WorldWideScience

Sample records for activity-dependent vmat-mediated depletion

  1. Activity Dependent Regulation of Inhibitory Circuitry

    Sharma, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition controls information flow through a neural circuit by modulating synaptic integration, restricting action potentials, and coordinating the activity of ensembles of neurons. These functions are mediated by a diverse array of inhibitory neuron subtypes that synapse on defined domains of a postsynaptic neuron. Activity-dependent transcription controls inhibitory synapse number and function, but how this transcription program affects the inhibitory inputs that form on di...

  2. Depleted uranium

    Full text: The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Mohamed ElBaradei, issued today the following statement: The IAEA has been involved in United Nations efforts relating to the impact of the use of depleted uranium (DU) ammunition in Kosovo. It has supported the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) in the assessment which it is making, at the request of the Secretary-General, of that impact. In this connection, in November 2000, Agency experts participated in a UNEP-led fact-finding mission in Kosovo. DU is only slightly radioactive, being about 40% as radioactive as natural uranium. Chemically and physically, DU behaves in the same way as natural uranium. The chemical toxicity is normally the dominant factor for human health. However, it is necessary to carefully assess the impact of DU in the special circumstances in which it was used, e.g. to determine whether it was inhaled or ingested or whether fragments came into close contact with individuals. It is therefore essential, before an authoritative conclusion can be reached, that a detailed survey of the territory in which DU was used and of the people who came in contact with the depleted uranium in any form be carried out. In the meantime it would be prudent, as recommended by the leader of the November UNEP mission, to adopt precautionary measures. Depending on the results of the survey further measures may be necessary. The Agency, within its statutory responsibilities and on the basis of internationally accepted radiation safety standards, will continue to co-operate with other organizations, in particular WHO and UNEP, with a view to carrying out a comprehensive assessment. Co-operation by and additional information from NATO will be prerequisites. The experience gained from such an assessment could be useful for similar studies that may be carried out elsewhere in the Balkans or in the Gulf. (author)

  3. DEPLETED URANIUM TECHNICAL WORK

    The Depleted Uranium Technical Work is designed to convey available information and knowledge about depleted uranium to EPA Remedial Project Managers, On-Scene Coordinators, contractors, and other Agency managers involved with the remediation of sites contaminated with this mater...

  4. MPTP-meditated hippocampal dopamine deprivation modulates synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity

    Parkinson's disease (PD)-like symptoms including learning deficits are inducible by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Therefore, it is possible that MPTP may disturb hippocampal memory processing by modulation of dopamine (DA)- and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. We demonstrate here that intraperitoneal (i.p.) MPTP injection reduces the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) within 7 days. Subsequently, the TH expression level in SN and hippocampus and the amount of DA and its metabolite DOPAC in striatum and hippocampus decrease. DA depletion does not alter basal synaptic transmission and changes pair-pulse facilitation (PPF) of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) only at the 30 ms inter-pulse interval. In addition, the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) is impaired whereas the duration of long-term depression (LTD) becomes prolonged. Since both LTP and LTD depend critically on activation of NMDA and DA receptors, we also tested the effect of DA depletion on NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. Seven days after MPTP injection, the NMDA receptor-mediated fEPSPs are decreased by about 23%. Blocking the NMDA receptor-mediated fEPSP does not mimic the MPTP-LTP. Only co-application of D1/D5 and NMDA receptor antagonists during tetanization resembled the time course of fEPSP potentiation as observed 7 days after i.p. MPTP injection. Together, our data demonstrate that MPTP-induced degeneration of DA neurons and the subsequent hippocampal DA depletion alter NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. - Highlights: → I.p. MPTP-injection mediates death of dopaminergic neurons. → I.p. MPTP-injection depletes DA and DOPAC in striatum and hippocampus. → I.p. MPTP-injection does not alter basal synaptic transmission. → Reduction of LTP and enhancement of LTD after i.p. MPTP-injection. → Attenuation of NMDA-receptors mediated

  5. Depleted Uranium Management

    The paper considers radiological and toxic impact of the depleted uranium on the human health. Radiological influence of depleted uranium is less for 60 % than natural uranium due to the decreasing of short-lived isotopes uranium-234 and uranium-235 after enrichment. The formation of radioactive aerosols and their impact on the human are mentioned. Use of the depleted uranium weapons has also a chemical effect on intake due to possible carcinogenic influence on kidney. Uranium-236 in the substance of the depleted uranium is determined. The fact of beta-radiation formation in the uranium-238 decay is regarded. This effect practically is the same for both depleted and natural uranium. Importance of toxicity of depleted uranium, as the heavier chemical substance, has a considerable contribution to the population health. The paper analyzes risks regarding the use of the depleted uranium weapons. There is international opposition against using weapons with depleted uranium. Resolution on effects of the use of armaments and ammunitions containing depleted uranium was five times supported by the United Nations (USA, United Kingdom, France and Israel did not support). The decision for banning of depleted uranium weapons was supported by the European Parliament

  6. Activity-dependent plasticity of hippocampal place maps.

    Schoenenberger, Philipp; O'Neill, Joseph; Csicsvari, Jozsef

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons encode a cognitive map of space. These maps are thought to be updated during learning and in response to changes in the environment through activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Here we examine how changes in activity influence spatial coding in rats using halorhodopsin-mediated, spatially selective optogenetic silencing. Halorhoposin stimulation leads to light-induced suppression in many place cells and interneurons; some place cells increase their firing through disinhibition, whereas some show no effect. We find that place fields of the unaffected subpopulation remain stable. On the other hand, place fields of suppressed place cells were unstable, showing remapping across sessions before and after optogenetic inhibition. Disinhibited place cells had stable maps but sustained an elevated firing rate. These findings suggest that place representation in the hippocampus is constantly governed by activity-dependent processes, and that disinhibition may provide a mechanism for rate remapping. PMID:27282121

  7. Activity-dependent modulation of neural circuit synaptic connectivity

    Charles R Tessier

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In many nervous systems, the establishment of neural circuits is known to proceed via a two-stage process; 1 early, activity-independent wiring to produce a rough map characterized by excessive synaptic connections, and 2 subsequent, use-dependent pruning to eliminate inappropriate connections and reinforce maintained synapses. In invertebrates, however, evidence of the activity-dependent phase of synaptic refinement has been elusive, and the dogma has long been that invertebrate circuits are “hard-wired” in a purely activity-independent manner. This conclusion has been challenged recently through the use of new transgenic tools employed in the powerful Drosophila system, which have allowed unprecedented temporal control and single neuron imaging resolution. These recent studies reveal that activity-dependent mechanisms are indeed required to refine circuit maps in Drosophila during precise, restricted windows of late-phase development. Such mechanisms of circuit refinement may be key to understanding a number of human neurological diseases, including developmental disorders such as Fragile X syndrome (FXS and autism, which are hypothesized to result from defects in synaptic connectivity and activity-dependent circuit function. This review focuses on our current understanding of activity-dependent synaptic connectivity in Drosophila, primarily through analyzing the role of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP in the Drosophila FXS disease model. The particular emphasis of this review is on the expanding array of new genetically-encoded tools that are allowing cellular events and molecular players to be dissected with ever greater precision and detail.

  8. Activity-dependent modulation of neural circuit synaptic connectivity

    Tessier, Charles R.; Kendal Broadie

    2009-01-01

    In many nervous systems, the establishment of neural circuits is known to proceed via a two-stage process; 1) early, activity-independent wiring to produce a rough map characterized by excessive synaptic connections, and 2) subsequent, use-dependent pruning to eliminate inappropriate connections and reinforce maintained synapses. In invertebrates, however, evidence of the activity-dependent phase of synaptic refinement has been elusive, and the dogma has long been that invertebrate circ...

  9. Activity-dependent neuronal signalling and autism spectrum disorder

    Ebert, Daniel H.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal activity induces the post-translational modification of synaptic molecules, promotes localized protein synthesis within dendrites and activates gene transcription, thereby regulating synaptic function and allowing neuronal circuits to respond dynamically to experience. Evidence indicates that many of the genes that are mutated in autism spectrum disorders are crucial components of the activity-dependent signalling networks that regulate synapse development and plasticity. Dysregulati...

  10. Depleted uranium in Japan

    In Japan, depleted uranium ammunition is regarded as nuclear weapons and meets with fierce opposition. The fact that US Marines mistakenly fired bullets containing depleted uranium on an island off Okinawa during training exercises in December 1995 and January 1996, also contributes. The overall situation in this area in Japan is outlined. (P.A.)

  11. Management of depleted uranium

    Large stocks of depleted uranium have arisen as a result of enrichment operations, especially in the United States and the Russian Federation. Countries with depleted uranium stocks are interested in assessing strategies for the use and management of depleted uranium. The choice of strategy depends on several factors, including government and business policy, alternative uses available, the economic value of the material, regulatory aspects and disposal options, and international market developments in the nuclear fuel cycle. This report presents the results of a depleted uranium study conducted by an expert group organised jointly by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It contains information on current inventories of depleted uranium, potential future arisings, long term management alternatives, peaceful use options and country programmes. In addition, it explores ideas for international collaboration and identifies key issues for governments and policy makers to consider. (authors)

  12. Water Depletion Threatens Agriculture

    Brauman, K. A.; Richter, B. D.; Postel, S.; Floerke, M.; Malsy, M.

    2014-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the human activity that has by far the largest impact on water, constituting 85% of global water consumption and 67% of global water withdrawals. Much of this water use occurs in places where water depletion, the ratio of water consumption to water availability, exceeds 75% for at least one month of the year. Although only 17% of global watershed area experiences depletion at this level or more, nearly 30% of total cropland and 60% of irrigated cropland are found in these depleted watersheds. Staple crops are particularly at risk, with 75% of global irrigated wheat production and 65% of irrigated maize production found in watersheds that are at least seasonally depleted. Of importance to textile production, 75% of cotton production occurs in the same watersheds. For crop production in depleted watersheds, we find that one half to two-thirds of production occurs in watersheds that have not just seasonal but annual water shortages, suggesting that re-distributing water supply over the course of the year cannot be an effective solution to shortage. We explore the degree to which irrigated production in depleted watersheds reflects limitations in supply, a byproduct of the need for irrigation in perennially or seasonally dry landscapes, and identify heavy irrigation consumption that leads to watershed depletion in more humid climates. For watersheds that are not depleted, we evaluate the potential impact of an increase in irrigated production. Finally, we evaluate the benefits of irrigated agriculture in depleted and non-depleted watersheds, quantifying the fraction of irrigated production going to food production, animal feed, and biofuels.

  13. A memristor SPICE model accounting for synaptic activity dependence.

    Qingjiang Li

    Full Text Available In this work, we propose a new memristor SPICE model that accounts for the typical synaptic characteristics that have been previously demonstrated with practical memristive devices. We show that this model could account for both volatile and non-volatile memristance changes under distinct stimuli. We then demonstrate that our model is capable of supporting typical STDP with simple non-overlapping digital pulse pairs. Finally, we investigate the capability of our model to simulate the activity dependence dynamics of synaptic modification and present simulated results that are in excellent agreement with biological results.

  14. Uses of depleted uranium

    The depleted uranium is that in which percentage of uranium-235 fission executable is less than 0.2% or 0.3%. It is usually caused by the process of reprocessing the nuclear fuel burning, and also mixed with some other radioactive elements such as uranium 236, 238 and plutonium 239. The good features of the depleted uranium are its high density, low price and easily mined. So, the specifications for depleted uranium make it one of the best materials in case you need to have objects small in size, but quite heavy regarding its size. Uses of deplet ed uranium were relatively increased in domestic industrial uses as well as some uses in nuclear industry in the last few years. So it has increased uses in many areas of military and peaceful means such as: in balancing the giant air crafts, ships and missiles and in the manufacture of some types of concrete with severe hardness. (author)

  15. Activity-dependent neural plasticity from bench to bedside.

    Ganguly, Karunesh; Poo, Mu-Ming

    2013-10-30

    Much progress has been made in understanding how behavioral experience and neural activity can modify the structure and function of neural circuits during development and in the adult brain. Studies of physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying activity-dependent plasticity in animal models have suggested potential therapeutic approaches for a wide range of brain disorders in humans. Physiological and electrical stimulations as well as plasticity-modifying molecular agents may facilitate functional recovery by selectively enhancing existing neural circuits or promoting the formation of new functional circuits. Here, we review the advances in basic studies of neural plasticity mechanisms in developing and adult nervous systems and current clinical treatments that harness neural plasticity, and we offer perspectives on future development of plasticity-based therapy. PMID:24183023

  16. Activity-dependent neuronal model on complex networks.

    de Arcangelis, Lucilla; Herrmann, Hans J

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches are a novel mode of activity in neuronal networks, experimentally found in vitro and in vivo, and exhibit a robust critical behavior: these avalanches are characterized by a power law distribution for the size and duration, features found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems. We present a recent model inspired in self-organized criticality, which consists of an electrical network with threshold firing, refractory period, and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. The model reproduces the critical behavior of the distribution of avalanche sizes and durations measured experimentally. Moreover, the power spectra of the electrical signal reproduce very robustly the power law behavior found in human electroencephalogram (EEG) spectra. We implement this model on a variety of complex networks, i.e., regular, small-world, and scale-free and verify the robustness of the critical behavior. PMID:22470347

  17. Antarctic ozone depletion

    Antarctic ozone depletion is most severe during the southern hemisphere spring, when the local reduction in the column amount may be as much as 50 percent. The extent to which this ozone poor air contributes to the observed global ozone loss is a matter of debate, but there is some evidence that fragments of the 'ozone hole' can reach lower latitudes following its breakup in summer. Satellite data show the seasonal evolution of the ozone hole. A new dimension has been added to Antarctic ozone depletion with the advent of large volcanic eruptions such as that from Mount Pinatubo in 1991. (author). 5 refs., 1 fig

  18. Shaping inhibition: activity dependent structural plasticity of GABAergic synapses

    Pablo Mendez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory transmission through the neurotransmitter Ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA shapes network activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex by filtering synaptic incoming information and dictating the activity of principal cells. The incredibly diverse population of cortical neurons that use GABA as neurotransmitter shows an equally diverse range of mechanisms that regulate changes in the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission and allow them to dynamically follow and command the activity of neuronal ensembles. Similarly to glutamatergic synaptic transmission, activity-dependent functional changes in inhibitory neurotransmission are accompanied by alterations in GABAergic synapse structure that range from morphological reorganization of postsynaptic density to de novo formation and elimination of inhibitory contacts. Here we review several aspects of structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses, including its induction by different forms of neuronal activity, behavioral and sensory experience and the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. We discuss the functional consequences of GABAergic synapse structural plasticity for information processing and memory formation in view of the heterogenous nature of the structural plasticity phenomena affecting inhibitory synapses impinging on somatic and dendritic compartments of cortical and hippocampal neurons.

  19. Solar activity dependence of nightside aurora in winter conditions

    Zhou, Su; Luan, Xiaoli; Dou, Xiankang

    2016-02-01

    The dependence of the nightside (21:00-03:00 MLT; magnetic local time) auroral energy flux on solar activity was quantitatively studied for winter/dark and geomagnetically quiet conditions. Using data combined from Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics/Global Ultraviolet Imager and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Special Sensor Ultraviolet Spectrographic Imager observations, we separated the effects of geomagnetic activity from those of solar flux on the nightside auroral precipitation. The results showed that the nightside auroral power was reduced by ~42% in solar maximum (F10.7 = 200 sfu; solar flux unit 1 sfu = 10-22 W m-2 Hz-1) with respect to that under solar minimum (F10.7 = 70 sfu) for the Kp = 1 condition, and this change rate became less (~21%) for the Kp = 3 condition. In addition, the solar cycle dependence of nightside auroral power was similar with that from both the premidnight (21:00-23:00 MLT) and postmidnight (01:00-03:00 MLT) sectors. These results indicated that as the ionospheric ionization increases with the enhanced auroral and geomagnetic activities, the solar activity dependences of nightside auroral power become weaker, at least under geomagnetically quiet conditions.

  20. Willpower depletion and framing effects

    de Haan, Thomas; van Veldhuizen, Roel

    2013-01-01

    We investigate whether depleting people's cognitive resources (or willpower) affects the degree to which they are susceptible to framing effects. Recent research in social psychology and economics has suggested that willpower is a resource that can be temporarily depleted and that a depleted level of willpower is associated with self-control problems in a variety of contexts. In this study, we extend the willpower depletion paradigm to framing effects and argue that willpower depletion should...

  1. Depletion of intense fields

    Seipt, D; Marklund, M; Bulanov, S S

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of charged particles and photons with intense electromagnetic fields gives rise to multi-photon Compton and Breit-Wheeler processes. These are usually described in the framework of the external field approximation, where the electromagnetic field is assumed to have infinite energy. However, the multi-photon nature of these processes implies the absorption of a significant number of photons, which scales as the external field amplitude cubed. As a result, the interaction of a highly charged electron bunch with an intense laser pulse can lead to significant depletion of the laser pulse energy, thus rendering the external field approximation invalid. We provide relevant estimates for this depletion and find it to become important in the interaction between fields of amplitude $a_0 \\sim 10^3$ and electron bunches with charges of the order of nC.

  2. Intrinsic Depletion or Not

    Klösgen, Beate; Bruun, Sara; Hansen, Søren;

    in between he polymer cushion and bulk water the layer was attributed to water of reduced density and was called "depletion layer".  Impurities or preparative artefacts were excluded as its origin. Later on, the formation of nanobubbles from this vapour-like water phase was initiated by tipping the......  The presence of a depletion layer of water along extended hydrophobic interfaces, and a possibly related formation of nanobubbles, is an ongoing discussion. The phenomenon was initially reported when we, years ago, chose thick films (~300-400Å) of polystyrene as cushions between a crystalline...... carrier and biomimetic membranes deposited thereupon and exposed to bulk water. While monitoring the sequential build-up of the sandwiched composite structure by continuous neutron reflectivity experiments the formation of an unexpected additional layer was detected (1). Located at the polystyrene surface...

  3. Ozone depletion by hydrofluorocarbons

    Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Fleming, Eric L.; Newman, Paul A.; Li, Feng; Mlawer, Eli; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Bailey, Roshelle

    2015-10-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are projected to increase considerably in the coming decades. Chemistry climate model simulations forced by current projections show that HFCs will impact the global atmosphere increasingly through 2050. As strong radiative forcers, HFCs increase tropospheric and stratospheric temperatures, thereby enhancing ozone-destroying catalytic cycles and modifying the atmospheric circulation. These changes lead to a weak depletion of stratospheric ozone. Simulations with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center 2-D model show that HFC-125 is the most important contributor to HFC-related atmospheric change in 2050; its effects are comparable to the combined impacts of HFC-23, HFC-32, HFC-134a, and HFC-143a. Incorporating the interactions between chemistry, radiation, and dynamics, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) for HFCs range from 0.39 × 10-3 to 30.0 × 10-3, approximately 100 times larger than previous ODP estimates which were based solely on chemical effects.

  4. Capital expenditure and depletion

    In the future, the increase in oil demand will be covered for the most part by non conventional oils, but conventional sources will continue to represent a preponderant share of the world oil supply. Their depletion represents a complex challenge involving technological, economic and political factors. At the same time, there is reason for concern about the decrease in exploration budgets at the major oil companies. (author)

  5. Ozone-depleting Substances (ODS)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This site includes all of the ozone-depleting substances (ODS) recognized by the Montreal Protocol. The data include ozone depletion potentials (ODP), global...

  6. Cellular mechanisms regulating activity-dependent release of native brain-derived neurotrophic factor from hippocampal neurons.

    Balkowiec, Agnieszka; Katz, David M

    2002-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in activity-dependent modifications of neuronal connectivity and synaptic strength, including establishment of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). To shed light on mechanisms underlying BDNF-dependent synaptic plasticity, the present study was undertaken to characterize release of native BDNF from newborn rat hippocampal neurons in response to physiologically relevant patterns of electrical field stimulation in culture, including tonic stimulation at 5 Hz, bursting stimulation at 25 and 100 Hz, and theta-burst stimulation (TBS). Release was measured using the ELISA in situ technique, developed in our laboratory to quantify secretion of native BDNF without the need to first overexpress the protein to nonphysiological levels. Each stimulation protocol resulted in a significant increase in BDNF release that was tetrodotoxin sensitive and occurred in the absence of glutamate receptor activation. However, 100 Hz tetanus and TBS, stimulus patterns that are most effective in inducing hippocampal LTP, were significantly more effective in releasing native BDNF than lower-frequency stimulation. For all stimulation protocols tested, removal of extracellular calcium, or blockade of N-type calcium channels, prevented BDNF release. Similarly, depletion of intracellular calcium stores with thapsigargin and treatment with dantrolene, an inhibitor of calcium release from caffeine-ryanodine-sensitive stores, markedly inhibited activity-dependent BDNF release. Our results indicate that BDNF release can encode temporal features of hippocampal neuronal activity. The dual requirement for calcium influx through N-type calcium channels and calcium mobilization from intracellular stores strongly implicates a role for calcium-induced calcium release in activity-dependent BDNF secretion. PMID:12451139

  7. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process

  8. Stratospheric ozone depletion

    The amount of stratospheric ozone and the reduction of the ozone layer vary according to seasons and latitudes. At present total and vertical ozone is monitored over all Austria. The mean monthly ozone levels between 1994 and 2000 are presented. Data on stratospheric ozone and UV-B radiation are published daily on the home page http: www.lebesministerium.at. The use of ozone depleting substances such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) is provided. Besides, the national measures taken to reduce their use. Figs. 2, Tables 2. (nevyjel)

  9. Depleted uranium: Metabolic disruptor?

    The presence of uranium in the environment can lead to long-term contamination of the food chain and of water intended for human consumption and thus raises many questions about the scientific and societal consequences of this exposure on population health. Although the biological effects of chronic low-level exposure are poorly understood, results of various recent studies show that contamination by depleted uranium (DU) induces subtle but significant biological effects at the molecular level in organs including the brain, liver, kidneys and testicles. For the first time, it has been demonstrated that DU induces effects on several metabolic pathways, including those metabolizing vitamin D, cholesterol, steroid hormones, acetylcholine and xenobiotics. This evidence strongly suggests that DU might well interfere with many metabolic pathways. It might thus contribute, together with other man-made substances in the environment, to increased health risks in some regions. (authors)

  10. Riddle of depleted uranium

    Depleted Uranium (DU) is the waste product of uranium enrichment from the manufacturing of fuel rods for nuclear reactors in nuclear power plants and nuclear power ships. DU may also results from the reprocessing of spent nuclear reactor fuel. Potentially DU has both chemical and radiological toxicity with two important targets organs being the kidney and the lungs. DU is made into a metal and, due to its availability, low price, high specific weight, density and melting point as well as its pyrophoricity; it has a wide range of civilian and military applications. Due to the use of DU over the recent years, there appeared in some press on health hazards that are alleged to be due to DU. In these paper properties, applications, potential environmental and health effects of DU are briefly reviewed

  11. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    Wayne Briner

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a c...

  12. Depleted zinc: Properties, application, production

    The addition of ZnO, depleted in the Zn-64 isotope, to the water of boiling water nuclear reactors lessens the accumulation of Co-60 on the reactor interior surfaces, reduces radioactive wastes and increases the reactor service-life because of the inhibitory action of zinc on inter-granular stress corrosion cracking. To the same effect depleted zinc in the form of acetate dihydrate is used in pressurized water reactors. Gas centrifuge isotope separation method is applied for production of depleted zinc on the industrial scale. More than 20 years of depleted zinc application history demonstrates its benefits for reduction of NPP personnel radiation exposure and combating construction materials corrosion.

  13. Depletable resources and the economy.

    Heijman, W.J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the depletion of scarce resources. The main question to be answered is how to avoid future resource crises. After dealing with the complex relation between nature and economics, three important concepts in relation with resource depletion are discussed: steady state, ti

  14. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    Wayne Briner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Depleted uranium (DU is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a clear and defined set of symptoms. Chronic low-dose, or subacute, exposure to depleted uranium alters the appearance of milestones in developing organisms. Adult animals that were exposed to depleted uranium during development display persistent alterations in behavior, even after cessation of depleted uranium exposure. Adult animals exposed to depleted uranium demonstrate altered behaviors and a variety of alterations to brain chemistry. Despite its reduced level of radioactivity evidence continues to accumulate that depleted uranium, if ingested, may pose a radiologic hazard. The current state of knowledge concerning DU is discussed.

  15. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  16. Testing fully depleted CCD

    Casas, Ricard; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castander, Francisco J.; Jiménez, Jorge; de Vicente, Juan

    2014-08-01

    The focal plane of the PAU camera is composed of eighteen 2K x 4K CCDs. These devices, plus four spares, were provided by the Japanese company Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. with type no. S10892-04(X). These detectors are 200 μm thick fully depleted and back illuminated with an n-type silicon base. They have been built with a specific coating to be sensitive in the range from 300 to 1,100 nm. Their square pixel size is 15 μm. The read-out system consists of a Monsoon controller (NOAO) and the panVIEW software package. The deafualt CCD read-out speed is 133 kpixel/s. This is the value used in the calibration process. Before installing these devices in the camera focal plane, they were characterized using the facilities of the ICE (CSIC- IEEC) and IFAE in the UAB Campus in Bellaterra (Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain). The basic tests performed for all CCDs were to obtain the photon transfer curve (PTC), the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) using X-rays and the EPER method, linearity, read-out noise, dark current, persistence, cosmetics and quantum efficiency. The X-rays images were also used for the analysis of the charge diffusion for different substrate voltages (VSUB). Regarding the cosmetics, and in addition to white and dark pixels, some patterns were also found. The first one, which appears in all devices, is the presence of half circles in the external edges. The origin of this pattern can be related to the assembly process. A second one appears in the dark images, and shows bright arcs connecting corners along the vertical axis of the CCD. This feature appears in all CCDs exactly in the same position so our guess is that the pattern is due to electrical fields. Finally, and just in two devices, there is a spot with wavelength dependence whose origin could be the result of a defectous coating process.

  17. Impaired activity-dependent neural circuit assembly and refinement in autism spectrum disorder genetic models

    Caleb Andrew Doll; Kendal eBroadie

    2014-01-01

    Early-use activity during circuit-specific critical periods refines brain circuitry by the coupled processes of eliminating inappropriate synapses and strengthening maintained synapses. We theorize these activity-dependent developmental processes are specifically impaired in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). ASD genetic models in both mouse and Drosophila have pioneered our insights into normal activity-dependent neural circuit assembly and consolidation, and how these developmental mechanism...

  18. Depletable resources and the economy.

    Heijman, W. J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the depletion of scarce resources. The main question to be answered is how to avoid future resource crises. After dealing with the complex relation between nature and economics, three important concepts in relation with resource depletion are discussed: steady state, time preference and efficiency.For the steady state, three variants are distinguished; the stationary state, the physical steady state and the state of steady growth. It is concluded that the so-call...

  19. Activity-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression regulates cortistatin-interneurons and sleep behavior

    Martinowich Keri

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep homeostasis is characterized by a positive correlation between sleep length and intensity with the duration of the prior waking period. A causal role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in sleep homeostasis has been suggested, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Cortistatin, a neuropeptide expressed primarily in a subset of cortical GABAergic interneurons, is another molecule implicated in sleep homeostasis. Results We confirmed that sleep deprivation leads to an increase in cortical cortistatin mRNA expression. Disruption of activity-dependent BDNF expression in a genetically modified mouse line impairs both baseline levels of cortistatin mRNA as well as its levels following sleep deprivation. Disruption of activity-dependent BDNF also leads to a decrease in sleep time during the active (dark phase. Conclusion Our studies suggest that regulation of cortistatin-expressing interneurons by activity-dependent BDNF expression may contribute to regulation of sleep behavior.

  20. Definition of a Bidirectional Activity-Dependent Pathway Involving BDNF and Narp

    Abigail Mariga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the cardinal features of neural development and adult plasticity is the contribution of activity-dependent signaling pathways. However, the interrelationships between different activity-dependent genes are not well understood. The immediate early gene neuronal-activity-regulated pentraxin (NPTX2 or Narp encodes a protein that has been associated with excitatory synaptogenesis, AMPA receptor aggregation, and the onset of critical periods. Here, we show that Narp is a direct transcriptional target of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, another highly regulated activity-dependent gene involved in synaptic plasticity. Unexpectedly, Narp is bidirectionally regulated by BDNF. Acute BDNF withdrawal results in downregulation of Narp, whereas transcription of Narp is greatly enhanced by BDNF. Furthermore, our results show that BDNF directly regulates Narp to mediate glutamatergic transmission and mossy fiber plasticity. Hence, Narp serves as a significant epistatic target of BDNF to regulate synaptic plasticity during periods of dynamic activity.

  1. Impaired activity-dependent neural circuit assembly and refinement in autism spectrum disorder genetic models

    Caleb Andrew Doll

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Early-use activity during circuit-specific critical periods refines brain circuitry by the coupled processes of eliminating inappropriate synapses and strengthening maintained synapses. We theorize these activity-dependent developmental processes are specifically impaired in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. ASD genetic models in both mouse and Drosophila have pioneered our insights into normal activity-dependent neural circuit assembly and consolidation, and how these developmental mechanisms go awry in specific genetic conditions. The monogenic Fragile X syndrome (FXS, a common cause of heritable ASD and intellectual disability, has been particularly well linked to defects in activity-dependent critical period processes. The Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP is positively activity-regulated in expression and function, in turn regulates excitability and activity in a negative feedback loop, and appears to be required for the activity-dependent remodeling of synaptic connectivity during early-use critical periods. The Drosophila FXS model has been shown to functionally conserve the roles of human FMRP in synaptogenesis, and has been centrally important in generating our current mechanistic understanding of the FXS disease state. Recent advances in Drosophila optogenetics, transgenic calcium reporters, highly-targeted transgenic drivers for individually-identified neurons, and a vastly improved connectome of the brain are now being combined to provide unparalleled opportunities to both manipulate and monitor activity-dependent processes during critical period brain development in defined neural circuits. The field is now poised to exploit this new Drosophila transgenic toolbox for the systematic dissection of activity-dependent mechanisms in normal versus ASD brain development, particularly utilizing the well-established Drosophila FXS disease model.

  2. Nonlinear lower hybrid wave depletion

    Two numerical ray tracing codes with focusing are used to compute lower hybrid daughter wave amplification by quasi-mode parametric decay. The first code, LHPUMP provides a numerical pump model on a grid. This model is used by a second code, LHFQM which computes daughter wave amplification inside the pump extent and follows the rays until their energy is absorbed by the plasma. An analytic model is then used to estimate pump depletion based on the numerical results. Results for PLT indicate strong pump depletion at the plasma edge at high density operation for the 800 Mhz wave frequency, but weak depletion for the 2.45 Ghz experiment. This is proposed to be the mechanism responsible for the high density limit for current drive as well as for the difficulty to heat ions

  3. DOPAMINE DEPLETION SLOWS RETINAL TRANSMISSION

    In male hooded rats, depletion of norepinephrine and dopamine by a-methyl-paratyrosine (AMT) significantly increased the latencies of early peaks in flash-evoked potentials recorded from the visual cortex, lateral geniculate nucleus, and optic tract. These effects were not produc...

  4. DREAM controls the on/off switch of specific activity-dependent transcription pathways.

    Mellström, Britt; Sahún, Ignasi; Ruiz-Nuño, Ana; Murtra, Patricia; Gomez-Villafuertes, Rosa; Savignac, Magali; Oliveros, Juan C; Gonzalez, Paz; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Knafo, Shira; Zhuo, Min; Higuera-Matas, Alejandro; Errington, Michael L; Maldonado, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier; Jefferys, John G R; Bliss, Tim V P; Dierssen, Mara; Naranjo, Jose R

    2014-03-01

    Changes in nuclear Ca(2+) homeostasis activate specific gene expression programs and are central to the acquisition and storage of information in the brain. DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator), also known as calsenilin/KChIP-3 (K(+) channel interacting protein 3), is a Ca(2+)-binding protein that binds DNA and represses transcription in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. To study the function of DREAM in the brain, we used transgenic mice expressing a Ca(2+)-insensitive/CREB-independent dominant active mutant DREAM (daDREAM). Using genome-wide analysis, we show that DREAM regulates the expression of specific activity-dependent transcription factors in the hippocampus, including Npas4, Nr4a1, Mef2c, JunB, and c-Fos. Furthermore, DREAM regulates its own expression, establishing an autoinhibitory feedback loop to terminate activity-dependent transcription. Ablation of DREAM does not modify activity-dependent transcription because of gene compensation by the other KChIP family members. The expression of daDREAM in the forebrain resulted in a complex phenotype characterized by loss of recurrent inhibition and enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP) in the dentate gyrus and impaired learning and memory. Our results indicate that DREAM is a major master switch transcription factor that regulates the on/off status of specific activity-dependent gene expression programs that control synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. PMID:24366545

  5. Civil use of depleted uranium

    In this paper the civilian exploitation of depleted uranium is briefly reviewed. Different scenarios relevant to its use are discussed in terms of radiation exposure for workers and the general public. The case of the aircraft accident which occurred in Amsterdam in 1992 involving a fire, is discussed in terms of the radiological exposure to bystanders. All information given has been obtained on the basis of an extensive literature search and are not based on measurements performed at the Institute for Transuranium Elements

  6. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    Gehrels, N; Jackman, C H; Cannizzo, J K; Mattson, B J; Chen, W; Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan

    2003-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time, improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma-ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma-rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion roughly to double the ``biologically active'' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova mu...

  7. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  8. Expression of activity-dependent neuroprotective protein in the brain of adult rats

    Gennet, N.; Herden, C.; Bubb, V J; Quinn, J P; Kipar, A.

    2008-01-01

    Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) is a VIP-regulated gene, which is essential for brain development. A synthetic peptide (NAP) derived from the ADNP sequence is highly neuroprotective, therefore it has been hypothesised that ADNP has a similar role. ADNP contains classical transcription factor motifs and nuclear localisation domains, but it has also been reported to be secreted and to co-localise with microtubules, indicating that ADNP may have multiple...

  9. Robustness and Enhancement of Neural Synchronization by Activity-Dependent Coupling

    Zhigulin, Valentin P.; Mikhail I. Rabinovich; Huerta, Ramon; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    2002-01-01

    We study the synchronization of two model neurons coupled through a synapse having an activity-dependent strength. Our synapse follows the rules of Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP). We show that this plasticity of the coupling between neurons produces enlarged frequency locking zones and results in synchronization that is more rapid and much more robust against noise than classical synchronization arising from connections with constant strength. We also present a simple discrete map m...

  10. The Development and Activity-Dependent Expression of Aggrecan in the Cat Visual Cortex

    Kind, P. C.; Sengpiel, F.; Beaver, C. J.; Crocker-Buque, A.; Kelly, G. M.; R. T. Matthews; Mitchell, D E

    2012-01-01

    The Cat-301 monoclonal antibody identifies aggrecan, a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in the cat visual cortex and dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). During development, aggrecan expression increases in the dLGN with a time course that matches the decline in plasticity. Moreover, examination of tissue from selectively visually deprived cats shows that expression is activity dependent, suggesting a role for aggrecan in the termination of the sensitive period. Here, we demonstrate for ...

  11. Robustness and Enhancement of Neural Synchronization by Activity-Dependent Coupling

    Zhigulin, V P; Huerta, R; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Zhigulin, Valentin P.; Rabinovich, Mikhail I.; Huerta, Ramon; Abarbanel, Henry D I

    2003-01-01

    We study the synchronization of two model neurons coupled through a synapse having an activity-dependent strength. Our synapse follows the rules of Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP). We show that this plasticity of the coupling between neurons produces enlarged frequency locking zones and results in synchronization that is more rapid and much more robust against noise than classical synchronization arising from connections with constant strength. We also present a simple discrete map model that demonstrates the generality of the phenomenon.

  12. Activity-dependent targeting of TRPV1 with a pore-permeating capsaicin analog

    Hui LI; Wang, Shu; Chuang, Alexander Y.; Cohen, Bruce E.; Chuang, Huai-hu

    2011-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 is the principal transduction channel for nociception. Excessive TRPV1 activation causes pathological pain. Ideal pain mangement requires selective inhibition of hyperactive pain-sensing neurons, but sparing normal nociception. We sought to determine whether it is possible to use activity-dependent TRPV1 agonists to identify nerves with excessive TRPV1 activity, as well as exploit the TRPV1 pore to deliver charged anesthetics for neuronal silencing. We synthesized...

  13. The activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 regulates domain-specific inhibition

    Bloodgood, Brenda L.; Sharma, Nikhil; Browne, Heidi Adlman; Trepman, Alissa Z.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    A heterogeneous population of inhibitory neurons controls the flow of information through a neural circuit1–3. Inhibitory synapses that form on pyramidal neuron dendrites modulate the summation of excitatory synaptic potentials4–6 and prevent the generation of dendritic calcium spikes7,8. Precisely timed somatic inhibition limits both the number of action potentials and the time window during which firing can occur8,9. The activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 regulates inhibitory syn...

  14. Issues in Stratospheric Ozone Depletion.

    Lloyd, Steven Andrew

    Following the announcement of the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985 there have arisen a multitude of questions pertaining to the nature and consequences of polar ozone depletion. This thesis addresses several of these specific questions, using both computer models of chemical kinetics and the Earth's radiation field as well as laboratory kinetic experiments. A coupled chemical kinetic-radiative numerical model was developed to assist in the analysis of in situ field measurements of several radical and neutral species in the polar and mid-latitude lower stratosphere. Modeling was used in the analysis of enhanced polar ClO, mid-latitude diurnal variation of ClO, and simultaneous measurements of OH, HO_2, H_2 O and O_3. Most importantly, such modeling was instrumental in establishing the link between the observed ClO and BrO concentrations in the Antarctic polar vortex and the observed rate of ozone depletion. The principal medical concern of stratospheric ozone depletion is that ozone loss will lead to the enhancement of ground-level UV-B radiation. Global ozone climatology (40^circS to 50^ circN latitude) was incorporated into a radiation field model to calculate the biologically accumulated dosage (BAD) of UV-B radiation, integrated over days, months, and years. The slope of the annual BAD as a function of latitude was found to correspond to epidemiological data for non-melanoma skin cancers for 30^circ -50^circN. Various ozone loss scenarios were investigated. It was found that a small ozone loss in the tropics can provide as much additional biologically effective UV-B as a much larger ozone loss at higher latitudes. Also, for ozone depletions of > 5%, the BAD of UV-B increases exponentially with decreasing ozone levels. An important key player in determining whether polar ozone depletion can propagate into the populated mid-latitudes is chlorine nitrate, ClONO_2 . As yet this molecule is only indirectly accounted for in computer models and field

  15. The Case of Ozone Depletion

    Lambright, W. Henry

    2005-01-01

    While the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is widely perceived as a space agency, since its inception NASA has had a mission dedicated to the home planet. Initially, this mission involved using space to better observe and predict weather and to enable worldwide communication. Meteorological and communication satellites showed the value of space for earthly endeavors in the 1960s. In 1972, NASA launched Landsat, and the era of earth-resource monitoring began. At the same time, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the environmental movement swept throughout the United States and most industrialized countries. The first Earth Day event took place in 1970, and the government generally began to pay much more attention to issues of environmental quality. Mitigating pollution became an overriding objective for many agencies. NASA's existing mission to observe planet Earth was augmented in these years and directed more toward environmental quality. In the 1980s, NASA sought to plan and establish a new environmental effort that eventuated in the 1990s with the Earth Observing System (EOS). The Agency was able to make its initial mark via atmospheric monitoring, specifically ozone depletion. An important policy stimulus in many respects, ozone depletion spawned the Montreal Protocol of 1987 (the most significant international environmental treaty then in existence). It also was an issue critical to NASA's history that served as a bridge linking NASA's weather and land-resource satellites to NASA s concern for the global changes affecting the home planet. Significantly, as a global environmental problem, ozone depletion underscored the importance of NASA's ability to observe Earth from space. Moreover, the NASA management team's ability to apply large-scale research efforts and mobilize the talents of other agencies and the private sector illuminated its role as a lead agency capable of crossing organizational boundaries as well as the science-policy divide.

  16. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  17. "When the going gets tough, who keeps going?" : Depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect

    Salmon, Stefanie J.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; De Vet, Emely; Fennis, Bob M.; De Ridder, Denise T. D.

    2014-01-01

    Self-control relies on a limited resource that can get depleted, a phenomenon that has been labeled ego-depletion. We argue that individuals may differ in their sensitivity to depleting tasks, and that consequently some people deplete their self-control resource at a faster rate than others. In thre

  18. Biomedical consequences of ozone depletion

    Coohill, Thomas P.

    1994-07-01

    It is widely agreed that a portion of the earth's protective stratospheric ozone layer is being depleted. The major effect of this ozone loss will be an increase in the amount of ultraviolet radiation (UV reaching the biosphere. This increase will be completely contained within the UVB (290nm - 320nm). It is imperative that assessments be made of the effects of this additional UVB on living organisms. This requires a detailed knowledge of the UVB photobiology of these life forms. One analytical technique to aid in the approximations is the construction of UV action spectra for such important biological end-points as human skin cancer, cataracts, immune suppression; plant photosynthesis and crop yields; and aquatic organism responses to UVB, especially the phytoplankton. Combining these action spectra with the known solar spectrum (and estimates for various ozone depletion scenarios) can give rise to a series of effectiveness spectra for these parameters. This manuscript gives a first approximation, rough estimate, for the effectiveness spectra for some of these bioresponses, and a series of crude temporary values for how a 10% ozone loss would affect the above end-points. These are not intended to masquerade as final answers, but rather, to serve as beginning attempts for a process which should be continually refined. It is hoped that these estimates will be of some limited use to agencies, such as government and industry, that have to plan now for changes in human activities that might alter future atmospheric chemistry in a beneficial manner.

  19. Early survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium enhances activity-dependent survival

    Adrien eFrançois

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The neuronal olfactory epithelium undergoes permanent renewal because of environmental aggression. This renewal is partly regulated by factors modulating the level of neuronal apoptosis. Among them, we had previously characterized endothelin as neuroprotective. In this study, we explored the effect of cell survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium by intranasal delivery of endothelin receptors antagonists to rat pups. This treatment induced an overall increase of apoptosis in the olfactory epithelium. The responses to odorants recorded by electroolfactogram were decreased in treated animal, a result consistent with a loss of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs. However, the treated animal performed better in an olfactory orientation test based on maternal odor compared to non-treated littermates. This improved performance could be due to activity-dependent neuronal survival of OSNs in the context of increased apoptosis level. In order to demonstrate it, we odorized pups with octanal, a known ligand for the rI7 olfactory receptor (Olr226. We quantified the number of OSN expressing rI7 by RT-qPCR and whole mount in situ hybridization. While this number was reduced by the survival factor removal treatment, this reduction was abolished by the presence of its ligand. This improved survival was optimal for low concentration of odorant and was specific for rI7-expressing OSNs. Meanwhile, the number of rI7-expressing OSNs was not affected by the odorization in non-treated littermates; showing that the activity-dependant survival of OSNs did not affect the OSN population during the 10 days of odorization in control conditions. Overall, our study shows that when apoptosis is promoted in the olfactory mucosa, the activity-dependent neuronal plasticity allows faster tuning of the olfactory sensory neuron population towards detection of environmental odorants.

  20. The 1988 Antarctic ozone depletion - Comparison with previous year depletions

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Krueger, Arlin J.

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 spring Antarctic ozone depletion was observed by TOMS to be substantially smaller than in recent years. The minimum polar total ozone values declined only 15 percent during September 1988, compared to nearly 50 percent during September 1987. At southern midlatitudes, exceptionally high total ozone values were recorded beginning in July 1988. The total integrated southern hemispheric ozone increased rapidly during the Austral spring, approaching 1980 levels during October. The high midlatitude total ozone values were associated with a substantial increase in eddy activity as indicated by the standard deviation in total ozone in the zonal band 30-60 deg S. Mechanisms through which the increased midlatitude eddy activity could disrupt the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole are briefly discussed.

  1. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however 39Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in 39Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO2 well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO2. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N2, and He mixture, from the CO2 through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N2 and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO2 facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  2. Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ''waste,'' but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity

  3. Depleted uranium. Nuclear related problems

    Depleted uranium (DU) has found a military application in Golf War, in Bosnia and in Yugoslavia (Kosovo). In military sense it was very efficient. But the fact that some parts of that ammunition are manufactured from depleted uranium, low level radioactive waste, implies other aspects of this application like radiological, ecological, jurist, ethical and psychological. The subject of this paper is just physical aspect. There are several problems concerning this aspect: production of DU, total amount of DU in the world, 235U/238U relation, radioactivity of DU, measurements, and presence of other radionuclides like plutonium. DU is by product of nuclear technology and represents low-level nuclear waste. Therefore it should be stored. Total amount of DU in the world is about one million tons with an annual increase of 30 000 t. The content of 235U in DU can vary in the range 0.16-0.3%. The total radioactivity of DU is a consequence of 7 radionuclides and amounts 39.42 Bq/mg. This include alpha, beta and gamma radioactivity. Because of characteristics of this radioactivity it is difficult to prospect the terrain except at the site of action. During the impact of DU rods four types of DU particles could be produced: whole penetrators, penetrator parts, big aerosols (>10 μm) and small aerosols (<10 μm). Most of these particles fall locally, although some of them could be find several tens of kilometers away. All these problems have been discussed in this paper. (author)

  4. SRP scientific meeting: depleted uranium

    The meeting was organised by the SRP to review current research and discuss the use, dispersion into the environment and radiological impact of depleted uranium (DU) by the UK and US in recent military conflicts. In addition to other presentations, there were two short presentations by T Cabianca and P Danesi of the IAEA concerning investigations into the DU legacy in Kuwait and the IAEA contribution to environmental contamination assessments of DU in Kosovo. In Kuwait the on-going study is limited to an assessment of the potential radiological consequences of DU residues in three types of site: open desert where DU was fired, farmland where DU was fired and DU storage facilities. The Kuwaiti government has also requested the IAEA to formulate a structured approach to deal with remediating such sites and disposing of the resulting material. In Kosovo the study investigated sand and soil samples from areas where DU had been fired. DU particulates were found in sizes up to 40 μm, but generally much smaller, typically about 5 μm, with 5% less than 1.5 μm in size. These particles were found to contain 90% DU and 1% Ti. Plutonium was also detected, but this was attributed to the 1960s bomb testing programme. This was an informative, well attended meeting that stimulated varied debate between delegates. It revealed that there is still much to learn concerning the effects of depleted uranium in the human body and highlighted the limitations of conventional dose estimates made using ICRP models. A balance must be struck between the operational requirements of the armed forces and acceptable levels of environmental contamination arising from any conflict they are involved in. Most importantly, as a scientific consensus is developed, a clear and consistent approach to providing key information to the public should be adopted, to build confidence in the radiation protection profession

  5. Repulsive depletion interactions in colloid polymer mixtures

    Rudhardt, Daniel; Bechinger, Clemens; Leiderer, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Depletion forces in colloidal systems are known to be entirely attractive, as long as the background of macromolecules is small enough that an ideal gas approach is valid. At higher densities, however, structural correlation effects of the macromolecules which lead to additional repulsive parts in the depletion interaction, have to be taken into account. We have measured the depletion interaction between a single polystyrene sphere and a wall in the presence of non-ionic polymer coils. Althou...

  6. Clodronate treatment significantly depletes macrophages in chickens

    Kameka, Amber M.; Haddadi, Siamak; Jamaldeen, Fathima Jesreen; Moinul, Prima; He, Xiao T.; Nawazdeen, Fathima Hafsa P.; Bonfield, Stephan; Sharif, Shayan; van Rooijen, Nico; Abdul-Careem, Mohamed Faizal

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages function as phagocytes and antigen-presenting cells in the body. As has been demonstrated in mammals, administration of clodronate [dichloromethylene bisphosphonate (Cl2MBP)] encapsulated liposomes results in depletion of macrophages. Although this compound has been used in chickens, its effectiveness in depleting macrophages has yet to be fully determined. Here, we show that a single administration of clodronate liposomes to chickens results in a significant depletion of macropha...

  7. Activity-dependent regulation of calcium and ribosomes in the chick cochlear nucleus.

    Call, C L; Hyson, R L

    2016-03-01

    Cochlea removal results in the death of 20-30% of neurons in the chick cochlear nucleus, nucleus magnocellularis (NM). Two potentially cytotoxic events, a dramatic rise in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and a decline in the integrity of ribosomes are observed within 1h of deafferentation. Glutamatergic input from the auditory nerve has been shown to preserve NM neuron health by activating metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), maintaining both normal [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomal integrity. One interpretation of these results is that a common mGluR-activated signaling cascade is required for the maintenance of both [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomal integrity. This could happen if both responses are influenced directly by a common messenger, or if the loss of mGluR activation causes changes in one component that secondarily causes changes in the other. The present studies tested this common-mediator hypothesis in slice preparations by examining activity-dependent regulation of [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomes in the same tissue after selectively blocking group I mGluRs (1-Aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA)) or group II mGluRs (LY 341495) during unilateral auditory nerve stimulation. Changes in [Ca(2+)]i of NM neurons were measured using fura-2 ratiometric calcium imaging and the tissue was subsequently processed for Y10B immunoreactivity (Y10B-ir), an antibody that recognizes a ribosomal epitope. The group I mGluR antagonist blocked the activity-dependent regulation of both [Ca(2+)]i and Y10B-ir, but the group II antagonist blocked only the activity-dependent regulation of Y10B-ir. That is, even when group II receptors were blocked, stimulation continued to maintain low [Ca(2+)]i, but it did not maintain Y10B-ir. These results suggest a dissociation in how calcium and ribosomes are regulated in NM neurons and that ribosomes can be regulated through a mechanism that is independent of calcium regulation. PMID:26739326

  8. Assessment of the depletion capability in MPACT

    The objective of the paper is to develop and demonstrate the depletion capability with pin resolved transport using the MPACT code. The first section of the paper provides a description of the depletion methodology and the algorithm used to solve the depletion equations in MPACT. A separate depletion library for MPACT is used based on the ORIGEN-S library to provide the basic decay constants and fission yields, as well as the 3-group cross-sections which are used for the isotopes not contained in the MPACT multi-group library. The cross sections for the depletion transmutation matrix were collapsed using the transport flux solution in MPACT based on either the 47 group HELIOS library based on ENDF-VI or a 56 group ORNL library based on ENDF-VII. The second section of this paper then describes the numerical verification of the depletion algorithm using two sets of benchmarks. The first is the JAERI LWR lattice benchmark which had participants from most of the lattice depletion codes currently used in the international nuclear community and the second benchmark is based on data from spent fuel of the Takahama-3 reactor. The results show that MPACT is generally in good agreement with the results of the other benchmark participants as well as the experimental data. Finally, a full core 2D model of CASL AMA benchmark was depleted based on the central plane of the Watts Bar reactor core which demonstrates the whole core depletion capability of MPACT. (author)

  9. Ozone depletion potentials of halocarbons

    The concept of ozone depletion potential (ODP) is widely used in the evaluation of numerous halocarbons and of their replacements for effects on ozone, but the methods, model assumptions and conditions of ODP calculation have not been analyzed adequately. In this paper, a model study of effects on ozone after the instantaneous releases of various amounts of CH3CCl3 and of CHF2Cl(HCFC-22) in the several conditions of the background atmosphere are presented, aimed to understand the main connections of ODP values with the methods of their calculations. To facilitate the ODP computation in numerous versions for long after the releases, the above rather short-lived gases have been used. The variation of released gas global mass from 1 Mt to 1 Gt leads to ODP value increase atmosphere. The same variations are analyzed for the CFC-free atmosphere of 1960s conditions for the anthropogenically loaded atmosphere in the 21st century according to the known IPCC- A scenario (business as usual). Recommendations of proper ways of ODP calculations are proposed for practically important cases

  10. Beneficial Uses of Depleted Uranium

    Naturally occurring uranium contains 0.71 wt% 235U. In order for the uranium to be useful in most fission reactors, it must be enriched the concentration of the fissile isotope 235U must be increased. Depleted uranium (DU) is a co-product of the processing of natural uranium to produce enriched uranium, and DU has a 235U concentration of less than 0.71 wt%. In the United States, essentially all of the DU inventory is in the chemical form of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and is stored in large cylinders above ground. If this co-product material were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and disposed, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. Only small amounts of DU have at this time been beneficially reused. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large-scale uses of DU and encourage its reuse for the primary purpose of potentially reducing the cost and expediting the disposition of the DU inventory. This paper discusses the inventory of DU and its rate of increase; DU disposition options; beneficial use options; a preliminary cost analysis; and major technical, institutional, and regulatory issues to be resolved

  11. Plutonium in depleted uranium penetrators

    Depleted Uranium (DU) penetrators used in the recent Balkan conflicts have been found to be contaminated with trace amounts of transuranic materials such as plutonium. This contamination is usually a consequence of DU fabrication being carried out in facilities also using uranium recycled from spent military and civilian nuclear reactor fuel. Specific activities of 239+240 Plutonium generally in the range 1 to 12 Bq/kg have been found to be present in DU penetrators recovered from the attack sites of the 1999 NATO bombardment of Kosovo. A DU penetrator recovered from a May 1999 attack site at Bratoselce in southern Serbia and analysed by University College Dublin was found to contain 43.7 +/- 1.9 Bq/kg of 239+240 Plutonium. This analysis is described. An account is also given of the general population radiation dose implications arising from both the DU itself and from the presence of plutonium in the penetrators. According to current dosimetric models, in all scenarios considered likely ,the dose from the plutonium is estimated to be much smaller than that due to the uranium isotopes present in the penetrators. (author)

  12. Tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium

    Heung, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    A tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium was tested in the laboratory using deuterium and protium. The vessel contains 0.5 kg of depleted uranium and can hold up to 18 grams of tritium. The conditions for activation, tritium loading and tritium unloading were defined. The safety aspects that included air-ingress, tritium diffusion, temperature and pressure potentials were evaluated.

  13. The Chemistry and Toxicology of Depleted Uranium

    Sidney A. Katz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural uranium is comprised of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Depleted uranium (DU is a byproduct of the processes for the enrichment of the naturally occurring 235U isotope. The world wide stock pile contains some 1½ million tons of depleted uranium. Some of it has been used to dilute weapons grade uranium (~90% 235U down to reactor grade uranium (~5% 235U, and some of it has been used for heavy tank armor and for the fabrication of armor-piercing bullets and missiles. Such weapons were used by the military in the Persian Gulf, the Balkans and elsewhere. The testing of depleted uranium weapons and their use in combat has resulted in environmental contamination and human exposure. Although the chemical and the toxicological behaviors of depleted uranium are essentially the same as those of natural uranium, the respective chemical forms and isotopic compositions in which they usually occur are different. The chemical and radiological toxicity of depleted uranium can injure biological systems. Normal functioning of the kidney, liver, lung, and heart can be adversely affected by depleted uranium intoxication. The focus of this review is on the chemical and toxicological properties of depleted and natural uranium and some of the possible consequences from long term, low dose exposure to depleted uranium in the environment.

  14. Depletion sensitivity predicts unhealthy snack purchases

    Salmon, Stefanie J.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; Fennis, Bob M.; De Vet, Emely; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to examine the relation between depletion sensitivity - a novel construct referring to the speed or ease by which one's self-control resources are drained - and snack purchase behavior. In addition, interactions between depletion sensitivity and the goal to lose we

  15. Depletion sensitivity predicts unhealthy snack purchases

    Salmon, Stefanie J.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; Fennis, Bob M.; Vet, De Emely; Ridder, De Denise T.D.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to examine the relation between depletion sensitivity - a novel construct referring to the speed or ease by which one's self-control resources are drained - and snack purchase behavior. In addition, interactions between depletion sensitivity and the goal to lose

  16. Oil depletion and terms of trade

    Irimia-Vladu, Marina; Thompson, Henry

    2007-01-01

    A model of the international oil market model with optimal depletion and offer curves suggests importers face a backward bending offer curve. An oil tariff would then raise oil imports and lower the price of oil including the tariff. Simulations of price and extraction paths for the coming century provide insight into the future of oil depletion and terms of trade.

  17. Deuterium - depleted water. Achievements and perspectives

    Deuterium - depleted water represents water that has an isotopic content lower than 145 ppm D/(D+H) which is the natural isotopic content of water. The research conducted at ICSI Ramnicu Valcea, regarding deuterium - depleted water were completed by the following patents: - technique and installation for deuterium - depleted water production; - distilled water with low deuterium content; - technique and installation for the production of distilled water with low deuterium content; - mineralized water with low deuterium content and technique to produce it. The gold and silver medals won at international salons for inventions confirmed the novelty of these inventions. Knowing that deuterium content of water has a big influence on living organisms, beginning with 1996, the ICSI Ramnicu Valcea, deuterium - depleted water producer, co-operated with Romanian specialized institutes for biological effects' evaluation of deuterium - depleted water. The role of natural deuterium in living organisms was examined by using deuterium - depleted water instead of natural water. These investigations led to the following conclusions: 1. deuterium - depleted water caused a tendency towards the increase of the basal tone, accompanied by the intensification of the vasoconstrictor effects of phenylefrine, noradrenaline and angiotensin; the increase of the basal tone and vascular reactivity produced by the deuterium - depleted water persists after the removal of the vascular endothelium; -2. animals treated with deuterium - depleted water showed an increase of the resistance both to sublethal and to lethal gamma radiation doses, suggesting a radioprotective action by the stimulation of non-specific immune defence mechanism; 3, deuterium - depleted water stimulates immune defence reactions, represented by the opsonic, bactericidal and phagocyte capacity of the immune system, together with increase in the numbers of polymorphonuclear neutrophils; 4. investigations regarding artificial

  18. Specification for the VERA Depletion Benchmark Suite

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-17

    CASL-X-2015-1014-000 iii Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The CASL neutronics simulator MPACT is under development for the neutronics and T-H coupled simulation for the pressurized water reactor. MPACT includes the ORIGEN-API and internal depletion module to perform depletion calculations based upon neutron-material reaction and radioactive decay. It is a challenge to validate the depletion capability because of the insufficient measured data. One of the detoured methods to validate it is to perform a code-to-code comparison for benchmark problems. In this study a depletion benchmark suite has been developed and a detailed guideline has been provided to obtain meaningful computational outcomes which can be used in the validation of the MPACT depletion capability.

  19. Expression of activity-dependent neuroprotective protein in the brain of adult rats.

    Gennet, N; Herden, C; Bubb, V J; Quinn, J P; Kipar, A

    2008-03-01

    Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) is a VIP-regulated gene, which is essential for brain development. A synthetic peptide (NAP) derived from the ADNP sequence is highly neuroprotective, therefore it has been hypothesised that ADNP has a similar role. ADNP contains classical transcription factor motifs and nuclear localisation domains, but it has also been reported to be secreted and to co-localise with microtubules, indicating that ADNP may have multiple functions. We investigated the pattern of ADNP expression by immunohistology in normal rat brain, in order to generate a framework for future studies examining changes in ADNP expression in response to noxious stimuli or in models of disease. We found widespread ADNP-like immunoreactivity in neurons throughout the rat brain, with the highest expression in the cerebellum, and strong expression in the thalamus, mesencephalon, pons and medulla oblongata. ADNP-like immunoreactivity was mainly observed in the cytoplasm of neurons, and fibre tracts were often strongly positive as well. In addition, positive neuronal nuclei were occasionally observed. ADNP-like immunoreactivity was lost in degenerating "dark" neurons, whereas it appeared to locate to the nucleus in some of the morphologically unaltered adjacent cells. Occasional astrocyte and microglial cells were also positive. We suggest that the widespread expression of ADNP may correlate with the wide-ranging protective effects of NAP, and that the cytoplasmic and axonal localisation of ADNP-like immunoreactivity suggests additional, non-transcriptional functions of ADNP. PMID:18072088

  20. Activity-dependent BDNF release via endocytic pathways is regulated by synaptotagmin-6 and complexin.

    Wong, Yu-Hui; Lee, Chia-Ming; Xie, Wenjun; Cui, Bianxiao; Poo, Mu-ming

    2015-08-11

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to modulate synapse development and plasticity, but the source of synaptic BDNF and molecular mechanisms regulating BDNF release remain unclear. Using exogenous BDNF tagged with quantum dots (BDNF-QDs), we found that endocytosed BDNF-QDs were preferentially localized to postsynaptic sites in the dendrite of cultured hippocampal neurons. Repetitive neuronal spiking induced the release of BDNF-QDs at these sites, and this process required activation of glutamate receptors. Down-regulating complexin 1/2 (Cpx1/2) expression eliminated activity-induced BDNF-QD secretion, although the overall activity-independent secretion was elevated. Among eight synaptotagmin (Syt) isoforms examined, down-regulation of only Syt6 impaired activity-induced BDNF-QD secretion. In contrast, activity-induced release of endogenously synthesized BDNF did not depend on Syt6. Thus, neuronal activity could trigger the release of endosomal BDNF from postsynaptic dendrites in a Cpx- and Syt6-dependent manner, and endosomes containing BDNF may serve as a source of BDNF for activity-dependent synaptic modulation. PMID:26216953

  1. The Molecular Physiology of Activity-Dependent Bulk Endocytosis of Synaptic Vesicles

    Clayton, Emma L.; Cousin, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Central nerve terminals release neurotransmitter in response to a wide variety of stimuli. Since maintenance of neurotransmitter release is dependent on the continual supply of synaptic vesicles (SVs), nerve terminals possess an array of endocytosis modes to retrieve and recycle SV membrane and proteins. During mild stimulation conditions single SV retrieval modes such as clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) predominate. However during increased neuronal activity additional SV retrieval capacity is required, which is provided by activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE). ADBE is the dominant SV retrieval mechanism during elevated neuronal activity. It is a high capacity SV retrieval mode that is immediately triggered during such stimulation conditions. This review will summarise the current knowledge regarding the molecular mechanism of ADBE, including molecules required for its triggering and subsequent steps, including SV budding from bulk endosomes. The molecular relationship between ADBE and the SV reserve pool will also be discussed. It is becoming clear that an understanding of the molecular physiology of ADBE will be of critical importance in attempts to modulate both normal and abnormal synaptic function during intense neuronal activity. PMID:19765184

  2. Activity-dependent synaptic plasticity modulates the critical phase of brain development.

    Chaudhury, Sraboni; Sharma, Vikram; Kumar, Vivek; Nag, Tapas C; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2016-04-01

    Plasticity or neuronal plasticity is a unique and adaptive feature of nervous system which allows neurons to reorganize their interactions in response to an intrinsic or extrinsic stimulation and shapes the formation and maintenance of a functional neuronal circuit. Synaptic plasticity is the most important form of neural plasticity and plays critical role during the development allowing the formation of precise neural connectivity via the process of pruning. In the sensory systems-auditory and visual, this process is heavily dependent on the external cues perceived during the development. Environmental enrichment paradigms in an activity-dependent manner result in early maturation of the synapses and more efficient trans-synaptic signaling or communication flow. This has been extensively observed in the avian auditory system. On the other hand, stimuli results in negative effect can cause alterations in the synaptic connectivity and strength resulting in various developmental brain disorders including autism, fragile X syndrome and rett syndrome. In this review we discuss the role of different forms of activity (spontaneous or environmental) during the development of the nervous system in modifying synaptic plasticity necessary for shaping the adult brain. Also, we try to explore various factors (molecular, genetic and epigenetic) involved in altering the synaptic plasticity in positive and negative way. PMID:26515724

  3. Cell Biological Mechanisms of Activity-Dependent Synapse to Nucleus Translocation of CRTC1 in Neurons

    Toh Hean eCh'ng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have revealed a critical role for CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivator (CRTC1 in regulating neuronal gene expression during learning and memory. CRTC1 localizes to synapses but undergoes activity-dependent nuclear translocation to regulate the transcription of CREB target genes. Here we investigate the long-distance retrograde transport of CRTC1 in hippocampal neurons. We show that local elevations in calcium, triggered by activation of synaptic glutamate receptors and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, initiate active, dynein-mediated retrograde transport of CRTC1 along microtubules. We identify a nuclear localization signal within CRTC1, and characterize three conserved serine residues whose dephosphorylation is required for nuclear import. Domain analysis reveals that the amino-terminal third of CRTC1 contains all of the signals required for regulated nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. We fuse this region to Dendra2 to generate a reporter construct and perform live-cell imaging coupled with local uncaging of glutamate and photoconversion to characterize the dynamics of stimulus-induced retrograde transport and nuclear accumulation.

  4. Activity-dependent synaptic plasticity of a chalcogenide electronic synapse for neuromorphic systems.

    Li, Yi; Zhong, Yingpeng; Zhang, Jinjian; Xu, Lei; Wang, Qing; Sun, Huajun; Tong, Hao; Cheng, Xiaoming; Miao, Xiangshui

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale inorganic electronic synapses or synaptic devices, which are capable of emulating the functions of biological synapses of brain neuronal systems, are regarded as the basic building blocks for beyond-Von Neumann computing architecture, combining information storage and processing. Here, we demonstrate a Ag/AgInSbTe/Ag structure for chalcogenide memristor-based electronic synapses. The memristive characteristics with reproducible gradual resistance tuning are utilised to mimic the activity-dependent synaptic plasticity that serves as the basis of memory and learning. Bidirectional long-term Hebbian plasticity modulation is implemented by the coactivity of pre- and postsynaptic spikes, and the sign and degree are affected by assorted factors including the temporal difference, spike rate and voltage. Moreover, synaptic saturation is observed to be an adjustment of Hebbian rules to stabilise the growth of synaptic weights. Our results may contribute to the development of highly functional plastic electronic synapses and the further construction of next-generation parallel neuromorphic computing architecture. PMID:24809396

  5. Developmental and activity-dependent plasticity of filiform hair receptors in the locust

    HaraldWolf

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A group of wind sensitive filiform hair receptors on the locust thorax and head makes contact onto a pair of identified interneuron, A4I1. The hair receptors’ central nervous projections exhibit pronounced structural dynamics during nymphal development, for example, by gradually eliminating their ipsilateral dendritic field while maintaining the contralateral one. These changes are dependent not only on hormones controlling development but on neuronal activity as well. The hair-to-interneuron system has remarkably high gain (close to 1 and makes contact to flight steering muscles. During stationary flight in front of a wind tunnel, interneuron A4I1 is active in the wing beat rhythm, and in addition it responds strongly to stimulation of sensory hairs in its receptive field. A role of the hair-to-interneuron in flight steering is thus suggested. This system appears suitable for further study of developmental and activity-dependent plasticity in a sensorimotor context with known connectivity patterns.

  6. Long lasting protein synthesis- and activity-dependent spine shrinkage and elimination after synaptic depression.

    Yazmín Ramiro-Cortés

    Full Text Available Neuronal circuits modify their response to synaptic inputs in an experience-dependent fashion. Increases in synaptic weights are accompanied by structural modifications, and activity dependent, long lasting growth of dendritic spines requires new protein synthesis. When multiple spines are potentiated within a dendritic domain, they show dynamic structural plasticity changes, indicating that spines can undergo bidirectional physical modifications. However, it is unclear whether protein synthesis dependent synaptic depression leads to long lasting structural changes. Here, we investigate the structural correlates of protein synthesis dependent long-term depression (LTD mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs through two-photon imaging of dendritic spines on hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We find that induction of mGluR-LTD leads to robust and long lasting spine shrinkage and elimination that lasts for up to 24 hours. These effects depend on signaling through group I mGluRs, require protein synthesis, and activity. These data reveal a mechanism for long lasting remodeling of synaptic inputs, and offer potential insights into mental retardation.

  7. Possible ozone depletions following nuclear explosions

    Whitten, R. C.; Borucki, W. J.; Turco, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    The degree of depletion of the ozone layer ensuing after delivery of strategic nuclear warheads (5000 and 10,000 Mton) due to production of nitrogen oxides is theoretically assessed. Strong depletions are calculated for 16-km and 26-km altitudes, peaking 1-2 months after detonation and lasting for three years, while a significant depletion at 36 km would peak after one year. Assuming the explosions occur between 30 and 70 deg N, these effects should be much more pronounced in this region than over the Northern Hemisphere as a whole. It is concluded that Hampson's concern on this matter (1974) is well-founded.-

  8. Depleted UF6 programmatic environmental impact statement

    The US Department of Energy has developed a program for long-term management and use of depleted uranium hexafluoride, a product of the uranium enrichment process. As part of this effort, DOE is preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the depleted UF6 management program. This report duplicates the information available at the web site (http://www.ead.anl.gov/web/newduf6) set up as a repository for the PEIS. Options for the web site include: reviewing recent additions or changes to the web site; learning more about depleted UF6 and the PEIS; browsing the PEIS and related documents, or submitting official comments on the PEIS; downloading all or part of the PEIS documents; and adding or deleting one's name from the depleted UF6 mailing list

  9. Ecological considerations of natural and depleted uranium

    Depleted 238U is a major by-product of the nuclear fuel cycle for which increasing use is being made in counterweights, radiation shielding, and ordnance applications. This paper (1) summarizes the pertinent literature on natural and depleted uranium in the environment, (2) integrates results of a series of ecological studies conducted at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in New Mexico where 70,000 kg of depleted and natural uranium has been expended to the environment over the past 34 years, and (3) synthesizes the information into an assessment of the ecological consequences of natural and depleted uranium released to the environment by various means. Results of studies of soil, plant, and animal communities exposed to this radiation and chemical environment over a third of a century provide a means of evaluating the behavior and effects of uranium in many contexts

  10. Real depletion in nodal diffusion codes

    The fuel depletion is described by more than one hundred fuel isotopes in the advanced lattice codes like HELIOS, but only a few fuel isotopes are accounted for even in the advanced steady-state diffusion codes. The general assumption that the number densities of the majority of the fuel isotopes depend only on the fuel burnup is seriously in error if high burnup is considered. The real depletion conditions in the reactor core differ from the asymptotic ones at the stage of lattice depletion calculations. This study reveals which fuel isotopes should be explicitly accounted for in the diffusion codes in order to predict adequately the real depletion effects in the core. A somewhat strange conclusion is that if the real number densities of the main fissionable isotopes are not explicitly accounted for in the diffusion code, then Sm-149 should not be accounted for either, because the net error in k-inf is smaller (Authors)

  11. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  12. Fully Depleted Charge-Coupled Devices

    We have developed fully depleted, back-illuminated CCDs that build upon earlier research and development efforts directed towards technology development of silicon-strip detectors used in high-energy-physics experiments. The CCDs are fabricated on the same type of high-resistivity, float-zone-refined silicon that is used for strip detectors. The use of high-resistivity substrates allows for thick depletion regions, on the order of 200-300 um, with corresponding high detection efficiency for near-infrared and soft x-ray photons. We compare the fully depleted CCD to the p-i-n diode upon which it is based, and describe the use of fully depleted CCDs in astronomical and x-ray imaging applications

  13. Cellular mechanisms of activity-dependent BDNF expression in primary sensory neurons.

    Vermehren-Schmaedick, A; Khanjian, R A; Balkowiec, A

    2015-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is abundantly expressed by both developing and adult rat visceral sensory neurons from the nodose ganglion (NG) in vivo and in vitro. We have previously shown that BDNF is released from neonatal NG neurons by activity and regulates dendritic development in their postsynaptic targets in the brainstem. The current study was carried out to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of activity-dependent BDNF expression in neonatal rat NG neurons, using our established in vitro model of neuronal activation by electrical field stimulation with patterns that mimic neuronal activity in vivo. We show that BDNF mRNA (transcript 4) increases over threefold in response to a 4-h tonic or bursting pattern delivered at the frequency of 6 Hz, which corresponds to the normal heart rate of a newborn rat. No significant increase in BDNF expression was observed following stimulation at 1 Hz. The latter effect suggests a frequency-dependent mechanism of regulated BDNF expression. In addition to BDNF transcript 4, which is known to be regulated by activity, transcript 1 also showed significant upregulation. The increases in BDNF mRNA were followed by BDNF protein upregulation of a similar magnitude after 24h of stimulation at 6 Hz. Electrical stimulation-evoked BDNF expression was inhibited by pretreating neurons with the blocker of voltage-gated sodium channels tetrodotoxin and by removing extracellular calcium. Moreover, our data show that repetitive stimulation-evoked BDNF expression requires calcium influx through N-, but not L-type, channels. Together, our study reveals novel mechanisms through which electrical activity stimulates de novo synthesis of BDNF in sensory neurons, and points to the role of N-type calcium channels in regulating BDNF expression in sensory neurons in response to repetitive stimulation. PMID:26459016

  14. Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) exhibits striking sexual dichotomy impacting on autistic and Alzheimer's pathologies.

    Malishkevich, A; Amram, N; Hacohen-Kleiman, G; Magen, I; Giladi, E; Gozes, I

    2015-01-01

    Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) is a most frequent autism spectrum disorder (ASD)-associated gene and the only protein significantly decreasing in the serum of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Is ADNP associated with ASD being more prevalent in boys and AD more prevalent in women? Our results revealed sex-related learning/memory differences in mice, reflecting hippocampal expression changes in ADNP and ADNP-controlled AD/ASD risk genes. Hippocampal ADNP transcript content was doubled in male vs female mice, with females showing equal expression to ADNP haploinsufficient (ADNP(+/)(-)) males and no significant genotype-associated reduction. Increased male ADNP expression was replicated in human postmortem hippocampal samples. The hippocampal transcript for apolipoprotein E (the major risk gene for AD) was doubled in female mice compared with males, and further doubled in the ADNP(+/-) females, contrasting a decrease in ADNP(+/-) males. Previously, overexpression of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) led to ASD-like phenotype in mice. Here, we identified binding sites on ADNP for eIF4E and co-immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, hippocampal eIF4E expression was specifically increased in young ADNP(+/-) male mice. Behaviorally, ADNP(+/-) male mice exhibited deficiencies in object recognition and social memory compared with ADNP(+/+) mice, while ADNP(+/-) females were partially spared. Contrasting males, which preferred novel over familiar mice, ADNP(+/+) females showed no preference to novel mice and ADNP(+/-) females did not prefer mice over object. ADNP expression, positioned as a master regulator of key ASD and AD risk genes, introduces a novel concept of hippocampal gene-regulated sexual dimorphism and an ADNP(+/-) animal model for translational psychiatry. PMID:25646590

  15. Depleted Uranium and Its Effects on Humans

    Zdeněk Hon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes contemporary scientific knowledge of depleted uranium effects on human health due to its use in military conflicts. The discussion covers cases of minimal risk due to external irradiation resulting from the storage and handling of depleted uranium ammunition and, in contrast, important toxicological and radio-toxicological risks of late effects resulting from the inhalation and ingestion of dust particles produced by the burning of the core of the anti-tank ammunition.

  16. Depleted Uranium and Its Effects on Humans

    Zdeněk Hon; Jan Österreicher; Leoš Navrátil

    2015-01-01

    The article summarizes contemporary scientific knowledge of depleted uranium effects on human health due to its use in military conflicts. The discussion covers cases of minimal risk due to external irradiation resulting from the storage and handling of depleted uranium ammunition and, in contrast, important toxicological and radio-toxicological risks of late effects resulting from the inhalation and ingestion of dust particles produced by the burning of the core of the anti-tank ammunition.

  17. Depleted Bulk Heterojunction Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics

    Barkhouse, D. Aaron R.

    2011-05-26

    The first solution-processed depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot solar cells are presented. The architecture allows for high absorption with full depletion, thereby breaking the photon absorption/carrier extraction compromise inherent in planar devices. A record power conversion of 5.5% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions is reported. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Radiative characteristics of depleted uranium bomb and it is protection

    Based on the developing process of depleted uranium bombs described in the first part, the radiative characteristics and mechanism of depleted uranium bombs are analyzed emphatically. The deeper discussion on protection of depleted uranium bombs is proceeded

  19. Essential role of presynaptic NMDA receptors in activity-dependent BDNF secretion and corticostriatal LTP.

    Park, Hyungju; Popescu, Andrei; Poo, Mu-ming

    2014-12-01

    Activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors (NMDARs) in postsynaptic dendrites is required for long-term potentiation (LTP) of many excitatory synapses, but the role of presynaptic axonal NMDARs in synaptic plasticity remains to be clarified. Here we report that axonal NMDARs play an essential role in LTP induction at mouse corticostriatal synapses by triggering activity-induced presynaptic secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Genetic depletion of either BDNF or the NMDAR subunit GluN1 specifically in cortical axons abolished corticostriatal LTP in response to theta burst stimulation (TBS). Furthermore, functional axonal NMDARs were required for TBS-triggered prolonged axonal Ca(2+) elevation and BDNF secretion, supporting the notion that activation of axonal NMDARs induces BDNF secretion via enhancing Ca(2+) signals in the presynaptic nerve terminals. These results demonstrate that presynaptic NMDARs are equally important as postsynaptic NMDARs in LTP induction of corticostriatal synapses due to their role in mediating activity-induced presynaptic BDNF secretion. PMID:25467984

  20. Geomagnetic and solar activity dependence of ionospheric upflowing O+: FAST observations

    Zhao, K.; Jiang, Y.; Chen, K. W.; Huang, L. F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the dependence of the occurrence frequency of ionospheric upflowing oxygen (O+) ions on the sunspot cycle and geomagnetic activity. We examine the upflows response to the geomagnetic disturbances as well as the influence of the ion energy factor in controlling the magnitude of the occurrence frequency and the net energy flux. We discuss the spatial distribution of the upflow occurrence frequency and construct a regression model as a function of the magnetic latitude. The results show an overall enhancement of the upflow occurrence frequency during magnetically disturbed periods and indicate that the high-occurrence area spreads out from the source regions during magnetically quiet periods. The high-occurrence areas are located at 70° magnetic latitude (mLat) in the dayside auroral oval zone and between 76-80° mLat in the dayside polar cusp region. In the nightside auroral oval zone, these areas are near 60° mLat, penetrating further equatorward to 55° mLat during magnetically disturbed periods. High energy (≥1 keV) upflowing ions are common in the nightside auroral oval zone while low energy (<1 keV) upflowing ions are found escaping from the high latitude dayside cusp region. A Gaussian function is shown to be a good fit to the occurrence frequency over the magnetic latitude. For high energy upflowing O+ ions, the occurrence frequency exhibits a single peak located at about 60° mLat in the nightside auroral oval zone while for low energy upflowing O+ ions, it exhibits two peaks, one near 60° mLat in the auroral oval zone and the other near 78° mLat in the cusp region. We study the solar activity dependence by analyzing the relationship between the upflow occurrence frequency and the sunspot number (RZ). The statistical result shows that the frequency decreases with declining solar activity level, from ˜30 % at solar maximum to ˜5 % at solar minimum. In addition, the correlation coefficient between the occurrence frequency and RZ

  1. EPRI depletion benchmark calculations using PARAGON

    Highlights: • PARAGON depletion calculations are benchmarked against the EPRI reactivity decrement experiments. • Benchmarks cover a wide range of enrichments, burnups, cooling times, and burnable absorbers, and different depletion and storage conditions. • Results from PARAGON-SCALE scheme are more conservative relative to the benchmark data. • ENDF/B-VII based data reduces the excess conservatism and brings the predictions closer to benchmark reactivity decrement values. - Abstract: In order to conservatively apply burnup credit in spent fuel pool criticality analyses, code validation for both fresh and used fuel is required. Fresh fuel validation is typically done by modeling experiments from the “International Handbook.” A depletion validation can determine a bias and bias uncertainty for the worth of the isotopes not found in the fresh fuel critical experiments. Westinghouse’s burnup credit methodology uses PARAGON™ (Westinghouse 2-D lattice physics code) and its 70-group cross-section library, which have been benchmarked, qualified, and licensed both as a standalone transport code and as a nuclear data source for core design simulations. A bias and bias uncertainty for the worth of depletion isotopes, however, are not available for PARAGON. Instead, the 5% decrement approach for depletion uncertainty is used, as set forth in the Kopp memo. Recently, EPRI developed a set of benchmarks based on a large set of power distribution measurements to ascertain reactivity biases. The depletion reactivity has been used to create 11 benchmark cases for 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 GWd/MTU and 3 cooling times 100 h, 5 years, and 15 years. These benchmark cases are analyzed with PARAGON and the SCALE package and sensitivity studies are performed using different cross-section libraries based on ENDF/B-VI.3 and ENDF/B-VII data to assess that the 5% decrement approach is conservative for determining depletion uncertainty

  2. Activity-dependent increases in local oxygen consumption correlate with postsynaptic currents in the mouse cerebellum in vivo

    Mathiesen, Claus; Caesar, Kirsten; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund;

    2011-01-01

    metabolism via mitochondrial signaling, but whether this also occurs in the intact brain is unknown. Here we applied a pharmacological approach to dissect the effects of ionic currents and cytosolic Ca(2+) rises of neuronal origin on activity-dependent rises in CMRO(2). We used two-photon microscopy and...

  3. Activity-dependent increases in local oxygen consumption correlate with postsynaptic currents in the mouse cerebellum in vivo

    Mathiesen, Claus; Caesar, Kirsten; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund;

    2011-01-01

    Evoked neural activity correlates strongly with rises in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). Activity-dependent rises in CMRO(2) fluctuate with ATP turnover due to ion pumping. In vitro studies suggest that increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) stimulate oxidative...

  4. Activity-dependent increases in local oxygen consumption correlate with post-synaptic currents in the mouse cerebellum in vivo

    Mathiesen, Claus; Caesar, Kirsten; Thomsen, Kirsten Joan;

    2011-01-01

    Evoked neural activity correlates strongly with rises in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) and cerebral blood flow. Activity-dependent rises in CMRO2 fluctuate with ATP turnover due to ion pumping. In vitro studies suggest that increases in cytosolic Ca2+ stimulate oxidative metabolism via...

  5. The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability

    Fensin, Michael Lorne [Los Alamos National Laboratory; James, Michael R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hendricks, John S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

  6. Depletion sensitivity predicts unhealthy snack purchases.

    Salmon, Stefanie J; Adriaanse, Marieke A; Fennis, Bob M; De Vet, Emely; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to examine the relation between depletion sensitivity - a novel construct referring to the speed or ease by which one's self-control resources are drained - and snack purchase behavior. In addition, interactions between depletion sensitivity and the goal to lose weight on snack purchase behavior were explored. Participants included in the study were instructed to report every snack they bought over the course of one week. The dependent variables were the number of healthy and unhealthy snacks purchased. The results of the present study demonstrate that depletion sensitivity predicts the amount of unhealthy (but not healthy) snacks bought. The more sensitive people are to depletion, the more unhealthy snacks they buy. Moreover, there was some tentative evidence that this relation is more pronounced for people with a weak as opposed to a strong goal to lose weight, suggesting that a strong goal to lose weight may function as a motivational buffer against self-control failures. All in all, these findings provide evidence for the external validity of depletion sensitivity and the relevance of this construct in the domain of eating behavior. PMID:26321417

  7. The modality effect of ego depletion: Auditory task modality reduces ego depletion.

    Li, Qiong; Wang, Zhenhong

    2016-08-01

    An initial act of self-control that impairs subsequent acts of self-control is called ego depletion. The ego depletion phenomenon has been observed consistently. The modality effect refers to the effect of the presentation modality on the processing of stimuli. The modality effect was also robustly found in a large body of research. However, no study to date has examined the modality effects of ego depletion. This issue was addressed in the current study. In Experiment 1, after all participants completed a handgrip task, one group's participants completed a visual attention regulation task and the other group's participants completed an auditory attention regulation task, and then all participants again completed a handgrip task. The ego depletion phenomenon was observed in both the visual and the auditory attention regulation task. Moreover, participants who completed the visual task performed worse on the handgrip task than participants who completed the auditory task, which indicated that there was high ego depletion in the visual task condition. In Experiment 2, participants completed an initial task that either did or did not deplete self-control resources, and then they completed a second visual or auditory attention control task. The results indicated that depleted participants performed better on the auditory attention control task than the visual attention control task. These findings suggest that altering task modality may reduce ego depletion. PMID:27241617

  8. Depleted uranium and the Gulf War syndrome

    Some military personnel involved in the 1991Gulf War have complained of continuing stress-like symptoms for which no obvious cause has been found. These symptoms have at times been attributed to the use of depleted uranium (DU) in shell casings which are believed to have caused toxic effects. Depleted uranium is natural uranium which is depleted in the rarer U-235 isotope. It is a heavy metal and in common with other heavy metals is chemically toxic. It is also slightly radioactive and could give rise to a radiological hazard if dispersed in finely divided form so that it was inhaled. In response to concerns, the possible effects of DU have been extensively studied along with other possible contributors to Gulf War sickness. This article looks at the results of some of the research that has been done on DU. (author)

  9. Depletion of the nuclear Fermi sea

    Rios, A; Dickhoff, W H

    2009-01-01

    The short-range and tensor components of the bare nucleon-nucleon interaction induce a sizeable depletion of low momenta in the ground state of a nuclear many-body system. The self-consistent Green's function method within the ladder approximation provides an \\textit{ab-initio} description of correlated nuclear systems that accounts properly for these effects. The momentum distribution predicted by this approach is analyzed in detail, with emphasis on the depletion of the lowest momentum state. The temperature, density, and nucleon asymmetry (isospin) dependence of the depletion of the Fermi sea is clarified. A connection is established between the momentum distribution and the time-ordered components of the self-energy, which allows for an improved interpretation of the results. The dependence on the underlying nucleon-nucleon interaction provides quantitative estimates of the importance of short-range and tensor correlations in nuclear systems.

  10. Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor

    Dong, Bao-Guo; Gu, Ji-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The supercritical, reactor core melting and nuclear fuel leaking accidents have troubled fission reactors for decades, and greatly limit their extensive applications. Now these troubles are still open. Here we first show a possible perfect reactor, Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor which is no above accident trouble. We found this reactor could be realized in practical applications in terms of all of the scientific principle, principle of operation, technology, and engineering. Our results demonstrate how these reactors can possess and realize extraordinary excellent characteristics, no prompt critical, long-term safe and stable operation with negative feedback, closed uranium-plutonium cycle chain within the vessel, normal operation only with depleted-uranium, and depleted-uranium high burnup in reality, to realize with fission nuclear energy sufficiently satisfying humanity long-term energy resource needs, as well as thoroughly solve the challenges of nuclear criticality safety, uranium resource insuffic...

  11. Ozone depletion and chlorine loading potentials

    Pyle, John A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Solomon, Susan; Zvenigorodsky, Sergei; Connell, Peter; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Fisher, Donald A.; Stordal, Frode; Weisenstein, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The recognition of the roles of chlorine and bromine compounds in ozone depletion has led to the regulation or their source gases. Some source gases are expected to be more damaging to the ozone layer than others, so that scientific guidance regarding their relative impacts is needed for regulatory purposes. Parameters used for this purpose include the steady-state and time-dependent chlorine loading potential (CLP) and the ozone depletion potential (ODP). Chlorine loading potentials depend upon the estimated value and accuracy of atmospheric lifetimes and are subject to significant (approximately 20-50 percent) uncertainties for many gases. Ozone depletion potentials depend on the same factors, as well as the evaluation of the release of reactive chlorine and bromine from each source gas and corresponding ozone destruction within the stratosphere.

  12. Depleted uranium speciation in the Bratoselce soil

    During the air strikes in 1999, about thirteen hundred projectiles with depleted uranium were fired into the Bratoselce, South Serbia. A study providing insight into physical chemical behaviour of depleted uranium originated from dissolved 'material' of projectile penetrators in the contaminated soil have been conducted. Samples were treated according to Tarriers modified procedure of five-step sequential extraction. Suitable choice of solvents for sequential extraction simulated the real conditions in the environment. Fractions are further analysed by alpha spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry methods to determine the uranium isotopes and trace or major elements. The results indicated potential substrates for depleted uranium compounds in the investigated environment, with specific soil composition that is essential for prediction of its mobility and bioavailability in certain conditions. (author)

  13. Gammaspectrometric determination of depleted uranium in soil

    Full text: Three years of monitoring the content of natural radionuclides as well as radionuclides of artificial origin in all samples in the south part of the Republic of Serbia and Montenegro indicated that there was widespread, low-level contamination by depleted uranium at this region. High activity of depleted uranium was found in the soil samples taken at the points where the penetrators were found. We used high resolution gamma spectrometry measurements, because of their simplicity and accuracy. Aims of the control were to asses the increase of radioactivity above the natural levels in the immediate and near vicinity of the bomb craters, to asses the corresponding effect of changed natural radioactivity on the health of the population living in these places and finding unexploded depleted uranium bullets. The collected soil samples were cleaned of plants and stones, dried at 105 deg. C - 110 deg. C till constant weight for 24-48 h. After this, the samples were ground, sieved, and measure in cylindrical geometry. Gamma activity was determined by gamma spectrometry measurements using HP Ge detector (ORTEC), with relative efficiency of 25% and energy resolution of 1.85 keV (1332.5 keV 60Co). The analyser system conducts a peak search, energy assignment, quantification and nuclide identification in acquired spectra. Time of measurement varied from 60000 s to 250000 s. Depleted uranium was found in the soil samples from Vranje region and cape Arza (Montenegro). There are four fenced areas in Vranje region (Pljackovica, Bratoselce, Borovac and Reljan) and one in the Montenegro (cape Arza) where we have found depleted uranium penetrators. The 238U and 235U specific activities and their isotopic composition correspond to depleted uranium (238U/235U ratio from 35 to 77). (author)

  14. Department of Energy depleted uranium recycle

    With its strategic supply of depleted uranium, the Department of Energy is studying reuse of the material in nuclear radiation shields, military hardware, and commercial applications. the study is expected to warrant a more detailed uranium recycle plan which would include consideration of a demonstration program and a program implementation decision. Such a program, if implemented, would become the largest nuclear material recycle program in the history of the Department of Energy. The bulk of the current inventory of depleted uranium is stored in 14-ton cylinders in the form of solid uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The radioactive 235U content has been reduced to a concentration of 0.2% to 0.4%. Present estimates indicate there are about 55,000 UF6-filled cylinders in inventory and planned operations will provide another 2,500 cylinders of depleted uranium each year. The United States government, under the auspices of the Department of Energy, considers the depleted uranium a highly-refined strategic resource of significant value. A possible utilization of a large portion of the depleted uranium inventory is as radiation shielding for spent reactor fuels and high-level radioactive waste. To this end, the Department of Energy study to-date has included a preliminary technical review to ascertain DOE chemical forms useful for commercial products. The presentation summarized the information including preliminary cost estimates. The status of commercial uranium processing is discussed. With a shrinking market, the number of chemical conversion and fabrication plants is reduced; however, the commercial capability does exist for chemical conversion of the UF6 to the metal form and for the fabrication of uranium radiation shields and other uranium products. Department of Energy facilities no longer possess a capability for depleted uranium chemical conversion

  15. Toxicological issues after depleted uranium weapons attacked

    Depleted Uranium (DU) is a byproduct of the uranium enrichment for producing nuclear reactor or nuclear weapon. DU is used in the military as an armor-piercing projectile due to its hardness, strength, and density. A lot of DU weapons were fired in the Gulf War, and bring about critical environmental and internal contamination. Therefore, DU becomes suddenly a hot issue. Some toxicological problems after DU weapons attacked have been reviewed, which include features of internal DU contamination. Hazard of wound contamination and inhalation with insoluble uranium, and other urgent toxicological issues. The healthy effects of implanted with depleted uranium pellets were illustrated in particular

  16. The Chemistry and Toxicology of Depleted Uranium

    Katz, Sidney A.

    2014-01-01

    Natural uranium is comprised of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Depleted uranium (DU) is a byproduct of the processes for the enrichment of the naturally occurring 235U isotope. The world wide stock pile contains some 1½ million tons of depleted uranium. Some of it has been used to dilute weapons grade uranium (~90% 235U) down to reactor grade uranium (~5% 235U), and some of it has been used for heavy tank armor and for the fabrication of armor-piercing bullets and missiles....

  17. Application of backtracking algorithm to depletion calculations

    Based on the theory of linear chain method for analytical depletion calculations, the burn-up matrix is decoupled by the divide and conquer strategy and the linear chain with Markov characteristic is formed. The density, activity and decay heat of every nuclide in the chain can be calculated by analytical solutions. Every possible reaction path of the nuclide must be considered during the linear chain establishment process. To confirm the calculation precision and efficiency, the algorithm which can cover all the reaction paths of the nuclide and search the paths automatically according to to problem description and precision restrictions should be sought. Through analysis and comparison of several kinds of searching algorithms, the backtracking algorithm was selected to search and calculate the linear chains using Depth First Search (DFS) method. The depletion program can solve the depletion problem adaptively and with high fidelity. The solution space and time complexity of the program were analyzed. The new developed depletion program was coupled with Monte Carlo program MCMG-II to calculate the benchmark burn-up problem of the first core of China Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR). The initial verification and validation of the program was performed by the calculation. (author)

  18. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    Hobson, Art

    2010-01-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of…

  19. Application of backtracking algorithm to depletion calculations

    Based on the theory of linear chain method for analytical depletion calculations, the burnup matrix is decoupled by the divide and conquer strategy and the linear chain with Markov characteristic is formed. The density, activity and decay heat of every nuclide in the chain then can be calculated by analytical solutions. Every possible reaction path of the nuclide must be considered during the linear chain establishment process. To confirm the calculation precision and efficiency, the algorithm which can cover all the reaction paths and search the paths automatically according to the problem description and precision restrictions should be found. Through analysis and comparison of several kinds of searching algorithms, the backtracking algorithm was selected to establish and calculate the linear chains in searching process using depth first search (DFS) method, forming an algorithm which can solve the depletion problem adaptively and with high fidelity. The complexity of the solution space and time was analyzed by taking into account depletion process and the characteristics of the backtracking algorithm. The newly developed depletion program was coupled with Monte Carlo program MCMG-Ⅱ to calculate the benchmark burnup problem of the first core of China Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR) and the preliminary verification and validation of the program were performed. (authors)

  20. CPG2 Recruits Endophilin B2 to the Cytoskeleton for Activity-Dependent Endocytosis of Synaptic Glutamate Receptors.

    Loebrich, Sven; Benoit, Marc Robert; Konopka, Jaclyn Aleksandra; Cottrell, Jeffrey Richard; Gibson, Joanne; Nedivi, Elly

    2016-02-01

    Internalization of glutamate receptors at the postsynaptic membrane via clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is a key mechanism for regulating synaptic strength. A role for the F-actin cytoskeleton in CME is well established, and recently, PKA-dependent association of candidate plasticity gene 2 (CPG2) with the spine-cytoskeleton has been shown to mediate synaptic glutamate receptor internalization. Yet, how the endocytic machinery is physically coupled to the actin cytoskeleton to facilitate glutamate receptor internalization has not been demonstrated. Moreover, there has been no distinction of endocytic-machinery components that are specific to activity-dependent versus constitutive glutamate receptor internalization. Here, we show that CPG2, through a direct physical interaction, recruits endophilin B2 (EndoB2) to F-actin, thus anchoring the endocytic machinery to the spine cytoskeleton and facilitating glutamate receptor internalization. Regulation of CPG2 binding to the actin cytoskeleton by protein kinase A directly impacts recruitment of EndoB2 and clathrin. Specific disruption of EndoB2 or the CPG2-EndoB2 interaction impairs activity-dependent, but not constitutive, internalization of both NMDA- and AMPA-type glutamate receptors. These results demonstrate that, through direct interactions with F-actin and EndoB2, CPG2 physically bridges the spine cytoskeleton and the endocytic machinery, and this tripartite association is critical specifically for activity-dependent CME of synaptic glutamate receptors. PMID:26776730

  1. A worldwide view of groundwater depletion

    van Beek, L. P.; Wada, Y.; van Kempen, C.; Reckman, J. W.; Vasak, S.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    During the last decades, global water demand has increased two-fold due to increasing population, expanding irrigated area and economic development. Globally such demand can be met by surface water availability (i.e., water in rivers, lakes and reservoirs) but regional variations are large and the absence of sufficient rainfall and run-off increasingly encourages the use of groundwater resources, particularly in the (semi-)arid regions of the world. Excessive abstraction for irrigation frequently leads to overexploitation, i.e. if groundwater abstraction exceeds the natural groundwater recharge over extensive areas and prolonged times, persistent groundwater depletion may occur. Observations and various regional studies have revealed that groundwater depletion is a substantial issue in regions such as Northwest India, Northeast Pakistan, Central USA, Northeast China and Iran. Here we provide a global overview of groundwater depletion from the year 1960 to 2000 at a spatial resolution of 0.5 degree by assessing groundwater recharge with the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB and subtracting estimates of groundwater abstraction obtained from IGRAC-GGIS database. PCR-GLOBWB was forced by the CRU climate dataset downscaled to daily time steps using ERA40 re-analysis data. PCR-GLOBWB simulates daily global groundwater recharge (0.5 degree) while considering sub-grid variability of each grid cell (e.g., short and tall vegetation, different soil types, fraction of saturated soil). Country statistics of groundwater abstraction were downscaled to 0.5 degree by using water demand (i.e., agriculture, industry and domestic) as a proxy. To limit problems related to increased capture of discharge and increased recharge due to groundwater pumping, we restricted our analysis to sub-humid to arid areas. The uncertainty in the resulting estimates was assessed by a Monte Carlo analysis of 100 realizations of groundwater recharge and 100 realizations of groundwater abstraction

  2. Health and environmental impact of depleted uranium

    Depleted Uranium (DU) is 'nuclear waste' produced from the enrichment process and is mostly made up of 238U and is depleted in the fissionable isotope 235U compared to natural uranium (NU). Depleted uranium has about 60% of the radioactivity of natural uranium. Depleted uranium and natural uranium are identical in terms of the chemical toxicity. Uranium's high density gives depleted uranium shells increased range and penetrative power. This density, combined with uranium's pyrophoric nature, results in a high-energy kinetic weapon that can punch and burn through armour plating. Striking a hard target, depleted uranium munitions create extremely high temperatures. The uranium immediately burns and vaporizes into an aerosol, which is easily diffused in the environment. People can inhale the micro-particles of uranium oxide in an aerosol and absorb them mainly from lung. Depleted uranium has both aspects of radiological toxicity and chemical toxicity. The possible synergistic effect of both kinds of toxicities is also pointed out. Animal and cellular studies have been reported the carcinogenic, neurotoxic, immuno-toxic and some other effects of depleted uranium including the damage on reproductive system and foetus. In addition, the health effects of micro/ nano-particles, similar in size of depleted uranium aerosols produced by uranium weapons, have been reported. Aerosolized DU dust can easily spread over the battlefield spreading over civilian areas, sometimes even crossing international borders. Therefore, not only the military personnel but also the civilians can be exposed. The contamination continues after the cessation of hostilities. Taking these aspects into account, DU weapon is illegal under international humanitarian laws and is considered as one of the inhumane weapons of 'indiscriminate destruction'. The international society is now discussing the prohibition of DU weapons based on 'precautionary principle'. The 1991 Gulf War is reportedly the first

  3. Elemental depletions in the Magellanic Clouds and the evolution of depletions with metallicity

    Tchernyshyov, Kirill; Seale, Jonathan; Fox, Andrew; Friedman, Scott D; Dwek, Eli; Galliano, Frédéric; Sembach, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of the composition of gas and dust in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, together -- the MCs) as measured by UV absorption spectroscopy. We have measured P II and Fe II along 85 sightlines toward the MCs using archival FUSE observations. For 16 of those sightlines, we have measured Si II, Cr II, and Zn II from new HST COS observations. We have combined these measurements with H I and H$_2$ column densities and reference stellar abundances from the literature to derive gas-phase abundances, depletions, and gas-to-dust ratios (GDRs). 80 of our 84 P measurements and 13 of our 16 Zn measurements are depleted by more than 0.1 decades, suggesting that P and Zn abundances are not accurate metallicity indicators at and above the metallicity of the SMC. The maximum P and Zn depletions are the same in the MW, LMC, and SMC. Si, Cr, and Fe are systematically less depleted in the SMC than in the MW or LMC. The minimum Si depletion in the SMC is consistent with zero. Our depletion-derive...

  4. The depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer

    The protection of the Earth's ozone layer is of the highest importance to mankind. The dangers of its destruction are by now well known. The depletion of that layer has reached record levels. The Antarctic ozone hole covered this year a record area. The ozone layer is predicted to begin recovery in the next one or two decades and should be restored to pre-1980 levels by 2050. This is the achievement of the regime established by the 1985 Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the 1987 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. The regime established by these two agreements has been revised, and made more effective in London (1990), Copenhagen (1992), Vienna (1995), and Beijing (1999)

  5. Copenhagen delegates advance phaseout of ozone depleters

    As expected, delegates at the United Nations Ozone Layer Conference in Copenhagen sped up ozone depleter phaseouts from the 1987 Montreal Protocol and the 1990 London amendments. The changes bring the worldwide production phaseout of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other ozone depleters in developed countries in line with U.S. and European plans announced earlier this year. Adjustments to the protocol, which are binding on the signatories, change the phaseout for CFC, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform production and consumption to January 1, 1996 from 2000. The 75% reduction of 1986 levels from CFCs by January 1, 1994 is a compromise between European pressure for an 85% cut and the US goal of 70%. Halon production is to end January 1, 1994, as anticipated. Developing countries continue to have a 10-year grace period. Friends of the Earth ozone campaign director Liz Cook counters that the phaseout dates were scheduled with concern for the chemical industry, not for the ozone layer

  6. Depleted uranium hexafluoride: Waste or resource?

    Schwertz, N.; Zoller, J.; Rosen, R.; Patton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bradley, C. [USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, Technology, Washington, DC (United States); Murray, A. [SAIC (United States)

    1995-07-01

    the US Department of Energy is evaluating technologies for the storage, disposal, or re-use of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). This paper discusses the following options, and provides a technology assessment for each one: (1) conversion to UO{sub 2} for use as mixed oxide duel, (2) conversion to UO{sub 2} to make DUCRETE for a multi-purpose storage container, (3) conversion to depleted uranium metal for use as shielding, (4) conversion to uranium carbide for use as high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel. In addition, conversion to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} as an option for long-term storage is discussed.

  7. Reactor fuel depletion benchmark of TINDER

    Highlights: • A reactor burnup benchmark of TINDER, coupling MCNP6 to CINDER2008, was performed. • TINDER is a poor candidate for fuel depletion calculations using its current libraries. • Data library modification is necessary if fuel depletion is desired from TINDER. - Abstract: Accurate burnup calculations are key to proper nuclear reactor design, fuel cycle modeling, and disposal estimations. The TINDER code, originally designed for activation analyses, has been modified to handle full burnup calculations, including the widely used predictor–corrector feature. In order to properly characterize the performance of TINDER for this application, a benchmark calculation was performed. Although the results followed the trends of past benchmarked codes for a UO2 PWR fuel sample from the Takahama-3 reactor, there were obvious deficiencies in the final result, likely in the nuclear data library that was used. Isotopic comparisons versus experiment and past code benchmarks are given, as well as hypothesized areas of deficiency and future work

  8. Improvements in EBR-2 core depletion calculations

    The need for accurate core depletion calculations in Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-2) is discussed. Because of the unique physics characteristics of EBR-2, it is difficult to obtain accurate and computationally efficient multigroup flux predictions. This paper describes the effect of various conventional and higher order schemes for group constant generation and for flux computations; results indicate that higher-order methods are required, particularly in the outer regions (i.e. the radial blanket). A methodology based on Nodal Equivalence Theory (N.E.T.) is developed which allows retention of the accuracy of a higher order solution with the computational efficiency of a few group nodal diffusion solution. The application of this methodology to three-dimensional EBR-2 flux predictions is demonstrated; this improved methodology allows accurate core depletion calculations at reasonable cost. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Depletion modeling of liquid dominated geothermal reservoirs

    Olsen, G.

    1984-06-01

    Depletion models for liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs are derived and presented. The depletion models are divided into two categories: confined and unconfined. For both cases depletion models with no recharge (or influx), and depletion models including recharge, are used to match field data from the Svartsengi high temperature geothermal field in Iceland. The influx models included with the mass and energy balances are adopted from the petroleum engineering literature. The match to production data from Svartsengi is improved when influx was included. The Schilthuis steady-state influx gives a satisfactory match. The finite aquifer method of Fetkovitch, and the unsteady state method of Hurst gave reasonable answers, but not as good. The best match is obtained using Hurst simplified solution when lambda = 1.3 x 10{sup -4} m{sup -1}. From the match the cross-sectional area of the aquifer was calculated as 3.6 km{sup 2}. The drawdown was predicted using the Hurst simplified method, and compared with predicted drawdown from a boiling model and an empirical log-log model. A large difference between the models was obtained. The predicted drawdown using the Hurst simplified method falls between the other two. Injection has been considered by defining the net rate as being the production rate minus the injection rate. No thermal of transient effects were taken into account. Prediction using three different net rates shows that the pressure can be maintained using the Hurst simplified method if there is significant fluid reinjection. 32 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Educational software on the ozone layer Depletion

    Psomiadis, Ploutarchos; Chalkidis, Anthimos; Saridaki, Anna; Tampakis, Constantine (Konstantinos); Skordoulis, Constantine

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the design and the formative evaluation of educational software concerning the ‘Depletion of the Ozone Layer’ designed for the students of the Faculty of Primary Education (pre-service teachers) of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. The selection of the topic was based on: i) environmental criteria (importance of the phenomenon, complexity of the phenomenon), ii) societal criteria (local interest, human activities effects), iii) pedagogical cr...

  11. Effects of Streambed Conductance on Stream Depletion

    Greg Lackey; Roseanna M. Neupauer; John Pitlick

    2015-01-01

    Stream depletion, which is the reduction in flow rate of a stream or river due to the extraction of groundwater in a hydraulically connected stream-aquifer system, is often estimated using numerical models. The accuracy of these models depends on the appropriate parameterization of aquifer and streambed hydraulic properties. Streambed conductance is a parameter that relates the head difference between the stream and aquifer to flow across the stream channel. It is a function of streambed hydr...

  12. Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor

    Dong, Bao-Guo; Dong, Pei; Gu, Ji-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The supercritical, reactor core melting and nuclear fuel leaking accidents have troubled fission reactors for decades, and greatly limit their extensive applications. Now these troubles are still open. Here we first show a possible perfect reactor, Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor which is no above accident trouble. We found this reactor could be realized in practical applications in terms of all of the scientific principle, principle of operation, technology, and engineering. Our results...

  13. Ecological and corrosion behavior of depleted uranium

    Stojanović Mirjana D.; Lačnjevac Časlav M.; Mihajlović Marija L.; Petrović Marija V.; Šoštarić Tanja D.; Petrović Jelena T.; Lopičić Zorica R.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental pollution with radionuclides, particularly uranium and its decay products is a serious global problem. The current scientific studies estimated that the contamination originating from TENORM, caused by nuclear and non-nuclear technologies, has significantly increased natural level of radioactivity in the last thirty years. During the last decades all the more were talking about the "new pollutant" - depleted uranium (DU), which has been used i...

  14. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  15. Ecological and corrosion behavior of depleted uranium

    Stojanović Mirjana D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution with radionuclides, particularly uranium and its decay products is a serious global problem. The current scientific studies estimated that the contamination originating from TENORM, caused by nuclear and non-nuclear technologies, has significantly increased natural level of radioactivity in the last thirty years. During the last decades all the more were talking about the "new pollutant" - depleted uranium (DU, which has been used in anti-tank penetrators because of its high density, penetration and pyrophoric properties. It is estimated that during the Gulf War, the war in Bosnia and Yugoslavia and during the invasion of Iraq, 1.4 million missiles with depleted uranium was fired. During the NATO aggression against the ex Yugoslavia in 1999., 112 locations in Kosovo and Metohija, 12 locations in southern Serbia and two locations in Montenegro were bombed. On this occasion, approximately 10 tons of depleted uranium were entered into the environment, mainly on land, where the degree of contamination ranged from 200 Bq / kg to 235 000 Bq/kg, which is up to 1000 times higher than the natural level. Fourteen years ago there was very little information about the behavior of ecological systems damaged by DU penetrators fired. Today, unfortunately, we are increasingly faced with the ―invisible threat" of depleted uranium, which has a strong radioactive and hemotoxic impact on human health. Present paper provides a detailed overview of the current understanding of corrosion and corrosion behavior of DU and environmental factors that control corrosion, together with indicators of environmental impact in order to highlight areas that need further attention in developing remediation programs.

  16. Depleted uranium during the Kosovo war

    Using the depleted uranium (DU) in the war and civil aims is considered. There are characterized the head parts of projectiles (drifts) from DU, used during Balkan wars, are described. The uranium isotope activity and exposure dose rates from β, γ and photon radiation of the drifts are investigated. The content of uranium and plutonium isotopes in the soil samples are measured. It is concluded that DU cannot exercise the acute influence on the health of military man and civil population

  17. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    1990-12-01

    Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

  18. Optical assessment of phytoplankton nutrient depletion

    Heath, M.R.; Richardson, Katherine; Kiørboe, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The ratio of light absorption at 480 and 665 nm by 90% acetone extracts of marine phytoplankton pigments has been examined as a potential indicator of phytoplankton nutritional status in both laboratory and field studies. The laboratory studies demonstrated a clear relationship between nutritional......-replete and nutrient-depleted cells. The field data suggest that the absorption ratio may be a useful indicator of nutritional status of natural phytoplankton populations, and can be used to augment the interpretation of other data....

  19. Understanding the haling power depletion (HPD) method

    The Pennsylvania State Univ. (PSU) is using the university version of the Studsvik Scandpower Code System (CMS) for research and education purposes. Preparations have been made to incorporate the CMS into the PSU Nuclear Engineering graduate class 'Nuclear Fuel Management' course. The information presented in this paper was developed during the preparation of the material for the course. The Haling Power Depletion (HPD) was presented in the course for the first time. The HPD method has been criticized as not valid by many in the field even though it has been successfully applied at PSU for the past 20 years. It was noticed that the radial power distribution (RPD) for low leakage cores during depletion remained similar to that of the HPD during most of the cycle. Thus, the Haling Power Depletion (HPD) may be used conveniently mainly for low leakage cores. Studies were then made to better understand the HPD and the results are presented in this paper. Many different core configurations can be computed quickly with the HPD without using Burnable Poisons (BP) to produce several excellent low leakage core configurations that are viable for power production. Once the HPD core configuration is chosen for further analysis, techniques are available for establishing the BP design to prevent violating any of the safety constraints in such HPD calculated cores. In summary, in this paper it has been shown that the HPD method can be used for guiding the design for the low leakage core. (authors)

  20. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al2O3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values

  1. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    Polk, James E., E-mail: james.e.polk@jpl.nasa.gov; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Capece, Angela M. [Graduate Aerospace Laboratories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  2. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Capece, Angela M.; Katz, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al2O3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  3. Activity-dependent plasticity of electrical synapses: increasing evidence for its presence and functional roles in the mammalian brain.

    Haas, Julie S; Greenwald, Corey M; Pereda, Alberto E

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions mediate electrical synaptic transmission between neurons. While the actions of neurotransmitter modulators on the conductance of gap junctions have been extensively documented, increasing evidence indicates they can also be influenced by the ongoing activity of neural networks, in most cases via local interactions with nearby glutamatergic synapses. We review here early evidence for the existence of activity-dependent regulatory mechanisms as well recent examples reported in mammalian brain. The ubiquitous distribution of both neuronal connexins and the molecules involved suggest this phenomenon is widespread and represents a property of electrical transmission in general. PMID:27230776

  4. Depletions at Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge [Draft

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Estimated depletion associated with the operation of Spitzie Marsh in Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge. Attached are the methods used to estimate depletion....

  5. Lithium Depletion in Fully Convective Pre-Main Sequence Stars

    Bildsten, L; Matzner, C D; Ushomirsky, G; Bildsten, Lars; Brown, Edward F.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Ushomirsky, Greg

    1996-01-01

    We present an analytic calculation of the thermonuclear depletion of lithium in contracting, fully convective, pre-main sequence stars of mass M 0.08 M_sun) and for constraining the masses of lithium depleted stars.

  6. 26 CFR 1.642(e)-1 - Depreciation and depletion.

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Depreciation and depletion. 1.642(e)-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(e)-1 Depreciation and depletion. An estate or trust is allowed the deductions for depreciation and depletion, but only to the extent...

  7. Children's Models of the Ozone Layer and Ozone Depletion.

    Christidou, Vasilia; Koulaidis, Vasilis

    1996-01-01

    The views of 40 primary students on ozone and its depletion were recorded through individual, semi-structured interviews. The data analysis resulted in the formation of a limited number of models concerning the distribution and role of ozone in the atmosphere, the depletion process, and the consequences of ozone depletion. Identifies five target…

  8. The DEG/ENaC cation channel protein UNC-8 drives activity-dependent synapse removal in remodeling GABAergic neurons

    Miller-Fleming, Tyne W; Petersen, Sarah C; Manning, Laura; Matthewman, Cristina; Gornet, Megan; Beers, Allison; Hori, Sayaka; Mitani, Shohei; Bianchi, Laura; Richmond, Janet; Miller, David M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic programming and neural activity drive synaptic remodeling in developing neural circuits, but the molecular components that link these pathways are poorly understood. Here we show that the C. elegans Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channel (DEG/ENaC) protein, UNC-8, is transcriptionally controlled to function as a trigger in an activity-dependent mechanism that removes synapses in remodeling GABAergic neurons. UNC-8 cation channel activity promotes disassembly of presynaptic domains in DD type GABA neurons, but not in VD class GABA neurons where unc-8 expression is blocked by the COUP/TF transcription factor, UNC-55. We propose that the depolarizing effect of UNC-8-dependent sodium import elevates intracellular calcium in a positive feedback loop involving the voltage-gated calcium channel UNC-2 and the calcium-activated phosphatase TAX-6/calcineurin to initiate a caspase-dependent mechanism that disassembles the presynaptic apparatus. Thus, UNC-8 serves as a link between genetic and activity-dependent pathways that function together to promote the elimination of GABA synapses in remodeling neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14599.001 PMID:27403890

  9. Targeted, activity-dependent spinal stimulation produces long-lasting motor recovery in chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    McPherson, Jacob G; Miller, Robert R; Perlmutter, Steve I

    2015-09-29

    Use-dependent movement therapies can lead to partial recovery of motor function after neurological injury. We attempted to improve recovery by developing a neuroprosthetic intervention that enhances movement therapy by directing spike timing-dependent plasticity in spared motor pathways. Using a recurrent neural-computer interface in rats with a cervical contusion of the spinal cord, we synchronized intraspinal microstimulation below the injury with the arrival of functionally related volitional motor commands signaled by muscle activity in the impaired forelimb. Stimulation was delivered during physical retraining of a forelimb behavior and throughout the day for 3 mo. Rats receiving this targeted, activity-dependent spinal stimulation (TADSS) exhibited markedly enhanced recovery compared with animals receiving targeted but open-loop spinal stimulation and rats receiving physical retraining alone. On a forelimb reach and grasp task, TADSS animals recovered 63% of their preinjury ability, more than two times the performance level achieved by the other therapy groups. Therapeutic gains were maintained for 3 additional wk without stimulation. The results suggest that activity-dependent spinal stimulation can induce neural plasticity that improves behavioral recovery after spinal cord injury. PMID:26371306

  10. Benchmark Specification for HTGR Fuel Element Depletion

    explicitly represent the dynamics of neutron slowing down in a heterogeneous environment with randomised grain distributions, but traditional tracking simulations can be extremely slow, and the large number of grains in a fuel element may often represent an extreme burden on computational resources. A number of approximations or simplifying assumptions have been developed to simplify the computational process and reduce the effort. Multi-group (MG) methods, on the other hand, require special treatment of DH fuels in order to properly capture resonance effects, and generally cannot explicitly represent a random distribution of grains due to the excessive computational burden resulting from the spatial grain distribution. The effect of such approximations may be important and has potential to misrepresent the spectrum within a fuel grain. Depletion methods utilised in lattice calculations typically rely on point depletion methods, based on the isotopic inventory of fuel depleted, assuming a single localised neutron flux. This flux is generally determined using either a CE or MG transport solver. Hence, in application to DH fuels, the primary factor influencing the accuracy of a depletion calculation will be the accuracy of the local flux calculated within the transport solution and the cross-sections. The current lack of well-qualified experimental measurements for spent HGTR fuel elements limits the validation of advanced DH depletion method. Because of this shortage of data, this benchmark has been developed as the first, simplest phase in a planned series of increasingly complex set of code-to-code benchmarks. The intent of this benchmark is to encourage submission of a wide range of computational results for depletion calculations in a set of basic fuel cell models. Comparison of results using independent methods and data should provide insight into potential limitations in various modelling approximations. The benchmark seeks to provide the simplest possible models, in

  11. A modern depleted uranium manufacturing facility

    The Specific Manufacturing Capabilities (SMC) Project located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and operated by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co. (LMIT) for the Department of Energy (DOE) manufactures depleted uranium for use in the U.S. Army MIA2 Abrams Heavy Tank Armor Program. Since 1986, SMC has fabricated more than 12 million pounds of depleted uranium (DU) products in a multitude of shapes and sizes with varying metallurgical properties while maintaining security, environmental, health and safety requirements. During initial facility design in the early 1980's, emphasis on employee safety, radiation control and environmental consciousness was gaining momentum throughout the DOE complex. This fact coupled with security and production requirements forced design efforts to focus on incorporating automation, local containment and computerized material accountability at all work stations. The result was a fully automated production facility engineered to manufacture DU armor packages with virtually no human contact while maintaining security, traceability and quality requirements. This hands off approach to handling depleted uranium resulted in minimal radiation exposures and employee injuries. Construction of the manufacturing facility was complete in early 1986 with the first armor package certified in October 1986. Rolling facility construction was completed in 1987 with the first certified plate produced in the fall of 1988. Since 1988 the rolling and manufacturing facilities have delivered more than 2600 armor packages on schedule with 100% final product quality acceptance. During this period there was an annual average of only 2.2 lost time incidents and a single individual maximum radiation exposure of 150 mrem. SMC is an example of designing and operating a facility that meets regulatory requirements with respect to national security, radiation control and personnel safety while achieving production schedules and product quality

  12. A modern depleted uranium manufacturing facility

    Zagula, T.A.

    1995-07-01

    The Specific Manufacturing Capabilities (SMC) Project located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and operated by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co. (LMIT) for the Department of Energy (DOE) manufactures depleted uranium for use in the U.S. Army MIA2 Abrams Heavy Tank Armor Program. Since 1986, SMC has fabricated more than 12 million pounds of depleted uranium (DU) products in a multitude of shapes and sizes with varying metallurgical properties while maintaining security, environmental, health and safety requirements. During initial facility design in the early 1980`s, emphasis on employee safety, radiation control and environmental consciousness was gaining momentum throughout the DOE complex. This fact coupled with security and production requirements forced design efforts to focus on incorporating automation, local containment and computerized material accountability at all work stations. The result was a fully automated production facility engineered to manufacture DU armor packages with virtually no human contact while maintaining security, traceability and quality requirements. This hands off approach to handling depleted uranium resulted in minimal radiation exposures and employee injuries. Construction of the manufacturing facility was complete in early 1986 with the first armor package certified in October 1986. Rolling facility construction was completed in 1987 with the first certified plate produced in the fall of 1988. Since 1988 the rolling and manufacturing facilities have delivered more than 2600 armor packages on schedule with 100% final product quality acceptance. During this period there was an annual average of only 2.2 lost time incidents and a single individual maximum radiation exposure of 150 mrem. SMC is an example of designing and operating a facility that meets regulatory requirements with respect to national security, radiation control and personnel safety while achieving production schedules and product quality.

  13. Simulation of polar ozone depletion: An update

    Solomon, Susan; Kinnison, Doug; Bandoro, Justin; Garcia, Rolando

    2015-08-01

    We evaluate polar ozone depletion chemistry using the specified dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model for the year 2011. We find that total ozone depletion in both hemispheres is dependent on cold temperatures (below 192 K) and associated heterogeneous chemistry on polar stratospheric cloud particles. Reactions limited to warmer temperatures above 192 K, or on binary liquid aerosols, yield little modeled polar ozone depletion in either hemisphere. An imposed factor of three enhancement in stratospheric sulfate increases ozone loss by up to 20 Dobson unit (DU) in the Antarctic and 15 DU in the Arctic in this model. Such enhanced sulfate loads are similar to those observed following recent relatively small volcanic eruptions since 2005 and imply impacts on the search for polar ozone recovery. Ozone losses are strongly sensitive to temperature, with a test case cooler by 2 K producing as much as 30 DU additional ozone loss in the Antarctic and 40 DU in the Arctic. A new finding of this paper is the use of the temporal behavior and variability of ClONO2 and HCl as indicators of the efficacy of heterogeneous chemistry. Transport of ClONO2 from the southern subpolar regions near 55-65°S to higher latitudes near 65-75°S provides a flux of NOx from more sunlit latitudes to the edge of the vortex and is important for ozone loss in this model. Comparisons between modeled and observed total column and profile ozone perturbations, ClONO2 abundances, and the rate of change of HCl bolster confidence in these conclusions.

  14. The Time of Shipbuilding Order Depletion

    Reporter Xing Dan

    2012-01-01

    In 2012, shipbuilding market is facing even colder weather. Depletion of orders, deals that can only ensure cost recovery ndustry which has already bankruptcy of ship yards one after another are also torturing this had many uncertainties. Some shipbuilding enterprises are trying to survive by cutting off parts of their business, some enterprises are leaving like the horses migrating on the African grassland, only those horses that have fights with crocodiles will reach the fertile land and enjoy the next warm spring. the business. It is survived the fierce

  15. Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

    2004-10-19

    In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

  16. Depleted Uranium Penetrators : Hazards and Safety

    Rao, S S; T. Balakrishna Bhat

    1997-01-01

    The depleted uranium (DU) alloy is a state-of-the-art material for kinetic energy penetrators due to its superior ballistic performance. Several countries use DU penetrators in their main battle tanks. There is no gamma radiation hazard to the crew members from stowage of DO rounds. Open air firing can result in environmental contamination and associated hazards due to airborne particles containing essentially U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ and UO/sub 2/. Inhalation of polluted air only through resp...

  17. Uranium: myths and realities the depleted uranium

    Uranium is an element whose name causes worry. The uranium properties are very unknown for people. However the element plays an important roll in the Earth as responsible of numerous natural phenomena, which are vital for life evolution. An example of the low knowledge about uranium has been the Balkan syndrome. A relation between cancers and the use of depleted uranium in ammunition in the Balkan War has been pretended to be established. From the beginning, this hypothesis could have been discarded as it has been confirmed and stated in recent reports of UNEP Commissions who have studied this matter. (Author)

  18. Scientific assessment of ozone depletion: 1991

    1991-01-01

    Over the past few years, there have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer and the influence of changes in chemical composition of the radiative balance of the climate system. Specifically, since the last international scientific review (1989), there have been five major advances: (1) global ozone decreases; (2) polar ozone; (3) ozone and industrial halocarbons; (4) ozone and climate relations; and (5) ozone depletion potentials (ODP's) and global warming potentials (GWP's). These topics and others are discussed.

  19. Microscopic to macroscopic depletion model development for FORMOSA-P

    Microscopic depletion has been gaining popularity with regard to employment in reactor core nodal calculations, mainly attributed to the superiority of microscopic depletion in treating spectral history effects during depletion. Another trend is the employment of loading pattern optimization computer codes in support of reload core design. Use of such optimization codes has significantly reduced design efforts to optimize reload core loading patterns associated with increasingly complicated lattice designs. A microscopic depletion model has been developed for the FORMOSA-P pressurized water reactor (PWR) loading pattern optimization code. This was done for both fidelity improvements and to make FORMOSA-P compatible with microscopic-based nuclear design methods. Needless to say, microscopic depletion requires more computational effort compared with macroscopic depletion. This implies that microscopic depletion may be computationally restrictive if employed during the loading pattern optimization calculation because many loading patterns are examined during the course of an optimization search. Therefore, the microscopic depletion model developed here uses combined models of microscopic and macroscopic depletion. This is done by first performing microscopic depletions for a subset of possible loading patterns from which 'collapsed' macroscopic cross sections are obtained. The collapsed macroscopic cross sections inherently incorporate spectral history effects. Subsequently, the optimization calculations are done using the collapsed macroscopic cross sections. Using this approach allows maintenance of microscopic depletion level accuracy without substantial additional computing resources

  20. Convective Polymer Depletion on Pair Particle Interactions

    Fan, Tai-Hsi; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tuinier, Remco

    2011-11-01

    Understanding transport, reaction, aggregation, and viscoelastic properties of colloid-polymer mixture is of great importance in food, biomedical, and pharmaceutical sciences. In non-adsorbing polymer solutions, colloidal particles tend to aggregate due to the depletion-induced osmotic or entropic force. Our early development for the relative mobility of pair particles assumed that polymer reorganization around the particles is much faster than particle's diffusive time, so that the coupling of diffusive and convective effects can be neglected. Here we present a nonequilibrium two-fluid (polymer and solvent) model to resolve the convective depletion effect. The theoretical framework is based on ground state approximation and accounts for the coupling of fluid flow and polymer transport to better describe pair particle interactions. The momentum and polymer transport, chemical potential, and local viscosity and osmotic pressure are simultaneously solved by numerical approximation. This investigation is essential for predicting the demixing kinetics in the pairwise regime for colloid-polymer mixtures. This work is supported by NSF CMMI 0952646.

  1. Equatorial airglow depletions induced by thermospheric winds

    Meriwether J.W. Jr.; Biondi, M.A.; Anderson, D.N.

    1985-08-01

    Interferometric observations of the 630.0 nm nightglow brightness at the equatorial station of Arequipa. Peru (16.2/sup 0/S, 71.4/sup 0/W geographic, 3.2/sup 0/S dip latitude) have revealed widespread areas of airglow depletion, with reductions in intensity as large as factors of 3 or 4. These depletions correlated closely with large increases of the equatorward (northward) wind and the 630.0 nm kinetic temperature. On occasion, the usually small meridonal wind reached a velocity of 100 m/s near 22/sup h/ LT lasting for 1 or 2 hours. The temperature increases of 10 K or more existed only in the poleward (southward) direction. Comparisons with modeling calculations suggest that this effect results from an upward movement of the ionosphere along the inclined magnetic field lines, driven by the equatorward neutral wind. The airglow column integrated emission rate is consequently decreased by the slower rate of formation and subsequent dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions within the higher F-layer. We conclude that the transient period of equatorward wind is a result of the passage of the midnight pressure bulge.

  2. Equatorial airglow depletions induced by thermospheric winds

    Meriwether, J.W.; Biondi, M.A.; Anderson, D.N.

    1985-08-01

    Interferometric observations on the 630.0 nm nightglow brightness at the equatorial station at Arequipa, Peru (16.2 S, 71.4 W geographic, 3.2 S dip latitude) have revealed widespread areas of airglow depletion, with reductions in intensity as large as factors of 3 or 4. These depletions correlated closely with large increases of the equatorward (northward) wind and the 630.0 nm kinetic temperature. On occasion, the usually small meridional wind reached a velocity of 100 m/s near 22h LT lasting for 1 to 2 hours. The temperature increases of 100K or more existed only in the poleware (southward) direction. Comparisons with modeling calculations suggest that this effect results from an upward movement of the ionosphere along the inclined magnetic field lines, driven by the equatorward neutral wind. The airglow column integrated emission rate is consequently decreased by the slower rate of formation and subsequent dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions within the higher F-layer. We conclude that the transient period of equatorward wind is a result of the passage of the midnight pressure bulge. (Author)

  3. Imaging neurotransmitter uptake and depletion in astrocytes

    Tan, W. [Ames Laboratory-USDOE and Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)]|[Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7200 (United States); Haydon, P.G. [Department of Zoology and Genetics, Laboratory of Cellular Signaling, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Yeung, E.S. [Ames Laboratory-USDOE and Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    1997-08-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) laser-based optical microscope and charge-coupled device (CCD) detection system was used to obtain chemical images of biological cells. Subcellular structures can be easily seen in both optical and fluorescence images. Laser-induced native fluorescence detection provides high sensitivity and low limits of detection, and it does not require coupling to fluorescent dyes. We were able to quantitatively monitor serotonin that has been taken up into and released from individual astrocytes on the basis of its native fluorescence. Different regions of the cells took up different amounts of serotonin with a variety of uptake kinetics. Similarly, we observed different serotonin depletion dynamics in different astrocyte regions. There were also some astrocyte areas where no serotonin uptake or depletion was observed. Potential applications include the mapping of other biogenic species in cells as well as the ability to image their release from specific regions of cells in response to external stimuli. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  4. Bone marrow scintigraphy in hemopoietic depletion states

    Bone marrow scintigraphy was performed in 29 patients with hemopoietic depletion states of various etiology. Two tracers were used for visualization, viz., sup(99m)Tc-sulfur-colloid and 111InCl3;some patients were examined using both indicators. 111InCl3 is bound to transferrin and is adsorbed on the surface of reticulocytes and erythroblasts. A scintillation camera PHO GAMMA SEARLE IV fitted with a moving table and computer CLINCOM were used to obtain whole-body images. The comparison of all scans and marrow puncture smears was done. In patients with aplastic anemia with both hyperplastic or hypoplastic marrow good correlation of bone marrow scans and sternal puncture smears was found. In several cases the scintigraphic examination helped to establish the diagnosis of marrow depletion. A peculiar disadvantage of the imaging method with either sup(99m)Tc-sulfur-colloid or 111InCl3 is that it shows the disorders in erythropoietic and reticuloendothelial cells whereas the defects in myelopoietic cell series and platelet precursors are not provable. According to literature data, great attention is paid to the prognostic value of scintigraphic examination in aplastic anemia. (author)

  5. Molecular beam depletion: a new approach

    Dorado, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    During the last years some interesting experimental results have been reported for experiments in N20, N0 , N0 dimer , H2 , Toluene and BaFCH3 cluster. The main result consists in the observation of molecular beam depletion when the molecules of a pulsed beam interact with a static electric or magnetic field and an oscillating field (RF). In these cases, and as a main difference, instead of using four fields as in the original technique developed by I.I. Rabi and others, only two fields, those which configure the resonant unit, are used. That is, without using the nonhomogeneous magnetic fields. The depletion explanation for I.I. Rabi and others is based in the interaction between the molecular electric or magnetic dipole moment and the non-homogeneous fields. But, obviously, the change in the molecules trajectories observed on these new experiments has to be explained without considering the force provided by the field gradient because it happens without using non-homogeneous fields. In this paper a theoreti...

  6. Halocarbon ozone depletion and global warming potentials

    Cox, Richard A.; Wuebbles, D.; Atkinson, R.; Connell, Peter S.; Dorn, H. P.; Derudder, A.; Derwent, Richard G.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Fisher, D.; Isaksen, Ivar S. A.

    1990-01-01

    Concern over the global environmental consequences of fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has created a need to determine the potential impacts of other halogenated organic compounds on stratospheric ozone and climate. The CFCs, which do not contain an H atom, are not oxidized or photolyzed in the troposphere. These compounds are transported into the stratosphere where they decompose and can lead to chlorine catalyzed ozone depletion. The hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs or HFCs), in particular those proposed as substitutes for CFCs, contain at least one hydrogen atom in the molecule, which confers on these compounds a much greater sensitivity toward oxidation by hydroxyl radicals in the troposphere, resulting in much shorter atmospheric lifetimes than CFCs, and consequently lower potential for depleting ozone. The available information is reviewed which relates to the lifetime of these compounds (HCFCs and HFCs) in the troposphere, and up-to-date assessments are reported of the potential relative effects of CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs, and halons on stratospheric ozone and global climate (through 'greenhouse' global warming).

  7. The down-stream effects of mannan-induced lectin complement pathway activation depend quantitatively on alternative pathway amplification

    Harboe, Morten; Garred, Peter; Karlstrøm, Ellen;

    2009-01-01

    of AP was not observed even at high mannan concentrations since addition of the inhibiting anti-MBL mAb 3F8 completely abolished generation of the terminal C5b-9 complex (TCC). However, selective blockade of AP by anti-factor D inhibited more than 80% of TCC release into the fluid phase after LP...... activation showing that AP amplification is quantitatively responsible for the final effect of initial specific LP activation. TCC generation on the solid phase was distinctly but less inhibited by anti-fD. C2 bypass of the LP pathway could be demonstrated, and AP amplification was also essential during C2...... bypass in LP as shown by complete inhibition of TCC generation in C2-deficient serum by anti-fD and anti-properdin antibodies. In conclusion, the down-stream effect of LP activation depends strongly on AP amplification in normal human serum and in the C2 bypass pathway....

  8. The solar activity dependence of nonmigrating tides in electron density at low and middle latitudes observed by CHAMP and GRACE

    Zhou, Yun-Liang; Wang, Li; Xiong, Chao; Lühr, Hermann; Ma, Shu-Ying

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we use more than a decade of in situ electron density observations from CHAMP and GRACE satellites to investigate the solar activity dependence of nonmigrating tides at both low and middle latitudes. The results indicate that the longitudinal patterns of F region electron density vary with season and latitude, which are exhibiting a wavenumber 4 (WN4) pattern around September equinox at low latitudes and WN1/WN2 patterns during local summer at the southern/northern middle latitudes. These wave patterns in the F region ionosphere can clearly be seen during both solar maximum and minimum years. At low latitudes the absolute amplitudes of DE3 (contributing to the WN4 pattern) are found to be highly related to the solar activity, showing larger amplitudes during solar maximum years. Similarly a solar activity dependence can also be found for the absolute amplitudes of D0, DW2 and DE1 (contributing to the WN1 and WN2 pattern) at middle latitudes. The relative amplitudes (normalized by the zonal mean) of these nonmigrating tides at both low and middle altitudes show little dependence on solar activity. We further found a clear modulation by the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of the relative DE3 amplitudes in both satellite observations, which is consistent with the QBO dependence as reported for the E region temperatures and zonal wind. It also supports the strong coupling of the low-latitude nonmigrating tidal activity between the E and F regions. However, the QBO dependence cannot be found for the relative amplitudes of the nonmigrating tides at middle latitudes, which implies that these tides are generated in situ at F region altitudes.

  9. Design optimization using depletion perturbation theory

    Analysis of the fuel cycle performance of a reactor requires knowledge of the entire fuel burnup history. The optimal design depends upon the desired performance parameter or combination of parameters to be minimized (or maximized). The emphasis to date has been to use some combination of iterations involving a number of direct calculations, static perturbation theory, binary exchange methods, and empirical relationships. The object of this study is to demonstrate an approach to optimization based upon Depletion Perturbation Theory (DPT). The DPT equations directly couple the nuclide burnup equations and the neutron balance equations. The equations require the calculation of forward and adjoint solutions for the neutron flux and nuclide transmutations. The application is for analysis of a modular HTGR. The reactor has axially dependent fuel loadings in order to achieve an axial power shape that keeps fuel temperatures below a specified maximum

  10. Depleted Reactor Analysis With MCNP-4B

    Monte Carlo neutronics calculations are mostly done for fresh reactor cores. There is today an ongoing activity in the development of Monte Carlo plus burnup code systems made possible by the fast gains in computer processor speeds. In this work we investigate the use of MCNP-4B for the calculation of a depleted core of the Soreq reactor (IRR-1). The number densities as function of burnup were taken from the WIMS-D/4 cell code calculations. This particular code coupling has been implemented before. The Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B calculates the coupled transport of neutrons and photons for complicated geometries. We have done neutronics calculations of the IRR-1 core with the WIMS and CITATION codes in the past Also, we have developed an MCNP model of the IRR-1 standard fuel for a criticality safety calculation of a spent fuel storage pool

  11. Vacancy Formation Enthalpy in Polycrystalline Depleted Uranium

    Lund, K. R.; Lynn, K. G.; Weber, M. H.; Okuniewski, M. A.

    2013-06-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy was performed as a function of temperature and beam energy on polycrystalline depleted uranium (DU) foil. Samples were run with varying heat profiles all starting at room temperature. While collecting Doppler-Broadening data, the temperature of the sample was cycled several times. The first heat cycle shows an increasing S-parameter near temperatures of 400K to 500K much lower than the first phase transition of 941K indicating increasing vacancies possibly due to oxygen diffusion from the bulk to the surface. Vacancy formation enthalpies were calculated fitting a model to the data to be 1.6± 0.16 eV. Results are compared to previous work [3,4].

  12. Depleted Uranium Penetrators : Hazards and Safety

    S. S. Rao

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The depleted uranium (DU alloy is a state-of-the-art material for kinetic energy penetrators due to its superior ballistic performance. Several countries use DU penetrators in their main battle tanks. There is no gamma radiation hazard to the crew members from stowage of DO rounds. Open air firing can result in environmental contamination and associated hazards due to airborne particles containing essentially U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ and UO/sub 2/. Inhalation of polluted air only through respirators or nose masks and refraining form ingestion of water or food materials from contaminated environment are safety measures for avoiding exposure to uranium and its toxicity. Infusion of sodium bicarbonate helps in urinary excretion of uranium that may have entered the body.

  13. Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium

    In most circumstances, measurement of uranium excreted in urine at known times after exposure is potentially the most sensitive method for determining the amount of depleted uranium (DU) incorporated. The problems associated with this approach are that natural uranium is always present in urine because of the ingestion of natural uranium in food and drink, and that the uncertainties in the intakes as assessed from excretion measurements can be quite large, because many assumptions concerning the exposure characteristics (time pattern of exposure, route of intake, chemical form, solubility, biokinetics within the body) must be made. Applying currently available methods and instruments for the measurement of uranium in urine samples, DU incorporations of levels relevant with respect to potential health hazards can be detected reliably, even a long time after exposure. (author)

  14. TURTLE 24.0 diffusion depletion code

    TURTLE is a two-group, two-dimensional (x-y, x-z, r-z) neutron diffusion code featuring a direct treatment of the nonlinear effects of xenon, enthalpy, and Doppler. Fuel depletion is allowed. TURTLE was written for the study of azimuthal xenon oscillations, but the code is useful for general analysis. The input is simple, fuel management is handled directly, and a boron criticality search is allowed. Ten thousand space points are allowed (over 20,000 with diagonal symmetry). TURTLE is written in FORTRAN IV and is tailored for the present CDC-6600. The program is core-contained. Provision is made to save data on tape for future reference. (auth)

  15. Arctic Ozone Depletion from UARS MLS Measurements

    Manney, G. L.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements of ozone during four Arctic winters are compared. The evolution of ozone in the lower stratosphere is related to temperature, chlorine monoxide (also measured by MLS), and the evolution of the polar vortex. Lagrangian transport calculations using winds from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office's Stratosphere-Troposphere Data Assimilation system are used to estimate to what extent the evolution of lower stratospheric ozone is controlled by dynamics. Observations, along with calculations of the expected dynamical behavior, show evidence for chemical ozone depletion throughout most of the Arctic lower stratospheric vortex during the 1992-93 middle and late winter, and during all of the 1994-95 winter that was observed by MLS. Both of these winters were unusually cold and had unusually cold and had unusually strong Arctic polar vortices compared to meteorological data over the past 17 years.

  16. Depleted uranium waste assay at AWE

    The Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) at Aldermaston has recently conducted a Best Practical Means (BPM) study, for solid Depleted Uranium (DU) waste assay, in order to satisfy key stakeholders that AWE is applying best practice. This study has identified portable passive High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (HRGS), combined with an analytical software package called Spectral Nondestructive Assay Platform (SNAP), as the preferred option with the best balance between performance and costs. HRGS/SNAP performance has been assessed by monitoring 200 l DU waste drum standards and also heterogeneous, high density drums from DU firing trials. Accuracy was usually within 30 % with Detection Limits (DL) in the region of 10 g DU for short count times. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations have been used to confirm the shape of the calibration curve generated by the SNAP software procured from Eberline Services Inc. (authors)

  17. The MOD depleted uranium program independent review board : closure report

    B. Smith

    2007-01-01

    This closure report was prepared by the MOD’s Depleted Uranium Independent Review Board (IRB; see Appendix A for membership) and summarises the review board’s general observations in respect of MOD’s depleted uranium research programme and the associated independent review process. The report starts by providing an introduction to MOD’s research programme on the health and environmental consequences of depleted uranium (DU), membership of the IRB, the operation of the review...

  18. Control of Single Molecule Fluorescence Dynamics by Stimulated Emission Depletion

    Marsh, R J; Osborne, M A; Bain, A. J.

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of manipulating the single molecule absorption-emission cycle using picosecond stimulated emission depletion (STED) is investigated using a stochastic computer simulation. In the simulation the molecule is subjected to repeated excitation and depletion events using time delayed pairs of excitation (PUMP) and depletion (DUMP) pulses derived from a high repetition rate pulsed laser system. The model is used to demonstrate that a significant and even substantial reduction in the ...

  19. A Novel Depletion-Mode MOS Gated Emitter Shorted Thyristor

    张鹤鸣; 戴显英; 张义门; 马晓华; 林大松

    2000-01-01

    A Novel MOS-gated thyristor, depletion-mode MOS gated emitter shorted thyristor (DMST),and its two structures are proposed. In DMST,the channel of depletion-mode MOS makes the thyristor emitter-based junction inherently short. The operation of the device is controlled by the interruption and recovery of the depletion-mode MOS P channel. The perfect properties have been demonstrated by 2-D numerical simulations and the tests on the fabricated chips.

  20. Effect of greenhouse gas emissions on stratospheric ozone depletion

    Velders GJM; LLO

    1997-01-01

    The depletion of the ozone layer is caused mainly by the increase in emissions of chlorine- and bromine-containing compounds like CFCs, halons, carbon tetrachloride, methyl chloroform and methyl bromide. Emissions of greenhouse gases can affect the depletion of the ozone layer through atmospheric interaction. We studied the interactions in the atmosphere between the greenhouse effect and stratospheric ozone depletion from the point of view of past and future emissions of the anthropogenic com...

  1. Development of heavy concrete mixed with depleted uranium

    Compressive strength and shielding performance tests of heavy weight concrete mixed with depleted Uranium (Depleted Uranium Concrete) were carried out. The depleted uranium pellets (φ 8 mm, height 9.5 mm) were mixed into cement paste instead of coarse aggregate. Specimens with nominal specific gravity of 3.2 - 5.4 were manufactured. The results of the compression strength test showed that compressive strength of more than 30 MPa was obtained with the specimens having the nominal specific gravity of more than 5 and it was confirmed from the shielding performance tests that Depleted Uranium Concrete has shielding corresponding to its nominal specific gravity. (author)

  2. Research on using depleted uranium as nuclear fuel for HWR

    The purpose of our work is to find a way for application of depleted uranium in CANDU reactor by using MOX nuclear fuel of depleted U and Pu instead of natural uranium. From preliminary evaluation and calculation, it was shown that MOX nuclear fuel consisting of depleted uranium enrichment tailings (0.25% 235U) and plutonium (their ratio 99.5%:0.5%) could replace natural uranium in CANDU reactor to sustain chain reaction. The prospects of application of depleted uranium in nuclear energy field are also discussed

  3. The depletion potential in one, two and three dimensions

    R Roth; P-M König

    2005-06-01

    We study the behavior of the depletion potential in binary mixtures of hard particles in one, two, and three dimensions within the framework of a general theory for depletion potential using density functional theory. By doing so we extend earlier studies of the depletion potential in three dimensions to the cases of = 1 and 2 about which little is known, despite their importance for experiments. We also verify scaling relations between depletion potentials in sphere–sphere and wall–sphere geometries in = 3 and in disk–disk and wall–disk geometries in = 2, which originate from geometrical considerations.

  4. Regret causes ego-depletion and finding benefits in the regrettable events alleviates ego-depletion.

    Gao, Hongmei; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Fang; Xu, Yan; Hong, Ying-Yi; Jiang, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that experiencing regret would result in ego-depletion, while finding benefits (i.e., "silver linings") in the regret-eliciting events counteracted the ego-depletion effect. Using a modified gambling paradigm (Experiments 1, 2, and 4) and a retrospective method (Experiments 3 and 5), five experiments were conducted to induce regret. Results revealed that experiencing regret undermined performance on subsequent tasks, including a paper-and-pencil calculation task (Experiment 1), a Stroop task (Experiment 2), and a mental arithmetic task (Experiment 3). Furthermore, finding benefits in the regret-eliciting events improved subsequent performance (Experiments 4 and 5), and this improvement was mediated by participants' perceived vitality (Experiment 4). This study extended the depletion model of self-regulation by considering emotions with self-conscious components (in our case, regret). Moreover, it provided a comprehensive understanding of how people felt and performed after experiencing regret and after finding benefits in the events that caused the regret. PMID:24940811

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in arterial baroreceptor pathways: implications for activity-dependent plasticity at baroafferent synapses.

    Martin, Jessica L; Jenkins, Victoria K; Hsieh, Hui-ya; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2009-01-01

    Functional characteristics of the arterial baroreceptor reflex change throughout ontogenesis, including perinatal adjustments of the reflex gain and adult resetting during hypertension. However, the cellular mechanisms that underlie these functional changes are not completely understood. Here, we provide evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin with a well-established role in activity-dependent neuronal plasticity, is abundantly expressed in vivo by a large subset of developing and adult rat baroreceptor afferents. Immunoreactivity to BDNF is present in the cell bodies of baroafferent neurons in the nodose ganglion, their central projections in the solitary tract, and terminal-like structures in the lower brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius. Using ELISA in situ combined with electrical field stimulation, we show that native BDNF is released from cultured newborn nodose ganglion neurons in response to patterns that mimic the in vivo activity of baroreceptor afferents. In particular, high-frequency bursting patterns of baroreceptor firing, which are known to evoke plastic changes at baroreceptor synapses, are significantly more effective at releasing BDNF than tonic patterns of the same average frequency. Together, our study indicates that BDNF expressed by first-order baroreceptor neurons is a likely mediator of both developmental and post-developmental modifications at first-order synapses in arterial baroreceptor pathways. PMID:19054281

  6. Two-Photon Correlation Spectroscopy in Single Dendritic Spines Reveals Fast Actin Filament Reorganization during Activity-Dependent Growth.

    Jian-Hua Chen

    Full Text Available Two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (2P-FCS within single dendritic spines of living hippocampal pyramidal neurons was used to resolve various subpopulations of mobile F-actin during activity-dependent structural changes such as potentiation induced spine head growth. Two major classes of mobile F-actin were discovered: very dynamic and about a hundred times less dynamic F-actin. Spine head enlargement upon application of Tetraethylammonium (TEA, a protocol previously used for the chemical induction of long-term potentiation (cLTP strictly correlated to changes in the dynamics and filament numbers in the different actin filament fractions. Our observations suggest that spine enlargement is governed by a mechanism in which longer filaments are first cut into smaller filaments that cooperate with the second, increasingly dynamic shorter actin filament population to quickly reorganize and expand the actin cytoskeleton within the spine head. This process would allow a fast and efficient spine head enlargement using a major fraction of the actin filament population that was already present before spine head growth.

  7. Activity-Dependent NPAS4 Expression and the Regulation of Gene Programs Underlying Plasticity in the Central Nervous System

    José Fernando Maya-Vetencourt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The capability of the brain to change functionally in response to sensory experience is most active during early stages of development but it decreases later in life when major alterations of neuronal network structures no longer take place in response to experience. This view has been recently challenged by experimental strategies based on the enhancement of environmental stimulation levels, genetic manipulations, and pharmacological treatments, which all have demonstrated that the adult brain retains a degree of plasticity that allows for a rewiring of neuronal circuitries over the entire life course. A hot spot in the field of neuronal plasticity centres on gene programs that underlie plastic phenomena in adulthood. Here, I discuss the role of the recently discovered neuronal-specific and activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 as a critical mediator of plasticity in the nervous system. A better understanding of how modifications in the connectivity of neuronal networks occur may shed light on the treatment of pathological conditions such as brain damage or disease in adult life, some of which were once considered untreatable.

  8. Activity-dependent branching ratios in stocks, solar x-ray flux, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sandpile model

    Martin, Elliot; Shreim, Amer; Paczuski, Maya

    2010-01-01

    We define an activity-dependent branching ratio that allows comparison of different time series Xt . The branching ratio bx is defined as bx=E[ξx/x] . The random variable ξx is the value of the next signal given that the previous one is equal to x , so ξx={Xt+1∣Xt=x} . If bx>1 , the process is on average supercritical when the signal is equal to x , while if bxefficient market hypothesis.” For stock volumes, solar x-ray flux intensities, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld (BTW) sandpile model, bx is supercritical for small values of activity and subcritical for the largest ones, indicating a tendency to return to a typical value. For stock volumes this tendency has an approximate power-law behavior. For solar x-ray flux and the BTW model, there is a broad regime of activity where bx≃1 , which we interpret as an indicator of critical behavior. This is true despite different underlying probability distributions for Xt and for ξx . For the BTW model the distribution of ξx is Gaussian, for x sufficiently larger than 1, and its variance grows linearly with x . Hence, the activity in the BTW model obeys a central limit theorem when sampling over past histories. The broad region of activity where bx is close to one disappears once bulk dissipation is introduced in the BTW model—supporting our hypothesis that it is an indicator of criticality.

  9. Observed and simulated depletion layers with southward IMF

    N. C. Maynard

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available We present observations from the Polar satellite that confirm the existence of two types of depletion layers predicted under southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF conditions in magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The first depletion type occurs along the stagnation line when IMF BX and/or dipole tilt are/is present. Magnetic merging occurred away from the equator (Maynard et al., 2003 and flux pile-ups developed while the field lines drape to the high-latitude merging sites. This high-shear type of depletion is consistent with the depletion layer model suggested by Zwan and Wolf (1976 for low-shear northward IMF conditions. Expected sites for depletion layers are associated with places where IMF tubes of force first impinge upon the magnetopause. The second depletion type develops poleward of the cusp. Under strongly driven conditions, magnetic fields from Region 1 current closure over the lobes (Siscoe et al., 2002c cause the high-latitude magnetopause to bulge outward, creating a shoulder above the cusp. These shoulders present the initial obstacle with which the IMF interacts. Flow is impeded, causing local flux pile-ups and low-shear depletion layers to form poleward of the cusps. Merging at the high-shear dayside magnetopause is consequently delayed. In both low- and high-shear cases, we show that the depletion layer structure is part of a slow mode wave standing in front of the magnetopause. As suggested by Southwood and Kivelson (1995, the depletions are rarefactions on the magnetopause side of slow-mode density compressions. While highly sheared magnetic fields are often used as proxies for ongoing local magnetic merging, depletion layers are prohibited at merging locations. Therefore, the existence of a depletion layer is evidence that the location of merging must be remote relative to the observation.

  10. Levels of depleted uranium in Kosovo soils

    The United Nations Environment Programme has performed a field survey at 11 sites located in Kosovo, where depleted uranium (DU) ammunitions were used by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) during the last Balkans conflict (1999). Soil sampling was performed to assess the spread of DU ground contamination around and within the NATO target sites and the migration of DU along the soil profile. The 234U/238U and 235U/238U activity concentration ratios have been used as an indicator of natural against anthropogenic sources of uranium. The results show that levels of 238U activity concentrations in soils above 100 Bq.kg-1 can be considered a 'tracer' of the presence of DU in soils. The results also indicate that detectable ground surface contamination by DU is limited to areas within a few metres from localised points of concentrated contamination caused by penetrator impacts. Vertical distribution of DU along the soil profile is measurable up to a depth of 10-20 cm. This latter aspect is of particular relevance for the potential risk of future contamination of groundwater. (author)

  11. Decommissioning plan depleted uranium manufacturing facility

    Aerojet Ordnance Tennessee, Inc. (Aerojet) is decommissioning its California depleted uranium (DU) manufacturing facility. Aerojet has conducted manufacturing and research and development activities at the facility since 1977 under a State of California Source Materials License. The decontamination is being performed by a contractor selector for technical competence through competitive bid. Since the facility will be released for uncontrolled use it will be decontaminated to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). In order to fully apply the principles of ALARA, and ensure the decontamination is in full compliance with appropriate guides, Aerojet has retained Rogers and Associaties Engineering Corporation (RAE) to assist in the decommissioning. RAE has assisted in characterizing the facility and preparing contract bid documents and technical specifications to obtain a qualified decontamination contractor. RAE will monitor the decontamination work effort to assure the contractor's performance complies with the contract specifications and the decontamination plan. The specifications require a thorough cleaning and decontamination of the facility, not just sufficient cleaning to meet the numeric cleanup criteria

  12. Nitrogen chemistry and depletion in starless cores

    Hily-Blant, Pierre; forêts, G Pineau Des; Flower, David

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the chemistry of nitrogen--containing species, principally isotopomers of CN, HCN, and HNC, in a sample of pre-protostellar cores. We used the IRAM 30 m telescope to measure the emission in rotational and hyperfine transitions of CN, HCN, 13CN, H13CN, HN13C, and HC15N, in L 1544, L 183, Oph D, L 1517B, L 310. The observations were made along axial cuts through the dust emission peak, at a number of regularly--spaced offset positions. The observations were reduced and analyzed to obtain the column densities, using the measurements of the less abundant isotopic variants in order to minimize the consequences of finite optical depths in the lines. The observations were compared with the predictions of a free--fall gravitational collapse model, which incorporates a non-equilibrium treatment of the relevant chemistry. We found that CN, HCN, and HNC remain present in the gas phase at densities well above that at which CO depletes on to grains. The CN:HCN and the HNC:HCN abundance ratios are larger th...

  13. Levels of depleted uranium in Kosovo soils

    Sansone, U.; Stellato, L.; Jia, G.; Rosamilia, S.; Gaudino, S.; Barbizzi, S.; Belli, M

    2001-07-01

    The United Nations Environment Programme has performed a field survey at 11 sites located in Kosovo, where depleted uranium (DU) ammunitions were used by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) during the last Balkans conflict (1999). Soil sampling was performed to assess the spread of DU ground contamination around and within the NATO target sites and the migration of DU along the soil profile. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U and {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U activity concentration ratios have been used as an indicator of natural against anthropogenic sources of uranium. The results show that levels of {sup 238}U activity concentrations in soils above 100 Bq.kg{sup -1} can be considered a 'tracer' of the presence of DU in soils. The results also indicate that detectable ground surface contamination by DU is limited to areas within a few metres from localised points of concentrated contamination caused by penetrator impacts. Vertical distribution of DU along the soil profile is measurable up to a depth of 10-20 cm. This latter aspect is of particular relevance for the potential risk of future contamination of groundwater. (author)

  14. Supercontinuum Stimulated Emission Depletion Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    Lesoine, Michael; Bose, Sayantan; Petrich, Jacob; Smith, Emily

    2012-06-13

    Supercontinuum (SC) stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence lifetime imaging is demonstrated by using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) detection. The spatial resolution of the developed STED instrument was measured by imaging monodispersed 40-nm fluorescent beads and then determining their fwhm, and was 36 ± 9 and 40 ± 10 nm in the X and Y coordinates, respectively. The same beads measured by confocal microscopy were 450 ± 50 and 430 ± 30 nm, which is larger than the diffraction limit of light due to underfilling the microscope objective. Underfilling the objective and time gating the signal were necessary to achieve the stated STED spatial resolution. The same fluorescence lifetime (2.0 ± 0.1 ns) was measured for the fluorescent beads by using confocal or STED lifetime imaging. The instrument has been applied to study Alexa Fluor 594-phalloidin labeled F-actin-rich projections with dimensions smaller than the diffraction limit of light in cultured cells. Fluorescence lifetimes of the actin-rich projections range from 2.2 to 2.9 ns as measured by STED lifetime imaging.

  15. Use, effects and legal standing of depleted uranium munitions

    The paper provides a brief description of depleted uranium and its use in weapons. Several exposure scenarios are described, and examples of the use of DU ammunition in training, testing, and combat are provided. A summary of depleted uranium's health and environmental effects follows, and the paper concludes with a brief analysis of the legal standing of DU munitions under international humanitarian law

  16. Surface depletion in the vacuum distillation of metals from bismuth

    Surface depletion was investigated in laboratory- and plant-scale distillation units with mixing by natural convection or by mechanical surface agitation. A model was developed for predicting the degree of surface depletion during the distillation of metals from bismuth as a function of temperature, still pot dimensions, and degree of agitation. This paper discusses those findings

  17. Effect of greenhouse gas emissions on stratospheric ozone depletion

    Velders GJM; LLO

    1997-01-01

    The depletion of the ozone layer is caused mainly by the increase in emissions of chlorine- and bromine-containing compounds like CFCs, halons, carbon tetrachloride, methyl chloroform and methyl bromide. Emissions of greenhouse gases can affect the depletion of the ozone layer through atmospheric i

  18. The Abiotic Depletion Potential: Background, Updates, and Future

    Lauran van Oers

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Depletion of abiotic resources is a much disputed impact category in life cycle assessment (LCA. The reason is that the problem can be defined in different ways. Furthermore, within a specified problem definition, many choices can still be made regarding which parameters to include in the characterization model and which data to use. This article gives an overview of the problem definition and the choices that have been made when defining the abiotic depletion potentials (ADPs for a characterization model for abiotic resource depletion in LCA. Updates of the ADPs since 2002 are also briefly discussed. Finally, some possible new developments of the impact category of abiotic resource depletion are suggested, such as redefining the depletion problem as a dilution problem. This means taking the reserves in the environment and the economy into account in the reserve parameter and using leakage from the economy, instead of extraction rate, as a dilution parameter.

  19. Mineralized water depleted in deuterium and production technique

    Mineralized water depleted in deuterium is similar to natural water but has an isotopic content of 30-120 ppm D/(D+H). One can obtain mineralized water depleted in deuterium both in continuous and in discontinuous way by mixing deuterium depleted water with strong mineralized water obtained by vacuum distillation at atmospheric pressure of natural water. The mixture is saturated with oxygen by bubbling dry air into it at ambient temperature. This invention allows obtaining a product depleted in deuterium similar to natural water with biostimulating properties that can be used as developing medium for living organisms or for human use. The invention has the following qualities: allows the production of deuterium depleted water with chemical composition similar to natural water; allows the precise control of deuterium content in the product. (authors)

  20. Barium depletion study on impregnated cathodes and lifetime prediction

    Roquais, J. M.; Poret, F.; le Doze, R.; Ricaud, J. L.; Monterrin, A.; Steinbrunn, A.

    2003-06-01

    In the thermionic cathodes used in cathode ray-tubes (CRTs), barium is the key element for the electronic emission. In the case of the dispenser cathodes made of a porous tungsten pellet impregnated with Ba, Ca aluminates, the evaporation of Ba determines the cathode lifetime with respect to emission performance in the CRT. The Ba evaporation results in progressive depletion of the impregnating material inside the pellet. In the present work, the Ba depletion with time has been extensively characterized over a large range of cathode temperature. Calculations using the depletion data allowed modeling of the depletion as a function of key parameters. The link between measured depletion and emission in tubes has been established, from which an end-of-life criterion was deduced. Taking modeling into account, predicting accelerated life-tests were performed using high-density maximum emission current (MIK).

  1. Barium depletion study on impregnated cathodes and lifetime prediction

    In the thermionic cathodes used in cathode ray-tubes (CRTs), barium is the key element for the electronic emission. In the case of the dispenser cathodes made of a porous tungsten pellet impregnated with Ba, Ca aluminates, the evaporation of Ba determines the cathode lifetime with respect to emission performance in the CRT. The Ba evaporation results in progressive depletion of the impregnating material inside the pellet. In the present work, the Ba depletion with time has been extensively characterized over a large range of cathode temperature. Calculations using the depletion data allowed modeling of the depletion as a function of key parameters. The link between measured depletion and emission in tubes has been established, from which an end-of-life criterion was deduced. Taking modeling into account, predicting accelerated life-tests were performed using high-density maximum emission current (MIK)

  2. Ozone depletion during solar proton events in solar cycle 21

    Mcpeters, R. D.; Jackman, C. H.

    1985-01-01

    Ozone profile data from the Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet Instrument on Nimbus 7 from 1979 to the present and clear cases of ozone destruction associated with five sudden proton events (SPEs) on June 7, 1979, August 21, 1979, October 13-14, 1981, July 13, 1982, and December 8, 1982 are found. During the SPE on July 13, 1982, the largest of this solar cycle, no depletion at all at 45 km is observed, but there is a 15 percent ozone depletion at 50 km increasing to 27 percent at 55 km, all at a solar zenith angle of 85 deg. A strong variation of the observed depletion with solar zenith angle is found, with maximum depletion occurring at the largest zenith angles (near 85 deg) decreasing to near zero for angles below about 70 deg. The observed depletion is short lived, disappearing within hours of the end of the SPE.

  3. Activity-dependent release of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor from primary sensory neurons detected by ELISA in situ.

    Balkowiec, A; Katz, D M

    2000-10-01

    To define activity-dependent release of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), we developed an in vitro model using primary sensory neurons and a modified ELISA, termed ELISA in situ. Dissociate cultures of nodose-petrosal ganglion cells from newborn rats were grown in wells precoated with anti-BDNF antibody to capture released BDNF, which was subsequently detected using conventional ELISA. Conventional ELISA alone was unable to detect any increase in BDNF concentration above control values following chronic depolarization with 40 mM KCl for 72 hr. However, ELISA in situ demonstrated a highly significant increase in BDNF release, from 65 pg/ml in control to 228 pg/ml in KCl-treated cultures. The efficacy of the in situ assay appears to be related primarily to rapid capture of released BDNF that prevents BDNF binding to the cultured cells. We therefore used this approach to compare BDNF release from cultures exposed for 30 min to either continuous depolarization with elevated KCl or patterned electrical field stimulation (50 biphasic rectangular pulses of 25 msec, at 20 Hz, every 5 sec). Short-term KCl depolarization was completely ineffective at evoking any detectable release of BDNF, whereas patterned electrical stimulation increased extracellular BDNF levels by 20-fold. In addition, the magnitude of BDNF release was dependent on stimulus pattern, with high-frequency bursts being most effective. These data indicate that the optimal stimulus profile for BDNF release resembles that of other neuroactive peptides. Moreover, our findings demonstrate that BDNF release can encode temporal features of presynaptic neuronal activity. PMID:11007900

  4. Activity-dependent endogenous taurine release facilitates excitatory neurotransmission in the neocortical marginal zone of neonatal rats

    Taizhe eQian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the developing cerebral cortex, the marginal zone (MZ, consisting of early-generated neurons such as Cajal-Retzius cells, plays an important role in cell migration and lamination. There is accumulating evidence of widespread excitatory neurotransmission mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA in the MZ. Cajal-Retzius cells express not only GABAA receptors but also α2/β subunits of glycine receptors, and exhibit glycine receptor-mediated depolarization due to high [Cl−]i. However, the physiological roles of glycine receptors and their endogenous agonists during neurotransmission in the MZ are yet to be elucidated. To address this question, we performed optical imaging from the MZ using the voltage-sensitive dye JPW1114 on tangential neocortical slices of neonatal rats. A single electrical stimulus evoked an action-potential-dependent optical signal that spread radially over the MZ. The amplitude of the signal was not affected by glutamate receptor blockers, but was suppressed by either GABAA or glycine receptor antagonists. Combined application of both antagonists nearly abolished the signal. Inhibition of Na+, K+-2Cl− cotransporter by 20 µM bumetanide reduced the signal, indicating that this transporter contributes to excitation. Analysis of the interstitial fluid obtained by microdialysis from tangential neocortical slices with high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that GABA and taurine, but not glycine or glutamate, were released in the MZ in response to the electrical stimulation. The ambient release of taurine was reduced by the addition of a voltage-sensitive Na+ channel blocker. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy indicated that taurine was stored both in Cajal-Retzius and non-Cajal-Retzius cells in the MZ, but was not localized in presynaptic structures. Our results suggest that activity-dependent non-synaptic release of endogenous taurine facilitates excitatory neurotransmission through activation of

  5. Multi-timescale Modeling of Activity-Dependent Metabolic Coupling in the Neuron-Glia-Vasculature Ensemble

    Jolivet, Renaud

    2015-02-26

    Glucose is the main energy substrate in the adult brain under normal conditions. Accumulating evidence, however, indicates that lactate produced in astrocytes (a type of glial cell) can also fuel neuronal activity. The quantitative aspects of this so-called astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS) are still debated. To address this question, we developed a detailed biophysical model of the brain’s metabolic interactions. Our model integrates three modeling approaches, the Buxton-Wang model of vascular dynamics, the Hodgkin-Huxley formulation of neuronal membrane excitability and a biophysical model of metabolic pathways. This approach provides a template for large-scale simulations of the neuron-glia-vasculature (NGV) ensemble, and for the first time integrates the respective timescales at which energy metabolism and neuronal excitability occur. The model is constrained by relative neuronal and astrocytic oxygen and glucose utilization, by the concentration of metabolites at rest and by the temporal dynamics of NADH upon activation. These constraints produced four observations. First, a transfer of lactate from astrocytes to neurons emerged in response to activity. Second, constrained by activity-dependent NADH transients, neuronal oxidative metabolism increased first upon activation with a subsequent delayed astrocytic glycolysis increase. Third, the model correctly predicted the dynamics of extracellular lactate and oxygen as observed in vivo in rats. Fourth, the model correctly predicted the temporal dynamics of tissue lactate, of tissue glucose and oxygen consumption, and of the BOLD signal as reported in human studies. These findings not only support the ANLS hypothesis but also provide a quantitative mathematical description of the metabolic activation in neurons and glial cells, as well as of the macroscopic measurements obtained during brain imaging.

  6. Multi-timescale modeling of activity-dependent metabolic coupling in the neuron-glia-vasculature ensemble.

    Jolivet, Renaud; Coggan, Jay S; Allaman, Igor; Magistretti, Pierre J

    2015-02-01

    Glucose is the main energy substrate in the adult brain under normal conditions. Accumulating evidence, however, indicates that lactate produced in astrocytes (a type of glial cell) can also fuel neuronal activity. The quantitative aspects of this so-called astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS) are still debated. To address this question, we developed a detailed biophysical model of the brain's metabolic interactions. Our model integrates three modeling approaches, the Buxton-Wang model of vascular dynamics, the Hodgkin-Huxley formulation of neuronal membrane excitability and a biophysical model of metabolic pathways. This approach provides a template for large-scale simulations of the neuron-glia-vasculature (NGV) ensemble, and for the first time integrates the respective timescales at which energy metabolism and neuronal excitability occur. The model is constrained by relative neuronal and astrocytic oxygen and glucose utilization, by the concentration of metabolites at rest and by the temporal dynamics of NADH upon activation. These constraints produced four observations. First, a transfer of lactate from astrocytes to neurons emerged in response to activity. Second, constrained by activity-dependent NADH transients, neuronal oxidative metabolism increased first upon activation with a subsequent delayed astrocytic glycolysis increase. Third, the model correctly predicted the dynamics of extracellular lactate and oxygen as observed in vivo in rats. Fourth, the model correctly predicted the temporal dynamics of tissue lactate, of tissue glucose and oxygen consumption, and of the BOLD signal as reported in human studies. These findings not only support the ANLS hypothesis but also provide a quantitative mathematical description of the metabolic activation in neurons and glial cells, as well as of the macroscopic measurements obtained during brain imaging. PMID:25719367

  7. Regulation of new depleted uranium uses

    This report evaluates how the existing U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory structure and pending modifications would affect full deployment into radiologically uncontrolled areas of certain new depleted uranium (DU) uses being studied as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's DU uses research and development program. Such new DU uses include as catalysts (for destroying volatile organic compounds in off-gases from industrial processes and for hydrodesulfurization [HDS] of petroleum fuels), semiconductors (for fabricating integrated circuits, solar cells, or thermoelectric devices, especially if such articles are expected to have service in hostile environments), and electrodes (for service in solid oxide fuel cells, in photoelectrochemical cells used to produce hydrogen, and in batteries). The report describes each new DU use and provides a detailed analysis of whether any existing NRC licensing exemption or general license would be available to users of products and devices manufactured to deploy the new use. Although one existing licensing exemption was found to be possibly available for catalysts used for HDS of petroleum fuels and one general license was found to be possibly available for catalysts, semiconductors, and electrodes used in hydrogen production or batteries, existing regulations would require most users of products and devices deploying new DU uses to obtain specific source material licenses from the NRC or an Agreement State. This situation would not be improved by pending regulatory modifications. Thus, deployment of new DU uses may be limited because persons having no previous experience with NRC or Agreement State regulations may be hesitant to incur the costs and inconvenience of regulatory compliance, unless using a DU-containing product or device offers a substantial economic benefit over nonradioactive alternatives. Accordingly, estimating the risk of deploying new DU-containing products and devices in certain

  8. Depletion of ozone layer in the stratosphere

    Ozone is a minor and naturally produced component in the stratosphere which encircles the earth some 15 to 45 Km above its surface. It is not an abundant chemical in the atmosphere but it is highly significant due to its property of shielding the earth from much of the potentially damaging ultraviolet radiation coming from the sun. Should ozone disappear, the earth would become uninhabitable for most forms of life. Due to this property, ozone depletion in the stratosphere is now recognized as a major environmental problem with potentially catastrophic effects. Approximately 90% of ozone is found in the stratosphere where its peak concentrations are about 300 ppb. The altitude of peak concentrations varies from about 25 Km near the equator to approximately 15 Km in the polar region (Botkin and Keller, 1995). Ozone concentration is measured in Dobson Units (D.U.) One D.U. is equivalent to a concentration of 1 ppb of ozone. If brought to normal pressure at sea level, all of the existing atmospheric ozone would form a band of no more than 3 mm thick around the earth. (Kemp. 1994). Concentrations of ozone in the stratosphere have been measured for more than 70 years. Today there is nearly a 30-years record of ozone concentrations available from more than 30 locations around the world. It was found that in the Antarctic zone, the ozone concentrations, taken each year in October, decreased from 300 D.U. in 1970 to 200 D.U. in 1984 and a low of about 90 D.U. in 1993. The records indicate that the ozone concentrations in the stratosphere have been decreasing since mid 1960s. (Botkin and Keller, 1995). The concentration of ozone in Polar Regions is more than that near equator. In fact much of ozone is produced near the equator but moves from equator towards poles with global circulation patterns which are not well understood. (author)

  9. Deuterium depleted water. Present applications and prospects

    The deuterium depleted water, DDW, is distilled, microbiologically pure water with an isotopic concentration D/(D+H) under 145 ppm, the natural water value. At ICSI Rm Valcea a procedure was developed and a patent was recorded for the method and installation for obtaining DDW. The procedure consists in vacuum distillation of natural water on columns equipped with highly performing ordered packing. The system allows obtaining DDW at isotopic concentration within the range 20-120 ppm. Biological studies showed that treatment with this DDW reduced significantly the high rate in L929 linear fibroblast cells and annihilated the tumoral growth in xenotransplant. It was suggested that the deuterium occurring naturally has an essential in converting the signals regulating the cellular cycling. A vast program based on collaborations of ICSI with different specialized research institutes in Romania was initiated and important results already obtained among which one can mention: - DDW determines an increase of vascular reactivity seemingly endotelio-dependent and implying radical species (superoxides, nitric oxides); - immunity defense reaction represented by the opsonic, bactericide and phagocytic capacity are stimulated; - animals pre-treated with DDW present an increased resistance to both sub-lethal and lethal doses of gamma radiations, suggesting a radioprotective property; - study of artificial fecundation in fishes with fecundating solution containing an 1:1 mixture of DDW and distilled water showed the beneficent effects both in embryonal development and growth in alevins; - an increase of metabolism rate in aquatic macrophytes following the dilution of spectral energy of sea water mixed with DDW was observed; - studies on three genotypes of Zea mays showed significant effects on coleoptile growth. At present programs for studying prevention and treatment of tumors and various cancer forms are underway

  10. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  11. Removal of depleted uranium from contaminated soils

    Contamination of soil and water with depleted uranium (DU) has increased public health concerns due to the chemical toxicity of DU at elevated dosages. For this reason, there is great interest in developing methods for DU removal from contaminated sources. Two DU laden soils, taken from U.S. Army sites, were characterized for particle size distribution, total uranium concentration and removable uranium. Soil A was found to be a well graded sand containing a total of 3210 mg/kg DU (3.99 x 104 Bq/kg, where a Becquerel (Bq) is a unit of radiation). About 83% of the DU in the fines fraction (particle diameter 4 Bq/kg)) was associated with the carbonate, iron and manganese oxide and organic matter fractions of the material. Soil B was classified as a sandy silt with total DU of 1560 mg/kg (1.94 x 104 Bq/kg). The DU content in the fines fraction was 5171 mg/kg (6.43 x 104 Bq/kg). Sequential extraction of the Soil B fines fraction indicated that 64% of the DU was present either as soluble U(VI) minerals or as insoluble U(IV). Citric acid, sodium bicarbonate and hydrogen peroxide were used in batch experiments to extract DU from the fines fraction of both soils. Citric acid and sodium bicarbonate were relatively successful for Soil A (50-60% DU removal), but not for Soil B (20-35% DU removal). Hydrogen peroxide was found to significantly increase DU extraction from both soils, attaining removals up to 60-80%

  12. Biological effects of deuterium - depleted water

    Deuterium-depleted water (DDW) is represented by water that has an isotopic content smaller than 145 ppm D/(D + H). DDW production technique consists in the separation of deuterium from water by a continuous distillation process under pressure of about 133.3 mbar. The water used as raw material has a isotopic content of 145 ppm D/(D + H) and can be demineralized water, distillated water or condensed-steam. DDW results as a distillate with an isotopic deuterium content of 15-80 ppm, depending on the level we want to achieve. Beginning with 1996 the Institute of Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies, DDW producer, co-operated with Romanian specialized institutes for studying the biological effects of DDW. The role of naturally occurring D in living organisms was examined by using DDW instead of natural water. These investigations led to the following conclusions: - DDW caused a tendency towards the increase of the basal tone, accompanied by the intensification of the vasoconstrictor effects of phenylefrine, noradrenaline and angiotensin; the increase of the basal tone and vascular reactivity produced by the DDW persists after the removal of the vascular endothelium; - Animals treated with DDW showed an increase of the resistance both to sublethal and lethal gamma radiation doses, suggesting a radioprotective action by the stimulation of non-specific immune defense mechanisms; - DDW stimulates immuno-defense reactions represented by the opsonic, bactericidal and phagocyte capacity of the immune system together with an increase in the number of poly-morphonuclear neutrophils; - Investigations regarding artificial reproduction of fish with DDW fecundated solutions confirmed favorable influence in embryo growth stage and resistance and following growth stages; - It was studied germination, growth and quantitative character variability in plants; one can remark the favorable influence of DDW on biological processes in plants in various ontogenetic stages. (authors)

  13. Determination of depleted uranium in fish

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a by-product of the uranium enrichment process for nuclear fuel. According to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC, a confirmatory method for the quantification of DU in freeze-dried fish was developed by isotope ratio dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (IR-DRC-ICP-MS). A preliminary study was performed to determine the following parameters: instrumental detection limit (IDL), isotopic ratio measurement limit (IRML), percentage of DU (PDU) in presence of natural uranium (NU) and limit of quantification (LoQDU). The analyses were carried out by means of IR-DRC-ICP-MS. Ammonia was the reaction gas used for the dynamic reaction cell. In addition, a sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (SF-ICP-MS) was employed to calculate the within-laboratory reproducibility. For the confirmatory method the following parameters were determined: (a) trueness; (b) precision; (c) critical concentrations alpha and beta (CCα, CCβ); (d) specificity; (e) stability. Trueness was assessed by using the recovery tests. The recovery and within-laboratory reproducibility were determined by fortifying the blank digested solution of dogfish tissue: six aliquots were fortified at 1, 1.5 and 2 times the LOQDU with 25.0, 37.5 and 50.0 ng L-1 or 4.16, 6.24, 8.32 μg kg-1 with a recovery of -8.2, +9.5 and +9.6%, respectively and a within-laboratory reproducibility (three analytical run) of 15.5, 8.0 and 11.0%, respectively. The results for the decision limit and the detection capability were: CCα = 11.69 ng L-1 and CCβ = 19.8 ng L-1. The digested solutions resulted to be stable during testing time (60 days) and the method can be considered highly specific as well

  14. Impact of ozone depletion on immune function

    Jeevan, A.; Kripke, M.L. (Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Immunology)

    1993-06-01

    Depletion of stratospheric ozone is expected to lead to an increase in the amount of UV-B radiation present in sunlight. In addition to its well known ability to cause skin cancer, UV-B radiation has been shown to alter the immune system. The immune system is the body's primary defense mechanism against infectious diseases and protects against the development of certain types of cancer. Any impairment of immune function may jeopardize health by increasing susceptibility to infectious diseases, increasing the severity of infections, or delaying recovery for infections. In addition, impaired immune function can increase the incidence of certain cancers, particularly cancers of the skin. Research carried out with laboratory animals over the past 15 years has demonstrated that exposure of the skin to UV-B radiation can suppress certain types of immune responses. These include rejection of UV-induced skin cancers and melanomas, contact allergy reactions to chemicals, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to microbial and other antigens, and phagocytosis and elimination of certain bacteria from lymphoid tissues. Recent studies with mycobacterial infection of mice demonstrated that exposure to UV-B radiation decreased the delayed hypersensitivity response to mycobacterial antigens and increased the severity of infection. In humans, UV-B radiation has also been shown to impair the contact allergy response. These studies demonstrate that UV radiation can decrease immune responses in humans and laboratory and raise the possibility that increased exposure to UV-B radiation could adversely affect human health by increasing the incidence or severity of certain infectious diseases.

  15. Ozone Depletion Potential of CH3Br

    Sander, Stanley P.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, Nien Dak; Scott, Courtney; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Weisenstein, Debra K.

    1998-01-01

    The ozone depletion potential (ODP) of methyl bromide (CH3Br) can be determined by combining the model-calculated bromine efficiency factor (BEF) for CH3Br and its atmospheric lifetime. This paper examines how changes in several key kinetic data affect BEF. The key reactions highlighted in this study include the reaction of BrO + H02, the absorption cross section of HOBr, the absorption cross section and the photolysis products of BrON02, and the heterogeneous conversion of BrON02 to HOBR and HN03 on aerosol particles. By combining the calculated BEF with the latest estimate of 0.7 year for the atmospheric lifetime of CH3Br, the likely value of ODP for CH3Br is 0.39. The model-calculated concentration of HBr (approximately 0.3 pptv) in the lower stratosphere is substantially smaller than the reported measured value of about I pptv. Recent publications suggested models can reproduce the measured value if one assumes a yield for HBr from the reaction of BrO + OH or from the reaction of BrO + H02. Although the DeAlore et al. evaluation concluded any substantial yield of HBr from BrO + HO2 is unlikely, for completeness, we calculate the effects of these assumed yields on BEF for CH3Br. Our calculations show that the effects are minimal: practically no impact for an assumed 1.3% yield of HBr from BrO + OH and 10% smaller for an assumed 0.6% yield from BrO + H02.

  16. Deuterium depleted water. Romanian achievements and prospects

    The deuterium depleted water (DDW) is microbiologically pure distilled water with a deuterium content lower than that of natural waters which amounts to 140 - 150 ppm D/(D+H); variations depend on geographical zone and altitude. The procedure of obtaining DDW is based on isotopic separation of natural water by vacuum distillation. Isotope concentration can be chosen within 20 to 120 ppm D/(D+H). The ICSI at Rm. Valcea has patented the procedure and equipment for the production of DDW. According to the document SF-01-2002/INC-DTCI - ICSI Rm. Valcea, the product has a D/(D+H) isotope concentration of 25 ± 5. Studies and research for finding the effects and methods of application in different fields were initiated and developed in collaboration with different institutes in Romania. The following important results obtained so far could be mentioned: - absence of toxicity upon organisms; - activation of vascular reactivity; - enhancement of defence capacity of the organism through non-specific immunity activation; - increase of salmonid reproduction capacity and enhancement of the adaptability of alevins to the environmental conditions; - radioprotective effect to ionizing radiation; - maintaining meat freshness through osmotic shock; - stimulation of growth of aquatic macrophytes; - enhancement of culture plant development in certain ontogenetic stages. Mostly, the results and practical applications of the research were patented and awarded with gold medals at international invention fairs. At present, research-development programmes are undergoing to find active biological features of DDW in fighting cancer, on one hand, and its applicability as food additive of pets or performing animals, on the other hand

  17. Cost estimate report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride : storage of depleted uranium metal

    This report contains a cost analysis of the long-term storage of depleted uranium in the form of uranium metal. Three options are considered for storage of the depleted uranium. These options are aboveground buildings, partly underground vaults, and mined cavities. Three cases are presented. In the first case, all the depleted uranium metal that would be produced from the conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6) generated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) prior to July 1993 would be stored at the storage facility (100% Case). In the second case, half the depleted uranium metal would be stored at this storage facility (50% Case). In the third case, one-quarter of the depleted uranium metal would be stored at the storage facility (25% Case). The technical basis for the cost analysis presented in this report is principally found in the companion report, ANL/EAD/TM-100, ''Engineering Analysis Report for the Long-Term Management of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride: Storage of Depleted Uranium Metal'', prepared by Argonne National Laboratory

  18. Deuterium depleted water. Current and potential applications

    Deuterium depleted water (DDW) is distilled, microbiologically pure water with a D/(D+H) isotopic content lower than the value 145 ppm of natural water. It is practically unnoxious, with a toxic potential pT 50 > 0.01 mol/kg c.m. At ICSI a procedure was worked out and patented and a facility was achieved for obtaining DDW. The procedure consists in continuous vacuum distillation of natural water on columns with highly performing ordered packings. DDW of controlled isotopic concentration D/(D+H) within the range 20-120 ppm, of quality similar to distilled water can be currently produced. Many studies were reported in literature evidencing the active biological properties of DDW. DDW lowered significantly the high division rate of the L929 linear fibroblast cell and blocked the tumoral growth in xenotransplants. It was suggested that the naturally occurring deuterium plays a prominent role in converting the signal implied in cellular cycle mechanism. Having in view the high significance of the experiments in this field, ICSI has promoted a programme of collaborations with Romanian institutes of various specialties to evaluate the biological effects of DDW with a D/(D+H) concentration of about 30 ppm. The following results obtained so far obtained should be highlighted: - DDW causes an increase of vascular reactivity both in rings isolated from thorax aorta and in vivo upon arterial pressure. The reactivity increase seems to be endothelium-depended and is achieved with participation of the radical species (superoxides, nitric oxide); - DDW stimulates the immunodefence reaction, as represented by the opsonic, bactericide and phagocytic capacity of the immunity system as well as by the increase of the number of polymorphonucleates; - animals pre-treated with DDW exhibit an increased resistance both to sublethal and lethal γ radiation doses, what suggests a radioprotective effect; - studies on artificial fecundation in fishes with fecundant solutions containing a 1

  19. CO depletion in ATLASGAL-selected high-mass clumps

    Giannetti, A.; Wyrowski, F.; Brand, J.; Csengeri, T.; Fontani, F.; Walmsley, C. M.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Beuther, H.; Schuller, F.; Güsten, R.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    In the low-mass regime, it is found that the gas-phase abundances of C-bearing molecules in cold starless cores rapidly decrease with increasing density. Here the molecules tend to stick to the grains, forming ice mantles. We study CO depletion in the TOP100 sample of the ATLASGAL survey, and investigate its correlation with evolutionary stage and with the physical parameters of the sources. We use low-J emission lines of CO isotopologues and the dust continuum emission to infer the depletion factor fD. RATRAN one-dimensional models were also used to determine fD and to investigate the presence of depletion above a density threshold. The isotopic ratios and optical depth were derived with a Bayesian approach. We find a significant number of clumps with a large CO depletion, up to ˜20. Larger values are found for colder clumps, thus for earlier evolutionary phases. For massive clumps in the earliest stages of evolution we estimate the radius of the region where CO depletion is important to be a few tenths of a pc. CO depletion in high-mass clumps seems to behave as in the low-mass regime, with less evolved clumps showing larger values for the depletion than their more evolved counterparts, and increasing for denser sources.

  20. Observations of TEC Depletions in South and Central America

    Valladares, C. E.; Sheehan, R. E.; Pradipta, R.

    2014-12-01

    TEC values gathered with several networks of GPS receivers, which operated in South and Central America and the Caribbean region between 2010 and 2013, have been used to investigate the characteristics and morphology of TEC depletions that develop at these locations. In South America the TEC depletions are associated with low-latitude plasma bubbles. In Central America and the Caribbean region, we found that TEC depletions that occur during magnetically active conditions (Kp > 5o), persist for very long periods and sometimes remain even during afternoon hours. During quiet magnetic conditions, TEC depletions occur around the June solstice in Central America and during the December solstice in the Southern part of South America. We have also studied possible links between mid-latitude depletions and the formation of plasma bubbles at low latitudes. In addition, TEC measurements from North America have been utilized to determine the poleward extension of the mid-latitude depletions. These depletions do not appear to be related to auroral plasma processes or to storm enhanced densities (SED). We are studying the possibility that their initiation process is associated with the disturbance dynamo or the prompt penetrating electric field that develop during storm conditions.

  1. Development of the point-depletion code DEPTH

    Highlights: ► The DEPTH code has been developed for the large-scale depletion system. ► DEPTH uses the data library which is convenient to couple with MC codes. ► TTA and matrix exponential methods are implemented and compared. ► DEPTH is able to calculate integral quantities based on the matrix inverse. ► Code-to-code comparisons prove the accuracy and efficiency of DEPTH. -- Abstract: The burnup analysis is an important aspect in reactor physics, which is generally done by coupling of transport calculations and point-depletion calculations. DEPTH is a newly-developed point-depletion code of handling large burnup depletion systems and detailed depletion chains. For better coupling with Monte Carlo transport codes, DEPTH uses data libraries based on the combination of ORIGEN-2 and ORIGEN-S and allows users to assign problem-dependent libraries for each depletion step. DEPTH implements various algorithms of treating the stiff depletion systems, including the Transmutation trajectory analysis (TTA), the Chebyshev Rational Approximation Method (CRAM), the Quadrature-based Rational Approximation Method (QRAM) and the Laguerre Polynomial Approximation Method (LPAM). Three different modes are supported by DEPTH to execute the decay, constant flux and constant power calculations. In addition to obtaining the instantaneous quantities of the radioactivity, decay heats and reaction rates, DEPTH is able to calculate the integral quantities by a time-integrated solver. Through calculations compared with ORIGEN-2, the validity of DEPTH in point-depletion calculations is proved. The accuracy and efficiency of depletion algorithms are also discussed. In addition, an actual pin-cell burnup case is calculated to illustrate the DEPTH code performance in coupling with the RMC Monte Carlo code

  2. Solution of depletion chain equations using nonsingular Bateman coefficients

    The exact solution of the depletion chain equations for arbitrary values of depletion constants is obtained. New nonsingular coefficients are introduced, and recurrence formulas that provide an efficient and accurate method of calculation are derived. Generality and simplicity of the method are found to be useful in evaluating depletion chains with one hundred or more nuclides in the chain, such as the s-process chain in studies of nucleosynthesis by neutron capture. The method can also be used to check the validity of approximate solutions

  3. Iron Depletion into Dust Grains in Galactic Planetary Nebulae

    Delgado-Inglada, G

    2010-01-01

    We present preliminary results of an analysis of the iron depletion factor into dust grains for a sample of 20 planetary nebulae (PNe) from the Galactic bulge. We compare these results with the ones we obtained in a prior analysis of 28 Galactic disk PNe and 8 Galactic H II regions. We derive high depletion factors in all the objects, suggesting that more than 80% of their iron atoms are condensed into dust grains. The range of iron depletions in the sample PNe covers about two orders of magnitude, and we explore here if the differences are related to the PN morphology. However, we do not find any significant correlation.

  4. Nondestructive testing of 105mm depleted uranium penetrators

    The report is an information update concerning the nondestructive testing (NDT) activities at Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) for depleted uranium penetrator (XM774, XM833) quality inspection and evaluation. This report covers NDT activities from August to November, 1979

  5. TISSUE DISTRIBUTION AND RESIDUE DEPLETION OF OXYTETRACYCLINE IN THE RABBIT

    Villa, R.; Cagnardi, P; Bacchetta, P.; Sonzogni, O.; Faustini, M.; Carli, S.

    2001-01-01

    Abstract not available. Villa, R.; Cagnardi, P.; Bacchetta, P.; Sonzogni, O.; Faustini, M.; Carli, S. (2001). TISSUE DISTRIBUTION AND RESIDUE DEPLETION OF OXYTETRACYCLINE IN THE RABBIT. http://hdl.handle.net/10251/10016.

  6. Verification of Depleted Uranium in non-Nuclear use

    The present work describes a system for the verification of depleted uranium-being recognized by the International Atomic Energy as a Nuclear which should be accounted for and put under Nuclear Safeguards even if it is used for non-nuclear applications such as in shielding against gamma radiation in Radiotherapy facilities, industrial radiography systems or as counterweights in air craft. Measurement of depleted uranium is performed by employing Non-Destructive Assay techniques, which use a gamma-ray spectrometer system and/or a neutron coincidence counter system. Results show that the used techniques can detect the presence of depleted uranium in the investigated materials. Also, quantitative values of U-235 enrichment and mass content of the assayed material could be obtained with a precision of better than 7%. This work would find important applications for the verification and control of depleted uranium for the purposes of Nuclear Safeguards

  7. Mass measurement of depleted uranium components with coincidence neutron count

    The technique of the mass measurement of depleted uranium components was studied with active and passive coincidence neutron count. A well neutron coincidence counter was used to measure the coincidence neutron counts of the depleted uranium components with various mass. Am-Be source was selected as the external neutron source for induced fission in the active measurement, and a shield was optimized to reduce the accidental coincidence counts. In the active measurement, the maximum relative deviation of the linear fit mass from the nominal mass of the depleted uranium components is 11.71%, compared to 4.05% in the passive measurement. It is proved that because of the weakening of the shape influence, the passive method is more accurate and reliable to measure the mass of depleted uranium components than the active method. (authors)

  8. Prediction Method of Safety Mud Density in Depleted Oilfields

    Yuan Jun-Liang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available At present, many oilfields were placed in the middle and late development period and the reservoir pressure depleted usually, resulting in more serious differential pressure sticking and drilling mud leakage both in the reservoir and cap rock. In view of this situation, a systematic prediction method of safety mud density in depleted oilfields was established. The influence of reservoir depletion on stress and strength in reservoir and cap formation were both studied and taken into the prediction of safety mud density. The research showed that the risk of differential pressure sticking and drilling mud leakage in reservoir and cap formation were both increased and they were the main prevention object in depleted oilfields drilling. The research results were used to guide the practice drilling work, the whole progress gone smoothly.

  9. Groundwater depletion in the United States (1900-2008)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A natural consequence of groundwater withdrawals is the removal of water from subsurface storage, but the overall rates and magnitude of groundwater depletion in...

  10. The Role of Gluon Depletion in J/$\\psi$ Suppression

    Hwa, R C; Pisútová, N

    1997-01-01

    The depletion of gluons as the parton flux traverses a nucleus in a heavy-ion collision can influence the production rate of heavy-quark states. Thus the suppression of $J/\\psi$ can be due to gluon depletion in the initial state in addition to nuclear and hadronic absorption in the final state. A formalism is developed to describe the depletion effect. It is shown that, without constraints from other experimental facts beside the $J/\\psi$ suppression data in $pA$ and $AB$ collisions, it is not possible to determine the relative importance of depletion vs absorption. Possible relevance to the enhanced suppression seen in the $Pb - Pb$ data is mentioned but not studied.

  11. Net depletion determination for Hankin Wetland Development Project

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This memorandum contains the analysis and the data used to produce the net depletion that would occur as a result of the Hankin Wetland Development Project.

  12. Importance of energetic solar protons in ozone depletion

    CHLORINE-catalysed depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer has commanded considerable attention since 1985, when Farman et al. observed a decrease of 50% in the total column ozone over Antarctica in the austral spring. Here we examine the depletion of stratospheric ozone caused by the reaction of ozone with nitric oxide generated by energetic solar protons, associated with solar flares. During large solar flares in March 1989, satellite observations indicated that total column ozone was depleted by ∼ 9% over ∼ 20% of the total area between the South Pole and latitude 70oS. Chlorine-catalysed ozone depletion takes place over a much larger area, but our results indicate that the influence of solar protons on atmospheric ozone concentrations should not be ignored. (author)

  13. AFSC/REFM: Pacific cod Localized Depletion Study

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Localized Depletion study for Pacific cod 2001-2005. Study was conducted using cod pot gear to measure localized abundance of Pacific cod inside and...

  14. Use of Depleted Uranium Weapons in Contemporary Military Interventions

    Okafor-Yarwood, Ifesinachi Marybenedette

    2014-01-01

    This research note examines the use of depleted uranium weapons in contemporarymilitary interventions and the hazardous effects of their use. It also demonstratesattempts made by the United States and the United Kingdom to block anyinternational efforts to ban the use of these weapons. Although there is no laboratory evidence, experiential evidence from Iraq indicates that depleted uranium weapons are dangerous to human health and the environment. This research note argues that the United Nat...

  15. Depletion models can predict shorebird distribution at different spatial scales.

    Gill, J. A.; Sutherland, W. J.; Norris, K.

    2001-01-01

    Predicting the impact of habitat change on populations requires an understanding of the number of animals that a given area can support. Depletion models enable predictions of the numbers of individuals an area can support from prey density and predator searching efficiency and handling time. Depletion models have been successfully employed to predict patterns of abundance over small spatial scales, but most environmental change occurs over large spatial scales. We test the ability of depleti...

  16. Retrieval of buried depleted uranium from the T-1 trench

    The Trench 1 remediation project will be conducted this year to retrieve depleted uranium and other associated materials from a trench at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. The excavated materials will be segregated and stabilized for shipment. The depleted uranium will be treated at an offsite facility which utilizes a novel approach for waste minimization and disposal through utilization of a combination of uranium recycling and volume efficient uranium stabilization

  17. Assessment Of Depleted Uranium Contamination In Selective IRAQI Soils

    The aim of this research was to measure the radiation exposure rates in three selected Locations in southren part of Iraq (two in Nassireya, and one in Amara) resulted from the existence of depleted uranium in soil and metal pieces have been taken from destroyed tank and study mathmatically the concentration of Depleted Uranium by its dispersion from soil surface by winds and rains from 2003 to 2007. The exposure rates were measured using inspector device, while depleted uranium concentration in soil samples and tank's matal pieces were detected with Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors(SSNTDs). The wind and rain effects were considered in the calculation of dispersion effect on depleted uranium concentration in soil, where the wind effect were calculated with respect to the sites nature and soil conditions, and rain effect with respect to dispersive-convective equation for radionuclide in soil. The results obtained for the exposure rates were high near the penetrated surfac, moderate and low in soil and metal pices. The Depleted Uranium concentration in soil and metal pieces have the highest value in Nassireya. The results from dispersion calculation (wind & rain) showed that the depleted uranium concentration in 2008 will be less than the danger level and in allowable contamination range

  18. Yield, utilization, storage and ultimate storage of depleted uranium

    More than 80% of the uranium leaving uranium enrichment plants is depleted to a residual content of about 0,25% U 235. Due to the present ineconomical further depletion to the technically possible residual content of 0,1% U 235, the so-called 'tails' are first of all stored. The quantity of stored depleted uranium in the FRG should be about 100.000 t by the year 2000. It represents a strategic reserve for future energy supply regardless of profitableness. The study analysis the conceivable possible uses for the tails quantity considered. These are, besides further depletion whose profitableness is considered, also the use as breeder material in breeder reactors and the use in the non-nuclear field. The main part of the study deals with the various storage possibilities of the depleted uranium in oxidic or fluoride form. A comparison of costs of alternative storage concepts showed a clear advantage for the storage of UF6 in 48 inch containers already in use. The conceivable accidents in storing are analyzed and measures to reduce the consequences are discussed. Finally, the problems of ultimate storage for the remaining waste after further depletion or use are investigated and the costs arising here are also estimated. (RB)

  19. Engineering analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride : storage of depleted uranium metal

    This report contains an engineering analysis of long-term storage of uranium metal in boxes as an option for long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). Three storage facilities are considered: buildings, vaults, and mined cavities. Three cases are considered: either all, half, or a quarter of the depleted uranium metal that would be produced from the conversion of depleted UF6 is stored at the facility. The analysis of these alternatives is based on a box design used in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, report DOE/EIS-0269, published in 1999 by the US Department of Energy. This box design does not appear to effectively use space within the box. Hence, an alternative box design that allows for a reduced storage area is addressed in the appendices for long-term storage in buildings

  20. The influence of ego depletion on sprint start performance in athletes without track and field experience

    Englert, Chris; Persaud, Brittany N.; Oudejans, Raôul R. D.; Bertrams, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We tested the assumption that ego depletion would affect the sprint start in a sample of N = 38 athletes without track and field experience in an experiment by applying a mixed between- (depletion vs. non-depletion) within- (T1: before manipulation of ego depletion vs. T2: after manipulation of ego depletion) subjects design. We assumed that ego depletion would increase the possibility for a false start, as regulating the impulse to initiate the sprinting movement too soon before the starting...

  1. Depletion of nonlinearity in the pressure force driving Navier-Stokes flows : nonlinear depletion in NS flows

    Tran, Chuong Van; Yu, Xinwei

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of the velocity norms ||u||Lq for q ≥ 3, in Navier-Stokes flows is studied. The pressure term that drives this dynamics has a high degree of nonlinear depletion, which owes its origin to a genuine negative correlation between |u| and |∇|u||, among other things. Under viscous effects, such depletion may give rise to mild growth of ||u||Lq. We explore the possibility of non-singular growth of ||u||Lq.

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of MEF2 Transcriptional Program Reveals Synaptic Target Genes and Neuronal Activity-Dependent Polyadenylation Site Selection

    Flavell, Steven W; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Gray, Jesse M.; Harmin, David A.; Hemberg, Martin; Hong, Elizabeth J.; Markenscoff-Papadimitriou, Eirene; Bear, Daniel M.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    Although many transcription factors are known to control important aspects of neural development, the genome-wide programs that are directly regulated by these factors are not known. We have characterized the genetic program that is activated by MEF2, a key regulator of activity-dependent synapse development. These MEF2 target genes have diverse functions at synapses, revealing a broad role for MEF2 in synapse development. Several of the MEF2 targets are mutated in human neurological disorder...

  3. Genome-wide analysis of MEF2 transcriptional program reveals synaptic target genes and neuronal activity-dependent polyadenylation site selection

    Flavell, Steven W; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Gray, Jesse M.; Harmin, David A.; Hemberg, Martin; Hong, Elizabeth J.; Markenscoff-Papadimitriou, Eirene; Bear, Daniel M.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    Although many transcription factors are known to control important aspects of neural development, the genome-wide programs that are directly regulated by these factors are not known. We have characterized the genetic program that is activated by MEF2, a key regulator of activity-dependent synapse development. These MEF2 target genes have diverse functions at synapses, revealing a broad role for MEF2 in synapse development. Several of the MEF2 targets are mutated in human neurological disorder...

  4. The Etv1 transcription factor activity-dependently downregulates a set of genes controlling cell growth and differentiation in maturing cerebellar granule cells.

    Okazawa, Makoto; Abe, Haruka; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2016-05-13

    In the early postnatal period, cerebellar granule cells exhibit an activity-dependent downregulation of a set of immaturation genes involved in cell growth and migration and are shifted to establishment of a mature network formation. Through the use of a granule cell culture and both pharmacological and RNA interference (siRNA) analyses, the present investigation revealed that the downregulation of these immaturation genes is controlled by strikingly unified signaling mechanisms that operate sequentially through the stimulation of AMPA and NMDA receptors, tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) channels and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). This signaling cascade induces the Etv1 transcription factor, and knockdown of Etv1 by a siRNA technique prevented this activity-dependent downregulation of immaturation genes. Thus, taken into consideration the mechanism that controls the upregulation of maturation genes involved in synaptic formation, these results indicate that Etv1 orchestrates the activity-dependent regulation of both maturation and immaturation genes in developing granule cells and plays a key role in specifying the identity of mature granule cells in the cerebellum. PMID:27059140

  5. Vitamin D depletion aggravates hypertension and target-organ damage

    Andersen, Louise Bjørkholt; Przybyl, Lukasz; Haase, Nadine; von Versen-Höynck, Frauke; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Jørgensen, Jan Stener; Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Fruekilde, Palle; Poglitsch, Marko; Szijarto, István; Gollasch, Maik; Peters, Joerg; Muller, Dominik N; Christesen, Henrik Thybo; Dechend, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the controversial hypothesis that vitamin D depletion aggravates hypertension and target-organ damage by influencing renin. METHODS AND RESULTS: Four-week-old double-transgenic rats (dTGR) with excess angiotensin (Ang) II production due to overexpression of the human renin (h......REN) and angiotensinogen (hAGT) genes received vitamin D-depleted (n=18) or standard chow (n=15) for 3 weeks. The depleted group had very low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (mean±SEM; 3.8±0.29 versus 40.6±1.19 nmol/L) and had higher mean systolic BP at week 5 (158±3.5 versus 134.6±3.7 mm Hg, P<0......, hREN, and rRen were increased by vitamin D depletion. Regulatory T cells in the spleen and in the circulation were not affected. Ang metabolites, including Ang II and the counter-regulatory breakdown product Ang 1 to 7, were significantly up-regulated in the vitamin D-depleted groups, while ACE-1...

  6. Antarctic winter mercury and ozone depletion events over sea ice

    Nerentorp Mastromonaco, M.; Gårdfeldt, K.; Jourdain, B.; Abrahamsson, K.; Granfors, A.; Ahnoff, M.; Dommergue, A.; Méjean, G.; Jacobi, H.-W.

    2016-03-01

    During atmospheric mercury and ozone depletion events in the springtime in polar regions gaseous elemental mercury and ozone undergo rapid declines. Mercury is quickly transformed into oxidation products, which are subsequently removed by deposition. Here we show that such events also occur during Antarctic winter over sea ice areas, leading to additional deposition of mercury. Over four months in the Weddell Sea we measured gaseous elemental, oxidized, and particulate-bound mercury, as well as ozone in the troposphere and total and elemental mercury concentrations in snow, demonstrating a series of depletion and deposition events between July and September. The winter depletions in July were characterized by stronger correlations between mercury and ozone and larger formation of particulate-bound mercury in air compared to later spring events. It appears that light at large solar zenith angles is sufficient to initiate the photolytic formation of halogen radicals. We also propose a dark mechanism that could explain observed events in air masses coming from dark regions. Br2 that could be the main actor in dark conditions was possibly formed in high concentrations in the marine boundary layer in the dark. These high concentrations may also have caused the formation of high concentrations of CHBr3 and CH2I2 in the top layers of the Antarctic sea ice observed during winter. These new findings show that the extent of depletion events is larger than previously believed and that winter depletions result in additional deposition of mercury that could be transferred to marine and terrestrial ecosystems.

  7. International aspects of restrictions of ozone-depleting substances

    McDonald, S.C.

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes international efforts to protect stratospheric ozone. Also included in this report is a discussion of activities in other countries to meet restrictions in the production and use of ozone-depleting substances. Finally, there is a brief presentation of trade and international competitiveness issues relating to the transition to alternatives for the regulated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons. The stratosphere knows no international borders. Just as the impact of reduced stratospheric ozone will be felt internationally, so protection of the ozone layer is properly an international effort. Unilateral action, even by a country that produces and used large quantities of ozone-depleting substances, will not remedy the problem of ozone depletion if other countries do not follow suit. 32 refs., 7 tabs.

  8. Effect of Shim Arm Depletion in the NBSR

    Hanson A. H.; Brown N.; Diamond, D.J.

    2013-02-22

    The cadmium shim arms in the NBSR undergo burnup during reactor operation and hence, require periodic replacement. Presently, the shim arms are replaced after every 25 cycles to guarantee they can maintain sufficient shutdown margin. Two prior reports document the expected change in the 113Cd distribution because of the shim arm depletion. One set of calculations was for the present high-enriched uranium fuel and the other for the low-enriched uranium fuel when it was in the COMP7 configuration (7 inch fuel length vs. the present 11 inch length). The depleted 113Cd distributions calculated for these cores were applied to the current design for an equilibrium low-enriched uranium core. This report details the predicted effects, if any, of shim arm depletion on the shim arm worth, the shutdown margin, power distributions and kinetics parameters.

  9. Resource depletion does not influence prospective memory in college students.

    Shelton, Jill Talley; Cahill, Michael J; Mullet, Hillary G; Scullin, Michael K; Einstein, Gilles O; McDaniel, Mark A

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports an experiment designed to investigate the potential influence of prior acts of self-control on subsequent prospective memory performance. College undergraduates (n=146) performed either a cognitively depleting initial task (e.g., mostly incongruent Stroop task) or a less resource-consuming version of that task (e.g., all congruent Stroop task). Subsequently, participants completed a prospective memory task that required attentionally demanding monitoring processes. The results demonstrated that prior acts of self-control do not impair the ability to execute a future intention in college-aged adults. We conceptually replicated these results in three additional depletion and prospective memory experiments. This research extends a growing number of studies demonstrating the boundary conditions of the resource depletion effect in cognitive tasks. PMID:24021851

  10. Observations of ozone depletion associated with solar proton events

    Mcpeters, R. D.; Jackman, C. H.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1981-01-01

    Ozone profiles from the solar proton events (SPE) of January and September 1971 and August 1972 were obtained after the backscattered ultraviolet (BUV) measured radiances were corrected for the direct effects of protons on the instrument. The SPE of August 1972 produced an ozone depletion of 15% at 42 km that persisted for one month in both northern and southern polar regions. This long recovery time indicates that NO(x) was produced in a quantity sufficient to alter the ozone chemistry. The two SPE in 1971 were of moderate size, but produced ozone depletions of 10-30% at 50 km with a 36 hour recovery time. This rapid recovery is consistent with the assumption that HO(x) is responsible for altering the ozone chemistry (Weeks et al., 1972). The magnitude of the observed depletion, however, exceeds that predicted by the chemical models.