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Sample records for acute aortic syndromes

  1. Acute aortic valve prolapse in Marfan's syndrome.

    Carr, N J; Cullen, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    A 22 year old man with Marfan's syndrome died suddenly following acute aortic valve prolapse. Although aortic root involvement in Marfan's syndrome is common, we have found no previous description of this particular complication in the literature.

  2. MDCT evaluation of acute aortic syndrome (AAS).

    Valente, Tullio; Rossi, Giovanni; Lassandro, Francesco; Rea, Gaetano; Marino, Maurizio; Muto, Maurizio; Molino, Antonio; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    Non-traumatic acute thoracic aortic syndromes (AAS) describe a spectrum of life-threatening aortic pathologies with significant implications on diagnosis, therapy and management. There is a common pathway for the various manifestations of AAS that eventually leads to a breakdown of the aortic intima and media. Improvements in biology and health policy and diffusion of technology into the community resulted in an associated decrease in mortality and morbidity related to aortic therapeutic interventions. Hybrid procedures, branched and fenestrated endografts, and percutaneous aortic valves have emerged as potent and viable alternatives to traditional surgeries. In this context, current state-of-the art multidetector CT (MDCT) is actually the gold standard in the emergency setting because of its intrinsic diagnostic value. Management of acute aortic disease has changed with the increasing realization that endovascular therapies may offer distinct advantages in these situations. This article provides a summary of AAS, focusing especially on the MDCT technique, typical and atypical findings and common pitfalls of AAS, as well as recent concepts regarding the subtypes of AAS, consisting of aortic dissection, intramural haematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer and unstable aortic aneurysm or contained aortic rupture. MDCT findings will be related to pathophysiology, timing and management options to achieve a definite and timely diagnostic and therapeutic definition. In the present article, we review the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, outcomes and therapeutic approaches to acute aortic syndromes. PMID:27033344

  3. Resolution of an Acute Aortic Syndrome with Aortic Valve Insufficiency Post-PCI

    de Barros e Silva, Pedro G.M.; Aquino, Thiago de; Resende, Marcos V.; Richter, Ivo; Barros, Cecilia M.; Andrioli, Vanessa G.; Baruzzi, Antonio C.; Medeiros, Caio C.J.; Furlan, Valter

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 52 Final Diagnosis: Acute aortic syndrome with aortic valve insufficiency post-PCI Symptoms: Chest pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Conservative Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Acute aortic syndrome is the modern term that includes aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and symptomatic aortic ulcer. Iatrogenic coronary artery dissection extending to the aorta during percutaneous coronary intervention is a very rare...

  4. The role of aortic wall CT attenuation measurements for the diagnosis of acute aortic syndromes

    Objectives: To determine if measurements of aortic wall attenuation can improve the CT diagnosis of acute aortic syndromes. Methods: CT reports from a ten year period were searched for acute aortic syndromes (AAS). Studies with both an unenhanced and a contrast enhanced (CTA) series that had resulted in the diagnosis of intramural hematoma (IMH) were reviewed. Diagnoses were confirmed by medical records. The attenuation of aortic wall abnormalities was measured. The observed attenuation threshold was validated using studies from 39 new subjects with a variety of aortic conditions. Results: The term “aortic dissection” was identified in 1206, and IMH in 124 patients’ reports. IMH was confirmed in 31 patients, 21 of whom had both unenhanced and contrast enhanced images. All 21 had pathologic CTA findings, and no CTA with IMH was normal. Attenuation of the aortic wall was greater than 45 HUs on the CTA images in all patients with IMH. When this threshold was applied to the new group, sensitivity for diagnosing AAS was 100% (19/19), and specificity 94% (16/17). Addition of unenhanced images did not improve accuracy. Conclusions: Measurements of aortic wall attenuation in CTA have a high negative predictive value for the diagnosis of acute aortic syndromes

  5. Multi-detector row computed tomography: Imaging in acute aortic syndrome

    Manghat, N.E. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, Devon (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: docnatman@msn.com; Morgan-Hughes, G.J. [Department of Cardiology, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, Devon (United Kingdom); Roobottom, C.A. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, Devon (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    Acute aortic syndromes (AAS) encompass a spectrum of emergencies. These include those non-traumatic disease entities of the aorta namely, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer, intramural haematoma, dissection and aneurysm rupture. The various types of AAS cannot be reliably differentiated on clinical grounds alone. Acute thoracic aortic injury is usually included in this group even though clinical presentation is different, i.e., in the context of trauma, the imaging features are very similar. Differentiation of AAS from acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is important, however, it must be remembered that ACS may occur as a result of AAS. Now electrocardiogram (ECG)-gating technology is widely available, ECG-gated multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) is a powerful clinical tool in the acute emergency setting, which enables rapid and specific diagnosis of aortic pathology. ECG-gated MDCT significantly reduces motion artefact, avoids potential pitfalls in diagnosis and often provides diagnostic information about the coronary arteries. It should be used as a first-line imaging technique. This article examines the role of MDCT imaging and cardiac gating in the assessment of AAS and discusses the differentiation of this spectrum of aortic diseases with reference to the key imaging findings as obtained by experience in our institution.

  6. Multi-detector row computed tomography: Imaging in acute aortic syndrome

    Acute aortic syndromes (AAS) encompass a spectrum of emergencies. These include those non-traumatic disease entities of the aorta namely, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer, intramural haematoma, dissection and aneurysm rupture. The various types of AAS cannot be reliably differentiated on clinical grounds alone. Acute thoracic aortic injury is usually included in this group even though clinical presentation is different, i.e., in the context of trauma, the imaging features are very similar. Differentiation of AAS from acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is important, however, it must be remembered that ACS may occur as a result of AAS. Now electrocardiogram (ECG)-gating technology is widely available, ECG-gated multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) is a powerful clinical tool in the acute emergency setting, which enables rapid and specific diagnosis of aortic pathology. ECG-gated MDCT significantly reduces motion artefact, avoids potential pitfalls in diagnosis and often provides diagnostic information about the coronary arteries. It should be used as a first-line imaging technique. This article examines the role of MDCT imaging and cardiac gating in the assessment of AAS and discusses the differentiation of this spectrum of aortic diseases with reference to the key imaging findings as obtained by experience in our institution

  7. A pictorial review of acute aortic syndrome: discriminating and overlapping features as revealed by ECG-gated multidetector-row CT angiography

    Ueda, Takuya; Chin, Anne; Petrovitch, Ivan; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Background The term "acute aortic syndrome" (AAS) encompasses a spectrum of life-threatening conditions characterized by acute aortic pain. AAS traditionally embraces three abnormalities including classic aortic dissection, intramural haematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. Although the underlying etiologies and conditions predisposing to AAS are diverse, the clinical features are indistinguishable. Methods Multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) with electrocardiographic gating ...

  8. Clinical manifestation as acute coronary syndrome without electrocardiographically ischemia:a clue for aortic dissection

    Hung Yi Chen

    2015-01-01

    Aortic dissection is a critical condition requiring immediate assessment and management. Clinical presentation is commonly associated with severe chest pain and high blood pressure. However, misdiagnosis is frequent because of various features. We presented a case of 51-year-old woman who complained of dyspnea for 3 d after she experienced back pain for one week. She was presented with severe respiration distress with impending respiration failure on arrival to our hospital. Her chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with acute pulmonary edema. The laboratory data revealed elevated cardiac enzyme and electrocardiography demonstrated sinus tachycardia. She was hospitalized under the initial diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. The patient remained hemodynamically stable, and experienced one episode of chest discomfort. After electrocardiography, she was found with bigeminy ventricular premature beats without ST-T change. Follow-up cardiac enzyme demonstrated progressive declined. Cardiac catheterization was performed on the third day of admission, and coronary angiography revealed large intimal flap on aortic root with bilateral coronary artery involvement. Surgical management was arranged after immediate chest computed tomography study.

  9. Successful management of aortic thrombi resulting in spinal cord infarction in a patient with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and acute cholecystitis

    Izumi M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Manabu Izumi, Shoko Teraoka, Keisuke Yamashita, Kenji Matsumoto, Tomohiro Muronoi, Yoshimitsu Izawa, Chikara Yonekawa, Masaki Ano, Masayuki SuzukawaDepartment of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, JapanAbstract: A 74-year-old man with coronary artery disease was suffering from acute nonobstructive cholecystitis and was admitted to a nearby hospital. Dual antiplatelet (aspirin and ticlopidine therapy was discontinued before preparation for surgical resection of the gall bladder. During his time in hospital he was aware of lumbar pain and weakness in both legs. He was transferred to our hospital for further evaluation and therapy. Diffuse intra-aortic thrombi were revealed by computed tomography with contrast media, and magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal cord infarction. However, computed tomography scans of the descending aorta obtained 4 months before admission exhibited no signs of atherosclerotic plaques or intra-aortic thrombi. Laboratory data suggest that antiphospholipid antibody syndrome might have caused these acute multiple intra-arterial thrombi. By restarting dual antiplatelet therapy and increasing the dose of heparin (from 10,000 IU/day to 15,000 IU/day we successfully managed the patient's clinical condition and symptoms. It is important to understand that stopping antiplatelet therapy may rapidly grow thrombi in patients with a hypercoagulative state.Keywords: intra-aortic thrombus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, spinal cord infarction

  10. Acute aortic dissection in pregnant women.

    Yang, Zhaohua; Yang, Shouguo; Wang, Fangshun; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic dissection occurring during pregnancy represents a lethal risk to both the mother and fetus. Management of parturient with acute aortic dissection is complex. We report our experience of two pregnancies with type A acute aortic dissection. One patient is a 31-year-old pregnant woman (33rd gestational week) with a bicuspid aortic valve and the other is a 32-year-old pregnant woman (30th gestational week) with the Marfan syndrome. In both cases, a combined emergency operation consisting of Cesarean section, total hysterectomy prior to corrective surgery for aortic dissection was successfully performed within a relatively short period of time after the onset. Both patients' postoperative recovery was uneventful, and we achieved a favorable maternal and fetal outcome. PMID:25085319

  11. Acute aortic intramural hematoma

    Bae, Oh Keun; Choi, Yo Won; Kim, Kwon Hyung; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Kee; Seo, Heung Suk; Hahm, Chang Kok [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-02-01

    To evaluate the radiologic findings of acute intramural hematoma of the aorta, and the clinical follow up thereof. Among 34 cases confirmed clinically and radiologically as aortic dissection, and analysis was carried out based on 15 cases in which intramural hematoma without false lumen was demonstrated, on initial CT, 12 cases of in which follow up CT was used and five cases involving an aortogram. Elements such as the shape of the thickened aortic wall, ulcer-like intimal defects, and intimal calcification were examined. Changes in these elements were also examined on follow-up CT. DeBackey types 1 and 3 accounted for one and 14 cases, respectively. Initial precontrast CT demonstrated continuous, crescentic high attenuation areas along the wall of the descending aorta. In postcontrast scans, the crescentic areas were of relatively lower-attenuation and appeared along the aorta wall. Displaced intimal calcifications were seen in nine of fifteen patients. There was no intimal flap on all five aortogram, while aortic wall thickening and atherosclerotic change were demonstrated in four cases and in one case, respectively. Focal ulcers were seen in three cases. Ulcer-like intimal defects were demonstrated in a total of eleven cases (eight on CT, two on aortogram, and one on both). In ten of the twelve cases seen on follow up CT, the thickness of the intramural hematoma was seen to be reduced. Among the 15 cases, the operation was performed in two cases, and the remaining 13 received conservative treatment. In ten cases observed for more than twelve months, a recurrence of symptoms did not occur. Eccentric aortic wall thickening in patients who complain of acute chest pain is the result of acute aortic dissection with intramural hematoma, or a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aorta. The later may be differentiated from the former by the presence of on ulcer-like intimal defect. When both diseases are limited to the descending aorta, conservative treatment may

  12. Acute aortic intramural hematoma

    To evaluate the radiologic findings of acute intramural hematoma of the aorta, and the clinical follow up thereof. Among 34 cases confirmed clinically and radiologically as aortic dissection, and analysis was carried out based on 15 cases in which intramural hematoma without false lumen was demonstrated, on initial CT, 12 cases of in which follow up CT was used and five cases involving an aortogram. Elements such as the shape of the thickened aortic wall, ulcer-like intimal defects, and intimal calcification were examined. Changes in these elements were also examined on follow-up CT. DeBackey types 1 and 3 accounted for one and 14 cases, respectively. Initial precontrast CT demonstrated continuous, crescentic high attenuation areas along the wall of the descending aorta. In postcontrast scans, the crescentic areas were of relatively lower-attenuation and appeared along the aorta wall. Displaced intimal calcifications were seen in nine of fifteen patients. There was no intimal flap on all five aortogram, while aortic wall thickening and atherosclerotic change were demonstrated in four cases and in one case, respectively. Focal ulcers were seen in three cases. Ulcer-like intimal defects were demonstrated in a total of eleven cases (eight on CT, two on aortogram, and one on both). In ten of the twelve cases seen on follow up CT, the thickness of the intramural hematoma was seen to be reduced. Among the 15 cases, the operation was performed in two cases, and the remaining 13 received conservative treatment. In ten cases observed for more than twelve months, a recurrence of symptoms did not occur. Eccentric aortic wall thickening in patients who complain of acute chest pain is the result of acute aortic dissection with intramural hematoma, or a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aorta. The later may be differentiated from the former by the presence of on ulcer-like intimal defect. When both diseases are limited to the descending aorta, conservative treatment may

  13. Pregnancy after aortic root replacement in Loeys-Dietz syndrome: High risk of aortic dissection.

    Braverman, Alan C; Moon, Marc R; Geraghty, Patrick; Willing, Marcia; Bach, Christopher; Kouchoukos, Nicholas T

    2016-08-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome due to mutations in TGFBR1 and 2 is associated with early and aggressive aortic aneurysm and branch vessel disease. There are reports of uncomplicated pregnancy in this condition, but there is an increased risk of aortic dissection and uterine rupture. Women with underlying aortic root aneurysm are cautioned about the risk of pregnancy-related aortic dissection. Prophylactic aortic root replacement is recommended in women with aortopathy and aortic root dilatation to lessen the risk of pregnancy. There is limited information in the literature about the outcomes of pregnancy after root replacement in Loeys-Dietz syndrome. We present a case series of three women with Loeys-Dietz syndrome who underwent elective aortic root replacement for aneurysm disease and subsequently became pregnant and underwent Cesarean section delivery. Each of these women were treated with beta blockers throughout pregnancy. Surveillance echocardiograms and noncontrast MRA studies during pregnancy remained stable demonstrating no evidence for aortic enlargement. Despite the normal aortic imaging and careful observation, two of the three women suffered acute aortic dissection in the postpartum period. These cases highlight the high risk of pregnancy following aortic root replacement in Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Women with this disorder are recommended to be counseled accordingly. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27125181

  14. Rarity of isolated pulmonary embolism and acute aortic syndrome occurring outside of the field of view of dedicated coronary CT angiography

    Background Although triple rule-out CT angiography (TRO) to simultaneously evaluate acute coronary syndrome (ACS), pulmonary embolism (PE), and acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is increasingly used in many institutions, TRO is inevitably associated with increased radiation exposure due to extended z-axis coverage compared with dedicated coronary CT angiography (DCTA). Purpose To determine the frequency of exclusion of findings of AAS, PE, and significant incidental non-cardiac pathology that may be the cause of acute chest pain when using a restricted DCTA field of view (FOV). Material and Methods We retrospectively reviewed CT images and charts of 103 patients with acute PE and 50 patients with AAS. Either non-ECG gated dedicated pulmonary or aortic CT angiography was performed using 16- or 64-slice multidetector CT (MDCT). We analyzed the incidence of isolated PE, AAS, or significant non-cardiac pathology outside of DCTA FOV (i.e. from tracheal carina to the base of heart). Results There were two cases of isolated PE (2/103, 1.9%) excluded from the FOV of DCTA. One case of PE was isolated to the subsegmental pulmonary artery in the posterior segment of the right upper lobe. In the second case, pulmonary embolism in the left main pulmonary artery was located out of the FOV of DCTA because the left main pulmonary artery was retracted upwardly by fibrotic scar in the left upper lobe due to prior tuberculosis. There was no case of AAS and significant non-cardiac pathology excluded from the FOV of DCTA. AAS (n = 50) consisted of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (n = 7), intramural hematoma (n = 5) and aortic dissection (n = 38). Conclusion As isolated PE, AAS, and significant non-cardiac pathology outside of the DCTA FOV rarely occur, DCTA may replace TRO in the evaluation of patients with non-specific acute chest pain and a low pre-test probability of PE or aortic dissection

  15. Rarity of isolated pulmonary embolism and acute aortic syndrome occurring outside of the field of view of dedicated coronary CT angiography

    Lee, Hwa Yeon; Song, In Sup (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology Chung-Ang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Yoo, Seung Min; Rho, Ji Young (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology CHA Medical Univ. Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of)), email: smyoo68@hanmail.net; Moon, Jae Youn; Kim, In Jai; Lim, Sang Wook; Sung, Jung Hoon; Cha, Dong Hun (Dept. of Cardiology CHA Medical Univ. Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of)); White, Charles S. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore (United States))

    2011-05-15

    Background Although triple rule-out CT angiography (TRO) to simultaneously evaluate acute coronary syndrome (ACS), pulmonary embolism (PE), and acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is increasingly used in many institutions, TRO is inevitably associated with increased radiation exposure due to extended z-axis coverage compared with dedicated coronary CT angiography (DCTA). Purpose To determine the frequency of exclusion of findings of AAS, PE, and significant incidental non-cardiac pathology that may be the cause of acute chest pain when using a restricted DCTA field of view (FOV). Material and Methods We retrospectively reviewed CT images and charts of 103 patients with acute PE and 50 patients with AAS. Either non-ECG gated dedicated pulmonary or aortic CT angiography was performed using 16- or 64-slice multidetector CT (MDCT). We analyzed the incidence of isolated PE, AAS, or significant non-cardiac pathology outside of DCTA FOV (i.e. from tracheal carina to the base of heart). Results There were two cases of isolated PE (2/103, 1.9%) excluded from the FOV of DCTA. One case of PE was isolated to the subsegmental pulmonary artery in the posterior segment of the right upper lobe. In the second case, pulmonary embolism in the left main pulmonary artery was located out of the FOV of DCTA because the left main pulmonary artery was retracted upwardly by fibrotic scar in the left upper lobe due to prior tuberculosis. There was no case of AAS and significant non-cardiac pathology excluded from the FOV of DCTA. AAS (n = 50) consisted of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (n = 7), intramural hematoma (n = 5) and aortic dissection (n = 38). Conclusion As isolated PE, AAS, and significant non-cardiac pathology outside of the DCTA FOV rarely occur, DCTA may replace TRO in the evaluation of patients with non-specific acute chest pain and a low pre-test probability of PE or aortic dissection

  16. Diagnostic imaging of acute aortic dissection

    One hundred and nineteen patients with aortic dissection who underwent diagnostic imaging were reviewed and angiographic findings as well as those of CT were analysed. Thirty eight cases (43.1%) had non-contrast opacified false lumen, the type of which we call 'thrombosed type aortic dissection'. A comparative study of the thrombosed type with the patent type of false lumens was made particularly from the stand point of the characteristic diagnostic imagings (CT and angiography). At the same time, the pitfalls of these imagings in thrombosed type aortic dissection were studied. At the onset the average age of thrombosed type was 62.3 years old, while that of the patent type was 57.3. A statistical significance between the two groups was p<0.05. Thrombosed type in all cases was caused by atherosclerosis, whereas patent type was caused by the Marfan's syndrome in 11 cases. Other clinical findings, such as initial symptoms and blood pressure revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Pre-contrast CT in acute thrombosed type aortic dissection showed 'hyperdense crescent sign' in 89.4%. However, in 3 cases with thrombosed type in which the pre-contrast CT showed 'hyperdense crescent sign' contrast-enhanced CT detected no clear evidence of aortic dissection in the same site. This was due to obscurity induced by contrast medium. Angiographic findings of thrombosed type were classified into 3 groups: normal type, stenosed true lumen type and ulcer-like projection type. The incidence of normal type was estimated to be 48.4%, whereas stenosed true lumen type was 24.2% and ulcer-like projection was 27.7%. The present study concluded that thrombosed type is not rare in acute aortic dissection and contrast-enhanced CT as well as pre-contrast CT, is of great value in diagnosing thrombosed type. 'Hyperdense crescent sign' in pre-contrast CT is characteristic of intramural hematoma. (author)

  17. Acute aortic dissection: be aware of misdiagnosis

    Asteri Theodora

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute aortic dissection (AAD is a life-threatening condition requiring immediate assessment and therapy. A patient suffering from AAD often presents with an insignificant or irrelevant medical history, giving rise to possible misdiagnosis. The aim of this retrospective study is to address the problem of misdiagnosing AD and the different imaging studies used. Methods From January 2000 to December 2004, 49 patients (41 men and 8 women, aged from 18–75 years old presented to the Emergency Department of our hospital for different reasons and finally diagnosed with AAD. Fifteen of those patients suffered from arterial hypertension, one from giant cell arteritis and another patient from Marfan's syndrome. The diagnosis of AAD was made by chest X-ray, contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE and coronary angiography. Results Initial misdiagnosis occurred in fifteen patients (31% later found to be suffering from AAD. The misdiagnosis was myocardial infarction in 12 patients and cerebral infarction in another three patients. Conclusion Aortic dissection may present with a variety of clinical manifestations, like syncope, chest pain, anuria, pulse deficits, abdominal pain, back pain, or acute congestive heart failure. Nearly a third of the patients found to be suffering from AD, were initially otherwise diagnosed. Key in the management of acute aortic dissection is to maintain a high level of suspicion for this diagnosis.

  18. Acute aortic syndrome - the advantages in modern diagnostic imaging, advisable protocols, key steps in reporting radiologic findings

    Full text: Assessment of the aorta includes clinical examination and laboratory testing, but is based mainly on imaging techniques using ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and MRI. Computed tomography plays a central role in the diagnosis, risk stratification, and management of aortic diseases. MSCT scanners are preferred for their higher spatial and temporal resolution and ECG-gated acquisition protocols are crucial in reducing motion artefacts of the aortic root and thoracic aorta. Triple-rule out’ is an ECG-gated CT study to evaluate patients with acute chest pain, in the emergency department, for three potential causes: AD, pulmonary embolism, and coronary artery disease. endovascular therapies are playing an increasingly important role in the treatment of aortic diseases, while surgery remains necessary in many situations. Standardized CT measurements will help to better assess changes in aortic size over time and avoid erroneous findings of arterial growth. Learning objectives: to illustrate radiological features and evaluate its prognosis and possible complications; to review radiologic findings on each entity focusing on diagnostic pearls, potential pitfalls and systemic complications; to define CT protocols necessary to make an accurate diagnosis; to clarify an adequate report with detailed information about the necessary reporting data that the surgeon or interventionalist needs to plan an adequate treatment on each case

  19. MARFAN SYNDROME AND QUADRICUSPID AORTIC VALVE

    Sürücü, Hüseyin; ÇİMEN, Sadi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACTWhile the major cardiovascular manifestation in Marfan syndrome is a progressive dilatation of the ascending aorta, leading to aortic aneurysm formation and eventually to fatal aortic rupture or dissection, mitral valve prolapse and calcification of the mitral valve annulus, dilatation of the main pulmonary artery may be seen. There was no knowledge about the association of Marfan syndrome and quadricuspid aortic valve. In this case report, we aimed to declare this association between...

  20. [Surgical aspects of acute aortic dissection].

    Laas, J; Heinemann, M; Jurmann, M; Borst, H G

    1992-12-01

    This paper highlights some of the surgical aspects of acute aortic dissections such as: emergency diagnosis, indications for surgery, reconstructive operative techniques, malperfusion phenomena and necessity for follow-up. Aortic dissection is caused by an intimal tear, called the "entry", and subsequent splitting of the media by the stream of blood. Two lumina are thus created, which may communicate through "re-entries". As this creates severe weakness of the aortic wall, rupture and/or dilatation are the imminent dangers of acute aortic dissection. Acute aortic dissection type A, by definition involving the ascending aorta (Figures 1 and 2), is an absolute indication for emergency surgical treatment, because its natural history shows an extremely poor outcome (Figure 3). Due to impending (intrapericardial) aortic rupture, it may be necessary to limit diagnostic procedures to a minimum. Transesophageal echocardiography is the method of choice for establishing a quick, precise and reliable diagnosis (Figure 4). In stable patients, computed tomography gives additional information about aortic diameters or sites of extrapericardial perforation. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) shows perfusion of the lumina and dependent organs. The surgical strategy in acute aortic dissection type A aims at replacement of the ascending aorta. Reconstructive techniques have to be considered, especially in aortic valve regurgitation without annuloectasia (Figures 5 and 6). In recent times, the use of GRF tissue glue has reduced the need for teflon felt. Involvement of the aortic arch should be treated aggressively up to the point of total arch replacement in deep hypothermic circulatory arrest as part of the primary procedure (Figure 7). Malperfusion phenomena of aortic branches remain risk-factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1483624

  1. Acute Aortic Dissection Extending Into the Lung.

    Makdisi, George; Said, Sameh M; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2015-07-01

    The radiologic manifestations of ruptured acute aortic dissection, Stanford type A aortic dissection, DeBakey type 1 can present in different radiographic scenarios with devastating outcomes. Here, we present a rare case of a 70-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with chest pain radiating to the back. A chest computed tomography scan showed a Stanford type A, DeBakey type 1, acute aortic dissection ruptured into the aortopulmonary window and stenosing the pulmonary trunk, both main pulmonary arteries, and dissecting the bronchovascular sheaths and flow into the pulmonary interstitium, causing pulmonary interstitial hemorrhage. The patient underwent emergent ascending aorta replacement with hemiarch replacement with circulatory arrest. The postoperative course was unremarkable. PMID:26140779

  2. Vasopressor mechanisms in acute aortic coarctation hypertension

    Salgado H.C.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (ANG II and vasopressin (AVP act together with the mechanical effect of aortic constriction in the onset of acute aortic coarctation hypertension. Blockade of ANG II and AVP V1 receptors demonstrated that ANG II acts on the prompt (5 min rise in pressure whereas AVP is responsible for the maintenance (30-45 min of the arterial pressure elevation during aortic coarctation. Hormone assays carried out on blood collected from conscious rats submitted to aortic constriction supported a role for ANG II in the early stage and a combined role for both ANG II and AVP in the maintenance of proximal hypertension. As expected, a role for catecholamines was ruled out in this model of hypertension, presumably due to the inhibitory effect of the sinoaortic baroreceptors. The lack of afferent feedback from the kidneys for AVP release from the central nervous system in rats with previous renal denervation allowed ANG II to play the major role in the onset of the hypertensive response. Median eminence-lesioned rats exhibited a prompt increase in proximal pressure followed by a progressive decline to lower hypertensive levels, revealing a significant role for the integrity of the neuroaxis in the maintenance of the aortic coarctation hypertension through the release of AVP. In conclusion, the important issue raised by this model of hypertension is the likelihood of a link between some vascular territory - probably renal - below the coarctation triggering the release of AVP, with this vasoconstrictor hormone participating with Ang II and the mechanical effect of aortic constriction in the acute aortic coarctation hypertension

  3. Precision medical and surgical management for thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections based on the causative mutant gene.

    Milewicz, Dianna; Hostetler, Ellen; Wallace, Stephanie; Mellor-Crummey, Lauren; Gong, Limin; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    Almost one-quarter of patients presenting with thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) or acute aortic dissections (TAADs) have an underlying mutation in a specific gene. A subset of these patients will have systemic syndromic features, for example, skeletal features in patients with Marfan Syndrome. It is important to note that the majority of patients with thoracic aortic disease will not have these syndromic features but many will have a family history of the disease. The genes predisposing to these thoracic aortic diseases are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, and thirteen genes have been identified to date. As the clinical phenotype associated with each specific gene is defined, the data indicate that the underlying gene dictates associated syndromic features. More importantly, the underlying gene also dictates the aortic disease presentation, the risk for dissection at a given range of aortic diameters, the risk for additional vascular diseases and what specific vascular diseases occur associated with the gene. These results lead to the recommendation that the medical and surgical management of these patients be dictated by the underlying gene, and for patients with mutations in ACTA2, the specific mutation in the gene. PMID:26837258

  4. Incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome after endovascular aortic repair

    De La Motte, L; Vogt, K; Jensen, Leif Panduro;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of the post-implantation syndrome/systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) after endovascular aortic repair.......The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of the post-implantation syndrome/systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) after endovascular aortic repair....

  5. Recommendations for accurate CT diagnosis of suspected acute aortic syndrome (AAS)-on behalf of the British Society of Cardiovascular Imaging (BSCI)/British Society of Cardiovascular CT (BSCCT).

    Vardhanabhuti, Varut; Nicol, Edward; Morgan-Hughes, Gareth; Roobottom, Carl A; Roditi, Giles; Hamilton, Mark C K; Bull, Russell K; Pugliese, Franchesca; Williams, Michelle C; Stirrup, James; Padley, Simon; Taylor, Andrew; Davies, L Ceri; Bury, Roger; Harden, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Accurate and timely assessment of suspected acute aortic syndrome is crucial in this life-threatening condition. Imaging with CT plays a central role in the diagnosis to allow expedited management. Diagnosis can be made using locally available expertise with optimized scanning parameters, making full use of recent advances in CT technology. Each imaging centre must optimize their protocols to allow accurate diagnosis, to optimize radiation dose and in particular to reduce the risk of false-positive diagnosis that may simulate disease. This document outlines the principles for the acquisition of motion-free imaging of the aorta in this context. PMID:26916280

  6. Incidence of patients with acute aortic dissection

    Salkovski, Safet; Panova, Gordana; Velickova, Nevenka; Panova, Blagica; Panov, Nenad; Nikolovska, Lence; Dzidrova, Violeta

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Acute aortic dissection (AAD) e life-threatening condition that characterizes the high mortality worldwide (7-8%). When AAD is split in the wall of the aorta where the blood circulates between layers of the wall which can lead to its rupture. Early recognition of symptoms and appropriate response to the medical team is crucial to the outcome of the patient. On receipt of a patient with chest pain to bear in mind the possibility of AAD. Standard diagnostics when fasti...

  7. Aortic dissection presenting as acute subtotal left main coronary artery occlusion: a case approach and review of the literature.

    Ruisi, Michael; Fallahi, Arzhang; Lala, Moinakhtar; Kanei, Yumiko

    2015-05-01

    Aortic dissection is the most common fatal condition of the aorta, yet it is often missed on initial clinical presentation. Aortic dissection associated with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is relatively rare, but if it occurs, it can be diagnostically challenging, and the condition can be fatal. Here we describe a case of aortic dissection presenting as ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) managed via the transradial approach. We describe the current literature on the subject. PMID:25780485

  8. Diagnostic imaging of acute aortic dissection; Evaluation of thrombosed type aortic dissection by CT and angiography

    Ohya, Tohru; Kumazaki, Tatsuo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    One hundred and nineteen patients with aortic dissection who underwent diagnostic imaging were reviewed and angiographic findings as well as those of CT were analysed. Thirty eight cases (43.1%) had non-contrast opacified false lumen, the type of which we call 'thrombosed type aortic dissection'. A comparative study of the thrombosed type with the patent type of false lumens was made particularly from the stand point of the characteristic diagnostic imagings (CT and angiography). At the same time, the pitfalls of these imagings in thrombosed type aortic dissection were studied. At the onset the average age of thrombosed type was 62.3 years old, while that of the patent type was 57.3. A statistical significance between the two groups was p<0.05. Thrombosed type in all cases was caused by atherosclerosis, whereas patent type was caused by the Marfan's syndrome in 11 cases. Other clinical findings, such as initial symptoms and blood pressure revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Pre-contrast CT in acute thrombosed type aortic dissection showed 'hyperdense crescent sign' in 89.4%. However, in 3 cases with thrombosed type in which the pre-contrast CT showed 'hyperdense crescent sign' contrast-enhanced CT detected no clear evidence of aortic dissection in the same site. This was due to obscurity induced by contrast medium. Angiographic findings of thrombosed type were classified into 3 groups: normal type, stenosed true lumen type and ulcer-like projection type. The incidence of normal type was estimated to be 48.4%, whereas stenosed true lumen type was 24.2% and ulcer-like projection was 27.7%. The present study concluded that thrombosed type is not rare in acute aortic dissection and contrast-enhanced CT as well as pre-contrast CT, is of great value in diagnosing thrombosed type. 'Hyperdense crescent sign' in pre-contrast CT is characteristic of intramural hematoma. (author).

  9. Emergency Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Acute and Early Failure of Sutureless Perceval Aortic Valve.

    Durand, Eric; Tron, Christophe; Eltchaninoff, Hélène

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a 78-year-old woman admitted for cardiogenic shock related to acute and early failure (severe aortic regurgitation) of a Perceval sutureless aortic bioprosthesis (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy). Clinical stability was achieved using rescue transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation with an Edwards SAPIEN 3 prosthesis (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA). To our knowledge, we report herein the first case of successful valve-in-valve implantation using a SAPIEN 3 transcatheter heart valve in a sutureless bioprosthetic aortic valve with acute and early deterioration. PMID:26095935

  10. Spectrum of Aortic Valve Abnormalities Associated with Aortic Dilation Across Age Groups in Turner Syndrome

    Olivieri, Laura J.; Baba, Ridhwan Y.; Arai, Andrew E.; Bandettini, W. Patricia; Rosing, Douglas R.; Bakalov, Vladimir; Sachdev, Vandana; Bondy, Carolyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital aortic valve fusion is associated with aortic dilation, aneurysm and rupture in girls and women with Turner syndrome (TS). Our objective was to characterize aortic valve structure in subjects with TS, and determine the prevalence of aortic dilation and valve dysfunction associated with different types of aortic valves. Methods and Results The aortic valve and thoracic aorta were characterized by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in 208 subjects with TS in an IRB-approved natural history study. Echocardiography was used to measure peak velocities across the aortic valve, and the degree of aortic regurgitation. Four distinct valve morphologies were identified: tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) 64%(n=133), partially fused aortic valve (PF) 12%(n=25), bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) 23%(n=47), and unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) 1%(n=3). Age and body surface area (BSA) were similar in the 4 valve morphology groups. There was a significant trend, independent of age, towards larger BSA-indexed ascending aortic diameters (AADi) with increasing valve fusion. AADi were (mean +/− SD) 16.9 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, 18.3 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, and 19.8 +/− 3.9 mm/m2 (p<0.0001) for TAV, PF and BAV+UAV respectively. PF, BAV, and UAV were significantly associated with mild aortic regurgitation and elevated peak velocities across the aortic valve. Conclusions Aortic valve abnormalities in TS occur with a spectrum of severity, and are associated with aortic root dilation across age groups. Partial fusion of the aortic valve, traditionally regarded as an acquired valve problem, had an equal age distribution and was associated with an increased AADi. PMID:24084490

  11. Acute oesophageal necrosis syndrome

    Garas, George; Wou, Constance; Sawyer, Joseph; Amygdalos, Iakovos; Gould, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    An 89-year-old woman with a known hiatus hernia presented to the accident and emergency department with acute onset epigastric pain. CT of the thorax and abdomen revealed a large hiatus hernia with mesentero-axial volvulus but no evidence of strangulation. A large aneurysmal aortic arch and descending aorta were visible with associated mural thrombus. As the pain was worsening, following discussion with the patient, the decision to operate was taken. The hiatus hernia was successfully reduced...

  12. Mesenteric ischemia in acute aortic dissection.

    Orihashi, Kazumasa

    2016-05-01

    Mesenteric ischemia complicated by acute aortic dissection (AAD) is uncommon, but serious, as there is no established treatment strategy and it can progress rapidly to multi-organ failure. Diagnosing mesenteric ischemia before necrotic change is difficult, not only for primary care physicians, but even for gastrointestinal or cardiovascular surgeons as it can occur at any time during surgery. Thus, measures need to be in place at the bedside to enable us to obtain information on visceral perfusion. It is often difficult to decide which of laparotomy or aortic repair should be performed first, especially when there is associated shock or malperfusion of other vital organs. The standard surgical procedures for mesenteric ischemia are prompt revascularization of the mesenteric artery and, if needed, resection of necrotic intestine. However, the development of endovascular treatment and the introduction of hybrid ORs have improved the treatment strategies for mesenteric ischemia. This article reviews the issues of "diagnosis" in relation to the mechanism of mesenteric ischemia, and discusses the current "treatment strategies". PMID:26024781

  13. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome predicts short-term outcome after transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Rettig, Thijs C D; Rigter, Sander; Nijenhuis, Vincent J.; Van Kuijk, Jan Peter; Ten Berg, Jurriën M.; Heijmen, Robin H.; Van De Garde, Ewoudt M W; Noordzij, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite the minimally invasive nature of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality is of major concern. Several studies showed that outcome was influenced by the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in patients underg

  14. [Vasoplegic Syndrome after Aortic Valve Replacement].

    Miyata, Kazuto; Shigematsu, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of vasoplegic syndrome (VS) after aortic valve replacement in a 65 year old male with aortic stenosis. The patient developed hypotension after separation from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Transesophageal echocardiography revealed well-maintained cardiac function and normal prosthetic valve function. However, his cardiac index was 3.0 l x min(-1) x m(-2) and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) was 1100 dynes x sec(-1) x cm(-5) x m(-2). Diagnosing VS, norepinephrine administration was commenced. Since his respiratory status was good, the patient was extubated on the day of surgery. Two days after surgery, catecholamines were discontinued with the stabilization of his circulatory status. However, his respiratory status showed gradual deterioration, and he was re-intubated. Chest X-ray showed bilateral pleural effusion, which was treated by drainage and fluid restriction. With this, his oxygenation improved and he could be extubated 5 days after surgery. Vasoplegic syndrome is a potentially life-threatening complication following cardiac surgery. Hypotension at the time of separation from CPB can be due to multiple factors. Despite an incidence rate of 10%, little is known about VS. We hope that, in future, tailored therapeutic protocols for VS will be developed. PMID:27004393

  15. Turner's syndrome associated with bicuspid aortic stenosis and dissecting aortic aneurysm

    Slater, D N; Grundman, M. J.; Mitchell, L

    1982-01-01

    A case of Turner's syndrome is described associated with bicuspid aortic stenosis and fatal rupture of a thoracic dissecting aortic aneurysm. Histology of the aneurysm showed severe cystic medial necrosis. This association has not been previously described in the absence of coarctation.

  16. Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis caused by paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Riccioni, G; Bucciarelli, V; Bisceglia, N; Totaro, G; Scotti, L; Aceto, A; Martini, F; Gallina, S; Bucciarelli, T; Macarini, L

    2013-01-01

    Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis is a rare and potential fatal event, which occurs in adult subjects. We present the case of a 72-year-old-man, who referred to the emergency Department of our hospital because of persistent severe abdominal and perineal pain. Doppler ultrasounds and computerized tomography angiography revealed the acute thrombosis of the abdominal aorta. Immediate revascularization through aortic thrombo-endoarterectomy resolved the disease. PMID:23830410

  17. Successful Surgical Treatment for Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Leriche Syndrome

    Chong, Byung Kwon; Kim, Joon Bum

    2015-01-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm accompanied by Leriche syndrome is an extremely rare combination of aortic diseases, the surgical management of which has not been described to date. We report the successful treatment of one such case through open surgical repair of the thoracoabdominal aorta. PMID:25883898

  18. Chest radiograph usefulness in the diagnosis of acute aortic dissection

    Nancy Welch; Chat Dang; Carlton Allen; Robert Cook

    2005-01-01

    Objective To assess the diagnostic value of chest radiographs in patients presenting to a busy inner-city Emergency Department with subsequently proven acute aortic dissection. Methods A retrospective review of initial chest radiographs and charts of patients with the confirmed diagnosis of acute aortic dissection was done for a period of 5 years from 1998 to 2003. A comparison was made between the initial readings of chest radiographs prior to confirmation of the aortic dissection, and a retrospective review of the same radiographs by two board-certified radiologists with special attention to the classic findings of acute aortic dissection identifiable on plain films. Results The charts of nine patients (four men, five women) with proven acute aortic dissection were reviewed. All nine patients were suspected of having acute aortic dissection based on presenting history and symptoms of chest pain (66% ), migratory pain (89% ), back pain (89% ), and the abruptness of onset of pain (89% ). Initial plain portable chest X-rays were obtained in the Emergency Department in all nine patients. Six of nine (67%) radiographs were read as normal, while three (33%) demonstrated a widened mediastinum (> 8.0cm), two (22%) showed an abnormal aortic contour, with one ( 11% ) displaying an apical cap. Confirmation of the diagnosis was obtained with either a spiral CT angiogram or transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). All nine plain radiographs were retrospectively reviewed by two board-certified radiologists aware of the diagnosis of acute dissection without a change in the readings. Conclusions Plain portable chest radiographs are of limited usefulness for the screening of acute aortic dissection. Further radiologic evaluation should be dictated by the clinical presentation and an awareness of the low sensitivity of portable chest X- rays.

  19. Overview of current surgical strategies for aortic disease in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Miyahara, Shunsuke; Okita, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a heritable, systemic disorder of the connective tissue with a high penetrance, named after Dr. Antoine Marfan. The most clinically important manifestations of this syndrome are cardiovascular pathologies which cause life-threatening events, such as acute aortic dissections, aortic rupture and regurgitation of the aortic valve or other artrioventricular valves leading to heart failure. These events play important roles in the life expectancy of patients with this disorder, especially prior to the development of effective surgical approaches for proximal ascending aortic disease. To prevent such catastrophic aortic events, a lower threshold has been recommended for prophylactic interventions on the aortic root. After prophylactic root replacement, disease in the aorta beyond the root and distal to the arch remains a cause for concern. Multiple surgeries are required throughout a patient's lifetime that can be problematic due to distal lesions complicated by dissection. Many controversies in surgical strategies remain, such as endovascular repair, to manage such complex cases. This review examines the trends in surgical strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular disease in patients with Marfan syndrome, and current perspectives in this field. PMID:26586198

  20. Fluid dynamics of aortic root dilation in Marfan syndrome

    Querzoli, Giorgio; Espa, Stefania; Costantini, Martina; Sorgini, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Aortic root dilation and propensity to dissection are typical manifestations of the Marfan Syndrome (MS), a genetic defect leading to the degeneration of the elastic fibres. Dilation affects the structure of the flow and, in turn, altered flow may play a role in vessel dilation, generation of aneurysms, and dissection. The aim of the present work is the investigation in-vitro of the fluid dynamic modifications occurring as a consequence of the morphological changes typically induced in the aortic root by MS. A mock-loop reproducing the left ventricle outflow tract and the aortic root was used to measure time resolved velocity maps on a longitudinal symmetry plane of the aortic root. Two dilated model aortas, designed to resemble morphological characteristics typically observed in MS patients, have been compared to a reference, healthy geometry. The aortic model was designed to quantitatively reproduce the change of aortic distensibility caused by MS. Results demonstrate that vorticity released from the valve ...

  1. Complete graft dehiscence 8 months after repair of acute type A aortic dissection

    Gebhard, Cathérine; Biaggi, Patric; Stähli, Barbara E; Schwarz, Urs; Felix, Christian; Falk, Volkmar

    2013-01-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection is a dreaded differential diagnosis of acute chest pain. Long-term outcome mainly depends on pre-existing comorbidities and post-operative complications. We present a patient with aortic graft dehiscence and subsequent severe aortic regurgitation due to fungal graft infection 8 months after repair of acute type A aortic dissection. Redo aortic surgery had to be delayed for 28 days due to intracerebral haemorrhage caused by septic embolism and clipping of a mycot...

  2. Acute Contained Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm Presenting as Left Vocal Fold Immobility

    Sharon H. Gnagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To recognize intrathoracic abnormalities, including expansion or rupture of aortic aneurysms, as a source of acute onset vocal fold immobility. Methods. A case report and review of the literature. Results. An 85-year-old female with prior history of an aortic aneurysm presented to a tertiary care facility with sudden onset hoarseness. On laryngoscopy, the left vocal fold was immobile in the paramedian position. A CT scan obtained that day revealed a new, large hematoma surrounding the upper descending aortic stent graft consistent with an acute contained ruptured aortic aneurysm. She was referred to the emergency department for evaluation and treatment by vascular surgery. She was counseled regarding surgical options and ultimately decided not to pursue further treatment. Her vocal fold immobility was subsequently treated via office-based injection medialization two weeks after presentation and again 5 months after the initial injection which dramatically improved her voice. Follow-up CT scan at 8 months demonstrated a reduction of the hematoma. The left vocal cord remains immobile to date. Conclusion. Ortner’s syndrome, or cardiovocal syndrome, is hoarseness secondary to left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy caused by cardiovascular pathology. It is a rare condition and, while typically presenting gradually, may also present with acute symptomatology.

  3. Marfan syndrome in children and adolescents: predictive and prognostic value of aortic root growth for screening for aortic complications

    Groenink, M; Rozendaal, L; Naeff, M.S.J.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Hart, A.A.M.; Wall; Mulder, B.J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess and measure the diagnostic and prognostic value of individual aortic root growth in children and adolescents with Marfan syndrome.
Design—From 1983 to 1996, 250 children were screened for Marfan syndrome. Serial echocardiographic aortic root measurements of 123 children (57 Marfan, 66 control) were available for evaluation of aortic root growth. Aortic root diameters were correlated with body surface area. Based on individual growth of the aortic root a discrimination form...

  4. Endovascular Repair of Acute Uncomplicated Aortic Type B Dissection Promotes Aortic Remodelling

    Brunkwall, J; Kasprzak, P; Verhoeven, E; Heijmen, R; Taylor, P; Alric, P; Canaud, L; Janotta, M; Raithel, D; Malina, W; Resch, Ti; Eckstein, H-H; Ockert, S; Larzon, T; Carlsson, F; Schumacher, H; Classen, S; Schaub, P; Lammer, J; Lönn, Lars Birger; Clough, R E; Rampoldi, V; Trimarchi, S; Fabiani, J-N; Böckler, D; Kotelis, D; von Tenng-Kobligk, H; Mangialardi, N; Ronchey, S; Dialetto, G; Matoussevitch, V

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Uncomplicated acute type B aortic dissection (AD) treated conservatively has a 10% 30-day mortality and up to 25% need intervention within 4 years. In complicated AD, stent grafts have been encouraging. The aim of the present prospective randomised trial was to compare best medical...

  5. Reinforced aortic root reconstruction for acute type A aortic dissection involving the aortic root

    Han Qing-qi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There are debates regarding the optimal approach for AAAD involving the aortic root. We described a modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction approach for treating AAAD involving the aortic root. METHODS: A total of 161 patients with AAAD involving the aortic root were treated by our modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction approach from January 1998 to December 2008. Key features of our modified approach were placement of an autologous pericardial patch in the false lumen, lining of the sinotubular junction lumen with a polyester vascular ring, and wrapping of the vessel with Teflon strips. Outcome measures included post-operative mortality, survival, complications, and level of aortic regurgitation. RESULTS: A total of 161 patients were included in the study (mean age: 43.3 1 15.5 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 5.1 1 2.96 years (2-12 years. A total of 10 (6.2% and 11 (6.8% patients died during hospitalization and during follow-up, respectively. Thirty-one (19.3% patients experienced postoperative complications. The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 99.3%, 98%, 93.8%, and 75.5%, respectively. There were no instances of recurrent aortic dissection, aortic aneurysm, or pseudoaneurysm during the entire study period. The severity of aortic regurgitation dramatically decreased immediately after surgery (from 28.6% to 0% grade 3-4 and thereafter slightly increased (from 0% to 7.2% at 5 years and 9.1% at 10 years. CONCLUSION: This modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction was feasible, safe and durable/effective, as indicated by its low mortality, low postoperative complications and high survival rate.

  6. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Marcelo Cury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD, bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV, and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research.

  7. Incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome after endovascular aortic repair

    De La Motte, L; Vogt, K; Jensen, Leif Panduro;

    2011-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of the post-implantation syndrome/systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) after endovascular aortic repair. METHODS: All patients, undergoing elective primary endovascular repair of an asymptomatic infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm...... groups (3% in the SIRS group vs. none in the non-SIRS group). CONCLUSION: The high incidence of SIRS after EVAR is unexpected considering the minimally invasive procedure. Further studies on the cause of this response and measures to attenuate the response seem appropriate....

  8. Predicting long-term outcomes of acute aortic dissection: a focus on gender.

    Divchev, Dimitar; Najjar, Tarek; Tillwich, Falko; Rehders, Tim; Palisch, Holger; Nienaber, Christoph A

    2015-03-01

    Acute aortic disease ranks as the 19th leading cause of death with steadily increasing incidence. The prevalence of aneurysms varies depending on the localization along the aorta with a mortality of aortic rupture of around 80%. Traditionally, aortic disease affects men more frequently than women, however, with a varying gender ratio. Nevertheless, in the setting of acute aortic dissection, the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissections identified significant gender-related differences in the management of both sexes with acute aortic conditions. Current data suggest that women are at an increased risk of both dying from aortic dissection and having aorta-related complications than men. This review aims to report on current evidence of gender impact on natural history, treatment and outcomes in patients with acute aortic dissection. PMID:25608580

  9. Relationship of Metabolic Syndrome With Incident Aortic Valve Calcium and Aortic Valve Calcium Progression

    Katz, Ronit; Budoff, Matthew J.; Takasu, Junichiro; Shavelle, David M; Bertoni, Alain; Blumenthal, Roger S.; Ouyang, Pamela; Wong, Nathan D.; O'Brien, Kevin D.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been associated with increased prevalence of aortic valve calcium (AVC) and with increased progression of aortic stenosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether MetS is associated with increased risks for the development of new (“incident”) AVC or for progression of established AVC as assessed by CT. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The relationships of MetS or its components as well as of diabetes to risks for incident AVC or AVC progression we...

  10. Unreliability of aortic size index to predict risk of aortic dissection in a patient with Turner syndrome

    Nijs, Jan; Gelsomino, Sandro; Lucà, Fabiana; Parise, Orlando; Maessen, Jos G; Meir, Mark La

    2014-01-01

    Aortic size index (ASI) has been proposed as a reliable criterion to predict risk for aortic dissection in Turner syndrome with significant thresholds of 20-25 mm/m2. We report a case of aortic arch dissection in a patient with Turner syndrome who, from the ASI thresholds proposed, was deemed to be at low risk of aortic dissection or rupture and was not eligible for prophylactic surgery. This case report strongly supports careful monitoring and surgical evaluation even when the ASI is < 20 mm/m2 if other significant risk factors are present. PMID:24944765

  11. Acute Right Coronary Ostial Stenosis during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Sarwar Umran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of acute right coronary artery stenosis developing in a patient undergoing aortic valve replacement. We present a case report with a brief overview of the literature relating to coronary artery occlusion associated with cardiac valve surgery - the theories and treatments are discussed. A 85 year-old female was admitted under the care of the cardiothoracic team with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Investigations, including cardiac echocardiography and coronary angiography, indicated a critical aortic valve stenosis. Intraoperative right ventricular failure ensued post aortic valve replacement. Subsequent investigations revealed an acute occlusion of the proximal right coronary artery with resultant absence of distal flow supplying the right ventricle. An immediate right coronary artery bypass procedure was performed with resolution of the right ventricular failure. Subsequent weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass was uneventful and the patient continued to make excellent recovery in the postoperative phase. To our knowledge this is one of the few documented cases of intraoperative acute coronary artery occlusion developing during valve surgery. However, surgeons should be aware of the potential for acute occlusion so that early recognition and rapid intervention can be instituted.

  12. Hybrid repair of ruptured type B aortic dissection extending into an aberrant right subclavian artery in a patient with Turner's syndrome.

    Hamidian-Jahromi, Alireza; Carroll, Jonathan D; Doucet, Linda D; Zhang, Wayne W

    2013-11-01

    Turner's syndrome (TS) has been documented as the most common cause of aortic dissection in young women. However, little attention from vascular surgery has been paid to these patients. We report the first case of ruptured type B aortic dissection with aberrant right subclavian artery treated successfully with hybrid endovascular and open procedures in a patient with TS. Left carotid to subclavian artery bypass, thoracic endovascular aortic repair, and coil embolization of the aberrant right subclavian and left subclavian arteries were performed in an emergency setting. Literature on epidemiology, causes, and management options of acute aortic dissection in TS patients are reviewed and discussed. PMID:24011806

  13. [Acute penetrating atherosclerotic ulcers in aortic arch: differential diagnosis of chest pain].

    Rodrigues, Bruno; Ribeiro, Carla; Santos, Luis Ferreira; Moreira, Davide; Ferreira, Pedro; Pipa, João; Beirão, Ilídio; Santos, Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Penetrating atherosclerotic ulcers (PAU) represent a pathological phenomenon in which ulceration of atheromatous lesions of the aorta penetrates the internal elastic lamina, reaching the middle muscular layer. These ulcers are more common in the descending thoracic aorta, being rare in the ascending aorta. The differential diagnosis between PAU and other entities of acute aortic syndromes (AAS) becomes difficult. The diagnosis of this disease is made through imaging studies: multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), magnetic resonance (MR) or transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). After diagnosis, the PAU of the ascending aorta should be treated surgically in an emergency context. In this paper the authors report a case of PAU in the aortic arch in a 84 years old patient admitted to the emergency room for chest pain. In this context a review of the natural evolution of this entity is made, with emphasis on diagnostic imaging modalities used for its characterization as well as their treatment options. PMID:23560267

  14. High-risk pregnancy in a woman with Marfan syndrome, a bicuspid aortic valve, and a dilated aortic sinus

    Groth, Kristian Ambjørn; Greisen, Jacob Raben; Nielsen, Birgitte Bruun;

    2015-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman with Marfan syndrome, a bicuspid aortic valve, and a dilated aortic sinus (5.2 cm) presented herself in clinic 14 weeks pregnant. She was advised to discontinue the pregnancy due to risk of dissection; however, she decided to continue. She was treated with labetalol (300 mg...

  15. ANTICOAGULANTS IN ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

    I. A. Latfullin; A. A. Podolskaya

    2016-01-01

    Clinical efficacy of unfractionated and low molecular heparins in acute coronary syndrome is discussed. New synthetic heparin derivative fondaparinux (Arixtra) is focused. Author’s brief experience of fondaparinux clinical implementation is presented.

  16. Novel pharmacological strategies to prevent aortic complications in Marfan syndrome.

    Matt, Peter; Eckstein, Friedrich

    2011-12-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the FBN1 gene. Recent molecular studies, most performed in mouse models, revealed that the MFS is more a developmental abnormality with broad and complex effects on the morphogenesis and function of multiple organ systems. FBN1 haploinsufficiency and dysregulated transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling seem to be critical for clinical manifestations in MFS including aortic root dilatation. Aortic root aneurysm and aortic dissection represent the main causes of morbidity and mortality in MFS. Most importantly, TGF-β antagonism through angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), for example losartan, has been shown to prevent and possibly reverse aortic root dilatation in a mouse model of MFS. A first human study on a small pediatric cohort confirmed those promising results in reducing the aortic root growth over a follow-up period of 12 to 47 months. So, a large multicenter trial has been set up and results should be available soon. Other therapeutic strategies which might be combined with losartan include traditional β-blockade, doxycyclin and statins. Such management could offer the first potential for primary prevention of clinical manifestations in MFS. PMID:22783312

  17. Novel pharmacological strategies to prevent aortic complications in Marfan syndrome

    Peter Matt; Friedrich Eckstein

    2011-01-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the FBN1 gene.Recent molecular studies,most performed in mouse models,revealed that the MFS is more a developmental abnormality with broad and complex effects on the morphogenesis and function of multiple organ systems.FBN1 haploinsufficiency and dysregulated transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β)signaling seem to be critical for clinical manifestations in MFS including aortic root dilatation.Aortic root aneurysm and aortic dissection represent the main causes of morbidity and mortality in MFS.Most importantly,TGF-β antagonism through angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs),for example losartan,has been shown to prevent and possibly reverse aortic root dilatation in a mouse model of MFS.A first human study on a small pediatric cohort confirmed those promising results in reducing the aortic root growth over a follow-up period of 12 to 47 months.So,a large multicenter trial has been set up and results should be available soon.Other therapeutic strategies which might be combined with losartan include traditional β-blockade,doxycyclin and statins.Such management could offer the first potential for primary prevention of clinical manifestations in MFS.

  18. Histopathology of aortic complications in bicuspid aortic valve versus Marfan syndrome: relevance for therapy?

    Grewal, Nimrat; Franken, Romy; Mulder, Barbara J M; Goumans, Marie-José; Lindeman, Johannes H N; Jongbloed, Monique R M; DeRuiter, Marco C; Klautz, Robert J M; Bogers, Ad J J C; Poelmann, Robert E; Groot, Adriana C Gittenberger-de

    2016-05-01

    Patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) are more prone to develop aortic dilation and dissection compared to persons with a tricuspid aortic valve (TAV). To elucidate potential common and distinct pathways of clinical relevance, we compared the histopathological substrates of aortopathy. Ascending aortic wall biopsies were divided in five groups: BAV (n = 36) and TAV (n = 23) without and with dilation and non-dilated MFS (n = 8). General histologic features, apoptosis, the expression of markers for vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) maturation, markers predictive for ascending aortic dilation in BAV, and expression of fibrillin-1 were investigated. Both MFS and BAV showed an altered distribution and decreased fibrillin-1 expression in the aorta and a significantly lower level of differentiated VSMC markers. Interestingly, markers predictive for aortic dilation in BAV were not expressed in the MFS aorta. The aorta in MFS was similar to the aorta in dilated TAV with regard to the presence of medial degeneration and apoptosis, while other markers for degeneration and aging like inflammation and progerin expression were low in MFS, comparable to BAV. Both MFS and BAV aortas have immature VSMCs, while MFS and TAV patients have a similar increased rate of medial degeneration. However, the mechanism leading to apoptosis is expected to be different, being fibrillin-1 mutation induced increased angiotensin-receptor-pathway signaling in MFS and cardiovascular aging and increased progerin in TAV. Our findings could explain why angiotensin inhibition is successful in MFS and less effective in TAV and BAV patients. PMID:26129868

  19. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Modrykamien, Ariel M.; Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss t...

  20. Novel pharmacological strategies to prevent aortic complications in Marfan syndrome

    Peter Matt; Friedrich Eckstein

    2011-01-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the FBN1 gene. Recent molecular studies, most performed in mouse models, revealed that the MFS is more a developmental abnormality with broad and complex effects on the morphogenesis and function of multiple organ systems. FBN1 haploinsufficiency and dysregulated transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling seem to be critical for clinical manifestations in MFS including aortic root dilatation. A...

  1. Novel pharmacological strategies to prevent aortic complications in Marfan syndrome

    Matt, Peter; Eckstein, Friedrich

    2011-01-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the FBN1 gene. Recent molecular studies, most performed in mouse models, revealed that the MFS is more a developmental abnormality with broad and complex effects on the morphogenesis and function of multiple organ systems. FBN1 haploinsufficiency and dysregulated transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling seem to be critical for clinical manifestations in MFS including aortic root dilatation. Aort...

  2. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Yadam, Suman; Bihler, Eric; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious inflammatory disorder with high mortality. Its main pathologic mechanism seems to result from increased alveolar permeability. Its definition has also changed since first being described according to the Berlin definition, which now classifies ARDS on a severity scale based on PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen, arterial)/FIO2 (fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio. The cornerstone of therapy was found to be a low tidal volume strategy featuring volumes of 6 to 8 mL per kg of ideal body weight that has been shown to have decreased mortality as proven by the ARDSnet trials. There are other areas of treatment right now that include extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, as well for severe refractory hypoxemia. Other methods that include prone positioning for ventilation have also shown improvements in oxygenation. Positive end-expiratory pressure with lung recruitment maneuvers has also been found to be helpful. Other therapies that include vasodilators and neuromuscular agents are still being explored and need further studies to define their role in ARDS. PMID:26919679

  3. Spontaneous Thrombosis of a Bicuspid Aortic valve due to Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Sarah Farrell

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 51-year-old man who was admitted as an emergency with spontaneous thrombosis of the aortic valve and ascending aorta. At operation he was found to have a congenitally bicuspid aortic valve and subsequent investigation revealed primary antiphospholipid syndrome. He underwent successful removal of the thrombus combined with mechanical replacement of the aortic valve.

  4. Intravenous Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Ischemic Stroke Secondary to Aortic Dissection

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Park, So-Young; Whang, Seon-Il; Seo, So-Young; Lee, Dong-Ha; Kim, Han-Joon; Cho, Joong-Yang; Cho, Yong-Jin; Jang, Woo-Ik; Kim, Chang Young

    2008-01-01

    Background Acute ischemic stroke secondary to aortic dissection (AoD) is challenging in the era of thrombolysis owing to the diagnostic difficulty within a narrow time window and the high risk of complications. Case Report A 64-year-old woman with middle cerebral artery occlusion syndrome admitted to the emergency room within intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) time window. Her neurological symptoms improved during thrombolysis, but chest and abdominal pain developed....

  5. Dilated aortic root and severe aortic regurgitation causing dilated cardiomyopathy in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Zainal, Abir; Hamad, Mahmoud Nidal; Naqvi, Syed Yaseen

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of heritable disorders characterised by vast clinical heterogeneity ranging from the classic constellation of symptoms including skin hyperextensibility, joint hypermobility and skin fragility to the exceedingly critical consequences of arterial rupture and visceral perforation. We describe the case of a 65-year-old male with a history of classic EDS who reported of dyspnoea on exertion, orthopnoea, fatigue and palpitations. He was found to have dilated cardiomyopathy with an ejection fraction of 35%, aortic root dilation and severe aortic valve regurgitation. The authors intend to draw attention to the rare cardiac manifestations of this condition and the therapeutic challenges involved in managing such patients. PMID:27413024

  6. The acute radiation syndrome

    Symptoms and signs from medical aspects resulting from whole body exposure, or in the main part, to ionizing radiation are described. The dose-response relationship is studied and the exposure is divided in three parts: central nervous system syndrome, gastrointestinal syndrome and hematopoietic syndrome. Brief comments about the treatment are reported. (M.A.C.)

  7. Aortic plaque rupture in the setting of acute lower limb ischemia.

    O'Donnell, David H

    2012-02-01

    Acute aortic plaque rupture is an uncommon cause of acute lower limb ischemia. The authors report sequence computed tomographic imaging of a distal aortic plaque rupture in a young man with bilateral lower limb complications. Clinical awareness, prompt recognition and imaging, and appropriate treatment of this uncommon condition are necessary to improve patient outcomes.

  8. Aortic anomalies in an adolescent with the Williams' elfin facies syndrome

    An adolescent with classical Williams' syndrome who presented with hypertensive encephalopathy is described. He had the unusual combination of supravalvular aortic stenosis, long segment coarctation of the aorta, aortic hypoplasia and a high bifurcation of the abdominal aorta. Surgical resection of the coarctation was required; however, the patient has remained moderately hypertensive. The aortic anomalies in this syndrome are reviewed and their frequency and importance examined. (orig.)

  9. Aortic anomalies in an adolescent with the Williams' elfin facies syndrome

    Williams, R.L.; Azouz, E.M.

    1984-02-01

    An adolescent with classical Williams' syndrome who presented with hypertensive encephalopathy is described. He had the unusual combination of supravalvular aortic stenosis, long segment coarctation of the aorta, aortic hypoplasia and a high bifurcation of the abdominal aorta. Surgical resection of the coarctation was required; however, the patient has remained moderately hypertensive. The aortic anomalies in this syndrome are reviewed and their frequency and importance examined.

  10. Determination of entry site for acute type A aortic dissection by initial enhanced CT-scan

    Mase, Takenori; Narumiya, Chihiro; Aoyama, Takahiko; Nagata, Yoshihisa [Aichi Medical Univ., Nagakute (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-01-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection presents a surgical emergency because conservative therapy is not effective in the majority of instances. Enhanced CT-scan of the chest is commonly available and is considered to be an optimal diagnostic method for this disease. The operative strategy is to resect the primary tear to close the entry site of the aortic dissection and replace it with a tubular Dacron graft. Therefore, the existence of the entry site is important in determining the operative procedure. Based on the numerical value of the enhanced CT-scan inspection, the present study seeks to preoperatively identify the location of the presumed entry site in aortic dissection. From May 1996 to June 1999, 21 consecutive patients (Marfan's syndrome excluded) with acute type A aortic dissection underwent surgical treatment. Nineteen patients were preoperatively examined by enhanced CT-scan: 11 men and 8 women, with a mean age of 61 years. CT-scan slices used for early diagnosis were of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, descending aorta, and thoracoabdominal aorta. The largest diameters of the whole and true lumen were measured from cross-sectional aortic images with a personal computer, and the areas of the whole and true lumen were obtained by the manual tracing method. The true ratio was calculated for the largest diameter and area of the whole lumen. The nineteen patients were divided into two groups according to the location of the entry site based on the operating views. Seven patients with the entry site in the ascending aorta were classified as group A, and twelve patients with the entry site further in the aortic arch and descending aorta were classified as group B. Comparisons were performed by non-parametric analysis. Moreover, a discriminant analysis was applied to evaluate the classification between the two groups. The ratio of the largest diameter of the true lumen in group A at the level of the ascending and descending aorta was significantly greater than

  11. Determination of entry site for acute type A aortic dissection by initial enhanced CT-scan

    Acute type A aortic dissection presents a surgical emergency because conservative therapy is not effective in the majority of instances. Enhanced CT-scan of the chest is commonly available and is considered to be an optimal diagnostic method for this disease. The operative strategy is to resect the primary tear to close the entry site of the aortic dissection and replace it with a tubular Dacron graft. Therefore, the existence of the entry site is important in determining the operative procedure. Based on the numerical value of the enhanced CT-scan inspection, the present study seeks to preoperatively identify the location of the presumed entry site in aortic dissection. From May 1996 to June 1999, 21 consecutive patients (Marfan's syndrome excluded) with acute type A aortic dissection underwent surgical treatment. Nineteen patients were preoperatively examined by enhanced CT-scan: 11 men and 8 women, with a mean age of 61 years. CT-scan slices used for early diagnosis were of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, descending aorta, and thoracoabdominal aorta. The largest diameters of the whole and true lumen were measured from cross-sectional aortic images with a personal computer, and the areas of the whole and true lumen were obtained by the manual tracing method. The true ratio was calculated for the largest diameter and area of the whole lumen. The nineteen patients were divided into two groups according to the location of the entry site based on the operating views. Seven patients with the entry site in the ascending aorta were classified as group A, and twelve patients with the entry site further in the aortic arch and descending aorta were classified as group B. Comparisons were performed by non-parametric analysis. Moreover, a discriminant analysis was applied to evaluate the classification between the two groups. The ratio of the largest diameter of the true lumen in group A at the level of the ascending and descending aorta was significantly greater than that

  12. Aortic root pathology in Marfan syndrome increases the risk of migraine with aura

    Koppen, H; Vis, J C; Gooiker, D J;

    2012-01-01

    To assess the lifetime prevalence of migraine in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) and to investigate a history of aortic root replacement (AR) as a possible risk factor.......To assess the lifetime prevalence of migraine in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) and to investigate a history of aortic root replacement (AR) as a possible risk factor....

  13. Hybrid Treatment of Acute Abdominal Aortic Thrombosis Presenting with Paraplegia.

    Azzarone, Matteo; De Troia, Alessandro; Iazzolino, Luigi; Nabulsi, Bilal; Tecchio, Tiziano

    2016-05-01

    Acute thrombotic or embolic occlusion of the abdominal aorta is a rare vascular emergency associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Classically, the clinical presentation is a severe peripheral ischemia with bilateral leg pain as the predominant feature. Aortic occlusion presenting as an isolated acute onset of paraplegia due to spinal cord ischemia is very rare and requires improved awareness to prevent adverse outcomes associated with delayed diagnosis. We report the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with sudden paraplegia due to the thrombotic occlusion of the infrarenal aorta involving the first segment of the common iliac arteries on both sides; emergent transperitoneal aorto iliac thrombectomy combined with the endovascular iliac kissing-stent technique were performed achieving perioperative complete regression of the symptoms. PMID:26968371

  14. Metabolic syndrome in acute coronary syndrome

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome Study design: A Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008 Patients and Methods: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery in the past and other co-morbid diseases were excluded. All patients were assessed for the presence of five components of metabolic syndrome including hypertension, HDL-Cholesterol and triglycerides, glucose intolerance and abdominal obesity. Systolic, diastolic blood pressures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting glucose and lipid profile were also done. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied with a mean age of 54.26 +- 11 years. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 55 (40.7%) patients. MS with all five components was documented in 4 (7.27%) while MS with four and three components was seen in 23 (41.81%) and 28 (50.90%) patients respectively. Only 24 (43.63%) patients with MS had diabetes mellitus, remaining 31(56.36%) were non diabetic. Frequencies of diabetes, hypertension and family history of CAD were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients with normal metabolic status. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is fairly common and important risk factor in patients of IHD. Other risk factors like smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes were also frequently found. Public awareness to control the risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD in our country. (author)

  15. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  16. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Respiratory Failure Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  17. Decreased aortic growth and middle aortic syndrome in patients with neuroblastoma after radiation therapy

    Sutton, Elizabeth J. [Harvard University, Department of Radiology, Mount Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, MA (United States); University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Tong, Ricky T. [Stanford University, Department of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Gillis, Amy M.; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Henning, Tobias D.; Boddington, Sophie; Sha, Vinil; Gooding, Charles; Coakley, Fergus V.; Daldrup-Link, Heike [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Weinberg, Vivian A. [University of California, San Francisco, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Biostatistics Core, San Francisco, CA (United States); Matthay, Katherine [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Pediatrics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Long-term CT follow-up studies are required in pediatric patients who have received intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to assess vascular toxicities and to determine the exact complication rate. To analyze with CT the effects of radiation therapy (RT) on the growth of the aorta in neuroblastoma patients. Abdominal CT scans of 31 patients with intraabdominal neuroblastoma (stage II-IV), treated with RT (20 IORT{+-}EBRT, 11 EBRT alone), were analyzed retrospectively. The diameter of the abdominal aorta was measured before and after RT. These data were compared to normal and predicted normal aortic diameters of children, according to the model of Fitzgerald, Donaldson and Poznanski (aortic diameter in centimeters = 0.844+0.0599 x age in years), and to the diameters of a control group of children who had not undergone RT. Statistical analyses for the primary aims were performed using the chi-squared test, t-test, Mann-Whitney test, nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs test and analysis of variance for repeated measures. Clinical files and imaging studies were evaluated for signs of late vascular complications of neuroblastoma patients who had received RT. The mean diameter before and after RT and the growth of the aorta were significantly lower than expected in patients with neuroblastoma (P<0.05 for each) and when compared to the growth in a control group with normal and nonirradiated aortas. Among the patients who had received RT, there was no difference due to the type of RT. Seven patients from the IORT{+-}EBRT group developed vascular complications, which included hypertension (five), middle aortic syndrome (two), death due to mesenteric ischemia (one) and critical aortic stenosis, which required aortic bypass surgery (two). Patients with neuroblastoma who had received RT showed impaired growth of the abdominal aorta. Significant long-term vascular complications occurred in seven patients who received IORT

  18. Long-Term Follow-Up After Endovascular Treatment of Acute Aortic Emergencies

    satisfactory follow-up despite the necessity for reintervention and graft extension in 3 of 6 cases (50%). Two patients with type B dissection died due to mesenteric ischemia despite sufficient mesenteric blood flow being restored (but too late). Two suffered from neurologic complications, 1 from paraplegia and 1 from cerebral ischemia (probably embolic), 1 from penetrating ulcer, and 1 from persistent ischemia of the kidney. Five of 9 (56%) patients with symptomatic thoracic aneurysm demonstrated endoleaks during follow-up and there was an increase in the aneurysm in 1. Conclusion. Endovascular treatment is safe and effective for emergency treatment of life-threatening acute thoracic aortic syndromes. Results are encouraging, particularly for traumatic aortic ruptures. However, regular follow-up is mandatory, particularly in the other pathologies, to identify late complications of the stent-graft and to perform appropriate additional corrections as required

  19. Stenotic and obstructive lesions in acute dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Shumacker, H B; Isch, J H; Jolly, W W

    1975-05-01

    The present study of 33 operatively treated patients, 88 per cent of whom survived the procedure, is concerned with an important problem associated with acute thoracic aortic dissection, the stenotic and obstructive lesions of the aorta and its branches. Their variety and nature are described, as are the additional operative procedures deemed necessary at the time of the operation, immediately thereafter, or later on. Much has been learned about these difficulties from clinical and autopsy observations and especially from careful arteriographic surveys. They seem to be generally well withstood following resectional and grafting procedures upon the affected segment of the thoracic aorta. Occasionally, additional operative manipulations may be necessary at the same time, for example, interpolation of grafts between the ascending aortic graft and a coronary when the origin of the latter is sheared off by the dissection, and distal arterial manipulations when the patient still has ischemic lower extremities immediately after the primary procedure. Later operations must sometimes be performed because of persistence of complaints such as intermittent claudication. It is extremely rare that immediate reoperation is advisable because of indications of intra-abdominal ischemia. Much more can be learned from careful pre- and postoperative arteriographic study. PMID:1130882

  20. Prophylactic aortic root surgery in patients with Marfan syndrome : 10 years' experience with a protocol based on body surface area

    Aalberts, Jan J. J.; van Tintelen, J. Peter; Hillege, Hans L.; Boonstra, Piet W.; van den Berg, Maarten P.; Waterbolk, T

    2008-01-01

    Background: Current guidelines recommending prophylactic aortic root replacement in Marfan syndrome are based on absolute diameters of the aortic root. However, aortic root diameter is a function of body surface area (BSA). Here, we report our experience with a protocol for prophylactic aortic root

  1. Late aortic lymphocele and residual ovary syndrome after gynecological surgery

    Iuliano Marialetizia

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gynecological surgery, as radical hysterectomy or pelvic and aortic lymphadenectomy, accounts for more than 50% of iatrogenic injuries. In premenopausal women, an hysterectomy with ovarian sparing and concomitant lateral ovarian transposition is frequently performed. However, the fate of the retained ovary is complicated by the residual ovarian syndrome (ROS and one of the most common postoperative complications of the lymphadenectomy procedure is the lymphocele, with an average incidence of 22–48.5%. The differential diagnosis of a postoperative fluid collection includes, in addition to a lymphocele, urinoma, hematoma, seroma or abscess and the computed tomography (CT findings alone is not enough. Case presentation We describe a patient, affected by ROS concomitant with a asymptomatic lymphocele, initially confused with an aortic lymph nodes relapse, after abdominal radical hysterectomy. The patient was subjected to a surgical approach, included a diagnostic open laparoscopy and laparotomy with sovraombelico-pubic incision, wide opening of the pelvic peritoneum and retroperitoneum. Examination of the mass revealed, macroscopically, a ovary with multiloculated cystic masses filled with clear or yellow serous fluid and the layers were composed by flat or cuboidal mesothelial cells. Conclusion The tribute of this case illustrates the atypical appearance with uncertain aetiology after complex imaging. Gynecologist and radiologist should acquaint with the appearance of fluid collection (urinoma, lymphocele, seroma, hematoma, abscess in gynecologic oncology follow-up to properly differentiated from tumor recurrence.

  2. [Diagnostic pathways and pitfalls in acute thoracic aortic dissection: practical recommendations and an awareness campaign].

    Sievers, H-H; Schmidtke, C

    2011-09-01

    Despite significant improvements in the surgical therapy of acute aortic dissection (AAD), mortality rates in the initial phase remain unacceptably high. Early diagnosis and therapy are essential to improving prognosis in these patients. A prerequisite of prompt and correct diagnosis is"thinking of it". Delayed or incorrect diagnosis can often have catastrophic results.The reported acute chest and back pain of a tearing, stabbing nature combined with the physiognomy of Marfan syndrome often arouse the clinical suspicion of AAD, prompting immediate imaging of the thoracic aorta and therapy. For less clear cases, additional hints drawn from the patient history and special findings from the medical examination are presented schematically in a diagnostic pathway. As an innovative form of diagnosis, preventive echocardiographic screening in high risk groups is discussed.To heighten awareness of AAD and the importance of its correct diagnosis, the poster campaign "Thinking of it can save lives" has been initiated. The poster depicts AAD schematically, indicates Marfan syndrome as a risk factor for AAD in young people and illustrates a CT scan as the most frequently performed imaging technique with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:21858545

  3. Management of severe asymmetric pectus excavatum complicating aortic repair in a patient with Marfan's syndrome.

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Marcuzzi, Danny; Peterson, Mark D; Ko, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    We describe the case of a 28-year old man with Marfan's syndrome and severe pectus excavatum who required an aortic root replacement for an ascending aortic aneurysm. There was a near-vertical angulation of the sternum that presented challenges with opening and exposure of the heart during aortic surgery. Furthermore, removal of the sternal retractor after aortic repair resulted in sudden loss of cardiac output. A Ravitch procedure was then performed to successfully close the chest without further cardiovascular compromise. We propose that patients with a severe pectus excavatum and mediastinal displacement seen on preoperative CT scanning should be considered for simultaneous, elective repair. PMID:26874148

  4. Massive Thoracoabdominal Aortic Thrombosis in a Patient with Iatrogenic Cushing Syndrome

    Massive thoracoabdominal aortic thrombosis is a rare finding in patients with iatrogenic Cushing syndrome in the absence of any coagulation abnormality. It frequently represents an urgent surgical situation. We report the case of an 82-year-old woman with massive aortic thrombosis secondary to iatrogenic Cushing syndrome. A follow-up computed tomography scan showed a decreased amount of thrombus in the aorta after anticoagulation therapy alone.

  5. Massive Thoracoabdominal Aortic Thrombosis in a Patient with Iatrogenic Cushing Syndrome

    Kim, Dong Hun; Choi, Dong Hyun; Lee, Young Min; Kim, Bo Bae; Ki, Young Jae; Kim, Jin Hwa; Chung, Joong Wha; Koh, Young Youp [Chosun University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Joon Tae; Chae, Seung Seok [Dept. of nternal Medicine, Mokpo Jung-Ang General Hospital, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Massive thoracoabdominal aortic thrombosis is a rare finding in patients with iatrogenic Cushing syndrome in the absence of any coagulation abnormality. It frequently represents an urgent surgical situation. We report the case of an 82-year-old woman with massive aortic thrombosis secondary to iatrogenic Cushing syndrome. A follow-up computed tomography scan showed a decreased amount of thrombus in the aorta after anticoagulation therapy alone.

  6. Upper gastrointestinal obstruction secondary to aortoduodenal syndrome owing to a noninflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Cahill, Kevin

    2012-01-31

    Aortoduodenal syndrome is a rare complication of an abdominal aortic aneurysm wherein the aneurysm sac obstructs the patient\\'s duodenum. It presents with the symptoms of an upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction and requires surgical intervention to relieve it. Previously, gastric bypass surgery was advocated, but now aortic replacement is the mainstay of treatment. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman whose aortoduodenal syndrome was successfully managed and review the literature on this topic.

  7. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romeo, Daniela de Araujo; Escudero, Carlos Caparros; Falcon, Maria del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi, E-mail: jaherrero5@hotmail.com [Unidade de Gestao Clinica (UGC) de Diagnostico por Imagem - Hosppital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilha (Spain); Vazquez, Rosa Maria Lepe [Unit of Radiodiagnosis - Hospital Nuestra Senora de la Merced, Osuna, Sevilha (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease. (author)

  8. Acute aortic dissection caused by Clostridium septicum aortitis.

    Eplinius, Franziska; Hädrich, Carsten

    2014-11-01

    Clostridium septicum aortitis is a rare cause of aortic dissection. So far, only 28 cases have been described in literature before. Most of these cases occurred in elderly patients and an association to colonic neoplasms and/or atherosclerosis has been witnessed frequently. Here we report the case of a 32-year-old man with fatal aortic dissection due to aortic infection with C. septicum. Beside a case of a 22-year-old man who died of aortic dissection due to C. septicum aortitis this is the second case of C. septicum aortitis in a young individual with no signs of colonic neoplasms or atherosclerosis. PMID:25242573

  9. Participation of oleic acid in the formation of the aortic aneurysm in Marfan syndrome patients.

    Soto, María Elena; Iturriaga Hernández, Alejandra Valeria; Guarner Lans, Verónica; Zuñiga-Muñoz, Alejandra; Aranda Fraustro, Alberto; Velázquez Espejel, Rodrigo; Pérez-Torres, Israel

    2016-03-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is associated with progressive aortic dilatation and endothelial dysfunction that lead to early acute dissection and rupture of the aorta and sudden death. Alteration in fatty acid (FA) metabolism can stimulate nitric oxide (NO) overproduction which increases the activity of the inducible form of NO synthase (iNOS) that is involved in endothelial dysfunction. We evaluated the participation of FA in the formation of thoracic aneurysms in MFS and its relation to the iNOS. Oleic acid (OA), iNOS, citrulline, nitrates and nitrites, TGF-β1, TNF-α, monounsaturated FA and NO synthase activity were significantly increased (p<0.05) in tissue from the aortas of MFS. Saturated FA, eNOS and HDL were significantly decreased (p<0.05). Arachidonic acid, delta-9 desaturase tended to increase and histological examination showed an increase in cystic necrosis, elastic fibers and collagen in MFS. The increase in OA contributes to the altered pathway of iNOS, which favors endothelial dysfunction and formation of the aortic aneurysms in MFS. PMID:27163200

  10. Aortic dilatation in Turner syndrome: the role of MRI in early recognition

    Chalard, Francois; Ferey, Solene; Kalifa, Gabriel [Saint Vincent de Paul Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Teinturier, Cecile [Saint Vincent de Paul Hospital, Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, Paris (France)

    2005-03-01

    Aortic dilatation and dissection are rare but important complications of Turner syndrome that increase the risk of sudden death in young patients. To assess the value of aortic MRI in patients with Turner syndrome; in particular to demonstrate early aortic dilatation. A total of 21 patients with Turner syndrome underwent MRI of the thoracic aorta with measurement of vessel diameter at four levels. Measurements were normal for age in 15 cases, two patients presented with values at the upper limit of normal and four had obvious dilatation of the ascending aorta. All were symptom free. MRI allows the non-invasive demonstration of early aortic dilatation, which may lead to earlier surgery in asymptomatic individuals. (orig.)

  11. Coronary ostial involvement in acute aortic dissection: detection with 64-slice cardiac CT.

    Ryan, E Ronan

    2012-02-01

    A 41-year-old man collapsed after lifting weights at a gym. Following admission to the emergency department, a 64-slice cardiac computed tomography (CT) revealed a Stanford Type A aortic dissection arising from a previous coarctation repair. Multiphasic reconstructions demonstrated an unstable, highly mobile aortic dissection flap that extended proximally to involve the right coronary artery ostium. Our case is an example of the application of electrocardiogram-gated cardiac CT in directly visualizing involvement of the coronary ostia in acute aortic dissection, which may influence surgical management.

  12. [Surgical aortic valve replacement for acute Streptococcus viridans endocarditis with simultaneous moderate hemophilia A].

    Krawietz, W; Loracher, C; Struck, E; Schlimok, G; Falk, H

    1988-07-01

    This is a report of a 25-year-old patient with known aortic valve stenosis since early youth and hemophilia A, showing recurrent joint bleeding. Acute Streptococcus endocarditis induced aortic valve insufficiency resulting in cardiac failure. Aortic valve replacement was performed after substitution of factor VIII, during which intra- and postoperative bleeding was prolonged by pericardial adhesions. Heparin was administered during cardiopulmonary-bypass as usual, but usual postoperative cumarin therapy was not initiated due to prolonged PTT time. One year postoperatively, the patient was in an excellent condition and fully rehabilitated. PMID:3145652

  13. Sweet's Syndrome Presenting in Concordance with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Kassardjian, Michael; Holland, Vanessa; Leong, Tracy; Horowitz, David; Hirokane, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet's syndrome) is typically characterized by an acute onset of erythematous papules, plaques, and nodules in a febrile patient. This dermatosis is classically accompanied by leukocytosis and neutrophilia, and has had reported associations with various underlying etiologies including drug reactions, malignancies, infections, autoimmune disorders, and inflammatory bowel diseases. However, most cases of acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis are idiopathi...

  14. Aortic calcification and renal cysts demonstrated by CT in a teenager with Alagille syndrome

    Alagille syndrome, or arteriohepatic dysplasia, is a disorder characterized by paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts, peculiar facies and skeletal anomalies. We report a typical case of this syndrome in an 18-year-old girl, in whom abdominal CT showed bilateral renal cysts and aortic wall calcification, findings unreported in the radiological literature. (orig.)

  15. Double aortic arch with double aneuploidy-rare anomaly in combined Down and Klinefelter syndrome

    M.F. Gerretsen; W. Peelen; L.A.J. Rammeloo; D.R. Koolbergen; J. Hruda

    2009-01-01

    A 14-month-old boy with double aneuploidy and a double aortic arch suffered from frequently recurrent severe feeding and respiratory problems. Chromosomal analysis showed a 48,XXY + 21 karyotype: a double aneuploidy of Down syndrome (DS) and Klinefelter syndrome (KS). Only four cases of double aneup

  16. Serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases -1,-2,-3 and -9 in thoracic aortic diseases and acute myocardial ischemia

    Argiriadou Helena

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs constitute a family of zinc-dependent proteases (endopeptidases whose catalytic action is the degradation of the extracellular matrix components. In addition, they play the major role in the degradation of collagen and in the process of tissue remodeling. The present clinical study investigated blood serum levels of metalloproteinases- 1, -2, -3 and -9 in patients with acute and chronic aortic dissection, thoracic aortic aneurysm and acute myocardial ischemia compared to healthy individuals. Methods The blood serum levels of MMP-1, -2, -3 and -9 were calculated in 31 patients with acute aortic dissection, 18 patients with chronic aortic dissection, 18 patients with aortic aneurysm and in 13 patients with acute myocardial ischemia, as well as in 15 healthy individuals who served as the control group. Serum MMP levels were measured by using an ELISA technique. Results There were significantly higher levels of MMP-3 in patients with acute myocardial ischemia as compared to acute aortic dissection (17.33 ± 2.03 ng/ml versus 12.92 ± 1.01 ng/ml, p Conclusion Measurement of serum MMP levels in thoracic aortic disease and acute myocardial ischemia is a simple and relatively rapid laboratory test that could be used as a biochemical indicator of aortic disease or acute myocardial ischemia, when evaluated in combination with imaging techniques.

  17. Simultaneous endovascular stent and renal stent placement for acute type B aortic dissection with malperfusion of kidney

    Dagdelen, Sinan; Aydın, Ebuzer; Karabulut, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection frequently causes life-threatening organ ischemia. The optimal therapy for acute type-B aortic dissection is still controversial. Surgery for acute dissection with organ malperfusion is known to carry a high morbidity and mortality; however endovascular treatment is becoming an alternative form of treatment. We report a clinical case of emergency percutaneous thoracal aorta endovascular stenting and renal artery stenting in a patient who had renal malperfusion and acut...

  18. Severe aortic regurgitation and partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection in a Turner syndrome patient.

    Yin, Kanhua; Li, Jun; Zhu, Kai; Wang, Yulin; Lai, Hao; Wang, Chunsheng

    2015-11-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is one of the most common sex chromosome diseases. Short stature (if untreated) and ovarian dysgenesis (streak ovary) are two typical clinical manifestations of these patients. A variety of cardiovascular abnormalities has been found associated with TS. We report a 29-year-old TS patient with severe aortic regurgitation, bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection (PAPVC). We discuss the diagnostic and surgical management of cardiovascular complications in TS patients. PMID:26716053

  19. [Clinical pathway "Acute Coronary Syndrome"].

    Grimm, W; Maisch, B

    2006-07-01

    The clinical pathway "acute coronary syndrome" of the university hospital Marburg describes the guideline-conform and consented management of patients with ST-segment elevation infarct (STEMI), non-ST-segment elevation infarct (NSTEMI) and Troponin negative unstable angina. A 12-lead ECG recording is made and read in all patients within 10 minutes. All patients with STEMI undergo immediate revascularisation using primary percutanuous catheter intervention (PCI) after administration of basic medical therapy. Primary PCI is also used in all patients with NSTEMI, persistent chest pain, rhythm or hemodynamic instability. Patients with unstable angina, who became free of symptoms after application of basic medication, but who have additional risk factors undergo cardiac catheterisation within 48 hours. Acute myocardial infarction can be ruled out in patients with twofold negative cardiac troponin levels during 6-12 hours. In the absence of further symptoms, these patiens undergo differential diagnostic evaluation of cardiac and extracardiac causes of chest pain. The introduction of this clinical pathway 2 years ago, which was consented before by the hospital board and the clinical directors, has lead to a remarkable improvement in the clinical decision-making at the emergency room of the hospital and reduced the door to intervention time considerably. PMID:16763796

  20. Acute Aortic Dissection Mimicking STEMI in the Catheterization Laboratory: Early Recognition Is Mandatory

    Alessio Arrivi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary malperfusion due to type A aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition where timely recognition and treatment are mandatory. A 77-year-old woman underwent an acute evolving type A aortic dissection mimicking acute myocardial infarction. Two pathophysiologic mechanisms are discussed: either thrombosis migrating from a previously treated giant aneurism of proximal left anterior descending or a local arterial complication due to left main stenting. Recognition of these occurrences in the catheterization laboratory is important to look immediately for surgery.

  1. Aortic aneurysm and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in Marfan syndrome

    Sujoy Ghosh; Subrata Ghosh; Sandip Kumar Ghosh

    2009-01-01

    The combination of Marfan syndrome with lymphoma is extremely rare. This report describes a case of Marfan syndrome who presented with chest discomfort and was diagnosed to have an aortic aneurysm and an additional incidental mediastinal mass that on further investigation turned out to be a diffuse large B cell lymphoma. We have suggested a hypothesis which can explain the occurrence of lymphoma in Marfan syndrome.

  2. Aortic aneurysm and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in Marfan syndrome

    Sujoy Ghosh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The combination of Marfan syndrome with lymphoma is extremely rare. This report describes a case of Marfan syndrome who presented with chest discomfort and was diagnosed to have an aortic aneurysm and an additional incidental mediastinal mass that on further investigation turned out to be a diffuse large B cell lymphoma. We have suggested a hypothesis which can explain the occurrence of lymphoma in Marfan syndrome.

  3. Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome Following Acute Pancreatitis

    Sinha A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Haemolytic uraemic syndrome is a common cause of renal failure in children but it is a rare condition in adults. Acute pancreatitis in adult as a cause of haemolytic uraemic syndrome is very rare. CASE REPORT: A 19-year-old male presented with symptom and signs suggestive of acute pancreatitis which was confirmed as his serum amylase was significantly raised. Within three days of admission he developed acute renal failure with evidence of haemolytic anaemia and thrombocytopenia. A clinical diagnosis of haemolytic uraemic syndrome was made and he was treated with plasma exchange. He made a complete recovery. CONCLUSION: Renal failure in a patient with acute pancreatitis is rarely due to haemolytic uraemic syndrome. But it is important to consider this differential diagnosis so that early treatment can be instituted to prevent mortality.

  4. Bicuspid aortic valve and aortic coarctation are linked to deletion of the X chromosome short arm in Turner syndrome

    Bondy, Carolyn; Bakalov, Vladimir K; Cheng, Clara; Olivieri, Laura; Rosing, Douglas R; Arai, Andrew E

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a cardinal feature of X chromosome monosomy, or Turner syndrome (TS). Haploinsufficiency for gene(s) located on Xp have been implicated in the short stature characteristic of the syndrome, but the chromosomal region related to the CHD phenotype has not been established. Design We used cardiac MRI to diagnose cardiovascular abnormalities in four non-mosaic karyotype groups based on 50-metaphase analyses: 45,X (n=152); 46,X,del(Xp) (n=15); 46,X,del(Xq) (n=4); and 46,X,i(Xq) (n=14) from peripheral blood cells. Results Bicuspid aortic valves (BAV) were found in 52/152 (34%) 45,X study subjects and aortic coarctation (COA) in 19/152 (12.5%). Isolated anomalous pulmonary veins (APV) were detected in 15/152 (10%) for the 45,X study group, and this defect was not correlated with the presence of BAV or COA. BAVs were present in 28.6% of subjects with Xp deletions and COA in 6.7%. APV were not found in subjects with Xp deletions. The most distal break associated with the BAV/COA trait was at cytologic band Xp11.4 and ChrX:41,500 000. One of 14 subjects (7%) with the 46,X,i(Xq) karyotype had a BAV and no cases of COA or APV were found in this group. No cardiovascular defects were found among four patients with Xq deletions. Conclusions The high prevalence of BAV and COA in subjects missing only the X chromosome short arm indicates that haploinsufficiency for Xp genes contributes to abnormal aortic valve and aortic arch development in TS. PMID:23825392

  5. Endovascular stent graft treatment of acute thoracic aortic transections due to blunt force trauma.

    Bjurlin, Marc A

    2012-02-01

    Endovascular stent graft treatment of acute thoracic aortic transections is an encouraging minimally invasive alternative to open surgical repair. Between 2006 and 2008, 16 patients with acute thoracic aortic transections underwent evaluation at our institution. Seven patients who were treated with an endovascular stent graft were reviewed. The mean Glasgow Coma Score was 13.0, probability of survival was .89, and median injury severity score was 32. The mean number of intensive care unit days was 7.7, mean number of ventilator support days was 5.4, and hospital length of stay was 10 days. Mean blood loss was 285 mL, and operative time was 143 minutes. Overall mortality was 14%. Procedure complications were a bleeding arteriotomy site and an endoleak. Endovascular treatment of traumatic thoracic aortic transections appears to demonstrate superior results with respect to mortality, blood loss, operative time, paraplegia, and procedure-related complications when compared with open surgical repair literature.

  6. Presentation of an uncommon form of aortic dissection and rupture in Marifoan syndrome

    In Marfan syndrome, aneurysmatic enlargement of ascending aorta and dissection starting at the root are the most common cardiovascular complications. We present an infrequent case of a 15-year-old patient with a typical case of Marfan syndrome. CT disclosed an aorta and aortic arch of normal size with dissection originating distally with respect to the point where left subclavian artery arises. The disecction extended to descending aorta and to iliac and femoral arteries. Aortic rupture occurred in the arch, with massive hemothorax. The CT findings were confirmed at necropsy. 9 refs

  7. Aortic Aneurysm: A Rare Cause of Ortner's Syndrome

    A young man presented with hoarseness of voice and was found to have left vocal cord paralysis and a large opacity on chest X-ray in the left upper zone. CT angiography showed a giant aneurysm of the aortic arch involving the left subclavian artery. Using a dual perfusion system, with the femoral bypass circuit taking care of the spinal protection and the aortic bypass circuit providing the cerebral protection, the aneurysm was excised and a 16 mm Dacron graft was anastomosed to the aortic arch and the left subclavian artery was anastomosed to the interposition graft. He had a smooth postoperative course and his hoarseness subsided in next 6 months. (author)

  8. Medical image of the week: acute aortic dissection

    Desai H

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. An 85-year-old gentleman with the past medical history significant for hypertension, smoking, and coronary artery disease presented to the emergency department (ED with complains of sudden onset of chest pain. His pain was described as squeezing and radiating to the back, associated with nausea and vomiting. His chest pain improved with nitroglycerin in ED. Chest x-ray showed a tortuous aortic knob and widened mediastinum. He underwent a CT angiogram, which showed, Stanford Type B aortic dissection, from distal aortic arch to renal arteries (Figure 1. He was managed in the hospital conservatively with tight blood pressure control given the type of dissection and no surgical intervention was done. He was uneventfully discharged with follow up arranged with vascular surgery. Aortic dissection is classified by Stanford Criteria as Type A which involves the ascending aorta and arch and Type B when it involves the descending aorta. Type A dissection is a ...

  9. Acute radiation syndrome in human

    The combination of the different types of irradiation dramatically changes the clinical course of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in the case of short term exposure. The recent experience has been compared mostly with the data on the atomic bomb victims in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The comparison of the injuries from different radiation exposures resulted in the possibility to receive summarized data and the actual basis of the observed difference. The situation with total relatively uniform irradiation is observed when human position is at long distance from powerful radiation sources or when he changes his position, as seen in atomic bomb survivors, the results of nuclear weapon tests and the patients in the Chernobyl accident. This is connected with the ARS of bone, marrow and intestine. The situation characterized by the clinical signs of the large area of skin and mucosa injuries was observed in nuclear weapon tests and the Chernobyl accident. In the case of the more localized and less severe beta injuries of skin and mucosa, the long term effects may be important. The majority of accidents in peaceful period are related to the uneven exposure from near sources, and the situation of the combination of external and internal irradiation is related to uneven irradiation and the predominance of internal exposure. (K.I.)

  10. Postoperative peri-axillary seroma following axillary artery cannulation for surgical treatment of acute type A aortic dissection

    Katsanos Konstantinos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The arterial cannulation site for optimal tissue perfusion and cerebral protection during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB for surgical treatment of acute type A aortic dissection remains controversial. Right axillary artery cannulation confers significant advantages, because it provides antegrade arterial perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass, and allows continuous antegrade cerebral perfusion during hypothermic circulatory arrest, thereby minimizing global cerebral ischemia. However, right axillary artery cannulation has been associated with serious complications, including problems with systemic perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass, problems with postoperative patency of the artery due to stenosis, thrombosis or dissection, and brachial plexus injury. We herein present the case of a 36-year-old Caucasian man with known Marfan syndrome and acute type A aortic dissection, who had direct right axillary artery cannulation for surgery of the ascending aorta. Postoperatively, the patient developed an axillary perigraft seroma. As this complication has, not, to our knowledge, been reported before in cardiothoracic surgery, we describe this unusual complication and discuss conservative and surgical treatment options.

  11. SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF A RARE CASE OF MARFAN SYNDROME - THE RUPTURE OF AN ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM

    L. Stoica

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare manifestation of the Marfan syndrome. A 33 years old woman with a 10 cm diameter juxta-renal aortic aneurysm ruptured in the retro peritoneum arrived in hemorrhagic shock. Surgery was performed in emergency by thoraco-phreno-laparatomy, the aneurysm was resected and a 20 mm Dacron tube was sutured between the origin of the renal arteries and the aortic bifurcation. Rapid thoracic aortic cross-clamping to stop the hemorrhage and good aneurismal exposure by the division of the left renal vein was the key of this successful management. The patient recovered without any complication. Rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is a life threatening complication which requires a rapid diagnosis and an emergency treatment by open surgery or by endovascular stent grafting. We present the surgical strategy in our case

  12. How I do it: transapical cannulation for acute type-A aortic dissection

    Alexiou Christos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aortic dissection is the most frequently diagnosed lethal disease of the aorta. Half of all patients with acute type-A aortic dissection die within 48 hours of presentation. There is still debate as to the optimal site of arterial cannulation for establishing cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with type-A aortic dissection. Femoral artery cannulation with retrograde perfusion is the most common method but because of the risk of malperfusion of vital organs and atheroembolism related to it different sites such as the axillary artery, the innominate artery and the aortic arch are used. Cannulation of these sites is not without risks of atheroembolism, neurovascular complications and can be time consuming. Another yet to be popularised option is the transapical aortic cannulation (TAC described in this article. TAC consists of the insertion of the arterial cannula through the apex of the left ventricle and the aortic valve to lie in the sinus of Valsalva. Trans-oesophageal guidance is necessary to ensure correct placement of the cannula. TAC is an excellent method of establishing cardiopulmonary bypass as it is quick, provides a more physiological method of delivering antegrade arterial flow and is the only method to assure perfusion of the true lumen.

  13. Inflammatory aortic arch syndrome: contrast-enhanced, three-dimensional MR - angiography in stenotic lesions

    Purpose: To determine the value of contrast-enhanced, three-dimensional MR angiography for the evaluation of stenotic and occlusive vascular lesions in inflammatory aortic arch syndrome. Materials and Methods: 14 patients with inflammatory aortic arch syndrome (giant cell arteritis: n = 8, Takayasu arteritis: n = 4, ankylosing spondylitis: n = 1 sarcoidosis: n = 1) underwent MR angiography of the aortic arch and the supra-aortic vessels (n = 15,2 patients were examined twice) and of the abdominal aorta (n = 2). MRA was performed using a 3D-FLASH sequence (TR/TE 4.6/1.8 ms, flip angle 30 ) on a 1.5T system. MRA imaging was compared with the findings of DSA, which served as gold standard. Results: In a total of 467 examined vascular territories, DSA revealed 50 stenoses and 35 occlusions. All lesions were detected by MRA. In 23 segments, the degree of stenosis was overestimated by MRA. Sensitivity and specificity of MRA were 100% and 94,3%, positive and negative predictive values were 73.6 and 100%, and the accuracy was 95,1%. Conclusions: Despite a tendency to overestimate stenoses, contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography is a valid, non-invasive technique in the assessment of inflammatory aortic arch syndrome. (orig.)

  14. A rare case of discrete aortic coarctation in Williams-Beuren syndrome. Diagnostic and therapeutic considerations

    Savina Mannarino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS is a genetic disorder caused by elastin gene deletions, and is characterized by cardiovascular malformations, primarily including supravalvular aortic stenosis and peripheral pulmonary stenosis. We report a case of a neonate who developed severe discrete aortic coarctation, underwent multiple surgical interventions, and was subsequently diagnosed with WBS. Severe discrete aortic coarctation is a rare event in WBS newborns. An abnormally thick aortic wall is present in these patients and is the basis of the failure of the classical approach towards coarctation repair, which consists of end-to-end anastomosis as first surgical choice. Our case, and a very few similar previously documented cases, have all demonstrated recoarctation, which only aortic patch implantation was able to successfully repair. In light of this, we would also like to underline the importance of early WBS diagnosis. Therefore, even in mild syndromic phenotype such as low birth weight or facial dysmorphism that raise the suspicion of a genetic syndrome, it is advisable to perform fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis rather than merely karyotypic one.

  15. Giant Aortic Root Aneurysm Presenting as Acute Type A Aortic Dissection

    Raz, Guy M.; Stamou, Sotiris C.

    2014-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman with four months of increasing episodic palpitations, chest pain, and shortness of breath presented to an outside clinic where a new 4/6 systolic ejection murmur was identified. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a large aortic root aneurysm. The patient underwent emergent repair of the dissected root aneurysm with a modified Bentall procedure utilizing a #19 St Jude Valsalva mechanical valve conduit. Postoperatively, she required a permanent pacemaker placement. Her ...

  16. Pathobiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Sapru, Anil; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael W; Dahmer, Mary K

    2015-06-01

    The unique characteristics of pulmonary circulation and alveolar-epithelial capillary-endothelial barrier allow for maintenance of the air-filled, fluid-free status of the alveoli essential for facilitating gas exchange, maintaining alveolar stability, and defending the lung against inhaled pathogens. The hallmark of pathophysiology in acute respiratory distress syndrome is the loss of the alveolar capillary permeability barrier and the presence of protein-rich edema fluid in the alveoli. This alteration in permeability and accumulation of fluid in the alveoli accompanies damage to the lung epithelium and vascular endothelium along with dysregulated inflammation and inappropriate activity of leukocytes and platelets. In addition, there is uncontrolled activation of coagulation along with suppression of fibrinolysis and loss of surfactant. These pathophysiological changes result in the clinical manifestations of acute respiratory distress syndrome, which include hypoxemia, radiographic opacities, decreased functional residual capacity, increased physiologic deadspace, and decreased lung compliance. Resolution of acute respiratory distress syndrome involves the migration of cells to the site of injury and re-establishment of the epithelium and endothelium with or without the development of fibrosis. Most of the data related to acute respiratory distress syndrome, however, originate from studies in adults or in mature animals with very few studies performed in children or juvenile animals. The lack of studies in children is particularly problematic because the lungs and immune system are still developing during childhood and consequently the pathophysiology of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome may differ in significant ways from that seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. This article describes what is known of the pathophysiologic processes of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as we know it today while also presenting the much

  17. Acute Aortic Dissection in Third Trimester Pregnancy without Risk Factors

    Kinney-Ham, Lisa; Nguyen, H Bryant; Steele, Robert; Walters, Elizabeth L

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous aortic dissection in pregnancy is rare and life threatening for both the mother and the fetus. Most commonly, it is associated with connective tissue disorders, cardiac valve variants, or trauma. We present the case of a 23-year-old previously healthy woman, 36 weeks pregnant with a syncopal episode after dyspnea and vomiting. She subsequently developed cardiac arrest and underwent aggressive resuscitation, emergent thoracotomy, and cesarean delivery without recovery. On autopsy, ...

  18. Middle aortic syndrome as a cause of heart failure in children and its management.

    Gupta, S; Goswami, B.; Ghosh, D C; Sen Gupta, A N

    1981-01-01

    Two cases of middle aortic syndrome in children are described along with two other cases reported earlier. In childhood, this disease may present as incipient or overt cardiac failure. Surgical treatment should be undertaken based on an objective assessment of the severity of the stricture and after taking into account the future growth of the child.

  19. Our experience in the diagnosis of aortic dissection by multislice computed tomography

    Aortic dissection (AD) is the most frequent and life-threatening acute aortic syndrome. Currently the more used method for the aortic study is the multislice computed tomography. The purpose of this paper is to expose the more relevant features in 22 patients with AD consecutively studied by multislice computed tomography

  20. Acute pancreatitis and Cushing's syndrome.

    Clague, H W; B. Warren; Krasner, N.

    1984-01-01

    A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in a 53-year-old man with an ectopic adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) producing bronchial carcinoma is described. The aetiology of acute pancreatitis in relation to steroid therapy and malignancy is discussed and it is suggested that excess endogenous steroid production may also cause acute pancreatitis.

  1. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Pryhuber, Gloria S.; Chess, Patricia R.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Paul R. Knight; Notter, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by rapid-onset respiratory failure following a variety of direct and indirect insults to the parenchyma or vasculature of the lungs. Mortality from ALI/ARDS is substantial, and current therapy primarily emphasizes mechanical ventilation and judicial fluid management plus standard treatment of the initiating insult and any known underlying disease. Current pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS is not optimal, a...

  2. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2016-03-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  3. Acute aortic dissection in a young healthy athlete with androgenic anabolic steroid use: A case report

    Barman M, Djamel B, Mathews J

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute aortic dissection can occur at the time of intense physical exertion in strength-trained athletes like weight lifters, bodybuilders, throwers, and wrestlers. Rapid rise in blood pressure and history of hypertension are the most common causes of aortic dissection in athletes. It is a very tragic event because of its high mortality rate of about 32% in young patients. We report a case of aortic dissection in a young weightlifter with a history of anabolic steroid usage with an extensive intimal tear of the aorta at Sino tubular junction and arch. All athletes must be assessed for predisposing factors for aortic dissection, and all patients should be encouraged to undergo appropriate diagnostic studies, like echocardiography and blood pressure monitoring while weightlifting to recognize possible predisposing factors for aortic dissection. Athletes who do have a problem should be encouraged to avoid or limit their exercise or activity by their cardiologist. It is vital that this disastrous event be prevented in young people. In conclusion, although a rare occurrence, AD should be considered in symptomatic patients with any family history of early cardiac deaths, a history suggestive of a connective tissue disorder (that is, multiple joint surgeries or who practice weightlifting.

  4. Severe Congenital Obstruction of the Left Main Coronary Artery Coexisting With Supravalvular Aortic Stenosis in Williams Syndrome: A Dangerous Association.

    Szaflik, Katarzyna; Kaźmierczak, Piotr; Moll, Jacek Jan; Moll, Jadwiga Anna

    2016-03-01

    Congenital obstruction of the left main coronary artery is a complicating feature of supravalvular aortic stenosis. We describe an eight-month-old female patient with Williams syndrome, supravalvular aortic stenosis, and branch pulmonary artery stenosis, with concomitant anomaly of severe obstruction of the left coronary artery orifice. PMID:26582765

  5. Marfan syndrome in children and adolescents: an adjusted nomogram for screening aortic root dilatation

    Rozendaal, L; Groenink, M; Naeff, M.S.J.; Hennekam, R. C. M.; Hart, A.A.M.; Wall, van der, E.E.; Mulder, B.J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To construct an adjusted nomogram for the echocardiographic screening of aortic root diameter in children with possible Marfan disease.
Design—In 91 children (42 boys, 49 girls, age range 3.2 to 18.4 years) undergoing Marfan screening from 1983 until 1996, the diagnosis Marfan syndrome and any other aortic pathology was definitely ruled out. These served as a control population to set appropriate reference standards.
Results—Compared with a standard Dutch reference population, body ...

  6. Acute Abdominal Pain Secondary to Chilaiditi Syndrome

    Buicko, Jessica L.; Miguel Lopez-Viego; David Kang; Lopez, Michael A.; Pan, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    Chilaiditi syndrome is a rare condition occurring in 0.025% to 0.28% of the population. In these patients, the colon is displaced and caught between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm. Patients' symptoms can range from asymptomatic to acute intermittent bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is best achieved with CT imaging. Identification of Chilaiditi syndrome is clinically significant as it can lead to many significant complications such as volvulus, perforation, and bowel obstruction. If the pat...

  7. Contemporary management of acute coronary syndrome

    Large, G

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on the modern management of the non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction). Patients with these syndromes are at varying degrees of risk of (re)infarction and death. This risk can be reliably predicted by clinical, electrocardiographic, and biochemical markers. Aspirin, clopidogrel, heparin (unfractionated or low molecular weight), and anti-ischaemic drugs should be offered to all patients, irrespective of the pre...

  8. Inflammation: a trigger for acute coronary syndrome.

    Sager, Hendrik B; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the vessel wall and a major cause of death worldwide. One of atherosclerosis' most dreadful complications are acute coronary syndromes that comprise ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, and unstable angina. We now understand that inflammation substantially contributes to the initiation, progression, and destabilization of atherosclerosis. In this review, we will focus on the role of inflammatory leukocytes, which are the cellular protagonists of vascular inflammation, in triggering disease progression and, ultimately, the destabilization that causes acute coronary syndromes. PMID:27273431

  9. Acute organophosphorus poisoning complicated by acute coronary syndrome.

    Pankaj, Madhu; Krishna, Kavita

    2014-07-01

    We report a case of 30 year old alcoholic male admitted with vomiting, drowsiness, limb weakness and fasciculations after alleged history of consumption of 30 ml of chlorpyriphos insecticide. He had low serum cholinesterase levels. With standard treatment for organophosphorus poisoning (OPP), he improved gradually until day 5, when he developed neck and limb weakness and respiratory distress. This intermediate syndrome was treated with oximes, atropine and artificial ventilation. During treatment, his ECG showed fresh changes of ST elevation. High CPK & CPK-MB levels, septal hypokinesia on 2D echo suggested acute coronary syndrome. Coronary angiography was postponed due to his bedridden and obtunded status. The patient finally recovered fully by day 15 and was discharged. Acute coronary syndrome is a rare occurrence in OP poisoning. The present case thus emphasises the need for careful electrocardiographic and enzymatic monitoring of all patients of organophosphorus poisoning to prevent potential cardiac complication which can prove fatal. PMID:25672037

  10. The Risk Factors and Outcomes of Acute Kidney Injury after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Jeon, Yun-Ho; Bae, Chi-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate the incidence, predictive factors, and impact of acute kidney injury (AKI) after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Methods A total of 53 patients who underwent 57 TEVAR operations between 2008 and 2015 were reviewed for the incidence of AKI as defined by the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage kidney disease risk) consensus criteria. The estimated glomerular filtration rate was determined in the perioperative period. Comorbidities and p...

  11. Aneurysm of the left aortic sinus causing acute myocardial infarction

    Jan-Peter Smedema; Vernon Freeman; Johan Brink

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the findings and management of a young male who presented with an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction due to compression of the circumflex coronary artery by a large aneurysm of left sinus of Valsalva.

  12. Aneurysm of the left aortic sinus causing acute myocardial infarction

    This report describes the findings and management of a young male who presented with an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction due to compression of the circumflex coronary artery by a large aneurysm of left sinus of Valsalva

  13. Acute cardiac failure in neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    Sparrow, Patrick

    2012-02-03

    We present a case of rapid onset acute cardiac failure developing as part of neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a 35-year-old woman following treatment with thioridazine and lithium. Post mortem histology of cardiac and skeletal muscle showed similar changes of focal cellular necrosis and vacuolation suggesting a common disease process.

  14. Radiobiology of the acute radiation syndrome

    Acute radiation syndrome or acute radiation sickness is classically subdivided into three sub syndromes: the hematopoietic, gastrointestinal and neurovascular syndrome but many other tissues can be damaged. The time course and severity of clinical signs and symptoms are a function of the overall body volume irradiated, the inhomogeneity of dose exposure, the particle type, the absorbed dose and the dose rate. Classical pathophysiology explain the failure of each of these organs and the timing of appearance of their signs and symptoms due to radiation-induced cytocidal effects of a great number of parenchymal cells of hierarchically organized tissues. Contemporaneously, many other radiation-induced effects has been described and all of them may lead to tissue injury with their corresponding signs and symptoms that can be expressed after short or long period of time. Radiation-induced multi-organ involvement is thought to be due to radiation-induced systemic inflammatory response mediated by released pro-inflammatory cytokines. (authors)

  15. Perturbed sympatho-vagal balance in Turner syndrome - relation to aortic dilation

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian Havmand; Andersen, Niels Holmark;

    Objective: The risk of aortic dissection is 100 fold increased in Turner syndrome (TS). Increased blood pressure (BP) and heart rate is present as well as an increased risk of ischemic heart disease and diabetes. This study aimed to prospectively assess heart rate variability (HRV) in TS and its...... relation to aortic dimensions. Methods: Adults with TS (n=91, aged 37.4±10.4 years) recruited through the Danish National Society of Turner Syndrome Contact Group and an endocrine outpatient clinic were examined thrice (mean follow-up of 4.7±0.5 years). Healthy controls (n=64, aged 39.4±12.1 years) were...

  16. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    ... connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, get thoracic aortic aneurysms. Signs and symptoms of thoracic aortic aneurysm can include Sharp, sudden pain in the chest or upper back. Shortness of ...

  17. Late Pseudocoarctation Syndrome After Stent-Graft Implantation For Traumatic Aortic Rupture

    The present observation illustrates an unusual complication occurring after stent-grafting (S-graft) for aortic isthmus rupture. A 22-year-old patient, treated by S-graft in the emergency department for traumatic aortic rupture, was readmitted 10 months later with pseudocoarctation syndrome. A membrane was found inside the stent-graft that had induced a pseudo-dissection, which caused the pseudocoarctation syndrome. Surgical treatment consisted of removing the stent-graft and membrane and replacing it with a vascular implant. The patient’s clinical course was fair. The suggested mechanism was circumferential neoendothelialization of the stent-graft. Dehiscence caused the superior part of the membrane to drop into the lumen of the stent-graft creating a “false channel” that compressed the “true lumen” and induced “pseudocoarctation” syndrome. The cause of the extensive neointimalization remains unexplained. Thoracic aortic stent-grafts require regular follow-up monitoring by angioscan or angio-magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. Late Pseudocoarctation Syndrome After Stent-Graft Implantation For Traumatic Aortic Rupture

    Letocart, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.letocart@chu-nantes.fr; Fau, Georges, E-mail: georges.fau@chu-nantes.fr; Tirouvanziam, Ashok, E-mail: ashok.tirouvanziam@chu-nantes.fr [University Hospital of Nantes, Institut du Thorax (France); Toquet, Claire, E-mail: claire.toquet@chu-nantes.fr [University Hospital of Nantes, Department of Pathology (France); Al Habash, Oussama, E-mail: oussama.alhabash@chu-nantes.fr; Guerin, Patrice, E-mail: patrice.guerin@chu-nantes.fr [University Hospital of Nantes, Institut du Thorax (France); Rousseau, Herve, E-mail: rousseau.h@chu-toulouse.fr [University Hospital of Toulouse, Department of Radiology (France); Crochet, Dominique, E-mail: dominique.crochet@chu-nantes.fr [University Hospital of Nantes, Institut du Thorax (France)

    2013-06-15

    The present observation illustrates an unusual complication occurring after stent-grafting (S-graft) for aortic isthmus rupture. A 22-year-old patient, treated by S-graft in the emergency department for traumatic aortic rupture, was readmitted 10 months later with pseudocoarctation syndrome. A membrane was found inside the stent-graft that had induced a pseudo-dissection, which caused the pseudocoarctation syndrome. Surgical treatment consisted of removing the stent-graft and membrane and replacing it with a vascular implant. The patient's clinical course was fair. The suggested mechanism was circumferential neoendothelialization of the stent-graft. Dehiscence caused the superior part of the membrane to drop into the lumen of the stent-graft creating a 'false channel' that compressed the 'true lumen' and induced 'pseudocoarctation' syndrome. The cause of the extensive neointimalization remains unexplained. Thoracic aortic stent-grafts require regular follow-up monitoring by angioscan or angio-magnetic resonance imaging.

  19. Prenatal Diagnosis of Down Syndrome Associated with Right Aortic Arch and Dilated Septum Cavi Pellucidi

    José Morales-Roselló

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old woman with a normal first trimester Down syndrome screening attended our ultrasound unit for a 20-week scan. The most remarkable anomalies were the presence of a right aortic arch along with a dilated cavum septi pellucidi. In addition, the scan showed an atrioventricular canal and bilateral choroid plexus cysts. Fetal karyotype showed the existence of trisomy 21. A novel association between Down syndrome and dilated cavum septi pellucidi is reported and the relationship between DS and vascular rings is discussed.

  20. Acute Abdominal Pain Secondary to Chilaiditi Syndrome

    Pan, Andrew S.; Lopez, Michael A.; Buicko, Jessica L.; Lopez-Viego, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Chilaiditi syndrome is a rare condition occurring in 0.025% to 0.28% of the population. In these patients, the colon is displaced and caught between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm. Patients' symptoms can range from asymptomatic to acute intermittent bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is best achieved with CT imaging. Identification of Chilaiditi syndrome is clinically significant as it can lead to many significant complications such as volvulus, perforation, and bowel obstruction. If the patient is symptomatic, treatment is usually conservative. Surgery is rarely indicated with indications including ischemia and failure of resolution with conservative management. PMID:23936720

  1. Acute Abdominal Pain Secondary to Chilaiditi Syndrome

    David Kang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chilaiditi syndrome is a rare condition occurring in 0.025% to 0.28% of the population. In these patients, the colon is displaced and caught between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm. Patients' symptoms can range from asymptomatic to acute intermittent bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is best achieved with CT imaging. Identification of Chilaiditi syndrome is clinically significant as it can lead to many significant complications such as volvulus, perforation, and bowel obstruction. If the patient is symptomatic, treatment is usually conservative. Surgery is rarely indicated with indications including ischemia and failure of resolution with conservative management.

  2. The Risk Factors and Outcomes of Acute Kidney Injury after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Jeon, Yun-Ho; Bae, Chi-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate the incidence, predictive factors, and impact of acute kidney injury (AKI) after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Methods A total of 53 patients who underwent 57 TEVAR operations between 2008 and 2015 were reviewed for the incidence of AKI as defined by the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage kidney disease risk) consensus criteria. The estimated glomerular filtration rate was determined in the perioperative period. Comorbidities and postoperative outcomes were retrospectively reviewed. Results Underlying aortic pathologies included 21 degenerative aortic aneurysms, 20 blunt traumatic aortic injuries, six type B aortic dissections, five type B intramural hematomas, three endoleaks and two miscellaneous diseases. The mean age of the patients was 61.2±17.5 years (range, 15 to 85 years). AKI was identified in 13 (22.8%) of 57 patients. There was an association of preoperative stroke and postoperative paraparesis and paraplegia with AKI. The average intensive care unit (ICU) stay in patients with AKI was significantly longer than in patients without AKI (5.3 vs. 12.7 days, p=0.017). The 30-day mortality rate in patients with AKI was significantly higher than patients without AKI (23.1% vs. 4.5%, p=0.038); however, AKI did not impact long-term survival. Conclusion Preoperative stroke and postoperative paraparesis and paraplegia were identified as predictors for AKI. Patients with AKI experienced longer average ICU stays and greater 30-day mortality than those without AKI. Perioperative identification of high-risk patients, as well as nephroprotective strategies to reduce the incidence of AKI, should be considered as important aspects of a successful TEVAR procedure. PMID:26889441

  3. Surfactant treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Lopez-Herce, J.; de Lucas, N; Carrillo, A.; Bustinza, A.; Moral, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine prospectively the efficacy of surfactant in acute respiratory distress syndrome.
STUDY DESIGN—Twenty patients, 1 month to 16 years of age, diagnosed with an acute pulmonary disease with severe hypoxaemia (PaO2/FiO2 < 100) (13 with systemic or pulmonary disease and seven with cardiac disease) were treated with one to six doses of 50-200 mg/kg of porcine surfactant administered directly into the trachea. The surfactant was considered to be effectiv...

  4. Posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in poststretococcal acute glomerulonephritis

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy (LEPR) is a clinical entity that affects radiation usually the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres. It is frequently associated with acute arterial hypertension and immunosuppressive therapy, among other causes. The clinical presentation is varied, with headache, nausea, vomiting, impaired consciousness and abnormal behavior, seizures and visual disturbances, symptoms that often regress. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images show white matter edema predominantly in posterior regions of the brain. We present a 10 year old boy with leprosy in the course of a nephrotic syndrome secondary to acute diffuse glomerunefritis (GNDA) poststreptococcal. (author)

  5. Induction of macrophage chemotaxis by aortic extracts from patients with Marfan syndrome is related to elastin binding protein.

    Gao Guo

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of connective tissue with prominent skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular manifestations. Aortic aneurysm and dissection are the major determinants of premature death in untreated patients. In previous work, we showed that extracts of aortic tissues from the mgR mouse model of Marfan syndrome showed increased chemotactic stimulatory activity related to the elastin-binding protein. Aortic samples were collected from 6 patients with Marfan syndrome and 8 with isolated aneurysms of the ascending aorta. Control samples were obtained from 11 organ donors without known vascular or connective tissue diseases. Soluble proteins extracted from the aortic samples of the two patient groups were compared against buffer controls and against the aortic samples from controls with respect to the ability to induce macrophage chemotaxis as measured using a modified Boyden chamber, as well as the reactivity to a monoclonal antibody BA4 against bioactive elastin peptides using ELISA. Samples from Marfan patients displayed a statistically significant increase in chemotactic inductive activity compared to control samples. Additionally, reactivity to BA4 was significantly increased. Similar statistically significant increases were identified for the samples from patients with idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm. There was a significant correlation between the chemotactic index and BA4 reactivity, and the increases in chemotactic activity of extracts from Marfan patients could be inhibited by pretreatment with lactose, VGVAPG peptides, or BA4, which indicates the involvement of EBP in mediating the effects. Our results demonstrate that aortic extracts of patients with Marfan syndrome can elicit macrophage chemotaxis, similar to our previous study on aortic extracts of the mgR mouse model of Marfan syndrome (Guo et al., Circulation 2006; 114:1855-62.

  6. Acute encephalitis syndrome following scrub typhus infection

    Ayan Kar; Dhanaraj, M.; Devaprasad Dedeepiya; Harikrishna, K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to find the incidence of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) secondary to scrub infection and to observe the clinical, biochemical, radiological profile, and outcomes in these patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 consecutive patients of AES were evaluated for scrub infection using scrub typhus immunoglobulin M enzyme linked immuno-sorbant assay positivity along with the presence or absence of an eschar. Clinical profile, routine laboratory tests, cerebrospinal f...

  7. The Acute Coronary Syndrome in elderly patients

    Kalliopi Vougiouka; Theodore Kapadohos

    2015-01-01

    The Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) is one of the most common and also life-threatening diseases. Elderly patients due to comorbidity and changes in anatomy and physiology of the body, present some differentiation in the clinical presentation of the disease and common symptoms. Aim: The purpose of this study was to review the literature about the specific characteristics that elderly people with ACS present. Method: A review of international and Greek bibliography of the last fifteen years was ...

  8. [Endovascular repair for an acute traumatic aortic transection: a case report].

    Sanioğlu, Soner; Sahin, Sinan; Aydoğan, Hakki; Barutça, Hakan; Eren, Ergin

    2012-03-01

    A thirty-eight-year-old male patient who suffered from 10th and 11th thoracal vertebrae fractures, paraplegia and acute traumatic aortic transection because of accidental fall was referred to our hospital. Open surgical repair carried a very high risk due to severe coexisting injuries. Transection was treated with 30x100 mm Valiant thoracic endograft, which was deployed just distal to the ostium of the left carotid artery. The patient was transferred to the neurosurgery clinic for treatment of paraplegia after an uneventful recovery. Endovascular repair of acute transection confers substantial advantages in mortality and morbidity compared to surgical repair. However, the long-term durability of thoracic endografts remains unknown. If the long-term results are as satisfactory as the promising mid-term results, this technique may become the gold standard approach for the treatment of acute transection. PMID:22792827

  9. Intimal Detachment of the Left Main Coronary Artery in a Marfan Patient with Acute Aortic Dissection: An Alternative Technique for Coronary Revascularization.

    Song, Joon Young; Kim, Tae Youn; Choi, Jong Bum; Kuh, Ja Hong

    2016-05-01

    In patients with acute type A aortic dissection, intimal detachment associated with circumferential dissection of the left main coronary artery (LMCA) is a rare but lethal complication. We report a Marfan patient with dissection and intimal detachment of the LMCA that was caused by acute aortic dissection involving the left aortic sinus and that was reconstructed using a short reversed saphenous vein graft. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12746 (J Card Surg 2016;31:348-350). PMID:27073038

  10. Osteoprotegerin in Turner syndrome - relationship to aortic diameter

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian Havmand; Bjerre, Mette;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is a cardinal trait of Turner syndrome (TS), causing half of the 3-fold excess mortality. Since osteoprotegerin (OPG) is as a potential biomarker of cardiovascular disease, this cross-sectional and prospective study aimed at elucidating OPG levels in TS and its...

  11. Acute hypotension induced by aortic clamp vs. PTH provokes distinct proximal tubule Na+ transporter redistribution patterns

    Leong, Patrick K K; Yang, Li E; Lin, Harrison W;

    2004-01-01

    renal cortical membranes fractionated on sorbitol density gradients. Aortic clamp-induced acute hypotension (from 100 +/- 3 to 78 +/- 2 mmHg) provoked a 62% decrease in urine output and a significant decrease in volume flow from the proximal tubule detected as a 66% decrease in endogenous lithium...... clearance. There was, however, no significant change in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or subcellular distribution of NHE3 and NaPi2. In contrast, high-dose PTH rapidly (<2 min) decreased arterial blood pressure to 51 +/- 3 mmHg, decreased urine output, and shifted NHE3 and NaPi2 out of the low...

  12. Novel Technique Using Polyester Fabric and Fibrin Sealant Patch for Acute Aortic Dissection.

    Ohira, Suguru; Fukumoto, Atsushi; Matsushiro, Takuya; Yaku, Hitoshi

    2016-08-01

    We describe a simple and effective technique for acute aortic dissection using a combination of polyester fabric and a fibrin sealant patch (FSP) to achieve effective reinforcement and haemostasis of the aortic stump. Firstly, the 0.61mm thick knitted polyester fabric sheet was cut to half of the size of the FSP. Next, fibrin glue was sprayed onto the collagen layer of the FSP. Subsequently, a fabric sheet was placed upon it, and the FSP was put together with the irrigated collagen layer, and then completely dried to bind the patch. As a result, the dry fibrinogen/thrombin layers, as an adhesive surface, faced outward. This patch was trimmed to a 10-15-mm-wide strip. The composite patch was inserted into the false lumen. The stump was gently pressed to fix the aortic intima and adventitia. There are several advantages: the combined patch can be prepared during systemic cooling, and therefore can minimise the circulatory arrest time; secondly, the false lumen is not directly exposed to fibrin glue and so the risk of embolism is extremely low; thirdly, the expected haemostatic effect is greater as FSP lines the exterior of the intima, achieving haemostasis for suture holes. PMID:27011040

  13. Abnormal aortic arch morphology in Turner syndrome patients is a risk factor for hypertension.

    De Groote, Katya; Devos, Daniël; Van Herck, Koen; Demulier, Laurent; Buysse, Wesley; De Schepper, Jean; De Wolf, Daniël

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension in Turner syndrome (TS) is a multifactorial, highly prevalent and significant problem that warrants timely diagnosis and rigorous treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between abnormal aortic arch morphology and hypertension in adult TS patients. This was a single centre retrospective study in 74 adult TS patients (age 29.41 ± 8.91 years) who underwent a routine cardiac MRI. Patients were assigned to the hypertensive group (N = 31) if blood pressure exceeded 140/90 mmHg and/or if they were treated with antihypertensive medication. Aortic arch morphology was evaluated on MRI images and initially assigned as normal (N = 54) or abnormal (N = 20), based on the curve of the transverse arch and the distance between the left common carotid-left subclavian artery. We additionally used a new more objective method to describe aortic arch abnormality in TS by determination of the relative position of the highest point of the transverse arch (AoHP). Logistic regression analysis showed that hypertension is significantly and independently associated with age, BMI and abnormal arch morphology, with a larger effect size for the new AoHP method than for the classical method. TS patients with hypertension and abnormal arch morphology more often had dilatation of the ascending aorta. There is a significant association between abnormal arch morphology and hypertension in TS patients, independent of age and BMI, and not related to other structural heart disease. We suggest that aortic arch morphology should be included in the risk stratification for hypertension in TS and propose a new quantitative method to express aortic arch morphology. PMID:24935217

  14. Acute rhabdomyolysis associated with atypical Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    Scott, A. J.; Duncan, R; Henderson, L.; Jamal, G A; Kennedy, P G

    1991-01-01

    We report a patient with atypical Guillain-Barré syndrome associated with acute rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis may be the cause of elevation of creatine kinase sometimes seen in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  15. Guillain-Barré syndrome following acute head trauma.

    Duncan, R; Kennedy, P G

    1987-01-01

    A case of classical Guillain-Barré syndrome following acute head trauma is described. The association of Guillain-Barré syndrome with head injury per se is not well recognized, and a possible immunological explanation is proposed.

  16. Acute respiratory failure following ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Antonello Nicolini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is a serious and potentially life-threatening physiological complication that may be encountered in patients who undergo controlled ovarian hyperstimulation cycles. The syndrome is typically associated with regimes of exogenous gonadotropins, but it can be seen, albeit rarely, when clomiphene is administered during the induction phase. Although this syndrome is widely described in scientific literature and is well known by obstetricians, the knowledge of this pathological and potentially life-threatening condition is generally less than satisfactory among physicians. The dramatic increase in therapeutic strategies to treat infertility has pushed this condition into the realm of acute care therapy. The potential complications of this syndrome, including pulmonary involvement, should be considered and identified so as to allow a more appropriate diagnosis and management. We describe a case of a woman with an extremely severe (Stage 6 ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome who presented ascites, bilateral pleural effusion and severe respiratory failure treated with non-invasive ventilation. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit because of severe respiratory failure, ascites, and bilateral pleural effusion due to ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Treatment included non-invasive ventilation and three thoracentesis procedures, plus the administration of albumin, colloid solutions and high-dose furosemid. Severe form of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is observed in 0.5-5% of the women treated, and intensive care may be required for management of thromboembolic complications, renal failure and severe respiratory failure. Pulmonary intensive care may involve thoracentesis, oxygen supplementation and, in more severe cases, assisted ventilation. To our knowledge, there have been only two studies in English language medical literature that describe severe respiratory failure treated with non

  17. Mutations in a TGF-β Ligand, TGFB3, Cause Syndromic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Bertoli-Avella, Aida M.; Gillis, Elisabeth; Morisaki, Hiroko; Verhagen, Judith M.A.; de Graaf, Bianca M.; van de Beek, Gerarda; Gallo, Elena; Kruithof, Boudewijn P.T.; Venselaar, Hanka; Myers, Loretha A.; Laga, Steven; Doyle, Alexander J.; Oswald, Gretchen; van Cappellen, Gert W.A.; Yamanaka, Itaru; van der Helm, Robert M.; Beverloo, Berna; de Klein, Annelies; Pardo, Luba; Lammens, Martin; Evers, Christina; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dumoulein, Michiel; Timmermans, Janneke; Bruggenwirth, Hennie T.; Verheijen, Frans; Rodrigus, Inez; Baynam, Gareth; Kempers, Marlies; Saenen, Johan; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M.; Minatoya, Kenji; Matsukawa, Ritsu; Tsukube, Takuro; Kubo, Noriaki; Hofstra, Robert; Goumans, Marie Jose; Bekkers, Jos A.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; van de Laar, Ingrid M.B.H.; Dietz, Harry C.; Van Laer, Lut; Morisaki, Takayuki; Wessels, Marja W.; Loeys, Bart L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes, have revealed an important contribution of disturbed transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. Objectives This study sought to discover a novel gene causing syndromic aortic aneurysms in order to unravel the underlying pathogenesis. Methods We combined genome-wide linkage analysis, exome sequencing, and candidate gene Sanger sequencing in a total of 470 index cases with thoracic aortic aneurysms. Extensive cardiological examination, including physical examination, electrocardiography, and transthoracic echocardiography was performed. In adults, imaging of the entire aorta using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was done. Results Here, we report on 43 patients from 11 families with syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysms caused by TGFB3 mutations. We demonstrate that TGFB3 mutations are associated with significant cardiovascular involvement, including thoracic/abdominal aortic aneurysm and dissection, and mitral valve disease. Other systemic features overlap clinically with Loeys-Dietz, Shprintzen-Goldberg, and Marfan syndromes, including cleft palate, bifid uvula, skeletal overgrowth, cervical spine instability and clubfoot deformity. In line with previous observations in aortic wall tissues of patients with mutations in effectors of TGF-β signaling (TGFBR1/2, SMAD3, and TGFB2), we confirm a paradoxical up-regulation of both canonical and noncanonical TGF-β signaling in association with up-regulation of the expression of TGF-β ligands. Conclusions Our findings emphasize the broad clinical variability associated with TGFB3 mutations and highlight the importance of early recognition of the disease because of high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25835445

  18. Aortic root thrombosis with coronary embolization following neo-aortic reconstruction in a child with hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

    Mitchell, Elizabeth A; Berman, Darren P; McConnell, Patrick I; Buber, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    In the recent era, the diagnosis, treatment options, postoperative management and outcomes of infants born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) have undergone dramatic changes. As is the case with many other novel treatment modalities used for congenital heart diseases, data concerning the long-term outcomes and complications of the various strategies become gradually more available as the numbers of survivors grow. In general, complications of the three-stage surgical palliation used for HLHS tend to occur most commonly following the first-stage surgery. Post-stage 2 complications are substantially less common, and centre on the procedure itself and the unique physiology of the cavopulmonary connection. In the following case report, we describe a relatively rare adverse outcome that occurred following a stage 2 surgery in the form of native aortic root thrombosis extending to the coronary arteries. The selected methods of treatment used in the catheterization laboratory and later in the operating theatre, as well as its outcomes are described. PMID:25972598

  19. Acute coronary syndrome in pregnant women.

    El-Deeb, Mohammed; El-Menyar, Ayman; Gehani, Abdulrazzak; Sulaiman, Kadhim

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the available information on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of acute coronary syndromes (ST-elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI] and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction [NSTEMI]) during all stages of pregnancy. We searched the English-language literature indexed in MEDLINE, Scopus and EBSCO host research databases from 1980 through to August 2010 using the indexing terms 'pregnancy', 'ante-,peri-, and postpartum', 'acute coronary syndrome', 'myocardial infarction', 'STEMI' and 'NSTEMI'. Symptomatic coronary artery disease is still infrequent in women of childbearing age, but the recent increase in its prevalence in pregnancy has been attributed to the modern trend of childbearing in older years because many young working women are postponing having children. Although rare, acute pregnancy-related MI is a devastating event that may claim the life of a mother and her fetus. The incidence of MI is estimated at 0.6-1 per 10,000 pregnancies. The case fatality rate has been reported to be 5-37%. Owing to the rarity of the event, information related to MI in pregnancy is derived from case reports and, therefore, is subject to considerable reporting bias. Treatment needs to be prompt and urgent because of the very high mortality rate. Current guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of MI should be expanded to include pregnancy-related MI. Screening and management of cardiovascular risk factors should be achieved before pregnancy. PMID:21517733

  20. Serum trace elements as nutritional markers in a case with acute aortic dissection

    Serum trace elements were analyzed by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method in a patient with acute aortic dissection during the supportive process by a Nutrition support team (NST). The patient was a 53-year old male who suffered from acute aortic dissection on March 1, 2007. He received emergent Bentall operation and bow pars total displacement. Since he suffered from diarrhea as a result of hypoalbuminemia and bowel dysfunction, enteral nutrition was not sufficient to maintain adequate intake. Therefore, we also used parenteral nutrition until the 97th disease day. Afterwards, the patient managed only with enteral nutrition. We measured serum trace elements during these periods. Serum trace elements such as Fe, Zn and Se were preserved within normal ranges. On the other hand, Cu gradually decreased until the 54th disease day (44 μg/l) and stayed in the lower levels around the detection limit until the 109th disease day. Thereafter, Cu slightly increased and reached 117 μg/l on the 131st disease day (reference range of serum Cu in adult males: 700-1,300 μg/l). It was suggested that the serum levels of these trace elements might reflect the nutritional stages of the patient and could be useful as clinical markers for nutritional therapies. (author)

  1. Simultaneous Open Surgical Treatment of Aortic Coral Reef and Leriche Syndrome: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Pranteda, Chiara; Menna, Danilo; Capoccia, Laura; Sirignano, Pasqualino; Mansour, Wassim; Speziale, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The coral reef aorta (CRA) is a rare syndrome commonly referred to a distribution of calcified plaques in the visceral part of the aorta. Because those plaques can cause malperfusion of the lower limbs, visceral ischemia or renovascular hypertension, surgical treatment is recommended. Transaortic endarterectomy is accepted as a standard repair and it is often performed through an extensive thoracoabdominal approach. CRA has been reported in association with polidistrectual atherosclerotic disease, such as Leriche syndrome. When these 2 conditions coexist, surgical invasivity increases raising several issues concerning the type of surgical access and the revascularization techniques. We report the case of a patient with CRA and Leriche syndrome treated by simultaneous aortic endarterectomy and aortibifemoral bypass at our institution. Intervention was performed through left lumbotomy at 10th intercostal space extended by a left pararectal abdominal incision with section of 11th rib. Through extraperitoneal access visceral vessels were isolated. Aortic cross-clamping was performed at supraceliac and infrarenal levels and a longitudinal arteriotomy was performed on the posterolateral wall of visceral aorta for an overall 4-cm extension. Aortic endarterectomy was then performed and complete plaque excision was easily achieved. Superior mesenteric artery angioplasty was then performed by a DeBakey dilator, gaining an optimal backflow. The aortotomy was then closed with running 3-0 polypropylene suture. Subsequently, through a transperitoneal access an aortobi-femoral bypass was performed by a Dacron knitted graft. Postoperative course was uneventful. At a 6-month follow-up, the patient is in good clinical condition with normal patency of visceral vessels. PMID:26806247

  2. Endovascular Repair of Aortic Dissection in Marfan Syndrome: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Rosario Parisi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, improvement of medical and surgical therapy has increased life expectancy in Marfan patients. Consequently, the number of such patients requiring secondary interventions on the descending thoracic aorta due to new or residual dissections, and distal aneurysm formation has substantially enlarged. Surgical and endovascular procedures represent two valuable options of treatment, both associated with advantages and drawbacks. The aim of the present manuscript was to review endovascular outcomes in Marfan syndrome and to assess the potential role of Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR in this subset of patients.

  3. Early Manifestation of Supravalvular Aortic and Pulmonary Artery Stenosis in a Patient with Williams Syndrome.

    Lee, Jong Uk; Jang, Woo Sung; Lee, Young Ok; Cho, Joon Yong

    2016-04-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a developmental disorder characterized by vascular abnormalities such as thickening of the vascular media layer in medium- and large-sized arteries. Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) and peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPAS) are common vascular abnormalities in WS. The natural course of SVAS and PPAS is variable, and the timing of surgery or intervention is determined according to the progression of vascular stenosis. In our patient, SVAS and PPAS showed rapid concurrent progression within two weeks after birth. We report the early manifestation of SVAS and PPAS in the neonatal period and describe the surgical treatment for stenosis relief. PMID:27066434

  4. Blunt aortic trauma in a patient with the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome type VI

    Yung, Marco Yat Hang; Murray, Jennifer; Thompson, Errington C.

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male with the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VI (ocular scoliotic) who was kicked in the abdomen presented to the emergency room (ER) with abdominal pain. He was found to have a blunt traumatic aortic injury. The patient was treated nonoperatively. He was stable and discharged home on the eighth day. The patient returned to the ER several days later hypotensive and tachycardic. The patient was taken immediately to the operating room, but vascular repair was not possible. The patient expired. We discuss the challenges of taking care of a patient with EDS and offer suggestions that might improve future patient's outcome. PMID:26956239

  5. Blunt aortic trauma in a patient with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI.

    Yung, Marco Yat Hang; Murray, Jennifer; Thompson, Errington C

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VI (ocular scoliotic) who was kicked in the abdomen presented to the emergency room (ER) with abdominal pain. He was found to have a blunt traumatic aortic injury. The patient was treated nonoperatively. He was stable and discharged home on the eighth day. The patient returned to the ER several days later hypotensive and tachycardic. The patient was taken immediately to the operating room, but vascular repair was not possible. The patient expired. We discuss the challenges of taking care of a patient with EDS and offer suggestions that might improve future patient's outcome. PMID:26956239

  6. Contemporary management of acute coronary syndrome

    Large, G

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on the modern management of the non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction). Patients with these syndromes are at varying degrees of risk of (re)infarction and death. This risk can be reliably predicted by clinical, electrocardiographic, and biochemical markers. Aspirin, clopidogrel, heparin (unfractionated or low molecular weight), and anti-ischaemic drugs should be offered to all patients, irrespective of the predicted level of risk. Patients at high risk should also receive a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor inhibitor and should undergo early coronary arteriography with a view to percutaneous or surgical revascularisation. Lower risk patients should undergo non-invasive testing. When inducible myocardial ischaemia is exhibited coronary arteriography should follow. When non-invasive testing is negative, a conservative management strategy is safe. PMID:15811883

  7. Dual pathway therapy in acute coronary syndrome.

    Stachon, Peter; Ahrens, Ingo; Bode, Christoph; Zirlik, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    In 10 % of patients, who suffer an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a major cardiovascular event occurs despite optimal therapy. The occlusion of the vessel is driven by atherothrombosis, which arises from platelet activation and activation of the coagulation cascade. In the last decade the secondary prevention continuously improved by development of dual anti-platelet therapy with new P2Y12-inhibitors such as clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor. Until recently, the coagulation cascade was not targeted in secondary prevention. The coagulation factor Xa plays a crucial role in thrombosis and is elevated in patients after acute coronary syndrome, therefore representing an attractive target for novel therapies in ACS. Former studies with vitamin K antagonists showed reduction of cardiovascular events but increased major bleedings. Two phase-3 trials investigated the role of novel oral anticoagulant agents on top of aspirin and clopidogrel in patients with ACS. The APPRAISE-2 study, which tested the oral factor Xa inhibitor apixaban was prematurely terminated because of an increase of major bleedings in the absence of an effect on cardiovascular events. In contrast, the ATLAS ACS2 TIMI-51 trial interrogating the oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban in a low dose regimen showed significant reduction of cardiovascular events as well as total mortality. Thus, add-on treatment with low dose rivaroxaban emerged as a new option for patients with ACS. This review illustrates recent advances in the development of antithrombotic therapy in acute coronary syndromes, provides guidance on which patients should receive which therapy for secondary prevention of events, and points out potentially fruitful new strategies for the future of antithrombotic treatment in ACS. PMID:26660521

  8. Acute Coronary Syndrome- Conservative vs Invasive Treatment

    LIM; Yean Teng

    2001-01-01

    @@atients with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS)are a clinical continuum-with patients presenting with unstable angina on one end, with patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) at the other end of the spectrum. In between are those with non- ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) The pathophysiology is similar in these patients, namely isruption and fissuring of an atheromatous plaque,leading to enhanced platelet activation and local vasohyperactivity, with reduced flow and thrombus formation. While medical experts have reached consensus in the management of STEMI patients (thrombolysis nd / or percutaneous coronary intervention), optimalmanagement of patients with UA/NSTEMI remainsunclear.

  9. Acute Coronary Syndrome and ST Segment Monitoring.

    Carey, Mary G

    2016-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is caused by a critical obstruction of a coronary artery because of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Three specific conditions are included: ST elevation myocardial infarction, non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, and unstable angina. The ST segment on the electrocardiogram is a sensitive and specific marker of myocardial ischemia and infarction; however, ST segment deviation is regional not global, thus the ECG lead must be placed over the affected region of the myocardium. This article describes ACS and infarction and the use of ST segment monitoring to detect these conditions. PMID:27484662

  10. Contrast-fluid level in the inferior vena cava (IVC niveau sign) in patients with acute type A aortic dissection. Computed tomography findings during acute cardiac tamponade

    The purpose of this study was to report a new computed tomography (CT) finding in acute cardiac tamponade: a contrast-fluid level in the hepatic inferior vena cava (IVC) during an arterial dominant phase CT study (IVC niveau sign) in patients with acute type A aortic dissection. We retrospectively reviewed CT studies with the diagnosis of proximal aortic dissection (Stanford type A) with acute cardiac tamponade. There were 12 patients enrolled in the study (6 women, 6 men; mean age 66 years). A total of 62 patients were selected as a control chronic pericardial effusion group to compare with the acute cardiac tamponade group. Among the 12 patients with acute cardiac tamponade, the IVC niveau sign was seen in 7 (58%). In the control chronic pericardial effusion group (n=62), we identified the IVC niveau sign in only one patient (1.6%). There was a significant difference in the presence of the IVC niveau sign between the acute cardiac tamponade and chronic pericardial effusion groups (P<0.0001). The presence of the IVC niveau sign suggests acute cardiac tamponade in patients with acute type A aortic dissection. (author)

  11. Ecstasy-induced acute coronary syndrome: something to rave about.

    Hoggett, Kerry; McCoubrie, David; Fatovich, Daniel M

    2012-06-01

    Ecstasy or 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine is a commonly used illicit recreational drug, enjoying popularity for its stimulant effects. Although acute coronary syndrome is recognized after cocaine and methamphetamine use, association with Ecstasy use has rarely been reported. We report three cases of significantly delayed acute coronary syndrome and ST elevation myocardial infarction related to ingestion of Ecstasy. PMID:22672176

  12. Rivaroxaban in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome

    Mega, Jessica L; Braunwald, Eugene; Wiviott, Stephen D; Bassand, Jean-Pierre; Bhatt, Deepak L; Bode, Christoph; Burton, Paul; Cohen, Marc; Cook-Bruns, Nancy; Fox, Keith A A; Goto, Shinya; Murphy, Sabina A; Plotnikov, Alexei N; Schneider, David; Sun, Xiang; Verheugt, Freek W A; Gibson, C Michael; Grande, Peer

    2012-01-01

    Acute coronary syndromes arise from coronary atherosclerosis with superimposed thrombosis. Since factor Xa plays a central role in thrombosis, the inhibition of factor Xa with low-dose rivaroxaban might improve cardiovascular outcomes in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome....

  13. The role of inflammatory stress in acute coronary syndrome

    沈成兴; 陈灏珠; 葛均波

    2004-01-01

    Objective To summarize current understanding of the roles of anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndrome and to postulate the novel concept of inflammation stress as the most important factor triggering acute coronary syndrome. Moreover, markers of inflammation stress and ways to block involved pathways are elucidated.Data sources A literature search (MEDLINE 1997 to 2002) was performed using the key words "inflammation and cardiovascular disease". Relevant book chapters were also reviewed.Study selection Well-controlled, prospective landmark studies and review articles on inflammation and acute coronary syndrome were selected.Data extraction Data and conclusions from the selected articles providing solid evidence to elucidate the mechanisms of inflammation and acute coronary syndrome were extracted and interpreted in the light of our own clinical and basic research.Data synthesis Inflammation is closely linked to atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndrome. Chronic and long-lasting inflammation stress, present both systemically or in the vascular walls, can trigger acute coronary syndrome.Conclusions Inflammation stress plays an important role in the process of acute coronary syndrome. Drugs which can modulate the balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory processes and attenuate inflammation stress, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin Ⅱ receptor blockers, statins, and cytokine antagonists may play active roles in the prevention and treatment of acute coronary syndrome when used in addition to conventional therapies (glycoprotein Ⅱb/Ⅲa receptor antagonists, mechanical intervention strategies, etc).

  14. Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest with Lung Perfusion/Ventilation in a Patient with Acute Type A Aortic Dissection

    Yiliam F. Rodriguez-Blanco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old black male presented with acute type A aortic dissection. Surgical repair was performed under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA with lung perfusion/ventilation throughout the procedure. Details of the lung perfusion technique and its potential benefits and drawbacks are discussed.

  15. Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest with Lung Perfusion/Ventilation in a Patient with Acute Type A Aortic Dissection

    Yiliam F Rodriguez-Blanco; Lester Garcia; Tania Brice; Marco Ricci; Salerno, Tomas A.

    2012-01-01

    A 50-year-old black male presented with acute type A aortic dissection. Surgical repair was performed under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) with lung perfusion/ventilation throughout the procedure. Details of the lung perfusion technique and its potential benefits and drawbacks are discussed.

  16. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  17. What's new in acute compartment syndrome?

    Harvey, Edward J; Sanders, David W; Shuler, Michael S; Lawendy, Abdel-Rahman; Cole, Ashley L; Alqahtani, Saad M; Schmidt, Andrew H

    2012-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) after trauma is often the result of increased size of the damaged tissues after acute crush injury or from reperfusion of ischemic areas. It usually is not solely caused by accumulation of free blood or fluid in the compartment, although that can contribute in some cases. There is no reliable and reproducible test that confirms the diagnosis of ACS. A missed diagnosis or failure to cut the fascia to release pressure within a few hours can result in severe intractable pain, paralysis, and sensory deficits. Reduced blood circulation leads to oxygen and nutrient deprivation, muscle necrosis, and permanent disability. Currently, the diagnosis of ACS is made on the basis of physical examination and repeated needle sticks over a short time frame to measure intracompartmental pressures. Missed compartment syndromes continue to be one of most common causes of malpractice lawsuits. Existing technology for continuous pressure measurements are insensitive, particularly in the deep tissues and compartments, and their use is restricted to highly trained personnel. Newer concepts of the pathophysiology accompanied by new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities have recently been advanced. Among these are the concept of inflammatory mediators as markers and anti-inflammatories as medical adjunct therapy. New diagnostic modalities include near-infrared spectroscopy, ultrafiltration catheters, and radio-frequency identification implants. These all address current shortcomings in the diagnostic armamentarium that trauma surgeons can use. The strengths and weaknesses of these new concepts are discussed to allow the trauma surgeon to follow current evolution of the field. PMID:22913965

  18. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair Following Axillo-femoral Bypass in a Patient with Stanford B Acute Aortic Dissection Accompanied by Abdominal Visceral Ischemia;Report of a Case].

    Nishimoto, Takayuki; Bonkohara, Yukihiro; Azuma, Takashi; Iijima, Masaki; Higashidate, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    A 60-year-old woman was transfer-red to the emergency department of our medical center with worsening chest and back pain. Computed tomography revealed Stanford type B aortic dissection. There was a false lumen from the distal arch to the abdominal aorta just above the celiac artery. Although she was at 1st treated conservatively, she abruptly developed acute renal failure and lower limb ischemia because of an enlarged false lumen, and emergency axillo-femoral bypass surgery was performed with an 8 mm tube graft. However, renal failure gradually worsened, which necessitated continuous hemodiafiltration was performed. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair was then performed, and her renal function recovered. PMID:27586321

  19. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far.......Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  20. A case of acute ischemic colitis after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Grigorios Voulalas; Chrisostomos Maltezos

    2016-01-01

    Colonic ischemia is a recognized complication of either open or endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. The clinical difficulty in establishing the diagnosis, the severity of this complication and the patient's poor physiological status may lead to a fatal outcome. We presented a case of ischemic colitis in a patient with patent hypogastric arteries that occurred after an endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair as well as a review of the available literature. The patient's preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative data were recorded. A thorough search through the Google data and Medline to review similar cases or any analyses that referred to ischemic colitis after endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair was conducted. A 76-year-old male was admitted to our department for an elective endovascular repair of an 8 cm in diameter abdominal aortic aneurysm. A Zenith bifurcation graft was implanted. The whole procedure was uneventful and the final angiogram showed an accurate deployment of the endograft without endoleaks and patency of both hypogastric arteries. During the 1st postoperative day, the patient developed symptoms of acute abdomen in combination with metabolic acidosis and oliguria. He underwent an exploratory laparotomy, which revealed necrosis of the sig-moid. A Hartmann's procedure was performed;the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit where he deceased after 24 h. Postoperative ischemic colitis has been described after open abdominal aneurysm repair. The description of this complication has been reported since the early phase of endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair development with a current incidence of 1.5%–3.0%. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to ischemic colitis in spite of the presence of patent hypogastric arteries include athe-roembolization, shock, vasopressive drugs and inferior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  1. A case of acute ischemic colitis after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Grigorios Voulalas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonic ischemia is a recognized complication of either open or endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. The clinical difficulty in establishing the diagnosis, the severity of this complication and the patient's poor physiological status may lead to a fatal outcome. We presented a case of ischemic colitis in a patient with patent hypogastric arteries that occurred after an endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair as well as a review of the available literature. The patient's preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative data were recorded. A thorough search through the Google data and Medline to review similar cases or any analyses that referred to ischemic colitis after endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair was conducted. A 76-year-old male was admitted to our department for an elective endovascular repair of an 8 cm in diameter abdominal aortic aneurysm. A Zenith bifurcation graft was implanted. The whole procedure was uneventful and the final angiogram showed an accurate deployment of the endograft without endoleaks and patency of both hypogastric arteries. During the 1st postoperative day, the patient developed symptoms of acute abdomen in combination with metabolic acidosis and oliguria. He underwent an exploratory laparotomy, which revealed necrosis of the sigmoid. A Hartmann's procedure was performed; the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit where he deceased after 24 h. Postoperative ischemic colitis has been described after open abdominal aneurysm repair. The description of this complication has been reported since the early phase of endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair development with a current incidence of 1.5%–3.0%. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to ischemic colitis in spite of the presence of patent hypogastric arteries include atheroembolization, shock, vasopressive drugs and inferior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  2. A CASE REPORT ON SICKLE CELL DISEASE WITH HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA, NEPHROTIC SYNDROME AND ACUTE CHEST SYNDROME

    Putta; Yamini Devi

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to abnormal hemoglobin. Sickling of RBCs occur due to abnormal hemoglobin which leads to vaso - occlusive crisis. This disease manifests as hemolytic anemia, acute chest syndrome, stroke, ischemic leg ulcers and nephrotic syndrome. This patient presented with hemolytic anemia, nephrotic syndrome and acute chest syndrome. This case was diagnosed by electrophoresis of h emoglobin and peripheral smear. Thi...

  3. Short report Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalcin (NGAL) as a biomarker of dialysis-dependent acute kidney injury following infrarenal aortic surgery

    Jørgensen, Helene Korvenius; Stæhr, Jannie Bisgaard; Gilsaa, Torben

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common following abdominal aortic surgery. NGAL might be useful in the early diagnosis of AKI since it responds rapidly to ischaemic damage. Methods: Twenty patients undergoing elective infrarenal aortic surgery. U-NGAL was measured before surgery and 24, 48...

  4. Progress and perspectives in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Rotta, Alexandre Tellechea; Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Andreolio, Cinara; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of acute onset characterized by hypoxemia and infiltrates on chest radiographs that affects both adults and children of all ages. It is an important cause of respiratory failure in pediatric intensive care units and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, until recently, the definitions and diagnostic criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome have focused on the adult population. In this article, we review the evolution of the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome over nearly five decades, with a special focus on the new pediatric definition. We also discuss recommendations for the implementation of mechanical ventilation strategies in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and the use of adjuvant therapies. PMID:26331971

  5. Cardiac MRI of acute coronary syndrome.

    Akerem Khan, Shamruz; Khan, Shamruz Akarem; Williamson, Eric E; Foley, Thomas A; Cullen, Ethany L; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A

    2013-05-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. New serological biomarkers, such as troponins, have improved the diagnosis of ACS; however, the diagnosis of ACS can still be difficult as there is marked heterogeneity in its presentation and significant overlap with other disorders presenting with chest pain. Evidence is accumulating that cardiac MRI provides information that can aid the detection and differential diagnosis of ACS, guide clinical decision-making and improve risk-stratification after an event. In this review, we present the relevant cardiac MRI techniques that can be used to detect ACS accurately, provide differential diagnosis, identify the sequelae of ACS, and determine prognostication after ACS. PMID:23668741

  6. Nuclear Cardiology in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Paeng, Jin Chul; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging is very effective in the evaluation of patients with suspicious acute coronary syndrome (ACS), for adequate diagnosis and treatment. There have been many clinical evidences to support the efficacy and cost-effectiveness. In addition, many authoritative guidelines support the utility of myocardial perfusion imaging in ACS with an appropriate diagnostic protocol. However, with the development of other cardiac imaging modalities, the choice of modality for the diagnosis of suspicious ACS now depends on the availability of each modality in each institute. Newly developed imaging technologies, especially including molecular imaging, are expected to have great potential not only for diagnosis but also for primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of ACS.

  7. Nuclear Cardiology in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging is very effective in the evaluation of patients with suspicious acute coronary syndrome (ACS), for adequate diagnosis and treatment. There have been many clinical evidences to support the efficacy and cost-effectiveness. In addition, many authoritative guidelines support the utility of myocardial perfusion imaging in ACS with an appropriate diagnostic protocol. However, with the development of other cardiac imaging modalities, the choice of modality for the diagnosis of suspicious ACS now depends on the availability of each modality in each institute. Newly developed imaging technologies, especially including molecular imaging, are expected to have great potential not only for diagnosis but also for primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of ACS

  8. The clinics of acute coronary syndrome.

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Rastelli, Gianni

    2016-05-01

    Risk stratification and management of patients with chest pain continues to be challenging despite considerable efforts made in the last decades by many clinicians and researchers. The throutful evaluation necessitates that the physicians have a high index of suspicion for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and always keep in mind the myriad of often subtle and atypical presentations of ischemic heart disease, especially in certain patient populations such as the elderly ones. In this article we aim to review and discuss the available evidence on the value of clinical presentation in patients with a suspected ACS, with special emphasis on history, characteristics of chest pain, associated symptoms, atypical presentations, precipitating and relieving factors, drugs, clinical rules and significance of clinical Gestalt. PMID:27294087

  9. Aortic dimensions in girls and young women with turner syndrome: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    Mortensen, Kristian H; Skouby, Sven O; Leffers, Anne-Mette;

    2010-01-01

    .35-0.52; p < 0.03). The presence of bicuspid aortic valves correlated at the descending part of the aorta (R = 0.38; p < 0.03). The mean thoracic aortic dimensions were not enlarged in girls or young TS patients. The BSA predicted aortic size at all positions. The prevalence of aortic dilation and aneurysm...

  10. ANALYSIS OF PRE-HOSPITAL TREATMENT OF ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

    O. V. Reshetko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the pre-hospital treatment of patients with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina in 2001 and 2006.Material and methods. Retrospective pre-hospital treatment survey was performed in 1114 patients with acute coronary syndrome (acute myocardial infarction (AMI or unstable angina (UA in 2001 and 2006.Results. For acute myocardial infarction use of aspirin, β-blockers, heparin was 0%, 0%, 81,5% in 2001 and 23,9%, 8%, 13,4% in 2006, respectively. Use of aspirin, β-blockers, heparin in unstable angina were 0%, 16,2%, 12,3% in 2001 and 3,4%, 1,6%, 0,5% in 2006, respectively. Fibrinolytic therapy was not provided. Polypragmasia reduced in 2006 in comparison with 2001.Conclusions. This survey demonstrates the discordance between existing current practice and guidelines for acute coronary syndrome.

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: epidemiology and management approaches

    Walkey AJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Allan J Walkey,1 Ross Summer,1 Vu Ho,1 Philip Alkana21The Pulmonary Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 2Asthma Research Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Acute lung injury and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome represent a spectrum of lung disease characterized by the sudden onset of inflammatory pulmonary edema secondary to myriad local or systemic insults. The present article provides a review of current evidence in the epidemiology and treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, with a focus on significant knowledge gaps that may be addressed through epidemiologic methods.Keywords: acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, review, epidemiology

  12. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome.

    Fukumoto, Risaku

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome affects military personnel and civilians following the uncontrolled dispersal of radiation, such as that caused by detonation of nuclear devices and inappropriate medical treatments. Therefore, there is a growing need for medical interventions that facilitate the improved recovery of victims and patients. One promising approach may be cell therapy, which, when appropriately implemented, may facilitate recovery from whole body injuries. This editorial highlights the current knowledge regarding the use of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the benefits and limitations of which are under investigation. Establishing successful therapies for acute radiation syndrome may require using such a therapeutic approach in addition to conventional approaches. PMID:27182446

  13. Preventing acute renal failure is crucial during acute tumor lysis syndrome

    Darmon Michael

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumour Lysis syndrome (TLS is characterized by the massive destruction of tumoral cells and the release in the extracellular space of their content. While TLS may occur spontaneously before treatment, it usually develops shortly after the initiation of cytotoxic chemotherapy. These metabolites can overwhelm the homeostatic mechanisms and cause hyperuricemia, hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia and hypocalcemia. Moreover, TLS may lead to an acute renal failure (ARF. In addition to the hospital mortality induced by the acute renal failure itself, development of an ARF may preclude optimal cancer treatment. Therefore, prevention of the acute renal failure during acute tumor lysis syndrome is mandatory. The objective of this review is to describe pathophysiological mechanisms leading to acute tumor lysis syndrome, clinical and biological consequences of this syndrome and to provide up-to-date guidelines to ensure prevention and prompt management of this syndrome.

  14. Acute encephalitis syndrome following scrub typhus infection

    Ayan Kar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to find the incidence of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES secondary to scrub infection and to observe the clinical, biochemical, radiological profile, and outcomes in these patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 consecutive patients of AES were evaluated for scrub infection using scrub typhus immunoglobulin M enzyme linked immuno-sorbant assay positivity along with the presence or absence of an eschar. Clinical profile, routine laboratory tests, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis, and neuroimaging were analyzed. Patients were treated with doxycycline and followed-up. Results: Among 20 consecutive patients with AES, 6 (30% were due to scrub infection. They presented with acute onset fever, altered sensorium, seizures. "Eschar" was seen in 50% of patients. CSF done in two of them was similar to consistent with viral meningitis. Magnetic resonance imaging brain revealed cerebral edema, bright lesions in the putamen and the thalamus on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. Renal involvement was seen in all patients. All patients responded well to oral doxycycline. Conclusion: AES is not an uncommon neurological presentation following scrub typhus infection. It should be suspected in all patients with fever, altered sensorium, and renal involvement. Oral doxycycline should be started as early as possible for better outcomes.

  15. Surgical Treatment of Mitral-Aortic Incompetence and Aneurysm of the Ascending Aorta in a Child with Marfan's Syndrome: Case Report

    Stellin, Giovanni; Bortolotti, Uberto; Faggian, Giuseppe; Livi, Ugolino; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Frigo, Giuseppe; Gallucci, Vincenzo

    1983-01-01

    A 7-year-old girl with Marfan's syndrome developed severe mitral and aortic valve incompetence and aneurysmatic dilatation of the ascending aorta. She underwent successful replacement of the mitral valve, aortic valve, and ascending aorta with coronary reimplantation. After 3 months of follow-up, she continues to be asymptomatic.

  16. Mean platelet volume to platelet count ratio predicts in-hospital complications and long-term mortality in type A acute aortic dissection.

    Li, Dong-Ze; Chen, Qing-Jie; Sun, Hui-Ping; Zeng, Rui; Zeng, Zhi; Gao, Xiao-Ming; Ma, Yi-Tong; Yang, Yi-Ning

    2016-09-01

    Type A acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening vascular emergency because of its high morbidity and mortality. Platelet is a pivotal ingredient involved in the development of acute aortic dissection. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether mean platelet volume (MPV)/platelet count ratio predicts in-hospital complications and long-term mortality in type A acute aortic dissection. In this single-center and prospective cohort study, 106 consecutive patients with Stanford type A acute aortic dissection admitted to the hospital within 12 h after onset were recruited. The best cut-off value of MPV/platelet count ratio predicting all-cause mortality was determined by the receiver operator characteristic analysis. Patients were divided into high (H-MPV/platelet count) and low (L-MPV/platelet count) groups based on the cut-off value of 7.49 (10 fl/10/l). Patients were followed up for 3.5 years. Of the 106 acute aortic dissection patients, 71 (67.0%) died during the study period, with a median follow-up duration of 570 days. Compared to the L-MPV/platelet count group, patients with H-MPV/platelet count had a higher risk of in-hospital complications including hypotension, hypoxemia, myocardial ischemia/infarction, conscious disturbance, pericardial tamponade, paraplegia, and poor survival (all P acute aortic dissection. PMID:26575495

  17. Impact of copeptin on diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome

    Zeinab H. El Sayed

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: In suspected acute coronary syndrome, determination of copeptin and cardiac troponin I provides a remarkable negative predictive value, which aids in early and safe ruling out of myocardial infarction.

  18. Outcomes of treatment on acute aortic dissection in our hospital and tasks toward better survival

    Acute aortic dissection (AAD), a rupture of aortic inner and outer walls, occurs suddenly without a sign, is often fatal and thereby requires emergent treatment rapidly after crisis. Here, outcomes of AAD treatment in authors' hospital are explained and discussed about the present problems and tasks. Subjects are 119 patients with AAD (M 61/ F 58, 30-89 years old) conveyed to the hospital emergency during the period Jan. 2003-Nov. 2009, 10 cases (8.4%) of whom died rapidly after arrival, 78 of whom underwent the emergent operation (EO) due to AAD present at ascending and arcade aorta (A-type), and the remainder (B-type) had the lesion only at descending aorta. Diagnosis was done by CT, and usually post inducing anesthesia, during and post extracorporeal circulation, transesophageal echocardiography was conducted real-time during EO for monitoring the cerebral and general circulation. In A-type AAD, replacement of the lesion aorta was major with the artificial blood vessel in EO, and in B-type, either hypotensive or surgical treatment was determined depending on patient's status. If EO treatment was conducted before the circulatory failure, the life saving attained to 98% even in patients with A-type AAD but in cases after the failure, it decreased to 13%. EO was partially needed in the B-type, where the saving rate was 78% in 9 patients. Most of B-type patients were subjected to conservative hypotensive treatment. Protection of the disease and carrying process from the crisis to hospital arrival of patients were conceivably problems and tasks to be considered further. (T.T.)

  19. Analysis of the Korean Emergency Department Syndromic Surveillance System: Mass Type Acute Diarrheal Syndrome

    Ahn, Shin; Lee, Jae Ho; KIM, WON; Lim, Kyung Soo

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to compare the data from the emergency department syndromic surveillance system of Korea in detection and reporting of acute diarrheal syndrome (mass type) with the data from the Korea Food and Drug Administration. And to offer fundamental materials for making improvements in current surveillance system was our purpose. Methods A study was conducted by reviewing the number of cases reported as acute diarrheal syndrome (mass type) from the Korean Center for D...

  20. A Case with Repeated Recurrent Acute Coronary Syndrome due to Pseudoephedrine Use: Kounis Syndrome

    Metin Çeliker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic reaction-associated acute coronary syndrome picture is defined as Kounis syndrome. Although drug use is the most common cause of allergic reaction, foods and environmental factors may also play a role in the etiology. Herein, a case with acute coronary syndrome that developed two times at 8-month interval due to pseudoephedrine use for upper respiratory tract infection is presented.

  1. Thyroid Hormone Profile in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Abdulaziz Qari, Faiza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thyroid hormone has the a major role in the cardiovascular system function and cardiac a As well as to maintain the cardiovascular homeostasis A slightly change ind thyroid status actually affects cardiovascular mortality hemodynamic. The background of this study was to define the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Objectives: The primary objective was to define the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in acute coronary syndrome, including Non-ST Segm...

  2. Early prediction of acute kidney injury biomarkers after endovascular stent graft repair of aortic aneurysm: a prospective observational study

    Ueta, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Michiko; Iguchi, Naoya; Uchiyama, Akinori; Shirakawa, Yukitoshi; Kuratani, Toru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Fujino, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious condition usually detected some time after onset by changes in serum creatinine (sCr). Although stent grafting to repair aortic aneurysms is associated with AKI caused by surgical procedures or the use of contrast agents, early biomarkers for AKI have not been adequately examined in stent graft recipients. We studied biomarkers including urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), blood NGAL, N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminid...

  3. Report of a child with aortic aneurysm, orofacial clefting, hemangioma, upper sternal defect, and marfanoid features: possible PHACE syndrome.

    Slavotinek, Anne M; Dubovsky, Elizabeth; Dietz, Harry C; Lacbawan, Felicitas

    2002-07-01

    We report a female patient who had a scalp hemangioma, a cleft uvula, an upper sternal defect, pectus excavatum, arachnodactyly, pes planus, and joint hypermobility. She had rupture of an aortic aneurysm after minor trauma at 11 years of age. At 17 years of age, elective repair of a dilated, ectatic aorta was complicated by cerebral ischemia. Other vascular abnormalities in the proband included an aneurysm of the left subclavian artery, atresia of the right carotid artery, and calcified cerebral aneurysms. We believe that the proband's physical anomalies are best described by the PHACE (posterior fossa brain malformations, hemangiomas, arterial anomalies, coarctation of the aorta and cardiac defects, and eye abnormalities) phenotypic spectrum. This spectrum of physical anomalies also includes sternal clefting and hemagiomas as part of the sternal malformation/vascular dysplasia (SM/VD) association, as found in our patient, and the acronym PHACES has also been used. We consider that the PHACE phenotypic spectrum is likely to be broader than previously recognized and includes orofacial clefting and aortic dilatation and rupture. Our patient also had skeletal anomalies that lead to consideration of Marfan syndrome as a diagnosis. It should be recognized that there is clinical overlap between PHACE syndrome and Marfan syndrome when aortic dilatation is present. We would also like to emphasize the minor nature of the cutaneous findings in our patient despite her severe vascular complications. This is in contrast to previous reports of large or multiple hemangiomas in PHACE syndrome. PMID:12116239

  4. Acute Radiation Syndrome. Consequences and outcomes

    The consequences and outcomes of an Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS), induced by external gamma radiation for 59 persons (49 men and 10 women) have been estimated. All incidents have taken place more than 40 years ago in the yearly years of adjustment of an atomic industry (1950-1953-38 persons, 1954-1958-21 persons). According to the degree of severity ARS 5 groups are selected: the severest degree - 7 individuals (average dose in group 43.8±12.8 Sv), severe - 4 individuals (9.3±1.5 Sv), medium - 14 individuals (2.2±0.8 Sv), a light degree - 15 individuals (0.93±0.13 Sv), ''erased'' from - 19 individuals (0.85±0.07 Sv). In all cases, except for lethal (the severest degree), the characteristics of morphological composition of the peripheral blood were restored in the first year after ARS and now correspond to physiological standard. In 2 cases the moderate hypoplasia of granulocytopoiesis was diagnosed. A marker of the acute exposure was the chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of the peripheral blood. The frequency of chromosome aberrations correlates with severity degree of ARS (from 3-7 up to 35-50 stable aberrations per 100 cells). In cases of ARS with severe degree the early development of a cerebral atherosclerosis is detected. The radiation cataract was diagnosed in 5 patients (an exposure doses 4.0-9.8 Sv, a period of development 2-5 years). During the first years after ARS in 80% of cases the complete labour rehabilitation is reached. Of 53 patients with known vital status by 45 year of monitoring 19 persons (35.8%) have died, of these in 2 cases the causes of death are not determined. In remaining cases the causes of death were ARS of severest degree (7 persons), Ischemic Heart Disease (5 persons), malignant tumors (4 persons), accidents and traumas (2 persons). (author)

  5. Acute Radiation Syndrome. Consequences and outcomes

    Okladnikova, N.D.; Pesternikova, V.S.; Sumina, M.V.; Azizova, T.V.; Yurkov, N.N. [Branch No 1 State Research Center of Russia, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Biophysics

    2000-05-01

    The consequences and outcomes of an Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS), induced by external gamma radiation for 59 persons (49 men and 10 women) have been estimated. All incidents have taken place more than 40 years ago in the yearly years of adjustment of an atomic industry (1950-1953-38 persons, 1954-1958-21 persons). According to the degree of severity ARS 5 groups are selected: the severest degree - 7 individuals (average dose in group 43.8{+-}12.8 Sv), severe - 4 individuals (9.3{+-}1.5 Sv), medium - 14 individuals (2.2{+-}0.8 Sv), a light degree - 15 individuals (0.93{+-}0.13 Sv), ''erased'' from - 19 individuals (0.85{+-}0.07 Sv). In all cases, except for lethal (the severest degree), the characteristics of morphological composition of the peripheral blood were restored in the first year after ARS and now correspond to physiological standard. In 2 cases the moderate hypoplasia of granulocytopoiesis was diagnosed. A marker of the acute exposure was the chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of the peripheral blood. The frequency of chromosome aberrations correlates with severity degree of ARS (from 3-7 up to 35-50 stable aberrations per 100 cells). In cases of ARS with severe degree the early development of a cerebral atherosclerosis is detected. The radiation cataract was diagnosed in 5 patients (an exposure doses 4.0-9.8 Sv, a period of development 2-5 years). During the first years after ARS in 80% of cases the complete labour rehabilitation is reached. Of 53 patients with known vital status by 45 year of monitoring 19 persons (35.8%) have died, of these in 2 cases the causes of death are not determined. In remaining cases the causes of death were ARS of severest degree (7 persons), Ischemic Heart Disease (5 persons), malignant tumors (4 persons), accidents and traumas (2 persons). (author)

  6. Nuclear cardiology in acute coronary syndromes

    Acute coronary syndromes are a frequent manifestation of a coronary artery disease, usually being associated with chest pain and presenting as a medical emergency. Since a considerable number of patients with chest pain, however, have a non cardiac etiology of trier pain, properly triaging these patients represents a diagnostic challenge for physicians in the emergency department. As the available diagnostic procedures have limited accuracy, many different diagnostic strategies have been evaluated. Among these, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) at rest or in combination with stress procedures has been investigated in many trails. MPI has been proven to be useful, especially in a patient population with a low to intermediate probability of an ischemic event. Perfusion scintigraphy has a high sensitivity in the detection of myocardial infarction and reveals an excellent negative predictive value, allowing a safe discharge strategy of patients with a negative scan result. Moreover, it enables risk stratification and provides incremental and independent prognostic information regarding short to long term future cardiac adverse events. Several cost effectiveness studies have shown that perfusion imaging leads to lower overall direct costs, mainly by a reduction of unnecessary hospital admissions and diagnostic angiograms, without worsening of the clinical outcome of these patients. As a possible study endpoint, myocardial perfusion imaging in the acute setting enables the quantification of salvaged myocardium and therefore the evaluation of treatment efficacy. Besides perfusion agents, several infarcts avid radiopharmaceuticals have been developed, which in part show promising results. However, larger randomized trials evaluating these tracers in clinical settings are needed to warrant routine clinical application

  7. Enlightenment from a small but rapidly evolving penetrating aortic ulcer.

    Tan, Guangyi; Tang, Wenyi; Chen, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU) is a pathologic type of acute aortic syndrome and usually locates in the descending aorta. The presentation, behavior and natural history of this disease process have not been clear. Here we report a case in which a rapidly evolving PAU in descending aorta needed aggressive percutaneous interventional treatment. The present case with its unique scenario might draw clinicians' attention on a "beyond the guidelines" issue. PMID:26961076

  8. Role of contrast-enhanced helical CT in the evaluation of acute thoracic aortic injuries after blunt chest trauma

    Scaglione, M.; Pinto, A.; Pinto, F.; Romano, L.; Ragozzino, A. [Dept. of Emergency Radiology, Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Grassi, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Naples (Italy)

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the value of contrast-enhanced helical CT for detecting and managing acute thoracic aortic injury (ATAI). Between June 1995 and February 2000, 1419 consecutive chest CT examinations were performed in the setting of major blunt trauma. The following CT findings were considered indicative of ATAI: intimal flap; pseudoaneurysm; contour irregularity; lumen abnormality; and extravasation of contrast material. On the basis of these direct findings no further diagnostic investigations were performed. Isolated mediastinal hematoma on CT scans was considered an indirect sign of ATAI: In these cases, thoracic aortography was performed even if CT indicated normal aorta. Seventy-seven patients had abnormal CT scans: Among the 23 patients with direct CT signs, acute thoracic aortic injuries was confirmed at thoracotomy in 21. Two false-positive cases were observed. The 54 remaining patients had isolated mediastinal hematoma without aortic injuries at CT and corresponding negative angiograms. The 1342 patients with negative CT scans were included in the 8-month follow-up program and did not show any adverse sequela based on clinical and radiographic criteria. Contrast-enhanced helical CT has a critical role in the exclusion of thoracic aortic injuries in patient with major blunt chest trauma and prevents unnecessary thoracic aortography. Direct CT signs of ATAI do not require further diagnostic investigations to confirm the diagnosis: Isolated aortic bands or contour vessel abnormalities should be first considered as possible artifacts or related to non-traumatic etiologies especially when mediastinal hematoma is absent. In cases of isolated mediastinal hematoma other possible sources of bleeding should be considered before directing patients to thoracic aortography. (orig.)

  9. Role of contrast-enhanced helical CT in the evaluation of acute thoracic aortic injuries after blunt chest trauma

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the value of contrast-enhanced helical CT for detecting and managing acute thoracic aortic injury (ATAI). Between June 1995 and February 2000, 1419 consecutive chest CT examinations were performed in the setting of major blunt trauma. The following CT findings were considered indicative of ATAI: intimal flap; pseudoaneurysm; contour irregularity; lumen abnormality; and extravasation of contrast material. On the basis of these direct findings no further diagnostic investigations were performed. Isolated mediastinal hematoma on CT scans was considered an indirect sign of ATAI: In these cases, thoracic aortography was performed even if CT indicated normal aorta. Seventy-seven patients had abnormal CT scans: Among the 23 patients with direct CT signs, acute thoracic aortic injuries was confirmed at thoracotomy in 21. Two false-positive cases were observed. The 54 remaining patients had isolated mediastinal hematoma without aortic injuries at CT and corresponding negative angiograms. The 1342 patients with negative CT scans were included in the 8-month follow-up program and did not show any adverse sequela based on clinical and radiographic criteria. Contrast-enhanced helical CT has a critical role in the exclusion of thoracic aortic injuries in patient with major blunt chest trauma and prevents unnecessary thoracic aortography. Direct CT signs of ATAI do not require further diagnostic investigations to confirm the diagnosis: Isolated aortic bands or contour vessel abnormalities should be first considered as possible artifacts or related to non-traumatic etiologies especially when mediastinal hematoma is absent. In cases of isolated mediastinal hematoma other possible sources of bleeding should be considered before directing patients to thoracic aortography. (orig.)

  10. Supravalvular aortic stenosis associated to infectious endocarditis and cerebral vascular disease in a patient with Williams-Beuren Syndrome.

    De Rubens Figueroa, Jesús; Marhx, Alfonso; López Terrazas, Javier; Palacios Macedo, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by: (a) typical facial features; (b) psychomotor retardation with a specific neurocognitive profile; (c) cardiovascular condition and (d) likely transient hypocalcemia in infancy. The objective of this study was to describe the clinic evolution and diagnosis of patient with this syndrome that was associated with endocarditis caused by Streptococcus parasanguis in the ascending aorta and an aneurism located in the fronto-temporal area, which produced a parenchymal hematoma in the left lobe, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. He was treated with ceftriaxone and dicloxacillin. Then we proceeded to correct the aneurysm and perform vegetation resection in aortic arteries with supravalvular aortic stenosis correction. The evolution after one year has been favorable and is currently without neurologic sequelae. A 5-year-old male patient presented a diagnosis of supravalvular aortic stenosis. After cardiac catheterization was performed, he presented a fever and right side paresis. The echocardiogram showed multiple vegetations in the ascendant aortic arch and the supraortic arteries. The blood cultures reported S. parasanguis. The magnetic resonance showed a subarachnoid hemorrhage with an aneurysm and a hematoma. PMID:25882107

  11. Aortic Valve Sparing in Different Aortic Valve and Aortic Root Conditions.

    David, Tirone E

    2016-08-01

    The development of aortic valve-sparing operations (reimplantation of the aortic valve and remodeling of the aortic root) expanded the surgical armamentarium for treating patients with aortic root dilation caused by a variety of disorders. Young adults with aortic root aneurysms associated with genetic syndromes are ideal candidates for reimplantation of the aortic valve, and the long-term results have been excellent. Incompetent bicuspid aortic valves with dilated aortic annuli are also satisfactorily treated with the same type of operation. Older patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic insufficiency secondary to dilated sinotubular junction and a normal aortic annulus can be treated with remodeling of the aortic root or with reimplantation of the aortic valve. The first procedure is simpler, and both procedures are likely equally effective. As with any heart valve-preserving procedure, patient selection and surgical expertise are keys to successful and durable repairs. PMID:27491910

  12. Acute pancreatitis and acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating dengue haemorrhagic fever

    Agrawal, Avinash; Jain, Nirdesh; Gutch, Manish; Shankar, Amit

    2011-01-01

    Dengue infection is now known to present with wide spectrum of complications. Isolated cases of acute pancreatitis complicating dengue haemorrhagic fever have been reported in literature. Here the authors report a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever that develops acute pancreatitis and presented with acute onset of breathlessness, which then progressed to full-blown acute respiratory distress syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of dengue haemorrhagic fever complicated wi...

  13. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in an alpaca cria

    Simpson, Katharine M.; Streeter, Robert N.; Genova, Suzanne G.

    2011-01-01

    A 7-hour-old alpaca was presented for lethargy and depression. The cria responded favorably to initial treatment but developed acute-onset dyspnea 48 hours later. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was diagnosed by thoracic imaging and blood gas analysis. The cria was successfully treated with corticosteroids and discharged from the hospital.

  14. Pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    ZHANG Ding-mei; LU Jia-hai; ZHONG Nan-shan

    2008-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) first emerged in Guangdong province,China in November2002.During the following 3 months,it spread rapidly across the world,resulting in approximately 800 deaths.In 2004,subsequent sporadic cases emerged in Singapore and China.A novel coronavims,SARS-CoV,was identified as the etiological agent of SARS.1,2 This virus belongs to a family of large,positive,single-stranded RNA viruses.Nevertheless,genomic characterization shows that the SARS-CoV is only moderately related to other known coronaviruses.3 In contrast with previously described coronaviruses,SARS-CoV infection typically causes severe symptoms related to the lower respiratory tract.The SARS-CoV genome includes 14 putative open reading frames encoding 28 potential proteins,and the functions of many of these proteins are not known.4 A number of complete and partial autopsies of SARS patients have been reported since the first outbreak in 2003.The predominant pathological finding in these cases was diffuse alveolar damage (DAD).This severe pulmonary injury of SARS patients is caused both by direct viral effects and immunopathogenetic factors.5 Many important aspects of the pathogenesis of SARS have not yet been fully clarified.In this article,we summarize the most important mechanisms involved in the complex pathogenesis of SARS,including clinical characters,host and receptors,immune system response and genetic factors.

  15. Acute Coronary Syndrome: Posthospital Outpatient Management.

    Veauthier, Brian; Sievers, Karlynn; Hornecker, Jaime

    2015-10-01

    When providing care for patients who are discharged from the hospital after experiencing acute coronary syndrome (ACS), several issues should be addressed. Drug regimens should be reviewed to ensure that patients are taking appropriate drugs, including antiplatelet agents, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers, aldosterone antagonists, beta blockers/calcium channel blockers, cholesterol-lowering drugs, and nitroglycerin. The review also should confirm that patients understand when and how to take their drugs, and that there are no obstacles (eg, cost) that might result in nonadherence to drug regimens. Lifestyle modifications, including improvements in diet and exercise regimens, along with participation in a cardiac rehabilitation program, should be encouraged. Risk factor reduction measures include smoking cessation for smokers, weight management for patients who are overweight, and optimal control of blood pressure and blood glucose levels. Appropriate vaccinations should be administered; influenza and pneumococcal vaccines are indicated for all patients with ACS in the absence of contraindications. Patients requiring pain control should avoid use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs because they increase the risk of cardiovascular events; acetaminophen or other drugs should be used. Finally, depression is common among patients with ACS. Screening for and management of depression are significant components of care. PMID:26439396

  16. MRI assessment of local acute radiation syndrome

    Weber-Donat, G.; Potet, J.; Baccialone, J.; Teriitehau, C. [Military Hospital Percy, Radiology Department, Clamart (France); Amabile, J.C.; Laroche, P. [Military Hospital Percy, Army Institute of Radioprotection, Clamart (France); Lahutte-Auboin, M. [Military Hospital Val-de-Grace, Radiology Department, Paris (France); Bey, E. [Military Hospital Percy, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Department, Clamart (France)

    2012-12-15

    To describe local acute radiation syndrome and its radiological imaging characteristics. We performed a retrospective study of patients who had suffered skin and deeper radiation damage who were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared the clinical findings, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and MRI results. A total of 22 MRI examinations were performed between 2005 and 2010 in 7 patients; 6 patients had increased CRP levels and MRI abnormalities. They were treated by surgery and local cellular therapy. One patient had no CRP or MRI abnormalities, and had a spontaneous good outcome. Eighteen abnormal MR examinations demonstrated high STIR signal and/or abnormal enhancement in the dermis and muscle tissues. Three MRI examinations demonstrated skeletal abnormalities, consistent with radionecrosis. The four normal MRI examinations were associated only with minor clinical manifestations such as pain and pigmentation disorders. MRI seems to be a useful and promising imaging investigation in radiation burns management i.e. initial lesion evaluation, treatment evaluation and complication diagnosis. MRI findings correlated perfectly with clinical stage and no false negative examinations were obtained. In particular, the association between normal MRI and low CRP level seems to be related to good outcome without specific treatment. (orig.)

  17. MRI assessment of local acute radiation syndrome

    To describe local acute radiation syndrome and its radiological imaging characteristics. We performed a retrospective study of patients who had suffered skin and deeper radiation damage who were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared the clinical findings, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and MRI results. A total of 22 MRI examinations were performed between 2005 and 2010 in 7 patients; 6 patients had increased CRP levels and MRI abnormalities. They were treated by surgery and local cellular therapy. One patient had no CRP or MRI abnormalities, and had a spontaneous good outcome. Eighteen abnormal MR examinations demonstrated high STIR signal and/or abnormal enhancement in the dermis and muscle tissues. Three MRI examinations demonstrated skeletal abnormalities, consistent with radionecrosis. The four normal MRI examinations were associated only with minor clinical manifestations such as pain and pigmentation disorders. MRI seems to be a useful and promising imaging investigation in radiation burns management i.e. initial lesion evaluation, treatment evaluation and complication diagnosis. MRI findings correlated perfectly with clinical stage and no false negative examinations were obtained. In particular, the association between normal MRI and low CRP level seems to be related to good outcome without specific treatment. (orig.)

  18. Prevalence of Burnout Syndrome in Patients Admitted with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Ana Cláudia Giaxa Prosdócimo; Luciane Boreki Lucina; Olandoski Marcia; Priscila Megda João Jobs; Nicolle Amboni Schio; Fernanda Fachin Baldanzi; Costantino Ortiz Costantini; Ana Maria Teresa Benevides-Pereira; Luiz Cesar Guarita-Souza; José Rocha Faria-Neto

    2015-01-01

    Background: Burnout Syndrome is the extreme emotional response to chronic occupational stress, manifesting as physical and mental exhaustion. Although associated with higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, no study so far has evaluated whether the Burnout Syndrome could be a prevalent factor in non-elderly individuals active in the labor market, admitted for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome in non-elderly, economically act...

  19. The non-syndromic familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections maps to 15q21 locus

    Chandok Gurangad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD is a critical condition that often goes undiagnosed with fatal consequences. While majority of the cases are sporadic, more than 20% are inherited as a single gene disorder. The most common familial TAA is Marfan syndrome (MFS, which is primarily caused by mutations in fibrillin-1 (FBN1 gene. Patients with FBN1 mutations are at higher risk for dissection compared to other patients with similar size aneurysms. Methods Fifteen family members were genotyped using Affymetrix-10K genechips. A genome-wide association study was carried out using an autosomal dominant model of inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Mutation screening of all exons and exon-intron boundaries of FBN1 gene which reside near the peak Lod score was carried out by direct sequencing. Results The index case presented with agonizing substernal pain and was found to have TAAD by transthoracic echocardiogram. The family history was significant for 3 first degree relatives with TAA. Nine additional family members were diagnosed with TAA by echocardiography examinations. The affected individuals had no syndromic features. A genome-wide analysis of linkage mapped the disease gene to a single locus on chromosome 15q21 with a peak Lod score of 3.6 at fibrillin-1 (FBN1 gene locus (odds ratio > 4000:1 in favour of linkage, strongly suggesting that FBN1 is the causative gene. No mutation was identified within the exons and exon-intron boundaries of FBN1 gene that segregated with the disease. Haplotype analysis identified additional mutation carriers who had previously unknown status due to borderline dilation of the ascending aorta. Conclusions A familial non-syndromic TAAD is strongly associated with the FBN1 gene locus and has a malignant disease course often seen in MFS patients. This finding indicates the importance of obtaining detailed family history and echocardiographic screening of extended relatives of patients

  20. Acute Aortic Dissection Biomarkers Identified Using Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation.

    Xiao, Ziya; Xue, Yuan; Yao, Chenling; Gu, Guorong; Zhang, Yaping; Zhang, Jin; Fan, Fan; Luan, Xiao; Deng, Zhi; Tao, Zhengang; Song, Zhen-Ju; Tong, Chaoyang; Wang, Haojun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of potential serum biomarkers for acute aortic dissection (AAD) that were identified by isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) approaches. Serum samples from 20 AAD patients and 20 healthy volunteers were analyzed using iTRAQ technology. Protein validation was performed using samples from 120 patients with chest pain. A total of 355 proteins were identified with the iTRAQ approach; 164 proteins reached the strict quantitative standard, and 125 proteins were increased or decreased more than 1.2-fold (64 and 61 proteins were up- and downregulated, resp.). Lumican, C-reactive protein (CRP), thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), and D-dimer were selected as candidate biomarkers for the validation tests. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves show that Lumican and D-dimer have diagnostic value (area under the curves [AUCs] 0.895 and 0.891, P values for D-dimer were 93.33% and 68.33%. For Lumican and D-dimer AAD combined diagnosis, the sensitivity and specificity were 88.33% and 95%, respectively. In conclusion, Lumican has good specificity and D-dimer has good sensitivity for the diagnosis of AAD, while the combined detection of D-dimer and Lumican has better diagnostic value. PMID:27403433

  1. Isolated single coronary artery presenting as acute coronary syndrome: case report and review.

    Mahapatro, Anil K; Patro, A Sarat K; Sujatha, Vipperala; Sinha, Sudhir C

    2014-06-01

    Congenital single coronary artery is commonly associated with complex congenital heart diseases and manifests in infancy or childhood. But isolated single coronary artery is a rare congenital anomaly which can present as acute coronary syndrome in adults. The aim of the work is to discuss on isolated single coronary artery in two adults presenting as acute coronary syndrome. The first case underwent coronary angiography (CAG) through right radial route, but switched over to femoral for confirmation of diagnosis and due to radial spasm. An aortic root angiogram was done to rule out presence of any other coronary ostia. It revealed a single coronary artery originating from right sinus of valsalva. After giving rise to posterior descending artery branch at crux, it continued in the atrioventricular groove to the anterior basal surface of the heart and traversed as anterior descending artery. There was no atheromatous occlusive stenosis. This is R-I type single coronary artery as per Lipton classification. In the second case, angiography was completed through right radial route. It revealed a single coronary artery arising from right aortic sinus. Anterior descending and circumflex branch were originating from proximal common trunk of the single coronary artery and supplying the left side of the heart. The right coronary artery has diffuse atheromatous disease without significant stenosis in any major branch. This is R-III C type as per Lipton classification. A coronary anomaly of both origin and course is very rare. It may be encountered in adults evaluated for atherosclerotic coronary heart disease. Knowledge and understanding of anatomical types of this congenital anomaly will reduce time, anxiety, complications during CAG and cardiac surgery. PMID:25075168

  2. Role of Ventilation in Cases of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome /Acute Lung injury

    Hemant M Shah; Shilpa B Sutariya; Parul M Bhatt; Nishil Shah; Shweta Gamit

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute lung injury (ALI) and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by refractory hypoxemia that develops secondary to high-permeability pulmonary edema. These syndromes are gaining more attention as a means of better comprehending the pathophysiology of ARDS and possiblyfor modifying ventilatory management. In this context a study was done to compare role of invasive and non-invasive ventilation in cases of ARDS/ALI. Methods: in this study patients of AR...

  3. Is the outcome in acute aortic dissection type A influenced by of femoral versus central cannulation?

    Bucsky, Bence S.; Richardt, Doreen; Petersen, Michael; Sievers, Hans H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the single-center experience in initial femoral versus central cannulation of the extracorporeal circulation for acute aortic dissection type A (AADA). Methods Between January 2003 and December 2015, 235 patients underwent repair of AADA. All patients were evaluated for the type of arterial cannulation (femoral vs. central) for initial bypass. Demographic data and outcome parameters were accessed. Results One hundred and twenty seven (54.0%) were initially cannulated in the central aortic vessels (ascending aorta or subclavian/axillary artery) and 108 (46.0%) in the femoral artery. Patients were comparable between age (62.4±14.4 vs. 62.9±14.4 years, P=0.805), gender (male, 62.2 vs. 69.4%, P=0.152) and previous sternotomy (15.7 vs. 16.7%, P=0.861) between both cannulation groups; while EuroSCORE I (11.5±4.0 vs. 12.7±4.2, P=0.031) and ASA Score (3.5±0.81 vs. 3.8±0.57, P=0.011) were significantly higher in the femoral artery cannulation group. Bypass (249±102 vs. 240±81 min, P=0.474), X-clamp (166±85 vs. 157±67 min, P=0.418) and circulatory arrest time (51.6±28.7 vs. 48.3±21.7 min, P=0.365) were similar between the groups as were lowest temperature (18.1±2.0 vs. 18.1±2.2, P=0.775). Postoperative neurologic deficit and 30-day mortality were comparable between both cannulation groups (11.7 vs. 7.2%, P=0.449 and 20.2 vs. 16.9%, P=0.699, central vs. peripheral cannulation). Multivariate analysis revealed only EuroScore I above 13 as single preoperative predictor for mortality. Conclusions AADA can be operated with both femoral and central cannulation with similar results. Risk for early mortality was driven by the preoperative clinical and hemodynamic status before operation rather than the cannulation technique.

  4. Contrast-induced acute kidney injury after computed tomography prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Aim: To identify independent predictors of contrast medium-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) after enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in high-risk patients. Materials and methods: The present single-centre study analysed retrospectively 361 patients who were assessed using MDCT prior to TAVI. CI-AKI was defined as an increase in serum creatinine (SCr) of ≥25% or ≥0.5 mg/dl in at least one sample over baseline (24 h before MDCT) and at 24, 48, and 72 h after MDCT. Results: A total of 38 patients (10.5%) experienced CI-AKI. As compared to patients without CI-AKI, they presented more frequently with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 ml/min/1.73m2, (81.6% versus 64.4%, p = 0.045) and tended to receive higher volumes of iodinated contrast media (ICM; 55.3% versus 39%, p = 0.057). There was a significant interaction between baseline eGFR and the amount of intravenous ICM administered (pfor interaction = <0.001) identifying the amount of ICM >90 ml as independent predictive factor of CI-AKI only in patients with baseline eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2 (OR 2.615; 95% CI: 1.21–5.64). Conclusion: One in ten elderly patients with aortic stenosis undergoing MDCT to plan a TAVI procedure experienced CI-AKI after intravenous ICM injection. Intravenous administration of <90 ml of ICM reduces this risk in patients with or without pre-existing impaired renal function. However, in the majority of patients renal function recovers before the TAVI procedure. - Highlights: • We analyzed retrospectively 361 patients who were assessed by MDCT prior to TAVI. • Overall incidence of CI-AKI after intravenous ICM injection was 10.5%. • Interaction between baseline eGFR*amount of ICM injected predicts the risk of CI-AKI. • ICM <90 ml reduces the risk in patients with or without impaired renal function. • In the majority of patients renal function recovers before TAVI procedure

  5. Acute coronary syndromes: an old age problem

    Alexander D Simms; Philip D Batin; John Kurian; Nigel Durham; Christopher P Gale

    2012-01-01

    The increasing population in older age will lead to greater numbers of them presenting with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). This has implications on global healthcare resources and necessitates better management and selection for evidenced-based therapies. The elderly are a high risk group with more significant treatment benefits than younger ACS. Nevertheless, age related inequalities in ACS care are recognised and persist. This discrepancy in care, to some extent, is explained by the higher frequency of atypical and delayed presentations in the elderly, and less diagnostic electrocardiograms at presentation, potentiating a delay in ACS diagnosis. Under estimation of mortality risk in the elderly due to limited consideration for physiological frailty, co-morbidity, cognitive/psychological impairment and physical disability, less input by cardiology specialists and lack of randomised, controlled trials data to guide management in the elderly may further confound the inequality of care. While these inequalities exist, there remains a substantial opportunity to improve age related ACS outcomes. The selection of elderly patients for specific therapies and medication regimens are unanswered. There is a growing need for randomised, controlled trial data to be more representative of the population and enroll those of advanced age with co-morbidity. A lack of reporting of adverse events, such as renal impairment post coronary angiography, in the elderly further limit risk benefit decisions. Substantial improvements in care of elderly ACS patients are required and should be advocated. Ultimately, these improvements are likely to lead to better outcomes post ACS. However, the improvement in outcome is not infinite and will be limited by non-modifiable factors of age-related risk.

  6. [Coronary Embolism Probably Caused by Surgical Glue after Operation for Acute Aortic Dissection;Report of a Case].

    Kimura, Chieri; Takihara, Hitomi; Okada, Shuichi

    2016-07-01

    A 70-year-old female underwent an emergency replacement of the ascending aorta for acute aortic dissection. We used surgical adhesive BioGlue and teflon felt strips to reinforce the dissected aortic wall. On the 5th post operative day, electrocardiogram showed ischemic inverted T wave and the serum creatine phosphokinase level elevated without any symptoms such as chest pain or low blood pressure. By coronary angiography, severe stenosis was detected of the left descending coronary artery, and percutaneous coronary intervention was performed. Intravascular ultrasound images revealed that no atherosclerotic components were present in the embolic materials. As a result of in vitro examination, that material was probably a fragment of the BioGlue. The patient was discharged on foot 23 days after surgery. PMID:27365070

  7. A CASE REPORT ON SICKLE CELL DISEASE WITH HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA, NEPHROTIC SYNDROME AND ACUTE CHEST SYNDROME

    Putta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease is an autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to abnormal hemoglobin. Sickling of RBCs occur due to abnormal hemoglobin which leads to vaso - occlusive crisis. This disease manifests as hemolytic anemia, acute chest syndrome, stroke, ischemic leg ulcers and nephrotic syndrome. This patient presented with hemolytic anemia, nephrotic syndrome and acute chest syndrome. This case was diagnosed by electrophoresis of h emoglobin and peripheral smear. This patient recovered with blood transfusion, antibiotics, steroids, diuretics and oxygen inhalation. Sickle cell patients have a known predisposition to bacterial infection, particularly pneumococcal infection. The most si gnificant advance in the therapy of sickle cell anemia has been the introduction of hydroxyurea, but hydroxyurea should be considered in patients experiencing repeated episodes of acute chest syndrome. But in this patient as this is first episode, hydroxyu rea was not given and he recovered well.

  8. A successfully thrombolysed acute inferior myocardial infarction due to type A aortic dissection with lethal consequences: the importance of early cardiac echocardiography

    Bousoula Eleni

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thrombolysis, a standard therapy for ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI in non-PCI-capable hospitals, may be catastrophic for patients with aortic dissection leading to further expansion, rupture and uncontrolled bleeding. Stanford type A aortic dissection, rarely may mimic myocardial infarction. We report a case of a patient with an inferior STEMI thrombolysed with tenecteplase and followed by clinical and electrocardiographic evidence of successful reperfusion, which was found later to be a lethal acute aortic dissection. Prognostic implications of early diagnosis applying transthoracic echocardiography (TTE are described.

  9. Molecular genetic analysis of individuals with Williams syndrome and supravalvar aortic stenosis

    Smoot, L.B.; Lacro, R.V.; Kunkel, L.M. [Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Pober, B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Mutations at the elastin locus (chromosome 7q11.23) have been demonstrated in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) and familial supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS). Relationships between elastin mutations and vascular and/or neurodevelopmental pathology have yet to be defined. In determining phenotype-genotype correlations in WS/SVAS, we examined 35 individuals with sporadic WS, families with SVAS affecting multiple members, and sporadic cases of isolated obstructive vascular disease. Full length elastin cDNA was used to probe a human genomic library from which multiple elastin genomic clones have been isolated and ordered relative to the elastin gene, covering a minimum of 35 kb. (Additional genomic clones are being obtained by {open_quote}walking{close_quote} 5{prime} and 3{prime} to elastin.) Elastin genomic clones were used as probes in fluorescent in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes from WS/SVAS patients. Preliminary analysis confirms elastin deletions in WS patients, but have not yet been demonstrated in patients with isolated vascular disease using this technique. Results of deletional analysis in individuals representing a wide spectrum of phenotypes will be presented.

  10. Tachyarrhythmias, bradyarrhythmias and acute coronary syndromes

    Trappe Hans-Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of bradyarrhythmias in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS is 0.3% to 18%. It is caused by sinus node dysfunction (SND, high-degree atrioventricular (AV block, or bundle branch blocks. SND presents as sinus bradycardia or sinus arrest. First-degree AV block occurs in 4% to 13% of patients with ACS and is caused by rhythm disturbances in the atrium, AV node, bundle of His, or the Tawara system. First- or second-degree AV block is seen very frequently within 24 h of the beginning of ACS; these arrhythmias are frequently transient and usually disappear after 72 h. Third-degree AV blocks are also frequently transient in patients with infero-posterior myocardial infarction (MI and permanent in anterior MI patients. Left anterior fascicular block occurs in 5% of ACS; left posterior fascicular block is observed less frequently (incidence < 0.5%. Complete bundle branch block is present in 10% to 15% of ACS patients; right bundle branch block is more common (2/3 than left bundle branch block (1/3. In patients with bradyarrhythmia, intravenous (IV atropine (1-3 mg is helpful in 70% to 80% of ACS patients and will lead to an increased heart rate. The need for pacemaker stimulation (PS is different in patients with inferior MI (IMI and anterior MI (AMI. Whereas bradyarrhythmias are frequently transient in patients with IMI and therefore do not need permanent PS, there is usually a need for permanent PS in patients with AMI. In these patients bradyarrhythmias are mainly caused by septal necrosis. In patients with ACS and ventricular arrhythmias (VTA amiodarone is the drug of choice; this drug is highly effective even in patients with defibrillation-resistant out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. There is general agreement that defibrillation and advanced life support is essential and is the treatment of choice for patients with ventricular flutter/fibrillation. If defibrillation is not available in patients with cardiac arrest due to VTA

  11. Transesophageal echocardiographic evaluation of an intraoperative retrograde acute aortic dissection: case report

    Reiter Charles G

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report an intraoperative retrograde dissection of the aorta and its subsequent evaluation by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE. Case presentation A 78 year old woman with an ascending aortic aneurysm without dissection and coronary artery disease was brought to the operating room for aneurysm repair and coronary artery bypass grafting. After initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass through a femoral artery cannula, aortic dissection was noted and subsequently imaged by TEE. Conclusion Retrograde aortic dissection through the femoral artery is life-threatening. Intraoperative TEE can be used to diagnose this uncommon event, and should be considered after initiation of bypass.

  12. Anesthetic Implications of Emergent Cesarean Section in a Parturient with Marfan Syndrome Complicated by Ascending Aortic Aneurysm and Heart Failure

    Young Sung Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular comorbidities to the Marfan syndrome may induce hemodynamic instability especially in the parturients during labor or delivery. For anesthesiologists, it is challenging to maintain hemodynamic stability during Cesarean section in those patients with Marfan syndrome. Remifentanil is an ultra-short-acting opioid with rapid onset and offset of action which provides cardiovascular stability during surgery. Together with remifentanil, the use of a laryngeal mask airway can reduce the risk of hypertensive response followed by tracheal intubation. We describe the successful administration of remifentanil and application of laryngeal mask airway for emergent Cesarean section performed under general anesthesia in a patient with Marfan syndrome complicated by ascending aortic aneurysm and heart failure. The use of remifentanil (loading dose of 1 μg/kg for 1 min, 2 min before induction; thereafter continuous infusion dose of 0.1 μg/kg/min was useful to maintain hemodynamic stability of the parturient throughout the surgery without neonatal respiratory depression.Keywords: Ascending Aortic Aneurysm; Cesarean section; Laryngeal mask airway; Marfan syndrome; Remifentanil

  13. Acute respiratory distress syndrome--two decades later.

    Cunningham, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    Twenty years have now elapsed since Ashbaugh and Petty first described the syndrome of acute respiratory failure associated with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. During the past two decades, significant advances have emerged in our understanding of the clinical conditions associated with the syndrome and the pathophysiological changes affecting the alveolar-capillary membrane responsible for the characteristic non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Recent data have reaffirmed the notion that...

  14. Marfan syndrome with acute abdomen: a case report

    Beyazit Zencirci

    2010-01-01

    Beyazit ZencirciKahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University Medical Faculty, Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation Kahramanmaras, TurkeyIntroduction: Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder characterized by a combination of clinical manifestations in different organ systems. Patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) whose lifetimes are extended may be encountered as acute abdomen (appendicitis) cases apart from the obligatory reasons and emergencies arising naturally out ...

  15. GERSTMANN’S SYNDROME IN ACUTE STROKE PATIENTS

    Zukic, Sanela; Mrkonjic, Zamir; Sinanovic, Osman; Vidovic, Mirjana; Kojic, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Gerstmann in 1924. observed in a few patients a concomitant impairment in discriminating their own fingers, writing by hand, distinguishing left from right and performing calculations. He claimed that this tetrad of symptoms constituted a syndromal entity, assigned it to a lesion of the dominant parietal lobe. Since than, Gerstmann`s syndrome (GS) was enigma for neuropsychologists. The aim of this study was to analyze frequency and clinical features of GS among acute stroke patient...

  16. Cardiac computed tomography in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Currently, cardiac computed tomography (CT) is increasingly being implemented into clinical algorithms, primarily due to substantial technical advances over the last decade. Its use in the setting of suspected acute coronary syndrome is of particular relevance, given the high degree of accumulating scientific evidence of improving patient outcomes. Performing cardiac CT requires specific knowledge on the available scan acquisitions and patient preparation. Also, expertise is required in order to interpret the coronary and extra-coronary findings adequately. The present article provides an overview of the different aspects on the use of cardiac CT in the setting of acute coronary syndrome.

  17. Thrombotic occlusion of the ostial left main coronary artery in a patient with acute coronary syndrome

    Tatli, E.

    2009-01-01

    Ostial left main coronary artery (LMCA) occlusion is rarely seen in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Acute coronary syndrome resulting from an LMCA occlusion is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality rate, if it is managed with fibrinolysis. Electrocardiography can predict LMCA occlusion in patients with acute coronary syndrome. We report a 52-year-old male who presented with acute coronary syndrome and ostial LMCA occlusion. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:295-6.19789699)

  18. Effects of psychiatric disorders on Type A acute aortic dissection pathogenesis and analysis of follow-up results

    Paolo Nardi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: A connection between psychiatric disorders (PDs and Type A acute aortic dissection (AAD has not been shown. The aim of this study was to define the psychological profile of patients treated for AAD, and to analyze the prevalence of PDs in their medical histories, in the immediate postoperative period, and at a mid-term follow-up. Patients and Methods: From March 2005 to October 2014, 240 consecutive patients underwent surgery for AAD. 60 patients (mean age 60+/-13 years; 43 males underwent psychiatric consultation postoperatively, and they represent the subjects of our retrospective study. Ascending aorta +/- arch replacement was performed in 43 patients, whereas the Bentall procedure +/- arch replacement was performed in 17. Data were retrospectively analyzed. Follow-ups were completed in 59 patients (mean duration 35+/-23 months. Results: PDs were present in the medical histories of 34 patients. Postoperatively, in 28 cases, a definitive diagnosis of PD (group PD was made in agreement with the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders-IV criteria, including: Major depression (n=13, anxious-depressive syndrome (n=6, bipolar disorder Type 2 (n=4, panic attacks (n=2, paranoid schizophrenia (n=1, and anxiety (n=2. 32 patients without a definitive psychiatric diagnosis were classified as Group non-PD. In the postoperative period, clinical manifestations of PDs, including delirium, persistent spatio-temporal disorientation, and psychomotor agitation were evident in 22 patients (78% in group PD versus 8 patients (25% in group non-PD (P<0.0001. During follow-up, only one death for non-cardiac reasons occurred in group PD. There were no suicides; only 10 patients of group PD required PD treatment (P<0.0001 vs. early postoperative findings; 4 patients in group non-PD required PD treatment. Conclusion: Our findings suggest a strong relationship between PD and AAD. Because the psychiatric conditions appeared to be largely stable after

  19. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: Pulmonary and extrapulmonary not so similar

    Inderpaul Singh Sehgal; Sahajal Dhooria; Digambar Behera; Ritesh Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by acute onset respiratory failure with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and hypoxemia. Current evidence suggests different respiratory mechanics in pulmonary ARDS (ARDSp) and extrapulmonary ARDS (ARDSexp) with disproportionate decrease in lung compliance in the former and chest wall compliance in the latter. Herein, we report two patients of ARDS, one each with ARDSp and ARDSexp that were managed using real-time esophageal pressure m...

  20. Guillain-Barre Syndrome Presenting as Acute Abdomen

    Faruk incecik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barr and eacute; syndrome (GBS is the most common cause of acute flaccid paralysis in childhood. Symmetric weakness, headache, respiratory symptom, neuropathic pain, muscle pain, paresthesia, and facial palsy were the most common clinical presentations. We report 13-year-old boy with GBS who presented with acute abdominal pain. This is the first report, to our knowledge, first presented of acute abdomen of a pediatric patient with GBS. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 601-603

  1. SYNDROME X IN ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME PATIENTS- A TERTIARY CARE CENTER STUDY

    Yogendra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome (MS or insulin resistance syndrome is commonly defined as a group of risk factors or abnormalities associated with insulin resistance that markedly increased risk for both coronary heart disease and diabetes. Cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, even in the absence of baseline CVD and diabetes. Early identification, treatment and prevention of the metabolic syndrome present a major challenge for health care professionals facing an epidemic of overweight and sedentary lifestyle. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in pts. with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS and its effect on hospital outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS Observational study in 55 cases (28 cases and 27 controls was conducted in Dr. BRAMH, Raipur and each patient was assessed with detailed clinical history and was also assessed for parameters of MS. The cases and controls were also followed up during their hospital stay for the presence of or development of heart failure, arrhythmias, shock and death. Chi square and ‘t’ test were used to analyse obtained data. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS In the present study sex ratio amongst the cases was (M:F 1.15:1 and 2.6:1 in controls. Maximum patients were between the ages of 50-60. Non-ST elevation MI was more common in patients with metabolic syndrome and they presented late to the hospital for treatment. Hypertension and fasting hyperglycemia are the most prevalent components of metabolic syndrome in patients of acute coronary syndrome. Our Study also suggests that hypertriglyceridemia is the most common lipid abnormality in patients of acute coronary syndrome. An increase in the incidence of heart failure was observed in patients with metabolic syndrome Cardiogenic shock is seen with increased frequency in patients with metabolic syndrome. Case fatalities were seen with equal frequency in both the groups, hence metabolic syndrome is not associated with increased case fatality while

  2. Acute Sin Nombre hantavirus infection without pulmonary syndrome, United States.

    Kitsutani, P. T.; Denton, R. W.; Fritz, C. L.; Murray, R. A.; Todd, R. L.; Pape, W. J.; Wyatt Frampton, J.; Young, J C; Khan, A. S.; Peters, C. J.; Ksiazek, T. G.

    1999-01-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) occurs in most infections with Sin Nombre virus and other North American hantaviruses. We report five cases of acute hantavirus infection that did not fit the HPS case definition. The patients had characteristic prodromal symptoms without severe pulmonary involvement. These cases suggest that surveillance for HPS may need to be expanded.

  3. Developing diagnostic guidelines for the acute radiation syndrome

    Diagnostic guidelines seem to be promising for improving medical care. One aspect of a diagnostic guideline for the acute radiation syndrome has been tested against an extensive case history database. Subsequently, the guideline has been optimized for a small set of case histories. The improved performance has been proven by a test against the rest of the case history database

  4. Consensus for the manaegment of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Chinese Medical Association,China Association of C

    2003-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Since recognition of the first case of sever acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Guangdong Province in November 2002,health care worker engaged in basic medicine,clinical medicine and preventive progress in the understanding of the etiology,epidemiology,diagnosis,treatment and prevention of SARS.

  5. Coronary Emboli in a Young Patient with Mechanical Aortic Valve: A Rare Cause of Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Arash Gholoobi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery embolism is an uncommon cause of Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI. Herein, we reported a 24-year-old male who was admitted with acute infero-posterior myocardial infarction and cerebral Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA. He had undergone mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement (AVR surgery 6 years ago. Surprisingly, the patient had decided to stop taking his medication (warfarin 20 days earlier without any medical advice. Coronary angiography revealed a thrombus located at the distal part of the left circumflex artery. Discontinuation of anticoagulant therapy in the presence of mechanical valve prosthesis, clinical evidence of coincidental TIA, and lack of atherosclerotic risk factors were highly suggestive of coronary thromboembolism as the cause of AMI. Overall, this case report emphasized the necessity of continuous education in patients with mechanical heart valves to prevent such undesired events.

  6. Serum biomarkers in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome an ailing prognosticator

    Pneumatikos Ioannis

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of biomarkers in medicine lies in their ability to detect disease and support diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. New research and novel understanding of the molecular basis of the disease reveals an abundance of exciting new biomarkers who present a promise for use in the everyday clinical practice. The past fifteen years have seen the emergence of numerous clinical applications of several new molecules as biologic markers in the research field relevant to acute respiratory distress syndrome (translational research. The scope of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge about serum biomarkers in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome and their potential value as prognostic tools and present some of the future perspectives and challenges.

  7. Acute radiation syndrome caused by accidental radiation exposure - therapeutic principles

    Dörr Harald

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fortunately radiation accidents are infrequent occurrences, but since they have the potential of large scale events like the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima, preparatory planning of the medical management of radiation accident victims is very important. Radiation accidents can result in different types of radiation exposure for which the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, as well as the outcomes, differ. The clinical course of acute radiation syndrome depends on the absorbed radiation dose and its distribution. Multi-organ-involvement and multi-organ-failure need be taken into account. The most vulnerable organ system to radiation exposure is the hematopoietic system. In addition to hematopoietic syndrome, radiation induced damage to the skin plays an important role in diagnostics and the treatment of radiation accident victims. The most important therapeutic principles with special reference to hematopoietic syndrome and cutaneous radiation syndrome are reviewed.

  8. Acute idiopathic blue fingers: a young man with Achenbach's syndrome.

    Takeuchi, Hidemi; Uchida, Haruhito Adam; Okuyama, Yuka; Wada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 20-year-old man presenting with acute painful blue fingers. All physical findings, including an Allen test, were normal, and systematic symptoms frequently seen in collagen diseases were absent. Although we performed a wide variety of investigations including medical imaging, no specific abnormal findings were observed. Skin biopsy pathology was an important reference. The patient's symptoms gradually improved and were completely resolved without specific treatment. Based on the clinical presentation and course, we gave a diagnosis of Achenbach's syndrome, developed in a young male. Achenbach's syndrome is rare, but still may be encountered in clinical practice. The symptoms can be startling to the patient, eliciting fear of something terrible when, in fact, the syndrome is relatively benign and has a good prognosis. Recognising this disease quickly after presentation helps to eliminate the anxiety of the patient, as well as reducing excessively invasive investigations. We present a case report to enlighten Achenbach's syndrome. PMID:27090544

  9. Pneumococcal sepsis presenting as acute compartment syndrome of the lower limbs: a case report

    Doddi Sudeendra; Singhal Tarun; Sinha Prakash

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Acute compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency requiring immediate fasciotomy. Spontaneous onset of acute compartment syndrome of the lower limbs is rare. We present a very rare case of pneumococcal sepsis leading to spontaneous acute compartment syndrome. Case presentation A 40-year-old Caucasian man presented as an emergency with spontaneous onset of pain in both legs and signs of compartment syndrome. This was confirmed on fasciotomy. Blood culture grew Streptococ...

  10. Acute myocardial infarction in young adults with Antiphospholipid syndrome: report of two cases and literature review

    Leila Abid; Faten Frikha; Zouhir Bahloul; Samir Kammoun

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is rarely associated with antiphospholipid syndrome. The treatment of these patients is a clinical challenge. We report the observations of 2 young adults (1 woman and 1 man), admitted in our acute care unit for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A coagulopathy work-up concludes the existence of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in the 2 cases. APS syndrome was considered primary in 2 cases. All patients presented an intense inflammatory syndrome (high...