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Sample records for acute appendicitis retrospective

  1. Retrospective evaluation of acute appendicitis incorrectly diagnosed on CT

    The purpose of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the CT images of patients suffering with surgically proven appendicitis to determine the causes of missed diagnoses. We reviewed the pathology reports of the patients with surgically proven appendicitis from two hospitals during a 3-year period. Thirty-seven such cases with a misdiagnosis were identified and they served as our misdiagnosed group (17 females and 20 males, mean age: 58 years, age range 15-68 years). These were cases that were misdiagnosed on preoperative abdominal CT. All 57 patients in the control group (30 females and 27 males, mean age: 44 years, age range: 21-78 years) had undergone laparotomy for acute appendicitis and they had been correctly diagnosed preoperatively on CT. Two abdominal radiologists evaluated the following items from all 94 CT examinations: 1) an abnormal appendix, 2) periappendiceal fat inflammation, 3) pericecal extraluminal fluid, 4) pericecal extraluminal air, 5) appendicolith, 6) cecal wall thickening, 7) small bowel dilatation, and 8) the pericecal fat content. Statistical analysis was performed using a Chi-squared test and Fisher's exact test. Any abnormal appendix was not visualized, even retrospectively, in 27 (73%) of the 37 patients from the misdiagnosed group, whereas it was not visualized in 13 (23%) of the 57 patients in the control group (ρ = 0.001). Of the patients who had been misdiagnosed, inflammation of the pericecal fat was observed in 21 patients (57%) as compared to 50 (88%) patients in the control group (ρ =0.001). Pericecal fluid and air were noted in 15 (41%) and 9 (24%) patients, respectively, in the misdiagnosed group and in 19 (33%) and 14 (25%) patients, respectively, in the control group, (ρ = 0.477 and ρ =0.901, respectively). Appendicolith was found in 3 (8%) misdiagnosed subjects and in 10 (18%) of the controls (ρ = 0.001). Focal cecal wall thickening was noted in 14 (38%) misdiagnosed patients and in 28 (49%) control patients (

  2. Diagnosis of acute appendicitis with MSCT

    Objective: To analyze the CT appearance of acute appendicitis and investigate diagnostic value of MSCT on acute appendicitis. Methods: The type and CT appearance of 15 cases with acute appendicitis proved by surgery and histopathology or clinic was analyzed retrospectively. Multi-stages scanning was carried out on the whole abdomen with 16 row CT. Post processing techniques including MPR, CPR and MIP were performed to observe the lesions. Results: There were 3 acute suppurative appendicitis, 12 acute gangrene and perforative appendicitis and appendiceal abscess. Complication occurred in 10 cases with gangrene and perforative appendix or appendix molten. The complication included 4 pelvic abscess, 3 intra-abdminal abscess, 1 combined pelvic and intra-abdominal abscess, 4 conglutination bowel obstruction, 1 ureteritis stegnosis and 1 abdominal wall fistulae. The exact ratio of CT diagnosis on acute suppurative appendicitis and appendiceal abscess reached 93.3% preoperatively. It is difficult to distinguish between acute suppurative appendicitis and acute gangrenous appendicitis without perforation. Conclusion: The MSCT appearance of acute appendicitis was marked and of important value on diagnosis of acute appendicitis. (authors)

  3. Imaging diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    The nontraumatic acute abdomen is one of the most common presentation to the emergency room, with appendicitis being one of the most common causes of the acute abdomen. Up to 30 % of patients suspected of having acute appendicitis will present with atypical signs and symptoms. There are many conditions that imitate acute appendicitis. The percentage of unnecessary appendectomies that result from a clinical false-positive diagnosis of appendicitis. The use of computed tomography (CT) before planned surgery has decreased the negative appendicectomy rate for patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Recognition of the typical and atypical CT signs of appendicitis is important to optimize the diagnosis yield of the examination. Visualization of an appendix with normal characteristics is the most important finding to exclude appendicitis. (author)

  4. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical disease of acute abdomen, But the diagnosis of acute appendicitis is often difficult, and not in frequently, operation for appendicitis is performed only to find a normal appendix. Various radiological examinations have been proposed to improve diagnostic accuracy of appendicitis. The purpose of this study was to improve the diagnostic accuracy of appendicitis, and to decline negative exploration. High resolution real time ultrasonographical examination using graded compression was performed in 57 consecutive patients who were clinically suspected of appendicitis. Autors analysed ultrasonographical, surgical, and clinical follow up findings. The results were are follows: 1. Ultrasonographical finding of acute appendicitis was visualization of appendix as a tubular structure with one bline end, or target phenomenon. 2. Hypoechoic area over the appendix was thought to be a sign of periappendiceal abscess. 3. The sensitivity of US diagnosis of acute appendicitis in this study was 92.8% with a specificity of 93.1%. The overall accuracy was 93.0%. 4. In control group of 50 individuals, the abnormal appendix was not visualized. 5. In cases of clinically suspected appendicitis, the US evaluation with graded compression technique is very accurate and effective examination.

  5. Radiologic diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    Sixty-six cases of acute appendicitis were proved by surgery during the period from May 1969 to May 1971. The present study was designated to elucidate the findings of roentgen examination in acute appendicitis. The results obtained were summarized as follows: 1. Over 90 percent of cases of acute appendicitis showed significant radiographic findings. 2. Distension and fluid level in cecum and terminal ileum were disclosed approximately 75 percent of cases. It believe diagnostically significant in acute appendicitis. 3. About 10 percent of cases were found extra-alimentary free air. 4. The roentgen findings of the fluid interposed between colonic contents and frank stripesin the right lower quadrant was another interesting findings to suspect acute appendicitis

  6. Alvarado score: A valuable clinical tool for diagnosis of acute appendicitis –a retros-pective study

    Swagata Brahmachari1 and Ashwini B. Jajee2

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Appendicitis is a common surgical emergency and diagnosis is still a great challenge. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention re-duces morbidity and mortality. The present study was conducted to evaluate Alvarado scoring system for diagnosis of acute appen-dicitis in Indian set up. The study was carried out on 200 patients admitted in Surgery ward between January 2009 and December 2010 with right lower quadrant abdominal pain. Alvarado score was calculated and all patients were divided in three groups. Mean age of presentation was 29.12 years and male to female ratio was 1.27:1. Higher the Alvarado score, more is the sensitivity. So pa-tients having score 7 or above had sensitivity of 66%. We con-clude that Alvarado score is unique since it incorporates signs, symptoms and laboratory findings of suspicious patients. Alvarado score can be utilized safely for diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

  7. Echography in appendicitis acute diagnosis

    Over an 18-month period, high resolution ultrasound was used to assess 220 patients with doubtful clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The ultrasonographic findings were correlated with the surgical results and the pathological results in 115 cases, and with clinical follow-up in the rest. This technique has been found to be effective in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis, with a sensitivity of 90.4%, and similar specificity and reliability (90.2%). The positive predictive value of the test was 89% and the negative predictive value, 91%. The ultrasonographic criteria applied for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was the detection of an understood appendix measuring over 6 mm. All cases with perforation were correctly diagnosed as acute appendicitis. The observation of an accumulation of fluid pooled in DIF in patients with ultrasonographic findings suggestive of appendicitis points to a diagnosis of perforation or complicated (gangrenous) appendicitis. A relationship between complicated appendicitis and the detection of appendicoliths within the enlarged appendix was also observed. The results obtained demonstrate that high resolution ultrasound is indicated in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in all cases in which the clinical findings are doubtful

  8. Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis.

    Andrade, Javier E; Mederos, Raul; Rivero, Haidy; Sendzischew, Morgan A; Soaita, Mauela; Robinson, Morton J; Sendzischew, Harry; Danielpour, Payman

    2007-11-01

    Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis is extremely rare. The case of a 38-year-old Hispanic man who presented to the hospital with symptoms and signs suggestive of acute appendicitis is reported. He underwent laparoscopic appendectomy and the pathologic examination of the appendix revealed multiple trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica. The patient was treated postoperatively with metronidazole for amebiasis, and follow-up stool studies showed no sign of residual infection. The patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:17984748

  9. Ultrasonographic findings of acute appendicitis

    For the evaluation of acute appendicitis, many diagnostic methods, such as physical examination, laboratory findings, plain abdomen and barium enema have been widely used. But the overall accuracy was ranged from 50% to 84% and negative appendectomy rate was reported between 5% and 35%. In these days, high resolution ultrasonography is well known to be a good imaging modality in evaluation of acute appendicitis and its complications. Using high resolution ultrasonography, 138 patients with right lower quadrant abdominal pain were examined for 16 months. The results were compared to post-operative findings and clinical follow up study. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 58 males and 80 females, and most common in the third decade (33.3%). 2. The positive ultrasonographic findings were in 69 cases (50%), those were simple appendicitis without complication in 46 cases (66.7%), acute appendicitis with periappendicitis in 9 cases (13.0%), acute appendicitis with abscess in 6 cases (8.7%), acute appendicitis with appendicolith in 4 cases (5.8%) and perforated appendicitis in 4 cases (16%). 3. The ultrasonographic findings of normal appendix were in 69 cases (50%), those were nonvisualization of appendix in 62 cases (91.3%) and visualization of normal appendix with single thin echogenic wall in 6 cases (8.7%). 4. In the 50 cases of control group, the visualization of normal appendix on ultrasonography were in 8 cases (16%). 5. The overall accuracy was 95.7% with 97.1% of sensitivity and 94.4% of specificity

  10. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting as Acute Appendicitis

    Sherri Rauenzahn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Appendicitis in leukemic patients is uncommon but associated with increased mortality. Additionally, leukemic cell infiltration of the appendix is extremely rare. While appendectomy is the treatment of choice for these patients, diagnosis and management of leukemia have a greater impact on remission and survival. A 59-year-old Caucasian female was admitted to the surgical service with acute right lower quadrant pain, nausea, and anorexia. She was noted to have leukocytosis, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Abdominal imaging demonstrated appendicitis with retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymphadenopathy for which she underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. Peripheral smear, bone marrow biopsy, and surgical pathology of the appendix demonstrated acute myeloid leukemia (AML with nonsuppurative appendicitis. In the setting of AML, prior cases described the development of appendicitis with active chemotherapy. Of these cases, less than ten patients had leukemic infiltration of the appendix, leading to leukostasis and nonsuppurative appendicitis. Acute appendicitis with leukemic infiltration as the initial manifestation of AML has only been described in two other cases in the literature with an average associated morbidity of 32.6 days. The prompt management in this case of appendicitis and AML resulted in an overall survival of 185 days.

  11. Surpass sound the value applying in diagnosing in the acute appendicitis

    Objective: Discuss the value applying in surpassing sound examining the diagnose in the acute appendicitis. Method: Acoustic images carry out retrospect nature analysis On being over after 168 example acute appendicitis of operation pathological mechanism verification. Result: Acute appendicitis's surpass sound diagnosing coincidence rate being 89.9%(151/168). Conclusion: Surpass sound examining that the diagnose to the acute appendicitis has important value. (authors)

  12. What is the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after CT?

    The objective of our study was to estimate the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after abdominoplevic CT. A total of 104 patients initially underwent abdominopelvic CT before appendix US due to acute abdominal pain. All CT examinations were evaluated retrospectively for the presence of acute appendicitis. The findings of appendix on CT were classified into five categories (definite appendicitis, probably appendicitis, equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, probably not appendicitis, and normal looking appendix). Appendix US images and their radiologic reports were also evaluated retrospectively. Then, CT and US findings were correlated with clinical or pathologic diagnosis. Three all patients with definite appendicitis initially on CT again showed US findings of appendicitis. In the 32 patients of probably appendicitis on CT, US showed normal looking appendix in seven patients (21.8%, 7 of 32) who improved with medical treatment and discharged. In the 16 patients of equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, US showed appendicitis in seven patients (43.8%, 7 of 16) and normal looking appendix in nine patients. In the 12 patients of probably not appendicitis on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in two patients (16.7%, 2 of 12). In the 41 patients of normal looking appendix on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in five patients (12.2%, 5 of 41). US reevaluation enables us to avoid misdiagnosis of appendicitis on CT and improve diagnostic accuracy of acute appendicitis.

  13. What is the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after CT?

    Jang, Kyung Mi [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwanseop [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kwanseop@hallym.or.kr; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yoon, Hoi Soo; Jeon, Eui Yong; Koh, Sung Hye [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Min, Kwangseon [Department of Pathology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dongil [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The objective of our study was to estimate the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after abdominoplevic CT. A total of 104 patients initially underwent abdominopelvic CT before appendix US due to acute abdominal pain. All CT examinations were evaluated retrospectively for the presence of acute appendicitis. The findings of appendix on CT were classified into five categories (definite appendicitis, probably appendicitis, equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, probably not appendicitis, and normal looking appendix). Appendix US images and their radiologic reports were also evaluated retrospectively. Then, CT and US findings were correlated with clinical or pathologic diagnosis. Three all patients with definite appendicitis initially on CT again showed US findings of appendicitis. In the 32 patients of probably appendicitis on CT, US showed normal looking appendix in seven patients (21.8%, 7 of 32) who improved with medical treatment and discharged. In the 16 patients of equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, US showed appendicitis in seven patients (43.8%, 7 of 16) and normal looking appendix in nine patients. In the 12 patients of probably not appendicitis on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in two patients (16.7%, 2 of 12). In the 41 patients of normal looking appendix on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in five patients (12.2%, 5 of 41). US reevaluation enables us to avoid misdiagnosis of appendicitis on CT and improve diagnostic accuracy of acute appendicitis.

  14. Ultrasonography for the acute appendicitis

    The authors analysed ultrasonography (US) findings in patients with clinical signs of acute appendicitis during a recent 7-months period. The comparative analysis between US findings and surgical-pathologic findings was performed in 193 cases who underwent surgery. There were 52 cases with a sonographically non-visible appendix whose symptoms spontaneously resolved. The inflamed appendix was visualized by high-resolution, real-time US according to the graded-compression method described by Puylaert. The following results noted: 1. Sonographically visualized 136 cases were the target-appearance appendix in 47 cases, the fluid-filled appendix in 66 cases and the irregular marginated mixed echogenic mass-like density with surrounding fluid collection in 23 cases. The appendix was not visualized by US in 109 cases. 2. Appendicitis perforation was predictable in 21 cases of 24 cases. 3. Acute appendicitis was 24 cases (59%) among 41 cases who were sonographically visualized with appendiceal wall thickening less than 3mm and 77 cases (81%) among 95 cases with wall thickening more than 3mm. 4. When the results in women were analyzed separately (n=176), the sensitivity was 86%, the specificity was 76% and the accuracy was 80%. In women, US was helpful for the differential diagnosis between acute appendicitis and other gynecologic disease. 5. In men (n=69), the sensitivity was 88%, the specificity was 67% and the accuracy was 81%. 6. The overall sensitivity was 87%, the specificity was 75% and accuracy was 80% (n=245). Graded-compression US is the examination of choice in the patients with clinical signs of acute appendicitis, particularly in women

  15. Complications of acute appendicitis: a review of 120 cases

    To find out the frequency of complications of acute appendicitis. Patients and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted at surgical unit-I and III, Chandka Medical College Hospital, Larkana. Case records of patients who were admitted with complications of appendicitis from June 2004 to May 2007 were examined and data analysed. Most common complications of appendicitis were appendicular mass (38.3%) followed by appendicular perforation and peritonitis (37.5%), appendicular abscess (10%), gangrene of appendix (11.6%) and intestinal obstruction (2.5%). Majority (66.6 %) of the cases were operated while 33:3% were treated by conservative measures. Appendicular mass and perforation were the main complications of untreated acute appendicitis. Complications of appendicitis usually result due to delay in diagnosis and treatment. (author)

  16. Accuracy of Ultrasonography in Diagnosing Acute Appendicitis

    Parisa Javidi Parsijani; Nima Pourhabibi Zarandi; Shahram Paydar; Hamidreza Abbasi; Shahram Bolandparvaz

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the accuracy of sonography in diagnosing acute appendicitis in patients with Alvarado score 4–7.Methods: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study being performed in Namazee hospital affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical sciences during a one year period from 9/2007 to 9/2008. We evaluated all patients with Alvarado score 4-7 and divided them in two groups: those with Ultrasound study prior to surgery and those without any imaging modalities for diagnosis of...

  17. Diagnostic value of procalcitonin for acute complicated appendicitis

    Yamashita, Hiromasa; YUASA, NORIHIRO; TAKEUCHI, EIJI; Goto, Yasutomo; Miyake, Hideo; Miyata, Kanji; Kato, Hideki; Ito, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A rapid and reliable test for detection of complicated appendicitis would be useful when deciding whether emergency surgery is required. We investigated the clinical usefulness of procalcitonin for identifying acute complicated appendicitis. We retrospectively analyzed 63 patients aged ≥15 years who underwent appendectomy without receiving antibiotics before admission and had preoperative data on the plasma procalcitonin level (PCT), body temperature (BT), white blood cell count (WBC...

  18. Simultaneous acute appendicitis with right testicular torsion

    Tanveer Akhtar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a child with both acute appendicitis and torsion of the right testis presenting at the same time. Testicular torsion possibly occurring due to vomiting in acute appendicitis so far has not been reported in the literature.

  19. Clinical research. Acute appendicitis in children. Review of 324 operated cases

    A retrospective review was made of 324 operated cases of acute appendicitis for sixteen years from 1989 to 2005. For seven years from 1999 to 2005, an additional review was made of 63 cases where patients visited our department on suspicion of acute appendicitis and received medical treatment without operation. Cases of hospitalization on suspicion of appendicitis averaged 18 a year for 1999 to 2005, with half these being appendicitis or peritonitis due to perforated appendicitis. The number of cases by age groups for those with acute appendicitis reached 25 per year in 1997 but fell off from 1998 onwards. Out of the total 324 cases, 179 were boys, 145 were girls, and there were 188 cases of acute appendicitis and 136 cases of perforated appendicitis. There were 23 cases of catarrhal appendicitis, with three cases out of the 63 cases overall of the last seven years. There were 66 cases for ages 0 to 6, 168 cases for ages 7 to 11, and 90 cases for ages 12 to 20, the peak age group being 7 to 11. Perforated appendicitis occurred in 65.2% of cases involving infants under six, which is relatively high compared to the 36.0% of the over seven age grouping. There were 112 cases of fecalith out of the 324 overall cases, 24.5% of acute appendicitis cases and 48.5% of perforated appendicitis cases. Over the last seven years ultrasound examination made visible the inflamed appendix in 41 cases of 46 (89.1%) for acute appendicitis and in 16 cases of 17 (94.1%) for perforated appendicitis. CT scans were used in five cases of acute appendicitis/perforated appendicitis out of the 324 overall cases. Five of the 63 cases of surgical operations from 1999 to 2005 involved surgery made after diagnosis of acute appendicitis after follow-up hospitalization. Types of operations involved 11 cases of laparoscopic appendectomy, the remaining 313 operations involving classical open appendectomy. (author)

  20. Acute Appendicitis in Infants. A Case Report

    Sergio Luis González López

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is more common in school-age children, but it rarely occurs in infants. The younger the patient, the fastest the course of the disease. In addition, there are greater risks of complications. A case of a nine-month-old infant, admitted to the pediatric hospital with fever and diarrhea, is presented. After several tests, he underwent surgery. Peritonitis caused by acute gangrenous appendicitis was diagnosed. While the patient was in the intensive care unit, he suffered a septic shock and acute multiple organ failure. As a result, he died 24 hours later. The biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of acute gangrenous appendicitis. Acute appendicitis is a disease that must be considered by doctors who treat infants with fever, diarrhea and abdominal pain related to irritability. Thus, an early diagnosis of the disease as well as the implementation of an appropriate surgical treatment can be performed.

  1. Diagnosis of acute appendicitis using ultrasonography

    It is well known that acute appendicitis is the most common cause of emergency operation of the abdomen. The mortality rate of acute appendicitis has considerably declined during the past decades, but the diagnostic accuracy is still 70 to 82%, and moreover 54 to 65% in the young women. Various radiologic examinations have been proposed to improve diagnostic accuracy. Scout films of the abdomen and barium examinations have all proved to be of some value but are not generally employed. The purpose of this study was to improve the diagnostic accuracy and to make early diagnosis of acute appendicitis using ultrasonography. High resolution real time ultrasonography was performed in 39 patients with clinically suspected acute appendicitis at the department of Radiology, St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University Medical College from May to July 1987. Ultrasonographic findings, operative findings and results of clinical follow-up of acute appendicitis were analyzed and correlated. The results were as follows: 1. Ultrasonographic finding of acute appendicitis was visualization of appendix with thickened wall and distended lumen. In the acute appendicitis the thickness of wall was 4.5 ± 2.02mm (2 to 10mm) and even in 84.6%. The diameter of distended lumen was 6.58 ± 2.33mm (3 to 10mm). 2. Anechoic area over the appendix was thought to be a sign of periappendiceal abscess. 3. Although no echolucency was demonstrated around the appendix, perforation of appendix should be suspected when thickening of the appendiceal wall was asymmetrical and eccentric without luminal distension. 4. Ultrasonography had an 88.9% sensitivity, an 89.5% specificity and an 89.2% accuracy. 5. Ultrasonography is felt to be very accurate and effective method in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

  2. Scan role in diagnosing acute appendicitis

    Massimo Summa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is one of the commonest surgical diseases. It can rapidly progress to severe complications, like perforation and peritonitis. Consequently, surgeons often prefer to operate as soon as there is, clinically, a probable diagnosis, even if such a decision results in the ablation of up to 30% of normal appendixes. Many diagnostic methods have been proposed with the aim of decreasing the number of appendectomies in patients without appendicitis: ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, laparoscopy. In particular, ultrasonography has the advantage of being less expensive, widely available, and non-invasive; furthermore, it has demonstrated a diagnostic accuracy of 70-95%. However, its use needs further evaluation with respect to the best way to integrate it with clinical and laboratory data, in order to correctly identify a patient with suspected acute appendicitis. The aim of our study is to show our experience with ultrasonographic diagnosis of acute appendicitis, acquired by surgeons with specific sonographic expertise.

  3. Evidence for eosinophil degranulation in acute appendicitis

    Santosh G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Finding of increased numbers of eosinophils in the muscle in cases of acute appendicitis has led to the hypothesis that it may have an allergic origin. This study aimed to measure the eosinophil degranulation resulting in a rise in the serum of eosinophil granule proteins that would be expected in such cases. The levels of serum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP measured by chemiluminescence assay in acute appendicitis were compared, with those of appropriate controls. Mean (95% CI serum ECP (µg/L levels were: acute appendicitis 45.3 (27.7-63.0; normal appendix 22.7 (16.0-29.3; asthma 24.2 (4.6-43.8; and healthy volunteers 13.2 (8.3-18.1. In cases of acute appendicitis, there is an inverse relationship between duration of symptoms and serum ECP. However, this was not statistically significant. Significant local eosinophil activation and degranulation occurs in acute appendicitis, enough to cause a rise in serum levels of eosinophil chemotactic protein

  4. The platelet indices in pediatric patients with acute appendicitis

    Yunus Yilmaz; Fatih Kara; Musa Gumusdere; Hasan Arslan; Sefer Ustebay

    2015-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis (AA) remains a problem in pediatric population. It has been suggested that Mean Platelet Volume (MPV) is lower in the patients with AA. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of platelet indices in pediatric AA cases. Methods: A retrospective case-controlled study was designed: 224 subjects were included in this study. All patients had been operated on in division of pediatric surgery at the Kars Government Hospita...

  5. The value of hyperbilirubinaemia in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

    Emmanuel, Andrew

    2011-04-01

    No reliably specific marker for acute appendicitis has been identified. Although recent studies have shown hyperbilirubinaemia to be a useful predictor of appendiceal perforation, they did not focus on the value of bilirubin as a marker for acute appendicitis. The aim of this study was to determine the value of hyperbilirubinaemia as a marker for acute appendicitis.

  6. Imaging Acute Appendicitis: State of the Art

    Diana Gaitini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this review is to present the state of the art in imaging tests for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Relevant publications regarding performance and advantages/disadvantages of imaging modalities for the diagnosis of appendicitis in different clinical situations were reviewed. Articles were extracted from a computerized database (MEDLINE with the following activated limits: Humans, English, core clinical journals, and published in the last five years. Reference lists of relevant studies were checked manually to identify additional, related articles. Ultrasound (US examination should be the first imaging test performed, particularly among the pediatric and young adult populations, who represent the main targets for appendicitis, as well as in pregnant patients. A positive US examination for appendicitis or an alternative diagnosis of possible gastrointestinal or urological origin, or a negative US, either showing a normal appendix or presenting low clinical suspicion of appendicitis, should lead to a final diagnosis. A negative or indeterminate examination with a strong clinical suspicion of appendicitis should be followed by a computed tomography (CT scan or alternatively, a magnetic resonanace imaging (MRI scan in a pregnant patient. A second US examination in a patient with persistent symptoms, especially if the first one was performed by a less experienced imaging professional, is a valid alternative to a CT.

  7. Acute appendicitis mistaken as acute rejection in renal transplant recipients.

    Talwalkar N; Javali D; Venkatesh K; Iyer S; Venkatesh M; Joshi U

    1994-01-01

    Case histories of 2 renal transplant recipients are reported who had presenting features of fever, leukocytosis and pain/tenderness over right iliac fossa and were diagnosed to be due to acute appendicitis rather than more commonly suspected acute rejection episode which has very similar features. Diagnosis of acute appendicitis was suspected on the basis of rectal examination and later confirmed by laparotomy. The purpose of this communication is to emphasize the need for proper diagnosis in...

  8. Usefulness of computed tomography in diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    The usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was studied. CT was performed in 32 patients who were suspected to have acute appendicitis. Direct findings (abnormal appendix) were seen in 24 patients and suggestive findings were seen in 16 patients. Acute appendicitis was diagnosed in 25 patients with the help of CT findings, and the other seven patients was no found in acute appendicitis by CT. The diagnosis of appendicitis was made histopathologically in 21 cases. The benefits of CT in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis were high correct diagnosis rate, avoidance of unnecessary appendectomy, demonstration of abscess and perforated appendicitis, demonstration of retrocecal appendix, and selection of anesthesia method. The demerits were radiating of X-rays and expensive cost. If was concluded that CT is a useful aid in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. (author)

  9. The impact of ultrasound in suspected acute appendicitis

    Aims: To evaluate prospectively the impact of an appendix ultrasound (US) service on the clinical management of patients presenting with suspected acute appendicitis. Materials and methods: The referring clinician completed a proforma for patients presenting with suspected acute appendicitis. Two visual analogue scales assessed clinical suspicion before and after knowledge of laboratory results. The clinician also indicated if they intended to operate had US been unavailable. During a 3-year period, 327 patients were examined by graded-compression US and diagnosed 'positive' or 'negative' for acute appendicitis. Findings were correlated with histopathology results. The referring clinician completed a retrospective audit questionnaire to assess user satisfaction. Results: Clinical suspicion was altered by knowledge of laboratory results. The decision to operate if US had been unavailable, was 'yes' in 70 cases (group A), 'no' in 231 (group B), and incomplete in 26 (group C). In group A, 31 patients (44.3%) had a negative US and 25 avoided surgery. US identified 39 cases of appendicitis and 37 appendicectomies confirmed appendicitis in 34 cases. In group B, 72 (31.2%) patients had a positive US and 66 appendicectomies confirmed 51 cases of appendicitis. The sensitivity of US was 94.7% in group A, 93.3% in group B and 93.8% overall. Specificity was 90.6% in group A, 91.2% in group B and 91.3% overall. US findings were contrary to intended surgical management in 103 cases. Management was altered in 97 cases (32.2%), with a positive outcome in 85 (28.2%). The referrers found US of appendix very useful in planning appropriate management. Conclusion: US of the appendix increases diagnostic accuracy, alters management and is more sensitive and specific than clinical impression, either alone, or in conjunction with laboratory results

  10. Perforation rate in acute appendicitis: association with different risk facotrs

    B. Khorasani

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The early diagnosis of acute appendicitis before progression to gangrene or abscess formation is recognized as important to minimize morbidity from this common disease process. The aim of this study was to assess the value of different risk factors in the diagnosis of perforation. Methods: This descriptive-analytic and retrospective study was conducted to investigate epidemiological characteristics in patients with perforated and non-perforated appendicitis. A series of 1311 patients who were operated on for acute appendicitis between years 1380-1382 in Shahid Beheshti and Yahya-nejad hospitals were reviewed.. Data gathered included age at operation, gender, care sought prior to admission for appendectomy including antibiotic and analgesic therapy, time of presentation in the year, duration of symptoms, signs and symptoms at the time of admission, and the patient’s living area. Results: One hundred twenty one of 1311 patients (9% had perforated appendicitis and 1190 patients (91% had unperforated appendicitis. Presentation and referral in the first 6-month was associated with higher perforation rate. Patients from rural area showed a higher rate of perforations. The perforation rate was significantly higher in elderly patients (>65 year. When the duration of symptoms was more than 12 hours at presentation, the risk of perforation showed a five-fold increase. 30.7% of perforated cases had used antibiotic or sedative before referring to the hospital. Conclusion: Appendiceal perforation continues to be a complication in patients with acute appendicitis and increased in the frequency as the age of the patients increase and the duration of symptoms lengthen. We also found that the perforation rate is higher in patients from rural area and in whom present in the first 6-month of the year, a finding that was not reported so far.

  11. Simultaneous acute appendicitis and ectopic pregnancy

    Ankouz Amal; Ousadden Abdelmalek; Majdoub Karim; Chouaib Ali; Maazaz Khalid; Taleb Khalid

    2009-01-01

    The acute abdomen in pregnancy is a surgical emergency. Ectopic pregnancy and appendicitis are two causes of acute abdomen in pregnancy. Difficulties in correctly identifying the cause of the pain can be hazardous to the patient and care needs to be taken in obtaining a prompt and accurate diagnosis enabling the most appropriate management. The case presented here underlies the pathogenesis of the simultaneous existence of these two conditions in a patient.

  12. Acute appendicitis in pregnancy: literature review

    Antônio Henriques de Franca Neto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: suspected appendicitis is the most common indication for surgery in non-obstetric conditions during pregnancy and occurs in about one in 500 to one in 635 pregnancies per year. This occurs more often in the second trimester of pregnancy. Acute appendicitis is the most common general surgical problem encountered during pregnancy. Methods: a literature review on research of scientific articles, under the terms “acute appendicitis” and “pregnancy”, in PubMed, Lilacs/SciELO, Scopus, Cochrane Library and Uptodate databases. Results: the clinical manifestations of appendicitis are similar to non-pregnant women, however, without a classic presentation, which often occurs, diagnosis is difficult and must be supported by imaging. Discussion: clinical diagnosis should be strongly suspected in pregnant women with classic findings such as abdominal pain that migrates to the right lower quadrant. The main purpose of imaging is to reduce delays in surgical intervention due to diagnostic uncertainty. A secondary objective is to reduce, but not eliminate, the negative appendectomy rate. Differential diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis usually includes pathologies considered in non-pregnant people. Conclusion: the imaging study of choice is ultrasound, MRI may be used when the former is not conclusive and, as a last resort, a CT scan can be performed. The treatment remains appendectomy by laparotomy, since the feasibility of video- assisted surgery in these cases remains controversial.

  13. Acute amebic appendicitis: Report of a rare case

    Singh Naorem

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis of amebic origin is considered a rare cause of acute appendicitis. We report a case of amebic appendicitis presenting with fever, severe pain in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen and rebound tenderness. Lab investigations revealed neutrophilic leukocytosis. The patient underwent appendectomy. Histopathological examination revealed numerous Entameba histolytica trophozoites in the mucosa of the appendix. Acute appendicitis of amebic origin does not appear frequently. Appendicular amebiasis can give the clinical features of acute appendicitis and should be treated accordingly.

  14. Acute appendicitis mistaken as acute rejection in renal transplant recipients.

    Talwalkar N

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Case histories of 2 renal transplant recipients are reported who had presenting features of fever, leukocytosis and pain/tenderness over right iliac fossa and were diagnosed to be due to acute appendicitis rather than more commonly suspected acute rejection episode which has very similar features. Diagnosis of acute appendicitis was suspected on the basis of rectal examination and later confirmed by laparotomy. The purpose of this communication is to emphasize the need for proper diagnosis in patient with such presentation; otherwise wrong treatment may be received.

  15. Diagnosis of acute appendicitis: Current criteria

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of present paper was to identify some features related to preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis, according the selected variables, as well as to establish comparisons with findings from other authors. METHODS: We made a prospective, descriptive and observational study of 560 patients operated on and discharged with the histopathology diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients were seen in General Surgery Service of the 'Saturnino Lora' Teaching Provincial Hospital of Santiago de Cuba during year 2006. RESULTS: Among the more significant results were the predominance of young males with a mean age of 25,2 years, and the preponderance of the clinical diagnosis. Mean time of preoperative course was greater in men, and there was a predominance of gangrenous and perforated varieties, although the primacy was for the suppurative appendicitis. In the deceased ones the more severe pathologic histology ways were detected, and these were elderlies presenting with atypical clinical manifestations of disease. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical method has nowadays is of capital significance, since thorough it is possible early to diagnose this so common urgency, and to reduce the preoperative course time, whose length is cause of a unnecessary morbidity and mortality. (author)

  16. Sonography of acute appendicitis in pregnant women: diagnostic accuracy by the stage of gestation

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of a diagnosis of acute appendicitis in pregnant women according to the trimester. A retrospective review was performed on 103 pregnant women who underwent sonography with clinically suspected acute appendicitis. The sonographic technique used involved either the graded compression or a non-compression method. All the sonograms were obtained after changing the patient's position and identifying the diseased appendix. The criterion for a sonographic diagnosis of acute appendicitis was the visualization of a non-compressible appendix with a maximal diameter ≥ 6 mm. The sonographic findings were correlated with the surgical findings and clinical follow-up. Acute appendicitis was confirmed by both the surgical and pathological findings in 48 out of 103 pregnant women. Ultrasound established the diagnosis in 34 of the 48 patients with proven appendicitis. There were false-positives in 2 patients and false-negatives in 14 patients. Among the 55 patients who had a normal appendix, 30 patients improved at the clinical follow-up and 25 patients had other intra-abdominal disorders. The diagnostic accuracy of the ultrasound was 94% in the first trimester, 81% in the second trimester, and 76% in the third trimester. The overall accuracy was found to be 84%, with a 71% sensitivity and a 96% specificity. No significant difference was found in the diagnostic accuracy of the ultrasound according to the trimester in which the acute appendicitis occurred. Therefore, regardless of the stage of gestation, sonography is a valuable procedure for diagnosing acute appendicitis

  17. Acute appendicitis in children: ultrasound and CT findings in negative appendectomy cases

    To decrease the negative appendectomy rate in children, knowledge of the misleading imaging findings on US and CT in negative appendicitis cases is important. To evaluate the negative appendectomy rate and describe the imaging findings of US and CT that lead radiologists to misdiagnose acute appendicitis in children. From 2007 to 2013, 374 children operated for suspected appendicitis were proved to either have acute appendicitis (n = 348) or to be negative for appendicitis (n = 26) on pathological reports. Negative appendectomy rates were compared among imaging modalities, age groups and genders. We retrospectively reviewed US and CT findings from negative appendectomy cases. The overall negative appendectomy rate was 7.0% (26/374). There were no statistically significant differences among the subgroups. The most common misleading presentations on US were sonographic tenderness (9/16, 56%) and non-compressibility (9/16, 56%). The most common misleading finding on CT were the presence of an appendicolith or hyperdense feces (5/12, 42%). Periappendiceal fat inflammation was observed in only one case of negative appendicitis on US and on CT. Radiologists can misdiagnose children with equivocal diameters of appendices as having acute appendicitis when sonographic tenderness or non-compressibility is present on US and when an appendicolith or hyperdense feces is noted on CT. The possibility of negative appendicitis should be borne in mind when periappendiceal fat inflammation is absent or minimal in indeterminate cases. (orig.)

  18. Acute appendicitis in children: ultrasound and CT findings in negative appendectomy cases

    Kim, Seong Ho; Choi, Young Hun; Kim, Woo Sun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-One [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To decrease the negative appendectomy rate in children, knowledge of the misleading imaging findings on US and CT in negative appendicitis cases is important. To evaluate the negative appendectomy rate and describe the imaging findings of US and CT that lead radiologists to misdiagnose acute appendicitis in children. From 2007 to 2013, 374 children operated for suspected appendicitis were proved to either have acute appendicitis (n = 348) or to be negative for appendicitis (n = 26) on pathological reports. Negative appendectomy rates were compared among imaging modalities, age groups and genders. We retrospectively reviewed US and CT findings from negative appendectomy cases. The overall negative appendectomy rate was 7.0% (26/374). There were no statistically significant differences among the subgroups. The most common misleading presentations on US were sonographic tenderness (9/16, 56%) and non-compressibility (9/16, 56%). The most common misleading finding on CT were the presence of an appendicolith or hyperdense feces (5/12, 42%). Periappendiceal fat inflammation was observed in only one case of negative appendicitis on US and on CT. Radiologists can misdiagnose children with equivocal diameters of appendices as having acute appendicitis when sonographic tenderness or non-compressibility is present on US and when an appendicolith or hyperdense feces is noted on CT. The possibility of negative appendicitis should be borne in mind when periappendiceal fat inflammation is absent or minimal in indeterminate cases. (orig.)

  19. The US findings of acute nonperforated and perforated appendicitis in children

    To analyse and interpret different sonographic findings in acute nonperforated and appendicitis. In 46 cases of acute appendicitis in children(26 girls, 20 boys) proven by surgery, sonographic findings were reviewed retrospectively. The findings of nonperforated and perforated appendicitis were analysed, focusing on the size, shape and echogenicity of the appendix, echo patterns of periappendiceal abscesses, mesenteric lymphadenopathy, and the prevalence of appendicolith. A noncompressible distended appendix was present in 18 of 21 patients with nonperforated appendicitis and in 13 of 25 patients with perforation. In 18 patients with nonperforated appendicitis, the average diameter of distended appendix was 8.6 mm ; target appearance was noted in 16 patients and loss of echogenic submucosa in two. In 13 patients with perforated appendicitis, the average diameter of appendix was 9.1 mm ; target appearance was noted in four patients and loss of echogenic submucosa in nine. Periappendiceal abscesses were present in 21 of 25 cases of perforated appendicitis, and the echogenicity of abscesses was mixed in 12 patients, hypoechogenic in eight, and hyperechogenic in one. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy was present in two of 21 patients with nonperforated appendicitis and in four of 25 with perforation. Appendicolith was detected on sonography in three of 25 patients with perforated appendicitis, but was found in seven patients during surgery. One patients with perforated appendicitis also had right side hydronephrosis. Sonographically false-negative results were obtained in six cases. A sonographic examination was useful to differenciate perforated and nonperforated appendicitis in children. Loss of echogenic submucosa in the distended appendix and periappendiceal abscess formation were important findings in diagnosis of perforated appendicitis

  20. [BACTERIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF AN ACUTE APPENDICITIS].

    Zhuchenko, O P

    2016-03-01

    Peculiarities of microflora in the appendix mucosa and abdominal exudate in different morphological forms of an acute appendicitis (AA) were studied up. In accordance to the bacteriological investigations data, anaerobic, and aerobic microorganisms in AA were revealed in a monoculture and in association, more frequently--obligate anaer- obes (bacteroids) with E. coli--in 82 (80.39%) observations, staphylococcus--in 52 (50.98%), fecal streptococcus--in 19 (18.63%). With progression of inflammatory process and destructive changes in the appendix wall the quantity of bacteroids and enterobacteria have had enhanced, while the quantity of lacto- and bifidumflora-- reduced. PMID:27514082

  1. Acute appendicitis in a premature baby

    Beluffi, Giampiero; Alberici, Elisa [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Section of Paediatric Radiology, IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo, Piazzale Golgi 2, 27100 Pavia PV (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    A case of acute appendicitis in a premature baby in whom diagnosis was suggested on plain films of the abdomen is presented. In this baby air in a hollow viscus suspected of being an enlarged appendix was the clue to diagnosis. The diagnostic dilemma of this rare and life-threatening condition in premature babies and newborns is underlined. The relevance of different imaging modalities and of different findings in this age group is discussed. Awareness of this rare condition and possible differential diagnosis in newborns and premature babies is stressed. (orig.)

  2. Acute appendicitis in a premature baby

    A case of acute appendicitis in a premature baby in whom diagnosis was suggested on plain films of the abdomen is presented. In this baby air in a hollow viscus suspected of being an enlarged appendix was the clue to diagnosis. The diagnostic dilemma of this rare and life-threatening condition in premature babies and newborns is underlined. The relevance of different imaging modalities and of different findings in this age group is discussed. Awareness of this rare condition and possible differential diagnosis in newborns and premature babies is stressed. (orig.)

  3. A study of preoperative diagnosis using abdominal computed tomography in acute appendicitis

    To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in differential diagnosis and decisions for operative indications in patients with acute appendicitis, CT was done in 45 patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis. CT was retrospectively analyzed for the following findings: enlarged appendix, hazy periappendiceal density, increased enhancement of the appendiceal wall, deficiency of the appendiceal wall, appendiceal stones, abscess, and ascites. Surgery was conducted 28 patients, of whom 25 were pathologically diagnosed with gangrenous or phlegmonous appendicitis. Seventeen improved without surgery, i.e., 9 with acute appendicitis, 7 with diverticulitis of the colon, and 1 with pelvic peritonitis. Except for 3 with severe abscess, enlarged appendix, hazy periappendiceal density, and increased enhancement of the appendiceal wall were observed in 22 with phlegmonous or gangrenous appendicitis. In 25 with phlegmonous or gangrenous appendicitis, appendiceal stones were observed in 32% and abscess or ascites in 60%. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in CT diagnosis images were 100%, 80%, and 96%. CT findings thus provide useful information in differential diagnosis and decisions on operative indication in patients with acute appendicitis. (author)

  4. Two Cases of Omental Torsion Mimicking Acute Appendicitis

    Feeroz Alam Khan; Naeem Liaqat; Sajid Hameed Dar; Asif Iqbal Sandhu; Sajid Nayyer

    2014-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is often simulated by other entities like mesenteric adenitis, worm infestation, Meckel’s diverticulitis, urinary tract infection and rarely omental torsion. We report two cases, a 6 year old boy and an 11 year old girl, who presented with symptoms and signs of acute appendicitis but upon exploration turned out to be omental torsion.

  5. Two Cases of Omental Torsion Mimicking Acute Appendicitis

    Feeroz Alam Khan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is often simulated by other entities like mesenteric adenitis, worm infestation, Meckel’s diverticulitis, urinary tract infection and rarely omental torsion. We report two cases, a 6 year old boy and an 11 year old girl, who presented with symptoms and signs of acute appendicitis but upon exploration turned out to be omental torsion.

  6. Two Cases of Omental Torsion Mimicking Acute Appendicitis

    Liaqat, Naeem; Dar, Sajid Hameed; Sandhu, Asif Iqbal; Nayyer, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is often simulated by other entities like mesenteric adenitis, worm infestation, Meckel’s diverticulitis, urinary tract infection and rarely omental torsion. We report two cases, a 6 year old boy and an 11 year old girl, who presented with symptoms and signs of acute appendicitis but upon exploration turned out to be omental torsion. PMID:24834389

  7. Septic Mesenteric Venous Thrombophlebitis: A Rare Complication of Acute Appendicitis

    Stylianos Kykalos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenteric venous thrombophlebitis represents a very rare complication of acute appendicitis. Based on the findings of a 45-year-old patient with mesenteric venous thrombophlebitis due to acute appendicitis, we herein describe the diagnostic difficulties and therapeutic options in this uncommon disease. The treatment in our case consisted of simple appendectomy and perioperative anticoagulation therapy.

  8. Ultrasound Findings of Lymphoid Hyperplasia of the Appendix in Children: Differentiation from Acute Appendicitis

    Kim, Bong Jae; Seo, Jung Wook; Lee, Byung Hoon [Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Koyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    To evaluate the ultrasound (US) findings that can help differentiate lymphoid hyperplasia in the appendix from acute appendicitis. A total of 1230 patients (below 20 years old) suspected of having appendicitis received an appendectomy between November, 1999, and March, 2008, with US findings in 27 patients with pathologically proven lymphoid hyperplasia of the appendix. Of 167 patients that received an appendectomy from January, 2007, to December, 2007, 52 patients with acute appendicitis were retrospectively reviewed as a control group. Retrospective review of US images was performed by two radiologists who were blinded to the pathologic results. The review was based on 12 ultrasonographic criteria derived from reports on the diagnostic findings of the appendicitis. Compared with acute appendicitis, lymphoid hyperplasia in appendix had a smaller diameter (7.14{+-}1.22 mm vs 9.37{+-}1.80 mm, p < 0.001) and less wall thickening(1.38{+-}0.36 mm vs 1.74 {+-} 0.56 mm, p =0.001). Periappendicular inflammation (p < 0.001), intraluminal air (p = 0.006), round shape in transverse scan (p = 0.002),increased blood flow on color Doppler US (p = 0.03) were also different. US is a useful modality to differentiate lymphoid hyperplasia in the appendix from acute appendicitis

  9. Ultrasound Findings of Lymphoid Hyperplasia of the Appendix in Children: Differentiation from Acute Appendicitis

    To evaluate the ultrasound (US) findings that can help differentiate lymphoid hyperplasia in the appendix from acute appendicitis. A total of 1230 patients (below 20 years old) suspected of having appendicitis received an appendectomy between November, 1999, and March, 2008, with US findings in 27 patients with pathologically proven lymphoid hyperplasia of the appendix. Of 167 patients that received an appendectomy from January, 2007, to December, 2007, 52 patients with acute appendicitis were retrospectively reviewed as a control group. Retrospective review of US images was performed by two radiologists who were blinded to the pathologic results. The review was based on 12 ultrasonographic criteria derived from reports on the diagnostic findings of the appendicitis. Compared with acute appendicitis, lymphoid hyperplasia in appendix had a smaller diameter (7.14±1.22 mm vs 9.37±1.80 mm, p < 0.001) and less wall thickening(1.38±0.36 mm vs 1.74 ± 0.56 mm, p =0.001). Periappendicular inflammation (p < 0.001), intraluminal air (p = 0.006), round shape in transverse scan (p = 0.002),increased blood flow on color Doppler US (p = 0.03) were also different. US is a useful modality to differentiate lymphoid hyperplasia in the appendix from acute appendicitis

  10. Unusual computed tomography findings and complications in acute appendicitis

    The objective of this article is to describe and illustrate unusual computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with acute appendicitis. We reviewed the charts of 200 patients with clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis who were submitted to abdominal CT before surgery. Patients with unusual presentation or complications were selected for illustrating the main CT findings. Unusual complications of acute appendicitis were related to anomalous position of the appendix, contiguity to intraperitoneal organs such as the liver, gall bladder, annexes and the bladder and continuous use of anti inflammatory or antibiotics during the diagnostic process. We concluded that CT is a useful diagnostic tool in patients with complicated or unusual presentation acute appendicitis. The first step towards diagnosis in these cases i to have in mind the hypothesis of appendicitis in patients with acute abdominal pain. (author)

  11. The findings and usefulness of CT for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    CT findings were inspected retrospectively in 48 patients (age: 16-82, 25 males, 23 females) with acute appendicitis before surgery. A slice thickness was 10 mm or 5 mm and a slice distance was 10 mm. Scan was started following the rapid intravenous injection of 100 ml of non-ionic iodine contrast medium. Abnormality of appendix was confirmed in 40 cases (83%), and appendicolithiasis in 13 cases (27%). High density of fatty tissue by periappendicular inflammation or edema was recognized in 46 cases (96%). Periappendicular abscess or ascites was in 23 cases (48%). Phlegmonous or gangrenous appendicitis should be considered when appendix of 10 mm or more, abscess, ascites or appendicolithiasis was recognized. Diagnosis ability of CT in appendicitis was 96%. CT is useful for diagnosis of acute appendicitis and estimation of severity. (K.H.)

  12. [Anaerobic-aerobic infection in acute appendicitis].

    Mamchich, V I; Ulitovskiĭ, I V; Savich, E I; Znamenskiĭ, V A; Beliaeva, O A

    1998-01-01

    362 patients with acute appendicitis (AA) were examined. For microbiological diagnosis of aerobic and anaerobic nonclostridial microflora we used complex accelerated methods (including evaluation of gram-negative microorganisms in comparison with tinctorial-fermentative method of differential staining according to oxygen sensitivity of catalasopositive together with aerobic and cathalasonegative anaerobic microorganisms) as well as complete bacteriologic examination with determination of sensitivity of the above microorganism to antimicrobial remedies. High rate of aerobic-anaerobic microbial associations and substantial identity of microflora from appendicis and exudate from abdominal cavity was revealed, which evidenced the leading role of endogenous microorganisms in etiology and pathogenesis of AA and peritonitis i. e. autoinfection. In patients with destructive forms of AA, complicated by peritonitis it is recommended to use the accelerated method of examination of pathologic material as well as the complete scheme of examination with the identification of the isolated microorganisms and the correction of antibiotic treatment. PMID:9511291

  13. Acute appendicitis caused by acute myeloid leukemia

    Zhang, Shanxiang; Chen, Shaoxiong

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A case of appendiceal involvement by acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in an adult with recent history of AML transformed from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) was presented. Being aware of this rare presentation in particular in a patient with history of MDS and/or AML is important for prompt clinical diagnosis and management.

  14. [Change in pancreatic exocrine function in acute appendicitis].

    Ivanov, Iu A

    1979-10-01

    In order to study changes in the functional state of the pancreas 1572 investigations of the blood and urine amylase, atoxylresistant lipase of the blood serum before operation were performed in different postoperative periods in 131 patients with acute appendicitis. The enzyme activity was established to increase, especially in destructive forms of appendicitis and in elderly patients. PMID:505800

  15. Diagnostic value of procalcitonin for acute complicated appendicitis

    Yamashita, Hiromasa; Yuasa, Norihiro; Takeuchi, Eiji; Goto, Yasutomo; Miyake, Hideo; Miyata, Kanji; Kato, Hideki; Ito, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A rapid and reliable test for detection of complicated appendicitis would be useful when deciding whether emergency surgery is required. We investigated the clinical usefulness of procalcitonin for identifying acute complicated appendicitis. We retrospectively analyzed 63 patients aged ≥15 years who underwent appendectomy without receiving antibiotics before admission and had preoperative data on the plasma procalcitonin level (PCT), body temperature (BT), white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophil / lymphocyte ratio (N/L ratio), and C-reactive protein level (CRP). Patients were classified into 3 groups: group A (inflammatory cell infiltration of the appendix with intact mural architecture), group B (inflammatory cell infiltration with destruction of mural architecture, but without abscess or perforation), and group C (macroscopic abscess and/or perforation). For identifying destruction of mural architecture, the diagnostic accuracy of PCT was similar to that of BT or CRP. However, the diagnostic accuracy of PCT was highest among the five inflammatory indices for identifying abscess and/or perforation, with the positive predictive value of PCT for abscess and/or perforation being higher than that of CRP (73% vs. 48%). Univariate analysis of the predictors of abscess and/or perforation revealed that a plasma PCT level ≥0.46 ng/mL had the highest odds ratio (30.3 [95% confidence interval: 6.5–140.5] versus PCT <0.46 ng/mL). These findings indicate that procalcitonin is a useful marker of acute appendicitis with abscess and/or perforation. PMID:27019529

  16. MRI features associated with acute appendicitis

    To identify MRI features associated with appendicitis. Features expected to be associated with appendicitis were recorded in consensus by two expert radiologists on 223 abdominal MRIs in patients with suspected appendicitis. Nine MRI features were studied: appendix diameter >7 mm, appendicolith, peri-appendiceal fat infiltration, peri-appendiceal fluid, absence of gas in the appendix, appendiceal wall destruction, restricted diffusion of the appendiceal wall, lumen or focal fluid collections. Appendicitis was assigned as the final diagnosis in 117/223 patients. Associations between imaging features and appendicitis were evaluated with logistic regression analysis. All investigated features were significantly associated with appendicitis in univariate analysis. Combinations of two and three features were associated with a probability of appendicitis of 88 % and 92 %, respectively. In patients without any of the nine features, appendicitis was present in 2 % of cases. After multivariate analysis, only an appendix diameter >7 mm, peri-appendiceal fat infiltration and restricted diffusion of the appendiceal wall were significantly associated with appendicitis. The probability of appendicitis was 96 % in their presence and 2 % in their absence. An appendix diameter >7 mm, peri-appendiceal fat infiltration and restricted diffusion of the appendiceal wall have the strongest association with appendicitis on MRI. (orig.)

  17. MRI features associated with acute appendicitis

    Leeuwenburgh, Marjolein M.N. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology (G1-223.1), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jensch, Sebastiaan [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gratama, Jan W.C. [Gelre Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Spilt, Aart [Kennemer Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Haarlem (Netherlands); Wiarda, Bart M. [Alkmaar Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Es, H.W. van [Sint Antonius Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Cobben, Lodewijk P.J. [Haaglanden Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leidschendam (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick M.M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boermeester, Marja A. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Stoker, Jaap [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Collaboration: on behalf of the OPTIMAP study group

    2014-01-15

    To identify MRI features associated with appendicitis. Features expected to be associated with appendicitis were recorded in consensus by two expert radiologists on 223 abdominal MRIs in patients with suspected appendicitis. Nine MRI features were studied: appendix diameter >7 mm, appendicolith, peri-appendiceal fat infiltration, peri-appendiceal fluid, absence of gas in the appendix, appendiceal wall destruction, restricted diffusion of the appendiceal wall, lumen or focal fluid collections. Appendicitis was assigned as the final diagnosis in 117/223 patients. Associations between imaging features and appendicitis were evaluated with logistic regression analysis. All investigated features were significantly associated with appendicitis in univariate analysis. Combinations of two and three features were associated with a probability of appendicitis of 88 % and 92 %, respectively. In patients without any of the nine features, appendicitis was present in 2 % of cases. After multivariate analysis, only an appendix diameter >7 mm, peri-appendiceal fat infiltration and restricted diffusion of the appendiceal wall were significantly associated with appendicitis. The probability of appendicitis was 96 % in their presence and 2 % in their absence. An appendix diameter >7 mm, peri-appendiceal fat infiltration and restricted diffusion of the appendiceal wall have the strongest association with appendicitis on MRI. (orig.)

  18. Endometrial decidualization: a rare cause of acute appendicitis during pregnancy.

    Murphy, Skyle J; Kaur, Anupinder; Wullschleger, Martin E

    2016-01-01

    Appendicular endometriosis is a rare and poorly understood pathology that affects women in their reproductive years. In the gravid woman, ectopic endometrial tissue undergoes decidualization. This physiological process can result in acute appendicitis in exceptional cases. Here we describe a patient in her second trimester of pregnancy who presented with right iliac fossa pain and clinical, laboratory and imaging findings consistent with acute appendicitis. A laparoscopic appendectomy was performed with intraoperative findings suspicious for malignancy. Histological analysis made the surprising diagnosis of decidualized endometriosis causing luminal constriction resulting in acute appendicitis. We also detail the challenging diagnostic and management issues faced by clinicians in such cases. PMID:27106612

  19. Value of noncontrast spiral CT for suspected acute appendicitis

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy and clinical efficacy of noncontrast spiral CT in patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Over a six-month period, 100 patients with suspected acute appendicitis were prospectively evaluated with noncontrast spiral CT. All scans were obtained from the lower body of L3 to the symphysis pubis, with 5mm or 10mm collimation and pitch of 1 or 1.5, and without intravenous or oral contrast material. Diagnosis was established by means of surgical or clinical follow-up. Prospective diagnosis based on CT findings was compared with surgical results and clinical follow-up. Acute appendicitis was confirmed in 47 of 100 patients. On the basis of the Ct findings, SI patients were prospectively interpreted as positive for appendicitis, but in six the diagnosis was false-positive. Two of the 47 with acute appendicitis were prospectively interpreted as normal. The preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis was, thus, 45 true-positive, 47 true-negative, six false-positive and two false-negative yielding a sensitivity of 96%, a specificity of 89%, an accuracy of 92%, a positive predictive value of 88%, and a negative predictive value of 96%. Using CT, an alternative diagnosis was established in 14 patients. Noncontrast spiral CT is a useful technique for diagnosing acute appendicitis. =20

  20. Right Hydronephrosis as a Complication of Acute Appendicitis

    Okur, Selahattin Koray; Koca, Yavuz Savaş; Yıldız, İhsan; Barut, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdomen, but atypical appendicitis may lead to delayed diagnosis and related complications. In this report, we present a very rare case of acute appendicitis causing right hydronephrosis. Case Report. A 54-year-old male patient who had been receiving antibiotic therapy due to the diagnosis of urinary tract infection for the last one week but had no clinical improvement was admitted to the emergency service. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed right hydronephrosis and a pelvic abscess. After appendectomy and abscess drainage had been performed, hydronephrosis was completely recovered. Discussion. The use of appendicitis scoring systems, abdominal ultrasonography (USG), abdominal CT, and diagnostic laparoscopy can be useful for the diagnostic process in patients presenting with acute abdomen. In our patient, we considered that the surgical treatment was delayed since the symptoms of acute appendicitis were suppressed by the antibiotic therapy that was being administered due to the complaints including symptoms of urinary tract infections. Conclusion. Atypical appendicitis may cause a delay in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and thus may lead to serious complications such as right hydronephrosis, prolonged hospital stay, increased morbidity and mortality, and increased antibiotic resistance. PMID:27069699

  1. Right Hydronephrosis as a Complication of Acute Appendicitis.

    Okur, Selahattin Koray; Koca, Yavuz Savaş; Yıldız, İhsan; Barut, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdomen, but atypical appendicitis may lead to delayed diagnosis and related complications. In this report, we present a very rare case of acute appendicitis causing right hydronephrosis. Case Report. A 54-year-old male patient who had been receiving antibiotic therapy due to the diagnosis of urinary tract infection for the last one week but had no clinical improvement was admitted to the emergency service. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed right hydronephrosis and a pelvic abscess. After appendectomy and abscess drainage had been performed, hydronephrosis was completely recovered. Discussion. The use of appendicitis scoring systems, abdominal ultrasonography (USG), abdominal CT, and diagnostic laparoscopy can be useful for the diagnostic process in patients presenting with acute abdomen. In our patient, we considered that the surgical treatment was delayed since the symptoms of acute appendicitis were suppressed by the antibiotic therapy that was being administered due to the complaints including symptoms of urinary tract infections. Conclusion. Atypical appendicitis may cause a delay in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and thus may lead to serious complications such as right hydronephrosis, prolonged hospital stay, increased morbidity and mortality, and increased antibiotic resistance. PMID:27069699

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  3. Appendicitis

    ... function. A blockage inside of the appendix causes appendicitis. The blockage leads to increased pressure, problems with ... to pass gas Low fever Not everyone with appendicitis has all these symptoms. Appendicitis is a medical ...

  4. The Use of Delta Neutrophil Index and Myeloperoxidase Index for Predicting Acute Complicated Appendicitis in Children

    Kim, Oh Hyun; Cha, Yong Sung; Hwang, Sung Oh; Jang, Ji Young; Choi, Eun Hee; Kim, Hyung Il; Cha, KyoungChul; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background In children with acute appendicitis, 30% to 75% present with a complication, such as perforation, and the early diagnosis of complications is known to improve outcomes. Serum delta neutrophil index (DNI) and myeloperoxidase index (MPXI) are new inflammatory markers, and thus, in the present study, the authors evaluated the predictive values of these two markers for the presence of a complication in children with acute appendicitis. Methods This retrospective observational study was conducted on 105 consecutive children (<12 years old) with acute appendicitis treated over a 31-month period. DNI, MPXI, C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cells (WBCs) were measured in an emergency department and investigated with respect to their abilities to predict the presence of acute complicated appendicitis. Results Twenty-nine of the 105 patients (median age, 9 years) were allocated to the complicated group (27.6%) and 76 to the non-complicated group (72.4%). Median serum DNI and CRP were significantly higher in the complicated group [0% vs. 2.2%, p<0.001 and 0.65 mg/dL vs. 8.0 mg/dL, p<0.001], but median MPXI was not (p = 0.316). Area under curve (AUC) for the ability of serum DNI and CRP to predict the presence of acute complicated appendicitis were 0.738 and 0.840, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed initial CRP [odds ratio 1.301, 95% confidence interval (1.092–1.549), p = 0.003] significantly predicted the presence of a complication. The optimal cutoff for serum CRP was 4.0 mg/dL (sensitivity 69%, specificity 83%, AUC 0.840). Conclusions Although serum DNI values were significantly higher in children with acute complicated appendicitis, no evidence was obtained to support the notion that serum DNI or serum MPXI aid the differentiation of acute complicated and non-complicated appendicitis in the ED setting. PMID:26859663

  5. Solitary caecum diverticulitis mimicking acute appendicitis.

    Hot, Semih; Eğin, Seracettin; Gökçek, Berk; Yeşiltaş, Metin; Alemdar, Ali; Akan, Arzu; Karahan, Servet Rüştü

    2015-12-01

    Solitary cecum diverticulum is a benign formation, but it can be complicated with inflammation, perforation and bleeding. Cecum diverticulitis (CD) is the most common complication of caecal diverticulum and it has the highest incidence among Asians, but it is a rare condition in the western world. The incidence of colonic diverticular disease can vary according to national origin, cultural structure and nutritional habits. CD is not common in our country, but it is an important situation because of its clinical similarity with the commonly seen acute right side abdominal diseases like acute appendicitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult, and hence, the actual frequency is not known. The treatment of CD can vary from medical therapy to right hemi colectomy. In this study, we presented ten CD cases on whom surgical resection was performed in our surgery unit during the last 8 years. Our purpose was to increase the awareness of surgeons about this situation, and so, make them pay attention for not having their first experience in the operating room. PMID:27054646

  6. Acute appendicitis: sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of thin-section contrast-enhanced CT findings

    To assess the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of individual contrast-enhanced helical CT findings of acute appendicitis. We retrospectively reviewed the appendiceal helical CT scans, obtained after intravenous contrast administration (abdomen; 7-mm collimation, abdominopelvic junction; 5-mm collimation), of 50 patients with surgically proven acute appendicitis and 112 with alternative diagnoses. The following parameters were analysed by three radiologists: enlarged appendix (>6 mm in diameter), appendiceal wall thickening, appendiceal wall enhancement, no identification of the appendix, appendicolith(s), (appendiceal) intraluminal air, abscess, lymphadenopathy, terminal ileal wall thickening, focal cecal apical thickening, focal colonic wall thickening, and segmental colonic wall thickening. The CT findings of acute appendicitis that statistically distinguished it from alternative diagnoses were an enlarged appendix (sensitivity; 92%, specificity; 93%, diagnostic accuracy; 93%), appendiceal wall thickening (for these three parameters: 68%, 96% and 88%, respectively), periappendiceal fat stranding (90%, 79%, 82%), appendiceal wall enhancement (72%, 86%, 82%), appendicolith (16%, 100%, 74%), and focal cecal apical thickening (14%, 100%, 74%) (for each, p<0305). On thin-section contrast-enhanced helical CT, an enlarged appendix and periappendiceal fat stranding were found in 90% or more patients with acute appendicitis. Appendiceal wall thickening and enhancement were alearly demonstrated and significant findings for diagnosis. Less common but specific findings include appendicolith, focal cecal apical thickening and intramural air, can also help us establish a diagnosis of acute appendicitis

  7. Acute appendicitis in unenhanced spiral CT: Diagnostic luxury or benefit?

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of thin collimated unenhanced spiral-CT in patients with clinically suspected acute appendicitis and to determine the impact on patient management and overall costs. Method: Unenhanced focussed appendiceal spiral-CT was performed in 56 patients (23 women and 33 men) with clinically suspected acute appendicitis. Scans were obtained from the L4 level to the symphysis pubis using 5 mm collimation, 7.5 mm table feed (pitch 1.5) and 4 mm increment without i.v., oral, or rectal contrast material. Prospective diagnoses based on CT findings were compared with surgical (and histopathological) results and clinical follow-up. The effect of spiral-CT on patient management and clinical pressources was assessed. Results: 29 patients (10 women and 19 men) underwent appendectomy. Unenhanced spiral-CT was an accurate impaging technique for the initial examination of patients with suspected acute appendicitis with a sensitivity of 95.4% and a specificity 100%, an accuracy of 98.2%, a positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 97.1%. In 27 patients with no evidence of acute appendicitis, an alternative diagnosis could be made in 24 patients by unenhanced spiral-CT. Conclusion: Unenhanced spiral-CT is an accurate test to diagnose or to exclude acute appendicitis. Routine appendiceal spiral-CT can improve medical care and reduce the overall costs for patients suspected of having acute appendicitis. (orig.)

  8. Studies on CT findings and operation findings for acute appendicitis in children

    Pediatric CT findings of acute appendicitis were reviewed retrospectively. The subjects were 29 patients (15 boys and 14 girls with an average age of 8.2 years), consisting of 17 with necrotic, 8 with phlegmonous inflammatory, and 4 with catarrhal appendicitis. CT findings were compared with the degree of inflammation. CT revealed abscess in 64.7%, 12.5%, and 0% for necrotic, phlegmonous inflammatory, and catarrhal types, respectively, and 41.4% for all types. An enlarged appendicitis was shown on CT in 86.2% (25/29). Fecalithes were shown on CT in 67.7% (19/29), which was associated with necrotic and phlegmonous inflammatory types, but not with catarrhal type. The other CT findings included thickened paramesocolon of the right lower abdomen, undefined wall of the inner side of the cecum. Inflammation was relatively slight in cases of catarrhal appendicitis, Nine patients less than 5 years of age had phlegmonous inflammatory or necrotic appendicitis. CT allowed definitive diagnosis of appendicitis in 2 of 3 patients with necrotic type. Ct was considered to be very useful in the diagnosis of appendicitis. (N.K.)

  9. Laparoscopic management of acute appendicitis in situs inversus

    Golash Vishwanath

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Situs inversus is often detected incidentally in adults during imaging for a acute surgical emergency. We present a case of acute appendicitis in an adult who was previously unaware about his situs anomaly. A laparoscopic approach is helpful to deal with this condition. A 40 year old man was admitted with history of acute left lower abdominal pain, with uncontrolled diabetic keto-acidosis. Clinically, he was diagnosed as acute diverticulitis with localized peritonitis. Subsequent imaging studies and laparoscopy confirmed the diagnosis of situs inversus and acute left- sided appendicitis. He successfully underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. His postoperative recovery was uneventful. Although technically more challenging because of the reverse laparoscopic view of the anatomy, the laparoscopic diagnosis and management of acute appendicitis is indicated in situs inversus.

  10. Value of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    During a 12-month period high-resolution, real-time ultrasonography (US) with graded compression was performed on 268 consecutive patients with clinically suspected acute appendicitis and its complications. US visualization of a fluid-filled, non-compressed appendix or a decompressed, thick-walled appendix was the primary criterion for a diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The sonographic findings were correlated with surgical-pathologic outcome in 92 cases and with the findings of clinical follow-ups in the remainder. US was found to be accurate in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and its complication with a sensitivity of 93.3%, a specificity of 98.9%, and an accuracy of 97%. The predictive value of a positive test was 97.7%; that of a negative test was 96.7%. There were two false-positive examinations in patients with a thick-walled appendix or periapperdiceal abscess, which were surgically confirmed as appendiceal adenocarcinoma and perforated cecal diverticulitis respectively. There were six false-negative examinations in patients with a sonographically no-visible appendix, which were confirmed surgically as acute appendicitis (n=5) and perforated appendicitis (n=1). Our results show that high-resolution, real-time US is an accurate imaging modality in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and the evaluation of its complications

  11. Acute appendicitis: most common clinical presentation and causative microorganism

    Objective: To determine the most common clinical presentation and causative microorganism for acute appendicitis. Study Design: Descriptive. Place and duration of study: Department of Surgery, Combined Military Hospital Multan, from June 2002 to May 2004. Patients and Methods: Clinical features of all the patients, older than 5 years of age diagnosed with acute appendicitis were recorded. Patients presented with other pathology which mimic acute appendicitis were excluded from the study. Surgery was done under general anaesthesia. Appendices of all the patient as well as pus swabs from abdominal cavity were sent to the laboratory for histopathology and microbiological cultures to confirm the diagnoses of acute appendicitis and causative organism. Results: The mean age of 75 subjects was 32.56 +- 11.93 years. The most common symptom was pain in right iliac fossa (80 % cases) and the most common physical sign was tenderness (92% cases). Some of the patients(9.3%) had a histologically normal appendix. Maximum isolates on culture were E. coli. Conclusion: The most common presentation of acute appendicitis was pain in right iliac fossa while the most sensitive sign was tenderness. Proper history and sharp clinical examination is the key to diagnosis. The most frequent organism of appendicitis was Escherichia Coli. (author)

  12. Acute appendicitis: position paper, WSES, 2013.

    Agresta, Ferdinando; Ansaloni, Luca; Catena, Fausto; Verza, Luca Andrea; Prando, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Appendectomy is one of the most frequently performed operative procedures in general surgery departments of every size and category. Laparoscopic Appendectomy - LA - as compared to Open Appendectomy - OA - was very controversial at first but has found increasing acceptance all over the World, although the percentage of its acceptance is different in the various single National setting. Various meta-analyses and Cochrane reviews have compared LA with OA and different technical details. Furthermore, new surgical methods have recently emerged, namely, the single-port/incision laparoscopic appendectomy and NOTES technique. Their distribution among the hospitals, however, is unclear. Using laparoscopic mini-instruments with trocars of 2-3.5 mm diameter is proposed as a reliable alternative due to less postoperative pain and improved aesthetics. How to proceed in case of an inconspicuous appendix during a procedure planned as an appendectomy remains controversial despite existing study results. But the main question still is: operate or not operate an acute appendicitis, in the meaning of an attempt of a conservative antibiotic therapy. Therefore, we have done a literature survey on the performance of appendectomies and their technical details as well as the management of the intraoperative finding of an inconspicuous appendix in order to write down - under the light of the latest evidence - a position paper. PMID:24708651

  13. Abdominal CT Does Not Improve Outcome for Children with Suspected Acute Appendicitis

    Danielle I. Miano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute appendicitis in children is a clinical diagnosis, which often requires preoperative confirmation with either ultrasound (US or computed tomography (CT studies. CTs expose children to radiation, which may increase the lifetime risk of developing malignancy. US in the pediatric population with appropriate clinical follow up and serial exam may be an effective diagnostic modality for many children without incurring the risk of radiation. The objective of the study was to compare the rate of appendiceal rupture and negative appendectomies between children with and without abdominal CTs; and to evaluate the same outcomes for children with and without USs to determine if there were any associations between imaging modalities and outcomes. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review including emergency department (ED and inpatient records from 1/1/2009–2/31/2010 and included patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Results: 1,493 children, aged less than one year to 20 years, were identified in the ED with suspected appendicitis. These patients presented with abdominal pain who had either a surgical consult or an abdominal imaging study to evaluate for appendicitis, or were transferred from an outside hospital or primary care physician office with the stated suspicion of acute appendicitis. Of these patients, 739 were sent home following evaluation in the ED and did not return within the subsequent two weeks and were therefore presumed not to have appendicitis. A total of 754 were admitted and form the study population, of which 20% received a CT, 53% US, and 8% received both. Of these 57%, 95% CI [53.5,60.5] had pathology-proven appendicitis. Appendicitis rates were similar for children with a CT (57%, 95% CI [49.6,64.4] compared to those without (57%, 95% CI [52.9,61.0]. Children with perforation were similar between those with a CT (18%, 95% CI [12.3,23.7] and those without (13%, 95% CI [10.3,15.7]. The proportion of

  14. The diagnostic value of barium enema in acute appendicitis

    Acute appendicitis is the most common acute surgical condition of the abdomen. When the clinical presentation is atypical, barium enema has proven to be safe and useful in confirming the diagnosis and reducing the negative surgical exploration. However, the performance of barium enema in acute appendicitis has known contraindication primarily because of fear of leakage by perforation of the inflamed appendix. This study using barium enema as a diagnostic aid in acute appendicitis with atypical clinical presentation was performed to further support the previously noted efficacy and safety of this procedure. The results were as followings: 1. In case of acute appendicitis with atypical clinical presentation, the use of barium enema as a diagnostic aid increased the accuracy of diagnosis and decreased the negative surgical exploration. In women between 11 to 50 years old age, especially, it played important role differentiating appendicitis from nonsurgical acute abdomen. 2. The results of the study were 92.31% in sensitivity, 7.69% in false positive, 6.9% in false negative, and 10.26% in negative appendectomy. 3. None of case of leakage of barium by perforation of the inflamed appendix was noted, therefore, barium enema was thought to be safe as a diagnostic aid in acute appendicitis. 4. A simple partial or non filling of appendix without other associated positive finding could not exclude appendicitis, therefore, close clinical observation was necessary. 5. The positive findings of barium enema and their sensitivity were as followings: 1. Non filling of appendix: 90% 2. Partial filling of appendix: 91.7% 3. Displacement or a local impression on terminal ileum: 100%

  15. Ultrasound signs of acute appendicitis in children - clinical application

    Background. Acute appendicitis is a leading cause of the abdominal pain in children that need an urgent surgical treatment. Neither of individually clinical variables doesn't have a real discriminational nor predictive strength to be used as the only diagnostic test. A goal of this study is to define ultrasound criteria of the acute appendicitis by appointing of ultrasound parameters for this pathological condition, determine the relation between ultrasound signs and pathohistological finding, determine the connection of several ultrasound signs with a degree of the inflammation of the acute appendicitis. Methods. In the prospective study with an ultrasound method we examine 50 patients with clinical signs of the acute abdomen. In these patients, the sonographic diagnosis is confirmed by the surgical finding, in fact with a pathohistological diagnosis. A basic, positive sonograph finding of the acute appendicitis was the identification of tubular, noncompresive, aperistaltic bowel which demonstrates a connection with coecum and blind terminal. In our work we analysed the lasting of the symptoms until the hospital intervention in patients stratified according to the pathohistological finding. We used ultrasound equipment- Toshiba Sonolayer with convex 3.75 MHz and linear 8 MHz probes. Results. From 8 ultrasound signs of the acute appendicitis, only an anterior-posterior (AP) diameter of appendices, FAT (width of periappendicular fat tissue) and a peristaltic absence are positive ultrasound signs of the acute appendicitis. Appendicitis phlegmonosa is the most common pathohistological finding in our study (44%). Perforate gangrenous appendicitis and gangrenous appendicitis are represented in more than half of patients (30% + 22%), which suggests a long period of persisting symptoms until a hospital treatment. A statistic analysis shows a great possibility for using values of AP diameter, width of periapendicular fat tissue, just like the values of mural thickness in

  16. Study of 150 cases of acute appendicitis in children

    Fallahi Gh

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is the most common condidition, requiring emergency operation in children. Late appendicitis is still a major sours of morbidity and potential mortality. The charts of all pediatric appendectomy patients (150 cases treated between 1367-1373 (Iranian calender in Amir Kabir Medical Center were reviewed. Mean hospital stay was 4.7 days. Mean ages of patients was 8.5 years. Male to female ratio was 1.2/1. Most common symptom was abdominal pain (100% and deep tenderness in right lower quadrant in 94.6%. Mean temprature was 37.2 and leucocytosis (more than 10000 were in the 76.3%. 14 patients had perforated appendicitis and most common pathology was acut supporative appendicitis. Accuracy of diagnosis was 96.6% and post operative pelvic abccess was 2%. Mortality occurred in one case (0.6%

  17. Hydatidosis as a cause of acute appendicitis: a case report

    Hajizadeh, Maryam; Ahmadpour, Ehsan; Sadat, Amir Taher Eftekhar; Spotin, Adel

    2013-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is considered the most common cause of emergency surgery in children and young adults. The association between parasitic infections and appendicitis has been widely investigated. Hydatidosis, a zoonotic helminthic disease caused by the larval stage of the Echinococcus granulosus, may cause illness in intermediate hosts, generally human and herbivorous animals. This disease is considered hyper endemic in northwest of Iran and is a serious public health problem. Hydatidosis p...

  18. The Most Useful Findings for Diagnosing Acute Appendicitis on Contrast-Enhanced Helical CT

    Purpose: To evaluate the most useful findings to look for in diagnosing acute appendicitis on contrast-enhanced helical CT. Material and Methods: Appendiceal helical CT scans with intravenous contrast administration (abdomen, 7-mm collimation; abdominopelvic junction, 5-mm collimation) of 71 patients with surgically proven acute appendicitis and 167 patients with alternative diagnoses were reviewed retrospectively. Three radiologists analyzed the following parameters: enlarged appendix (>6 mm in diameter), appendiceal wall thickening, appendiceal wall enhancement, no identification of the appendix, appendicolith(s), appendiceal intraluminal air, intramural air, extraluminal air, periappendiceal fat stranding, extraluminal fluid, phlegmon, abscess, lymphadenopathy, segmental terminal ileal wall thickening, focal cecal apical thickening, focal colonic wall thickening, and segmental colonic wall thickening. The features that best distinguished appendicitis from alternative diagnoses were selected with stepwise logistic regression analysis. Results: Nine CT findings distinguished acute appendicitis from alternative diagnoses (P < 0.05): enlarged appendix (R = 0.739), appendiceal wall thickening (R = 0.525), periappendiceal fat stranding (R = 0.414), appendiceal wall enhancement (R = 0.404), focal cecal apical thickening (R 0.171), appendicolith(s) (R = 0.157), extraluminal air (R = 0.050), intramural air (R = 0.043), and phlegmon (R = 0.030). Enlarged appendix (sensitivity, 93%; specificity, 92%), appendiceal wall thickening (sensitivity, 66%; specificity, 96%), periappendiceal fat stranding (sensitivity, 87%; specificity, 74%), and appendiceal wall enhancement (sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 85%) showed the statistically most significant association with acute appendicitis. Conclusion: On 5-mm-section contrast-enhanced helical CT examinations, enlarged appendix, appendiceal wall thickening, periappendiceal fat stranding, and appendiceal wall enhancement were the most

  19. Acute Appendicitis Together with Chylous Ascites: Is It a Coincidence?

    Sami Akbulut

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute chylous ascites is a rarely seen clinical picture, therefore, examination findings are often confused with acute appendicitis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no publication to date showing the occurrence of them together. This study presents the treatment plan for a 25-year-old male patient with both acute chylous ascites and appendicitis. Surgical findings were retrocaecal appendicitis, evident lymphangiectasia in the proximal segment of jejunum, and approximately 3 lt of chylous fluid. An appendectomy was performed and drainage was applied. Low-fat total parenteral nutrition (TPN and octreotide treatment were administered for 7 days postoperatively. We also present a general review of some studies on chylous ascites, which have been published in the English language medical literature since 1910.

  20. CT scan for suspected acute appendicitis

    Widlus, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Appendicitis is common with a 7% lifetime risk for an individual in the United States. Mean age at diagnosis is 22 years old. While frequently clinically obvious, by 2006, more than 90% of patients diagnosed with appendicitis had a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis performed. Use of CT scans has allowed a decrease in false-negative rate at appendectomy to under 10% from a rate of approximately 20% before routine use of CT scan. In addition, the rate of perforation has decreased from nearly 30...

  1. Unenhanced MR Imaging in adults with clinically suspected acute appendicitis

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Achiam, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    AND METHODS: The prospective study included 48 consecutive patients (29 female, 19 male, 18-70 years old, mean age=37.1 years). MRI examination was designed to be comfortable and fast; no contrast was administered. The sequences were performed during quiet respiration. The MRI findings were reviewed......PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to evaluate unenhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of appendicitis or another surgery-requiring condition in an adult population scheduled for emergency appendectomy based on a clinical diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis. MATERIALS...... symptoms and 14 patients had other pathology. For the three reviewers the performance of MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis showed the following sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranges: 83-93%, 50-83% and 77-83%. Moderate (kappa=0.51) and fair (kappa=0.31) interobserver agreements in the MR...

  2. Validity of samul's paediatric appendicitis score (pas) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children

    Objective: To validate the paediatric appendicitis score for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children using histopathology as a gold standard. Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: Military Hospital (MH) and Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Rawalpindi, Pakistan from Dec 2009 to Jul 2010. Patients and Methods: Eighty five children 1-7year old who came to our tertiary surgical department with the chief complaint of abdominal pain of less than 7 days duration were included in the study. Paediatric appendicitis score (PAS) components including fever > 380 C, anorexia, nausea/vomiting, cough/percussion/hopping tenderness, right-lower-quadrant tenderness, migration of pain, leukocytosis > 10,000 (109/1) and polymorphonuclear - neutrophilia > 7500 (109/1) were assessed and recorded on admission, but the sum was not calculated until later and the score did not play any role in the management of the patient. The diagnosis of appendicitis was made by the trainees and consultants clinically and with the aid of routine sonography of abdomen. After appendicetomies, resected specimens were sent for histopathological examination. Pre-operative PAS, histopathology report of resected appendix were endorsed on patient's performa. A two by two table was used to determine sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and diagnostic efficacy of PAS. Results: Sensitivity of PAS was 92.16%, specificity 88.23%, positive predictive value 92.16%, negative predictive value 88.23% and the diagnostic efficacy 90.59%. Conclusion: PAS is a highly sensitive test with fair degree of specificity in diagnosing acute appendicitis in children and its routine usage may improve the diagnostic accuracy. (author)

  3. Influence of delays on perforation risk in adults with acute appendicitis.

    Kearney, D

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: This study analyzed whether prehospital or in-hospital delay was the more significant influence on perforation rates for acute appendicitis and whether any clinical feature designated patients requiring higher surgical priority. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted over one year at a tertiary referral hospital without a dedicated emergency surgical theater. Admission notes, theater logbook, and the Hospital Inpatient Enquiry system were reviewed to identify the characteristics and clinical course of patients aged greater than 16 years who were operated upon for histologically confirmed acute appendicitis. RESULTS: One hundred and fifteen patients were studied. The overall perforation rate was 17 percent. The mean duration of symptoms prior to hospital presentation was 38.1 hours with the mean in-hospital waiting time prior to operation being 23.4 hours. Although body temperature on presentation was significantly greater in patients found to have perforated appendicitis (P < 0.05), only patient heart rate at presentation and overall duration of symptoms, but not in-hospital waiting time, independently predicted perforation by stepwise linear regression modeling. CONCLUSION: In-hospital delay was not an independent predictor of perforation in adults with acute appendicitis although delays may contribute if patients are left to wait unduly. Tachycardia at presentation may be a quantifiable feature of those more likely to have perforation and who should be given higher surgical priority.

  4. Unenhanced MR Imaging in adults with clinically suspected acute appendicitis

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Achiam, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    by two radiologists and one surgeon independent of each other and compared with surgical and pathological records. RESULTS: According to the surgical and histopathological findings 30 of 48 patients (63%) had acute appendicitis. Of the remaining 18 patients, 4 patients had no reasons for the clinical...

  5. Torsion of an Epiploic Appendix Pretending as Acute Appendicitis

    Kamran Ahmad Malik

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Torsion of an epiploic appendix is a rare surgical entity. Its unusual symptomatology, wide variation in physical findings and the absence of helpful laboratory and radiological studies makes it very difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. This is a report of this rare entity found in a patient upon diagnostic laparoscopy performed for suspected acute appendicitis

  6. Ileocecocolic Intussusception Induced by Acute Appendicitis: A Case Report

    Jo, Bang Sil; Kim, Min Jeong; Jang, Kyung Mi; Lee, Hyun; Jeon, Eui Yong; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee, Yul [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Intussusception is a rare disease in adults. Moreover, appendiceal disease is very rarely the leading cause of adult intussusception. We report a case in which ileocecocolic intussusception is secondary to an acute appendicitis in an adult, and describe the radiologic, clinical, and pathologic findings.

  7. Faecal loading in the cecum as a new radiological sign of acute appendicitis

    Purpose: Although the radiological features of acute appendicitis have been well documented, the value of the plain radiography has not been fully appreciated. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of the association of acute appendicitis and images of faecal loading in the cecum. Methods: Plain abdominal radiographs of 100 consecutive adult patients operated on acute appendicitis were assessed. The presence of faecal loading was registered. Results: The presence of faecal loading in the cecum occurred in 97 of the cases of acute appendicitis. Conclusion: This study seems to demonstrate that the presence of radiological images of faecal loading in the cecum may be a useful sign of acute appendicitis

  8. Sonographic study about differential diagnosis between acute appendicitis and non-appendicitis in appendices of borderline diameter

    To find out the sonographic criteria which can be effectively used to differentiate acute appendicitis from non-appendicitis in patients with appendices with borderline diameter(5-8 mm). Sixteen patients diagnosed as acute appendicitis, another 16 patients diagnosed as non-appendicitis were included in this study. They complained of RLQ pain and their appendices measured 5-8 mm in diameter on sonogram. Features such as appendiceal wall thickness, presence or absence of air in appendiceal lumen, movability of tip of the appendix, compressibility of the appendix were evaluated on gray-scale sonogram and thereafter, presence or absence of color flow in the wall of the appendix was evaluated on color Doppler sonogram. Thickness of appendiceal wall is 2.98 ± 0.77 mm in acute appendicitis group and 1.73 ± 0.44 mm in non-appendicitis group (p<0.05). When 2.5 mm thickness of appendiceal wall is applied for diagnosis of acute appendicitis, sensitivity is 81.3%, specificity is 87.5% and accuracy is 84.4%. With absence of air in appendiceal lumen, sensitivity is 93.8%, specificity is 68.8% and accuracy is 81.3%. With absence of movability of appendiceal tip, sensitivity is 87.5%, specificity is 50% and accuracy is 68.8%. With absence of compressibility of the appendix, sensitivity is 100%, specificity is 31.3% and accuracy is 65.6%. With color flow in appendiceal wall, sensitivity is 81.3%, specificity is 62.5% and accuracy is 71.9%. The above mentioned criteria show statistically significant difference between acute appendicitis and non-appendicitis groups (p<0.05). When the diameter of the appendix measures 5-8 mm on sonogram, evaluation of thickness of appendiceal wall, air in appendiceal lumen, movability of tip, compressibility and color flow in the wall will be helpful to diagnose the acute appendicitis with confidence.

  9. Case report of recurrent acute appendicitis in a residual tip.

    O'Leary, Donal P

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Residual appendicitis involving the stump of the appendix has been well described in the literature in the past. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 43 year old male with acute onset of abdominal pain who had undergone an appendicectomy ten years previously. Ultrasound revealed the presence of an inflamed tubular structure. Subsequent laparotomy and histology confirmed that this structure was an inflamed residual appendiceal tip. CONCLUSION: Residual tip appendicitis has not been reported in the literature previously and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of localised peritonitis in a patient with a history of a previous open appendicectomy.

  10. Cecal diverticulitis mimicking acute Appendicitis: a report of 4 cases

    Kurtulus Idris

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Diverticulum of the cecum is a rare, benign, generally asymptomatic lesion that manifests itself only following inflammatory or hemorrhagic complications. Most patients with inflammation of a solitary diverticulum of the cecum present with abdominal pain that is indistinguishable from acute appendicitis. The optimal management of this condition is still controversial, ranging from conservative antibiotic treatment to aggressive resection. We describe four cases that presented with symptoms suggestive of appendicitis, but were found at operation to have an inflamed solitary diverticulum.

  11. Unenhanced MR Imaging in adults with clinically suspected acute appendicitis

    Chabanova, Elizaveta, E-mail: elcha@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Balslev, Ingegerd, E-mail: inbal@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Achiam, Michael, E-mail: micach01@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Nielsen, Yousef W., E-mail: yujwni01@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Adamsen, Sven, E-mail: svad@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Gocht-Jensen, Peter, E-mail: petgoc01@heh.reginh.dk [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Brisling, Steffen K., E-mail: stkibr01@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Logager, Vibeke B., E-mail: viloe@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Thomsen, Henrik S., E-mail: heth@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate unenhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of appendicitis or another surgery-requiring condition in an adult population scheduled for emergency appendectomy based on a clinical diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis. Materials and methods: The prospective study included 48 consecutive patients (29 female, 19 male, 18-70 years old, mean age = 37.1 years). MRI examination was designed to be comfortable and fast; no contrast was administered. The sequences were performed during quiet respiration. The MRI findings were reviewed by two radiologists and one surgeon independent of each other and compared with surgical and pathological records. Results: According to the surgical and histopathological findings 30 of 48 patients (63%) had acute appendicitis. Of the remaining 18 patients, 4 patients had no reasons for the clinical symptoms and 14 patients had other pathology. For the three reviewers the performance of MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis showed the following sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranges: 83-93%, 50-83% and 77-83%. Moderate ({kappa} = 0.51) and fair ({kappa} = 0.31) interobserver agreements in the MR diagnosis of acute appendicitis were found between the reviewers. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values for overall performance of MRI in detecting pelvic abnormalities were 100%, 75% (3 of 4 healthy patients were identified by MRI) and 98%, respectively. Conclusion: Unenhanced fast MRI is feasible as an additional fast screening before the appendectomy. It may prevent unnecessary surgeries. The fast MRI examination can be adequately performed on an MRI unit of broad range of field strengths.

  12. Unenhanced MR Imaging in adults with clinically suspected acute appendicitis

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate unenhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of appendicitis or another surgery-requiring condition in an adult population scheduled for emergency appendectomy based on a clinical diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis. Materials and methods: The prospective study included 48 consecutive patients (29 female, 19 male, 18-70 years old, mean age = 37.1 years). MRI examination was designed to be comfortable and fast; no contrast was administered. The sequences were performed during quiet respiration. The MRI findings were reviewed by two radiologists and one surgeon independent of each other and compared with surgical and pathological records. Results: According to the surgical and histopathological findings 30 of 48 patients (63%) had acute appendicitis. Of the remaining 18 patients, 4 patients had no reasons for the clinical symptoms and 14 patients had other pathology. For the three reviewers the performance of MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis showed the following sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranges: 83-93%, 50-83% and 77-83%. Moderate (κ = 0.51) and fair (κ = 0.31) interobserver agreements in the MR diagnosis of acute appendicitis were found between the reviewers. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values for overall performance of MRI in detecting pelvic abnormalities were 100%, 75% (3 of 4 healthy patients were identified by MRI) and 98%, respectively. Conclusion: Unenhanced fast MRI is feasible as an additional fast screening before the appendectomy. It may prevent unnecessary surgeries. The fast MRI examination can be adequately performed on an MRI unit of broad range of field strengths.

  13. High-Resolution Ultrasonography (US) of Appendiceal Specimens: Differentiation of Acute Non-perforated Appendicitis from Perforated Appendicitis

    To analyze surgical specimens from patients with acute non-perforated and perforated appendicitis using high-resolution ultrasonography (US), and to correlate the US features with the pathologic findings. One hundred and six surgical appendix specimens obtained from patients with suspected acute appendicitis were evaluated. The following US features were evaluated for differentiating acute non-perforated appendicitis from perforated appendicitis: circumferential loss of the echogenic submucosal layer, disruption of the serosal layer, asymmetrical wall thickening, the sum of opposing walls ≥ 9 mm and the presence of appendicoliths. The sensitivity and specificity of the US findings for diagnosing perforated appendicitis were determined. All US features were detected significantly more often in the perforated appendicitis group of specimens. The disruption of the serosal layer was the most significant independent predictor of perforation (p < .001). The sensitivity for circumferential loss of the echogenic submucosal layer, disruption of the serosal layer, asymmetrical wall thickening, wall thickness ≥ 9 mm, and the presence of appendicoliths individually was 84.6%, 69.2%, 61.5%, 73.1% and 46.2%, respectively. The specificity for all of these findings was 86.3%, 98.7%, 95.0%, 85.0% and 85.0%, respectively. High-resolution US of appendiceal specimens was very useful for differentiating acute non-perforated from perforated appendicitis

  14. Fecal loading in the cecum as a new radiological sign of acute appendicitis

    Andy Petroianu; Luiz Ronaldo Alberti; Renata Indelicato Zac

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Although the radiological features of acute appendicitis have been well documented, the value of plain radiography has not been fully appreciated. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of the association of acute appendicitis with images of fecal loading in the cecum.METHODS: Plain abdominal radiographs of 400 patients operated upon for acute appendicitis (n = 100), acute cholecystitis (n = 100), right acute pelvic inflammatory disease (n = 100) and right nephrolithiasis (n = 100)were assessed. The presence of fecal loading was recorded and the sensitivity and specificity of this sign for acute appendicitis were calculated.RESULTS: The presence of fecal loading in the cecum occurred in 97 patients with acute appendicitis, 13 patients with acute cholecystitis, 12 patients with acute inflammatory pelvic disease and 19 patients with nephrolithiasis. The sensitivity of this sign for appendicitis was 97% and its specificity to this disease was 85.3%. Its positive predictive value for appendicitis was 68.7%; however, its negative predictive value for appendicitis was 98.8%.CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that the presence of radiological images of fecal loading in the cecum may be a useful sign of acute appendicitis, and the absence of this sign probably excludes this disease.This is the first description of fecal loading as a radiological sign for acute appendicitis.

  15. Acute appendicitis complicated by mass formation occurring simultaneously with serologically proven dengue fever: a case report

    Senanayake, Manouri P; Samarasinghe, Malik

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute abdomen and acute appendicitis are unusual clinical presentations that occur in dengue infection–caused illness. Lymphoid hyperplasia and mesenteric adenitis are possible explanations, although vasculitis in the pathology of dengue infection has not been reported. Authors of previous case reports have described mimicking of acute appendicitis discovered upon surgical treatment. Dengue virus has not been proven to cause acute appendicitis. Case presentation We report a case ...

  16. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase in acute appendicitis.

    Zakrzewska, I; Gajda, R

    1994-01-01

    The activity of alpha-amylase was measured in isolated granulocytes, serum and urine of 35 patients with acute appendicitis. The measurements were performed before operation and on the 7th day after operation. Slightly increased activity of alpha-amylase was found in the serum and urine of 15 patients. On the 7th day after operation the activity of this enzyme reached normal value. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase was elevated in 22 patients. In 2 of them the increased activity still maintained on the 7th day after operation. Positive correlation between the serum and granulocyte alpha-amylase activities was found. These observations allow to conclude that granulocytes are the source of increased alpha-amylase activity in the serum of patients with acute appendicitis. PMID:7497089

  17. Acute appendicitis: computed tomography findings - an iconographic essay

    Acute appendicitis is the most important cause of abdominal pain requiring surgical intervention in the Western world. The early diagnosis of this disease is of paramount relevance for minimizing its morbidity. Imaging methods have represented a huge progress in the diagnosis of this entity, which used to be based essentially on clinical history, physical examination and laboratory tests results, considering that 20% to 33% of patients present with atypical symptoms. Diagnostic difficulty is higher in children, the elderly, and women in childbearing age. The main imaging methods for evaluation of acute appendicitis are ultrasound and computed tomography. The present study is aimed at describing the disease physiopathology, commenting main computed tomography technical aspects, demonstrating and illustrating tomographic findings, and describing main differential diagnoses. (author)

  18. The platelet indices in pediatric patients with acute appendicitis

    Yunus Yilmaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis (AA remains a problem in pediatric population. It has been suggested that Mean Platelet Volume (MPV is lower in the patients with AA. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of platelet indices in pediatric AA cases. Methods: A retrospective case-controlled study was designed: 224 subjects were included in this study. All patients had been operated on in division of pediatric surgery at the Kars Government Hospital with the preliminary diagnosis of AA. 204 and 20 of these patients were pathologically diagnosed as AA (group 1 and normal appendix vermiformis (group 2, respectively. Platelet indices had been studied in the biochemistry laboratory of the hospital, before the surgery. Results: In group 1, platelet count, mean platelet volume, plateletcrit and platelet distribution width were 305 +/- 94x103/ and micro;L; 7.37 +/- 0.90 fL; 0,220 +/- 0.057 % and 16.3 +/- 0.5%, respectively. In group 2, platelet count, mean platelet volume, plateletcrit and platelet distribution width were 283 +/- 85 103/ and micro;L; 7.60 +/- 1.24 fL; 0.208 +/- 0.045 % and 16.4 +/- 0.7%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups studied with regard to platelet indices (P>0.05. Conclusions: Our study showed that platelet indices have no diagnostic value in the diagnosis of AA at pediatric age group. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(6.000: 1388-1391

  19. Macroamylasemia in a patient with acute appendicitis: a case report.

    Um, J. W.; Kim, K.H.; Kang, M. S.; Choe, J. H.; Bae, J. W.; Hong, Y S; Suh, S O; Kim, Y C; Whang, C. W.; Kim, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    Macroamylasemia is a condition of persistent, elevated serum amylase activity with no apparent clinical symptoms of a pancreatic disorder. In Korea, however, no such case has been reported to date. We report a case of a 17-year-old female diagnosed with macroamylasemia and acute appendicitis. One day earlier, she developed epigastric and right lower quadrant abdominal pain. She was characterized by high level of serum amylase, but normal lipase. Amylase isoenzyme analysis demonstrated increas...

  20. Issues in Management of Acute Appendicitis in Pregnancy

    Sivalingam Nalliah; Lionel Wijesuriya; Subramani Venugopal

    2011-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is an infrequent yet the commonestsurgical emergency in pregnancy occurring in about1:1500 pregnancies. The classical abdominal pain in theright lower quadrant of the abdomen is the only reliableclinical sign. Delay in diagnosis is attributed to presenceof symptoms commonly seen in pregnancy like nauseaand vomiting and difficulty in localizing abdominal paindue to displacement of the appendix with advancinggestation. Perforated appendix and generalizedperitonitis impacts ad...

  1. Comparison of helical computed tomography and ultrasonography in diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    The objective of study is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of helical computed tomography and ultrasonography in acute appendicitis using histopathology as gold standard. Thirty cases of clinically suspected acute appendicitis were included in the study selected on non probability convenience sampling technique. Computed tomography and graded compression ultrasonography of right lower quadrant of abdomen were conducted and results compared with histopathological findings. Amongst 30 patients who underwent computed tomography and graded compression ultrasonography examinations of right lower quadrant for diagnosis of acute appendicitis, on computed tomography 19 were diagnosed with acute appendicitis, 10 were diagnosed as not having the disease and 01 patient diagnosed as not having appendicitis on computed tomography did not improve clinically, was operated upon and histopathology proved it as acute appendicitis. While on graded compression ultrasonography 15 were diagnosed with acute appendicitis, 11 were diagnosed as not having the disease and 04 patients diagnosed as not having appendicitis on ultrasonography, did not improve clinically, were operated upon and histopathology proved it as acute appendicitis. This showed that CT scan has sensitivity of 95%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 90.91% and overall accuracy of 96.67% while ultrasonography has sensitivity of 78.9%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 73.33% and overall accuracy of 86.67%. We concluded that Helical computed tomography is highly accurate in diagnosing acute appendicitis as compared to ultrasonography and it helps to reduce negative appendectomy rate. (author)

  2. [New ways in the surgery of acute appendicitis?].

    Magdeburg, R; Kähler, G

    2013-06-01

    Acute appendicitis is still one of the most common abdominal emergencies necessitating operative treatment. For the past century, the conventional management of appendicitis has been open appendectomy. Since the introduction of laparoscopic appendectomy, it has been performed with increased frequency. Clinical trials evaluating outcomes comparing open appendectomy with laparoscopic appendectomy indicate that laparoscopic appendectomy is associated with lower complication rate and lower mortality and is to be considered the procedure of choice for patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Ever since Kalloo's first report on transgastric peritoneoscopy in a porcine model in 2004, this dramatic surgical revolution has prompted many surgeons and endoscopists to study this new technique. This complex technique involves breaching the wall of a hollow organ to gain access into the peritoneum: Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES). In recent years, several NOTES experiments have been carried out in animal models and even on humans, including appendectomy. NOTES may help to reduce surgical pain and shorten recovery time. The concept of NOTES has generated intensive interest in the medical community as well as in the group of patients. Although the novel procedure is still far from being mature and many technical problems have to be overcome and more clinical studies have to be done before its widespread application in human appendectomy, NOTES is a promising procedure for the future. PMID:23325519

  3. Retroperitoneal Leiomyosarcoma Mimicking Acute Appendicitis: Laparoscopic Management

    Agresta, Ferdinando; De Simone, Paolo; Michelet, Ivan; Bedin, Natalino

    2003-01-01

    Background: Retroperitoneal leiomyosarcomas (RLMS) are a challenging clinical entity. The vast majority of patients are operated on when tumors are advanced. We report herein a case of RLMS, mimicking acute appendiceal disease and treated successfully via laparoscopy. Methods: A 37-year-old woman, para 1, was admitted to our department for right lower quadrant abdominal pain, fever, and leukocytosis. She had no changes in gastrointestinal and urologic function. A physical examination revealed...

  4. Changes in the epidemiology of acute appendicitis and appendectomy in Danish children 1996-2004

    Andersen, S B; Paerregaard, A; Larsen, K

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Aim of the study was to describe changes in the epidemiology of acute appendicitis in Danish children between 0-19 years of age for the period 1996-2004. METHODS: The study was based on discharge diagnoses taken from the Danish National Patient Registry of all 28 274 patients with a...... diagnosis of acute uncomplicated or complicated appendicitis, and/or a registered procedure code of appendectomy. These data were computed together with data on the background population, and incidences were calculated. RESULTS: A significant decrease in the incidence of acute uncomplicated appendicitis was...... found for all age groups (range, 13-36%). The decrease was present for both sexes, but most prominent in girls. The incidence of complicated acute appendicitis decreased by 10%. CONCLUSION: The incidence of acute appendicitis is declining. The incidence of uncomplicated appendicitis appears to be...

  5. Enhanced CT in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis to evaluate the severity of disease. Comparison of CT findings and histological diagnosis

    To assess the potential of CT in evaluating the histological severity of acute appendicitis in comparison with surgical and pathological findings. The CT images of 75 patients with surgically proven appendicitis, including 10 cases of catarrhal, 34 of phlegmonous, and 31 of gangrenous appendicitis, were retrospectively analyzed for the following five CT findings: hazy periappendiceal densities, enlarged appendix, increased enhancement of the appendiceal wall, increased enhancement of the periappendiceal intestinal wall, and deficiency of the appendiceal wall. By comparing all the CT findings and the pathological severity of appendicitis (catarrhal, phlegmonous, and gangrenous), the prevalence of the five CT findings was calculated for each pathological category. Abnormal CT findings were noted in only one case of catarrhal appendicitis. Increased enhancement of the appendiceal wall was observed in all 29 cases of phlegmonous appendicitis (100%), but in only 66.7% (18 cases) of gangrenous appendicitis. Deficiency of the appendiceal wall was more frequently observed in gangrenous (19/27, 70.4%) than phlegmonous appendicitis (4/29, 13.8%). Findings of enhanced CT provide useful information in evaluating the pathological severity of acute appendicitis. (author)

  6. The Diagnostic Value of D-dimer, Procalcitonin and CRP in Acute Appendicitis

    Bulent Kaya, Baris Sana, Cengiz Eris, Koray Karabulut, Orhan Bat, Riza Kutanis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The early diagnosis of acute abdomen is of great importance. To date, several inflammatory markers have been used for the diagnosis of acute abdominal conditions, including acute appendicitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic utility of D-dimer, Procalcitonin (PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP measurements in the acute appendicitis.METHODS: This prospective study was conducted between March 1st, 2010 and July 1st, 2011. In this period, seventy-eight patients were operated with the diagnosis of acute appendicitis, and D-dimer, PCT and CRP levels of the patients were measured. The patients were grouped as phlegmonous appendicitis (Group 1, gangrenous appendicitis (Group 2, perforated appendicitis (Group 3 and negative appendectomy (Group 4 according to the surgical findings and histopathological results.RESULTS: Of 78 patients, 54 (69.2 % were male and 24 (30.8 % were female, and the mean age was 25.4 ± 11.1 years (range, 18 to 69 years. 66 (84.6 % patients had increased leukocyte count (white blood cell count. The PCT values were higher than the upper normal limit in 20 (25.6% patients, followed by D-dimer in 22 (28.2 % patients and CRP in 54 (69.2 % patients. The diagnostic value of leukocyte count and CRP in acute appendicitis was higher than that of the other markers, whereas leukocyte count showed very low specificity. CRP values were higher in perforated appendicitis when compared with the phlegmonous appendicitis (p<0.05. However, PCT and D-dimer showed lower diagnostic values (26% and 31%, respectively.CONCLUSION: An increase in CRP levels alone is not sufficient to make the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. However, CRP levels may differentiate between phlegmonous appendicitis and perforated appendicitis. Due to their low sensitivity and diagnostic value, PCT and D-dimer are not better markers than CRP for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

  7. Contrast-enhanced power Doppler US in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    Introduction/objective: To determine the value of power Doppler (PD) ultrasonography (US) and contrast-enhanced power Doppler (CEPD) US in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and the prediction of histopathologic stages. Methods and material: 50 patients with suspected acute appendicitis were evaluated by the same radiologist with PD US and CEPD US. Air micro bubbles stabilized by a granulate of 'galactose and palmitic acid' were used as a contrast medium for sonography with the concentration of 400 mg/ml. PD US and CEPD US results were later correlated with the surgical and histopathologic findings. PD US and CEPD US findings were considered positive for appendicitis; if there was depiction of hyperemia in the wall of the appendix or if there was depiction of prominent peripheral vascularity when compared with normal soft tissues; and negative if both hyperemia and peripheral hyperemia were not prominent. Results and discussions: Of the 50 patients, 35 patients had histopathologically proven acute appendicitis. CEPD US showed prominent hyperemia in the appendiceal vessels or feeding vessels of the inflamed appendix, and resistance index (RI) calculations were easier. There was statistically significant difference between mean RI values of the normal appendix, suppurative appendicitis and gangrenous appendicitis. PD US has accuracy of 80%, sensitivity of 74% and CEPD US has 98%, and 100% in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. CEPD US identified 100% of suppurative appendicitis and gangrenous appendicitis. Conclusion: CEPD US is a promising method in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and determination of the inflammation stage

  8. Diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced MR for acute appendicitis and alternative causes of abdominal pain in children

    Koning, Jeffrey L. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Rady Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Unenhanced MRI has emerged as a useful tool for diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis. The use of contrast-enhanced MRI for diagnosing pediatric appendicitis has not been documented. The purpose of this study is to examine the diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced MRI for acute appendicitis and alternative entities in the pediatric population presenting with acute abdominal pain. A retrospective review was conducted of 364 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI for the evaluation of possible appendicitis at a single institution between November 2012 and September 2013. There were 132 cases of pathologically confirmed appendicitis out of 364 pediatric patients (36.3%) included in the study. Overall sensitivity and specificity were 96.2% (95% CI [91.4-98.4%]) and 95.7% (95% CI [92.3-97.6%]), respectively. Positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 92.7% (95% CI [86.6-96.3%]) and 97.8% (95% CI [94.7-99.1%]), respectively. The appendix was visualized in 243 cases (66.8%). Imaging confirmed alternative diagnoses in 75 patients, including most commonly colitis, enteritis or terminal ileitis (n = 25, 6.9%), adnexal cysts (n = 25, 6.9%) and mesenteric adenitis (n = 7, 1.9%). Contrast-enhanced MRI is capable of accurately diagnosing acute appendicitis while detecting many alternative entities of abdominal pain, and it allows good visualization of the appendix. Further evaluation is needed to determine whether contrast-enhanced MRI provides an advantage over non-enhanced MRI for imaging evaluation of acute abdominal pain in the pediatric population. (orig.)

  9. Diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced MR for acute appendicitis and alternative causes of abdominal pain in children

    Unenhanced MRI has emerged as a useful tool for diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis. The use of contrast-enhanced MRI for diagnosing pediatric appendicitis has not been documented. The purpose of this study is to examine the diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced MRI for acute appendicitis and alternative entities in the pediatric population presenting with acute abdominal pain. A retrospective review was conducted of 364 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI for the evaluation of possible appendicitis at a single institution between November 2012 and September 2013. There were 132 cases of pathologically confirmed appendicitis out of 364 pediatric patients (36.3%) included in the study. Overall sensitivity and specificity were 96.2% (95% CI [91.4-98.4%]) and 95.7% (95% CI [92.3-97.6%]), respectively. Positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 92.7% (95% CI [86.6-96.3%]) and 97.8% (95% CI [94.7-99.1%]), respectively. The appendix was visualized in 243 cases (66.8%). Imaging confirmed alternative diagnoses in 75 patients, including most commonly colitis, enteritis or terminal ileitis (n = 25, 6.9%), adnexal cysts (n = 25, 6.9%) and mesenteric adenitis (n = 7, 1.9%). Contrast-enhanced MRI is capable of accurately diagnosing acute appendicitis while detecting many alternative entities of abdominal pain, and it allows good visualization of the appendix. Further evaluation is needed to determine whether contrast-enhanced MRI provides an advantage over non-enhanced MRI for imaging evaluation of acute abdominal pain in the pediatric population. (orig.)

  10. Differentiation of Acute Perforated from Non-Perforated Appendicitis: Usefulness of High-Resolution Ultrasonography

    To evaluate the usefulness of high-resolution ultrasonography (US) for the differentiation of acute perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis. The high-resolution US features in 96 patients (49 males, 47 females; mean age, 33.8 years; age range, 4-80 years) with pathologically proven acute appendicitis were evaluated. The following US findings were evaluated for differentiation of acute perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis: circumferential loss of the echogenic submucosal layer, periappendiceal fluid collection, disruption of the serosal layer, asymmetrical wall thickening, maximum overall diameter > 10.5 mm, and the presence of appendicoliths. The sensitivity and specificity of the US features in the diagnosis of acute perforated appendicitis were calculated. All of the US findings, except for appendicoliths, were significantly more common in the acute perforated appendicitis group (p 10.5 mm, and the presence of appendicoliths was 85.4, 73.2, 68.3, 70.7, 80.5, and 36.6%, respectively, while the specificity was 65.5, 89.1, 96.4, 98.2, 81.8, and 80.0%, respectively. High-resolution US was found to be useful for differentiating acute perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis.

  11. Differentiation of Acute Perforated from Non-Perforated Appendicitis: Usefulness of High-Resolution Ultrasonography

    Choi, Gyu Chang [Dept. of Radiology, Gumi Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of high-resolution ultrasonography (US) for the differentiation of acute perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis. The high-resolution US features in 96 patients (49 males, 47 females; mean age, 33.8 years; age range, 4-80 years) with pathologically proven acute appendicitis were evaluated. The following US findings were evaluated for differentiation of acute perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis: circumferential loss of the echogenic submucosal layer, periappendiceal fluid collection, disruption of the serosal layer, asymmetrical wall thickening, maximum overall diameter > 10.5 mm, and the presence of appendicoliths. The sensitivity and specificity of the US features in the diagnosis of acute perforated appendicitis were calculated. All of the US findings, except for appendicoliths, were significantly more common in the acute perforated appendicitis group (p < 0.001). The sensitivity of circumferential loss of the echogenic submucosal layer, periappendiceal fluid collection, disruption of the serosal layer, asymmetrical wall thickening, maximum overall diameter > 10.5 mm, and the presence of appendicoliths was 85.4, 73.2, 68.3, 70.7, 80.5, and 36.6%, respectively, while the specificity was 65.5, 89.1, 96.4, 98.2, 81.8, and 80.0%, respectively. High-resolution US was found to be useful for differentiating acute perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis.

  12. Suspected acute appendicitis in female patients: Trends in diagnosis in emergency department in a University Hospital in Western region of Saudi Arabia

    Objective was to determine the negative appendectomy rate; utilization, accuracy of Alvarado scale, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) in diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Hospital records of 124 female patients admitted for suspicious of acute appendicitis from January 2003-January 2004 to the Emergency Department (ED) at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital Jeddah, Saudi Arabia were reviewed retrospectively. We reviewed the age of patients, clinical presentation, Alvarado scale, US, CT, histopathalogical diagnosis of appendicular specimen. A total of 124 female patients aged 6-64 years were presented to ED with right iliac fossa pain. Of the total, 103 patients have appendectomies (83.1%), 21 (16.9%) patients underwent conservative treatment. Prevalence of advanced appendicitis was 13.7% and negative appendectomy rate was 27.2%. Accuracy rate of appendicitis with Alvarado scale 67.7%, US was 57.9% CT was 66.7%. Postoperative correlation was found between advanced cases and Alvarado scale (r=0.338), and hospital stay duration (r=0.250, p<0.01). Clinical findings and experiments remain of major importance in appendicitis-diagnosis. When appendicitis appears with atypical presentations, it remains a clinical challenge. In such cases, laboratory and imaging investigation may be useful in establishing a correct diagnosis. Alvarado scoring system is easy, simple and cheap complementary aid for supporting the diagnosis of acute appendicitis especially for junior surgeons. (author)

  13. Appendicular mass complicating acute appendicitis in a patient with dengue fever.

    Low, Y N; Cheong, B M K

    2016-04-01

    Abdominal pain with dengue fever can be a diagnostic challenge. Typically, pain is localised to the epigastric region or associated with hepatomegaly. Patients can also present with acute abdomen. We report a case of a girl with dengue fever and right iliac fossa pain. The diagnosis of acute appendicitis was made only after four days of admission. An appendicular mass and a perforated appendix was noted during appendectomy. The patient recovered subsequently. Features suggestive of acute appendicitis are persistent right iliac fossa pain, localised peritonism, persistent fever and leucocytosis. Repeated clinical assessment is important to avoid missing a concurrent diagnosis like acute appendicitis. PMID:27326951

  14. Macroamylasemia in a patient with acute appendicitis: a case report.

    Um, J W; Kim, K H; Kang, M S; Choe, J H; Bae, J W; Hong, Y S; Suh, S O; Kim, Y C; Whang, C W; Kim, S M

    1999-12-01

    Macroamylasemia is a condition of persistent, elevated serum amylase activity with no apparent clinical symptoms of a pancreatic disorder. In Korea, however, no such case has been reported to date. We report a case of a 17-year-old female diagnosed with macroamylasemia and acute appendicitis. One day earlier, she developed epigastric and right lower quadrant abdominal pain. She was characterized by high level of serum amylase, but normal lipase. Amylase isoenzyme analysis demonstrated increased fraction of salivary type and follow-up amylase level was persistently increased. Immunofixation disclosed the macroamylase binding with an immunoglobulin, consisting of IgA and kappa chain. The patient was treated by appendectomy, and the abdominal pain subsided. PMID:10642949

  15. Issues in Management of Acute Appendicitis in Pregnancy

    Sivalingam Nalliah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is an infrequent yet the commonestsurgical emergency in pregnancy occurring in about1:1500 pregnancies. The classical abdominal pain in theright lower quadrant of the abdomen is the only reliableclinical sign. Delay in diagnosis is attributed to presenceof symptoms commonly seen in pregnancy like nauseaand vomiting and difficulty in localizing abdominal paindue to displacement of the appendix with advancinggestation. Perforated appendix and generalizedperitonitis impacts adversely on pregnancy contributingto increases in miscarriage, pre-term delivery, fetalloss and even maternal mortality. Imaging studieslike abdominal ultrasonogram, helical computerizedtomography and magnetic imaging have been utilizedto complement clinical suspicion and decrease ‘negativeappendectomies’ but robust data on their routine use isawaited. Although the laparoscopic approach is a usefuldiagnostic and therapeutic tool in early pregnancy, itsuse as the primary approach for appendicectomy inpregnancy requires further evaluation as increases inthe incidence of fetal loss of 5.6% has been reportedcompared to 3.1% in open access surgery.

  16. Can Clinical Findings Prevent Negative Laparotomy in Parasitosis Mimicking Acute Appendicitis?

    Musa Zorlu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Rates of negative laparotomy (NL for acute appendicitis have been reported as 15% and parasitosis contributed to 2%. This study was planned to reduce the rates of NL by preoperative determination of parasitosis. Methods. In retrospective examination of 2730 appendectomy specimens in Hitit University Department of General Surgery between 2008 and 2012, 55 patients were determined with parasitosis and compared with 102 age-matched randomly selected patients with lymphoid hyperplasia. Results. The parasite group comprised 63.6% females with a mean age of 15.1 years. The number of patients in the parasitosis group increased from city centre to rural areas of towns and villages (p2.2% was determined as a diagnostic value. Conclusion. It is important to determine parasitosis to prevent NL. When acute appendicitis is considered for young patients living in rural areas, the observation of high eosinophil together with negative sonographic findings should bring Enterobius vermicularis parasitosis to mind and thereby should prevent NL.

  17. 急性阑尾炎的CT诊断%CT FINDINGS IN ACUTE APPENDICITIS

    吴俊凤; 潘旭民; 陈慧妙; 李秀芳

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究急性阑尾炎的典型CT表现。方法收集45例经手术病理证实的急性阑尾炎病例,回顾性分析其表现特征。结果45例中CT诊断为急性阑尾炎可能1例(2.22%);急性阑尾炎8例(17.78%);急性阑尾炎并阑尾周围炎14例(31.11%);急性阑尾炎并穿孔5例(11.11%);阑尾脓肿13例(28.89%);阑尾炎性肿块4例(8.89%)。急性阑尾炎的CT直接征象为阑尾肿大增粗(直径>6mm)、阑尾壁增厚和阑尾石,间接征象有阑尾-盲肠周围脂肪内条索影等。临床诊断为急性阑尾炎可能4例;急性阑尾炎21例;阑尾炎包块16例;另有4例因右上腹痛而拟诊胆囊炎。主要CT表现:①阑尾肿胀,管壁增厚,可呈不同密度分层的“同心圆”样结构;阑尾边缘模糊,密度近似甚至高于邻近肌肉;②阑尾管腔内可见积液、粪石和气体;③阑尾系膜肿胀,周围脂肪组织密度升高;④阑尾穿孔,周围形成脓肿;⑤相邻盲肠壁可有增厚,末端呈尖角样改变;右侧肾筋膜和侧锥筋膜增厚;⑥小肠低位梗阻、肝脓肿等并发症。CT所显示的阑尾形态及其周围组织的改变,与手术和病理所见一致。结论急性阑尾炎有典型CT表现。CT检查可准确显示阑尾本身和周围组织改变及其合并症,为临床的诊治提供有价值的信息。CT对急性阑尾炎的诊断特别是对临床表现不甚典型的阑尾炎及其并发症的诊断,具有很高准确率。%Objective To investigate CT characteristics of acute appendicitis and to find the significance of CT findings in acute appendicitis .Methods A total of of 45 patients with acute appendicitis confirmed by CT were included in this study ,in which 21 male patients and 24 female patients were included and the av-erage age was 48 years old with the range from 38y to 65y .The clinical and CT data were analyzed retro-spectively

  18. Acute appendicitis in a 14-year-old boy with familial Mediterranean fever

    Yoshihiko Sakurai; Takaaki Murata; Hirohisa Hirata; Takeshi Morita

    2015-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is one manifestation of a heritable periodic fever syndrome that is characterized by recurrent attacks of febrile polyserositis, most frequently peritonitis. An FMF abdominal attack is often misdiagnosed as acute appendicitis, a more common cause of an acute abdomen. We report a 14-year-old boy with FMF who developed acute appendicitis during his follow-up. The patient had a several-year history of abdominal pain episodes, and was initially admitted for an a...

  19. Synchronous presentation of acute acalculous cholecystitis and appendicitis: a case report

    Sahebally, Shaheel M

    2011-11-14

    Abstract Introduction Acute acalculous cholecystitis is traditionally associated with elderly or critically ill patients. Case presentation We present the case of an otherwise healthy 23-year-old Caucasian man who presented with acute right-sided abdominal pain. An ultrasound examination revealed evidence of acute acalculous cholecystitis. A laparoscopy was undertaken and the dual pathologies of acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute appendicitis were discovered and a laparoscopic cholecystectomy and appendectomy were performed. Conclusion Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a rare clinical entity in young, healthy patients and this report describes the unusual association of acute acalculous cholecystitis and appendicitis. A single stage combined laparoscopic appendectomy and cholecystectomy is an effective treatment modality.

  20. Histopathological Feature of Acute Appendicitis in Kerman-Iran from 1997 to 2003

    Fatemeh Nabipour

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is one of the most common surgical conditions that affect about seven percent of the population. The histopathologic stages of appendicitis are important to regarding prognosis. To evaluate pathologic features of appendix after operation, this study was designed. 2753 appendices specimen that had been received to department of pathology of two major hospitals in Kerman-Iran during five years periods were reviewed by two pathologist and classification was performed by followed: Normal, early acute, acute, suppurative or purulent, gangrenous and perforated appendicitis. There were 54.6% males, the average age of patients was 24.9+/-13.3 (mean+/-SD, that 76.6% was under 30 years old. 34.2% of reports were normal histopathologically. The accuracy rate of acute appendicitis was 65.8%. Perforation observed to 0.8%. There was significant difference between sex and stage of development of appendicitis. Seasonal incidence was difference in various histopathology views, significantly. Finally, acute appendicitis was more frequent in men than women and was increase by age specially 19-30 years. Our results showed appendicitis was more frequent and higher in stage at winter.

  1. Usefulness of computed tomography in patients with right inferior abdominal quadrant pain: acute appendicitis and its alternative diagnosis

    Purpose: To review the tomography findings of the acute appendicitis, their complications and alternative diagnosis. To value the use of helicoidal computed tomography (HCT) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and in the study of patients with right inferior abdominal quadrant (RIQ) pain and acute abdomen, for diagnosis and eventual complications, in order to decide treatment. Materials and method: For five months, the populations included in this retrospectively study were all patients delivered for presenting with RIQ pain for a HCT exam. These exams were made with oral and intravenous contrasts, when there were not contraindications. The HCT results were correlated with clinical follow up, surgery and histopathologic exams. Results: Over a total of 100 patients studied, 53 presented tomographic diagnosis of appendicitis, 22 of which presented perforation signs; 27 showed an alternative diagnosis (ovaries follicles, ureteral litiasis, tiphlitis, diverticulitis, colitis, salpingitis), 18 patients did not present tomographic findings to support the clinical symptoms and 2 presented indeterminated results. These data represented a sensibility of 100%, specificity of 95,7%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 96,2% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% for the tomography diagnosis of acute appendicitis and a sensibility of 100%, specificity of 81,8%, PPV of 95,1% and NPV of 100% for the tomography diagnosis of the different etiology in patient with right inferior acute abdomen. Conclusion: HCT is extremely useful in the study of patients with acute abdomen with origin in the RIQ, not only to make a diagnosis, but also to evaluate the complications, so as to decide proper treatment. (authors)

  2. Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis: Report of a case and review of Japanese literature

    Daisuke Ito

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: We report a case of acute amebic appendicitis in a 31-year-old woman and review the ages at presentation, causative factors, treatments, and outcomes of 11 cases reported in Japan between 1995 and 2013.

  3. Acute appendicitis in preschoolers: a study of two different populations of children

    Sivridis Efthimios; Tripsianis Gregorios; Kambouri Katerina; Giatromanolaki Alexandra; Gardikis Stefanos; Vaos George

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the incidence and the risk factors implicated in acute appendicitis in preschoolers in our region. Methods Over a 7-year period, 352 children underwent appendectomy for suspected acute appendicitis. Of these, data for 23 children were excluded because no inflammation of the appendix was found on subsequent histology. Of the remaining 329, 82 were ≤ 5 years old (i.e., preschool children) and 247 were 5-14 years old. These two groups of children were further divided...

  4. EVALUATION OF MODIFIED ALVARADO SCORE IN PREOPERATIVE DIAGNOSIS OF ACUTE APPENDICITIS

    Ramachandra

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Decision making in case of acute appendicitis may be difficult, especiall y for junior surgeon. Radiological investigations do not appear to be helpful sometime. A decision to operate based on clinical suspicion alone can lead to removal of normal appendix in 15 - 30% cases. In some studies Modified Alvarado Scoring System (MASS was helpful in minimizing unnecessary appendectomies. The present study aims to evaluate the efficiency of Modified Alvarado scoring in preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

  5. Enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and its severity

    The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in diagnosing acute appendicitis and its severity. Contrast-enhanced MD-CT 3.5 mm thick images of 23 control patients (A), and 64 patients with surgically proven acute appendicitis including 8 catarrhal (B), 28 phiegmonous (C), and 28 gangrenous (D) appendicitis patients were respectively analyzed. The number of observed major computed tomography (CT) findings for each patient group were as follows: enlarged (≥6 mm in maximum diameter) appendix (A: 5, B: 8, C: 28, D: 28), enhancement of the appendiceal wall; hyper (A: 3, B: 8, C: 27, D: 20), iso (A: 15, B: 0, C: 1, D: 2), hypo (A-C: 0, D: 4), and patched (A-C: 0, D: 2) enhancement, appendicolith (A, B: 0, C: 7, D: 13), dirty fat sign (A: 3, B: 1, C: 21, D: 28), localized ascites (A: 2, B: 0, C: 2, D: 11), and abscess formation (A-C: 0, D: 5). From the combinations of these findings, we could differentiate acute appendicitis from the control normal appendix with an accuracy of 99% and could diagnose the severity of acute appendicitis with accuracies of 92% for catarrhal appendicitis, 84% for phlegmonous appendicitis, and 92% for gangrenous appendicitis. We could also visually reconstruct the entire forms and positions of the appendices from the successive CT findings because of the high-resolution thin-slice MDCT images. MDCT is highly accurate in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and its severity. (author)

  6. Ultrasonography with a hand-held device for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of ultrasonography (US) with a hand-held device for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in the emergency room. US with a hand-held device was performed by the first author in 33 patients suspected of having appendicitis in the emergency room. From these 33 patients, 24 who subsequently underwent computed tomography (CT) or surgery were included in this study. The accuracy of US with the hand-held device for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was evaluated based on the findings of CT or surgery. CT and surgery were performed in 22 and 12 patients, respectively. Final diagnoses were acute appendicitis (n=18), terminal ileitis (n=2), pelvic inflammatory disease (n=2), diverticulitis (n=1), and ureterolithiasis (n=1). The US yielded a sensitivity of 78% and a positive predictive value of 100%. The shortest distance between the abdominal wall and the appendix measured on CT was less than 40 mm in 11 patients. In ten (91%) of the 11 patients US with the hand-held device showed the swollen appendix. US with a hand-held device is potentially useful in the positive identification of acute appendicitis, but further investigation is needed to prove its utility in the routine diagnosis of acute appendicitis. (author)

  7. Analysis of Recurrence Management in Patients Who Underwent Nonsurgical Treatment for Acute Appendicitis.

    Liang, Tsung-Jung; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Tsai, Chung-Yu; Kang, Chi-Hsiang; Huang, Wei-Chun; Chang, Hong-Tai; Chen, I-Shu

    2016-03-01

    The recurrence rate for acute appendicitis treated nonoperatively varies between studies. Few studies have adequately evaluated the management of these patients when appendicitis recurs. We aimed to explore the recurrence rate and management of patients with acute appendicitis that were first treated nonoperatively.We identified patients in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database who were hospitalized due to acute appendicitis for the first time between 2000 and 2010 and received nonsurgical treatment. The recurrence and its management were recorded. Data were analyzed to access the risk factors for recurrence and factors that influenced the management of recurrent appendicitis.Among the 239,821 patients hospitalized with acute appendicitis for the first time, 12,235 (5.1%) patients were managed nonoperatively. Of these, 864 (7.1%) had a recurrence during a median follow-up of 6.5 years. Appendectomy was performed by an open and laparoscopic approach in 483 (55.9%) and 258 (29.9%) patients, respectively. The remaining 123 (14.2%) patients were again treated nonsurgically. Recurrence was independently associated with young age, male sex, percutaneous abscess drainage, and medical center admission by multivariable analysis. In addition, age <18, a (CCI) <2, medical center admission, and a longer time to recurrence were correlated with using laparoscopy to treat recurrence. Neither type of appendicitis, percutaneous abscess drainage, nor length of first time hospital stay had an influence on the selection of surgical approach.In conclusion, a laparoscopic appendectomy can be performed in recurrent appendicitis cases, and its application may not be related to previous appendicitis severity. PMID:27015200

  8. Improving diagnosis of acute appendicitis with atypical findings by Tc-99m HMPAO leukocyte scan

    Aim: Even with careful observation, the overall false-positive rate of laparotomy remains 10-15% when acute appendicitis was suspected. Therefore, the clinical efficacy of Tc-99m HMPAO labeled leukocyte (TC-WBC) scan for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in patients presenting with atypical clinical findings is assessed. Patients and Methods: Eighty patients presenting with acute abdominal pain and possible acute appendicitis but atypical findings were included in this study. After intravenous injection of TC-WBC, serial anterior abdominal/pelvic images at 30, 60, 120 and 240 min with 800 k counts were obtained with a gamma camera. Any abnormal localization of radioactivity in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen, equal to or greater than bone marrow activity, was considered as a positive scan. Results: 36 out of 49 patients showing positive TC-WBC scans received appendectomy. They all proved to have positive pathological findings. Five positive TC-WBC were not related to acute appendicitis, because of other pathological lesions. Eight patients were not operated and clinical follow-up after one month revealed no acute abdominal condition. Three of 31 patients with negative TC-WBC scans received appendectomy. They also presented positive pathological findings. The remaining 28 patients did not receive operations and revealed no evidence of appendicitis after at least one month of follow-up. The overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values for TC-WBC scan to diagnose acute appendicitis were 92, 78, 86, 82, and 90%, respectively. Conclusion: TC-WBC scan provides a rapid and highly accurate method for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in patients with equivocal clinical examination. It proved useful in reducing the false-positive rate of laparotomy and shortens the time necessary for clinical observation. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of ultrasonographic finding in men and women suspected of acute appendicitis: Usefulness and limitation of measurement of the outer diameter of the vermiform appendix

    To evaluate the usefulness and limitations of measurement of the outer diameter of the vermiform appendix in men and women patients suspected of acute appendicitis on ultrasonography (US). Retrospectively, the review of the outer diameter of the appendix measured in 197 adult patients, 70 men and 127 women (age ranged from 16 to 83 years), suspected of acute appendicitis on sustained-compression US was done. The measured outer diameters were categorized into two groups according to the patient's sex, and relationships between categoric variables were analyzed by calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy. Data analyses were performed using MedCalc for windows version 7.1.0.1. The outer appendiceal diameters in men ranged between 3.2 and 15 mm, while those in women, between 3.4 and 17 mm. The diameters of acute inflamed appendices ranged from 6 to 17 mm. In men, a diameter equal to or larger than 6 mm was confirmed as acute appendicitis with the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of 100%, 57.6%, 70.2% and 100%, respectively. Meanwhile, in women, a diameter of ≥ 6 mm was confirmed as acute appendicitis with the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of 98%, 55.8%, 68.9% and 96.5%, respectively. The accuracy in women (67.7%) was lower than in men(75.7%), but no statistically significant difference (p=0.395) was seen between men and women. The outer appendiceal diameter of ≥ 6 mm as a sign of acute appendicitis provides a high sensitivity and negative predictive values. This diagnostic criterion is more useful in excluding acute appendicitis than confirming it. There was no statistically significant difference in the accuracy between men and women.

  10. Correlation of serum C-reactive protein, white blood count and neutrophil percentage with histopathology findings in acute appendicitis

    Xharra Shefki; Gashi-Luci Lumturije; Xharra Kumrije; Veselaj Fahredin; Bicaj Besnik; Sada Fatos; Krasniqi Avdyl

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Acute appendicitis is one of the most common surgical emergencies. Accurate diagnosis of acute appendicitis is based on careful history, physical examination, laboratory and imaging investigation. The aim of the study is to analyze the role of C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood count (WBC) and Neutrophil percentage (NP) in improving the accuracy of diagnosis of acute appendicitis and to compare it with the intraoperative assessment and histopathology findings. Materials...

  11. No Circadian Variation in Surgeons' Ability to Diagnose Acute Appendicitis

    Jørgensen, Anders Bech; Amirian, Ilda; Watt, Sara Kehlet;

    2015-01-01

    patients were included. There were no age limitations or selection in sex. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the ability to diagnose appendicitis in day-evening hours vs night hours (p = 0.391), nor was any significant difference found on weekdays (Monday-Thursday) vs weekends (Friday...... imaging had no effect on the ability to diagnose appendicitis. Male sex showed a higher probability of the diagnosis being appendicitis compared with other or no pathology (odds ratio: 3.094; p < 0.001). Age between 40 and 80 years was significantly associated with a higher probability of the diagnosis...

  12. Utility of diffusion-weighted imaging in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    To evaluate the value of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. 119 patients with acute appendicitis and 50 controls were enrolled in this prospective study. DWI was obtained with b factors 0, 500 and 1000 s/mm2 and were assessed with a visual scoring system by two radiologists followed by quantitative evaluation of the DW images and ADC maps. Histopathology revealed appendicitis in 79/92 patients (78%) who had undergone surgery. On visual evaluation, except for one patient with histopathologically proven appendicitis all inflamed appendixes were hyperintense on DWI (98.7%). Quantitative evaluation with DW signal intensities and ADC values revealed a significant difference with normal and inflamed appendixes (p 2/s had a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 99%. DWI is a valuable technique for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis with both qualitative and quantitative evaluation. DWI increases the conspicuity of the inflamed appendix. We recommend using DWI to diagnose acute appendicitis. (orig.)

  13. Utility of diffusion-weighted imaging in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    Inci, Ercan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Aydin, Sibel; Bayramoglu, Sibel; Cimilli, Tan [Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Kilickesmez, Ozgur [Yeditepe University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2011-04-15

    To evaluate the value of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. 119 patients with acute appendicitis and 50 controls were enrolled in this prospective study. DWI was obtained with b factors 0, 500 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2} and were assessed with a visual scoring system by two radiologists followed by quantitative evaluation of the DW images and ADC maps. Histopathology revealed appendicitis in 79/92 patients (78%) who had undergone surgery. On visual evaluation, except for one patient with histopathologically proven appendicitis all inflamed appendixes were hyperintense on DWI (98.7%). Quantitative evaluation with DW signal intensities and ADC values revealed a significant difference with normal and inflamed appendixes (p < 0.001). The best discriminative parameter was signal intensity (b 500). With a cut-off value of 56 for the signal intensity the ratio had a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 97%. The cut-off ADC value at 1.66 mm{sup 2}/s had a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 99%. DWI is a valuable technique for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis with both qualitative and quantitative evaluation. DWI increases the conspicuity of the inflamed appendix. We recommend using DWI to diagnose acute appendicitis. (orig.)

  14. Usefulness of measurement of the outer appendiceal diameter on abdominal computer tomography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of our computer tomography (CT)-based protocol and the usefulness of measurement of the outer appendiceal diameter on CT in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Two-hundred thirty-nine consecutive patients with clinical diagnoses of acute appendicitis during the period from January 2002 to Jun 2004 were evaluated. The CT criterion of acute appendicitis was the outer appendiceal diameter of 6 mm or more, and/or other associated inflammatory changes. The histological criterion of acute appendicitis was the presentation of polymorphic granulocytes throughout the appendiceal wall. Of 239 patients, 235 underwent CT examination. Among 222 patients with appendectomy, 205 had histologically proven acute appendicitis. Of 200 patients who had the outer appendiceal diameter of 6 mm or more on CT, 193 had histologically proven acute appendicitis. The positive predictive value for diagnosing acute appendicitis was 92.3% in the surgery group, and 96.5% in the group that the outer appendiceal diameter was 6 mm or more on CT. The recurrence rate of acute appendicitis diagnosed by CT following conservative therapy was 35.3%, and was high (50%) in the group with the appendiceal diameter of at least 10 mm. CT is useful in the diagnosis for acute appendicitis. (author)

  15. Can New Inflammatory Markers Improve the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis?

    Andersson, Manne; Rubér, Marie; Ekerfelt, Christina; Hallgren, Hanna Björnsson; Olaison, Per Olov Gunnar; Andersson, Roland E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of appendicitis is difficult and resource consuming. New inflammatory markers have been proposed for the diagnosis of appendicitis, but their utility in combination with traditional diagnostic variables has not been tested. Our objective is to explore the potential of new...... inflammatory markers for improving the diagnosis of appendicitis.METHODS: The diagnostic properties of the six most promising out of 21 new inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6, chemokine ligand [CXCL]-8, chemokine C-C motif ligand [CCL]-2, serum amyloid A [SAA], matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-9, and...... myeloperoxidase [MPO]) were compared with traditional diagnostic variables included in the Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score (right iliac fossa pain, vomiting, rebound tenderness, guarding, white blood cell [WBC] count, proportion neutrophils, C-reactive protein and body temperature) in 432 patients...

  16. An unusual manifestation of acute appendicitis with left flank pain

    Roland Talanow, MD, PhD

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The author presents a case with an unusual presentation of early appendicitis. The patient presented initially with left sided flank pain. Workup for nephrolithiasis, including non-contrast CT of the abdomen and pelvis was negative for renal stones or hydronephrosis. After discharge, the patient presented one week later in the ED with right lower quadrant pain. Contrast enhanced CT of the abdomen revealed perforated appendicitis.

  17. Co-infection with Enterobius vermicularis and Taenia saginata mimicking acute appendicitis.

    Saravi, Kasra H; Fakhar, Mahdi; Nematian, Javad; Ghasemi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we describe an unusual case of verminous appendicitis due to Enterobius vermicularis and Taenia saginata in a 29-year-old woman from Iran. The histopathological examinations and parasitological descriptions of both worms found in the appendix lumen are discussed. The removed appendix exhibited the macroscopic and microscopic features of acute appendicitis. Antihelminthic therapy was initiated with single doses of praziquantel for the taeniasis and mebendazole for the enterobiasis, and the patient was discharged. PMID:26754203

  18. The role of the cytokines and cell-adhesion molecules on the immunopathology of acute appendicitis

    To study the local expression of the proinflammatory cytokine such as interferon gamma and anti-inflammatory cytokine like interleukin-10 (IL-10) and their role in cell adhesion molecules (CAM) expression on the surface of endothelial cell at the site of inflammation in acute appendicitis. The local expression of these cytokines and CAM was correlated with clinical findings to shed light on their role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis. Thirty-five patients with acute appendicitis and 6 apparently normal appendices were removed incidentally from individuals presented with problems other than appendicitis, were included in this prospective study. They were attendant of the emergency room in Al-Khadhumiyah Teaching Hospital in Baghdad, from October 2003 to September 2004. Cell adhesion molecules (intracellular adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-l], ICAM-3 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [VCAM-1]) were detected by immunohistochemistry while IL-10 and interferon gamma were detected by in situ hybridization. The specimens were classified into 5 groups; early acute appendicitis, phlegmonous appendicitis, ulcero-phlegmonousappendicitis, and gangrenous appendicitis, and the fifth group included specimens that showed no histopathological changes, defined as histologically normal appendix. Intracellular adhesion molecule-1, VCAM-I, IL-10 and interferon gamma were expressed weakly in the control group, while ICAM-3 was not detected in the control group. The average score for ICAM-I, VCAM-1 and the percentage of cells expressing IL-l0 and interferon gamma were significantly higher in the patient groups when compared with the control group. Intracellular adhesion molecule-3 was expressed in the patient group. The kinetics of CAM expression were tightly correlated to the balance between IL-10 and interferon gamma especially after 12.5 hours from the first symptoms experienced by the patients. The interferon gamma was the main player and the most significant factor that leads

  19. Correlation between the serum and tissue levels of oxidative stress markers and the extent of inflammation in acute appendicitis

    Ersin Gürkan Dumlu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the serum and tissue levels of markers of impaired oxidative metabolism and correlate these levels with the histopathology and Alvarado score of acute appendicitis patients. METHOD: Sixty-five acute appendicitis patients (mean age, 31.4±12.06 years; male/female, 30/35 and 30 healthy control subjects were studied. The Alvarado score was recorded. Serum samples were obtained before surgery and 12 hours postoperatively to examine the total antioxidant status, total oxidant status, paraoxonase, stimulated paraoxonase, arylesterase, catalase, myeloperoxidase, ceruloplasmin, oxidative stress markers (advanced oxidized protein products and total thiol level and ischemia-modified albumin. Surgical specimens were also evaluated. RESULTS: The diagnoses were acute appendicitis (n = 37, perforated appendicitis (n = 8, phlegmonous appendicitis (n = 12, perforated+phlegmonous appendicitis (n = 4, or no appendicitis (n = 4. The Alvarado score of the acute appendicitis group was significantly lower than that of the perforated+phlegmonous appendicitis group (p = 0.004. The serum total antioxidant status, total thiol level, advanced oxidized protein products, total oxidant status, catalase, arylesterase, and ischemia-modified albumin levels were significantly different between the acute appendicitis and control groups. There was no correlation between the pathological extent of acute appendicitis and the tissue levels of the markers; additionally, there was no correlation between the tissue and serum levels of any of the parameters. CONCLUSIONS: The imbalance of oxidant/antioxidant systems plays a role in the pathogenesis acute appendicitis. The Alvarado score can successfully predict the presence and extent of acute appendicitis.

  20. Acute appendicitis during pregnancy:analysis of 23 cases%妊娠期合并急性阑尾炎23例诊治分析

    赵智毅; 王晓亮

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis during pregnancy. Methods The clinic data of 23 pregnant women with acute appendicitis from June 2004 to June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Results 21 cases underwent operation and 2 cases were given conservative treatment. Four cases were acute simple appendicitis, 15 cases acute suppurative appendicitis and 2 cases acute gangrenous appendicitis with pathological examination after surgery. Of them, 1 case suffered from surgical wound infection after surgery. Conclusion For acute appendicitis during pregnancy which is harmful to pregnant women and fetus, it is critical to carry out surgery as soon as possible after diagnosis was made.%目的 探讨妊娠期急性阑尾炎的诊断及治疗方案.方法回顾性分析我院2004年6月至2012年6月收治的妊娠期急性阑尾炎23例的临床资料.结果 手术治疗21例,保守治疗2例;术后病理检查:单纯性阑尾炎4例,化脓性阑尾炎15例,坏疽性阑尾炎2例;切口感染1例.结论 妊娠期急性阑尾炎对孕妇及胎儿都会产生不利影响,明确诊断后,应尽早手术治疗.

  1. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. A study of 226 cases

    To determine the clinical value of ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Graded-compression ultrasound was performed in 226 patients with atypical or unclear clinical signs of appendicitis. Twenty-three patients were excluded from study because of an inconclusive examination due to inadequate compression. Appendicitis was considered to be present when the appendix was non compressible and measured over 6 mn in anteroposterior diameter or the patient presented an abscess in right iliac fossa. The findings were confirmed by pathological study of surgically resected tissue or by clinical follow-up. The operative features and the predictive capacity of ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis were calculated. In 98 cases, acute appendicitis was confirmed intraoperatively. In 103, this diagnosis was ruled out by the clinical course or intraoperative findings. Ninety-four patients presented ultrasonographic signs compatible with appendiceal inflammation. The sensitivity of ultrasound in the diagnosis of these doubtful cases of appendicitis was, 93.9%; the specificity, 98.1%; reliability, 96%; positive value, 9%; negative predictive value, 94.5%, and the positive probability rate, 49.3%. Our results indicate that high-resolution ultrasonography is indicated in all cases in which the clinical diagnosis of appendiceal inflammation id doubtful. (Author) 64 refs

  2. Acute appendicitis in preschoolers: a study of two different populations of children

    Sivridis Efthimios

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To assess the incidence and the risk factors implicated in acute appendicitis in preschoolers in our region. Methods Over a 7-year period, 352 children underwent appendectomy for suspected acute appendicitis. Of these, data for 23 children were excluded because no inflammation of the appendix was found on subsequent histology. Of the remaining 329, 82 were ≤ 5 years old (i.e., preschool children and 247 were 5-14 years old. These two groups of children were further divided according to their religion into Muslims and Christian Orthodox: 43 of the children aged ≤ 5 years were Muslims and 39 were Christian Orthodox. A household questionnaire was designed to collect data concerning age, gender, type of residence area, living conditions, vegetable consumption, and family history of surgery for acute appendicitis as preschool children. The removed appendices were also assessed histologically for the amount of lymphoid tissue. Results Acute appendicitis of preschoolers developed more frequently in Muslims (39.4% than in Christians (17.7%; p p p > 0.05. Conclusions In our region, the percentage of preschool-aged Muslim children with acute appendicitis was remarkably high. One possible explanation for this finding could be the higher amount of lymphoid tissue in the wall of the appendix in Muslim preschool children together with their low standard of hygiene.

  3. ACUTE APPENDICITIS SECONDARY TO ENTEROBIUS VERMICULARIS INFESTATION IN A YOUNG FEMALE: A CASE REPORT

    Kumar Premjeet

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal infection due to enterobius vermicularis occurs worldwide and is considered to be the most common helminth infection. The simple presence of enterobius vermicularis in the appendix usually produces symptoms of acute appendicitis. Acute appendicitis due to enterobius vermicularis is very rare, affecting mostly children. The association of this parasitic infestation with acute appendicitis varies from 0.2%–41.8% worldwide. Whether pinworms cause inflammation of the appendix or just appendiceal colic has been a matter of controversy. We present a case of an 18 year old female with enterobiasis of appendix presented with clinical features of acute appendicitis. The appendix was surgically removed and the specimen was pathologically diagnosed to contain of enterobius vermicularis in non-inflamed and histologically mild mononuclear cell infiltrated appendix. One should keep in mind that the clinical signs of intestinal parasite infection may mimic acute appendicitis, although rare. A careful evaluation of symptoms such as pruritus ani, or eosinophilia on laboratory examination, could prevent unnecessary appendectomies.

  4. Computed tomography and ultrasonography in the diagnosis of equivocal acute appendicitis. A meta-analysis

    Acute appendicitis is the most common acute surgical condition of the abdomen. Computed tomography (CT) and Ultrasonography (US) can reduce the rate of complications and unnecessary appendectomies, in addition, they can establish an alternative diagnosis. We carried out a systematic review to evaluate the evidence relating radiological imaging (US and CT scan) and early detection of acute appendicitis in patients presenting with equivocal findings, and to provide recommendations to use radiological imaging (US and CT scan) in diagnosing acute appendicitis as part of the initial clinical assessment of the patients presenting with equivocal findings to reduce complications and unnecessary appendectomies. We used the MEDLINE to search for articles published from 1966 to December 2005 that related to radiological imaging of acute appendicitis; additional articles were identified from the bibliographies of review articles. Selection criteria were used to limit the analysis to prospective studies with more than 100 patients involved in each study as a study group. Forty-five studies fulfilling our inclusion and exclusion criteria were extracted, and 13,046 patients were included. Although the CT scan was more sensitive than US in diagnosing patients with equivocal appendicitis (93.4% [95% CI 92.1-94.6] versus 83.7% [95% CI 82.3-85.0]), either diagnostic study should be used as part of the initial assessment of the patients presenting with equivocal findings. (author)

  5. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Becker, Christoph D.; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Rutschmann, Olivier T. [University Hospital of Geneva, Emergency Center, Geneva (Switzerland); Verdun, Francis R. [University Institute for Radiation Physics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Gervaz, Pascal [University Hospital of Geneva, Clinic of Digestive Surgery, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) {>=} 18.5. In slim patients (BMI < 18.5), sensitivity to diagnose appendicitis was 50% (2/4) for LDCT and 100% (4/4) for standard CT, while specificity was identical for both techniques (67%, 2/3). LDCT may play a role in the diagnostic workup of patients with a BMI {>=} 18.5. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 18.5. In slim patients (BMI < 18.5), sensitivity to diagnose appendicitis was 50% (2/4) for LDCT and 100% (4/4) for standard CT, while specificity was identical for both techniques (67%, 2/3). LDCT may play a role in the diagnostic workup of patients with a BMI ≥ 18.5. (orig.)

  7. Value of multi-slice spiral CT MPVR reconstruction in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    Objective: To investigate the value of multi-slice spiral CT MPVR reconstruction in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Methods: A total of 39 patients with clinically suspected acute appendicitis underwent surgery from February, 2002 to September, 2003. They were prospectively examined before surgery with routine CT scanning and MPVR reconstruction spiral CT. 31 cases of appendicitis were confirmed after appendectomy. CT scans and surgery-pathology reports were evaluated on a five-grade scale from hyperemic-edematous appendix to abscess (normal appendix: 0 grade). Results: The results of spiral CT MPVR reconstruction were compared with the surgical and pathologic findings at appendectomy, yielding an accuracy of 87.2%, sensitivity of 90.3%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 93.3%, and negative predictive value of 66.7%, respectively. Results of routine CT yielded an accuracy of 38.5%, sensitivity of 38.7%, specificity of 37.5%, positive predictive value of 70.6%, and negative predictive value of 13.6%, respectively. MPVR reconstruction signs of 28 patients with acute appendicitis included enlarged appendix ( > 6 mm) (96.4%), appendicoliths (26.7%), caecal apical thickening (36.7%), periappendiceal inflammation (71.4%), and abscess (10.7%). Conclusion: The use of spiral CT MPVR reconstruction in patients with equivocal clinical presentation suspected of having acute appendicitis can lead to a significant improvement in the preoperative diagnosis and maybe a decrease in surgical-pathologic severity of appendiceal disease. (authors)

  8. Mucosal invasion by fusobacteria is a common feature of acute appendicitis in Germany, Russia, and China

    Alexander Swidsinski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: To investigate the geographic occurrence of mucosa-invading Fusobacteria in acute appendicitis. Patients and Methods: Carnoy- and formalin-fixated appendices from Germany, Russia, and China were comparatively investigated. Bacteria were detected using fluorescent in situ hybridization. Cecal biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and other conditions were used as disease controls. Results: Fusobacteria represented mainly by Fusobacterium nucleatum were the major invasive component in bacterial infiltrates in acute appendicitis but were completely absent in controls. The occurrence of invasive Fusobacteria in Germany, Russia, and China was the same. The detection rate in Carnoy-fixated material was 70-71% and in formalin-fixated material was 30-36%. Conclusions: Acute appendicitis is a polymicrobial infectious disease in which F. nucleatum and other Fusobacteria play a key role.

  9. Is urinary 5-HIAA determination a valuable method in diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children?

    Ozel S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to investigate the significance of spot urine 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA levels in patients admitted with the suspicion of acute appendicitis. Seventy-one patients with the mean age of 9.4±2.9 years, who were admitted to our pediatric surgery clinic between August 2002 and March 2004 with the complaints of abdominal pain were evaluated prospectively. Additionally spot urine samples were collected from 34 healthy children for control. 5-HIAA was detected from the urine samples in all children with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method. The results were analyzed with one way analysis of variance (ANOVA, post hoc Tukey HSD test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. After the clinical follow-up appendicitis was detected in 40 patients and abdominal pain was found to be due to causes other than appendicitis in 31 patients. Results were found to be correlative with the final diagnosis in all patients. The mean 5-HIAA levels were 2.5±1.8 µmol/dl in healthy children, whereas 9±5 µmol/dl in nonappendicitis and 18.9±17.8 µmol/dl in appendicitis patients, respectively. The difference between the patients with acute appendicitis and the other two groups were statistically significant ( P = 0.001. For a value of 8.9 µmol/dl, this test was found to be 70% sensitive and 67% specific according to the ROC curve. 5-HIAA significantly rises in pediatric acute appendicitis. However, due to high values of SD and relatively low sensitivity and specificity, this test seems to have limited diagnostic power as a single parameter in childhood acute appendicitis.

  10. Efficiency of unenhanced MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: Comparison with Alvarado scoring system and histopathological results

    Inci, Ercan, E-mail: ercan_inci@mynet.com [Department of Radiology, Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Incirli-Bakirkoy, Istanbul (Turkey); Hocaoglu, Elif; Aydin, Sibel; Palabiyik, Figen; Cimilli, Tan [Department of Radiology, Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Incirli-Bakirkoy, Istanbul (Turkey); Turhan, Ahmet Nuray; Ayguen, Ersan [Department of Surgery, Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare with Alvarado scores and histopathological results. Materials and methods: The study included 85 consecutive patients (mean age, 26.5 {+-} 11.3 years) who were clinically suspected of having acute appendicitis. Each patients Alvarado scores were recorded and unenhanced MRI was performed, consisting of T1-weighted, T2-weighted and fat-suppressed T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequences. The MR images were prospectively reviewed in consensus for the presence of acute appendicitis by two radiologists who were blinded to the results of the Alvarado scores. The study population were divided into three subgroups based on the MRI findings: Group I: definitely not appendicitis, Group II: probably appendicitis, Group III: definitely appendicitis. All patients were divided into two subgroups according to Alvarado scores as Group A (low: 1-6), and Group B (high: 7-10). MR findings were compared with Alvarado scores and histopathological findings. Results: Sixty-six (77.6%) of the 85 patients with clinically suspected acute appendicitis, had undergone surgery. The diagnosis of appendicitis could be correctly achieved with MRI in 55 (83.3%) of 57 (86.4%) patients with histopathologically proven acute appendicitis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of MRI examination and Alvarado scoring system in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis were 96.49%, 66.67%, 94.83%, 75.0% and 84.21%, 66.67%, 94.12%, 40.0%, respectively. Conclusions: MRI is a valuable technique for detecting acute appendicitis even in the cases with low Alvarado scores. To increase the diagnostic accuracy and preventing unnecessary laparotomies for suspected appendicitis, shorter and cheaper unenhanced basic MRI may be performed.

  11. Efficiency of unenhanced MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: Comparison with Alvarado scoring system and histopathological results

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare with Alvarado scores and histopathological results. Materials and methods: The study included 85 consecutive patients (mean age, 26.5 ± 11.3 years) who were clinically suspected of having acute appendicitis. Each patients Alvarado scores were recorded and unenhanced MRI was performed, consisting of T1-weighted, T2-weighted and fat-suppressed T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequences. The MR images were prospectively reviewed in consensus for the presence of acute appendicitis by two radiologists who were blinded to the results of the Alvarado scores. The study population were divided into three subgroups based on the MRI findings: Group I: definitely not appendicitis, Group II: probably appendicitis, Group III: definitely appendicitis. All patients were divided into two subgroups according to Alvarado scores as Group A (low: 1-6), and Group B (high: 7-10). MR findings were compared with Alvarado scores and histopathological findings. Results: Sixty-six (77.6%) of the 85 patients with clinically suspected acute appendicitis, had undergone surgery. The diagnosis of appendicitis could be correctly achieved with MRI in 55 (83.3%) of 57 (86.4%) patients with histopathologically proven acute appendicitis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of MRI examination and Alvarado scoring system in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis were 96.49%, 66.67%, 94.83%, 75.0% and 84.21%, 66.67%, 94.12%, 40.0%, respectively. Conclusions: MRI is a valuable technique for detecting acute appendicitis even in the cases with low Alvarado scores. To increase the diagnostic accuracy and preventing unnecessary laparotomies for suspected appendicitis, shorter and cheaper unenhanced basic MRI may be performed.

  12. Primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the appendix mimicking acute appendicitis

    Primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the appendix is a very rare neoplasm that usually presents with signs and symptoms of acute appendicitis and in particular with a right lower abdominal pain. Preoperative imaging detection of appendiceal adenocarcinoma has an important value because it may result in an appropriate surgical procedure. We report a rare case of primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the vermiform appendix in an 80-year-old man who was misdiagnosed on computed tomography (CT) scan as acute appendicitis

  13. Unusual computed tomography findings and complications in acute appendicitis; Aspectos tomograficos incomuns da apendicite aguda e suas complicacoes

    Palacio, Glaucia Andrade e Silva; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe [Hospital Sao Luiz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Setor de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: glauciapalacio@uol.com.br; Bianco, Fabio Davolio [Hospital Sao Luiz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Setor de Tomografia Computadorizada e Ressonancia Magnetica; Domenicis Junior, Osvaldo de [CURA Imagem e Diagnostico, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this article is to describe and illustrate unusual computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with acute appendicitis. We reviewed the charts of 200 patients with clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis who were submitted to abdominal CT before surgery. Patients with unusual presentation or complications were selected for illustrating the main CT findings. Unusual complications of acute appendicitis were related to anomalous position of the appendix, contiguity to intraperitoneal organs such as the liver, gall bladder, annexes and the bladder and continuous use of anti inflammatory or antibiotics during the diagnostic process. We concluded that CT is a useful diagnostic tool in patients with complicated or unusual presentation acute appendicitis. The first step towards diagnosis in these cases i to have in mind the hypothesis of appendicitis in patients with acute abdominal pain. (author)

  14. An Imaging Diagnostic Protocol in Children with Clinically Suspected Acute Appendicitis.

    Epifanio, Matias; Antonio de Medeiros Lima, Marco; Corrêa, Patricia; Baldisserotto, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate a new diagnostic strategy using clinical findings followed by ultrasound (US) and, in selected cases, MRI. This study included 166 children presenting signs and symptoms suggesting acute appendicitis. Cases classified as suggesting appendicitis according to clinical exams had to be referred to surgery, whereas the other cases were discharged. Unclear cases were evaluated using US. If the US results were considered inconclusive, patients underwent MRI. Of the 166 patients, 78 (47%) had acute appendicitis and 88 (53%) had other diseases. The strategy under study had a sensitivity of 96 per cent, specificity of 100 per cent, positive predictive value of 100 per cent, negative predictive value of 97 per cent, and accuracy of 98 per cent. Eight patients remained undiagnosed and underwent MRI. After MRI two girls presented normal appendixes and were discharged. One girl had an enlarged appendix on MRI and appendicitis could have been confirmed by surgery. In the other five patients, no other sign of the disease was detected by MRI such as an inflammatory mass, free fluid or an abscess in the right iliac fossa. All of them were discharged after clinical observation. In the vast majority of cases the correct diagnosis was reached by clinical and US examinations. When clinical assessment and US findings were inconclusive, MRI was useful to detect normal and abnormal appendixes and valuable to rule out other abdominal pathologies that mimic appendicitis. PMID:27215717

  15. Evaluation of Tc-99m leukocyte scan in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    A new /sup 99m/Tc Microlite leukocyte scan was performed in 38 patients to assess its value in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Autologous leukocytes are labeled with /sup 99m/Tc by inducing phagocytosis of /sup 99m/Tc albumin microcolloid particles. The advantages of this test over the standard indium-111 scan include superior imaging capability, a marked reduction (greater than 75%) in the radiation dose, and performance of the test including labeling, in less than 3 hr. Imaging is performed at 5-90 min postinjection of labeled cells. There were 19 male and 19 female patients with ages ranging from 10 to 80 years, in whom the diagnosis of appendicitis was indeterminate on clinical examination. Of the 13 of the 38 patients (34%) who came to surgery 12 had acute appendicitis. The WBC scan correctly identified 10 of the 12 cases of appendicitis. There were two false-negative studies. In the nonoperative group of 25 patients admitted for observation, 21 studies were reported as negative and four identified other sites of inflammation. All patients with a negative study have remained asymptomatic on follow-up. With a sensitivity of 83% (10/12) and a specificity of 100% (26/26) the /sup 99m/Tc leukocyte scan provides a rapid and highly accurate method for diagnosis of appendicitis in this preliminary study of patients with equivocal clinical exams

  16. Accuracy of Unenhanced MR Imaging in the Detection of Acute Appendicitis: Single-Institution Clinical Performance Review.

    Petkovska, Iva; Martin, Diego R; Covington, Matthew F; Urbina, Shannon; Duke, Eugene; Daye, Z John; Stolz, Lori A; Keim, Samuel M; Costello, James R; Chundru, Surya; Arif-Tiwari, Hina; Gilbertson-Dahdal, Dorothy; Gries, Lynn; Kalb, Bobby

    2016-05-01

    Purpose To determine the accuracy of unenhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of acute appendicitis in patients younger than 50 years who present to the emergency department with right lower quadrant (RLQ) pain. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this retrospective study of 403 patients from August 1, 2012, to July 30, 2014, and waived the informed consent requirement. A cross-department strategy was instituted to use MR imaging as the primary diagnostic modality in patients aged 3-49 years who presented to the emergency department with RLQ pain. All MR examinations were performed with a 1.5- or 3.0-T system. Images were acquired without breath holding by using multiplanar half-Fourier single-shot T2-weighted imaging without and with spectral adiabatic inversion recovery fat suppression without oral or intravenous contrast material. MR imaging room time was measured for each patient. Prospective image interpretations from clinical records were reviewed to document acute appendicitis or other causes of abdominal pain. Final clinical outcomes were determined by using (a) surgical results (n = 77), (b) telephone follow-up combined with review of the patient's medical records (n = 291), or (c) consensus expert panel assessment if no follow-up data were available (n = 35). Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging in the detection of acute appendicitis, and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were determined. Results Of the 403 patients, 67 had MR imaging findings that were positive for acute appendicitis, and 336 had negative findings. MR imaging had a sensitivity of 97.0% (65 of 67) and a specificity of 99.4% (334 of 336). The mean total room time was 14 minutes (range, 8-62 minutes). An alternate diagnosis was offered in 173 (51.5%) of 336 patients. Conclusion MR imaging is a highly sensitive and specific test in the evaluation of patients younger than 50 years

  17. Comparative study between patients with acute appendicitis treated in primary care units and in emergency hospitals

    Thiago de Paula Bon

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To retrospectively analyze the relationship of time of care, combined with possible post-appendectomy complications, with the promptness of transfer of patients seen in Emergency Care Units (UPA to the emergency hospital.Methods: We analyzed patients with preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis undergoing appendectomy from January to July 2012. Patients were divided into two groups according to the site of the first care. Group A included patients who received initial care directly in the emergency department of the Lourenço Jorge County Hospital (HMLJ and group B consisted of patients seen in the UPA and forwarded to HMLJ to undergo surgical treatment.Results: the average time between initial treatment and surgery in group A was 29 hours (SD = 21.95 and 54 hours in group B (SD = 54.5. Considering the onset of symptoms, the patients in group A were operated on average 67 hours after (SD = 42.55, while group B, 90 hours (SD = 59.58. After the operation, patients in group A were hospitalized, on average, for 94 hours (SD = 73.53 and group B, 129 hours (SD = 193.42.Conclusion: there was no significant difference in the time elapsed between the onset of symptoms, initial treatment and early surgical treatment, or time elapsed between surgery and discharge.

  18. Utility of abdominal ultrasonography in acute painful tables of right iliac Fossa with appendicitis acute suspicion. Maciel Hospital Experience

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most frequent causes of consultation and of indication of emergency laparotomy in most western countries. Despite its diagnostic being based mainly on clinical examination, there is a certain percentage of patients whose clinical presentation is atypical. In these cases image methods such as the abdominal ultrasound are particularly useful as diagnostic auxiliaries.The objective of this work is to compare the echographic with the Anatomopathological diagnosis in 80 patients who consulted the Hospital Maciel emergency service with episodes of acute appendicitis

  19. The impact of diagnostic delay on the course of acute appendicitis

    V.C. Cappendijk; F.W.J. Hazebroek (Frans)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The diagnosis of acute appendicitis is often delayed, which may complicate the further course of the disease. AIMS: To review appendectomy cases in order to determine the incidence of diagnostic delay, the underlying factors, and impact on the co

  20. Mesenteric teratoma associated with acute perforated appendicitis in a 2-year-old girl

    Jihoon Jang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mesenteric teratoma is a rare tumor, with few cases reported in the literature. Because mesenteric teratomas have no specific signs or symptoms, their clinical manifestations depend on their size and location. This report describes a mesenteric teratoma associated with acute perforated appendicitis in a 2-year-old girl who presented with abdominal pain and high grade fever.

  1. Hyperbilirubinaemia a predictive factor for complicated acute appendicitis: a study in a tertiary care hospital

    Objective: To study the role of hyperbilirubinaemia as a predictive factor for appendiceal perforation in acute appendicitis. Methods: The prospective, descriptive study was conducted at the Abbasi Shaheed Hospital and the Karachi Medical and Dental College, Karachi, from January 2010 to June 2012. It comprised all patients coming to the surgical outpatient department and emergency department with pain in the right iliac fossa with duration less than seven days. They were clinically assessed for signs and symptoms of acute appendicitis and relevant tests were conducted. Patients were diagnosed as a case of acute appendicitis on the basis of clinical and ultrasound findings, and were prepared for appendicectomy. Per-operative findings were recorded and specimens were sent for histopathology to confirm the diagnosis. SPSS version 10 was used to analyse the data. Results: Of the 71 patients, 37 (52.10%) were male and 34 (47.90%) were female. The age range was 3-57 years, and most of the patients (n=33; 46.5%) were between 11 and 20 years. Besides, 63 (89%) patients had pain in the right iliac fossa of less than four-days duration, while 8 (11%) had pain of longer duration. Total leukocyte count was found to be elevated in 33 (46.5%) patients, while total serum bilirubin was elevated in 41 (57.70%). Ultrasound of abdomen showed 9 (12.70%) patients having normal appearance of appendix and 59 (83.30%) had inflamed appendix. Four (5.60%) patients had no signs of inflammation on naked eye appearance per operatively. Histopathology of appendix showed 10 (14.10%) patients had non-inflammatory appendix. Conclusion: Patients with signs and symptoms of acute appendicitis and a raised total serum bilirubin level indicated a complication of acute appendicitis requiring an early intervention to prevent peritonitis and septicaemia. A raised serum bilirubin level is a good indicator of complicated acute appendicitis, and should be included in the assessment of patients with

  2. The role of radiolabeled leukocyte imaging in the management of patients with acute appendicitis

    Acute appendicitis is a clinical challenging surgical disease particularly difficult to diagnosis in women and children. An atypical presentation of acute appendicitis is a major factor leading to delay in diagnosis and unnecessary surgery. Delay in diagnosis is associated with morbidity from perforation, abscess and prolonged hospitalization. The routine use of adjunctive imaging studies has not improved the diagnostic accuracy for acute appendicitis nor has impacted clinical outcome. 99mTc HMPAO-labeled leukocyte imaging is one diagnostic imaging test that has the potential of altering the clinical management of acute appendicitis. 99mTc HMPAO-labeled leukocyte imaging is highly sensitive for detecting even small inflammatory processes in the abdomen because of high target to background and early rapid uptake at sites of inflammation. The paper studies the use of99mTc HMPAO-labeled leukocyte for diagnosis and management of suspected acute appendicitis in 124 patients with an atypical clinical presentation. Emergent imaging was performed immediately following injection of labeled leukocytes and continued until positive or through 2 hours if negative. The scan correctly and rapidly detected acute appendicitis in 50 of 51 patients with a surgical confirmation for a sensitivity of 98%. The specificity was 82% leading to an overall accuracy of 90%. The high negative predicted value of 98% allowed early discharge from the emergency department. The negative exploratory laparotomy rate wae 4% in this patient population compared to 9% in a similar population of patients who were not scanned. These data have been confirmed now in over 600 patients scanned in that department. The main drawbacks of 99mTc HMPAO-labeled leukocyte imaging are the requirement of blood handling and a delay in diagnosis because of 2-hours preparation time prior to imaging. There are new radiopharmaceuticals on the horizon which have the potential of replacing 99mTc HMPAO-labeled leukocyte imaging

  3. Transumbilical Laparoscopic-Assisted Appendectomy in the Treatment of Acute Uncomplicated Appendicitis in Children

    Carmine Noviello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transumbilical laparoscopic-assisted appendectomy (TULAA is increasingly being performed worldwide. The authors report their experience in the treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis in children with TULAA. From January 2008 to December 2012 all types of acute appendicitis were divided, according to the clinical and ultrasonographic findings, into complicated (appendiceal mass/abscess, diffuse peritonitis and uncomplicated. Complicated appendicitis was treated by open appendectomy (OA. All patients with the suspicion of uncomplicated appendicitis were offered TULAA by all surgeons of the team. Conversion to open or laparoscopic appendectomy (LA was performed in case of impossibility to complete TULAA, depending on the choice of surgeon. The histopathologic examination of appendix was always performed. 444 children (252 males with acute appendicitis were treated. The mean age was 9.2 years (range, 2 to 14 years. Primary OA was performed in 144 cases. In 300 patients a transumbilical laparoscopic-assisted approach was performed. TULAA was completed in 252 patients. Conversion to OA was performed in 45 patients and to LA in 3. Conversion was related to the impossibility to adequately expose the appendix in 47 patients and bleeding in 1. The mean operative time for TULAA was 42 minutes. Histopathologic examination of the appendix removed by TULAA showed a phlegmonous/gangrenous type in 92.8% of cases. Among the 252 TULAA there were 11 cases of umbilical wound infection. TULAA is a feasible and effective procedure for uncomplicated appendicitis in children. It combines the advantages of open and laparoscopic technique (low operative time, low complications rate, and excellent cosmetic results.

  4. Selection of nonessential intravenous contrast enhanced-computed tomography for diagnosing acute appendicitis

    Since computed tomography (CT) has made acute appendicitis increasingly easy to diagnose correctly, intravenous contrast-enhanced CT (IV-CT) is increasingly used for this diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to clarify an indication of IV-CT and to eliminate unnecessary IV-CT. We studied whether IV-CT is necessary in all patients suspected of acute appendicitis, given the interval between onset and clinical diagnosis. IV-CT was performed in patient who had right lower quadrant abdominal pain or who had no pain but physical findings at right lower quadrant abdomen. We reviewed detailed medical records of 171 consecutive patients who underwent IV-CT followed by appendectomy within 24 hr. We compared Blumberg's sign, muscle guarding, body temperature, white blood cell count, and C reaction protein, dividing patients into 3 groups-half a day, in which the interval between onset and initial diagnosis was shorter than half a day; 1-day, in which the interval was longer than half a day but shorter than 1 day; and multiple-day, in which the interval exceeded 1 day. We also analyzed IV-CT findings for the abnormal appendix and the number of positive individual CT findings including abnormal appendix, calcified appendicolith, ascites, cecal wall thickening, and dilated intestines. Muscle guarding was significantly common in the patients who had appendicitis among 1-day and multiple-day patients. In IV-CT, enlarged appendix was observed more frequently in those with appendicitis in all 3 groups. Positive individual CT findings were detected more often in multiple-day patients who had appendicitis. We found no significant difference among the other items. A patient diagnosed clinically later than half a day after onset and having muscle guarding should be strongly suspected having acute appendicitis, indicating that IV-CT is not needed in such patients. (author)

  5. Total leucocyte count, C-reactive protein and neutrophil count: Diagnostic Aid in acute appendicitis

    Shafi Sheikh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Acute appendicitis is one of the most common acute intraabdominal affections seen in surgical departments, which can be treated easily if an accurate diagnosis is made in time. Otherwise, delay in diagnosis and treatment can lead to diffuse peritonitis. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted on 110 patients who were operated for acute appendicitis to determine the role and predictive value of the total leucocyte count (TLC, C-reactive protein (CRP and percentage of neutrophil count in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Preoperative TLC, CRP and percentage of neutrophil count were determined and were compared with the results of the histopathology of the removed appendix. Results: Of all the patients studied, 92 had histopathologically positive appendicitis. The TLC was found to be significantly high in 90 patients who proved to have acute appendicitis, whereas CRP was high in only 88 patients and neutrophil percentage was raised in 91; four had a normal CRP level. Thus, TLC had a sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of 97.82%, 55.55% and 91.8%, respectively. CRP had a sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of 95.6%, 77.77% and 95.6% respectively. Percentage of neutrophil count had a sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of 98.9%, 38.88% and 89.21%, respectively. When used in combination, there was a marked improvement in the specificity and the positive predictive value to 88.04% and 98.7%, respectively. Conclusion: The inflammatory markers, i.e., TLC, CRP and neutrophil count can be helpful in the diagnosis when measured together as this increases their specificity and positive predictive value.

  6. Case report of idiopathic cecal perforation presenting as acute appendicitis on ultrasound

    Calista Harbaugh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cecal perforation is an uncommon phenomenon in a pediatric population. It has been linked to a number of underlying medical conditions, which may result in focal inflammation or relative ischemia including hematologic malignancy, infection, and inflammatory bowel disease. We present an otherwise healthy 16-year-old male diagnosed with acute uncomplicated appendicitis on ultrasound, who was found to have cecal perforation with normal appendix intraoperatively, ultimately requiring ileocectomy. With this report, we aim to present the numerous pathophysiologic etiologies of cecal perforation, and to promote a comprehensive differential diagnosis despite the clinical and radiologic findings consistent with uncomplicated appendicitis.

  7. Interleukin 6 and lipopolysaccharide binding protein - markers of inflammation in acute appendicitis.

    Brănescu, C; Serban, D; Dascălu, A M; Oprescu, S M; Savlovschi, C

    2013-01-01

    The rate of incidence of acute appendicitis is 12% in the case of male patients and 25% in case of women, which represents about 7% of the world population. The appendectomy rate has remained constant (i.e. 10 out of 10,000 patients per year). Appendicitis most often occurs in patients aged between 11-40 years, on the threshold between the third and fourth decades, the average age being 31.3 years. Since the first appendectomy performed by Claudius Amyand (1681/6 -1740), on December, 6th, 1735 to our days, i.e., 270 years later, time has confirmed the efficiency of both the therapy method and the surgical solution. The surgical cure in case of acute appendicitis has proved to be acceptable within the most widely practised techniques in general surgery. The variety of clinical forms has reached all age ranges, which in its turn has resulted in a large number of semiotic signs. In the case of acute appendicitis, interdisciplinarity has allowed the transfer of concept and methodology transfer among many areas of expertise, aimed at a better, minute understanding of the inflammatory event itself. Acute appendicitis illustrates inflammation development at digestive level and provides for a diagnostic and paraclinical exploration which continually upgrades. The recent inclusion in the studies of the Lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP)- type inflammation markers has laid the foundation of the latter's documented presence in the case of acute appendicitis-related inflammation. Proof of the correlation between the histopathological, clinical and evolutive forms can be found by identifying and quantifying these inflammation markers. The importance of studying inflammation markers allows us to conduct studies going beyond the prognosis of the various stages in which these markers were identified. The present article shows the results of a 1-year monitoring of the inflammation markers' values for Interleukin-6 and Lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP)-types, both pre

  8. A hybrid decision support model to discover informative knowledge in diagnosing acute appendicitis

    Son Chang Sik; Jang Byoung Kuk; Seo Suk Tae; Kim Min Soo; Kim Yoon Nyun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study is to develop a simple and reliable hybrid decision support model by combining statistical analysis and decision tree algorithms to ensure high accuracy of early diagnosis in patients with suspected acute appendicitis and to identify useful decision rules. Methods We enrolled 326 patients who attended an emergency medical center complaining mainly of acute abdominal pain. Statistical analysis approaches were used as a feature selection process in the ...

  9. Comparison of outcomes of laparoscopic intracorporeal knotting technique in patients with complicated and noncomplicated acute appendicitis

    Ay, Nurettin; Dinç, Bulent; Alp, Vahhac; Kaya, Şafak; Sevük, Utkan

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim In our study we aimed to compare laparoscopic intracorporeal knotting technique (base of the appendix was ligated with 20 cm of 2.0 silk) in patients with complicated acute appendicitis (CAA) and noncomplicated acute appendicitis. Patients and methods Ninety patients (female/male: 40/50, age ranging from 16 to 60 years, median age and interquartile range [IQR]: 25 [20; 32] years) who underwent laparoscopic appendectomy were included in the study. The patients were evaluated for the type of acute appendicitis, duration of operation, duration of hospital stay, and postoperative complications. Results The number of cases diagnosed as CAA was 28 (31.1%), and the number of noncomplicated cases was 62 (68.9%). We found that there was no significant difference in postoperative complication rates between complicated and noncomplicated appendicitis cases. Incision site infection was seen in seven cases (7.8%) and ileus was seen in two cases (2.2%). Bleeding, intra-abdominal abscess, and appendix stump leakage were not observed in any of the cases. Median and IQR duration of operation were 42 (35; 52) minutes and median and IQR duration of hospital stay were detected as 2 (1; 2) (range 1–10) days. Conclusion Laparoscopic intracorporeal knotting technique may be a safe, effective, and reliable technique as the materials needed for closing the appendix stumps are easily available for both CAA cases and noncomplicated cases. PMID:26316765

  10. Causes of delayed presentation of acute appendicitis and its impact on morbidity and mortality

    Background: Acute appendicitis is one of the commonest abdominal emergencies and appendectomy. is one of the commonest emergency procedures performed all over the world. The study was done with an objective to evaluate the different causative factors for delayed presentation of appendicitis. Method: This cross-sectional study was carried out in the Surgical C unit, at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan from 20th June 2013 to 19th June 2014. A total of 130 patients presented with appendicitis in OPDs or emergency department. Detailed history, general physical and systemic examination especially abdominal examination was done along with investigations. Results: It was found that 23.08 percentage of complicated appendicitis presentation is due to missed diagnosis by physicians, 30.77 percentage is due to missed diagnosis by non-doctors, 23.08 percentage is due to conservative management at DHQ hospitals by surgeons, and 23.08 percentage presented late because of self-medication at home. Conclusion: All patients with pain Right iliac fossa, there should be suspected of appendicitis. Proper workup should be done to exclude it. If kept on conservative management then regular monitoring of vitals with laboratory investigations should be done. (author)

  11. Comparison of outcomes of laparoscopic intracorporeal knotting technique in patients with complicated and noncomplicated acute appendicitis

    Ay N

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nurettin Ay,1 Bulent Dinç,2 Vahhac Alp,1 Şafak Kaya,3 Utkan Sevük4 1Department of General Surgery, Diyarbakir Gazi Yaşargil Training and Research Hospital, Diyarbakir, Turkey; 2Department of General Surgery, Ataturk State Hospital, Antalya, Turkey; 3Department of Infectious Disease, Diyarbakir Gazi Yaşargil Training and Research Hospital, Diyarbakir, Turkey; 4Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Diyarbakir Gazi Yaşargil Training and Research Hospital, Diyarbakir, Turkey Background and aim: In our study we aimed to compare laparoscopic intracorporeal knotting technique (base of the appendix was ligated with 20 cm of 2.0 silk in patients with complicated acute appendicitis (CAA and noncomplicated acute appendicitis. Patients and methods: Ninety patients (female/male: 40/50, age ranging from 16 to 60 years, median age and interquartile range [IQR]: 25 [20; 32] years who underwent laparoscopic appendectomy were included in the study. The patients were evaluated for the type of acute appendicitis, duration of operation, duration of hospital stay, and postoperative complications. Results: The number of cases diagnosed as CAA was 28 (31.1%, and the number of noncomplicated cases was 62 (68.9%. We found that there was no significant difference in postoperative complication rates between complicated and noncomplicated appendicitis cases. Incision site infection was seen in seven cases (7.8% and ileus was seen in two cases (2.2%. Bleeding, intra-abdominal abscess, and appendix stump leakage were not observed in any of the cases. Median and IQR duration of operation were 42 (35; 52 minutes and median and IQR duration of hospital stay were detected as 2 (1; 2 (range 1–10 days. Conclusion: Laparoscopic intracorporeal knotting technique may be a safe, effective, and reliable technique as the materials needed for closing the appendix stumps are easily available for both CAA cases and noncomplicated cases. Keywords: laparoscopic intracorporeal knotting

  12. A study of the usefulness of CT in diagnosis of diverticulitis of the right colon and acute appendicitis

    It is difficult to differentiate between diverticulitis of the right colon and acute appendicitis based on pathological and hematological findings. This study was designed to investigate the usefulness of CT in differentiation between the both diseases and indications of operation. Eight cases of right colon diverticulitis and 39 cases of acute appendicitis undergone abdominal plain CT scan before surgery were enrolled in the study. As for diverticulitis cases, diverticulum was visualized on abdominal CT scan in seven (87.5%) out of the eight cases. Of 39 cases of acute appendicitis, the appendix vermiformis was able to be visualized on abdominal CT scan in 26 (66.7%) cases. Some correlations between CT findings and postoperative pathological diagnosis of appendicitis were observed. A comparison was made on acute appendicitis cases by dividing them into two groups; namely, the non-surgery group comprising of cases pathologically diagnosed as non-inflammatory and catarrhal' and the surgery group comprising of cases diagnosed as 'phlegmonous and gangrenous' after surgery. Statistically significant difference was noted between both groups in two factors, whole-circumferential thickening of the appendiceal wall and fading panniculus adiposus around the appendix. It is concluded that abdominal CT scan is useful for differential diagnosis between right colon diverticulitis and acute appendicitis, and further that CT diagnosis of acute appendicitis well reflects the severity of the disease and contribute to decide indication of operation. (author)

  13. Acute right lower quadrant pain beyond acute appendicitis: MDCT in evaluation of benign and malignant gastrointestinal causes

    Reem Hassan Bassiouny

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Using a systematic pattern approach MDCT has proved to be an extremely useful noninvasive method for evaluation of patients with acute RLQP, allowing diagnosis and management of not only the most common conditions such as appendicitis but also less common conditions.

  14. BACTERIAL PATTERN OF APPENDIX IN ACUTE AND CHRONIC APPENDICITIS WITH ITS CLINICAL CORRELATION

    Surajit

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute appendicitis is a common, sometimes confusing and often treacherous cause of acute abdomen at all ages. The only way to reduce morbidity and to prevent mortality is to perform appendicectomy before perforation or gangrene occurs. As appendicectomy is a very common practice, it is essential to know in detail the various etiological factors that precipitate appendicitis. Bacterial invasion being a very common cause makes it imperative that we have a clear picture of the bacterial pattern of appendix in acute and recurrent appendicitis and to correlate this with clinical findings. A proper idea of bacterial flora of appendix thus helps us not only to prevent postoperative complication, but also to impart effective conservative treatment by pinpointing sensitive drugs. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES Knowledge of bacterial flora of appendix also has socio-economic benefits through low rates of post-operative complications, reduced hospital stay and also reduced indiscriminate use of multiple costly drugs. The aim of this study is to establish the bacterial profile in acute as well as recurrent appendicitis and to correlate the findings with the severity of the disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted on 90 patients irrespective of age and sex who attended the emergency and OPD during the course of the work with symptoms suggestive of appendicitis. Following appendicectomy, each of the specimens was cut into two pieces. One was sent for histopathological examination and other was sent for bacterial culture. RESULT The commonest bacteria isolated were Escherichia coli in 67.78% cases, which is a facultative anaerobe and it was closely accompanied by Klebsiella species in 47.78% cases. Other isolates that were recorded included Staphylococcus aureus in 3.33% cases with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus species in 2.22% cases each. Mixed infections were seen in phlegmonous, gangrenous and perforative appendicitis. Bacteroides

  15. Is it possible to make a useful scoring system for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis?

    We conducted a prospective study of 561 patients hospitalized with abdominal pain suggestive of acute appendicitis. History, signs, symptoms, leukocytosis and CT findings were analyzed for sensitivity and specificity. The result of a multivariate analysis of these factors revealed five factors which were found to be useful in making the diagnosis of acute appendicitis, as follows: age; CT findings (distended appendix, appendicolith, periappendiceal inflammatory changes); and the inflammatory changes around the ascending colon (negative finding). Based on this weighting, we devised a practical diagnostic score that may help in excluding catarrhal appendicitis and diagnosing only phlegmonous and gangrenous appendicitis for operation. As a result, the sensitivity and specificity were only 77.2% and 75.6%, respectively. The actual comprehensive diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 88% and 88.7%, respectively, were 10% greater than the sensitivity and specificity by the scoring system. This difference was equivalent to the overall judgment based on the experience of the surgeons, and appeared impossible to fill by the diagnostic score with statistical analysis. (author)

  16. Evaluation of the Appendix Base Location in Acute Appendicitis Using Sonography and its Clinical Significance

    Lee, Kwan Seop; Kim, Min Jeong; Ko, Eun Young; Hong, Myung Sun; Jeon, Eui Yong; Hwang, Hee Sung; Lee, In Jae; Yang, Ik; Lee, Eil Seong; Lee, Bong Hwa [Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the location of appendiceal base using sonography in acute appendicitis and the usefulness of the appendiceal base marking in deciding the incision site of appendectomy. We performed appendix sonography in 813 patients and 381 patients were diagnosed as acute appendicitis. During sonography, we marked the base of the appendix on the skin of the patients' abdomen. After appendiceal base marking, we measured the distance from McBurney's point to the appendiceal base. The marking was used as the guide for incision site for appendectomy by the surgeon. Among 381 patients, we excluded 78 patients due to non visualization of the cecoappendiceal junction (n = 6), pregnancy appendicitis (n = 2), false positive appendicitis (n = 3) and no reply from the surgeon (n = 67). So we investigated 303 patients prospectively. After operation, we asked the surgeon whether the appendiceal base marking was helpful for appendectomy or not. The base of the appendix at McBurney's point were 31%, lying within 2 cm from McBurney's point were 20%, within 5 cm were 28%, more than 5 cm were 21%. For the usefulness of appendiceal base marking, 95% showed good correlation with marking and surgical incision, and 5% revealed poor correlation. The base of the appendix was located in diverse areas of the abdomen, although most frequent in the McBurney's point and within 2 cm from the McBurney's point. Appendiceal base marking on the skin of the abdomen after diagnosis of acute appendicitis could be an useful method to guide the surgeon for decision of surgical incision site

  17. Evaluation of the Appendix Base Location in Acute Appendicitis Using Sonography and its Clinical Significance

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the location of appendiceal base using sonography in acute appendicitis and the usefulness of the appendiceal base marking in deciding the incision site of appendectomy. We performed appendix sonography in 813 patients and 381 patients were diagnosed as acute appendicitis. During sonography, we marked the base of the appendix on the skin of the patients' abdomen. After appendiceal base marking, we measured the distance from McBurney's point to the appendiceal base. The marking was used as the guide for incision site for appendectomy by the surgeon. Among 381 patients, we excluded 78 patients due to non visualization of the cecoappendiceal junction (n = 6), pregnancy appendicitis (n = 2), false positive appendicitis (n = 3) and no reply from the surgeon (n = 67). So we investigated 303 patients prospectively. After operation, we asked the surgeon whether the appendiceal base marking was helpful for appendectomy or not. The base of the appendix at McBurney's point were 31%, lying within 2 cm from McBurney's point were 20%, within 5 cm were 28%, more than 5 cm were 21%. For the usefulness of appendiceal base marking, 95% showed good correlation with marking and surgical incision, and 5% revealed poor correlation. The base of the appendix was located in diverse areas of the abdomen, although most frequent in the McBurney's point and within 2 cm from the McBurney's point. Appendiceal base marking on the skin of the abdomen after diagnosis of acute appendicitis could be an useful method to guide the surgeon for decision of surgical incision site

  18. Acute appendicitis secondary to Enterobius vermicularis infection in a middle-aged man: a case report

    Panidis Stavros

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute appendicitis due to Enterobius vermicularis is very rare, affecting mostly children. Whether pinworms cause inflammation of the appendix or just appendiceal colic has been a matter of controversy. Case presentation A Caucasian 52-year-old man was referred to our Emergency Department with acute abdominal pain in his right lower quadrant. The physical and laboratory examination revealed right iliac fossa tenderness and leukocytosis with neutrophilia. An open appendectomy was performed. The pathological examination showed the lumen containing pinworms. Two oral doses of mebendazole were administered postoperatively. The follow-up to date was without incident and he was free of symptoms one year after the operation. Conclusion The finding of E. vermicularis in appendectomy pathological specimens is infrequent. Parasitic infections rarely cause acute appendicitis, especially in adults. One should keep in mind that the clinical signs of intestinal parasite infection may mimic acute appendicitis, although rare. A careful evaluation of symptoms such as pruritus ani, or eosinophilia on laboratory examination, could prevent unnecessary appendectomies.

  19. Acute Appendicitis in a Man Undergoing Therapy for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    Michael Linden

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old man was diagnosed with an aggressive mantle cell lymphoma and was started on six cycles of R-CHOP chemotherapy. Approximately two weeks after starting his first cycle of chemotherapy, he complained of severe right lower quadrant abdominal pain, and an abdominal CT scan demonstrated an enlarged appendix with evidence of contained perforation. The man underwent open appendectomy for acute appendicitis and recovered. The appendectomy specimen was submitted for routine pathological analysis. There was histologic evidence of perforation in association with an inflammatory infiltrate with fibrin adhered to the serosal surface; scattered small lymphoid aggregates were present on the mucosal surface. Although the lymphoid aggregates in the submucosa and lamina propria were rather unremarkable by routine histologic examination, immunohistochemistry revealed the lymphocytes to be predominantly Cyclin D1-overexpressing B cells. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of acute appendicitis in association with appendiceal involvement by mantle cell lymphoma.

  20. Tubercular tubo-ovarian cystic mass mimicking acute appendicitis: a case report

    Arikanoglu Zulfu; Akbulut Sami; Basbug Murat

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Female genital tuberculosis is a rare form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It is an asymptomatic disease usually diagnosed during the search for causes of infertility. However, it can present with a number of abdominopelvic symptoms. Herein we report a case of tubo-ovarian tuberculosis mimicking acute appendicitis. Case presentation A 17-year-old single Turkish woman presented to our hospital with complaints of right lower quadrant abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. H...

  1. Acute appendicitis presenting with abdominal wall and right groin abscess: A case report

    Mustafa Yildiz; Ahmet Sevki Karakayali; Saadet Ozer; Hilal Ozer; Aydin Demir; Bugra Kaptanoglu

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of right lower abdominal wall and groin abscess resulting from acute appendicitis. The patient was an 27-year-old man who had no apparent abdominal signs and was brought to the hospital due to progressive painful swelling of right lower abdomen and the groin for 10 d. Significant inflammatory changes of soft tissue involving the right lower trunk were noted without any apparent signs of peritonitis. Laboratory results revealed leukocytosis. Abdominal ultrasonography described the presence of abscess at right inguinal site also communicating with the intraabdominal region. Right inguinal exploration and laparotomy were performed and about 250 mL of pus was drained from the subcutaneous tissue and preperitoneal space. No collection of pus was found intraabdominally and subserous acute appendicitis was the cause of the abscess. The patient fully recovered at the end of the second post-operation week. This case reminds us that acute appendicitis may have an atypical clinical presentation and should be treated carefully on an emergency basis to avoid serious complications.

  2. Teníase: uma causa rara de apendicite aguda Taeniasis: a rare cause of acute appendicitis

    Fábio Vieira Teixeira

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical condition of acute abdomen. Approximately 7 percent of the population will have appendicitis during their lifetime, with the peak incidence occurring between 10 through 30 years-old. Obstruction of the appendix lumen with subsequent bacterial infection initiates the pathophysiological sequence of acute appendicitis. Obstruction may have multiple causes, including fecalith, lymphoid hyperplasia (related to viral illnesses, including upper respiratory infection, mononucleosis, and gastroenteritis, foreign bodies, carcinoid tumor, and parasites. In Asia, Africa and Latin America, Enterobius vermicularis has been reported as the main parasite that causes appendix obstruction. Rarely, Taenia sp., has been pointed as a cause of parasitic appendicitis. We reported a 30 years-old patient clinically diagnosed with acute appendicitis. The appendectomy was performed through a McBurney incision. The patient's convalescence was uneventful, and he was discharged from hospital 48 hours after operation. Histological examination of the appendix showed acute appendicitis, and it was found a parasite (Taenia sp. lying inside of the appendix lumen at a transverse section. He has received 10 mg/Kg weight of praziquantel for taeniasis treatment.

  3. Perforated appendicitis masquerading as acute pancreatitis in a morbidly obese patient.

    Forster, Michael-J; Akoh, Jacob-A

    2008-03-21

    Diagnosis and treatment of common conditions in morbidly obese patients still pose a challenge to physicians and surgeons. Sometimes too much reliance is put on investigations that can lead to a misdiagnosis. This case demonstrates an obese woman admitted under the medical team with a presumed diagnosis of pneumonia, who was later found to have an acute abdomen and raised amylase, which led to an assumed diagnosis of pancreatitis. She died within 24 h of admission and post mortem confirmed the cause of death as systemic sepsis due to perforated appendicitis, with no evidence of pancreatitis. Significantly elevated serum amylase level may occur in non-pancreatitic acute abdomen. PMID:18350613

  4. Perforated appendicitis masquerading as acute pancreatitis in a morbidly obese patient

    Michael J Forster; Jacob A Akoh

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of common conditions in morbidly obese patients still pose a challenge to physicians and surgeons. Sometimes too much reliance is put on investigations that can lead to a misdiagnosis. This case demonstrates an obese woman admitted under the medical team with a presumed diagnosis of pneumonia, who was later found to have an acute abdomen and raised amylase, which led to an assumed diagnosis of pancreatitis. She died within 24 h of admission and post mortem confirmed the cause of death as systemic sepsis due to perforated appendicitis, with no evidence of pancreatitis. Significantly elevated serum amylase level may occur in non-pancreatitic acute abdomen.

  5. Acute appendicitis: diagnostic value of nonenhanced CT with selective use of contrast in routine clinical settings

    Tamburrini, Stefania [Universita' di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Dip. Sc. Biomorfologiche e Funzionali, Naples (Italy); UCSD Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Brunetti, Arturo [Universita' di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Dip. Sc. Biomorfologiche e Funzionali, Naples (Italy); Brown, Michele; Sirlin, Claude; Casola, Giovanna [UCSD Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2007-08-15

    The purposes of this study were to determine the (1) frequency with which nonenhanced computed tomography (CT) (NECT) permits conclusive diagnosis of acute appendicitis, (2) accuracy of NECT when findings are conclusive, and (3) overall accuracy of a CT protocol consisting of NECT with selective use of contrast. Five hundred and thirty-six patients underwent a NECT protocol with selective use of contrast. Diagnostic accuracy was then determined separately for (1) patients with conclusive initial NECT, (2) patients with inconclusive initial NECT, and (3) all patients. NECT was conclusive on initial interpretation in 404/536 patients and inconclusive in 132/536. Of 132 inconclusive studies, 126 were repeated with contrast (intravenous, oral or rectal). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value for diagnosis of acute appendicitis were (1) 90%, 96.0%, 84.8%, and 97.4% in patients with conclusive NECT (n = 404); (2) 95.6%, 92.3%, 73%, and 99% in patients with inconclusive NECT followed by repeat CT with contrast; and (3) 91.3%, 95%, 82%, and 98% in all patients. The initial diagnosis of appendicitis may be made by NECT in 75% of patients, with contrast administration reserved for inconclusive NECT studies. (orig.)

  6. Acute appendicitis: diagnostic value of nonenhanced CT with selective use of contrast in routine clinical settings

    The purposes of this study were to determine the (1) frequency with which nonenhanced computed tomography (CT) (NECT) permits conclusive diagnosis of acute appendicitis, (2) accuracy of NECT when findings are conclusive, and (3) overall accuracy of a CT protocol consisting of NECT with selective use of contrast. Five hundred and thirty-six patients underwent a NECT protocol with selective use of contrast. Diagnostic accuracy was then determined separately for (1) patients with conclusive initial NECT, (2) patients with inconclusive initial NECT, and (3) all patients. NECT was conclusive on initial interpretation in 404/536 patients and inconclusive in 132/536. Of 132 inconclusive studies, 126 were repeated with contrast (intravenous, oral or rectal). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value for diagnosis of acute appendicitis were (1) 90%, 96.0%, 84.8%, and 97.4% in patients with conclusive NECT (n = 404); (2) 95.6%, 92.3%, 73%, and 99% in patients with inconclusive NECT followed by repeat CT with contrast; and (3) 91.3%, 95%, 82%, and 98% in all patients. The initial diagnosis of appendicitis may be made by NECT in 75% of patients, with contrast administration reserved for inconclusive NECT studies. (orig.)

  7. Impact of the use of contrast-enhancement multidetector CT for acute appendicitis: a prospective comparison with the Alvarado score

    To determine the diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced multidetector CT (MDCT) and the Alvarado score for acute appendicitis. MDCT and determination of the Alvarado score were prospectively performed in 282 patients with 146 pathologically proven cases of acute appendicitis and 136 pathologically proven or clinically diagnosed cases of non-acute appendicitis. To compare the diagnostic performance of MDCT and the Alvarado score, the patients were subdivided according to age and sex, and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis and Spearman rank correlation were performed. ROC analysis revealed that the optimal cut off value of the CT appendicitis grades was 2 in all patients, resulting in a sensitivity of 96.6% and a specificity of 94.9%. The optimal cut off values of the Alvarado score was different according to age and sex, resulting in a sensitivity of 85.6% and a specificity of 48.5%. There was a significant correlation between the CT appendicitis grades and the surgical-pathological grades (r = 0.496, ρ < .0001). However, no significant correlation was observed between the Alvarado score and the surgical-pathological grades. Contrast-enhanced MDCT has a higher diagnostic accuracy and significant correlation with pathological findings than those of the Alvarado score in patients with acute appendicitis

  8. The efficacy of unenhanced MR imaging for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: a performance comparison versus abdominal ultrasonography

    To evaluate the efficacy of unenhanced MR imaging compared to the diagnostic accuracy, advantage, and limitations of abdominal ultrasonography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The study included 40 patients suspected of having acute appendicitis and who were subjected to an unenhanced MR image, as well as an abdominal ultrasonography. A T1 FLASH in an axial image, a chemical shift-selective fat suppressed T2 HASTE in an axial image, as well as a T2 HASTE in an axial and coronal image were obtained as unenhanced MR images. The diagnosis was established based on a surgical or clinical follow-up of the unenhanced MR results, which were then statistically compared to the ultrasonographic results. The surgical or clinical follow-up results revealed that 25 patients were positively diagnosed with appendicitis. Of these, 7 patients had symptoms of acute appendicitis with no pathologic diagnoses, whereas the 8 remaining patients were diagnosed with another condition. The sensitivity and accuracy of the unenhanced MR imaging was 92% and 90%, compared to ultrasonography which was 68% and 72.5% accurate, respectively. The differences in sensitivity and accuracy between the two methods were found to be statistically significant (ρ < 0.05, chi-square test). Based on these results, unenhanced MR imaging was superior to sonography for the diagnosis of appendicitis. Unenhanced MR imaging may be a useful modality for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis, especially for suboptimal or nondiagnostic sonographies, as well as patients that are particularity sensitive to radiation exposure

  9. A Patient with an Unusual Cause Right Lower Quadrant Pain and Vomiting: Pyelonephritis of an Ectopic Right Kidney Masquerading as Acute Appendicitis

    Michele N. Lossius

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An adolescent female presented with one day of abdominal pain and clinical findings of acute appendicitis. CT scan revealed an ectopic right kidney with changes of acute pyelonephritis. This paper underscores the importance of imaging the right pelvis prior to surgical intervention in suspected cases of acute appendicitis in children.

  10. Reassessment of CT images to improve diagnostic accuracy in patients with suspected acute appendicitis and an equivocal preoperative CT interpretation

    To identify CT features that discriminate individuals with and without acute appendicitis in patients with equivocal CT findings, and to assess whether knowledge of these findings improves diagnostic accuracy. 53 patients that underwent appendectomy with an indeterminate preoperative CT interpretation were selected and allocated to an acute appendicitis group or a non-appendicitis group. The 53 CT examinations were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus to identify CT findings that could aid in the discrimination of those with and without appendicitis. In addition, two additional radiologists were then requested to evaluate independently the 53 CT examinations using a 4-point scale, both before and after being informed of the potentially discriminating criteria. CT findings found to be significantly different in the two groups were; the presence of appendiceal wall enhancement, intraluminal air in appendix, a coexistent inflammatory lesion, and appendiceal wall thickening (P < 0.05). Areas under the curves of reviewers 1 and 2 significantly increased from 0.516 and 0.706 to 0.677 and 0.841, respectively, when reviewers were told which CT variables were significant (P = 0.0193 and P = 0.0397, respectively). Knowledge of the identified CT findings was found to improve diagnostic accuracy for acute appendicitis in patients with equivocal CT findings. circle Numerous patients with clinically equivocal appendicitis do not have acute appendicitis circle Computed tomography (CT) helps to reduce the negative appendectomy rate circle CT is not always infallible and may also demonstrate indeterminate findings circle However knowledge of significant CT variables can further reduce negative appendectomy rate circle An equivocal CT interpretation of appendicitis should be reassessed with this knowledge. (orig.)

  11. Reassessment of CT images to improve diagnostic accuracy in patients with suspected acute appendicitis and an equivocal preoperative CT interpretation

    Kim, Hyun Cheol; Yang, Dal Mo; Kim, Sang Won [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Jin [Kyung Hee University Hospital, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To identify CT features that discriminate individuals with and without acute appendicitis in patients with equivocal CT findings, and to assess whether knowledge of these findings improves diagnostic accuracy. 53 patients that underwent appendectomy with an indeterminate preoperative CT interpretation were selected and allocated to an acute appendicitis group or a non-appendicitis group. The 53 CT examinations were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus to identify CT findings that could aid in the discrimination of those with and without appendicitis. In addition, two additional radiologists were then requested to evaluate independently the 53 CT examinations using a 4-point scale, both before and after being informed of the potentially discriminating criteria. CT findings found to be significantly different in the two groups were; the presence of appendiceal wall enhancement, intraluminal air in appendix, a coexistent inflammatory lesion, and appendiceal wall thickening (P < 0.05). Areas under the curves of reviewers 1 and 2 significantly increased from 0.516 and 0.706 to 0.677 and 0.841, respectively, when reviewers were told which CT variables were significant (P = 0.0193 and P = 0.0397, respectively). Knowledge of the identified CT findings was found to improve diagnostic accuracy for acute appendicitis in patients with equivocal CT findings. circle Numerous patients with clinically equivocal appendicitis do not have acute appendicitis circle Computed tomography (CT) helps to reduce the negative appendectomy rate circle CT is not always infallible and may also demonstrate indeterminate findings circle However knowledge of significant CT variables can further reduce negative appendectomy rate circle An equivocal CT interpretation of appendicitis should be reassessed with this knowledge. (orig.)

  12. Comparative analysis between single incision and conventional laparoscopic appendectomy for acute appendicitis

    Sreeram Sateesh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Appendicitis is an acute inflammatory condition of appendix. Since it is a surgical emergency, needs early diagnosis and treatment strategies which include clinical examination, followed by Laboratory investigations and Imaging studies. The scoring systems like Alvarado score have been considered for better diagnosis. In most studies surgery has been reported as the best modality of treatment. Several studies clearly mentioned the impact of various surgical procedures which include Open appendectomy (OA, Conventional laparoscopic appendectomy (CLA and Single incision laparoscopic appendectomy (SILA. Hence, the present study is carried in an aim to assess and compare the merits and demerits between the surgical procedures Like SILA and CLA. The patients were randomly selected from the surgical department (NMCH who presented with acute pain abdomen and diagnosed as acute appendicitis. 50 patients were enrolled in the study after fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The various demographic variables have been studied between the surgical procedures to demonstrate their impact, which include wound infection rate, pain scores at 24 and 48hrs, the amount of time period for surgery in minutes, patient satisfaction scores and post-operative stay tenure at the hospital in days. The laparoscopic hand instruments used in both techniques are similar, except covidien port which was reused in SILA, following gas sterilization to reduce the cost. Findings reveal that the pain score was significantly lower in SILA than CLA group. The procedure time is comparatively more in SILA than CLA group. Patients had significant satisfaction score in SILA measured at 6 weeks after appendectomy. However the post operative stay, wound infection rate was almost similar in both the groups. There was no conversion to open Appendectomy performed in either of these groups. Results also clearly suggest that the SILA procedure is the safe, alternative and effective

  13. The value of pancreatic stone protein in predicting acute appendicitis in patients presenting at the emergency department with abdominal pain

    Tschuor Christoph

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic Stone Protein (PSP is a protein naturally produced mainly in the pancreas and the gut. There is evidence from experimental and clinical trials that blood PSP levels rise in the presence of inflammation or infection. However, it is not known whether PSP is superior to other established blood tests (e.g. White Blood Count, Neutrophils or C - reactive protein in predicting appendicitis in patients presenting with abdominal pain and a clinical suspicion of appendicitis at the emergency room. Methods/design The PSP Appendix Trial is a prospective, multi-center, cohort study to assess the value of PSP in the diagnostic workup of acute appendicitis. 245 patients will be prospectively recruited. Interim analysis will be performed once 123 patients are recruited. The primary endpoint of the study concerns the diagnostic accuracy of PSP in predicting acute appendicitis and therefore the evidence of appendicitis on the histopathological specimen after appendectomy. Discussion The PSP Appendix Trial is a prospective, multi-center, cohort study to assess the value of PSP in the diagnostic workup of acute appendicitis. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01610193; Institution Ethical Board Approval ID: KEKZH- Nr. 2011–0501

  14. The usefulness of enhanced computed tomography imaging in the diagnosis and evaluation of the severity of acute appendicitis

    To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and the decision for an appropriate operative approach, CT was performed in addition to the clinical and laboratory findings in 42 patients suspected of having acute appendicitis. As for CT findings, surgical intervention was considered in principle in patients with enlargement of the appendix over 10 mm, enhanced appendiceal wall, appendicolith, abscess, ascites, deficiency of appendiceal wall, or hazy periappendicular densities. The maximal diameter of resected specimen was also measured. Surgery was conducted in 23 patients, and 19 of them had phlegmonous/gangrenous appendicitis. The remaining 19 patients were treated without surgery. Enhanced appendiceal wall and hazy periappendicular densities were detected in all patients with phlegmonous/gangrenous appendicitis, and deficiency of the appendiceal wall, appendicolith, and abscess/ascites were seen in 79%, 42% and 58%, respectively. The maximal diameter of phlegmonous/gangrenous appendix was 11.8 mm, and was significantly larger than that of the appendix with normal or catarrhal appendicitis. The correlation coefficient of the maximal diameter of the appendix between resected specimen and the appendix as measured with CT was 0.65. The specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy of the preoperative diagnosis including CT were 75%, 97%, and 90%, respectively. Preoperative diagnosis including CT is useful to identify acute appendicitis, to evaluate the severity of disease, and to decide the surgical indication. (author)

  15. Comparison of two surgical techniques; simple ligation and ligation with invagination of appendicular stump in appendicectomy for acute appendicitis

    Appendicitis is an important differential diagnosis in patients with right lower quadrant pain. Acute appendicitis is the common emergency encountered round the globe. It is the cause of an acute surgical abdomen, and it remains one of the most challenging diagnoses in the emergency department. Appendicectomy is the accepted therapy for acute appendicitis. To compare the technique of simple ligation and ligation with burial of the stump during appendicectomy for acute appendicitis. Subjects and Methods: Eighty cases of acute appendicitis were analysed for this study. They were randomly allocated to the two surgical procedures such as simple ligation (Group I) and ligation with invagination (Group II) of appendicular stump in appendicectomy. The clinical variables were statistically evaluated. The frequency of postoperative ileus was more in group II (22.5%, and 5%) during first 48 and 72 hours respectively as compared to group I, P 0.05). Simple ligation of stump during appendicectomy is a better and safe procedure as compared to the invagination of stump because there is less incidence of postoperative complications such as postoperative paralytic ileus and wound infection. (author)

  16. Usefulness of the inner hypoechoic band of the vermiform appendix as ultrasonographic criteria for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of the inner hypoechoic band in pediatric appendices as an ultrasonographic criterion to exclude or confirm acute appendicitis. Among the 169 consecutive children with right lower abdominal pain, the 149 appendices depicted on US were prospectively evaluated for an inner hypoechoic band in the appendiceal walls. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy were assessed for loss of the inner hypoechoic band as a diagnostic criterion for acute appendicitis. The appendices in 12 (25%) patients with acute appendicitis show entire inner hypoechoic bands and those in 36 patient (75%) did not. The appendices in 97 (96%) patients without acute appendicitis showed entire inner hypoechoic bands, an those in 4 (4%) did not. The loss of inner hypoechoic band confirmed acute appendicitis with a sensitivity of 75%, a specificity of 96%, positive and negative predictive values of 89% and 90%, respectively, and an accuracy of 89%. The thickness of the inner hypoechoic band in patients without appendicitis was significantly higher than that in patients with appendicitis (ρ = 0.03). The visualization of entire thickened inner hypoechoic band in the appendiceal wall helps to rule out acute appendicitis. However, the loss of the inner hypoechoic band is suggestive of acute appendicitis

  17. Acute appendicitis in a young adult with midgut malrotation: a case report

    Bider, K.; Kaim, A.; Wiesner, W.; Bongartz, G. [Dept. of Radiology University Hospital Basel (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    Midgut malrotation is defined as a developmental anomaly that may cause atypical clinical symptoms in relatively common intestinal disorders due to altered anatomy. A 27-year-old woman presented with acute left-sided abdominal pain. Underlying type Ia malrotation prevented the correct clinical diagnosis of perforated, ulcerated appendicitis. Cross-sectional imaging demonstrated all the typical signs of this type of malrotation, i.e., right-sided duodenojejunal junction, left positioned cecum and ascending colon, inverted position of the superior mesenteric vessels, and hypoplasia of the uncinate process of pancreas, and surgical treatment was initiated. (orig.)

  18. Torsion of a giant pedunculated liver hemangioma mimicking acute appendicitis: a case report

    Sari Serkan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hemangiomas are the most common benign neoplasms affecting the liver. They occur at all ages. Most cases are asymptomatic and do not require any treatment. Rarely, hemangiomas can be pedunculated. İf they undergo torsion and infarction, they become symptomatic. Herein; we report the case of a 31 year old male presenting with features of acute appendicitis: continuous right iliac fossa pain, rebound, guarding tenderness at McBurney' s point, nausea, anorexia, shifted white blood cell count and a Mantrels score of 6. At laparotomy a normal appendix was observed and a torsioned pedinculated liver hemangioma turned out to be the cause.

  19. Localized pseudomembranous colitis in the cecum and ascending colon mimicking acute appendicitis

    Ju Won Chyung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to right lower abdominal pain and watery diarrhea for 3 d. Beginning 3 wk before he arrived in our hospital, he took 3rd-generation cephalosporin (cefixime for 2 wk due to chronic left ear otitis media. Colonoscopic examination revealed yellowish patches of ulcerations and swelling covered with thick serosanguineous exudate in the cecum and ascending colon. After 7 d of oral metronidazole treatment, his symptoms completely disappeared. We report a case of localized pseudomembranous colitis in the cecum and ascending colon mimicking acute appendicitis associated with cefixime.

  20. Localized pseudomembranous colitis in the cecum and ascending colon mimicking acute appendicitis.

    Chyung, Ju Won; Shin, Dong Gue

    2013-05-27

    A 61-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to right lower abdominal pain and watery diarrhea for 3 d. Beginning 3 wk before he arrived in our hospital, he took 3(rd)-generation cephalosporin (cefixime) for 2 wk due to chronic left ear otitis media. Colonoscopic examination revealed yellowish patches of ulcerations and swelling covered with thick serosanguineous exudate in the cecum and ascending colon. After 7 d of oral metronidazole treatment, his symptoms completely disappeared. We report a case of localized pseudomembranous colitis in the cecum and ascending colon mimicking acute appendicitis associated with cefixime. PMID:23710293

  1. Iterative reconstruction technique with reduced volume CT dose index: diagnostic accuracy in pediatric acute appendicitis

    Iterative reconstruction technique has been proposed as a means of reducing patient radiation dose in pediatric CT. Yet, the effect of such reductions on diagnostic accuracy has not been thoroughly evaluated. This study compares accuracy of diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis using contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans performed with traditional pediatric weight-based protocols and filtered back projection reconstruction vs. a filtered back projection/iterative reconstruction technique blend with reduced volume CT dose index (CTDIvol). Results of pediatric contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans done for pain and/or suspected appendicitis were reviewed in two groups: A, 192 scans performed with the hospital's established weight-based CT protocols and filtered back projection reconstruction; B, 194 scans performed with iterative reconstruction technique and reduced CTDIvol. Reduced CTDIvol was achieved primarily by reductions in effective tube current-time product (mAseff) and tube peak kilovoltage (kVp). CT interpretation was correlated with clinical follow-up and/or surgical pathology. CTDIvol, size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) and performance characteristics of the two CT techniques were then compared. Between groups A and B, mean CTDIvol was reduced by 45%, and mean SSDE was reduced by 46%. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 96%, 97% and 96% in group A vs. 100%, 99% and 99% in group B. Accuracy in diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis was maintained in contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans that incorporated iterative reconstruction technique, despite reductions in mean CTDIvol and SSDE by nearly half as compared to the hospital's traditional weight-based protocols. (orig.)

  2. Iterative reconstruction technique with reduced volume CT dose index: diagnostic accuracy in pediatric acute appendicitis

    Didier, Ryne A. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, DC7R, Portland, OR (United States); Vajtai, Petra L. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Pediatrics, Portland, OR (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, DC7R, Portland, OR (United States); Hopkins, Katharine L. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, DC7R, Portland, OR (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Pediatrics, Portland, OR (United States)

    2014-07-05

    Iterative reconstruction technique has been proposed as a means of reducing patient radiation dose in pediatric CT. Yet, the effect of such reductions on diagnostic accuracy has not been thoroughly evaluated. This study compares accuracy of diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis using contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans performed with traditional pediatric weight-based protocols and filtered back projection reconstruction vs. a filtered back projection/iterative reconstruction technique blend with reduced volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}). Results of pediatric contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans done for pain and/or suspected appendicitis were reviewed in two groups: A, 192 scans performed with the hospital's established weight-based CT protocols and filtered back projection reconstruction; B, 194 scans performed with iterative reconstruction technique and reduced CTDI{sub vol}. Reduced CTDI{sub vol} was achieved primarily by reductions in effective tube current-time product (mAs{sub eff}) and tube peak kilovoltage (kVp). CT interpretation was correlated with clinical follow-up and/or surgical pathology. CTDI{sub vol}, size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) and performance characteristics of the two CT techniques were then compared. Between groups A and B, mean CTDI{sub vol} was reduced by 45%, and mean SSDE was reduced by 46%. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 96%, 97% and 96% in group A vs. 100%, 99% and 99% in group B. Accuracy in diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis was maintained in contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans that incorporated iterative reconstruction technique, despite reductions in mean CTDI{sub vol} and SSDE by nearly half as compared to the hospital's traditional weight-based protocols. (orig.)

  3. Cytomegalovirus immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome manifesting as acute appendicitis in an HIV-infected patient

    Faldetta, Kimberly F; Kattakuzhy, Sarah; Wang, Hao-Wei; Sereti, Irini; Sheikh, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Background Appendicitis occurs with increased frequency in HIV infected compared to HIV uninfected persons. CMV-related appendicitis specifically presents with typical appendicitis symptoms including surgical abdomen, fever and leukocytosis and may have a more severe course with higher mortality than other types of infective appendicitis. We report the first case of CMV appendicitis as a manifestation of Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS). Case presentation The patient was a 3...

  4. Non-surgical contraindication for acute appendicitis with secondary thrombocytopenia: a case report.

    Zhang, Hai-Hong; Gu, Guo-Li; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Fan, Qin; Wang, Xin-Yan; Wei, Xue-Ming

    2015-03-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with migrated right lower abdominal pain and without any history of hematological systemic diseases. Blood routine test showed a leukocyte count of 22.74 × 10(9)/L, with 91.4% neutrophils, and a platelet count of 4 × 10(9)/L before admission. The case question was whether the team should proceed with surgery. Obviously, a differential diagnosis is essential before making such a decision. Acute appendicitis was easily diagnosed based on clinical findings, including migrating abdominal pain, a leukocyte count of 22.74 × 10(9)/L and the result of abdominal computed tomography scan. However, it was not clear whether the severe thrombocytopenia was primary or secondary. So smear of peripheral blood and aspiration of bone marrow were ordered to exclude hematological diseases. Neither of the tests indicated obvious pathological hematological changes. There was no hepatosplenomegaly found by ultrasound examination of the liver and spleen. Therefore, operative intervention may be a unique clinical scenario in acute severe appendicitis patients with secondary thrombocytopenia. PMID:25759558

  5. Tubercular tubo-ovarian cystic mass mimicking acute appendicitis: a case report

    Arikanoglu Zulfu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Female genital tuberculosis is a rare form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It is an asymptomatic disease usually diagnosed during the search for causes of infertility. However, it can present with a number of abdominopelvic symptoms. Herein we report a case of tubo-ovarian tuberculosis mimicking acute appendicitis. Case presentation A 17-year-old single Turkish woman presented to our hospital with complaints of right lower quadrant abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Her physical examination findings, ultrasonogram, and leukocyte count were consistent with acute appendicitis. A cystic mass (15 cm × 6 cm was detected on the right tubo-ovarian structure by laparotomy. The mass was excised while the tubo-ovarian structures were preserved and the need for an appendectomy was avoided. No microbiological evaluation was performed. The histopathological examination of the cystic mass revealed a granuloma with central caseating necrosis surrounded by epithelioid histiocytes. The patient was treated with anti-tuberculosis therapy for six months. No recurrence was observed during a 10-month follow-up period. Conclusion Genital tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of right lower quadrant pain in women who live in tuberculosis-endemic regions.

  6. Blunt abdominal trauma with handlebar injury: A rare cause of traumatic amputation of the appendix associated with acute appendicitis

    Amanda Jensen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe traumatic appendicitis in a 7-year-old boy who presented after sustaining blunt abdominal trauma to his right lower abdomen secondary to bicycle handlebar injury. With diffuse abdominal pain following injury, he was admitted for observation. Computed axial tomography (CT obtained at an outside hospital demonstrated moderate stranding of the abdomen in the right lower quadrant. The CT was non-contrasted and therefore significant appendiceal distention could not be confirmed. However, there was a calcified structure in the right pelvis with trace amount of free fluid. Patient was observed with conservative management and over the course of 15 h his abdominal pain continued to intensify. With his worsening symptoms, we elected to take him for diagnostic laparoscopy. In the operating room we found an inflamed traumatically amputated appendix with the mesoappendix intact. We therefore proceeded with laparoscopic appendectomy. Pathology demonstrated acute appendicitis with fecalith. It was unclear as to whether the patient's appendicitis and perforation were secondary to fecalith obstruction, his blunt abdominal trauma or if they concurrently caused his appendicitis. Acute appendicitis is a common acute surgical condition in the pediatric population and continues to be a rare and unique cause of operative intervention in the trauma population.

  7. A hybrid decision support model to discover informative knowledge in diagnosing acute appendicitis

    Son Chang Sik

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is to develop a simple and reliable hybrid decision support model by combining statistical analysis and decision tree algorithms to ensure high accuracy of early diagnosis in patients with suspected acute appendicitis and to identify useful decision rules. Methods We enrolled 326 patients who attended an emergency medical center complaining mainly of acute abdominal pain. Statistical analysis approaches were used as a feature selection process in the design of decision support models, including the Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, the Mann-Whitney U-test (p Results Of 55 variables, two subsets were found to be indispensable for early diagnostic knowledge discovery in acute appendicitis. The two subsets were as follows: (1 lymphocytes, urine glucose, total bilirubin, total amylase, chloride, red blood cell, neutrophils, eosinophils, white blood cell, complaints, basophils, glucose, monocytes, activated partial thromboplastin time, urine ketone, and direct bilirubin in the univariate analysis-based model; and (2 neutrophils, complaints, total bilirubin, urine glucose, and lipase in the multivariate analysis-based model. The experimental results showed that the model with univariate analysis (80.2%, 82.4%, 78.3%, 76.8%, 83.5%, and 80.3% outperformed models using multivariate analysis (71.6%, 69.3%, 73.7%, 69.7%, 73.3%, and 71.5% with entry and removal criteria of 0.01 and 0.05; 73.5%, 66.0%, 80.0%, 74.3%, 72.9%, and 73.0% with entry and removal criteria of 0.05 and 0.10 in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and area under ROC curve, during a 10-fold cross validation. A statistically significant difference was detected in the pairwise comparison of ROC curves (p p Conclusions The decision model developed in this study can be applied as an aid in the initial decision making of clinicians to increase vigilance in cases of suspected acute

  8. Ripasa score: a new diagnostic score for diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    Objective: To determine the usefulness of RIPASA score for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis using histopathology as a gold standard. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of General Surgery, Combined Military Hospital, Kohat, from September 2011 to March 2012. Methodology: A total of 267 patients were included in this study. RIPASA score was assessed. The diagnosis of appendicitis was made clinically aided by routine sonography of abdomen. After appendicectomies, resected appendices were sent for histopathological examination. The 15 parameters and the scores generated were age (less than 40 years = 1 point; greater than 40 years = 0.5 point), gender (male = 1 point; female = 0.5 point), Right Iliac Fossa (RIF) pain (0.5 point), migration of pain to RIF (0.5 point), nausea and vomiting (1 point), anorexia (1 point), duration of symptoms (less than 48 hours = 1 point; more than 48 hours = 0.5 point), RIF tenderness (1 point), guarding (2 points), rebound tenderness (1 point), Rovsing's sign (2 points), fever (1 point), raised white cell count (1 point), negative urinalysis (1 point) and foreign national registration identity card (1 point). The optimal cut-off threshold score from the ROC was 7.5. Sensitivity analysis was done. Results: Out of 267 patients, 156 (58.4%) were male while remaining 111 patients (41.6%) were female with mean age of 23.5 +- 9.1 years. Sensitivity of RIPASA score was 96.7%, specificity 93.0%, diagnostic accuracy was 95.1%, positive predictive value was 94.8% and negative predictive value was 95.54%. Conclusion: RIPASA score at a cut-off total score of 7.5 was a useful tool to diagnose appendicitis, in equivocal cases of pain. (author)

  9. C-reactive protein and white blood cell count do not improve clinical decision-making in acute appendicitis

    Tind, Sofie; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Zimmermann-Nielsen, Erik;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute appendicitis (AA) remains a diagnostic challenge as indicated by the high rate of unnecessary surgery. Blood samples, primarily C-reactive protein (CRP) and leucocyte counts, are used as a diagnostic supplement despite their relatively low sensitivities and specificities...... leucocyte counts did not influence clinical decision-making....

  10. INCIDENCE, RISK FACTORS AND COMPLICATIONS OF ACUTE PERFORATED AND NON - PERFORATED APPENDICITIS IN A RURAL SETUP OF ANDHRA PRADESH

    Anil Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Appendicitis is one of the most common surgical emergencies. The incidence of appendicitis and chances of complication in the form of perforation are dependent on both the patients and non - patient factors . There are various studies conducted to address this problem, but there are no studies conducted to look in to the incidence of appendicitis in east Godavari district of Andhra Pradesh. Our study was aimed to bridge thi s gap. METHOD S AND MATERIALS: this was a retrospective study, patient data from 2009 - 2014 was analyzed and the age, distance from hospital, educational and socioeconomic background of the patients was collected. The duration between first appearance of sy mptoms and hospitalization was recorded. The incidence of post - op complication was also recorded. RESULTS: T he incidence of perforation was 15% in our study population, most of the patients were from low socioeconomic group and having income less than 5000 /month. The middle age group between 30 - 40 years was commonly affected by the appendicitis. The time laps between appearance of symptoms and hospitalization was found to be a predominant factor in the perforation. Surgical site infection was most common co mplication in the patients treated. CONCLUSION: T he incidence of perforation is still high and the time laps between first appearance of symptoms and hospitalization is a major determinant of perforation or complication in the appendicitis.

  11. Evaluation of modified Alvarado score in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    Abhinandan B. Vandakudri

    2016-01-01

    Results: The result of the study showed that high scores in men and children (7-9 had a sensitivity of 92.3% and 83.3% respectively, whereas in females it had a sensitivity of 72.7%. The score (5-6 in males and females had a sensitivity of 57% and 50% respectively. Conclusions: The high scores in modified Alvarado score is dependable aid in the early diagnosis of acute appendicitis in men and children but it's not true as far as women are considered. Ultrasonography of abdomen is a useful tool in avoiding negative appendicectomy rates particularly in females. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(1.000: 84-88

  12. Suppurative appendicitis presenting as acute scrotum confounded by a testicular appendage

    Shumon, Syed; Bennett, John; Lawson, Geoffrey; Small, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Patients presenting with testicular pain and swelling mandate an urgent urology review and scrotal exploration to prevent testicle loss due to torsion. Other pathology masquerading as torsion is extremely rare but can occur. We present one such case. A 14-year-old male presented with a 1-day history of right testicular swelling and tenderness. He was apyrexial and denied any other symptoms. Blood tests demonstrated raised inflammatory markers. He had lower left-sided abdominal tenderness with a swollen, erythematous right hemiscrotum. During an urgent scrotal exploration for testicular torsion, a purulent hydrocele with a patent process vaginalis was noted, but no torsion. Post-operative abdominal pain mandated a general surgical review and subsequent appendicectomy. The patient made a full recovery. Acute suppurative appendicitis presenting as a urological emergency is extremely rare. To make a correct diagnosis and prevent multiple surgeries, a joint urological and general surgical assessment with a high index of suspicion is required. PMID:26966225

  13. 急性阑尾炎术后切口感染的防治%Prevention of wound infection after acute appendicitis

    张崇广; 王文江

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨综合措施预防急性阑尾炎术后切口感染的效果。方法选取2008年1月~2014年12月我院接受急性阑尾炎手术患者363例作为研究对象,从术前刷手、皮肤消毒等到术中操作以及术后围手术期处理的各个环节进行回顾性分析。结果本组患者仅发生切口感染3例,感染发生率为0.8%。结论采取综合方法预防阑尾术后切口感染,明显降低切口感染率,效果满意。%Objective To explore effective comprehensive measures of acute appendicitis postoperative infection prevention.Methods 363 cases of acute appendicitis from preoperative surgical scrub,skin disinfection until surgery operations and all aspects of perioperative treatment were analyzed retrospectively.Results Wound infection occurred in this group only three cases,the infection rate was 0.8%.Conclusion We take an integrated approach to the prevention of wound infection after appendectomy,signiifcantly reduced wound infection rate,results were satisfactory.

  14. Correlation of serum C-reactive protein, white blood count and neutrophil percentage with histopathology findings in acute appendicitis

    Xharra Shefki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute appendicitis is one of the most common surgical emergencies. Accurate diagnosis of acute appendicitis is based on careful history, physical examination, laboratory and imaging investigation. The aim of the study is to analyze the role of C-reactive protein (CRP, white blood count (WBC and Neutrophil percentage (NP in improving the accuracy of diagnosis of acute appendicitis and to compare it with the intraoperative assessment and histopathology findings. Materials and methods This investigation was a prospective double blinded clinical study. The study was done on 173 patients surgically treated for acute appendicitis. The WBC, NP, and measurement of CRP were randomly collected pre-operatively from all involved patients. Macroscopic assessment was made from the operation. Appendectomy and a histopathology examination were performed on all patients. Gross description was compared with histopathology results and then correlated with CRP, WBC, and NP. Results The observational accuracy was 87,3%, as compared to histopathological accuracy which was 85.5% with a total of 173 patients that were operated on. The histopathology showed 25 (14.5% patients had normal appendices, and 148 (85.5% patients had acutely inflamed, gangrenous, or perforated appendicitis. 52% were male and 48% were female, with the age ranging from 5 to 59 with a median of 19.7. The gangrenous type was the most frequent (52.6%. The WBC was altered in 77.5% of the cases, NP in 72.3%, and C-reactive protein in 76.9% cases. In those with positive appendicitis, the CRP and WBC values were elevated in 126 patients (72.8%, whereas NP was higher than 75% in 117 patients (67.6%. Out of 106 patients with triple positive tests, 101 (95.2% had appendicitis. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values of the 3 tests in combination were 95.3%, 72.2%, and 95.3%, respectively. Conclusion The raised value of the CRP was directly related to the severity of

  15. Diagnosis and Treatment of Mucinous Appendiceal Neoplasm Presented as Acute Appendicitis

    Kehagias, Ioannis; Markopoulos, Georgios; Papandreou, Thanasis; Kraniotis, Pantelis

    2016-01-01

    Appendiceal mucocele is a rare cause of acute abdomen. Mucinous appendiceal neoplasms represent 0.2–0.7% of all appendix specimens. The aim of this study is to report a case of a mucinous appendiceal neoplasm presented as acute appendicitis, discussing the clinical and surgical approach in the emergency setting. A 72-year-old female patient was admitted to the emergency department with a clinical examination indicative of acute abdomen. The patient underwent abdominal computed tomography scan which revealed a cystic lesion in the right iliac fossa measuring 8.3 × 5.2 × 4.1 cm, with calcified walls, and a mean density indicative of high protein content. The patient was taken to the operating room and a right hemicolectomy was performed. The postoperative course was unremarkable. The histopathological examination revealed a low-grade mucinous appendiceal neoplasm with negative regional lymph nodes. Ultrasound and CT are useful in diagnosing appendiceal mucocele and synchronous cancers in the emergency setting. The initial operation should include appendectomy and resection of the appendicular mesenteric fat along with any fluid collection for cytologic examination. During urgent appendectomy it is important to consider every mucocele as malignant in order to avoid iatrogenic perforation causing pseudomyxoma peritonei. Although laparotomy is recommended, the laparoscopic approach is not contraindicated. PMID:27066284

  16. A SURVEY ON FREQUENCY OF ACUTE APPENDICITIS IN (15-70 YEARS DURING 1418-1420 (LUNAR

    A DAVOUDABADI

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available History and Objective: Since acute appendicitis occur as a surgical emergency and should be operated as soon as possible, our experiences showed some fluctuations of appendicitis in Various mouth. We Performed this study to define the frequency of it in 1418 - 1420. Material and Method: Affected Patients In all ages, and aged from 15 - 70 years old which tolerated fasting were enrolled in this study Age. sex and the number of operated patient in each month were considered. Results: Total number of docummended appendicitis Were 414 - 423 - 407 for the years of 1418, 1419 and 1420 respectively. The ratio of M/F=1.2:1 and total frequency was 110/100000.ln the Moharram and Shawal of 1418-20 the number of patients were 49-48-46 and 54-47-47 respectively, which was higher than other months Rmadan had the least frequent patients in these years (20-25-17 there was no significant difference in the number of patient among other months. Conclusion: The frequency of acute appendicitis is decreaed in Ramadan significantly which was most likely due to the fasting and diatary states of the ptients althouqh other nivestigation is rocommended.

  17. A Feasibility Study of Real-Time Remote CT Reading for Suspected Acute Appendicitis Using an iPhone.

    Kim, Changsun; Kang, Bossng; Choi, Hyuk Joong; Park, Joon Bum

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of an iPhone-based remote control system as a real-time remote computed tomography (CT) reading tool for suspected appendicitis using a third-generation (3G) network under suboptimal illumination. One hundred twenty abdominal CT scans were selected; 60 had no signs of appendicitis, whereas the remaining 60 had signs of appendicitis. The 16 raters reviewed the images using the liquid crystal display (LCD) monitor of a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) workstation, as well as using an iPhone connected to the PACS workstation via a remote control system. We graded the probability of the presence of acute appendicitis for each examination using a five-point Likert scale. The overall sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of suspected appendicitis using the iPhone and the LCD monitor were high, and they were not significantly different (sensitivity P = 1.00, specificity P = 0.14). The average areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for all CT readings with the iPhone and LCD monitor were 0.978 (confidence interval 0.965-0.991) and 0.974 (0.960-0.988), respectively, and the two devices did not have significantly different diagnostic performances (P = 0.55). The inter-rater agreement for both devices was very good; the kappa value for the iPhone was 0.809 (0.793-0.826), and that for the LCD monitor was 0.817 (0.801-0.834). Each rater had moderate-to-very good intra-observer agreement between the two devices. We verified the feasibility of an iPhone-based remote control system as a real-time remote CT reading tool for identifying suspected appendicitis using a 3G network and suboptimal illumination. PMID:25700617

  18. 超声在急性阑尾炎临床诊断和分型中的临床意义%Clinical Signi.cance of Ultrasound in Acute Appendicitis Diagnosis and Pathological Typing

    盛建超

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the significance of ultrasound in acute appendicitis diagnosis and pathological typing.Methods A retrospective review of 168 cases of emergency patients with acute abdomen with operation in the years April 2010 ~ November 2011 was done with comparison between preoperative ultrasonography diagnosis results and postoperative pathological examination results.Results Simple appendicitis ultrasound diagnostic accuracy rate was 97.1%,suppurative appendicitis accuracy rate was 95.2%,gangrenous appendicitis ultrasound accuracy rate was 100%,the overall diagnostic accuracy rate was 97.1%.Appendiceal ultrasonography of appendicitis group shows that the appendiceal diameter,length,wall thickness were higher than that of non-acute-appendicitis patients(P < 0.01).Conclusion Ultrasonography on acute appendicitis diagnosis accuracy rate is very high,which has important diagnostic value,and should be preferred as auxiliary diagnostic method.%目的 探讨超声在急性阑尾炎诊断及病理分型中的作用和意义.方法 回顾2010年4月~2011 年11月急诊就诊的急腹症患者168例,均进行手术治疗,比较术前超声检查诊断结果 与术后病理检查结果 的差异.结果 单纯性阑尾炎超声诊断准确率为97.1%,化脓性阑尾炎准确率为95.2%,坏疽性阑尾炎准确率为100%,超声总的诊断准确率为97.1%;阑尾炎组的阑尾超声结果 显示其阑尾直径、长度、管壁厚度均高于非阑尾炎急腹症患者(P<0.01).结论 超声检查对急性阑尾炎诊断准确率很高,具有重要的诊断价值,应作为首选辅助诊断方法.

  19. Appendicitis in Children: Evaluation of the Pediatric Appendicitis Score in Younger and Older Children

    Martin Salö

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to evaluate Pediatric Appendicitis Score (PAS, diagnostic delay, and factors responsible for possible late diagnosis in children <4 years compared with older children who were operated on for suspected appendicitis. Method. 122 children, between 1 and 14 years, operated on with appendectomy for suspected appendicitis, were retrospectively analyzed. The cohort was divided into two age groups: ≥4 years (n=102 and <4 years (n=20. Results. The mean PAS was lower among the younger compared with the older patients (5.3 and 6.6, resp.; P=0.005, despite the fact that younger children had more severe appendicitis (75.0% and 33.3%, resp.; P=0.001. PAS had low sensitivity in both groups, with a significantly lower sensitivity among the younger patients. Parent and doctor delay were confirmed in children <4 years of age with appendicitis. PAS did not aid in patients with doctor delay. Parameters in patient history, symptoms, and abdominal examination were more diffuse in younger children. Conclusion. PAS should be used with caution when examining children younger than 4 years of age. Diffuse symptoms in younger children with acute appendicitis lead to delay and to later diagnosis and more complicated appendicitis.

  20. Primary appendiceal lymphoma presenting as suspected perforated acute appendicitis: clinical, sonography and CT findings with pathologic correlation

    Guo, Jingjing; Wu, Gang; Chen, Xiaojun; Li, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the most common site for extranodal involvement by non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. However, primary appendiceal lymphomas presenting as perforated acute appendicitis are very rare: they occur in only 0.015% of all gastrointestinal lymphoma cases. The management of this condition is still controversial, and a multimodality approach (e.g., surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy) is the optimal treatment. In these cases, appendiceal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas typically m...

  1. Spontaneous intra-peritoneal bleeding secondary to warfarin, presenting as an acute appendicitis: a case report and review of literature

    Shah Dharmendra K; Kumar Vikas; Sagar Jayesh; Bhatnagar Ashok

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Warfarin is a coumarin anti-coagulant, used widely for the therapeutic and prophylactic anticoagulation. Although, it is considered as a life saving medicine, it is associated with the significant adverse effects including intra-abdominal bleeding, which have been very well documented in literature. However, the presentation of warfarin induced intra-peritoneal bleeding as an acute appendicitis has not been reported in English literature. We report this rare, spontaneous i...

  2. Avaliação ultra-sonográfica da apendicite aguda Ultrasonographic evaluation of acute appendicitis

    Orlando Jorge Martins Torres

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A apendicite aguda é a mais comum urgência cirúrgica abdominal. Na tentativa de aumentar a acurácia diagnóstica a ultra-sonografia abdominal tem sido observada como método sensível e específico. O presente estudo tem por objetivo avaliar a ultra-sonografia do abdome no diagnóstico de apendicite aguda. MÉTODO: Um total de 138 pacientes submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico com suspeita diagnóstica admitidos no Hospital Municipal Djalma Marques foi estudado no período de janeiro de 1997 a dezembro de 1998. Todos os exames foram realizados na mesma instituição e havia 87 pacientes do sexo masculino (63,0% e 51 do sexo feminino (37,0% com idade variando de 11 a 81 anos (média de 28,4 anos. RESULTADOS: Dos 134 casos com diagnóstico comprovado cirurgicamente, o estudo ultra-sonográfico foi positivo em 114 (sensibilidade de 85,0%. O apêndice foi visualizado como imagem longitudinal ou transversal maior do que 7mm em 75 dos 114 achados positivos (65,8%. CONCLUSÕES: Os autores concluem que a ultra-sonografia abdominal é um instrumento valioso no diagnóstico de apendicite aguda.BACKGROUND: Acute appendicitis is the most common disease leading to emergency abdominal surgery. Many diagnostic tools have been evaluated. Abdominal ultrasonography is sensitive and specific which increase diagnostic accuracy in acute appendicitis. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the abdominal ultrasonography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. METHOD: A total of 138 patients underwent surgical treatment for suspected appendicitis admitted to the Hospital Municipal Djalma Marques from January 1997 to December 1998. All abdominal ultrasonography examinations were performed at same hospital. There were 87 male (63.0% and 51 female (37.0%, and their ages ranged from 11 to 81 years (mean 28.4 years. RESULTS: Of the 134 patients with proved appendicitis at surgery the ultrasonographic diagnosis was positive in 114 (sensitivity of 85.0%. The

  3. Assessment of effectiveness of ultrasonography in diagnosis of acute appendicitis: Correlation with level of initial clinical diagnostic confidence

    To evaluate effectiveness of ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis by comparing with initial level of clinical diagnostic confidence. Graded compression US of one hundred forty eight with clinically suspected of acute appendicitis were prospectively evaluated. General surgeons classified patients into three groups bases on the clinical probability before US examination: group 1 as cases with low probability (75%). Two radiologists performed US examination. Statistical significance of ultrasonographic results in each group was assessed. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of sonography for all patients were 91.3%, 97%, 97.3%, 90.4%, and 93.9% respectively. Those of group 1 were 100%, 95.5%, 84.6%, 100%, and 96.4%, and those of group 2, 95.8%, 100%, 100%, 95%, and 97.7% while those of group 3, 86.4%, 100%, 100%, 50%, and 88%. There was no statistical difference in each parameter among three groups. The accuracy and NPV in group 3 was significantly higher than those in groups with the low and intermediate probability (group 1 and 2). Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis is an useful and reliable method, especially in case of low clinical diagnostic confidence.

  4. Assessment of effectiveness of ultrasonography in diagnosis of acute appendicitis: Correlation with level of initial clinical diagnostic confidence

    Song, Soon Young; Koo, Ja Hong; Lee, Eun Ja; Lee, Jong In; Jung, Jin Ho; Kim, Jin Young; Oh, Hwa Eun [Kwandong University College of Medicine, Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Won Jin [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sam Soo; Heon, Han [Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    To evaluate effectiveness of ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis by comparing with initial level of clinical diagnostic confidence. Graded compression US of one hundred forty eight with clinically suspected of acute appendicitis were prospectively evaluated. General surgeons classified patients into three groups bases on the clinical probability before US examination: group 1 as cases with low probability (<25%), group 2 as cases with an intermediate probability (25-75%) and group 3 as cases with a high probability (>75%). Two radiologists performed US examination. Statistical significance of ultrasonographic results in each group was assessed. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of sonography for all patients were 91.3%, 97%, 97.3%, 90.4%, and 93.9% respectively. Those of group 1 were 100%, 95.5%, 84.6%, 100%, and 96.4%, and those of group 2, 95.8%, 100%, 100%, 95%, and 97.7% while those of group 3, 86.4%, 100%, 100%, 50%, and 88%. There was no statistical difference in each parameter among three groups. The accuracy and NPV in group 3 was significantly higher than those in groups with the low and intermediate probability (group 1 and 2). Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis is an useful and reliable method, especially in case of low clinical diagnostic confidence.

  5. The diagnostic value of a panel of serological markers in acute appendicitis

    Farooqui, W; Pommergaard, H-C; Burcharth, J; Eriksen, J R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Appendicitis is a frequent reason for hospital admissions. Elevated C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, and serum bilirubin have been suggested as individual markers for appendicitis and appendiceal perforation. The aim of this study was to analyze if a combination of serologic...... markers could increase the prognostic accuracy of diagnosing non-perforated and perforated appendicitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Demographic data, histological findings, blood tests, and clinical symptoms were collected on all patients who underwent a diagnostic laparoscopy, a laparoscopic appendectomy, or...... conventional (open) appendectomy between May 2009 and May 2012 from a surgical department. The patients were grouped into those with either perforated appendicitis, non-perforated appendicitis, or differential diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate models were used to identify which markers were useful in...

  6. Endothelial Fas-Ligand in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and in Acute Appendicitis.

    Kokkonen, Tuomo S; Karttunen, Tuomo J

    2015-12-01

    Fas-mediated induction of apoptosis is a major factor in the selection of lymphocytes and downregulation of immunological processes. In the present study, we have assessed endothelial Fas-ligand (FasL) expression in normal human ileum, appendix, and colon, and compared the expression levels with that in inflammatory bowel disease and in acute appendicitis. In a normal appendix, endothelial FasL levels were constant in almost half of the mucosal vessels; but, in the normal ileum and colon, endothelial FasL was practically restricted to areas in close proximity to lymphatic follicles, and was expressed mainly in the submucosal aspect of the follicles in the vessels with high endothelium. In samples from subjects with either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, the extent of endothelial FasL expression was elevated in the submucosa and associated with an elevated number of lymphoid follicles. In inflammatory bowel disease, ulcers and areas with a high density of mononuclear cells expressing FasL also showed an elevated density of blood vessels with endothelial FasL expression. Although the function of endothelial FasL remains unclear, such a specific expression pattern suggests that endothelial FasL expression has a role in the regulation of lymphocyte access to the peripheral lymphoid tissues, including the intestinal mucosa. PMID:26374830

  7. Lessons to be learned: a case study approach--acute appendicitis masquerading as macroamylasaemia.

    Ganesh, Muniappan; Salam, Imroz

    2008-05-01

    Macroamylasaemia is a condition in which serum amylase is elevated in the presence of a low to normal urinary amylase and normal renal function. It is rare but can masquerade as other clinical disorders. Discussed here is a case report of a patient who presented initially with abdominal pain (later recognized as being due to gangrenous appendicitis) and in whom there was a very high serum amylase level, leading to an erroneous initial diagnosis and management as acute pancreatitis. The CT scan of the abdomen was normal without any evidence of pancreatitis. Subsequently, the renal amylase:creatinine clearance ratio (C(am)/C(cr)) was found to be low, being characteristic and diagnostic of macroamylasaemia; the latter was, in turn, the cause for the elevated serum amylase level. The underlying macroamylasaemia had thus masqueraded as pancreatitis. The patient underwent appendicectomy and hence made an excellent recovery. It is vitally important to recognize this condition in order to avoid both an incorrect diagnosis and inappropriate treatment/management. PMID:18595630

  8. Informative content of clinical symptoms of acute appendicitis in different terms of pregnancy

    Kutovoy A.B.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose to evaluate diagnostic efficacy of some clinical symptoms of acute appendicitis 75 women in different terms of pregnancy were examined. Informative content of such symptoms as Kocher- Volkovich, Rovsing, Bartomje - Michelson, Sitkovsky, Gabay, Brendo, Michelson, Ivanov was studied. Pain syndrome was fixed in all examined women. Pain localization was various and depended on the pregnancy term. During the I trimester of pregnancy the most often pain was manifestated in epigastrium and right lower quadrant, rarely in other abdomen regions. In the II trimester in majority of cases pain occurred in right lower quadrant. During III trimester pain prevailed in right upper quadrant of abdomen. Analyzing informative component of researching symptoms there was noted significant decrease (р<0,05; р<0,01; р<0,001 of their diagnostic value with growth of pregnancy term. Therefore Kocher – Volkovich and Rovsing symptoms were the most informative in the I trimester of pregnancy. Diagnostic efficacy of Brendo(67,3%, Michelson(55,7%, Ivanov(59,6% symptoms was higher than that of Kocher – Volkovich (36,5%, Rovsing (28,8%, Sitkovsky (51,9%, Bartomje – Michelson (55,7% symptoms, their value was diminishing together with increase of pregnancy terms.

  9. Rectal contrast-enhanced computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    To assess the efficacy and utility of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of appendicitis, and to evaluate the reliability of CT findings in right iliac fossa in the confirmation or exclusion of this diagnosis. Over a one-year period, 152 patients presenting clinical signs of appendicitis underwent CT scans. The images were reviewed by two radiologists who considered whether the appendix was normal or enlarged and the existence of other signs of appendicitis for the purpose of determining whether or not the patient presented appendicitis. The definitive diagnoses were established by surgery or by clinical follow-up. The sensitivity of CT for the diagnosis of appendicitis was 81.8%, the specificity was 95.3%, the positive predictive value was 93.1%, the negative predictive value was 87.2% and the reliability was 89.9%. The signs of appendicitis observed were: appendicoliths (sensitivity 30.3% and specificity 98.8%), fluid collections (sensitivity 19.7%, specificity 96.5%), cecal enlargement (sensitivity 21.2%, specificity 97.7%), inflammation of pericecal fat (sensitivity 72.7%, specificity 90.7%), fascial thickening (sensitivity 48.5%, specificity 91.9%) and an appendix measuring more than 6 mm (sensitivity 78.8%, specificity 94.3%). Adenopathy and free peritoneal fluid were not significantly related to appendicitis. The presence of a normal appendix filled with air or contrast material had an elevated negative predictive value with respect to appendicitis. In 35 of the 94 cases with negative CT scans, the images suggested alternative diagnoses. CT is a highly reliable diagnostic method for appendicitis. The observation of an appendix filled with air or contrast material has an elevated negative predictive value. The presence of appendicoliths has an elevated positive predictive value. (Author) 29 refs

  10. Bedside Ultrasonography as an Adjunct to Routine Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in the Emergency Department

    Samuel H.F. Lam

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Appendicitis is a common condition presenting to the emergency department (ED. Increasingly emergency physicians (EP are using bedside ultrasound (BUS as an adjunct diagnostic tool. Our objective is to investigate the test characteristics of BUS for the diagnosis of appendicitis and identify components of routine ED workup and BUS associated with the presence of appendicitis. Methods: Patients four years of age and older presenting to the ED with suspected appendicitis were eligible for enrollment. After informed consent was obtained, BUS was performed on the subjects by trained EPs who had undergone a minimum of one-hour didactic training on the use of BUS to diagnose appendicitis.They then recorded elements of clinical history, physical examination, white blood cell count (WBC with polymophonuclear percentage (PMN, and BUS findings on a data form. We ascertained subject outcomes by a combination of medical record review and telephone follow-up. Results: A total of 125 subjects consented for the study, and 116 had adequate image data for final analysis. Prevalence of appendicitis was 40%. Mean age of the subjects was 20.2 years, and 51% were male. BUS was 100% sensitive (95% CI 87-100% and 32% specific (95% CI 14-57% for detection of appendicitis, with a positive predictive value of 72% (95% CI 56-84%, and a negative predictive value of 100% (95% CI 52-100%. Assuming all non-diagnostic studies were negative would yield a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 81%. Subjects with appendicitis had a significantly higher occurrence of anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and a higher WBC and PMN count when compared to those without appendicitis. Their BUS studies were significantly more likely to result in visualization of the appendix, appendix diameter >6mm, appendix wall thickness >2mm, periappendiceal fluid, visualization of the appendix tip, and sonographic Mcburney’s sign (p6mm, appendix wall thickness >2mm, periappendiceal fluid were

  11. The validity and reliability of iridology in the diagnosis of previous acute appendicitis as evi-denced by appendectomy

    L. Frank

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iridology is defined as a photographic science that identifies pathological and functional changes within organs via biomicroscopic iris assessment for aberrant lines, spots, and discolourations. According to iridology, the iris does not reflect changes  during  anaesthesia,  due  to  the  drugs inhibitory  effects  on  nerves  impulses,  and  in cases of organ removal, it reflects the pre-surgical condition.The profession of Homoeopathy is frequently associated with iridology and in a recent survey (2009  investigating  the  perceptions  of  Masters of  Technology  graduates  in  Homoeopathy  of University of Johannesburg, iridology was highly regarded as a potential additional skill requirement for assessing the health status of the patient.This  study  investigated  the  reliability  of iridology  in  the  diagnosis  of  previous  acute appendicitis, as evidenced by appendectomy. A total of 60 participants took part in the study. Thirty of the 60 participants had an appendectomy due to acute appendicitis, and 30 had had no prior history  of  appendicitis.  Each  participant’s  right iris  was  documented  by  photography  with  the use  of  a  non-mydriatic  retinal  camera  that  was reset for photographing the iris. The photographs were then randomized by an external person and no identifying data made available to the three raters.  The  raters  included  the  researcher,  who had little experience in iridology and two highly experienced  practising  iridologists.  Data  was obtained  from  the  analyses  of  the  photographs wherein  the  presence  or  absence  of  lesions (implying acute appendicitis was indicated by the raters. None of the three raters was able to show a significant  success  rate  in  identifying  correctly the  people  with  a  previous  history  of  acute appendicitis and resultant appendectomies

  12. ALVARADO’S ACUTE APPENDICITIS SCORE FOR ALGORITHM, ADMISSION AND APPENDICECTOMY

    Kiran Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Appendicitis is a most common abdominal surgical emergency, clinically mimicked by other pathologies. Even with modern imaging, at times diagnosis is challenging. Several scorings are available to predict pre-operative diagnosis.

  13. Acute appendicitis: prospective evaluation of a diagnostic algorithm integrating ultrasound and low-dose CT to reduce the need of standard CT

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland); University Hospital of Geneva, Emergency Center, Geneva (Switzerland); Perrot, Thomas de; Becker, Christoph D. [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Sarasin, Francois; Rutschmann, Olivier [University Hospital of Geneva, Emergency Center, Geneva (Switzerland); Andereggen, Elisabeth [University Hospital of Geneva, Emergency Center, Geneva (Switzerland); University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Surgery, Geneva (Switzerland); Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Perneger, Thomas [University Hospital of Geneva, Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Gervaz, Pascal [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Surgery, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-12-15

    To evaluate an algorithm integrating ultrasound and low-dose unenhanced CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) in the assessment of acute appendicitis, to reduce the need of conventional CT. Ultrasound was performed upon admission in 183 consecutive adult patients (111 women, 72 men, mean age 32) with suspicion of acute appendicitis and a BMI between 18.5 and 30 (step 1). No further examination was recommended when ultrasound was positive for appendicitis, negative with low clinical suspicion, or demonstrated an alternative diagnosis. All other patients underwent LDCT (30 mAs) (step 2). Standard intravenously enhanced CT (180 mAs) was performed after indeterminate LDCT (step 3). No further imaging was recommended after ultrasound in 84 (46%) patients; LDCT was obtained in 99 (54%). LDCT was positive or negative for appendicitis in 81 (82%) of these 99 patients, indeterminate in 18 (18%) who underwent standard CT. Eighty-six (47%) of the 183 patients had a surgically proven appendicitis. The sensitivity and specificity of the algorithm were 98.8% and 96.9%. The proposed algorithm achieved high sensitivity and specificity for detection of acute appendicitis, while reducing the need for standard CT and thus limiting exposition to radiation and to intravenous contrast media. (orig.)

  14. Acute appendicitis: prospective evaluation of a diagnostic algorithm integrating ultrasound and low-dose CT to reduce the need of standard CT

    To evaluate an algorithm integrating ultrasound and low-dose unenhanced CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) in the assessment of acute appendicitis, to reduce the need of conventional CT. Ultrasound was performed upon admission in 183 consecutive adult patients (111 women, 72 men, mean age 32) with suspicion of acute appendicitis and a BMI between 18.5 and 30 (step 1). No further examination was recommended when ultrasound was positive for appendicitis, negative with low clinical suspicion, or demonstrated an alternative diagnosis. All other patients underwent LDCT (30 mAs) (step 2). Standard intravenously enhanced CT (180 mAs) was performed after indeterminate LDCT (step 3). No further imaging was recommended after ultrasound in 84 (46%) patients; LDCT was obtained in 99 (54%). LDCT was positive or negative for appendicitis in 81 (82%) of these 99 patients, indeterminate in 18 (18%) who underwent standard CT. Eighty-six (47%) of the 183 patients had a surgically proven appendicitis. The sensitivity and specificity of the algorithm were 98.8% and 96.9%. The proposed algorithm achieved high sensitivity and specificity for detection of acute appendicitis, while reducing the need for standard CT and thus limiting exposition to radiation and to intravenous contrast media. (orig.)

  15. Improving the false-negative rate of CT in acute appendicitis-Reassessment of CT images by body imaging radiologists: A blinded prospective study

    Poortman, Pieter [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: ppoortman@wlz.nl; Lohle, Paul N.M. [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: plohle@elisabeth.nl; Schoemaker, Cees M. [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: mcschoemaker@elisabeth.nl; Cuesta, Miguel A. [Department of Surgery, VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: ma.cuesta@vumc.nl; Oostvogel, Henk J.M. [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: h.oostvogel@elisabeth.nl; Lange-de Klerk, Elly S.M. de [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: esm.delange@vumc.nl; Hamming, Jaap F. [Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre (Netherlands)], E-mail: j.f.hamming@lumc.nl

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) analyzed by individual radiology staff members and body imaging radiologists in a non-academic teaching hospital for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients and methods: In a prospective study 199 patients with suspected acute appendicitis were examined with unenhanced CT. CT images were pre-operatively analyzed by one of the 12 members of the radiology staff. In a later stage two body imaging radiologist reassessed all CT images without knowledge of the surgical findings and without knowledge of the primary CT diagnosis. The results, independently reported, were correlated with surgical and histopathologic findings. Results: In 132 patients (66%) acute appendicitis was found at surgery, in 67 patients (34%) a normal appendix was found. The sensitivity of the primary CT analysis and of the reassessment was 76% and 88%, respectively; the specificity was 84% and 87%; the positive predictive value was 90% and 93%; the negative predictive value was 64% and 78%; and the accuracy was 78% and 87%. Conclusion: Reassessment of CT images for acute appendicitis by body imaging radiologists results in a significant improvement of sensitivity, negative predictive value and accuracy. To prevent false-negative interpretation of CT images in acute appendicitis the expertise of the attending radiologist should be considered.

  16. Comparison and Efficacy of LigaSure and Rubber Band Ligature in Closing the Inflamed Cecal Stump in a Rat Model of Acute Appendicitis

    Chun-Chieh Yeh; Chia-Ing Jan; Horng-Ren Yang; Po-Han Huang; Long-Bin Jeng; Wen-Pang Su; Hui-Chen Chen

    2015-01-01

    Safety of either LigaSure or rubber band in closing inflamed appendiceal stump in acute appendicitis has been less investigated. In this study, cecal ligation followed by resecting inflamed cecum was performed to mimic appendectomy in a rat model of acute appendicitis. Rats were sacrificed immediately (Group A) and 7 days (Group B) after cecal resection, respectively. The cecal stumps were closed by silk ligature (S), 5 mm LigaSure (L), or rubber band (R). Seven days after cecal resection, th...

  17. Comparison of clinical judgment and diagnostic ultrasonography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    Jahn, H; Mathiesen, F K; Neckelmann, K;

    1997-01-01

    accuracy of 76%, specificity of 58%, and negative appendicectomy rate of 36%. 193 Patients underwent diagnostic US conducted by the radiologist on call of whom 123 were operated on, 78 for histologically proven appendicitis. US had a diagnostic accuracy of 72%, sensitivity of 49%, and specificity of 88...

  18. Reliability of diagnostic imaging techniques in suspected acute appendicitis: proposed diagnostic protocol

    To study the utility of ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) in case of suspected appendicitis. To determine the diagnostic yield in terms of different clinical contexts and patient characteristics. to assess the costs and benefits of introducing these techniques and propose a protocol for their use. Negative appendectomies, complications and length of hospital stay in a group of 152 patients with suspected appendicitis who underwent ultrasound and CT were compared with those of 180 patients who underwent appendectomy during the same time period, but had not been selected for the first group: these patients costs for each group were calculated. In the first group, the diagnostic value of the clinical signs was also evaluated. The reliability of the clinical signs was limited, while the results with ultrasound and CT were excellent. The incidence of negative appendectomy was 9.6% in the study group and 12.2% in the control group. Moreover, there were fewer complications and a shorter hospital stay in the first group. Among men, however, the rate of negative appendectomy was lower in the control group. The cost of using ultrasound and CT in the management of appendicitis was only slightly higher than that of the control group. Although ultrasound and CT are not necessary in cases in which the probability of appendicitis is low or in men presenting clear clinical evidence, the use of these techniques is indicated in the remaining cases in which appendicitis is suspected. In children, ultrasound is the technique of choice. In all other patients, if negative results are obtained with one of the two techniques, the other should be performed. (Author) 49 refs

  19. Comparison of ultrasonography and computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    The compare the efficacy of ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) in cases of suspected appendicitis. To study to what extent age, sex and habits of the patients, as well as the clinical context, influence the diagnostic yield of these two technique. Over a one-year period, 152 patients underwent ultrasonography and CT because of the clinical suspicion of appendicitis. The studies were carried out independently, and the results of each in terms of the presence or absence of appendicitis were unknown to the specialists performing the other. The final diagnoses were established by surgical treatment or clinical follow-up. The sensitivity of CT for the diagnosis of appendicitis was 82%, the specificity was 95%, the positive predictive value was 93%, the negative predictive value was 87% and the reliability was 90%. Ultrasonography has a sensitivity of 83%, a specificity of 97%, a positive predictive value of 95%, a negative predictive value of 88% and a reliability of 91%. Ultrasound was more efficient in patients in which there was a high clinical suspicion and in children, while the results with CT were better in patients in which the clinical diagnosis was less clear. The incidence of false negatives and positives was higher with ultrasound, while CT was more frequently able to identify a normal appendix. Sex and habits had no influence on the respective efficacies, although the performance of ultrasound was simplified in thin patients and that of CT in obese individuals. Ultrasonography and CT are highly reliable in cases of suspected appendicitis, especially when this diagnosis is conformed. Ultrasound is recommended as the technique of choice in children and in patients in which the clinical suspicion is strong. The yield of CT is somewhat greater when the clinical signs and symptoms are less clear. However, the efficacy of both techniques ultimately depends on the expertise of the specialist who interprets them. (Author) 62 refs

  20. Descriptive analysis of sonographic findings, surgical and pathological in patients with acute appendicitis in the Hospital San Juan de Dios in the year 2010

    The Hospital San Juan de Dios has found without studies correlating the ultrasound findings, with the pathology of acute appendicitis by surgery and histological analysis, especially that meets in the same study the utility of ultrasound in the diagnosis. For that reason, the ultrasonographic findings, pathological and surgical of patients with appendiceal pathology are described in the Servicio de Radiologia of Hospital San Juan de Dios in the year 2010. A revision of 324 dossiers in patients with positive biopsy is performed; however, 23% have result without alterations by ultrasound. The female sex has obtained the largest number of diagnosis by ultrasound. The age group for both sexes is found between 21-30 years. The most common transoperative finding has been grade I appendicitis and no perforated appendicitis have prevailed regarding biopsies reported in the pathology service. The validity of ultrasonography is determined to aid in decision making in pathology of acute appendicitis in the emergency room and avoid or reduce complications that can lead a diagnostic doubt, this will inform the surgeon the possible findings when the surgical intervention. Additionally, the diagnosis of acute appendicitis may be discarded when are encountered other pathologies such as ovarian cysts, kidney stones, among others, avoiding unnecessary surgeries. The costs to the institution are reduced by decreasing the hospital stay and the use of operating rooms

  1. Torsion of a lipoma of parietal peritoneum: a rare case mimicking acute appendicitis

    Shrestha, Binod Bade; Karmacharya, Mikesh

    2014-01-01

    Lipomas are found most often on the torso, neck, upper thighs, upper arms and armpits; they can also occur almost anywhere in the body. Parietal peritoneum lipoma is a rare intraoperative finding during abdominal surgery. We present a case of a torted, pedunculated parietal wall lipoma in the right iliac fossa that gave rise to a clinical diagnosis of appendicitis. So far only one case has been reported.

  2. Improving the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children with atypical clinical findings using the technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime-labelled white-blood-cell abdomen scan

    Heading AbstractBackground. Diagnosing acute appendicitis in children with equivocal signs and symptoms may be difficult. The usual approach is hospital observation and frequent re-examination. However, many surgeons are reluctant to delay surgery because of the risk of perforation and a negative laparotomy.Objective. To assess and compare the value of the technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO)-labelled white-blood-cell (WBC) abdomen scan in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children with atypical clinical presentation.Patients and methods. Fifty children with acute right lower quadrant abdominal pain and possible acute appendicitis, but atypical findings were included. After IV injection of 99mTc-HMPAO-labelled WBCs, serial anterior abdomen scans were obtained using a gamma camera.Results. Thirty-three children underwent surgery, while 17 children were managed conservatively and were followed up for at least 1 month. Four children had false-positive results and one child had a false-negative scan result. The overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the scan to diagnose acute appendicitis in children with atypical findings was 96.7, 80.0, 90.0, 87.8 and 94.1%, respectively.Conclusions. The 99mTc-HMPAO WBC abdomen scan is a potential tool for diagnosing acute appendicitis in children with atypical clinical findings. The high sensitivity and negative predictive value allows early discharge from the emergency department to avoid costly observation in hospital and potentially unnecessary surgery in those patients with negative scans. (orig.)

  3. Analyses of Laboratory Tests in Cases with Appendicitis in Childhood

    Özkan Cesur

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study, we aimed to analyze the values of diagnostic methods in patients with acute and perforated appendicitis Methods: The last year files of 97 patients who performed appendectomy with suspected appendicitis were retrospectively analyzed for demographic information, laboratory and histopathological findings. Results: The mean age of patients was 11 ± 3.36. Female/Male of ratio was as a 1/1,4. Histopathological examination of the patients has been defined as acute appendicitis 37.2% (n=36, suppurative appendicitis 34,1% (n=33, gangrenous-perforated appendicitis 17.8% (n=17, lymphoid hyperplasia 9.8% (n=10, chronic appendicitis 1.1% (n=1. White blood cells (WBC count, neuthrophil ratio (NR and C-Reactive Protein (CRP levels were significantly higher Suppurative and gangrenous-perforated appendicitis than other types (p<0.05. As a result of laboratory investigations of patients with white blood cell count, NR and CRP sensitivity, specificity, positive identification, definition and accuracy rates were negative for WBC count 65%, 60%, 96%, 92%, 65%, respectively. For neutrophil ratio 55%, 60%, 96%, 94%,56%, and CRP 50%, 80%, 92%, 98% 52% respectively. White blood cell count, NR and CRP were evaluated together, for the test 84%, 60%, 97%, 84% 83% was significantly higher. Conclusion: A very significant increase of WBC levels not increase diagnostic accuracy observed but it was complicated cases may be related. WBC count, neutrophil rate and CRP were separately observed not only the independent predictors but selectivity was not sufficient as well. As a result, the level of WBC, NR and CRP were found to be more useful approach to the assessment of cases of complicated appendicitis.

  4. Diagnosis of acute appendicitis in the community hospital: validity and usefulness of sonography

    To compare the accuracy of initial clinical diagnosis with that of ultrasonography (US) in diagnosing appendicitis and to determine its effect on the care of patients in a community hospital. One hundred and fifty patients with suspected appendicitis were prospectively examined with US. Prior to this, they had been divided into three groups on the basis of clinical judgement regarding diagnosis and their treatment plan ; Group 1 : high suspicion (probability > 75%)-urgent surgery indicated ; Group 2 : equivocal (probability 25-75%)-in hospital for observation, Group 3 : very unlikely (probability < 25%)-discharge without further testing. In order to determine the validity of these groupings, we calculated the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of sonographic examination, and the likelihood ratios of initial clinical diagnosis. US revealed a sensitivity of 92%, specificity of 90%, positive predictive value of 95%, negative predictive value of 85% and overall accuracy of 91%. The initial clinical impression showed a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 82%, positive predictive value of 89%, negative predictive value of 58%, and overall accuracy of 74%. Among 79 patients in the high clinical risk category(Group 1), the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of US were 96%, 89%, and 95%, respectively. Among 71 patients in the low- and intermediate- clinical categories(Groups 2 and 3), the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of US were 83%, 90%, and 87%. The likelihood ratios were 3.9 in Group 1, 0.52 in Group 2, and 0.15 in Group 3. In 32 of 150 patients(21%), the findings of US led to changes in the proposed management plan. The overall accuracy of US in the diagnosis of appendicitis was statistically superior to that of the clinician's initial impression(p < 0.05). In addition, US played an important role in making decisions regarding the treatment plan

  5. A case-control study of acute appendicitis and diet in children.

    Nelson, M.; Morris, J; Barker, D J; Simmonds, S

    1986-01-01

    The diets of 53 Southampton children who had had appendicitis were compared with those of two sets of age-sex matched controls using a seven-day weighed food record. One set of controls comprised classmates of the cases; the other was a random sample of all schoolchildren in the city. The cases weighed less and were shorter in height; they had lower intakes of energy, all the main nutrients and water. The differences in weight and water intake were statistically significant. Low water intake ...

  6. Apendicite aguda: achados na tomografia computadorizada - ensaio iconográfico Acute appendicitis: computed tomography findings - an iconographic essay

    Marcelo Eustáquio Montandon Júnior

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A apendicite aguda é a causa mais comum de dor abdominal aguda que requer intervenção cirúrgica no mundo ocidental. O diagnóstico precoce é essencial para minimizar a morbidade da doença. O uso dos métodos de imagem significou grande avanço no diagnóstico desta entidade, até então avaliada apenas com base na história clínica, exame físico e dados laboratoriais, haja vista que 20% a 33% dos pacientes apresentam sintomas atípicos. O diagnóstico é mais difícil nas crianças, nos idosos e nas mulheres em idade fértil. Os principais métodos de imagem para sua avaliação são a ultra-sonografia e a tomografia computadorizada. Os objetivos deste trabalho são: descrever a fisiopatologia da doença, comentar os principais aspectos técnicos da tomografia computadorizada, demonstrar e ilustrar os achados tomográficos e citar os principais diagnósticos diferenciais.Acute appendicitis is the most important cause of abdominal pain requiring surgical intervention in the Western world. The early diagnosis of this disease is of paramount relevance for minimizing its morbidity. Imaging methods have represented a huge progress in the diagnosis of this entity, which used to be based essentially on clinical history, physical examination and laboratory tests results, considering that 20% to 33% of patients present with atypical symptoms. Diagnostic difficulty is higher in children, the elderly, and women in childbearing age. The main imaging methods for evaluation of acute appendicitis are ultrasound and computed tomography. The present study is aimed at describing the disease physiopathology, commenting main computed tomography technical aspects, demonstrating and illustrating tomographic findings, and describing main differential diagnoses.

  7. Added value of coronal reformations for duty radiologists and for referring physicians or surgeons in the CT diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    To assess the added value of coronal reformation for radiologists and for referring physicians or surgeons in the CT diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Contrast-enhanced CT was performed using 16-detector-row scanners in 110 patients, 46 of whom had appendicitis. Transverse (5-mm thickness, 4-mm increment), coronal (5-mm thickness, 4-mm increment), and combined transverse and coronal sections were interpreted by four radiologists, two surgeons and two emergency physicians. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az value), sensitivity, specificity, (McNemar test), diagnostic confidence and appendiceal visualization (Wilcoxon signed rank test) were compared. For radiologists, the additional coronal sections tended to increase the Az value (0.972 vs 0.986, ρ=0.076) and pooled sensitivity (92% [95% CI: 88,96] vs. 96% [93,99]), and enhanced appendiceal visualization in true-positive cases (ρ= 0.031). For non-radiologists, no such enhancement was observed, and the confidence for excluding acute appendicitis declined (ρ=0.013). Coronal sections alone were inferior to transverse sections for diagnostic confidence as well as appendiceal visualization for each reader group studied (ρ<0.05). The added value of coronal reformation is more apparent for radiologists compared to referring physicians or surgeons in the CT diagnosis of acute appendicitis

  8. Comparison of imaging strategies with conditional versus immediate contrast-enhanced computed tomography in patients with clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of conditional computed tomography (CT), i.e. CT when initial ultrasound findings are negative or inconclusive, and immediate CT for patients with suspected appendicitis. Data were collected within a prospective diagnostic accuracy study on imaging in adults with acute abdominal pain. All patients underwent ultrasound and CT, read by different observers who were blinded from the other modality. Only patients with clinical suspicion of appendicitis were included. An expert panel assigned a final diagnosis to each patient after 6 months of follow-up (clinical reference standard). A total of 422 patients were included with final diagnosis appendicitis in 251 (60 %). For 199 patients (47 %), ultrasound findings were inconclusive or negative. Conditional CT imaging correctly identified 241 of 251 (96 %) appendicitis cases (95 %CI, 92 % to 98 %), versus 238 (95 %) with immediate CT (95 %CI, 91 % to 97 %). The specificity of conditional CT imaging was lower: 77 % (95 %CI, 70 % to 83 %) versus 87 % for immediate CT (95 %CI, 81 % to 91 %). A conditional CT strategy correctly identifies as many patients with appendicitis as an immediate CT strategy, and can halve the number of CTs needed. However, conditional CT imaging results in more false positives. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of imaging strategies with conditional versus immediate contrast-enhanced computed tomography in patients with clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis

    Atema, J.J.; Gans, S.L.; Boermeester, M.A. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (G4-142), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Randen, A. van; Stoker, J. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lameris, W. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (G4-142), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Spaarne Hospital, Department of Surgery, Hoofddorp (Netherlands); Es, H.W. van; Heesewijk, J.P.M. van [St Antonius Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Ramshorst, B. van [St Antonius Hospital, Department of Surgery, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Bouma, W.H. [Gelre Hospital, Department of Surgery, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Hove, W. ten [Gelre Hospital, Department of Radiology, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Keulen, E.M. van [Tergooi Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hilversum (Netherlands); Dijkgraaf, M.G.W. [Academic Medical Centre, Clinical Research Unit, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bossuyt, P.M.M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Bioinformatics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of conditional computed tomography (CT), i.e. CT when initial ultrasound findings are negative or inconclusive, and immediate CT for patients with suspected appendicitis. Data were collected within a prospective diagnostic accuracy study on imaging in adults with acute abdominal pain. All patients underwent ultrasound and CT, read by different observers who were blinded from the other modality. Only patients with clinical suspicion of appendicitis were included. An expert panel assigned a final diagnosis to each patient after 6 months of follow-up (clinical reference standard). A total of 422 patients were included with final diagnosis appendicitis in 251 (60 %). For 199 patients (47 %), ultrasound findings were inconclusive or negative. Conditional CT imaging correctly identified 241 of 251 (96 %) appendicitis cases (95 %CI, 92 % to 98 %), versus 238 (95 %) with immediate CT (95 %CI, 91 % to 97 %). The specificity of conditional CT imaging was lower: 77 % (95 %CI, 70 % to 83 %) versus 87 % for immediate CT (95 %CI, 81 % to 91 %). A conditional CT strategy correctly identifies as many patients with appendicitis as an immediate CT strategy, and can halve the number of CTs needed. However, conditional CT imaging results in more false positives. (orig.)

  10. The value of 99mTc-HMPAO labelled white blood cell scintigraphy in acute appendicitis patients with an equivocal clinical presentation

    Various imaging studies can be performed in the evaluation of patients with a clinical presentation equivocal for acute appendicitis. One of these studies is technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) labelled white blood cell (WBC) scintigraphy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and clinical value of 99mTc-HMPAO WBC scintigraphy in the aforementioned group of patients. Forty-one patients who had acute right lower quadrant abdominal pain with a clinical presentation equivocal for acute appendicitis were included in the study. The anterior abdomen and pelvis were imaged up to 4 h after the injection of 125-300 MBq 99mTc-HMPAO WBCs and the results were immediately reported to the surgeon before a decision was taken on whether to perform laparotomy. Diagnostic accuracy was established by the intra-operative findings and the histopathology in operated patients. In non-operated patients, absence of abdominal symptoms 1 month after scintigraphy and/or identification of another cause of abdominal pain was used to rule out acute appendicitis. There were 16 patients with positive scintigraphy and 81% of these patients were positive within 2 h post injection. There were no false-positive or false-negative results. We operated on 17 (41.4%) patients, and only one patient (5.9%) underwent unnecessary laparotomy. We conclude that 99mTc-HMPAO WBC scintigraphy is a rapid, highly accurate method for the exclusion of acute appendicitis and that its use can lower the unnecessarily high laparotomy rate in patients with an equivocal clinical presentation. (orig.)