WorldWideScience

Sample records for activity radioactive waste

  1. Radioactive Wastes.

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2015-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2014. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:26420096

  2. Radioactive Wastes.

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2016-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2015. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:27620100

  3. Volume reduction through incineration of low-activity radioactive wastes

    The aim of the waste treatment plant, designed by Technicatome (CEA) for an Indonesian Nuclear Research Center, is to reduce through incineration the volume of low-activity radioactive wastes such as technological solids (cotton, PVC, paper board), biological solids (animal bones) and liquids (cutting fluids...). The complete combustion is realized with a total air multi-fuel burner (liquid wastes) and flash pyrolysis-complete combustion (solid wastes). A two stage flue gas filtration system, a flue gas washing system, and an ash recovery system are used. A test platform has been built. 3 figs

  4. This is how we manage Sweden's radioactive waste. Activities 1995

    SKB operates systems and facilities for the management and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste in Sweden. SKB has conducted extensive R, D and D work with regard to constructing a spent fuel encapsulation plant and a deep repository in crystalline bedrock. This annual report treats all the different activities without going into technical details

  5. Method to determine the activity concentration and total activity of radioactive waste

    A characteristic system of radioactive waste is described to determine the concentration of radionuclides activity and the total activity of bundles of radioactive waste. The system this integrated by three subsystems: - Elevator of drums. - Electromechanics. - Gamma spectroscopy. In the system it is analyzed waste of issuing gamma specifically, and this designed for materials of relative low density and it analyzes materials of cylindrical recipients

  6. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    The guide sets out the radiation safety requirements and limits for the treatment of radioactive waste. They shall be observed when discharging radioactive substances into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid, low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste treatment plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilisation of nuclear energy or natural resources

  7. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide sets out the radiation safety requirements and limits for the treatment of radioactive waste. They shall be observed when discharging radioactive substances into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid, low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste treatment plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilisation of nuclear energy or natural resources.

  8. Development for low-activation concrete design reducing radioactive waste

    Full text: Concrete is very valuable and inexpensive material, however it can be changed to be expensive and hard to deal with in use of a nuclear plant after long operation. One of the counter plans for the above is to use low-activation concrete instead of the ordinary concrete, that will reduce radioactive waste and could be even below clearance level in decommissioning and that is very useful in term of life cycle cost. Radioactive analysis showed that Co and Eu were the major target elements which decide the radioactivity level of reinforced concrete in decommissioning stage, and a several material were selected as a low-activation raw material from wide survey of raw materials for concrete (typically aggregates and cements). With the canditate of raw materials, several low-activation concrete were proposed for various portion of light water reactor plant, which reduction ratio were 1/10 to 1/30 which were mainly consist of limestone and low heat cement or white cement, and 1/100 to 1/300 which were mainly consist of alumina aggregate or quartz and high almina cement, comparing to the ordinary concrete in ΣDi/Ci unit, where 'Di' indicates concentration of each residual radioisotope, Ci defined by IAEA as a clearance level, and suffition of 'i' indicates each radioisotope. National funded project for development of low-activation design method for reduction of radioactive waste below clearance level were started from 2005 with aiming (1) development of a database on the content of target elements, which transform radioactive nuclides, in raw materials of reinforced concrete, (2) development of calculation tools for estimation of residual radioactivity of plant components, and (3) development of low-activation materials for concrete such as cements and reinforcing steel bars for structural components. For the optimized design for applying low-activation concrete to the reactor portion, effective evaluation of neutron spectrum in the certain portion including

  9. Treatment of radioactive wastes

    This report is a review of some waste management activities including sources, system of collection and treatment of radioactive wastes. The report also includes methods and options used for treatment of liquid and solid radioactive wastes. (author). 26 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Radioactive waste management

    This eighth chapter presents the radioactive wastes and waste disposal; classification of radioactive wastes; basis requests of the radioactive waste management; conditions for a radioactive waste disposal; registers and inventories; transport of radioactive wastes from a facility to another and the radioactive waste management plan

  11. Recycling of radioactive mineral waste by activity separation

    The AST process is a device for the recycling of building rubble originating from the dismantling of nuclear installations. Due to the activity separation in the process, a major part of rubble which would have otherwise been radioactive waste can now be cleared. The AST process has been developed in the course of the combined research project ''Aufbereitung radioaktiver mineralischer Rueckstaede durch Aktivitaetsseparation (Recycling of radioactive mineral waste by activity separation)'' which was sponsored by the BMBF (Federal Ministry for Education and Research). The first step was to investigate the activity distribution between the various constituents of activated heavy concrete (additions: hematite, magnetite, iron cuttings), of contaminated heavy and normal concrete, as well as of composition floor. Heavy concrete with metal additions showed a selective activation of the various constituents. Contaminated rubble often exhibits a selective enrichment of the activity in the cement in contrast to the aggregate. The AST facility for activity separation was designed on the basis of these results. Trial operation with various types of building rubble was carried out using three methods for sorting, screening according to grain size, magnetic separation and radiometric sorting. The use of these three methods was adapted to the material. (orig.)

  12. Low-level radioactive waste activities in Texas

    In September 1982, the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority began the process for the selection, construction, and operation of a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in Texas. The statute creating the Authority is a very comprehensive law which calls for the orderly completion of a step-by-step process in the development of the disposal facility. The organization of the Authority and its use of external resources, both professional organizations and citizens groups, are functioning extremely well in the performance of the Authority's objectives. Continued success will lead to the development and operation of a low-level radioactive waste disposal site in Texas prior to 1988

  13. Radioactive waste

    Focusing on radioactive waste management and disposal policies in the United Kingdom, Sweden and the Federal Republic of Germany, this book gives a detailed historical account of the policy process in these three countries, and draws out the implications for theory and public policy. This comparative approach underlines how profoundly different the policy process has been in different countries. By comparing the evolution of policy in three countries, fundamental questions about the formation and resolution of technical decisions under uncertainty are clarified. The analysis of nuclear strategy, the politics of nuclear power, and the shifting emphasis of government regulation redefines the issue of radwaste management and sets it at the heat of the current debate about power, the environment and society. The combination of up-to-date technological assessment with an account of the social and political implications of radwaste management makes'Radioactive Waste'particularly useful to students of environmental studies, geography and public administration. (author)

  14. USDOE activities in low-level radioactive waste treatment

    This paper describes current research, development and demonstration (R, D and D) programs sponsored by the US Department of Energy in the area of low-level radioactive waste treatment. The US Department of Energy Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program is directed toward a coordinated program covering the period from low-level radioactive waste generation through the decommissioning of the disposal site. This paper addresses the treatment portion of the program. The development efforts include: mechanical methods for metal and compactible waste volume reduction; incineration of trash or other combustibles through the use of controlled air, cyclone, or molten glass furnaces; ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, biological or chemical destruction of nitrates; adsorption treatment of low-concentration aqueous waste streams; combustion of organic liquids; and smelting of metal wastes to reduce their volume and conserve our natural resources. (author)

  15. Hospitalar radioactive waste of low activity, a daily practice

    Rezio, M.T.; Vieira, M.R. [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia de Francisco Gentil - CROL, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2006-07-01

    Introduction According to the law we should have a specific area for storing and treating waste. That area should have special containers for temporary storage in order to assure the radioactive decay for all the radioactive waste, biological contaminated or non biological and in solid or liquid form. According with that law the limits established for discharge are: For solid waste, we must not discharge more than 370 MBq in a minimum volume of 0,1 m{sup 3} and is not allowed waste with activities higher than 3,7 kBq; For liquid waste discharges from the department to the public sewer, the average concentrations calculated taking into account the water flow of the sewer system that serves the installation, should be the following:The annual medium concentration must not exceed 3 times the reference concentration (C.R.) for that nuclide; The monthly medium concentration must not exceed 15 times the reference concentration (C.R.); The daily medium concentration must not exceed 60 times the reference concentration (C.R.); The reference concentration (C.R.), expressed in Bq.m{sup -3}, should be calculated taking into account the relevant incorporation per ingestion. The calculation of C.R. in liquid waste should have into account the following: For the general public the effective dose E achieved, per ingestion by an individual in the group of age g is determined according to the following formula(1):E= {sigma}{sub i} h(g){sub j,ing} X J{sub j,ing}, where h(g){sub j,ing} is the committed effective dose per unit-intake for the ingested radionuclide j (Sv/Bq) by an individual in the group of age g; J{sub j,ing} is the relevant intake via ingestion of the radionuclide j (Bq). The effective dose E achieved by an individual in the group of age g should not be higher than 0,1 mSv/year. If the average water volume ingested by an individual adult is 800 l, the value J{sub j,ing}, calculated by the formula (1) should be referred to 1000 l, in order to obtain the C.R., for the

  16. Radioactive waste management in Hungary

    Activities underway at various levels in Hungary in the field of the safe management and disposal of radioactive waste and spent fuel are outlined. Various specific aspects, including financing of radioactive waste management, handling of spent fuel, high level radioactive waste disposal, site selection for a disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, and public information activities are described. (author)

  17. Underwater cutting up of high-activity radioactive waste

    Radioactive waste has be treated in order to ensure that the radio-elements it contains are not released over a very long period. In the case of high-activity waste containing radio-elements of short half-life a preliminary storage permitting a sufficient decrease in activity makes it possible subsequently to use the same treatment as for low-activity waste. Since the active or contaminated portions are in most cases well localized, it is useful to separate them according to their activity level. There results a considerable decrease in the amounts which have be stocked. At the Marcoule Centre, these dismantling operations are carried out using a plasma torch or a pneumatic saw, in a swimming pool containing de-ionized water. The main advantages of this process are: decrease in the risks of atmospheric pollution, in particular for α contamination; flexibility in adjusting the protection as a function of the β γ irradiation; ease of handling across a fluid protection; much lower capital and running costs than in the case of a reinforced enclosure built for the same purpose. (author)

  18. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    According to the Section 24 of the Finnish Radiation Decree (1512/91), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety shall specify the concentration and activity limits and principles for the determination whether a waste can be defined as a radioactive waste or not. The radiation safety requirements and limits for the disposal of radioactive waste are given in the guide. They must be observed when discharging radioactive waste into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste disposal plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilization of nuclear energy of natural resources. (4 refs., 1 tab.)

  19. The potential significance of microbial activity in radioactive waste disposal

    The aim of this report is to assess the potential significance of microbial activity in radioactive waste disposal. It outlines the major factors which need to be considered in order to evaluate the importance of microbiological action. These include water and nutritional sources (particularly carbon) hostile conditions (particularly the effects of radiation and pH), the establishment of pH micro-environments and the degradative effect of microbial metabolic by-products on the disposed waste forms. Before an active microbial population can develop there are certain basic requirements for life. These are outlined and the possibility of colonisation occurring within the chemical, radiological and nutritional constraints of a repository are considered. Once colonisation is assumed, the effect of microbial activity is discussed under five headings, i.e. (i) direct attack, (ii) physical disruption (which includes consideration of fissuring processes and void formation), (iii) gas generation (which may be of particular importance), (iv) radionuclide uptake and finally (v) alteration of groundwater chemistry. Particular attention is paid to the possibility of environments becoming established both within the waste form itself (allowing microbes to attack from the inside of the repository outward) or attack on the encapsulant materials (microbes attacking from the outside inward). (author)

  20. Radioactive wastes

    Here are gathered 1)the decrees (99-686 and 99-687) of the 3 rd of August 1999 relative to the researches on radioactive waste management. A local committee of information and follow-up has to be established on the site of each underground facility. The composition of this committee is determined here (99-686). 3 people will from now on be jointly ordered by the Minister of Economy, Finance and Industry and by the Secretary of State of Industry to conduct a preliminary dialogue for the choice of one or several sites on which previous works should be made before the construction of an underground facility (99-687). They take the opinion of the people's representatives, the associations and the concerned population and inform the Ministers of Environment, Energy and Research of the collected information. 2)the decree of the 3 rd of August 1999 authorizing the 'Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs' (ANDRA) to install and exploit an underground facility located in Bure (Meuse) and intended to study the deep geological deposits where could be stored radioactive wastes. (O.M.)

  1. Underground storage of radioactive wastes

    An introductory survey of the underground disposal of radioactive wastes is given. Attention is paid to various types of radioactive wastes varying from low to highly active materials, as well as mining techniques and salt deposits

  2. Radioactive wastes

    The execution of the Brazilian nuclear power program involves the generation of radwastes, some of which must be isolated, for several centuries, from human activities and environment. The Materials Directory from National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) organized a project in order to collect information concerning the waste disposal practices that may fulfill national technical-social-economic conditions and to recommend them, if requested, to the competent authorities. The paper provides general information concerning the waste producers, the project organization, the regions in Brazil that should be investigated in more detail during the site selection studies, as well as the preliminary conclusion in waste management area

  3. An overview of the AECB's strategy for regulating radioactive waste management activities

    The goal of the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board in regulating the management of radioactive wastes is to ensure the protection of people and the environment. A program of cooperation with other agencies, identification and adoption of baselines for describing radioactive wastes, development of explicit criteria and requirements, publication of related regulatory documents, establishment of independent consultative processes with technical experts and the public, and maintenance of awareness and compatibility with international activities is underway. Activities related to high-level radioactive waste, uranium mine and mill tailings, low- and medium-level wastes, radioactive effluents from nuclear facilities, and decommissioning and decontamination are described

  4. Radioactive waste management

    First, some general informations are given about radioactive waste, e.g. arising of waste, classification, intermediate deposition and transport, as well as about the multi-barrier concept. Then, emphasis is laid on the internationally favoured vitrification of high-active waste. Safety requirements and the physical-chemical characteristics of the waste forms are described as are the different technical vitrification processes. Moreover, alternative solidification products such as ceramic materials and synthetic rocks were discussed. In addition, the worldwide technical concepts for the management and final disposal of radioactive waste are summarized. (orig./HP)

  5. Radioactive waste management

    This book highlights the main issues of public concern related to radioactive waste management and puts them into perspective. It provides an overview of radioactive waste management covering, among other themes, policies, implementation and public communication based on national experiences. Its purpose is to assists in increasing the understanding of radioactive waste management issues by public and national authorities, organizations involved in radioactive waste management and the nuclear industry; it may also serve as a source book for those who communicate with the public. Even in the unlikely event that nuclear power does not further develop around the world, the necessity for dealing with nuclear waste from past usages, from uranium mining and milling, decontamination and decommissioning of existing nuclear facilities and from the uses of radioactive materials in medicine, industry and research would still exist. In many countries, radioactive waste management planning involves making effective institutional arrangements in which responsibilities and liabilities are well established for the technical operation and long term surveillance of disposal systems. Financing mechanisms are part of the arrangements. Continuous quality assurance and quality control, at all levels of radioactive waste management, are essential to ensure the required integrity of the system. As with any other human activity, improvements in technology and economics may be possible and secondary problems avoided. Improvements and confirmation of the efficiency of processes and reduction of uncertainties can only be achieved by continued active research, development and demonstration, which are the goals of many national programmes. International co-operation, also in the form of reviews, can contribute to increasing confidence in the ongoing work. The problem of radioactive wastes is not a unique one; it may be compared with other problems of toxic wastes resulting from many other

  6. Radioactive waste management plan for TRIGA Mark-II and III deecommissioning activities

    A radioavtive waste management plan was set-up for the decontamination and decommissioning of the TRIGA Mark II and III. They were categorized by the radioactivity and by the physical properties, solid , liquid, gaseous radioactive waste. The gaseous waste will be treated by the existing filtration equipment. The use of temporary containment with a portable ventilation system is planned during the dismantling work where there is the potential to generate particles. Liquid radioactive waste will be concentrated by a natural evaporator and the concentrate will then be solidified by using cement. All of the solid wastes will be packed in a 4 m3 ISO container and stored until a final disposal facility for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste is operational. This paper covers a general plan of the radioactive waste management during the TRIGA Mark-II and III decontamination and decommissioning activities. (author)

  7. Management of hospital radioactive wastes

    The general structure of a regulatory scheme for the management of hospital radioactive wastes is presented. The responsabilities of an institution in the radioactive waste management, and storage conditions are defined. The radioactive wastes are classified in physical terms, and the criteria for evaluating the activity of solid wastes are described. The container characteristics and, the types of treatments given to the wastes are specified. (M.C.K.)

  8. Alternatives evaluation of high activity radioactive wastes disposal

    Different alternatives considered in the world to be used as barriers to isolate the high level radioactive from the environment wastes produced during the electric energy generation of nuclear origin are presented. Engineering and geologic barriers, are analyzed, considering nuclear fuel cycles with or without plutonium recycling; to that purpose the consideration of elements such as durability and resistance of the various engineering, availability of the fabrication processes, associated radiological impact, geological media apt to be used as geological barrier. Finally, the scopes of the Feasibility Study and Engineering draft are presented for the construction of a repository for high-level radioactive wastes, for the Argentine Nuclear Program needs, which contemplates the construction of six nuclear power plants with a potential installed towards the year 2000 GW(e), with natural and/or lowly enriched uranium power plants and recycling of plutonium generated in the cycle. (Author)

  9. Radioactive waste management activities of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    The objectives of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), which groups most of the developed countries of the world, are to promote high economic growth and a rising standard of living in Member countries while contributing to the economic development and the expansion of world trade on a multilateral basis. International co-operation in nuclear energy activities takes place through the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in which a total of 23 countries now participate: Australia, Canada, Japan, the United States, in addition to all the European Member countries of OECD. The Commission of the European Communities also takes part in the work of NEA. One of the primary objectives of the NEA is to promote co-operation between its Member governments on the safety and regulatory aspects of nuclear development. This is achieved by encouraging harmonization of governments' regulatory policies and practices in the nuclear field, with particular reference to the safety of nuclear installations, protection of many against ionizing radiations, radioactive waste management, and nuclear third party liability and insurance

  10. Radioactive waste management

    Throughout this century, the application of nuclear energy has produced many benefits, in industry, in research, in medicine, and in the generation of electricity. These activities generate wastes in the same way as do other human activities. The primary objective of radioactive waste management is to protect human health and environment now and in the future without imposing undue burden on future generations, through sound, safe and efficient radioactive waste management. This paper briefly describes the different steps of the management of short lived low and intermediate level wastes, and presents and overview of the state of art in countries involved in nuclear energy, describing their organizations, methodologies used in the processing of these wastes and the final disposal concepts. It also presents the Argentine strategy, its technical and legal aspects. Worldwide experience during the past 50 years has shown that short lived low and intermediate level wastes can be successfully isolated from human and environment in near surface disposal facilities. (author)

  11. Procedure to convert mean and low activity radioactive wastes

    A procedure to convert mean and low activity radioactive effluents into a suitable solid is described. Radioactive compounds are precipitated in this procedure in which 0.6 to 2 parts (by weight) of cement are mixed with 0.5 to 5% (by weight) of asbestos (relative to the cement) together with the necessary quantity of water for the cement to set, and in addition, with 5 to 30% (by weight) of bitumen (relative to the cement)

  12. Management on radioactive wastes

    The basic philosophy governing the radioactive waste management activities in India is to concentrate and contain as much activity as possible and to discharge to the environment only such of these streams that have radioactive content much below the nationally and internationally accepted standards. The concept of ''Zero Release'' is also kept in view. At Tarapur, the effluents are discharged into coastal waters after the radioactivity of the effluents is brought down by a factor 100. The effluents fΩm Rajasthan reactors are discharged into a lake keeping their radioactivity well within permissible limits and a solar evaporation plant is being set up. The plant, when it becomes operational, will be a step towards the concept of ''Zero Release''. At Kalpakkam, the treated wastes are proposed to be diluted by circulating sea water and discharged away from the shore through a long pipe. At Narora, ion exchange followed by chemical precipitation is to be employed to treat effluents and solar evaporation process for total containment. Solid wastes are stored/dispsed in the concrete trenches, underground with the water proofing of external surfaces and the top of the trench is covered with concrete. Highly active wastes are stored/disposed in tile holes which are vaults made of steel-lined, reinforced concrete pipes. Gas cleaning, dilution and dispersion techniques are adopted to treat gaseous radioactive wastes. (M.G.B.)

  13. Radioactive waste processing method

    When granular materials comprising radioactive wastes containing phosphorus are processed at first in a fluidized bed type furnace, if the granular materials are phosphorus-containing activated carbon, granular materials comprising alkali compound such as calcium hydroxide and barium hydroxide are used as fluidizing media. Even granular materials of slow burning speed can be burnt stably in a fluidizing state by high temperature heat of the fluidizing media, thereby enabling to take a long burning processing time. Accordingly, radioactive activated carbon wastes can be processed by burning treatment. (T.M.)

  14. Regulation and practices regarding the management of very low activity radioactive wastes. Report nr 309

    This document reports a study which aims at analysing the recommendations made by international bodies (IAEA, Euratom) and the regulations of several countries (Germany, United States, United Kingdom, Sweden, Spain, Canada, Slovakia, Belgium, Japan and France) regarding the management of low activity radioactive wastes, with a focus on practices in releasing and recycling very low activity materials and the French national program for radioactive waste management

  15. Radioactive waste management

    This booklet is a publication by International Atomic Energy Agency for general awareness of citizens and policy-makers to clarify their concept of nuclear wastes. In a very simple way it tells what is radioactivity, radiations and radioactive wastes. It further hints on various medial and industrial uses of radiations. It discusses about different types of radioactive wastes and radioactive waste management. Status of nuclear power plants in Central and Eastern European countries are also discussed

  16. Historically Black Colleges and Universities Radioactive Waste Management Research Program: Summary of activities, 1985-1986

    This report summarizes the 1985 to 1986 activities of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) Radioactive Waste Management Research Program sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The first set of three awards was made in September,1984. In September, 1985, two of these projects were renewed and a new proposal was funded. The program has been enthusiastically received by the community of HBCUs and the program sponsor

  17. Disposal of low activity radioactive waste. Proceedings of an international symposium

    Speakers from several countries described the existing and planned arrangements for managing low activity waste in their countries. The potential of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention) to help establishing adequate national infrastructures and to resolving disputes between countries on radioactive waste management matters was highlighted. The increasing interest of nuclear power countries in developing national strategies for managing the waste from decommissioning has prompted proposals for new waste categories and, in particular, a category of very low level waste. Several countries are actively exploring the scheme, which brings clear economic benefits, and one country has already adopted it. The recent international agreement on clearance levels, as documented in the IAEA's Safety Guide RS-G-1.7, has greatly helped national policy development in this area. Other waste types are not explicitly considered in the current international waste categorization scheme, examples are: disused sealed sources, uranium mining and milling waste and waste containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) from non-nuclear industries. In summary, the international categorization scheme for radioactive waste is useful since it provides a scientific and technical rationale for separating waste types, but it needs to be elaborated to include other important waste types and their potential disposal routes. Long lived low activity radioactive waste arises as a by-product from several industrial processes, for example, the uranium processing industry, the phosphate industry, the gas and oil industry and from the cleanup of historic sites contaminated with radium. National regulatory approaches to the management of this waste vary and disposal practices being adopted vary considerably. A strong desire was expressed for international guidance towards establishing a coherent and

  18. Regulation of radioactive waste management

    This bulletin contains information about activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD). In this leaflet the regulation of radioactive waste management of the UJD are presented. Radioactive waste (RAW) is the gaseous, liquid or solid material that contains or is contaminated with radionuclides at concentrations or activities greater than clearance levels and for which no use is foreseen. The classification of radioactive waste on the basis of type and activity level is: - transition waste; - short lived low and intermediate level waste (LlLW-SL); - long lived low and intermediate level waste (LlLW-LL); - high level waste. Waste management (in accordance with Act 130/98 Coll.) involves collection, sorting, treatment, conditioning, transport and disposal of radioactive waste originated by nuclear facilities and conditioning, transport to repository and disposal of other radioactive waste (originated during medical, research and industrial use of radioactive sources). The final goal of radioactive waste management is RAW isolation using a system of engineered and natural barriers to protect population and environment. Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic regulates radioactive waste management in accordance with Act 130/98 Coll. Inspectors regularly inspect and evaluate how the requirements for nuclear safety at nuclear facilities are fulfilled. On the basis of safety documentation evaluation, UJD issued permission for operation of four radioactive waste management facilities. Nuclear facility 'Technologies for treatment and conditioning contains bituminization plants and Bohunice conditioning centre with sorting, fragmentation, evaporation, incineration, supercompaction and cementation. Final product is waste package (Fibre reinforced container with solidified waste) acceptable for near surface repository in Mochovce. Republic repository in Mochovce is built for disposal of short lived low and intermediate level waste. Next

  19. Radioactive waste management profiles

    In 1989, the International Atomic Energy Agency began development of the Waste Management Data Base (WMDB) to, primarily, establish a mechanism for the collection, integration, storage, and retrieval of information relevant to radioactive waste management in Member States. This report is a summary and compilation of the information contained in the data base. The WMDB contains information and data on several aspects of waste management and offer a ready source of information on such activities as R and D efforts, waste disposal plans and programmes, important programme milestones, waste volume projections, and national and regulatory policies. This report is divided into two parts. Part one describes the Waste Management Data Base system and the type of information it contains. The second part contains data provided by Member States between August 1989 and December 1990 in response to a questionnaire sent by the Agency. However, if a Member State did not respond to the questionnaire, data from IAEA sources, such as technical assistance mission reports, were used - where such data exist. The WMDB system became operational in January 1991. The type of information contained in the data base includes radioactive waste management plans, policies and activities in Member States

  20. Neutronic measurements of radioactive waste

    This document presents the general matters involved in the radioactive waste management and the different non destructive assays of radioactivity. The neutronic measurements used in the characterization of waste drums containing emitters are described with more details, especially the active neutronic interrogation assays with prompt or delayed neutron detection: physical principle, signal processing and evaluation of the detection limit. (author)

  1. Where, when, how: the place of radioactive wastes in France. Andra, 1998 activity report

    The 1998 activity report of the French national agency of radioactive wastes (Andra) presents successively: the role and missions of the Andra (history, status of radioactive wastes in France, surface storage and know-how, underground research laboratories, site selection and public information); the aspects of safety (inventory, identification and labelling of wastes, environmental policy, public relation, safety rules and reports, information storage); the scientific programs (collaborations, financing, site studies, rock mechanics and reversibility of storage, design of storage facilities, services); financial report. (J.S.)

  2. Participation of the ININ in the activities of radioactive waste management of the Laguna Verde Central

    From the beginning of the operation of the Laguna Verde Central (CLV) the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) has come supporting the CLV in the activities of administration of the humid and dry radioactive waste generated by the operation of the two units of the CLV, from the elaboration of procedures to the temporary storage in site, the implementation of a program of minimization and segregation of dry solid wastes, until the classification of the lots of humid waste and bulk dry wastes. In this work the description of the management activities of radioactive wastes carried out by the ININ in the facilities of the CLV to the date is presented, as well as some actions that they are had drifted in the future near, among those that it stands out the determination of the total alpha activity in humid samples by means of scintillation analysis. (Author)

  3. Low and intermediate level radioactive waste. Waste characterization and activity measurements

    The report deals with waste categories in Finland and methods for determining or estimating the waste content. The study mainly focuses on long-lived low and intermediate level waste. Methods for the determination of activity content and chemical content are discussed. The report presents recommendations for the characterization of waste under treatment as well as recommendations for the characterization of waste packages

  4. Radioactive Demonstrations Of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) With Hanford Low Activity Wastes

    Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Burket, P. R.; Bannochie, C. J.; Daniel, W. G.; Nash, C. A.; Cozzi, A. D.; Herman, C. C.

    2012-10-22

    Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One immobilization technology being considered is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) which offers a low temperature (700-750?C) continuous method by which wastes high in organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, or other aqueous components may be processed into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The granular waste form produced by co-processing the waste with kaolin clay has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. The FBSR granular product will be monolithed into a final waste form. The granular component is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals such as sodalite. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial, engineering, pilot, and laboratory scales on simulants. Radioactive testing at SRNL commenced in late 2010 to demonstrate the technology on radioactive LAW streams which is the focus of this study.

  5. The radioactive wastes management

    The different types of radioactive waste are presented in this paper in the frame of the official categories which take into account their dangerousness and the lifetimes of their radioactivity. It is indicated how the less dangerous of them are handled in France. The ways of protecting the environment from the more dangerous ones (high activity and long lifetimes) are object of studies. Scientific questions, in the field of chemistry and physical chemistry, related to the implementation of deep underground repository facilities with full respect of nuclear safety are presented. (authors)

  6. Understanding radioactive waste

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes)

  7. Understanding radioactive waste

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  8. Optimization of sorption technology processing of liquid radioactive waste of low and middle activity level

    A substantial amount of liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) is formed during the regeneration of irradiated nuclear fuel (INF). Liquid wastes of low activity level (LAL) include: wash water and leakages; water for hydrotransport; water in storage basins; water from special laundries and disinfestation posts; and waste deactivation solutions. The radioactivity of these LRWs is equal to 1 x 10-7 1 x 10-5 Ci/l. Depending on the sources of the water supply for processing of INF, as well as technology and time (seasons) of processing, productivity and other factors, variations exist in the chemical and radiochemical compositions of LAL. This article discusses various processing treatments for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

  9. Predisposal Radioactive Waste Management

    Recognition of the importance of the safe management of radioactive waste means that, over the years, many well-established and effective techniques have been developed, and the nuclear industry and governments have gained considerable experience in this field. Minimization of waste is a fundamental principle underpinning the design and operation of all nuclear operations, together with waste reuse and recycling. For the remaining radioactive waste that will be produced, it is essential that there is a well defined plan (called a waste treatment path) to ensure the safe management and ultimately the safe disposal of radioactive waste so as to guarantee the sustainable long term deployment of nuclear technologies

  10. Derivation of activity limits for the disposal of radioactive waste in near surface disposal facilities

    criteria for disposal of radioactive wastes to near surface facilities. These criteria are qualitative in nature and, for example, they do not address limitations on radionuclide content of waste, waste packages or the facility as a whole. This publication is to present an approach for establishing radiological waste acceptance criteria using a safety assessment methodology and to illustrate its application in establishing limits on the total activity and the activity concentrations of radioactive waste to be disposed in near surface disposal facilities. The approach makes use of accepted methods and computational schemes currently used in assessing the safety of near surface disposal facilities both during the operational and post-closure periods. The scope of this publication covers the use of safety assessment methodology to calculate total and specific activities limits for radioactive waste in near surface disposal facilities. It is used to evaluate the potential operational and post-closure radiological impact of solid and solidified radioactive waste in near surface facilities. The radioactive waste types used to illustrate the approach range from waste containing radionuclides used for medical, industrial and research purposes to waste arising from nuclear fuel cycle activities. They also include waste arising from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The focus of the publication is on using of safety assessment methodology in derivation of quantitative radioactivity limits. This report deals with the role of activity limits in disposal system safety (Section 2), the relevant radiation protection criteria (Section 3), the approach to derive activity limits (Section 4), illustrations of the application of this approach (Section 5), and guidance on the use of the approach (Section 6)

  11. Low level radioactive waste

    More than 10 new disposal facilities for low level radioactive waste are now under development in the USA. They were planned in the wake of the highly visible failures of three such sites and a widespread loss of public confidence, both in shallow burial technology and the federal government's ability to regulate commercial waste disposal enterprises. The development of new technology and active involvement of state governments presents the nuclear power industry with its best opportunity for regaining the public confidence that it lost during the 1970s. This paper critically explores the fundamental technical, economic, political and value issues at stake in this process. (author)

  12. Solidification of radioactive liquid wastes

    Purpose: To decrease the amount of surface active agents required for solidifying sodium sulfate-containing concentrated radioactive liquid wastes with asphalts. Method: Water soluble calcium compounds (calcium nitrate, etc.) are added to alkaline radioactive concentrated liquid wastes essentially consisting of sodium sulfate to adjust the pH value of the liquid wastes to 4.5 - 8.5. The addition amount of the water soluble calcium compounds (based on the weight of the calcium ions) is set to about 2 - 5% of the sulfate ions in the liquid wastes. Then, surface active agents are added by 3 - 10 weight % to the solid contents in the liquid wastes. (Ikeda, J.)

  13. Radioactive waste management in Argentina

    An overview is provided on the major nuclear facilities operating in Argentina and data are given on radioactive wastes arising from these operations. The respective legal framework and the nuclear activities, including research and development, are outlined. The programme for the management of the different categories of radioactive wastes is described. Main milestones for establishing geological repositories for intermediate level and high level waste are highlighted. (author)

  14. Controlling radioactive waste

    The guideline of the Ministry for Environmental Protection for controlling radioactive waste with a negligible development of heat defines in detail what data are relevant to the control of radioactive waste and should be followed up on and included in a system of documentation. By introducing the AVK (product control system for tracing the course of waste disposal) the operators of German nuclear power plants have taken the requirements of this guideline into account. In particular, possibilities for determining the degree of radioactivity of radioactive waste, which the BMU-guidelines call for, were put into practice by means of the programming technology of the product control system's module MOPRO. (orig.)

  15. Management of Radioactive Wastes in Developing Countries

    The management of radioactive wastes is one area of increasing interest especially in developing countries having more and more activities in the application of radioisotopes in medicine, research and industry. For a better understanding of radioactive waste management in developing countries this work will discuss the following items:Classification of countries with respect to waste management programs. Principal Radionuclides used in medicine, biological research and others and the range of radioactivity commonly used. Estimation of radioactive waste volumes and activities. Management of liquid wastes Collection. Treatment. Management of small volumes of organic liquid waste. Collection Treatment. Packaging and storage of radioactive wastes

  16. Radioactive waste management

    The purpose of this document is to set out the Government's current strategy for the long term in the management of radioactive wastes. It takes account of the latest developments, and will be subject to review in the light of future developments and studies. The subject is discussed under the headings: what are radioactive wastes; who is responsible; what monitoring takes place; disposal as the objective; low-level wastes; intermediate-level wastes; discharges from Sellafield; heat generating wastes; how will waste management systems and procedures be assessed; how much more waste is there going to be in future; conclusion. (U.K.)

  17. Radioactive waste disposal

    The current disposal concept for radioactive waste in the FRG was discussed in the framework of this seminar. In addition to this concept for the treatment of radioactive waste also the volume of this waste is indicated. The present state of the two repositories 'Konrad' and 'Gorleben' is explained, as well as the requirements on waste packages for transportation, intermediate and ultimate storage. The final part discusses the conditioning of this radioactive waste and the control of the barrels as regards the observance of the requirements. (orig.)

  18. Storage of radioactive wastes

    Even if the best waste minimization measures are undertaken throughout radioisotope production or usage, significant radioactive wastes arise to make management measures essential. For developing countries with low isotope usage and little or no generation of nuclear materials, it may be possible to handle the generated waste by simply practicing decay storage for several half-lives of the radionuclides involved, followed by discharge or disposal without further processing. For those countries with much larger facilities, longer lived isotopes are produced and used. In this situation, storage is used not only for decay storage but also for in-process retention steps and for the key stage of interim storage of conditioned wastes pending final disposal. The report will serve as a technical manual providing reference material and direct step-by-step know-how to staff in radioisotope user establishments and research centres in the developing Member States without nuclear power generation. Considerations are limited to the simpler storage facilities. The restricted quantities and low activity associated with the relevant wastes will generally permit contact-handling and avoid the need for shielding requirements in the storage facilities or equipment used for handling. A small quantity of wastes from some radioisotope production cells and from reactor cooling water treatment may contain sufficient short lived activity from activated corrosion products to require some separate decay storage before contact-handling is suitable. 16 refs, 12 figs, 8 tabs

  19. Radioactive Demonstrations Of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming As A Supplementary Treatment For Hanford's Low Activity Waste And Secondary Wastes

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides

  20. Policies and strategy for low activity radioactive waste management in Spain

    Electric power generation is the main potential source of radioactive waste in Spain. There are nine power reactors in operation with an output of 7.8 GW(e) and one nuclear power plant is being decommissioned. Other radioactive waste comes from nuclear fuel fabrication facilities, the use of radioisotopes in medicine, education, industry and research (minor producers) and incidents involving radioactive materials. An accumulated volume of 170,000 m3 from all origins, including the decommissioning of the existing nuclear facilities, is assumed for planning purposes in the next decades. The Spanish Government, through the Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (MITC), establishes the radioactive waste management policy, which is issued in a document entitled the General Radioactive Waste Plan (GRWP). Other important actors are the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN) and the Ministry of Environment. ENRESA was created in 1984 with the role of managing the radioactive waste in Spain. It has a broad scope of responsibilities in this field. These include the management of low, intermediate and high level radioactive waste and their final disposal, decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other redundant facilities, and, when so required by the MITC, the rehabilitation of other type of facilities. Low activity radioactive waste (LAW) management in Spain can be described as an integrated system; control is exercised the production of radioactive waste until its final disposal. Major producers are responsible for waste treatment and conditioning; they follow ENRESA's specifications, which are approved by the MITC after prior approval by the CSN. From a nuclear safety and radiological protection point of view, the CSN controls the different actors in all steps of the process. The MITC establishes the management policy and surveys the economical and financial needs to support the plan. A key element in the management of LAW in Spain is the El Cabril disposal facility. The main

  1. This is how we manage Sweden`s radioactive waste. Activities 1995

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    SKB operates systems and facilities for the management and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste in Sweden. SKB has conducted extensive R, D and D work with regard to constructing a spent fuel encapsulation plant and a deep repository in crystalline bedrock. This annual report treats all the different activities without going into technical details.

  2. Stabilization/solidification of hazardous and radioactive wastes with alkali-activated cements

    This paper reviews progresses on the use of alkali-activated cements for stabilization/solidification of hazardous and radioactive wastes. Alkali-activated cements consist of an alkaline activator and cementing components, such as blast furnace slag, coal fly ash, phosphorus slag, steel slag, metakaolin, etc., or a combination of two or more of them. Properly designed alkali-activated cements can exhibit both higher early and later strengths than conventional portland cement. The main hydration product of alkali-activated cements is calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) with low Ca/Si ratios or aluminosilicate gel at room temperature; C-S-H, tobmorite, xonotlite and/or zeolites under hydrothermal condition, no metastable crystalline compounds such as Ca(OH)2 and calcium sulphoaluminates exist. Alkali-activated cements also exhibit excellent resistance to corrosive environments. The leachability of contaminants from alkali-activated cement stabilized hazardous and radioactive wastes is lower than that from hardened portland cement stabilized wastes. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-activated cements are better matrix for solidification/stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes than Portland cement

  3. ORNL radioactive waste operations

    Since its beginning in 1943, ORNL has generated large amounts of solid, liquid, and gaseous radioactive waste material as a by-product of the basic research and development work carried out at the laboratory. The waste system at ORNL has been continually modified and updated to keep pace with the changing release requirements for radioactive wastes. Major upgrading projects are currently in progress. The operating record of ORNL waste operation has been excellent over many years. Recent surveillance of radioactivity in the Oak Ridge environs indicates that atmospheric concentrations of radioactivity were not significantly different from other areas in East Tennesseee. Concentrations of radioactivity in the Clinch River and in fish collected from the river were less than 4% of the permissible concentration and intake guides for individuals in the offsite environment. While some radioactivity was released to the environment from plant operations, the concentrations in all of the media sampled were well below established standards

  4. Determination of Solid Radioactive Waste Activities Using Gamma In-Situ Spectrometer

    Measurements of solid radioactive waste activities using in-situ gamma ray spectrometer by mechanically drum rotating system had been conducted. Both measurements should be done namely: first, In-situ gamma spectrometer calibrated by using standard 152Eu source in several drums (drum 1 to drum 5) of 100 liter volume at distance 15 cm from detector and counted them for 2253 seconds then background counting measurement in each drum also counted where a drum was not containing radioactive materials to achieve the lowest detection level. The data result of measurements can be shown as follows: the lowest detection level of insitu gamma ray spectrometer on radionuclide of 137Cs and 60Co was (57 ± 8) Bq and (97 ± 9) Bq. Radiation exposure rate on surface between 0.26 - 100 mR/jam. Total activity of radioactive waste between (423 ± 29) to (114,289 ± 7,459) Bq. So these radioactive materials waste have a high activity waste of group I, because radiation exposure rate less than 0.2 R/hour. (author)

  5. Radioactive waste programme in Latvia

    An overview is made on the use of radioactive sources and waste management in Latvia. Brief overview of the development of national legal documents - the framework law of environmental protection; international agreements; the new law on radiation safety and nuclear safety; regulation of the Cabinet of Ministers - is given. The regulatory infrastructure in the nearest future is outlined. The institutional framework for radioactive waste management is described. Basic design of the repository and radioactive waste inventory are also given. The activities on the EU DG Environment project CASIOPEE are reported

  6. Radioactive waste disposal policy

    The responsibilities of the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food and Ministry policy on radioactive waste disposal are described. The disposal of solid radioactive waste at sea is subject to detailed safeguards developed within two international agreements to which the United Kingdom is a contracting party. The agreements are discussed together with a research and monitoring programme to provide scientific data for informed decisions on waste disposal authorisations and dumping licences. (U.K.)

  7. Treatment and conditioning of historical radioactive waste

    The paper describes the management of historical radioactive waste from the storage facility of Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant. The historical waste stored into storage facility of IFIN-HH consists of spent sealed radioactive sources, empty contaminated containers, wooden radioactive waste, low specific activity radioactive waste, contaminated waste as well as radioactive waste from operation of WWR-S research reactor. After decommissioning of temporary storage facility about 5000 packages with radioactive waste were produced and transferred to the disposal facility. A large amount of packages have been transferred and disposed of to repository but at the end of 2000 there were still about 800 packages containing cement conditioned radioactive waste in an advanced state of degradation declared by authorities as 'historical waste'. During the management of historical waste campaign there were identified: radium spent radioactive sources, containers containing other spent sealed radioactive sources, packages containing low specific activity waste consist of thorium scrap allow, 30 larger packages (316 L), packages with activity lower than activity limit for disposal, packages with activity higher than activity limit for disposal. At the end of 2008, the whole amount of historical waste which met the waste acceptance criteria has been conditioned and transferred to disposal facility. (authors)

  8. Scaling factors for the activity determination of radioactive waste from nuclear power reactors

    Specific information of the total activity and activity concentration of the radionuclides contained is required for conditioning, transporting and final disposal of radioactive waste. Due to the complexity associated to alpha and beta measurements for these emitters it is worldwide used, particularly in the case of heterogeneous radioactive waste, the Scaling Factor Method. As in other cases, inputs of the results of the analysis of waste samples taking from waste streams are necessary. The Scaling Factor Method is based on the determination of averaged correlations between the activity concentrations of Difficult to Measure (DTM) nuclides (i.e. alpha and beta emitters) and the activity concentration of easy to measure nuclides (i.e. strong gamma emitters) called Key Nuclides (KN). In the application of this method two phases may be identified: in the first one the degree of correlation between averaged activities of DTM and a given KN is verified, and specific Scaling Factors are derived for every DTM radionuclide. In the second stage the total activity and the activity concentration of the selected KN is determined in each waste item and, by applying the SFs obtained previously, the activities of DTM nuclides are calculated. It is concluded that this method is appropriate and cost-effective and it is stressed that it is only applicable while the Nuclear Power Reactor is in operation. (author)

  9. Specified radioactive waste final disposal act

    Radioactive wastes must be finally and safely disposed far from human activities. Disposal act is a long-range task and needs to be understood and accepted by public for site selection. This paper explains basic policy of Japanese Government for final disposal act of specified radioactive wastes, examination for site selection guidelines to promote residential understanding, general concept of multi-barrier system for isolating the specific radioactive wastes, and research and technical development for radioactive waste management. (S. Ohno)

  10. Radioactive waste: show time? - 16309

    Time will render radioactive waste harmless. How can we manage the time radioactive substances remain harmful? Just 'wait and see' or 'marking time' is not an option. We need to isolate the waste from our living environment and control it as long as necessary. For the situation in the Netherlands, it is obvious that a period of long term storage is needed. Both the small volume of waste and the limited financial possibilities are determining factors. Time is needed to let the volume of waste grow and to let the money, needed for disposal, grow in a capital growth fund. An organisation such as COVRA - the radioactive waste organisation in the Netherlands - can only function when it has good, open and transparent relationship with the public and particularly with the local population. If we tell people that we safely store radioactive waste for 100 years, they often ask: 'That long?' How can we explain the long-term aspect of radioactive waste management in a way people can relate to? In this paper, an overview is given of the activities of COVRA on the communication of radioactive waste management. (authors)

  11. Storage of Radioactive Waste. Safety Guide

    Radioactive waste is generated in a broad range of activities involving a wide variety of materials. The wastes arising from these activities have differing physical, chemical and radiological characteristics. This publication gives guidance on the storage of solid, liquid and gaseous radioactive wastes in a wide range of facilities, including those at which waste is generated, treated and conditioned. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of human health and the environment; 3. Roles and responsibilities; 4. Common safety considerations for waste storage facilities; 5. Design and operation of small storage facilities for radioactive waste; 6. Design and operation of large storage facilities for radioactive waste; Appendix.

  12. Encapsulation of radioactive waste

    A method is described for encapsulating a particular radioactive waste which consists of suspending the waste in a viscous liquid encapsulating material, of synthetic resin monomers or prepolymers, and setting the encapsulating material by addition or condensation polymerization to form a solid material in which the waste is dispersed. (author)

  13. Classification of radioactive waste

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. To simplify their management, a number of schemes have evolved for classifying radioactive waste according to the physical, chemical and radiological properties of significance to those facilities managing this waste. These schemes have led to a variety of terminologies, differing from country to country and even between facilities in the same country. This situation makes it difficult for those concerned to communicate with one another regarding waste management practices. This document revises and updates earlier IAEA references on radioactive waste classification systems given in IAEA Technical Reports Series and Safety Series. Guidance regarding exemption of materials from regulatory control is consistent with IAEA Safety Series and the RADWASS documents published under IAEA Safety Series. 11 refs, 2 figs, 2 tab

  14. Krsko NPP radioactive waste characteristics

    In May 2005 Krsko NPP initiated the Radioactive Waste Characterization Project and commissioned its realization to the consulting company Enconet International, Zagreb. The Agency for Radwaste Management was invited to participate on the Project. The Project was successfully closed out in August 2006. The main Project goal consisted of systematization the existing and gathering the missing radiological, chemical, physical, mechanical, thermal and biological information and data on radioactive waste. In a general perspective, the Project may also be considered as a part of broader scope of activities to support state efforts to find a disposal solution for radioactive waste in Slovenia. The operational low and intermediate level radioactive waste has been structured into 6 waste streams that contain evaporator concentrates and tank sludges, spent ion resins, spent filters, compressible and non-compressible waste as well as specific waste. For each of mentioned waste streams, process schemes have been developed including raw waste, treatment and conditioning technologies, waste forms, containers and waste packages. In the paper the main results of the Characterization Project will be briefly described. The results will indicate that there are 17 different types of raw waste that have been processed by applying 9 treatment/conditioning technologies. By this way 18 different waste forms have been produced and stored into 3 types of containers. Within each type of container several combinations should be distinguished. Considering all of this, there are 34 different types of waste packages altogether that are currently stored in the Solid Radwaste Storage Facility at the Krsko NPP site. Because of these findings a new identification system has been recommended and consequently the improvement of the existing database on radioactive waste has been proposed. The potential areas of further in depth characterization are indicated. In the paper a brief description on the

  15. Radioactive waste management

    This chapter discussed the basic subjects covered in the radioactive waste management. The subjects are policy and legislation, pre-treatment, classification, segregation, treatment, conditioning, storage, siting and disposal, and quality assurance

  16. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis of toxic elements in radioactive waste packages.

    Ma, J-L; Carasco, C; Perot, B; Mauerhofer, E; Kettler, J; Havenith, A

    2012-07-01

    The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) are conducting an R&D program to improve the characterization of long-lived and medium activity (LL-MA) radioactive waste packages. In particular, the amount of toxic elements present in radioactive waste packages must be assessed before they can be accepted in repository facilities in order to avoid pollution of underground water reserves. To this aim, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA-Cadarache has started to study the performances of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) for elements showing large capture cross sections such as mercury, cadmium, boron, and chromium. This paper reports a comparison between Monte Carlo calculations performed with the MCNPX computer code using the ENDF/B-VII.0 library and experimental gamma rays measured in the REGAIN PGNAA cell with small samples of nickel, lead, cadmium, arsenic, antimony, chromium, magnesium, zinc, boron, and lithium to verify the validity of a numerical model and gamma-ray production data. The measurement of a ∼20kg test sample of concrete containing toxic elements has also been performed, in collaboration with Forschungszentrum Jülich, to validate the model in view of future performance studies for dense and large LL-MA waste packages. PMID:22406218

  17. Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis for the non-destructive characterization of radioactive wastes

    In Germany, stringent official regulations govern the handling and final storage of radioactive waste. For this reason, the Federal Government has opted for final storage of radioactive waste with negligible heat generation in deep geological formations. At present the Konrad mine in Salzgitter will be rebuilt as a final disposal, the start of operation is scheduled for 2014. Radioactive waste with negligible heat generation originates from the operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants, the medical sector or from research establishments. The requirements of the planning approval decision to build up the disposal Konrad, published on the 22nd of May 2002, obligate the waste producer to consider the limits for chemotoxic substances and to document the waste content. Before the radioactive waste can be stored in the final disposal, it is necessary to characterize the waste composition, relating to the concentration of water polluting substances. In particular for the wastes produced in the year before 1990, the so-called old wastes, there is a lack of documentation. The chemotoxicity of old wastes can mostly only characterized by time consuming and destructive methods. Furthermore these methods produce high costs, which depend on the arrangements to avoid contamination, to comply with the radiation protection and for the conditioning of the wastes. A prototype system, based on the Prompt-Gamma-Neutron-Activation-Analysis (PGNAA) with 14 MeV neutrons, has been developed in this work. This system allows the characterization of large samples, like 25 and 50 l drums. The signature of the element composition is in this processed by gamma-ray spectroscopy. This work was focused, in addition to the feasibility of the system, to the neutron and photon transport in large samples. Therefore the neutron and photon self-absorption in dependence of the sample composition were the main part of interest. Computer simulations (MCNP) and experiments were performed to

  18. Radioactive Waste Management in Romania

    In Romania, the radioactive waste results from nuclear industry and from the applications of the nuclear energy in research, medicine, industry and agriculture. The main producers of radioactive waste are: - Nuclear Power Plant - Unit 1 and 2 of Cernavoda NPP; - Nuclear Research Reactors - WWR-S IFIN-HH and TRIGA INR-Pitesti; - The Factory for production of nuclear fuel, FCN-Pitesti; - Mining facilities and uranium processing facilities - The Uranium National Company; - Hospitals using radioisotopes in medical applications (radiology, oncology); - Classical industry, as a consequence of the industrial applications (the use of radioactive, sources in weld testing, leak detection, wall thickness measurements, etc). According to the Romanian legislation in force, the licensees producing radioactive waste are responsible for the safe management of the radioactive waste up to the moment of disposal. National Agency Radioactive Waste ANDRAD was created on the basis of Governmental Ordinance No.11/2003 on the 28th of August 2004. ANDRAD is responsible for the disposal of the radioactive waste and the spent nuclear fuel. In order to achieve this objective ANDRAD has to develop a lot of activities, defined in the Governmental Ordinance No. 11/2003 modified and completed in 2007. The paper deals with the most important aspects of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel management and the ANDRAD responsibilities in this area. Last year by the Governmental Ordinance a task was approved regarding the management of nuclear waste produced in nuclear power stations. There are finalized safety studies for LILW final repository and licensing procedures are in progress. (authors)

  19. Radioactive Waste Management BasisApril 2006

    Perkins, B K

    2011-08-31

    This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  20. IAEA decadal activities in the field of radioactive gaseous waste management

    The IAEA has long recognized that gaseous waste management is vital in the design and safe operation of all nuclear facilities such that in the decade of the 1980's the IAEA program covered the important aspects of the entire field. The activities reviewed in this paper were marked at the outset by a comprehensive international symposium on the subject in February 1980 organized by the IAEA jointly with the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD when the detailed state-of-the-art was established in 43 papers. In the interim, experts have been convened in IAEA sponsored meetings to result in sixteen technical documents which included summaries of three substantial Co-ordinated Research Programs. Early IAEA activities paid particular attention to management of gas radionuclides which from a matured nuclear industry, could be judged to build-up to long-term sources of irradiation for regional and global populations. Mid-term ongoing activities in handling and retention of gaseous radionuclides arising from abnormal operations in nuclear power plants were given much emphasis following the Chernobyl accident. In the latter years the IAEA activities included detailed examinations of the design and operation of gas cleaning systems for the range of nuclear facilities. Technical reports on gaseous waste management were issued relating to high-level liquid waste conditioning plants (including control of semi-volatiles), nuclear power plants, low- and intermediate-level radioactive materials handling facilities and radioactive waste incinerators

  1. Disposal of Radioactive Waste

    This Safety Requirements publication applies to the disposal of radioactive waste of all types by means of emplacement in designed disposal facilities, subject to the necessary limitations and controls being placed on the disposal of the waste and on the development, operation and closure of facilities. The classification of radioactive waste is discussed. This Safety Requirements publication establishes requirements to provide assurance of the radiation safety of the disposal of radioactive waste, in the operation of a disposal facility and especially after its closure. The fundamental safety objective is to protect people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. This is achieved by setting requirements on the site selection and evaluation and design of a disposal facility, and on its construction, operation and closure, including organizational and regulatory requirements.

  2. Radioactive wastes management

    This article presents the French way to deal with nuclear wastes. 4 categories of radioactive wastes have been defined: 1) very low-level wastes (TFA), 2) low or medium-wastes with short or medium half-life (A), 3) low or medium-level wastes with long half-life (B), and 4) high-level wastes with long half-life (C). ANDRA (national agency for the management of radioactive wastes) manages 2 sites of definitive surface storage (La-Manche and Aube centers) for TFA-wastes. The Aube center allows the storage of A-wastes whose half-life is less than 30 years. This site will receive waste packages for 50 years and will require a regular monitoring for 300 years after its decommissioning. No definitive solutions have been taken for B and C wastes, they are temporarily stored at La Hague processing plant. Concerning these wastes the French parliament will have to take a decision by 2006. At this date and within the framework of the Bataille law (1991), scientific studies concerning the definitive or retrievable storage, the processing techniques (like transmutation) will have been achieved and solutions will be proposed. These studies are numerous, long and complex, they involve fresh knowledge in geology, chemistry, physics,.. and they have implied the setting of underground facilities in order to test and validate solutions in situ. This article presents also the transmutation technique. (A.C.)

  3. Radioactive waste management in Romania

    In Romania, the radioactive waste results from nuclear industry and from the applications of the nuclear energy in research, medicine, industry and agriculture. The main producers of radioactive waste are: Nuclear Power Plant - Unit 1 and 2 of Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant; Nuclear Research Reactors - VVRS IFIN-HH and TRIGA SCN-Pitesti; The Factory which produces nuclear fuel Nuclear Fuel Plant (FCN-Pitesti Mining facilities and uranium processing facilities - The Uranium National Company; Hospitals which use applications of the radioisotopes in medical field (radiology, oncology); Classical industry, as a consequence of the industrial applications (the use of radioactive, sources in weld testing, leak detection, wall thickness measurement, etc.). According to the Romanian legislation in force, the licensees who produce radioactive waste are responsible for the safe management of the radioactive waste up to the moment of disposal. National Agency Radioactive Waste ANDRAD was created on the basis of the Governmental Ordinance No.11/2003 on the 28. of August 2004. ANDRAD is responsible for the disposal of the radioactive waste and the spent nuclear fuel. In order to achieve this objective ANDRAD has to develop a lot of activities, defined in the Governmental Ordinance No. 11/2003 modified and completed in 2007. The paper deals with the most important aspects of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel management, the ANDRAD responsibilities in this area. The main nuclear waste management facilities the National Nuclear Waste Repository (DNDR) Baita, the nuclear waste storage, treatment and conditioning plants are presented. The Low and Intermediate Level Waste (LILW) storage facility (DIDR) and spent fuel storage (DICA) are presented, also. ANDRAD is responsible for the future LILW DFDSMA which is to be built at Saligny, near Cernavoda NPP site and future High Level Waste (HLW) and spent fuel repository (DFCA). This year was approved by the Governmental Ordinance the

  4. Low- and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Environmental and Safety Assessment Activities in Slovenia

    The protection of the environment is one of the main concerns in the management of radioactive waste, especially in repository planning. In different stages of repository lifetime the environmental assessment has different functions: it can be used as a decision making process and as a planning, communication and management tool. Safety assessment as a procedure for evaluating the performance of a disposal system, and its potential radiological impact on human health and environment, is also required. Following the international recommendations and Slovene legislation, a presentation is given of the role and importance of the environmental and safety assessment activities in the early stages following concept development and site selection for a low- and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) repository in Slovenia. As a case study, a short overview is also given of the preliminary safety assessment that has been carried out in the analysis of possibilities for long-lived LILW disposal in Slovenia. (author)

  5. Radioactive waste gas processing systems

    Purpose: To effectively separate and remove only hydrogen from hydrogen gas-containing radioactive waste gases produced from nuclear power plants without using large scaled facilities. Constitution: From hydrogen gas-enriched waste gases which contain radioactive rare gases (Kr, Xe) sent from the volume control tank of a chemical volume control system, only the hydrogen is separated in a hydrogen separator using palladium alloy membrane and rare gases are concentrated, volume-decreased and then stored. In this case, an activated carbon adsorption device is connected at its inlet to the radioactive gas outlet of the hydrogen separator and opened at its outlet to external atmosphere. In this system, while only the hydrogen gas permeates through the palladium alloy membrane, other gases are introduced, without permeation, into the activated carbon adsorption device. Then, the radioactive rare gases are decayed by the adsorption on the activated carbon and then released to the external atmosphere. (Furukawa, Y.)

  6. Radioactive waste management - an educational challenge

    University Radioactive Waste Management educational programs are being actively advanced by the educational support activities of the Offices of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) of the DOE. The DOE fellowship program formats of funding students and requiring a practical research experience (practicum) at a DOE site has helped to combine the academic process with a practical work experience. Support for faculty in these programs is augmenting the benefits of the fellowship programs. The many job opportunities and funding sources for students which currently exists in the radioactive waste management area are fueling an increase in academic programs seeking recognition of their radioactive waste management curriculums

  7. Radioactive waste storage issues

    Kunz, D.E.

    1994-08-15

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

  8. Radioactive waste storage issues

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state's boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected

  9. Radioactive Waste management - v. 1

    The state of the art for each stage and activities correlated to the nuclear fuel cycle, describing the activities of main countries of the world in this area, is presented. In this volume, the principles which described the several sources of radioactive wastes from nuclear industry, the standardization of waste categories, the strategies adopted for treatment and disposal, the repository types and the practices and proposals of several countries in this field, are presented. (M.C.K.)

  10. Public acceptance activities for final disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Japan

    In Japan, the Specified Radioactive Waste Final Disposal Act (hereafter the Act) was promulgated in June 2000, with a view to ensuring systematic and safe disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Act calls for the establishment of an implementing body responsible for disposal of high-level waste (HLW). The body specified under the Act, the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO), was established in October 2000. In order to initiate the disposal project for HLW in Japan, NUMO selected an open solicitation approach for finding candidate sites and sent an information package to all municipalities in Japan in December 2002. For successful implementation of the HLW project, it is essential to gain public understanding of the need for HLW disposal in Japan, the disposal system planned by NUMO and NUMO's activities, with the focus on the following: the development of repository concepts in Japan, the site selection process, the open solicitation approach and the public outreach scheme. NUMO has organized fact-to-face forums and conducted information campaigns in leading newspapers, on TV and in magazines to raise awareness of its mission and activities. As a result of these actions, some municipalities have expressed an interested in the project, but this has not yet led to the first step of conducting literature surveys. Experience with municipalities that expressed an interest indicates the need to step up efforts towards improving the understanding of the final disposal project by the general public and local residents. (author)

  11. Submission of the national commission of the public debate on the options concerning the long life high and medium activity radioactive wastes management

    This document deals with the presentation of a public debate on the radioactive wastes management and the opportunities of its organization. It presents successively the long life high and medium activity radioactive wastes, the today radioactive wastes management policy and some questions and topics which could be discussed during the debate. (A.L.B.)

  12. Radioactive waste packaging and transport in Argentina

    This article is aimed at summarising the activities related to the transport of radioactive materials carried out in Argentina and, especially, with regard to the transport of radioactive wastes. In particular, the legislation applicable within the national territory is described. Additionally, figures are provided on the features and amounts of transported radioactive materials, including radioactive wastes, concerning both the nuclear fuel cycle and activities related to their industrial and medical applications. (Author)

  13. Radioactive wastes in Oklo

    The acceptance of the Nuclear Energy as electric power supply implies to give answer to the population on the two main challenges to conquer in the public opinion: the nuclear accidents and the radioactive wastes. Several of the questions that are made on the radioactive wastes, its are the mobility migration of them, the geologic stability of the place where its are deposited and the possible migration toward the aquifer mantels. Since the half lives of the radioactive waste of a Nuclear Reactor are of several hundred of thousands of years, the technical explanations to the previous questions little convince to the public in general. In this work summary the results of the radioactive waste generated in a natural reactor, denominated Oklo effect that took place in Gabon, Africa, it makes several thousands of millions of years, a lot before the man appeared in the Earth. The identification of at least 17 reactors in Oklo it was carried out thanks to the difference in the concentrations of Uranium 235 and 238 prospective, and to the analysis of the non-mobility of the radioactive waste in the site. It was able by this way to determine that the reactors with sizes of hardly some decimeter and powers of around 100 kilowatts were operating in intermittent and spontaneous form for space of 150,000 years, with operation cycles of around 30 minutes. Recent studies have contributed information valuable on the natural confinement of the radioactive waste of the Oklo reactors in matrixes of minerals of aluminum phosphate that caught and immobilized them for thousands of millions of years. This extracted information from the nature contributes guides and it allows 'to verify' the validity of the current proposals on the immobilization of radioactive wastes of a nuclear reactor. This work presents in clear and accessible form to the public in general on the secure 'design', operation, 'decommissioning' and 'storage' of the radioactive waste of the reactors that the nature put

  14. Radioactive waste management and handling

    In this paper, mainly from the radioactive solid waste separation, treatment details of Shaanxi uranium Enrichment Co., Ltd. the actual situation of radioactive waste management, and solid radioactive waste by raising the whole preparation, storage for planning. Through the planning to address the company's accumulation of radioactive waste, more and more waste repository issue of storage space is shrinking each year. Planning is mainly to establish compression volume reduction system, to be accumulated to a certain amount of radioactive waste, the compressed volume reduction package, packaged material blocks passing through the surface contamination testing was conducted after the weighing to measure, and paste the labels, establishing a database and record sets account, record the weight, type, date, etc. after the warehouse store. Would be a good package of radioactive solid waste brought to the state designated for storage of radioactive waste storage sites. By planning the company's radioactive solid waste control and management has been continued to improve. (authors)

  15. Artificial neural networks in the evaluation of the radioactive waste drums activity

    The mathematical techniques are becoming more important to solve geometry and standard identification problems. The gamma spectrometry of radioactive waste drums would be a complex solution problem. The main difficulty is the detectors calibration for this geometry; the waste is not homogeneously distributed inside the drums, therefore there are many possible combinations between the activity and the position of these radionuclides inside the drums, making the preparation of calibration standards impracticable. This work describes the development of a methodology to estimate the activity of a 200 L radioactive waste drum, as well as a mapping of the waste distribution, using Artificial Neural Network. The neural network data set entry obtaining was based on the possible detection efficiency combination with 10 sources activities varying from 0 to 74 x 103 Bq. The set up consists of a 200 L drum divided in 5 layers. Ten detectors were positioned all the way through a parallel line to the drum axis, from 15 cm of its surface. The Cesium -137 radionuclide source was used. The 50 efficiency obtained values (10 detectors and 5 layers), combined with the 10 source intensities resulted in a 100,000 lines for 15 columns matrix, with all the possible combinations of source intensity and the Cs-137 position in the 5 layers of the drum. This archive was divided in 2 parts to compose the set of training: input and target files. The MatLab 7.0 module of neural networks was used for training. The net architecture has 10 neurons in the input layer, 18 in the hidden layer and 5 in the output layer. The training algorithm was the 'traincgb' and after 300 'epoch s' the medium square error was 0.00108172. This methodology allows knowing the detection positions answers in a heterogeneous distribution of radionuclides inside a 200 L waste drum; in consequence it is possible to estimate the total activity of the drum in the training neural network limits. The results accuracy depends on

  16. Thermal treatment of organic radioactive waste

    The organic radioactive waste which is generated in nuclear and isotope facilities (power plants, research centers and other) must be treated in order to achieve a waste form suitable for long term storage and disposal. Therefore the resulting waste treatment products should be stable under influence of temperature, time, radioactivity, chemical and biological activity. Another reason for the treatment of organic waste is the volume reduction with respect to the storage costs. For different kinds of waste, different treatment technologies have been developed and some are now used in industrial scale. The paper gives process descriptions for the treatment of solid organic radioactive waste of low beta/gamma activity and alpha-contaminated solid organic radioactive waste, and the pyrolysis of organic radioactive waste

  17. Liability coverage for high-level radioactive waste management activities: An update

    A continuing concern surrounding development of facilities for management of high-level radioactive waste is the scope of liability coverage that might have to be called upon to compensate the public. The Price-Anderson Act, which now establishes an exemplary system of private insurance or government indemnity for various nuclear activities, expires on August 1, 1987. Thus, Congress has been considering whether to extend the Act; and, if so, what provisions it should contain and whether it should be amended to apply more explicitly to waste management activities. Additional Congressional activities are expected in the coming months. This paper explores the current status of Congressional consideration of this important matter, which is taking place at the same time growing attention is being devoted to the overall liability crisis in this country

  18. Comparison exercise on activity determination of radioactive waste drums in Taiwan.

    Chu, Wei-Han; Yeh, Chin-Hsien; Yuan, Ming-Chen

    2016-03-01

    The National Radiation Standard Laboratory of Taiwan organized in 2014 a comparison exercise by distributing 210 L drum-typed samples to seven radioactive waste analysis laboratories in Taiwan. Four drums were filled with uniformly distributed active carbon, water, resin and concrete, respectively and five drums were filled with cracked metals and heterogeneously distributed radioactive sources. Measurement uncertainties of participants results are in the range 3–40% (k=2) and about 96% of the reported results produced En values (ISO, 1997) smaller than one for drums with activity uniformly distributed. The minimum discrepancies, expressed as Bi values (ISO, 1997), of drums with heterogeneously distributed 137Cs and 60Co were 0.34 and 0.17, respectively. PMID:27358943

  19. Radioactive liquid waste processing system

    The present invention provides a system for processing radioactive liquid wastes containing laundry liquid wastes, shower drains or radioactive liquid wastes containing chemical oxygen demand (COD) ingredients and oil content generated from a nuclear power plant. Namely, a collecting tank collects radioactive liquid wastes. A filtering device is connected to the exit of the collective tank. A sump tank is connected to the exit of the filtering device. A powdery active carbon supplying device is connected to the collecting tank. A chemical fluid tank is connected to the collecting tank and the filtering device by way of chemical fluid injection lines. Backwarding pipelines connect a filtered water flowing exit of the filtering device and the collecting tank. The chemical solution is stored in the chemical solution tank. Then, radioactive materials in radioactive liquid wastes generated from a nuclear power plant are removed by the filtering device. The water quality standard specified in environmental influence reports can be satisfied. In the filtering device, when the filtering flow rate is reduced, the chemical fluid is supplied from the chemical fluid tank to the filtering device to recover the filtering flow rate. (I.S.)

  20. Radioactive waste processing device

    Liquid wastes are supplied to a ceramic filter to conduct filtration. In this case, a device for adding a powdery inorganic ion exchanger is disposed to the upstream of the ceramic filter. When the powdery inorganic ion exchanger is charged to the addition device, it is precoated to the surface of the ceramic filter, to conduct separation of suspended matters and separation of ionic nuclides simultaneously. Liquid wastes returned to a collecting tank are condensed while being circulated between the ceramic filter and the tank and then contained in a condensation liquid waste tank. With such a constitution, both of radioactive nuclides accompanied by suspended matters in the radioactive liquid wastes and ionic nuclides can be captured efficiently. (T.M.)

  1. Radioactive wastes, disposal sites wanted

    Two towns that were selected by the French government to home a disposal site for low-level radioactive wastes, have withdrawn their bid. ANDRA (French national agency for the management of radioactive wastes) attributes this withdrawal to the unbearable pressure made by the opponents on the city councils despite the public information meetings that were held in the 2 cities. The selection rules included the presence of clay layers with a thickness of at least 50 m, the absence of seismic activity and zones containing exploitable resources like petroleum or metal ores were barred in order to avoid future unexpected drilling. (A.C.)

  2. Law on the management of radioactive waste

    This law regulate the relations of legal persons, enterprises without the rights of legal persons, and natural persons in the management of radioactive waste in Lithuania and establish the legal grounds for the management of radioactive waste. Thirty one article of the law deals with the following subjects: principles of radioactive waste management, competence of the Government, State Nuclear Power Safety Inspectorate, Ministry of Economy, Ministry of Environment and Radiation Protection Center in the sphere of regulation of the radioactive waste management, activities subject to licensing, issue of licences and authorisations, duties and responsibilities of the waste producer, founding of the radioactive waste management agency, its basic status and principles of the activities, functions of the agency, management of the agency, transfer of the radioactive waste to the agency, assessment of the existing waste management facilities and their past practices, siting, design and construction, safety assessment, commissioning and operation of the radioactive waste management facilities, radiation protection, quality assurance, emergency preparedness, decommissioning of radioactive waste storage and other facilities, post-closure surveillance of the repository, disused sealed sources, transportation, export and transit of radioactive waste

  3. Method of packaging radioactive wastes

    Purpose: To decrease the leaching of radioactive waste in marine environment. Method: Fillers are placed between a drum can and an inner cage for charging radioactive wastes in order to prevent the leakage of the radioactive wastes from the drum can. Leaching inhibitors for radioactive materials are mixed with the fillers made of organic substance such as asphalts and plastics. The leaching inhibitors are made of materials in the similar chemical form to that of the radioactive materials in the wastes and mixed into the fillers to the saturation limit of dissolution. For the radioactive wastes containing spent adsorbents for iodine, the inhibitors are made of silver nitrates. (Ikeda, J.)

  4. Estimation of activity in radioactive solid waste at Rajasthan Atomic Power Station- 1 and 2

    In view of the present regulatory norms, it is required that any radioactive solid waste should be labeled for activity content and radionuclide composition in it. An easy method for this purpose is to measure the radiation field at a fixed distance from the waste package and convert it to the activity content by applying suitable predetermined conversion factor. A user friendly PC-based code ACTDOR was developed by Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. This code requires a library of radionuclides and their composition present in the waste of different systems. A special sample collection technique and the analysis of samples has been evolved at Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS)-1 and 2. The sample collection technique, the behaviour of radionuclides in the waste package and the validation of the code at RAPS-1 and 2 have been described. Experimental values are in reasonable agreement with the values given by the code in the light of high degree of non-homogeneity present in the waste package. (author)

  5. Radioactive waste management

    The main issues of the radioactive waste safe management are covered in the monograph. The international knowledge, as well as the national experience in this field are summarized. The technologies and methods used for the safety objective achievement are described. The main attention is paid to the safety norms and rules, to the descriptions of the radwaste management facilities under operation

  6. Radioactive waste processing field

    Storing space for radioactive wastes (storage tunnels) are formed underground of the sea bottom along coast. A plurality of boreholes through which sea water flows are pored vertically in a direction intersecting underground streams of brine in the ground between the tunnels and seaside. Sea water introduction pipes are joined to the upper side walls of the boreholes. The sea water introduction pipes have introduction ports protruded under the sea level of the coastal sea area region. Since sea water flows from the introduction ports to the boreholes passing through the sea water introduction pipes, sea water is always filled in the boreholes. Therefore, brine is sufficiently supplied toward the land by sea water from the boreholes, the underground stream of brine is negligibly small. This can prevent radioactive contamination due to flow of the underground water when radioactive wastes are buried in the underground near coast. (I.N.)

  7. Radioactive waste management glossary

    The Waste Management Glossary defines over 300 terms in the English language that have special meanings when they are used in the context of radioactive waste management. The Glossary is intended to provide a consistent reference for these terms for specialists in this field. It also will assist non-specialists who read IAEA reports dealing with waste management. This is the second edition of the Glossary. It is intended to update and replace its predecessor, TECDOC-264, that was issued in 1982. (author)

  8. Qualification tests for packages used for transport and storage of radioactive waste (low activity) in INR Pitesti

    Vieru, G. (Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania))

    1993-01-01

    Radioactive wastes generated by the TRIGA INR research reactor are packaged according to the national and international standards and the IAEA Regulations. The technology for packaging and treatment of radioactive wastes used in this institute can be applied, prospectively, at the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda, after commissioning. The qualification tests (low tests) are described for packages used for transport and storage (for a long period of about 30 years) of radioactive wastes (low activity, up to 0.5068 x 10[sup 10] Bq per drum, or 0.164 Ci per drum). As a result of the tests, Romanian technology for treatment and packaging of radioactive wastes is considered to be in accordance with IAEA Regulations. (author).

  9. Radioactive wastes handling facility

    There are disposed an area where a conveyor is disposed for separating miscellaneous radioactive solid wastes such as metals, on area for operators which is disposed in the direction vertical to the transferring direction of the conveyor, an area for receiving the radioactive wastes and placing them on the conveyor and an area for collecting the radioactive wastes transferred by the conveyor. Since an operator can conduct handling while wearing a working cloth attached to a partition wall as he wears his ordinary cloth, the operation condition can be improved and the efficiency for the separating work can be improved. When the area for settling conveyors and the area for the operators is depressurized, cruds on the surface of the wastes are not released to the outside and the working clothes can be prevented from being involved. Since the wastes are transferred by the conveyor, the operator's moving range is reduced, poisonous materials are fallen and moved through a sliding way to an area for collecting materials to be separated. Accordingly, the materials to be removed can be accumulated easily. (N.H.)

  10. Solid radioactive waste: evaluation of residual activity in nuclear medicine services

    An experimental programme to estimate, with a better degree of accuracy, the activity that remains adsorbed in flasks and syringes used in Nuclear Medicine Services for the administration of radionuclides to patients submitted to diagnostic or therapy is been conducted under the coordination of the Radioactive Waste Division of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN. The adopted recommendation in Brazil to allow an expedite solid waste management in nuclear medicine facilities, up to the present, is to consider that 2% of the initial activity remains adsorbed in the solid waste, which easily allows the calculation of the storage time to achieve regulatory clearance levels by decay. This research evaluates 17 different kinds of radiopharmaceuticals and three radioisotopes: 99mTc, 67Ga and 201Tl. Results obtained by means of a weighting method to estimate the residual mass in flasks show that the ratio of the mass of the liquid that remains in the solid waste to the mass of the empty flask is constant. This suggests that the residual activity depends on the initial activity concentration of radiopharmaceutical contained in each flask, as assumed by the regulatory body. Additionally, results obtained by determining the remaining activity in flasks, shortly after the injection of its radionuclide contents in patients, indicate that an average value for the residual activity of the order of 10% of the initial activity contained in the flasks or syringes should be adopted to determine the decay storage time before the release of solid waste in the urban conventional land fill disposal system. The 'rule of thumb' of 10 half-lives for storage before clearance is also discussed in the present work. (author)

  11. Development of joint regulatory guidance on the management of higher activity radioactive wastes on nuclear licensed sites - 16095

    In 2006 the UK Government's response (1) to recommendations by its Committee on Radioactive Waste Management (CoRWM) established, in England and Wales, that geological disposal, supported by safe and secure interim storage, is the preferred route for the long-term management of higher-activity radioactive waste (i.e. that which is not suitable for near-surface disposal). It also gave the responsibility for delivering the programme for a deep geological repository to the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA). The Scottish Government has a policy of long term, near site, near surface safe and secure interim storage. To support the open and transparent approach promised by Government, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), the Environment Agency and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) are developing joint guidance on the management of higher-activity radioactive waste to explain regulatory objectives in securing safe and secure interim storage and the associated management of radioactive wastes. The guidance comes in two parts: - Guidance on the regulatory process; - Technical guidance modules. The guidance promotes a cradle to grave approach to radioactive waste management and by aligning the regulatory interests of environmental and safety regulators it delivers one of the Government's 'Better Regulation' objectives. This paper describes the process by which the joint guidance was produced with particular emphasis on stakeholder engagement. It describes the key features of the guidance, including the concept of the radioactive waste management case (RWMC). Finally the problems encountered with dissemination and implementation are discussed together with measures taken by the regulators to improve these aspects. (1) : UK Government and the devolved administrations, 'Response to the Report and Recommendations from the Committee on Radioactive Waste Management (CoRWM)', (PB 12303) October 2006. www.defra.gov.uk/environment/radioactivity/waste

  12. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING WITH ACUTAL HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTES VERIFYING FBSR AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT

    Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Bannochie, C.; Daniel, G.; Nash, C.; Cozzi, A.; Herman, C.

    2012-01-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the cleanup mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is one of the supplementary treatments being considered. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and other secondary wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates/nitrites, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, and/or radio-nuclides like I-129 and Tc-99. Radioactive testing of Savannah River LAW (Tank 50) shimmed to resemble Hanford LAW and actual Hanford LAW (SX-105 and AN-103) have produced a ceramic (mineral) waste form which is the same as the non-radioactive waste simulants tested at the engineering scale. The radioactive testing demonstrated that the FBSR process can retain the volatile radioactive components that cannot be contained at vitrification temperatures. The radioactive and nonradioactive mineral waste forms that were produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process are shown to be as durable as LAW glass.

  13. Radioactive Demonstrations Of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming With Acutal Hanford Low Activity Wastes Verifying Fbsr As A Supplementary Treatment

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the cleanup mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is one of the supplementary treatments being considered. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and other secondary wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates/nitrites, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, and/or radio-nuclides like I-129 and Tc-99. Radioactive testing of Savannah River LAW (Tank 50) shimmed to resemble Hanford LAW and actual Hanford LAW (SX-105 and AN-103) have produced a ceramic (mineral) waste form which is the same as the non-radioactive waste simulants tested at the engineering scale. The radioactive testing demonstrated that the FBSR process can retain the volatile radioactive components that cannot be contained at vitrification temperatures. The radioactive and nonradioactive mineral waste forms that were produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process are shown to be as durable as LAW glass.

  14. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank Farm Blend) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)

    day, ASTM C1308 testing (similar to ANSI/ANS 16.1 testing) was only performed on two fly ash geopolymer monoliths at 67-68 wt% FBSR loading and three clay geopolymer monoliths at 42 wt% FBSR loading. More clay geopolymers need to be made and tested at longer times at higher FBSR loadings for comparison to the fly ash monoliths. Monoliths made with metakaolin (heat treated) clay are of a more constant composition and are very reactive as the heat treated clay is amorphous and alkali activated. The monoliths made with fly ash are subject to the inherent compositional variation found in fly ash as it is a waste product from burning coal and it contains unreactive components such as mullite. However, both the fly ash and the clay based monoliths perform well in long term ASTM C1308 testing. Extensive testing and characterization of the granular and monolith material were made including the following American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) tests: ASTM C1285 testing (Product Consistency Test) of granular and monolithic waste forms; Comparison of granular BSR radioactive to ESTD and pilot scale granular non-radioactive waste form made from the Rassat simulant; Comparison of granular radioactive to granular non-radioactive waste form made from the Rassat simulant made using the SRNL BSR; Comparison of monolithic BSR radioactive waste forms to monolithic BSR and ESTD non-radioactive waste forms made of fly ash; Comparison of granular BSR radioactive waste forms to monolithic BSR non-radioactive waste forms made of fly ash; Comparison of granular BSR radioactive waste forms to monolithic BSR non-radioactive waste forms made of clay; ASTM C1308 Accelerated Leach Test for Diffusive Releases from Solidified Waste and a Computer Program to Model Diffusive, Fractional Leaching from Cylindrical Waste Forms; Comparison of BSR non-radioactive waste forms to monolithic ESTD non-radioactive waste forms made from fly ash; Testing of BSR non-radioactive monoliths made from clay

  15. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank Farm Blend) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)

    Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

    2013-08-21

    . The granular ESTD and BSR products (radioactive and non-radioactive) were analyzed for total constituents and durability tested as a granular waste form. A subset of the granular material was stabilized in a clay based geopolymer matrix at 42% and 65% FBSR loadings and durability tested as a monolith waste form. The 65 wt% FBSR loaded monolith made with clay (radioactive) was more durable than the 67-68 wt% FBSR loaded monoliths made from fly ash (non-radioactive) based on short term PCT testing. Long term, 90 to 107 day, ASTM C1308 testing (similar to ANSI/ANS 16.1 testing) was only performed on two fly ash geopolymer monoliths at 67-68 wt% FBSR loading and three clay geopolymer monoliths at 42 wt% FBSR loading. More clay geopolymers need to be made and tested at longer times at higher FBSR loadings for comparison to the fly ash monoliths. Monoliths made with metakaolin (heat treated) clay are of a more constant composition and are very reactive as the heat treated clay is amorphous and alkali activated. The monoliths made with fly ash are subject to the inherent compositional variation found in fly ash as it is a waste product from burning coal and it contains unreactive components such as mullite. However, both the fly ash and the clay based monoliths perform well in long term ASTM C1308 testing. Extensive testing and characterization of the granular and monolith material were made including the following American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) tests: ASTM C1285 testing (Product Consistency Test) of granular and monolithic waste forms; Comparison of granular BSR radioactive to ESTD and pilot scale granular non-radioactive waste form made from the Rassat simulant  Comparison of granular radioactive to granular non-radioactive waste form made from the Rassat simulant made using the SRNL BSR; Comparison of monolithic BSR radioactive waste forms to monolithic BSR and ESTD non-radioactive waste forms made of fly ash; Comparison of granular BSR radioactive

  16. Unrestricted disposal of minimal activity levels of radioactive wastes: exposure and risk calculations

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is currently considering revision of rule 10 CFR Part 20, which covers disposal of solid wastes containing minimal radioactivity. In support of these revised rules, we have evaluated the consequences of disposing of four waste streams at four types of disposal areas located in three different geographic regions. Consequences are expressed in terms of human exposures and associated health effects. Each geographic region has its own climate and geology. Example waste streams, waste disposal methods, and geographic regions chosen for this study are clearly specified. Monetary consequences of minimal activity waste disposal are briefly discussed. The PRESTO methodology was used to evaluate radionuclide transport and health effects. This methodology was developed to assess radiological impacts to a static local population for a 1000-year period following disposal. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to exposed populations included the following considerations: groundwater transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, resuspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. 12 references, 2 figures, 8 tables

  17. Radioactive waste management in FR Yugoslavia

    Results presented in this paper represent the nowadays status of the radioactive waste management, especially quality testing methods, which are in common with radioactive waste solidification processes, performing in the Institute of nuclear sciences ''Vinca'' in Belgrade. These investigations represent the part of important activity in a ten years mortar and concrete testing project and research work that is dealing with the radioactive waste mixture forms. The data obtained in these investigations are intended to use during the designing of the proposed central radioactive waste materials repository in FR Yugoslavia. (author)

  18. Radioactive waste management

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) attaches considerable importance to its cooperation with Japan. It was said in the annual conference in 1977 that the presentation of the acceptable policy regarding radioactive waste management is the largest single factor for gaining public confidence when nuclear power is adopted with assurance. The risk connected with radioactive wastes was often presented as the major obstacle to the development of nuclear energy, however, an overall impression of optimism and confidence prevailed by the technical appraisal of the situation in this field by the committee of the NEA. This evolution can be easily explained by the significant progress achieved in radioactive waste management both at the technical level and with respect to the implementation of special legislation and the establishment of specialized institutions and financing schemes. More research will focus on the optimization of the technical, safety and economic aspects of specific engineering designs at specific sites on the long term isolation of wastes, and the NEA contributes to this general effort. The implementation of disposal programs is also in progress. (Kako, I.)

  19. Categorizing operational radioactive wastes

    The primary objective of this publication is to improve communications among waste management professionals and Member States relative to the properties and status of radioactive waste. This is accomplished by providing a standardized approach to operational waste categorization using accepted industry practices and experience. It is a secondary objective to draw a distinction between operational waste categorization and waste disposal classification. The approach set forth herein is applicable to waste generation by mature (major, advanced) nuclear programmes, small-to-medium sized nuclear programmes, and programmes with waste from other nuclear applications. It can be used for planning, developing or revising categorization methodologies. For existing categorization programmes, the approach set forth in this publication may be used as a validation and evaluation tool for assessing communication effectiveness among affected organizations or nations. This publication is intended for use by waste management professionals responsible for creating, implementing or communicating effective categorization, processing and disposal strategies. For the users of this publication, it is important to remember that waste categorization is a communication tool. As such, the operational waste categories are not suitable for regulatory purposes nor for use in health and safety evaluations. Following Section 1 (Introduction) Section 2 of this publication defines categorization and its relationship to existing waste classification and management standards, regulations and practices. It also describes the benefits of a comprehensive categorization programme and fundamental record considerations. Section 3 provides an overview of the categorization process, including primary categories and sub-categories. Sections 4 and 5 outline the specific methodology for categorizing unconditioned and conditioned wastes. Finally, Section 6 provides a brief summary of critical considerations that

  20. Training activities and perspectives in the radioactive waste management area of Moscow SIA 'Radon' - 16131

    The education service for specialists dealing with radioactive waste was established in Russia (former USSR) in 1983 and was based on the capabilities of two organisations: Moscow Scientific and Industrial Association 'Radon' (SIA 'Radon') and Lomonosov's Moscow State University. These two organizations are able jointly to offer training programs in the science fundamentals, applied research and in practical operational areas of the all pre-disposal activities of the radioactive waste management (RWM). Since 1997 this system was upgraded to the international level and now acts as the International Education Training Centre (IETC) at SIA 'Radon' under the guidance of the IAEA. During last 12 years more than 350 specialists from 33 European and Asian countries enhanced their knowledge and skills in RWM. The IAEA supported many specialized regional training courses and workshops, fellowships, on-the-job training, and scientific visits which are additional means to assure development of personnel capabilities. Efficiency of training was analysed at IETC using the structural adaptation of educational process as well as factors, which have influence on education quality. In addition social-psychological aspects were also taken into account in assessing the overall efficiency. The analysis of the effect of individual factors and the efficiency of education activity were carried out based on appraisal results and post-course questioning of attendees. (authors)

  1. Radioactive waste management in Albania

    The policy and strategy of radioactive waste management in Albania are described in the Ministers Council's Decree No. 83, 1971. According to this Decree the liquid waste are all contaminated liquids with concentrations 10-100 times higher than maximal permissible concentrations for ordinary water. The management of liquid waste is done through their collection in special tanks without any treatment and subsequent discharge to sewer. The principal radioisotopes in liquid waste are I-131 and Tc-99m. The solid waste are all materials, which contain of or are contaminated with radioisotopes up to levels greater than exempted quantities. The management of solid waste is done through its safe storage in the premises, where radioactive decay occurs, especially for short lived radionuclides. Last years, many spent radiation sources were gathered in the Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) for conditioning and interim storage. For conditioning 200 litres standard drums with steel bars and concrete filling having a hole in the centre are used. Spent radiation sources were emplaced in the hole until the activity of 20 GBq has been reached. Interim storage of conditioned sources is carried out in the engineering facility near the INP with trenches of capacity 5 cubic meters each. Last year a national inventory of sealed radiation sources begin to compile. A national programme for radioactive waste management in the future has been developed, taking into account the future extension of production and use of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals and the participation of Albania in the IAEA Interregional Model Project on Radioactive Waste Management. (author). 6 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Sorting method for radioactive waste

    This paper describes a method for detecting radioactive components in dry active waste, comprising the steps of: providing a substantially airtight housing, withdrawing air from the housing, reducing the waste to pieces of substantially uniform size, providing a first conveyor in the housing, the first conveyor having a receiving portion and a discharge portion, discharging the pieces of reduced waste onto the first conveyor, flattening the pieces of reduced waste, detecting radiation emanating from the pieces of reduced waste from a position closely overlying the first conveyor, after the pieces are flattened, removing from the first conveyor the pieces of reduced waste from which radioactive radiation above a determined level is detected, providing a second conveyor in the housing, the second conveyor having a receiving portion and a discharge portion, disposing the second conveyor so that its receiving portion is below and spaced from the discharge portion of the first conveyor, discharging the pieces of reduced waste from the discharge portion of the first conveyor so that they fall onto the receiving portion of the second conveyor; the space between the last named discharge portion and the last named receiving portion being sufficiently great so that the pieces of reduced waste are substantially overturned and dispersed as they fall to the last named receiving portion

  3. Radioactive Waste Management Objectives

    considered and the specific goals to be achieved at different stages of implementation, all of which are consistent with the Basic Principles. The four Objectives publications include Nuclear General Objectives, Nuclear Power Objectives, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Objectives, and Radioactive Waste Management and Decommissioning Objectives. This publication sets out the objectives that need to be achieved in the area of radioactive waste management, including decommissioning and environmental remediation, to ensure that the Nuclear Energy Basic Principles are satisfied.

  4. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    Freiesleben H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste – LLW, intermediate-level waste – ILW, high-level waste – HLW) are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of c...

  5. Radioactive waste management policies

    Eight senior government representatives outlined the views and policies of their countries in the field of radioactive waste management at a 'scientific afternoon' during the 27th Regular Session of the General Conference of the IAEA in Vienna in October. The countries represented were Argentina, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, India, Japan, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the USA; statements made by the participants are reproduced in this article

  6. Chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal waste

    The invention relates to a decontamination method for radioactive metal waste products derived from equipment that handles radioactive materials whose surfaces have been contaminated; in particular it concerns a decontamination method that reduces the amount of radioactive waste by decontaminating radioactive waste substances to a level of radioactivity in line with normal waste products. In order to apply chemical decontamination to metal waste products whose surfaces are divided into carbon steel waste and stainless steel waste; the carbon steel waste is treated using only a primary process in which the waste is immersed in a sulfuric acid solution, while the stainless steel waste must be treated with both the primary process and then electrolytically reduces it for a specific length of time and a secondary process that uses a solution of sulfuric acid mixed with oxidizing metal salts. The method used to categorize metal waste into carbon steel waste and stainless steel waste involves determining the presence, or absence, of magnetism. Voltage is applied for a fixed duration; once that has stopped, electrolytic reduction repeats the operative cycle of applying, then stopping voltage until the potential of the radioactive metal waste is retained in the active region. 1 fig. 2 tabs

  7. Radioactive waste management strategy in Argentina

    In this paper, an outline is given concerning the treatment, conditioning, characterization, storage, transport and final disposal of radioactive wastes arising in the fuel cycle, radioisotopes production plant, research centers, etc. The overall strategy of the Argentina program is to plan, develop and implement the technology and provide the facilities for the permanent isolation of commercially generated wastes, with the aim that this waste not compromise the health and safety of the general public. To implement all these activities, CNEA has established in 1986 a Radioactive Waste Management Program. This long term project is aimed at meeting all the requirements for the radioactive waste management of Argentina

  8. Radioactive waste management glossary

    Terminology used in documents published by the IAEA is frequently defined in glossaries in the separate documents so that understanding is enhanced, particularly for terms having unique meanings in the field of radioactive waste management. This has been found to be a good practice but frequently a burdensome one, too. In addition, terms in various documents occasionally were used differently. Thus, a common glossary of terms for radioactive waste management documents is believed to have merit. This glossary has been developed for use in IAEA documentation on radioactive waste management topics. The individual items have been compiled by selecting terms and definitions from thirty sources, listed on the next page, and numerous people. An effort has been made to use the definitions in internationally-accepted glossaries (e.g. ICRP, ICRU, ISO), with minimum modification; similarly, definitions in recently published IAEA documents have been respected. Nevertheless, when modifications were believed appropriate, they have been made. The glossary, stored on magnetic tape, is intended to be used as a standard for terminology for IAEA use; it is hoped that some benefits of common international terminology may result from its use in IAEA documentation

  9. Radioactive wastes management development in Chile

    A Facility for immobilizing and conditioning of radioactive wastes generated in Chile, has recently started in operation. It is a Radioactive Wastes Treatment Plant, RWTP, whose owner is Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, CCHEN. A Storgement Building of Conditioned Wastes accomplishes the facility for medium and low level activity wastes. The Project has been carried with participation of chilean professionals at CCHEN and Technical Assistance of International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA. Processes developed are volume reduction by compaction; immobilization by cementation and conditioning. Equipment has been selected to process radioactive wastes into a 200 liters drum, in which wastes are definitively conditioned, avoiding exposition and contamination risks. The Plant has capacity to treat low and medium activity radioactive wastes produced in Chile due to Reactor Experimental No. 1 operation, and annex Laboratories in Nuclear Research Centers, as also those produced by users of nuclear techniques in Industries, Hospitals, Research Centers and Universities, in the whole country. With the infrastructure developed in Chile, a centralization of Radioactive Wastes Management activities is achieved. A data base system helps to control and register radioactive wastes arising in Chile. Generation of radioactive wastes in Chile, has found solution for the present production and that of near future

  10. The Treatment of Low Level Radioactive Liquid Waste Containing Detergent by Biological Activated Sludge Process

    The treatment of low level radioactive liquid waste containing persil detergent from laundry operation of contaminated clothes by activated sludge process has been done, for alternative process replacing the existing treatment by evaporation. The detergent concentration in water solution from laundry operation is 14.96 g/l. After rinsing operation of clothes and mixing of laundry water solution with another liquid waste, the waste water solution contains about ≤ 1.496 g/l of detergent and 10-3 Ci/m3 of Cs-137 activity. The simulation waste having equivalent activity of Cs-137 10-3 Ci/m3, detergent content (X) 1.496, 0.748, 0.374, 0.187, 0.1496 and 0.094 g/l on BOD value respectively 186, 115, 71, 48, 19, and 16 ppm was processed by activated sludge in reactor of 18.6 l capacity on ambient temperature. It is used Super Growth Bacteria (SGB) 102 and SGB 104, nitrogen and phosphor nutrition, and aeration. The result show that bacteria of SGB 102 and SGB 104 were able to degrade the persil detergent for attaining standard quality of water release category B in which BOD values 6 ppm. It was need 30 hours for X ≤ 0.187 g/l, 50 hours for 0.187 < X ≤ 0.374 g/l, 75 hours for 0.374 < X ≤ 0.748, and 100 hours for 0.748 < X ≤ 1.496 g/l. On the initial period the bacteria of SGB 104 interact most quickly to degrade the detergent comparing SGB 102. Biochemical oxidation process decontaminate the solution on the decontamination factor of 350, Cs-137 be concentrate in sludge by complexing with the bacteria wall until the activity of solution be become very low. (author)

  11. Regulation of Federal radioactive waste activities. Report to Congress on extending the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's licensing or regulatory authority to Federal radioactive waste storage and disposal activities

    The report contains two recommendations for extending the Commission's regulatory authority: (1) NRC licensing authority should be extended to cover all new DOE facilities for disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste and nondefense low-level waste. (2) A pilot program, focused on a few specific DOE waste management activities, should be established to test the feasibility of extending NRC regulatory authority on a consultative basis to DOE waste management activities not now covered by NRC's licensing authority or its extension as recommended in Recommendation 1

  12. Qualification tests of packages used for transport and storage of low activity radioactive wastes in INR Pitesti

    Vieru, G. (Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania))

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive wastes generated by the TRIGA INR research reactor are packaged according to the national and international rules and standards. The technology for packaging and treatment of radioactive wastes can also be used at the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda. The qualification tests for the package used for transport and storage of radioactive wastes (low activity, up to 6.07 GBq (0.164 Ci) per drum) are described. The package used is a drum manufactured from 1 mm thick mild steel with the dimensions: height 915 [+-] 10 mm; diameter 600 [+-] 5 mm; volume 220 litres. To achieve adequate safety in the transport of radioactive wastes strict precautions must be taken according to the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials. The adequacy of the package design is therefore of primary importance, the design requirements being supplemented by careful construction, quality assurance and inspection procedures. Taking into consideration the above requirements, qualification tests for the prototype package were carried out. These tests include compression, penetration, free fall, leaching, safety in use (biological protection), checking of chemical and mechanical characteristics, and the effect of the product on the environment. Performance of these tests, and the results obtained, prove that our technology for treatment and packaging of radioactive waste is in accordance with international rules. (author).

  13. Qualification tests of packages used for transport and storage of low activity radioactive wastes in INR Pitesti

    Radioactive wastes generated by the TRIGA INR research reactor are packaged according to the national and international rules and standards. The technology for packaging and treatment of radioactive wastes can also be used at the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda. The qualification tests for the package used for transport and storage of radioactive wastes (low activity, up to 6.07 GBq (0.164 Ci) per drum) are described. The package used is a drum manufactured from 1 mm thick mild steel with the dimensions: height 915 ± 10 mm; diameter 600 ± 5 mm; volume 220 litres. To achieve adequate safety in the transport of radioactive wastes strict precautions must be taken according to the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials. The adequacy of the package design is therefore of primary importance, the design requirements being supplemented by careful construction, quality assurance and inspection procedures. Taking into consideration the above requirements, qualification tests for the prototype package were carried out. These tests include compression, penetration, free fall, leaching, safety in use (biological protection), checking of chemical and mechanical characteristics, and the effect of the product on the environment. Performance of these tests, and the results obtained, prove that our technology for treatment and packaging of radioactive waste is in accordance with international rules. (author)

  14. Argentina's radioactive waste disposal policy

    The Argentina policy for radioactive waste disposal from nuclear facilities is presented. The radioactive wastes are treated and disposed in confinement systems which ensure the isolation of the radionucles for an appropriate period. The safety criteria adopted by Argentina Authorities in case of the release of radioactive materials under normal conditions and in case of accidents are analysed. (M.C.K.)

  15. Management of radioactive waste; Beheer van radioactief afval

    Neerdael, B.; Marivoet, J.; Put, M.; Van Iseghem, P.; Volckaert, G.; Wacquier, W

    1998-09-01

    The document gives an overview of of different aspects of radioactive waste management in Belgium. The document discusses the radioactive waste inventory in Belgium, the treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste as well as activities related to the characterisation of different waste forms. A separate chapter is dedicated to research and development regarding deep geological disposal of radioactive waste. In the Belgian waste management programme, particular emphasis is on studies for disposal in clay. Main results of these studies are highlighted and discussed.

  16. Application of active and passive neutron non destructive assay methods to concrete radioactive waste drums

    This paper deals with the application of non-destructive neutron measurement methods to control and characterize 200 l radioactive waste drums filled with a concrete matrix. Due to its composition, and particularly to hydrogen, concrete penalizes the use of such methods to quantify uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) components, which are mainly responsible of the α-activity of the waste. The determination of the alpha activity is the main objective of neutron measurements, in view to verify acceptance criteria in surface storage. Calibration experiments of the Active Neutron Interrogation (ANI) method lead to Detection Limit Masses (DLM) of about 1 mg of 239Pueff in the total counting mode, and of about 10 mg of 239Pueff in the coincidence counting mode, in case of a homogeneous Pu source and measurement times between one and two hours. Monte Carlo calculation results show a very satisfactory agreement between experimental values and calculated ones. Results of the application of passive and active neutron methods to control two real drums are presented in the last part of the paper. They show a good agreement between measured data and values declared by the waste producers. The main difficulties that had to be overcome are the low neutron signal in passive and active coincidence counting modes due to concrete, the analysis of the passive neutron signal in presence of 244Cm in the drum, which is a strong spontaneous fission neutron emitter, the variation of the active background with the concrete composition, and the analysis of the active prompt neutron signal due to the simultaneous presence of U and Pu in the drums.

  17. Radioactive waste: Issues and debates

    Waste management in general has always been in terms of regulation Environmental, a subject of attention but also voltages. Radioactive waste management is no exception to the rule and concentrates, sometimes irrationally, the vast majority industry fears nuclear. The first difficulty is to define radioactive waste, which raises further questions with regard to the case law on this topic and reactions of stakeholders. One of the other components of the debate on radioactive waste is the ability of different actors to ensure sustainable waste management Radioactive in optimum conditions in terms of nuclear safety.This results in the acceptance management solutions by the public.

  18. Radioactive waste management: Spanish experiences

    Radioactive waste generation began in Spain during the 1950's, in association with the first applications of radioactive isotopes in industry, medicine and research. Spain's first nuclear power plant began its operations in 1968. At present, there are in operation some one thousand installations possessing the administrative authorization required to use radioactive isotopes (small producers), nine nuclear groups and a tenth is now entering the dismantling phase. There are also activities and installations pertaining to the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle (mining, milling and the manufacturing of fuel elements). Until 1985, the research center Junta de Energia Nuclear (now CIEMAT) rendered radioactive waste removal, and subsequent conditioning and temporary storage services to the small producers. Since the beginning of their operations the nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities have had the capacity to condition and temporarily store their own radioactive wastes. ENRESA (Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, S. A.) began its operations in the second half of 1985. It is a state-owned company created by the Government in accordance with a previous parliamentary resolution and commissioned to establish a system for management of such wastes throughout Spain, being in charge also of the dismantling of nuclear power plants and other major installations at the end of their operating lifetimes. Possibly the most outstanding characteristic of ENRESA's evolution over these last seven years has been the need to bring about a compromise between solving the most immediate and pressing day-to-day problems of operation (the first wastes were removed at the beginning of 1986) and establishing the basic organization, resources, technology and installations required for ENRESA to operate efficiently in the long term. (author)

  19. Regulatory aspects and activities in the field of radioactive waste management in Bulgaria

    Bulgaria uses nuclear power for electricity generation and for a variety of nuclear applications in industry, research and medicine. Six WWER type Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) went into operation at Kozloduy between 1974 and 1991. Until 1988 spent fuel was transported back to the former Soviet Union, but since then has been stored on site. Operational low level waste is stored on site, but since 1993 a volume reduction strategy using supercompaction has been employed, which has reduced stored waste volumes by a factor of four. Institutional radioactive wastes are disposed at the Novi Han near surface repository, located 35 km from Sofia. It was commissioned in 1964 and is now about half full. Siting studies have begun for a new near surface repository that would accept both institutional and NPP waste. A legislative and regulatory framework, as well as organizational and institutional arrangements, are in place. A national strategy that includes provisions for compiling a national inventory of spent fuel and radioactive waste and provisions for funding spent fuel and radioactive waste management, has been developed. The paper elaborates on the current situation regarding radioactive waste management in Bulgaria. (author)

  20. Study on rich alumina alkali-activated slag clay minerals cementitious materials for immobilization of radioactive waste

    The composition and some properties of its pastes of rich alumina alkali-activated slag clay minerals (RAAASCM) cementitious materials for immobilization of radioactive waste are studied. Experimental results show that heat activated kaolinite, Xingjiang zeolite, modified attapulgite clay are better constituents of RAAASCM. RAAASCM cementitious materials pastes exhibit high strength, low porosity, fewer harmful pore, and high resistance to sulphate corrosion as well as gamma irradiation. The Sr2+, Cs+ leaching portion of the simulated radioactive waste forms based on RAAASCM, is low

  1. Maintaining knowledge of radioactive waste

    Full text: [Knowledge - 'awareness or familiarity gained by experience (of a person, fact or thing)... a person's range of information ... the sum of what is known ... true, justified belief; certain understanding, as opposed to opinion.' The Oxford Concise English Dictionary.] Organisations responsible for the safe and effective management of radioactive waste will be aware of the value of information characterising the waste and the need for its preservation. In the United Kingdom the principal legal instrument controlling nuclear site activities is the Nuclear Installations Act (1990), which requires certain licence conditions to be fulfilled. One of the 35 conditions of the nuclear site licence demands that operators ensure that adequate records are kept relating to, inter alia, 'the location of all radioactive material, including nuclear fuel and radioactive waste'. Through the application of this licence condition, the relevant nuclear regulator, Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII), requires licensees to make arrangements for recording and preserving all the information that may be required in the future to ensure the safe management of radioactive material and radioactive waste. The majority of operators responsible for the long-term management of radioactive waste will establish systems for preserving information. In order for the system to deliver real benefits, there must be absolute clarity concerning what information is to be preserved, the reasons why it must be preserved, how it is to be managed over the long-term and who is responsible for its management. However, the decisive characteristic of this information management system that could make the difference between preserved liability and valued asset is the ability to access and interpret the information now and in the future. On first inspection, this characteristic appears obvious but how often are these systems established with the primary objective of preserving information when it should

  2. Natural radioactivity of wastes

    By-products of the combustion of coal (wastes) are often used for various types of construction (dwellings, roads, etc.). The legal regulations (The Ordinance of the Council of Ministers of 2 January 2007 'On the requirements for the content of natural radioactive isotopes of potassium K-40, radium Ra-226 and thorium Th-228 in raws and materials used in buildings for the residence of people and livestock, as well as in the industrial by-products used in the construction, and the control of the content of the aforementioned isotopes' - Law Gazette no. 4/2007 item 29) are in force in Poland. The regulations permit the possibility of utilization of raws and by-products basing upon the level of the natural radioactivity of the examined raws and materials. The article is a survey of the results obtained during the measurements of many types of raws and building materials for almost 30 years by the network of the laboratories in Poland. It is based upon the results stored in the database of the Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection (CLRP), Warsaw. The article tends to outline the radioactivity of the waste materials with respect to other raws and materials used in the construction industry. The article shows the possibilities for the use of by-products originating in the power stations and heat- and power stations (mainly ashes, slag and hinter) in the construction of dwellings and roads. (authors)

  3. Radioactive waste from non-licensed activities - identification of waste, compilation of principles and guidance, and proposed system for final management

    Presently national guidelines for the handling of radioactive waste from non-licensed activities are lacking in Sweden. Results and information presented in this report are intended to form a part of the basis for decisions on further work within the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute on regulations or other guidelines on final management and final disposal of this type of waste. An inventory of radioactive waste from non-licensed activities is presented in the report. In addition, existing rules and principles used in Sweden - and internationally - on the handling of radioactive and toxic waste and non-radioactive material are summarized. Based on these rules and principles a system is suggested for the final management of radioactive material from non-licensed activities. A model is shown for the estimation of dose as a consequence of leaching of radio-nuclides from different deposits. The model is applied on different types of waste, e.g. peat ashes, light concrete and low-level waste from a nuclear installation

  4. Treatment of radioactive wastes by incineration

    Great part of the radioactive wastes of low and intermediate level generated during the nuclear fuel cycle, in laboratories and other sites where the radionuclides are used for the research in the industry, in medicine and other activities, are combustible wastes. The incineration of these radioactive wastes provides a very high reduction factor and at the same time converts the wastes in radioactive ashes and no-flammable residuals, chemically inert and much more homogeneous that the initial wastes. With the increment of the costs in the repositories and those every time but strict regulations, the incineration of radioactive wastes has been able to occupy an important place in the strategy of the wastes management. However, in a particular way, the incineration is a complex process of high temperature that demands the execution of safety and operation requirements very specific. (author)

  5. TREATMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS CONTAINING CESIUM AND STRONTIUM BY CHEMICALLY MODIFIED ACTIVATED CARBON

    The aim of this study is to develop activated carbon prepared from peach stone shell as an adsorbent for Cs+ and Sr2+ ions from their aqueous waste solutions. In this respect, five samples of peach stone shell were investigated. The first four samples were prepared by immersing the samples in different concentrations of either ZnCl2 or KOH, individually, prior to heat treatment at 500oC. The fifth sample was prepared only by thermal treatment at 500oC.The physical and chemical characteristics of the prepared samples were carried out. A comparative study for the removal of Cs+ and Sr2+ ions from their aqueous waste solutions using the investigated samples have been carried out using batch experiments.The different parameters affecting adsorption process such as contact time and metal ion concentration were studied. The results obtained showed that the activated carbon prepared using ZnCl2 was more effective than the other investigated samples for adsorbing Cs+ and Sr2+ ions since the removal percentages reached 85% and 98% , respectively, while the activated carbon prepared using KOH was less effective for the removal of the same elements since the removal percentages reached 69% and 60%, respectively. In case of using physically activated carbon, the removal percentages reached 18% and 25% for Cs+ and Sr2+, respectively.From the obtained data, it can be concluded that the activated carbon prepared using ZnCl2 can be used as a good adsorbent for the removal of the investigated elements that may present in radioactive waste solutions before their discharge to the environment

  6. Management of radioactive wastes

    The law from December 30, 1991, precisely defines 3 axes of researches for the management of high level and long-lived radioactive wastes: separation/transmutation, surface storage and underground disposal. A global evaluation report about these researches is to be supplied in 2006 by the French government to the Parliament. A first synthesis of the knowledge gained after 14 years of research has led the national commission of the public debate (CNDP) to organize a national debate about the general options of management of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes before the 2006 date line. The debate comprises 4 public hearings (September 2005: Bar-le-Duc, Saint-Dizier, Pont-du-Gard, Cherbourg), 12 round-tables (October and November 2005: Paris, Joinville, Caen, Nancy, Marseille), a synthesis meeting (December 2005, Dunkerque) and a closing meeting (January 2006, Lyon). This document is the synthesis of the round table debates which took place at Joinville, i.e. in the same area as the Bure underground laboratory of Meuse/Haute-Marne. Therefore, the discussion focuses more on the local impacts of the setting up of a waste disposal facility (environmental aspects, employment, economic development). (J.S.)

  7. Education activities of the US Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    This paper reports that science education has long been a critical element in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. OCRWM has developed educational programs aimed at improving the science literacy of students from kindergarten through college and post-graduate levels, enhancing the skills of teachers, encouraging careers in science and engineering, and developing a keener awareness of science issues among the general population. Activities include interaction with educators in the development of curricula material; workshops for elementary and secondary students; cooperative agreements and projects with universities; OCRWM exhibit showings at technical and non-technical meetings and at national and regional teacher/educator conferences; the OCRWM Fellowship Program; and support for Historically Black Colleges and Universities

  8. Chemical treatment of radioactive wastes

    This is the third manual of three commissioned by the IAEA on the three principal techniques used in concentrating radioactive liquid wastes, namely chemical precipitation, evaporation and ion exchange. The present manual deals with chemical precipitation by coagulation-flocculation and sedimentation, commonly called ''chemical treatment'' of low-activity wastes. Topics discussed in the manual are: (i) principles of coagulation on flocculation and sedimentation and associated processes; (ii) process and equipment; (iii) conditioning and disposal of flocculation sludge; (iv) sampling and the equipment required for experiments; and (v) factors governing the selection of processes. 99 refs, 17 figs, 4 tabs

  9. National inventory of radioactive wastes

    There are in France 1064 sites corresponding to radioactive waste holders that appear in this radioactive waste inventory. We find the eighteen sites of E.D.F. nuclear power plants, The Cogema mine sites, the Cogema reprocessing plants, The Cea storages, the different factories and enterprises of nuclear industry, the sites of non nuclear industry, the Andra centers, decommissioned installations, disposals with low level radioactive wastes, sealed sources distributors, national defence. (N.C.)

  10. Radioactive waste management in European Union countries

    Although the Euratom Treaty does not assign direct authorities to the European Union in the Field of radioactive waste, the Commission has developed a series of activities related to this type of waste. The article deals with these Community initiatives, and the problems of radioactive waste management in the different Member States, and future plans in the field in the light of forthcoming European Union enlargement in 2004. (Author)

  11. Radioactive Waste Repositories Administration - SURAO

    The Atomic Act specifies, among other things, responsibilities of the government in the field of safe disposal of radioactive wastes. To satisfy this responsibility, the Ministry of Industry and Trade has established the Radioactive Waste Repositories Administration (SURAO). SURAO's major responsibilities include: (a) the preparation, construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning of radioactive waste repositories and the monitoring of their environmental impacts; (b) radioactive waste management; (c) spent or irradiated nuclear fuel processing into a form suitable for storage/disposal or reuse; (d) record-keeping of received radioactive wastes and their producers; (e) administration of fund transfers as stipulated by the Atomic Act, Article 27; (f) development of proposals for specification of fees to be paid to the Nuclear Account; (g) responsibility for and coordination of research and development in the field of radioactive waste handling and management; (h) supervision of licensees' margin earmarked for the decommissioning of their facilities; (i) providing services in radioactive waste handling and management; (j) handling and management of radioactive wastes that have been transferred to the Czech Republic from abroad and cannot be sent back; (k) interim administration of radioactive wastes that have become state property. The Statute of the Administration is reproduced in full. (P.A.)

  12. Radioactive waste: show time?

    The basic concept within both EC funded SAPIERR I and SAPIERR II projects (FP6) is that of one or more geological repositories developed in collaboration by two or more European countries to accept spent nuclear fuel, vitrified high-level waste and other long-lived radioactive waste from those partner countries. The SAPIERR II project (Strategic Action Plan for Implementation of Regional European Repositories) examines in detail issues that directly influence the practicability and acceptability of such facilities. This paper describes the work in the SAPIERR II project (2006-2008) on the development of a possible practical implementation strategy for shared, regional repositories in Europe and lays out the first steps in implementing that strategy. (authors)

  13. Radioactive waste: show time?

    Verhoef, E.V. [COVRA N.V., Spanjeweg 1, 4455 TW Nieuwdorp (Netherlands); McCombie, Charles; Chapman, Neil [Arius Association, Taefernstrasse 1, CH-4050 Baden (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    The basic concept within both EC funded SAPIERR I and SAPIERR II projects (FP6) is that of one or more geological repositories developed in collaboration by two or more European countries to accept spent nuclear fuel, vitrified high-level waste and other long-lived radioactive waste from those partner countries. The SAPIERR II project (Strategic Action Plan for Implementation of Regional European Repositories) examines in detail issues that directly influence the practicability and acceptability of such facilities. This paper describes the work in the SAPIERR II project (2006-2008) on the development of a possible practical implementation strategy for shared, regional repositories in Europe and lays out the first steps in implementing that strategy. (authors)

  14. Study on the management of radioactive solid wastes for the KRR-I and II dismantling activities

    KRR-1(TRIGA Mark II) and KRR-2(TRIGA Mark-III) have been operated 33 years and 23 years, respectively, and now are about to be decommissioned as they reach the end of their useful lives. In the decommissioning of the reactors, the treatment of radioactive wastes is practical issues and, therefore, the plan on it has to be essentially established prior to the actual decontamination and decommissioning activities. In the present study, the classification, radiological status, classification criteria and package on the radioactive solid wastes in the TRIGA Mark-II and III are investigated for the investigated for the purpose of the effective management plan of them

  15. National policy and experience with the management of radioactive wastes from non-fuel cycle activities in the Czech Republic

    Research, production, and application of radioisotopes in many fields of science, industry, agriculture, medicine, education, etc. proceeded in the former Czechoslovak Republic (CSFR) since the mid-fifties. These activities resulted in a great accumulation of relatively large volumes and activities of radioactive wastes. Therefore, in 1959 the Czechoslovak government appointed the Institute for Research, Production, and Application of Radioisotopes (IRPAR), now NYCOM, to be the central authority for collection and disposal of these radioactive wastes. In 1972 these responsibilities were defined in more detail by the decree of the Ministry of Health of the Czech Republic No. 59/1972 on the protection of public health against the effects of ionizing radiation. From the very beginning the services for collection, transport, and disposal provided by IRPAR (NYCOM) were based on the concept of waste concentration and their safe disposal in well-controlled facilities. The aim of disposal is to guarantee that man and his environment will not suffer, neither at present nor in the future, from these wastes. This aim is achieved by isolation of radioactive wastes from the human environment by a system of multiple barriers for a sufficiently long period of time to allow activity to decay below acceptable limits. The disposal of radioactive wastes in the central repositories started in 1959, when the first repository located near the village Hostim in the Beroun District was put in operation. The operational period of this repository was ended in 1963 and it was closed in 1965. At present, there are other two repositories in operation. The repository Richard serves for disposal of wastes containing artificial radionuclides, i.e., nuclides with induced radioactivity and fission products. The repository Bratrstvi serves for disposal of naturally occurring radionuclides, i.e., nuclides of uranium and thorium and their daughter products. (author). 2 refs, 2 figs

  16. 2009 National inventory of radioactive material and wastes. In short

    This booklet gives a summary of the national inventory report on radioactive wastes that are present on the French territory (as recorded until december, 2007). Intended for public information, the booklet explains the basics of radioactive materials and wastes and waste management, and gives some data on present and future waste volumes, information about radioactive waste classification, the geographical distribution of waste sites in France, etc. The various types of radioactive wastes are described (classified by their lifetime and activity level) as well as historical storage sites, polluted areas where wastes are stored, radioactive objects, etc. and their respective management approaches are presented

  17. Performance of phosphoric acid activated montmorillonite as buffer materials for radioactive waste repository

    In this study, the performance of phosphoric acid activated montmorillonite (PAmmt) was evaluated by cesium ions adsorption experiments. The PAmmt samples were obtained by activating with 1, 3 and 5 mol L-1 of phosphoric acid, respectively under reflux for 3, 12, and 24 h. Experimental results demonstrated that the treatment of raw K-10 montmorillonite with phosphoric acid increased the materials' affinity for Cs uptake and no significant amount of suspension solids were produced. A relatively insignificant variation in the CEC value was observed. Furthermore, PAmmt also showed high adsorption selectivity toward Cs ions. The improved sorptive properties were mainly related to the increased surface area and the relatively higher surface charge density. Increased specific surface area was the resulted from partial decomposition of lamellar structure of mmt; while the higher surface charge density was caused by the protonation of octahedral Al-OH sites during the acid activation. Generally speaking, stronger acid concentration and longer activation times would produce relatively more decomposed PAmmt particles. However, as the activation exceeds 3 h, the precipitation of Si4+ would passivate PAmmt against further acid attacks. Based upon our results, acid activation by phosphoric acid could produce PAmmt samples with high sorption capacity and selectivity, and good structural integrity, which are beneficial to be used at radioactive waste repository.

  18. Radioactive waste management in Canada

    Reports and other Canadian literature on radioactive waste processing and disposal covering the period 1953-1979 are listed. A selected list of international conferences relating to waste management (1959-1979) is attached. (LL)

  19. The low to intermediate activity and short living waste storage facility. For a controlled management of radioactive wastes

    Sited at about 50 km of Troyes (France), the Aube facility started in 1992 and has taken over the Manche facility for the surface storage of low to intermediate and short living radioactive wastes. The Aube facility (named CSFMA) is the answer to the safe management of these wastes at the industrial scale and for 50 years onward. This brochure presents the facility specifications, the wastes stored at the center, the surface storage concept, the processing and conditioning of waste packages, and the environmental monitoring performed in the vicinity of the site. (J.S.)

  20. The Guatemala Programme of radioactive waste management

    Guatemala aims at ensuring safety of present and future generations as well as the environment, this is to be achieved by preventing the release of radioactive substances contained in radioactive wastes into the environment. The main activities that produce radioactive wastes in Guatemala are medical practices (radiodiagnostic and radiotherapy), wastes are also generated in industry and research, but to lesser extent. The most frequently used radioisotopes are cesium-137, cobalt-60, iodine-131, technetium-99m. Some spent sources are radium-226, cobalt-60 and contaminated material generated in medicine and research. The radioactive wastes generated are basically low and intermediate level wastes. The collection of the wastes is done periodically, the users must deliver them correctly packed and marked. When the radioactive wastes are short lived the user must manage them himself, as in the case of technetium-99m. Presently, Guatemala is trying to achieve by means of National Centre of Radioactive Wastes (CENDRA) the adequate practices in managing, storing and subsequent disposal of radioactive wastes. 3 figs

  1. Regulation on radioactive waste management

    A national calculator control system for the metropolitan radioactive waste banks was developed in 1999. The NNSA reviewed by the regulations the feasibility of some rectification projects for uranium ore decommissioning and conducted field inspections on waste treating systems and radioactive waste banks at the 821 plant. The NNSA realized in 1999 the calculator control for the disposal sites of low and medium radioactive waste. 3 routine inspections were organized on the reinforced concrete structures for disposal units and their pouring of concrete at waste disposal site and specific requirements were put forth

  2. Radioactive waste engineering and management

    Nakayama, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    This book describes essential and effective management for reliably ensuring public safety from radioactive wastes in Japan. This is the first book to cover many aspects of wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle to research and medical use, allowing readers to understand the characterization, treatment and final disposal of generated wastes, performance assessment, institutional systems, and social issues such as intergenerational ethics. Exercises at the end of each chapter help to understand radioactive waste management in context.

  3. Criteria for the siting, construction, management and evaluation of low and intermediate activity radioactive waste stores

    The experience acquired by Spain for the storage of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes, is presented. General considerations related to the technology, financing, administrative measures and risk determination are done. The criteria of site selection for construction and management of the waste storage facility are described, evaluating the specific criteria for the licensing procedure, and taking in account the safety and the radiation protection during periods of the system operation. (M.C.K.)

  4. Portable radioactive waste tracking and inspection system

    Hardware has components such as host computer, Personal Digital Assistant(PDA), bar code scanner, and digital camera. Software consists of database about radioactive waste which covers date, generator, container type, activity, images, physical characteristics, and nuclide. The portable radioactive waste tracking and inspection system needs programs such as web communication between the host computer and PDA, database application of PDA, processing of bar codes and images. The inspector can track, inspect, and modify information such as date, generator, container type, activity, images, physical characteristics, and nuclide by reading two dimensional bar code on container of radioactive waste with bar code scanner on PDA

  5. Assessment of Malaysia Institutional radioactive waste management

    A complete inventory of radioactive wastes from different source bas been set up in Malaysia. Wastes from external agencies were sent to the National Radioactive Waste Management Center at MINT for final disposal. MINT has been collecting information on the accumulated wastes received since 1982. Assessment of radioactive waste management in Malaysia has been conducted based on the inventory record. The information in the inventory include description of users, type volume, characteristics of the wastes; and the current and accumulated activities of the radioisotopes in the wastes forms while storing. The records indicate that there is a significant increase in the volume of wastes from medical and industrial applications. The category of users varies; there are about 270 industrial users, about 60 in medical fields and 13 in research institutes and universities. Major users generating sealed source wastes for the industrial sector are services, manufacturing and consumer companies; including government department and universities. It is estimated that by the year 2005, approximately a total accumulated processed waste package volume for disposal will be between 210-215 m sup 3. This estimate includes low level and intermediate level wastes. From this study, future waste management activities in Malaysia can be planned with proper policy decision, treatment conditioning, storage and disposal facilities. This will enable radioactive wastes to be kept under control and their potential impact on man and the environment to be minimal

  6. Quality control in the radioactive waste management

    Radioactive waste management as in industrial activities must mantain in all steps a quality control programme. This control extended from materials acquisition, for waste treatment, to the package deposition is one of the most important activities because it aims to observe the waste acceptance criteria in repositories and allows to guarantee the security of the nuclear facilities. In this work basic knowledges about quality control in waste management and some examples of adopted procedures in other countries are given. (author)

  7. Radioactive Waste Management Fellowship Program: Summary of program activities for calendar year 1986

    This document describes a graduate fellowship program designed to guide future scientists and engineers toward a career in high level radioactive waste management. Oak Ridge Associated Universities administers this program on behalf of 17 participating universities. The report summarizes the background and qualifications of the last year's applicants and awardees and provides examples of the distributed literature describing the program. 8 figs

  8. Public debate - radioactive wastes management

    Between September 2005 and January 2006 a national debate has been organized on the radioactive wastes management. This debate aimed to inform the public and to allow him to give his opinion. This document presents, the reasons of this debate, the operating, the synthesis of the results and technical documents to bring information in the domain of radioactive wastes management. (A.L.B.)

  9. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics

    Hulse, R.A.

    1991-08-01

    Planning for storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste to estimate volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms. Data from existing literature, disposal records, and original research were used to estimate the characteristics and project volumes and radionuclide activities to the year 2035. GTCC LLW is categorized as: nuclear utilities waste, sealed sources waste, DOE-held potential GTCC LLW; and, other generator waste. It has been determined that the largest volume of those wastes, approximately 57%, is generated by nuclear power plants. The Other Generator waste category contributes approximately 10% of the total GTCC LLW volume projected to the year 2035. Waste held by the Department of Energy, which is potential GTCC LLW, accounts for nearly 33% of all waste projected to the year 2035; however, no disposal determination has been made for that waste. Sealed sources are less than 0.2% of the total projected volume of GTCC LLW.

  10. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics

    Planning for storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste to estimate volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms. Data from existing literature, disposal records, and original research were used to estimate the characteristics and project volumes and radionuclide activities to the year 2035. GTCC LLW is categorized as: nuclear utilities waste, sealed sources waste, DOE-held potential GTCC LLW; and, other generator waste. It has been determined that the largest volume of those wastes, approximately 57%, is generated by nuclear power plants. The Other Generator waste category contributes approximately 10% of the total GTCC LLW volume projected to the year 2035. Waste held by the Department of Energy, which is potential GTCC LLW, accounts for nearly 33% of all waste projected to the year 2035; however, no disposal determination has been made for that waste. Sealed sources are less than 0.2% of the total projected volume of GTCC LLW

  11. Measurement of activity in large packages of radioactive waste, taking into account heterogeneities in mass and activity

    The activity of a radioactive waste package is usually evaluated from gamma measurements associated with transfer functions. These functions are calculated assuming that both activity and mass distributions are homogeneous. But generally, activity and mass distributions are not homogeneous and potentially huge errors may arise from such evaluations. In this paper, we propose a method for creating a numeric model to simulate mass and activity distributions, which enables to both evaluate and reduce the level of uncertainty due to non homogeneous distributions. The model can be adjusted in order to be fully representative, and its representativeness can be justified. We show 2 examples of application of this method to acquisition data obtained from field experimentation. (author)

  12. Evaluation of Terrorist Interest in Radioactive Wastes

    Since September 11, 2001, intelligence gathered from Al Qaeda training camps in Afghanistan, and the ensuing terrorist activities, indicates nuclear material security concerns are valid. This paper reviews available information on sealed radioactive sources thought to be of interest to terrorists, and then examines typical wastes generated during environmental management activities to compare their comparative 'attractiveness' for terrorist diversion. Sealed radioactive sources have been evaluated in numerous studies to assess their security and attractiveness for use as a terrorist weapon. The studies conclude that tens of thousands of curies in sealed radioactive sources are available for potential use in a terrorist attack. This risk is mitigated by international efforts to find lost and abandoned sources and bring them under adequate security. However, radioactive waste has not received the same level of scrutiny to ensure security. This paper summarizes the activity and nature of radioactive sources potentially available to international terrorists. The paper then estimates radiation doses from use of radioactive sources as well as typical environmental restoration or decontamination and decommissioning wastes in a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) attack. These calculated doses indicate that radioactive wastes are, as expected, much less of a health risk than radioactive sources. The difference in radiation doses from wastes used in an RDD are four to nine orders of magnitude less than from sealed sources. We then review the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) definition of 'dangerous source' in an adjusted comparison to common radioactive waste shipments generated in environmental management activities. The highest waste dispersion was found to meet only category 1-3.2 of the five step IAEA scale. A category '3' source by the IAEA standard 'is extremely unlikely, to cause injury to a person in the immediate vicinity'. The obvious conclusion of the

  13. Method of removing radioactive waste

    A paste prepared by mixing a mixed acid containing HF and at least one of HCl and HNO3 with a paste aid is coated at the surface of radioactive wastes, to dissolve the surface thereof. Water is jetted to remove the dissolved radioactive contaminants and the pastes from the surface of the radioactive wastes. Since the pastes are thus used, the amount of liquid wastes can be remarkably reduced compared with that in a conventional electrolysis method. Further, if it is confirmed that dose rate of the radioactive wastes after decontamination is lower than a predetermined level by adding a step of measuring the extent of contamination of the wastes before and after the steps, they can be handled hereinafter being regarded as ordinary wastes. (T.M.)

  14. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT FOR HANFORD'S LOW ACTIVITY WASTE AND SECONDARY WASTES

    Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Cozzi, A.; Bannochie, C.; Burket, P.; Daniel, G.

    2011-02-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates

  15. Process for packaging radioactive waste

    The waste is filled into auxiliary barrels made of sheet steel. It is compressed with the auxiliary barrels into steel jacket bodies. A number of steel jacket bodies are accommodated in storage barrels, which are simultaneously stiffened by them. The radioactive waste is therefore no longer free in the storage barrels, the storage barrels are reinforced and appreciably greater quantities of radioactive waste can be accommodated in the storage barrels and therefore in the stores. (orig./PW)

  16. Radioactive wastes on Kazakhstan territory

    Common amount of radioactive wastes in Kazakhstan makes up 235 million tons. In Semipalatinsk test site in the result of surface and underground explosions low-radioactive wastes have accumulated in the form of soils contaminated with radionuclides and these wastes could be buried during re-cultivation works. In the same time there are places contaminated with plutonium. These soils should be buried in special points. Volume of these wastes is estimated in 5,000 m3. In Kazakhstan there are one power nuclear reactor in Aktau, 3 research reactors on Semipalatinsk site territory and 1 in Almaty city. During operation of BN-350 power reactor in Aktau city till present day 10,000 m3 of different wastes have been accumulated. Great amount of wastes will appear in 2005 during the reactor decommissioning, common volume of processed and packaged wastes after BN-350 reactor out of operation will be estimated in 623,000 m3. In Kazakhstan system of gathering, processing, and transporting of radioactive wastes is not taken into operation yet. According of conception on radioactive wastes burial and IAEA recommendation part of wastes with volume 67,450 m3 (intermediate- and high-level radioactive wastes) are subjected to burial in points in geological formations

  17. Model of behavior of concrete barriers for the isolation of radioactive waste of low activity

    In most countries the final disposal of low level radioactive waste is performed in surface or near-surface disposal facilities, with an extended use of disposal designs in which concrete is the basic material of the isolation barriers. This thesis collects a good deal of the results of the research works on barriers behaviour performed in the frame of the different ENRESA R+D Plans in support of the enhancement of the safety assessment of the low activity radioactive was te disposal facility. In this work the functions of the different components of the disposal system are analysed together with their characteristics. Also there is a description of the evolution processes and the laws that control those processes, based on previous research works. The flow and content of water in low permeability porous media with particular regard to concrete is also developed for the expected environmental conditions after sealing the disposal vaults with an engineered cap and when they are exposed to non isothermal conditions having an influence in the behaviour of the system water content. A sum mary of the R+D work previously performed for ENRESA on the behaviour of low activity waste isolation barriers behaviour. Some enhancements on previous models and an integration scheme are also proposed. This work also contains the on going research tasks for the calibration of the models and the collection of experimental data that may al low a fruitful use of the models, beyond an academic exercise, and provide reference data for future development as well. The initial aim of this work was to propose a general model on the behaviour of the concrete barriers. Such general model still presents lack of experts consensus on basic aspects such as the CSH chemistry. It concludes that an approach based on the use of models representing separately the different processes, based on experimental work and expressed in phenomenological simple models is more rigorous at this point. Nevertheless

  18. Upgrade activities for the Criticality Safety Program of Hanford High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Farm

    This document describes the plan for implementing the findings and recommendations made by a team of experts for the US Department of Energy in their Nuclear Criticality Safety Review Of Hanford High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Farms. The team was chartered to review the nuclear criticality safety of the tank farms and recommend programmatic changes where appropriate, including the specific incident leading to an Unusual Occurrence Report filed in June 1991 on the 241-C-104 specification violation. Although no imminent risks of criticality were found, the review team identified several problems with respect to nuclear criticality safety. Primary among the problems is the Tack of dofinitive knowledge of the fissile material inventory and distribution within the tanks. The lack of good characterization data prompted Westinghouse Hanford Company to declare an Unreviewed Safety Question with respect to criticality safety. Activities by the responsible Hanford Site contractor that address each of the findings, recommendations, and activities required to resolve the Unreviewed Safety Question are described. Schedules and estimated costs are also included with the plan

  19. The 1985 United Kingdom radioactive waste inventory

    This report provides a compilation of stocks of radioactive wastes in the UK by volume, as at 1 January 1985, and estimates of future arisings to the year 2030. It includes radionuclide contents as available, together with specific activities, notional conditioning factors and disposal routes. In the main the stock volumes are given as unconditioned waste. However for clarity and precision some of the data relates to treated wastes (ie compacted wastes, incinerator ash, etc). These are clearly marked in the Tables. (author)

  20. Radioactive wastes. Management prospects

    This article describes the perspectives of management of radioactive wastes as defined in the French law from December 30, 1991. This law defines three ways of research: abatement of the radiotoxicity of wastes (first way), reversible geological storage (second way) or long duration geological disposal (third way). This article develops these three solutions: 1 - strategic perspectives; 2 - separation, transmutation and specific conditioning: isotopes to be separated (evolution of the radio-toxicity inventory of spent fuels, migration of long-living radionuclides, abatement of radio-toxicity), research on advanced separation (humid and dry way), research on transmutation of separate elements (transmutation and transmutation systems, realistic scenarios of Pu consumption and actinides transmutation, transmutation performances), research on materials (spallation targets, fuels and transmutation targets), research on conditioning matrices for separated elements; 3 - long-term storage: principles and problems, containers, surface and subsurface facilities; 4 - disposal: reversibility and disposal, geological disposal (principle and problems, site and concept selection), adaptation to reversibility, research on materials (bentonite and cements for geologic barrier, metals for containers), underground research and qualification laboratories, quantity of containers to be stored. (J.S.)

  1. Radioactive waste package assay facility. Volume 2. Investigation of active neutron and active gamma interrogation

    Volume 2 of this report describes the theoretical and experimental work carried out at Harwell on active neutron and active gamma interrogation of 500 litre cemented intermediate level waste drums. The design of a suitable neutron generating target in conjunction with a LINAC was established. Following theoretical predictions of likely neutron responses, an experimental assay assembly was built. Responses were measured for simulated drums of ILW, based on CAGR, Magnox and PCM wastes. Good correlations were established between quantities of 235-U, nat-U and D2O contained in the drums, and the neutron signals. Expected sensitivities are -1g of fissile actinide and -100g of total actinide. A measure of spatial distribution is obtainable. The neutron time spectra obtained during neutron interrogation were more complex than expected, and more analysis is needed. Another area of discrepancy is the difference between predicted and measured thermal neutron flux in the drum. Clusters of small 3He proportional counters were found to be much superior for fast neutron detection than larger diameter counters. It is necessary to ensure constancy of electron beam position relative to target(s) and drum, and prudent to measure the target neutron or gamma output as appropriate. 59 refs., 77 figs., 11 tabs

  2. Report of safety of the characterizing system of radioactive waste

    Report of safety of the system of radioactive waste of the ININ: Installation, participant personnel, selection of the place, description of the installation, equipment. Proposed activities: operations with radioactive material, calibration in energy, calibration in efficiency, types of waste. Maintenance: handling of radioactive waste, physical safety. Organization: radiological protection, armor-plating, personal dosemeter, risks and emergency plan, environmental impact, medical exams. (Author)

  3. Management of radioactive wastes

    When I first became concerned with radioactive waste management, in the early 1950's, very little was really known about the subject. There was a general feeling that it was a serious 'problem'. Articles were appearing in the press and talks were being given on the radio suggesting that the wastes generated by the proposed nuclear power reactors might be a serious menace to humanity. The prophets pointed with alarm to the enormous quantities of fission products that would accumulate steadily over the years in tank farms associated with reactor fuel reprocessing plants, and calculations were made of the possible results from rupture of the tanks due to corrosion, earthquakes or enemy attack. Responsible people suggested seriously that the waste disposal problem might be fatal to the development of a nuclear power industry, and this attitude was reinforced by the popular outcry that arose from experience with fallout from nuclear weapons testing. The Canadian nuclear power industry was not critically involved in this controversy because our heavy-water reactors are fuelled with natural uranium, and reprocessing of the fuel is not necessary. The spent fuel contains plutonium, a potential fuel, but the cost of recovering it was such that it was not competitive with natural uranium, which is not in short supply in Canada. Our spent fuel is not dissolved in acid - it is stored. still in its zirconium cladding, under water at the reactor site, or placed in sealed concrete-and-steel pipes below ground. If the price of uranium rises sufficiently it will become profitable to recover the plutonium, and only then shall we have an appreciable amount of waste from this source. However. during the first five or six years of research and development at Chalk River we did investigate fuel processing methods, and like everybody else we grad stainless steel tanks containing high and medium level wastes. These were located quite close to the Ottawa River, and we worried about what

  4. Radioactive waste disposal

    A deep gap, reflecting a persisting fear, separates the viewpoints of the experts and that of the public on the issue of the disposal of nuclear WASTES. The history of this field is that of the proliferation with time of spokesmen who pretend to speak in the name of the both humans and non humans involved. Three periods can be distinguished: 1940-1970, an era of contestation and confusion when the experts alone represents the interest of all; 1970-1990, an era of contestation and confusion when spokespersons multiply themselves, generating the controversy and the slowing down of most technological projects; 1990-, an era of negotiation, when viewpoints, both technical and non technical, tend to get closer and, let us be optimistic, leading to the overcome of the crisis. We show that, despite major differences, the options and concepts developed by the different actors are base on two categories of resources, namely Nature and Society, and that the consensus is built up through their 'hydridation'. we show in this part that the perception of nuclear power and, in particular of the underground disposal of nuclear wastes, involves a very deep psychological substrate. Trying to change mentalities in the domain by purely scientific and technical arguments is thus in vain. The practically instinctive fear of radioactivity, far from being due only to lack of information (and education), as often postulated by scientists and engineers, is rooted in archetypical structures. These were, without doubt, reactivated in the 40 s by the traumatizing experience of the atomic bomb. In addition, anthropological-linked considerations allow us to conclude that he underground disposal of wastes is seen as a 'rape' and soiling of Mother Earth. This contributes to explaining, beyond any rationality, the refusal of this technical option by some persons. However, it would naturally be simplistic and counter-productive to limit all controversy in this domain to these psychological aspects

  5. Radioactive wastes vitrification

    Borosilicate glass is capable to solidify the liquid wastes and to confine the radionuclides present in fission product solutions, not by coating, but thanks to the existence of chemical bonds with the glass oxides. Glass materials have a large chemical flexibility in comparison with crystal structures. In parallel to the studies of nuclear glass formulation, a continuous vitrification process has been developed in France which allows to generate glass in a highly radioactive environment. The first demonstration of the feasibility of this process was done at Marcoule in 1969 with the vitrification pilot system PIVER. The industrial vitrification facility of Marcoule started in 1978 for the confinement of spent fuel reprocessing wastes. This process was implemented at the R7 and T7 facilities of La Hague in 1989 and 1992, respectively. The process used today at La Hague comprises two steps: a calcination of fission products liquid solutions at 400 deg. C and a melting at 1100 deg. C in a crucible heated by magnetic induction. The molten mixture of glass and fission products is cast and solidified in 400 kg containers. Other vitrification processes have been developed like the cold crucible vitrification process and the vitrification in electrode heated ceramic melter. This article presents: 1 - the formulation of nuclear glasses: constraints, choice of vitreous systems, chemical reactivity between the waste and the vitrification catalyst, some basic properties of nuclear glasses, confining properties, perspectives of evolution of glass compositions; 2 - vitrification processes: vitrification with induction-heated metal crucible, with cold crucible, with electrode-heated ceramic melters; 3 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  6. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    Freiesleben H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste – LLW, intermediate-level waste – ILW, high-level waste – HLW are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of countries is mentioned. Also, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency with regard to the development and monitoring of international safety standards for both spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management is described.

  7. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE's obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option

  8. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE`s obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option.

  9. Disposal or radioactive wastes, tendencies and challenges

    The administration of radioactive wastes is an important part of the uses of the nuclear energy, even not carrying out some application due to the natural radioisotopes. The result will be that to more radioactive wastes production major will be the expense in its administration. In this work the main activities in an item of selected countries are described and it concludes with the necessities that should be carried out in this field in Mexico. (Author)

  10. Method of solidifying radioactive waste

    Purpose: To obtain satisfactory plastic solidification products rapidly and more conveniently from radioactive wastes. Method: liquid wastes contain, in addition to sodium sulfate as the main ingredient, nitrates hindering the polymerizing curing reactions and various other unknown ingredients, while spent resins contain residual cationic exchange groups hindering the polymerizing reaction. Generally, as the acid value of unsaturated liquid polyester resins is lower, the number of terminal alkyd resins is small, formation of nitrates is reduced and the polymerizing curing reaction is taken place more smoothly. In view of the above, radioactive wastes obtained by dry powderization or dehydration of radioactive liquid wastes or spent resins are polymerized with unsaturated liquid polyester resins with the acid value of less than 13 to obtain plastic solidification. Thus, if the radioactive wastes contain a great amount of polymerization hindering material such as NaNO2, they can be solidified rapidly and conveniently with no requirement for pre-treatment. (Kamimura, Y.)

  11. Experience gained and future activities in radioactive waste management in Uruguay

    The origin and the characteristics of the radioactive waste produced in the Nuclear Research Center are described, as well as those resulting from the application of radioisotopes in different external institutions. The methods utilized in the waste management, and the future actions that will be performed, in order to solve the specific problems of the management are also explained. The Nuclear Research Center is a university institution that has many research opportunities in different applications of radioisotopes: in medicine, biology, industry, agronomy and radiochemistry, and beside that, was here where the 10 km research reactor, that nowadays is being decommissioned, was in operation. Due to the infrastructure of this center, it has been usually responsible for the waste management produced in other institutions, but at present the capacity was exceeded, so that a program was carried out in order to confront this problem. The program for the radioactive waste management qualifies the personnel in formation courses and receives the support of specialists of the IAEA. It also records the sealed radiation sources using a data base by means of a computer to exhausted sources, developed by the same organization. The country regulating organization is carrying out a study to establish a national policy related to the treatment and disposal of wastes. (authors). 4 refs. 1 tab

  12. Method and techniques of radioactive waste treatment

    This study illustrates the characterization of radioactive wastes produced by the application of radioisotopes in industry and research. The treatment methods of such radioactive wastes, chemical co-precipitation and ion exchange depending on the technical state of radioactive waste management facility in Syria were described. The disposal of conditioned radioactive wastes, in a safe way, has been discussed including the disposal of the radioactive sources. The characterizations of the repository to stock conditioned radioactive wastes were mentioned. (author)

  13. Management of radioactive waste: A review

    Luis Paulo Sant'ana; Taynara Cristina Cordeiro

    2016-01-01

    The issue of disposal of radioactive waste around the world is not solved by now and the principal reason is the lack of an efficient technologic system. The fact that radioactive waste decays of radioactivity with time are the main reasons for setting nuclear or radioactive waste apart from the other common hazardous wastes management. Radioactive waste can be classified according to the state of matter and level of radioactivity and this classification can be differently interpreted from co...

  14. Rapid separation of nickel for 59Ni and 63Ni activity measurement in radioactive waste samples

    A separation procedure of Ni has been described for the quantification of 59Ni and 63Ni in radioactive wastes discharged from nuclear power plants and various research activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle. For a rapid separation of the Ni-nuclides in sixteen sample solutions in 0.2 M NH4-oxalate, a separation system composed of a peristaltic pump with sixteen channels and the same number of Ni-Resin columns was constructed. After sorption of the Ni-nuclides by sequentially passing 100 mL of the sample solution in 0.2 M NH4-oxalate, 130 mL of 0.1 M NH4-oxalate solution and 10 mL of deionized water as a wash into the columns, these were purely recovered by passing 10 mL of 9 M HCl into the Ni-Resin columns stacked in series on the anion exchange resin columns. The separation of the Ni-nuclides in sixteen sample solutions can be achieved within 7 h. The chemical yield of the proposed procedure is 92.3 ± 0.8 % (n = 5) and the gravimetric recovery in the preparation stage of the Ni-nuclide sources is also acceptable, 88.5 ± 1.3 % (n = 5). (author)

  15. Low level radioactive waste management

    This talk is an overview of the problem of radioactive waste management in general as a step in dealing with the issues it presents to emergency preparedness. Major topics covered include the following: types of radioactive waste; Low-level radioactive waste including an overview of regulations and the problems/possibilities of developing disposal sites; Barriers to LLRW disposal site development including technical issues, not in my backyard, not in my term of office, and legal issues; impacts created by lack of disposal; and possible solutions

  16. Final treatment of liquid radioactive wastes

    Final treatment of liquid radioactive wastes which are produced by 1st and 2nd bloc of the Mochovce NPP, prepares the NPP in its natural range. The purpose of the equipment is liquidation of wastes, which are formed at production. Wastes are warehoused in the building of active auxiliary plants in the present time, where are reservoirs in which they are deposited. Because they are already feeling and in 2006 year they should be filled definitely, it is necessary to treat them in that manner, so as they may be liquidated. Therefore the Board of directors of the Slovenske elektrarne has disposed about construction of final treatment of liquid radioactive wastes in the Mochovce NPP. Because of transport the wastes have to be treated in the locality of power plant. Technically, the final treatment of the wastes will be interconnected with building of active operation by bridges. These bridges will transport the wastes for treatment into processing centre

  17. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank Farm Blend) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Cozzi, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hall, H. K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Miller, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Missimer, D. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-08-01

    testing. The granular ESTD and BSR products (radioactive and non-radioactive) were analyzed for total constituents and durability tested as a granular waste form. A subset of the granular material was stabilized in a clay based geopolymer matrix at 42% and 65% FBSR loadings and durability tested as a monolith waste form. The 65 wt% FBSR loaded monolith made with clay (radioactive) was more durable than the 67-68 wt% FBSR loaded monoliths made from fly ash (non-radioactive) based on short term PCT testing. Long term, 90 to 107 day, ASTM C1308 testing (similar to ANSI/ANS 16.1 testing) was only performed on two fly ash geopolymer monoliths at 67-68 wt% FBSR loading and three clay geopolymer monoliths at 42 wt% FBSR loading. More clay geopolymers need to be made and tested at longer times at higher FBSR loadings for comparison to the fly ash monoliths. Monoliths made with metakaolin (heat treated) clay are of a more constant composition and are very reactive as the heat treated clay is amorphous and alkali activated. The monoliths made with fly ash are subject to the inherent compositional variation found in fly ash as it is a waste product from burning coal and it contains unreactive components such as mullite. However, both the fly ash and the clay based monoliths perform well in long term ASTM C1308 testing.

  18. Safety of radioactive waste management in France

    Radioactive waste produced in France vary considerably by their activity level, their half lives, their volume or even their nature. In order to manage them safely, the treatment and final disposal solution must be adapted to the type of waste considered by setting up specific waste management channels. A strong principle in France is that it is the responsibility of the nuclear operators as waste producers to dispose of their waste or have them disposed of in a suitable manner. The competent authorities regulate and control the radioactive waste management activities. At present, only short-lived low and intermediate level waste have a definitive solution, the surface repository, where adequate waste packages are disposed of in concrete structures. Other types of radioactive waste are in interim storage facilities at the production sites. For very low level waste coming mainly from dismantling of nuclear facilities a dedicated repository is planned to be built in the coming years. Dedicated repositories are also planned for radiferous, tritiated and graphite waste. As for high level waste and long-lived waste coming mainly from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel the disposal options are being sought along the lines specified by law 91-1381 concerning research on radioactive waste management, passed on December 30, 1991: research of solutions to partition and transmute long-lived radionuclides in the waste; studies of retrievable and non retrievable disposal in deep geological layers with the help of underground laboratories; studies of processes for conditioning and long term surface storage of these waste. In 2006, the French Parliament will assess the results of the research conducted by ANDRA relative to deep geological disposal as well as the work conducted by CEA in the two other areas of research and, if this research is conclusive, pass a law defining the final disposal option. (author)

  19. The safe management of radioactive waste from mining and milling activities

    The IAEA is developing a Safety Guide for the management of radioactive waste from the mining and milling of uranium and thorium ores. This new Safety Guide will provide information that has been requested by Member States concerning the safe management of these wastes. The guide includes some new concepts, but they are intended to be reasonable and provide appropriate safety conditions for the workers, general public and the environment. The Regulatory Authorities of individual countries are responsible for establishing and implementing the regulatory framework through the development of appropriate rules, criteria and guidelines and establishing a licensing framework. The IAEA has issued a number of publications that provide requirements and guidance for the protection of workers, public and the environment. The overall objective and subsidiary principles developed explicitly for the management of radioactive waste should emphasize that the protection of the public from the beginning of operation to post-closure should be considered in its entity from the beginning of the design of the facility. The Safety Guide acknowledges that mining and milling wastes will contain non radiological hazards, in addition to the radiological hazards. The development of the waste management strategy is usually a complex process that aims to achieve a reasonable balance between the often conflicting goals - maximizing risk reduction versus minimizing financial expenditures. The evaluation criteria and procedures used to select the preferred option/and or development of the waste management strategy should be clearly defined and acceptable for the different parties interested in the project. This includes the public. A safety assessment should be performed to indicate how the design of the waste management facilities provides the optimum protection for the workers, public and environment using safety-type indicators. (author)

  20. Underground disposal of radioactive wastes

    This report is an overview document for the series of IAEA reports dealing with underground waste disposal to be prepared in the next few years. It provides an introduction to the general considerations involved in implementing underground disposal of radioactive wastes. It suggests factors to be taken into account for developing and assessing waste disposal concepts, including the conditioned waste form, the geological containment and possible additional engineered barriers. These guidelines are general so as to cover a broad range of conditions. They are generally applicable to all types of underground disposal, but the emphasis is on disposal in deep geological formations. Some information presented here may require slight modifications when applied to shallow ground disposal or other types of underground disposal. Modifications may also be needed to reflect local conditions. In some specific cases it may be that not all the considerations dealt with in this book are necessary; on the other hand, while most major considerations are believed to be included, they are not meant to be all-inclusive. The book primarily concerns only underground disposal of the wastes from nuclear fuel cycle operations and those which arise from the use of isotopes for medical and research activities

  1. Radioactive waste management in Tanzania

    Radioactive waste, like many other hazardous wastes, is of great concern in Tanzania because of its undesirable health effects. The stochastic effects due to prolonged exposure to ionizing radiation produce cancer and hereditary effects. The deterministic effects due to higher doses cause vomiting, skin reddening, leukemia, and death to exposed victims. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the status of radioactive wastes in Tanzania, how they are generated and managed to protect humans and the environment. As Tanzania develops, it is bound to increase the use of ionizing radiation in research and teaching, industry, health and agriculture. Already there are more than 42 Centers which use one form of radioisotopes or another for these purposes: Teletherapy (Co-60), Brach-therapy (Cs-137, Sr-89), Nuclear Medicine (P-32, Tc-99m, 1-131, 1-125, Ga-67, In-111, Tl-206), Nuclear gauge (Am-241, Cs- 137, Sr-90, Kr-85), Industrial radiography (Am-241, C-137, Co-60, lr-92), Research and Teaching (1-125, Am241/Be, Co-60, Cs-137, H-3 etc). According to IAEA definition, these radioactive sources become radioactive waste if they meet the following criteria: if they have outlived their usefulness, if they have been abandoned, if they have been displaced without authorization, and if they contaminate other substances. Besides the origin of radioactive wastes, special emphasis will also be placed on the existing radiation regulations that guide disposal of radioactive waste, and the radioactive infrastructure Tanzania needs for ultimate radioactive waste management. Specific examples of incidences (theft, loss, abandonment and illegal possession) of radioactive waste that could have led to serious deterministic radiation effects to humans will also be presented. (author)

  2. Radioactive liquid waste processing device

    The present invention provides a device for processing radioactive liquid wastes generated in a facility of a nuclear power plant, especially suitable to liquid wastes at relatively high electroconductivity and solid content concentration. Namely, the device comprises a vessel for receiving radioactive liquid wastes, a device for concentrating the radioactive liquid wastes and a device for solidifying the liquid wastes. The concentrated liquid wastes can be charged from the concentration device to the receiving container. The concentration device has a precipitation separation function and comprises a supernatant withdrawing section and a solid content withdrawing section. In addition, the concentration device is connected with the receiving device for transferring the supernatant in the concentration device. Further, the receiving device is connected to the solidification device by way of a solid content transferring line, and the precipitated and separated solid content is transferred to a cement solidification device, plastic solidification device, asphalt solidification device, a glass solidification device etc. (I.S.)

  3. Treatment of Radioactive Gaseous Waste

    Radioactive waste, with widely varying characteristics, is generated from the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, research laboratories and medical facilities. The waste needs to be treated and conditioned as necessary to provide waste forms acceptable for safe storage and disposal. Although radioactive gaseous radioactive waste does not constitute the main waste flow stream at nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste processing facilities, it represents a major source for potential direct environmental impact. Effective control and management of gaseous waste in both normal and accidental conditions is therefore one of the main issues of nuclear fuel cycle and waste processing facility design and operation. One of the duties of an operator is to take measures to avoid or to optimize the generation and management of radioactive waste to minimize the overall environmental impact. This includes ensuring that gaseous and liquid radioactive releases to the environment are within authorized limits, and that doses to the public and the effects on the environment are reduced to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. Responsibilities of the regulatory body include the removal of radioactive materials within authorized practices from any further regulatory control — known as clearance — and the control of discharges — releases of gaseous radioactive material that originate from regulated nuclear facilities during normal operation to the environment within authorized limits. These issues, and others, are addressed in IAEA Safety Standards Series Nos RS-G-1.7, WS-G-2.3 and NS-G-3.2. Special systems should be designed and constructed to ensure proper isolation of areas within nuclear facilities that contain gaseous radioactive substances. Such systems consist of two basic subsystems. The first subsystem is for the supply of clean air to the facility, and the second subsystem is for the collection, cleanup and

  4. Radioactive waste management in Austria

    Neubauer Josef

    2004-01-01

    At the Austrian Research Centers Seibersdorf, there are several facilities in stalled for treatment of waste of low and intermediate radioactivity level (radwaste). A separate company within Centers, Nuclear Engineering Seibersdorf, has been formed recently, acting as a centralized facility for treatment, conditioning and storing of such waste within the country. The relevant treatment technology is applied depending on the waste category. In total about 6900 m3 of solid waste of low and inte...

  5. Radioactive waste processing and disposal

    This compilation contains 4144 citations of foreign and domestic reports, journal articles, patents, conference proceedings, and books pertaining to radioactive waste processing and disposal. Five indexes are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number

  6. From uranium to radioactive waste

    A brief outline is given of the fuel cycle of conventional thermal reactors explaining the role of the individual stages leading from the uranium enrichment stage to fuel elements reprocessing and radioactive waste disposal. (S.R.)

  7. National radioactive waste management strategy

    This article briefs out the strategic management of radioactive wastes in Malaysia. The criteria and methods discussed are those promoted by UTN (Nuclear Energy Unit) which has been given the authority to carry out local research programs in nuclear energy

  8. Radioactive Waste and Clean-up: Introduction

    geological disposal of high active waste. Therefore SCK-CEN, NIRAS/ONDRAF and the Economic Interest Grouping EURIDICE join their effort to demonstrate the feasibility of geological disposal of radioactive waste and spent fuel in Boom clay. A first step of this demonstration is the PRACLAY project. The objectives of the PRACLAY project are the demonstration of the reference design for vitrified HLW, as well as the characterization, verification, confirmation and demonstration of relevant elements of the disposal system and their behaviour by means of a combination of small surface and large in situ experiments

  9. Qualification of radioactive waste cement conditioning processes

    Nucleco Qualification Process Laboratory activities are focused on qualification of cement matrix conditioning processes of Low and Intermediate Level Waste produced by the decommissioning of old Nuclear Power Plants and research centres. Radioactive waste management strategies for Second- and Third Category wastes (according to the ENEA Technical Guide n. 26), involve specific processes (treatment and conditioning) aimed at producing a final waste form in which the radionuclides are incorporated into a solid matrix in order to reduce their potential migration or dispersion. The qualification of conditioning processes consists of all those activities demonstrating that the final waste form and waste package have the minimum requirements (mechanical, chemical and physical characteristics) compliant with all the subsequent management phases: long term interim storage, transport and long term disposal of the waste (in accordance with UNI 11193- 2006 standard). First, the paper recalls the classification into 3 categories of radioactive wastes by the Italian authorities. Cementation is one of the most common method for conditioning radioactive wastes into a solid, safe form suitable for long term storage. 3 tables list the qualification tests that are assigned to waste form, containers and final packages, the minimum requirements for second category wastes and the results of qualification tests

  10. NRI's research on radioactive wastes

    A survey is given (including 41 references) of work carried out at the Nuclear Research Institute. Discussed are sorption processes (a selective sorbent for 90Sr based on BaSO4, etc.), sorption on inorganic ion exchangers (heteropolyacid salts, ferrocyanides for 137Cs capture), on organic cation exchangers (separation of lanthanides), electrocoagulation. The process is described of vitrification of highly radioactive wastes, the arrest of emissions, the deposition of radioactive wastes and surface decontamination. (M.K.)

  11. Progress on Radioactive Waste Treatment Facilities Construction

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, five projects were undertaken by radioactive waste projects management department, which are "Cold Commissioning of the Pilot Project on Radioactive Waste Retrieval and Conditioning (abbreviation 'Pilot Project')", "Radioactive Ventilation Project Construction (abbreviation 'Ventilation

  12. Radioactive wastes problem in Poland

    The localization of CSOP Near Surface Repository of radioactive wastes in Rozan (Poland) and description of storage facilities was presented. This place is systematically controlled (e.g. measurements of radioactive contamination of the surface air, ground water, soil, grass and cereals). Contamination by tritium near by storage facilities was observed

  13. Collection and Segregation of Radioactive Waste. Principals for Characterization and Classification of Radioactive Waste

    Radioactive wastes are generated by all activities which utilize radioactive materials as part of their processes. Generally such activities include all steps in the nuclear fuel cycle (for power generation) and non-fuel cycle activities. The increasing production of radioisotopes in a Member State without nuclear power must be accompanied by a corresponding development of a waste management system. An overall waste management scheme consists of the following steps: segregation, minimization, treatment, conditioning, storage, transport, and disposal. To achieve a satisfactory overall management strategy, all steps have to be complementary and compatible. Waste segregation and minimization are of great importance mainly because they lead to cost reduction and reduction of dose commitments to the personnel that handle the waste. Waste characterization plays a significant part in the waste segregation and waste classification processes, it implicates required waste treatment process including the need for the safety assessment of treatment conditioning and storage facilities

  14. Iron-clay reactivity in radioactive waste disposal - Impacts of bacterial activities and heterogeneities

    This study focuses on the interactions between two materials that may be introduced in a geological disposal of radioactive waste: metallic materials such as the high-level waste overpack, and clay materials such as the clay host rock. Indeed, the interactions between these two materials in such conditions could induce a change of their initial confinement properties. This work aimed at determining the influence of heterogeneities (technological gaps and fractures) and bacterial activities on these interactions, in terms of evolution of chemical and hydraulic properties of clayey materials. To this end, two percolation cells have been conducted during 13 months: the first one with two bacteria (SRB, IRB), the second one without bacteria. These experiments, carried out at 60 C, involved circulating synthetic water representative of the Tournemire pore water through iron powder and through Toarcian artificially cracked argillite from Tournemire. An iron rod was also placed into the argillite. Thus, solid characterizations (SEM, SEM/EDS, Raman, XRD, X-ray tomography) allowed the study of both interfaces: the iron powder/argillite interface and the iron rod/argillite interface. The water probably circulated into the crack during the entire test, which was confirmed by reactive transport modeling with the HYTEC reactive transport code. However, no secondary phase was identified in the crack. In addition, bacteria survival in the biotic cell was confirmed during the experiment by monitoring their population and by analyzing their genetic diversity at the end of the experiment. A strong decrease in sulfate concentration was measured in the output, which confirms the SRB activity. Solid characterization conducted at the end of the experiments have highlighted, with and without bacteria, the occurrence of magnetite and chukanovite in the iron powder, the latter being mainly located close to the argillite interface. In the argillite, a Fe-enriched zone (10 μm) was

  15. Overview of radioactive waste management

    The question of what to do with radioactive wastes is discussed. The need to resolve this issue promptly is pointed out. Two significant events which have occurred during the Carter administration are discussed. An Interagency Review Group (IRG) on waste management was formed to formulate recommendations leading to the establishment of a National policy for managing radioactive wastes. The technical findings in the IRG report are listed. The author points out some issues not addressed by the report. President Carter issued a national policy statement on Radioactive Waste Management in February 1980. The most significant elements of this statement are summarized. The cancellation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is currently meeting opposition in Congress. This and other items in the National Policy Statement are discussed

  16. Technologies for the management of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants and back end nuclear fuel cycle activities. Proceedings

    This document includes 79 presentations delivered at the symposium. The topics discussed include: requirements, options and strategies for waste management; supporting infrastructural needs; waste arising and waste minimization at sources; treatment, conditioning and interim storage of low and intermediate level waste from operation of facilities; treatment, conditioning and interim storage of spent fuel and high level waste; disposal of radioactive waste; decommissioning waste management. Each paper has been indexed separately

  17. 2009 National inventory of radioactive material and wastes. Synthesis report

    Third edition of the ANDRA's national inventory report on radioactive wastes that are present on the French territory (as recorded until december, 2007). After a brief historical review of the national inventory and the way it is constructed, the report gives the basics on radioactive wastes, their classification, origins and management processes, followed by a general presentation and discussion of the inventory results (radioactive wastes and materials). Results are then detailed for the different activity sectors using radioactive materials (nuclear industry, medical domain, scientific research, conventional industry, Defense...). Information is also given concerning radioactive polluted areas (characterization and site management) and radioactive waste inventories in various foreign countries

  18. Radioactive wastes assay technique and equipment

    The waste inventory records such as the activities and radio- nuclides contained in the waste packages are to be submitted with the radioactive wastes packages for the final disposal. The nearly around 10,000 drums of waste stocked in KAERI now should be assayed for the preparation of the waste inventory records too. For the successive execution of the waste assay, the investigation into the present waste assay techniques and equipment are to be taken first. Also the installation of the waste assay equipment through the comprehensive design, manufacturing and procurement should be proceeded timely. As the characteristics of the KAERI-stocked wastes are very different from that of the nuclear power plant and those have no regular waste streams, the application of the in-direct waste assay method using the scaling factors are not effective for the KAERI-generated wastes. Considering for the versal conveniency including the accuracy over the wide range of waste forms and the combination of assay time and sensitivity, the TGS(Tomographic Gamma Scanner) is appropriate as for the KAERI -generated radioactive waste assay equipment

  19. Characterization of radioactive hazardous waste

    The characterization of radioactive hazardous waste, also known as transuranic 'mixed waste' has to be completed before it can be classified for proper treatment (incinerator, mechanical compaction or thermal treatment), packing, and transport. The characterization of the TRU mixed waste is not only complex process but rather an expensive undertaking. The process knowledge is the basic foundation of characterization. It is the documented knowledge of processes and materials that generated the waste. The transuranic waste Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) defines the Data Quality Objectives (DQO's) and provides the scope of analytical parameters and methods required to accurately characterize the radioactive mixed waste. Based on the historical data and process knowledge a sampling and analysis plan can be developed to characterize the radioactive hazardous waste. Based on the characterization, an assessment of the regulatory status can be made before the waste could be accepted for disposal at the WIPP facility. The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) developed by WIPP defines the parameters for receiving and final disposal of the TRU waste. The sets of criteria, such as: heat generated, fissile gram equivalent (FGE), plutonium-equivalent (PE) curies, and specifications of a dose rate have to be met before the waste is accepted for deep geological disposal. The characterization of radioactive waste becomes even more complex due to the presence of iron base metals/alloys, aluminum base metals/alloys, organic, chelating agents that are mixed with plastic, rubber, cellulose, soils and cement. Some of the modern characterization technologies that are under development and currently used for TRU mixed wastes are: nondestructive examination, nondestructive assay, headspace gas analysis, and drum coring for Resources Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) sampling. (author)

  20. Microbiology and radioactive waste disposal

    The present Nirex Safety Assessment Research Programme on microbiology is based on experimental as well as theoretical work. It has concentrated on the study of how mixed, natural populations of microbes might survive and grow on the organic component of Low Level Radioactive Wastes (LLW) and PCM (Plutonium Contaminated Waste) in a cementitious waste repository. The present studies indicate that both carbon dioxide and methane will be produced by microbial action within the repository. Carbon dioxide will dissolve and react with the concrete to a limited extent so methane will be the principal component of the produced gas. The concentration of hydrogen, derived from corrosion, will be depressed by microbial action and that this will further elevate methane levels. Actual rates of production will be lower than that in a domestic landfill due to the more extreme pH. Microbial action will clearly affect the aqueous phase chemistry where organic material is present in the waste. The cellulosic fraction is the main determinant of cell growth and the appearance of soluble organics. The structure of the mathematical model which has been developed, predicts the general features which are intuitively expected in a developing microbial population. It illustrates that intermediate compounds will build up in the waste until growth of the next organism needed for sequential degradation is initiated. The soluble compounds in the pore water and the mixture of microbes present in the waste will vary with time and sustain biological activity over a prolonged period. Present estimates suggest that most microbial action in the repository will be complete after 400 years. There is scope for the model to deal with environmental factors such as temperature and pH and to introduce other energy sources such as hydrogen. (author)

  1. Radioactive waste management in Canada

    This bibliography is an up-date to AECL-6186(Rev 3), 1952-1982, 'Radioactive Waste Management in Canada AECL Publications and Other Literature' compiled by Dianne Wallace. Canadian publications from outside contractors concerning the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program are included in addition to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited reports and papers. 252 refs

  2. Decontamination method for radioactive waste

    Metallic radioactive wastes are immersed in a liquid nitrogen vessel above a freezing crusher and they are frozen to about -196degC. Then, impact shocks are applied to crush the radioactive wastes frozen by a rotary shearing shock crusher disposed below the freezing crusher. The thus obtained crushed materials are sent to a decontamination device and decontaminated. In this case, since the objective materials are crushed, any of a blast decontamination method, an electrolytic polishing decontamination method, a redox decontamination method and a chemical agent immersion decontamination method can be applied. Thereafter, the dose of remaining radioactivity of the decontaminated crushed materials is measured. With such procedures, the decontamination and the subsequent measurement for the radiation contamination dose can easily and certainly be conducted for metallic radioactive wastes such as pipes of a small diameter and complicated structures. (I.N.)

  3. Human factors engineering applications to the cask design activities of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    The use of human factors engineering (HFE) in the design and use of spent fuel casks being developed for the Department of Energy's Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is addressed. The safety functions of cask systems are presented as background for HFE considerations. Because spent fuel casks are passive safety devices they could be subject to latent system failures due to human error. It is concluded that HFE should focus on operations and verifications tests, but should begin, to the extent possible, at the beginning of cask design. Use of HFE during design could serve to eliminate or preclude opportunity for human error

  4. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank SX-105 And AN-103) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation

    One of the immobilization technologies under consideration as a Supplemental Treatment for Hanford's Low Activity Waste (LAW) is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). The FBSR technology forms a mineral waste form at moderate processing temperatures thus retaining and atomically bonding the halides, sulfates, and technetium in the mineral phases (nepheline, sodalite, nosean, carnegieite). Additions of kaolin clay are used instead of glass formers and the minerals formed by the FBSR technology offers (1) atomic bonding of the radionuclides and constituents of concern (COC) comparable to glass, (2) short and long term durability comparable to glass, (3) disposal volumes comparable to glass, and (4) higher Na2O and SO4 waste loadings than glass. The higher FBSR Na2O and SO4 waste loadings contribute to the low disposal volumes but also provide for more rapid processing of the LAW. Recent FBSR processing and testing of Hanford radioactive LAW (Tank SX-105 and AN-103) waste is reported and compared to previous radioactive and non-radioactive LAW processing and testing

  5. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank SX-105 And AN-103) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation

    Jantzen, Carol; Herman, Connie; Crawford, Charles; Bannochie, Christopher; Burket, Paul; Daniel, Gene; Cozzi, Alex; Nash, Charles; Miller, Donald; Missimer, David

    2014-01-10

    One of the immobilization technologies under consideration as a Supplemental Treatment for Hanford’s Low Activity Waste (LAW) is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). The FBSR technology forms a mineral waste form at moderate processing temperatures thus retaining and atomically bonding the halides, sulfates, and technetium in the mineral phases (nepheline, sodalite, nosean, carnegieite). Additions of kaolin clay are used instead of glass formers and the minerals formed by the FBSR technology offers (1) atomic bonding of the radionuclides and constituents of concern (COC) comparable to glass, (2) short and long term durability comparable to glass, (3) disposal volumes comparable to glass, and (4) higher Na2O and SO{sub 4} waste loadings than glass. The higher FBSR Na{sub 2}O and SO{sub 4} waste loadings contribute to the low disposal volumes but also provide for more rapid processing of the LAW. Recent FBSR processing and testing of Hanford radioactive LAW (Tank SX-105 and AN-103) waste is reported and compared to previous radioactive and non-radioactive LAW processing and testing.

  6. Radioactive waste shredding: Preliminary evaluation

    The critical constraints for sizing solid radioactive and mixed wastes for subsequent thermal treatment were identified via a literature review and a survey of shredding equipment vendors. The types and amounts of DOE radioactive wastes that will require treatment to reduce the waste volume, destroy hazardous organics, or immobilize radionuclides and/or hazardous metals were considered. The preliminary steps of waste receipt, inspection, and separation were included because many potential waste treatment technologies have limits on feedstream chemical content, physical composition, and particle size. Most treatment processes and shredding operations require at least some degree of feed material characterization. Preliminary cost estimates show that pretreatment costs per unit of waste can be high and can vary significantly, depending on the processing rate and desired output particle size

  7. Iron/argillite interactions in radioactive waste disposal context: Oxidising transient and bacterial activities influence

    disposal conditions. Indeed, the nature, the quantity of nutrients and the environmental conditions (space, temperature, water, radioactivity and pressure) are key parameters for bacterial development. Even though disposal conditions may be not favourable during a part of the thermal transient characterised by high temperature, irradiation conditions and heterogeneous water saturation, bacterial activity may resume when environmental conditions become more suitable. Moreover, argillite cracks and residual voids between the waste packages and the liner create additional space for bacterial development. Concerning the nutrient content, significant amounts of hydrogen (an energetic substrate for bacteria) produced by anoxic corrosion of metallic materials are expected, which will favour the development of hydrogenotrophic bacteria. Furthermore, it is widely accepted that micro-organisms may locally affect the corrosion processes and the corrosion rates due to their influence on the water composition, pH and redox potential of the metal/environment interface. More specifically, sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) may produce ferrous sulphide, a corrosive product that may lead to significant pits on steel surface. Also, under anaerobic conditions, the iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) can reduce Fe(III) from iron oxides composing passive layers, which may impact corrosion by re-exposing the metal surfaces to corrosion. Therefore, the survival of bacteria cannot be excluded and their impact on corrosion phenomena must be investigated. In this context, this paper focuses on two studies regarding iron/argillite interactions. The first one addresses these interactions under oxidising and reducing conditions, while the second one tackles bacteria effects on corrosion in conditions that may prevail in a repository. These studies are both based on laboratory and in situ experiments. Iron and carbon steel have been chosen as typical of metallic components, and the Tournemire Toarcian argillite

  8. Radioactive Waste in Oil Exploration

    Naturally occurring radioactive material commonly known as NORM composes the majority of the dose received by a person each year at approximately 80% of the total amount. However, there is a noticeably higher concentration of radioisotopes present in technologically enhanced NORM, often called TENORM, which results directly from human industrial activities. NORM is formed in the process of mineral mining including phosphate production, where the end goal is to concentrate high quantities of metals or elements (e.g. phosphorous). However, NORM has also become a widely recognized problem in the oil and gas industry. It is approximately one hundred and fifty years since oil was discovered in the continental United States and the mention of radioactivity in mineral oils and natural gases occurred in 1904, just eight years after the discovery of radioactivity by Henri Bequerel in 1896. In just over three decades the problems from naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) wastes arising from the oil and gas industry have been much more scrutinized. In the 1980’s 226Ra began to be noticed when scrap metal dealers would detect unacceptably high levels of radiation from oil-field piping1. In 1991 Raloff2 published an article on the new hot wastes in NORM and in 1992 Wilson et. al3 described the health physics aspects of radioactive petroleum piping scale. NORM will develop in high concentrations in by-product oil and gas waste streams4-7. The NORM will chemically separate from other piped material in the process of the extraction of oil, resulting in high concentrations of 226Ra, 228 Ra and 210Pb and other radioisotopes in a densely caked layer on the inner surfaces of the piping1 . The activity of the 226Ra from NORM ranges from 185 to several tens of thousands Bq/kg of sample. By comparison, the NORM concentrations of radium in rock and soil is, at a natural level, 18.5 - 185 Bq/kg1. Disposal of NORM becomes more problematic as higher concentrations of

  9. Environmental aspects of commercial radioactive waste management

    1979-05-01

    Volume 2 contains chapters 6 through 10: environmental effects related to radioactive waste management associated with LWR fuel reprocessing - mixed-oxide fuel fabrication plant; environmental effects related to transporting radioactive wastes associated with LWR fuel reprocessing and fabrication; environmental effects related to radioactive waste management associated with LWR fuel reprocessing - retrievable waste storage facility; environmental effects related to geologic isolation of LWR fuel reprocessing wastes; and integrated systems for commercial radioactive waste management. (LK)

  10. Environmental aspects of commercial radioactive waste management

    Volume 2 contains chapters 6 through 10: environmental effects related to radioactive waste management associated with LWR fuel reprocessing - mixed-oxide fuel fabrication plant; environmental effects related to transporting radioactive wastes associated with LWR fuel reprocessing and fabrication; environmental effects related to radioactive waste management associated with LWR fuel reprocessing - retrievable waste storage facility; environmental effects related to geologic isolation of LWR fuel reprocessing wastes; and integrated systems for commercial radioactive waste management

  11. Nuclear data for radioactive waste management

    Highlights: • The role nuclear data plays in determining the source term of radiation from spent fuel and radioactive waste is described. • Isotopes most contributing to this source for different fuel cycles are identified. • Current international activities aiming at improving the existing data bases are addressed. - Abstract: The role nuclear data plays in determining the source term of radiation emitted by spent fuel and radioactive waste arising from nuclear activities is described. The isotopes most contributing to this source for different fuel cycles are identified. Current international activities aiming at improving the existing data bases, in particular as concerns data uncertainties are addressed

  12. Radioactive waste disposal in granite

    Within the framework of completing its knowledge of various rock formations, the Federal Government also considers the suitability of granite for radioactive waste disposal. For this purpose, the Federal Minister of Research and Technology participated from 1983 to 1990 in relevant research and development activities in the NAGRA rock laboratory at Grimsel, Switzerland. After about 17 field tests, it can be stated that the understanding of basic connections and interactions between the mechanical behaviour of the rock, which is determined, for instance, by natural or artificially induced rock movements, and the hydrogeological or rock hydraulic relations could be clearly improved. So far, the German share in the project costs amounts to a total of approximately DM 20.7 million. Till the end of 1993, further activities are scheduled to be carried out which will require financial funds of about DM 6.3 million. (orig./HSCH)

  13. Standardization of radioactive waste categories

    A large amount of information about most aspects of radioactive waste management has been accumulated and made available to interested nations in recent years. The efficiency of this service has been somewhat hampered because the terminology used to describe the different types of radioactive waste has varied from country to country and indeed from installation to installation within a given country. This publication is the outcome of a panel meeting on Standardization of Radioactive Waste Categories. It presents a simple standard to be used as a common language between people working in the field of waste management at nuclear installations. The purpose of the standard is only to act as a practical tool for increasing efficiency in communicating, collecting and assessing technical and economical information in the common interest of all nations and the developing countries in particular. 20 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  14. Plastic solidification of radioactive wastes

    Over 20 years have elapsed after the start of nuclear power development, and the nuclear power generation in Japan now exceeds the level of 10,000 MW. In order to meet the energy demands, the problem of the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced in nuclear power stations must be solved. The purpose of the plastic solidification of such wastes is to immobilize the contained radionuclides, same as other solidification methods, to provide the first barrier against their move into the environment. The following matters are described: the nuclear power generation in Japan, the radioactive wastes from LWR plants, the position of plastic solidification, the status of plastic solidification in overseas countries and in Japan, the solidification process for radioactive wastes with polyethylene, and the properties of solidified products, and the leachability of radionuclides in asphalt solids. (J.P.N.)

  15. Research programme on radioactive wastes

    This report for the Swiss Federal Department of the Environment, Transport, Energy and Communication (DETEC) takes a look at work done within the framework of the research programme on radioactive wastes. The paper discusses the development of various projects and the associated organisations involved. Both long-term and short-term topics are examined. The long-term aspects of handling radioactive wastes include organisation and financing as well as the preservation of know-how and concepts for marking the repositories. Communication with the general public on the matter is looked at along with public perception, opinion-making and acceptance. Waste storage concepts are looked at in detail and aspects such as environmental protection, monitoring concepts, retrievability and encasement materials are discussed. Finally, ethical and legal aspects of radioactive waste repositories are examined. The paper is completed with appendixes dealing with planning, co-ordination and the responsibilities involved

  16. Radioactive waste management in Slovenia

    The problem of radioactive waste management is both scientifically and technically complex and also deeply emotional issue. In the last twenty years the first two aspects have been mostly resolved up to the point of safe implementation. In the Republic of Slovenia, certain fundamentalist approaches in politics and the use of radioactive waste problem as political marketing tool, make things even more complex. Public involvement in planning and development of radioactive waste management program must be perceived as essential for the success of the program. Education is a precursor to public comprehension and confidence which lead to adequate waste management decisions that will protect the public health, safety and environment without jeopardizing further progress and development. (author)

  17. Underground radioactive waste disposal concept

    The paper presents some solutions for radioactive waste disposal. An underground disposal of radioactive waste is proposed in deep boreholes of greater diameter, fitted with containers. In northern part of Croatia, the geological data are available on numerous boreholes. The boreholes were drilled during investigations and prospecting of petroleum and gas fields. The available data may prove useful in defining safe deep layers suitable for waste repositories. The paper describes a Russian disposal design, execution and verification procedure. The aim of the paper is to discuss some earlier proposed solutions, and present a solution that has not yet been considered - lowering of containers with high level radioactive waste (HLW) to at least 500 m under the ground surface.(author)

  18. Clays in radioactive waste disposal

    Delage, Pierre; CUI, Yu-Jun; Tang, Anh-Minh

    2010-01-01

    Clays and argillites are considered in some countries as possible host rocks for nuclear waste disposal at great depth. The use of compacted swelling clays as engineered barriers is also considered within the framework of the multi-barrier concept. In relation to these concepts, various research programs have been conducted to assess the thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of radioactive waste disposal at great depth. After introducing the concepts of waste isolation developed in Belgium, Fran...

  19. Radioactive Waste Management in the Republic of Lithuania

    Description of regulation of radioactive waste management in Lithuania, waste processing in Ignalina NPP is presented. On 2001 VATESI approved the regulations governing pre disposal waste management at the Ignalina NPP. The classification of radioactive waste was modified in accordance with the practice of the IAEA. Short information on radioactive waste forms in the cause of operation of Ignalina NPP is presented. Comparison with previous years is made. On July 2001 Radioactive Waste Management Agency (RATA) was established. Description of RATA's aims and activities is provided

  20. Operational experience at radioactive waste treatment plant, after 15 years

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The experience of the radioactive waste treatment plant (PTDR) in Chile, which centralizes all activities related to pre-disposal activities in the radioactive waste management, in the country is presented. It is the solely waste treatment plant in the country, where radioactive waste are received from all nuclear and radioactive waste generators facilities located in the country. Radioactive waste in Chile proceeds from radioisotope application at industrial, health, universities research, and from two nuclear research centers. Lately, there have been included the radioactive wastes discovered in metal recycling facilities, which sometimes make big amounts. Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant was planned in 1990; adoption of decision and started operation in 1992. At that time, a facility to store waste packages as conditioned waste in cementitious matrices in standardized 200 l drums was built (43 m3 total capacity) for a storage period estimated in 15 years. The methodology and procedures developed has been transferred to Latin American and El Caribe professionals, through demonstration training courses held in this Waste Treatment Plant which recognized as Demonstration facilities to prepare people in the processing of radioactive waste from nuclear applications, previous to disposal. These procedures were the first one developed following international recommendations and complying requirements to immobilize the radioactive material to avoid the external intrusion of thirds, and requirements of dose radiation according to transport regulations for radioactive material. (authors)

  1. Management of radioactive waste: A review

    Luis Paulo Sant'ana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The issue of disposal of radioactive waste around the world is not solved by now and the principal reason is the lack of an efficient technologic system. The fact that radioactive waste decays of radioactivity with time are the main reasons for setting nuclear or radioactive waste apart from the other common hazardous wastes management. Radioactive waste can be classified according to the state of matter and level of radioactivity and this classification can be differently interpreted from country to country. Furthermore, microbiological procedures, plasma vitrification process, chemical precipitation, ion exchange, evaporation and reverse osmosis are strategies used for the treatment of radioactive wastes. The major challenge is to manage these radioactive substances after being used and discharged. This report brings data from the literature published worldwide from 2009 to 2014 on radioactive waste management studies and it covers production, classification and management of radioactive solid, liquid and gas waste.

  2. Disposal of radioactive waste material

    Radioactive waste is disposed below ground at a position adjacent the coast line such that, 1. drainage of any water which has flowed through the disposal volume can be drained to the sea, or 2. the waste is disposed below the foreshore or coastal shallow water. Disposal facilities are described which advantageously include surrounding the waste with absorber to increase protection against migration of radionuclides. An example of a radioactive waste disposal facility is shown and includes a number of cells formed from concrete walls and floors, the cells being loaded successively with drums containing the waste, each cell being roofed with concrete after filling, there being absorber placed beneath the floors between the walls and after complete filling, above the said roof, with a soil mound surmounting. Drainage channels extend to sea via monitoring means. (author)

  3. Development of Specifications for Radioactive Waste Packages

    The main objective of this publication is to provide guidelines for the development of waste package specifications that comply with waste acceptance requirements for storage and disposal of radioactive waste. It will assist waste generators and waste package producers in selecting the most significant parameters and in developing and implementing specifications for each individual type of waste and waste package. This publication also identifies and reviews the activities and technical provisions that are necessary to meet safety requirements; in particular, selection of the significant safety parameters and preparation of specifications for waste forms, waste containers and waste packages using proven approaches, methods and technologies. This report provides guidance using a systematic, stepwise approach, integrating the technical, organizational and administrative factors that need to be considered at each step of planning and implementing waste package design, fabrication, approval, quality assurance and control. The report reflects the considerable experience and knowledge that has been accumulated in the IAEA Member States and is consistent with the current international requirements, principles, standards and guidance for the safe management of radioactive waste

  4. Measurement of alpha emitters in radioactive waste

    The alpha emitters measurement in radioactive waste (10-2Ci/T) is essential for a good fissil materials management. This paper describes 3 classes of devices: device using a neutronic passive counting, device using a neutronic activation and detection of fission gamma, device using a neutronic activation and detection of prompt neutrons fission

  5. Radioactive waste management: A status report

    This publication briefly summarizes the activities of the IAEA and its Member States in the area of radioactive waste management. The information is presented in two major sections. One section presents a brief overview of the Agency's programme, and the other section provides a status report on the activities in many of the Agency's Member States

  6. Mental Models of Radioactivity and Attitudes towards Radioactive Waste

    radiation on people irrespective of the public which was involved in the survey. Among the most important factors which influence public acceptability of the construction of the LILW repository in the domestic location is perceived risk to the nuclear power plant. This factor is more important than knowledge on radioactivity and radioactive waste for different groups, also for the local public with experience of living beside nuclear power plant. Although it can be seen that the factor of knowledge has higher importance in the local community which means that communication activities among local citizens do influence the acceptability. Based on the analyses of the results, the starting points for improvement of communication plans were prepared, which should be used by the implementer of the site selection, and later during the repository construction. These communication starting points have a broader validity, since they could be suitable also for risk communications for other technologies.(author).

  7. The European Communities' research and development activities relative to the disposal of radioactive wastes into geological formations

    The European Communities' research and development activities in radioactive waste disposal are part of its more general multiyear programmes on radioactive waste management and storage. The immediate purpose of these activities is to determine the best conditions for disposal of high-level and/or long-lived wastes into geological formations so that they do not present any danger to man and his environment. The studies are carried out either under contract with various organizations and firms of Member States on a cost-sharing basis or directly at the facilities of the Joint Research Centre at Ispra. The Communities' programme at present embraces most of the activities of the Nine in Europe on waste disposal in deep geological formations. There is a co-ordinated division of the work among the national organizations responsible for waste disposal, and this arrangement takes into account existing national commitments to specific formations (such as salt in the Federal Republic of Germany), the particular nature of the subsoil in the territories concerned (such as clay in Belgium) and considerations of economy to avoid duplication of costly research. Thus, argillaceous formations are being studied at present mainly by Belgium and Italy, crystalline rocks (granite) by France and the United Kingdom and salt domes by the Federal Republic of Germany and the Netherlands. Back-up studies applicable to all these different formations are being conducted by Denmark, Ireland and the Communities' Joint Research Centre at Ispra. The paper describes the activities and studies being carried out under the Communities' programme on the various formations concerned, indicates the progress achieved and surveys the results obtained. (author)

  8. Comparison among the rice bark in the raw and active forms in the removal of 241Am and 137Cs from liquid radioactive wastes

    New techniques involving treatment of radioactive wastes which associate simplicity and low cost have been directed the attention for the bio sorption, which is a process were solid vegetable or micro-organism for the retention, removing, or recovering of heavy metals from a liquid environment. This study evaluated the capacity of a bio sorbent to remove Am-241 and Cs-137 from liquid radioactive waste. The chosen material was the rice bark employed in the raw or activated forms. The obtained results suggest that the bio sorption, with the activated rice bark, can be a viable technique for the treatment of liquid radioactive wastes containing Am-241 and Cs-137 present in liquid radioactive wastes

  9. National inventory of radioactive wastes and recoverable materials 2006. Descriptive catalogue of radioactive waste families

    Real comprehensive overview of radioactive wastes, the national inventory of radioactive wastes and recoverable materials describes the situation in France of the wastes that can be conditioned (in their definitive form) or not. It presents also the waste production quantities foreseen for 2010, 2020 and beyond. This document is a complement to the synthesis report and to the geographic inventory of radioactive wastes in France and details the classification of wastes by families (wastes with similar characteristics). For each family of wastes, the description comprises a general presentation and some photos. It comprises also some data such as the position of the family in the French classification, the industrial activity at the origin of the waste, the production situation of the waste in concern (finished, in progress, not started). Some information about the raw waste are given and the conditioning process used is described. Some figures complete the description, like: the past and future production quantities, the evaluation of the radioactivity of the waste family in 2004 and 2020, and the evaluation of the thermal power when available. Finally, some information are given about the presence of compounds with a specific risk of toxicity. (J.S.)

  10. Method of solidifying radioactive wastes

    Purpose: To prevent radioactive leaching and to attain excellent heat-dissipating and mechanical performances of radioactive wastes. Method: Solution or powder of radioactive wastes is dispersed, for example, into molten borosilicate glass or phosphate glass of about 70 to 30 % by weight per the dried oxides of the wastes and then molded into glass spheres of 2 - 50 mm in diameter. The surface of the glass solidified particles are made with electroconductive membranes by way of electroless plating, sputtering, vapor deposition, paste sintering or the like, thereafter, formed with membranes of metals such as copper, nickel, iron and silver by way of electroplating. The particles are sintered at a temperature between glass-softening point and metal-melting point. (Horiuchi, T.)