Yikilmaz, Ali; Taylor, George Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Cranial sonography plays an important role in the initial evaluation of infants with suspected bacterial meningitis and in monitoring for complications of the disease. Echogenic widening of the brain sulci, meningeal thickening and hyperemia suggest the diagnosis in an at-risk population. Sonography can identify the presence of extra-axial fluid collections, and color Doppler sonography can be very helpful in differentiating benign enlargement of subarachnoid spaces from subdural effusions. I...

  4. The utility of the polymerase chain reaction assay for aetiologic definition of unspecified bacterial meningitis cases

    Mari Tuyama

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Most patients with acute suppurative meningitis are otherwise healthy individuals with regard to immune mechanisms against invasive bacterial disease. This medical emergency is among the most dramatic and potentially ravaging diseases that affect humans, particularly young children. The illness often strikes suddenly, and can either result in death or leave the survivors with significant neurological dysfunctions. The demonstration of a bacterial aetiology is necessary for decisions regarding treatment and prophylaxis. Conventional bacteriological methods frequently fail to identify an agent, as a result of administration of antibiotics or delayed lumbar punctures. We investigated the major aetiologic sources of unspecified bacterial meningitis cases (G00.9, ISCD-10 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based identification of Neisseria meningitidis (crgA, Streptococcus pneumoniae (ply and Haemophilus influenzae (bexA in cerebrospinal fluid samples. The multiplex PCR detected N. meningitidis in 92%, S. pneumoniae in 4% and H. influenzae in 1% of the 192 clinical samples assayed; 3% were negative for all three DNA targets. Bacterial DNA detection was found to be a valuable adjunct to enhance bacterial meningitis surveillance when the yield of specimens by culture is reduced. The implementation of PCR assays as a diagnostic procedure in Public Health Laboratories is perceived to be a significant advance in the investigation of bacterial meningitis.

  5. Recent advances in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis.

    Quagliarello, V J; Scheld, W M

    1986-11-01

    Bacterial meningitis continues to account for worldwide morbidity and mortality despite the advent of effective bactericidal antibiotic therapy. Recent advances over the past 10 years in the development of experimental animal models as well as basic investigation into critical bacterial surface virulence factors have begun to clarify a conceptual framework for understanding the mechanism of meningitis development in humans. Basic observations regarding competing host defenses and bacterial virulence factors have supported a pathogenetic sequence of mucosal colonization with a meningeal pathogen; systemic host invasion with intravascular replication; blood brain barrier penetration and unimpeded CSF proliferation amid the impaired host defenses in the CSF milieu; and pathophysiologic sequelae including vasogenic, cytotoxic, and interstitial brain edema (and other processes) accounting for irreversible neuronal injury and death. Only through continued basic investigation into each of these pathogenetic steps will significant reductions in morbidity and mortality ensue. PMID:3535498

  6. Pneumococcal-meningitis associated acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) – case report of effective early immunotherapy

    Huhn, Konstantin; Lee, De-Hyung; Linker, Ralf A.; Kloska, Stephan; Huttner, Hagen B.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Unvaccinated patients with history of splenectomy are prone to fulminant courses of Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated bacterial meningitis. Besides direct brain damage those patients may additionally suffer from parainfectious syndromes, notably vasculitis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). Differentiation and treatment of these immunological reactions is challenging. Methods Case report. Results A 61 year-old woman with history of splenectomy without vaccination ...

  7. Brain ventricular dimensions and relationship to outcome in adult patients with bacterial meningitis

    Sporrborn, Janni L; Baunbæk-Knudsen, Gertrud Louise; Sølling, Mette; Seierøe, Karina; Farre, Annette; Lindhardt, Bjarne Ø; Benfield, Thomas; Brandt, Christian T

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental studies suggest that changes in brain ventricle size are key events in bacterial meningitis. This study investigated the relationship between ventricle size, clinical condition and risk of poor outcome in patients with bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Adult patients diagnosed...

  8. [Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Bacterial Meningitis and Encephalitides].

    Kamei, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive impairments, including dementia, can present as first symptoms at the acute stage, and/or as sequelae in the chronic stages, in some patients with bacterial meningitis (BM) or encephalitides. BM and encephalitides are lifethreatening neurological emergencies, and early recognition, efficient decision-making, and rapid commencement of therapy can be lifesaving. Empirical therapy should be initiated promptly whenever BM or encephalitides are a probable diagnosis. In this article cognitive impairments, including dementia, presenting in patients with BM, Herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE), Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) encephalitis, and Anti N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis are reviewed. In the above mentioned diseases, cognitive impairment without fever might be observed at the time of disease onset. cognitive impairment has been also noted in some aged or immunocompromised patients at the onset of BM. Immediate memory disturbance as one of the first symptoms of HHV-6 encephalitis presented in 74% of patients with this disease. Cognitive impairment, including dementia as sequela, was also found in 10-27% of patients with BM, 54-69% of patients with HSVE, 33% of HHV-6 encephalitis patients, and 39% of patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Suitable therapeutic management of these diseases at the acute stage is thus required in order to avoid these sequelae. PMID:27056850

  9. Meningococcal Meningitis

    ... Fact sheets Features Commentaries 2014 Multimedia Contacts Meningococcal meningitis Fact sheet N°141 Updated November 2015 Key facts Meningococcal meningitis is a bacterial form of meningitis, a serious ...

  10. Focal parenchymal lesions in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a clinico-radiological study

    Here, we analyzed the frequency, morphological pattern, and imaging characteristics of focal lesions as a consequence of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We hypothesized that diffusion-weighted imaging combined with contrast-enhanced imaging, serial scanning, and multimodal vascular studies would provide further insight into the pathological basis of such parenchymal lesions in bacterial meningitis. We reviewed clinical and imaging data (i.e., magnetic resonance tomography, magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography angiography, digital subtraction angiography) of 68 adult patients admitted to our neurological intensive care unit between March 1998 and February 2009 with the diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We identified seven patients with parenchymal lesions. These lesions could be attributed to four morphological patterns: (1) territorial cerebral ischemia, (2) perforating vessels ischemia, (3) ischemia of presumed cardiac origin, and (4) isolated cortical lesions. Whereas the patterns (1) and (2) were associated with vasculopathy of large- and medium-sized vessels (as shown by cerebral vascular imaging), vessel imaging in (3) and (4) did not show abnormal findings. Our study implies that parenchymal lesions in acute bacterial meningitis are mainly ischemic and due to involvement of large-, medium-, and small-sized arteries of the brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging combined with conventional, CT-, or MR-based cerebral angiography revealed the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in the majority of patients. Furthermore, we detected two patients with isolated bilateral cortical involvement and normal vessel imaging. These lesions might represent ischemia due to the involvement of small pial and intracortical arteries. (orig.)

  11. Focal parenchymal lesions in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a clinico-radiological study

    Katchanov, Juri [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); University Hospital Charite, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Siebert, Eberhard; Klingebiel, Randolf [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neuroradiology, Berlin (Germany); Endres, Matthias [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Here, we analyzed the frequency, morphological pattern, and imaging characteristics of focal lesions as a consequence of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We hypothesized that diffusion-weighted imaging combined with contrast-enhanced imaging, serial scanning, and multimodal vascular studies would provide further insight into the pathological basis of such parenchymal lesions in bacterial meningitis. We reviewed clinical and imaging data (i.e., magnetic resonance tomography, magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography angiography, digital subtraction angiography) of 68 adult patients admitted to our neurological intensive care unit between March 1998 and February 2009 with the diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We identified seven patients with parenchymal lesions. These lesions could be attributed to four morphological patterns: (1) territorial cerebral ischemia, (2) perforating vessels ischemia, (3) ischemia of presumed cardiac origin, and (4) isolated cortical lesions. Whereas the patterns (1) and (2) were associated with vasculopathy of large- and medium-sized vessels (as shown by cerebral vascular imaging), vessel imaging in (3) and (4) did not show abnormal findings. Our study implies that parenchymal lesions in acute bacterial meningitis are mainly ischemic and due to involvement of large-, medium-, and small-sized arteries of the brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging combined with conventional, CT-, or MR-based cerebral angiography revealed the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in the majority of patients. Furthermore, we detected two patients with isolated bilateral cortical involvement and normal vessel imaging. These lesions might represent ischemia due to the involvement of small pial and intracortical arteries. (orig.)

  12. Bacterial cytolysin during meningitis disrupts the regulation of glutamate in the brain, leading to synaptic damage.

    Carolin Wippel

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal meningitis is a common bacterial infection of the brain. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin represents a key factor, determining the neuropathogenic potential of the pneumococci. Here, we demonstrate selective synaptic loss within the superficial layers of the frontal neocortex of post-mortem brain samples from individuals with pneumococcal meningitis. A similar effect was observed in mice with pneumococcal meningitis only when the bacteria expressed the pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin. Exposure of acute mouse brain slices to only pore-competent pneumolysin at disease-relevant, non-lytic concentrations caused permanent dendritic swelling, dendritic spine elimination and synaptic loss. The NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists MK801 and D-AP5 reduced this pathology. Pneumolysin increased glutamate levels within the mouse brain slices. In mouse astrocytes, pneumolysin initiated the release of glutamate in a calcium-dependent manner. We propose that pneumolysin plays a significant synapto- and dendritotoxic role in pneumococcal meningitis by initiating glutamate release from astrocytes, leading to subsequent glutamate-dependent synaptic damage. We outline for the first time the occurrence of synaptic pathology in pneumococcal meningitis and demonstrate that a bacterial cytolysin can dysregulate the control of glutamate in the brain, inducing excitotoxic damage.

  13. Dexamethasone in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    D. van de Beek; J. de Gans

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis in adults is a severe disease with high fatality and morbidity rates. Experimental studies have shown that the inflammatory response in the subarachnoid space is associated with an unfavourable outcome. In these experiments, corticosteroids, and in particular dexamethasone, were

  14. Pasteurella multocida bacterial meningitis caused by contact with pigs

    C López; Sanchez-Rubio, P.; Betrán, A.; Terré, R.

    2013-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida belongs to the normal flora of the respiratory and digestive tract of many animals. Animal exposure is a considerable risk factor for Pasteurella infection. P. multocida is the most common cause of local infection after an animal bite but is an unusual cause of meningitis. We present a case of bacterial meningitis by P. multocida in a 37-year-old man who worked in a pig farm and was bitten by a pig. The patient had a defect located in the lamina cribosa and this lesion c...

  15. Molecular Detection of Common Bacterial Pathogens Causing Meningitis

    H Sadighian

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The clinical diagnosis of meningitis is crucial, particularly in children. The early diagnosis and empiric an­tibi­otic treatments have led to a reduction in morbidity and mortality rates. PCR and the enzymatic digestion of 16SrDNA frag­ment which is produced by universal primers led up fast and sensitive determination. The purpose of this study was to investi­gate a rapid method for detection of common bacterial pathogens causing meningitis."nMethods: According to the gene encoding 16SrDNA found in all bacteria, a pair of primers was designed. Then the univer­sal PCR was performed for bacterial agents of meningitis (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influ­enzae, etc. by employing broad- range DNA extraction method. The ob­tained uni­versal PCR products were digested with restriction enzymes (HaeIII, AluI and MnlI to identify bacterial species. "nResults: By the enzymatic digestion of the universal products of each standard strain of the above bacteria, specific patterns were achieved. These specific patterns may be used for comparison in CSF examination. The analytical sensitivity of the as­say was approximately 1.5´102 CFU/ml of CSF even in samples with high amount of proteins. Conclusion: The universal PCR coupled with enzymatic digestion can be used to detect and identify bacterial pathogens in clini­cal specimens rapidly and accurately. Molecular diagnostic of bacterial meningitis, though expensive and labor-inten­sive, but is valuable and critical in patient management.

  16. An Acute Ibuprofen Overdose Masking a Severe Staphylococcus aureus Meningitis: A Case Report

    Matthew Smetana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute bacterial meningitis has a low incidence (3/100,000 in the United States and yet high fatality rate (approximately 14–16% and classically presents as a triad of fever, neck stiffness, and altered mental status. However, less than half of patients with meningitis present with this classic triad. We present the clinical course of a patient who initially presented to the emergency department after overdosing on ibuprofen for what he described as back pain secondary to mechanical injury. However, the patient's condition quickly deteriorated: he developed tachycardia, mental status changes, was intubated due to respiratory distress, and then suffered an 8-minute PEA arrest before return of spontaneous circulation was achieved. After the patient was stabilized, in addition to the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID overdose Staphylococcus aureus meningitis, bacteremia, and pneumonia were diagnosed. We report this case to illustrate that the initial presentation of meningitis may be extremely unusual especially in the setting of NSAID overdose and the acutely decompensating patient. As the risk of adverse clinical outcomes increases with delays in appropriate antibiotic therapy, it is therefore crucial to recognize the many signs and symptoms of meningitis, typical and atypical, and quickly begin appropriate treatment.

  17. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging in bacterial meningitis in children. Temporal profile and correlation with the prognosis

    Treatment periods for bacterial meningitis are often very long, and often this prolonged treatment is based on the judgment of its effectiveness by the degree of enhancement on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we analyzed the contrast MRI in the acute and recovery phases of bacterial meningitis in twelve patients, and graded the contrast level of the subdural space and subarachnoid space separately. While the contrast level of the subarachnoid space increased with time in 4 cases, that of the subdural space increased in 10 cases, and 9 of them revealed a good prognosis without continuation of the treatment. These findings indicate that increased contrast level of the subdural space is common in the recovery phase of bacterial meningitis, and that repetitive MRI investigation is not valuable to determine the duration of treatment. (author)

  18. A proteomic approach for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

    Sarah Jesse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The discrimination of bacterial meningitis (BM versus viral meningitis (VM shapes up as a problem, when laboratory data are not equivocal, in particular, when Gram stain is negative. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With the aim to determine reliable marker for bacterial or viral meningitis, we subjected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF to a quantitative proteomic screening. By using a recently established 2D-DIGE protocol which was adapted to the individual CSF flow, we compared a small set of patients with proven BM and VM. Thereby, we identified six potential biomarkers out of which Prostaglandin-H2 D-isomerase was already described in BM, showing proof of concept. In the subsequent validation phase on a more comprehensive collective of 80 patients, we could validate that in BM high levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and low levels of soluble amyloid precursor protein alpha/beta (sAPPalpha/beta are present as possible binding partner of Fibulin-1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that our CSF flow-adapted 2D-DIGE protocol is valid especially in comparing samples with high differences in total protein and suppose that GFAP and sAPPalpha/beta have a high potential as additional diagnostic markers for differentiation of BM from VM. In the clinical setting, this might lead to an improved early diagnosis and to an individual therapy.

  19. Outcome in patients with bacterial meningitis presenting with a minimal Glasgow Coma Scale score

    Lucas, M. J.; Brouwer, M.C.; Ende, A; van de Beek, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In bacterial meningitis, a decreased level of consciousness is predictive for unfavorable outcome, but the clinical features and outcome in patients presenting with a minimal score on the Glasgow Coma Scale are unknown. Methods: We assessed the incidence, clinical characteristics, and outcome of patients with bacterial meningitis presenting with a minimal score on the Glasgow Coma Scale from a nationwide cohort study of adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis in the Net...

  20. Pasteurella multocida bacterial meningitis caused by contact with pigs

    C. López

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida belongs to the normal flora of the respiratory and digestive tract of many animals. Animal exposure is a considerable risk factor for Pasteurella infection. P. multocida is the most common cause of local infection after an animal bite but is an unusual cause of meningitis. We present a case of bacterial meningitis by P. multocida in a 37-year-old man who worked in a pig farm and was bitten by a pig. The patient had a defect located in the lamina cribosa and this lesion could be the gateway of the infection, although in this case the infection could also be acquired through the pig bite. The bacteria was identified as P. multocida with the biochemical test API 20E (bioMérieux. In agreement with findings in the literature, the strain was susceptible in vitro to penicillin, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, imipenem and tetracycline.

  1. Sonographic findings in bacterial meningitis in neonates and young infants.

    Yikilmaz, Ali; Taylor, George A

    2008-02-01

    Cranial sonography plays an important role in the initial evaluation of infants with suspected bacterial meningitis and in monitoring for complications of the disease. Echogenic widening of the brain sulci, meningeal thickening and hyperemia suggest the diagnosis in an at-risk population. Sonography can identify the presence of extra-axial fluid collections, and color Doppler sonography can be very helpful in differentiating benign enlargement of subarachnoid spaces from subdural effusions. Intraventricular debris and stranding, and an irregular and echogenic ependyma are highly suggestive findings associated with ventriculitis. Sonography can play an important role in the detection of postinfectious hydrocephalus, in the determination of the level of obstruction, and in the evaluation of intracranial compliance. Focal or diffuse parenchymal involvement can represent parenchymal involvement by cerebritis, infarction, secondary hemorrhage or early abscess. PMID:17611750

  2. Dementia and capsular genu ischemia in patients with severe bacterial meningitis.

    Naito, Makoto; Johkura, Ken; Momoo, Takayuki; Nomiya, Tamaki; Kudo, Yosuke; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    Infarction in the genu of the internal capsule causes dementia that is characterized by abulia, lethargy and memory loss without obvious motor palsy (capsular genu syndrome). We found infarction or decreased cerebral blood flow in the genu of the internal capsule in 6 of 13 patients with severe bacterial meningitis. Four of these six patients developed post-meningitis dementia, characterized by abulia, lethargy, and memory loss. Of 24 patients with viral meningitis, none developed capsular genu ischemia or post-meningitis dementia. In patients with severe bacterial meningitis, capsular genu ischemia may play some role in the development of post-meningitis dementia. In patients with viral meningitis, absence of such ischemia may explain, at least in a part, the rarity of post-meningitis dementia. PMID:19838622

  3. Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis

    Ibrahim, Wanis H; Elalamy, Osama R.; Doiphode, Sanjay H.; Mobyaed, Hassan; Darweesh, Adham

    2010-01-01

    Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia is a very rare manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, with only a few cases reported in the literature. In almost all previously reported cases, other clinical manifestations of meningitis, such as fever, headache, and neck stiffness preceded acute myelopathy. In this paper, we report a case of acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, in the absence of other clinical manifestations of meningitis....

  4. Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis.

    Ibrahim, Wanis H; Elalamy, Osama R; Doiphode, Sanjay H; Mobyaed, Hassan; Darweesh, Adham

    2010-01-01

    Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia is a very rare manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, with only a few cases reported in the literature. In almost all previously reported cases, other clinical manifestations of meningitis, such as fever, headache, and neck stiffness preceded acute myelopathy. In this paper, we report a case of acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, in the absence of other clinical manifestations of meningitis. PMID:21483588

  5. Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis

    Wanis H. Ibrahim

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia is a very rare manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, with only a few cases reported in the literature. In almost all previously reported cases, other clinical manifestations of meningitis, such as fever, headache, and neck stiffness preceded acute myelopathy. In this paper, we report a case of acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, in the absence of other clinical manifestations of meningitis.

  6. Chemical meningitis in metrizamide myelography

    Seven patients with acute chemcial meningitis after metrizamide myelography are described. Five of the cases occurred within a time span of two months. Clinical and cerebrospinal fluid findings in the acute stage of the illness were similar to findings in acute bacterial meningitis. Possible causes of this complication are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Brain sonography in African infants with complicated sporadic bacterial meningitis

    Kenneth C Eze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine the structural findings in brain sonography of African infants with complicated sporadic bacterial meningitis. Materials and Methods: Retrospective assessment of medical records of patients who underwent brain sonography on account of complicated bacterial meningitis. The brain sonography was carried out over a 4-year period (between September 15, 2004 and September 14, 2008. Result : A total of 86 infants were studied (40 boys and 46 girls in a ratio of 1:1.1; more than 70% of the patients were aged below 6 months. Presenting complaint included convulsion with fever in 34 (39.53%, persistent fever 20 (23.26%, bulging fontanelles 8 (9.30%, coma 7 (8.14% and sepsis with convulsion 6 (6.98%, among others. Patients′ place of previous treatment included specialist hospitals 33 (38.37%, private hospitals 21 (24.42%, herbal home centres 12 (13.95%, nursing homes 8 (9.30%, patent medicine stores 7 (8.14% and other non-doctor attended clinics 5 (5.81% infants. The sonographic findings included hydrocephalus 36 (41.86%, cerebral infarction 12 (13.95%, encephalocoele 9 (10.49% and intracerebral abscess 7 (8.14% infants. Cerebritis 5 (5.81%, intracerebral hemorrhage 3 (3.49%, porocephalic cysts 2 (2.33%, cerebral oedema 2 (2.33%, intraventricular haemorrhage 1 (1.16% and subdural collection 1 (1.16% infants; 8 patients (9.30% had normal findings. Conclusion: Hydrocephalus, cerebral infarction and intracerebral abscess were the most common complications elicited by sonography in this study. Early and adequate treatment with antibiotics in patients with persistent fever and convulsion with fever will reduce the complications of meningitis and its long-term neurological sequelae.

  8. Educational achievement and economic self-sufficiency in adults after childhood bacterial meningitis

    Roed-Petersen, Casper; Omland, Lars Haukali; Skinhoj, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    To our knowledge, no previous study has examined functioning in adult life among persons who had bacterial meningitis in childhood.......To our knowledge, no previous study has examined functioning in adult life among persons who had bacterial meningitis in childhood....

  9. Recurrent Bacterial Meningitis in a Child with Hearing Impairment, Mondini Dysplasia: A Case Report

    Narges Mazloomi Nobandegani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent bacterial meningitis is not a common disease and makes physicians seek underlying predisposing factors which can result from anatomic anomalies or immunodeficiency. In this paper we present a boy with recurrent bacterial meningitis with the history of trauma and sensorineural hearing loss. Mondini dysplasia was demonstrated with computed homographic scans (CT-Scan of temporal bones.

  10. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    ... and older People at high risk for pneumococcus infection Alternative Names Pneumococcal meningitis Images Pneumococci organism Pneumococcal pneumonia References Swartz MN. Meningitis: bacterial, ...

  11. BACTERIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH ACUTE PYOGENIC MENINGITIS - A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY

    Arnab

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pyogenic meningitis is one of the most common infectious disease emergencies involving the central nervous system with higher incidence in developing countries than developed nations. Despite the large number of pathogens that have been reported to cause acute pyogenic meningitis, certain microorganisms are isolated with higher frequency depending on patient’s age, immune status and geography. Present study was aimed to determine the trends in aetiology and spectrum of the bacteriological profile in adult patients with suspected pyogenic meningitis in North-East India. MATERIALS 50 CSF samples from as many patients of Acute Bacterial Meningitis over a period of one year were processed for cell counts, biochemical analysis, gram staining, culture, antigen detection by latex agglutination test and antibiotic susceptibility tests, as per standard techniques. OBSERVATION CSF cell counts showed neutrophilic predominance in all cases along with high protein and low sugar levels. 44% of the cases were culture positive and latex agglutination test was positive in 46.4% of the cases where culture was negative. S. pneumonia was the predominant pathogen identified in the present study in 12(24% cases, followed by Pseudomonas and E. coli in 5(10% cases each. Gram stain indicated the causative organisms in 68.2% of the culture positive cases. Among the culture negative patients gram stain indicated the causative organism in 3(10.7% cases and these three cases were positive by LAT also. CONCLUSION Simple, rapid, inexpensive tests like gram staining remain significant means for diagnosis of acute pyogenic meningitis in developing countries. LAT goes a long way in identifying the organisms where the cultures are negative. This study thus paves the way for larger studies in this region for better recognition of the predominant organisms and the empirical antibiotic regimens.

  12. Hydrocephalus is a rare outcome in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    Bodilsen, Jacob; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Nielsen, Henrik I

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM) continues to have a high mortality rate and often results in severe sequelae among survivors. Lately, an increased effort has been focused on describing the neurological complications of meningitis including hydrocephalus. To aid in this ...... neurosurgical interventions. Our findings are comparable with a recent Dutch national prospective study....

  13. Prediction of bacterial meningitis based on cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis in children

    Sofia Águeda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Children with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis are frequently treated with parenteral antibiotics, but only a few have bacterial meningitis. Although some clinical prediction rules, such as bacterial meningitis score, are of well-known value, the cerebrospinal fluid white blood cells count can be the initial available information. Our aim was to establish a cutoff point of cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count that could distinguish bacterial from viral and aseptic meningitis. A retrospective study of children aged 29 days to 17 years who were admitted between January 1st and December 31th, 2009, with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis (white blood cell > 7 µL-1 was conducted. The cases of traumatic lumbar puncture and of antibiotic treatment before lumbar puncture were excluded. There were 295 patients with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, 60.3% females, medium age 5.0 ± 4.3 years distributed as: 12.2% 1-3 months; 10.5% 3-12 months; 29.8% 12 months to 5 years; 47.5% >5 years. Thirty one children (10.5% were diagnosed with bacterial meningitis, 156 (52.9% viral meningitis and 108 (36.6% aseptic meningitis. Bacterial meningitis was caused by Neisseria meningi tidis (48.4%, Streptococcus pneumoniae (32.3%, other Streptococcus species (9.7%, and other agents (9.7%. cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count was significantly higher in patients with bacterial meningitis (mean, 4839 cells/µL compared to patients with aseptic meningitis (mean, 159 cells/µL, p < 0.001, with those with aseptic meningitis (mean, 577 cells/µL, p < 0.001 and with all non-bacterial meningitis cases together (p < 0.001. A cutoff value of 321 white blood cell/µL showed the best combination of sensitivity (80.6% and specificity (81.4% for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis (area under receiver operating characteristic curve 0.837. Therefore, the value of cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count was found to be a useful and rapid diagnostic test to distinguish

  14. Gene expression in cortex and hippocampus during acute pneumococcal meningitis

    Wittwer Matthias

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with high mortality (~30% and morbidity. Up to 50% of survivors are affected by neurological sequelae due to a wide spectrum of brain injury mainly affecting the cortex and hippocampus. Despite this significant disease burden, the genetic program that regulates the host response leading to brain damage as a consequence of bacterial meningitis is largely unknown. We used an infant rat model of pneumococcal meningitis to assess gene expression profiles in cortex and hippocampus at 22 and 44 hours after infection and in controls at 22 h after mock-infection with saline. To analyze the biological significance of the data generated by Affymetrix DNA microarrays, a bioinformatics pipeline was used combining (i a literature-profiling algorithm to cluster genes based on the vocabulary of abstracts indexed in MEDLINE (NCBI and (ii the self-organizing map (SOM, a clustering technique based on covariance in gene expression kinetics. Results Among 598 genes differentially regulated (change factor ≥ 1.5; p ≤ 0.05, 77% were automatically assigned to one of 11 functional groups with 94% accuracy. SOM disclosed six patterns of expression kinetics. Genes associated with growth control/neuroplasticity, signal transduction, cell death/survival, cytoskeleton, and immunity were generally upregulated. In contrast, genes related to neurotransmission and lipid metabolism were transiently downregulated on the whole. The majority of the genes associated with ionic homeostasis, neurotransmission, signal transduction and lipid metabolism were differentially regulated specifically in the hippocampus. Of the cell death/survival genes found to be continuously upregulated only in hippocampus, the majority are pro-apoptotic, while those continuously upregulated only in cortex are anti-apoptotic. Conclusion Temporal and spatial analysis of gene expression in experimental pneumococcal meningitis identified potential

  15. The diagnostic value of c-reactive protein estimation in differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of serum and CSF C-reactive protein (C-rp) in differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis. Design: An observational, respective hospital-based study. Place and duration of study: It was conducted at the Department of Medicine and Department of Pediatrics, Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute Lahore, Over a Period of one year between march, 1999 and March, 2000. Subject and Methods: A randomized group of thirty patients, who presented with clinical features, suggestive of meningitis, were included in the study. C-reactive protein determinations were performed by latex agglutination method on the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of these patients. Results: In the present study, c-reactive protein was found to be a more sensitive test for differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial meningitis on initial examination than the usual conventional methods used to diagnose bacterial meningitis. CSF C-reactive protein had a greater sensitivity (92% as compared to serum C-reactive protein (71%). Conclusion: C-reactive protein determination in CSF was found to be a useful indicator of bacterial meningitis that can be used to distinguish it from viral meningitis. (author)

  16. Meningitis

    2012-10-24

    This podcast gives a general overview of meningitis, including what it is, the five types, and the causes.  Created: 10/24/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/24/2012.

  17. Identification of the serotypes of bacterial meningitis agents; implication for vaccine usage.

    Mohammad Mehdi Attarpour-Yazdi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial meningitis is one of the most serious infections and should be treated as emergency. As it has significant morbidity and mortality throughout the world, every country should have precise information regarding the etiological agents of disease and populations at risk to design public health prevention strategy. In the present study in addition of evaluation of common etiological agents (Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in bacterial meningitis cases, we sero-grouped or serotyped the obtained agents in order to predict the usefulness of existing vaccines against bacterial meningitis.Cerebrospinal fluid of 182 suspected meningitis patients were collected, from which 114 cases were approved by biochemical, microbiological and molecular tests as bacterial meningitis. The isolated bacteria were serogrouped or serotyped to determine the dominant serotypes.Streptococcus pneumoniae accounted for 36%, Haemophilus influenza for 26% and Neisseria meningitidis for 14% of cases. From 13 serogroups of N. meningitides the most frequent serogroups, were meningococcus group B (51%, C(24% A (18%, Z(2%, W135 (1% and 3% was not identified. In H. influenzae group only serotype b (100% have been identified and in pneumococcal meningitis the most common serotype among our cases were 18C (44% followed by14 (17%, 19A (13%, 6A (9%, 7F (4%, 4(3%, 3 (3%, 9V (2%, 8 (2%, 23f (2%, 5 (1%.Since there is no nationwide mass immunization program for common agents of bacterial meningitis in Iran, the result of this study can be used to improve the existing vaccines to cover the detected serotypes and consequently reduce the incidence of bacterial meningitis.

  18. The use of magnetic resonance and MR angiography in the detection of cerebral infarction: A complication of pediatric bacterial meningitis

    Stošić-Opinćal Tatjana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground. Association of both cerebral infarction and acute bacterial meningitis is more common in younger patients than in the elderly. The rate of mortality and the frequency of sequel are very high inspite of the use of modern antibiotic therapy. In more than 30% of the cases of childhood bacterial meningitis, both arterial and venous infarctions can occur. The aim of this study was to present the role of the use of magnetic resonance (MRI, and MR angiography (MRA in the detection of bacterial meningitis in children complicated with cerebral infarctions. Method. In the Centre for MR, the Clinical Centre of Serbia, 25 patients with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis, of which 9 children with cerebral infarction whose clinical conditon deteriorated acutely, despite the antibiotic therapy, underwent MRI and MR angiography examination on a 1T scanner. Examination included the conventional spin-echo techniques with T1-weighted saggital and coronal, and T2- weighted axial and coronal images. Coronal fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR and the postcontrast T1-weighted images in three orthogonal planes were also used. The use MR angiography was accomplished by the three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D TOF technique. Results. The findings included: multiple hemorrhagic infarction in 4 patients, multiple infarctions in 3 patients, focal infarction in 1 patient and diffuse infarction (1 patient. Common sites of involvement were: the frontal lobes, temporal lobes and basal ganglia. The majority of infarctions were bilateral. In 3 of the patients empyema was found, and in 1 patient bitemporal abscess was detected. In 8 of the patients MR angiography confirmed inflammatory vasculitis. Conclusion. Infarction is the most common sequel of severe meningitis in children. Since the complication of cerebral infarction influences the prognosis of meningitis, repetitive MRI examinations are very significant for the evaluation of the time course of

  19. Bacterial Meningitis in the Absence of Cerebrospinal Fluid Pleocytosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Ryota Hase

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elevation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF cell count is a key sign in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. However, there have been reports of bacterial meningitis with no abnormalities in initial CSF testing. This type of presentation is extremely rare in adult patients. Here, a case involving an 83-year-old woman who was later diagnosed with bacterial meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis is described, in whom CSF at initial and second lumbar puncture did not show elevation of cell counts. Twenty-six non-neutropenic adult cases of bacterial meningitis in the absence of CSF pleocytosis were reviewed. The frequent causative organisms were Streptococcus pneumoniae and N meningitidis. Nineteen cases had bacteremia and seven died. The authors conclude that normal CSF at lumbar puncture at an early stage cannot rule out bacterial meningitis. Therefore, repeat CSF analysis should be considered, and antimicrobial therapy must be started immediately if there are any signs of sepsis or meningitis.

  20. Swiftly Decreasing Cerebrospinal Fluid Cathelicidin Concentration Predicts Improved Outcome in Childhood Bacterial Meningitis.

    Savonius, Okko; Helve, Otto; Roine, Irmeli; Andersson, Sture; Fernández, Josefina; Peltola, Heikki; Pelkonen, Tuula

    2016-06-01

    We investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cathelicidin concentrations in childhood bacterial meningitis on admission and during antimicrobial treatment. CSF cathelicidin concentrations on admission correlated with CSF white cell counts and protein levels but not with bacterial etiology. A greater decrease in the concentration in response to treatment was associated with a better outcome. Since the CSF cathelicidin concentration reflects the degree of central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, it may be used as a novel biomarker in childhood bacterial meningitis. An early decrease during treatment likely signals more rapid mitigation of the disease process and thus a better outcome. PMID:27008883

  1. Cochlear Implantation after Bacterial Meningitis in Infants Younger Than 9 Months

    Hensen, E.F.; P. Merkus; S. T. Goverts; Smit, C. F.; Smits, C.; M. C. Van Loon; Roukema, B. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To describe the audiological, anesthesiological, and surgical key points of cochlear implantation after bacterial meningitis in very young infants. Material and Methods. Between 2005 and 2010, 4 patients received 7 cochlear implants before the age of 9 months (range 4–8 months) because of profound hearing loss after pneumococcal meningitis. Results. Full electrode insertions were achieved in all operated ears. The audiological and linguistic outcome varied considerably, with catego...

  2. Excacerbation of systemic lupus erythematodes, aseptic meningitis and acute mental symptoms, following metrizamide lumbar myelography

    A clinical constellation of excacerbation of systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE), together with aseptic meningitis, and acutre mental symptoms occurred following lumbar myelography with metrizamide. Excacerbation of SLE has not been previously described following myelography with any contrast agent. Meningeal reactions and acute mental symptoms have been reported earlier, but this clinical constellation is new. (orig.)

  3. Epidemiology of bacterial meningitis among children in Brazil, 1997-1998

    Débora PL Weiss

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To document the incidence and the descriptive epidemiology of bacterial meningitis among individuals under age 20 in a geographically defined region in Brazil during the two-year period immediately preceding the introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib vaccines into the national immunization program of Brazil. METHODS: Population-based epidemiological study of all cases of bacterial meningitis reported among residents of Campinas, Brazil, under age 20 (n=316,570 during the period of 1997-98, using comprehensive surveillance records compiled by the Campinas Health Department from cases reported among hospital inpatients, outpatients, emergency room visits, death certificates, and autopsy reports. RESULTS: The incidence of bacterial meningitis (n=274 was 334.9, 115 and 43.5 cases/10(5 person-years (pys for residents of Campinas under age 1, 5 and 20, respectively. All cases were hospitalized, with an average length of stay of 12 days. Documented prior antibiotic use was 4.0%. The case-fatality rate of bacterial meningitis in individuals under age 20 was 9% (24/274 with 75% of deaths occurring in children under the age of five. The incidence of Hib meningitis (n=26 was 62.8 and 17 cases/10(5 pys in children age <1 and <5, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of Hib meningitis in children under the age of 5 in Campinas during 1997-98 was similar to that reported in the US, Western Europe, and Israel prior to widespread Hib vaccine use in those regions. This study provides a baseline for later studies to evaluate changes in the etiology and incidence of bacterial meningitis in children after introduction of routine Hib vaccination in Brazil.

  4. Epidemiology of bacterial meningitis among children in Brazil, 1997-1998

    Weiss Débora PL

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To document the incidence and the descriptive epidemiology of bacterial meningitis among individuals under age 20 in a geographically defined region in Brazil during the two-year period immediately preceding the introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib vaccines into the national immunization program of Brazil. METHODS: Population-based epidemiological study of all cases of bacterial meningitis reported among residents of Campinas, Brazil, under age 20 (n=316,570 during the period of 1997-98, using comprehensive surveillance records compiled by the Campinas Health Department from cases reported among hospital inpatients, outpatients, emergency room visits, death certificates, and autopsy reports. RESULTS: The incidence of bacterial meningitis (n=274 was 334.9, 115 and 43.5 cases/10(5 person-years (pys for residents of Campinas under age 1, 5 and 20, respectively. All cases were hospitalized, with an average length of stay of 12 days. Documented prior antibiotic use was 4.0%. The case-fatality rate of bacterial meningitis in individuals under age 20 was 9% (24/274 with 75% of deaths occurring in children under the age of five. The incidence of Hib meningitis (n=26 was 62.8 and 17 cases/10(5 pys in children age <1 and <5, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of Hib meningitis in children under the age of 5 in Campinas during 1997-98 was similar to that reported in the US, Western Europe, and Israel prior to widespread Hib vaccine use in those regions. This study provides a baseline for later studies to evaluate changes in the etiology and incidence of bacterial meningitis in children after introduction of routine Hib vaccination in Brazil.

  5. The UK joint specialist societies guideline on the diagnosis and management of acute meningitis and meningococcal sepsis in immunocompetent adults.

    McGill, F; Heyderman, R S; Michael, B D; Defres, S; Beeching, N J; Borrow, R; Glennie, L; Gaillemin, O; Wyncoll, D; Kaczmarski, E; Nadel, S; Thwaites, G; Cohen, J; Davies, N W S; Miller, A; Rhodes, A; Read, R C; Solomon, T

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial meningitis and meningococcal sepsis are rare conditions with high case fatality rates. Early recognition and prompt treatment saves lives. In 1999 the British Infection Society produced a consensus statement for the management of immunocompetent adults with meningitis and meningococcal sepsis. Since 1999 there have been many changes. We therefore set out to produce revised guidelines which provide a standardised evidence-based approach to the management of acute community acquired meningitis and meningococcal sepsis in adults. A working party consisting of infectious diseases physicians, neurologists, acute physicians, intensivists, microbiologists, public health experts and patient group representatives was formed. Key questions were identified and the literature reviewed. All recommendations were graded and agreed upon by the working party. The guidelines, which for the first time include viral meningitis, are written in accordance with the AGREE 2 tool and recommendations graded according to the GRADE system. Main changes from the original statement include the indications for pre-hospital antibiotics, timing of the lumbar puncture and the indications for neuroimaging. The list of investigations has been updated and more emphasis is placed on molecular diagnosis. Approaches to both antibiotic and steroid therapy have been revised. Several recommendations have been given regarding the follow-up of patients. PMID:26845731

  6. Treating Meningitis

    ... David C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD Treating meningitis Steven Karceski, MD WHAT DID THE AUTHORS STUDY? ... study, “ Dexamethasone and long-term survival in bacterial meningitis, ” Dr. Fritz and his colleagues carefully evaluated 2 ...

  7. CSF markers for diagnosis of bacterial meningitis in neurosurgical postoperative patients

    Tavares Wagner Malagó

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF cellularity, protein, neutrophils, glucose and lactate for detection of postoperative bacterial meningitis. METHOD: This prospective study was conducted in 28 postoperative neurosurgical patients from 2002 to 2005 at University of São Paulo. The CSF markers were plotted in a receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve to evaluate their accuracy. RESULTS: Based on the area under ROC curve CSF glucose, cellularity, and lactate were considered good tests. Polymorphonuclear and protein did not achieve enough accuracy to be used clinically. CONCLUSION: The CSF glucose, lactate, and cellularity can be used for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Moreover, it can be helpful to differentiate bacterial from aseptic meningitis.

  8. A Fuzzy Expert System for Distinguishing between Bacterial and Aseptic Meningitis

    Mostafa Langarizadeh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Bacterial meningitis is a known infectious disease which occurs at early ages and should be promptly diagnosed and treated. Bacterial and aseptic meningitis are hard to be distinguished. Therefore, physicians should be highly informed and experienced in this area. The main aim of this study was to suggest a system for distinguishing between bacterial and aseptic meningitis, using fuzzy logic.    Materials and Methods In the first step, proper attributes were selected using Weka 3.6.7 software. Six attributes were selected using Attribute Evaluator, InfoGainAttributeEval, and Ranker search method items. Then, a fuzzy inference engine was designed using MATLAB software, based on Mamdani’s fuzzy logic method with max-min composition, prod-probor, and centroid defuzzification. The rule base consisted of eight rules, based on the experience of three specialists and information extracted from textbooks. Results Data were extracted from 106 records of patients with meningitis (42 cases with bacterial meningitis in order to evaluate the proposed system. The system accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity were 89%, 92 %, and 97%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve was 0.93, and Kappa test revealed a good level of agreement (k=0.84, P

  9. Haemophilus influenzae type f meningitis in a previously healthy boy

    Ronit, Andreas; Berg, Ronan M G; Bruunsgaard, Helle;

    2013-01-01

    Non-serotype b strains of Haemophilus influenzae are extremely rare causes of acute bacterial meningitis in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of acute bacterial meningitis in a 14-year-old boy, who was previously healthy and had been immunised against H influenzae serotype b (Hib). The...

  10. Epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of bacterial meningitis in Dapaong, northern Togo

    Simplice D Karou; Abago Balaka; Mitiname Bamok; Damhan Tchelougou; Malki Assih; Kokou Anani; Kodjo Agbonoko; Jacques Simpore; Comlan de Souza

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To assess the seasonality of the bacterial meningitis and the antibiotic resistance of incriminated bacteria over the last three years in the northern Togo. Methods: From January 2007 to January 2010, 533 cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) samples were collected from patients suspected of meningitis in the Regional Hospital of Dapaong (northern Togo). After microscopic examination, samples were cultured for bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility. Results:The study included 533 patients (306 male and 227 female) aged from 1 day to 55 years [average age (13.00±2.07) years]. Bacterial isolation and identification were attempted for 254/533 (47.65%) samples. The bacterial species identified were:Neisseria meningitidis A (N. meningitidis A) (58.27%), Neisseria meningitidis W135 (N. meningitidis W135) (7.09%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) (26.77%), Haemophilus influenza B (H. influenza B) (6.30%) and Enterobacteriaceae (1.57%). The results indicated that bacterial meningitis occur from November to May with a peak in February for H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae and March for Neisseriaceae. The distribution of positive CSF with regards to the age showed that subjects between 6 and 12 years followed by subjects of 0 to 5 years were most affected with respective frequencies of 67.82% and 56.52% (P20%for both bacterial strains), macrolides (resistance rate> 30%for H. influenzae) quinolones (resistance rate>15%for H. influenzae and N. meningitidis W135). Over three years, the prevalence of S. pneumoniae significantly increased from 8.48%to 73.33%(P<0.001), while the changes in the prevalence of H. influenzae B were not statistically significant: 4.24%, vs. 8.89%, (P= 0.233). Conclusions:Our results indicate that data in African countries differ depending on geographical location in relation to the African meningitis belt. This underlines the importance of epidemiological surveillance of bacterial meningitis.

  11. Performance of thirteen clinical rules to distinguish bacterial and presumed viral meningitis in Vietnamese children.

    Nguyen Tien Huy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Successful outcomes from bacterial meningitis require rapid antibiotic treatment; however, unnecessary treatment of viral meningitis may lead to increased toxicities and expense. Thus, improved diagnostics are required to maximize treatment and minimize side effects and cost. Thirteen clinical decision rules have been reported to identify bacterial from viral meningitis. However, few rules have been tested and compared in a single study, while several rules are yet to be tested by independent researchers or in pediatric populations. Thus, simultaneous test and comparison of these rules are required to enable clinicians to select an optimal diagnostic rule for bacterial meningitis in settings and populations similar to ours. METHODS: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted at the Infectious Department of Pediatric Hospital Number 1, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The performance of the clinical rules was evaluated by area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC using the method of DeLong and McNemar test for specificity comparison. RESULTS: Our study included 129 patients, of whom 80 had bacterial meningitis and 49 had presumed viral meningitis. Spanos's rule had the highest AUC at 0.938 but was not significantly greater than other rules. No rule provided 100% sensitivity with a specificity higher than 50%. Based on our calculation of theoretical sensitivity and specificity, we suggest that a perfect rule requires at least four independent variables that posses both sensitivity and specificity higher than 85-90%. CONCLUSIONS: No clinical decision rules provided an acceptable specificity (>50% with 100% sensitivity when applying our data set in children. More studies in Vietnam and developing countries are required to develop and/or validate clinical rules and more very good biomarkers are required to develop such a perfect rule.

  12. Evaluation of aztreonam in experimental bacterial meningitis and cerebritis.

    Scheld, W. M.; Brodeur, J P; Gratz, J C; Foresman, P; Rodeheaver, G

    1983-01-01

    Aztreonam (SQ 26,776), a new monocyclic beta-lactam agent, was compared with ampicillin, ampicillin plus chloramphenicol, and gentamicin in rabbits with experimental meningitis induced by, respectively, ampicillin-susceptible Haemophilus influenzae, ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae, and Escherichia coli. Aztreonam was also compared with gentamicin in experimentally induced E. coli cerebritis in rats. Doses of the various agents were delivered that produced near-peak concentrations in serum ...

  13. Thrombopoietin Contributes to Neuronal Damage in Experimental Bacterial Meningitis

    Hoffmann, Olaf; Rung, Olga; Im, Ae-Rie; Freyer, Dorette; Zhang, Juan; Held, Josephin; Stenzel, Werner; Dame, Christof

    2010-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (Tpo), which primarily regulates megakaryopoiesis, and its receptor (c-Mpl) are expressed in the brain, where Tpo exhibits proapototic effects on neurons. In the present study, we investigated the implication of Tpo in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. Following intrathecal infection with the encapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae strain D39, we observed upregulation of Tpo mRNA expression at 12 h and 24 h in brain homogenates of wild-type C57BL/6 mice. c-Mpl mRNA expression...

  14. Soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1: a biomarker for bacterial meningitis

    R.M. Determann; M. Weisfelt; J. de Gans; A. van der Ende; M.J. Schultz; D. van de Beek

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (sTREM-1) in CSF can serve as a biomarker for the presence of bacterial meningitis and outcome in patients with this disease. Design: Retrospective study of diagnostic accuracy. Setting and patients: CSF was coll

  15. Arthritis in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis: a prospective cohort study

    M. Weisfelt; D. van de Beek; L. Spanjaard; J. de Gans

    2006-01-01

    Background: Although the coexistence of bacterial meningitis and arthritis has been noted in several studies, it remains unclear how often both conditions occur simultaneously. Methods: We evaluated the presence of arthritis in a prospective nationwide cohort of 696 episodes of community-acquired ba

  16. The risk of acquiring bacterial meningitis following surgery in Denmark, 1996-2009

    Howitz, M F; Homøe, P

    2014-01-01

    procedure; second, we scrutinized notified bacterial meningitis cases to see if the clinician suspected a surgical procedure to be the aetiology. We found that ear, nose and throat surgery had an 11-fold, and neurosurgery a sevenfold, increased risk compared to the reference group in the first 10 days...

  17. [Pediatric Patient with anaerobic Bacterial Meningitis Who was Infected through a Spinal Congenital Dermal Sinus Route].

    Okui, Hideyuki; Fukasawa, Chie; Tokutake, Shoko; Takei, Haruka; Sato, Junichi; Hoshino, Tadashi

    2016-05-01

    We report the case of a pediatric patient in whom a spinal congenital dermal sinus was detected after the onset of anaerobic bacterial meningitis. The patient was a 4-month-old boy. He had a recurrent fever for 2 weeks before admission. On admission, he presented with a convulsive status and a bulging anterior fontanel. The previously consulted physician had made a diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Spinal fluid cultures tested positive for Peptoniphilus asaccharolyticus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a spinal subdural abscess and cranial subdural hydrops; therefore, the patient was transported to our hospital for surgical treatment. A sacral dimple was noted on his lower back, and an MRI showed a spinal congenital dermal sinus. Antimicrobial therapy, cranial subdural aspiration, dermal sinus excision, and drainage were performed. He was discharged on the 60th hospital day. When pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli, Proteus sp. or anaerobic bacteria invade through a dermal sinus, it can result in meningitis. Involvement of a dermal sinus should be suspected when meningitis is caused by these pathogens or when recurrent meningitis occurs. PMID:27529968

  18. Determination Of Appropriate Antibiotic In Bacterial Meningitis Of Children Based On MIC

    Noorbakhsh S; SA Siadati; Rimaz S; Mamishi S.; Haghi Ashtiani T

    2005-01-01

    Background: Bacterial meningitis is one of the most serious infections in infants and children. Three organisms include S.Pneumo;N.mening;H.Influ are the most common cause of meningitis in children between 2M-14y age.Etest is a new method for determination the MIC of some antimicrobial drugs in agarose .This method is useful for some organisms like as S .Pneumo; N.mening; H.Influ;sensitive Streptococcus and anaerobic ;aerobic gram negative. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross sec...

  19. Improved outcome of bacterial meningitis associated with use of corticosteroid treatment

    Baunbæk-Knudsen, Gertrud; Sølling, Mette; Farre, Annette; Benfield, Thomas; Brandt, Christian T

    2016-01-01

    were included in the study. The population had a median age of 62 years and 31% had an immunosuppressive co-morbidity. Eighty-nine patients had an unfavourable outcome (GOS score = 1-4). Adjuvant treatment with corticosteroids (RR = 0.48; 95% CI = 0.30-0.76) was associated with a favourable outcome...... (GOS score = 5), while altered mental status (RR = 2.36; 95% CI = 1.17-4.78) and age (RR = 1.03; 95% CI = 1.01-1.04) per year increment was associated with an unfavourable outcome. Adjuvant corticosteroid treatment did not affect short- or long-term survival. Short-term mortality was influenced by age...... (RR = 1.06; 95% CI = 1.04-1.09). Long-term mortality was influenced by age (RR = 1.06; 95% CI = 1.03-1.08) and female sex (RR = 1.81; 95% CI = 1.05-3.14). CONCLUSION: This study indicated that adjuvant corticosteroid treatment in acute bacterial meningitis improves the outcome and can safely be...

  20. Cerebral blood flow and carbon dioxide reactivity in children with bacterial meningitis

    We examined total and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) by stable xenon computed tomography in 20 seriously ill children with acute bacterial meningitis to determine whether CBF was reduced and to examine the changes in CBF during hyperventilation. In 13 children, total CBF was normal (62 +/- 20 ml/min/100 gm) but marked local variability of flow was seen. In five other children, total CBF was significantly reduced (26 +/- 10 ml/min/100 gm; p less than 0.05), with flow reduced more in white matter (8 +/- 5 ml/min/100 gm) than in gray matter (30 +/- 15 ml/min/100 gm). Autoregulation of CBF appeared to be present in these 18 children within a range of mean arterial blood pressure from 56 to 102 mm Hg. In the remaining two infants, brain dead within the first 24 hours, total flow was uniformly absent, averaging 3 +/- 3 ml/min/100 gm. In seven children, CBF was determined at two carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) levels: 40 (+/- 3) mm Hg and 29 (+/- 3) mm Hg. In six children, total CBF decreased 33%, from 52 (+/- 25) to 35 (+/- 15) ml/min/100 gm; the mean percentage of change in CBF per millimeter of mercury of PCO2 was 3.0%. Regional variability of perfusion to changes in PCO2 was marked in all six children. The percentage of change in CBF per millimeter of mercury of PCO2 was similar in frontal gray matter (3.1%) but higher in white matter (4.5%). In the seventh patient a paradoxical response was observed; total and regional CBF increased 25% after hyperventilation. Our findings demonstrate that (1) CBF in children with bacterial meningitis may be substantially decreased globally, with even more variability noted regionally, (2) autoregulation of CBF is preserved, (3) CBF/CO2 responsitivity varies among patients and in different regions of the brain in the same patient, and (4) hyperventilation can reduce CBF below ischemic thresholds

  1. Prevention of meningeal relapses in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    The paper describes modern methods of preventing meningeal leukemia which, in view of the noxiousness of skull radiotherapy, increasingly restrict the use of this method in a growing number of children.(author)

  2. Sonographic nomogram of the leptomeninges (pia-glial plate) and its usefulness for evaluating bacterial meningitis in infants

    Jequier, Sigrid; Jéquier, J C

    1999-01-01

    To our knowledge, the upper limits of the thickness of normal meninges on neurosonograms are not known. We therefore established a nomogram for sonographic measurements of the leptomeninges (pia-glial plate) and assessed its usefulness in neurosonographic examinations of children with bacterial meningitis.

  3. PATTERN AND ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY OF BACTERIA ISOLATED IN CLINICALLY SUSPECTED CASES OF ACUTE PYOGENIC MENINGITIS IN CHILDREN IN KRH, GWALIOR

    Dutt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in Department of Pediatrics, Kamla Raja Hospital Gwalior, (MP, during a period of a year September 2011 to August 2012. It was prospective and investigational study. Two hundred cases were enrolled for the study confirmed by either CSF r/m and or CSF c/s. Their history, complete physical examination and investigation like CSF, RBS, Blood c/s and Urine c/s were sent. Out of 200, male were 66% and female were 34% making a ratio of 1.9:1. Maximum cases were below the age group of 6year (80%. About 60% cases were from the rural area and 40% from urban area. More cases found in the months of May, Jun and July (45%. Commonest manifestations were fever (96%, irritability/ lethargy (88%, vomiting (80%, convulsion (75%, unconsciousness (53% and headache (31%. Signs of meningeal irritation were neck rigidity (57%; kerning’s sign (51%, brudzinki’s sign (45% and photophobia (28%. Anterior fontanel Bulging were found in (30% cases. Sensitivity of gram stain of the CSF was 88%. Culture was found positive in 35%. Out of 70 cases of culture positive 52 cases were gram negative and 18 cases were gram positive. Bacteria isolated from CSF were common below 3 years age group and there was very less difference in sex distribution. The bacteria isolated from the CSF culture were pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Acinetobacter, Streptococci pneumonia, Staph. Aureus, E.coli, Gm –ve bacilli, Citrobacter, Proteus, Enterobacter. Overall sensitivity pattern were for meropenem (90%, vancomycin (87.5%, ceftriaxone (85.7%, Amikacin (85.7%, Ceftazidime (82.2%, Piperacillin-Tazobactam (81.4%, Amoxyclav (77.1%, Cefotaxime (70%, Gentamicin (70%, and Netilmicin (70%. Blood and urine culture were positive 5% and 2% respectively. Case fatality rate was 11.5%. Acute bacterial meningitis in children has a considerable mortality, morbidity and serious long term sequelae therefore neurodevelopmental follow up and therapy should begin early. The study concluded that

  4. Pre-infection physical exercise decreases mortality and stimulates neurogenesis in bacterial meningitis

    Liebetanz David

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Physical exercise has been shown to increase neurogenesis, to decrease neuronal injury and to improve memory in animal models of stroke and head trauma. Therefore, we investigated the effect of voluntary wheel running on survival, neuronal damage and cell proliferation in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Mice were housed in cages equipped with voluntary running wheels or in standard cages before induction of bacterial meningitis by a subarachnoid injection of a Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3 strain. 24 hours later antibiotic treatment was initiated with ceftriaxone (100 mg/kg twice daily. Experiments were terminated either 30 hours or 4 days (short-term or 7 weeks (long-term after infection, and the survival time, inflammatory cytokines and corticosterone levels, neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation and the cognitive function were evaluated in surviving mice. Survival time was significantly increased in running mice compared to control animals (p = 0.0087 in short-term and p = 0.016 in long-term experiments, log-rank test. At the end of the long-term experiment, mortality was lower in trained than in sedentary animals (p = 0.031, Fisher’s Exact test. Hippocampal neurogenesis – assessed by the density of doublecortin-, TUC-4- and BrdU + NeuN-colabeled cells - was significantly increased in running mice in comparison to the sedentary group after meningitis. However, Morris water maze performance of both groups 6 weeks after bacterial meningitis did not reveal differences in learning ability. In conclusion, physical exercise prior to infection increased survival in a mouse model of bacterial meningitis and stimulated neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation.

  5. A Case of Fatal Bacterial Meningitis Caused by Enterococcus Faecalis: Postmortem Diagnosis

    Gülhan Yağmur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus species rarely cause bacterial meningitis without predisposing factors such as trauma, brain surgery, etc. In this study, we present a bacterial meningitis case caused by Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis in a 13-year-old male who was found dead at home. One hundred and forty two cm tall, 37 kg weight male had admitted to hospital two days after the beginning of complaints such as weakness, headache, swelling of left eye, nausea and vomiting. Body temperature was 37.3 oC, leucocyte count 22100/ mm3, and CRP 71 g/dl at the hospital admission. Antibiotic treatment with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (625 mg was given to the patient but he was found dead in his house the day after. In autopsy; yellow-green purulant liquid in left frontoparietal zone, fullness of meningeal vessels and oedema was seen in brain. Isolated bacteria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was identificated as E. faecalis by mini API 32 Strep®. Postmortem microbiological sampling in autopsy and defining etiologic agents is important for rare meningitis cases in which antemortem identification could not be done before death.

  6. Bacterial Meningitis: a five year retrospective study among patients who had attended at University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Birehanemeskel Tegene

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Bacterial Meningitis (ABM is an important cause of death and long-term neurological disability. Recent Information on the relative frequency of the isolation and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of these pathogens is scarce in Ethiopia. This study was to document the microbial characteristics, the antibacterial sensitivity pattern, and seasonal variation of community acquired acute bacterial meningitis. The study was retrospective, conducted at university of Gondar referral hospital, serving the rural population of the northwest parts of Ethiopia. A total of three thousand and eighty five cerebrospinal fluid specimens submitted to the bacteriology laboratory for culture and antibiotic susceptibility patterns in a period between January 2006 and December 2010. Analysis of extracted data was performed using SPSS statistical software (Version 17. The etiological agent had been identified in 120 (3.8% of the total 3,085 CSF samples by culture. Thirty-nine (32.5% of them were infants below the age of 12 months. S. pneumoniae was the predominant pathogen accounting for 52 (43.3% of the cases. Whereas N. meningitidis and H. influenzae accounted for 27(22.5%, and 12(10%, respectively. Other gram negative bacilli and S. aureus were isolated from 21(17.2%, and 11(9.2% cases, respectively. Among gram positive organisms S.pneumoniae showed a high level of drug resistance against co-trimoxazole 44(84.3%. Among gram negative bacteria, N.meningitidis was found to be resistant to co-trimoxazole in 25(92.5%. E. coli and salmonella spp. were found to be resistant to most antibiotics except ciprofloxacin. Multiple drug resistance was observed in 58.3% of the isolates. S. pneumoniae remains the major etiological agent of Community Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis (CAABM both in adults and children in the study area. 5.7% of S. pneumoniae were resistances to penicillin. Further research should focus on preventable aspects CAABM of, especially pneumococcal

  7. "Bacterial Meningitis in children and adolescents: an observational study based on the national surveillance system"

    Dickinson Félix O

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial meningitis is a group of life threatening infections that mostly affect children and adolescents, and may be the cause of severe neurological sequelae. Cuba has implemented massive vaccination programmes against both Neisseria meningitidis (serogroup C in 1979 and B in 1987, and Haemophilus influenzae type b (1999, two of the main causal pathogens. We described and discussed some epidemiological aspects of the current status of bacterial meningitis to learn from the Cuban experience. Methods A nationwide observational study on children and adolescents from 1 to 18 years old was carried out from 1998 to 2003, estimating the incidence and case-fatality rate by age group and causal pathogens, as well as the seasonality and frequency of overcrowded dormitories. The association between disease and attendance to day care centres or boarding schools was estimated by using relative risk (Chi-squared test and Fisher Exact Test. Results The overall number of cases was 1023; the incidence ranged from 3.4 to 8.5 per 100 000 population, with the higher figures in children 1–5 years old (16.8 per 100 000 population. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B were the main identified agents. The average case-fatality rate was 10.5% and the most lethal agents were Streptococcus pneumoniae (27% and Haemophilus influenzae type b (10.7%. Overall percentage of cases who slept in overcrowded dormitories was 15%, reaching 30.6% in adolescents. Seasonality was only evident among meningococcal meningitis cases between September–October. The attendance to boarding high school showed an association with disease only in 1998 and 1999 (RR = 2.1; p > 0.05. Conclusion The highest incidence of bacterial meningitis was observed among children from 1–5 years old. Pneumococcus was both the leading causal and the most lethal agent. Sleeping in overcrowded dormitories was more frequent among

  8. Pathogenic Triad in Bacterial Meningitis: Pathogen Invasion, NF-κB Activation, and Leukocyte Transmigration that Occur at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Wang, Shifu; Peng, Liang; Gai, Zhongtao; Zhang, Lehai; Jong, Ambrose; Cao, Hong; Huang, Sheng-He

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis remains the leading cause of disabilities worldwide. This life-threatening disease has a high mortality rate despite the availability of antibiotics and improved critical care. The interactions between bacterial surface components and host defense systems that initiate bacterial meningitis have been studied in molecular and cellular detail over the past several decades. Bacterial meningitis commonly exhibits triad hallmark features (THFs): pathogen penetration, nuclear fa...

  9. Association between Toll-like receptor 9 gene polymorphisms and risk of bacterial meningitis in a Chinese population.

    Wang, X H; Shi, H P; Li, F J

    2016-01-01

    We determined whether two common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Toll-like receptor 9 gene (TLR9) (TLR9+2848 rs352140 and TLR9-1237 rs5743836) influenced susceptibility to bacterial meningitis in a Chinese population. The study comprised 126 patients with bacterial meningitis and 252 control subjects, all of whom were recruited from the Tuberculosis Hospital of Shanxi Province. Genotyping of TLR9+2848 rs352140 and TLR9-1237 rs5743836 was performed by polymerase chain reaction coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that individuals with the AA genotype were associated with an increased risk of bacterial meningitis compared with those with the GG genotype (OR = 0.43, 95%CI = 0.19-0.95; P = 0.03). In a recessive model, the AA genotype was correlated with an elevated risk of bacterial meningitis compared with the GG+GA genotype (OR = 0.49, 95%CI = 0.22-0.99; P = 0.04). However, no significant differences were observed in the association between the TLR9-1237 rs5743836 polymorphism and the risk of bacterial meningitis in the codominant, dominant, or recessive models. In conclusion, the results of our study suggest an association between the TLR9+2848 polymorphism and a reduced risk of bacterial meningitis in the codominant and recessive models. PMID:27525854

  10. Analysis on the risk factors of bacterial meningitis complicated with subdural effusion

    Zhi JIANG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the risk factors of bacterial meningitis complicated with subdural effusion.  Methods The clinical data of children with bacterial meningitis in our hospital were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the risk factors for subdural effusion.  Results A total of 128 cases were divided into control group (N = 64 and subdural effusion group (N = 64. There was no significant difference on serum erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, and white blood cell (WBC between 2 groups (P > 0.05, for all. Compared with control group, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF WBC (Z = 3.126, P = 0.003, CSF protein (Z = 4.928, P = 0.000 and serum procalcitonin (PCT; Z = 2.823, P = 0.007 in subdural effusion group were significantly higher, while CSF glucose (t = 2.166, P = 0.033 was significantly lower. After treatment, CSF WBC (Z = 2.467, P = 0.012 in subdural effusion group was still significantly higher than that of control group, and CSF glucose (t = 4.938, P = 0.000 was still significantly lower. Logistic regression analysis showed that WBC in CSF (P = 0.027, CSF protein (P = 0.002 and serum PCT (P = 0.014 were independent risk factors for bacterial meningitis complicated with subdural effusion.  Conclusions CSF examination of children with bacterial meningitis reveals significant increase of CSF WBC, CSF protein and serum PCT, suggesting concurrent subdural effusion is easily occurred. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.08.012

  11. Bacterial Meningitis in Brazil: Baseline Epidemiologic Assessment of the Decade Prior to the Introduction of Pneumococcal and Meningococcal Vaccines.

    Luciano Cesar Pontes Azevedo

    Full Text Available Bacterial meningitis is associated with significant burden in Brazil. In 2010, both 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and meningococcal capsular group C conjugate vaccine were introduced into the routine vaccination schedule. Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine was previously introduced in 1999. This study presents trends in demographics, microbiological characteristics and seasonality patterns of bacterial meningitis cases in Brazil from 2000 to 2010.All meningitis cases confirmed by clinical and/or laboratory criteria notified to the national information system for notifiable diseases between 2000 and 2010 were analyzed. Proportions of bacterial meningitis cases by demographic characteristics, criteria used for confirmation and etiology were calculated. We estimated disease rates per 100,000 population and trends for the study period, with emphasis on H. influenzae, N. meningitidis and S. pneumoniae cases. In the decade, 341,805 cases of meningitis were notified in Brazil. Of the 251,853 cases with defined etiology, 110,264 (43.8% were due to bacterial meningitis (excluding tuberculosis. Of these, 34,997 (31.7% were due to meningococcal disease. The incidence of bacterial meningitis significantly decreased from 3.1/100,000 population in 2000-2002 to 2.14/100,000 in 2009-2010 (p<0.01. Among cases of meningococcal disease, the proportion of those associated with group C increased from 41% in 2007 to 61.7% in 2010, while the proportion of group B disease progressively declined. Throughout the study period, an increased number of cases occurred during winter.Despite the reduction in bacterial meningitis incidence during the last decade, it remains a significant healthcare issue in Brazil. Meningococcal disease is responsible for the majority of the cases with group C the most common capsular type. Our study demonstrates the appropriateness of introduction of meningococcal vaccination in Brazil. Furthermore, this study provides a baseline

  12. Acute hydrocephalus in a child with a third ventricle arachnoid cyst and coincidental enteroviral meningitis

    Jeltema, Hanne-Rinck; Kuijlen, Jos M. A.; Hoving, Eelco W.

    2014-01-01

    We present a 2.5-year-old child suffering from acute hydrocephalus. First, the child was diagnosed with aseptic viral meningitis. The PCR of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was positive for enterovirus. Subsequently, MRI revealed that the hydrocephalus was caused by a cyst in the third ventricle. Duri

  13. Probable acute disseminated encephalomyelitis due to Haemophilus influenzae meningitis

    Beleza, P; M. Ribeiro; Pereira, J.; Jordão, MJ; Almeida, F.

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male on long-term steroid therapy for minimal lesion glomerulopathy who, after an upper respiratory infection, presented with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis. Twenty-four hours later he developed depression of consciousness which progressed to coma and left hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multiple lesions (hyperintense on T2 and slightly hypointense on Tl) involving mainly white matter suggestive of inflammation. MRI fe...

  14. Some pathogenetic aspects of experimental pneumococcal meningitis in acute period

    V. V. Pilipenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Morphological displays of cerebral microcirculation derangements in a brain cortex with their semiquantitative estimation have been studied in experimental mice model of the first 24-72 hours period of pneumococcal meningitis.Also displays oxidative stress and activity antioxidative protectional system by means of definition of markers of these processes – malondialdehide, reduced glutathione and glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase activity have been investigated. The received results testify to morphological signs of the expressed derangements of cerebral microcirculation in a brain cortex already by first 24 hour of an experimental meningitis. The maximum expressiveness oxidative stress and activity antioxidative protectional system of reduced glutathione with the max activity of glucose-6-phosphatedehydrogenase in a mice brain cortex was noted at first 48hour durations of experimental disease. Signs of irreversible changes of mice cortex neurons are not revealed at 24–72-hour duration of experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

  15. The role of adjunctive dexamethasone in the treatment of bacterial meningitis: an updated systematic meta-analysis

    Shao, Mei; Xu, Peng; Liu, Jun; Liu, Wenyun; Wu, Xiujie

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterial meningitis is a serious infection in children and adults worldwide, with considerable morbidity, mortality, and severe neurological sequelae. Dexamethasone is often used before antibiotics in cases of this disease, and improves outcomes. Objective Although several studies have identified the role of adjunctive dexamethasone therapy in the treatment of bacterial meningitis, the results are still inconclusive. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the therapeutic and adverse effect of adjunctive dexa-methasone in patients with bacterial meningitis. Materials and methods Relevant randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of dexamethasone in bacterial meningitis published between 2000 and 2016 were retrieved from the common electronic databases. The odds ratio (OR) and risk ratio (RR) with their 95% confidence interval (CI) were employed to calculate the effect. Results A total of ten articles including 2,459 bacterial meningitis patients (1,245 in the dex-amethasone group and 1,214 in the placebo group) were included in this meta-analysis. Our result found that dexamethasone was not associated with a significant reduction in follow-up mortality (292 of 1,245 on dexamethasone versus 314 of 1,214 on placebo; OR =0.91, 95% CI =0.80–1.03, P=0.14) and severe neurological sequelae (22.4% versus 24.1%, OR =0.84, 95% CI =0.54–1.29, P=0.42). However, dexamethasone seemed to reduce hearing loss among survivors (21.2% versus 26.1%; OR =0.76, 95% CI =0.59–0.98, P=0.03). No significant difference was found between these two groups in adverse events. Conclusion Our results suggested that adjunctive dexamethasone might not be beneficial in the treatment of bacterial meningitis. Future studies with more data are needed to further prove the role of dexamethasone in bacterial meningitis.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis, predictors of bacterial meningitis: a study in 312 patients with suspected meningial infection

    Seyed Mohammad Alavi; Naser Moshiri

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis are routinely admitted to the hospital and treated with parenteral antibiotics, although few have bacterial meningitis (BM). The aim of this study was to evaluate predictors to dif-ferentiate BM from aseptic meningitis (ASM). Methods:The study was conducted in Razi hospital, a training center affiliated to Ahvaz Joundishapoor University of Medical Sciences in Iran. And all patients were 18 years old or above and were treated in the hospital between 2003 and 2007. Data of those who had meningitis, tested as CSF pleocytosis but had not received antibiotic treatment before lumbar puncture were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Among 312 patients with CSF pleocytosis, two hundred fifteen (68.9%) had BM and ninety seven (31.1%) had ASM. The mean age for patients with BM was (34.7±17.7) years (P=0.22, NS). Sixty percent of the BM cases and 61.2% of the ASM cases occurred in men (P=0.70, NS). We identified the following predictors of BM:CSF-WBC count > 100 per micro liter, CSF-glucose level 80 mg/dL. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV of these predictors, and LR for BM are 86.5% ,52.6% ,80.2%, 63.7% and 104. 1 for CSF-WBC count and 72.1%, 83.5%, 90.6% ,57.4% and 164.2% for CSF glucose, and 49.7%, 91.8%, 93.4% ,45. 2% and 104.5% for CSF protein. Conclusion:The CSF WBC count should not be used alone to rule out bacterial meningitis. When it is combined with other factors such as CSF glucose and protein improved decision making in patients with suspected BM may occur.

  17. Diagnosis of ventricular drainage-related bacterial meningitis by broad-range real-time polymerase chain reaction

    Deutch, Susanna; Dahlberg, Daniel; Hedegaard, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a broad-range real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnostic strategy with culture to evaluate additional effects on the etiological diagnosis and the quantification of the bacterial load during the course of ventricular drainage-related bacterial meningitis (VR-BM). M...

  18. Clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcomes of nosocomial super-infection in adult bacterial meningitis

    Chang Chiung-Chih

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Super-infection in adult bacterial meningitis (ABM is a condition wherein the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF grows new pathogen(s during the therapeutic course of meningitis. It is an uncommon but clinically important condition rarely examined in literature. Methods Twenty-seven episodes of super-infection states in 21 ABM patients collected in a 9.5-year study period (January 2001 to June 2010 were evaluated. The clinical characteristics, implicated pathogens, results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests, and therapeutic outcomes were analyzed. Results Twenty-one patients (13 men, 8 women aged 25-73 years (median, 45 years had post-neurosurgical state as the preceding event and nosocomial infection. The post-neurosurgical states included spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (ICH with craniectomy or craniotomy with extra-ventricular drainage (EVD or ventriculo-peritoneal shunt (VPS in 10 patients, traumatic ICH with craniectomy or craniotomy with EVD or VPS in 6 patients, hydrocephalus s/p VPS in 2 patients, and one patient each with cerebral infarct s/p craniectomy with EVD, meningeal metastasis s/p Omaya implant, and head injury. All 21 patients had EVD and/or VP shunt and/or Omaya implant during the whole course of ABM. Recurrent fever was the most common presentation and the implicated bacterial pathogens were protean, many of which were antibiotic resistant. Most patients required adjustment of antibiotics after the pathogens were identified but even with antimicrobial therapy, 33.3% (7/21 died. Morbidity was also high among survivors. Conclusions Super-infection in ABM is usually seen in patients with preceding neurosurgical event, especially insertion of an external drainage device. Repeat CSF culture is mandatory for diagnostic confirmation because most of the implicated bacterial strains are non-susceptible to common antibiotics used. Unusual pathogens like anaerobic bacteria and fungi may also appear. Despite

  19. Usefulness of 99mTc-HMPAO-SPECT in evaluation of bacterial meningitis

    99mTc-HMPAO SPECT was performed to detect the periodical changes of blood flow distribution in 6 infants (average age 5.5 months) with bacterial meningitis and was compared with findings by CT and MRI imaging, by DQ (developmental quotient) and by neurological examinations. SPECT was done with Shimadzu HEADTOME SET 70 for 20 min at 5 min after intravenous administration of 99mTc-HMPAO (111 MBq) at the stage of 16-26 days (SPECT I) after hospitalization, of 39-105 days (II) and/or of 138-197 days (III). The region of interest was set in both cerebellar hemispheres to calculate the mean pixel count c1 and in other 16 areas for the count c2. SPECT image was evaluated together with c2/c1 ratios. Head CT was performed at hospitalization or at the period around the SPECT I, and head MRI, at 39-183 days. At 3-5 months after crisis, evaluation was done for DQ and neurological signs. Periodical brain SPECT was found useful for the precise evaluation of bacterial meningitis and for prediction of its prognosis. (K.H.)

  20. Comparative study of bacteriological culture and real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) and multiplex PCR-based reverse line blot (mPCR/RLB) hybridization assay in the diagnosis of bacterial neonatal meningitis

    Wang, Yajuan; Guo, Gaili; Wang, Huixin; Yang, Xuefang; Shao, Fang; Yang, Caiyun; Gao, Wei; Shao, Zhujun; Zhang, Jinjing; Luo, Jie; Yang, Yonghong; Kong, Fanrong; Zhu, Bingqing

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial meningitis is more common in the neonatal period than any other time in life; however, it is still a challenge for the evidence based diagnosis. Strategy for identification of neonatal bacterial meningitis pathogens is presented by evaluating three different available methods to establish evidence-based diagnosis for neonatal bacterial meningitis. Methods The cerebrospinal fluid samples from 56 neonates diagnosed as bacterial meningitis in 2009 in Beijing Children’s Hospi...

  1. Procalcitonin as a Serum Biomarker for Differentiation of Bacterial Meningitis From Viral Meningitis in Children: Evidence From a Meta-Analysis.

    Henry, Brandon Michael; Roy, Joyeeta; Ramakrishnan, Piravin Kumar; Vikse, Jens; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have explored the use of serum procalcitonin (PCT) in differentiating between bacterial and viral etiologies in children with suspected meningitis. We pooled these studies into a meta-analysis to determine the PCT diagnostic accuracy. All major databases were searched through March 2015. No date or language restrictions were applied. Eight studies (n = 616 pediatric patients) were included. Serum PCT assay was found to be very accurate for differentiating the etiology of pediatric meningitis with pooled sensitivity and specificity of 0.96 (95% CI = 0.92-0.98) and 0.89 (95% CI = 0.86-0.92), respectively. The pooled positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and area under the curve (AUC) for PCT were 7.5 (95% CI = 5.6-10.1), 0.08(95% CI = 0.04-0.14), 142.3 (95% CI = 59.5-340.4), and 0.97 (SE = 0.01), respectively. In 6 studies, PCT was found to be superior than CRP, whose DOR was only 16.7 (95%CI = 8.8-31.7). Our meta-analysis demonstrates that serum PCT assay is a highly accurate and powerful test for rapidly differentiating between bacterial and viral meningitis in children. PMID:26378091

  2. Determination Of Appropriate Antibiotic In Bacterial Meningitis Of Children Based On MIC

    Noorbakhsh S

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bacterial meningitis is one of the most serious infections in infants and children. Three organisms include S.Pneumo;N.mening;H.Influ are the most common cause of meningitis in children between 2M-14y age.Etest is a new method for determination the MIC of some antimicrobial drugs in agarose .This method is useful for some organisms like as S .Pneumo; N.mening; H.Influ;sensitive Streptococcus and anaerobic ;aerobic gram negative. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross sectional study; In 57 suspected meningitis children ; organisms isolated from blood; CSF or other sterile boy fluid after culturing and antibiogram;. .MIC of someorganisms detected by Etest method. Results: Streptococcuswas the most prevalent ( 70% and S.pneumon( 90% of all Streptococcus; H.infl 2%;N.mening 4%and L.monocyt 6%(more than expected;Gram negative (Ecoli; Klebsiella; entrobacter and psudomona 18%. There was significant difference (P =0.01in type of organisms between age groups. S.pneumonia was more frequent in children > 2 year ;N.meningitis in>4yr old .Site of isolation :blood; CSF (35.8*;28.3%other sterile site 18.4%;concomitant positive culture in two site:17%.Mean age in Streptococcus was significantly different with Listeria (p=0.05; N.meningitis (p=0.04;H.influ (p=0.04;.but no difference with Staphylococcus;Klebsiella and E.coli Two type of H.inf were sensitive to Ampici or chloram ;both of them were sensitive to ceftiaxon. GBS were sensitive to PNC or Ampici Strep.nonAnonBnon- Cotrimoxazol>32mic/ml /PNC >256mic/ml/ Vanco>256mic/ml Strep.D: Cotrimoxazol>0.062mg/ml/ /PNC >0.016mic/ml/Imipenem>0.032mic/ml. Strep Pneumonia: All fo them were sensitive except 3 cases /Cotrimoxazol>2ic/ml /PNC =0.01mic/ml/Vanco>0.125mic/ m Vanco>0. 25mic/ ml/.Cotrimoxazol>2ic/ml / PNC =0.01mg/ml Vanco>0.125mic/ ml / Cotrimoxazol>2mic/ml /MIC-PNC >0.016mic/ml Therefore high dose of PNC is adequate for S.pneu ;because of Interm resistance to PNC All 3 N.menin were

  3. Determination of bacterial meningitis: a retrospective study of 80 cerebrospinal fluid specimens evaluated by four in vitro methods.

    Wasilauskas, B L; Hampton, K D

    1982-01-01

    A total of 80 cerebrospinal fluid specimens were analyzed for bacterial meningitis by four procedures readily available to most laboratories. These tests included routine culturing. Gram staining, countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis, staphylococcal coagglutination (CoA) with laboratory-prepared reagents, and CoA with Pharmacia Diagnostics reagents. A total of 56 specimens were positive for bacterial agents by routine culturing: Gram stain results were positive for 64% of all specimens positi...

  4. Acute Bacterial Prostatitis: Diagnosis and Management.

    Coker, Timothy J; Dierfeldt, Daniel M

    2016-01-15

    Acute bacterial prostatitis is an acute infection of the prostate gland that causes pelvic pain and urinary tract symptoms, such as dysuria, urinary frequency, and urinary retention, and may lead to systemic symptoms, such as fevers, chills, nausea, emesis, and malaise. Although the true incidence is unknown, acute bacterial prostatitis is estimated to comprise approximately 10% of all cases of prostatitis. Most acute bacterial prostatitis infections are community acquired, but some occur after transurethral manipulation procedures, such as urethral catheterization and cystoscopy, or after transrectal prostate biopsy. The physical examination should include abdominal, genital, and digital rectal examination to assess for a tender, enlarged, or boggy prostate. Diagnosis is predominantly made based on history and physical examination, but may be aided by urinalysis. Urine cultures should be obtained in all patients who are suspected of having acute bacterial prostatitis to determine the responsible bacteria and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Additional laboratory studies can be obtained based on risk factors and severity of illness. Radiography is typically unnecessary. Most patients can be treated as outpatients with oral antibiotics and supportive measures. Hospitalization and broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics should be considered in patients who are systemically ill, unable to voluntarily urinate, unable to tolerate oral intake, or have risk factors for antibiotic resistance. Typical antibiotic regimens include ceftriaxone and doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. The risk of nosocomial bacterial prostatitis can be reduced by using antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin, before transrectal prostate biopsy. PMID:26926407

  5. Evolution of bacterial meningitis diagnosis in Sao Paulo State-Brazil and future challenges

    Maristela Marques Salgado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial meningitis (BM is a severe disease and still represents a serious public health problem with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The most common cases of BM around the world, mainly in Brazil, have been caused by Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae type b. Bacterial culture is the gold-standard technique for BM confirmation, but approximately 50% of suspected cases are not culture-confirmed, due to problems related to improper transportation and seeding or previous antibiotic treatment. Immunological methods present low sensitivity and have possibility of cross-reactions. Real time PCR (qPCR is a molecular technique and has been successful used for BM diagnosis at Instituto Adolfo Lutz in São Paulo State, Brazil, since 2007. The incorporation of qPCR in the Public Health surveillance routine in our state resulted in diminishing 50% of undetermined BM cases. Our efforts are focused on qPCR implementation in the BM diagnostic routine throughout Brazil.

  6. A Population-Based Acute Meningitis and Encephalitis Syndromes Surveillance in Guangxi, China, May 2007- June 2012

    Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Wu, Xinghua; Bi, Fuyin; Hadler, Stephen C.; Jiraphongsa, Chuleeporn; Sornsrivichai, Vorasith; Lin, Mei; Quan, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Acute meningitis and encephalitis (AME) are common diseases with the main pathogens being viruses and bacteria. As specific treatments are different, it is important to develop clinical prediction rules to distinguish aseptic from bacterial or fungal infection. In this study we evaluated the incidence rates, seasonal variety and the main etiologic agents of AME, and identified factors that could be used to predict the etiologic agents. Methods A population-based AME syndrome surveillance system was set up in Guigang City, Guangxi, involving 12 hospitals serving the study communities. All patients meeting the case definition were investigated. Blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid were tested for bacterial pathogens using culture or RT-PCR and serological tests for viruses using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Laboratory testing variables were grouped using factor analysis. Multinomial logistic regression was used to predict the etiology of AME. Results From May 2007 to June 2012, the annual incidence rate of AME syndrome, and disease specifically caused by Japanese encephalitis (JE), other viruses, bacteria and fungi were 12.55, 0.58, 4.57, 0.45 and 0.14 per 100,000 population, respectively. The top three identified viral etiologic agents were enterovirus, mumps virus, and JE virus, and for bacteria/fungi were Streptococcus sp., Cryptococcus neoformans and Staphylococcus sp. The incidence of JE and other viruses affected younger populations and peaked from April to August. Alteration of consciousness and leukocytosis were more likely to be caused by JE, bacteria and fungi whereas CSF inflammation was associated with bacterial/fungal infection. Conclusions With limited predictive validity of symptoms and signs and routine laboratory tests, specific tests for JE virus, mumps virus and enteroviruses are required to evaluate the immunization impact and plan for further intervention. CSF bacterial culture cannot be omitted in guiding clinical decisions

  7. Patterns of Local and Systemic Cytokines in Bacterial Meningitis and its Relation with Severity and Long-Term Sequelae

    Federico Perdomo-Celis; Miguel A. Torres; Henry Ostos; Javier Gutierrez-Achury; Víctor Molano; Luis F. Durán; Guillermo González; Narváez, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis (BM) is a pyogenic infection present in the subarachnoid space, potentially fatal and frequently associated with neurological sequelae. During BM, cytokines (CTs) are locally produced. We sought to determine the CTs’ clinical role as disease severity predictors in adults, which is not completely clear. Using a bead-based flow cytometric assay, levels of six CTs were determined in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from 18 adult BM patients and 19 uninfected controls. Lo...

  8. A comparative study on CT and neurological sequelae in bacterial meningitis in children

    Computed tomography (CT) studies were performed on 24 children with bacterial meningitis (1 month-16 years) within 2 - 4 weeks after the onset of the disease, and the results were correlated to the neurological sequelate after 2 - 3 years. CT abnormalities were found in 15 patients less than 2 years of age. Among them 3 patients died at the early stage of the disease, and the neurological sequelae persisted in 6 patients. The prognosis was better in the patients with normal CT than in those with abnormal CT (P < 0.01). Abnormalities consisted of ventricular dilatation (6 patients), subdural effusion (7 patients) and brain atrophy (2 patients). Three patients with ventricular dilatation showed a gradual improvement in follow-up CT and had no neurological sequelae. Subdural effusion disappeared within 6 months after the onset without sequelae in 4 patients with normal intracerebral density in the initial CT. The patients with low or high intracerebral density died early in the course of the disease (3 cases) or survived with severe neurological sequelae (3 cases). The prognosis was worse in the patients with low or high intracerebral density than in those with normal intracerebral density (P < 0.05). It was concluded that the late neurological sequelae could be anticipated by the initial CT findings. (author)

  9. Streptococcus suis, an important cause of adult bacterial meningitis in northern Vietnam.

    Heiman F L Wertheim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus suis can cause severe systemic infection in adults exposed to infected pigs or after consumption of undercooked pig products. S. suis is often misdiagnosed, due to lack of awareness and improper testing. Here we report the first fifty cases diagnosed with S. suis infection in northern Viet Nam. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In 2007, diagnostics for S. suis were set up at a national hospital in Hanoi. That year there were 43 S. suis positive cerebrospinal fluid samples, of which S. suis could be cultured in 32 cases and 11 cases were only positive by PCR. Seven patients were blood culture positive for S. suis but CSF culture and PCR negative; making a total of 50 patients with laboratory confirmed S. suis infection in 2007. The number of S. suis cases peaked during the warmer months. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: S. suis was commonly diagnosed as a cause of bacterial meningitis in adults in northern Viet Nam. In countries where there is intense and widespread exposure of humans to pigs, S. suis can be an important human pathogen.

  10. Streptococcus suis, an Important Cause of Adult Bacterial Meningitis in Northern Vietnam

    Wertheim, Heiman F. L.; Nguyen, Huyen Nguyen; Taylor, Walter; Lien, Trinh Thi Minh; Ngo, Hoa Thi; Nguyen, Thai Quoc; Nguyen, Bich Ngoc Thi; Nguyen, Ha Hong; Nguyen, Ha Minh; Nguyen, Cap Trung; Dao, Trinh Tuyet; Nguyen, Trung Vu; Fox, Annette; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance; Nguyen, Hien Duc; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Horby, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis can cause severe systemic infection in adults exposed to infected pigs or after consumption of undercooked pig products. S. suis is often misdiagnosed, due to lack of awareness and improper testing. Here we report the first fifty cases diagnosed with S. suis infection in northern Viet Nam. Methodology/Principal Findings In 2007, diagnostics for S. suis were set up at a national hospital in Hanoi. That year there were 43 S. suis positive cerebrospinal fluid samples, of which S. suis could be cultured in 32 cases and 11 cases were only positive by PCR. Seven patients were blood culture positive for S. suis but CSF culture and PCR negative; making a total of 50 patients with laboratory confirmed S. suis infection in 2007. The number of S. suis cases peaked during the warmer months. Conclusions/Significance S. suis was commonly diagnosed as a cause of bacterial meningitis in adults in northern Viet Nam. In countries where there is intense and widespread exposure of humans to pigs, S. suis can be an important human pathogen. PMID:19543404

  11. Comparison of 16S rDNA-PCR Amplification and Culture of Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Bacterial Meningitis

    Farshad Foroughi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Early and accurate diagnosis of bacterial meningitis is of critical concern. Optimum and rapid laboratory facilities are not routinely available for detecting the etiologic agents of meningitis. The objective of this study was to compare polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay with culture for detection of bacteria in central nervous system (CNS samples from patients suspected to have meningitis. Methods: One-hundred CSF samples were obtained and divided into two parts. One part of samples was used for standard bacterial culture and gram staining. The remaining was used for DNA extraction. PCR assay was performed with universal primers for 16S rDNA gene of bacteria. Performance characteristics of the test were determined. Findings:The PCR method was able to detect bacteria in all 36 culture-positive and in 38 of 64 culture-negative cases showing sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 40.6% respectively. Positive predictive value was 48.6% and negative predictive value 100%, however, Kappa coefficient showed the correlation of the 2 methods to be at 0.33. Conclusion:There are advantages and disadvantages in performance characteristics of the conventional CSF culture and universal CSF 16S rDNA PCR. Therefore, it is recommended to use both methods in clinical practice, particularly in suspicious contaminated samples, with presumable presence of fastidious or slow growing bacteria because of antibiotic consumption.

  12. Computed tomography in suppurative meningitis. CT and clinical findings in the acute stage

    Yoshida, Akira; Fujiwara, Katsuhiko; Iino, Shigeru (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1982-06-01

    Computed tomography abnormalities revealed in 18 of 29 patients (62%) with infantile supprative meningitis. The abnormalities included ventricular dilatation (12 cases), subdural edema (8), cerebral infarction (4), cerebral atrophy (3), encephalitis (2), and cerebral herniation (1). The comparative study of CT pictures and clinical findings in the acute stage of the disease showed that the high incidence of these abnormalities occurred in the following conditions: 1) The age was less than 1 year, 2) establishment of the diagnosis took more than 5 days, 3) glucose of the cerebrospinal fluid was less than 200 mg/dl, 4) protein of the cerebrospinal fluid was more than 200 mg/dl, and 5) convulsion occurred 24 hrs after institution of the treatment.

  13. Predicting sequelae and death after bacterial meningitis in childhood: A systematic review of prognostic studies

    Gemke Reinoud JBJ

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial meningitis (BM is a severe infection responsible for high mortality and disabling sequelae. Early identification of patients at high risk of these outcomes is necessary to prevent their occurrence by adequate treatment as much as possible. For this reason, several prognostic models have been developed. The objective of this study is to summarize the evidence regarding prognostic factors predicting death or sequelae due to BM in children 0-18 years of age. Methods A search in MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted to identify prognostic studies on risk factors for mortality and sequelae after BM in children. Selection of abstracts, full-text articles and assessment of methodological quality using the QUIPS checklist was performed by two reviewers independently. Data on prognostic factors per outcome were summarized. Results Of the 31 studies identified, 15 were of moderate to high quality. Due to substantial heterogeneity in study characteristics and evaluated prognostic factors, no quantitative analysis was performed. Prognostic factors found to be statistically significant in more than one study of moderate or high quality are: complaints >48 hours before admission, coma/impaired consciousness, (prolonged duration of seizures, (prolonged fever, shock, peripheral circulatory failure, respiratory distress, absence of petechiae, causative pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae, young age, male gender, several cerebrospinal fluid (CSF parameters and white blood cell (WBC count. Conclusions Although several important prognostic factors for the prediction of mortality or sequelae after BM were identified, the inability to perform a pooled analysis makes the exact (independent predictive value of these factors uncertain. This emphasizes the need for additional well-conducted prognostic studies.

  14. Immunohistochemical analysis of MMP-9, MMP-2 and TIMP-1, TIMP-2 expression in the central nervous system following infection with viral and bacterial meningitis.

    Lech Chyczewski

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are capable of degrading components of the basal lamina of cerebral vessels, thereby disrupting the blood-brain barrier and inducing leukocyte recruitment. This study provides comprehensive information regarding the cell specificity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9 and their binding tissue inhibitors (TIMP-1, TIMP-2 in the central nervous system during viral and bacterial meningitis. Specifically, we evaluated the immunoreactivity of MMPs and TIMPs in various cell types in brain parenchyma and meninges obtained from autopsy tissues. We found that a higher proportion of endothelial cells were positive for MMP-9 during meningitis when compared to controls. In addition, the immunoreactivity of MMP-9 decreased and the immunoreactivity of TIMP-1 increased in astrocytes upon infection. Furthermore, the results of this study revealed that mononuclear cells were highly immunoreactive for TIMP-1, TIMP-2 and MMP-9 during viral meningitis and that the expression of TIMPs in polymorphonuclear cells was even higher during bacterial meningitis. Taken together the results of this study indicated that the central nervous system resident cells and inflammatory infiltrates contribute to MMPs activity and that the expression patterns vary between cell types and in response to viral and bacterial meningitis.

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 deficiency impairs host defense mechanisms against Streptococcus pneumoniae in a mouse model of bacterial meningitis.

    Böttcher, Tobias; Spreer, Annette; Azeh, Ivo; Nau, Roland; Gerber, Joachim

    2003-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) appears to contribute to blood-brain barrier damage and neuronal injury in bacterial meningitis. To further explore the function of MMP-9 in meningeal inflammation, we injected 10(4) colony forming units (CFU) of a Streptoccocus pneumoniae type 3 strain into the right forebrain of MMP-9 deficient mice (MMP-9(-/-), n=16) and wild-type controls (129 x B6, n=15). The clinical course of the disease, leukocyte recruitment into the subarachnoid space and bacterial titers in the brain did not differ. Yet, clearance of the bacteria from blood (log CFU/ml 4.7 [3.8/5.4] vs. 3.6 [3.0/4.0]; P=0.005) and spleen homogenates (log CFU/ml 5.3 [4.8/5.5] vs. 4.0 [2.8/4.7]; P=0.01) was reduced in MMP-9 deficient mice. A reduced systemic bacterial clearance of MMP-9(-/-) mice was confirmed in experimental S. pneumoniae peritonitis/sepsis. This implies a compromised systemic, but not intracerebral host response against S. pneumoniae in MMP-9 deficiency. PMID:12581831

  16. Adhesion molecule levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in children with bacterial meningitis and sepsis

    Soad M Jaber

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Adhesion molecules play a role in leukocyte recruitment during central nervous system (CNS inflammation. Aim: This study was designed to compare serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF concentrations of adhesion molecules in children with meningitis and sepsis, and to evaluate their sources. Setting : This study was carried out at Pediatric Department, King Abdulaziz University Hospital from January 2007 to June 2008. Design: Serum and CSF samples were collected on admission from meningitis (n = 40, sepsis (n = 20 patients, and sera from controls (n = 20. Materials and Methods : Endothelial (E, leukocyte (L, platelet (P selectins intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecules-1 (VCAM-1 were measured using ELISA. Statistics : ANOVA and Spearman′s correlations were used. Adhesion molecules with albumin concentration were estimated in CSF/serum to calculate concentration quotients. Results : In meningitis, serum sE-, sL-, sP-selectins sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 levels were higher than controls. Compared to sepsis, serum sE-selectin, sL-selectin, sVCAM-1, CSF-sL-selectin, CSF-sVCAM-1, VCAM-1 ratio and index were higher, while serum sP-selectin was lower than meningitis. sE-selectin ratio, CSF sICAM-1 were higher in meningitis with positive than negative culture. The sE-selectin index was higher in meningitis with neurological complication than those without it. In meningitis, correlation was found between CSF protein and CSF white blood cell counts (WBCs, CSF sICAM-1, CSF sVCAM-1 and between CSF sE-selectin and CSF sICAM-1. Conclusions : This study supports the role of adhesion molecules especially sL-selectin, sVCAM-1 in meningitis and suggests further research to determine their use as biomarkers for meningitis and use of their antagonists as therapeutic for CNS inflammation. The presence of discrepancy of CSF/serum ratios for molecules of same molecular weight suggest intrathecal shedding in addition to

  17. Identification of Common Bacterial Pathogens Causing Meningitis in Culture-Negative Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    Khater, Walaa Shawky; Elabd, Safia Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Background. Meningitis is a serious communicable disease with high morbidity and mortality rates. It is an endemic disease in Egypt caused mainly by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. In some settings, bacterial meningitis is documented depending mainly on positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture results or CSF positive latex agglutination test, missing the important role of prior antimicrobial intake which can yield negative culture and latex agglutination test results. This study aimed to utilize molecular technology in order to diagnose bacterial meningitis in culture-negative CSF samples. Materials and Methods. Forty culture-negative CSF samples from suspected cases of bacterial meningitis were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) for the presence of lytA, bexA, and ctrA genes specific for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis, respectively. Results. Positive real-time PCR results for Streptococcus pneumoniae were detected in 36 (90%) of culture-negative CSF samples while no positive results for Haemophilus influenzae or Neisseria meningitidis were detected. Four (10%) samples were negative by real-time PCR for all tested organisms. Conclusion. The use of molecular techniques as real-time PCR can provide a valuable addition to the proportion of diagnosed cases of bacterial meningitis especially in settings with high rates of culture-negative results. PMID:27563310

  18. Bedside Evaluation of Cerebral Energy Metabolism in Severe Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Schulz, Mette; Jacobsen, Anne;

    2015-01-01

    this technique may separate ischemia and non-ischemic mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study is a retrospective interpretation of biochemical data obtained in a series of patients with severe community-acquired meningitis. METHODS: Cerebral energy metabolism was monitored in 15 patients with...... severe community-acquired meningitis utilizing intracerebral microdialysis and bedside biochemical analysis. According to previous studies, cerebral ischemia was defined as lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio >30 with intracerebral pyruvate level <70 µmol L(-1). Non-ischemic mitochondrial dysfunction was defined...... 5 patients classified as non-ischemic mitochondrial dysfunction, and in 2 patients (3 catheters) classified as ischemia. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with severe community-acquired meningitis, compromised cerebral energy metabolism occurs frequently and was diagnosed in 7 out of 15 cases. A biochemical...

  19. Comparative analysis of clinical characters between acute focal bacterial nephritis and acute pylonephritis

    李湛

    2013-01-01

    Objective To improve standards of diagnosis and therapy for acute focal bacterial nephritis by comparing the characters of acute focal bacterial nephritis and acute pylonephritis.Methods Thirty-five patients of upper urinary tract infection whoever accepted ultrasongraphic and computed tomographic (CT) examinations in Beijing Hospital from January 2007 to January 2013 were studied retrospectively.Eighteen patients were diagnosed as acute focal bacterial nephritis (AFBN) according to CT imaging features,the other 17 patients were diagnosed as acute

  20. A Fatal Case of Acute Steroid Responsive Meningitis Arteritis in a Dog

    Kwiatkowska Miłosława*, Andrzej Pomianowski and Zbigniew Adamiak1

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nine years old female boxer was evaluated for progressive tetraparesis, cranial nerve deficits, lethargy and stupor. Serum biochemistry revealed elevated liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALT 379 u/l, asparaginian aminotransferase (AST 55 u/l, alkaline phosphatase (ALP 685 u/l and creatinine kinase (CK 511 u/l, and elevated acute phase proteins C-reactive protein (CRP 70 mg/ml. The cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed a mixed pleocytosis, protein content elevation (315 mg/dl and positive Pandy reaction. Immunoglobulin A (IgA in CSF was elevated (357 µg/ml, CRP was characteristic for a presentation period of disease (70 mg/ml. MRI examination revealed multifocal, diffused lesions in grey matter of frontal, occipital lobes. The white matter lesions were detected in cranial fossa region, thalamus, medulla oblongata and pons. The lesions were enhanced after contrast administration. Ventricular system was compressed; sediment was present in both of them. The biochemistry CSF results and MRI image were characteristic for steroid responsive meningitis arteritis (SRMA.

  1. A case of acute meningitis with clear cerebrospinal fluid: value of computed tomography for the diagnosis of central nervous system tuberculosis

    The author reports a case of acute meningitis with clear cerebrospinal fluid in which extensive bacteriologic investigations were negative making the etiologic diagnosis exceedingly difficult. Initiation of empiric antituberculous therapy was rapidly followed by clinical and biological improvement, without complications, and by resolution of abnormal findings on computed tomography of the brain. On these grounds, meningitis secondary to a tuberculoma in the temporal lobe was diagnosed. The author points out that tuberculous meningitis is still a severe, potentially fatal condition; this, together with the fact that tubercle bacilli are often very scarce or absent, requires that tuberculous meningitis be routinely considered in every patient with clear cerebrospinal fluid meningitis whose condition deteriorates. Computed tomography of the brain is essential to ensure rapid diagnosis and prompt initiation of antituberculous therapy. Lastly, the author points out that nowadays herpes simplex virus encephalopathy should also be considered

  2. Post-infective transverse myelitis following Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis with radiological features of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: a case report

    Williams Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Post-infectious autoimmune demyelination of the central nervous system is a rare neurological disorder typically associated with exanthematous viral infections. We report an unusual presentation of the condition and a previously undocumented association with Streptococcus pneumonia meningitis. Case presentation A 50-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our facility with an acute myelopathy three days after discharge following acute Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis. Imaging studies of the spine ruled out an infective focus and no other lesions were seen within the cord. Diffuse, bilateral white matter lesions were seen within the cerebral hemispheres, and our patient was diagnosed as having a post-infective demyelination syndrome that met the diagnostic criteria for an acute transverse myelitis. Our patient clinically and radiologically improved following treatment with steroids. Conclusions The novel association of a Streptococcus pneumoniae infection with post-infectious autoimmune central nervous system demyelination should alert the reader to the potentially causative role of this common organism, and gives insights into the pathogenesis. The unusual dissociation between the clinical presentation and the location of the radiological lesions should also highlight the potential for the condition to mimic the presentation of others, and stimulates debate on the definitions of acute transverse myelitis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and their potential overlap.

  3. Isolated Torticollis May Present as an Atypical Presentation of Meningitis

    Roger Chirurgi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening medical emergency that requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Diagnosis is infrequently missed if the patient presents with the classic symptoms of fever, headache, rash, nuchal rigidity, or Kernig or Brudzinski sign. However, it may be less obvious in neonates, elderly, or immunocompromised patients. Meningitis which presents as isolated torticollis, without any other signs or symptoms, is exceedingly rare. Objective. To identify an abnormal presentation of meningitis in an adult immunocompromised patient. Case Report. We present a case of an adult diabetic male who presented multiple times to the ED with complaint of isolated torticollis, who ultimately was diagnosed with bacterial meningitis. Conclusion. We propose that in the absence of sufficient explanation for acute painful torticollis in an immunocompromised adult patient, further evaluation, possibly including a lumbar puncture may be warranted.

  4. Expression of innate immune complement regulators on brain epithelial cells during human bacterial meningitis

    Gasque Philippe

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In meningitis, the cerebrospinal fluid contains high levels of innate immune molecules (e.g. complement which are essential to ward off the infectious challenge and to promote the infiltration of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes. However, epithelial cells of either the ependymal layer, one of the established niche for adult neural stem cells, or of the choroid plexus may be extremely vulnerable to bystander attack by cytotoxic and cytolytic complement components. Methods In this study, we assessed the capacity of brain epithelial cells to express membrane-bound complement regulators (ie, CD35, CD46, CD55 and CD59 in vitro and in situ by immunostaining of control and meningitis human brain tissue sections. Results Double immunofluorescence experiments for ependymal cell markers (GFAP, S100, ZO-1, E-cadherin and complement regulators indicated that the human ependymal cell line model was strongly positive for CD55, CD59 compared to weak stainings for CD46 and CD35. In tissues, we found that CD55 was weakly expressed in control choroid plexus and ependyma but was abundantly expressed in meningitis. Anti-CD59 stained both epithelia in apical location while increased CD59 staining was solely demonstrated in inflamed choroid plexus. CD46 and CD35 were not detected in control tissue sections. Conversely, in meningitis, the ependyma, subependyma and choroid plexus epithelia were strongly stained for CD46 and CD35. Conclusion This study delineates for the first time the capacity of brain ependymal and epithelial cells to respond to and possibly sustain the innate complement-mediated inflammatory insult.

  5. Genome-wide identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae genes essential for bacterial replication during experimental meningitis

    Molzen, T E; Burghout, P; Bootsma, H J;

    2010-01-01

    of invasive pneumococcal disease is required in order to enable the development of new or adjunctive treatments and/or pneumococcal vaccines that are efficient across serotypes. We applied genomic array footprinting (GAF) in the search for S. pneumoniae genes that are essential during experimental...... relevant as targets for future therapy and prevention of pneumococcal meningitis, since their mutants were attenuated in both models of infection as well as in competitive growth in human cerebrospinal fluid in vitro....

  6. Prevention of meningeal relapses in acute lymphoblastic leukemia; Zapobieganie wznowom oponowym w ostrej bialaczce limfoblastycznej

    Armata, J. [Polsko-Amerykanski Instytut Pediatrii, Collegium Medicum, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    The paper describes modern methods of preventing meningeal leukemia which, in view of the noxiousness of skull radiotherapy, increasingly restrict the use of this method in a growing number of children.(author) 25 refs, 3 tabs

  7. Perfil etiológico das meningites bacterianas em crianças Etiological profile of bacterial meningitis in children

    Orlando C. Mantese

    2002-12-01

    meningite bacteriana continua tendo uma importante mortalidade entre as crianças, principalmente quando causada pelo pneumococo.Objective: To determine the etiologic profile and analyze some epidemiological aspects of children with bacterial meningitis admitted to a public teaching hospital. Methods: A prospective study was conducted on children with clinical and laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis, admitted to Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, from January 1987 to January 2001. Patients with meningitis associated with trauma, intracranial devices or malformations of the neural tube, and tuberculosis, were not included in the study. Results: From a total of 415 children with bacterial meningitis, the etiologic agent was detected in 315 (75.9%: Haemophilus influenzae b in 54.2%, meningococci in 20.6%, pneumococci in 18.1% and other agents, in 6.9%. Previous antibiotic treatment, observed in 47.2% of the cases, led to a significant decrease in positive blood cultures (from 50.8% to 38.7% and in cerebrospinal fluid cultures (from 71.7% to 57.6%. Among children younger than 48 months Haemophilus influenzae b was predominant, particularly when compared to meningococci. The overall mortality was 10.1%, with a significant difference between the rates of pneumococcal (17.5% and meningococcal meningitis (4.6%. Conclusions: Children affected by Haemophilus influenzae b and by pneumococci were younger than those with meningitis caused by meningococci. The blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid culture remains an important laboratory tool for etiologic diagnosis, despite the negative impact caused by antibiotic previous treatment. The agents most commonly detected were Haemophilus influenzae b, meningococci and pneumococci. Bacterial meningitis continues to present an important mortality among children, particularly when caused by pneumococci.

  8. Meningitis Meningococcus

    Iskandar Japardi

    2002-01-01

    Meningitis pyogenic akut merupakan suatu respon inflamasi terhadap infeksi bakteria yang mengenai pria dan arakhnoid. Tiga organisme utama yang dapat menyebabkan meningitis pyogenic adalah Diplococcus pneumonia, Neisseria meningitis dan Haemophilus influenzae bedah-iskandar japardi23

  9. Non-Type B Haemophilus Influenzae Meningitis: A Case Report

    Fatma Deniz Aygun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Haemophilus influenza is one of the most common cause of bacterial meningitis in children. H.influenzae, especially type b (Hib serotype causes invasive infections in children under five years of age. The widespread use of Hib conjugate vaccines has led to a dramatic decline in the incidence of invasive Hib infections. But, the invasive diseases are still reported, particularly nontypeable H. influenzae (noncapsulated remain as an important pathogen. However, there is no evidence that nontypeable H. influenzae infections have increased in frequency. Nontypeable H. Ižnfluenzae serotype is encountered as a cause of acute bacterial meningitis among all ages. In this paper, we present to draw attention to the causative bacterium, in a case of bacterial meningitis caused by nontypeable H. influenzae infection in a child immunized with Hib vaccine.

  10. Canadian guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis

    Kaplan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide a clinical summary of the Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) that includes relevant considerations for family physicians. Quality of evidence Guideline authors performed a systematic literature search and drafted recommendations. Recommendations received both strength of evidence and strength of recommendation ratings. Input from external content experts was sought, as was endorsement from Canadian medical societies (Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Canadian Society of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, and the Family Physicians Airways Group of Canada). Main message Diagnosis of ABRS is based on the presence of specific symptoms and their duration; imaging or culture are not needed in uncomplicated cases. Treatment is dependent on symptom severity, with intranasal corticosteroids (INCSs) recommended as monotherapy for mild and moderate cases, although the benefit might be modest. Use of INCSs plus antibiotics is reserved for patients who fail to respond to INCSs after 72 hours, and for initial treatment of patients with severe symptoms. Antibiotic selection must account for the suspected pathogen, the risk of resistance, comorbid conditions, and local antimicrobial resistance trends. Adjunct therapies such as nasal saline irrigation are recommended. Failure to respond to treatment, recurrent episodes, and signs of complications should prompt referral to an otolaryngologist. The guidelines address situations unique to the Canadian health care environment, including actions to take during prolonged wait periods for specialist referral or imaging. Conclusion The Canadian guidelines provide up-to-date recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of ABRS that reflect an evolving understanding of the disease. In addition, the guidelines offer useful tools to help

  11. Bacterial meningitis exposure during an international flight: lessons for communicable pathogens.

    Riley, Lyrad K

    2006-07-01

    Air transport of infectious patients presents challenges for screening, post-exposure follow-up of fellow passengers, and international coordination issues. This report illustrates how an index case may not receive a clear diagnosis until days after the flight of interest, complicating treatment and fellow passenger tracking. This patient was diagnosed with meningococcal meningitis after a transatlantic flight with over 200 other passengers. In such cases, prompt initiation of public health measures and rapid coordination between various agencies may be required to limit outbreaks. Similar concerns will likely complicate intentional pathogen exposures; however, there may also be additional challenges related to unfamiliar pathogens and legal or political limitations to information sharing. For meningococcal disease, published guidelines exist to assist in determining which passengers and health-care workers meet criteria for antimicrobial chemoprophylaxis. PMID:16856365

  12. Attenuation of the bacterial load in blood by pretreatment with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor protects rats from fatal outcome and brain damage during Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Lund, Søren Peter;

    2004-01-01

    to the infection compared to that for untreated rats (P = 0.039 by the log rank test). The improved outcome was associated with reduced signs of cerebral cortical damage (P = 0.008). Furthermore, the beneficial effects of G-CSF were associated with reduced bacterial loads in the cerebrospinal fluid...... meningitis result in reduced risks of death and brain damage. This beneficial effect is most likely achieved through improved control of the systemic disease....

  13. Immunohistochemical analysis of MMP-9, MMP-2 and TIMP-1, TIMP-2 expression in the central nervous system following infection with viral and bacterial meningitis.

    Lech Chyczewski; Artur Sulik

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are capable of degrading components of the basal lamina of cerebral vessels, thereby disrupting the blood-brain barrier and inducing leukocyte recruitment. This study provides comprehensive information regarding the cell specificity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) and their binding tissue inhibitors (TIMP-1, TIMP-2) in the central nervous system during viral and bacterial meningitis. Specifically, we evaluated the immunoreactivity of MMPs and TIMPs...

  14. Bacterial Invasion of the Inner Ear in Association With Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    through the cochlear aqueduct, into the scala tympani of the cochlea (perilymphatic space). From here, bacteria spreads apically toward the helicotrema and subsequently basally through the scala vestibuli, toward the vestibule and the vestibular system. When the bacteria after 5 to 6 days had reached...... scala vestibuli of the basal turn of the cochlea, hematogenous spreading occurred to the spiral ligament and into the cochlear endolymph, subsequently to the vestibular endolymph. We found no evidence of alternative routes for bacterial invasion in the inner ear. Several internal barriers to bacterial...

  15. Patterns of Local and Systemic Cytokines in Bacterial Meningitis and its Relation with Severity and Long-Term Sequelae

    Perdomo-Celis, Federico; Torres, Miguel A.; Ostos, Henry; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Molano, Víctor; Durán, Luis F.; González, Guillermo; Narváez, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis (BM) is a pyogenic infection present in the subarachnoid space, potentially fatal and frequently associated with neurological sequelae. During BM, cytokines (CTs) are locally produced. We sought to determine the CTs’ clinical role as disease severity predictors in adults, which is not completely clear. Using a bead-based flow cytometric assay, levels of six CTs were determined in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from 18 adult BM patients and 19 uninfected controls. Long-term neurological sequelae were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). All evaluated CTs were higher in CSF than in plasma, and the levels of CSF interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α and plasma IL-10 and IL-12p70 were significantly higher in patients with severe sepsis than with sepsis, suggesting an association with clinical severity. There was a strong negative correlation between CSF IL-6 and plasma IL-12p70 with GOS score, supporting the possible role of these CTs in the development of neurological long-term sequelae. These findings could be helpful to identify candidates to receive neuroprotective treatments and early physiotherapy schemes. PMID:26715831

  16. Development of internally controlled duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays for the detection of microorganisms associated with bacterial meningitis.

    Clancy, Eoin; Coughlan, Helena; Higgins, Owen; Boo, Teck Wee; Cormican, Martin; Barrett, Louise; Smith, Terry J; Reddington, Kate; Barry, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Three duplex molecular beacon based real-time Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA) assays have been designed and experimentally validated targeting RNA transcripts for the detection and identification of Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae respectively. Each real-time NASBA diagnostics assay includes an endogenous non-competitive Internal Amplification Control (IAC) to amplify the splice variant 1 mRNA of the Homo sapiens TBP gene from human total RNA. All three duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays were determined to be 100% specific for the target species tested for. Also the Limits of Detection (LODs) for the H. influenzae, N. meningitidis and S. pneumoniae duplex real-time NASBA assays were 55.36, 0.99, and 57.24 Cell Equivalents (CE) respectively. These robust duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays have the potential to be used in a clinical setting for the rapid (<60min) specific detection and identification of the most prominent microorganisms associated with bacterial meningitis in humans. PMID:27319375

  17. Progress towards meningitis prevention in the conjugate vaccines era

    Cristina Aparecida Borges Laval

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute bacterial meningitis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among children less than five years old. Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are the most important agents of bacterial meningitis in developing countries. The development of the conjugate vaccines in the beginning of the 90's, especially type b H. influenzae (Hib, and more recently the heptavalent pneumococcal and the serogroup C meningococcal vaccines, have contributed directly to changes in the epidemiological profile of these invasive diseases (direct effect and of their carriage status (indirect effect. We review the impact of the Hib conjugate vaccine in Latin American countries, where this vaccine has been implemented, and the potential of pneumococcal and meningococcal conjugate vaccines for the reduction of meningitis worldwide. We also address constraints for the development and delivery of these vaccines and review new candidate state-of-the-art vaccines. The greatest challenge, undoubtedly, is to implement these vaccines worldwide, especially in the developing regions.

  18. Development of Real-Time PCR Methods for the Detection of Bacterial Meningitis Pathogens without DNA Extraction.

    Jeni Vuong

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis (Nm, Haemophilus influenzae (Hi, and Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp are the lead causes of bacterial meningitis. Detection of these pathogens from clinical specimens using traditional real-time PCR (rt-PCR requires DNA extraction to remove the PCR inhibitors prior to testing, which is time consuming and labor intensive. In this study, five species-specific (Nm-sodC and -ctrA, Hi-hpd#1 and -hpd#3 and Sp-lytA and six serogroup-specific rt-PCR tests (A, B, C, W, X, Y targeting Nm capsular genes were evaluated in the two direct rt-PCR methods using PerfeCTa and 5x Omni that do not require DNA extraction. The sensitivity and specify of the two direct rt-PCR methods were compared to TaqMan traditional rt-PCR, the current standard rt-PCR method for the detection of meningitis pathogens. The LLD for all 11 rt-PCR tests ranged from 6,227 to 272,229 CFU/ml for TaqMan, 1,824-135,982 for 5x Omni, and 168-6,836 CFU/ml for PerfeCTa. The diagnostic sensitivity using TaqMan ranged from 89.2%-99.6%, except for NmB-csb, which was 69.7%. For 5x Omni, the sensitivity varied from 67.1% to 99.8%, with three tests below 90%. The sensitivity of these tests using PerfeCTa varied from 89.4% to 99.8%. The specificity ranges of the 11 tests were 98.0-99.9%, 97.5-99.9%, and 92.9-99.9% for TaqMan, 5x Omni, and PerfeCTa, respectively. PerfeCTa direct rt-PCR demonstrated similar or better sensitivity compared to 5x Omni direct rt-PCR or TaqMan traditional rt-PCR. Since the direct rt-PCR method does not require DNA extraction, it reduces the time and cost for processing CSF specimens, increases testing throughput, decreases the risk of cross-contamination, and conserves precious CSF. The direct rt-PCR method will be beneficial to laboratories with high testing volume.

  19. Efficacy and safety of intrathecal liposomal cytarabine for the treatment of meningeal relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: experience of two pediatric institutions.

    Parasole, Rosanna; Menna, Giuseppe; Marra, Nicoletta; Petruzziello, Fara; Locatelli, Franco; Mangione, Argia; Misuraca, Aldo; Buffardi, Salvatore; Di Cesare-Merlone, Alessandra; Poggi, Vincenzo

    2008-08-01

    The treatment of meningeal relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains a challenging clinical problem. Liposomal cytarabine (DepoCyte) permits to decrease frequency of lumbar punctures, without loss of efficacy, because intrathecal levels of the drug remain cytotoxic for up to 14 days. We investigated the efficacy and safety of intrathecal DepoCyte in six children with meningeal relapse, treated in two pediatric institutions. DepoCyte was well tolerated in all patients, who achieved complete clearance of blasts from the cerebrospinal fluid after the first three intrathecal drug administrations. Five of the six patients were concurrently treated with high-dose administration of systemic cytarabine, without additional neurological side effects. Our results suggest that DepoCyte is a valid option for children with ALL experiencing meningeal relapse; it deserves further investigation in intensive treatment regimens, taking into due consideration potential neurotoxicity. PMID:18766969

  20. Recognising early meningitis: a missed opportunity to diagnose meningitis.

    Ponnampalam, Anusha; de Sousa, Paula; Carroll, Will

    2016-01-01

    There are ∼250 cases of neonatal bacterial meningitis each year in the UK. Clinical evaluation of signs and symptoms of meningitis is challenging, particularly, during the neonatal period. Although uncommon, it is recognised that bacterial meningitis can be present in a child with an apparently normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) initially.We report the case of a newborn baby girl who was admitted with concerns regarding 2 dusky episodes. She underwent blood tests, a lumbar puncture and was started on intravenous antibiotics. With negative cultures, normal blood results and following a significant clinical improvement, antibiotics were discontinued after 48 hours and the baby was discharged home. She re-presented to the children's emergency department 7 hours later with a history of an apnoeic episode. A second CSF sample was suggestive of bacterial meningitis. We will discuss the published literature and the potential drawbacks of lumbar punctures and ways to diagnose meningitis early. PMID:27516108

  1. Cryptococcal Meningitis

    ... while treating cryptococcal meningitis increased the risk of IRIS. Better outcomes were obtained by treating the meningitis before starting anti-HIV treatment. The tests use blood or spinal fluid. ...

  2. Fungal Meningitis

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Fungal Meningitis Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... the brain or spinal cord. Investigation of Fungal Meningitis, 2012 In September 2012, the Centers for Disease ...

  3. Meningitis (For Parents)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Meningitis KidsHealth > For Parents > Meningitis Print A A A ... to Call the Doctor en español Meningitis About Meningitis Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, the ...

  4. Bacterial meningitis Meningitis bacateriana aguda en niños: estudio clínico y bacteriológico en el Hospital Infantil de Medellín

    Daniel Hoyos

    1988-02-01

    Full Text Available

     

    Between aprl13, 1984 and march 31,1986,95  children with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM were admitted to Hospital lnfantil, Medellín, Colombia. 68 (71.6% were under two years old. Haemophifus influenza  type B was the predominant microorganism (41%, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (27.4%, enterobacteriaceae (15.8%, Neisseria meningitidis (4.2%, Staphylococcus aureus (3.2% and betahemolytlc streptococci (2.1%. One case produced by Streptococcus agalactiae was the first one in our Hospital and another one due to Shigella was the first one in Colombia. Bacterial origin was confirmed in 93.7% of the cases, employing direct examination, cultures and counter immuno electrophoresis. The most frequent clinical manifestations were: fever, vomit, irritability, meningeai irritation and seizures; the younger the patient the most severe the clinical picture. Those with persistent focal seizures showed cerebral infarction, subdural effusion, ventricular dilatation or a combination of them. Mortality was 19%; sequelae were observed in 26% (seizure, motor deficit and deafness; Haemophilus influenzae resistance to ampicilin was observed for the first time in this institution. We suggest modifications in the initial therapeutic approach and recommend the suppression of the routine pre-discharge lumbar puncture.

    Entre abril 3 de 1984 y marzo 31 de 1986, se estudiaron 95 niños que ingresaron al Hospital Infantil de Medellín con el diagnóstico de meningitis bacteriana aguda (MBA; 68 de ellos fueron menores de 2 años (71.6%; el HaemophiIus influenzae tipo e fue el germen predominante (41.0%; le

  5. Clinical and laboratory features of Streptococcus salivarius meningitis: a case report and literature review.

    Wilson, Megan; Martin, Ryan; Walk, Seth T; Young, Carol; Grossman, Sylvia; McKean, Erin Lin; Aronoff, David M

    2012-02-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a normal member of the human oral microbiome that is an uncommon cause of invasive infections. Meningitis is a rare but increasingly reported infection caused by S. salivarius. Despite the growing number of reported cases, a comprehensive review of the literature on S. salivarius meningitis is lacking. We sought to gain a better understanding of the clinical presentation, evaluation, management, and outcome of S. salivarius meningitis by analyzing previously reported cases. In addition to a single case reported here, 64 previously published cases of meningitis were identified for this review. The collected data confirm that most patients presented with classical signs and symptoms of bacterial meningitis with a predominance of neutrophils in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and hypoglycorrhachia. The majority of cases followed iatrogenic or traumatic CSF contamination. Most cases were diagnosed by CSF culture within one day of symptom onset. There was no clear evidence of predisposing co-morbid conditions in patients with meningitis, although in most case reports, limited information was given on the medical history of each patient. Outcomes were generally favorable with antibiotic management. Clinicians should suspect S. salivarius meningitis in patients presenting acutely after medical or surgical procedures involving the meninges. PMID:21817122

  6. Action for child survival: elimination of Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis in Uganda

    Rosamund F Lewis

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To guide immunization policy, we determined the public health benefit of introducing Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib vaccine in Uganda and estimated the vaccine effectiveness. METHODS: Surveillance data for acute bacterial meningitis among children aged 0-59 months were reviewed from three hospital sentinel sites, for July 2001 to June 2007, to determine the incidence of Hib meningitis, the effectiveness of Hib vaccine with a case-control design, and the number of vaccine-preventable cases and deaths of Hib disease in Uganda. FINDINGS: Of the 13 978 children from 17 districts with suspected bacterial meningitis, 269 had confirmed Hib meningitis, declining from 69 patients in the prevaccine year (2001-2002 to three in 2006-2007. Hib meningitis incidence dropped from 88 cases per 100 000 children aged < 5 years in the year before vaccine introduction to 13 within 4 years, and to near zero in the fifth year. Vaccine effectiveness for 2 or more doses was 93% (95% confidence interval, CI: 69-99 against confirmed Hib meningitis and 53% (95% CI: 11-68 against purulent meningitis of unknown cause. In Uganda, Hib vaccine prevents an estimated 28 000 cases of pneumonia and meningitis, 5000 deaths and 1000 severe meningitis sequelae each year. CONCLUSION: Infant immunization with Hib vaccine has virtually eliminated Hib meningitis in Uganda within 5 years. Ensuring long-term benefits of Hib vaccine urgently requires sustainable vaccine financing, high-quality ongoing surveillance, and a health sector able to deliver a robust immunization programme.

  7. 75 FR 52755 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing...

    2010-08-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for... the development of antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin...

  8. Ventricular Pneumocephalus with Meningitis after Lumbar Nerve Root Block

    Shin Ahn; Young Sang Ko; Kyung Soo Lim

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar nerve root block is a common modality used in the management of radiculopathy. Its complications are rare and usually minor. Despite its low morbidity, significant acute events can occur. Pneumocephalus is an accumulation of air in the intracranial space. It indicates a violation of the dura or the presence of infection. The object of this report is to describe the case of a patient with intraventricular pneumocephalus and bacterial meningitis after lumbar nerve root block. A 70-year-o...

  9. Update on immunology associated with bacterial meningitis%细菌性脑膜炎的免疫学研究进展

    毛丹丹

    2015-01-01

    细菌性脑膜炎是小儿时期最常见的中枢神经系统感染性疾病之一,尽管给予积极治疗,其病死率及致残率仍居高不下.研究表明,病原感染后导致宿主免疫失调是该病高致残率的主要因素.补体C3沉积细菌表面并活化是补体介导的细菌清除的关键步骤.脑脊液中C3或C5水平明显变化提示预后不良.致病菌穿过血脑屏障后,细菌细胞组分被模式识别受体识别,刺激机体产生过量细胞因子,介导白细胞募集及氧化应激反应,最终导致神经元不可逆损伤.该文以肺炎链球菌感染为例,综述细菌性脑膜炎的免疫学研究进展.%Bacterial meningitis is one of the most common infectious diseases of the central nervous system in childhood,with high mortality and disability rate despite available treatment.Studies have shown that the host's immunity dysfunction after the infection plays a central role in neurological sequelae.The deposition and activation of complement component C3 on the bacterial surface is a key step in the complement cascade leading to elimination of the microbe,and the level of complement component C3 or C5 in cerebrospinal fluid may predict outcome of bacterial meningitis.After the microorganisms cross the blood-brain barrier,bacterial compounds are recognized by pattern recognition receptors,triggering the production of excessive cytokines,attracting leukocytes and generating oxidative stress,which contributes to neuron injury irreversibly.This review focuses on current research progress on immunology associated with pneumococcal meningitis.

  10. Etiologia e evolução das meningites bacterianas em centro de pediatria Etiology and evolution of bacterial meningitis in a pediatric center

    Roberta M.C. Romanelli

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: determinar a prevalência dos agentes etiológicos das meningites bacterianas em serviço de referência, no atendimento de doenças infecciosas para o estado de Minas Gerais, e verificar a resposta ao tratamento utilizado.Métodos: estudo descritivo em que foram incluídas todas as crianças com diagnóstico provável de meningite, admitidas na instituição no período de junho a novembro/99.Resultados: obteve-se 210 casos de meningite, sendo 111 casos de etiologia bacteriana (52,9%. Destes, 52 casos foram diagnósticos prováveis (por alteração do liquor rotina e 59 com diagnósticos de certeza (por cultura e/ou isolamento de antígeno. Os principais agentes isolados foram, em ordem decrescente, H. influenzae, N. meningitidis e S. pneumoniae. O tratamento inicial para a faixa etária de três meses a cinco anos foi ampicilina e cloranfenicol, sendo posteriormente restrito para penicilina em casos de meningococo e pneumococo, e para cloranfenicol nos casos de H. influenzae. A mudança para antimicrobiano de maior espectro foi realizada com base em dados clínicos ou laboratoriais, não havendo isolamento de microorganismo resistente.Conclusões: o acompanhamento do perfil epidemiológico das meningites deve ser contínuo, e cada serviço deve se basear em dados locais para direcionar a terapia antimicrobiana. A monitorização contínua dos agentes prevalentes em cada instituição e de sua resistência é fundamental para a escolha antimicrobiana, atuando com menor interferência na colonização individual, sem contribuir para a crescente resistência dos agentes responsáveis pelas infecções meníngeas.Objective: to establish the prevalence of the etiological agents of bacterial meningitis in a reference center for the treatment of infectious diseases in the state of Minas Gerais. Methods: descriptive study including all children with probable diagnosis of meningitis between June/1999 and November/1999.Results: there were 210

  11. Blockade of NMDA receptor subtype NR2B prevents seizures but not apoptosis of dentate gyrus neurons in bacterial meningitis in infant rats

    Täuber Martin G

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excitotoxic neuronal injury by action of the glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA subtype have been implicated in the pathogenesis of brain damage as a consequence of bacterial meningitis. The most potent and selective blocker of NMDA receptors containing the NR2B subunit is (R,S-alpha-(4-hydroxyphenyl-beta-methyl-4-(phenylmethyl-1-piperid inepropanol (RO 25-6981. Here we evaluated the effect of RO 25-6981 on hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in an infant rat model of meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Animals were randomized for treatment with RO 25-6981 at a dosage of either 0.375 mg (15 mg/kg; n = 28 or 3.75 mg (150 mg/kg; n = 15 every 3 h or an equal volume of sterile saline (250 μl; n = 40 starting at 12 h after infection. Eighteen hours after infection, animals were assessed clinically and seizures were observed for a period of 2 h. At 24 h after infection animals were sacrificed and brains were examined for apoptotic injury to the dentate granule cell layer of the hippocampus. Results Treatment with RO 25-6981 had no effect on clinical scores, but the incidence of seizures was reduced (P Conclusions Treatment with a highly selective blocker of NMDA receptors containing the NR2B subunit failed to protect hippocampal neurons from injury in this model of pneumococcal meningitis, while it had some beneficial effect on the incidence of seizures.

  12. 77 FR 59929 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Exacerbations of Chronic Bronchitis in Patients With...

    2012-10-01

    ... August 22, 2008 (73 FR 49684), which in turn revised the draft guidance for industry entitled ``Acute... ``Acute Bacterial Exacerbations of Chronic Bronchitis in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary... treatment of acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis in patients with chronic...

  13. Avaliação e acompanhamento audiológico após meningite bacteriana Audiological assessment and follow-up post bacterial meningitis

    MARIA INÊS VIEIRA COUTO

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência auditiva é uma das sequelas da meningite bacteriana que ocorre com maior frequência em crianças. Este estudo descreve o perfil audiológico (periférico e central de crianças internadas com diagnóstico de meningite bacteriana. Nas 89 crianças que compareceram ao seguimento audiológico após a alta hospitalar e foram submetidas aos testes audiológicos, os resultados evidenciaram que 85,4% apresentaram acuidade auditiva normal em ambas orelhas, 10,1% apresentaram deficiência auditiva neurossensorial bilateral e 4,5% apresentaram deficiência auditiva neurossensorial unilateral. Nos testes que avaliaram as habilidades de processamento auditivo, os resultados mostraram que 10% dessas crianças apresentaram alteração no desempenho de localização auditiva e de reconhecimento de sentenças com mensagem competitiva ipsilateral.Hearing loss is the more frequent sequel of bacterial meningitis in children. This study describes the audiological profile (peripheric and central of 89 children admitted to the hospital wards with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Those children attended audiological follow up, after their hospital descharge, and were submitted to audiological tests. The results showed that 85.4% among them presented normal hearing in both ears 10.1% presented bilateral neurosensorial hearing loss and 4.5% presented unilateral neurosensorial hearing loss. The results from the auditory processing skills assessment showed that 10% of those children presented auditory localization and recognition of sentences with competitive messages (Paediatric Sentences Identification - ipsilateral disorders.

  14. Bakteriel meningitis i Danmark 2002 og 2003. Landsdaekkende registrering baseret på laboratoriedata

    Meyer, Christian N; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Nielsen, Xiaohui C; Møller, Jens K; Mølbak, Kåre; Korshin, André; Rønneberg, Elisabeth; Køster-Rasmussen, Rasmus; Høiby, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Notification of bacterial meningitis (BM) is likely to be incomplete, and a recent Danish study indicated that unbalanced notification may bias expected aetiology of BM. Therefore the Danish Bacterial Meningitis Group initiated a national registration of culture-positive BM.......Notification of bacterial meningitis (BM) is likely to be incomplete, and a recent Danish study indicated that unbalanced notification may bias expected aetiology of BM. Therefore the Danish Bacterial Meningitis Group initiated a national registration of culture-positive BM....

  15. Antibiotikavalg ved purulent meningitis uden bakteriologisk diagnose

    Krarup, H B

    1989-01-01

    A case of meningitis in a 16 month old boy caused by Hemophilus influenzae resistant to ampicillin is presented. The question is raised whether a third generation cephalosporin such as cefotaxime should be the drug of choice in the treatment of bacterial meningitis with unknown etiology...

  16. Modulation of the Colonic Bacterial Flora Affects Differently Bacterial Translocation and Liver Injury in an Acute Liver Injury Model

    Adawi, Diya; Molin, Göran; Ahrné, Siv; Jeppsson, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of the administration of different bacterial strains on the extent of liver injury and bacterial translocation in an acute liver injury model. Design: Experimental study. Setting: University hospital, Sweden. Subjects: Sprague–Dawley rats. Interventions: Six different bacterial strains (Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 25285T, Enterococcus faecium No.1, Enterococcus faecium No.2, Escherichia coli F131, Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 6595, and Bifidobacterium lon...

  17. Epidemiology of bacterial meningitis among children in Brazil, 1997-1998 Epidemiologia de meningites bacterianas entre crianças no Brasil, 1997 a 1998

    Débora PL Weiss

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To document the incidence and the descriptive epidemiology of bacterial meningitis among individuals under age 20 in a geographically defined region in Brazil during the two-year period immediately preceding the introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib vaccines into the national immunization program of Brazil. METHODS: Population-based epidemiological study of all cases of bacterial meningitis reported among residents of Campinas, Brazil, under age 20 (n=316,570 during the period of 1997-98, using comprehensive surveillance records compiled by the Campinas Health Department from cases reported among hospital inpatients, outpatients, emergency room visits, death certificates, and autopsy reports. RESULTS: The incidence of bacterial meningitis (n=274 was 334.9, 115 and 43.5 cases/10(5 person-years (pys for residents of Campinas under age 1, 5 and 20, respectively. All cases were hospitalized, with an average length of stay of 12 days. Documented prior antibiotic use was 4.0%. The case-fatality rate of bacterial meningitis in individuals under age 20 was 9% (24/274 with 75% of deaths occurring in children under the age of five. The incidence of Hib meningitis (n=26 was 62.8 and 17 cases/10(5 pys in children age OBJETIVO: Documentar a incidência e a epidemiologia descritiva de meningites bacterianas entre pessoas com idade inferior a 20 anos em uma região geográfica definida do Brasil. O período foi de dois anos, imediatamente anterior à introdução da vacina contra Haemophilus influenzae tipo b (Hib, no Programa Nacional de Imunização do Brasil. MÉTODOS: Estudo epidemiológico populacional dos casos de meningites bacterianas notificados entre residentes em Campinas, SP, Brasil, com idade inferior a 20 anos (n=316.570, entre 1997 e 1998. Baseia-se em dados de notificação da vigilância epidemiológica da Secretaria Municipal de Saúde de Campinas, relatados entre casos provenientes de pacientes hospitalizados

  18. Assessment of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in uncomplicated acute diverticulitis of the colon

    Tursi, Antonio; Brandimarte, Giovanni; Giorgetti, Gian Marco; Elisei, Walter

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may contribute to the appearance of several gastrointestinal nonspecific symptoms. Acute diverticulitis is affected by some similar symptoms and bacterial colonic overgrowth. We assessed the prevalence of SIBO in acute uncomplicated diverticulitis and evaluated its influence on the clinical course of the disease.

  19. Meningitis caused by human herpesvirus-6.

    Huang, L M; Lee, C Y; Lee, P I; J. M. Chen; Wang, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    Since the discovery of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) the illnesses associated with it have increased steadily. Two infants with meningitis are reported: both suffered a mild meningitis and serological studies confirmed an acute HHV-6 infection. This report supports a role of HHV-6 in nervous system disease.

  20. The Role of Vancomycin on Meningitis

    team, Ahmed I. Shatat and P.I.C.U; Hashem Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Central nervous system(CNS) infection is the most common cause of fever associate with signs and symptoms of CNS disease in children. Many organisms can cause these infections, but viral is the most common, then bacterial which is more common than parasitic and fungal infections. The most common three organisms are Haemophilus influenza type b(Hib), streptococcus pneumonia and Nieseria meningitis. Treatment should start as soon as possible in bacterial meningitis with antibiotics, bu...

  1. Leukemic meningitis involving the cauda equina: a case report

    The CNS involvement by leukemia may either be meningeal or parenchymal, although meningeal infiltration of leukemic cells, known as leukemic meningitis is more common. We report a case of leukemic meningitis involving the cauda equina in a patient with an acute lymphoblastic crisis which transformed from the chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia. An MR image revealed diffuse enlargement and peripheral ring enhancement of the nerve roots of the cauda equina

  2. Leukemic meningitis involving the cauda equina: a case report

    Lee, Dong Hyun; Kim, Ho Kyun; Lee, Young Hwan [School of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    The CNS involvement by leukemia may either be meningeal or parenchymal, although meningeal infiltration of leukemic cells, known as leukemic meningitis is more common. We report a case of leukemic meningitis involving the cauda equina in a patient with an acute lymphoblastic crisis which transformed from the chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia. An MR image revealed diffuse enlargement and peripheral ring enhancement of the nerve roots of the cauda equina.

  3. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for... drugs to treat acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). This guidance finalizes...

  4. The Use of Animal Models to Study Bacterial Translocation During Acute Pancreatitis

    2007-01-01

    Infection of pancreatic necrosis with intestinal flora is accepted to be a main predictor of outcome during severe acute pancreatitis. Bacterial translocation is the process whereby luminal bacteria migrate to extraintestinal sites. Animal models were proven indispensable in detecting three major aspects of bacterial translocation: small bowel bacterial overgrowth, mucosal barrier failure, and disturbed immune responses. Despite the progress made in the knowledge of bacterial translocation, t...

  5. The use of animal models to study bacterial translocation during acute pancreatitis.

    Minnen, L.P. van; Blom, M.; Timmerman, H; Visser, M. R.; Gooszen, H.G.; Akkermans, L M A

    2007-01-01

    Infection of pancreatic necrosis with intestinal flora is accepted to be a main predictor of outcome during severe acute pancreatitis. Bacterial translocation is the process whereby luminal bacteria migrate to extraintestinal sites. Animal models were proven indispensable in detecting three major aspects of bacterial translocation: small bowel bacterial overgrowth, mucosal barrier failure, and disturbed immune responses. Despite the progress made in the knowledge of bacterial translocation, t...

  6. Acute-on-chronic liver failure due to bacterial infection in liver cirrhosis: causes and management

    Han, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection is a common complication in patients with liver cirrhosis, and acute-on-chronic liver failure due to bacterial infection has become a serious clinical problem. There are still many problems in the research on the pathogenesis and management of bacterial infection in liver cirrhosis, such as insidious onset, difficult early diagnosis, and increased multi-drug resistant bacteria. This article reviews the research progress in the causes and management of bacterial infection i...

  7. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma

    Guang-zhi YANG

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical, neuroimaging and pathological features of meningeal hemangiopericytoma.  Methods One case of meningeal hemangiopericytoma was reported, and the relevant literatures were also reviewed.  Results A 40-year-old male had caught a headache for about 3 months with muscle weakness in the left limb, and became progressively serious for 2 weeks. Brain MRI displayed a space-occupying lesion in the right temporal lobe with equal signals in T1WI, mixed signals in T2WI and obvious enhancements. In surgery, the tumor was found to be located in the cranial fossa, and was completely removed. The tumor was large, with rich blood supply, and had no capsule. In histology, the neoplasm was composed of dense spindle cells with mild atypia. The boundary of the tumor cells was unclear. The nuclei were circular, oval or spindle with obvious mitoses (4/10 HPF. There were plenty of thick-wall blood vessels and blood sinuses with characteristic "staghorn" shape. In immunohistochemistry, CD34 and vimentin (Vim were positive, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA was focally positive and Ki-67 labeling index was 17%-20%. Postoperative radiotherapy was adopted and no relapse was found during the 20-month follow-up period. Conclusions The meningeal hemangiopericytoma is easy to be misdiagnosed as meningioma, however, the prognosis of meningeal hemangiopericytoma is quite worse, thus the differential diagnosis is very important. A clear diagnosis often depends on pathological examination. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.03.011

  8. Subdural effusion following purulent meningitis

    The authors experienced 6 cases of subdural effusion following purulent meningitis. All patients were less than one year old. Subdural puncture revealed subdural effusion in all cases. CT scan was performed in 4 cases at an acute stage and showed a low density area in the anterior parietal region. In 3 of them, although neurological symptoms disappeared after subdural puncture, CT findings did not improve. Follow-up CT scan revealed ventricular dilatation and cerebral atrophy. CT is considered to be useful for diagnosis of subdural effusion after meningitis and follow-up the effect of treatment. (Ueda, J.)

  9. Meningitis, clinical presentation of tetanus.

    Moniuszko, Anna; Zajkowska, Agata; Tumiel, Ewa; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Czupryna, Piotr; Pancewicz, Sławomir; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Zdrodowska, Agnieszka; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tetanus is an acute disease caused by a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani. Tetanus immunization has been available since the late 1930s but sporadic cases still occur, usually in incompletely vaccinated or unvaccinated individuals. Case Report. An elderly previously vaccinated female contracted tetanus following foot injury. Clinically she presented with meningitis causing diagnostic and therapeutic delays. Why Should Physician Be Aware of This? Even in developed countries the differential diagnosis of meningitis, especially in the elderly, should include tetanus. Treatment in intensive care unit is required. General population might benefit from vaccine boosters and education on this potentially fatal disease. PMID:25789186

  10. Meningitis, Clinical Presentation of Tetanus

    Anna Moniuszko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tetanus is an acute disease caused by a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani. Tetanus immunization has been available since the late 1930s but sporadic cases still occur, usually in incompletely vaccinated or unvaccinated individuals. Case Report. An elderly previously vaccinated female contracted tetanus following foot injury. Clinically she presented with meningitis causing diagnostic and therapeutic delays. Why Should Physician Be Aware of This? Even in developed countries the differential diagnosis of meningitis, especially in the elderly, should include tetanus. Treatment in intensive care unit is required. General population might benefit from vaccine boosters and education on this potentially fatal disease.

  11. Dexamethasone treatment in adults with pneumococcal meningitis: risk factors for death

    M. Weisfelt; D. van de Beek; J. de Gans

    2006-01-01

    In experimental meningitis, adjunctive treatment with steroids reduces cerebrospinal fluid inflammation and thereby improves neurological outcome. On the basis of these findings, several clinical trials have assessed treatment with adjunctive steroids in bacterial meningitis, with conflicting result

  12. Use of Vaccines to Prevent Meningitis in Persons with Cochlear Implants

    ... conjugate vaccine=MenACWY Use of Vaccines to Prevent Meningitis in Persons with Cochlear Implants Recommend on Facebook ... cochlear implants are more likely to get bacterial meningitis than children without cochlear implants. In addition, some ...

  13. Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging in meningitis

    Gd-DPTA-enhanced MR imaging was performed in 16 patients with meningitis (seven tuberculous, four bacterial, three fungal, and two viral) on a 2.0-T unit. Hemorrhagic infarcts of basal ganglia and localized enhancement of thickened dura adjacent were demonstrated on T1-weighted images in three patients with tuberculous meningitis and four with bacterial meningitis, respectively, that were not seen on CT. Enhanced T1-weighted images readily differentiated leptomeningeal enhancement from vessels in two cases with CT of equivocal meningeal enhancement. Nonenhanced T2-weighted images were most sensitive for demonstrating ischemia/infarct and edema. Otherwise, MR images generally matched CT scans

  14. CT in meningitis purulenta

    Twenty nine infants with meningitis purulenta were classified into 5 groups according to CT findings in the acute stage: cerebral infarction group, subdural hygroma group, ventricular enlargement group, and a group of other diseases. In each group, clinical findings, surgical procedures and prognosis were evaluated. In the cerebral infarction group, although 3 of 4 patients underwent V-P shunt or subdural drainage, remarkable sequelae were found in all the cases. Of 4 subdural hygroma patients, 2 had subdural drainage, and 4 of 8 patients with ventricular enlargement underwent V-P shunt. All the patients of the two groups had favorable prognosis without any sequela. A patient with cerebral herniation in the group of other diseases died in its acute stage. Eleven infants without abnormal CT findings showed normal psychomotor development. (Ueda, J.)

  15. THE VALUE OF PROCALCITONIN MEASUREMENT IN MENINGITIS PATIENTS

    SHAIMAA A. HAMEED

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Meningitis is defined as inflammation of the membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord and can occur at any age, it is caused by infectious microorganisms include (bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites and non infectious include (drugs, carcinoma and inflammatory disorder. Objective: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the value of PCT levels to discriminate between bacterial and non-bacterial meningitis patients. Methods: A total of 40 patients with meningitis admitted to emergency department of Baghdad teaching hospital and pediatrics emergency room in child welfare teaching hospital were followed in this prospective study. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF sample where collected from 40 patients and serum sample collected from these patients and healthy person. NHS real-time PCR technique using to identified the type of bacteria and serum levels of PCT were measured. Results: The diagnosis of meningitis was based on clinical findings, gram staining, culture, and chemical analysis of CSF. Twenty-eight of patients were diagnosed as bacterial meningitis and the other twelve patients as non-bacterial meningitis. The mean PCT level in patients with bacterial meningitis was 658.00 pg/ml, and the lower level was 21. Pg/ml, while the higher level in patients with non-bacterial meningitis was 11.00 pg/ml (mean level, 5.30 pg/ml. It is clear from the range of serum PCT level that there are no overlapping values seen for serum PCT in both groups. Conclusion: Serum PCT levels can be used in the early diagnosis of bacterial meningitis and is more valuable marker than the other predictive marker. Similarly, they may be useful in differential diagnosis of bacterial and non-bacterial meningitis to assess treatment efficacy.

  16. Severe renal failure in acute bacterial pyelonephritis: Do not forget corticosteroids

    Sqalli Tarik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF is a rare complication of acute pyelonephritis in adult immunocompetent patients. Recovery of renal function usually occurs if antibiotics are promptly initiated. However, long-term consequences of renal scarring due to acute pyelonephritis are probably underestimated, and some patients present with prolonged renal failure despite adequate antibiotic therapy. We report two cases of severe ARF complicating bacterial pyelonephritis successfully treated with corticosteroids in association with conventional antibiotics.

  17. Bacterial Diversity in Oral Samples of Children in Niger with Acute Noma, Acute Necrotizing Gingivitis, and Healthy Controls

    Bolivar, Ignacio; Whiteson, Katrine; Stadelmann, Benoît Yves; Baratti, Denise; Gizard, Yann; Mombelli, Andrea; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background Noma is a gangrenous disease that leads to severe disfigurement of the face with high morbidity and mortality, but its etiology remains unknown. Young children in developing countries are almost exclusively affected. The purpose of the study was to record and compare bacterial diversity in oral samples from children with or without acute noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis from a defined geographical region in Niger by culture-independent molecular methods. Methods and Principal F...

  18. Cryptococcal meningitis

    DING Wen-ting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a kind of encapsulated fungal organism that widely exists in the nature. Because of its neurotropic nature, the central nervous system becomes its major target organ. Cryptococcus neoformans can use "transcellular pathway", "paracellular pathway" and "Trojan horse approach" to cross blood-brain barrier, and then make the devastating diffusion. Despite antifungal therapy, the mortality rate remains between 10% and 25% in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, and at least one-third of patients have experienced failure of antifungal therapy. Consequently, it is very important for us to understand the pathogenesis of CM, to diagnose as soon as possible and to explore more reasonable treatment.

  19. Outbreak of Enterovirus - 71 Meningitis in Calicut

    CK Sasidharan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Enterovirus 71(EV 71 causes wide spectrum of infections ranging from asymptomatic conditions to clinical syndromes like diarrhea, rash, hand-foot-and mouth disease (HFMD, herpangina, aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, myocarditis, acute flaccid paralysis, bulbar and brainstem encephalitis Guillain Barre syndrome, pulmonary haemorrhage. This study deals with an outbreak of aseptic meningitis in children caused by EV 71 virus. Methods: The authors report an outbreak of aseptic meningitis in children in and around Calicut in June 2008. Clinical and laboratory study was done in collaboration with National Centre for Disease Control, New Delhi. 149 children with aseptic meningitis were studied and followed up from June 2008 to May 2009. Result: All children had clinical features suggestive of aseptic meningitis and serology showed the rising antibody titre against EV 71 virus infection. CSF analysis also showed four fold rise in antibodies in one and ≥ 1:2 neutralising antibodies titer against EV- 71 in four samples indicating meningitis due to EV-71. Conclusion: EV 71 was identified as the causative agent of the outbreak of aseptic meningitis in the study and the fact that the EV 71 infection has evolved from minor illness like HFMD to major illness like aseptic meningitis from the same locality is truly alarming.

  20. Spontaneous pneumorrhachis and transverse myelitis complicating purulent meningitis

    Bouchra Amara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumorrhachis is the presence of air in the spinal canal; mostly, it has an iatrogenic origin. The association of this entity with spontaneous pneumomediastinum without any pneumothorax is rarely reported in the literature. The spontaneous resorption is the usual evolution. The association to acute transverse myelitis is discussed by the authors. The patient is a 21-year-old male with pneumorrhachis associated to a spontaneous pneumomediastinum was admitted at the emergency department for bacterial meningitis. The antibiotherapy has marked the clinical profile by disappearance of the meningeal signs in the 48 h after admission. In contrast, the neurological symptoms were of marked aggravation by appearance of a tetraparesis with a respiratory distress syndrome having required artificial ventilation. The computed tomography (CT scan showed a typical hypodensity corresponding to paramedullary air extending to several thoracic segments. The spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a high cervical medullary edema without signs of compression. The patient died within 15 days with a profile of vasoparalysis resistant to vasoactive drugs. Pneumomediastinum associated to pneumorrhachis and transverse myelitis complicating purulent meningitis is a rare entity. Although the usual evolution is favorable, the occurrence of serious complications is possible.

  1. Meningite bacteriana neonatal: estudo prospectivo da evolução a longo prazo de 55 crianças Neonatal bacterial meningitis: prospective study of the long term outcome of 55 children

    Vera Lúcia Jornada Krebs

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudadas prospectivamente 55 crianças que apresentaram meningite bacteriana no período neonatal, com o objetivo da analisar a frequência e o tipo de sequelas neurológicas. Todas as crianças nasceram a termo, sendo 38 do sexo masculino e 17 do feminino; a idade de início da doença variou de 3 a 28 dias. Os principais agentes etiológicos foram as enterobactérias. O tempo médio de seguimento foi 5 anos. A frequência de sequelas neurológicas foi 67,3%, representadas principalmente pelo atraso do desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor (58,2%, hidrocefalia (45,5% e convulsões (34,5%. As alterações motoras graves ocorreram em 23,6% dos pacientes (tetraplegia, diplegia, hemiparesia e ataxia. As convulsões na fase aguda da doença e a cultura positiva do líquido cefalorraqueano estiveram associadas significativamente com a presença de sequelas. Na avaliação do desempenho escolar, realizada em 25 crianças, observaram-se dificuldades na aprendizagem em 48% dos casos, associadas significativamente à deficiência mental.Fifty-five infants who presented bacterial neonatal meningitis were prospectively studied to analyze the frequency and the type of sequelae. All the infants were full term newborns.There were 38 boys and 17 girls; the age of disease onset varied from 3 to 28 days. The causative organism was represented mainly by enterobacteriae. The median time of follow-up was 5 years. The frequency of neurologic sequelae was 63.7%, represented mainly by neuropsychomotor development delay (58.2%, hydrocephaly (45.5% and convulsions (34.5%. Severe motor abnormalities ocurred in 23.6% of children (quadriplegia, diplegia, hemiparesia and ataxia. Convulsions in the acute phase of the disease and the positive cerebrospinal fluid culture were highly associated to sequelae. The school performance, obtained in 25 children, showed presence of disabilities in 48% of cases, which were significantly associated to mental retardation.

  2. The Effects of Total Colectomy on Bacterial Translocation in a Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Şenocak, Rahman; Yigit, Taner; Kılbaş, Zafer; Coşkun, Ali Kağan; Harlak, Ali; Menteş, Mustafa Öner; Kılıç, Abdullah; Günal, Armağan; Kozak, Orhan

    2015-12-01

    Prevention of secondary infection is currently the main goal of treatment for acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Colon was considered as the main origin of secondary infection. Our aim was to investigate whether prophylactic total colectomy would reduce the rate of bacterial translocation and infection of pancreatic necrosis. Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Pancreatitis was created by ductal infusion of sodium taurocholate. Rats were divided into four groups: group-1, laparotomy + pancreatic ductal infusion of saline; group-2, laparotomy + pancreatic ductal infusion of sodium taurocholate; group-3, total colectomy + pancreatic ductal infusion of saline; and group-4, total colectomy + pancreatic ductal infusion of sodium taurocholate. Forty-eight hours later, tissue and blood samples were collected for microbiological and histopathological analysis. Total colectomy caused small bowel bacterial overgrowth with gram-negative and gram-positive microorganisms. Bacterial count of gram-negative rods in the small intestine and pancreatic tissue in rats with colectomy and acute pancreatitis were significantly higher than in rats with acute pancreatitis only (group-2 versus group-4; small bowel, p = bacterial overgrowth and pancreatic infection (r = 0,836, p = 0.001). In acute pancreatitis, prophylactic total colectomy (which can mimic colonic cleansing and reduction of colonic flora) induces small bowel bacterial overgrowth, which is associated with increased bacterial translocation to the pancreas. PMID:26730036

  3. Neuroimaging in tuberculous meningitis

    Ravindra Kumar Garg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous meningitis is a serious infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Early diagnosis is the key to success of treatment. Neuroimaging plays a crucial role in the early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis and its disabling complications. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered superior to computed tomography. Neuroimaging characteristics include leptomeningeal and basal cisternal enhancement, hydrocephalus, periventricular infarcts, and tuberculoma. Partially treated pyogenic meningitis, cryptococcal meningitis, viral encephalitis, carcinomatous, and lymphomatous meningitis may have many similar neuroimaging characteristics, and differentiation from tuberculous meningitis at times on the basis of neuroimaging characteristics becomes difficult.

  4. Carcinomatous meningitis

    Carcinomatous meningitis (CM) occurs in approximately 10%-30% of patient with various malignant neoplasms and commonly eludes standard radiographic techniques or spinal fluid examination. Fifteen New Zealand white rabbits were used in this study. Twelve rabbits were injected with 10/sup 6/ VX2 tumor cells into the cisterna magna, while four rabbits received sterile culture medium. Animals were scanned 6-12 days later at 0.5 or 1.5 using a surface coil, 3-5-mm section thickness, and a field of view of 8-12 cm. Spin-echo (SE) (repetion time ms/echo time ms) pulse sequence with SE500-300/20-40 or SE 2,000/80 pulse sequences were used. Animals were scanned before and after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA, 0.1 mM/kg. Contrast enhancement (CE) was demonstrated as increased signal intensity in the images along the base of the brain and spinal canal in all tumor-bearing rabbits compared with CE absence in control rabbits. These results indicate that Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging can accurately delineate CM in an animal model

  5. Elevated soluble urokinase receptor values in CSF, age and bacterial meningitis infection are independent and additive risk factors of fatal outcome

    Tzanakaki, G; Paparoupa, M; Kyprianou, M;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential role of cerebrospinal fluid soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) level, infection and age as risk factors for fatal outcome in patients suspected of having meningitis and/or bacteraemia on admission to hospital. A total of 545 cerebrospinal...

  6. Meningitis and Encephalitis

    ... Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Meningitis and Encephalitis Fact Sheet See a list of ... Where can I get more information? What is meningitis? What is encephalitis? Infections, and less commonly other ...

  7. Meningitis Myths and Facts

    ... Diseases Infographic Prevention and Control of Meningococcal Disease Meningitis Myths and Facts Myth: Meningococcal disease is easy ... infected person, such as shaking hands. Fact: Meningococcal meningitis is spread through air droplets and direct contact ...

  8. Meningitis - H. influenzae

    ... antibiotics may be considered. Always use good hygiene habits, such as washing hands before and after changing a diaper, and after using the bathroom. Alternative Names H. influenzae meningitis; H. flu meningitis ...

  9. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Infectious diarrhea - bacterial gastroenteritis; Acute gastroenteritis; Gastroenteritis - bacterial ... Bacterial gastroenteritis can affect 1 person or a group of people who all ate the same food. It is ...

  10. Prevention of bacterial infection and sepsis in acute severe pancreatitis.

    McClelland, P.; Murray, A; Yaqoob, M.; Van Saene, H. K.; Bone, J M; Mostafa, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1986 six patients with acute respiratory failure (requiring ventilation for at least 3 days) complicating acute pancreatitis were managed on the intensive care unit (median ventilation period 6 days; range 3-41 days). Between 1987 and 1989 nine similar patients were managed (median ventilation period 35 days, range 4-69 days), and a regimen of enteral tobramycin, polymyxin and amphotericin to selectively decontaminate the digestive tract (SDD) was introduced. Five of six pati...

  11. Bacterial etiology in acute hospitalized chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations

    Asli Gorek Dilektasli; Ezgi Demirdogen Cetinoglu; Nilufer Aylin Acet Ozturk; Funda Coskun; Guven Ozkaya; Ahmet Ursavas; Cuneyt Ozakin; Mehmet Karadag; Esra Uzaslan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The most common cause of acute COPD exacerbation (AECOPD) is the respiratory tract infections. We sought to determine the bacteriological etiology of hospitalized acute exacerbations of COPD requiring hospitalization in consecutive two years. Methods. We aimed to determine the bacteriological etiology underlying in patients whom admitted to Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and hospitalized with AECOPD in the last two years. Medical records ...

  12. Clinical efficacy of dalbavancin for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI)

    Leuthner KD; Buechler KA; Kogan D; Saguros A; Lee HS

    2016-01-01

    Kimberly D Leuthner,1 Kristin A Buechler,1 David Kogan,1 Agafe Saguros,1 H Stephen Lee2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Services, University Medical Center of Southern Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA; 2Roseman University of Health Sciences College of Pharmacy, Henderson, NV, USA Abstract: Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) are a common disease causing patients to seek treatment through the health care system. With the continued increase of drug-resistant bacterial pathogen...

  13. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth mimicking acute flare as a pitfall in patients with Crohn's Disease

    Reinshagen Max; Mason Richard A; Adler Guido; Spaniol Ulrike; Klaus Jochen; von Tirpitz C Christian

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is characterized by excessive proliferation of colonic bacterial species in the small bowel. Potential causes of SIBO include fistulae, strictures or motility disturbances. Hence, patients with Crohn's Disease (CD) are especially predisposed to develop SIBO. As result, CD patients may experience malabsorption and report symptoms such as weight loss, watery diarrhea, meteorism, flatulence and abdominal pain, mimicking acute flare...

  14. Detection and identification of bacterial DNA in serum from patients with acute pancreatitis

    E. de Madaria; Martínez, J.; Lozano, B; L. Sempere; S. Benlloch; J. Such; Uceda, F; Francés, R; Pérez-Mateo, M

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: Bacterial infections are common complications in patients with acute pancreatitis, and translocation of bacteria from the intestinal lumen is probably the first step in the pathogenesis of these infections. As blood cultures in afebrile patients are usually negative, more sensitive methods to investigate this hypothesis in patients are needed. Our group has recently developed a method to detect the presence of bacterial DNA in biological fluids, and we aimed to detect bac...

  15. Primary Spinal Meningeal Melanocytoma

    Ha, Dong Ho [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Primary meningeal melanocytic neoplasms are rare lesions that originate from leptomeningeal melanocytes. An intradural meningeal melanocytoma in the thoracic spine is less common than a malignant melanoma, which is its malignant counterpart. We report a case of a histopathologically confirmed primary intradural meningeal melanocytoma in the thoracic spine along with a literature.

  16. Mechanisms of the Hepatic Acute-Phase Response during Bacterial Pneumonia▿

    Quinton, Lee J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Robson, Bryanne E.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    The acute-phase response is characterized by increased circulating levels of acute-phase proteins (APPs) generated by the liver. During bacterial pneumonia, APPs correlate with the severity of disease, serve as biomarkers, and are functionally significant. The kinetics and regulatory mechanisms of APP induction in the liver during lung infection have yet to be defined. Here we show that APP mRNA transcription is induced in the livers of mice whose lungs are infected with either Escherichia co...

  17. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Bacterial Meningoencephalitis.

    Belkys Rodríguez Llerena.; Luciano Núñez Almoguea.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Bacterial Meningoencephalitis. It has been defined as an acute inflammatory process caused by bacteria, often purulent, which involves the meninges, subarachnoid space around the brain, spinal cord and usually includes the ventricles. It is caused in the 80% of the patients by three bacteria: Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides and Streptococcus pneumonia. Concepts, classification, diagnosis and treatment were reviewed. It includes assessment guidel...

  18. Management of acute bacterial keratitis: Fortified antibiotics or fluoroquinolones?

    Ana Luisa Hofling-Lima

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial keratitis (BK is one of the most frequent causes for emergency hospital admissions.1 Identifying the causative microorganism promptly and properly is mandatory to achieve acceptable outcomes. Nevertheless, appropriate initial management of these cases requires laboratory-based diagnosis and even a modest laboratory set may not always be available at some clinical settings.

  19. Exome Array Analysis of Susceptibility to Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Kloek, Anne T.; van Setten, Jessica; van der Ende, Arie; Bots, Michiel L.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Serón, Mercedes Valls; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik; Ferwerda, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Host genetic variability may contribute to susceptibility of bacterial meningitis, but which genes contribute to the susceptibility to this complex disease remains undefined. We performed a genetic association study in 469 community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis cases and 2072 population-based controls from the Utrecht Health Project in order to find genetic variants associated with pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility. A HumanExome BeadChip was used to genotype 102,097 SNPs in the collected DNA samples. Associations were tested with the Fisher exact test. None of the genetic variants tested reached Bonferroni corrected significance (p-value pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27389768

  20. Host Biomarkers for Distinguishing Bacterial from Non-Bacterial Causes of Acute Febrile Illness: A Comprehensive Review

    Kapasi, Anokhi J.; Dittrich, Sabine; González, Iveth J.; Rodwell, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Background In resource limited settings acute febrile illnesses are often treated empirically due to a lack of reliable, rapid point-of-care diagnostics. This contributes to the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs and poor treatment outcomes. The aim of this comprehensive review was to summarize the diagnostic performance of host biomarkers capable of differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infections to guide the use of antibiotics. Methods Online databases of published literature were searched from January 2010 through April 2015. English language studies that evaluated the performance of one or more host biomarker in differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infection in patients were included. Key information extracted included author information, study methods, population, pathogens, clinical information, and biomarker performance data. Study quality was assessed using a combination of validated criteria from the QUADAS and Lijmer checklists. Biomarkers were categorized as hematologic factors, inflammatory molecules, cytokines, cell surface or metabolic markers, other host biomarkers, host transcripts, clinical biometrics, and combinations of markers. Findings Of the 193 citations identified, 59 studies that evaluated over 112 host biomarkers were selected. Most studies involved patient populations from high-income countries, while 19% involved populations from low- and middle-income countries. The most frequently evaluated host biomarkers were C-reactive protein (61%), white blood cell count (44%) and procalcitonin (34%). Study quality scores ranged from 23.1% to 92.3%. There were 9 high performance host biomarkers or combinations, with sensitivity and specificity of ≥85% or either sensitivity or specificity was reported to be 100%. Five host biomarkers were considered weak markers as they lacked statistically significant performance in discriminating between bacterial and non-bacterial infections. Discussion This manuscript provides a summary

  1. Medicininduceret aseptisk meningitis

    Farr, Katherina Podlekareva; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Drug-induced aseptic meningitis is a rare adverse effect of some drugs. We report a patient with four episodes of meningitis caused by ibuprofen. In all episodes the patient had taken ibuprofen for pain, and subsequently developed fever and cerebrovascular symptoms. Drug-induced meningitis cannot...... be distinguished from meningitis caused by other agents. Diagnosis is therefore based on close association between drug administration and onset of symptoms, as well as negative microbiology tests results, especially if previous episodes of drug-induced meningitis have occurred....

  2. Attenuation of the bacterial load in blood by pretreatment with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor protects rats from fatal outcome and brain damage during Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Lund, Søren Peter;

    2004-01-01

    postinfection did not alter the clinical or histological outcome relative to that for non-G-CSF-treated rats. The magnitude of bacteremia and pretreatment with G-CSF were found to be prognostic factors for both outcome and brain damage. In summary, elevated neutrophil levels prior to the development of...... meningitis result in reduced risks of death and brain damage. This beneficial effect is most likely achieved through improved control of the systemic disease....

  3. Purulent meningitis with unusual diffusion-weighted MRI findings

    We describe unusual findings obtained by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a patient with acute purulent meningitis caused by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. Along cerebral convexities and the Sylvian fissure, multiple small intense lesions showed high signal intensity in these sequences. This may be the first report of diffusion-weighted in purulent meningitis

  4. Aseptic meningitis caused by human parvovirus B19.

    Okumura, A.; Ichikawa, T

    1993-01-01

    Reports on aseptic meningitis caused by human parvovirus B19 are extremely rare. A case of aseptic meningitis is described in which human parvovirus B19 DNA was detected in the acute phase in cerebrospinal fluid by the polymerase chain reaction.

  5. Acute bacterial infections of the lower respiratory tract in children from low-income countries

    Fleer, A; Wolf, B.H.M.

    2000-01-01

    Acute bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children and is responsible for 4 million childhood deaths each year. Most of these deaths are caused by pneumonia and occur in the youngest children in the poorest parts of the world. Severe pneu

  6. Increased anisotropy in neonatal meningitis: an indicator of meningeal inflammation

    Increased anisotropy in brain abscesses has been shown to be due to adhesion of inflammatory cells and is suggestive of an active inflammatory process. The objective of this study was to determine if similar changes occur in the pia-arachnoid on the surface of the cerebral cortex in patients with pyogenic meningitis, and if these changes regress following antibiotic therapy. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed on 14 term neonates (mean age 13 days) with bacterial meningitis and 10 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on areas including the leptomeninges, the cerebral cortex and adjoining subcortical white matter for quantitation of mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivity (MD) values. Follow-up MRI was performed in five of the neonates in the patient group after 2 weeks of antibiotic treatment. FA and MD values were compared in patients before and after antibiotic treatment as well as with those in the healthy controls. Significantly higher FA values but no difference in MD values were observed in the patient group as compared to the healthy controls at both time points (before and after antibiotic treatment). Significantly decreased FA values in the frontal, occipital and temporal cortical regions were observed in patients following antibiotic treatment. DTI-derived FA may be of value in the noninvasive assessment of meningeal inflammatory activity and treatment response in neonates. (orig.)

  7. Increased anisotropy in neonatal meningitis: an indicator of meningeal inflammation

    Trivedi, Richa; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Nath, Kavindra [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Lucknow, UP (India); Malik, Gyanendra K.; Gupta, Amit [King George' s Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, Lucknow (India); Prasad, Kashi N. [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Microbiology, Lucknow (India); Purwar, Ankur; Rathore, Divya; Rathore, Ram K.S. [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Kanpur (India); Narayana, Ponnada A. [University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Increased anisotropy in brain abscesses has been shown to be due to adhesion of inflammatory cells and is suggestive of an active inflammatory process. The objective of this study was to determine if similar changes occur in the pia-arachnoid on the surface of the cerebral cortex in patients with pyogenic meningitis, and if these changes regress following antibiotic therapy. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed on 14 term neonates (mean age 13 days) with bacterial meningitis and 10 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on areas including the leptomeninges, the cerebral cortex and adjoining subcortical white matter for quantitation of mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivity (MD) values. Follow-up MRI was performed in five of the neonates in the patient group after 2 weeks of antibiotic treatment. FA and MD values were compared in patients before and after antibiotic treatment as well as with those in the healthy controls. Significantly higher FA values but no difference in MD values were observed in the patient group as compared to the healthy controls at both time points (before and after antibiotic treatment). Significantly decreased FA values in the frontal, occipital and temporal cortical regions were observed in patients following antibiotic treatment. DTI-derived FA may be of value in the noninvasive assessment of meningeal inflammatory activity and treatment response in neonates. (orig.)

  8. Análise de sobrevida de meningite piogênica em crianças Survival analysis of acute pyogenic meningitis in children

    RITA LUCENA

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de estabelecer a letalidade intra-hospitalar de meningite piogênica em crianças da cidade de Salvador, realizamos análise de todos os prontuários dos pacientes com idade inferior a 15 anos admitidos no Hospital Couto Maia, entre 1990 e 1992, segundo publicado anteriormente. As curvas de sobrevida baseadas nas taxas de letalidade e no tempo de permanência hospitalar foram analisadas, comparando-se os grupos de etiologia identificada e não identificada. A mesma análise foi utilizada para comparar os três agentes etiológicos mais prevalentes na faixa etária pediátrica (H. influenzae, N. meningitidis e S. pneumoniae. Não houve diferença estatística entre as curvas de sobrevida do grupo identificado e não identificado. Comparando-se os três agentes, observamos que S. pneumoniae foi responsável pela maior letalidade intra-hospitalar e N. meningitidis apresentou a melhor evolução. Concluímos que esforços devem ser feitos para estabelecer variáveis preditoras de letalidade de meningites piogênicas que possam ser identificadas no momento da admissão hospitalar.In order to determine the survival curves of lethality in acute bacteral meningitis (ABM in children, we reviewed the charts of all patients admitted to the Hospital Couto Maia from January 1990 to December 1992. The Kaplan-Meir analysis was used to compare the survival rate and hospitalar permanence of patients with identified pathogens with those whose bacteria were not determined. The same analysis was used to compare the curves of the three most frequent agents. Statistical difference between the identified and non-identified groups was not observed. The analysis of the three curves shows that the first 24 hours were responsible for the most elevated lethality rate. When the curves are compared, it is clear that S. pneumoniae has the most important intrahospitalar lethality and N. meningitidis the most benign evolution. We conclude that efforts have to be

  9. Antibiotic induced meningitis.

    1994-01-01

    Three patients with antibiotic induced meningitis, one following penicillin with seven episodes, are reported on--the first well documented description of penicillin induced meningitis. In this patient episodes of headache and nuchal rigidity appeared with and without CSF pleocytosis. Two patients had a total of five episodes of antibiotic induced meningitis after trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole) administration. The features common to all three patients were myalgia, confusion ...

  10. Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 Contributes to Escherichia coli Meningitis

    Ming-Hsien Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available E. coli is the most common Gram-negative bacteria causing neonatal meningitis, and E. coli meningitis continues to be an important cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world. Recent reports of E. coli meningitis caused by antimicrobial resistant strains are a particular concern. These findings indicate that a novel strategy is needed to identify new targets for prevention and therapy of E. coli meningitis. Cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1 is a bacterial virulence factor associated principally with E. coli strains causing urinary tract infection and meningitis. We have shown that CNF1 contributes to E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier and penetration into the brain, the essential step in the development of E. coli meningitis, and identified the host receptor for CNF1, 37-kDa laminin receptor precursor (37LRP. CNF1, however, is a cytoplasmic protein and its contribution to E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier requires its secretion from the bacterial cytoplasm. No signal peptide is found in the CNF1 sequence. CNF1 secretion is, therefore, a strategy utilized by meningitis-causing E. coli to invade the blood-brain barrier. Elucidation of the mechanisms involved in CNF1 secretion, as shown in this report with the involvement of Fdx and YgfZ provides the novel information on potential targets for prevention and therapy of E. coli meningitis by virtue of targeting the secretion of CNF1.

  11. Method for inducing experimental pneumococcal meningitis in outbred mice

    Cintorino Marcella

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with the highest mortality among bacterial meningitis and it may also lead to neurological sequelae despite the use of antibiotic therapy. Experimental animal models of pneumococcal meningitis are important to study the pathogenesis of meningitis, the host immune response induced after infection, and the efficacy of novel drugs and vaccines. Results In the present work, we describe in detail a simple, reproducible and efficient method to induce pneumococcal meningitis in outbred mice by using the intracranial subarachnoidal route of infection. Bacteria were injected into the subarachnoid space through a soft point located 3.5 mm rostral from the bregma. The model was tested with several doses of pneumococci of three capsular serotypes (2, 3 and 4, and mice survival was recorded. Lethal doses killing 50 % of animals infected with type 2, 3 and 4 S. pneumoniae were 3.2 × 10, 2.9 × 10 and 1.9 × 102 colony forming units, respectively. Characterisation of the disease caused by the type 4 strain showed that in moribund mice systemic dissemination of pneumococci to blood and spleen occurred. Histological analysis of the brain of animals infected with type 4 S. pneumoniae proved the induction of meningitis closely resembling the disease in humans. Conclusions The proposed method for inducing pneumococcal meningitis in outbred mice is easy-to-perform, fast, cost-effective, and reproducible, irrespective of the serotype of pneumococci used.

  12. Meningitis due to Fusobacterium necrophorum

    Luana Coltella

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram negative bacillus highly virulent, responsible, usually in children or adolescents, of localized abscesses and pharynx, as well as severe systemic infections, called Lemierre syndrome. Methods: A 15 year old child came to the emergency department (ED of Bambino Gesù Children Hospital. Physicians prescribed chemicalphysical examination on blood and liquor, blood cultures for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and for fungi (BD Ped Plus, lytic Ana, Micosis, microbiological culture on liquor (CSF and on the swab from the right outer ear. Results: On chemical examination, liquor appears cloudy, with 309 mg/dl of total proteins, glucose undetectable,WBC 11,160 mmc, 92% of neutrophils. Hyperleukocytosis was detected also on the emocrome (WBC 21x103/μl, 92% neutrophils. No bacterial antigens were detected. CSF culture resulted negative for aerobic bacteria, even after 48 hours of incubation. After 24 hours of inoculation, the blood culture for anaerobic bacteria resulted positive and, Fusobacterium necrophorum was isolated and identified, by genomic sequencing, after 24 hours growth on Schaedler medium. Microbiological culture of the right outer ear swab, highlighted only Corynebacterium spp. After 6 days from admission, the patient died for meningitis. Conclusion:This event has shown the severity of infection by F. necrophorum and, at the same time, the underestimation of this germ in the spectrum of etiologic agents responsible for meningitis.The only microbiological indication was obtained from the anaerobes bacteria blood culture. Following this episode our working procedures for what concerns liquor samples management was modified, including routinely the investigation for anaerobic bacteria. Presumably this episode of meningitis has originated from a F. necrophorum otitis of the right ear, unfortunately not microbiologically confirmed.The anaerobic bacteria should always be considered as

  13. Chest physiotherapy in children with acute bacterial pneumonia

    Lieselotte Corten

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pneumonia is the single leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years of age. Chest physiotherapy is often prescribed as an additional therapy in children with pneumonia. Different chest physiotherapy techniques are available that aim to improve airway clearance, gas exchange and reduce the work of breathing. However, it is unclear if these techniques are effective in this population.Objective: The present review aimed to determine the efficacy of different chest physiotherapy techniques compared with no physiotherapy or other chest physiotherapy treatments in hospitalised children with bacterial pneumonia.Method: Six electronic databases (PubMed, Medline, Cochrane Library, PEDro, CINAHL and Africa-wide information, clinicaltrials.gov and pactr.org were searched for eligible studies.Results: Two randomised controlled trials and one ongoing study were identified. Neither completed trial reported differences between the control and intervention groups, although one study reported a longer duration of coughing (p = 0.04 and rhonchi (p = 0.03 in the intervention group.Conclusion: Because of the limited number of included articles and different presentations of outcome measures, we could not reject or accept chest physiotherapy as either an effective or harmful treatment option in this population.

  14. Oral iron acutely elevates bacterial growth in human serum.

    Cross, James H; Bradbury, Richard S; Fulford, Anthony J; Jallow, Amadou T; Wegmüller, Rita; Prentice, Andrew M; Cerami, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency worldwide and routine supplementation is standard policy for pregnant mothers and children in most low-income countries. However, iron lies at the center of host-pathogen competition for nutritional resources and recent trials of iron administration in African and Asian children have resulted in significant excesses of serious adverse events including hospitalizations and deaths. Increased rates of malaria, respiratory infections, severe diarrhea and febrile illnesses of unknown origin have all been reported, but the mechanisms are unclear. We here investigated the ex vivo growth characteristics of exemplar sentinel bacteria in adult sera collected before and 4 h after oral supplementation with 2 mg/kg iron as ferrous sulfate. Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (all gram-negative bacteria) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (gram-positive) showed markedly elevated growth in serum collected after iron supplementation. Growth rates were very strongly correlated with transferrin saturation (p oral supplements with highly soluble (non-physiological) iron, as typically used in low-income settings, could promote bacteremia by accelerating early phase bacterial growth prior to the induction of immune defenses. PMID:26593732

  15. Localized basal meningeal enhancement in tuberculous meningitis

    Focal basal meningeal enhancement may produce a confusing CT picture in children with suspected tuberculous meningitis (TBM). To demonstrate the incidence, distribution and appearance of localized basal meningeal enhancement in children with TBM. CT scans of patients with definite (culture proven) and probable (CSF suggestive) TBM were retrospectively evaluated by two observers. Localized basal enhancement was documented as involving: unilateral cistern of the lateral fossa (CLF), unilateral sylvian fissure, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure in combination, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure with ipsi- or contralateral ambient cistern and isolated quadrigeminal plate cistern. The study included 130 patients with TBM (aged 2 months to 13 years 9 months). Focal basal enhancement was seen in 11 patients (8.5%). The sylvian fissure was involved most commonly, followed by the lateral fossa cistern. The ambient cistern was involved in three patients and the quadrigeminal plate cistern in one. Focal areas of enhancement corresponded to the areas of infarction in every patient. Focal basal meningeal enhancement is common (8.5%) in paediatric TBM. This must be kept in mind when evaluating CT scans in children presenting with focal neurological findings, seizures or meningism in communities where TBM is endemic. (orig.)

  16. Localized basal meningeal enhancement in tuberculous meningitis

    Theron, Salomine; Andronikou, Savvas; Grobbelaar, Marie; Steyn, Freda; Mapukata, Ayanda; Plessis, Jaco du [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Tygerberg Hospital, P.O. BOX 19063, Tygerberg (South Africa)

    2006-11-15

    Focal basal meningeal enhancement may produce a confusing CT picture in children with suspected tuberculous meningitis (TBM). To demonstrate the incidence, distribution and appearance of localized basal meningeal enhancement in children with TBM. CT scans of patients with definite (culture proven) and probable (CSF suggestive) TBM were retrospectively evaluated by two observers. Localized basal enhancement was documented as involving: unilateral cistern of the lateral fossa (CLF), unilateral sylvian fissure, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure in combination, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure with ipsi- or contralateral ambient cistern and isolated quadrigeminal plate cistern. The study included 130 patients with TBM (aged 2 months to 13 years 9 months). Focal basal enhancement was seen in 11 patients (8.5%). The sylvian fissure was involved most commonly, followed by the lateral fossa cistern. The ambient cistern was involved in three patients and the quadrigeminal plate cistern in one. Focal areas of enhancement corresponded to the areas of infarction in every patient. Focal basal meningeal enhancement is common (8.5%) in paediatric TBM. This must be kept in mind when evaluating CT scans in children presenting with focal neurological findings, seizures or meningism in communities where TBM is endemic. (orig.)

  17. Streptococcus pneumoniae arginine synthesis genes promote growth and virulence in pneumococcal meningitis

    J.R. Piet; M. Geldhoff; B.D.C. van Schaik; M.C. Brouwer; M. Valls Seron; M.E. Jakobs; K. Schipper; Y. Pannekoek; A.H. Zwinderman; T. van der Poll; A.H.C. van Kampen; F. Baas; A van der Ende; D. van de Beek

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a major human pathogen causing pneumonia, sepsis and bacterial meningitis. Using a clinical phenotype based approach with bacterial whole-genome sequencing we identified pneumococcal arginine biosynthesis genes to be associated with outcome in patients with

  18. Rapid and widely disseminated acute phase protein response after experimental bacterial infection of pigs

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Boye, Mette; Poulsen, Karin T.; Campbell, Fiona M; Eckersall, P. David; Heegaard, Peter M.H.

    2009-01-01

    International audience The acute phase protein response is a well-described generalized early host response to tissue injury, inflammation and infection, observed as pronounced changes in the concentrations of a number of circulating serum proteins. The biological function of this response and its interplay with other parts of innate host defence reactions remain somewhat elusive. In order to gain new insight into this early host defence response in the context of bacterial infection we st...

  19. Triclosan as a Systemic Antibacterial Agent in a Mouse Model of Acute Bacterial Challenge

    Sharma, Shilpi; Ramya, T. N. C.; Surolia, Avadhesha; Surolia, Namita

    2003-01-01

    The upsurge of multiple-drug-resistant microbes warrants the development and/or use of effective antibiotics. Triclosan, though used in cosmetic and dermatological preparations for several decades, has not been used as a systemic antibacterial agent due to problems of drug administration. Here we report the striking efficacy of triclosan in a mouse model of acute systemic bacterial infection. Triclosan not only significantly extends the survival time of the infected mice, it also restores blo...

  20. Antibody-induced neutrophil depletion prior to the onset of pneumococcal meningitis influences long-term neurological complications in mice.

    Too, Lay Khoon; Mitchell, Andrew J; McGregor, Iain S; Hunt, Nicholas H

    2016-08-01

    During pneumococcal meningitis, clearance of bacteria by recruited neutrophils is crucial for host protection. However, these innate immune mechanisms are often insufficient and treatment with antibiotics is necessary to prevent death. Despite this antibiotic treatment, approximately half of all survivors suffer lifelong neurological problems. There is growing evidence indicating the harmful effects of neutrophils on CNS integrity. Therefore, the present study investigated the roles of neutrophils in the acute inflammatory response and the resulting long-term neuropsychological effects in murine pneumococcal meningitis. Long-term behavioural and cognitive functions in mice were measured using an automated IntelliCage system. Neutrophil depletion with antibody 1A8 as adjunctive therapy was shown to remarkably impair survival in meningitic C57BL/6J mice despite antibiotic (ceftriaxone) treatment. This was accompanied by increased bacterial load in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and an increase in IL-1β, but decrease in TNF, within the CSF at 20h after bacterial inoculation. In the longer term, the surviving neutrophil-depleted post-meningitic (PM) mice displayed reduced diurnal hypolocomotion compared to PM mice treated with an isotype antibody. However, they showed nocturnal hyperactivity, and greater learning impairment in a patrolling task that is believed to depend upon an intact hippocampus. The data thus demonstrate two important mechanisms: 1. Neutrophil extravasation into the CNS during pneumococcal meningitis influences the pro-inflammatory response and is central to control of the bacterial load, an increase in which may lead to death. 2. Neutrophil-mediated changes in the acute inflammatory response modulate the neuropsychological sequelae in mice that survive pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:26965652

  1. Syringomyelia following tuberculous meningitis

    We present three cases with syringomyelia after tuberculous meningitis. The MR findings suggested the syrinx was formed by blockage of the CSF flow at the outlets of the fourth ventricle. We consider this complication is not a rare condition following tuberculous meningitis. (author)

  2. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A.; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  3. Adjuvant glycerol is not beneficial in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    Wittwer Matthias

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial meningitis in children causes high rates of mortality and morbidity. In a recent clinical trial, oral glycerol significantly reduced severe neurological sequelae in paediatric meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b, and a tendency towards a benefit of adjunctive glycerol was seen in pneumococcal meningitis. Methods Here we examined the effects of glycerol in pneumococcal meningitis of infant rats and adult mice. All animals received ceftriaxone, and glycerol or placebo. Brain damage, hearing loss, and inflammatory parameters were assessed. Results Clinically and by histopathology, animals treated with glycerol or placebo did not differ. While both groups showed equally high levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 at 24 h after infection, a significant difference in favour of glycerol was observed at 40 h after infection. However, this difference in matrix metalloproteinase-9 in late disease did not result in an improvement of histopathologic parameters. Conclusion No benefit of adjunctive glycerol was found in these models of pneumococcal meningitis.

  4. BACTERIAL PATTERN OF APPENDIX IN ACUTE AND CHRONIC APPENDICITIS WITH ITS CLINICAL CORRELATION

    Surajit

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute appendicitis is a common, sometimes confusing and often treacherous cause of acute abdomen at all ages. The only way to reduce morbidity and to prevent mortality is to perform appendicectomy before perforation or gangrene occurs. As appendicectomy is a very common practice, it is essential to know in detail the various etiological factors that precipitate appendicitis. Bacterial invasion being a very common cause makes it imperative that we have a clear picture of the bacterial pattern of appendix in acute and recurrent appendicitis and to correlate this with clinical findings. A proper idea of bacterial flora of appendix thus helps us not only to prevent postoperative complication, but also to impart effective conservative treatment by pinpointing sensitive drugs. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES Knowledge of bacterial flora of appendix also has socio-economic benefits through low rates of post-operative complications, reduced hospital stay and also reduced indiscriminate use of multiple costly drugs. The aim of this study is to establish the bacterial profile in acute as well as recurrent appendicitis and to correlate the findings with the severity of the disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted on 90 patients irrespective of age and sex who attended the emergency and OPD during the course of the work with symptoms suggestive of appendicitis. Following appendicectomy, each of the specimens was cut into two pieces. One was sent for histopathological examination and other was sent for bacterial culture. RESULT The commonest bacteria isolated were Escherichia coli in 67.78% cases, which is a facultative anaerobe and it was closely accompanied by Klebsiella species in 47.78% cases. Other isolates that were recorded included Staphylococcus aureus in 3.33% cases with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus species in 2.22% cases each. Mixed infections were seen in phlegmonous, gangrenous and perforative appendicitis. Bacteroides

  5. Corticosteroids for managing tuberculous meningitis

    Prasad, Kameshwar; Singh, Mamta B; Ryan, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    effect on this outcome (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.20; eight trials, 1314 participants, low quality evidence). There was no difference between groups in the incidence of adverse events, which included gastrointestinal bleeding, invasive bacterial infections, hyperglycaemia, and liver dysfunction. One trial followed up participants for five years. The effect on death was no longer apparent at this time-point (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.12; one trial, 545 participants, moderate quality evidence); and there was no difference in disabling neurological deficit detected (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.49 to 1.69; one trial, 545 participants, low quality evidence). One trial included human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive people. The stratified analysis by HIV status in this trial showed no heterogeneity, with point estimates for death (RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.20; one trial, 98 participants) and disability (RR 1.23, 95% CI 0.08 to 19.07; one trial, 98 participants) similar to HIV-negative participants in the same trial. Authors' conclusions Corticosteroids reduce mortality from tuberculous meningitis, at least in the short term. Corticosteroids may have no effect on the number of people who survive tuberculous meningitis with disabling neurological deficit, but this outcome is less common than death, and the CI for the relative effect includes possible harm. However, this small possible harm is unlikely to be quantitatively important when compared to the reduction in mortality. The number of HIV-positive people included in the review is small, so we are not sure if the benefits in terms of reduced mortality are preserved in this group of patients. PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY Corticosteroids for managing people with tuberculous meningitis What is tuberculous meningitis and how might corticosteroids work? Tuberculous meningitis is a serious form of tuberculosis that affects the meninges that cover the brain and spinal cord, causing headache, coma and death. The clinical outcome is often poor

  6. The effect of sennosides on bacterial translocation and survival in a model of acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis.

    Chen, X; Valente, J F; Alexander, J W

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial translocation leading to subsequent infectious complications is a significant determinant of outcome in acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis (AHP). The colonic ileus and impaired intestinal barrier function that often accompany AHP may predispose to translocation. Sennoside is a naturally occurring cathartic and choleretic agent that stimulates intestinal mucous secretion and has potent promotility effects. The impact of sennoside-induced intestinal motility and secretory function on bacterial translocation and survival was studied in a rat model of AHP. Severe acute pancreatitis was induced in rats by the intraductal infusion of 2% sodium deoxycholate (DCA, 0.4 ml/kg). A group of sham-operated rats (group A) received intraductal saline, whereas experimental animals were subsequently administered distilled water (group B) or sennoside solution (group C) by gavage every 8 h. After 48 h, intestinal transit of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran, serum endotoxin, and amylase levels, and bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and pancreatic tissue were determined. The pancreas and intestine were sampled for histologic study. All group A animals survived and did not develop pancreatitis or endotoxemia, whereas groups B and C all demonstrated severe hemorrhagic pancreatitis with evidence of necrosis. Mortality at 48 h was 55% in group B versus 12.5% in group C. Inhibition of intestinal motility was noted in 40% versus 20%, and endotoxin levels were 61.36+/-28.26 pg/L versus 5.41+/-3.58 pg/L in group B versus group C rats, respectively (ptranslocation of endotoxin and bacteria, restored intestinal motility, increased mucous secretion, and reduced mortality in a model of acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis in the rat. Other cathartics may have similar properties and may be useful in preventing infectious complications in acute pancreatitis. PMID:9888659

  7. Characterization of a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model

    Mook-Kanamori Barry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S. pneumoniae is the most common causative agent of meningitis, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We aimed to develop an integrated and representative pneumococcal meningitis mouse model resembling the human situation. Methods Adult mice (C57BL/6 were inoculated in the cisterna magna with increasing doses of S. pneumoniae serotype 3 colony forming units (CFU; n = 24, 104, 105, 106 and 107 CFU and survival studies were performed. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, brain, blood, spleen, and lungs were collected. Subsequently, mice were inoculated with 104 CFU S. pneumoniae serotype 3 and sacrificed at 6 (n = 6 and 30 hours (n = 6. Outcome parameters were bacterial outgrowth, clinical score, and cytokine and chemokine levels (using Luminex® in CSF, blood and brain. Meningeal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, parenchymal and subarachnoidal hemorrhages, microglial activation and hippocampal apoptosis were assessed in histopathological studies. Results Lower doses of bacteria delayed onset of illness and time of death (median survival CFU 104, 56 hrs; 105, 38 hrs, 106, 28 hrs. 107, 24 hrs. Bacterial titers in brain and CSF were similar in all mice at the end-stage of disease independent of inoculation dose, though bacterial outgrowth in the systemic compartment was less at lower inoculation doses. At 30 hours after inoculation with 104 CFU of S. pneumoniae, blood levels of KC, IL6, MIP-2 and IFN- γ were elevated, as were brain homogenate levels of KC, MIP-2, IL-6, IL-1β and RANTES. Brain histology uniformly showed meningeal inflammation at 6 hours, and, neutrophil infiltration, microglial activation, and hippocampal apoptosis at 30 hours. Parenchymal and subarachnoidal and cortical hemorrhages were seen in 5 of 6 and 3 of 6 mice at 6 and 30 hours, respectively. Conclusion We have developed and validated a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis.

  8. Syphilitic aseptic meningitis

    ... done to confirm the diagnosis. Tests include: FTA-ABS MHA-TP TP-PA TP-EIA Treatment The ... syphilis . Alternative Names Meningitis - syphilitic Images Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References Hook EW III. ...

  9. Syphilitic aseptic meningitis

    Syphilitic aseptic meningitis is a complication of untreated syphilis. It involves inflammation of the tissues covering the ... Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochete bacteria Treponema pallidum . Syphilis has three main ...

  10. Rapid etiological classification of meningitis by NMR spectroscopy based on metabolite profiles and host response.

    Uwe Himmelreich

    Full Text Available Bacterial meningitis is an acute disease with high mortality that is reduced by early treatment. Identification of the causative microorganism by culture is sensitive but slow. Large volumes of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are required to maximise sensitivity and establish a provisional diagnosis. We have utilised nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy to rapidly characterise the biochemical profile of CSF from normal rats and animals with pneumococcal or cryptococcal meningitis. Use of a miniaturised capillary NMR system overcame limitations caused by small CSF volumes and low metabolite concentrations. The analysis of the complex NMR spectroscopic data by a supervised statistical classification strategy included major, minor and unidentified metabolites. Reproducible spectral profiles were generated within less than three minutes, and revealed differences in the relative amounts of glucose, lactate, citrate, amino acid residues, acetate and polyols in the three groups. Contributions from microbial metabolism and inflammatory cells were evident. The computerised statistical classification strategy is based on both major metabolites and minor, partially unidentified metabolites. This data analysis proved highly specific for diagnosis (100% specificity in the final validation set, provided those with visible blood contamination were excluded from analysis; 6-8% of samples were classified as indeterminate. This proof of principle study suggests that a rapid etiologic diagnosis of meningitis is possible without prior culture. The method can be fully automated and avoids delays due to processing and selective identification of specific pathogens that are inherent in DNA-based techniques.

  11. Scrub Typhus Meningitis in South India — A Retrospective Study

    Viswanathan, Stalin; Muthu, Vivekanandan; Iqbal, Nayyar; Remalayam, Bhavith; George, Tarun

    2013-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus is prevalent in India although definite statistics are not available. There has been only one study on scrub typhus meningitis 20 years ago. Most reports of meningitis/meningoencephalitis in scrub typhus are case reports Methods A retrospective study done in Pondicherry to extract cases of scrub typhus admitted to hospital between February 2011 and January 2012. Diagnosis was by a combination of any one of the following in a patient with an acute febrile illness- a pos...

  12. The Role of Vancomycin on Meningitis

    Ahmed I. Shatat and P.I.C.U team

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: After the previous discussion of the results obtained from this study, the researchers concluded that most of the cases diagnosed meningitis was aseptic and there was no need for antibiotics. Also in those who diagnosed as bacterial vancomycin was not essential in all cases, this confirmed by the absence of any differences in the outcome. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 501-511

  13. Epidemiología descriptiva de meningitis no meningocócicas bacterianas de la provincia de Zaragoza (1999-2004: evaluación de su sistema de vigilancia Descriptive epidemiology of non-meningococcal bacterial meningitis in the province of Saragossa [Spain] from 1999 to 2004: evaluation of the Epidemiological Surveillance System

    Carmen Varela

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Describir las meningitis no meningocócicas bacterianas (MnMB y evaluar el Sistema de Vigilancia Epidemiológica (SVE en la provincia de Zaragoza entre 1999 y 2004. Métodos: Se utilizó el registro de enfermedades de declaración obligatoria (EDO y el conjunto mínimo básico de datos (CMBD. Se evaluó el SVE utilizando criterios de los Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, estimando la exhaustividad mediante captura-recaptura. Resultados: Se notificaron 111 casos de MnMB (62,2% en hombres. La edad media fue de 40,7 años. La mayor proporción de casos (16,5% fue en niños menores de 2 años. La forma clínica en el 81,1% de los casos fue la meningitis; el 70,3% fue diagnosticada por cultivo. Aparecieron Streptococcus en el 54% de los casos (el 82% por S. pneumoniae, enterobacterias en el 5,4%, Lysteria y Staphylococcus en el 4,5%, Pseudomona aeruginosa en el 1,8%, y Haemophilus influenzae en el 0,9%. La incidencia por 100.000 habitantes fue entre 1,6 en 2004 y 2,6 en 2001. La letalidad fue del 7,3%. La exhaustividad del sistema EDO fue máxima en el año 2001 (del 84,4%. La exhaustividad conjunta con CMBD fue superior al 85% y la oportunidad fue de 2 días. La aceptabilidad del sistema fue buena, ya que el 75% de las variables estaban cumplimentadas en el 97% de las encuestas. Conclusiones: Se destaca la relevancia de la evaluación del SVE en función de sus resultados. Las MnMB debidas a S. pneumoniae representan un grupo significativo y su letalidad es elevada. La exhaustividad del SVE en Zaragoza supera el 80%, al considerar EDO y CMBD. La incorporación del CMBD en la vigilancia facilitaría una aproximación a la incidencia real de algunas EDO.Objectives: To describe non-meningococcal bacterial meningitis (nMM and to evaluate the Epidemiological Surveillance System (ESS in the province of Saragossa (Spain between 1999 and 2004. Methods: Information was obtained from the register of diseases subject to mandatory reporting

  14. Vaccine preventable meningitis in Malaysia: epidemiology and management.

    McNeil, Hannah C; Jefferies, Johanna M C; Clarke, Stuart C

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide bacterial meningitis accounts for more than one million cases and 135,000 deaths annually. Profound, lasting neurological complications occur in 9-25% of cases. This review confirms the greatest risk from bacterial meningitis is in early life in Malaysia. Much of the disease burden can be avoided by immunization, particularly against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Despite inclusion of the Hib vaccine in the National Immunisation Programme and the licensure of pneumococcal vaccines, these two species are the main contributors to bacterial meningitis in Malaysia, with Neisseria meningitidis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, causing a smaller proportion of disease. The high Hib prevalence may partly be due to dated, small-scale studies limiting the understanding of the current epidemiological situation. This highlights the need for larger, better quality surveillance from Malaysia to evaluate the success of Hib immunization and to help guide immunization policy for vaccines against S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis. PMID:25962101

  15. [Clinical contribution of the newer fluoroquinolones in acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis].

    Niederman, M S

    1999-01-01

    Acute exacerbations occur frequently in patients with chronic bronchitis and the majority of these patients benefit from antimicrobial therapy. The ideal antimicrobial agent for the management of acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (AECB) should have good activity against the common bacterial pathogens associated with these exacerbations (non-typable Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and pneumococci); it should be resistant to bacterial betalactamases; penetrate well into pulmonary tissues and secretions; kill bacteria without inducing excessive airway inflammation; be easy to take (given once or twice a day) in order to ensure high patient compliance, and be cost-effective. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of AECB, but because of the limited activity of certain older agents in this class when administered in standard doses against Streptococcus pneumoniae, they have not be extensively used for this indication. Newer agents including levofloxacin, grepafloxacin, sparfloxacin and trovafloxacin have excellent activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative pathogens likely to be involved in AECB. These agents can be administered once daily, making patient compliance and a successful therapeutic outcome more likely. The new quinolones offer promising alternatives for antimicrobial therapy in outpatients with AECB, particularly those with underlying co-morbidity and severe obstruction. PMID:10436551

  16. Enterovirus meningitis in Brazil, 1998-2003.

    Dos Santos, Gina P L; Skraba, Irene; Oliveira, Denise; Lima, Ana A F; de Melo, Maria Mabel M; Kmetzsch, Claudete I; da Costa, Eliane V; da Silva, Edson E

    2006-01-01

    Acute viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS) such as acute flaccid paralysis, meningitis, and encephalitis, are responsible for a high morbidity, particularly in children. Non-Polio enteroviruses (NPEV) are known to be responsible for over 80% of viral meningitis in which the etiologic agent is identified. In the present study, we show the frequency of enterovirus meningitis in Brazil from December 1998 to December 2003. Enterovirus were isolated from 162 (15.8%), of a total of 1,022 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens analyzed. Echovirus 30 was identified in 139 of these isolates (139/162-85.2%). Other identified enteroviruses were: Coxsackievirus B5 (3.7%), Echovirus 13 (3.7%), Echovirus 18 (3%), Echovirus 6 (1.2%), Echovirus 25 (1.2%), Echovirus 1 (0.6%), and Echovirus 4 (0.6%). Patients's age ranged from 28 days to 68 years old. The most frequent symptoms were fever (77%), headache (69.5%), vomiting (71.3%), neck stiffness (41.3%), convulsion (7.1%), and diarrhea (3.7%). Although, the majority of the patients recovered without any complication or permanent squeal, five deaths occurred. Throughout the surveillance period, five viral meningitis outbreaks were confirmed: four in the Southern Brazil and one in the Northeast Brazil. Echovirus 30 was responsible for four out of the five outbreaks while Echovirus 13 caused the fifth one. Besides the outbreaks, 734 sporadic cases were also identified during the study period and 59 of these were positive for virus isolation (8%). Echovirus 30 accounted for 70% of the isolates. Our results showed that Echovirus 30 was the most prevalent etiological agent of viral meningitis in Brazil, causing both outbreaks and sporadic cases. PMID:16299728

  17. EDA-containing fibronectin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis.

    Pupek, Małgorzata; Jasonek, Jolanta; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Fibronectin containing an alternatively spliced extra domain A (EDA-FN) participates in diverse biological cell functions, being also directly or indirectly engaged during an inflammatory response to brain injury and/or neuron regeneration. We analyzed FN and EDA-FN isoform levels by ELISA in 85 cerebrospinal fluid samples and 67 plasma samples obtained from children suffering from bacterial or viral meningitis and non-meningitis peripheral inflammation. We have found that the cerebrospinal level of EDA-FN was significantly lower in the bacterial meningitis group than in the viral- and non-meningitis groups. In the patients' plasma, EDA-FN was almost undetectable. The determination of fibronectin containing the EDA segment might be considered as an additional diagnostic marker of bacterial meningitis in children. PMID:23884219

  18. Molecular mechanisms of cryptococcal meningitis

    Liu, Tong-Bao; Perlin, David; Xue, Chaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Fungal meningitis is a serious disease caused by a fungal infection of the central nervous system (CNS) mostly in individuals with immune system deficiencies. Fungal meningitis is often fatal without proper treatment, and the mortality rate remains unacceptably high even with antifungal drug interventions. Currently, cryptococcal meningitis is the most common fungal meningitis in HIV-1/AIDS, and its disease mechanism has been extensively studied. The key steps for fungi to infect brain and ca...

  19. A first meningococcal meningitis case caused by serogroup Ⅹ Neisseria meningitidis strains in China

    CHEN Chao; UANG Ying-chun; ZHANG Tie-gang; HE Jing-guo; WU Jiang; CHEN Li-juan; LIU Jun-feng; PANG Xing-huo; YANG Jie; SHAO Zhu-jun

    2008-01-01

    @@ Neisseria meningitidis is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis and classified into 13 serogroups based on the immunological reactivity of the capsular polysaccharide.1 Serogroups A,B,C,W135 and Y are the most common causes of meningitis.2

  20. Inhaled hyaluronic acid as ancillary treatment in children with bacterial acute rhinopharyngitis.

    Varricchio, A; Capasso, M; Avvisati, F; Varricchio, A M; De Lucia, A; Brunese, F P; Ciprandi, G

    2014-01-01

    Acute rhinopharyngitis (ARP) is the most common upper respiratory infection in children and represents a social problem for both the pharmaco-economic impact and a burden for the family. Topical antibiotic therapy is usually effective in bacterial ARP, but ancillary treatment might improve its efficacy. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a promising molecule that has been recently proposed in upper respiratory disorders. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ancillary HA treatment in children with bacterial ARP. Globally, 51 children (27 males, mean age 5.9 ± 2.1 years) with bacterial ARP were enrolled in the study. At baseline, children were randomly assigned to the treatment with: 125 mg of thiamphenicol diluted in 4 mL of saline isotonic solution twice daily (group A) or with 125 mg of thiamphenicol plus 4 ml of sodium hyaluronate 0.2% plus xylitol 5% (Aluneb, Sakura Italia) twice daily (group B) administered by the nasal device Rinowash (Airliquide Medical System, Italy) and connected to an aerosol nebulizer with pneumatic compressor (1.5 bar per 5 L/min) Nebula (Airliquide Medical System, Italy), for 10 days. sVAS, nasopharyngeal spotting, neutrophils and bacteria were assessed at baseline and after the treatment. Both treatments induced significant reduction of symptom perception, spotting, neutrophil and bacteria count. However, thiamphenicol plus HA was able to significantly induce a greater effect on sVAS (p=0.006), neutrophil count (p=0.01), and bacteria count (p=0.0003) than thiamphenicol alone. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence that intranasal HA, as ancillary treatment, may be able to improve topical antibiotic efficacy in children with bacterial ARP. PMID:25316142

  1. Tamsulosin alters levofloxacin pharmacokinetics in prostates derived from rats with acute bacterial prostatitis

    Guo-Dong Qin; Ming-Zhao Xiao; Yuan-Da Zhou; Jing Yang; Hai-Xia He; Yue He; Yang Zeng

    2013-01-01

    The combination of levofloxacin and α1 adrenergic antagonist treatment is the current preferred choice for both bacterial and non-bacterial prostatitis.The aim of this study is to explore the influence of α1 adrenergic antagonists on the pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin using rat models with acute bacterial prostatitis (ABP) induced by direct injection with Escherichia coli(ATCC25922).A total of 96 model rats were randomly assigned into two groups:the experimental group (treated with both tamsulosin and levofloxacin,n=48) and the control group (treated with levofloxacin and solvents,n=48).Six rats from each group were euthanized to collect blood,liver,kidney and prostate samples at the time points of 0.125,0.25,0.5,1,2,4,8 and 12 h after drug administration.The levofloxacin concentrations were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC),and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using the 3p97 software program.There were no obvious differences (P>0.05) between the experimental and control groups in the major pharmacokinetic parameters of levofloxacin,including the halftime (t1/2),time to peak (tpeak),clearance rate (CL),maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC0~12),in the plasma or in the hepatic and kidney tissues of the model rats.However,in the prostatic tissues,tamsulosin increased the Cmax,prolonged the t1/2 and decreased the CL of levofloxacin (P<0.05).These results indicate that tamsulosin may enhance the effect of levofloxacin in the treatment of bacterial prostatitis without changing the drug concentration in the liver and kidney.

  2. Role of acute-phase proteins in interleukin-1-induced nonspecific resistance to bacterial infections in mice.

    Vogels, M.T.E.; L. Cantoni; Carelli, M.; Sironi, M; Ghezzi, P; van der Meer, J. W M

    1993-01-01

    Treatment with a single low dose (80 to 800 ng) of interleukin-1 (IL-1) 24 h before a lethal bacterial challenge of granulocytopenic and normal mice enhances nonspecific resistance. Since IL-1 induces secretion of acute-phase proteins, liver proteins which possess several detoxifying effects, we investigated the role of these proteins in the IL-1-induced protection. Inhibition of liver protein synthesis with D-galactosamine (GALN) completely inhibited the IL-1-induced synthesis of acute-phase...

  3. Acute bacterial prostatitis: heterogeneity in diagnostic criteria and management. Retrospective multicentric analysis of 371 patients diagnosed with acute prostatitis

    Doucet Jean

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a lack of consensus for the diagnosis, investigations and treatments of acute bacterial prostatitis (AP. Methods The symptoms, investigations and treatments of 371 inpatients diagnosed with AP were analyzed through a retrospective study conducted in four departments – Urology (U, Infectious Diseases (ID, Internal Medicine (IM, Geriatrics (G – of two French university hospitals. Results The cause of admission, symptoms, investigations and treatments depended markedly on the department of admission but not on the hospital. In U, patients commonly presented with a bladder outlet obstruction, they had a large imaging and functional check-up, and received alpha-blockers and anti-inflammatory drugs. In ID, patients were febrile and received longer and more appropriate antibiotic treatments. In G, patients presented with cognitive disorders and commonly had post-void urine volume measurements. In IM, patients presented with a wide range of symptoms, and had very diverse investigations and antibiotic regimen. Overall, a 3:1 ratio of community-acquired AP (CA-AP to nosocomial AP (N-AP was observed. Urine culture isolated mainly E. coli (58% of AP, 68% of CA-AP, with venereal agents constituting less than 1%. The probabilistic antibiotic treatments were similar for N-AP and CA-AP (58% bi-therapy; 63% fluoroquinolone-based regimen. For N-AP, these treatments were more likely to be inadequate (42% vs. 8%, p vs. 19%, p Clinical failure at follow-up was more common than bacteriological failure (75% versus 24%, p Conclusion This study highlights the difficulties encountered on a daily basis by the physicians regarding the diagnosis and management of acute prostatitis.

  4. High diagnostic value of general practitioners' presumptive diagnosis for pyelonephritis, meningitis and pancreatitis

    Sriskandarajah, Srishamanthi; Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Frydkjær-Olsen, Ulrik;

    2016-01-01

    by the GP in a population acutely referred to an ED. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of all registered acute referrals for admission to Kolding ED in 2010. Eight presumptive diagnoses were selected for further studies: meningitis, acute coronary syndrome (ACS), pulmonary embolism....... The highest and lowest sensitivities were seen for DVT (90%) and meningitis (36%), respectively; and the highest and lowest values for specificity were observed for meningitis (99%) and ACS (30%), respectively. The positive predictive value had a wide range with the lowest value for ACS (9%) and the...... highest for pneumonia (59%). For pyelonephritis, meningitis and pancreatitis, the likelihood ratio of a positive test was above 10. The likelihood ratio of a negative test was above 0.1 for all diagnoses. CONCLUSIONS: Patients referred with the presumptive diagnoses pyelonephritis, meningitis and...

  5. Diagnosing viral and bacterial respiratory infections in acute COPD exacerbations by an electronic nose: a pilot study.

    van Geffen, Wouter H; Bruins, Marcel; Kerstjens, Huib A M

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory infections, viral or bacterial, are a common cause of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). A rapid, point-of-care, and easy-to-use tool distinguishing viral and bacterial from other causes would be valuable in routine clinical care. An electronic nose (e-nose) could fit this profile but has never been tested in this setting before. In a single-center registered trial (NTR 4601) patients admitted with AECOPD were tested with the Aeonose(®) electronic nose, and a diagnosis of viral or bacterial infection was obtained by bacterial culture on sputa and viral PCR on nose swabs. A neural network with leave-10%-out cross-validation was used to assess the e-nose data. Forty three patients were included. In the bacterial infection model, 22 positive cases were tested versus the negatives; and similarly 18 positive cases were tested in the viral infection model. The Aeonose was able to distinguish between COPD-subjects suffering from a viral infection and COPD patients without infection, showing an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.74. Similarly, for bacterial infections, an AUC of 0.72 was obtained. The Aeonose e-nose yields promising results in 'smelling' the presence or absence of a viral or bacterial respiratory infection during an acute exacerbation of COPD. Validation of these results using a new and large cohort is required before introduction into clinical practice. PMID:27310311

  6. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed. PMID:27084183

  7. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth mimicking acute flare as a pitfall in patients with Crohn's Disease

    Reinshagen Max

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is characterized by excessive proliferation of colonic bacterial species in the small bowel. Potential causes of SIBO include fistulae, strictures or motility disturbances. Hence, patients with Crohn's Disease (CD are especially predisposed to develop SIBO. As result, CD patients may experience malabsorption and report symptoms such as weight loss, watery diarrhea, meteorism, flatulence and abdominal pain, mimicking acute flare in these patients. Methods One-hundred-fifty patients with CD reporting increased stool frequency, meteorism and/or abdominal pain were prospectively evaluated for SIBO with the Hydrogen Glucose Breath Test (HGBT. Results Thirty-eight patients (25.3% were diagnosed with SIBO based on positive findings at HGBT. SIBO patients reported a higher rate of abdominal complaints and exhibited increased stool frequency (5.9 vs. 3.7 bowel movements/day, p = 0.003 and lower body weight (63.6 vs 70.4 kg, p = 0.014. There was no correlation with the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. SIBO was significantly more frequent in patients with partial resection of the colon or multiple intestinal surgeries; there was also a clear trend in patients with ileocecal resection that did not reach statistical significance. SIBO rate was also higher in patients with affection of both the colon and small bowel, while inflammation of the (neoterminal ileum again showed only tendential association with the development of SIBO. Conclusion SIBO represents a frequently ignored yet clinically relevant complication in CD, often mimicking acute flare. Because symptoms of SIBO are often difficult to differentiate from those caused by the underlying disease, targeted work-up is recommended in patients with corresponding clinical signs and predisposing factors.

  8. Stroke? Localized, otogenic meningitis!

    Ingolfsdottir, Harpa Maria; Thomasen, Per Caye

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a patient admitted with aphasia, treated for a stroke. Subsequently, it was revealed that the symptoms were caused by complicated otitis media with localized meningitis. This case draws attention to the possible intracranial spread of infection when neurological symptoms occur...

  9. [Angiostrongylosis or eosinophilic meningitis].

    Bourée, Patrice; Dumazedier, Déborah; Dahane, Naïma

    2010-04-20

    Eosinophilic meningitis, or angiostrongyliasis, is a common disease in Asia, in the Caribbean and in the Pacific islands. It is caused by a rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Infection occurs by consumption of raw or undercooked snails. Diagnosis is based on epidemiological criteria, clinical manifestations, elevated count of eosinophils in the cerebrospinal fluid and serological tests. Treatment is symptomatic and supportive. PMID:20465114

  10. Acute bacterial gastroenteritis: a study of adult patients with positive stool cultures treated in the emergency department

    Chan, S.; Ng, K; Lyon, D.; Cheung, W; Cheng, A.; Rainer, T

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the presenting clinical features of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in adult patients treated as outpatients in the emergency department (ED), and the pathogens responsible in this setting and population; and to identify the frequency with which positive stool culture result changes management.

  11. Acute Exposure to Crystalline Silica Reduces Macrophage Activation in Response to Bacterial Lipoproteins.

    Beamer, Gillian L; Seaver, Benjamin P; Jessop, Forrest; Shepherd, David M; Beamer, Celine A

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined the relationship between alveolar macrophages (AMs) and crystalline silica (SiO2) using in vitro and in vivo immunotoxicity models; however, exactly how exposure to SiO2 alters the functionality of AM and the potential consequences for immunity to respiratory pathogens remains largely unknown. Because recognition and clearance of inhaled particulates and microbes are largely mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) on the surface of AM, we hypothesized that exposure to SiO2 limits the ability of AM to respond to bacterial challenge by altering PRR expression. Alveolar and bone marrow-derived macrophages downregulate TLR2 expression following acute SiO2 exposure (e.g., 4 h). Interestingly, these responses were dependent on interactions between SiO2 and the class A scavenger receptor CD204, but not MARCO. Furthermore, SiO2 exposure decreased uptake of fluorescently labeled Pam2CSK4 and Pam3CSK4, resulting in reduced secretion of IL-1β, but not IL-6. Collectively, our data suggest that SiO2 exposure alters AM phenotype, which in turn affects their ability to uptake and respond to bacterial lipoproteins. PMID:26913035

  12. Serum procalcitonin and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines level in children with meningitis

    Erdal Taskın

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine the level of serum procalcitonin and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines in children with bacterial or viral meningitis and to document the use of these parameters in differential diagnosis.

  13. Antibiofilm Activity, Compound Characterization, and Acute Toxicity of Extract from a Novel Bacterial Species of Paenibacillus

    Saad Musbah Alasil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of many antimicrobial agents is currently decreasing; therefore, it is important to search for alternative therapeutics. Our study was carried out to assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity using microtiter plate assay, to characterize the bioactive compounds using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detection and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and to test the oral acute toxicity on Sprague Dawley rats of extract derived from a novel bacterial species of Paenibacillus strain 139SI. Our results indicate that the crude extract and its three identified compounds exhibit strong antibiofilm activity against a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Three potential compounds were identified including an amino acid antibiotic C8H20N3O4P (MW 253.237, phospholipase A2 inhibitor C21H36O5 (MW 368.512, and an antibacterial agent C14H11N3O2 (MW 253.260. The acute toxicity test indicates that the mortality rate among all rats was low and that the biochemical parameters, hematological profile, and histopathology examination of liver and kidneys showed no significant differences between experimental groups P>0.05. Overall, our findings suggest that the extract and its purified compounds derived from novel Paenibacillus sp. are nontoxic exhibiting strong antibiofilm activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens that can be useful towards new therapeutic management of biofilm-associated infections.

  14. Meningitis due to Enterobacter aerogenes subsequent to resection of an acoustic neuroma and abdominal fat graft to the mastoid

    Fida A. Khan

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Meningitis is an uncommon complication of neurosurgical procedures, with an incidence of 1.1% to 2.5%. Although unusual, the frequency of nosocomial Gram-negative meningitis appears to be increasing. Gram-negative meningitis has been documented following disruption of the dura-arachnoid barrier secondary to trauma or surgery. The association of Gram-negative bacillary meningitis with neurosurgical procedures was first reported in the 1940's. Wolff et al. described the association between Enterobacter species and post-neurosurgical infection. More recently, risk factors for nosocomial Enterobacter meningitis have been characterized by Parodi et al. Adipose graft, as an independent risk factor has not yet been reported. A patient with acoustic neuroma resection, who developed bacterial meningitis from an abdominal fat pad graft to a mastoidectomy bed is described. A brief overview was made of post-neurosurgical Gram-negative meningitis.

  15. Epidemiology of infectious meningitis in the State of Amazonas, Brazil

    Maria das Graças Gomes Saraiva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In the State of Amazonas, particularly in the capital Manaus, meningitis has affected populations of different cultures and social strata over the years. Bacterial meningitis is caused by several different species and represents a major issue of public health importance. The present study reports the meningitis case numbers with different etiologies in Amazonas from January 1976 to December 2012. METHODS: Since the 1970s, the (currently named Tropical Medicine Foundation of Doutor Heitor Vieira Dourado [Fundação de Medicina Tropical Doutor Heitor Vieira Dourado (FMT-HVD] has remained a reference center in Amazonas for the treatment of meningitis through the diagnosis and notification of cases and the confirmation of such cases using specific laboratory tests. RESULTS: The foundation has achieved coverage of over 90% of the state medical records for many years. Between 1990 and 2012, meningitis cases caused by Haemophilus influenzae decreased with the introduction of the H. influenzae vaccine. Meningococcal disease previously had a higher frequency of serogroup B disease, but starting in 2008, the detection of serogroup C increased gradually and has outpaced the detection of serogroup B. Recently, surveillance has improved the etiological definition of viral meningitis at FMT-HVD, with enteroviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and varicella zoster virus (VZV prevailing in this group of pathogens. With the advent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, cryptococcal meningitis has become an important disease in Amazonas. Additionally, infectious meningitis is an important burden in the State of Amazonas. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in the epidemiological profile for the different etiology-defined cases are the result of continuous epidemiological surveillance and laboratory capacity improvements and control measures, such as Haemophilus influenzae vaccination.

  16. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma in childhood

    Meningeal hemangiopericytoma (MHP) is extremely rare in childhood. Mean age at diagnosis is between 38 and 43 years. We present an 8-year-old boy with MHP of the middle cranial fossa. Imaging findings were indistinguishable from an aggressive bone tumor such as Ewing's sarcoma. Imaging findings are presented and discussed. Our case indicates that MHP should be considered in the differential diagnosis of skull-base tumors despite the fact that MHP is extremely rare in childhood. (orig.)

  17. Corticosteroids for managing tuberculous meningitis

    Prasad, Kameshwar; Singh, Mamta B.; Ryan, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculous meningitis is a serious form of tuberculosis (TB) that affects the meninges that cover a person's brain and spinal cord. It is associated with high death rates and with disability in people who survive. Corticosteroids have been used as an adjunct to antituberculous drugs to treat people with tuberculous meningitis, but their role has been controversial. Objectives To evaluate the effects of corticosteroids as an adjunct to antituberculous treatment on death and severe ...

  18. Potential role of tedizolid phosphate in the treatment of acute bacterial skin infections

    Urbina O

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Olatz Urbina,1 Olivia Ferrández,1 Mercè Espona,1 Esther Salas,1 Irene Ferrández,2 Santiago Grau1 1Services of Hospital Pharmacy, Hospital Universitari del Mar, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 2Ciència i Tecnologia dels Aliments, Pharmacy Department, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Tedizolid phosphate (TR-701, a prodrug of tedizolid (TR-700, is a next-generation oxazolidinone that has shown favorable results in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections in its first Phase III clinical trial. Tedizolid has high bioavailability, penetration, and tissue distribution when administered orally or intravenously. The activity of tedizolid was greater than linezolid against strains of Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Enterococcus spp. in vitro studies, including strains resistant to linezolid and those not susceptible to vancomycin or daptomycin. Its pharmacokinetic characteristics allow for a once-daily administration that leads to a more predictable efficacy and safety profile than those of linezolid. No hematological adverse effects have been reported associated with tedizolid when used at the therapeutic dose of 200 mg in Phase I, II, or III clinical trials of up to 3 weeks of tedizolid administration. Given that the clinical and microbiological efficacy are similar for the 200, 300, and 400 mg doses, the lowest effective dose of 200 mg once daily for 6 days was selected for Phase III studies in acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections, providing a safe dosing regimen with low potential for development of myelosuppression. Unlike linezolid, tedizolid does not inhibit monoamine oxidase in vivo, therefore interactions with adrenergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic drugs are not to be expected. In conclusion, tedizolid is a novel antibiotic with potent activity against Gram-positive microorganisms responsible for skin and soft tissue infections, including strains resistant to

  19. Allergic Airway Inflammation Decreases Lung Bacterial Burden following Acute Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection in a Neutrophil- and CCL8-Dependent Manner

    Dulek, Daniel E.; Newcomb, Dawn C.; Goleniewska, Kasia; Cephus, Jaqueline; Zhou, Weisong; Reiss, Sara; Toki, Shinji; Ye, Fei; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Sherrill, Taylor P.; Timothy S. Blackwell; Moore, Martin L.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Kolls, Jay K.; Peebles, R. Stokes

    2014-01-01

    The Th17 cytokines interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-17F, and IL-22 are critical for the lung immune response to a variety of bacterial pathogens, including Klebsiella pneumoniae. Th2 cytokine expression in the airways is a characteristic feature of asthma and allergic airway inflammation. The Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 diminish ex vivo and in vivo IL-17A protein expression by Th17 cells. To determine the effect of IL-4 and IL-13 on IL-17-dependent lung immune responses to acute bacterial infect...

  20. Diagnostic value of serum procalcitonin levels in children with meningitis: a comparison with blood leukocyte count and C-reactive protein

    Objectives: To determine the level of serum procalcitonin, blood leukocyte count (TLC) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in children with bacterial and non bacterial meningitis and document their efficacy in differential diagnosis. Also described are procalcitonin levels variation during treatment. Methods: From March 2005 to February 2008, we evaluated 38 clinically suspected meningitis patients in the paediatric departments, Al-Jedaany Hospital, Jeddah, KSA, for Serum procalcitonin, CRP, TLC and Lumbar punctures and CSF analysis. Patients were classified into bacterial meningitis group I (18) and non bacterial meningitis group II (20). Results: Serum PCT levels were significantly higher in bacterial meningitis (BM) 9 mean 4.8 +- 3.85 ng/ml (2.9-11.6)) compared with non bacterial meningitis (NBM) (mean 0.38 +- 0.25 ng/ml(0.31-0.61)) P< 0.001). Mean of all CSF parameters, TLC (15,000 +- 2,900 cell/ml(BM) and 9,500 +-1,105 cell/ml(NBM))and CRP (20 +- 6.8 mg/l (BM) and 12.5 +-12.0 mg/l(NBM))showed a zone of overlapping between the two groups. There is a positive correlation between serum PCT, TLC and CRP in bacterial and non bacterial meningitis cases but this relation becomes highly significant with bacterial meningitis positive group. Day 3 and day 6 treatment serum PCT was less than on admission levels (P<0.001). Conclusion: PCT can be used in the early diagnosis of bacterial meningitis and may be a useful adjunct in differentiating bacterial and non bacterial meningitis than CRP or TLC and diminishing the value of lumbar puncture performed 48-72 hours after admission to assess treatment efficacy. (author)

  1. Significance of cerebrospinal fluid lactate level in diagnosing neonatal bacterial meningitis%脑脊液乳酸水平对新生儿细菌性脑膜炎的诊断价值

    赵翠; 张澜; 刘宁; 张鹏; 梅枚; 胡黎园; 周文浩; 曹云; 程国强

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨脑脊液乳酸水平在新生儿细菌性脑膜炎诊断中的价值。方法收集2014年1月至2015年3月复旦大学附属儿科医院新生儿科住院患儿脑脊液。采用血气分析仪检测脑脊液乳酸、葡萄糖水平。采用纸片法检测血糖水平及脑脊液葡萄糖水平。根据脑脊液培养、细胞数及临床表现将纳入患儿分为细菌性脑膜炎组(观察组)与非细菌性脑膜炎组(对照组),利用 Stata 12.0软件对数据进行统计学分析。结果共纳入93例患者,其中观察组16例,对照组77例。观察组脑脊液乳酸、脑脊液乳酸/脑脊液糖比值中位数分别为4.2 mmol/ L、2.32,高于对照组的1.3 mmol/ L、0.52,差异有统计学意(Z =-6.19、5.92,P 均﹤0.05);观察组脑脊液糖、脑脊液糖/血糖比值中位数分别为1.25 mmol/ L、0.44,较对照组(2.50 mmol/ L、0.81)明显低,差异有统计学意义(Z =4.97、4.43,P 均﹤0.05)。作为诊断细菌性脑膜炎指标时,脑脊液乳酸最佳界值2.2 mmol/ L,其阳性预测值(PPV)为72.7%、阴性预测值(NPV)为100.0%;脑脊液乳酸/脑脊液糖最佳界值1.24,PPV 为94.1%、NPV 为100.0%;脑脊液糖最佳界值2.0 mmol/ L,其 PPV 为65.0%、NPV 为96.9%;脑脊液糖/血糖比值最佳界值0.6,其 PPV 为60.0%、NPV 为96.9%。结论脑脊液乳酸可作为新生儿细菌性脑膜炎诊断指标之一。%Objective To study the significance of the cerebrospinal fluid(CSF)lactate level in diagnosing neonatal bacterial meningitis(BM). Methods The CSF samples were collected from neonates admitted to Neonatal Ward of Children's Hospital of Fudan University between January 2014 and March 2015. CSF lactate and glucose con-centrations were measured with blood - gas analyzer. CSF and serum glucose levels were measured with glucometer. The enrolled neonates were divided into 2 groups based on CSF culture,CSF white blood cells(WBCs)and clinical

  2. Otobasal liquor fistula causing recurrent bacterial meningitis

    Cerebral subarachnoid space scintigraphy today still is the modality of choice for detection of a liquorrea or a liquor fistula, especially in the case of a recurrent menengitis of unclear origin. This diagnostic method yielded the results required in the case reported for efficient and successful surgical treatment. (orig./CB)

  3. Adenoviral augmentation of elafin protects the lung against acute injury mediated by activated neutrophils and bacterial infection.

    Simpson, A J; Wallace, W A; Marsden, M E; Govan, J R; Porteous, D J; Haslett, C; Sallenave, J M

    2001-08-01

    During acute pulmonary infection, tissue injury may be secondary to the effects of bacterial products or to the effects of the host inflammatory response. An attractive strategy for tissue protection in this setting would combine antimicrobial activity with inhibition of human neutrophil elastase (HNE), a key effector of neutrophil-mediated tissue injury. We postulated that genetic augmentation of elafin (an endogenous inhibitor of HNE with intrinsic antimicrobial activity) could protect the lung against acute inflammatory injury without detriment to host defense. A replication-deficient adenovirus encoding elafin cDNA significantly protected A549 cells against the injurious effects of both HNE and whole activated human neutrophils in vitro. Intratracheal replication-deficient adenovirus encoding elafin cDNA significantly protected murine lungs against injury mediated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vivo. Genetic augmentation of elafin therefore has the capacity to protect the lung against the injurious effects of both bacterial pathogens resistant to conventional antibiotics and activated neutrophils. PMID:11466403

  4. Profile of tedizolid phosphate and its potential in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    Hall RG 2nd; Michaels HN

    2015-01-01

    Ronald G Hall 2nd, Heidi N Michaels Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Dallas, TX, USA Abstract: Tedizolid phosphate is the first once-daily oxazolidinone approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). It is more potent in vitro than linezolid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other gram-positive pathogens causing ABSSSI, even retaining activity against some l...

  5. Bacteriological Profile of Pyogenic Meningitis in Tertiary Care Hospital, Ahmedabad

    Gaurav B Modi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Bacterial meningitis remains a major cause of mortality and long term neurological sequelae worldwide. The purpose of present study was to identify the pathogen in pyogenic meningitis and to determine its antibiotic susceptibility pattern. Material and Methods: Present study was undertaken from July 2010 to December 2011 included 1470 CSF samples of clinically suspected pyogenic meningitis cases in all age groups. The samples were subjected to macroscopic examination, microscopic examination, Gram’s stain and culture tests. The organisms isolated in the study were characterized by standard procedure and antibiotic susceptibility tests according to CLSI guidelines. Results: Bacterial pathogens were isolated from 205 samples showing an isolation rate of 13.94%. Gram’s stain positivity was 61.95%. Among the isolated organisms, 69.26% were gram negative bacilli and 30.74% were gram positive cocci. The most commonly isolated bacteria were K. pneumoniae (22.92% & S. aureus in 19.02%. Pyogenic meningitis was more common in paediatric patients than adults. K. pneumoniae and Enterococci spp. were most common isolated in neonatal age group. Most common organisms isolated in neurosurgical patients were Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococci aureus. 09.10% gram negative organisms were ESBLs. Only 2 Gram positive isolates were MRSA. Conclusion: The frequency of single as well as multiple drug resistance was very high among the bacterial isolates. Antibiogram study indicated that the third generation cephalosporins and aminoglycosides can be used as single or in combinations for the empirical treatment of bacterial meningitis till culture and sensitivity report is awaited. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(3.000: 313-317

  6. MR features in patients with residual paralysis following aseptic meningitis

    MR studies were performed in three patients with paralysis in the lower extremities. Poliomyelitis-like paralysis can be caused by neurovirulent strains of nonpolioenteroviruses. Entervirus 71 (EV 71) is documented as one of the potentially neurovirulent strains and a causative agent of some epidemics (1-7). The clinical manifestations associated with the EV 71 infection include aseptic meningitis, hand-food-mouth disease (HFMD), acute respiratory illness and gastrointestinal disease(6). Although rarely fatal, flaccidparalysis can be followed by EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis. Anterior horn cell necrosis was suggested on MR in two patients with residual paralysis (7). MR features, however, have not yet been described in detail. In this report we present three cases of patients with clinical evidence of EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis whose MR studies showed residual changes in spinal cord

  7. MR features in patients with residual paralysis following aseptic meningitis

    Suh, Dae Chul; Park, Young Seo [College of Medicine, Asan Meidcal Center, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-01-15

    MR studies were performed in three patients with paralysis in the lower extremities. Poliomyelitis-like paralysis can be caused by neurovirulent strains of nonpolioenteroviruses. Entervirus 71 (EV 71) is documented as one of the potentially neurovirulent strains and a causative agent of some epidemics (1-7). The clinical manifestations associated with the EV 71 infection include aseptic meningitis, hand-food-mouth disease (HFMD), acute respiratory illness and gastrointestinal disease(6). Although rarely fatal, flaccidparalysis can be followed by EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis. Anterior horn cell necrosis was suggested on MR in two patients with residual paralysis (7). MR features, however, have not yet been described in detail. In this report we present three cases of patients with clinical evidence of EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis whose MR studies showed residual changes in spinal cord.

  8. Pathogenic bacteria distribution and drug resistance in one hundred children of bacterial meningitis%儿童细菌性脑膜炎100例病原分布及耐药分析

    林罗娜; 林立; 温顺航; 陈秀珍; 尚燕萍; 李昌崇

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the pathogenic bacteria distribution, antibiotics resistance, and clinical features of childhood bacterial meningitis (BM). Methods Clinical data from BM children with positive cerebrospinal lfuid culture were retrospectively analyzed from March 2004 to March 2015. According to age, the BM children were divided into neonates group (0-28 days), infants group (—1 year), and children group (≥1 year). According to the onset time, the BM children were divided into the early group (March 2004 to March 2010) and the late group (April 2010 to March 2015). According to the clinical situation, the BM children were divided into the trauma and surgery secondary infection group and the control group. Results A total of 100 BM children were recruited. One hundred and two strains of pathogens were detected, 62 (60.8%) strains of Gram positive bacteria and 40 (39.2%) strains of Gram negative bacteria. The main pathogens were Streptococcus pneumoniae (33 strains), Escherichia coli (22 strains), and Streptococcus agalactiae (10 strains). The proportion of Streptococcus agalactiae was higher in the late group (18.8%(9 cases)) than that in the early group (1.9%(1 case)) (χ2=6.406, P=0.011). The proportion of coagulase-negative staphylococci was higher in the trauma and surgery secondary infection group than that in the control group (χ2=6.631, P=0.010). Drug sensitivity analysis found that 60.0%of Escherichia coli produced extended-spectrumβ-lactamases (ESBLs) in the control group, while the only one strain of Escherichia coli in the trauma and surgery secondary infection group was ESBLs negative. Streptococcus pneumoniae were sensitive to vancomycin and linezolid. Streptococcus agalactiae were all found in the control group, which were all sensitive to penicillin and linezolid. The sensitive rate to vancomycin was only 70%. The incidence of complications in neonates group, infants group, and children group was 55.0%(22/40), 78.6%(33/42), and 33

  9. Differential effects of kidney-lung cross-talk during acute kidney injury and bacterial pneumonia

    Singbartl, Kai; Bishop, Jeffery; Wen, Xiaoyan; Murugan, Raghavan; Chandra, Saurabh; Filippi, Marie-Dominique; John A Kellum

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and acute lung injury (ALI) represent serious, complex clinical problems. The combination of AKI and ALI drastically decreases survival. However, detailed knowledge about the interactions between these two organs is scarce.

  10. Detection of single bacteria - causative agents of meningitis using raman microscopy

    Baikova, T. V.; Minaeva, S. A.; Sundukov, A. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Bagratashvili, V. N.; Alushin, M. V.; Gonchukov, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnostics of meningitis is a very topical problem as it is a fulminant disease with a high level of mortality. The progress of this disease is, as a rule, accompanied by the appearance of bacteria in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition. The examination of the CSF is well known to be the only reliable approach to the identification of meningitis. However, the traditional biochemical analyses are time consuming and not always reliable, simple, and inexpensive, whereas the optical methods are poorly developed. This work is devoted to the study of Raman spectra of several bacterial cultures which are mainly present during meningitis. Raman microscopy is a prompt and noninvasive technique capable of providing reliable information about molecular-level alterations of biological objects at their minimal quantity and size. It was shown that there are characteristic lines in Raman spectra which can be the reliable markers for determination of bacterial form of meningitis at a level of a single bacterium.

  11. The relationship between prior antimicrobial prescription and meningitis: a case–control study

    Armstrong, David; Ashworth, Mark; Dregan, Alex; White, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent research into the role of the human microbiome in maintaining health has identified the potentially harmful impact of antimicrobials. Aim The association with bacterial and viral meningitis following antimicrobial prescription during the previous year was investigated to determine whether antimicrobials have a deleterious effect on the nasopharyngeal microbiome. Design and setting A case-control study (1:4 cases to controls) was conducted examining the rate of previous antimicrobial exposure in cases of meningitis and in a matched control group. Data from a UK primary care clinical database were analysed using conditional logistic regression. Results A total of 7346 cases of meningitis were identified, 3307 (45%) viral, 1812 (25%) bacterial, and 2227 (30%) unspecified. The risks of viral (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.45; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.24 to 2.68) or bacterial (AOR 1.98; 95% CI = 1.71 to 2.30) meningitis were both increased following antimicrobial prescription in the preceding year. Patients who received ≥4 antimicrobial prescriptions in the preceding year were at significantly increased risk of all types of meningitis (AOR 2.85; 95% CI = 2.44 to 3.34), bacterial meningitis (AOR 3.06; 95% CI = 2.26 to 4.15) and viral meningitis (AOR 3.23; 95% CI = 2.55 to 4.08) compared to their matched controls. Conclusion There was an increased risk of meningitis following antimicrobial prescription in the previous year. It is possible that this increase was due to an effect of antimicrobials on the microbiome or reflected an increased general susceptibility to infections in these patients. PMID:26965030

  12. A Review of the Impact of Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Conjugate Vaccine (7-valent) on Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Tin Tin Htar, Myint; Madhava, Harish; Balmer, Paul; Christopoulou, Dina; Menegas, Damianos; Bonnet, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Young children, the elderly and those who are immunocompromised or who suffer from chronic diseases have the highest risk of developing pneumococcal meningitis. A 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was licensed in 2000 in the US and in 2001 in Europe. Methods A literature search was performed in PubMed to identify studies assessing the impact of routine childhood PCV7 vaccination on pneumococcal di...

  13. Epidemiología descriptiva de meningitis no meningocócicas bacterianas de la provincia de Zaragoza (1999-2004): evaluación de su sistema de vigilancia Descriptive epidemiology of non-meningococcal bacterial meningitis in the province of Saragossa [Spain] from 1999 to 2004: evaluation of the Epidemiological Surveillance System

    Carmen Varela; Alberto Vergara; Joaquín Guimbao; María Pilar Rodrigo Val; Salvador de Mateo; Dionisio Herrera

    2007-01-01

    Objetivos: Describir las meningitis no meningocócicas bacterianas (MnMB) y evaluar el Sistema de Vigilancia Epidemiológica (SVE) en la provincia de Zaragoza entre 1999 y 2004. Métodos: Se utilizó el registro de enfermedades de declaración obligatoria (EDO) y el conjunto mínimo básico de datos (CMBD). Se evaluó el SVE utilizando criterios de los Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, estimando la exhaustividad mediante captura-recaptura. Resultados: Se notificaron 111 casos de MnMB (62,2%...

  14. Treatment Complications of Lyme Meningitis

    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at Alfred I duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE, and other Centers in Lyme endemic areas determined the frequency and type of all treatment complications at return visits within 30 days of an initial Lyme meningitis diagnosis.

  15. Spinal perineurial and meningeal cysts.

    Tarlov, I M

    1970-12-01

    Perineurial cysts may be responsible for clinical symptoms and a cure effected by their removal. They do not fill on initial myelography but may fill with Pantopaque some time, days or weeks, after Pantopaque has been instilled into the subarachnoid space. Perineurial cysts arise at the site of the posterior root ganglion. The cyst wall is composed of neural tissue. When initial myelography fails to reveal an adequate cause for the patient's symptoms and signs referable to the caudal nerve roots, then about a millilitre of Pantopaque should be left in the canal for delayed myelography which may later reveal a sacral perineurial cyst or, occasionally, a meningeal cyst. Meningeal diverticula occur proximal to the posterior root ganglia and usually fill on initial myelography. They are in free communication with the subarachnoid space and are rarely in my experience responsible for clinical symptoms. Meningeal diverticula and meningeal cysts appear to represent a continuum. Pantopaque left in the subarachnoid space may convert a meningeal diverticulum into an expanding symptomatic meningeal cyst, as in the case described. Many cases described as perineurial cysts represent abnormally long arachnoidal prolongations over nerve roots or meningeal diverticula. In general, neither of the latter is of pathological significance. Perineurial, like meningeal cysts and diverticula, may be asymptomatic. They should be operated upon only if they produce progressive or disabling symptoms or signs clearly attributable to them. When myelography must be done, and this should be done only as a preliminary to a probable necessary operation, then patient effort should be made to remove the Pantopaque. PMID:5531903

  16. Cooperation between Monocyte-Derived Cells and Lymphoid Cells in the Acute Response to a Bacterial Lung Pathogen.

    Andrew S Brown

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a potentially fatal lung infection. Alveolar macrophages support intracellular replication of L. pneumophila, however the contributions of other immune cell types to bacterial killing during infection are unclear. Here, we used recently described methods to characterise the major inflammatory cells in lung after acute respiratory infection of mice with L. pneumophila. We observed that the numbers of alveolar macrophages rapidly decreased after infection coincident with a rapid infiltration of the lung by monocyte-derived cells (MC, which, together with neutrophils, became the dominant inflammatory cells associated with the bacteria. Using mice in which the ability of MC to infiltrate tissues is impaired it was found that MC were required for bacterial clearance and were the major source of IL12. IL12 was needed to induce IFNγ production by lymphoid cells including NK cells, memory T cells, NKT cells and γδ T cells. Memory T cells that produced IFNγ appeared to be circulating effector/memory T cells that infiltrated the lung after infection. IFNγ production by memory T cells was stimulated in an antigen-independent fashion and could effectively clear bacteria from the lung indicating that memory T cells are an important contributor to innate bacterial defence. We also determined that a major function of IFNγ was to stimulate bactericidal activity of MC. On the other hand, neutrophils did not require IFNγ to kill bacteria and alveolar macrophages remained poorly bactericidal even in the presence of IFNγ. This work has revealed a cooperative innate immune circuit between lymphoid cells and MC that combats acute L. pneumophila infection and defines a specific role for IFNγ in anti-bacterial immunity.

  17. Protective effect of a bacterial extract against acute exacerbation in patients with chronic bronchitis accompanied by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    李靖; 郑劲平; 袁锦屏; 曾广翘; 钟南山; 林材元

    2004-01-01

    Background Immunostimulating agents made from bacterial extracts represent a class of medications that contains antigens derived from several bacterial strains and their potential ability to prevent bacterial infections results from the stimulation of the nonspecific component of the immune system. The present study investigated the effect of the oral immunostimulant Broncho-Vaxom, which includes material from eight different species of bacteria that are frequently present in the lower respiratory tract, on the frequency and severity of acute exacerbation in patients with chronic bronchitis accompanied by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods Ninety patients with chronic bronchitis complicated with COPD were randomly divided into groups A and B. Forty-nine subjects in group A received oral capsules containing 7mg Broncho-Vaxom, while 41 patients in group B received similar placebo capsules. Both groups took one capsule daily for the first 10 days of each month for 3 consecutive months. The frequency of acute exacerbation, symptom scores, and lung function were recorded for the following one year period.Results There was a significant decrease in the incidence, duration, and severity of acute exacerbation, as well as a reduction in the course of antibiotics administered and in the dosage of bronchodilator and mucolytic agent in group A, as compared to group B (P<0.05, respectively). Symptom scores for cough, sputum, dyspnea, as well as symptoms observed upon auscultation of the chest also improved significantly in group A as compared to group B (P<0.05, respectively). The bacterial clearance rate in sputum cultures from patients who received no antibiotics for the first 3 months was also significantly higher in group A compared to group B (P<0.01).Conclusions Orally administered Broncho-Vaxom is associated with a decrease in the incidence of acute exacerbation and a decrease in the need for antibiotics and symptomatic relief medications in patients

  18. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  19. Computed tomography of tuberculous meningitis

    Recently, tuberculous meningitis has become rather rare except in areas where tuberculosis is still endemic. Six adolescents and young adults with tuberculous meningitis were evaluated by means of serial computerized tomography (CT), and the results were correlated with the findings of surgical specimens or autopsies. All cases showed meningeal irritation and fever at onset. CSF cultures revealed the presence of tuberculous bacilli. Four cases advanced rapidly to the clinical stage III and expired in a short period-between two weeks to one month from onset. On initial CT scanning, the disappearance of the basal cistern was a characteristic finding in all these cases. With the progression, an enhancement of the basal cistern on contrast injection, a localized hypodensity in adjacent parenchyma, and symmetrical ventricular dilatation appeared. Two autopsied cases showed tuberculous granulomas with purulent materials, thickened meninges, and caseous necrosis in the parenchyma around the basal cistern. The other two cases progressed rather slowly. CT findings at Stage II showed multiple enhanced spots in the basal subcortical area following contrast injection. Tuberculous granulomas were identified in these parts by means of explorative craniotomy. The authors point out the pathognomonic CT findings of tuberculous meningitis and emphasize the necessity of serial CT for the early detection and management of tuberculous meningitis. (author)

  20. Leptomeningeal contrast enhancement and blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in aseptic meningitis

    Alonso, Angelika; Eisele, Philipp; Ebert, Anne D.; Griebe, Martin; Engelhardt, Britta; Szabo, Kristina; Hennerici, Michael G.; Gass, Achim

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB) dysfunction in aseptic meningitis. METHODS In our case series of 14 patients with acute aseptic meningitis, we compared MRI characteristics with CSF findings. RESULTS Contrast enhancement in the sulcal space in a leptomeningeal pattern was visualized in 7 patients with BCSFB dysfunction categorized as moderate to severe as evidenced by the CSF/serum albumin ratio (Qalb) but was not present in those with mild or no barr...

  1. Fulminant citrobacter meningitis with multiple periventricular abscesses in a three-month-old infant

    P. Anoop

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrobacter, a Gram-negative enteric bacillus, is a rare cause of septicemia and meningitis, seldom reported beyond the neonatal period. It is characterized by a fulminant clinical course and a high incidence of complications, including brain abscesses. We studied a three-month-old infant with Citrobacter meningitis, who developed acute communicating hydrocephalus and multiple periventricular brain abscesses while on treatment. The patient died, despite intensive antibiotic treatment directed towards the causative organism, C. diversus.

  2. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    Jones, Travis M; Johnson, Steven W; DiMondi, V Paul; Wilson, Dustin T

    2016-01-01

    JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. PMID:27354817

  3. Evaluation of acute bacterial rhino sinusitis in asthma patients based on clinical parameters and imaging studies, together with ear, nose and throat examination

    Faure, Alecsandra Calil Moises; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Fernandes, Ana Luisa Godoy [Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine from Sao Paulo. Dept. of Internal Medicine]. E-mail: analgf@terra.com.br; analuisa@pneumo.epm.br; Weckx, Luc Louis Maurice [Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine from Sao Paulo. Otorhinolaryngology; Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa [Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine from Sao Paulo. Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging

    2008-06-15

    Objective: To evaluate paranasal sinuses in patients with stable or acute asthma in order to determine the prevalence of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 30 patients with acute asthma (73% females) treated in the emergency room and 30 patients with stable asthma (80% females) regularly monitored as outpatients. All patients completed a questionnaire on respiratory signs and symptoms and were submitted to ear, nose and throat (ENT) examination, as well as to X-ray and computed tomography (CT) imaging of the sinuses. Results: Based on the clinical diagnosis, the prevalence of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis was 40% in the patients with acute asthma and 3% in those with stable asthma. The ENT examination findings and the imaging findings in isolation were not useful to confirm the diagnosis. Conclusions: In themselves, ENT examination findings, X-ray findings and CT findings were not useful for the diagnosis of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Our results provide further evidence that a clinical diagnosis of bacterial rhinosinusitis should be made with caution. (author)

  4. Evaluation of acute bacterial rhino sinusitis in asthma patients based on clinical parameters and imaging studies, together with ear, nose and throat examination

    Objective: To evaluate paranasal sinuses in patients with stable or acute asthma in order to determine the prevalence of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 30 patients with acute asthma (73% females) treated in the emergency room and 30 patients with stable asthma (80% females) regularly monitored as outpatients. All patients completed a questionnaire on respiratory signs and symptoms and were submitted to ear, nose and throat (ENT) examination, as well as to X-ray and computed tomography (CT) imaging of the sinuses. Results: Based on the clinical diagnosis, the prevalence of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis was 40% in the patients with acute asthma and 3% in those with stable asthma. The ENT examination findings and the imaging findings in isolation were not useful to confirm the diagnosis. Conclusions: In themselves, ENT examination findings, X-ray findings and CT findings were not useful for the diagnosis of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Our results provide further evidence that a clinical diagnosis of bacterial rhinosinusitis should be made with caution. (author)

  5. Local and disseminated acute phase response during bacterial respiratory infection in pigs

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2010-01-01

    proteins (APP) outside the liver is increasingly recognized, still little is known of extra-hepatic production of APP in pigs. 14-18 h after experimental infection with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, causing acute pleuropneumonia in pigs, we studied local APP gene expression changes in different......The acute phase response is playing an important role, aiming to restore the healthy state after tissue injury, inflammation and infection. The biological function of this response and its interplay with other parts of innate defense reactions remain somewhat elusive. Expression of acute phase...... differentially expressed between infected and control animals. We demonstrated that acute pleuropneumonia caused by A. pleuropneumoniae leads to a rapid disseminated local intra-lung APP response, also in apparently unaffected areas of the infected lung. Further extrahepatic expression of several acute-phase...

  6. Rapid and widely disseminated acute phase protein response after experimental bacterial infection of pigs

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Boye, Mette;

    2009-01-01

    The acute phase protein response is a well-described generalized early host response to tissue injury, inflammation and infection, observed as pronounced changes in the concentrations of a number of circulating serum proteins. The biological function of this response and its interplay with other...... measurements of interleukin-6 and selected acute phase proteins in serum. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A were clearly induced 14-18 h after infection. Extrahepatic expression of acute phase proteins was found to be dramatically altered as a result of the lung infection with an extrahepatic acute phase...... protein response occurring concomitantly with the hepatic response. This suggests that the acute phase protein response is a more disseminated systemic response than previously thought. The current study provides to our knowledge the first example of porcine extrahepatic expression and regulation of C...

  7. Cryptococcal meningitis in HIV infected: Experience from a North Indian tertiary center

    Kumar Susheel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is a common opportunistic infection in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-infected individuals. There is little information specifically addressing cryptococcal meningitis in HIV-infected patients from North India. Aims: To determine clinical presentation, hospital course, response to treatment, complications developed, in-hospital mortality, any recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis and reasons of recurrence during follow-up. Settings and Design: A retrospective observational study undertaken in a large tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Patient′s demographic data, presenting clinical symptomatology, physical findings, laboratory parameters, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination findings, side-effects of treatment, development of any complications and hospital outcome were analyzed. During follow-up any recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis, possible reasons of recurrence, type of treatment received, complications developed and outcome was recorded as well. Results: Forty patients diagnosed to have cryptococcal meningitis were analyzed. Twenty-two (55% patients had acute/ subacute presentation. Thirty-six (90% patients presented with headache and 18 (45% had altered sensorium. Twenty (50% patients had no cells in the CSF. Hypoglycorrhchia was seen in 30 (75% patients. Cryptococcal meningitis was the first acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS-defining illness in 30 (75% patients. Thirty-five patients developed some adverse effects to amphotericin-B. Thirty-three patients improved with treatment while three patients died. Four patients had recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis within six months of first episode. Non-compliance of fluconazole therapy was the reason for recurrence in all of these patients. Conclusions: Cryptococcal meningitis is a common initial AIDS-defining illness. Acute and/or subacute presentation of cryptococcal meningitis is not uncommon in HIV-infected individuals. An early

  8. Evaluation of procalcitonin and neopterin level in serum of patients with acute bacterial infection

    Babak Pourakbari; Setareh Mamishi; Javid Zafari; Hanieh Khairkhah; Mohammad H Ashtiani; Masomeh Abedini; Shahla Afsharpaiman; Soroush Seifi Rad

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fever as a common presenting complaint in pediatric patients can be due to various causes. Differentiating bacterial infection from other causes is important because the prompt use of antibiotics is critical in bacterial infection. Traditional markers of infection such as BT and WBC count may be unspecific and culture may be late or absent. CRP and Procalcitonin (PCT) have been considered to evaluate the evolution of infections and sepsis in patients presenting with SIRS. Neopteri...

  9. Possible implication of bacterial infection in acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Shigeo eFuji

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD is still one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. In the pathogenesis of acute GVHD, it has been established that donor-derived T cells activated in the recipient play a major role in GVHD in initiation and maintenance within an inflammatory cascade. To reduce the risk of GVHD, intensification of GVHD prophylaxis like T cell depletion is effective, but it inevitably increases the risk of infectious diseases and abrogates beneficial graft-versus-leukemia effects. Although various cytokines are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of GVHD, GVHD initiation is such a complex process that cannot be prevented by means of single inflammatory cytokine inhibition. Thus, efficient methods to control the whole inflammatory milieu both on cellular and humoral view are needed. In this context, infectious diseases can theoretically contribute to an elevation of inflammatory cytokines after allogeneic HSCT and activation of various subtypes of immune effector cells, which might in summary lead to an aggravation of acute GVHD. The appropriate treatments or prophylaxis of bacterial infection during the early phase after allogeneic HSCT might be beneficial to reduce not only infectious-related but also GVHD-related mortality. Here, we aim to review the literature addressing the interactions of bacterial infections and GVHD after allogeneic HSCT.

  10. Intrathecal application of the antimicrobial peptide CRAMP reduced mortality and neuroinflammation in an experimental model of pneumococcal meningitis.

    Dörr, Arndt; Kress, Eugenia; Podschun, Rainer; Pufe, Thomas; Tauber, Simone C; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove

    2015-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AP) are important components of the innate immune system. Our previous work revealed a higher mortality rate and up-regulation of proinflammatory gene expression as well as glial cell activation in cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP)-deficient mice after bacterial meningitis. However, the influence of CRAMP application on the progression of inflammation and its impact on mortality after bacterial meningitis remains unknown. To assess the effects of continuous CRAMP exposure in the brain, C57BL/6 wildtype mice were given intracerebroventricular infusion of CRAMP to investigate the effects on mortality, glial cell activation and inflammation in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis using immunohistochemistry and realtime RT-PCR. Our results revealed a decrease of mortality after CRAMP infusion. The intrathecal CRAMP infusion after pneumococcal meningitis resulted in a decreased mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, whereas the immune responses including the expression of pattern recognition receptors and chemokines were increased in bacterial meningitis. Taken together, the results support the important role of CRAMP as part of the innate immune response against pathogens in bacterial CNS infections. The APs may be a promising approach for the development of an adjuvant therapy for bacterial meningitis. PMID:25896094

  11. Meningitis tras anestesia espinal Meningitis after a spinal anesthesia

    A. L. Vázquez-Martínez

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available La meningitis post-punción es una importante complicación de la anestesia espinal. Describimos el caso de un varón de cuarenta y seis años que ingresó para tratamiento quirúrgico de una hernia umbilical, la cirugía se realizó bajo anestesia intradural. Tras la intervención el paciente comenzó con un cuadro clínico compatible con meningitis, que se confirmó tras examen del líquido cefalorraquídeo. Se trató con antibióticos a pesar de la no identificación de gérmenes, siendo la evolución favorable. El diagnóstico etiológico de una meningitis iatrogénica no siempre es posible, pero siempre debemos tener en cuenta esta posibilidad. En este artículo queremos revisar la situación actual del problema, especialmente la profilaxis y la actitud terapéutica.Post-dural puncture meningitis is a serious complication of spinal anesthesia. We describe the case of a forty six years old male who was admitted for surgical intervention of an umbilical hernia, performed under spinal anesthesia. After surgery the patient developed a clinical syndrome compatible with meningitis, the diagnosis was confirmed by examination of the cerebrospinal fluid. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were started although spinal cultures were negatives, and the patient's clinical course was favourable. The meningitis differential diagnosis may be difficult, but we must think about this possibility. In this case report ,we want to check the present situation, specially the prevention and medical treatment.

  12. Meningitis Myths and Facts for Consumers

    ... for Teenagers 14 Adult Vaccine-Preventable Diseases Infographic Meningitis Myths and Facts Myth: Meningococcal disease is easy ... infected person, such as shaking hands. Fact: Meningococcal meningitis is spread through air droplets and direct contact ...

  13. Voriconazole in an infant with cryptococcal meningitis

    2008-01-01

    @@ Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) is the most common cause of fungal meningitis worldwide.1 Cryptococcal meningitis is an opportunistic infection commonly found in immunocompromised hosts,especially HIV-infected adults. It also occurs in apparently immunocompetent individuals.

  14. Meningitis B Vaccine Falls Short of Expectations

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159976.html Meningitis B Vaccine Falls Short of Expectations 1 in ... University students given a vaccine to combat a meningitis B outbreak on campus in 2013 didn't ...

  15. Myeloid-Related Protein 14 Promotes Inflammation and Injury in Meningitis

    Wache, Christina; Klein, Matthias; Andersen, Christian Østergaard;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Neutrophilic inflammation often persists for days despite effective antibiotic treatment and contributes to brain damage in bacterial meningitis. We propose here that myeloid-related protein 14 (MRP14), an abundant cytosolic protein in myeloid cells, acts as an endogenous danger signal......, driving inflammation and aggravating tissue injury. METHODS:  The release pattern of MRP14 was analyzed in human and murine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as well as in isolated neutrophils. Its functional role was assessed in a mouse meningitis model, using MRP14-deficient mice. RESULTS:  We detected large...... quantities of MRP14 in CSF specimens from patients and mice with pneumococcal meningitis. Immunohistochemical analyses and a cell-depletion approach indicated neutrophils as the major source of MRP14. In a meningitis model, MRP14-deficient mice showed a better resolution of inflammation during antibiotic...

  16. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    Jones TM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Travis M Jones,1,2 Steven W Johnson,1,3 V Paul DiMondi,1,4 Dustin T Wilson,1,2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Campbell University, Buies Creek, 2Department of Pharmacy, Duke University Hospital, Durham, 3Department of Pharmacy, Forsyth Medical Center, Novant Health, Winston-Salem, 4Department of Pharmacy, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. Keywords: JNJ-Q2, fluoroquinolone, ABSSSI, CABP, MRSA

  17. Co-trimoxazole induced aseptic meningitis.

    PASHANKAR, D.; McArdle, M.; A. Robinson

    1995-01-01

    A 15 year old boy presented with two episodes of aseptic meningitis-like reactions after ingestion of co-trimoxazole. The diagnosis of co-trimoxazole induced aseptic meningitis was made. This syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aseptic meningitis.

  18. Tobacco use increases susceptibility to bacterial infection

    Demuth Donald R; Bagaitkar Juhi; Scott David A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Active smokers and those exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk of bacterial infection. Tobacco smoke exposure increases susceptibility to respiratory tract infections, including tuberculosis, pneumonia and Legionnaires disease; bacterial vaginosis and sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea; Helicobacter pylori infection; periodontitis; meningitis; otitis media; and post-surgical and nosocomial infections. Tobacco smoke compromises the anti-bacteri...

  19. Using Relative Humidity Forecasts to Manage Meningitis in the Sahel

    Pandya, R. E.; Adams-Forgor, A.; Akweogno, P.; Awine, T.; Dalaba, M.; Dukic, V.; Dumont, A.; Hayden, M.; Hodgson, A.; Hopson, T. M.; Hugonnet, S.; Yoksas, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    Meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur quasi-regularly and with devastating impact. In 2008, for example, eighty-eight thousand people contracted meningitis and over five thousand died. Until very recently, the protection provided by the only available vaccine was so limited and short-lived that the only practical strategy for vaccination was reactive: waiting until an epidemic occurred in the region and then vaccinating in that region to prevent the epidemic's further growth. Even with that strategy, there were still times when demand outpaced available vaccine. While a new vaccine has recently been developed that is effective and inexpensive enough to be used more broadly and proactively, it is only effective against the strain of bacteria that causes the most common kind of bacterial meningitis. As a result, there will likely be continued need for reactive vaccination strategies. It is widely known that meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur only in the dry season. Our project investigated this relationship, and several independent lines of evidence demonstrate a robust relationship between the onset of the rainy season, as marked by weekly average relative humidity above 40%, and the end of meningitis epidemics. These lines of evidence include statistical analysis of two years of weekly meningitis and weather data across the Sahel, cross-correlation of ten years of meningitis and weather data in the Upper East region of northern Ghana, and high-resolution weather simulations of past meningitis seasons to interpolate available weather data. We also adapted two techniques that have been successfully used in public health studies: generalized additive models, which have been used to relate air quality and health, and a linearized version of the compartmental epidemics model that has been used to understand MRSA. Based on these multiple lines of evidence, average weekly relative humidity forecast two weeks in advance appears consistently and strongly related to

  20. Prostatitis - bacterial

    Any bacteria that can cause a urinary tract infection can cause acute bacterial prostatitis. Infections spread through sexual contact can cause prostatitis. These include chlamydia and gonorrhea . Sexually transmitted ...

  1. Clinico-radiological features of subarachnoid hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images in patients with meningitis

    Aim: To investigate the clinical and radiological features of meningitis with subarachnoid diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) hyperintensity. Materials and methods: The clinical features, laboratory data, and radiological findings, including the number and distribution of subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions and other radiological abnormalities, of 18 patients seen at five institutions were evaluated. Results: The patients consisted of eight males and 10 females, whose ages ranged from 4 months to 82 years (median 65 years). Causative organisms were bacteria in 15 patients, including Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Listeria monocytogenes. The remaining three were fungal meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. Subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions were multiple in 16 of the 18 cases (89%) and predominantly distributed around the frontal lobe in 16 of the 18 cases (89%). In addition to subarachnoid abnormality, subdural empyema, cerebral infarction, and intraventricular empyema were found in 50, 39, and 39%, respectively. Compared with paediatric patients, adult patients with bacterial meningitis tended to have poor prognoses (7/10 versus 1/5; p = 0.1). Conclusion: Both bacterial and fungal meningitis could cause subarachnoid hyperintensity on DWI, predominantly around the frontal lobe. This finding is often associated with poor prognosis in adult bacterial meningitis.

  2. Clinico-radiological features of subarachnoid hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images in patients with meningitis

    Kawaguchi, T., E-mail: madarafuebuki@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Sakurai, K.; Hara, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Muto, M. [Department of Radiology, Okazaki City Hospital, Okazaki, Aichi (Japan); Nakagawa, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Tohyama, J. [Department of Radiology, Toyota-kai Medical Corporation Kariya Toyota General Hospital, Kariya, Aichi (Japan); Oguri, T. [Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Mitake, S. [Department of Neurology, Tosei General Hospital, Seto-shi, Aichi (Japan); Maeda, M. [Department of Radiology, Mie University School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie (Japan); Matsukawa, N.; Ojika, K. [Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Shibamoto, Y. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    Aim: To investigate the clinical and radiological features of meningitis with subarachnoid diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) hyperintensity. Materials and methods: The clinical features, laboratory data, and radiological findings, including the number and distribution of subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions and other radiological abnormalities, of 18 patients seen at five institutions were evaluated. Results: The patients consisted of eight males and 10 females, whose ages ranged from 4 months to 82 years (median 65 years). Causative organisms were bacteria in 15 patients, including Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Listeria monocytogenes. The remaining three were fungal meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. Subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions were multiple in 16 of the 18 cases (89%) and predominantly distributed around the frontal lobe in 16 of the 18 cases (89%). In addition to subarachnoid abnormality, subdural empyema, cerebral infarction, and intraventricular empyema were found in 50, 39, and 39%, respectively. Compared with paediatric patients, adult patients with bacterial meningitis tended to have poor prognoses (7/10 versus 1/5; p = 0.1). Conclusion: Both bacterial and fungal meningitis could cause subarachnoid hyperintensity on DWI, predominantly around the frontal lobe. This finding is often associated with poor prognosis in adult bacterial meningitis.

  3. Onkologisk behandling af meningeal carcinomatose

    Sulim, S.; Høyer, Morten

    2005-01-01

    Meningeal carcinomatosis (MC) occurs in 5-8% of cancer patients. In the       majority of cases, MC appears in patients with advanced disease. The       increase in incidence is probably caused by improved survival due to       improvements in systemic therapy and an increased awareness of MC among...

  4. Neuroimaging features of tuberculous meningitis.

    Sobri, M; Merican, J S; Nordiyana, M; Valarmathi, S; Ai-Edrus, S A

    2006-03-01

    Tuberculous meningitis leads to a high mortality rate. However, it responds well to chemotherapy if the treatment is started early. Neuroimaging is one of the most important initial investigations. There were 42 patients diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis in Kuala Lumpur Hospital based on clinical criteria, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and response to anti-tuberculous treatment over a 7 year period. Relevant information was obtained from patients' medical case notes and neuroimaging findings were evaluated. Male to female ratio was 3:1. The three major ethnics and the immigrant groups in Malaysia were represented in this study. The majority of the cases involved the Malays followed by immigrants, Chinese and Indians. The patients' age ranged from 18 to 62 years old with the mean age of 34.4 years. There were 95.2% (n = 40) of patients who presented with various neuroimaging abnormalities and only 2 (4.8%) patients had normal neuroimaging findings. Hydrocephalus and meningeal enhancement were the two commonest neuroimaging features. Other features include infarction, enhancing lesion, tuberculoma, abcess, oedema and calcification. Contrasted CT scan is an adequate neuroimaging tool to unmask abnormal findings in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:16708732

  5. The role of prophylaxis of bacterial infections in children with acute leukemia/non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Elio Castagnola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infections represent a well-known complication of antineoplastic chemotherapy that may cause delay of treatment, with alteration of the antineoplastic program and dose-intensity, or even the death of a patient that could heal from his/her neoplasia. Bacterial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients who are neutropenic following chemotherapy for malignancy. Therefore a program of antibiotic prophylaxis for febrile neutropenia may be considered in the management strategy of cancer patients.

  6. The Role of Prophylaxis of Bacterial Infections in Children With Acute Leukemia/Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Elio Castagnola

    2014-01-01

    Infections represent a well-known complication of antineoplastic chemotherapy that may cause delay of treatment, with alteration of the antineoplastic program and dose-intensity, or even the death of a patient that could heal from his/her neoplasia. Bacterial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients who are neutropenic following chemotherapy for malignancy. Therefore a program of antibiotic prophylaxis for febrile neutropenia may be considered in the management stra...

  7. Clinical outcome of pneumococcal meningitis during the emergence of pencillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: an observational study

    Gouveia Edilane L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior to the availability of generic third-generation cephalosporins, penicillins were widely used for treatment of pneumococcal meningitis in developing countries despite concerns about rising levels of penicillin resistance among pneumococcal isolates. We examined the impact of penicillin resistance on outcomes of pneumococcal meningitis over a ten year period in an infectious diseases hospital in Brazil. Methods Clinical presentation, antimicrobial therapy and outcomes were reviewed for 548 patients with culture-confirmed pneumococcal meningitis from December, 1995, to November, 2005. Pneumococcal isolates from meningitis patients were defined as penicillin-resistant if Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations for penicillin were greater than 0.06 μg/ml. Proportional hazards regression was used to identify risk factors for fatal outcomes. Results During the ten-year period, ceftriaxone replaced ampicillin as first-line therapy for suspected bacterial meningitis. In hospital case-fatality for pneumococcal meningitis was 37%. Of 548 pneumococcal isolates from meningitis cases, 92 (17% were resistant to penicillin. After controlling for age and severity of disease at admission, penicillin resistance was associated with higher case-fatality (Hazard Ratio [HR], 1.62; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.08-2.43. Penicillin-resistance remained associated with higher case-fatality when initial therapy included ceftriaxone (HR, 1.68; 95% CI 1.02-2.76. Conclusions Findings support the use of third generation cephalosporin antibiotics for treatment of suspected pneumococcal meningitis even at low prevalence of pneumococcal resistance to penicillins.

  8. [The importance of immune deficiency for the prognosis of purulent meningitis (author's transl)].

    Weippl, G; Eibl, M; Harasek, G; Kucera, H; Unger, F

    1976-12-01

    Morbidity and mortality of suppurative bacterial meningitis show a very constant behavior over many decades. The introduction of antibiotics certainly lowered the lethality considerably, but since then it has remained fairly unchanged at about 15-20%. However, in the principal groups of pathogens--meningococci, pneumococci, Haemophilus influenzae--antibiotic resistence plays no special role. The significance of disorders of defense against infections for the course of the disease has not yet been investigated. Of 92 children examined with purulent meningitis, 49 showed a selective antibody deficiency syndrome against bacterial antigens, 38 of 48 children investigated showed further disorders of bactericidal activity. The proportion of these disorders is particularly high in children with defective healing of a meningitis. PMID:826806

  9. [Cryptococcus meningitis in an immunocompetent child: a case report].

    Ndiaye, M; Hagerimana, R; Diagne, N S; Faye, M W; Sène, M S; Sow, A D; Sène-Diouf, F; Diop, A G; Ndiaye, M M

    2010-07-01

    Cryptococcus meningitis is uncommon in childhood. We report a Senegalese case of cryptococcus meningitis diagnosed in an apparently immunocompetent child. A 9-year-old boy was admitted for acute meningoencephalitis. A computerized tomography scan of the brain showed an ischemic lesion in the left caudate and study of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed cytological and biochemical abnormalities and Cryptococcus neoformans on direct exam and culture. HIV and syphilis antibodies were negative and the blood CD4 lymphocyte count was 804/mm(3). The child had no immunocompromising factors such as hematologic abnormalities, solid tumor, or undernutrition. He was treated with fluconazole intravenously, but clinical outcome was unsuccessful. The patient died after 1 month from cardiovascular and respiratory distress. PMID:20400277

  10. Viral and Bacterial Etiology of Acute Diarrhea among Children under 5 Years of Age in Wuhan, China

    Zhu, Xu-Hui; Tian, Lei; Cheng, Zhong-Ju; Liu, Wei-Yong; Li, Song; Yu, Wei-Ting; Zhang, Wen-Qian; Xiang, Xu; Sun, Zi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute diarrhea remains the serious problem in developing countries, especially among children under 5 years of age. Currently, only two or three common diarrhea pathogens were screened at most hospitals in China. The aim of this study was to provide a wide variety of diarrhea pathogens and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in children under 5 years of age. Methods: Totally 381 stool samples collected from Tongji Hospital between July 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015 were tested by culture and/or polymerase chain reaction for eight kinds of bacteria and five kinds of viruses. An antimicrobial sensitivity test was performed using dilution method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Results: Viral infections were mainly identified in infants (0–11 months), whereas bacterial infections were more prevalent in the age of 24–59 months. About 69.8% of samples were positive for at least one pathogen, 51.7% of samples were virus positive, followed by bacteria positive cases (19.4%), and 12.6% of cases displayed co-infections with two viruses or a virus and a bacterium. Rotavirus was the most prevalent pathogen, followed closely by norovirus, while Salmonella was the most commonly isolated bacteria, followed by diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) and Campylobacter. More than 40% of Salmonella spp. and DEC isolates were resistant to first-line antibiotics (ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline). Around 10% of Salmonella spp. isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin simultaneously. Campylobacter spp. displayed high resistance to ciprofloxacin but kept low resistance to azithromycin and doxycycline. Conclusions: The etiology of acute diarrhea varies in children of different age groups. The high frequency of infection with viruses suggests the urgent demand for new viral vaccine development. Proper use of antibiotics in the treatment of acute diarrhea is crucial due to the high level of antibiotic

  11. Capnocytophaga canimorsus-meningitis diagnosticeret ved hjælp af 16S rRNA-analyse

    Risum, Malene; Ellekvist, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a gram-negative bacterial species hosted in the oral cavity of dogs. C. canimorsus can cause sepsis, meningitis and endocarditis. Penicillin is the drug of choice. However, the species is a slow-grower and sometimes missed in blood cultures. Patients with a history of...... alcoholism, splenectomy or immunodeficiency are at an increased risk of contracting serious infections with C. canimorsus following dog bites. We report a case story of C. canimorsus meningitis contracted after a dog bite....

  12. Etiology and Risk Factors of Acute Gastroenteritis in a Taipei Emergency Department: Clinical Features for Bacterial Gastroenteritis

    Chao-Chih Lai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The causative pathogen is rarely identified in the emergency department (ED, since the results of cultures are usually unavailable. As a result, antimicrobial treatment may be overused. The aim of our study was to investigate the pathogens, risk factors of acute gastroenteritis, and predictors of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in the ED. Methods: We conducted a matched case-control study of 627 stool samples and 612 matched pairs. Results: Viruses (41.3% were the leading cause of gastroenteritis, with noroviruses (32.2% being the most prevalent, followed by bacteria (26.8% and Giardia lamblia (12.4%. Taking antacids (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.57–6.53, household members/classmates with gastroenteritis (aOR 4.69; 95% CI, 2.76–7.96, attending a banquet (aOR 2.29; 95% CI, 1.64–3.20, dining out (aOR 1.70; 95% CI, 1.13–2.54, and eating raw oysters (aOR 3.10; 95% CI, 1.61–5.94 were highly associated with gastroenteritis. Elders (aOR 1.04; 05% CI, 1.02–1.05, those with CRP >10 mg/L (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62, or those who were positive for fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62 or fecal occult blood (aOR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.03–3.77 were more likely to be hospitalized in ED. In addition, presence of fecal leukocytes (time ratio [TR] 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06–1.41, abdominal pain (TR 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07–1.41, and frequency of vomiting (TR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.98 were significantly associated with the duration of acute gastroenteritis. Presence of fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.08; 95% CI, 1.42–3.05, winter season (aOR 0.45; 95% CI, 0.28–0.74, frequency of diarrhea (aOR 1.69; 95% CI, 1.01–2.83, and eating shrimp or crab (aOR 1.53; 95% CI, 1.05–2.23 were highly associated with bacterial gastroenteritis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the final model was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.55–0.63. Conclusions: Acute bacterial gastroenteritis was highly associated with

  13. Culture Negative Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis Resulting in Hydrocephalus and Severe Neurological Sequelae in a Previously Healthy Immunocompetent Man with Penicillin Allergy

    Gaini, Shahin; Karlsen, Gunn Hege; Nandy, Anirban;

    2015-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Caucasian man with penicillin allergy was admitted with evolving headache, confusion, fever, and neck stiffness. Treatment for bacterial meningitis with dexamethasone and monotherapy ceftriaxone was started. The cerebrospinal fluid showed negative microscopy for...... catheter. The patient had severe neurological sequelae. This case report emphasises the importance of covering empirically for Listeria monocytogenes in all patients with penicillin allergy with suspected bacterial meningitis. The case also shows that it is possible to have significant infection and...

  14. Decompressive craniectomy and early cranioplasty in a 15-year-old boy with N. meningitidis meningitis

    Julius Hoehne

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: This unique report shows that decompressive craniotomy with duroplasty may be a crucial therapeutic approach in bacterial meningitis with refractory increased intracranial pressure and brainstem compression. Early cranioplasty with a patient-specific implant allowed the early and full reintegration of the patient.

  15. Characterisation of patients receiving moxifloxacin for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis in clinical practice: results from an international, observational cohort study.

    Ralph Mösges

    Full Text Available We conducted a prospective, non-controlled, multi-centre Phase IV observational cohort study of patients with acute bacterial rhinosinusitis who were treated with moxifloxacin in clinical practice in 19 countries in Asia Pacific, Europe and the Middle East. With the data collected we evaluated the presentation and course of the current disease episode, particularly in terms of the principal clinical signs and symptoms of acute rhinosinusitis and diagnostic procedures. A final assessment of moxifloxacin therapy was made to evaluate the impact of the sinusitis episode on activities of daily life and on sleep disturbance, and to evaluate the clinical outcome of treatment. A total of 7,090 patients were enrolled, of whom 3909 (57.6% were included in the valid for clinical outcome and safety population. Regional differences were observed in the main symptoms of acute rhinosinusitis and, according to several characteristics, disease episodes appeared to be more severe in patients in Europe than in the Asia Pacific or Middle East regions. The sinusitis episode impacted on daily living for mean (SD periods of 3.6 (3.2, 4.6 (3.9 and 3.1 (3.0 days and disturbed sleep for 3.6 (3.2, 4.6 (3.9 and 3.1 (3.0 nights in the Asia Pacific, Europe and Middle East regions, respectively. With moxifloxacin treatment, the mean (SD time to improvement of symptoms was 3.0 (1.5, 3.4 (1.6 and 3.2 (1.5 days, and the time to resolution of symptoms was 4.8 (2.6 days, 5.7 (2.4 days and 5.5 (2.5 days, in the Asia Pacific, Europe and Middle East regions, respectively. In conclusion, acute rhinosinusitis remains a substantial health burden with significant impact on patients' quality of life, and there are differences between global regions in the clinical presentation, diagnosis and clinical course of disease episodes. Moxifloxacin was an effective and well-tolerated treatment option in the overall population.ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00930488.

  16. Nosocomial outbreak of neonatal Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis meningitis in a rural hospital in northern Tanzania

    Krüger Carsten

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinicians at Haydom Lutheran Hospital, a rural hospital in northern Tanzania noted an unusually high case-fatality rate of pediatric meningitis and suspected an outbreak of an unknown agent or an organism resistant to the empirical therapy. Methods We established a provisional microbiology laboratory to investigate the suspected outbreak. Blood and spinal fluid specimens were taken from children below the age of seven years with suspected meningitis. The blood and spinal fluid specimens were inoculated in commercial blood culture bottles and locally prepared Thayer-Martin medium in slanted tubes, respectively. The bacterial isolates were sent to Norway for further investigation, including susceptibility testing and pulsed-field gel-electrophoresis (PFGE. Results Among 24 children with suspected meningitis and/or septicemia, five neonates had meningitis caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis, all of whom died. Two children had S. Enteritidis septicemia without meningitis and both survived. Genotyping with PFGE suggested a clonal outbreak. The salmonella strain was resistant to ampicillin and sensitive to gentamicin, the two drugs commonly used to treat neonatal meningitis at the hospital. Conclusion The investigation reminds us that nontyphoidal salmonellae can cause meningitis associated with very high case-fatality rates. Resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents increases the risk of treatment failure and may have contributed to the fatal outcome in all of the five patients with salmonella meningitis. The investigation indicated that the outbreak was nosocomial and the outbreak subsided after hygienic measures were instituted. Establishing a provisional microbiological laboratory is a valuable and affordable tool to investigate and control outbreaks even in remote rural areas.

  17. Adult meningitis in a setting of high HIV and TB prevalence: findings from 4961 suspected cases

    Meintjes Graeme

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presentation and causes of adult meningitis in South Africa have changed substantially as a result of HIV. Knowledge of aetiology and laboratory findings in patients presenting with meningitis are important in guiding management. We performed a retrospective study to determine these findings in a setting of high HIV and TB prevalence in Cape Town. Methods Patients undergoing lumbar punctures between 1st January 2006 and 31st December 2008 at a public sector referral hospital were studied. Cases were classified by microbiological diagnosis, or in the absence of definitive microbiology as 1 normal CSF (neutrophils ≤ 1 × 106/L, lymphocytes ≤ 5 × 106/L, protein ≤ 0.5 g/dL, glucose ≥1.5 mmol/L, 2 minor abnormalities (neutrophils 2-5, lymphocytes 6-20, protein 0.51-1.0, glucose 1.0-1.49 or 3 markedly abnormal (neutrophils>5, lymphocytes>20, protein>1.0, glucose Results 5578 LPs were performed on 4549 patients, representing 4961 clinical episodes. Of these, 2293 had normal CSF and 931 had minor abnormalities and no aetiology identified. Of the remaining 1737, microbiological diagnoses were obtained in 820 (47%. Cryptococcus accounted for 63% (514 of microbiological diagnoses, TB for 28% (227, bacterial meningitis for 8% (68. Of the remaining 917 who had marked abnormalities, the majority (59% had a sterile lymphocytic CSF. Of note 16% (81 patients with confirmed Cryptococcus, 5% (12 with TB and 4% (3 with bacterial meningitis had normal CSF cell-counts and biochemistry. Conclusions Cryptococcal and tuberculous meningitis are now the commonest causes of adult meningitis in this setting. TB meningitis is probably underdiagnosed by laboratory investigation, as evidence by the large numbers presenting with sterile lymphocytic markedly abnormal CSFs.

  18. Capnocytophaga canimorsus Meningitis: Three Cases and a Review of the Literature.

    van Samkar, A; Brouwer, M C; Schultsz, C; van der Ende, A; van de Beek, D

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a disease with a high morbidity and mortality. It may be caused by the zoonotic pathogen Capnocytophaga canimorsus, which is part of the commensal oral flora in dogs and cats. We report three cases of C. canimorsus meningitis in a nationwide cohort study of bacterial meningitis patients and performed a review of the literature. Three episodes of C. canimorsus meningitis were identified in three patients included in a nationwide cohort study from 2006 through 2014. The calculated annual incidence was 0.03 per million adults. When combined with the literature, 33 patients were identified of which 28 were male (85%). The median age was 63 years, and 13 (42%) were immunocompromised, which consisted of alcoholism in 7 (21%). Animal contact could be established in 29 of 30 patients (93%) and consisted of dog bites in 22 of 29 (76%). One patient died (3%) and 8 had neurological sequelae upon discharge (25%), most often hearing loss (n = 6, 19%). Capnocytophaga canimorsus meningitis is associated with dog bites. Although mortality is relatively low, survivors often have neurological sequelae. PMID:26693951

  19. A Rare Complication of Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole: Drug Induced Aseptic Meningitis.

    Jha, Pinky; Stromich, Jeremiah; Cohen, Mallory; Wainaina, Jane Njeri

    2016-01-01

    Drug induced aseptic meningitis is a rare but challenging diagnosis, most commonly reported with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is a sulfonamide that is widely used in clinical practice for the treatment and prophylaxis of various infections. Drug induced aseptic meningitis, when seen with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, occurs predominantly in patients with some degree of immune compromise and is less commonly seen in immune competent individuals. The patient often exhibits the classic symptoms of meningitis. Early diagnosis is important, since the cessation of the antibiotic leads to rapid clinical improvement. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole induced aseptic meningitis has been underreported to FDA/MED-WATCH program. Here we report two cases of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole: an immune competent individual and immune compromised individual, both of which presented with signs of meningitis and a negative infectious workup. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is an uncommon and mysterious adverse reaction to a commonly used antibiotic. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with acute signs and symptoms of meningitis especially after infectious causes have been ruled out. PMID:27579194

  20. Scrub typhus meningitis: An under-recognized cause of aseptic meningitis in India

    Kundavaram Paul Prabhakar Abhilash

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: In endemic regions, scrub typhus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aseptic meningitis. Modest elevation of cells in the CSF with lymphocytic pleocytosis and multi-organ involvement may indicate scrub typhus meningitis/meningo-encephalitis.

  1. Mouse meninges isolation for FACS

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Noel Derecki & Jonathan Kipnis ### Abstract Presented is a method for removal of meninges from the brain and interior skull of the mouse yielding tissue suitable for preparing a single-cell suspension amenable to downstream applications such as flow cytometric analysis or short-term cell culture. ### Materials 1. Nembutal (or similar, as approved by your governing body) - Perfusion apparatus suitable for transcardial mouse perfusion - Perfusion Buffer (0.1M...

  2. Comparing Cerumen Bacterial Flora in Acute Otitis Externa Patients and Healthy Controls

    Keyvan Kiakojori

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In spite of the fact that acute otitis media is a systemic and symptomatic disease with sever otalgia, otitis media with effusion (OME is an asymptomatic and silent disease. OME is the most common cause of conductive hearing loss in children and has adverse effects on speech development and cognitive skills. Results: Among 1001 children under study, 57 subjects (5.7% were diagnosed with OME, more than 50% of which were asymptomatic. Periodic otalgia and turning up television volume were the most common symptoms. Conclusion: Regarding the improved knowledge on diagnosis and treatment of OME especially in younger children, hearing problems or cognitive and linguistic skills retardation may be avoided by promoting general information.

  3. Protective effect of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants in an acute bacterial infection.

    Plotnikov, Egor Y; Morosanova, Maria A; Pevzner, Irina B; Zorova, Ljubava D; Manskikh, Vasily N; Pulkova, Natalya V; Galkina, Svetlana I; Skulachev, Vladimir P; Zorov, Dmitry B

    2013-08-13

    Acute pyelonephritis is a potentially life-threatening infection of the upper urinary tract. Inflammatory response and the accompanying oxidative stress can contribute to kidney tissue damage, resulting in infection-induced intoxication that can become fatal in the absence of antibiotic therapy. Here, we show that pyelonephritis was associated with oxidative stress and renal cell death. Oxidative stress observed in pyelonephritic kidney was accompanied by a reduced level of mitochondrial B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2). Importantly, renal cell death and animal mortality were both alleviated by mitochondria-targeted antioxidant 10(6'-plastoquinonyl) decylrhodamine 19 (SkQR1). These findings suggest that pyelonephritis can be treated by reducing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and thus by protecting mitochondrial integrity and lowering kidney damage. PMID:23898194

  4. Tuberculous Meningitis in BCG-Vaccinated Children

    M Movahhedi

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that BCG vaccination is fully effective in preventing Tuberculous Meningitis and military Tuberculous, although it does not develop complete immunity for Tuberculous infection of lungs and other organs. A series of 3 children with Tuberculous Meningitis who had positive history of BCG vaccination as newborns and distinct BCG scar show that Tuberculous Meningitis may be caught despite successful BCG vaccination.

  5. Diagnostic value of MRI in tuberculous meningitis

    In this study 15 patients with clinical findings and positive cerebrospinal fluid analyses for tuberculous meningitis were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tuberculous meningitis was diagnosed in 11 cases when thick meningeal enhancement was present after intravenous injection of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) in T1-weighted images. Intra-axial tuberculomas were present in 8 patients, 2 of whom had intra-axial tuberculomas without MRI evidence of meningitis. Tuberculomas showed ring or nodular enhancement in postcontrast T1-weighted images, but the most significant MR feature of intraparenchymal tuberculomas was the hypointense appearance of the lesions on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  6. Carcinomatous meningitis appearing as acoustic neuromas. Two cases

    Background: For acoustic neuromas, stereotactic radiotherapy (radiosurgery or stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy) has been established as an important alternative to microsurgery. In most cases initial symptoms are slow progression of unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus or vertigo or acute hearing loss with vertigo. MRI scan shows a contrast-enhancing tumor within the inner auditory channel. If the patient undergoes primary radiotherapy, diagnosis is usually not verified histologically. Therefore, careful evaluation of the medical history is mandatory despite a typical appearance on the MRI scan. If medical history does not match with acoustic neuroma, further diagnostics are necessary to rule out infectious disease or carcinomatous meningitis. Case Report: Two patients with hearing loss, vertigo and the diagnosis of acoustic neuromas by MRI scan were referred for radiotherapy. In both cases the symptoms progressed very rapidly, not typical of acoustic neuromas, and in both patients repeated liquor puncture finally revealed carcinomatous meningitis. One patient died during therapy; in the second patient intrathecal chemotherapy and additional radiotherapy of the skull base led to partial remission continuing for several months. Conclusion: Before primary radiotherapy of small intrameatal lesions diagnosis must be reassessed carefully. This is especially true for bilateral lesions suspicious for acoustic neuromas and rapid progression and persistence of clinical symptoms where carcinomatous meningitis has to be taken into account. (orig.)

  7. Carcinomatous meningitis appearing as acoustic neuromas. Two cases

    Astner, S.T.; Nieder, C.; Grosu, A.L. [Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Stock, K. [Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany). Dept. of Internal Medicine; Gaa, J. [Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2007-05-15

    Background: For acoustic neuromas, stereotactic radiotherapy (radiosurgery or stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy) has been established as an important alternative to microsurgery. In most cases initial symptoms are slow progression of unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus or vertigo or acute hearing loss with vertigo. MRI scan shows a contrast-enhancing tumor within the inner auditory channel. If the patient undergoes primary radiotherapy, diagnosis is usually not verified histologically. Therefore, careful evaluation of the medical history is mandatory despite a typical appearance on the MRI scan. If medical history does not match with acoustic neuroma, further diagnostics are necessary to rule out infectious disease or carcinomatous meningitis. Case Report: Two patients with hearing loss, vertigo and the diagnosis of acoustic neuromas by MRI scan were referred for radiotherapy. In both cases the symptoms progressed very rapidly, not typical of acoustic neuromas, and in both patients repeated liquor puncture finally revealed carcinomatous meningitis. One patient died during therapy; in the second patient intrathecal chemotherapy and additional radiotherapy of the skull base led to partial remission continuing for several months. Conclusion: Before primary radiotherapy of small intrameatal lesions diagnosis must be reassessed carefully. This is especially true for bilateral lesions suspicious for acoustic neuromas and rapid progression and persistence of clinical symptoms where carcinomatous meningitis has to be taken into account. (orig.)

  8. From suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to confirmed histoplasma meningitis.

    Batra, Vivek; Khararjian, Armen; Wheat, Joseph; Zhang, Sean X; Crain, Barbara; Baras, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old man with chronic obstructive lung disease who was on steroids, presented to the hospital after a fall with subacute headaches and ataxia. During the patient's hospital course, his clinical condition deteriorated with myoclonic jerks, fevers and severe encephalopathy. An extensive workup, including EEG, brain MRI and lumbar puncture, revealed possible Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Unfortunately, the patient failed to improve and died 12 days after admission. A brain-only autopsy revealed he had acute histoplasma meningitis with patchy superficial cerebritis. PMID:27389723

  9. A study of the blood brain barrier and an evaluation of demyelination in tuberculous meningitis

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in the regulation of homeostasis of the CNS. The effect of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) on the BBB was studied using a ratio of serum albumin-CSF albumin levels. During the acute stage of meningitis 80% of the patients had moderate to severe disturbances in the BBB that persisted 1 to 3 months post therapy. Neurological damage was assessed using Myelin Basic Protein (CBP) as marker. Over 62% of patients with TBM had a significantly high level of MBP. (author). 19 refs, 5 tabs

  10. Japanese Encephalitis Virus in Meningitis Patients, Japan

    Kuwayama, Masaru; Ito, Mikako; Takao, Shinichi; Shimazu, Yukie; Fukuda, Shinji; Miyazaki, Kazuo; Kurane, Ichiro; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2005-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid specimens from 57 patients diagnosed with meningitis were tested for Japanese encephalitis virus. Total RNA was extracted from the specimens and amplified. Two products had highest homology with Nakayama strain and 2 with Ishikawa strain. Results suggest that Japanese encephalitis virus causes some aseptic meningitis in Japan.

  11. Neonatal Salmonella Typhi Meningitis: A Rare Entity

    Singhal, Vikram; EK, Saleem; SM, Rajesh; Coutinho, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella meningitis is rarely seen in neonates and if it is present, it is associated with complications like subdural collections and abscesses. We are presenting a case of Salmonella meningitis in a 28 days old neonate who developed complications like extensive subdural collections and ventriculitis. The child responded well to prolonged systemic antibiotics and other supportive measures.

  12. Refractory status epilepticus due to pneumococcal meningitis in an infant with congenital immunodeficiency

    Prasanth, Sudhakaran; Shaji, Velayudhan Cheruvallil; Lyla, Chacko; Jayalakshmi, Vasudevapanicker

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis remains a life-threatening infection, with varied presentations. A 3 month-old-baby with pneumococcal meningitis presented with clusters of seizures evolving into refractory status epilepticus despite standard antibiotic and aggressive anticonvulsant therapy. Progressive illness despite antibiotic initially suggested possible antibiotic resistance and resulted in addition of another antibiotic. Nonresponse to standard treatment and previous history of abscess in the back of neck pointed to some underlying congenital immunodeficiency. Further evaluation showed a deficiency of complement factor C3. This case underlines the need to consider underlying immunodeficiency in cases of refractory status epilepticus due to bacterial meningitis. Gram-staining of cerebrospinal fluid sample showing plenty of Gram-positive bacteria and comparatively fewer pus cells is a clue regarding some underlying immunodeficiency.

  13. MR of childhood tuberculous meningitis

    MR imaging was performed on 27 children with stage II-III tuberculous meningitis for the specific purpose of examining the brainstem, as well as comparison with other CT features of the disease. In addition to defining the ischemic disturbances of basal ganglia and diencephalon more clearly, MR also demonstrates the frequent occurrence of parenchymal signal abnormalities in the brainstem and adjacent temporal lobes, which are invisible or uncertain on CT. Although the presence of brainstem abnormalities on MR correlated well with clinical findings of brainstem dysfunction, clinical staging on admission remains the best prognostic indicator in advanced TBM. We also review the MR features of basal exudation, hydrochephalus and tuberculoma. (orig.)

  14. Cryptococcal Meningitis: Diagnosis and Management Update

    Abassi, Mahsa; Boulware, David R; Rhein, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the diagnosis and management of cryptococcal meningitis are promising and have been improving long-term survival. Point of care testing has made diagnosing cryptococcal meningitis rapid, practical, and affordable. Targeted screening and treatment programs for cryptococcal antigenemia are a cost effective method for reducing early mortality on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Optimal initial management with amphotericin and flucytosine improves survival against alternative therapies, although amphotericin is difficult to administer and flucytosine is not available in middle or low income countries, where cryptococcal meningitis is most prevalent. Controlling increased intracranial pressure with serial therapeutic lumbar punctures has a proven survival benefit. Delaying ART initiation for 4 weeks after the diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis is associated with improved survival. Fortunately, new approaches have been leading the way toward improving care for cryptococcal meningitis patients. New trials utilizing different combinations of antifungal therapy are reviewed, and we summarize the efficacy of different regimens. PMID:26279970

  15. Case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis meningitis: Gram staining as a useful initial diagnostic clue for tuberculous meningitis.

    Kawakami, Sayoko; Kawamura, Yasuyosi; Nishiyama, Kyouhei; Hatanaka, Hiroki; Fujisaki, Ryuichi; Ono, Yasuo; Miyazawa, Yukihisa; Nishiya, Hajime

    2012-12-01

    A 32-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of fever, headache, and loss of consciousness. Four days before admission, he had had difficulty speaking. On the day of admission, his colleague had found him to be unconscious and lying on his back. He was admitted to our hospital. The temperature at the eardrum was 35.2°C. Neurologic evaluation was negative. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed slight ventricular enlargement bilaterally. An X-ray film of the chest showed no abnormality. On the second hospital day, neck stiffness was noted. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contained 870 white cells/μl, most of which were neutrophils; the glucose level in the CSF was 10 mg/dl, and the protein level was 140 mg/dl. Stained smears of the CSF, including Gram staining and India-ink preparations, disclosed no microorganisms. Capsular antigen tests for several bacteria were negative. Antimicrobial agents were started. However, by changing the microscope focus slightly while viewing Gram stains of the CSF, we could see brightened and Gram-positive bacilli that had been phagocytosed by neutrophils. This finding suggested the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Ziehl-Neelsen staining of the CSF and gastric juice revealed anti-acid bacilli. Polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis in the gastric juice was positive. This case showed that Gram staining could be useful as an initial adjunct for the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis, particularly when the CSF shows predominantly neutrocytic pleocytosis, but no other evidence of bacterial meningitis. PMID:22476652

  16. Meteorological influences on the interannual variability of meningitis incidence in northwest Nigeria.

    Abdussalam, Auwal; Monaghan, Andrew; Dukic, Vanja; Hayden, Mary; Hopson, Thomas; Leckebusch, Gregor

    2013-04-01

    Northwest Nigeria is a region with high risk of bacterial meningitis. Since the first documented epidemic of meningitis in Nigeria in 1905, the disease has been endemic in the northern part of the country, with epidemics occurring regularly. In this study we examine the influence of climate on the interannual variability of meningitis incidence and epidemics. Monthly aggregate counts of clinically confirmed hospital-reported cases of meningitis were collected in northwest Nigeria for the 22-year period spanning 1990-2011. Several generalized linear statistical models were fit to the monthly meningitis counts, including generalized additive models. Explanatory variables included monthly records of temperatures, humidity, rainfall, wind speed, sunshine and dustiness from weather stations nearest to the hospitals, and a time series of polysaccharide vaccination efficacy. The effects of other confounding factors -- i.e., mainly non-climatic factors for which records were not available -- were estimated as a smooth, monthly-varying function of time in the generalized additive models. Results reveal that the most important explanatory climatic variables are mean maximum monthly temperature, relative humidity and dustiness. Accounting for confounding factors (e.g., social processes) in the generalized additive models explains more of the year-to-year variation of meningococcal disease compared to those generalized linear models that do not account for such factors. Promising results from several models that included only explanatory variables that preceded the meningitis case data by 1-month suggest there may be potential for prediction of meningitis in northwest Nigeria to aid decision makers on this time scale.

  17. Meningitis caused by mumps virus in children admitted to Gorgan’s

    Meningitis caused by mumps virus in children admitted to Gorgan’s

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Mumps virus is one of the first knowncausative agents of meningitis in children. On-time diagnosis is the firststep in treating meningitis. We aimed to evaluate Mumps virus meningitisin children in Gorgan, IranMaterial and Methods: CSF and blood samples were taken fromchildren with meningitis, Jun 2008 till Sep 2010. For 40 samples withnegative bacterial culture, Extraction of viral RNA was carried out andReal-time PCR was performed for detection of Mumps virus.Demographic, clinical, biochemical and cytological data were collected.We run SPSS version 18 to analyze the data, using Chi Square (p<0.05Results: three (7.5 % samples have Mumps virus, two boys and one girl.All three positive cases have 0.5-1 degrees Celsius fever and vomiting butno bulging fontanel. They have not Kernig, Rodor, Brudzinski’s sign,hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, pharyngitis and rash. ESR ishigher than normal in all positive cases and CRP is positive in two cases.Protein of CSF in one case is higher than normal range.Conclusion: meningitis is an emergency condition; therefore, moleculardiagnostic techniques are recommended for early diagnosis andintervention.Key words: meningitis, mumps virus, cerebrospinal fluid, Real-TimePCR

  18. Olfactory nerve--a novel invasion route of Neisseria meningitidis to reach the meninges.

    Hong Sjölinder

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a human-specific pathogen with capacity to cause septic shock and meningitis. It has been hypothesized that invasion of the central nervous system (CNS is a complication of a bacteremic condition. In this study, we aimed to characterize the invasion route of N. meningitidis to the CNS. Using an intranasally challenged mouse disease model, we found that twenty percent of the mice developed lethal meningitis even though no bacteria could be detected in blood. Upon bacterial infection, epithelial lesions and redistribution of intracellular junction protein N-cadherin were observed at the nasal epithelial mucosa, especially at the olfactory epithelium, which is functionally and anatomically connected to the CNS. Bacteria were detected in the submucosa of the olfactory epithelium, along olfactory nerves in the cribriform plate, at the olfactory bulb and subsequently at the meninges and subarachnoid space. Furthermore, our data suggest that a threshold level of bacteremia is required for the development of meningococcal sepsis. Taken together, N. meningitidis is able to pass directly from nasopharynx to meninges through the olfactory nerve system. This study enhances our understanding how N. meningitidis invades the meninges. The nasal olfactory nerve system may be a novel target for disease prevention that can improve outcome and survival.

  19. C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AND LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE IN SERUM AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID IN RAPID AND EARLY DIAGNOSIS OF CHILDHOOD MENINGITIS

    F. Jadali MD,

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveBacterial meningitis is still a life threatening epidemiological problem especiallyin many developing countries; considering its dire consequences, its promptand accurate diagnosis has become a priority for clinicians. Because of thevarious limitations of conventionally used laboratory techniques, we evaluatedand compared the diagnostic utility of C-reactive protein(CRP and lactatedehydrogenase (LDHin serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSFin the diagnosisof bacterial meningitis and its effectivity in distinguishing it from asepticmeningitis (AP.Material and MethodsA total of 125 pediatric cases, aged between 1 month and 12 years, includingpatients with bacterial meningitis (n=45, aseptic meningitis (n=42 and acontrol group (n=38, were retrospectively analyzed on the basis of datafrom the initial clinical examinations. Cultures, smears and other commonserum and CSF indices were compared with serum and CSF CRP levels andLDH activity.ResultsCompared with each of the other variables, there were significant differencesin the mean values of serum-CRP, CSF-glucose, CSF-LDH and CSF/serumLDH ratio between the bacterial and aseptic meningitis groups (p<0.001.Of all the tests applied, the highest sensitivity (95% and negative predictivevalue (95% belonged to CSF-LDH activity and the most specific (100% testwith the highest positive predictive value (100% was CSF-CRP titration aswell as smear and culture. Combination of CSF-CRP serum-CRP, and CSFLDHyielded the highest sensitivity (100% and negative predictive value butthe combined application of CSF-LDH and CSF-CRP proved to be the mostspecific and efficient.ConclusionIn the presence of a normal CRP titration and low glucose level in CSF,bacterial meningitis is excluded, whereas elevated level of CSF-LDH activityis a valid confirmatory predictor of BM. In addition, combination of thesethree tests with serum CRP is far more effective than the separate determinationof any of these parameters.

  20. CT finding of cryptococcal meningitis

    We have experienced 14 cases of cryptococcal meningitis in the last 6 years. Their neurological signs, CT findings, and prognoses were studied. They fall into three types: the brain-stem-encephalitis type, the cortical-encephalitis type, and the meningitis type, according to the clinical course. The first type (6 cases) revealed mainly cerebellar signs, eye-movement damage, and so forth. The second type (5 cases) demonstrated ''Personality'' changes, chiefly aphasia. The third type (5 cases) did not show any focal signs. Prognosis of the brain-stem-encephalitis type was very poor, with a 50% mortality rate. In the survivors, also, clinical signs did not disappear for a long time. Repeated CT was performed in 13 among the 14 cases; abnormal CT findings were revealed in 5 cases because of cryptococcal infection. Granuloma shadow and ventriculitis shadow were observed in 3 cases each. These abnormal findings disappeared upon treatment except in one case. The clinical signs are not completely related with the CT finding, but it is useful that the site which has been infiltrated by the cryptococcus can be observed. Abnormal CT findings were observed in the 4 cases of the brain-stem-encephalitis type among the 5 abnormal cases. It is very useful to know the severity of the condition. (author)

  1. In Brief: Forecasting meningitis threats

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-12-01

    The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), in conjunction with a team of health and weather organizations, has launched a project to provide weather forecasts to medical officials in Africa to help reduce outbreaks of meningitis. The forecasts will enable local health care providers to target vaccination programs more effectively. In 2009, meteorologists with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, which is managed by UCAR, will begin issuing 14-day forecasts of atmospheric conditions in Ghana. Later, UCAR plans to work closely with health experts from several African countries to design and test a decision support system to provide health officials with useful meteorological information. ``By targeting forecasts in regions where meningitis is a threat, we may be able to help vulnerable populations. Ultimately, we hope to build on this project and provide information to public health programs battling weather-related diseases in other parts of the world,'' said Rajul Pandya, director of UCAR's Community Building Program. Funding for the project comes from a $900,000 grant from Google.org, the philanthropic arm of the Internet search company.

  2. Effect of an acute necrotic bacterial gill infection and feed deprivation on the metabolic rate of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

    Jones, M A; Powell, M D; Becker, J A; Carter, C G

    2007-10-31

    In this study, experiments were conducted to examine the effect of an acute necrotic bacterial gill infection on the metabolic rate (M(O2)) of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. Fed and unfed Atlantic salmon smolts were exposed to a high concentration (5 x 10(12) CFU ml(-1)) of the bacteria Tenacibaculum maritimum, their routine and maximum metabolic rates (M(O2rout) and M(O2max), respectively) were measured, and relative metabolic scope determined. A significant decrease in metabolic scope was found for both fed and unfed infected groups. Fed infected fish had a mean +/- standard error of the mean (SEM) decrease of 2.21 +/- 0.97 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1), whilst unfed fish a mean +/- SEM decrease of 3.16 +/- 1.29 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1). The decrease in metabolic scope was a result of significantly increased M(O2rout) of both fed and unfed infected salmon. Fed infected fish had a mean +/- SEM increase in M(O2rout) of 1.86 +/- 0.66 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1), whilst unfed infected fish had a mean +/- SEM increase of 2.16 +/- 0.72 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1). Interestingly, all groups maintained M(O2max) regardless of infection status. Increases in M(O2rout) corresponded to a significant increase in blood plasma osmolality. A decrease in metabolic scope has implications for how individuals allocate energy; fish with smaller metabolic scope will have less energy to allocate to functions such as growth, reproduction and immune response, which may adversely affect the efficiency of fish growth. PMID:18159670

  3. Development of a real-time PCR method for the detection of bacterial colonization in rat models of severe acute pancreatitis

    PENG Jun-sheng; LIU Zhong-hui; LI Chu-jun; WU Xiao-bin; DIAO De-chang; DU Yan-ping; CHEN Jun-rong; LI Yun; WANG Hua-she

    2010-01-01

    Background Techniques for the fast and accurate detection of bacterial infection are critical for early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of bacterial translocation in clinical severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). In this study, the availability of a real-time PCR method in detection of bacterial colonization in SAP rat models was investigated.Methods Samples of blood, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), pancreas and liver from 24 specific pathogen-free rats (8 in a control group, 16 in a SAP group) were detected for bacterial infection rates both by agar plate culture and a real-time PCR method, and the results were made contrast.Results Bacterial infection rates of the blood, MLN, pancreas and liver in the SAP group and the control group by the two different methods were almost the same, which were 5/16, 12/16, 15/16, 12/16 in the SAP group compared with 0/8, 1/8, 0/8, 0/8 in the control group by agar plate culture, while 5/16, 10/16, 13/16, 12/16 and 0/8, 1/8, 0/8, 0/8 respectively by a real-time PCR method. Bacterial number was estimated by real-time PCR, which showed that in the same mass of tissues, the pancreas contained more bacteria than the other three kinds of organs in SAP rats (P <0.01), that may be due to the edema, necrosis and hemorrhage existing in the pancreas, making it easier for bacteria to invade and breed.Conclusion Fast and accurate detection of bacterial translocation in SAP rat models could be carried out by a real-time PCR procedure.

  4. Frequency of Meningitis in Children Presenting with Febrile Seizures at Ali- Asghar Children’s Hospital

    Azita TAVASOLI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Tavasoli A, Afsharkhas L, Edraki A. Frequency of Meningitis in Children Presenting with Febrile Seizure in Ali-Asghar Children’s Hospital. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Autumn; 8(4:51-56.AbstractObjectiveFebrile seizures (FS are the most common type of childhood seizures, affecting 2–5% of children. As the seizure may be the sole presentation of bacterial meningitis in febrile infants, it is mandatory to exclude underlying meningitis in children presenting with fever and seizure. To determine the frequency of meningitis in children with FS and related risk factors, the present study was conducted at Ali-Asghar Children’s Hospital.Materials & MethodsThe records of children aged from 1-month–6 years of age with fever and seizure admitted to the hospital from October 2000–2010 were studied. The charts of patients who had undergone a lumbar puncture were studied and cases of meningitis were selected. The related data was collected and analyzed with SPSS version 16.ResultsA total of 681 patients with FS were known from which 422 (62% lumbar punctures (LP were done. Meningitis (bacterial or aseptic was identified in 19 cases (4.5%, 95% CI 2.9–6.9 by Wilson- Score internal and bacterial meningitis in 7 (1.65%, 95% CI 0.8–3.3. None of the patients with bacterial meningitis had meningeal irritation signs. Complex FS, first attack of FS, and impaired consciousness were more common in patients with meningitis when compared to non- meningitis patients.ConclusionMeningitis is more common in patients less than 18 months presenting with FS; however, complex features of seizures, first attack of FS, or impaired consciousness seem significant risk factors for meningitis in these children and an LP should be considered in this situation. ReferencesKimia A, Ben-Joseph EP, Rudleo T, et al. Yield of lumbar puncture among children who present with their first complex febrile seizure. Pediatrics.2010; 126: 62

  5. 石家庄地区急性细菌性结膜炎致病菌分析%ANALYSIS ABOUT BACTERIAL SPECTRUM IN ACUTE BACTERIAL CONJUNCTIVITIS OF SHIJIAZHUANG DISTRICT

    张荣霞; 史素恩; 孙鹏; 吴静; 郭春莲

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT:Objective To provide reasonable clinical treatments for acute bacterial conjunctivitis by exploring the bacterial spectrum and sensitive changes in Shijiazhuang district. Methods Secretion specimens were cultured before treatment in all 358 eyes of 358 patients with acute bacterial conjunctivitis.The sensitivity test was done at the same time.Other papers about this subject were also searched to enhance this analysis.Results The top five bacteria tested were below: Staphylococcus epidermidais,Staphylococcus saprophyticus,Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsierlla penmoniae and Escherchia Coli.They are the primary bacteria leading to acute bacteria conjunctivitis in Shijiazhuang district.Most bacteria were sensitive to Gatifloxacin,Levofloxacin and Ciprofloxacin but resistant to Chloromycetin,Erythromycin and Tobramycin.Conclusion Staphylococcus epidermidais is the leading bacteria to acute bacterial conjunctivitis in Shijiazhuang district currently.Selecting availably antibiotics drops is important in clinical work.%目的:了解石家庄地区急性细菌性结膜炎致病菌种类及耐药情况,探索本地区急性细菌性结膜炎致病菌演变过程,为该疾病的合理用药提供依据。方法对358例(358眼)急性细菌性结膜炎患者结膜囊分泌物进行细菌培养和药敏试验,并结合其他关于本地区急性细菌性结膜炎的文献加以分析。结果石家庄地区急性细菌性结膜炎致病菌前5位依次为表皮葡萄球菌、金黄色葡萄球菌、腐生葡萄球菌、肺炎克雷伯杆菌、大肠埃希菌。大多数致病菌对加替沙星、左氧氟沙星、环丙沙星敏感,对氯霉素、红霉素、妥布霉素耐药。结论表皮葡萄球菌已成为石家庄地区急性细菌性结膜炎的首要致病菌,在临床工作中应有针对性选择有效抗生素进行治疗。

  6. Meningitis

    ... as enteroviruses (say: en-TEH-row-VYE-rus-ez). Like most viruses, enteroviruses infect your body through ... your hands. Wash up regularly with warm, soapy water — especially before eating, after using the bathroom, and ...

  7. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: rare cause of meningitis.

    Correia, Cátia Rodrigues; Ferreira, Sara Tavares; Nunes, Paula

    2014-08-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a Gram-negative bacillus, which is an extremely rare cause of meningitis. To our knowledge, there are only five previous pediatrics cases. Here, we describe the case of a 4-year-old boy who developed meningitis associated with this organism, after several neurosurgical procedures and previous treatment with a broad-spectrum antibiotic. He was treated successfully with a combination of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ceftazidime and levofloxacin. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia should be considered as a potential cause of meningitis, especially among severely debilitated or immunosuppressed patients. Antimicrobial therapy is complicated by the high resistance of the organism to multiple antibiotics. PMID:25252064

  8. 人造电子耳蜗植入者有患脑膜炎的危险%Cochlear implant recipients at risk for meningitis

    Eric Wooltorton; 农东晓

    2004-01-01

    Cochlear implants are electronic devices that allow sound perception in some people with profound sensorineural deafhess. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently identified a possible association between cochlear implants and bacterial meningitis in 52 people worldwide. The meningitis occurred in children and adults aged 21 months to 72 years and included 12 deaths. The onset of meningitis symptoms ranged from less than 24 hours to more than 5 years after insertion of the implant, and most of the organisms isolated in 14 cases were Streptococcus pneuraoniae. Vaccination histories against pneumococcus were known for 6 of the individuals, and none had been vaccinated.

  9. MR angiography in tuberculous meningitis

    Background: Infarctions in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) are common but there is a paucity of studies on MR angiography (MRA). Purpose: To evaluate the pattern and predictors of MRA abnormality in patients with TBM. Material and Methods: Sixty-seven patients with TBM were subjected to clinical, laboratory, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRA evaluation. The severity of meningitis, focal deficit, CSF findings, and stroke co-morbidities were recorded. Presence of exudates, infarction, hydrocephalous, and tuberculoma on MRI were noted. On intracranial MRA, occlusion or more than 50% narrowing of proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA), anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and posterior cerebral artery (PCA), and basilar artery were considered abnormal. The MRA abnormality was correlated with clinical, laboratory, and MRI findings. Results: Sixty-seven patients, aged 3-75 years (median 34 years) were included. MRI was abnormal in 61 (91%) patients; basal exudates in 24, hydrocephalous in 23, tuberculoma in 33, and infarction in 40. MRA was abnormal in 34 (50.7%); MCA was most commonly involved (n = 21), followed by PCA (n = 14), ICA (n = 8), ACA (n 5), basilar artery (n = 5), and vertebral and superior cerebellar artery (1 each). One-fourth of the patients had abnormality in both anterior and posterior circulations. MRA abnormality was related to hydrocephalous and infarction; corresponding infarct was present in 61.8% patients; 41.7% patients with abnormal MRA developed infarct at 3 months but none with normal MRA. Conclusion: Half the patients with TBM had MRA abnormality involving both anterior and posterior circulations and 61.8% of them had corresponding infarcts

  10. MR angiography in tuberculous meningitis

    Kalita, Jayantee; Prasad, Sreeram; Maurya, Pradeep K.; Misra, Usha K. (Dept. of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)), Email: drukmisra@rediffmail.com; Kumar, Sunil (Dept. of Radiodiagnosis, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India))

    2012-04-15

    Background: Infarctions in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) are common but there is a paucity of studies on MR angiography (MRA). Purpose: To evaluate the pattern and predictors of MRA abnormality in patients with TBM. Material and Methods: Sixty-seven patients with TBM were subjected to clinical, laboratory, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRA evaluation. The severity of meningitis, focal deficit, CSF findings, and stroke co-morbidities were recorded. Presence of exudates, infarction, hydrocephalous, and tuberculoma on MRI were noted. On intracranial MRA, occlusion or more than 50% narrowing of proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA), anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and posterior cerebral artery (PCA), and basilar artery were considered abnormal. The MRA abnormality was correlated with clinical, laboratory, and MRI findings. Results: Sixty-seven patients, aged 3-75 years (median 34 years) were included. MRI was abnormal in 61 (91%) patients; basal exudates in 24, hydrocephalous in 23, tuberculoma in 33, and infarction in 40. MRA was abnormal in 34 (50.7%); MCA was most commonly involved (n = 21), followed by PCA (n = 14), ICA (n = 8), ACA (n 5), basilar artery (n = 5), and vertebral and superior cerebellar artery (1 each). One-fourth of the patients had abnormality in both anterior and posterior circulations. MRA abnormality was related to hydrocephalous and infarction; corresponding infarct was present in 61.8% patients; 41.7% patients with abnormal MRA developed infarct at 3 months but none with normal MRA. Conclusion: Half the patients with TBM had MRA abnormality involving both anterior and posterior circulations and 61.8% of them had corresponding infarcts

  11. Meningitis Caused by Candida Dubliniensis in a Patient with Cirrhosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Yamahiro, Atsuko; Lau, K H Vincent; Peaper, David R; Villanueva, Merceditas

    2016-08-01

    Candida species, including Candida dubliniensis, are a rare cause of meningitis. Herein, we report the second case of C. dubliniensis meningitis in a 49-year-old man with a history of hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis, substance use disorder, and recent exposure to intravenous antibiotic therapy, presenting with confusion, abnormal gait, and urinary incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed marked hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal enhancement. Initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies were concerning for bacterial meningitis, although cultures were negative. Despite empiric treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, the patient's mental status declined. The diagnosis of C. dubliniensis meningitis was not made until the third lumbar puncture. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin B and flucytosine. Despite improvement of hydrocephalus on MRI of the brain and sterilization of CSF, the patient's mental status declined and he expired. This case highlights the difficulty in the diagnosis of C. dubliniensis meningitis as multiple lumbar punctures may be necessary. C. dubliniensis meningitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for a patient with risk factors such as end-stage liver disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, recent chemotherapy, substance use disorders, and recent broad-spectrum antibiotic use. A high index of suspicion is necessary as delay in initiation of therapy is associated with high mortality. The optimal treatment strategy has not been determined. PMID:27038312

  12. Eradication of common pathogens at days 2, 3 and 4 of moxifloxacin therapy in patients with acute bacterial sinusitis

    Benson Alice

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS is a common infection in clinical practice. Data on time to bacteriologic eradication after antimicrobial therapy are lacking for most agents, but are necessary in order to optimize therapy. This was a prospective, single-arm, open-label, multicenter study to determine the time to bacteriologic eradication in ABS patients (maxillary sinusitis treated with moxifloxacin. Methods Adult patients with radiologically and clinically confirmed ABS received once-daily moxifloxacin 400 mg for 10 days. Middle meatus secretion sampling was performed using nasal endoscopy pre-therapy, and repeated on 3 consecutive days during treatment. Target enrollment was 30 bacteriologically evaluable patients (pre-therapy culture positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae or Moraxella catarrhalis and evaluable cultures for at least Day 2 and Day 3 during therapy visits, including at least 10 each with S. pneumoniae or H. influenzae. Results Of 192 patients enrolled, 42 were bacteriologically evaluable, with 48 pathogens isolated. Moxifloxacin was started on Day 1. Baseline bacteria were eradicated in 35/42 (83.3% patients by day 2, 42/42 (100% patients by day 3, and 41/42 (97.6% patients by day 4. In terms of individual pathogens, 12/18 S. pneumoniae, 22/23 H. influenzae and 7/7 M. catarrhalis were eradicated by day 2 (total 41/48; 85.4%, and 18/18 S. pneumoniae and 23/23 H. influenzae were eradicated by day 3. On Day 4, S. pneumoniae was isolated from a patient who had negative cultures on Days 2 and 3. Thus, the Day 4 eradication rate was 47/48 (97.9%. Clinical success was achieved in 36/38 (94.7% patients at the test of cure visit. Conclusion In patients with ABS (maxillary sinusitis, moxifloxacin 400 mg once daily for 10 days resulted in eradication of baseline bacteria in 83.3% of patients by Day 2, 100% by Day 3 and 97.6% by Day 4.

  13. Spinal cord ischaemia complicating meningococcal meningitis.

    Swart, S. S.; Pye, I F

    1980-01-01

    An extensive ischaemic cord syndrome developed in a patient with meningococcal meningitis complicated by 2 respiratory arrests but not by any period of prolonged hypotension or other signs of cardiovascular collapse. Excellent functional recovery occurred after intensive rehabilitation.

  14. Hemi-meningitis with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    Kocak, Ozan; Yarar, Coskun; Yimenicioğlu, Sevgi; Ekici, Arzu; Bör, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder. HLH may occur as a complication of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), particularly in patients with immunodeficiencies. Herein, we describe a 16-year-old girl with neurological complications associated EBV-induced HLH. Her cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted images with enhancement of meningeal surface in the right hemisphere that was consistent with right hemi-meningitis. Hydrocephalus, dilated subdural spaces, delayed myelination, edema, diffuse parenchymal atrophy, calcifications, diffuse/patchy white matter abnormalities have all been previously described with HLH. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of hemi-meningitis associated with HLH. We suggest that clinicians should consider HLH with vascular disorders when they determine unilateral meningitis on a brain MRI. PMID:27570395

  15. Clinical research progress of tuberculous meningitis

    Zhan-yun MA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous meningitis is an infectious disease of central nervous system caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It mainly invades into brain meninges and parenchyma, and may spread to the spinal cord and spinal meninges. The disability rate and mortality rate of this disease are very high. In recent years, incidence of tuberculosis increased significantly due to the increase of drug-resistant tuberculosis cases, population mobility, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS epidemic and other factors. Tuberculosis is still a worldwide serious threat to human life and health, especially in the underdeveloped and developing countries. China is the world's largest developing country with large population, so tuberculosis prevention and control is still a quite severe problem. In this paper, the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and differential diagnosis, treatment progress of tuberculous meningitis were reviewed systematically. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.08.004

  16. Modeling tuberculous meningitis in zebrafish using Mycobacterium marinum

    Lisanne M. van Leeuwen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous meningitis (TBM is one of the most severe extrapulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis, with a high morbidity and mortality. Characteristic pathological features of TBM are Rich foci, i.e. brain- and spinal-cord-specific granulomas formed after hematogenous spread of pulmonary tuberculosis. Little is known about the early pathogenesis of TBM and the role of Rich foci. We have adapted the zebrafish model of Mycobacterium marinum infection (zebrafish–M. marinum model to study TBM. First, we analyzed whether TBM occurs in adult zebrafish and showed that intraperitoneal infection resulted in granuloma formation in the meninges in 20% of the cases, with occasional brain parenchyma involvement. In zebrafish embryos, bacterial infiltration and clustering of infected phagocytes was observed after infection at three different inoculation sites: parenchyma, hindbrain ventricle and caudal vein. Infection via the bloodstream resulted in the formation of early granulomas in brain tissue in 70% of the cases. In these zebrafish embryos, infiltrates were located in the proximity of blood vessels. Interestingly, no differences were observed when embryos were infected before or after early formation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, indicating that bacteria are able to cross this barrier with relatively high efficiency. In agreement with this observation, infected zebrafish larvae also showed infiltration of the brain tissue. Upon infection of embryos with an M. marinum ESX-1 mutant, only small clusters and scattered isolated phagocytes with high bacterial loads were present in the brain tissue. In conclusion, our adapted zebrafish–M. marinum infection model for studying granuloma formation in the brain will allow for the detailed analysis of both bacterial and host factors involved in TBM. It will help solve longstanding questions on the role of Rich foci and potentially contribute to the development of better diagnostic tools and therapeutics.

  17. Diagnostic value of soluble CD163 serum levels in patients suspected of meningitis: comparison with CRP and procalcitonin

    Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Larsen, Klaus; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk;

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic value of sCD163 serum levels with CRP and PCT in meningitis and bacterial infection. An observational cohort study was conducted between February 2001 and February 2005. The study population comprised 55 patients suspected of meningi...

  18. Blocking of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid augments bacteremia and increases lethality in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Christensen, Thomas; Benfield, Thomas; Espersen, Frank; Hougaard, David M; Ostergaard, Christian

    The role of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the evolution of the pathophysiological changes that occur in bacterial meningitis is unclear. Here, we investigate how leukocyte recruitment to the CSF, modulated by the leukocyte blocker fucoidin, affects the extent of brain...

  19. Meningitis caused by Neisseria Meningitidis, Hemophilus Influenzae Type B and Streptococcus Pneumoniae during 2005–2012 in Turkey

    Ceyhan, Mehmet; Gürler, Nezahat; Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Keser, Melike; Aycan, Ahmet Emre; Gurbuz, Venhar; Salman, Nuran; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Ozkan, Sengul; Sensoy, Gulnar; Belet, Nursen; Alhan, Emre; Hacimustafaoglu, Mustafa; Celebi, Solmaz; Uzun, Hakan; Faik Oner, Ahmet; Kurugol, Zafer; Ali Tas, Mehmet; Aygun, Denizmen; Oncel, Eda Karadag; Celik, Melda; Yasa, Olcay; Akin, Fatih; Coşkun, Yavuz

    2014-01-01

    Successful vaccination policies for protection from bacterial meningitis are dependent on determination of the etiology of bacterial meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained prospectively from children from 1 month to ≤ 18 years of age hospitalized with suspected meningitis, in order to determine the etiology of meningitis in Turkey. DNA evidence of Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae), and Hemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) was detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In total, 1452 CSF samples were evaluated and bacterial etiology was determined in 645 (44.4%) cases between 2005 and 2012; N. meningitidis was detected in 333 (51.6%), S. pneumoniae in 195 (30.2%), and Hib in 117 (18.1%) of the PCR positive samples. Of the 333 N. meningitidis positive samples 127 (38.1%) were identified as serogroup W-135, 87 (26.1%) serogroup B, 28 (8.4%) serogroup A and 3 (0.9%) serogroup Y; 88 (26.4%) were non-groupable. As vaccines against the most frequent bacterial isolates in this study are available and licensed, these results highlight the need for broad based protection against meningococcal disease in Turkey. PMID:25483487

  20. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    Mahadevan A; Kumar A; Santosh V; Satishchandra P; Shankar S K

    2000-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of...

  1. Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliomatosis simulating tuberculous meningitis

    Rees, J.; Balakas, N; AGATHONIKOU, A; Hain, S.; Giovanonni, G; Panayiotopoulos, C; Luxsuwong, M; Revesz, T

    2001-01-01

    Three patients are reported on who presented with communicating hydrocephalus due to presumed tuberculous meningitis. Subsequent clinical deterioration despite antituberculous chemotherapy prompted reassessment with FDG-PET scanning and meningeal biopsy in one case and repeat CSF cytology with special staining in the second. The third patient died and postmortem confirmed a diagnosis of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliomatosis. In the first two patients, MRI of the entire neu...

  2. Cryptococcal meningitis among HIV infected patients

    Manoharan G

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis is an emerging opportunistic infection among HIV infected patients and an important cause of mortality among these patients. The incidence of cryptococcal meningitis varies from place to place. A total of 31 specimens of CSF out of 89 samples processed from known HIV positive cases yielded Cryptococcus neoformans during the period of 3 years. C.neoformans was the most common opportunistic pathogen isolated from CSF samples of these patients with an incidence of 34.8%

  3. Cryptococcal meningitis among HIV infected patients

    Manoharan G; Padmavathy B; Vasanthi S; Gopalte R

    2001-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an emerging opportunistic infection among HIV infected patients and an important cause of mortality among these patients. The incidence of cryptococcal meningitis varies from place to place. A total of 31 specimens of CSF out of 89 samples processed from known HIV positive cases yielded Cryptococcus neoformans during the period of 3 years. C.neoformans was the most common opportunistic pathogen isolated from CSF samples of these patients with an incidence of 34.8&#x...

  4. Cryptococcal meningitis among HIV infected patients.

    Manoharan, G; Padmavathy, B K; Vasanthi, S; Gopalte, R

    2001-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an emerging opportunistic infection among HIV infected patients and an important cause of mortality among these patients. The incidence of cryptococcal meningitis varies from place to place. A total of 31 specimens of CSF out of 89 samples processed from known HIV positive cases yielded Cryptococcus neoformans during the period of 3 years. C.neoformans was the most common opportunistic pathogen isolated from CSF samples of these patients with an incidence of 34.8% PMID:17664823

  5. Neurosyphilis: An Unresolved Case of Meningitis

    Shagufta Ahsan; Joesph Burrascano

    2015-01-01

    Neurosyphilis can cause both symptomatic and asymptomatic meningitis. However the epidemiology of modern neurosyphilis is not well defined because of the paucity of population-based data. The majority of neurosyphilis cases have been reported in HIV-infected patients. Here we present a case of early neurosyphilis/symptomatic syphilitic meningitis in a non-HIV patient who presented with rash but was mistakenly treated for early latent or secondary syphilis. Syphilis presenting with a skin rash...

  6. Anthrax Meningitis - Report Of An Autopsied Case

    Mahadevan A; Panda K. M; Khanna N; Swamy H S; Yasha T. C

    1999-01-01

    Anthrax is a rare cause of hemorrhagic meningitis in man. This report illustrates the characteristic hemorrhagic manifestations in the brain of a patient dying of anthrax meningitis secondary to overwhelming bacteremia. Gross examination of the brain revealed a thick dense subarachnoid hemorrhage with numerous petechial hemorrhages in the cortex. Histologically, meningoencephalitis with vascular necrosis, edema, perivascular cortical hemorrhages and clumps of Gram positive bacilli in the v...

  7. Streptococcus salivarius meningitis after dental care: case report

    Maira Zoppelletto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcus salivarius is a common commensal of the oral mucosa, associated with infections in different sites. Meningitis due to this species are described in a few occasions . In this study refer to a case recently diagnosed in our hospital for treatment of a subsequent dental caries. Case report. A man of 35 years, presents to the emergency room with fever, headache, confusion, marked nuchal rigor.Anamnesis is the treatment of dental caries on the previous day.The blood count showed 24.7x109 / L with WBC 22.9x109 / L (92.9% neutrophils. The lumbar puncture CSF noted cloudy with 15.0 x 109 / L WBC, glicorrachia 5 g / L, protidorrachia 6.5 g / L. Microscopic examination showed numerous granulocytes and prevalence of Gram-positive cocci.The pneumococcal antigen was negative.The blood cultures before starting antibiotic therapy, were negative. CSF was isolated from the culture of a Streptococcus salivarius. To antibiotic therapy started in the ED, after lumbar puncture is associated with the Ampicillin Ceftriaxone and continued for 15 days to improve the patient’s general condition, then resigned in the 17 th day. Materials and methods. From CSF inoculated in blood agar plates and chocolate agar alpha hemolytic colonies were isolated, catalysis negative, optochin resistant. The biochemical identification performed with Phoenix (BD and confirmed by PCR Pan bacterial (16S rDNA bacterial strain identified as Streptococcus salivarius.The antibiogram performed with Phoenix (BD according to the CLSI guidelines indicated sensitivity to penicillin, vancomycin, cefotaxime, cefepime, and chloramphenicol. Conclusions. Meningitis by Streptococcus salivarius was found in a few cases, mainly related to the transmission of health personnel from the oral cavity during lumbar punctures performed without the use of surgical masks. The following bacterial meningitis in dental treatment having a low incidence and often fatal course be suspected by

  8. Influence of the blood bacterial load on the meningeal inflammatory response in Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    Østergaard, C; O´Reilly, T; Brandt, C;

    2006-01-01

    was induced by intracisternal injection of approximately 1 x 10(6) CFU Streptococcus pneumoniae, type 3, and the 26 rabbits were either provided with approximately 1 x 10(6) CFU S. pneumoniae intravenously at 0 hour ("bacteraemic" rabbits, n = 9), immunized with paraformaldehyde-killed S. pneumoniae...

  9. Meningitis and Climate: From Science to Practice

    Perez Garcia-Pando, Carlos; Thomson, Madeleine C.; Stanton, Michelle C.; Diggle, Peter J.; Hopson, Thomas; Pandya, Rajul; Miller, Ron L.; Hugonnet, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is a climate sensitive infectious disease. The regional extent of the Meningitis Belt in Africa, where the majority of epidemics occur, was originally defined by Lapeysonnie in the 1960s. A combination of climatic and environmental conditions and biological and social factors have been associated to the spatial and temporal patterns of epidemics observed since the disease first emerged in West Africa over a century ago. However, there is still a lack of knowledge and data that would allow disentangling the relative effects of the diverse risk factors upon epidemics. The Meningitis Environmental Risk Information Technologies Initiative (MERIT), a collaborative research-to-practice consortium, seeks to inform national and regional prevention and control strategies across the African Meningitis Belt through the provision of new data and tools that better determine risk factors. In particular MERIT seeks to consolidate a body of knowledge that provides evidence of the contribution of climatic and environmental factors to seasonal and year-to-year variations in meningococcal meningitis incidence at both district and national scales. Here we review recent research and practice seeking to provide useful information for the epidemic response strategy of National Ministries of Health in the Meningitis Belt of Africa. In particular the research and derived tools described in this paper have focused at "getting science into policy and practice" by engaging with practitioner communities under the umbrella of MERIT to ensure the relevance of their work to operational decision-making. We limit our focus to that of reactive vaccination for meningococcal meningitis. Important but external to our discussion is the development and implementation of the new conjugate vaccine, which specifically targets meningococcus A

  10. A diagnostic dilemma: drug-induced aseptic meningitis in a 45-year-old HIV-positive man.

    Rowley, D

    2014-03-01

    We describe a case of aseptic meningitis following the administration of moxifloxacin in a 45-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). At presentation he was receiving tuberculosis treatment on a modified regimen following severe hepatotoxicity; this included moxifloxacin, started 8 days previously. Initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis was grossly abnormal. Anti-viral and -bacterial treatments were started. All microbiological tests proved negative and his moxifloxacin was withheld resulting in a complete normalisation of CSF. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis is a diagnosis of exclusion and presents a serious diagnostic dilemma. The decision to withhold medication cannot be taken lightly.

  11. Blocking of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid augments bacteremia and increases lethality in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels;

    2005-01-01

    damage and outcome in pneumococcal meningitis in rats treated with ceftriaxone from 28 h after infection. Rats treated with fucoidin from time of infection had an excess risk of a fatal outcome compared to rats not receiving fucoidin (25/63 versus 5/34, p=0.012), whereas the risk of cortical damage in......, blocking leukocyte entry to the central nervous system in experimental pneumococcal meningitis compromises the survival prognosis but does not affect the risk of brain damage or level of infection in this compartment. Conversely, poorer prognosis was associated with an increase in bacterial load in blood...

  12. [Pathogenetic ground of including reamberin and cycloferon combination into the therapy program for patients with severe cases of acute tonsillitis of a mixed viral/bacterial etiology].

    Frolov, V M; Peresadin, N A; Tereshin, V A; Chkhetiani, R B; Kruglova, O V

    2012-03-01

    The increase of severe cases of acute tonsillitis (AT) is presently marked. Severe cases of AT disturb immune and metabolic homoeostasis initiating the development of disease. Therapy optimization is required to select the best treatment. In patients with severe cases of AT of mixed viral/bacterial etiology before the treatment it is revealed the increase of general activity of lactatedehydrigenase (LDH) and increase of the level of cathode "anaerobic" factions LDH4+5 and the decline of concentration ATP in the blood. There was a compensatory rise of level of ADP and АМP. The substantial decline of serum interferon (CIF) activity and diminishing maintenance of α-interferon (α-IFN) and γ-interferon (γ-IFN) in the blood of the patients, that testified to oppressing of interferonogenesis. Treatment of severe cases of AT of mixed viral/bacterial etiology of modern detoxic preparation reamberin and immunoactive preparation cycloferon combination positively influences the studied laboratory indexes. The improvement of power metabolism is marked, that was characterized by normalization of level adenine nucleotides (ATP, АDP, АМP) and general activity of LDH and its izoenzimes spectrum. At the same time the increase of CIF level is set, maintenances α-IFN and γ-IFN in the blood, that testified to the improvement of interferonogenesis. The results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of reamberin and cycloferon combination for treatment of patients with AT of mixed viral/bacterial etiology. PMID:22573749

  13. Using the polymerase chain reaction coupled with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to investigate the association between bacterial translocation and systemic inflammatory response syndrome in predicted acute severe pancreatitis

    Callum B Pearce; Vitaly Zinkevich; Iwona Beech; Viera Funjika; Ana Garcia Ruiz; Afraa Aladawi; Hamish D Duncan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the use of PCR and DGGE to investigate the association between bacterial translocation and systemic inflammatory response syndrome in predicted severe AP.METHODS: Patients with biochemical and clinical evidence of acute pancreatitis and an APACHE Ⅱ score ≥8 were enrolled. PCR and DGGE were employed to detect bacterial translocation in blood samples collected on d1,3, and 8 after the admission. Standard microbial blood cultures were taken when there was clinical evidence of sepsis or when felt to be clinically indicated by the supervising team.RESULTS: Six patients were included. Of all the patients investigated, only one developed septic complications;the others had uneventful illness. Bacteria were detected using PCR in 4 of the 17 collected blood samples. The patient with sepsis was PCR-positive in two samples (taken on d 1 and 3), despite three negative blood cultures. Using DGGE and specific primers, the bacteria in all blood specimens which tested positive for the presence of bacterial DNA were identified as E coli.CONCLUSION: Our study confirmed thatunlike traditional microbiological techniques, PCR can detect the presence of bacteria in the blood of patients with severe AP. Therefore, this latter method in conjunction with DGGE is potentially an extremely useful tool in predicting septic morbidity and evaluating patients with the disease. Further research using increased numbers of patients, in particular those patients with necrosis and sepsis, is required to assess the reliability of PCR and DGGE in the rapid diagnosis of infection in AP.

  14. Interaction of fibrinogen and muramidase-released protein promotes the development of Streptococcus suis meningitis.

    Wang, Junping; Kong, Decong; Zhang, Shengwei; Jiang, Hua; Zheng, Yuling; Zang, Yating; Hao, Huaijie; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Muramidase-released protein (MRP) is as an important virulence marker of Streptococcus suis (S. suis) serotype 2. Our previous works have shown that MRP can bind human fibrinogen (hFg); however, the function of this interaction in S. suis meningitis is not known. In this study, we found that the deletion of mrp significantly impairs the hFg-mediated adherence and traversal ability of S. suis across human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3). Measurement of the permeability to Lucifer yellow in vitro and Evans blue extravasation in vivo show that the MRP-hFg interaction significantly increases the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the mouse meningitis model, wild type S. suis caused higher bacterial loads in the brain and more severe histopathological signs of meningitis than the mrp mutant at day 3 post-infection. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence observations reveal that the MRP-hFg interaction can destroy the cell adherens junction protein p120-catenin of hCMEC/D3. These results indicate that the MRP-hFg interaction is important in the development of S. suis meningitis. PMID:26441928

  15. Interaction of Fibrinogen and Muramidase-released Protein Promotes the Development of Streptococcus suis Meningitis

    Junping eWang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Muramidase-released protein (MRP is as an important virulence marker of Streptococcus suis (S. suis serotype 2. Our previous works have shown that MRP can bind human fibrinogen (hFg; however, the function of this interaction in S.suis meningitis is not known. In this study, we found that the deletion of mrp significantly impairs the hFg-mediated adherence and traversal ability of S. suis across human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3. Measurement of the permeability to Lucifer yellow in vitro and Evans blue extravasation in vivo show that the MRP-hFg interaction significantly increases the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. In the mouse meningitis model, wild type S. suis caused higher bacterial loads in the brain and more severe histopathological signs of meningitis than the mrp mutant at day 3 post-infection. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence observations reveal that the MRP-hFg interaction can destroy the cell adherens junction protein p120-catenin of hCMEC/D3. These results indicate that the MRP-hFg interaction is important in the development of S. suis meningitis.

  16. Meningitis tras anestesia y analgesia espinal

    M. Robles Romero

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de esta revisión es una puesta al día en la etiología, diagnóstico, profilaxis y tratamiento de la meningitis tras anestesia y analgesia espinales. Aunque es una complicación mayor de esta técnica y su incidencia es baja, cada vez son más frecuentes los casos publicados en la literatura médica. Según su etiología se les clasifica en meningitis sépticas, víricas y asépticas. Las meningitis sépticas son las más frecuentes, y en su etiología cada vez juega un papel más destacado como agente implicado el estreptococo salivarius. Como meningitis asépticas se clasifican aquellas en las que el cultivo de líquido cefalorraquídeo es negativo, con un periodo de latencia de síntomas inferior a seis horas, que pueden cursar con eosinofilia en el líquido cefalorraquídeo y unos niveles cercanos a la normalidad en la glucorraquia. Suelen tener buena respuesta y evolución con tratamiento antibiótico con vancomicina y cefalosporinas de tercera generación. Como profilaxis incidir en las medidas de asepsia, sobre todo en el uso de mascarilla facial para realizar la técnica, como práctica para disminuir la incidencia de gérmenes cuyo origen está en la cavidad oral y orofaringe. Asimismo podrían reducir la incidencia de meningitis las medidas de asepsia tales como el lavado de manos, uso de guantes y asepsia de la piel. La diferenciación entre meningitis séptica y aséptica se hará con mayor seguridad cuando se estandaricen las técnicas para detectar genoma bacteriano en el líquido cefalorraquídeo; actualmente se etiquetan como meningitis asépticas aquellas en las que el cultivo de líquido cefalorraquídeo es negativo y cuya tinción de Gram es negativa. Pese a que el pronóstico y evolución en rasgos generales de las meningitis tras anestesia y analgesia espinal es bueno, en comparación con las meningitis adquiridas en la comunidad, por la escasa virulencia de las bacterias implicadas (Estreptococo salivarius

  17. IL-1RI (interleukin-1 receptor type I signalling is essential for host defence and hemichannel activity during acute central nervous system bacterial infection

    Tammy Kielian

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a common aetiological agent of bacterial brain abscesses. We have previously established that a considerable IL-1 (interleukin-1 response is elicited immediately following S. aureus infection, where the cytokine can exert pleiotropic effects on glial activation and blood–brain barrier permeability. To assess the combined actions of IL-1α and IL-1β during CNS (central nervous system infection, host defence responses were evaluated in IL-1RI (IL-1 receptor type I KO (knockout animals. IL-1RI KO mice were exquisitely sensitive to intracerebral S. aureus infection, as demonstrated by enhanced mortality rates and bacterial burdens within the first 24 h following pathogen exposure compared with WT (wild-type animals. Loss of IL-1RI signalling also dampened the expression of select cytokines and chemokines, concomitant with significant reductions in neutrophil and macrophage infiltrates into the brain. In addition, the opening of astrocyte hemichannels during acute infection was shown to be dependent on IL-1RI activity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that IL-1RI signalling plays a pivotal role in the genesis of immune responses during the acute stage of brain abscess development through S. aureus containment, inflammatory mediator production, peripheral immune cell recruitment, and regulation of astrocyte hemichannel activity. Taken in the context of previous studies with MyD88 (myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 and TLR2 (Toll-like receptor 2 KO animals, the current report advances our understanding of MyD88-dependent cascades and implicates IL-1RI signalling as a major antimicrobial effector pathway during acute brain-abscess formation.

  18. [A case of recurrent aseptic meningitis induced by ergot agents].

    Ogawa, Tomoko; Tagawa, Asako; Hashimoto, Ritsuo; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 29-year-old woman with recurrent aseptic meningitis that was caused by ergot agents. She miscarried at age 27, and the uterus constrictor methylergometrine was prescribed. Three days later, she developed aseptic meningitis and was hospitalized. Two years later, she again developed aseptic meningitis the day after she took ergotamine tartrate. In both events, her symptoms improved rapidly when the medication was stopped. The drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test for methylergometrine yielded a value of 180%. Drug-induced meningitis is a rare form of recurrent aseptic meningitis. Many studies have reported cases of meningitis caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but many other drugs can induce aseptic meningitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of aseptic meningitis induced by ergot agents. PMID:26103816

  19. Frequency and clinical significance of CAT findings in purulent and lymphocytic meningitis

    From 1974-1980, computerized tomography was carried out on 34 patients with purulent and on 17 patients with lymphocytic meningitis. 25 out of the patients with purulent meningitis resp. meningoencephalitis could be examined in the acute stage. For all patients with already attenuated clinical symptoms normal results were obtained, while for the remainder findings were in part highly pathological consisting, e.g. in dilatations or narviowings of the ventricula system, failure to make the outer liquor cavities roentgenoparens, accumulation of pas in the subarachnoidal and subdur spaces including the interhemispheric clefs, cerebral medulla and periventricular edemas, abscesses and signs of ependymitis. Various findings could only be classified as pathological upon serial examination. Correlation statistics showed that all patients with marked pathological CT findings also suffered from distinct pertubations of consciousness. Out of 14 patients with pathological CT findings, 12 died. No connexions could be established between the level of liquor cell counts and CT alterations. Among 17 patients with a lymphocytic meningitis, CT findings were pathological with a mean dilatation of the ventricular system in only one case of chronic course and predominantly basal localization. The patient decreased. Phathological CT findings in purulent and lymphocytic meningitis point to an unfavourable prognosis. (orig.)

  20. Frequency and clinical significance of CAT findings in purulent and lymphocytic meningitis

    Schneider, E.; Kloes, G.; Hopp, G.; Becker, H.

    1982-02-01

    From 1974-1980, computerized tomography was carried out on 34 patients with purulent and on 17 patients with lymphocytic meningitis. 25 out of the patients with purulent meningitis resp. meningoencephalitis could be examined in the acute stage. For all patients with already attenuated clinical symptoms normal results were obtained, while for the remainder findings were in part highly pathological consisting, e.g. in dilatations or narviowings of the ventricula system, failure to make the outer liquor cavities roentgenoparens, accumulation of pas in the subarachnoidal and subdur spaces including the interhemispheric clefs, cerebral medulla and periventricular edemas, abscesses and signs of ependymitis. Various findings could only be classified as pathological upon serial examination. Correlation statistics showed that all patients with marked pathological CT findings also suffered from distinct pertubations of consciousness. Out of 14 patients with pathological CT findings, 12 died. No connexions could be established between the level of liquor cell counts and CT alterations. Among 17 patients with a lymphocytic meningitis, CT findings were pathological with a mean dilatation of the ventricular system in only one case of chronic course and predominantly basal localization. The patient decreased. Pathological CT findings in purulent and lymphocytic meningitis point to an unfavourable prognosis.

  1. Use of radiologic modalities in coccidioidal meningitis

    The diagnostic utility of pentetate indium trisodium CSF studies, technetium Tc 99m brain scans, and computerized tomographic (CT) scans was evaluated in eight patients in whom coccidioidal meningitis developed following a dust storm in the Central Valley of California. The 111In flow studies and the CT scans demonstrated hydrocephalus in five patients with clinical findings suggesting this complication. Ventriculitis has not previously been diagnosed before death in patients with coccidioidal meningitis; however, it was demonstrated in two patients by the technetium Tc 99m brain scan. The finding that communicating hydrocephalus occurs early in meningitis and interferes with CSF flow into infected basilar regions has important therapeutic implications in that antifungal agents injected into the lumbar subarachnoid space may not reach these regions

  2. Meningitis tras anestesia y analgesia espinal

    M. Robles Romero; M.A. Rojas Caracuel; C. del Prado Álvarez

    2013-01-01

    El objetivo de esta revisión es una puesta al día en la etiología, diagnóstico, profilaxis y tratamiento de la meningitis tras anestesia y analgesia espinales. Aunque es una complicación mayor de esta técnica y su incidencia es baja, cada vez son más frecuentes los casos publicados en la literatura médica. Según su etiología se les clasifica en meningitis sépticas, víricas y asépticas. Las meningitis sépticas son las más frecuentes, y en su etiología cada vez juega un papel más destacado como...

  3. Proteus mirabilis meningitis and cerebral abscess in the newborn period.

    M. L. Smith; Mellor, D

    1980-01-01

    Three cases of Proteus mirabilis meningitis in neonates are reported, in 2 of which abscess formation was proved neuroradiologically. All neonates with P. mirabilis meningitis warrant a CAT scan, as does any newborn infant with meningitis who has a continuing pleocytosis after adequate treatment with antibiotics.

  4. Unexplained fever in young children: how to manage severe bacterial infection

    Brook, Itzhak

    2003-01-01

    Fever with no clear source of infection in children under 3 years old carries a small but important risk of sepsis and meningitis. This review describes the bacterial causes of such infection and the appropriate management in different age groups

  5. Asymptomatic (Subclinical Meningitis in One of Premature Triplets with Simultaneous Enteroviral Meningitis: A Case Report

    Ashish Gupta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Most enterovirus infection in the neonate and young infant is asymptomatic, but serious disease may occur, especially if acquired perinatally. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of asymptomatic enterovirus aseptic meningitis, and of concurrent enterovirus aseptic meningitis in premature triplets. Ten-week-old, 31-week-estimated gestational age premature triplet boys were diagnosed with enterovirus aseptic meningitis on the same day. Two of the triplets developed symptoms on the day of admission, while the third remained symptom free throughout the infection. All three recovered completely and are healthy more than a decade later.

  6. Tuberculosis meningitis presenting as isolated interhemispheric exudates

    Full text: The total number of tuberculosis cases in the world is increasing, and less common forms of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) with varying imaging manifestations are being encountered more often. We describe anterior interhemispheric variety of TBM, which has not been previously described to the best of our knowledge in the literature. Common imaging findings in these five patients include predominant involvement of the meninges in the anterior interhemispheric fissure with relatively little enhancement of the basal cisterns. Knowledge of uncommon radiological findings is vital in early diagnosis and treatment of this common disease.

  7. Meningeal involvement in Behcet's disease: MRI

    Behcet's disease is a multisystem disease that involves the central nervous system up to half of cases. Presentation with neurologic symptoms occurs in 5 % of cases and cerebral venous thrombosis is one of its major manifestations. A feature not previously reported is progressive meningeal thickening with involvement of both optic nerves. We report a patient with cerebral venous thrombosis, meningeal thickening and contrast enhancement on MRI. This patient had two other unusual features: positive antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and later development of central diabetes insipidus. (orig.)

  8. CSF cytology versus immunocytochemistry in meningeal carcinomatosis.

    Boogerd, W; Vroom, T M; van Heerde, P; Brutel de la Rivière, G; Peterse, J L; van der Sande, J J

    1988-01-01

    CSF immunocytochemistry with monoclonal antibodies was compared with conventional cytology to determine its sensitivity in detecting malignant cells in patients with meningeal carcinomatosis. One hundred and eighteen samples were investigated. Cytology was tumour positive in 83 samples and immunocytochemistry in 85. Dissimilar results between the two diagnostic methods were noted in 12 specimens, invariably occurring in samples with a low cell count and obtained from treated patients. Combined use of the two methods led to a 9% increase of sensitivity in detecting malignant cells compared with cytology alone. It is concluded that immunocytochemistry is of minor help in the problem of false-negative cytology in meningeal carcinomatosis. PMID:2832546

  9. Innervation of the human middle meningeal artery

    Edvinsson, L; Gulbenkian, S; Barroso, C P;

    1998-01-01

    The majority of nerve fibers in the middle meningeal artery and branching arterioles are sympathetic, storing norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y (NPY). A sparse supply of fibers contain acetylcholinesterase activity and immunoreactivity toward vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), peptidine histidine...... methionine (PHM), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Only few substance P and neuropeptide K immunoreactive fibers are noted. Electronmicroscopy shows axons and terminals at the adventitial medial border of the human middle meningeal artery, with a fairly large distance to the smooth muscle cells...

  10. The microbiological diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis

    Erdem, H; Ozturk-Engin, D; Elaldi, N;

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to provide data on the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in this largest case series ever reported. The Haydarpasa-1 study involved patients with microbiologically confirmed TBM in Albania, Croatia, Denmark, Egypt, France, Hungary, Iraq, Italy, Macedonia, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia......, Syria and Turkey between 2000 and 2012. A positive culture, PCR or Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen staining (EZNs) from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was mandatory for inclusion of meningitis patients. A total of 506 TBM patients were included. The sensitivities of the tests were as follows: interferon-γ release...

  11. Anthrax Meningitis - Report Of An Autopsied Case

    Mahadevan A

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax is a rare cause of hemorrhagic meningitis in man. This report illustrates the characteristic hemorrhagic manifestations in the brain of a patient dying of anthrax meningitis secondary to overwhelming bacteremia. Gross examination of the brain revealed a thick dense subarachnoid hemorrhage with numerous petechial hemorrhages in the cortex. Histologically, meningoencephalitis with vascular necrosis, edema, perivascular cortical hemorrhages and clumps of Gram positive bacilli in the vascular lumen and invading vessel wall were the salient features. The anthrax bacillus was isolated from CSF and brain tissue and further its pathogenecity was confirmed by animal inoculation.

  12. Meningitis-retention Syndrome; A Case Report.

    Ishii, Gen; Hata, Kenichi; Aoki, Soichiro; Suzuki, Masayasu; Kimura, Takahiro; Egawa, Shin

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of meningitis-retention syndrome followed by urodynamic tests. A 48-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for an undiagnosed fever with headache and urinary retention. Aseptic meningitis was suspected according to cerebrospinal fluid analyses, and urodynamic test showed an underactive detrusor, leading to inadequate contraction of the bladder on voiding in spite of a normal sensation during bladder filling. Clean intermittent self-catheterization was required temporarily, but normal urinary voiding without the need for medication was restored in 2 weeks after discharge from the hospital, when urodynamic tests showed normal contractility of the bladder during voiding. PMID:27175342

  13. Etiology of bacterial meningitis among children aged 2-59 months in Salvador, Northeast Brazil, before and after routine use of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine Etiologia da meningite bacteriana em crianças com idade entre 2 e 59 meses em Salvador, Nordeste do Brasil, antes e depois do uso rotineiro da vacina para Haemophilus influenzae tipo b

    Cristiana M. Nascimento-Carvalho

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the frequency of etiologic agents of bacterial meningitis (BM among children aged 2-59 months in a sample of patients in Salvador, Northeast Brazil, with emphasis on the frequency of BM of unknown etiology (BMUE, just before, during and after the implementation of routine immunization of infants with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib vaccination. METHOD: Demographic, clinical and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF information was collected from the chart of every patient, aged 2-59 months, whose CSF exam was performed at the CSF Lab - José Silveira Foundation, between January 1989 and December 2001. Every CSF exam was completely performed according to standard methods. The etiologic diagnosis was based on either culture and/or latex-agglutination test. When the agent was only seen on Gram stained smear, the diagnosis was descriptive. BMUE was defined as: glucose 100 mg / dl, white blood cell count > 20 cells / mm³, percentage of neutrophils > 80%. RESULTS: Of 1519 patients, 894 (58.9% had normal exams and BM was diagnosed in 95 (6.2%. Etiologic agents were: Hib (44.2%, meningococcus (13.7%, Gram-negative bacilli (11.6%, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (6.3%, pneumococcus (4.2%, other agents (4.2%; BMUE was diagnosed in 15.8% of cases with BM. By analysing the frequency of BMUE and Hib among all exams performed yearly, the peaks were recorded in 1989 (5.3% and 1990 (16.9%, respectively, decreasing to 0.7% and 0% in 2001. CONCLUSION: It is possible that the implementation of the conjugate Hib vaccine during the 1990's has been decreasing not only the occurrence of Hib meningitis but also of BMUE.OBJETIVO: Descrever a freqüência dos agentes etiológicos de meningite bacteriana (MB em amostra das crianças com idade entre 2 e 59 meses, em Salvador, Nordeste do Brasil, com ênfase na freqüência de MB de etiologia indeterminada (MBEI, antes, durante e após a implementação da imunização rotineira de lactentes com vacina para

  14. Radioactive bromide partition test in the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis

    The utility of the radioactive bromide partition test in differentiating tuberculous meningitis (TBM) from other forms of meningitis has been assessed. The test was carried out in 19 patients with TBM, 6 patients with partially treated pyogenic meningitis and 17 non-meningitis controls. Eighteen of the 19 TBM patients gave bromide partition ratio (BPR) value below 1.3 while the value was above this level in all control patients including partially treated meningitis. The results indicate that the test is useful in the differential diagnosis of TBM. (author)

  15. MR demonstration of the meninges: Normal and pathological findings

    The MR appearance of normal and pathological meninges was studied in 23 patients. Amongst twelve normals, T1-weighted images demonstrated the meninges as slightly hyperintense density structures (compared with CSF) which increased in signal intensity somewhat after the administration of gadolinium-DTPA. On T2-weighted images, the subarachnoid space and meninges were isointense. In eleven patients with inflammatory disease or tumourous infiltration of the meninges, abnormal findings were evident in the unenhanced images as well as after administration of gadolinium-DTPA. Compared with CT, MR proved greatly superior in the diagnosis of meningeal abnormalities. (orig.)

  16. Scrub typhus meningitis: An under-recognized cause of aseptic meningitis in India

    Kundavaram Paul Prabhakar Abhilash; Karthik Gunasekaran; Shubhanker Mitra; Shalom Patole; Sowmya Sathyendra; Sudha Jasmine; G M Varghese

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in scrub typhus is seen in up to a quarter of patients. However, the literature on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and outcome in meningitis/meningo-encephalitis due to scrub typhus is scant. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study included patients who were admitted to a medical college hospital with scrub typhus meningitis/meningo-encephalitis between 2005 and 2011. The clinical and laboratory profile, details of CSF analys...

  17. Intratympanic steroid prevents long-term spiral ganglion neuron loss in experimental meningitis

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.; Lund, S.P.;

    2010-01-01

    Hypothesis: Intratympanic steroid treatment prevents hearing loss and cochlear damage in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis. Background: Sensorineural hearing loss is a long-term complication of meningitis affecting up to a third of survivors. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the bacterial species...... distortion product otoacoustic emissions showed significant hearing loss at the low frequencies in animals treated with intratympanic steroid compared with animals treated with systemic saline (p <0.05; Mann-Whitney test). However, intratympanic steroid significantly increased the number of viable neurons in...... the spiral ganglion compared with both intratympanic and systemic saline (p = 0.0082 and p = 0.0089; Mann-Whitney test). Histology revealed fibrosis of the tympanic membrane and cavity in steroid-treated animals, which plausibly caused the low-frequency hearing loss. Conclusion: Intratympanic...

  18. Factors associated with the occurrence of hearing loss after pneumococcal meningitis

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Caye-Thomasen, P.; Brandt, C.T.;

    2010-01-01

    pneumococcal serotype) for development of hearing loss. Methods. Results of blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biochemistry, bacterial serotyping, follow-up audiological examinations, and medical records were collected, and disease-related risk factors for hearing loss were identified. The mean pure......Background. On the basis of a nationwide registration during a 5-year period (1999-2003), the frequency and severity of hearing loss was investigated retrospectively in 343 consecutive Danish patients who survived pneumococcal meningitis, to identify important risk factors (including the...... hearing loss, and another 16 (7%) had bilateral profound hearing loss. Significant risk factors for hearing loss were advanced age, the presence of comorbidity, severity of meningitis, a low CSF glucose level, a high CSF protein level, and a certain pneumococcal serotype (P <.05). By applying multivariate...

  19. Creatine kinase in the serum of patients with acute infections of the central nervous system

    Peterslund, N A; Heinsvig, E M; Christensen, K D

    1985-01-01

    Serum creatine kinase was assessed in 94 consecutive patients without convulsions admitted to hospital due to suspicion of infection of the central nervous system. No reliable discrimination between patients with aseptic and those with bacterial meningitis was obtained. Patients with bacterial...... bacterial meningitis. The highest serum CK value found in patients with encephalitis was 725 U/l. Reference values for control patients with meningism were 16-269 U/1. In a subset of 9 patients creatine kinase isoenzyme analysis was performed. In all cases only muscle type (MM) isoenzyme was found...

  20. Phylotype-level 16S rRNA analysis reveals new bacterial indicators of health state in acute murine colitis

    Berry, David; Schwab, Clarissa; Milinovich, Gabriel; Reichert, Jochen; Ben Mahfoudh, Karim; Decker, Thomas; Engel, Marion; Hai, Brigitte; Hainzl, Eva; Heider, Susanne; Kenner, Lukas; Müller, Mathias; Rauch, Isabella; Strobl, Birgit; Wagner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Human inflammatory bowel disease and experimental colitis models in mice are associated with shifts in intestinal microbiota composition, but it is unclear at what taxonomic/phylogenetic level such microbiota dynamics can be indicative for health or disease. Here, we report that dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis is accompanied by major shifts in the composition and function of the intestinal microbiota of STAT1−/− and wild-type mice, as determined by 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial...

  1. Bacteremia causes hippocampal apoptosis in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    Andersen, Christian Østergaard; Leib, S.L.; Rowland, Ian J;

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Bacteremia and systemic complications both play important roles in brain pathophysiological alterations and the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. Their individual contributions to the development of brain damage, however, still remain to be defined. METHODS: Using an adult...... rat pneumococcal meningitis model, the impact of bacteremia accompanying meningitis on the development of hippocampal injury was studied. The study comprised of the three groups: I. Meningitis (n=11), II. meningitis with attenuated bacteremia resulting from iv injection of serotype......-specific pneumococcal antibodies (n=14), and III. uninfected controls (n=6). RESULTS: Pneumococcal meningitis resulted in a significantly higher apoptosis score 0.22 (0.18-0.35) compared to uninfected controls (0.02 (0.00-0.02), Mann Whitney test, P=0.0003). Also, meningitis with an attenuation of bacteremia by...

  2. Clinical and MRI evaluation of tuberculous meningitis

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship of clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM), and to improve the understanding of TBM. Methods: The clinical and MRI findings in 42 patients with confirmed TBM were analyzed retrospectively. MRI examination was performed using a 1 Tesla system, including SE T1WI and T2WI. Intravenous contrast was injected in 29 patients, and follow-up scans were performed on 17 patients. Results: Of 24 patients with early TBM, MRI was abnormal in 5(21%) with slight Tl-hypointense meningeal (4) or ependymal thickening (1). MRI on 33/35 (94%) patients with late stage TBM was abnormal with T1 hypointensity and T2 hyperintensity including meningeal thickening (19), mild surrounding brain edema (10), nodules (11), tuberculoma (5) and abscess (2). There was significant plaque-like, nodular or rim enhancement with surrounding brain edema. Conclusion: Tuberculous meningitis has minimal clinical and MRI findings in the early phase and significant clinical and MRI findings in the late phase. The enhanced scan may help to detect the abnormality. (authors)

  3. CHOROIDAL TUBERCLES IN ISOLATED TUBERCULOUS MENINGITIS

    Tharun Tom

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Choroidal tubercles are the most common manifestation of intraocular tuberculosis and results from the haematogenous spread of mycobacteria in miliary tuberculosis. However, its presence without the evidence of miliary tuberculosis is a rare entity. We present a case of isolated tuberculous meningitis with choroidal tubercles, who had no features of miliary tuberculosis.

  4. Tuberculous meningitis in a Filipino maid.

    Sheu, J J; Yuan, R Y; Lu, J J; Chung, C L; Hsu, C Y

    1999-11-01

    Tuberculous meningitis, while not uncommon in Taiwan, has not been reported among foreign workers. We report the first case of tuberculous meningitis in a 37-year-old Filipino maid in Taiwan, who presented with headache, fever and vomiting. She had been well before this episode and the small screening films of the chest radiograph obtained on her arrival in Taiwan 15 months previously, and every 6 months thereafter showed no evidence of tuberculosis. The suspicion of tuberculous meningitis was delayed until disturbance of consciousness manifested and a standard chest radiograph showed a diffuse miliary pattern in both lung fields. A cerebrospinal fluid sample that was sent for a polymerase chain reaction-based assay specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed a positive result. The patient recovered with sequelae of mildly incoherent speech and urinary incontinence after antituberculous medication and short-course steroid treatment. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of tuberculous meningitis in foreign workers with complaints of fever and headache. Because high-quality chest radiographs are a prerequisite for early detection of pulmonary tuberculosis, we recommended that standard posterior-anterior chest radiographs should be obtained as part of the routine health examination for foreign workers. PMID:10705697

  5. Meningism following Salmonella virchow food poisoning.

    Norris, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty six patients were admitted to hospital as a result of Salmonella virchow infection during an outbreak of food poisoning in Essex in 1984. Out of 12 patients with evidence of bloodstream invasion, one third presented primarily with meningism and attention is drawn to this unusual clinical picture.

  6. Citrobacter koseri meningitis: another freediving risk?

    Pollara, Gabriele; Savy, Lloyd; Cropley, Ian; Hopkins, Susan

    2011-01-01

    We present a rare case of meningitis caused by Citrobacter koseri in an immunocompetent adult who had recently been freediving. Middle ear pressure changes from this recreational activity, and the subsequent inflammatory response, are likely to have provided this environmental organism access to the central nervous system, and thus the ability to cause clinically significant infection. PMID:20933000

  7. Tuberculous and brucellosis meningitis differential diagnosis

    Erdem, Hakan; Senbayrak, Seniha; Gencer, Serap;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Thwaites and Lancet scoring systems have been used in the rapid diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). However, brucellar meningoencephalitis (BME) has similar characteristics with TBM. The ultimate aim of this study is to infer data to see if BME should be included in the dif...

  8. Hearing assessment after meningitis and meningococcal disease.

    Riordan, A; Thomson, A; Hodgson, J.

    1995-01-01

    A method to increase audiology referral after meningitis or meningococcal disease was audited in 89 children. A standardised proforma increased referrals from 78% to 96% over a two year period. However, only 73% of children had a hearing test. The major reason for hearing not being tested changed from non-referral to non-attendance.

  9. October 2012 Multistate Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

    2012-10-17

    This podcast gives an overview of the October 2012 multistate fungal meningitis outbreak, including symptoms to watch for and a website for up-to-date information.  Created: 10/17/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/17/2012.

  10. Comparison of hyponatremia and SIADH frequency in patients with tick borne encephalitis and meningitis of other origin.

    Czupryna, Piotr; Moniuszko, Anna; Garkowski, Adam; Pancewicz, Sławomir; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Aim The aim of the study was the evaluation of frequency and origin of hyponatremia in tick borne encephalitis (TBE) in comparison to non-TBE viral meningitis and bacterial meningitis. Methods A total of 124 patients aged 18-80 years, with TBE were included to the study. The mild form of TBE was diagnosed in 59 patients, while the severe form was diagnosed in 65 patients. The first control group (VMG) consisted of 72 patients with viral meningitis, but excluded TBE. The second control group (BMG) consisted of 16 patients diagnosed with bacterial meningitis. Results Hyponatremia was diagnosed in 55 (44.4%) patients with TBE. In 12 (9.7%) patients (mean age 56.6 ± 19.9 years; 9 men, 3 women) syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) was diagnosed. In VMG hyponatremia was diagnosed in 7 (9.7%) patients. In the age group dehydration and fluid supplementation should be a treatment of choice. (3) Overall, 16.9% of the patients with the severe form of TBE develop SIADH syndrome and they required treatment based on fluid restriction and hypertonic saline infusion. PMID:26785285

  11. Suppurative meningitis: A life-threatening complication in male macroprolactinomas

    Farida Chentli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Suppurative meningitis (SM or bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening condition, which is exceptionally due to pituitary tumors (PT. Our aim was to analyze its frequency among male macroprolactinomas (MPRL deemed to be aggressive, to report the cases we observed in our practice and describe the circumstances under which SM appeared. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 82 male MPRL in order to look for a history of well proved SM and the circumstances under which SM appeared. We also took into account the possibility of SM relapsing. Results: Four out of 82 male MPRL had SM = 4.87%. Three consulted for SM symptoms. SM was confirmed in Infectious Diseases department, but only one had rhinorrhea. Hormonal assessment and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging pleaded for aggressive prolactinomas. After antibiotics, SM was sterilized. Then, MPRL were treated with bromocriptine, which normalized prolactin and reduced PT. SM never relapsed. The 4 th case was hospitalized for a large multidirectional prolactinoma invading and/or arising from the skull base. He was operated on 3 times and then he was given Bromocriptine. After 3 months, he had rhinorrhea and then SM which was successfully treated by antibiotics. SM never relapsed after tumor reduction. Conclusion: SM was demonstrated in 4.87%. SM has revealed MPRL in 3 cases and appeared after bromocriptine intake in the 4 th one. Endocrinologists should be aware of this severe condition, which can be avoided by repairing as soon as possible the bony defect secondary to aggressive tumors, unless it is clogged by fibrosis: What probably happened in our cases.

  12. Bacterial load of pneumococcal serotypes correlates with their prevalence and multiple serotypes is associated with acute respiratory infections among children less than 5 years of age.

    Bhim Gopal Dhoubhadel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among pneumococcal serotypes, some serotypes are more prevalent in the nasopharynx than others; determining factors for higher prevalence remain to be fully explored. As non-vaccine serotypes have emerged after the introduction of 7-valent conjugate vaccines, study of serotype specific epidemiology is in need. When two or more serotypes co-colonize, they evolve rapidly to defend host's immune responses; however, a clear association of co-colonization with a clinical outcome is lacking. METHODS: Children less than 5 years old who were admitted to hospital due to acute respiratory infections (ARI (n = 595 and healthy children (n = 350 were recruited. Carriage of pneumococcus was determined by culture and lytA PCR in the nasopharyngeal samples. Serotype/serogroup detection and its quantification were done by the nanofluidic real time PCR system. Spearman's correlation and logistic regression were used to examine a correlation of serotype/serogroup specific bacterial load with its prevalence and an association of co-colonization with ARI respectively. RESULTS: Serotype/serogroup specific bacterial load was correlated with its prevalence, both in ARI cases (Spearman's rho = 0.44, n = 186; P<0.0001 and healthy children (Spearman's rho = 0.41, n = 115; P<0.0001. The prevalence of multiple serotypes was more common in ARI cases than in healthy children (18.5% vs 7.1%; aOR 2.92, 95% CI: 1.27-6.71; P = 0.01. The dominant serotype in the co-colonization had a 2 log10 higher bacterial load than the subdominant serotype, both in ARI cases (P<0.001 and healthy children (P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: High bacterial load in the nasopharynx may help transmit pneumococci among hosts, and increase the chance of successful acquisition and colonization. Co-colonization of multiple serotypes of pneumococci is linked with ARI, which infers the interactions of multiple serotypes may increase their pathogenicity; however, they may compete

  13. Factors predisposing to acute and recurrent bacterial non-necrotizing cellulitis in hospitalized patients: a prospective case-control study.

    Karppelin, M; Siljander, T; Vuopio-Varkila, J; Kere, J; Huhtala, H; Vuento, R; Jussila, T; Syrjänen, J

    2010-06-01

    Acute non-necrotizing cellulitis is a skin infection with a tendency to recur. Both general and local risk factors for erysipelas or cellulitis have been recognized in previous studies using hospitalized controls. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for cellulitis using controls recruited from the general population. We also compared patients with a history of previous cellulitis with those suffering a single episode, with regard to the risk factors: length of stay in hospital, duration of fever, and inflammatory response as measured by C-reactive protein (CRP) level and leukocyte count. Ninety hospitalized cellulitis patients and 90 population controls matched for age and sex were interviewed and clinically examined during the period April 2004 to March 2005. In multivariate analysis, chronic oedema of the extremity, disruption of the cutaneous barrier and obesity were independently associated with acute cellulitis. Forty-four (49%) patients had a positive history (PH) of at least one cellulitis episode before entering the study. Obesity and previous ipsilateral surgical procedure were statistically significantly more common in PH patients, whereas a recent (<1 month) traumatic wound was more common in patients with a negative history (NH) of cellulitis. PH patients had longer duration of fever and hospital stay, and their CRP and leukocyte values more often peaked at a high level than those of NH patients. Oedema, broken skin and obesity are risk factors for acute cellulitis. The inflammatory response as indicated by CRP level and leukocyte count is statistically significantly more severe in PH than NH patients. PMID:19694769

  14. An unusual presentation of carcinomatous meningitis.

    Foo, Chuan T; Burrell, Louise M; Johnson, Douglas F

    2016-08-01

    A 67-year old previously well male presented with a 1 week history of confusion on a background of 3 weeks of headache. Past history included two superficial melanomas excised 5 years ago. Treatment for meningoencephalitis was commenced based on lumbar puncture (LP) and non-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. Lack of a clinical response to antibiotics resulted in a second LP and contrast brain MRI which demonstrated hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal disease. Ongoing deterioration led to a whole-body computed tomographic and spinal MRI that showed widespread metastatic disease and extensive leptomeningeal involvement of the spinal cord. The diagnosis of metastatic melanoma with carcinomatous meningitis was made based on cytological analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. He died 2 weeks later in a palliative care facility. This case illustrates that the diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis can be difficult to make as the heterogeneous nature of its presentation often delays the diagnosis. PMID:27574561

  15. Intracranial meningeal melanocytoma: CT and MRI

    We report the MRI and CT findings of an intracranial meningeal melanocytoma (IMM) arising from Meckel's cave and review the imaging characteristics of IMM. On CT, IMM constantly appear as well-circumscribed, isodense to slightly dense, extra-axial tumours with homogeneous contrast enhancement. This appearance is nonspecific and similar to that of meningiomas or small neuromas. On MRI, the signal of IMM is strongly related to the amount of melanin pigment: the more melanin, the more shortening of T1 and T2 relaxation times. Only when it shows as a homogeneous mass, bright on T1 and dark on T2 weighting, can a specific diagnosis of a melanin-containing tumour be made. However, this still cannot provide a distinction between IMM and malignant meningeal melanoma. (orig.)

  16. Neurosyphilis: An Unresolved Case of Meningitis

    Shagufta Ahsan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurosyphilis can cause both symptomatic and asymptomatic meningitis. However the epidemiology of modern neurosyphilis is not well defined because of the paucity of population-based data. The majority of neurosyphilis cases have been reported in HIV-infected patients. Here we present a case of early neurosyphilis/symptomatic syphilitic meningitis in a non-HIV patient who presented with rash but was mistakenly treated for early latent or secondary syphilis. Syphilis presenting with a skin rash and an extremely high RPR titer could indicate CNS infection rather than simply secondary syphilis because rash is a nonspecific manifestation of disseminated infection. Given the effectiveness of penicillin therapy, why is the rate of syphilis continuing to increase? Is it due to a failure of prevention or could it be also because of failure to diagnose and treat syphilis adequately, as in this case?

  17. Neurosyphilis: An Unresolved Case of Meningitis.

    Ahsan, Shagufta; Burrascano, Joesph

    2015-01-01

    Neurosyphilis can cause both symptomatic and asymptomatic meningitis. However the epidemiology of modern neurosyphilis is not well defined because of the paucity of population-based data. The majority of neurosyphilis cases have been reported in HIV-infected patients. Here we present a case of early neurosyphilis/symptomatic syphilitic meningitis in a non-HIV patient who presented with rash but was mistakenly treated for early latent or secondary syphilis. Syphilis presenting with a skin rash and an extremely high RPR titer could indicate CNS infection rather than simply secondary syphilis because rash is a nonspecific manifestation of disseminated infection. Given the effectiveness of penicillin therapy, why is the rate of syphilis continuing to increase? Is it due to a failure of prevention or could it be also because of failure to diagnose and treat syphilis adequately, as in this case? PMID:26075118

  18. Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in previously healthy adults.

    Hearmon, C. J.; S. K. Ghosh

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study of four sporadic cases of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis is reported. Contrary to the conventional epidemiology these patients were adults who were not immuno-compromised. Although all four cases produced positive cerebrospinal fluid cultures, in three, listeria was not microscopically identified. Protein and glucose contents of cerebrospinal fluids were variable and all samples showed lymphocytic pleocytosis. All four had neutrophil leucocytosis in peripheral blood. ...

  19. Tuberculous Meningitis: Diagnosis and Treatment Overview

    Grace E. Marx; Chan, Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the most common form of central nervous system tuberculosis (TB) and has very high morbidity and mortality. TBM is typically a subacute disease with symptoms that may persist for weeks before diagnosis. Characteristic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings of TBM include a lymphocytic-predominant pleiocytosis, elevated protein, and low glucose. CSF acid-fast smear and culture have relatively low sensitivity but yield is increased with multiple, large volume samples...

  20. CARBAPENEM-RESISTANT ACINETOBACTER BAUMANII POSTOPERATIVE MENINGITIS

    Laura Ghibu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen of increasing relevance in hospital infections during the last 15 years.This organism causes a wide range of infection .Extensive use of antibiotics within hospitals has contribute to the emergence of multidrug-resistent A.baumannii strains that exhibit resistance to a wide range of antibiotics ,including carbapenems.We report the case of an 37 years old man diagnosed with Acinetobacter multidrug-resistant post-neurosurgical meningitis with fatal outcome.

  1. CARBAPENEM-RESISTANT ACINETOBACTER BAUMANII POSTOPERATIVE MENINGITIS

    Laura Ghibu; Egidia Miftode; Olivia Dorneanu; Carmen Dorobat

    2011-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen of increasing relevance in hospital infections during the last 15 years.This organism causes a wide range of infection .Extensive use of antibiotics within hospitals has contribute to the emergence of multidrug-resistent A.baumannii strains that exhibit resistance to a wide range of antibiotics ,including carbapenems.We report the case of an 37 years old man diagnosed with Acinetobacter multidrug-resistant post-neurosurgical meningitis with...

  2. RICKETTSIAL MENINGITIS : FUNDOSCOPY AS DIAGNOSTIC TOOL

    Patil

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF, also known as boutonneuse fever, is caused by R. conorii . The onset of MSF is typically abrupt. Almost all patients have fever, headache, and a rash. Neurological complications are rarely described. AIM : We report a rare case of meningitis of rickettsial origin. Suspected and later confirmed on the basis of fundoscopy findings. METHODS : 31 yr old female presented with fever, headache and altered sensorium of abrupt onset past one day. On examination she had signs of meningitis. Fundus examination revealed haemorrages and cotton wool spots. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed normal protein and sugar , with 2 lymphocytes and no polymorph nuclear cells on cytology. Weil - Felix test showed significantly raised titres to proteus antigen (ag OX 19 (1 : 320 and proteus Ag OX 2 (1 : 640, suggestive of rickettsia of spotted fever group. Later confirmed with PCR based detection. Patient was started on Doxycycline and responded well. CONCLUSION: Meningitis of rickettsial origin require a high index of suspicion and Ocular involvement in rickettsioses is common, easily overlooked. Typical ocular manifestations are helpful in diagnosing a rickettsial disease, would increase the frequency with which rickettsial diseases are diagnosed.

  3. Linkages between observed, modeled Saharan dust loading and meningitis in Senegal during 2012 and 2013

    Diokhane, Aminata Mbow; Jenkins, Gregory S.; Manga, Noel; Drame, Mamadou S.; Mbodji, Boubacar

    2016-04-01

    The Sahara desert transports large quantities of dust over the Sahelian region during the Northern Hemisphere winter and spring seasons (December-April). In episodic events, high dust concentrations are found at the surface, negatively impacting respiratory health. Bacterial meningitis in particular is known to affect populations that live in the Sahelian zones, which is otherwise known as the meningitis belt. During the winter and spring of 2012, suspected meningitis cases (SMCs) were with three times higher than in 2013. We show higher surface particular matter concentrations at Dakar, Senegal and elevated atmospheric dust loading in Senegal for the period of 1 January-31 May during 2012 relative to 2013. We analyze simulated particulate matter over Senegal from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model during 2012 and 2013. The results show higher simulated dust concentrations during the winter season of 2012 for Senegal. The WRF model correctly captures the large dust events from 1 January-31 March but has shown less skill during April and May for simulated dust concentrations. The results also show that the boundary conditions are the key feature for correctly simulating large dust events and initial conditions are less important.

  4. Linkages between observed, modeled Saharan dust loading and meningitis in Senegal during 2012 and 2013.

    Diokhane, Aminata Mbow; Jenkins, Gregory S; Manga, Noel; Drame, Mamadou S; Mbodji, Boubacar

    2016-04-01

    The Sahara desert transports large quantities of dust over the Sahelian region during the Northern Hemisphere winter and spring seasons (December-April). In episodic events, high dust concentrations are found at the surface, negatively impacting respiratory health. Bacterial meningitis in particular is known to affect populations that live in the Sahelian zones, which is otherwise known as the meningitis belt. During the winter and spring of 2012, suspected meningitis cases (SMCs) were with three times higher than in 2013. We show higher surface particular matter concentrations at Dakar, Senegal and elevated atmospheric dust loading in Senegal for the period of 1 January-31 May during 2012 relative to 2013. We analyze simulated particulate matter over Senegal from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model during 2012 and 2013. The results show higher simulated dust concentrations during the winter season of 2012 for Senegal. The WRF model correctly captures the large dust events from 1 January-31 March but has shown less skill during April and May for simulated dust concentrations. The results also show that the boundary conditions are the key feature for correctly simulating large dust events and initial conditions are less important. PMID:26296434

  5. Postoperative meningeal enhancement on MRI in children with brain neoplasms

    Lee, Min Hee; Han, Bokyung Kim; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Shin, Hyung Jin [Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-05-01

    The meninges composed of the dura, the arachnoid and the pia are significant sites of blood-brain barrier. Physical disruption of the integrity of the meninges from a variety of causes including surgery results in various patterns of meningeal enhancement on contrast enhanced MR images. It is important to distinguish normal reactive or benign postoperative enhancement from more serious leptomeningeal metastasis or infection, particularly in children with intracranial neoplasms. We present various patterns of meningeal enhancement on MRI in children following surgery for brain neoplasms. (author)

  6. Concurrent tubercular and staphylococcus meningitis in a child

    Amit Agrawal

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous,non-surgical haematogenous Staphylococcus aureus meningitis is rare and associated with high mortality.Mixed infection causing meningitis (pyogenic and tubercular)is further rarer,poses a difficult diag-nostic and management challenge,which warrants early diagnosis and aggressive therapy.We present a case of concurrent pyogenic and tubercular meningitis in a child managed successfully.It seems that in present case initial pyogenic infection resulted in the immunocompromised state for the child that would had lead to the acti-vation of tubercular foci resulting in tubercular meningitis.

  7. Recurrent meningitis in the adult: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge Meningitis recurrente en el adulto: un reto diagnóstico y terapéutico

    Mónica Zuluaga Quintero

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Recurrent meningitis is an uncommon condition with the capability of causing important midand long-term sequelae. Its clinical presentation depends on the etiologic agent, although most patients exhibit at least one of the classical symptoms of acute meningitis (intense headache, fever and neck stiffness. Due to the clinical variability of the disease, a high level of suspicion and an adequate use of laboratory tests are required in order to establish a timely diagnosis. This article contains a literature review regarding epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of recurrent meningitis.

    La meningitis recurrente no es una entidad común pero tiene el potencial de generar secuelas importantes a mediano y largo plazo. Su cuadro clínico depende del agente causal aunque en la mayoría de los pacientes se conserva al menos uno de los síntomas clásicos de la meningitis aguda (cefalea intensa, fiebre y rigidez de nuca. Debido a su variabilidad clínica se requieren un alto nivel de sospecha y usar bien las pruebas de laboratorio para llegar oportunamente al diagnóstico. El presente artículo contiene una revisión de la literatura sobre la epidemiología, la etiología, el cuadro clínico, el diagnóstico y el tratamiento de esta enfermedad.

  8. Minocycline-induced hypersensitivity syndrome presenting with meningitis and brain edema: a case report

    Lefebvre Nicolas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Hypersentivity Syndrome (HS may be a life-threatening condition. It frequently presents with fever, rash, eosinophilia and systemic manifestations. Mortality can be as high as 10% and is primarily due to hepatic failure. We describe what we believe to be the first case of minocycline-induced HS with accompanying lymphocytic meningitis and cerebral edema reported in the literature. Case presentation A 31-year-old HIV-positive female of African origin presented with acute fever, lymphocytic meningitis, brain edema, rash, eosinophilia, and cytolytic hepatitis. She had been started on minocycline for inflammatory acne 21 days prior to the onset of symptoms. HS was diagnosed clinically and after exclusion of infectious causes. Minocycline was withdrawn and steroids were administered from the second day after presentation because of the severity of the symptoms. All signs resolved by the seventh day and steroids were tailed off over a period of 8 months. Conclusion Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for serious adverse reactions to minocycline including lymphocytic meningitis and cerebral edema among HIV-positive patients, especially if they are of African origin. Safer alternatives should be considered for treatment of acne vulgaris. Early recognition of the symptoms and prompt withdrawal of the drug are important to improve the outcome.

  9. Tobacco use increases susceptibility to bacterial infection

    Demuth Donald R

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Active smokers and those exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk of bacterial infection. Tobacco smoke exposure increases susceptibility to respiratory tract infections, including tuberculosis, pneumonia and Legionnaires disease; bacterial vaginosis and sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea; Helicobacter pylori infection; periodontitis; meningitis; otitis media; and post-surgical and nosocomial infections. Tobacco smoke compromises the anti-bacterial function of leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes, T cells and B cells, providing a mechanistic explanation for increased infection risk. Further epidemiological, clinical and mechanistic research into this important area is warranted.

  10. 116例细菌性脑膜炎儿童脑脊液病原菌分布及耐药性分析%Frequency distribution and antibiotic resistance of pathogens from the cerebrospinal fluid of 116 children with bacterial meningitis

    蒋鸿超; 奎莉越; 黄海林; 苏敏; 温柏平

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解小儿细菌性脑膜炎病原菌分布特点及其耐药状况,为临床进行及时有效治疗提供依据.方法 回顾分析2008年1月至2012年6月昆明市儿童医院5097例小儿脑脊液中的病原菌分离培养结果及其药敏试验情况.采用K-B纸片法对病原菌进行常用抗生素的敏感性检测并进行分析.结果 5年来共从5097例脑脊液标本中检出病原菌116株,其中革兰阳性菌77株(66.4%),革兰阴性菌30株(25.9%),真菌9株(7.8%),阳性率为2.28% (116/5097).排名前6位的病原菌依次为表皮葡萄球菌32株(27.6%),肺炎链球菌15株(12.9%),大肠埃希菌15株(12.9%),溶血葡萄球菌9株(7.8%),新型隐球菌8株(6.9%),金黄色葡萄球菌6株(5.2%).新生儿及婴儿早期的病原菌主要是凝固酶阴性葡萄球菌,其对青霉素、红霉素、克林霉素敏感率均低于40%;肺炎链球菌对青霉素敏感率仅为13.4%,而对红霉素和克林霉素敏感率达到60.0%;但未见万古霉素耐药的葡萄球菌和肺炎链球菌.革兰阴性杆菌对亚胺培南、美洛培南、头孢哌酮/舒巴坦及头孢吡肟敏感率较高.结论 近5年来小儿细菌性脑膜炎患者病原菌以革兰阳性球菌为主,检出病原菌对常用抗生素耐药性较高;另外,新型隐球菌检出占有一定的比例,应高度注意新型隐球菌性脑膜炎,防止误诊和漏诊.%Objective To determine the frequency distribution and antibiotic resistance of pathogens isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid samples of children with bacterial meningitis (BM) and to provide a basis for the timely and effective treatment of childhood BM. Methods Retrospective analysis was performed on pathogens isolated from 5097 cerebrospinal fluid samples collected from children in Kunming Children's Hospital between January 2008 and June 2012, as well as drug sensitivity test results. Kirby-Bauer antibiotic testing was used to analyze the sensitivity of these pathogens

  11. A case of Staphylococcus aureus meningitis associated with cryoglobulin-related renal failure and clinically mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion.

    Shimozono, Koji; Korenaga, Hideki; Mawatari, Reiko; Tsukishima, Naoki

    2016-05-31

    A 59-years old man, having untreated hypertension and diabetes, was admitted to our hospital because of lumbago and fever. A T2-weighted image of spine showed increased signal intensity of vertebra at L3 and L4. Methicillin-susceptible staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infection was confirmed by blood culturing. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed pleocytosis. Diagsosis of pyogenic spondylitis with bacterial meningitis was made. Diffusion-weighted magnetic imaging of the brain disclosed a focal hyperintense lesion in the corpus callosum which showed a low coefficient in the apparent diffusion coefficient mapping. This finding suggests a clinically mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS). His symptoms temporarily ameliorated by antibiotic therapy. Two weeks later, however, his conscious level rapidly worsened to comatose state. Concomitantly he developed acute renal failure with severe proteinuria. Serum serology showed a positive cryoglobulin test. Mechanical ventilation, hemodialysis and steroid pulse therapy improved his consciousness with a resultant complete recovery of all symptoms. We emphasize the possible complications in some cases of MERS. PMID:27151224

  12. Radioactive bromide partition test in early diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis

    Use of the radioactive bromide partition test in the early diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis is described briefly. Results of the (1) normal control group, (2) tuberculous menigitis group and (3) non-tuberculous lymphocytic meningitis are reported. Dose rates administered are specified. (K.B.)

  13. An autopsied case of tuberculous meningitis showing interesting CT findings

    A 61-year-old female patient died of a neurological disorder of unknown origin one month after the first visit and was found to have had tuberculous meningitis at autopsy. CT revealed a low density area showing an enlargement of the cerebral ventricle but did not reveal contrast enhancement in the basal cistern peculiar to tuberculous meningitis. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Pharmacokinetics of Moxifloxacin in an Infant with Mycoplasma hominis Meningitis

    Watt, Kevin M; Massaro, Matthew M; Smith, Brian; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Benjamin, Daniel K; Laughon, Matthew M

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of Mycoplasma hominis meningitis in infants is limited by a lack of consensus regarding therapy and limited pharmacokinetic data for agents to which M. hominis is susceptible. We report the successful treatment of a premature infant with M. hominis meningitis with doxycycline and moxifloxacin and provide a pharmacokinetic profile of moxifloxacin.

  15. Possible Tick-Borne Human Enterovirus Resulting in Aseptic Meningitis

    Freundt, Eric C.; Beatty, Douglas C.; Stegall-Faulk, Teresa; Wright, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    Enterovirus-specific genetic sequences were isolated from two Amblyomma americanum tick pools. Identical genetic sequences were later obtained from cerebrospinal fluid of a patient with aseptic meningitis and a recent history of tick attachment. These observations suggest the possibility of an emerging tick-borne human enterovirus associated with aseptic meningitis.

  16. Unusual presentation of primary klebsiella meningitis: successful treatment with cefotaxime.

    Sandyk, R.; Brennan, M J

    1983-01-01

    A man who presented with lumbar backache subsequently developed signs of meningitis. The causative organism was proved to be Klebsiella pneumoniae. Despite treatment with chloramphenicol and amikacin, the condition progressed until cefotaxime was added to the treatment regimen. The patient made a good recovery. This is the first report of the use of cefotaxime in klebsiella meningitis.

  17. Meningitis in a College Student in Connecticut, 2007

    Sosa, Lynn E.; Gupta, Shaili; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Hadler, James L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a case of aseptic meningitis in a college student that was ultimately attributed to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The authors also provide a review of LCMV infection, epidemiology, and public health implications. Providers should be aware of LCMV as a cause of meningitis in college students,…

  18. Meningococcal Meningitis C in Tamil Nadu, Public Health Perspectives

    David, Kirubah Vasandhi; Pricilla, Ruby Angeline; Thomas, Beeson

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis has rarely been reported in Tamil Nadu. We report here two children diagnosed with meningococcal meningitis in Vellore, Tamil Nadu, on May 2014. The causative strain was Neisseria meningitidis serotype C. The role of the primary care physician in early diagnosis, appropriate referral, and preventive measures of this disease to the immediate family and community is stressed.

  19. Meningococcal meningitis presenting with bilateral deafness and ataxia.

    Sandyk, R.; Brennan, M J

    1984-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with bilateral deafness and ataxia of sudden onset and without constitutional symptoms or signs of meningeal irritation. He was subsequently proved to have meningococcal meningitis, and the deafness and ataxia resolved following appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  20. Diagnostic value of soluble CD163 serum levels in patients suspected of meningitis: comparison with CRP and procalcitonin

    Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Larsen, Klaus; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Møller, Holger Jon; Tvede, Michael; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Kronborg, Gitte

    The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic value of sCD163 serum levels with CRP and PCT in meningitis and bacterial infection. An observational cohort study was conducted between February 2001 and February 2005. The study population comprised 55 patients suspected of...... marker for distinguishing bacterial infection from non-bacterial disease (specificity 0.91; sensitivity 0.47). However, the overall diagnostic accuracy of CRP (AUC =0.91) and PCT (AUC =0.87) were superior (p<0.02 and p<0.06) compared to that of sCD163 (AUC =0.72). For the diagnosis of systemic bacterial...... infection, the AUC of sCD163 (0.83) did not differ significantly from those of CRP or PCT. All markers had AUCs <0.75 for differentiating between purulent meningitis and other conditions. In conclusion, CRP and PCT had high diagnostic value and were superior as markers of bacterial infection compared to s...

  1. Cryptococcal meningitis post autologous stem cell transplantation.

    Chaaban, S; Wheat, L J; Assi, M

    2014-06-01

    Disseminated Cryptococcus disease occurs in patients with defective T-cell immunity. Cryptococcal meningitis following autologous stem cell transplant (SCT) has been described previously in only 1 patient, 4 months post SCT and while off antifungal prophylaxis. We present a unique case of Cryptococcus meningitis pre-engraftment after autologous SCT, while the patient was receiving fluconazole prophylaxis. A 41-year-old man with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma underwent autologous SCT. Post-transplant prophylaxis consisted of fluconazole 400 mg daily, levofloxacin 500 mg daily, and acyclovir 800 mg twice daily. On day 9 post transplant, he developed fever and headache. Peripheral white blood cell count (WBC) was 700/μL. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed lesions consistent with meningoencephalitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed a WBC of 39 with 77% lymphocytes, protein 63, glucose 38, CSF pressure 20.5 cmH2 O, and a positive cryptococcal antigen. CSF culture confirmed Cryptococcus neoformans. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin B 5 mg/kg intravenously daily, and flucytosine 37.5 mg/kg orally every 6 h. He was switched to fluconazole 400 mg daily after 3 weeks of amphotericin therapy, with sterilization of the CSF with negative CSFCryptococcus antigen and negative CSF culture. Review of the literature revealed 9 cases of cryptococcal disease in recipients of SCT. Median time of onset was 64 days post transplant. Only 3 meningitis cases were described; 2 of them after allogeneic SCT. Fungal prophylaxis with fluconazole post autologous SCT is recommended at least through engraftment, and for up to 100 days in high-risk patients. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose and treat opportunistic infections, especially in the face of immunosuppression and despite adequate prophylaxis. Infection is usually fatal without treatment, thus prompt diagnosis and therapy might be life saving. PMID:24750320

  2. In vivo study of experimental pneumococcal meningitis using magnetic resonance imaging

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) methods were evaluated as a tool for the study of experimental meningitis. The identification and characterisation of pathophysiological parameters that vary during the course of the disease could be used as markers for future studies of new treatment strategies. Rats infected intracisternally with S. pneumoniae (n = 29) or saline (n = 13) were randomized for imaging at 6, 12, 24, 30, 36, 42 or 48 hours after infection. T1W, T2W, quantitative diffusion, and post contrast T1W images were acquired at 4.7 T. Dynamic MRI (dMRI) was used to evaluate blood-brain-barrier (BBB) permeability and to obtain a measure of cerebral and muscle perfusion. Clinical- and motor scores, bacterial counts in CSF and blood, and WBC counts in CSF were measured. MR images and dMRI revealed the development of a highly significant increase in BBB permeability (P < 0.002) and ventricle size (P < 0.0001) among infected rats. Clinical disease severity was closely related to ventricle expansion (P = 0.024). Changes in brain water distribution, assessed by ADC, and categorization of brain 'perfusion' by cortex ΔSI(bolus) were subject to increased inter-rat variation as the disease progressed, but without overall differences compared to uninfected rats (P > 0.05). Areas of well-'perfused' muscle decreased with the progression of infection indicative of septicaemia (P = 0.05). The evolution of bacterial meningitis was successfully followed in-vivo with MRI. Increasing BBB-breakdown and ventricle size was observed in rats with meningitis whereas changes in brain water distribution were heterogeneous. MRI will be a valuable technique for future studies aiming at evaluating or optimizing adjunctive treatments

  3. Locations of cerebral infarctions in tuberculous meningitis

    The locations of cerebral infarctions were studied in 14 patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and 173 patients with noninflammatory ischemic stroke (IS). In patients with TBM, 75% of infarctions occurred in the 'TB zone' supplied by medial striate and thalamoperforating arteries; only 11% occurred in the 'IS zone' supplied by lateral striate, anterior choroidal and thalamogeniculate arteries. In patients with IS, 29% of infarctions occurred in the IS zone, 29% in the subcortical white matter, and 24% in (or involving) the cerebral cortex. Only 11% occurred in the TB zone. Bilaterally symmetrical infarctions of the TB zone were common with TBM (71%) but rare with IS (5%). (orig.)

  4. Meningococcal carriage in the African meningitis belt

    2013-01-01

    A meningococcal serogroup A polysaccharide/tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) (MenAfriVac#x2122;) is being deployed in countries of the African meningitis belt. Experience with other polysaccharide/protein conjugate vaccines has shown that an important part of their success has been their ability to prevent the acquisition of pharyngeal carriage and hence to stop transmission and induce herd immunity. If PsA-TT is to achieve the goal of preventing epidemics, it must be able to prevent ...

  5. Serial computed tomographies in subdural effusions following purulent meningitis

    The subdral effusion complicating acute purulent meningitis were visualized in seven children by means of cranial computed tomography (CCT). All these children were infants less than two years old; four were male, and three were female. The etiologic organisms could be cultured in three cases: Group B Streptococcus, Diplococcus pneumoniae, and Hemophilus influenza. The others could not be cultured. The subdural effusion could be detected by CCT on the 5th day after the onset in the earliest case and on the 30th day in the latest case. Four cases of them were resolved by chemotherapy and subdural taps, two cases were resolved spontaneously by chemotherapy only, and one case was resolved by means of a subdural-peritoneal shunt operation. The subdural taps through the anterior fontanelle were done in five cases. The fluids obtained by the subdural taps showed a bloody fluid in one case, a blood-tinged fluid in two cases, and a yellowish or brown-coloured fluid not including red cells in two cases. These fluids had a higher protein content than the CSF. These children were followed-up after the discharge. Their psychomotor development was good and they showed no epileptic complications. (author)

  6. Management of hydrocephalus in patients with tuberculous meningitis

    Rajshekhar Vedantam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocephalus is one of the commonest complications of tuberculous meningitis (TBM occurring in up to 85% of children with the disease. It is more severe in children than in adults. It could be either of the communicating type or the obstructive type with the former being more frequently seen. The Vellore grading system for clinical grading of patients with TBM and hydrocephalus with grade I being the best grade and grade IV being the worst grade has been validated by several authors. The management of hydrocephalus can include medical therapy with dehydrating agents and steroids for patients in good grades and those with communicating hydrocephalus. However, surgery is required for patients with obstructive hydrocephalus and those in poor grades. Surgery can involve either a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt or endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV. Complications of shunt surgery in patients with TBM and hydrocephalus are high with frequent shunt obstructions and shunt infections requiring repeated revisions. ETV has variable success in these patients and is generally not advisable in patients in the acute stages of the disease. Mortality on long-term follow up has been reported to vary from 10.5% to 57.1% in those with altered sensorium prior to surgery and 0 to 12.5% in patients with normal sensorium. Surgery for patients in Vellore grade IV is usually associated with a poor outcome and high mortality and therefore, its utility in these patients is debatable

  7. Stages of tuberculous meningitis: a clinicoradiologic analysis

    Objective: To determine the frequencies and percentages of various clinicoradiologic variables of tuberculosis meningitis (TBM) with reference to British Medical Research Council (BMRC) staging of the disease. Study Design: A case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Neurology, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from October 2010 to September 2011. Methodology: The study included 93 adult patients with the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) at the study place. Patients were divided in three groups according to British Medical Research Council (BMRC) staging of TBM. Different clinical and radiological findings were analyzed at different stages of the disease. Data was analyzed using SPSS (Statistical Package of Social Sciences) version 11.0. Results: A majority of patients were found to be in stage-II disease at the time of admission. History of illness at the time of admission was more than 2 weeks in 50% of stage-I patients but around 80% in stage-II and stage-III patients. Neck stiffness was the most commonly reported finding in all stages. Cranial nerve palsies were higher in stage-III (75%) than in stage-II (43%) and in stage-I (24%) patients. Hydrocephalus and basal enhancement was the most frequently reported radiographic abnormalities. Conclusion: Duration of illness and cranial nerve palsies are important variables in the diagnosis of TBM stages and if TBM is suspected, empiric treatment should be started immediately without bacteriologic proof to prevent morbidity and mortality. (author)

  8. Communicating hydrocephalus subsequent to purulent meningitis

    Based on CT findings one year after shunting, ventricular dialtion was classified into five degrees for examining prognosis of communicating hydrocephalus subsequent to purulent meningitis. Factors causing and aggravating hydrocephalus were also examined. Patients with hydrocephalus tended to have spasms frequently as the first symptom within one month after birth when there were few characteristic findings. Spasm and disturbance of consciousness occurred frequently during the first week of the occurrence of disease. Large numbers of cells in the spinal fluid and high volume of spinal cord protein were persistent in patients aged one month or less. Chloride transport decreased in patients aged two months or more. The occurrence of syndrome of the pyramidal tract, eye symptoms, movement of head to the left and right, and involuntary movement suggested serious conditions of the disease. Disturbance of movement could be relieved by giving adequate antibiotics as soon as meningitis was discovered within one month after birth and by giving chloramphenicol when symptoms suggesting the development of serious conditions occurred. However, mental retardation and epilepsy could not be prevented. (Namekawa, K.)

  9. Application of biological dural graft made by meninges from porkers

    Peng Liu; Shengping Huang; Songtao Qi

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Presently, over 40 kinds of dural grafts have been successively used in clinic. Among them, lyophilized human dura mater with good histocompatibility and less complications is applied most widely. But there are a few reports on cases of infected spongiform encephalopathy following application of lyodura. More ideal repair materials deserve to be further investigated.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficiency and safety of biological dural graft made by meninges from porkers to repair meningeal injury.DESIGN: A self-control observation.SETTING: Wuhan General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Sixteen New Zealand Rabbits, of either gender, weighing from 2 to 3 kg, of clean grade Ⅱ,with the age of 0.5 - 1 year, were involved in this experiment. The involved rabbits were provided by the Animal Experimental Center of the First Military Medical University of Chinese PLA. Biological surgical patch (dural graft) was developed by Guangdong Guanhao Biotechnological Co.,Ltd. It was processed by using meninges from porkers by tissue engineering technology.METHODS: This experiment was carried out in the Experimental Center of the 157 Hospital of Chinese PLA between December 2003 and June 2004. ① The experimental rabbits were anesthetized. Dura mater was exposed from two sides ofpostmedial line of coronal suture. A rectangular dura mater about 8 mm × 8mm in size was cut off. Then a biological surgical patch (dural graft) was sheared into insert with 8 mm diameter and sutured. The left dura mater was untouched and used as control. Scalp was sutured, and postoperative wound healing and recovery were observed. ②The anesthetized rabbits were sacrificed at postoperative 3, 14, 30 and 90 days, 4 rabbits once. The whole head was cut off, and its scalp was removed.Afterwards, the head was fixed by formalin. Tissues in operative site were obtained, performed routine paraffin embedding, sliced and conducted HE staining, finally, the

  10. Causes of acute bronchitis (image)

    ... the respiratory system that leads into the lungs. Acute bronchitis has a sudden onset and usually appears after ... and the production of thick yellow mucus. If acute bronchitis occurs because of a bacterial infection antibiotics are ...

  11. Environmental enrichment restores cognitive deficits induced by experimental childhood meningitis

    Tatiana Barichello

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the influence of environmental enrichment (EE on memory, cytokines, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the brain of adult rats subjected to experimental pneumococcal meningitis during infancy. Methods: On postnatal day 11, the animals received either artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF or Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension intracisternally at 1 × 106 CFU/mL and remained with their mothers until age 21 days. Animals were divided into the following groups: control, control + EE, meningitis, and meningitis + EE. EE began at 21 days and continued until 60 days of age (adulthood. EE consisted of a large cage with three floors, ramps, running wheels, and objects of different shapes and textures. At 60 days, animals were randomized and subjected to habituation to the open-field task and the step-down inhibitory avoidance task. After the tasks, the hippocampus and CSF were isolated for analysis. Results: The meningitis group showed no difference in performance between training and test sessions of the open-field task, suggesting habituation memory impairment; in the meningitis + EE group, performance was significantly different, showing preservation of habituation memory. In the step-down inhibitory avoidance task, there were no differences in behavior between training and test sessions in the meningitis group, showing aversive memory impairment; conversely, differences were observed in the meningitis + EE group, demonstrating aversive memory preservation. In the two meningitis groups, IL-4, IL-10, and BDNF levels were increased in the hippocampus, and BDNF levels in the CSF. Conclusions: The data presented suggest that EE, a non-invasive therapy, enables recovery from memory deficits caused by neonatal meningitis.

  12. Distribution of 82Br between serum and CSF in patients with meningitis

    The ratio between concentrations of 82Br in serum and spinal fluid was determined in patients with meningitis. The ratio was found to be low in three patients strongly suspect for tuberculous meningitis and in eight of nine patients with purulent meningitis, but normal in 13 patients with non-tuberculous, serous meningitis. These results confirm previous investigations and determination of the 82Br ratio is a simple, reliable aid in the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis. (author)

  13. Culture Negative Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis Resulting in Hydrocephalus and Severe Neurological Sequelae in a Previously Healthy Immunocompetent Man with Penicillin Allergy

    Shahin Gaini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 74-year-old Caucasian man with penicillin allergy was admitted with evolving headache, confusion, fever, and neck stiffness. Treatment for bacterial meningitis with dexamethasone and monotherapy ceftriaxone was started. The cerebrospinal fluid showed negative microscopy for bacteria, no bacterial growth, and negative polymerase chain reaction for bacterial DNA. The patient developed hydrocephalus on a second CT scan of the brain on the 5th day of admission. An external ventricular catheter was inserted and Listeria monocytogenes grew in the cerebrospinal fluid from the catheter. The patient had severe neurological sequelae. This case report emphasises the importance of covering empirically for Listeria monocytogenes in all patients with penicillin allergy with suspected bacterial meningitis. The case also shows that it is possible to have significant infection and inflammation even with negative microscopy, negative cultures, and negative broad range polymerase chain reaction in cases of Listeria meningitis. Follow-up spinal taps can be necessary to detect the presence of Listeria monocytogenes.

  14. Giant Leaking Colloid Cyst Presenting with Aseptic Meningitis

    Bakhtevari, Mehrdad Hosseinzadeh; Sharifi, Guive; Jabbari, Reza;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colloid cysts are benign third ventricle lesions that need to be diagnosed correctly because of their association with sudden death. Chemical or aseptic meningitis is a rare presentation of a colloid cyst. METHODS: We present a case of a 69-year-old man with fever, alteration of mental...... status, and meningismus. Microbiological examination of the cerebrospinal fluid revealed aseptic meningitis. Brain imaging revealed a third ventricular colloid cyst with hydrocephalus. RESULTS: The tumor was resected via endoscopic intervention. There were no persistent operative complications related to...... the endoscopic procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Chemical or aseptic meningitis is an unusual clinical manifestation of a colloid cyst, complicating the differential diagnosis, especially in the elderly....

  15. Neonatal Meningitis: Risk Factors, Causes, and Neurologic Complications

    KHALESSI, Nasrin; Ladan AFSHARKHAS*

    2014-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Khalessi N, Afsharkhas L. Neonatal Meningitis: Risk Factors, Causes and Neurologic Complications.Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Autumn;8(4): 46-50.AbstractObjectiveNeonates are at greater risk for sepsis and meningitis than other ages and in spite of rapid diagnoses of pathogens and treatments, they still contribute to complications and mortality. This study determines risk factors, causes, andneurologic complications of neonatal meningitis in  ospitalized neonates.Materi...

  16. Chronic meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus: An unusual etiology

    Anu Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic aseptic meningitis is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Apart from immunological causes and drugs, the aseptic meningitis group can include some unidentified viral infections that cannot be detected by routine microbiological testing. It is imperative to do complete cerebrospinal fluid (CSF workup before implicating the symptoms to disease activity or drugs, as untreated infections cause significant mortality in SLE. We present a case of young female with SLE who presented with chronic meningitis of an uncommon etiology.

  17. Carcinomatous Meningitis from Unknown Primary Carcinoma

    L. Favier

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Carcinomatous meningitis (CM occurs in 3 to 8% of cancer patients. Patients present with a focal symptom, and multifocal signs are often found following neurological examination. The gold standard for diagnosis remains the demonstration of carcinomatous cells in the cerebrospinal fluid on cytopathological examination. Despite the poor prognosis, palliative treatment could improve quality of life and, in some cases, overall survival. We report on a patient who presented with vertigo, tinnitus and left-sided hearing loss followed by progressive diffuse facial nerve paralysis. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid confirmed the diagnosis of CM. However, no primary tumor was discovered, even after multiple invasive investigations. This is the first reported case in the English-language medical literature of CM resulting from a carcinoma of unknown primary origin.

  18. Post Traumatic Meningitis in Neurosurgery Department

    Reza Malekpour-Afshar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Post-Traumatic Meningitis (PTM is a serious complication followed trauma. It sounds to have different pattern and characteristics. The aim of the current study was to determine the characteristics and outcome of PTM in referral neurosurgery department in Iran. Approach: During 5 years period-2003-2008, all records from meningitis patients in neurosurgery department in the unique referral trauma center in Kerman, Iran were evaluated by researchers, retrospectively. The PTM cases were selected and their data registered in the data collection form. The outcome of the disease as live or death considered, too. Analysis was conducted based on outcome and multivariable ANOVA was done to determine factor associated with death in PTM cases. Results: The incidence of PTM in head trauma patients estimated 3.1% (95% CI = 2.5-3.9%. The most frequent cases were male 89.7%. Average of age was 28.4±17.2 years. Klebsiella was the most common organism in CSF culture. Hospital staying time average in these patients was 25.7±15.8 days. Surgery was done for 52 (66.6% cases. The fatality rate was 24.4%, (95% CI = 15.4-35.4. All death had undergone operation. Multivariable ANAOVA declared that blood sugar and CSF protein differed statistically between two groups, died and survived. Conclusion: PTM is an important phenomenon that has great mortality. Certainly, it needs antibiotic prophylaxis and immediate intervention and preventive services to reduce its morbidity and mortality rate.

  19. Agentes bacterianos de enfermedad diarreica aguda en el Hospital Infantil de Cartagena Bacterial etiology of acute diarrheal disease at a hospital for children in Cartagena, Colombia

    Nora De La Hoz

    1992-02-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad diarreica aguda causa en la Población de Colombia un elevado índice de morbimortalidad. Como contribución al conocimiento de su etiología se estudiaron, de mayo a septiembre de 1991, 110 muestras de heces diarreicas de igual número de niños hasta de 5 años, que acudieron al Hospital Infantil de Cartagena. Para el aislamiento e Identificación de las bacterias enteropatógenas se usaron medios de cultivos convencionales y modificados y se realizaron pruebas bioquímicas y tipificación con antisueros específicos. Se aislaron 111 cepas de bacterias enteropatógenas: 62 pacientes (56.4% tenían una sola cepa; en 14 (12.7% se hallaron 2 cepas por paciente; en 7 (6.4% tres cepas por paciente y los restantes 27 (24.5% fueron negativos. El agente más frecuente fue Escherichia coli ente. ropatógena (ECEP (51 cepas; 45.9%; le siguieron Shigella spp. (17 cepas; 15.3%, Vibrio cholerae (17 cepas; 15.3%, Salmonella spp. (15 cepas; 13.5% y Aeromonas hydrophila (11 cepas; 10%. No se hallaron Yersinia enterocolitica nl Campylobacter spp.. Esta publicación contiene los primeros aislamientos de V. cholerae a partir de heces de pacientes que acudieron al Hospital Infantil de Cartagena. SI se realizan rutinariamente coprocultivos y se aplican métodos más sensibles y específicos para aislar e identificar las bacterias enteropatógenas, se podrá definir con mayor exactitud su papel etiológico y epidemiológico en la enfermedad diarreica aguda en nuestra población infantil.

    Acute diarrheal disease (ADD causes a high morbidity and mortality among Colombian population. One hundred and ten stool specimens from patients with diarrhea 0-5 years old who attended the Hospital for Children in Cartagena from May through September 1991 were studied in order to detect the bacterial etiological agents. Conventional, selective and modified culture media were employed. Stereotyping

  20. Neoplastic meningitis as the presenting manifestation of gastric adenocarcinoma.

    Schneider, Siim; Krikmann, Ulle; Lüüs, Siiri Merike; Kulla, Andres; Haldre, Sulev

    2009-01-01

    A middle aged man presented with clinical signs of chronic meningitis, including bilateral hearing loss and progressive blindness. Lumbar puncture revealed a mild elevation in lymphocyte number, an elevation in protein levels, and diminished glucose levels, without malignant cells. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2 weighted seqeunces showed bilateral enhancement of the acoustic nerves. The aetiology of the chronic meningitis was revealed gastric cancer by gastroscopy, and micrometastasis by bone marrow trephine biopsy. Although cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology was negative, neoplastic meningitis (NM) was diagnosed based on clinical and MRI data. The patient's condition worsened rapidly and he died shortly thereafter. Autopsy confirmed the presence of advanced gastric cancer (adenocarcinoma of signet-ring cell type) with pancreatic involvement, and NM with cancer cells on the meninges, but without infiltration tumour cells into underlying brain parenchyma. We conclude that NM as an initial symptom of gastric cancer is rare and ultimately fatal. PMID:21785656